Sample records for major rice ecosystems

  1. [Behavior of HTO in simulated rice-water-soil ecosystem].

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianjun; Guo, Jiangfeng

    2003-02-01

    The behavior of transportation, accumulation and disappearance of HTO (tritium water) in a simulated rice-water-soil ecosystem was studied by using isotope-tracer techniques for simulated pollutants, and the fitting equation was confirmed by application of the open three-compartment system model and nonlinear regression method. The results showed that HTO in water was not only transferred to other compartments in the ecosystem, but also vaporized into atmosphere rapidly. Both free water tritium and bound tritium were found in the rice, and tritium of hygroscopic and crystalline water was consisted in the soil. The specific activity of free water tritium (or tritium of hygroscopic water) was stronger than that of bound tritium (or tritium of crystalline water). The specific activity of total tritium reduced after reaching the maximum in the rice and soil, and the bound tritium increased slowly. The specific activity of total tritium in stem was the strongest in the rice, and reached equipoise each other in the later stage gradually. The regression equations of accumulation and disappearance for the specific activity of total tritium in the water, soil and rice were given by analyzing the obtained data with exponential regression method. The analysis results of variance showed that each regression equation could describe the behavior of accumulation and disappearance of HTO in the rice-water-soil ecosystems preferably. PMID:12827885

  2. Dissipation and residue of pymetrozine in rice field ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Zhang, Li; Xu, Peng; Li, Jianzhong; Wang, Huili

    2015-03-01

    The dissipation and residue of pymetrozine in rice field ecosystem were studied based on a novel and reliable analytical method for pymetrozine in paddy water, soil, rice straw, brown rice, and rice husk. The pymetrozine residues were extracted with acetonitrile and cleaned up by Carb-NH2 SPE cartridge and determined by high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS). The dissipation of pymetrozine followed first-order kinetics and its half-lives ranged from 1.7 to 1.8 days in paddy water, 5.1 to 5.7 days in soil, and 2.3 to 2.6 days in rice straw, respectively. At harvest time, the highest final residues of pymetrozine varied in soil among three geographical fields and were below the limit of detection in rice tissues. The recommended dosage was considered to be safe for human beings and animals, and the results were helpful in setting maximum residue limit for pymetrozine in rice. PMID:25655126

  3. Behavior and Fate of C-DDE (1, 1-Dichloro-2, 2Bis (4-Chlorophenyl) Ethylene) in Rice Ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. T. Mehetre; S. P. Kale

    2008-01-01

    Behavior of C-DDE (1, 1-dichloro-2, 2-bis (4-Chlorophenyl) Ethylene), a major degradation product of DDT (1, 1, 1-tricholoro-2, 2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane), was studied in a model rice ecosystem. Samples of rice plant, algae, soil and seed were collected at regular intervals and analyzed for DDE residues.C-DDE residues in water declined rapidly initially for the first 8 days and then gradually for

  4. ECOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF WEED F'LORAINAN IRRIGATED RICE FIEW) ECOSYSTEM AT BATHALAGODA IN SRI LANRA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. N. B. BAMBARADENIYA; C. V. S. GUNATILLEKE

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out to document some ecological aspects of weeds in an irrigated rice field ecosystem in Bathalagoda, Sri Lanka. The study was conducted from November 1995 to August 1997 in two rice fields which differed in weed management practices. A total of 89 vascular plant species of rice-weeds belonging to 21 families, 31 genera of algae and

  5. Transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than its non-transgenic counterpart.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangsheng; Wang, Yongmo; Liu, Biao; Zhang, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Rice lines genetically modified with the crystal toxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have experienced rapid development, with biosafety certificates for two Bt rice lines issued in 2009. There has still been no commercial release of these lines yet due to public concerns about human health and environmental risks. Some studies confirmed that Bt rice was as safe as conventional rice to non-target organisms when pesticides were not applied, however, pesticides are still required in Bt rice to control non-lepidopteran pests. In this study, we assessed the environmental effects of two Bt rice lines expressing either the cry1Ab/1Ac or cry2A genes, respectively, by using zooplanktons as indicator species under normal field management practices using pesticides when required. In the whole rice growing season, non-Bt rice was sprayed 5 times while Bt rice was sprayed 2 times, which ensured both rice achieved a normal yield. Field investigations showed that rice type (Bt and non-Bt) significantly influenced zooplankton abundance and diversity, which were up to 95% and 80% lower in non-Bt rice fields than Bt rice fields. Laboratory rearing showed that water from non-Bt rice fields was significantly less suitable for the survival and reproduction of Daphnia magna and Paramecium caudatum in comparison with water from Bt rice fields. Higher pesticide residues were detected in the water from non-Bt than Bt rice fields, accounting for the bad performance of zooplankton in non-Bt field water. Our results demonstrate that Bt rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than non-Bt rice, and its commercialization will be beneficial for biodiversity restoration in rice-based ecosystems. PMID:25105299

  6. Ecology of vector mosquitoes in Sri Lanka--suggestions for future mosquito control in rice ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Yasuoka, Junko; Levins, Richard

    2007-07-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases are a major public health threat in Asia. To explore effective mosquito control strategies in rice ecosystems from the ecological point of view, we carried out ecological analyses of vector mosquitoes in Sri Lanka. During the 18-month study period, 14 Anopheles, 11 Culex, 5 Aedes, 2 Mansonia, and 1 Armigeres species were collected, most of which are disease vectors for malaria, filariasis, Japanese encephalitis, or dengue in Sri Lanka and elsewhere in Asia. The density and occurrence of Anopheles and Culex species were the highest in seepage pools and paddy fields, where the majority of niche overlaps between larval mosquito and aquatic insect species were observed. All 7 aquatic insect species, which are larval mosquito predators, overlapped their niche with both Anopheles and Culex larvae. This suggests that conserving these aquatic insect species could be effective in controlling mosquito vectors in the study site. Correlations between several climatic factors and mosquito density were also analyzed, and weather conditions, including higher temperature, lower relative humidity, and higher wind velocity, were found to affect mosquito oviposition, propagation, and survival. These findings deepen our understanding of mosquito ecology and will strengthen future mosquito control strategies in rice ecosystems in Asia. PMID:17883002

  7. Using the DayCent Ecosystem Model to Predict Methane Emissions from Wetland Rice Production in Support for Mitigation Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, S. M.; Parton, W. J.; Cheng, K.; Pan, G.

    2014-12-01

    Wetland rice production is a major source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to the atmosphere, and rice production is predicted to increase dramatically in the future due to expected growth in human populations. Mitigating GHG emissions from future rice production is possible with best management practices for water management, residue management and organic amendments. Policy initiatives and programs that promote practices to reduce GHG emissions from rice production will likely need robust methods for quantifying emission reductions. Frameworks based on process-based model provide one alternative for estimating emissions reductions. The advantages of this approach are that the models are relatively inexpensive to apply, incorporate a variety of management and environmental drivers influencing emissions, and can be used to predict future emissions for planning purposes. The disadvantages are that the models can be challenging to parameterize and evaluate, and require a relatively large amount of data. The DayCent ecosystem model simulates plant and soil processes, and is an example of a model that could be used to quantify emission reductions for reporting mitigation activities associated with rice production systems. DayCent estimates methane emissions, which is the major source of GHG emissions from wetland rice, but also estimates nitrous oxide emissions and soil organic C stock changes. DayCent has been evaluated using data from China, explaining 83% of the variation in methane emissions from 72 experimental rice fields. In addition, DayCent has been applied regionally in the United States to estimate methane, nitrous oxide emissions, and soil C stock changes, in compliance with the guidelines for reporting GHG emissions to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. Given the cost of alternatives, process-based models such as DayCent may offer the best way forward for estimating GHG emissions from rice production, and with quantification of uncertainty, could provide a robust framework for policy initiatives and programs in the future.

  8. Temporal Dynamics of Bacterial and Fungal Communities in a Genetically Modified (GM) Rice Ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seung-Hoon Lee; Chang-Gi Kim; Hojeong Kang

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the temporal dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities in a soil ecosystem supporting genetically modified\\u000a (GM) rice (Oryza sativa L., ABC-TPSP; fusion of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase and phosphatase). Using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism\\u000a analysis and real-time quantitative PCR, we compared bacterial and fungal communities in the soils underlying GM rice (ABC-TPSP),\\u000a and its host cultivar (Nakdong) during growing

  9. Tracing the allocation of water in rainfed rice ecosystem by partitioning evapotranspiration of rainfed rice (Oryza Sativa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nay-Htoon, Bhone; Dubbert, Maren; Wei, Xue; Cuntz, Matthias; Ko, Jonghan; Tenhunen, John; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    To understand productive and unproductive water use of crop production, partitioning evapotranspiration (ET ) into evaporation (E) and transpiration (T ) is important. Water movements within the eco-hydrologic cycle of agroecosystems can be traced by stable oxygen isotopes of water (?18O) and plant transpiration and soil evaporation can also be estimated by tracing the ?18O. We quantified the contribution of transpiration to total ecosystem evapotranspiration of rainfed rice field by a stable oxygen isotope approach and FAO 56 dual crop modelling approach. Our study aims to provide quantification of ecosystem water cycle of rainfed rice by partitioning productive and unproductive water use since productivity and water use of rice which is a highly water demanding agroecosystem, is under intense research. Crop season total evapotranspiration fluxes from rainfed rice was mainly dominated by transpiration (T to ET contribution (T /ET ) = 65%) and domination of transpiration over evaporation fluxes was noted since early vegetative stage (Leaf Area Index = 0.8 m2 m-2) until harvesting. T /ET of rainfed rice fluctuated with changes in soil water content (SWC) and the highest T /ET was found at SWC of 0.34 m3 m-3, during seedling stage. Our results demonstrate that partitioning ET by FAO 56 dual crop model is in a good agreement with ?18O isotope based ET partitioning results. Using monthly mean values of leaf resistance and vegetation index derived crop coefficients instead of original fixed parameters of the FAO 56 dual crop model resulted better agreement with ?18O isotope based ET partitioning.

  10. Evaluating health of paddy rice field ecosystem with remote sensing and GIS in Lower Yangtze River Plain, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingjing; Qin, Zhihao; Li, Wenjuan; Lin, Lu

    2008-10-01

    A paddy rice ecosystem is a farming system composed of paddy, animals, microbes and other environmental factors in specific time and space, with particular temporal and spatial dynamics. Since paddy rice is a main grain crop to feed above half of population in China, the performance of paddy rice ecosystem is highly concerned to yield level of paddy and food supply safety in China. Therefore, monitoring the performance of paddy rice ecosystem is very important to obtain the required information for evaluation of ecosystem health. In the study we intend to develop an approach to monitor the ecosystem performance spatially and dynamically in a regional scale using MODIS remote sensing data and GIS spatial mapping. On the basis of key factors governing the paddy rice ecosystem, we accordingly develop the following three indicators for the evaluation: Crop growing index (CGI), environmental Index (EI), and pests-diseases index (PDI). Then, we integrated the three indicators into a model with different weight coefficients to calculate Comprehensive ecosystem health index (CEHI) to evaluate the performance and functioning of paddy rice ecosystem in a regional scale. CGI indicates the health status of paddy rice calculated from the normalizing enhanced vegetation Index (EVI) retrieved from MODIS data. EI is estimated from temperature Index (TI) and precipitation Index (PI) indicating heat and water stress on the rice field. PDI reflects the damage brought by pests and diseases, which can be estimated using the information obtained from governmental websites. Applying the approach to Lower Yangtze River Plain, we monitor and evaluate the performance of paddy rice ecosystem in various stages of rice growing period in 2006. The results indicated that the performance of the ecosystem was generally very encouraging. During booting stage and heading and blooming stage, the health level was the highest in Anhui province, which is the main paddy rice producer in the region. During stage of yellow ripeness, Jiangsu province had the lowest level of performance. Yield level of paddy rice in 2006 confirms that the applicability of the proposed approach for a rapid evaluation and monitoring of agricultural ecosystem performance in Lower Yangtze River Plain. As a result, the new approach could supply scientific basis for relevant departments taking policies and measures to make sure stable development of paddy yield.

  11. Investigating temperature effects on methane production and oxidation in the rice ecosystem using stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. L.; Sithole, A.; Shearer, M. J.; Hanson, E.; Fisher, A.; Khalil, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    Irrigated rice is a major agricultural source of methane emissions that contributes about 15% of global atmospheric methane (CH4). Our work investigates the relationships between temperature and CH4 production, oxidation, and flux in the rice ecosystem. This is central to understanding the response of the global CH4 emissions from rice under a changing climate. Temperatures were regulated in sixteen rice plots grown in a research greenhouse using four waterbath-temperature control systems held at 20°C, 24°C, 28°C, and 32°C over the course of a growing season. Belowground porewater samples were collected from each treatment weekly and CH4 was extracted into headspace N2 after vigorous shaking. Weekly flux samples were collected using acrylic static flux chambers placed over the rice plots. CH4 concentrations below and aboveground were measured using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection. The carbon (?13C) and hydrogen (?D) isotopic composition of CH4 was measured using continuous-flow gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Results show that CH4 flux ranged from near zero to 30-60 mg/m2/hr in mid-season corresponding to a rise in porewater CH4 to 8-12 mg/L. Early season CH4 fluxes were larger in elevated temperature treatments but this difference was smaller, or even reversed in some cases, in the late season. Similar trends were observed in CH4 porewater concentration profiles. Results from isotopic measurements show mean belowground ?13C values between -44‰ and -52‰ relative to VPDB and ?D values between -290‰ and -320‰ relative to VSMOW. Emitted CH4 had mean ?13C values which ranged from -50‰ to -60‰ VPDB. We integrate these results and interpret them using an empirically-driven concentration and isotope model to understand CH4 dynamics and to examine the effect of temperature on mechanisms that control CH4 emissions.

  12. Characterization of the major fragance gene from an aromatic japonica rice and analysis of its diversity in Asian cultivated rice.

    PubMed

    Bourgis, F; Guyot, R; Gherbi, H; Tailliez, E; Amabile, I; Salse, J; Lorieux, M; Delseny, M; Ghesquière, A

    2008-08-01

    In Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.), aroma is one of the most valuable traits in grain quality and 2-ACP is the main volatile compound contributing to the characteristic popcorn-like odour of aromatic rices. Although the major locus for grain fragrance (frg gene) has been described recently in Basmati rice, this gene has not been characterised in true japonica varieties and molecular information available on the genetic diversity and evolutionary origin of this gene among the different varieties is still limited. Here we report on characterisation of the frg gene in the Azucena variety, one of the few aromatic japonica cultivars. We used a RIL population from a cross between Azucena and IR64, a non-aromatic indica, the reference genomic sequence of Nipponbare (japonica) and 93-11 (indica) as well as an Azucena BAC library, to identify the major fragance gene in Azucena. We thus identified a betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase gene, badh2, as the candidate locus responsible for aroma, which presented exactly the same mutation as that identified in Basmati and Jasmine-like rices. Comparative genomic analyses showed very high sequence conservation between Azucena and Nipponbare BADH2, and a MITE was identified in the promotor region of the BADH2 allele in 93-11. The badh2 mutation and MITE were surveyed in a representative rice collection, including traditional aromatic and non-aromatic rice varieties, and strongly suggested a monophylogenetic origin of this badh2 mutation in Asian cultivated rices. Altogether these new data are discussed here in the light of current hypotheses on the origin of rice genetic diversity. PMID:18491070

  13. Characterization of the major fragance gene from an aromatic japonica rice and analysis of its diversity in Asian cultivated rice

    PubMed Central

    Bourgis, F.; Guyot, R.; Gherbi, H.; Tailliez, E.; Amabile, I.; Salse, J.; Lorieux, M.; Delseny, M.

    2008-01-01

    In Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.), aroma is one of the most valuable traits in grain quality and 2-ACP is the main volatile compound contributing to the characteristic popcorn-like odour of aromatic rices. Although the major locus for grain fragrance (frg gene) has been described recently in Basmati rice, this gene has not been characterised in true japonica varieties and molecular information available on the genetic diversity and evolutionary origin of this gene among the different varieties is still limited. Here we report on characterisation of the frg gene in the Azucena variety, one of the few aromatic japonica cultivars. We used a RIL population from a cross between Azucena and IR64, a non-aromatic indica, the reference genomic sequence of Nipponbare (japonica) and 93–11 (indica) as well as an Azucena BAC library, to identify the major fragance gene in Azucena. We thus identified a betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase gene, badh2, as the candidate locus responsible for aroma, which presented exactly the same mutation as that identified in Basmati and Jasmine-like rices. Comparative genomic analyses showed very high sequence conservation between Azucena and Nipponbare BADH2, and a MITE was identified in the promotor region of the BADH2 allele in 93–11. The badh2 mutation and MITE were surveyed in a representative rice collection, including traditional aromatic and non-aromatic rice varieties, and strongly suggested a monophylogenetic origin of this badh2 mutation in Asian cultivated rices. Altogether these new data are discussed here in the light of current hypotheses on the origin of rice genetic diversity. PMID:18491070

  14. Degradation kinetics of the insecticide spinetoram in a rice field ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Guo; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Yong; Yang, Ting; Wu, Yin-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The fate of spinetoram was studied in a rice field ecosystem, and an efficient method for the determination of spinetoram (XDE-175-J and XDE-175-L) in soil, rice straw, paddy water, husk and brown rice was developed. Spinetoram residues were extracted from samples with a salting out extraction procedure. The extracts were diluted with 0.10% formic acid in water and analysed with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) on a Waters Acquity BEH C18 column. The calibration curve was linear in the range 0.125-100 ?g L(-1) and r>0.999. The average recovery was 82.9-89.0% from soil, 78.5-92.1% from rice straw, 93.6-100.3% from paddy water, 79.1-87.9% from brown rice and 72.7-82.9% from husk. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 10%. These results are all within the accepted range for pesticide residue determination. The field test results showed that spinetoram degradation in paddy water, soil and rice straw coincided with C=0.0132e(-1.9685t), C=0.0308e(-0.1018t) and C=0.8530e(-0.6223t), respectively. The half-lives of spinetoram in paddy water, soil and rice straw were 0.35, 6.8 and 1.1 d, respectively. The final residue level was lower than the maximum residue limit (MRL) of 0.05 mg kg(-1) for spinetoram in rice with a harvest interval of 7d. A dosage of 450 mL ha(-1) was recommended, which can be considered safe for human beings and animals. The results of this study will contribute to establishing the scientific basis of the dosage of spinetoram for agricultural fields. PMID:25460760

  15. Exploring the Ecological Significance of Microbial Diversity and Networking in the Rice Ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Radha Prasanna; Lata Nain; Alok Kumar Pandey; Saswati Nayak

    \\u000a Rice fields represent “hot spots of biodiversity” – encompassing a complicated network of aerobic, anaerobic and facultative\\u000a micro-organisms, whose interactions with the resident macro flora and fauna lead to unique and complex biochemical and physicochemical\\u000a reactions. In turn, these reactions fuel the major nutrient cycles. The dynamics of microbiological activity of rice soil,\\u000a especially in the rhizosphere, represents a model

  16. Rice is the staple food source of nutrients for both humans and livestock throughout the world. The major proteins in rice seeds

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Rice is the staple food source of nutrients for both humans and livestock throughout the world. The major proteins in rice seeds are the storage proteins, glutelins and prolamins. Their m effector proteins in rice developing seed extracts. The eluted proteins from the positive and negative Rab5

  17. Carbon in live vegetation of major world ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.S.; Watts, J.A.; Allison, L.J.

    1983-06-01

    A computerized data base was developed to make a seven-color global ecology map of 44 land ecosystem mosaics or subdivisions in seven broad groups. Our main objectives are to document this compouter-based global map of vegetation and carbon density for natural and modified complexes of ecosystems and to illustrate some human influences on the global carbon cycle. The map provides a basis for making improved estimates of vegetation areas and carbon quantities, of natural biological exchanges of CO/sub 2/, and eventually of the net historic shifts of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Estimates of biomass in trees and total carbon in live plants per unit area are tabulated. The results help define the role of the terrestrial biosphere in the global carbon cycle. Results also imply major historic reductions of global carbon for broad regions and most vegetation types. Lowered estimates of carbon due to forest harvest or clearing for crops in the last century imply lowered estimates of input of nonfossil CO/sub 2/ to the atmosphere.

  18. Differential Effects of Bentazon and Molinate on Anabaena cylindrica , an Autochthonous Cyanobacterium of Portuguese Rice Field Agro-ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Galhano; F. Peixoto; J. Gomes-Laranjo; E. Fernández-Valiente

    2009-01-01

    The effects of bentazon and molinate, two selective herbicides recommended for integrated weed management in rice, were studied\\u000a in Anabaena cylindrica, an abundant cyanobacterium isolated from a Portuguese rice field agro-ecosystem. Comparative effects of both herbicides\\u000a on A. cylindrica were estimated under laboratory conditions by measuring its dry weight yield, photopigments, and carbohydrate and protein\\u000a contents in a time- and

  19. Major Ecosystems in China: Dynamics and Challenges for Sustainable Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yihe; Fu, Bojie; Wei, Wei; Yu, Xiubo; Sun, Ranhao

    2011-07-01

    Ecosystems, though impacted by global environmental change, can also contribute to the adaptation and mitigation of such large scale changes. Therefore, sustainable ecosystem management is crucial in reaching a sustainable future for the biosphere. Based on the published literature and publicly accessible data, this paper discussed the status and trends of forest, grassland, and wetland ecosystems in China that play important roles in the ecological integrity and human welfare of the nation. Ecological degradation has been observed in these ecosystems at various levels and geographic locations. Biophysical (e.g., climate change) and socioeconomic factors (e.g., intensive human use) are the main reasons for ecosystem degradation with the latter factors serving as the dominant driving forces. The three broad categories of ecosystems in China have partially recovered from degradation thanks to large scale ecological restoration projects implemented in the last few decades. China, as the largest and most populated developing nation, still faces huge challenges regarding ecosystem management in a changing and globalizing world. To further improve ecosystem management in China, four recommendations were proposed, including: (1) advance ecosystem management towards an application-oriented, multidisciplinary science; (2) establish a well-functioning national ecological monitoring and data sharing mechanism; (3) develop impact and effectiveness assessment approaches for policies, plans, and ecological restoration projects; and (4) promote legal and institutional innovations to balance the intrinsic needs of ecological and socioeconomic systems. Any change in China's ecosystem management approach towards a more sustainable one will benefit the whole world. Therefore, international collaborations on ecological and environmental issues need to be expanded.

  20. Major QTLs Control Resistance to Rice Hoja Blanca Virus and Its Vector Tagosodes orizicolus

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luz E.; Lozano, Ivan; Garavito, Andrea; Carabali, Silvio J.; Triana, Monica; Villareal, Natalia; Reyes, Luis; Duque, Myriam C.; Martinez, César P.; Calvert, Lee; Lorieux, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Rice hoja blanca (white leaf) disease can cause severe yield losses in rice in the Americas. The disease is caused by the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV), which is transmitted by the planthopper vector Tagosodes orizicolus. Because classical breeding schemes for this disease rely on expensive, time-consuming screenings, there is a need for alternatives such as marker-aided selection. The varieties Fedearroz 2000 and Fedearroz 50, which are resistant to RHBV and to the feeding damage caused by T. orizicolus, were crossed with the susceptible line WC366 to produce segregating F2:3 populations. The F3 families were scored for their resistance level to RHBV and T. orizicolus. The F2:3 lines of both crosses were genotyped using microsatellite markers. One major QTL on the short arm of chromosome 4 was identified for resistance to RHBV in the two populations. Two major QTL on chromosomes 5 and 7 were identified for resistance to T. orizicolus in the Fd2000 × WC366 and Fd50 × WC366 crosses, respectively. This comparative study using two distinct rice populations allowed for a better understanding of how the resistance to RHBV and its vector are controlled genetically. Simple marker-aided breeding schemes based on QTL information can be designed to improve rice germplasm to reduce losses caused by this important disease. PMID:24240781

  1. New insight for two major rice blast R genes: Pi-ta and Pi-km

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In rice breeding programs across the world, the introgression of major resistance (R) genes remains the most cost-effective method to control blast epidemics caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. During the last two years, we have examined two loci, on chromosome 12 and 11, which harbor ...

  2. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizer on Herbivores and Its Stimulation to Major Insect Pests in Rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhong-xian LU; Xiao-ping YU; Kong-luen HEONG; Cui HU

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most important factors in development of herbivore populations. The application of nitrogen fertilizer in plants can normally increase herbivore feeding preference, food consumption, survival, growth, reproduction, and population density, except few examples that nitrogen fertilizer reduces the herbivore performances. In most of the rice growing areas in Asia, the great increases in populations of major

  3. Carbon and water cycling in flooded and rainfed rice (Oryza Sativa) ecosystem: Disentangling agronomical and ecological aspects of water use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nay-Htoon, Bhone; Xue, Wei; Dubbert, Maren; Lindner, Steve; Cuntz, Matthias; Ko, Jonghan; Tenhunen, John; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural crops play an important role in the global carbon and water cycling process and there is intense research to understand and predict carbon and water fluxes, productivity and water use of cultivated crops under climate change. Mechanistic understanding of the trade of between ecosystem water use efficiency and agronomic water use efficiency to maintain higher crop yield and productive water loss is necessary for the ecosystem sustainability. . We compared water and carbon fluxes of paddy and rainfed rice by canopy scale gas exchange measurements, crop growth, and daily evapotranspiration, transpiration and carbon flux modeling. According to our findings, evaporation contributed strongly (maximum 100% to minimum 45%) to paddy rice evapotranspiration while transpiration of rainfed is almost 50 % of daily evapotranspiration. Water use efficiency (WUE) was higher in rainfed rice both from an agronomic (WUEagro, i.e. grain yield per evapotranspiration) and ecosystem (WUEeco, i.e. gross primary production per evapotranspiration) perspective. However, rainfed rice showed also high ecosystem respiration losses and a slightly lower crop yield, demonstrating that higher WUE in rainfed rice comes at the expense of higher respiration losses of assimilated carbon and lower plant production, compared to paddy rice. Our results highlighted the need to partition water and carbon fluxes to improve our mechanistic understanding of water use efficiency and environmental impact of different agricultural practices. Keywords: Rainfed rice, Paddy rice, water use efficiency, Transpiration/Evapotranspiration, ecosystem WUE, agronomic WUE, Evapotranspiration

  4. Days to heading 7, a major quantitative locus determining photoperiod sensitivity and regional adaptation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, He; Jin, Mingna; Zheng, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Jun; Yuan, Dingyang; Xin, Yeyun; Wang, Maoqing; Huang, Dongyi; Zhang, Zhe; Zhou, Kunneng; Sheng, Peike; Ma, Jin; Ma, Weiwei; Deng, Huafeng; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Shijia; Wang, Haiyang; Wu, Chuanyin; Yuan, Longping; Wan, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Success of modern agriculture relies heavily on breeding of crops with maximal regional adaptability and yield potentials. A major limiting factor for crop cultivation is their flowering time, which is strongly regulated by day length (photoperiod) and temperature. Here we report identification and characterization of Days to heading 7 (DTH7), a major genetic locus underlying photoperiod sensitivity and grain yield in rice. Map-based cloning reveals that DTH7 encodes a pseudo-response regulator protein and its expression is regulated by photoperiod. We show that in long days DTH7 acts downstream of the photoreceptor phytochrome B to repress the expression of Ehd1, an up-regulator of the “florigen” genes (Hd3a and RFT1), leading to delayed flowering. Further, we find that haplotype combinations of DTH7 with Grain number, plant height, and heading date 7 (Ghd7) and DTH8 correlate well with the heading date and grain yield of rice under different photoperiod conditions. Our data provide not only a macroscopic view of the genetic control of photoperiod sensitivity in rice but also a foundation for breeding of rice cultivars better adapted to the target environments using rational design. PMID:25378698

  5. Differences among Major Taxa in the Extent of Ecological Knowledge across Four Major Ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca Fisher; Nancy Knowlton; Russell E. Brainard; M. Julian Caley

    2011-01-01

    Existing knowledge shapes our understanding of ecosystems and is critical for ecosystem-based management of the world's natural resources. Typically this knowledge is biased among taxa, with some taxa far better studied than others, but the extent of this bias is poorly known. In conjunction with the publically available World Registry of Marine Species database (WoRMS) and one of the world's

  6. Major and Trace Elements in Rice Seeds from Ko~ani Field, Macedonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nastja Rogan; Tadej Dolenec; Todor Serafimovski

    The objective of this study was to assess the total concentrations of selected major and trace elements in rice seeds from Ko~ani Field impacted by heavy metals due to irrigation with riverine water affected by acid mine drainage and other mining activities of the Zletovo-Kratovo and Sasa-Toranica Pb-Zn ore districts. The analytical results obtained with the k0-instrumental neutron-activation analysis (k0-INAA)

  7. Modeling impacts of water and fertilizer management on ecosystem services from rice rotated crop systems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han; Yu, Chaoqing; Li, Changsheng; Huang, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Yue, Yali; Huang, Guorui

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable intensification in agriculture has stressed the need for management practices that could increase crop yields while simultaneously reducing environmental impacts. It is well recognized that water and nutrient management hold great promise to address these goals. This study uses the DNDC biogeochemical model to stimulate the impacts of water regime and nitrogen fertilizer management interactions on ecosystem services of rice rotated crop systems in China. County-level optimal nitrogen fertilizer application rates under various water management practices were captured and then multiple scenarios of water and nitrogen fertilizer management were set to more than 1600 counties with rice rotations in China. Results indicate that an national average of 15.7±5.9% (the mean value and standard deviation derive from variability of three water management practices) reduction of nitrogen fertilizer inputs can be achieved without significantly sacrificing rice yields. On a national scale, shallow flooding with optimal N application rates appear most potential to enhance ecosystem services, which led to 10.6% reduction of nitrogen fertilizer inputs, 34.3% decrease of total GHG emissions, 2.8% less of overall N loss (NH3 volatilization, denitrification and N leaching) and a 1.7% increase of rice yields compared to the baseline scenario. Regional GHG emissions mitigation derived from water regime change vary with soil properties and the multiple crop index. Among the main production regions of rice in China, the highest reduction happened in Jiangxu, Yunnan, Guizhou and Hubei (more than 40% reduction) with high SOC, high multiple crop index and low clay fraction. The highest reduction of GHG emissions derived from reducing current N application rate to optimal rate appeared in Zhejiang, Guangdong, Jiangsu where the serious over-application of mineral N exit. It was concluded that process models like DNDC would act an essential tool to identify sustainable agricultural management practices and evaluate their impacts on agro-ecosystem services.

  8. Effects of earthworms on soil enzyme activity in an organic residue amended rice–wheat rotation agro-ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Tao; Bryan Griffiths; Shujie Zhang; Xiaoyun Chen; Manqiang Liu; Feng Hu; Huixin Li

    2009-01-01

    The effect of earthworms on soil hydrolases (protease, urease, invertase, and alkaline phosphatase) and dehydrogenase activities was investigated in maize residue amended rice–wheat rotation agro-ecosystem. Experimental plots in the rotation had five treatments, i.e. incorporation or mulching of maize residues with or without added earthworms and an untreated control. The application of maize residues to soil without earthworms significantly enhanced

  9. Marine viruses--major players in the global ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Suttle, Curtis A

    2007-10-01

    Viruses are by far the most abundant 'lifeforms' in the oceans and are the reservoir of most of the genetic diversity in the sea. The estimated 10(30) viruses in the ocean, if stretched end to end, would span farther than the nearest 60 galaxies. Every second, approximately 10(23) viral infections occur in the ocean. These infections are a major source of mortality, and cause disease in a range of organisms, from shrimp to whales. As a result, viruses influence the composition of marine communities and are a major force behind biogeochemical cycles. Each infection has the potential to introduce new genetic information into an organism or progeny virus, thereby driving the evolution of both host and viral assemblages. Probing this vast reservoir of genetic and biological diversity continues to yield exciting discoveries. PMID:17853907

  10. Modeling greenhouse gas emissions from rice-based production systems: Sensitivity and upscaling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Changsheng Li; Arvin Mosier; Reiner Wassmann; Zucong Cai; Xunhua Zheng; Yao Huang; Haruo Tsuruta; Jariya Boonjawat; Rhoda Lantin

    2004-01-01

    A biogeochemical model, Denitrification-Decomposition (DNDC), was modified to enhance its capacity of predicting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from paddy rice ecosystems. The major modifications focused on simulations of anaerobic biogeochemistry and rice growth as well as parameterization of paddy rice management. The new model was tested for its sensitivities to management alternatives and variations in natural conditions including weather and

  11. Transgenic rice expressing Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) exhibits high-level resistance against major sap-sucking pests

    PubMed Central

    Yarasi, Bharathi; Sadumpati, Vijayakumar; Immanni, China Pasalu; Vudem, Dasavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Background Rice (Oryza sativa) productivity is adversely impacted by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. An approximate 52% of the global production of rice is lost annually owing to the damage caused by biotic factors, of which ~21% is attributed to the attack of insect pests. In this paper we report the isolation, cloning and characterization of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (asal) gene, and its expression in elite indica rice cultivars using Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation method. The stable transgenic lines, expressing ASAL, showed explicit resistance against major sap-sucking pests. Results Allium sativum leaf lectin gene (asal), coding for mannose binding homodimeric protein (ASAL) from garlic plants, has been isolated and introduced into elite indica rice cultivars susceptible to sap-sucking insects, viz., brown planthopper (BPH), green leafhopper (GLH) and whitebacked planthopper (WBPH). Embryogenic calli of rice were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium harbouring pSB111 super-binary vector comprising garlic lectin gene asal along with the herbicide resistance gene bar, both under the control of CaMV35S promoter. PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed stable integration of transgenes into the genomes of rice plants. Northern and western blot analyses revealed expression of ASAL in different transgenic rice lines. In primary transformants, the level of ASAL protein, as estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, varied between 0.74% and 1.45% of the total soluble proteins. In planta insect bioassays on transgenic rice lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on BPH, GLH and WBPH insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects. Conclusion In planta insect bioassays were carried out on asal transgenic rice lines employing standard screening techniques followed in conventional breeding for selection of insect resistant plants. The ASAL expressing rice plants, bestowed with high entomotoxic effects, imparted appreciable resistance against three major sap-sucking insects. Our results amply demonstrate that transgenic indica rice harbouring asal exhibit surpassing resistance against BPH, GLH and WBPH insects. The prototypic asal transgenic rice lines appear promising for direct commercial cultivation besides serving as a potential genetic resource in recombination breeding. PMID:18854007

  12. A putative acyl-CoA-binding protein is a major phloem sap protein in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Suzui, Nobuo; Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Fujiwara, Toru; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu

    2006-01-01

    The N-terminal amino-acid sequence of a major rice phloem-sap protein, named RPP10, was determined. RPP10 is encoded by a single gene in the rice genome. Its complete amino-acid sequence, predicted from the corresponding rice full-length cDNA, showed high similarity to plant acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs). Western blot analysis using anti-ACBP antiserum revealed that putative ACBP is abundant in the phloem sap of rice plants, and is also present in sieve-tube exudates of winter squash (Cucurbita maxima), oilseed rape (Brassica napus), and coconut palm (Cocos nucifera). These findings give rise to the idea that ACBP may involve lipid metabolism and regulation in the phloem. PMID:16804052

  13. LETTER Herbivory makes major contributions to ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycling in tropical forests

    E-print Network

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    . Doughty5 and Yadvinder Malhi5 Abstract The functional role of herbivores in tropical rainforests remains, montane rainforest. Ecology Letters (2013) INTRODUCTION Tropical rainforests play a key role in the globalLETTER Herbivory makes major contributions to ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycling in tropical

  14. Two alanine aminotranferases link mitochondrial glycolate oxidation to the major photorespiratory pathway in Arabidopsis and rice

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, Markus; Krause, Katrin; Horst, Ina; Staebler, Norma; Klaus, Stephanie; Gaertner, Stefanie; Kebeish, Rashad; Araujo, Wagner L.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Peterhansel, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    The major photorespiratory pathway in higher plants is distributed over chloroplasts, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. In this pathway, glycolate oxidation takes place in peroxisomes. It was previously suggested that a mitochondrial glycolate dehydrogenase (GlcDH) that was conserved from green algae lacking leaf-type peroxisomes contributes to photorespiration in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, the identification of two Arabidopsis mitochondrial alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferases (ALAATs) that link glycolate oxidation to glycine formation are described. By this reaction, the mitochondrial side pathway produces glycine from glyoxylate that can be used in the glycine decarboxylase (GCD) reaction of the major pathway. RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of mitochondrial ALAAT did not result in major changes in metabolite pools under standard conditions or enhanced photorespiratroy flux, respectively. However, RNAi lines showed reduced photorespiratory CO2 release and a lower CO2 compensation point. Mitochondria isolated from RNAi lines are incapable of converting glycolate to CO2, whereas simultaneous overexpression of GlcDH and ALAATs in transiently transformed tobacco leaves enhances glycolate conversion. Furthermore, analyses of rice mitochondria suggest that the side pathway for glycolate oxidation and glycine formation is conserved in monocotyledoneous plants. It is concluded that the photorespiratory pathway from green algae has been functionally conserved in higher plants. PMID:22268146

  15. Decision tools for bacterial blight resistance gene deployment in rice-based agricultural ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Dossa, Gerbert S; Sparks, Adam; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Attempting to achieve long-lasting and stable resistance using uniformly deployed rice varieties is not a sustainable approach. The real situation appears to be much more complex and dynamic, one in which pathogens quickly adapt to resistant varieties. To prevent disease epidemics, deployment should be customized and this decision will require interdisciplinary actions. This perspective article aims to highlight the current progress on disease resistance deployment to control bacterial blight in rice. Although the model system rice-Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae has distinctive features that underpin the need for a case-by-case analysis, strategies to integrate those elements into a unique decision tool could be easily extended to other crops. PMID:25999970

  16. Decision tools for bacterial blight resistance gene deployment in rice-based agricultural ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Gerbert S.; Sparks, Adam; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Attempting to achieve long-lasting and stable resistance using uniformly deployed rice varieties is not a sustainable approach. The real situation appears to be much more complex and dynamic, one in which pathogens quickly adapt to resistant varieties. To prevent disease epidemics, deployment should be customized and this decision will require interdisciplinary actions. This perspective article aims to highlight the current progress on disease resistance deployment to control bacterial blight in rice. Although the model system rice-Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae has distinctive features that underpin the need for a case-by-case analysis, strategies to integrate those elements into a unique decision tool could be easily extended to other crops. PMID:25999970

  17. Monitoring seasonal progress of rice stubble burning in major rice growing districts of Haryana, India, using multidate AWiFS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, M.; Prawasi, R.; Jangra, S.; Rana, P.; Kumari, K.; Lal, S.; Jakhar, K.; Sharma, S.; Hooda, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    The present paper describes the methodology and results of assessment of seasonal progress of rice stubble burning for 10 major rice growing districts of Haryana state in India. These 10 districts contribute about 84 per cent of total rice area of the state. As the rice fields are immediately required to be vacated for the sowing of next crop the farmers opt for mechanized harvesting and easy way out of burning the stubbles in the field. Such burning result in release of polluting gases and aerosols. Besides, the heating of the soil kills the useful micro-flora of the soil causing soil degradation. Multi-date AWiFS data from Resourcesat 1 and 2 satellites acquired between October 16, 2013 to November 26, 2013 were used for estimating paddy stubble burning areas at different intervals for the year 2013 crop growing season. In season collected ground truth data using hand held GPS along with field photographs were used to identify paddy stubble burning areas and other land features. Complete enumeration approach and Iterative Self-organizing Data Analysis Technique (ISODATA) unsupervised classifier was used for digital analysis. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) of each date was also used with other spectral bands of temporal images. To improve the classification accuracy the non-agricultural areas were masked out. The area was estimated by computing pixels under the classified image mask. Progress of paddy stubble burning was estimated at different intervals for the year 2013 using available cloud free multi-date IRS-P6 AWiFS data to identify the crucial period when stubbles burning takes place in major area so that preventive measures can be taken to curb the menace.

  18. Field screening of diverse rice genotypes for weed competitiveness in irrigated lowland ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M Haefele; D. E Johnson; D M’Bodj; M. C. S Wopereis; K. M Miezan

    2004-01-01

    Weeds cause considerable yield losses in irrigated rice in West Africa, particularly where sub-optimal crop management or limited resources hamper production. Because of the recent focus of regional breeding programs in West Africa on a wide diversity of interspecific (O.sativaindica×O.glaberrima) and intraspecific (O.sativa×O.sativa) crosses for lowland systems, new genotypes with promising yield potential and putatively improved weed competitiveness are now

  19. Combination Patterns of Major R Genes Determine the Level of Resistance to the M. oryzae in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ling; Pan, Cunhong; Li, Yuhong; Zhang, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Guangqing; Dai, Zhengyuan; Pan, Xuebiao; Li, Aihong

    2015-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is the most devastating disease of rice and poses a serious threat to world food security. In this study, the distribution and effectiveness of 18 R genes in 277 accessions were investigated based on pathogenicity assays and molecular markers. The results showed that most of the accessions exhibited some degree of resistance (resistance frequency, RF >50%). Accordingly, most of the accessions were observed to harbor two or more R genes, and the number of R genes harbored in accessions was significantly positively correlated with RF. Some R genes were demonstrated to be specifically distributed in the genomes of rice sub-species, such as Pigm, Pi9, Pi5 and Pi1, which were only detected in indica-type accessions, and Pik and Piz, which were just harbored in japonica-type accessions. By analyzing the relationship between R genes and RF using a multiple stepwise regression model, the R genes Pid3, Pi5, Pi9, Pi54, Pigm and Pit were found to show the main effects against M. oryzae in indica-type accessions, while Pita, Pb1, Pik, Pizt and Pia were indicated to exhibit the main effects against M. oryzae in japonica-type accessions. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis revealed that combination patterns of major R genes were the main factors determining the resistance of rice varieties to M. oryzae, such as ‘Pi9+Pi54’, ‘Pid3+Pigm’, ‘Pi5+Pid3+Pigm’, ‘Pi5+Pi54+Pid3+Pigm’, ‘Pi5+Pid3’ and ‘Pi5+Pit+Pid3’ in indica-type accessions and ‘Pik+Pib’, ‘Pik+Pita’, ‘Pik+Pb1’, ‘Pizt+Pia’ and ‘Pizt+Pita’ in japonica-type accessions, which were able to confer effective resistance against M. oryzae. The above results provide good theoretical support for the rational utilization of combinations of major R genes in developing rice cultivars with broad-spectrum resistance. PMID:26030358

  20. Combination Patterns of Major R Genes Determine the Level of Resistance to the M. oryzae in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunyu; Xiao, Ning; Yu, Ling; Pan, Cunhong; Li, Yuhong; Zhang, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Guangqing; Dai, Zhengyuan; Pan, Xuebiao; Li, Aihong

    2015-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is the most devastating disease of rice and poses a serious threat to world food security. In this study, the distribution and effectiveness of 18 R genes in 277 accessions were investigated based on pathogenicity assays and molecular markers. The results showed that most of the accessions exhibited some degree of resistance (resistance frequency, RF >50%). Accordingly, most of the accessions were observed to harbor two or more R genes, and the number of R genes harbored in accessions was significantly positively correlated with RF. Some R genes were demonstrated to be specifically distributed in the genomes of rice sub-species, such as Pigm, Pi9, Pi5 and Pi1, which were only detected in indica-type accessions, and Pik and Piz, which were just harbored in japonica-type accessions. By analyzing the relationship between R genes and RF using a multiple stepwise regression model, the R genes Pid3, Pi5, Pi9, Pi54, Pigm and Pit were found to show the main effects against M. oryzae in indica-type accessions, while Pita, Pb1, Pik, Pizt and Pia were indicated to exhibit the main effects against M. oryzae in japonica-type accessions. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis revealed that combination patterns of major R genes were the main factors determining the resistance of rice varieties to M. oryzae, such as 'Pi9+Pi54', 'Pid3+Pigm', 'Pi5+Pid3+Pigm', 'Pi5+Pi54+Pid3+Pigm', 'Pi5+Pid3' and 'Pi5+Pit+Pid3' in indica-type accessions and 'Pik+Pib', 'Pik+Pita', 'Pik+Pb1', 'Pizt+Pia' and 'Pizt+Pita' in japonica-type accessions, which were able to confer effective resistance against M. oryzae. The above results provide good theoretical support for the rational utilization of combinations of major R genes in developing rice cultivars with broad-spectrum resistance. PMID:26030358

  1. Assessing Major Ecosystem Types and the Challenge of Sustainability in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrendilek, Fatih; Doygun, Hakan

    2000-11-01

    In recent years, Turkey has experienced rapid economic and population growth coupled with both an equally rapid increase in energy consumption and a vast disparity in welfare between socioeconomic groups and regions. In turn, these pressures have accelerated the destruction of productive, assimilative, and regenerative capacities of the ecosystems, which are essential for the well-being of the people and the economy. This paper describes the structure and function of major ecosystem types in Turkey and discusses the underlying causes of environmental degradation in the framework of economy, energy, environment, and ethics. From a national perspective, this paper suggests three sustainability-based policies necessary for Turkey's long-term interests that balance economic, environmental, and energy goals: (1) decoupling economic growth from energy consumption growth through the development of energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies; (2) linking economic efficiency and distributive justice of wealth and power through distributive and participatory public policies; and (3) integrating the economic and ecological systems through the internalization of externalities and ecosystem rehabilitation.

  2. Health Benefits and Clinical Impact of Major Nutrient, Red Yeast Rice: A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kalaivani; R. Sabitha; V. Kalaiselvan; A. Rajasekaran

    2010-01-01

    Chinese red yeast rice (RYR), a natural food obtained after fermenting rice with Monascus purpureus. RYR contains unsaturated fatty acids, sterols, B-complex vitamins and monacolins with antioxidant properties. Scientific\\u000a evidences showed that fermented RYR proved to be effective for the management of cholesterol, diabetes, cardiovascular disease\\u000a (CVD) and also for the prevention of cancer. This review article describe about the

  3. Development of pyramidal lines with two major QTLs conferring resistance to sheath blight in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Jena, Kshirod; Bhuiyan, Md Atiqur Rahman; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2014-09-01

    Sheath blight is an emerging threat in rice cultivation. It is animportant disease caused by the soil-borne necrotrophic pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani Kühn. However, to date neither known major genes for quantitative resistance, nor any rice lines immune to this disease has been identified. The disease resistance is quantitative in nature. Numerous genes are involved in this resistance process. There are few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) detected conferring improved resistance against the disease. Teqing and Tetepshowimproved resistance having QTLs, qSB-9 and qSBR11-1, respectively. Since, these QTLs demonstrates additive effects, pyramiding of these QTLs might be an option to increase the sheath blight resistance in rice. Nine rice cultivars were screened at greenhouse conditions. Results showed that Tetep and Teqing had the lowest disease ratings. UKMRC2a new high yielding cultivar was as recipient parent. Crosses between UKMRC2 and Teqing, and UKMRC2 and Tetep were made and confirmed. Subsequently 4-way crosses between the two F1s were performed to develop pyramidal lines.

  4. Elevated CO2 facilitates C and N accumulation in a rice paddy ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Zhang, Mingqian; Wang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-03-01

    Elevated CO2 can stimulate wetland carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) exports through gaseous and dissolved pathways, however, the consequent influences on the C and N pools are still not fully known. Therefore, we set up a free-air CO2 enrichment experiment in a paddy field in Eastern China. After five year fumigation, we studied C and N in the plant-water-soil system. The results showed: (1) elevated CO2 stimulated rice aboveground biomass and N accumulations by 19.1% and 12.5%, respectively. (2) Elevated CO2 significantly increased paddy soil TOC and TN contents by 12.5% and 15.5%, respectively in the 0-15cm layer, and 22.7% and 26.0% in the 15-30cm soil layer. (3) Averaged across the rice growing period, elevated CO2 greatly increased TOC and TN contents in the surface water by 7.6% and 11.4%, respectively. (4) The TOC/TN ratio and natural ?(15)N value in the surface soil showed a decreasing trend under elevated CO2. The above results indicate that elevated CO2 can benefit C and N accumulation in paddy fields. Given the similarity between the paddies and natural wetlands, our results also suggest a great potential for long-term C and N accumulation in natural wetlands under future climate patterns. PMID:25766010

  5. Molecular Genetic Diversity of Major Indian Rice Cultivars over Decadal Periods

    PubMed Central

    Deborah, Dondapati Annekitty; Vipparla, Abhilash; Anuradha, Ghanta; Siddiq, Ebrahimali Abubacker; Vemireddy, Lakshminarayana Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity in representative sets of high yielding varieties of rice released in India between 1970 and 2010 was studied at molecular level employing hypervariable microsatellite markers. Of 64 rice SSR primer pairs studied, 52 showed polymorphism, when screened in 100 rice genotypes. A total of 184 alleles was identified averaging 3.63 alleles per locus. Cluster analysis clearly grouped the 100 genotypes into their respective decadal periods i.e., 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. The trend of diversity over the decadal periods estimated based on the number of alleles (Na), allelic richness (Rs), Nei’s genetic diversity index (He), observed heterozygosity (Ho) and polymorphism information content (PIC) revealed increase of diversity over the periods in year of releasewise and longevitywise classification of rice varieties. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) suggested more variation in within the decadal periods than among the decades. Pairwise comparison of population differentiation (Fst) among decadal periods showed significant difference between all the pairs except a few. Analysis of trends of appearing and disappearing alleles over decadal periods showed an increase in the appearance of alleles and decrease in disappearance in both the categories of varieties. It was obvious from the present findings, that genetic diversity was progressively on the rise in the varieties released during the decadal periods, between 1970s and 2000s. PMID:23805204

  6. Thioredoxin h is one of the major proteins in rice phloem sap

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yutaka Ishiwatari; Chikako Honda; Ichiro Kawashima; Shin-ichi Nakamura; Hisashi Hirano; Satoshi Mori; Toru Fujiwara; Hiroaki Hayashi; Mitsuo Chino

    1995-01-01

    Sieve tubes play important roles in the transfer of nutrients as well as signals. Hundreds of proteins were found in pure phloem sap collected from rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Kantou) plants through the cut ends of insect stylets. These proteins may be involved in nutrient transfer and signal transduction. To characterize the nature of these proteins, the partial amino-acid

  7. Simulation of future global warming scenarios in rice paddies with an open-field ecosystem warming facility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) in Yangtze River Valley (YRV) suffered serious yield losses in 2003 when extreme heatwave (HW), hampered rice reproductive growth phase (RGP). Climate change induced extreme and asymmetrical fluctuations in temperature during heat sensitive stage of rice growth cycle, i.e., RG...

  8. Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Houghton Mifflin Science

    This self-contained module on ecosystems includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

  9. Interacting Factors Driving a Major Loss of Large Trees with Cavities in a Forest Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmayer, David B.; Blanchard, Wade; McBurney, Lachlan; Blair, David; Banks, Sam; Likens, Gene E.; Franklin, Jerry F.; Laurance, William F.; Stein, John A. R.; Gibbons, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Large trees with cavities provide critical ecological functions in forests worldwide, including vital nesting and denning resources for many species. However, many ecosystems are experiencing increasingly rapid loss of large trees or a failure to recruit new large trees or both. We quantify this problem in a globally iconic ecosystem in southeastern Australia – forests dominated by the world's tallest angiosperms, Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans). Tree, stand and landscape-level factors influencing the death and collapse of large living cavity trees and the decay and collapse of dead trees with cavities are documented using a suite of long-term datasets gathered between 1983 and 2011. The historical rate of tree mortality on unburned sites between 1997 and 2011 was >14% with a mortality spike in the driest period (2006–2009). Following a major wildfire in 2009, 79% of large living trees with cavities died and 57–100% of large dead trees were destroyed on burned sites. Repeated measurements between 1997 and 2011 revealed no recruitment of any new large trees with cavities on any of our unburned or burned sites. Transition probability matrices of large trees with cavities through increasingly decayed condition states projects a severe shortage of large trees with cavities by 2039 that will continue until at least 2067. This large cavity tree crisis in Mountain Ash forests is a product of: (1) the prolonged time required (>120 years) for initiation of cavities; and (2) repeated past wildfires and widespread logging operations. These latter factors have resulted in all landscapes being dominated by stands ?72 years and just 1.16% of forest being unburned and unlogged. We discuss how the features that make Mountain Ash forests vulnerable to a decline in large tree abundance are shared with many forest types worldwide. PMID:23071486

  10. A process-based model of N2O emission from a rice-winter wheat rotation agro-ecosystem: Structure, validation and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zaixing; Zheng, Xunhua; Xie, Baohua; Han, Shenghui; Liu, Chunyan

    2010-01-01

    In order to numerically simulate daily nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from a rice-winter wheat rotation cropping system, a process-based site model was developed (referred to as IAP-N-GAS) to track the movement and transformation of several forms of nitrogen in the agro-ecosystem, which is affected by climate, soil, crop growth and management practices. The simulation of daily N2O fluxes, along with key daily environmental variables, was validated with three-year observations conducted in East China. The validation demonstrated that the model simulated well daily solar radiation, soil temperature and moisture, and also captured the dynamics and magnitude of accumulated rice aboveground biomass and mineral nitrogen in the soil. The simulated daily N2O emissions over all three years investigated were generally in good agreement with field observations. Particularly well simulated were the peak N2O emissions induced by fertilizations, rainfall events or mid-season drainages. The model simulation also represented closely the inter-annual variation in N2O emission. These validations imply that the model has the capability to capture the general characteristics of N2O emission from a typical rice-wheat rotation agro-ecosystem. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the simulated N2O emission is most sensitive to the fertilizer application rate and the soil organic matter content, but it is much less sensitive to variations in soil pH and texture, temperature, precipitation and crop residue incorporation rate under local conditions.

  11. MucoRice-cholera toxin B-subunit, a rice-based oral cholera vaccine, down-regulates the expression of ?-amylase/trypsin inhibitor-like protein family as major rice allergens.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Shiho; Nakamura, Rika; Mejima, Mio; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Kuroda, Masaharu; Takeyama, Natsumi; Oyama, Masaaki; Satoh, Shigeru; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Masumura, Takehiro; Teshima, Reiko; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2013-07-01

    To develop a cold chain- and needle/syringe-free rice-based cholera vaccine (MucoRice-CTB) for human use, we previously advanced the MucoRice system by introducing antisense genes specific for endogenous rice storage proteins and produced a molecularly uniform, human-applicable, high-yield MucoRice-CTB devoid of plant-associated sugar. To maintain the cold chain-free property of this vaccine for clinical application, we wanted to use a polished rice powder preparation of MucoRice-CTB without further purification but wondered whether this might cause an unexpected increase in rice allergen protein expression levels in MucoRice-CTB and prompt safety concerns. Therefore, we used two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and shotgun MS/MS proteomics to compare rice allergen protein expression levels in MucoRice-CTB and wild-type (WT) rice. Both proteomics analyses showed that the only notable change in the expression levels of rice allergen protein in MucoRice-CTB, compared with those in WT rice, was a decrease in the expression levels of ?-amylase/trypsin inhibitor-like protein family such as the seed allergen protein RAG2. Real-time PCR analysis showed mRNA of RAG2 reduced in MucoRice-CTB seed. These results demonstrate that no known rice allergens appear to be up-reregulated by genetic modification of MucoRice-CTB, suggesting that MucoRice-CTB has potential as a safe oral cholera vaccine for clinical application. PMID:23763241

  12. Malaria vector control practices in an irrigated rice agro-ecosystem in central Kenya and implications for malaria control

    PubMed Central

    Ng'ang'a, Peter N; Shililu, Josephat; Jayasinghe, Gayathri; Kimani, Violet; Kabutha, Charity; Kabuage, Lucy; Kabiru, Ephantus; Githure, John; Mutero, Clifford

    2008-01-01

    Background Malaria transmission in most agricultural ecosystems is complex and hence the need for developing a holistic malaria control strategy with adequate consideration of socio-economic factors driving transmission at community level. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted in an irrigated ecosystem with the aim of investigating vector control practices applied and factors affecting their application both at household and community level. Methods Four villages representing the socio-economic, demographic and geographical diversity within the study area were purposefully selected. A total of 400 households were randomly sampled from the four study villages. Both semi-structured questionnaires and focus group discussions were used to gather both qualitative and quantitative data. Results The results showed that malaria was perceived to be a major public health problem in the area and the role of the vector Anopheles mosquitoes in malaria transmission was generally recognized. More than 80% of respondents were aware of the major breeding sites of the vector. Reported personal protection methods applied to prevent mosquito bites included; use of treated bed nets (57%), untreated bed nets (35%), insecticide coils (21%), traditional methods such as burning of cow dung (8%), insecticide sprays (6%), and use of skin repellents (2%). However, 39% of respondents could not apply some of the known vector control methods due to unaffordability (50.5%), side effects (19.9%), perceived lack of effectiveness (16%), and lack of time to apply (2.6%). Lack of time was the main reason (56.3%) reported for non-application of environmental management practices, such as draining of stagnant water (77%) and clearing of vegetations along water canals (67%). Conclusion The study provides relevant information necessary for the management, prevention and control of malaria in irrigated agro-ecosystems, where vectors of malaria are abundant and disease transmission is stable. PMID:18667091

  13. Transgenic indica rice lines, expressing Brassica juncea Nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (BjNPR1), exhibit enhanced resistance to major pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sadumpati, Vijayakumar; Kalambur, Muralidharan; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2013-07-10

    Brassica juncea Nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (BjNPR1) has been introduced into commercial indica rice varieties by Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Transgenic rice plants were regenerated from the phosphinothricin-resistant calli obtained after co-cultivation with Agrobacterium strain LBA4404 harbouring Ti plasmid pSB111-bar-BjNPR1. Molecular analyses confirmed the stable integration and expression of BjNPR1 in various transgenic rice lines. Transgenes NPR1 and bar were stably inherited and disclosed co-segregation in subsequent generations in a Mendelian fashion. Homozygous transgenic rice lines expressing BjNPR1 protein displayed enhanced resistance to rice blast, sheath blight and bacterial leaf blight diseases. Rice transformants with higher levels of NPR1 revealed notable increases in plant height, panicle length, flag-leaf length, number of seeds/panicle and seed yield/plant as compared to the untransformed plants. The overall results amply demonstrate the profound impact of BjNPR1 in imparting resistance against major pathogens of rice. The multipotent BjNPR1, as such, seems promising as a prime candidate gene to fortify crop plants with durable resistance against various pathogens. PMID:23664883

  14. Influence of the Asian Monsoon on net ecosystem carbon exchange in two major plant functional types in Korea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Kwon; J. Kim; J. Hong

    2009-01-01

    Considering the feedback loops in radiation, temperature, and soil moisture with alterations in rainfall patterns, the influence of the changing monsoon on net ecosystem CO2 exchange can be critical to the estimation of carbon balance in Asia. In this paper, we examined the eddy covariance CO2 fluxes observed from 2004 to 2008 in two major plant functional types in KoFlux,

  15. Spatial abundance and human biting rate of Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus in savannah and rice agro-ecosystems of Central Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mboera, Leonard E G; Bwana, Veneranda M; Rumisha, Susan F; Stanley, Grades; Tungu, Patrick K; Malima, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the spatial variations in malaria mosquito abundance and human biting rate in five villages representing rice-irrigation and savannah ecosystems in Kilosa District, central Tanzania. The study involved five villages namely Tindiga and Malui (wetland/rice irrigation), Twatwatwa and Mbwade (dry savannah) and Kimamba (wet savannah). Indoor mosquitoes were sampled using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light traps in three houses in each village. Anopheles gambiae s.l. molecular identification was carried out using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 936 female mosquitoes were collected. About half (46.9%) were malaria mosquitoes (Anopheles gambiae s.l.=28.6%; An. funestus= 18.3%). A total of 161 (60.1%) of the morphologically identified An. gambiae s.l. (268) and subjected to PCR analysis for speciation were genotyped as An. arabiensis. The An. funestus complex mosquitoes were composed of An. funestus funestus and An. rivulorum at the 5:1 ratio. On average, 17.9 Anopheles mosquitoes were collected per village per day. Two-thirds (62.8%) of the malaria mosquitoes were collected in Malui (rice agro-ecosystem) and the lowest number (2.3%) in Twatwatwa (dry savannah ecosystem). The biting rate per person per night for An. arabiensis+An. funestus s.s. was highest in Malui (46.0) and lowest in Twatwatwa (1.67). The parity rate of the An. funestus mosquitoes was lower compared to that of An. arabiensis and none of the mosquitoes was infected with malaria sporozoites. In conclusion, An. arabiensis is the most abundant malaria vector in Kilosa district and its variation is related to the ecological system. The heterogeneity in malaria mosquito abundance and human biting rate could be used to guide selection of locally appropriated control interventions. PMID:26054517

  16. RICE GENETICS IV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the genome sequencing of the two major subspecies of rice (Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica) and the close genetic relationship of rice with other cereal crops, interest in rice as a model plant system has never been greater. This review of the book Rice Genetics IV, which represents a co...

  17. Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    R. Herzog

    This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 6-8. It focuses on biodiversity within ecosystems and within species. Students visit a local area and collect leaves to demonstrate how diverse life can exist within a small area. Included are objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, an audio-enhanced vocabulary list, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

  18. Root-to-shoot Cd translocation via the xylem is the major process determining shoot and grain cadmium accumulation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Uraguchi, Shimpei; Mori, Shinsuke; Kuramata, Masato; Kawasaki, Akira; Arao, Tomohito; Ishikawa, Satoru

    2009-01-01

    Physiological properties involved in divergent cadmium (Cd) accumulation among rice genotypes were characterized using the indica cultivar ‘Habataki’ (high Cd in grains) and the japonica cultivar ‘Sasanishiki’ (low Cd in grains). Time-dependence and concentration-dependence of symplastic Cd absorption in roots were revealed not to be responsible for the different Cd accumulation between the two cultivars because root Cd uptake was not greater in the Cd-accumulating cultivar ‘Habataki’ compared with ‘Sasanishiki’. On the other hand, rapid and greater root-to-shoot Cd translocation was observed in ‘Habataki’, which could be mediated by higher abilities in xylem loading of Cd and transpiration rate as a driving force. To verify whether different abilities in xylem-mediated shoot-to-root translocation generally account for the genotypic variation in shoot Cd accumulation in rice, the world rice core collection, consisting of 69 accessions which covers the genetic diversity of almost 32 000 accessions of cultivated rice, was used. The results showed strong correlation between Cd levels in xylem sap and shoots and grains among the 69 rice accessions. Overall, the results presented in this study revealed that the root-to-shoot Cd translocation via the xylem is the major and common physiological process determining the Cd accumulation level in shoots and grains of rice plants. PMID:19401409

  19. Nucleotide Diversity Analysis of Three Major Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Bimolata, Waikhom; Kumar, Anirudh; M, Sai Kiran Reddy; Sundaram, Raman Meenakshi; Laha, Gouri Sankar; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Ghazi, Irfan Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence polymorphisms among R gene alleles influence the process of co-evolutionary interaction between host and pathogen by shaping the response of host plants towards invading pathogens. Here, we present the DNA sequence polymorphisms and diversities present among natural alleles of three rice bacterial blight resistance genes, Xa21, Xa26 and xa5. The diversity was examined across different wild relatives and cultivars of Oryza species. Functional significance of selected alleles was evaluated through semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and real time PCR. The greatest nucleotide diversity and singleton variable sites (SVS) were present in Xa26 (? = 0.01958; SVS = 182) followed by xa5 and Xa21 alleles. The highest frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in Xa21 alleles and least in xa5. Transition bias was observed in all the genes and ‘G’ to ‘A’ transitions were more favored than other form of transitions. Neutrality tests failed to show the presence of selection at these loci, though negative Tajima’s D values indicate the presence of a rare form of polymorphisms. At the interspecies level, O. nivara exhibited more diversity than O. sativa. We have also identified two nearly identical resistant alleles of xa5 and two sequentially identical alleles of Xa21. The alleles of xa5 showed basal levels of expression while Xa21 alleles were functionally not expressed. PMID:25807168

  20. DIFFERENCES AMONG MAJOR LAND TYPES FOR NET ECOSYSTEM C02 FLUX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon sequestration or net ecosystem exchange (NEE) has received a great deal of attention during the past decade. I will provide some general numbers that can serve as a basis for comparing various land types, and discuss some of the factors which influence the calculations. Common unites of g C...

  1. 13Carbon isotope discrimination in major C4 weeds of rice-implications for root interference studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessing below ground plant interference in rice has been difficult in the past because separation of intertwined weed and crop roots is nearly impossible. A simple 13C depletion method was previously developed for simultaneous quantification of barnyardgrass and rice roots in flooded fields. Thi...

  2. RICE PI-TA GENE IS CLOSELY LINKED WITH RESISTANCE TO THE MAJOR PATHOTYPES OF THE RICE BLAST FUNGUS IN THE U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene, allelic to Pi-ta2, in rice is effective in preventing the infection of Magnaporthe grisea isolates containing the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Pi-ta encodes a putative cytoplasmic receptor that appears to bind to a predicted processed AVR-Pita to elicit a defense response...

  3. Factors affecting the organochlorine pollutant load in biota of a rice field ecosystem (Ebro Delta, NE Spain)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Pastor; C. Sanpera; J. González-Sol??s; X. Ruiz; J. Albaigés

    2004-01-01

    The concentrations of PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, HCB and OCS were determined in sediments and associated biota, both invertebrates (Physella acuta, Hirudo medicinalis, chironomid larvae, Hydrous pistaceus, Helochares lividus) and vertebrates (Rana perezi), in a temporary aquatic system, a rice field in the Ebro Delta (NE Spain). The qualitative and quantitative distribution of organochlorine compounds in sediments and aquatic biota has

  4. Genome Sequence of the Verrucomicrobium Opitutus terrae PB90-1, an Abundant Inhabitant of Rice Paddy Soil Ecosystems?

    PubMed Central

    van Passel, Mark W. J.; Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; Copeland, Alex; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Pitluck, Sam; Goltsman, Eugene; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Schmutz, Jeremy; Larimer, Frank W.; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikolaos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Richardson, P. Paul; Janssen, Peter H.; de Vos, Willem M.; Smidt, Hauke

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria of the deeply branching phylum Verrucomicrobia are rarely cultured yet commonly detected in metagenomic libraries from aquatic, terrestrial, and intestinal environments. We have sequenced the genome of Opitutus terrae PB90-1, a fermentative anaerobe within this phylum, isolated from rice paddy soil and capable of propionate production from plant-derived polysaccharides. PMID:21398538

  5. Entrepreneurial The Rice Business Plan Competition

    E-print Network

    of the Rice Business Plan Competition Rice Alliance Business Creation Eco-System Sustainability from Community by Industry RBPC Finalists Schools with Most Teams in the Final Round Conclusions Methodology About About

  6. Nutrient Management for Improving Lowland Rice Productivity and Sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. K Fageria; N. A Slaton; V. C Baligar

    2003-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is an important food crop for a large proportion of the world's population. Total rice production will need to increase to feed an increasing world population. Rice is produced under both upland and lowland ecosystems with about 76% of the global rice produced from irrigated-lowland rice systems. The anaerobic soil environment created by flood-irrigation of lowland

  7. Confirming a major QTL and finding additional loci responsible for field resistance to brown spot (Bipolaris oryzae) in rice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Kengo; Ota, Chihiro; Yamakawa, Tomohiro; Kihara, Junichi; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko

    2015-03-01

    Brown spot is a devastating rice disease. Quantitative resistance has been observed in local varieties (e.g., 'Tadukan'), but no economically useful resistant variety has been bred. Using quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from 'Tadukan' (resistant) × 'Hinohikari' (susceptible), we previously found three QTLs (qBS2, qBS9, and qBS11) that conferred resistance in seedlings in a greenhouse. To confirm their effect, the parents and later generations of RILs were transplanted into paddy fields where brown spot severely occurred. Three new resistance QTLs (qBSfR1, qBSfR4, and qBSfR11) were detected on chromosomes 1, 4, and 11, respectively. The 'Tadukan' alleles at qBSfR1 and qBSfR11 and the 'Hinohikari' allele at qBSfR4 increased resistance. The major QTL qBSfR11 coincided with qBS11 from the previous study, whereas qBSfR1 and qBSfR4 were new but neither qBS2 nor qBS9 were detected. To verify the qBSfR1 and qBSfR11 'Tadukan' resistance alleles, near-isogenic lines (NILs) with one or both QTLs in a susceptible background ('Koshihikari') were evaluated under field conditions. NILs with qBSfR11 acquired significant field resistance; those with qBSfR1 did not. This confirms the effectiveness of qBSfR11. Genetic markers flanking qBSfR11 will be powerful tools for marker-assisted selection to improve brown spot resistance. PMID:26069447

  8. Confirming a major QTL and finding additional loci responsible for field resistance to brown spot (Bipolaris oryzae) in rice

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Kengo; Ota, Chihiro; Yamakawa, Tomohiro; Kihara, Junichi; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko

    2015-01-01

    Brown spot is a devastating rice disease. Quantitative resistance has been observed in local varieties (e.g., ‘Tadukan’), but no economically useful resistant variety has been bred. Using quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from ‘Tadukan’ (resistant) × ‘Hinohikari’ (susceptible), we previously found three QTLs (qBS2, qBS9, and qBS11) that conferred resistance in seedlings in a greenhouse. To confirm their effect, the parents and later generations of RILs were transplanted into paddy fields where brown spot severely occurred. Three new resistance QTLs (qBSfR1, qBSfR4, and qBSfR11) were detected on chromosomes 1, 4, and 11, respectively. The ‘Tadukan’ alleles at qBSfR1 and qBSfR11 and the ‘Hinohikari’ allele at qBSfR4 increased resistance. The major QTL qBSfR11 coincided with qBS11 from the previous study, whereas qBSfR1 and qBSfR4 were new but neither qBS2 nor qBS9 were detected. To verify the qBSfR1 and qBSfR11 ‘Tadukan’ resistance alleles, near-isogenic lines (NILs) with one or both QTLs in a susceptible background (‘Koshihikari’) were evaluated under field conditions. NILs with qBSfR11 acquired significant field resistance; those with qBSfR1 did not. This confirms the effectiveness of qBSfR11. Genetic markers flanking qBSfR11 will be powerful tools for marker-assisted selection to improve brown spot resistance.

  9. Rice and red rice interference. II. Rice response to population densities of three red rice (Oryza sativa) ecotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice, which grows taller and produces more tillers than domestic rice and shatters most of its seeds early, is a major weed in many rice-growing areas of the world. Field experiments were conducted at Stuttgart, AR in 1997 and 1998 to evaluate the growth response of the Kaybonnet (KBNT) rice cul...

  10. Remote sensing based change analysis of rice environments in Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Gumma, Murali Krishna; Mohanty, Samarendu; Nelson, Andrew; Arnel, Rala; Mohammed, Irshad A; Das, Satya Ranjan

    2015-01-15

    The rainfed rice-growing environment is perhaps one of the most vulnerable to water stress such as drought and floods. It is important to determine the spatial extent of the stress-prone areas to effectively and efficiently promote proper technologies (e.g., stress-tolerant varieties) to tackle the problem of sustainable food production. This study was conducted in Odisha state located in eastern India. Odisha is predominantly a rainfed rice ecosystem (71% rainfed and 29% canal irrigated during kharif-monsoon season), where rice is the major crop and staple food of the people. However, rice productivity in Odisha is one of the lowest in India and a significant decline (9%) in rice cultivated area was observed in 2002 (a drought year). The present study analyzed the temporal rice cropping pattern in various ecosystems and identified the stress-prone areas due to submergence (flooding) and water shortage. The spatial distribution of rice areas was mapped using MODIS (MOD09Q1) 250-m 8-day time-series data (2000-2010) and spectral matching techniques. The mapped rice areas were strongly correlated (R(2) = 90%) with district-level statistics. Also the class accuracy based on field-plot data was 84.8%. The area under the rainfed rice ecosystem continues to dominate, recording the largest share among rice classes across all the years. The use of remote-sensing techniques is rapid, cost-effective, and reliable to monitor changes in rice cultivated area over long periods of time and estimate the reduction in area cultivated due to abiotic stress such as water stress and submergence. Agricultural research institutes and line departments in the government can use these techniques for better planning, regular monitoring of land-use changes, and dissemination of appropriate technologies. PMID:24405761

  11. Isotopic signatures and concentration profiles of nitrous oxide in a rice-based ecosystem during the drained crop-growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Z. Q.; Khalil, M. A. K.; Xing, G.; Shearer, M. J.; Butenhoff, C.

    2009-06-01

    The stable isotopic composition of nitrous oxide (N2O) in agricultural soils can improve our understanding of the relative contributions of the main microbial processes (nitrification and denitrification) responsible for N2O formation in soils, and can provide constraints for the atmospheric N2O budget. Here, we present soil profiles featuring N2O concentrations and ?15N and ?18O values in N2O over time, which permit the in situ identification of processes and sites of N2O production in a rice-based ecosystem seeded with winter wheat. Our ?15N and ?18O soil profile values support the conclusion that denitrification is the dominant process behind N2O production during the winter wheat season. The soil N2O gas concentrations are higher below 10 cm than above 10 cm, and more depleted in 15N-N2O at 10-15 cm depth compared to other soil depths, which indicates that the N2O production zone is located at a depth of 10-15 cm within 0-20 cm. The ?15Nair and ?18OSMOW (?18O of standard mean ocean water) values for soil gas N2O averaged over the entire wheat growing season are +0.90 ± 2.9 (n = 64) and +39.3 ± 3.1 (n = 64), respectively. Given that paddy source N2O is much heavier in both measured 15N and 18O compared to other fertilized soils, agricultural soils have been underestimated as a source of N2O since isotopic constraints from rice agriculture have not been taken into account.

  12. Red rice control in rice using herbicides plus safeners 

    E-print Network

    Price, James Bain

    1977-01-01

    RED RICE CONTROL IN RICE USING HERBICIDES PLUS SAFENERS A Thesis by JAMES BAIN PRICE, IV Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major... Subject: Agronomy RED RICE CONTROL IN RICE USING HERBICIDES PLUS SAFENERS A Thesis by JAMES BAIN PRICE, IV Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee Head of Department (Member) (Member) Memb May 1977 ABSTRACT Red Rice...

  13. Factors affecting the organochlorine pollutant load in biota of a rice field ecosystem (Ebro Delta, NE Spain).

    PubMed

    Pastor, D; Sanpera, C; González-Solís, J; Ruiz, X; Albaigés, J

    2004-04-01

    The concentrations of PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, HCB and OCS were determined in sediments and associated biota, both invertebrates (Physella acuta, Hirudo medicinalis, chironomid larvae, Hydrous pistaceus, Helochares lividus) and vertebrates (Rana perezi), in a temporary aquatic system, a rice field in the Ebro Delta (NE Spain). The qualitative and quantitative distribution of organochlorine compounds in sediments and aquatic biota has been explained by two mechanisms: equilibrium partitioning and/or biomagnification through the trophic web. Nevertheless, bioaccumulation processes are by far more complex, since several biotic and abiotic factors contribute to the observed pollutant loads in the organisms. In this respect, the biological characteristics of the organisms considered (e.g. species, age, lipid contents, feeding habits, etc.), as well as ecological factors (e.g. the habitat of the species and vertical distribution), have been shown to account for the organochlorine levels observed. PMID:15006509

  14. The usage of rice straw as a major substrate for the production of surfactin by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens XZ-173 in solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen; Zhang, Fengge; Wei, Zhong; Ran, Wei; Shen, Qirong

    2013-09-30

    Agro-industrial byproducts, especially rice straw, are potential resources. This work was aimed to utilize raw materials to produce value-added biosurfactant in solid-state fermentation (SSF). Rice straw and soybean flour were found efficient and selected as major substrates for surfactin production. The results of Plackett-Burman design indicated that glycerol, water content, inoculum size and temperature were the significant variables identified in the screen of nine total variables. The optimum values for the four significant variables were determined by the Box-Behnken design. The optimal surfactin production was obtained when the medium contained 5 g soybean flour, 4 g rice straw, 2% (w/w) maltose and 2.65% (w/w) glycerol, pH 7.0. The ideal growth conditions for surfactin production consisted of a moisture content of 62.8% (v/w) and growth supplemented with 15.96% inoculum size in 250 mL flasks at 26.9 °C for 48 h. Under optimal conditions, a surfactin yield of 15.03 mg/gds was attained in 1000-fold scale-up fermentation in a 50 L fermenter, thereby validating the accuracy of this approach. This study proposed an eco-friendly and economical way to convert agro-industrial byproducts into biosurfactant. PMID:23685270

  15. Transcriptome Profiling and Physiological Studies Reveal a Major Role for Aromatic Amino Acids in Mercury Stress Tolerance in Rice Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Ngoc Nam; Huang, Li-Yao; Chen, Ying-Chih; Cheng, Kai-Teng; Huang, Tsai-Lien; Lin, Chung-Yi; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a serious environmental pollution threat to the planet. The accumulation of Hg in plants disrupts many cellular-level functions and inhibits growth and development, but the mechanism is not fully understood. To gain more insight into the cellular response to Hg, we performed a large-scale analysis of the rice transcriptome during Hg stress. Genes induced with short-term exposure represented functional categories of cell-wall formation, chemical detoxification, secondary metabolism, signal transduction and abiotic stress response. Moreover, Hg stress upregulated several genes involved in aromatic amino acids (Phe and Trp) and increased the level of free Phe and Trp content. Exogenous application of Phe and Trp to rice roots enhanced tolerance to Hg and effectively reduced Hg-induced production of reactive oxygen species. Hg induced calcium accumulation and activated mitogen-activated protein kinase. Further characterization of the Hg-responsive genes we identified may be helpful for better understanding the mechanisms of Hg in plants. PMID:24840062

  16. RICE CRICKET CLUB Rice University

    E-print Network

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    RICE CRICKET CLUB Rice University 6100 Main St, Houston, TX-77005 www.ruf.rice.edu/~rcc Email: rcc@rice.edu MEMBERSHIP AGREEMENT I, ____________________________ desire to participate in activities conducted by RICE CRICKET CLUB which includes practice sessions, games and social gatherings conducted on and off the Rice

  17. TWELVE RICE GERMPLASM ACCESSIONS IDENTIFIED WITH NOVEL BLAST RESISTANCE FOR US RICE VARIETY IMPROVEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) germplasm accessions with new major resistance (R-) are constantly sought by rice breeders for use in developing resistant cultivars to control blast (Pyricularia oryza Cav.), a major fungal disease of cultivated rice. Initially, 91 blast resistant rice accessions were select...

  18. Increasing herbicide selectivity between rice and red rice 

    E-print Network

    Koetz, Paul Howard

    1982-01-01

    INCREASING HERBICIDE SEIZCTIVITY BETWEEN RICE AND RED RICE A Thesis by PAUL HOWARD KOETZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAN University 'n partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of' WASTER OF SCIENCE August 1982... major Subject: Agronomy INCREASING HERBICIDE SELECTIVITY BETWEEN RICE AND RED RICE A Thesis by PAUL HOWARD KOETZ Approved as to style and content by (Chairman of Committee) (Member (Member) (Head of Departmen August l982 ABSTRACT Increasing...

  19. RAINFED LOWLAND AND FLOOD-PRONE RICE: A CRITICAL REVIEW ON ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR IMPROVING THE PRODUCTIVITY IN ASIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. K. Swain; S. Herath; A. Pathirana; B. N. Mittra

    Rainfed lowland and flood-prone rice ecosystems cover 35 % rice area in Asia. The future increased demand of rice production has to come from these unfavorable ecosystems to meet the ever growing rice demand of increased population pressure in Asia. The countries Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam have more than 30 % of rice area under either

  20. Rice transformation: bombardment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Christou

    1997-01-01

    Bombardment-based methodology is responsible for the effective genetic manipulation of major cereals including rice. Many groups reported significant advances on various aspects of rice molecular biology and genetic engineering using procedures based on bombardment technology. Molecular and genetic characterization of large numbers of these plants (more than 500 independent transgenic plants) provided information on structure, expression and stability of integrated

  1. MOLECULAR CONTROL OF THE RICE BLAST DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe grisea is a major constraint to rice production worldwide. The rice blast system is one of the best-characterized monocot model systems. The goal of this project is to understand molecular mechanisms of disease resistance using rice blast as a model system....

  2. Modelling rice competition with Echinochloa crus-galli and Eleocharis kuroguwai in transplanted rice cultivation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Byeong Chul Moon; Seung Hyun Cho; Oh Do Kwon; Sun Gye Lee; Byun Woo Lee; Do Soon Kim

    2010-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted to investigate rice — Echinochloa crus-galli and rice — Eleocharis kuroguwai competition under transplanted rice cultivation in four major rice production areas; Suwon, Daejeon, Iksan, and Naju in Korea.\\u000a Rice yield data were used to predict rice yield as a function of plant densities of E. crus-galli and E. kuroguwai using a rectangular hyperbola and to

  3. Insights into molecular mechanism of blast resistance in weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy rice is a serious pest in direct-seeded rice fields in the U.S. and worldwide. Under suitable conditions, weedy rice can reduce crop yields up to 70%. However, weedy rice may carry novel disease resistance genes. Rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a major disease wo...

  4. Gene flow between Clearfield™ rice and red rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vinod K. Shivrain; Nilda R. Burgos; Merle M. Anders; Satyendra N. Rajguru; Jerry Moore; Marites A. Sales

    2007-01-01

    Imidazolinone-herbicide-resistant Clearfield™ (CL) rice allows the selective chemical control of red rice (Oryza sativa L.), a major weed problem in rice-growing areas of the southern US, using herbicides that otherwise are toxic to the crop. However, selection imposed by the herbicide of resistant individuals resulting from gene flow, and of naturally tolerant individuals, is a major concern. Experiments were conducted

  5. SEQUENCE-BASED ALIGNMENT OF SORGHUM CHROMOSOME 3 AND RICE CHROMOSOME 1 REVEALS EXTENSIVE CONSERVATION OF GENE ORDER AND ONE MAJOR CHROMOSOMAL REARRANGEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, methods were developed for sequence-based alignment of sorghum and rice chromosomes and for refining the sorghum genome map based on the rice genome sequence. A framework of 135 contigs of large insert clones spanning 33 million base pairs was anchored to sorghum chromosome 3. A lim...

  6. Evolutionary insights into the origins of weediness in U.S. red rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy red rice is a widespread, economically challenging problem in Southern U.S. rice fields. The two major U.S. red rice types, strawhull and blackhull, are thought to have arisen independently from Asian rice populations in the distant past. Red rice is a weedy relative of rice, a genomic model...

  7. EFFECTS OF CO2 ON COMPETITION BETWEEN RICE AND BARNYARDGRASS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric CO2 concentration is increasing. ffects of elevated CO2 on rice production could occur not only through direct impacts to rice, but also indirectly via ecosystem responses. hanged competitiveness with elevated CO2 could occur between rice hich has the C3 type of p...

  8. Rice consumption in China 

    E-print Network

    Lan, Jin

    1989-01-01

    RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Agricultural... Economics RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Approved as to style and content by: E, We ey F. Peterson (Chair of Committee) James E. Christiansen (Member) Carl Shaf (Member) Daniel I. Padberg (Head of Department) August 1989...

  9. Rice consumption in China

    E-print Network

    Lan, Jin

    1989-01-01

    RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Agricultural... Economics RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Approved as to style and content by: E, We ey F. Peterson (Chair of Committee) James E. Christiansen (Member) Carl Shaf (Member) Daniel I. Padberg (Head of Department) August 1989...

  10. Rice Distillers Dried Grain Is a Promising Ingredient as a Partial Replacement of Plant Origin Sources in the Diet for Juvenile Red Seabream (Pagrus major)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Lee, Sang-Min

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to test the effects of dietary distillers dried grain (DDG) level on the growth performance, feed utilization, body composition and antioxidant activity of juvenile red seabream (Pagrus major). Six isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets were formulated to contain 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% DDG from rice (designated as DDG0, DDG5, DDG10, DDG15, DDG20, and DDG25), respectively. Juvenile red seabream averaging 10.1±0.05 g were randomly distributed into 400-L tanks in a flow through systems. Three replicate groups of fish were fed one of the experimental diets to visual satiation two times a day for 10 weeks. Survival, weight gain, feed efficiency, protein efficiency ratio and hepatosomatic index of fish were not affected by dietary DDG levels (p>0.05). Proximate and amino acid composition of whole body in juvenile red seabream were not affected by dietary DDG levels (p>0.05). Plasma content of total protein, glucose, cholesterol, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, phospholipid and triglyceride were not affected by dietary DDG levels (p>0.05). 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical and alkyl radical scavenging activities in plasma and liver of fish were not affected by dietary DDG levels (p>0.05). The results of this experiment suggest that DDG has the potential to replace plant origin ingredients such as wheat flour and corn gluten meal and could be used up to 25% in diet without incurring negative effects on the growth performance of juvenile red seabream. PMID:25358367

  11. 13Carbon isotope discrimination in roots and shoots of major weed species of southern U.S. rice fields and its potential use for analysis of rice-weed root interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessing below ground plant interference in rice has been difficult in the past because thorough, accurate separation of the intertwined roots of weed and crop is extremely challenging. A d13C depletion method has been developed to assess interactions between roots of barnyardgrass and weed-suppre...

  12. Rice aroma and flavor: a literature review.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aroma and flavor of cooked rice are major criteria for preference among consumers. Small variations in these sensory properties can make rice highly desired or unacceptable to consumers. Human sensory analyses have identified over a dozen different aromas and flavors in rice. Instrumental ana...

  13. Identifying novel resistance genes in rice wild relatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast and sheath blight are major fungal diseases of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L. ) that limit Arkansas rough rice yields and market potential. Resistance to these diseases has been found in rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) A collection of these wild relatives originating from outside the U...

  14. [An evaluation of net carbon sink effect and cost/benefits of a rice-rape rotation ecosystem under long-term fertilization from Tai Lake region of China].

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Jing; Pan, Gen-Xing; Zhang, Xu-Hui; Fei, Qing-Hua; Li, Zhi-Peng; Zhou, Ping; Zheng, Ju-Feng; Qiu, Duo-Sheng

    2009-07-01

    Taking a long-term fertilized rice-rape rotation system in Taihu Lake as test objective, its annual C balance and economic benefit were estimated, based on the measurement of past years grain yield, litter C content, and field CO2 emission as well as the investigation of material and management inputs. The calculated annual C sink under different fertilizations ranged from 0.9 t C x hm(-2) x a(-1) to 7.5 t C x hm(-2) x a(-1), and the net C sink effect under combined inorganic/organic fertilization was three folds as that under chemical fertilization. The C cost of material input ranged from 0.37 t C x hm(-2) x a(-1) to 1.13 t C x hm(-2) x a(-1), and that of management input ranged from 1.69 t C x hm(-2) x a(-1) to 1.83 t C x hm(-2) x a(-1). The annual economic benefit ranged from 5.8 x 10(3) CNY x hm(-2) x a(-1) to 16.5 x 10(3) CNY x hm(-2) x a(-1), and was 2.1 times higher under combined fertilization than under chemical fertilization. Comparing with that under chemical fertilization, the marginal cost for per ton C sink under combined inorganic/organic fertilization was estimated as 217.1 CNY x t(-1) C, very close to the C price of 20 Euro x t(-1) C in the EU. In sum, under combined inorganic/organic fertilization, this rice paddy ecosystem could not only have higher productivity, but also present greater net C sink effect and higher economic benefit, compared with under chemical fertilizer fertilization. PMID:19899468

  15. Root-to-shoot Cd translocation via the xylem is the major process determining shoot and grain cadmium accumulation in rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shimpei Uraguchi; Shinsuke Mori; Masato Kuramata; Akira Kawasaki; Tomohito Arao; Satoru Ishikawa

    2009-01-01

    Physiological properties involved in divergent cadmium (Cd) accumulation among rice genotypes were character- ized using the indica cultivar 'Habataki' (high Cd in grains) and the japonica cultivar 'Sasanishiki' (low Cd in grains). Time-dependence and concentration-dependence of symplastic Cd absorption in roots were revealed not to be responsible for the different Cd accumulation between the two cultivars because root Cd uptake

  16. Rice alcohol dehydrogenase 1 promotes survival and has a major impact on carbohydrate metabolism in the embryo and endosperm when seeds are germinated in partially oxygenated water

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Greenway, Hank; Matsumura, Hideo; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Nakazono, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Rice (Oryza sativa) has the rare ability to germinate and elongate a coleoptile under oxygen-deficient conditions, which include both hypoxia and anoxia. It has previously been shown that ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE 1 (ADH1) is required for cell division and cell elongation in the coleoptile of submerged rice seedlings by means of studies using a rice ADH1-deficient mutant, reduced adh activity (rad). The aim of this study was to understand how low ADH1 in rice affects carbohydrate metabolism in the embryo and endosperm, and lactate and alanine synthesis in the embryo during germination and subsequent coleoptile growth in submerged seedlings. Methods Wild-type and rad mutant rice seeds were germinated and grown under complete submergence. At 1, 3, 5 and 7 d after imbibition, the embryo and endosperm were separated and several of their metabolites were measured and compared. Key results In the rad embryo, the rate of ethanol fermentation was halved, while lactate and alanine concentrations were 2·4- and 5·7- fold higher in the mutant than in the wild type. Glucose and fructose concentrations in the embryos increased with time in the wild type, but not in the rad mutant. The rad mutant endosperm had lower amounts of the ?-amylases RAMY1A and RAMY3D, resulting in less starch degradation and lower glucose concentrations. Conclusions These results suggest that ADH1 is essential for sugar metabolism via glycolysis to ethanol fermentation in both the embryo and endosperm. In the endosperm, energy is presumably needed for synthesis of the amylases and for sucrose synthesis in the endosperm, as well as for sugar transport to the embryo. PMID:24431339

  17. Genetic diversity and species relationships in the Oryza complex and glufosinate tolerance in rice 

    E-print Network

    Vaughan, Laura Kelly

    2005-08-29

    The weed red rice is a major problem in rice producing areas world wide. All of the red rice in commercial rice fields in the United States has traditionally been considered to be the same species as commercial rice, Oryza sativa. However, using DNA...

  18. IDENTIFYING NOVEL R-GENES IN RICE WILD RELATIVES WITH MICROSATELLITE MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) are an important source of novel R(resistance)-genes for rice improvement. Rice sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, and leaf blast, caused by Magnaporthe grisea, are major fungal diseases of cultivated rice (O. sativa) in the USA and of irrigated rice world...

  19. Air pollutant emissions from rice straw open field burning in India, Thailand and the Philippines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Butchaiah Gadde; Sébastien Bonnet; Christoph Menke; Savitri Garivait

    2009-01-01

    Rice is a widely grown crop in Asia. China (30%) and India (21%) contribute to about half of the world's total rice production. In this study, three major rice-producing countries in Asia are considered, India, Thailand and the Philippines (the later two contributing 4% and 2% of the world's rice production). Rice straw is one of the main field based

  20. Incorporation of 13C-labeled rice-straw-derived carbon into microbial communities in submerged rice field soil and percolating water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Murase; Yuri Matsui; Masahiko Katoh; Atsuko Sugimoto; Makoto Kimura

    2006-01-01

    Rice straw is a major organic material applied to rice fields. The microorganisms growing on rice-straw-derived carbon have not been well studied. Here, we applied 13C-labeled rice straw to submerged rice soil microcosms and analyzed phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in the soil and percolating water to trace the assimilation of rice-straw-derived carbon into microorganisms. PLFAs in the soil and water

  1. Rice Diseases. 

    E-print Network

    Jones, Roger K.

    1987-01-01

    (Blank P~ge in O .... a1-BUUetinl ? ~" -: . . r ". ./ RICE DISEASES Roger K. Jones * Rice diseases reduce yields in Texas by an average of 12 percent each year. The yield loss in certain fields with a history of disease may exceed 30... percent in some seasons. Disease development in individual fields depends upon the interaction of several factors including the genetic resistance of the variety planted, cropping practices, environmental conditions (such as temperature, dew periods...

  2. A method for the molecular characterization of rice starch using an aqueous HPSEC-MALLS-RI system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice starch composes approximately 90% of milled rice. It is made up of two major glucose polymers, amylose and amylopectin. The amylose content of rice starch ranges from 0 to 30% w/w. Cooked rice texture and rice starch functional properties are reported to be primarily impacted by amylose content...

  3. Ecosystem Explorations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kristen L. Gunckel

    1999-09-01

    The Ecosystem Explorations curriculum includes eleven classroom lessons. The lessons are divided into two sections--Understanding Ecosystems and Human Connections to Ecosystems. The curriculum incorporates scientific inquiry skills, cooperative l

  4. TITLE: Ecosystem Services: An Interdisciplinary Conversation and More HOSTS: Steven Wolf and Alex Flecker

    E-print Network

    Angenent, Lars T.

    TITLE: Ecosystem Services: An Interdisciplinary Conversation and More HOSTS: Steven Wolf and Alex Flecker DATE: September 17, 12-1pm, 300 Rice Hall Abstract: The concept of ecosystem services of the ecosystem services concept are contested. On one hand, expressing the significance of ecosystems in terms

  5. RICE UNIVERSITY Quantum Transport and Microwave Response in

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    RICE UNIVERSITY Quantum Transport and Microwave Response in Modulated High-Mobility Two appreciated for their assistances on experimental processes. Majority of the work was carried out in Rice Shared Equipment and Rice Quantum Transport Lab, supported and funded by National Science foundation

  6. Rice University | Rice Facts Index Undergraduates Graduates Faculty & Researchers Staff Alumni

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Rice University | Rice Facts Index Undergraduates Graduates Faculty & Researchers Staff Alumni Rice Facts Rice Facts Index Rice Culture Academics Campus Features Rice Administration Resources Historical Facts Archives About OIR Rice News Feed Font Size Rice Facts Rice Culture Mission History

  7. Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 2 

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    , determined that there is more to this weed than meets the eye. Phenotypic differences led the team of researchers to test for ge- notypic differences as well, in other words, studying which genes are responsible for which plant traits. Says Park, Simple... to sample each and every rice field in Texas, the actual number of red rice ecotypes would likely be several times higher. The major difference between commercial rice and any single red rice ecotype can be explained by a hand- full or two of genes...

  8. Confirming QTLs and finding additional Loci responsible for resistance to Sheath Blight in Rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most destructive diseases of rice around the globe, causing severe losses in rice yield and quality annually. Major genes governing resistance to ShB have not been found in cultivated rice worldwide; however...

  9. 10. Improving nitrogen fertilizer efficiency in lowland rice in tropical Asia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SK De Datta

    1986-01-01

    Rice production in Asia must increase 2.2–2.8% annually to keep abreast of increasing population. Greater fertilizer use and crop intensification together with varietal improvement and investment in irrigation will all contribute to increased rice supply. Because fertilizer and input prices have risen faster than the price of rice, increasing fertilizer N efficiency will be a major challenge for rice researchers

  10. Soil fertility in flooded and non-flooded irrigated rice systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kanwar Lal Sahrawat

    2011-01-01

    The lowland rice system in Asia makes a major contribution to the global rice supply and is often cited as an example of a sustainable system in which two or three crops of rice are grown in sequence under submerged conditions. However, water shortages are becoming critical in some regions for lowland rice cultivation; and there is high potential in

  11. Soil fertility in flooded and non-flooded irrigated rice systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kanwar Lal Sahrawat

    2012-01-01

    The lowland rice system in Asia makes a major contribution to the global rice supply and is often cited as an example of a sustainable system in which two or three crops of rice are grown in sequence under submerged conditions. However, water shortages are becoming critical in some regions for lowland rice cultivation; and there is high potential in

  12. GENETIC ANALYSIS AND RECIPROCAL OUTCROSSING RATES OF RED RICE TYPES IN ARKANSAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice is a severe weed problem in Arkansas rice fields and can intercross at low rates with rice. Using DNA marker analysis and visual observation, red rice accessions obtained from across Arkansas clearly clustered into major groups of awned and awnless types, which were easily distinguishable f...

  13. Origin, dispersal, cultivation and variation of rice.

    PubMed

    Khush, G S

    1997-09-01

    There are two cultivated and twenty-one wild species of genus Oryza. O. sativa, the Asian cultivated rice is grown all over the world. The African cultivated rice, O. glaberrima is grown on a small scale in West Africa. The genus Oryza probably originated about 130 million years ago in Gondwanaland and different species got distributed into different continents with the breakup of Gondwanaland. The cultivated species originated from a common ancestor with AA genome. Perennial and annual ancestors of O. sativa are O. rufipogon and O. nivara and those of O. glaberrima are O. longistaminata, O. breviligulata and O. glaberrima probably domesticated in Niger river delta. Varieties of O. sativa are classified into six groups on the basis of genetic affinity. Widely known indica rices correspond to group I and japonicas to group VI. The so called javanica rices also belong to group VI and are designated as tropical japonicas in contrast to temperate japonicas grown in temperate climate. Indica and japonica rices had a polyphyletic origin. Indicas were probably domesticated in the foothills of Himalayas in Eastern India and japonicas somewhere in South China. The indica rices dispersed throughout the tropics and subtropics from India. The japonica rices moved northward from South China and became the temperate ecotype. They also moved southward to Southeast Asia and from there to West Africa and Brazil and became tropical ecotype. Rice is now grown between 55 degrees N and 36 degrees S latitudes. It is grown under diverse growing conditions such as irrigated, rainfed lowland, rainfed upland and floodprone ecosystems. Human selection and adaptation to diverse environments has resulted in numerous cultivars. It is estimated that about 120,000 varieties of rice exist in the world. After the establishment of International Rice Research Institute in 1960, rice varietal improvement was intensified and high yielding varieties were developed. These varieties are now planted to 70% of world's riceland. Rice production doubled between 1966 and 1990 due to large scale adoption of these improved varieties. Rice production must increase by 60% by 2025 to feed the additional rice consumers. New tools of molecular and cellular biology such as anther culture, molecular marker aided selection and genetic engineering will play increasing role in rice improvement. PMID:9291957

  14. Avian foods, foraging and habitat conservation in world rice fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, J.D.; Kaminski, R.M.; Reinecke, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, rice (Oryza sativa) agriculture typically involves seasonal flooding and soil tillage, which provides a variety of microhabitats and potential food for birds. Water management in rice fields creates conditions ranging from saturated mud flats to shallow (<30 cm) water, thereby attracting different guilds of birds. Grain not collected during harvest (i.e. waste rice) is typically the most abundant potential food of birds in rice fields, with estimates of seed mass from North America ranging from 66672 kg/ha. Although initially abundant after harvest, waste rice availability can be temporally limited. Few abundance estimates for other foods, such as vertebrate prey or forage vegetation, exist for rice fields. Outside North America, Europe and Japan, little is known about abundance and importance of any avian food in rice fields. Currently, flooding rice fields after harvest is the best known management practice to attract and benefit birds. Studies from North America indicate specific agricultural practices (e.g. burning stubble) may increase use and improve access to food resources. Evaluating and implementing management practices that are ecologically sustainable, increase food for birds and are agronomically beneficial should be global priorities to integrate rice production and avian conservation. Finally, land area devoted to rice agriculture appears to be stable in the USA, declining in China, and largely unquantified in many regions. Monitoring trends in riceland area may provide information to guide avian conservation planning in rice-agriculture ecosystems.

  15. Methane emission estimates from rice fields using ground truths and GIS/ RS approach for Karnal in Haryana-India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Prabhat; Gupta, Vandana; Chandna, Parvesh; Kumar, Krishan; Ladha, J. K.

    Methane (CH4 ) is an important atmospheric greenhouse gas and has been estimated to account for 15-20 % of current radiative forcing. Rice cultivation has been identified as one of the important anthropogenic sources of CH4 and the type of water regime has been a major source of uncertainty in CH4 emission estimates and has direct bearing on its emissions. The present study aims to fill the gaps in uncertainty by adopting RS/ GIS based approach for the rice acreage estimation under different water regimes, so as to obtain CH4 emission estimates at the block level for Karnal district in Haryana state of India, using water regime specific methane emission factors (EF) generated from earlier emission data without any organic amendments and for low soil organic carbon. Total rice area was estimated using IRS LISS III - P6 satellite data of kharif season 2006. A survey was done from the rice-growing farmers across the village clusters of 3 blocks (Indri, Karnal and Nilokheri) of Karnal district, to capture the spatial variability of water regimes and its corresponding layer has been generated in GIS using inverse distance weightage (IDW) interpolation. The resulting spatial variability of water regimes was 42, 44 and 14% for MA, SA and CF, respectively. The overlay and intersection of thematic layer of rice crop with the water regime and administrative block boundary layers was done using GIS tools to arrive at the rice area under different water regimes at block level for Karnal. The annual CH4 emission from paddy fields of 3 blocks of Karnal district was estimated, using IPCC-1997 methodology, as the product of the rice area under each water regime of paddy growing ecosystem with the corresponding CH4 emission factors, at block level. The total budget, which is the sum of emissions, from each water regime at block level, was estimated to be 5.14 + 1.7 Gg y-1 .

  16. Australian Wild Rice Reveals Pre-Domestication Origin of Polymorphism Deserts in Rice Genome

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan S., Gopala; Waters, Daniel L. E.; Henry, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rice is a major source of human food with a predominantly Asian production base. Domestication involved selection of traits that are desirable for agriculture and to human consumers. Wild relatives of crop plants are a source of useful variation which is of immense value for crop improvement. Australian wild rices have been isolated from the impacts of domestication in Asia and represents a source of novel diversity for global rice improvement. Oryza rufipogon is a perennial wild progenitor of cultivated rice. Oryza meridionalis is a related annual species in Australia. Results We have examined the sequence of the genomes of AA genome wild rices from Australia that are close relatives of cultivated rice through whole genome re-sequencing. Assembly of the resequencing data to the O. sativa ssp. japonica cv. Nipponbare shows that Australian wild rices possess 2.5 times more single nucleotide polymorphisms than in the Asian wild rice and cultivated O. sativa ssp. indica. Analysis of the genome of domesticated rice reveals regions of low diversity that show very little variation (polymorphism deserts). Both the perennial and annual wild rice from Australia show a high degree of conservation of sequence with that found in cultivated rice in the same 4.58Mbp region on chromosome 5, which suggests that some of the ‘polymorphism deserts’ in this and other parts of the rice genome may have originated prior to domestication due to natural selection. Conclusions Analysis of genes in the ‘polymorphism deserts’ indicates that this selection may have been due to biotic or abiotic stress in the environment of early rice relatives. Despite having closely related sequences in these genome regions, the Australian wild populations represent an invaluable source of diversity supporting rice food security. PMID:24905808

  17. Characterization of paralogous protein families in rice

    E-print Network

    Lin, Haining

    Background: High gene numbers in plant genomes reflect polyploidy and major gene duplication events. Oryza sativa, cultivated rice, is a diploid monocotyledonous species with a ~390 Mb genome that has undergone segmental ...

  18. RiceCAP: Mapping rice milling yield QTL in a U.S. long grain cross

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole grain milling yield is a major determinant of rice crop value. Because this trait is under quantitative inheritance and is sensitive to variation due to the production environment and post-harvest handling, it is difficult to improve. This study was conducted as part of the USDA NRI RiceCAP pr...

  19. Characterization of rice blast resistance gene Pi61(t) in rice germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of resistance (R) genes to races of Magnaporthe oryzae in rice germplasm is essential for the development of rice cultivars with long lasting blast resistance. In the present study, one major quantitative trait locus, qPi93-3, was fine mapped using a recombinant inbred line (RIL), F8 ...

  20. The Rice Genome Knowledgebase (RGKbase): an annotation database for rice comparative genomics and evolutionary biology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng; Xia, Yan; Li, Xinna; Hou, Lixia; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, genomes of cultivated rice cultivars and their wild counterparts have been sequenced although most efforts are focused on genome assembly and annotation of two major cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) subspecies, 93-11 (indica) and Nipponbare (japonica). To integrate information from genome assemblies and annotations for better analysis and application, we now introduce a comparative rice genome database, the Rice Genome Knowledgebase (RGKbase, http://rgkbase.big.ac.cn/RGKbase/). RGKbase is built to have three major components: (i) integrated data curation for rice genomics and molecular biology, which includes genome sequence assemblies, transcriptomic and epigenomic data, genetic variations, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and the relevant literature; (ii) User-friendly viewers, such as Gbrowse, GeneBrowse and Circos, for genome annotations and evolutionary dynamics and (iii) Bioinformatic tools for compositional and synteny analyses, gene family classifications, gene ontology terms and pathways and gene co-expression networks. RGKbase current includes data from five rice cultivars and species: Nipponbare (japonica), 93-11 (indica), PA64s (indica), the African rice (Oryza glaberrima) and a wild rice species (Oryza brachyantha). We are also constantly introducing new datasets from variety of public efforts, such as two recent releases-sequence data from ?1000 rice varieties, which are mapped into the reference genome, yielding ample high-quality single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions-deletions. PMID:23193278

  1. Biology of rice bug Leptocorisa oratorius (Fabricius) (Hemiptera: Alydidae), population change and alternative host plants.

    PubMed

    Rattanapun, W

    2013-01-01

    Leptocorisa oratorius (Fabricius) (Hemiptera: Alydidae) is a major rice pest which feeds on the sap of stems and rice seeds. Some graminaceous weed species serve as an alternative host of L. oratorius causing outbreaks throughout the rice growing season. Population changes of L. oratorius during both rice growing seasons - wet-season rice and dry-season rice - including the influence of alternative host, barnyard grass Echinochloa crus-galli (Graminaceae) on the development of L. oratorius was studied. Results presented that L. oratorius was the dominant pest species during the late phase of rice growth. Adults of L. oratorius started their migrations to wet-season rice at the vegetative stage of rice growth, while they migrated to dry-season rice at the repropuctive stage of rice growth. Leptocorisa oratorius breds rapidly in rice fields. Meanwhile, other adults migrated to the rice field. The population of adults and nymphs significantly increased from the reproductive stage to grain formation and ripening stage in both rice growing seasons. The population of nymphs was greater than adults but not significantly different in their number of individuals. Leptocorisa oratorius had one generation in each rice growing season. The results of the host plant study indicated that L oratorius developed completely in barnyard grass E. crus-galli as well as rice Oriza sativa (Graminaceae). However, L. oratorius preferred rice to barnyard grass for feeding and oviposition. PMID:25145240

  2. Moulds and mycotoxins in rice from the Swedish retail market.

    PubMed

    Fredlund, E; Thim, A-M; Gidlund, A; Brostedt, S; Nyberg, M; Olsen, M

    2009-04-01

    A survey of moulds and mycotoxins was performed on 99 rice samples taken from the Swedish retail market. The main objective was to study the mould and mycotoxin content in basmati rice and rice with a high content of fibre. Samples of jasmine rice as well as long-grain rice were also included. The samples were analysed for their content of ochratoxin A (high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)), aflatoxin B(1), B(2), G(1), and G(2) (HPLC, RIDA(R)QUICK), and mould (traditional cultivation methods in combination with morphological analysis). The majority of samples were sampled according to European Commission Regulation 401/2006. Subsamples were pooled and mixed before milling and both mould and mycotoxin analyses were performed on milled rice. The results showed that the majority of basmati rice (71%) and many jasmine rice samples (20%) contained detectable levels of aflatoxin B(1) (level of quantification = 0.1 microg aflatoxin kg(-1) rice). Two samples of jasmine rice and ten basmati rice samples contained levels over the regulated European maximum limits of 2 microg kg(-1) for aflatoxin B(1) or 4 microg kg(-1) for total aflatoxins. Aspergillus was the most common mould genus isolated, but also Penicillium, Eurotium, Wallemia, Cladosporium, Epicoccum, Alternaria, and Trichotecium were found. The presence of Aspergillus flavus in 21% of the samples indicates that incorrect management of rice during production and storage implies a risk of mould growth and subsequent production of aflatoxin. Rough estimates showed that high rice consumers may have an intake of 2-3 ng aflatoxin kg(-1) bodyweight and day(-1) from rice alone. This survey shows that aflatoxin is a common contaminant in rice imported to Europe. PMID:19680928

  3. Rice Young Alumni Information

    E-print Network

    Palem, Krishna V.

    Rice Young Alumni Detailed Information: Houston Young Alumni Committee Programs 2011-2012 #12; Rice Young Alumni Information Alumni.rice.edu The Houston Young Alumni Committee Helps Shape Your Young Alumni Programs The Houston Young Alumni Committee represents the over 2,300 Rice undergrad

  4. Identification of Sheath Blight Resistance QTLs in Rice Using Recombinant Inbred Line Population of Lemont X Jasmine 85

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight (RSB) caused by the soil borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most destructive diseases of rice around the globe, causing severe losses in rice yield and quality annually. Major gene(s) governing the resistance to RSB have not been found in cultivated rice worldwide...

  5. Rejuvenating rice proteomics: facts, challenges, and visions.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Jwa, Nam-Soo; Iwahashi, Yumiko; Yonekura, Masami; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Rakwal, Randeep

    2006-10-01

    Proteomics is progressing at an unprecedented pace, as can be exemplified by the progress in model organisms such as yeast, bacteria, and mammals. Proteomics research in plants, however, has not progressed at the same pace. Unscrambling of the genome sequences of the dicotyledoneous Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) and monocotyledoneous rice (Oryza sativa L.) plant species, respectively, has made them accessible reference organisms to study plant proteomics. Study of these two reference plants is expected to unravel the mystery of plant biology. Rice, a critically important food crop on the earth, has been termed a "cornerstone" and the "Rosetta stone" for functional genomics of cereal crops. Here, we look at the progress in unraveling rice proteomes and present the facts, challenges, and vision. The text is divided into two major parts: the first part presents the facts and the second part discusses the challenges and vision. The facts include the technology and its use in developing proteomes, which have been critically and constructively reviewed. The challenges and vision deal with the establishment of technologies to exhaustively investigate the protein components of a proteome, to generate high-resolution gel-based reference maps, and to give rice proteomics a functional dimension by studying PTMs and isolation of multiprotein complexes. Finally, we direct a vision on rice proteomics. This is our third review in series on rice proteomics, which aims to stimulate an objective discussion among rice researchers and to understand the necessity and impact of unraveling rice proteomes to their full potential. PMID:16991195

  6. Effect of Rice Cultivation on Malaria Transmission in Central Kenya

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ephantus J. Muturi; Simon Muriu; Josephat Shililu; Joseph Mwangangi; Benjamin G. Jacob; Charles Mbogo; John Githure; Robert J. Novak

    2008-01-01

    A 12-month field study was conducted between April 2004 and March 2005 to determine the association between irrigated rice cultivation and malaria transmission in Mwea, Kenya. Adult mosquitoes were collected indoors twice per month in three villages representing non-irrigated, planned, and unplanned rice agro-ecosystems and screened for blood meal sources and Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite proteins. Anopheles arabiensis Patton and An.

  7. Leadership Rice The mission of Leadership RiceistohelpRiceUniversityundergraduates

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    189 Leadership Rice The mission of Leadership RiceistohelpRiceSummerMentorship ExperienceandtheLeadershipCertificate.LEAD309isofferedonlyduring thefall.Othercoursesmaybetakenindependently.LeadershipRiceLeadershipCertificateforstudentseagertoexperience personalgrowthandreflectdeeplyontheiractivitieswhileatRice.Theintention ofthecertificateisnottohavestudentsburdenedbydoingmorebuttogetmore

  8. Hang.Yu@rice.edu lzhong@rice.edu

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Lin

    Hang Yu Hang.Yu@rice.edu Lin Zhong lzhong@rice.edu Ashutosh Sabharwal ashu@rice.edu Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 All current mobile devices are omni

  9. Uncertainties in estimating regional methane emissions from rice paddies due to data scarcity in the modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Zhang, Q.; Huang, Y.; Li, T. T.; Bian, J. Y.; Han, P. F.

    2014-06-01

    Rice paddies are a major anthropogenic source of the atmospheric methane. However, because of the high spatial heterogeneity, making accurate estimations of the methane emission from rice paddies is still a big challenge, even with complicated models. Data scarcity is one of the substantial causes of the uncertainties in estimating the methane emissions on regional scales. In the present study, we discussed how data scarcity affected the uncertainties in model estimations of rice paddy methane emissions, from county/provincial scale up to national scale. The uncertainties in methane emissions from the rice paddies of China was calculated with a local-scale model and the Monte Carlo simulation. The data scarcities in five of the most sensitive model variables, field irrigation, organic matter application, soil properties, rice variety and production were included in the analysis. The result showed that in each individual county, the within-cell standard deviation of methane flux, as calculated via Monte Carlo methods, was 13.5-89.3% of the statistical mean. After spatial aggregation, the national total methane emissions were estimated at 6.44-7.32 Tg, depending on the base scale of the modeling and the reliability of the input data. And with the given data availability, the overall aggregated standard deviation was 16.3% of the total emissions, ranging from 18.3-28.0% for early, late and middle rice ecosystems. The 95% confidence interval of the estimation was 4.5-8.7 Tg by assuming a gamma distribution. Improving the data availability of the model input variables is expected to reduce the uncertainties significantly, especially of those factors with high model sensitivities.

  10. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 1 

    E-print Network

    2004-01-01

    are increasingly becoming the major way that Texas Rice is accessed. Last year, 1,264 copies of the March 2003 issue of Texas Rice were downloaded, accounting for about 75% of that issue; with only 425 copies either mailed or provided for walk-ins. In com- parison..., though, that Com- mand can only be applied with ground equipment, so postemergence applica- tions are dependant on dry continued on next page There are many genera of annual barnyardgrass, on the left is E.colona, also known as jungle rice...

  11. Texas Rice, Volume VII, Number 7 

    E-print Network

    2007-01-01

    of only minor importance, it caused major yield loss to many rice fields in Texas and Louisiana during the 2006 season. In the early 1980’s, the Mexican rice borer “de- cided” to copy its cousin the cotton boll weevil and migrate north from the Mexico... near Texarkana. Prior to that time, the sugar- cane borer was the dominant stem-boring rice pest, with sporadic borer injury occasionally caused by a second species. Although the sugarcane borer was, and still is broadly distributed across the Texas...

  12. MANAGING TROPICAL RICE PESTS THROUGH CONSERVATION OF GENERALIST NATURAL ENEMIES AND ALTERNATIVE PREY1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    WILLIAM H. SETTLE; HARTIAHYO ARIAWAN; ARIEF LUKMAN HAKIM; DADAN HINDAYANA; SRI LESTARI

    1996-01-01

    The cultivation of tropical Asian rice, which may have originated 9000 yr ago, represents an agricultural ecosystem of unrivaled ecological complexity. We undertook a study of the community ecology of irrigated tropical rice fields on Java, Indonesia, as a supporting study for the Indonesian National Integrated Pest Management Programme, whose purpose is to train farmers to be better agronomists and

  13. EFFECTS OF UV-B AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE ON RICE RESEARCH PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is currently known about the response of rice plants to UV-B radiation, enriched CO2, or elevated temperature. ven less is known about the responses of important rice ecosystem components (pests, pathogens, weeds, nitrogen fixation, methanogenesis) to these factors. o accu...

  14. Coral Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2006-06-01

    Why study coral ecosystems? Having survived millions of years, coral reefs are among the oldest and most diverse ecosystems on earth. Learning about coral ecosystems encompasses many of the 9-12 grade science curriculum standards. Life cycles of organisms, biological structure and function of organisms, and the behaviors and adaptations of organisms to their environment are all topics easily studied through a focus on coral reefs. All populations in this ecosystem are interdependent and part of a global food web. Healthy coral ecosystems are important to the humans, plants, fish, and other organisms that depend on them. However, the increasing impact of climate changes and human activities is endangering the very survival of these ecosystems. Pollution, habitat loss, invasive species, and diseases are all threats to the survival of coral ecosystems around the globe. Learning about them- "their fragility and value"- will help students understand what is needed to protect them. This SciGuide highlights outstanding NOAA resources, such as online tutorials and complete, hands-on, inquiry based lesson plans from the National Ocean Services. These resources address three areas. First, students can study the biology of the coral organism, learning about types of coral and where they are found. Next, resources focus on the populations, habitat, and dynamics of coral ecosystems. Finally, teachers and students, through online data sources and activities, learn about conservation of our coral ecosystems. Natural threats, human disturbances, and the benefits of coral protection focus students on the real world importance of science learning.

  15. Red Rice Research and Control. 

    E-print Network

    Baker, John B.; Baldwin, Ford L.; Bourgeois, W.J.; Cox, Clodis H.; Craigmiles, Julian P.; Dishman, William D.; Eastin, E. Ford; Helpert, Charles W.; Hill, Lewis C.; Huey, Bobby A.; Klosterboer, Arlen D.; Sonnier, Earl A.

    1980-01-01

    ...................................................... INTRODUCTION 5 J. P. Craigmiles RED RICE PROBLEMS - A SEEDSMAN'S VIEWPOINT ........................ 7 C. H. Cox ........................ RED RICE PROBLEMS - A PRODUCER'S VIEWPOINT 9 W. D. Dishman CULTURAL CONTROL OF RED RICE... ...................................... 10 E. A. Sonnier RED RICE CONTROL IN ALTERNATE CROPS ................................ 16 F. L. Baldwin ..# RED RICE CONTROL ..................................................lg B. A. Huey and F. L. Baldwin RED RICE HERBICIDE SCREENING TESTS...

  16. Tolerance of anaerobic conditions caused by flooding during germination and early growth in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Miro, Berta; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2013-01-01

    Rice is semi-aquatic, adapted to a wide range of hydrologies, from aerobic soils in uplands to anaerobic and flooded fields in waterlogged lowlands, to even deeply submerged soils in flood-prone areas. Considerable diversity is present in native rice landraces selected by farmers over centuries. Our understanding of the adaptive features of these landraces to native ecosystems has improved considerably over the recent past. In some cases, major genes associated with tolerance have been cloned, such as SUB1A that confers tolerance of complete submergence and SNORKEL genes that control plant elongation to escape deepwater. Modern rice varieties are sensitive to flooding during germination and early growth, a problem commonly encountered in rainfed areas, but few landraces capable of germination under these conditions have recently been identified, enabling research into tolerance mechanisms. Major QTLs were also identified, and are being targeted for molecular breeding and for cloning. Nevertheless, limited progress has been made in identifying regulatory processes for traits that are unique to tolerant genotypes, including faster germination and coleoptile elongation, formation of roots and leaves under hypoxia, ability to catabolize starch into simple sugars for subsequent use in glycolysis and fermentative pathways to generate energy. Here we discuss the state of knowledge on the role of the PDC-ALDH-ACS bypass and the ALDH enzyme as the likely candidates effective in tolerant rice genotypes. Potential involvement of factors such as cytoplasmic pH regulation, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species scavenging and other metabolites is also discussed. Further characterization of contrasting genotypes would help in elucidating the genetic and biochemical regulatory and signaling mechanisms associated with tolerance. This could facilitate breeding rice varieties suitable for direct seeding systems and guide efforts for improving waterlogging tolerance in other crops. PMID:23888162

  17. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 9, Winter Issue

    E-print Network

    2003-01-01

    of the Mad Island 2 From the Editor... Inside This Issue Grower Profile: Laurance Armour at Pierce Ranch ...........3 Shanghai Days Cowboy Gathering ....................................4 Report from the 2003 Rice Outlook Conference ...............9 Employee... are also suited to the production of crops such as cotton and sorghum, rice is a major com- modity there as well. Rice production in Texas pro- vides several environmental benefits, including wildlife habitats, water filtration through wetlands, and flood...

  18. Simultaneous determination of Se, trace elements and major elements in Se-rich rice by dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS) after microwave digestion.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yi Hua; Zhang, Jin Yan; Zhang, Da Wen; Luo, Lin Guang; Tu, Tian Hua

    2014-09-15

    A quick and accurate method was devised to determine Se, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn in Se-rich rice samples by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Spectral interferences on Se were eliminated using methane as a reaction gas in the dynamic reaction cell (DRC). Rhodium was used as an internal standard to compensate for sample matrix effects. A rice-certified reference material (CRM) (GBW 10010) was used to verify the accuracy of the method. The method detection limits were 0.001-0.03 mg/kg, analyte recoveries were 85-108% and precisions (RSDs) ranged from 2.1% to 5.8%. Correlation analysis showed that the Se concentrations in the Se-rich rice samples correlated well with the Cu concentrations (r=0.53, p<0.05). PMID:24767089

  19. AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS,

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic ecosystems are a vital part of the urban water cycle (and of urban areas more broadly), and, if healthy, provide a range of goods and services valued by humans (Meyer 1997). For example, aquatic ecosystems (e.g., rivers, lakes, wetlands) provide potable water, food resou...

  20. Shelf-sea ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J J

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

  1. Direct and reverse pollen-mediated gene flow between GM rice and red rice weed

    PubMed Central

    Serrat, X.; Esteban, R.; Peñas, G.; Català, M. M.; Melé, E.; Messeguer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Potential risks of genetically modified (GM) crops must be identified before their commercialization, as happens with all new technologies. One of the major concerns is the proper risk assessment of adventitious presence of transgenic material in rice fields due to cross-pollination. Several studies have been conducted in order to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow from transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) to both conventional rice and red rice weed (O. sativa f. spontanea) under field conditions. Some of these studies reported GM pollen-donor rice transferring GM traits to red rice. However, gene flow also occurs in the opposite direction, in a phenomenon that we have called reverse gene flow, resulting in transgenic seeds that have incorporated the traits of wild red rice. We quantified reverse gene flow using material from two field trials. A molecular analysis based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms was carried out, being complemented with a phenotypic identification of red rice traits. In both field trials, the reverse gene flow detected was greater than the direct gene flow. The rate of direct gene flow varied according to the relative proportions of the donor (GM rice) and receptor (red rice) plants and was influenced by wind direction. The ecological impact of reverse gene flow is limited in comparison with that of direct gene flow because non-shattered and non-dormant seeds would be obtained in the first generation. Hybrid seed would remain in the spike and therefore most of it would be removed during harvesting. Nevertheless, this phenomenon must be considered in fields used for elite seed production and in developing countries where farmers often keep some seed for planting the following year. In these cases, there is a higher risk of GM red rice weed infestation increasing from year to year and therefore a proper monitoring plan needs to be established.

  2. Academic Majors Undergraduate Majors

    E-print Network

    Weston, Ken

    Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences Aging/Cancer · Body Composition · Cardiovascular HealthAcademic Majors Undergraduate Majors Food & Nutrition Sciences Dietetics Exercise Science Athletic Training Masters Majors Nutrition & Food Sciences Exercise Physiology Sports Sciences Doctoral Majors

  3. Texas Rice Production Guidelines 

    E-print Network

    Way, M. O.; Cockrell, Jay

    2008-03-11

    This publication gives Texas rice farmers the latest research-based information about producing rice in Texas. Recommendations are based on research conducted by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA.

  4. Finding high yield genes in weedy red rice to improve new cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice (Oryza rufipogon) is a weedy, wild relative of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) that is considered a major pest in rice production fields. However, researchers have found that it can be a valuable source of disease and insect resistance genes. Researchers with USDA ARS and Cornell University ...

  5. Agro-economic evaluation of fertilizer recommendations for rainfed lowland rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M. Haefele; N. Sipaseuth; V. Phengsouvanna; K. Dounphady; S. Vongsouthi

    2010-01-01

    Soils used for cropping of rainfed lowland rice are frequently rather poor, and nutrient limitation is known to be a major constraint for grain yields. However, actual fertilizer use by most rainfed rice farmers is still very low even if input-responsive rice varieties are widely adopted. To address this contradiction, this study, conducted in central and southern Laos, intended to

  6. Early screening of recombinant inbred lines for fissure resistance in non-semidwarf rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) kernel fissuring poses a major problem for both rice farmers and millers. It results in the decreased value of milled rice because of the increase in the percentage of broken kernels associated with fissuring. This study employs the use of fine mapping to increase the genetic ...

  7. Modelling the impacts of climate change and methane emission reductions on rice production: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robin Matthews; Reiner Wassmann

    2003-01-01

    Rice agriculture is not only affected by climate change, but also contributes to global warming through the release of methane into the atmosphere. In 1989, a major research project was initiated at the International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines to investigate relationships between climate change and rice production. A second project started in 1993 to investigate, in more detail,

  8. The Recursion . . . Extended Rice . . .

    E-print Network

    Gallier, Jean

    The Recursion . . . Extended Rice . . . Creative and . . . Home Page Title Page Page 388 of 405 Go . . . Extended Rice . . . Creative and . . . Home Page Title Page Page 389 of 405 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit Rice . . . Creative and . . . Home Page Title Page Page 390 of 405 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit

  9. RICE UNIVERSITY Houston, Texas

    E-print Network

    Pentus, Mati

    RICE UNIVERSITY Houston, Texas Hierarchical Attribute Grammars: Dialects, Applications and Evaluation Algorithms by Alan Carle carle@cs.rice.edu A Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Doctor of Philosophy May, 1992 Rice University Department of Computer Science

  10. Rice Pudding Ingredients

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Rice Pudding Ingredients: 2 cups brown rice, cooked 2 cups skim milk 1/3 cup sugar 1 tablespoon margarine 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 1/4 cup raisins Cinnamon Directions 1. Place cooked rice, milk, sugar, raisins, and margarine in saucepan. 2. Place saucepan over medium heat. Cook 25 to 30 minutes without

  11. Rice Production and Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briers, Gary; Lee, Jasper S.

    This guide contains lesson plans for use in secondary programs of agricultural education in geographical areas in which rice is produced. Six units and 13 problem areas are organized into teaching plans that cover the broad nature of rice production. The six units are: (1) determining the importance and history of rice production; (2) determining…

  12. Rice Insect Management. 

    E-print Network

    Drees, Bastiaan M.

    1983-01-01

    and flower parrs of rice after fertilization, but causes no appreciable yield losses. A larger (I 1/ 4- to I 1/ 2-inches long) light brown to yellowish grasshopper with 2 black bands on the inside of each jumping leg can be more serious. This species... Management Practices ............... . Rice Water Weevil ......................... 4 Fall Armyworm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 6 Grasshoppers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 6 Rice Stink Bug...

  13. RICE GERMPLASM CHARACTERIZED FOR R-GENES AND POPULATION STRUCTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the USA, newly introduced rice germplasm is one source of novel resistance genes to blast, Magnaporthe grisea, and sheath blight, Rhizoctonia solani, major fungal diseases of irrigated rice (Oryza sativa). Resistance to U.S. blast races was observed in 91 of approximately 1,000 newly introduced ...

  14. Why adding rice hull ash can benefit beer clarification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JC Villar; RE Cañete; EA Manganelly

    2004-01-01

    Filter aids continue to play an important role in the beer brewing process. The majority of commercial products are either diatomite- or perlite based. However, rice hull ash, a by-product from the incineration of rice hulls, has been shown to be an effective filter aid in the filtration of raw sugar liquors. A research team from the Cuban Research Institute

  15. Root-Derived Short-Chain Suberin Diacids from Rice and Rape Seed in a Paddy Soil under Rice Cultivar Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haishi; Ding, Yuanjun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Li, Lianqing; Zhang, Dengxiao; Li, Zichuan; Sun, Jingling; Lashari, Muhammad Siddique; Joseph, Stephen; Meng, Yuanduo; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Pan, Genxing

    2015-01-01

    Suberin-derived substituted fatty acids have been shown to be potential biomarkers for plant-derived carbon (C) in soils across ecosystems. Analyzing root derived suberin compounds bound in soil could help to understand the root input into a soil organic carbon pool. In this study, bound lipids were extracted and identified in root and topsoil samples. Short-chain suberin diacids were quantified under rice (Oryza sativa L.) and rape (Brassica campestris) rotations with different cultivar combinations in a Chinese rice paddy. After removal of free lipids with sequential extraction, the residual bound lipids were obtained with saponification and derivatization before analysis using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Diacids C16 and C18 in bound lipids were detected both in rice and rape root samples, while diacids C20 and C22 were detected only in rape root samples. Accordingly, diacids were quantified in both rhizosphere and bulk soil (0–15 cm). The amount of total root-derived diacids in bulk soil varied in a range of 5.6–9.6 mg/kg across growth stages and crop seasons. After one year-round rice-rape rotation, root-derived suberin diacids were maintained at a level of 7–9 mg/kg in bulk soil; this was higher under a super rice cultivar LY than under a hybrid cultivar IIY. While concentrations of the analyzed diacids were generally higher in rhizosphere than in bulk soil, the total diacid (DA) concentration was higher at the time of rape harvest than at rice harvest, suggesting that rape roots made a major contribution to the preservation of diacids in the paddy. Moreover, the net change in the concentration and the ratios of C16:0 DA to C18:1 DA, and of C16:0 DA to C18:0 DA, over a whole growing season, were greater under LY than under IIY, though there was no difference between cultivars within a single growth stage. Overall, total concentration of root-derived suberin diacids was found to be positively correlated to soil organic carbon concentration both for bulk soil and rhizosphere. However, the turnover and preservation of the root suberin biomolecules with soil property and field conditions deserve further field studies. PMID:25961557

  16. Root-Derived Short-Chain Suberin Diacids from Rice and Rape Seed in a Paddy Soil under Rice Cultivar Treatments.

    PubMed

    Ji, Haishi; Ding, Yuanjun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Li, Lianqing; Zhang, Dengxiao; Li, Zichuan; Sun, Jingling; Lashari, Muhammad Siddique; Joseph, Stephen; Meng, Yuanduo; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Pan, Genxing

    2015-01-01

    Suberin-derived substituted fatty acids have been shown to be potential biomarkers for plant-derived carbon (C) in soils across ecosystems. Analyzing root derived suberin compounds bound in soil could help to understand the root input into a soil organic carbon pool. In this study, bound lipids were extracted and identified in root and topsoil samples. Short-chain suberin diacids were quantified under rice (Oryza sativa L.) and rape (Brassica campestris) rotations with different cultivar combinations in a Chinese rice paddy. After removal of free lipids with sequential extraction, the residual bound lipids were obtained with saponification and derivatization before analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Diacids C16 and C18 in bound lipids were detected both in rice and rape root samples, while diacids C20 and C22 were detected only in rape root samples. Accordingly, diacids were quantified in both rhizosphere and bulk soil (0-15 cm). The amount of total root-derived diacids in bulk soil varied in a range of 5.6-9.6 mg/kg across growth stages and crop seasons. After one year-round rice-rape rotation, root-derived suberin diacids were maintained at a level of 7-9 mg/kg in bulk soil; this was higher under a super rice cultivar LY than under a hybrid cultivar IIY. While concentrations of the analyzed diacids were generally higher in rhizosphere than in bulk soil, the total diacid (DA) concentration was higher at the time of rape harvest than at rice harvest, suggesting that rape roots made a major contribution to the preservation of diacids in the paddy. Moreover, the net change in the concentration and the ratios of C16:0 DA to C18:1 DA, and of C16:0 DA to C18:0 DA, over a whole growing season, were greater under LY than under IIY, though there was no difference between cultivars within a single growth stage. Overall, total concentration of root-derived suberin diacids was found to be positively correlated to soil organic carbon concentration both for bulk soil and rhizosphere. However, the turnover and preservation of the root suberin biomolecules with soil property and field conditions deserve further field studies. PMID:25961557

  17. ECOSYSTEM HEALTH: ENERGY INDICATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Ecosystem Health and Ecological Integrity 2. Historical Background on Ecosystem Health 3. Energy Systems Analysis, Health and Emergy 4. Energy and Ecosystems 5. Direct Measures of Ecosystem Health 6. Indirect Measures of Ecosystem Health...

  18. Genome duplication improves rice root resistance to salt stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Salinity is a stressful environmental factor that limits the productivity of crop plants, and roots form the major interface between plants and various abiotic stresses. Rice is a salt-sensitive crop and its polyploid shows advantages in terms of stress resistance. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of genome duplication on rice root resistance to salt stress. Results Both diploid rice (HN2026-2x and Nipponbare-2x) and their corresponding tetraploid rice (HN2026-4x and Nipponbare-4x) were cultured in half-strength Murashige and Skoog medium with 150 mM NaCl for 3 and 5 days. Accumulations of proline, soluble sugar, malondialdehyde (MDA), Na+ content, H+ (proton) flux at root tips, and the microstructure and ultrastructure in rice roots were examined. We found that tetraploid rice showed less root growth inhibition, accumulated higher proline content and lower MDA content, and exhibited a higher frequency of normal epidermal cells than diploid rice. In addition, a protective gap appeared between the cortex and pericycle cells in tetraploid rice. Next, ultrastructural analysis showed that genome duplication improved membrane, organelle, and nuclei stability. Furthermore, Na+ in tetraploid rice roots significantly decreased while root tip H+ efflux in tetraploid rice significantly increased. Conclusions Our results suggest that genome duplication improves root resistance to salt stress, and that enhanced proton transport to the root surface may play a role in reducing Na+ entrance into the roots. PMID:25184027

  19. Microsatellite markers reveal multiple origins for Italian weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Annabelle; Fogliatto, Silvia; Nick, Peter; Ferrero, Aldo; Vidotto, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Weedy rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the major issues of rice cultivation worldwide. In Italy, it infests about 70% of the total rice area. Different Weedy Rice populations can be distinguished based on variable morphological and physiological traits; however, little is known about genetic differentiation and origin of Italian weedy rice populations. The objective of this study was to genetically and morphologically characterize and compare different Italian weedy rice populations selected on the basis of different phenotypes. The main Italian rice territory was divided into 10 geographical areas in which 40 weedy rice populations were collected and grouped according to the awn traits. All the individuals of the populations were morphologically characterized according to plant and seed traits. Genetic characterization was performed using 19 SSR markers on all the collected accessions, and several rice cultivars, including some very old (late 19th century), nowadays are no longer cultivated. ANOVA showed that morphological plant and seed traits were significantly affected by the collection area and awnedness group. The importance of the awn morphology was also reflected in the Bayesian clustering where, despite a relatively low genetic diversity, the clusters displayed different awn types. An UPGMA dendrogram confirmed the clusters detected in STRUCTURE analysis and also revealed a grouping of certain old cultivars with the weedy rice, suggesting a common origin. PMID:24363904

  20. Suppression and overexpression of Lsi1 induce differential gene expression in rice under ultraviolet radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chang-Xun Fang; Qing-Shui Wang; Yan Yu; Qing-Mao Li; Hai-Li Zhang; Xing-Chun Wu; Ting Chen; Wen-Xiong Lin

    Low silicon rice gene 1 (Lsi1) belongs to a member of Nod26-like major intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily and is thought to control silicon (Si) accumulation in rice. In order to further elucidate its regulatory mechanisms\\u000a in the defense of rice plants to enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation stress, Lsi1 was subjected to suppressed and overexpressed treatments in a UV-B tolerance rice

  1. Differentially expressed genes in sensitive and tolerant rice varieties in response to salt-stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Awadhesh Pandit; Vandna Rai; Tilak R. Sharma; Prakash C. Sharma; Nagendra K. Singh

    2011-01-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to rice production worldwide; hence intensive efforts are on to identify genes that make\\u000a rice varieties tolerant to the salt stress. In this study, four rice varieties differing in tolerance to salinity were studied\\u000a for differential gene expression through microarray analysis of RNA extracted from rice seedlings grown under control and\\u000a salt stress conditions.

  2. Ethnobotanical investigation of 'wild' food plants used by rice farmers in Kalasin, Northeast Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Wild food plants are a critical component in the subsistence system of rice farmers in Northeast Thailand. One of the important characteristics of wild plant foods among farming households is that the main collection locations are increasingly from anthropogenic ecosystems such as agricultural areas rather than pristine ecosystems. This paper provides selected results from a study of wild food conducted in several villages in Northeast Thailand. A complete botanical inventory of wild food plants from these communities and surrounding areas is provided including their diversity of growth forms, the different anthropogenic locations were these species grow and the multiplicity of uses they have. Methods Data was collected using focus groups and key informant interviews with women locally recognized as knowledgeable about contemporarily gathered plants. Plant species were identified by local taxonomists. Results A total of 87 wild food plants, belonging to 47 families were reported, mainly trees, herbs (terrestrial and aquatic) and climbers. Rice fields constitute the most important growth location where 70% of the plants are found, followed by secondary woody areas and home gardens. The majority of species (80%) can be found in multiple growth locations, which is partly explained by villagers moving selected species from one place to another and engaging in different degrees of management. Wild food plants have multiple edible parts varying from reproductive structures to vegetative organs. More than two thirds of species are reported as having diverse additional uses and more than half of them are also regarded as medicine. Conclusions This study shows the remarkable importance of anthropogenic areas in providing wild food plants. This is reflected in the great diversity of species found, contributing to the food and nutritional security of rice farmers in Northeast Thailand. PMID:22067578

  3. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for sheath blight resistance in rice using recombinant inbred line population of Lemont X Jasmine 85

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight (RSB) caused by the soil borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most destructive diseases of rice, causing severe losses in rice yield and quality annually. The major gene (s) governing the resistance to RSB have not been found in cultivated rice worldwide. However, ri...

  4. Field trial of GABA-fortified rice plants and oral administration of milled rice in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kowaka, Emi; Shimajiri, Yasuka; Kawakami, Kouhei; Tongu, Miki; Akama, Kazuhito

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension is one of the most critical risk factors accompanying cardiovascular diseases. ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid that functions as a major neurotransmitter in mammals and also as a blood-pressure lowering agent. We previously produced GABA-fortified rice lines of a popular Japonica rice cultivar 'Koshihikari' by genetic manipulation of GABA shunt-related genes. In the study reported here, we grew these same novel rice lines in a field trial and administered the milled rice orally to rats. The yield parameters of the transgenic rice plants were almost unchanged compared to those of untransformed cv. 'Koshihikari' plants, while the rice grains of the transgenic plants contained a high GABA content (3.5 g GABA/kg brown rice; 0.75-0.85 GABA g/kg milled rice) in a greenhouse trial. Oral administration of a diet containing 2.5% GABA-fortified rice, with a daily intake for 8 weeks, had an approximately 20 mmHg anti-hypertensive effect in spontaneous hypertensive rats but not in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. These results suggest that GABA-fortified rice may be applicable as a staple food to control or prevent hypertension. PMID:25542346

  5. Carbon sequestration and methane emission from a tropical rice field under intensive rice cultivation with long-term application of compost and inorganic fertilizer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Nayak; J. Yeluriapti; T. K. Adhya

    2009-01-01

    The impact of long-term intensive rice-rice cropping system with different managements on soil organic carbon content (SOC) and methane emission was studied using a 36-year-old fertility experiment under tropical climate. Intensive rice production systems are important sinks of carbon but at the same time these are the major anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4, a major greenhouse gas. A significant increase

  6. Leadership Rice Leadership Rice exists to encourage and equip Rice students to obtain

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Leadership Rice Leadership Rice exists to encourage and equip Rice students to obtain leadership roles at Rice and beyond. We provide leadership development opportunities to undergraduates from every. Leadership Rice classes prepare students for the challenges and opportunities leaders face today. Classes

  7. Leadership Rice The mission of Leadership Rice is to help Rice University undergraduates from

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    189 Leadership Rice The mission of Leadership Rice is to help Rice University undergraduates from. Leadership Rice explores how heart and mind, theory and practice, and ideas and actions come together during the fall. Other courses may be taken independently.Leadership Rice's Summer Mentorship Experience

  8. Leadership Rice Leadership Rice exists to encourage and equip Rice students to obtain significant

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    206 Leadership Rice Leadership Rice exists to encourage and equip Rice students to obtain significant leadership roles at Rice and beyond. We provide leadership development opportunities and ability to translate ideas to action. Leadership Rice also sponsors the Toastmaster's International club

  9. Leadership Rice The mission of Leadership Rice is to help Rice University undergraduates

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    194 Leadership Rice The mission of Leadership Rice is to help Rice University undergraduates from Rice explores how heart and mind, theory and practice, and ideas and actions come together. LEAD 309 is offered only during the fall. Other courses may be taken independently. Leadership Rice

  10. Uncovering the spatial dynamics of wild rice lakes, harvesters and management across Great Lakes landscapes for shared regional conservation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annette D. Drewes; Janet Silbernagel

    Sustainable conservation and management of valued resources and ecosystem services relies on understanding the dynamics of the socio-ecological system. In the case of wild rice, a cherished food resource of Northern Great Lakes landscapes, the dynamics involve (a) a changing distribution of wild rice lakes, (b) changing harvester population and demographics, and (c) different management overlays. Together these factors influence

  11. Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... links Read our disclaimer about external links Menu Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction On this page: Key ... will help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Red Yeast Rice Red yeast rice is made by ...

  12. Air pollutant emissions from rice straw open field burning in India, Thailand and the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Gadde, Butchaiah; Bonnet, Sébastien; Menke, Christoph; Garivait, Savitri

    2009-05-01

    Rice is a widely grown crop in Asia. China (30%) and India (21%) contribute to about half of the world's total rice production. In this study, three major rice-producing countries in Asia are considered, India, Thailand and the Philippines (the later two contributing 4% and 2% of the world's rice production). Rice straw is one of the main field based residues produced along with this commodity and its applications vary widely in the region. Although rice production practises vary from one country to another, open burning of straw is a common practice in these countries. In this study, an approach was followed aiming at (a) determining the quantity of rice straw being subject to open field burning in those countries, (b) congregating pollutant specific emissions factors for rice straw burning, and (c) quantifying the resulting air pollutant emissions. Uncertainties in the results obtained as compared to a global approach are also discussed. PMID:19201513

  13. Diurnal variations in methane emission from rice plants 

    E-print Network

    Laskowski, Nicholas Aaron

    2004-11-15

    is generated biologically by methanogenic bacteria, a major division of the Archaea kingdom. Environments suitable for methanogenesis are very reduced (methanogens (Chen et al., 1993). Methane transport pathways Methane produced in a flooded rice paddy has three...

  14. Mitigation of arsenic accumulation in rice with water management and silicon fertilization.

    PubMed

    Li, R Y; Stroud, J L; Ma, J F; McGrath, S P; Zhao, F J

    2009-05-15

    Rice represents a major route of As exposure in populations that depend on a rice diet. Practical measures are needed to mitigate the problem of excessive As accumulation in paddy rice. Two potential mitigation methods, management of the water regime and Si fertilization, were investigated under greenhouse conditions. Growing rice aerobically during the entire rice growth duration resulted in the leastAs accumulation. Maintaining aerobic conditions during either vegetative or reproductive stage of rice growth also decreased As accumulation in rice straw and grain significantly compared with rice grown under flooded conditions. The effect of water management regimes was consistent with the observed effect of flooding-induced arsenite mobilization in the soil solution. Aerobic treatments increased the percentage of inorganic As in grain, but the concentrations of inorganic As remained lower than in the flooded rice. Silicon fertilization decreased the total As concentration in straw and grain by 78 and 16%, respectively, even though Si addition increased As concentration in the soil solution. Silicon also significantly influenced As speciation in rice grain and husk by enhancing methylation. Silicon decreased the inorganic As concentration in grain by 59% while increasing the concentration of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) by 33%. There were also significant differences between two rice genotypes in grain As speciation. This study demonstrated that water management Si fertilization, and selection of rice cultivars are effective measures that can be used to reduce As accumulation in rice. PMID:19544887

  15. Rice antioxidants: phenolic acids, flavonoids, anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, tocopherols, tocotrienols, ?-oryzanol, and phytic acid

    PubMed Central

    Goufo, Piebiep; Trindade, Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggested that the low incidence of certain chronic diseases in rice-consuming regions of the world might be associated with the antioxidant compound contents of rice. The molecules with antioxidant activity contained in rice include phenolic acids, flavonoids, anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, tocopherols, tocotrienols, ?-oryzanol, and phytic acid. This review provides information on the contents of these compounds in rice using a food composition database built from compiling data from 316 papers. The database provides access to information that would have otherwise remained hidden in the literature. For example, among the four types of rice ranked by color, black rice varieties emerged as those exhibiting the highest antioxidant activities, followed by purple, red, and brown rice varieties. Furthermore, insoluble compounds appear to constitute the major fraction of phenolic acids and proanthocyanidins in rice, but not of flavonoids and anthocyanins. It is clear that to maximize the intake of antioxidant compounds, rice should be preferentially consumed in the form of bran or as whole grain. With respect to breeding, japonica rice varieties were found to be richer in antioxidant compounds compared with indica rice varieties. Overall, rice grain fractions appear to be rich sources of antioxidant compounds. However, on a whole grain basis and with the exception of ?-oryzanol and anthocyanins, the contents of antioxidants in other cereals appear to be higher than those in rice. PMID:24804068

  16. A selectively terminable transgenic rice line expressing human lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chaoyang; Nie, Peng; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Li, Jing; Shen, Zhicheng

    2010-11-01

    Human lactoferrin (hLF) is a multifunctional milk protein which could be utilized for promoting human health. Transgenic rice has been used as a bioreactor for mass production of recombinant hLF. However, one major concern over such transgenic rice is the risk of its unintended spreading into environment and into our food supplies. Here we report the development of selectively terminable transgenic rice expressing human lactoferrin in seeds. These transgenic rice plants could be selectively terminated by bentazon, a common herbicide used for rice weed control. The hLF expression cassette was constructed into a T-DNA containing the RNA interference cassette suppressing the expression of the rice gene CYP81A6 which detoxifies herbicide bentazon, and the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) cassette which confers to glyphosate tolerance. A transgenic line, named as G281, was identified for its high sensitivity to bentazon, high tolerance to glyphosate, and high expression of hLF. Southern analysis suggested G281 is a single copy insertion event. Field tests demonstrated that G281 plants can be completely killed by a single spray of bentazon at 1000 mg/L, which is safe to regular rice and represents only half of the dose recommended by manufacturer for rice field weed control. Therefore, any G281 contaminations in regular rice could be selectively terminated to make sure it will not enter food or feed supplies. PMID:20433928

  17. SFRSF: Our Coastal Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This South Florida Restoration Science Forum (SFRSF) page highlights the coastal ecosystems of southern Florida. Research displayed from poster presentations covers the coastal area habitats, sustaining and enhancing coastal waters, major coastal challenges, restoring and enhancing estuaries, and using science for effective resource management. The six estuaries discussed are the Caloosahatchee, Southwest Florida, Biscayne Bay, Florida Bay, Florida Keys, and St. Lucie estuaries. Specific issues concerning each estuary are covered, and links are provided for additional information.

  18. Diversity of global rice markets and the science required for consumer-targeted rice breeding.

    PubMed

    Calingacion, Mariafe; Laborte, Alice; Nelson, Andrew; Resurreccion, Adoracion; Concepcion, Jeanaflor Crystal; Daygon, Venea Dara; Mumm, Roland; Reinke, Russell; Dipti, Sharifa; Bassinello, Priscila Zaczuk; Manful, John; Sophany, Sakhan; Lara, Karla Cordero; Bao, Jinsong; Xie, Lihong; Loaiza, Katerine; El-hissewy, Ahmad; Gayin, Joseph; Sharma, Neerja; Rajeswari, Sivakami; Manonmani, Swaminathan; Rani, N Shobha; Kota, Suneetha; Indrasari, Siti Dewi; Habibi, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Maryam; Tavasoli, Fatemeh; Suzuki, Keitaro; Umemoto, Takayuki; Boualaphanh, Chanthkone; Lee, Huei Hong; Hung, Yiu Pang; Ramli, Asfaliza; Aung, Pa Pa; Ahmad, Rauf; Wattoo, Javed Iqbal; Bandonill, Evelyn; Romero, Marissa; Brites, Carla Moita; Hafeel, Roshni; Lur, Huu-Sheng; Cheaupun, Kunya; Jongdee, Supanee; Blanco, Pedro; Bryant, Rolfe; Thi Lang, Nguyen; Hall, Robert D; Fitzgerald, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    With the ever-increasing global demand for high quality rice in both local production regions and with Western consumers, we have a strong desire to understand better the importance of the different traits that make up the quality of the rice grain and obtain a full picture of rice quality demographics. Rice is by no means a 'one size fits all' crop. Regional preferences are not only striking, they drive the market and hence are of major economic importance in any rice breeding / improvement strategy. In this analysis, we have engaged local experts across the world to perform a full assessment of all the major rice quality trait characteristics and importantly, to determine how these are combined in the most preferred varieties for each of their regions. Physical as well as biochemical characteristics have been monitored and this has resulted in the identification of no less than 18 quality trait combinations. This complexity immediately reveals the extent of the specificity of consumer preference. Nevertheless, further assessment of these combinations at the variety level reveals that several groups still comprise varieties which consumers can readily identify as being different. This emphasises the shortcomings in the current tools we have available to assess rice quality and raises the issue of how we might correct for this in the future. Only with additional tools and research will we be able to define directed strategies for rice breeding which are able to combine important agronomic features with the demands of local consumers for specific quality attributes and hence, design new, improved crop varieties which will be awarded success in the global market. PMID:24454799

  19. Diversity of Global Rice Markets and the Science Required for Consumer-Targeted Rice Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Calingacion, Mariafe; Laborte, Alice; Nelson, Andrew; Resurreccion, Adoracion; Concepcion, Jeanaflor Crystal; Daygon, Venea Dara; Mumm, Roland; Reinke, Russell; Dipti, Sharifa; Bassinello, Priscila Zaczuk; Manful, John; Sophany, Sakhan; Lara, Karla Cordero; Bao, Jinsong; Xie, Lihong; Loaiza, Katerine; El-hissewy, Ahmad; Gayin, Joseph; Sharma, Neerja; Rajeswari, Sivakami; Manonmani, Swaminathan; Rani, N. Shobha; Kota, Suneetha; Indrasari, Siti Dewi; Habibi, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Maryam; Tavasoli, Fatemeh; Suzuki, Keitaro; Umemoto, Takayuki; Boualaphanh, Chanthkone; Lee, Huei Hong; Hung, Yiu Pang; Ramli, Asfaliza; Aung, Pa Pa; Ahmad, Rauf; Wattoo, Javed Iqbal; Bandonill, Evelyn; Romero, Marissa; Brites, Carla Moita; Hafeel, Roshni; Lur, Huu-Sheng; Cheaupun, Kunya; Jongdee, Supanee; Blanco, Pedro; Bryant, Rolfe; Thi Lang, Nguyen; Hall, Robert D.; Fitzgerald, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    With the ever-increasing global demand for high quality rice in both local production regions and with Western consumers, we have a strong desire to understand better the importance of the different traits that make up the quality of the rice grain and obtain a full picture of rice quality demographics. Rice is by no means a ‘one size fits all’ crop. Regional preferences are not only striking, they drive the market and hence are of major economic importance in any rice breeding / improvement strategy. In this analysis, we have engaged local experts across the world to perform a full assessment of all the major rice quality trait characteristics and importantly, to determine how these are combined in the most preferred varieties for each of their regions. Physical as well as biochemical characteristics have been monitored and this has resulted in the identification of no less than 18 quality trait combinations. This complexity immediately reveals the extent of the specificity of consumer preference. Nevertheless, further assessment of these combinations at the variety level reveals that several groups still comprise varieties which consumers can readily identify as being different. This emphasises the shortcomings in the current tools we have available to assess rice quality and raises the issue of how we might correct for this in the future. Only with additional tools and research will we be able to define directed strategies for rice breeding which are able to combine important agronomic features with the demands of local consumers for specific quality attributes and hence, design new, improved crop varieties which will be awarded success in the global market. PMID:24454799

  20. Isozymes and classification of Asian rice varieties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Glaszmann

    1987-01-01

    Enzyme variation detected by starch gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the genetic structure of Oryza sativa L. species. Fifteen polymorphic loci coding for 8 enzymes were surveyed among 1688 traditional rices from Asia. Multivariate analysis of the data resulted in identification of six varietal groups, with two major ones, groups I and VI, two minor ones, groups II and

  1. Global efforts in managing rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a major destructive disease threatening global food security. Resistance (R) genes to M. oryzae are effective in preventing infections by strains of M. oryzae carry the corresponding avirulence (AVR) genes. Effectiveness of genetic resist...

  2. Rice Cluster I, an Important Group of Archaea Producing Methane in Rice Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, R.

    2006-12-01

    Rice fields are an important source for the greenhouse gas methane. Methane is a major degradation product of organic matter in the anoxic soil, is partially oxidized in the rhizosphere and is emitted into the atmosphere through the aerenchyma system of the plants. Anaerobic degradation of organic matter by fermenting bacteria eventually results in the production of acetate and hydrogen, the two major substrates for microbial methanogenesis. The community of methanogenic archaea consists of several major orders or families including hydrogen-utilizing Rice Cluster-I (RC-I). Environmental conditions affect the methanogenic degradation process and the community structure of the methanogenic archaea in soil and rhizosphere. For example, populations of acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae and Methanosarcinaceae are enhanced by low and high acetate concentrations, respectively. Stable isotope probing of 16S rRNA showed that RC-I methanogens are mainly active on rice roots and at low H2 concentrations. Growth and population size is largely consistent with energetic conditions. RC-I methanogens on roots seem to be responsible for methane production from plant photosynthates that account for a major part of the emitted methane. Populations of RC-I methanogens in rice field soil are also enhanced at elevated temperatures (40-50°C). Moderately thermophilic members of RC-I methanogens or other methanogenic families were found to be ubiquitously present in soils from rice fields and river marshes. The genome of a RC-I methanogen was completely sequenced out of an enrichment culture using a metagenome approach. Genes found are consistent with life in the rhizosphere and in temporarily drained, oxic soil. We found that the methanogenic community structure on the rice roots is mainly determined by the respective community structure of the soil, but is in addition affected by the rice cultivar. Rice microcosms in which soil and rice roots are mainly colonized by RC-I methanogens produce and emit more methane than when inhabited by Methanomicrobiales, indicating that the methanogenic archaeal community is an important factor for methane emission from rice fields.

  3. Bioethanol production from rice washing drainage and rice bran.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masanori; Takahashi, Makoto; Sasano, Kazuo; Kashiwamura, Takashi; Ozaki, Yuich; Tsuiki, Tomohiro; Hidaka, Harutaro; Kanemoto, Shigeharu

    2009-12-01

    Bioethanol production from rice washing drainage and rice bran derived from a rinse-free process of rice manufacturing was established using the combinations of an enzymatic procedure and an ultra-sonic procedure of rice washing drainage for a sample pre-treatment. The maximum ethanol concentration was attained at 6.2% (v/v). PMID:19914587

  4. EXIT INTERVIEW SUMMARY FORM Life after Rice...

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1 EXIT INTERVIEW SUMMARY FORM Life after Rice... Rice ID: _____________________ * Medical benefits - Your Rice medical benefits will end on: __________________________ * Vesting in the 401(a) Rice. * Rice retiree - If you qualify as a Rice retiree, in accordance with the Rice University Human Resources

  5. Crop management strategies and disease resistance control the severity of false smut and kernel smut of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    False smut and kernel smut are common diseases of rice capable of severe epidemics with dramatic yield losses. The importance of rice smuts is often overlooked in the US, and highly susceptible varieties are now being grown on the majority of production acres in the southern rice producing states. O...

  6. The LANSCE RICE control system upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Oothoudt, Michael; Schaller, S. (Stuart); Bjorklund, E. A. (Eric A.); Burns, M. J. (Mary J.); Carr, G. (Gary); Carr, G. (Gary); Faucett, John Allen,; Hayden, D. J. (David J.); Lusk, M. D. (Matthew D.); Merl, R. B. (Robert B.); Potter, J. M. (Jerry M.); Reynolds, J. A. (Jerome A.); Romero, D. B. (Dolores B.); Shelley, F. E. (Fred E.)

    2003-01-01

    The LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) control system upgrade program continues with the impending replacement of the RICE (Remote Instrumentation and Control Equipment) subsystem. The RICE subsystem upgrade is a challenge because of its technology (late 1960s), number of channels (>10,000), and unique characteristics (all-modules data takes, timed/flavored data takes). The plan is to replace at least the non-timed data and the command portions of the subsystem with Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs). We discuss motivations, technological challenges, proof-of-principle, and planning. The boundary condition, as usual, is that we must implement these major changes on a running accelerator.

  7. Invited Paper: Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecosystem Monitoring & Port Surveillance

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Immerse Platform, Underwater Ecosystem; Passive and Active Acoustics; Signal Processing, Blind Separation, Identification and Localization Problems, Data Fusion. 1- Introduction & National Benefits USA NOA Agency has two major targets to reach: underwater ecosystem monitoring and coast/port surveillance. Without

  8. Evaluation of Environmental Quality Productive Ecosystem Guayas (Ecuador).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo, Wilson; Pardo, Francisco; Sanfeliu, Teófilo; Carrera, Gloria; Jordan, Manuel; Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria

    2015-04-01

    Natural resources are deteriorating very rapidly in the Gulf of Guayaquil and the area of influence in the Guayas Basin due to human activity. Specific problems are generated by the mismanagement of the aquaculture industry affecting the traditional agricultural sectors: rice, banana, sugarcane, cocoa, coffee, and soya also studied, and by human and industrial settlements. The development of industrial activities such as aquaculture (shrimp building for shrimp farming in ponds) and agriculture, have increasingly contributed to the generation of waste, degrading and potentially toxic elements in high concentrations, which can have adverse effects on organisms in the ecosystems, in the health of the population and damage the ecological and environmental balance. The productive Guayas ecosystem, consists of three interrelated ecosystems, the Gulf of Guayaquil, the Guayas River estuary and the Guayas Basin buffer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the environmental quality of the productive Guayas ecosystem (Ecuador), through operational and specific objectives: 1) Draw up the transition coastal zone in the Gulf of Guayaquil, 2) Set temporal spatial variability of soil salinity in wetlands rice, Lower Guayas Basin, 3) evaluate the heavy metals in wetland rice in the Lower Basin of Guayas. The physical and chemical parameters of the soils have been studied. These are indicators of environmental quality. The multivariate statistical method showed the relations of similarities and dissimilarities between variables and parameter studies as stable. Moreover, the boundaries of coastal transition areas, temporal spatial variability of soil salinity and heavy metals in rice cultivation in the Lower Basin of Guayas were researched. The sequential studies included and discussed represent a broad framework of fundamental issues that has been valued as a basic component of the productive Guayas ecosystem. They are determinants of the environmental quality of the Guayas productive ecosystem. Keyword: Evaluation, Environmental Quality, Productive Ecosystem

  9. Registration of 'Medark' Rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Medark’ rice is a high-yielding, early maturing, semidwarf, medium-grain cultivar. It originated from the cross ‘Bengal’/’Short Rico’ and is similar in maturity to Bengal. It has improved disease resistance to rice blase, brown spot and straighthead. Medark has a lodging resistance slightly less...

  10. Induced mutations in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induced mutations have a long history in both applied and basic aspects of rice research. During the past fifty years, over 500 rice varieties have been developed worldwide, either directly from induced mutants or as a result of crossing such mutants with other breeding lines. More recently, the gen...

  11. Rice Diseases Atlas.

    E-print Network

    Walla, Walter

    1977-01-01

    . 448. au., S.H. 1972 Rice Diseases. Eastern Press Ltd., London and Reading, England. Whitney, N. G. and Richard A. Frederiksen, 1975 Kernel Smut of Rice. Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin MP-1231. (Blank Page in Original Bulletin... CONTENTS INTRODUCTION .......... . .. . ........ . SEEDLI NG DISEASES ... . ... . .. . ........ . FOLIAGE DISEASES ................... .. SHEATH AND STEM DISEASES .......... . DISEASES ATT ACKI NG THE KERNEL ..... . PHYSIOLOGICAL Di...

  12. Spanish Rice Ingredients

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Spanish Rice Ingredients: 2 cups brown rice, cooked Vegetable oil spray 1 onion 1 cup salsa skillet to medium. Cut the ends off of the onion, and peel off the brown layers. Run under water to remove any dirt. Cut the onion in half lengthwise, and place the flat side on the cutting board. Slice across

  13. Making rice even healthier!

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice is a naturally healthy food, but what if it could be made even healthier? Would Americans eat more rice if it could be advertised to be a 'New and Improved' source of calcium to promote bone growth, or iron to prevent anemia? Grocery stores are full of foods that are vitamin enhanced to attract...

  14. Marine Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    New Jersey

    2006-01-01

    In the wild, small crustaceans known as brine shrimp live in marine habitats such as saltwater lakes. In this activity, learners create a saltwater or marine ecosystem that becomes an experimental brine shrimp hatchery. Learners observe the brine shrimp life cycle and test the effect of salinity (salt content) on brine shrimp eggs and larvae, as well as consider the potential impact of other variables such as water temperature and pollution.

  15. Rice blast disease in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice is an important agricultural commodity in Texas, with an economic impact of more than $1 billion annually. Rice blast, caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases in rice. Texas Rice Belt provides a warm, humid climate favorable for the infection and reproduction of M....

  16. Information: Rice Young Alumni Information

    E-print Network

    Palem, Krishna V.

    Rice Young Alumni Detailed Information: Houston Events 2011-2012 #12; Rice Young Alumni Information Alumni.rice.edu 2 Join the Parliament in HoustonHouston Young Alumni Events This page to this site for more information and visit our Rice Young Alumni Houston Facebook page for special details

  17. Upland Rice Production in Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. P. Barbosa Filho; T. Yamada

    Most of the upland rice produced in Brazil is on Oxisols with low water-holding capacity and often with low fertility. This article outlines some of the management practices being studied for sustainable rice production systems. Upland rice occupied 2.4 million ha or 64 percent of the total rice area in Brazil in 1999 (Table 1). However, due to lower productivity

  18. Bioengineering nitrogen acquisition in rice

    E-print Network

    Britto, Dev T.

    Bioengineering nitrogen acquisition in rice: can novel initiatives in rice genomics and physiology to recombinant DNA technology. Here, we focus on the promise of these moderntechnologies inthe area of nitrogen acquisitionin rice, recognizing that nitrogen deficiency compromises the realization of rice yield potential

  19. Climate change: implications for the yield of edible rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangqian; Fitzgerald, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Global warming affects not only rice yield but also grain quality. A better understanding of the effects of climate factors on rice quality provides information for new breeding strategies to develop varieties of rice adapted to a changing world. Chalkiness is a key trait of physical quality, and along with head rice yield, is used to determine the price of rice in all markets. In the present study, we show that for every ?1% decrease in chalkiness, an increase of ?1% in head rice yield follows, illustrating the dual impact of chalk on amount of marketable rice and its value. Previous studies in controlled growing conditions report that chalkiness is associated with high temperature. From 1980-2009 at IRRI, Los Baños, the Philippines, annual minimum and mean temperatures, and diurnal variation changed significantly. The objective of this study was to determine how climate impacts chalkiness in field conditions over four wet and dry seasons. We show that low relative humidity and a high vapour pressure deficit in the dry season associate with low chalk and high head rice yield in spite of higher maximum temperature, but in the opposite conditions of the wet season, chalk is high and head rice yield is low. The data therefore suggest that transpirational cooling is a key factor affecting chalkiness and head rice yield, and global warming per se might not be the major factor that decreases the amount and quality of rice, but other climate factors in combination, that enable the crop to maintain a cool canopy. PMID:23776635

  20. Functional diversity of jasmonates in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Shumin; Sun, Ning; Liu, Hongyun; Zhao, Yanhong; Liang, Yuling; Zhang, Liping; Han, Yuanhuai

    2015-12-01

    Phytohormone jasmonates (JA) play essential roles in plants, such as regulating development and growth, responding to environmental changes, and resisting abiotic and biotic stresses. During signaling, JA interacts, either synergistically or antagonistically, with other hormones, such as salicylic acid (SA), gibberellin (GA), ethylene (ET), auxin, brassinosteroid (BR), and abscisic acid (ABA), to regulate gene expression in regulatory networks, conferring physiological and metabolic adjustments in plants. As an important staple crop, rice is a major nutritional source for human beings and feeds one third of the world's population. Recent years have seen significant progress in the understanding of the JA pathway in rice. In this review, we summarize the diverse functions of JA, and discuss the JA interplay with other hormones, as well as light, in this economically important crop. We believe that a better understanding of the JA pathway will lead to practical biotechnological applications in rice breeding and cultivation. PMID:26054241

  1. Effect of rice cultivation systems on indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community structure.

    PubMed

    Watanarojanaporn, Nantida; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tittabutr, Panlada; Longtonglang, Aphakorn; Young, J Peter W; Teaumroong, Neung

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in an agricultural ecosystem are necessary for proper management of beneficial symbiosis. Here we explored how the patterns of the AMF community in rice roots were affected by rice cultivation systems (the system of rice intensification [SRI] and the conventional rice cultivation system [CS]), and by compost application during growth stages. Rice plants harvested from SRI-managed plots exhibited considerably higher total biomass, root dry weight, and seed fill than those obtained from conventionally managed plots. Our findings revealed that all AMF sequences observed from CS plots belonged (only) to the genus Glomus, colonizing in rice roots grown under this type of cultivation, while rice roots sown in SRI showed sequences belonging to both Glomus and Acaulospora. The AMF community was compared between the different cultivation types (CS and SRI) and compost applications by principle component analysis. In all rice growth stages, AMF assemblages of CS management were not separated from those of SRI management. The distribution of AMF community composition based on T-RFLP data showed that the AMF community structure was different among four cultivation systems, and there was a gradual increase of Shannon-Weaver indices of diversity (H') of the AMF community under SRI during growth stages. The results of this research indicated that rice grown in SRI-managed plots had more diverse AMF communities than those grown in CS plots. PMID:23719585

  2. Ecological mechanisms underlying the sustainability of the agricultural heritage rice-fish coculture system.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jian; Hu, Liangliang; Tang, Jianjun; Wu, Xue; Li, Nana; Yuan, Yongge; Yang, Haishui; Zhang, Jiaen; Luo, Shiming; Chen, Xin

    2011-12-13

    For centuries, traditional agricultural systems have contributed to food and livelihood security throughout the world. Recognizing the ecological legacy in the traditional agricultural systems may help us develop novel sustainable agriculture. We examine how rice-fish coculture (RF), which has been designated a "globally important agricultural heritage system," has been maintained for over 1,200 y in south China. A field survey demonstrated that although rice yield and rice-yield stability are similar in RF and rice monoculture (RM), RF requires 68% less pesticide and 24% less chemical fertilizer than RM. A field experiment confirmed this result. We documented that a mutually beneficial relationship between rice and fish develops in RF: Fish reduce rice pests and rice favors fish by moderating the water environment. This positive relationship between rice and fish reduces the need for pesticides in RF. Our results also indicate a complementary use of nitrogen (N) between rice and fish in RF, resulting in low N fertilizer application and low N release into the environment. These findings provide unique insights into how positive interactions and complementary use of resource between species generate emergent ecosystem properties and how modern agricultural systems might be improved by exploiting synergies between species. PMID:22084110

  3. Rice-based oral antibody fragment prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhara, Daisuke; ?lvarez, Beatriz; Mejima, Mio; Hiroiwa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Yuko; Kurokawa, Shiho; Kuroda, Masaharu; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Nochi, Tomonori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Aladin, Farah; Marcotte, Harold; Frenken, Leon G.J.; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Hammarström, Lennart; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus-induced diarrhea is a life-threatening disease in immunocompromised individuals and in children in developing countries. We have developed a system for prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus disease using transgenic rice expressing the neutralizing variable domain of a rotavirus-specific llama heavy-chain antibody fragment (MucoRice-ARP1). MucoRice-ARP1 was produced at high levels in rice seeds using an overexpression system and RNAi technology to suppress the production of major rice endogenous storage proteins. Orally administered MucoRice-ARP1 markedly decreased the viral load in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. The antibody retained in vitro neutralizing activity after long-term storage (>1 yr) and boiling and conferred protection in mice even after heat treatment at 94°C for 30 minutes. High-yield, water-soluble, and purification-free MucoRice-ARP1 thus forms the basis for orally administered prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus infections. PMID:23925294

  4. VANET security research and development ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irshad Ahmed Sumra; Halabi Hasbullah; Jamalul-lail Ab Manan

    2011-01-01

    Every year thousands of people are seriously injured or die in road accidents over the globe. Traffic jam and road accidents are major problems in the current traffic system. These problems directly affect human lives at the road. In this paper, we present the Vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) Security R&D Ecosystem is discussed. The R&D Ecosystem can be divided

  5. Chesapeake Bay: Introduction to an Ecosystem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the contiguous United States. The Bay and its tidal tributaries make up the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. This document, which focuses of various aspects of this ecosystem, is divided into four major parts. The first part traces the geologic history of the Bay, describes the overall physical structure of…

  6. PRESERVING BIODIVERSITY: SPECIES, ECOSYSTEMS, OR LANDSCAPES?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JERRY F. FRANKLIN

    1993-01-01

    Efforts to preserve biological diversity must focus increasingly at the ecosystem level because of the immense number of species, the majority of which are currently unknown. An ecosystem approach is also the only way to conserve processes and habitats (such as forest canopies, belowground habitats, and hyporheic zones) that, with their constituent species, are poorly known. Continued concern with species

  7. ESRP approach to using final ecosystem services

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed the ecosystem Services Research Program (ESRP) as one of its major research efforts. The goal of this program is to create ?A comprehensive theory and practice for quantifying ecosystem services so that their value and their...

  8. Characterization of rice blast resistance genes in rice germplasm with monogenic lines and pathogenicity assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) genes have been effectively deployed in preventing rice crop losses due to the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. In the present study, we studied the interaction between 24 monogenic lines carrying at least one major R gene, Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pi...

  9. Weed Management in Rice?Based Cropping Systems in Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Rodenburg; D. E. Johnson

    2009-01-01

    Weed competition is a major constraint in all the rice production systems in Africa. In addition to the costs of weed control, weeds account for yield losses estimated to be at least 2.2 million tons per year in sub?Saharan Africa, valued at $1.45 billion, and equating to approximately half the current total imports of rice to this region. Important weeds

  10. Crop\\/weed competition studies in upland rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Govindra Singh; S. R. Yadav; D. Singh

    1987-01-01

    Critical period of crop\\/weed competition was studied in upland rice during monsoon season from 1981 to 1983. Echinochloa colonum, Seirpus grossus, Dactyloctenlum aegyptium, Cyperus rotundus, C. iria and Trianthema monogyna were the major weed species. Competition from weeds during the first 15 days after sowing (d.a.s.) had no significant effect on the grain yield of rice. Competition beyond 15 d.a.s.

  11. Louisiana Coastal Ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2000-01-01

    Louisiana's coast and its degradation and restoration are major environmental issues being studied at the National Wetlands Research Center. Coastal ecosystems are vulnerable because of the tremendous amount of human activity that takes place along the coast. Information on ecological processes is essential to guide the development along the coast as well as to protect and restore wildlife habitat. Louisiana has about 40% of coastal wetlands in the lower 48 states; they support fish, waterfowl, and fur-bearing animals as well as unique cultures like that of the Acadians. The fish and wildlife resources of Louisiana's coast produce over $1 billion each year in revenues. But Louisiana has the highest coastal loss rate because of natural and human causes. Over the past three decades, Louisiana has lost as much as 35-40 mi2 (90-104 km2) of coastal wetlands a year. The National Wetlands Research Center is qualified to assess and monitor this ecosystem because of its proximity to the study area, a staff chosen for their expertise in the system, and a number of established partnerships with others who study the areas. The Center is often the lead group in partnerships with universities, other federal agencies, and private entities who study this ecosystem. Most of the Center's research and technology development performed for coastal wetlands are done at the Lafayette headquarters; some work is performed at the National Wetlands Research Center's project office in Baton Rouge, LA.

  12. QTL analysis of internode elongation in response to gibberellin in deepwater rice

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Keisuke; Kondo, Yuma; Kitaoka, Takuya; Noda, Tomonori; Kuroha, Takeshi; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn B.; Yasui, Hideshi; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Ashikari, Motoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Gibberellin (GA) is a plant hormone that has important roles in numerous plant developmental phases. Rice plants known as deepwater rice respond to flooding by elongating their internodes to avoid anoxia. Previous studies reported that GA is essential for internode elongation in deepwater rice. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses identified QTLs regulating internode elongation in response to deepwater conditions. However, the interaction between internode elongation and regulators of GA sensitivity in deepwater rice is unknown. In this study, we applied GA to recombinant inbred lines of T65 (non-deepwater rice) and Bhadua (deepwater rice), and performed a QTL analysis of internode elongation in response to GA. GA-induced internode elongation was detected only in deepwater rice. Our QTL analysis revealed two major QTLs on chromosomes 3 and 9 regulating total internode length, lowest elongated internode and number of elongated internodes. Furthermore, the QTL on chromosome 3 acted as an enhancer of other QTLs (e.g. the QTL on chromosome 12). Nearly isogenic lines of deepwater rice carrying the QTL regions from chromosomes 3 and 12 of the deepwater rice C9285 showed internode elongation in response to GA. Thus, these QTLs may regulate GA responsiveness in deepwater rice. This study furthers our understanding of the mechanism of internode elongation in rice. PMID:24946943

  13. Rice Diseases Atlas. 

    E-print Network

    Walla, Walter

    1977-01-01

    . This condition is common early in the growing season when soil temperatures are cool FOLIAGE DISEASES Rice Blast - (fungus Piricularia oryzae) - Blast is one of the most important rice diseases in Texas. This disease varies in severity from year to year.... ~ ______________________________________________________________________ 5 Brown Leaf Sppt - (fungus He/minthosporium oryzae) - The disease is found on leaves, leaf sheath, panicle branches, glumes and grain. The fungus causes brown circular to oval spots on the first leaf sheath while it is still below ground...

  14. Terrestrial Ecosystem Adaptation

    E-print Network

    Mills, L. Scott

    Terrestrial Ecosystem Adaptation Steven W. Running and L. Scott Mills RFF REPORT ............................... 16 Expected Future Ecosystem Trends ................................................................................................................................................................ 27 #12; RUNNING AND MILLS 1 Terrestrial Ecosystem Adaptation Steven W. Running and L. Scott

  15. I Spy an Ecosystem

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Biology

    We hear the word ecosystems in the news and at school but just what are ecosystems? It turns out there are lots of ecosystems. You might even learn you have some inside you! Also in: Français | Español

  16. Population structure of putative rice-red rice hybrid derivatives in the Southern U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice and red rice can readily intercross in southern U.S. rice fields, however, the extent to which progeny of these rice-red rice hybrids may have successfully moved into red rice populations is unknown. Approximately 430 red rice accessions were obtained from farm samples in 1999 and 2000. Forty...

  17. A draft sequence of the rice ( Oryza sativa ssp. indica ) genome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Yu; Songnian Hu; Jun Wang; Songgang Li; Ka-Shu Gane Wong; Bin Liu; Yajun Deng; Li Dai; Yan Zhou; Xiuqing Zhang; Mengliang Cao; Jing Liu; Jiandong Sun; Jiabin Tang; Yanjiong Chen; Xiaobing Huang; Wei Lin; Chen Ye; Wei Tong; Lijuan Cong; Jianing Geng; Yujun Han; Lin Li; Wei Li; Guangqiang Hu; Xiangang Huang; Wenjie Li; Jian Li; Zhanwei Liu; Long Li; Jianping Liu; Qiuhui Qi; Jinsong Liu; Li Li; Xuegang Wang; Hong Lu; Tingting Wu; Miao Zhu; Peixiang Ni; Hua Han; Wei Dong; Xiaoyu Ren; Xiaoli Feng; Peng Cui; Xianran Li; Hao Wang; Xin Xu; Wenxue Zhai; Zhao Xu; Jinsong Zhang; Sijie He; Jianguo Zhang; Jichen Xu; Kunlin Zhang; Xianwu Zheng; Jianhai Dong; Wanyong Zeng; Lin Tao; Xuewei Chen; Jun He; Daofeng Liu; Wei Tian; Chaoguang Tian; Hongai Xia; Gang Li; Hui Gao; Ping Li; Wei Chen; Xudong Wang; Yong Zhang; Jianfei Hu; Jing Wang; Song Liu; Jian Yang; Guangyu Zhang; Yuqing Xiong; Zhijie Li; Long Mao; Chengshu Zhou; Zhen Zhu; Runsheng Chen; Bailin Hao; Weimou Zheng; Shouyi Chen; Wei Guo; Guojie Li; Siqi Liu; Guyang Huang; Ming Tao; Jian Wang; Lihuang Zhu; Longping Yuan; Huanming Yang

    2001-01-01

    The sequence of the rice genome holds fundamental information for its biology, including physiology, genetics, development,\\u000a and evolution, as well as information on many beneficial phenotypes of economic significance. Using a “whole genome shotgun”\\u000a approach, we have produced a draft rice genome sequence ofOryza sativa ssp.indica, the major crop rice subspecies in China and many other regions of Asia. The

  18. Mapping of QTLs for phosphorus-deficiency tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Wissuwa; M. Yano; N. Ae

    1998-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) deficiency of soils is a major yield-limiting factor in rice production. Increasing the P-deficiency tolerance\\u000a of rice cultivars may represent a more cost-effective solution than relying on fertilizer application. The objective of this\\u000a study was to identify putative QTLs for P-deficiency tolerance in rice, using 98 backcross inbred lines derived from a japonica?indica cross and genotyped at 245

  19. Effects of Out-migration on Rice-Farming Households and Women Left Behind in Vietnam

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thelma R. Paris; Truong Thi Ngoc Chi; Maria Fay Rola-Rubzen; Joyce S. Luis

    2009-01-01

    Vietnam is one of the major rice-producing countries in Asia, and since 1989 it has been a rice-exporting country. However, poor rice-farming households that depend primarily upon their own labor for farming face significant constraints on production that push members to migrate. Out-migration could have effects on agricultural production and household welfare. This study was conducted to draw correlations across

  20. [Cycling and balance of copper in farmland ecosystem of Jianghan plain in Hubei Province].

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuangfei; Xu, Xiaoqing; Xiang, Yaling; Jin, Xia; Shao, Zhihui

    2003-01-01

    The cycling and balance of copper in 8 cropping systems, i.e., wheat-rice, rice-rice, rape-soybean, rape-peanut, wheat-sesame, wheat-cotton, pepper-cabbage and radish-eggplant in Jianghan plain of Hubei Province were studied. The results showed that the main output of copper was crop harvesting, up to 85.9%-95.1% of total output, and the output of copper by field runoff and soil leaching was low. The main inputs of copper were organic fertilizer, rainfall, falldrop, and natural return. The inputs of copper from inorganic fertilizer and seeds (seedlings) were low. The balance analysis pointed out that copper had an accumulative trend in two patterns of rice and commercial vegetable ecosystem, and was in balance in upland field ecosystem. PMID:12722442

  1. Modelling the Security Ecosystem - The Dynamics of (In)Security

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Frei; Dominik Schatzmann; Bernhard Plattner; Brian Trammell

    by a wide variety of actors and pro- cesses which together make up a security ecosystem; here we examine this ecosystem, consolidating many as- pects of security that have hitherto been discussed only separately. First, we analyze the roles of the major ac- tors within this ecosystem and the processes they par- ticipate in, and the the paths vulnerability data

  2. Mammoth ecosystem: Climatic areal, animal's density and cause of extinctions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Zimov; N. Zimov; G. Zimova; S. F. Chapin

    2008-01-01

    During the last glaciations Mammoth Ecosystem (ME) occupied territory from present-day France to Canada and from the Arctic islands to China. This ecosystem played major role in global carbon cycle and human settling around the planet. Causes of extinction of this ecosystem are debatable. Analyses of hundreds of radiocarbon dates of ME animal fossil remains showed that warming and moistening

  3. ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Increasing donor ecosystem productivity decreases terrestrial

    E-print Network

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER Increasing donor ecosystem productivity decreases terrestrial Abstract Because nutrient enrichment can increase ecosystem productivity, it may enhance resource flows to adjacent ecosystems as organisms cross ecosystem bound- aries and subsidize predators in recipient

  4. Rice University Rice Outdoor Programs and Education (ROPE) Internship

    E-print Network

    Rice University Rice Outdoor Programs and Education (ROPE) Internship Fall and Spring Semester 2012-2013 Position: Internship - Paid Location: Rice University, Houston, Texas Start Date: August 13th, 2012 End-lead students on outdoor adventure trips, aid in the teaching of a college course, and assist with supervision

  5. Competitive N uptake between rice and weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy rice, red rice (Oryza sativa L.), is a serious problem in rice-producing areas of the southern U.S. and various regions worldwide. It competes for production inputs, increases weed control costs, reduces yield and grain quality, and could eliminate economic returns. Research was conducted to...

  6. Diversity of methanogenic archaeal communities in Japanese paddy field ecosystem, estimated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takeshi Watanabe; Makoto Kimura; Susumu Asakawa

    2010-01-01

    Diversity of methanogenic archaeal communities in Japanese paddy field ecosystem was evaluated by the denaturing gradient\\u000a gel electrophoresis (DGGE) after PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNAs), sequencing analysis and data evaluation\\u000a by principal component analysis. Data were obtained from samples collected from the plowed soil layer, rice roots, rice straws\\u000a incorporated in soil, plant residues (mixture of

  7. RICE UNIVERSITY BEAMSWITCH: DIRECTIONAL TRANSMISSION

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Lin

    RICE UNIVERSITY BEAMSWITCH: DIRECTIONAL TRANSMISSION FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT WIRELESS COMMUNICATION guidance and support throughout my research and study at Rice. This work would not be possible without his

  8. Rheological properties of rice-blackgram batter while replacing white rice with brown rice.

    PubMed

    Manickavasagan, Annamalai; Al-Marhubi, Insaaf Mohd; Dev, Satyanarayan

    2014-06-01

    Rice-blackgram batter is a raw material for many traditional convenience foods in Asia. Reformulation of traditional convenience food by replacing white rice with whole rice (brown rice) is a novel method to reduce the consumption of refined grain and increase the intake of whole grain in our diet. In this study, rheological properties of rice-blackgram batter was investigated while replacing white rice with brown rice at five levels (T1--0% replacement (control), T2--25% replacement, T3--50% replacement, T4--75% replacement, and T5--100% replacement). The shear stress versus shear rate plot indicates that the rice-blackgram batter exhibited non-Newtonian fluid behavior (shear thinning property) even after 100% replacement of white rice with brown rice. The rheological characteristics of rice-blackgram batters fitted reasonably well in Cassan (r2 = 0.8521-0.9856) and power law (r2 = 0.8042-0.9823) models. Brown rice replacement at all levels did not affect the flow behavior index, yield stress, consistency coefficient, and apparent viscosity of batter at 25 degrees C. However, at higher temperature, the viscosity was greater for T4 and T5 (no difference between them) than T1, T2, and T3 (no difference between them) batters. Further research is required to determine the sensory attributes and acceptability of the cooked products with brown rice-blended batter. PMID:23751544

  9. Degradation of chlorpyrifos in tropical rice soils.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhasis; Adhya, Tapan K

    2015-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos [O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol) phosphorothioate] is used worldwide as an agricultural insecticide against a broad spectrum of insect pests of economically important crops including rice, and soil application to control termites. The insecticide mostly undergoes hydrolysis to diethyl thiophosphoric acid (DETP) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), and negligible amounts of other intermediate products. In a laboratory-cum-greenhouse study, chlorpyrifos, applied at a rate of 10 mg kg(-1) soil to five tropical rice soils of wide physico-chemical variability, degraded with a half-life ranging from 27.07 to 3.82 days. TCP was the major metabolite under both non-flooded and flooded conditions. Chlorpyrifos degradation had significant negative relationship with electrical conductivity (EC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), clay and sand contents of the soils under non-flooded conditions. Results indicate that degradation of chlorpyrifos was accelerated with increase in its application frequency, across the representative rice soils. Management regimes including moisture content and presence or absence of rice plants also influenced the process. Biotic factors also play an important role in the degradation of chlorpyrifos as demonstrated by its convincing degradation in mineral salts medium inoculated with non-sterile soil suspension. PMID:25617866

  10. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research 

    E-print Network

    2004-01-01

    cherry oat aphid on seedling rice and investigating chinch bug damage on ratoon rice. Extension The Entomology Project continues to make on-site inspections of problem rice fields. This year false chinch bug, Nyssius raphanus, was found in very high...

  11. Rice Boulevard Track/Soccer

    E-print Network

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    Rice Boulevard Track/Soccer Stadium Reckling Park Founder's Court Sunset Boulevard Main Street University Boulevard Entrance 1 Entrance 2 Entrance 8 Entrance 20Entrance 18 Rice Stadium Vistor Parking Vistor Parking Vistor Parking L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L Rice University Centennial

  12. Huajian Gao James R. Rice

    E-print Network

    Huajian Gao James R. Rice Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 02138 Shear Stress Intensity Factors for a Planar Crack With Slightly Curved Front Recent work (Rice, 1985a be found. Rice (1985a) showed how the knowledge of such solutions enables one to calculate the changes

  13. Huajian Gao James R. Rice

    E-print Network

    Huajian Gao James R. Rice Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 is based on the perturbation technique developed by Rice (1985) for solving the elastic field of a crack is suppressed and configurationally unstable if there is no such restraint. Introduction Rice (1985) developed

  14. Development of a microarray for two rice subspecies: characterization and validation of gene expression in rice tissues

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rice is one of the major crop species in the world helping to sustain approximately half of the global population’s diet especially in Asia. However, due to the impact of extreme climate change and global warming, rice crop production and yields may be adversely affected resulting in a world food crisis. Researchers have been keen to understand the effects of drought, temperature and other environmental stress factors on rice plant growth and development. Gene expression microarray technology represents a key strategy for the identification of genes and their associated expression patterns in response to stress. Here, we report on the development of the rice OneArray® microarray platform which is suitable for two major rice subspecies, japonica and indica. Results The rice OneArray® 60-mer, oligonucleotide microarray consists of a total of 21,179 probes covering 20,806 genes of japonica and 13,683 genes of indica. Through a validation study, total RNA isolated from rice shoots and roots were used for comparison of gene expression profiles via microarray examination. The results were submitted to NCBI’s Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Data can be found under the GEO accession number GSE50844 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE50844). A list of significantly differentially expressed genes was generated; 438 shoot-specific genes were identified among 3,138 up-regulated genes, and 463 root-specific genes were found among 3,845 down-regulated genes. GO enrichment analysis demonstrates these results are in agreement with the known physiological processes of the different organs/tissues. Furthermore, qRT-PCR validation was performed on 66 genes, and found to significantly correlate with the microarray results (R?=?0.95, p?rice OneArray® 22 K microarray, the first rice microarray, covering both japonica and indica subspecies was designed and validated in a comprehensive study of gene expression in rice tissues. The rice OneArray® microarray platform revealed high specificity and sensitivity. Additional information for the rice OneArray® microarray can be found at http://www.phalanx.com.tw/index.php. PMID:24398116

  15. Internet Geography: Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site about ecosystems and biomes contains a map of different ecosystems, and provides rainfall statistics for each biome. There are sections on tropical rainforest, taiga (or boreal forest), savanna, desert, and tundra ecosystems. Each section describes the biome and its origins, where it is found, and how humans impact it. In some cases, sustainable development of the ecosystem is explained.

  16. A Decade of Ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen R Carpenter; Monica G. Turner

    2007-01-01

    Ten years ago, Ecosystems was introduced as a ‘‘substrate for primary succession of the discipline‘‘ (Carpenter and Turner 1998). We envisioned Ecosystems as an arena for new ways of thinking and new kinds of progress in ecosystem science. We suggested four frontiers that seemed particularly important at that time. ‘‘People and ecosystems‘‘ addressed the study of social-ecological systems, including pressing

  17. Seeing red: The origin of grain pigmentation in US weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) is the major weed of cultivated rice fields in the US, where it causes tens of millions of dollars in crop losses annually. This weedy crop-relative is characterized by several traits that are typical of wild Oryza species, including the anthocyanin-pigmented pericarp tha...

  18. Insect-Resistant GM Rice in Farmers' Fields: Assessing Productivity and Health Effects in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jikun Huang; Ruifa Hu; Scott Rozelle; Carl Pray

    2005-01-01

    Although no country to date has released a major genetically modified (GM) food grain crop, China is on the threshold of commercializing GM rice. This paper studies two of the four GM varieties that are now in farm-level preproduction trials, the last step before commercialization. Farm surveys of randomly selected farm households that are cultivating the insect-resistant GM rice varieties,

  19. Field water management to save water and increase its productivity in irrigated lowland rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. A. M. Bouman; T. P. Tuong

    2001-01-01

    Rice production in Asia needs to increase to feed a growing population whereas water for irrigation is getting scarcer. Major challenges are to (i) save water; (ii) increase water productivity and (iii) produce more rice with less water. This study analyzes the ways in which water-saving irrigation can help to meet these challenges at the field level. The analyses are

  20. Characterizing the Saltol Quantitative Trait Locus for Salinity Tolerance in Rice

    E-print Network

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    Characterizing the Saltol Quantitative Trait Locus for Salinity Tolerance in Rice Michael J) for seedling stage salinity tolerance in preparation for use in marker-assisted breeding. An analysis of 100 of the high sensitivity of modern rice varieties. Salinity is particularly a major problem in coastal regions

  1. Characterizing the Saltol Quantitative Trait Locus for Salinity Tolerance in Rice

    E-print Network

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    Characterizing the Saltol Quantitative Trait Locus for Salinity Tolerance in Rice Michael J-derived quanti- tative trait loci (QTLs) for seedling stage salinity tolerance in preparation for use in marker because of the high sensitivity of modern rice varieties. Salinity is particularly a major problem

  2. Genetic diversity and classification of Oryza sativa with emphasis on Chinese rice germplasm.

    PubMed

    Wang, C-H; Zheng, X-M; Xu, Q; Yuan, X-P; Huang, L; Zhou, H-F; Wei, X-H; Ge, S

    2014-05-01

    Despite extensive studies on cultivated rice, the genetic structure and subdivision of this crop remain unclear at both global and local scales. Using 84 nuclear simple sequence repeat markers, we genotyped a panel of 153 global rice cultivars covering all previously recognized groups and 826 cultivars representing the diversity of Chinese rice germplasm. On the basis of model-based grouping, neighbour-joining tree and principal coordinate analysis, we confirmed the widely accepted five major groups of rice cultivars (indica, aus, aromatic, temperate japonica and tropical japonica), and demonstrated that rayada rice was unique in genealogy and should be treated as a new (the sixth) major group of rice germplasm. With reference to the global classification of rice cultivars, we identified three major groups (indica, temperate japonica and tropical japonica) in Chinese rice germplasm and showed that Chinese temperate japonica contained higher diversity than that of global samples, whereas Chinese indica and tropical japonica maintained slightly lower diversity than that present in the global samples. Particularly, we observed that all seasonal, drought-tolerant and endosperm types occurred within each of three major groups of Chinese cultivars, which does not support previous claims that seasonal differentiation exists in Indica and drought-tolerant differentiation is present in Japonica. It is most likely that differentiation of cultivar types arose multiple times stemming from artificial selection for adaptation to local environments. PMID:24326293

  3. Tillage and Crop Establishment in South Asian Rice-Wheat Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R. Hobbs

    2001-01-01

    Tillage is one of the primary activities for crop production. It is a major cost for crop production and has a strong influence on yield through its interaction with timely planting and good plant stand. In the South Asian rice-wheat systems of the Indo-Gangetic Plains the tillage for rice is unique in that wet plowing (locally called puddling) is most

  4. RICE GROWTH, YIELD AND PHOTOSYNTHETIC RESPONSES TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CARBON DIOXIDE CONCENTRATION AND DROUGHT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice is a major food crop that should respond favorably to expected future increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. Due to uncertainties in the timing and amounts of monsoonal rainfall, drought is common in some rainfed rice production systems. In this paper, we summarize results of e...

  5. Genetic mapping of microsatellite (SSR) markers linked to the rice Pi-i blast resistance gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast is a major fungus disease threat to rice production throughout the world. Genes conferring resistance to blast are a valuable and environmentally-friendly means to minimize crop losses from this serious disease. The Pi-i blast resistance gene has been utilized worldwide as a source of dis...

  6. Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) control in herbicide tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.) 

    E-print Network

    Steele, Gregory Lee

    2000-01-01

    Red rice has interfered with production of commercial rice in the United States for over 150 years. Because of the genetic and physiological similarities between red rice and commercial rice, herbicides have been unsuccessful in adequately...

  7. [An ecologic study of adult and larval Culicidae in a rice field of Kou Valley, Burkino Faso].

    PubMed

    Robert, V; Ouari, B; Ouedraogo, V; Carnevale, P

    1988-12-01

    An entomological survey based on collections of human bait mosquitoes and of mosquito larvae was carried out through one year in a rice-field, the Kou Valley of southwest Burkina Faso. Each year, in this irrigated rice field there are two crops of rice, one during the dry season and another during the wet one. Between the two rice cycles irrigation is interrupted and the rice field becomes dry. The rice crop cycle moves through several stages, all of which have positive or negative effects on the development of the larvae of most abundant mosquitoes species. Rice cultivation does not explain however entirely the ecology of mosquito populations. Two main limiting factors for mosquito development are highlighted: the season with two periods (1. dry, 2. wet) and the rice cultivation with three periods (1. start of the flooding, growing rice transplantation and tillering, 2. rice heading and flowering, 3. rice maturation and harvest). The development of a majority of mosquito species depends strictly on rice growth: (i) Anopheles gambiae s.1. uses the whole rice field during the first period of rice cultivation until growing rice protects the larval breeding places from solar radiation. It is the most frequent mosquito (53% of the man-biting mosquitoes caught). 5% of its larvae are parasitized with a fungus Coelomomyces sp., (ii) A. pharoensis has its maximum density during the second period of rice cultivation, as Culex gr. decens; both seem to succeed better in the dry season, contrary to all other anophelines, (iii) A. coustani profits by the third period when the pH of the breeding places becomes basic.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2907262

  8. The State of Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christi�¡n Samper (National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution; )

    2005-08-01

    The recent Millennium Ecosystem Assessment has illustrated that human actions have significantly transformed many of Earths ecosystems. The main findings describe how: humans changed ecosystems dramatically over the past 50 years, changes to ecosystem services may get worse in the next 50 years, global action at all levels can reverse the degradation, and how ecosystem degradation increases risks of sudden changes and reduces benefits for future generations.

  9. A rice phenomics study—phenotype scoring and seed propagation of a T-DNA insertion-induced rice mutant population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chyr-Guan Chern; Ming-Jen Fan; Su-May Yu; Po-Chang Lu; Yao-Cheng Lin; Fu-Jin Wei; Sheng-Chung Huang; Shu Chen; Ming-Hsing Lai; Ching-Shan Tseng; Hsing-Mu Yen; Woei-Shyuan Jwo; Chen-Chia Wu; Tung-Lung Yang; Lung-Sheng Li; Yih-Cheng Kuo; Su-Mien Li; Charng-Pei Li; Chiu-Kai Wey; Arunee Trisiriroj; Hsing-Fang Lee; Yue-Ie C. Hsing

    2007-01-01

    With the completion of the rice genome sequencing project, the next major challenge is the large-scale determination of gene\\u000a function. As an important crop and a model organism, rice provides major insights into gene functions important for crop growth\\u000a or production. Phenomics with detailed information about tagged populations provides a good tool for functional genomics analysis.\\u000a By a T-DNA insertional

  10. A brief review of approaches using ciliated protists to assess aquatic ecosystem health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denis H. Lynn; Guy L. Gilron

    1992-01-01

    Ciliated protists are important components of marine and freshwater ecosystems. As such, their usefulness as indicators of aquatic ecosystem health has been recognized. Two major technical approaches have been employed: (1) community assessment, and (2) toxicological tests. Community assessment of an aquatic ecosystem must at least include comparisons to either baseline data on the ecosystem under study or to ‘pristine’

  11. Texas Rice, Volume 1, Number 4 

    E-print Network

    2001-01-01

    . It is distributed by email, mail, DTN, PDF, or fax under a low-cost subscription program. A sister company, RiceOnline is a rice informa- tion site for the worldwide rice industry. Features in- clude: Up-to-date rice market news, rice futures and quotes, directories...

  12. Coral Reef Ecosystems: Ecosystems in Crisis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2007-03-28

    This Science Object is the fourth of four Science Objects in the Coral Reef Ecosystems SciPack. It explores the natural and human causes of ecosystem stress. Human beings live near coral ecosystems and use them in a variety of ways. Increasing amounts of stress is brought on these ecosystems as humans continue to modify the surrounding environment as a result of population growth, technology, and consumption. Human destruction of habitats through direct harvesting, pollution, atmospheric changes, and other factors is threatening the stability and overall health of many coral reefs. Human activities may also exacerbate the impact of natural disturbances on coral reefs or compromise the ability of the reef to recover from events such as hurricanes, tsunamis, or disease. Learning Outcomes:? Describe ways in which human activities directly impact coral reef ecosystems (resource and recreational uses).? Describe ways in which human activities indirectly impact coral reef ecosystems (by changing the physical conditions, pollution, changes in the water chemistry, etc.).? Explain how human activity may decrease the reefs ability to recover from natural occurrences. ? Explain the effects of increased predation or disease on a reef ecosystem.? Describe the effect of habitat loss on the reef ecosystem.? Describe the effects of weather and climate change on a healthy and weakened reef ecosystem.

  13. Ecosystem health: I. Measuring ecosystem health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, David J.; Herricks, Edwin E.; Kerster, Harold W.

    1988-07-01

    Ecosystem analysis has been advanced by an improved understanding of how ecosystems are structured and how they function. Ecology has advanced from an emphasis on natural history to consideration of energetics, the relationships and connections between species, hierarchies, and systems theory. Still, we consider ecosystems as entities with a distinctive character and individual characteristics. Ecosystem maintenance and preservation form the objective of impact analysis, hazard evaluation, and other management or regulation activities. In this article we explore an approach to ecosystem analysis which identifies and quantifies factors which define the condition or state of an ecosystem in terms of health criteria. We relate ecosystem health to human/nonhuman animal health and explore the difficulties of defining ecosystem health and suggest criteria which provide a functional definition of state and condition. We suggest that, as has been found in human/nonhuman animal health studies, disease states can be recognized before disease is of clinical magnitude. Example disease states for ecosystems are functionally defined and discussed, together with test systems for their early detection.

  14. Localization and speciation of mercury in brown rice with implications for pan-Asian public health.

    PubMed

    Meng, Bo; Feng, Xinbin; Qiu, Guangle; Anderson, Christopher W N; Wang, Jianxu; Zhao, Lei

    2014-07-15

    Cultivation of paddy rice for human consumption is a dominant agricultural activity throughout Asia. High levels of mercury (Hg) in rice grain pose a potential threat to human health, although the extent of risk is dependent on the chemical speciation of Hg inside the grain. We have investigated the speciation and localization of Hg in three fractions of rice grain (hull, bran, and white rice) collected from a Hg-contaminated region in China. On a mass basis, the majority of inorganic mercury (IHg) in a rice grain is found in hull and bran. However, the majority of the more toxic species methyl mercury (MeHg) is found in edible white rice. Our data show that during grain processing, most of the IHg (?78%) is eliminated, but the majority of the MeHg remains in the food product (?80%). Synchrotron radiation microscopic X-ray fluorescence (SR-?XRF) mapping shows strong localization of Hg at the surface of brown rice grains, corresponding to the pericarp and aleurone layer. We infer that this Hg is predominantly IHg absorbed from the atmosphere. Based on X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) data we propose that IHg in bran is primarily bound to cysteine, and is associated with phytochelatins. Consequently, IHg is largely immobile and restricted to the outer layers of rice grain. MeHg in bran is primarily bound to cysteine and is associated with proteins. However, this MeHg-cysteine association behaves like a mobile nutrient and is actively transported to the endosperm during seed ripening. Concentration of MeHg-cysteine in white rice has implications for public health. There is growing evidence for Hg contamination of rice throughout Asia due to point and diffuse sources of Hg pollution. The magnitude of the associated risk must be quantified through better understanding of the localization and speciation of mercury in rice. Our work makes an effort to contribute to this understanding. PMID:24925231

  15. Rice bran phytonutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bran layer of the whole grain rice contains potential health-beneficial compounds. These include vitamin E homologs (tocopherols, tocotrienols), oryzanol fractions, simple phenolics and poly-phenolics. These are antioxidants that are believed to provide protection against diseases such as cancer...

  16. Flooded Wild Rice River

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Wild Rice River at Great Bend North Dakota, streamflow 1,890 cubic feet per second.  Photograph taken during spring 2010 flooding looking downstream of the bridge which was clogged with debris.  The river also had flooded over the road approaching the bridge....

  17. Direct Seeding of Rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Virender Kumar; Jagdish K. Ladha

    2011-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a staple food for more than half of the world population, is commonly grown by transplanting seedlings into puddled soil (wet tillage) in Asia. This production system is labor-, water-, and energy-intensive and is becoming less profitable as these resources are becoming increasingly scarce. It also deteriorates the physical properties of soil, adversely affects the performance

  18. Highly asymmetric rice genomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Ding; Hitoshi Araki; Qiang Wang; Pengfei Zhang; Sihai Yang; Jian-Qun Chen; Dacheng Tian

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individuals in the same species are assumed to share the same genomic set. However, it is not unusual to find an orthologous gene only in small subset of the species, and recent genomic studies suggest that structural rearrangements are very frequent between genomes in the same species. Two recently sequenced rice genomes Oryza sativa L. var. Nipponbare and O.

  19. RICE MICROSTRUCTURE - COMPARING CULTIVARS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The microstructures of short, medium, long and waxy grain rices were compared for microstructural characteristics using scanning electron and light microscopies. The cultivars in this study included three short grain (Akitakamachi, Koshihikari and S102); three medium grain (Bengal, M202 and M401); f...

  20. visitor parking rice village

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Central Campus Garage visitor parking tennis courts rice village apartments at 2410 shakespeare st visitor parking faculty, staff, student, contract parking Greenbriar Lot West Lot 4 W faculty, staff, student West Lot 2 faculty, staff, student West Lot 3 resident students faculty, staff, student parking SC

  1. Enzyme dynamics in paddy soils of the rice district (NE Italy) under different cropping patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Claudio; Nadimi-Goki, Mandana; Kato, Yoichi; Fornasier, Flavio; Wahsha, Mohammad; Spiandorello, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    The recent widespread interest on soil enzymes is due to the need to develop sensitive indicators of soil quality that reflect the effects of land management on soil and assist land managers in promoting long-term sustainability of terrestrial ecosystems. The activities of six important enzymes involved in C, N, P, and S cycling were investigated in a paddy soil from the Veneto region, Italy, in four different rotation systems (rice-rice-rice: R-R-R; soya-rice-rice: S-R-R; fallow-rice: F-R; pea-soya-rice: P-S-R) with three replications in April (after field preparation, field moist condition), June (after seedling, waterlogged soil condition), August (after tillering stage of rice, waterlogged soil condition) and October (after rice harvesting, drained soil condition) over the 2012 growing season. Our results demonstrated that enzyme activities varied with rotation systems and growth stages in paddy soil. Compared with field moist soil, drained soil condition resulted in a significant increase (P < 0.05) of ?-glucosidase, arylsulfatase, alkaline and acid phosphatases, leucine aminopeptidase (except of fallow-rice), and chitinase activities in all rotations, while compared with drained soil, early waterlogging (in month of June) significantly decreased (P moist soil> late waterlogged>early waterlogged. There was an inhibitory effect of waterlogging (except P-S-R rotation) for both alkaline and acid phosphatases due to high pH and redox conditions. However, the response of enzymes to waterlogging differed with the chemical species and the cropping pattern. The best rotation system for chitinase, leucine aminopeptidase and ?-glucosidase activity (C and N cycles) proved R-R-R, while for arylsulfatase, alkaline and acid phosphatases (P and S cycles) it was the S-R-R. Key Words: enzyme activity, paddy soil, Crop Rotation System, Italy __ Corresponding Author: Mandana Nadimi-Goki, Tel.: +39 3891356251 E-mail address: mandy.nadimi@gmail.com

  2. Soil nitric oxide emissions from terrestrial ecosystems in China: a synthesis of modeling and measurements.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Li, Dejun

    2014-01-01

    Soils are among the major sources of atmospheric nitric oxide (NO), which play a crucial role in atmospheric chemistry. Here we systematically synthesized the modeling studies and field measurements and presented a novel soil NO emission inventory of terrestrial ecosystems in China. The previously modeled inventories ranged from 480 to 1375 and from 242.8 to 550 Gg N yr(-1) for all lands and croplands, respectively. Nevertheless, all the previous modeling studies were conducted based on very few measurements from China. According to the current synthesis of field measurements, most soil NO emission measurements were conducted at croplands, while the measurements were only conducted at two sites for forest and grassland. The median NO flux was 3.2 ng N m(-2) s(-1) with a fertilizer induced emission factor (FIE) of 0.04% for rice fields, and was 7.1 ng N m(-2) s(-1) with an FIE of 0.67% for uplands. A novel NO emission inventory of 1226.33 (ranging from 588.24 to 2132.05) Gg N yr(-1) was estimated for China's terrestrial ecosystems, which was about 18% of anthropogenic emissions. More field measurements should be conducted to cover more biomes and obtain more representative data in order to well constrain soil NO emission inventory of China. PMID:25490942

  3. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using (13)C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems. PMID:25944542

  4. Sagebrush Ecosystem Conservation and Management

    E-print Network

    Aldridge, Cameron

    Sagebrush Ecosystem Conservation and Management: Ecoregional Assessment Tools and Models SagebrushEcosystemConservationandManagement Hanser Leu Knick Aldridge Sagebrush Ecosystem Conservation of the remaining strongholds of the sagebrush ecosystem. However, like most sagebrush habitats, threats

  5. Studies on nutrient uptake of rice and characteristics of soil microorganisms in a long-term fertilization experiments for irrigated rice*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi-chun; Wang, Guang-huo

    2005-01-01

    The ecosystem characteristics of soil microorganism and the nutrient uptake of irrigated rice were investigated in a split-block experiment with different fertilization treatments, including control (no fertilizer application), PK, NK, NP, NPK fertilization, in the main block, and conventional rice and hybrid rice comparison, in the sub block. Average data of five treatments in five years indicated that the indigenous N supply (INS) capacity ranged from 32.72 to 93.21 kg/ha; that indigenous P supply (IPS) capacity ranged from 7.42 to 32.25 kg/ha; and that indigenous K supply (IKS) capacity ranged from 16.24 to 140.51 kg/ha, which showed that soil available nutrient pool depletion might occur very fast and that P, K deficiency has become a constraint to increasing yields of consecutive crops grown without fertilizer application. It was found that soil nutrient deficiency and unbalanced fertilization to rice crop had negative effect on the diversity of the microbial community and total microbial biomass in the soil. The long-term fertilizer experiment (LTFE) also showed that balanced application of N, P and K promoted microbial biomass growth and improvement of community composition. Unbalanced fertilization reduced microbial N and increased C/N ratio of the microbial biomass. Compared with inbred rice, hybrid rice behavior is characterized by physiological advantage in nutrient uptake and lower internal K use efficiency. PMID:15633252

  6. Spatiotemporal simulation of changes in rice cropping systems in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Ru; Chen, Chi-Farn; Son, Nguyen-Thanh

    2015-04-01

    With the dramatic development of agro-economics, population growth, and climate change, the rice cropping systems in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (VMD) have been undergoing a major change. Information on rice cropping practices and changes in cropping systems is critical for policymakers to devise successful strategies to ensure food security and rice grain exports for the country. The primary objective of this research is to map rice cropping systems and predict future dynamics of rice cropping systems using MODIS time-series data from 2002 to 2012. A phenology-based classification approach was applied for the classification and assessment of rice cropping systems. Then, the Cellular Automata-Markov (CA-Markov) model was used to simulate future changes in rice-cropping activities. To obtain precise prediction, a calibration of CA-Markov were implemented by using a series of rice crop maps. The comparisons between the classification maps and the ground reference data indicated satisfactory results with overall accuracies above 81%, and Kappa coefficients above 0.75, respectively. The simulated maps of rice cropping systems for 2010-2012 were extrapolated by CA-Markov model based on the trend of rice cropping systems during 2002-2009. The comparison between the predicted scenarios and the classification maps for 2010-2012 presents a reasonably close agreement. In summary, the CA-Markov model with a long-term calibration confirmed the validity of the approach for dynamic modeling of changes in rice cropping systems in the study region. The results obtained from this study demonstrate that the approach produced satisfactory results in terms of accuracy, quantitative forecast, and spatial pattern changes. Thus, projections of future changes would provide useful information for the agricultural policymakers in respect to formulating effective management strategies of rice cropping practices in VMD.

  7. The Ecosystem Science Center

    E-print Network

    The Ecosystem Science Center 2010-2011 Annual report Photo, by graduate student Alex of the Ecosystem Science Center for the period July 1, 2010 July 1, 2011 Introduction to ESC ­ A Message from .......................................... 40 1 #12;A Message from the ESC Director The Ecosystem Science Center has now completed its

  8. The Ecosystem Science Center

    E-print Network

    1 The Ecosystem Science Center 2011-2012 Annual report #12;2 Table of Contents This document summarizes the activities of the Ecosystem Science Center for the period from July 1, 2011 July 1, 2012 of the Ecosystem Science Center who supported this research project in Calumet watershed with a graduate research

  9. Biodiversity regulates ecosystem predictability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia M. Harris; Peter J. Morin

    1997-01-01

    1-6 . Here we describe a previously unrecognized effect of biodiversity on ecosystem predictability, where predictability is inversely related to temporal and spatial variation in ecosystem properties. By manipulating biodiversity in aquatic microbial communities, we show that one process, ecosystem respiration, becomes more predictable as biodiversity increases. Analysis of similar patterns extracted from other studies 2,3,6 indicates that biodiversity also

  10. The polluted ecosystem game

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. A. Brock; W. D. Dechert

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of optimal management of ecosystems by developing a dynamic model of strategic behavior by users\\/communities of an ecosystem such as a lake, which is subject to pollution resulting from the users. More specifically, it builds a model of two ecosystems that are spatially connected. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper

  11. Ecosystem Health: Energy Indicators.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Just as for human beings health is a concept that applies to the condition of the whole organism, the health of an ecosystem refers to the condition of the ecosystem as a whole. For this reason, the study and characterization of ecosystems is fundamental to establishing accurate ...

  12. RICE UNIVERSITY The Barbara and David Gibbs

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    RICE UNIVERSITY The Barbara and David Gibbs RECREATION CENTER MEMBERSHIP CANCELLATION FORM Date for Cancellation:____________________________________________________ I authorize Rice University to terminate my

  13. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research 

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    Texas Rice Special Section Texas Rice Special Section - I Highlighting Research in 2002 Dr. Fred Turner Dr. Turner’s Soil and Plant Nutrition Project evaluates main and ratoon crop yield and quality of potential Ark, La, Miss and Texas rice... rates, plant population effect on yield, plant development for predicting growth stages, sheath blight resistance, plant height, lodging potential, variety strengths and weaknesses and an economic ranking for main, ratoon and total crop yield based...

  14. Cooking with Rice (not instant)

    E-print Network

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    or washed before cooking. Rice Salad (makes 6 servings) What you need 3 cups cooked rice, cooled 2 hard-cooked eggs, chopped ? cup mayonnaise-type salad dressing ? cup finely chopped green onions... ? cup chopped sweet pickles 1 teaspoon prepared mustard ground black pepper (as much as you like) How to make it 1. Wash your hands; make sure your cooking area is clean. 2. Combine the rice, eggs, mayonnaise, onions...

  15. Swamp rice development, schistosomiasis, and onchocerciasis in Southeast Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    White, P T; Coleman, M; Jupp, B P

    1982-05-01

    Seventy-four villages in eastern Sierra Leone, West Africa, many having a recently developed rice swamp, were surveyed for the presence of schistosomiasis and onchocerciasis, and their vectors. Prevalence rates for Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni were low, although the infections were widespread. There is some evidence that S. mansoni is extending its range in Sierra Leone although this is problematical because of the apparent absence of Biomphalaria pfeifferi, the recognized snail vector, from areas where the disease now occurs. The characteristics of rice swamp environment now being created in Sierra Leone are described and results of snail collections, which were with few exceptions small, are presented. Reasons for the apparent unsuitability of the developed rice swamp as a snail habitat are discussed. Onchocerciasis was found in all villages and the prevalence rate, almost 50%, was high. The rice swamp is not a suitable breeding site for Simulium damnosum s.l., but the study area is crossed by several major rivers and all villages in the area are within flying distance of potential breeding sites. There was no positive evidence that expansion of swamp rice farming will increase the incidence of water based/related diseases but a control program for onchocerciasis, which is a major rural health problem, would seem to be a national priority. PMID:7081542

  16. Arsenic levels in rice grain and assessment of daily dietary intake of arsenic from rice in arsenic-contaminated regions of Bangladesh--implications to groundwater irrigation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Owens, Gary; Naidu, Ravi

    2009-04-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic (As) causes significant human health effects, including various cancers and skin disorders. Naturally elevated concentrations of As have been detected in the groundwater of Bangladesh. Dietary intake and drinking water are the major routes of As exposure for humans. The objectives of this study were to measure As concentrations in rice grain collected from households in As-affected villages of Bangladesh where groundwater is used for agricultural irrigation and to estimate the daily intake of As consumed by the villagers from rice. The median and mean total As contents in 214 rice grain samples were 131 and 143 microg/kg, respectively, with a range of 2-557 microg/kg (dry weight, dw). Arsenic concentrations in control rice samples imported from Pakistan and India and on sale in Australian supermarkets were significantly lower (p < 0.001) than in rice from contaminated areas. Daily dietary intake of As from rice was 56.4 microg for adults (males and females) while the total daily intake of As from rice and from drinking water was 888.4 and 706.4 microg for adult males and adult females, respectively. From our study, it appears that the villagers are consuming a significant amount of As from rice and drinking water. The results suggest that the communities in the villages studied are potentially at risk of suffering from arsenic-related diseases. PMID:19142738

  17. Arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice grains influenced by arsenic phytotoxicity and rice genotypes grown in arsenic-elevated paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Syu, Chien-Hui; Huang, Chia-Chen; Jiang, Pei-Yu; Lee, Chia-Hsing; Lee, Dar-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Rice consumption is a major route of As exposure to human for the population of worldwide. This study investigates the effect of phytotoxicity and rice genotypes on the content and speciation of As in rice grains grown in different levels of As-elevated paddy soils from Taiwan. Three levels of As-elevated soils and six rice genotypes commonly planted in Taiwan were used for this study. The results indicate that As contents in grains of rice is not proportional to soil As concentrations and they were equal or higher in indica genotypes than japonica genotypes used in this study. It was also found that the As phytotoxicity not only reducing the grain yields but also the As concentrations in grain of rice. The predominant As species found in rice grains were dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and arsenite. The concentrations of DMA increased with total As concentrations, wherggeas the arsenite remained in a narrow range from 0.1 to 0.3 mg kg(-1). Because of the lower toxicity of DMA than inorganic As species, the health risks may not be increased through consumption of rice even when total As content in the grains is increased. PMID:25577320

  18. Drying Rough Rice in Storage. 

    E-print Network

    Sorenson, J. W. Jr.; Crane, L. E.

    1960-01-01

    the rice for the following reasons: (. tem. the wettest layer of rice is at the top whe sampling is easily accomplished; (2) heat frc 7.2, 9.0 and 10.8 cfm per barrel of rice are given the motor and fan can be utilized in drying; in Table 1. (3) under..., was developed. Loading storage bins to a depth of 2 to 3 feet succession until all storage space was utilized, I sulted in the maximum fan capacity on the wette rice. This procedure also resulted in faster dryir and reduced the possibility,o'f damage from...

  19. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research 

    E-print Network

    2007-01-01

    Entomology/Weed Management Sequential sampling plans for rice stink bug (RSB) recently have been developed by Luis Espino, graduate student under Mo Way. The plans minimize sampling effort to help you more easily make an accurate decision regarding RSB... in the analysis. Table 2 is similar to Table 1 but pertains to dough rice given an economic threshold of 10 adult RSB per 10 sweeps. Rice Stink Bug Research Table 1. Sequential sampling table for sampling rice stink bugs using the sweep net method (Economic...

  20. Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    M. Aslam K. Khalil

    2009-07-16

    This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

  1. Environments and Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students explore the biosphere and its associated environments and ecosystems in the context of creating a model ecosystem, learning along the way about the animals and resources. Students investigate different types of ecosystems, learn new vocabulary, and consider why a solid understanding of one's environment and the interdependence of an ecosystem can inform the choices we make and the way we engineer our communities. This lesson is part of a series of six lessons in which students use their growing understanding of various environments and the engineering design process, to design and create their own model biodome ecosystems.

  2. Differential sensitivity of rice pathogens to growth inhibition by flavonoids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manchikanti Padmavati; Natarajan Sakthivel; K. V. Thara; Arjula R. Reddy

    1997-01-01

    Differential sensitivity of the major pathogens of rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Pyricularia oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani to inhibition by certain flavonoids was tested using paper disc\\/liquid culture and spore germination assays. Naringenin, the first intermediate of the flavonoid pathway, displayed growth inhibition of Xanthomonas strains and spore germination of P. oryzae. On the other hand, no such inhibition was

  3. Found: Rice that produces grains with improved nutritional value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice provides the major source of nutrition for a large proportion of the world’s population, and is a key ingredient in baby foods in the U.S. Mineral nutrients such as Ca, Fe, and Zn play critical roles in human health, with over 3 billion people suffering from Fe and Zn deficiencies. Unfortunat...

  4. Identification of blast resistance genes for managing rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. In the present study, an international set of monogenic differentials carrying 24 major blast resistance (R) genes (Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pita2,...

  5. Evolutionary transients in the rice transcriptome.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jianguo; Li, Ruiqiang; Zheng, Hongkun; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Li, Heng; Ni, Peixiang; Li, Songgang; Li, Shengting; Wang, Jingquiang; Liu, Dongyuan; McDermott, Jason E.; Samudrala, Ram; Liu, Siqi; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Yu, Jun; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu

    2010-12-01

    The number of protein-coding genes predicted from the rice genome remains much larger than the number of genes for Arabidopsis. Most of the excess rice genes show low similarity to Arabidopsis, and eudicots in general. It is difficult to repudiate these genes because even for the 19,079 non-redundant rice cDNAs that have been sequenced, 34.3% are low similarity. Here, we describe a major contributor to this excess of low similarity genes: the frequent and continued occurrence of gene duplications in plants, and the post- duplicative degradation (i.e. relaxed selection) that is typically expected to occur in one of the two gene copies. The salient feature of this degradation is an increase in Ka/Ks for Ks per available site, respectively. We show that low similarity genes are expressed at lower mRNA and protein levels than other genes, and that regions of the encoded proteins are structurally disordered. Indeed, many are evolutionary “transients” that may be destined to die, even if they remain transcriptionally active for millions of years.

  6. Rheological properties of rice dough for making rice bread

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hema P. Sivaramakrishnan; B. Senge; P. K. Chattopadhyay

    2004-01-01

    The rheological properties of two varieties of rice with Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) added as gluten substitute were studied using a farinograph and a rheometer and compared with wheat dough to find its suitability for making rice bread. The water absorption and dough development time data were obtained from the farinogram. The tests conducted in the rheometer were oscillation

  7. Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Learn more at cmc.rice.edu

    E-print Network

    Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Wireless Learn more at cmc.rice.edu or ece.rice in either orthogonal time-slots (TDD) or frequency bands (FDD). In 2010, Rice re-purposed off-the-shelf MIMO Wireless project directed by Prof. Edward Knightly at Rice University aims to develop fundamental

  8. Effect of rice plants on CH4 production, transport, oxidation and emission in rice paddy soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhongjun Jia; Zucong Cai; Hua Xu; Xiaoping Li

    2001-01-01

    To understand the integrated effects of rice plants (variety Wuyugeng 2) on CH4 emission during the typical rice growth stage, the production, oxidation and emission of methane related to rice plants were investigated simultaneously through laboratory and greenhouse experiments. CH4 emission was significantly higher from the rice planted treatment than from the unplanted treatment. In the rice planted treatment, CH4

  9. Global Conservation of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Will Turner (University of the Philippines; World Agroforestry Center)

    2007-11-01

    This peer-reviewed article from the November 2007 issue of BioScience examines conservation strategies to preserve biodiversity and ecosystem services.Habitat destruction has driven much of the current biodiversity extinction crisis, and it compromises the essential benefits, or ecosystem services, that humans derive from functioning ecosystems. Securing both species and ecosystem services might be accomplished with common solutions. Yet it is unknown whether these two major conservation objectives coincide broadly enough worldwide to enable global strategies for both goals to gain synergy. In this article, we assess the concordance between these two objectives, explore how the concordance varies across different regions, and examine the global potential for safeguarding biodiversity and ecosystem services simultaneously. We find that published global priority maps for biodiversity conservation harbor a disproportionate share of estimated terrestrial ecosystem service value (ESV). Overlap of biodiversity priorities and ESV varies among regions, and in areas that have high biodiversity priority but low ESV, specialized conservation approaches are necessary. Overall, however, our findings suggest opportunities for safeguarding both biodiversity and ecosystem services. Sensitivity analyses indicate that results are robust to known limitations of available ESV data. Capitalizing on these opportunities will require the identification of synergies at fine scales, and the development of economic and policy tools to exploit them.

  10. Fertilizers for Rice in Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Wyche, R. H. (Robert Henry)

    1941-01-01

    . Although applications of potash have produced small increases in yield of rice, the. increases were not large enough to justify the general use of potash for rice. Applications of manganese, iron, copper, zinc, and boron did not increase the yield... ........................................ Tests in Liberty County 14 ........................................ Tests in Orange County 15 ................ Work with Manganese, Copper. Zinc. Iron. and Boron 16 Acknowledgments .......................................... 16 Summary...

  11. RICE: Rapid interconnect circuit evaluator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Curtis L. Ratzlaff; Nanda Gopal; Lawrence T. Pillage

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes RICE, an RLC interconnect evaluation tool based upon the moment-matching teehnique of Asymptotic Waveform Evaluation (AWE). The RLC circuit moments are calculated by a path-tracing algorithm which enables the analysis of large interconnect models several thousand times faster than a circuit simulation while requiring 5 to 10 times less memory. RICE also includes anew approach for determining

  12. Advances in Transgenic Rice Biotechnology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hitesh Kathuria; Jitender Giri; Himani Tyagi; Akhilesh K. Tyagi

    2007-01-01

    Rice is the most amenable crop plant for genetic manipulation amongst monocots due to its small genome size, enriched genetic map, availability of entire genome sequence, and relative ease of transformation. Improvement in agronomic traits of rice is bound to affect a sizeable population since it is a primary source of sustenance. Recent advances like use of ‘clean gene’ technology

  13. Microstructure Analysis of Rice Kernel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dong Li; Li-Jun Wang; De-Cheng Wang; Xiao Dong Chen; Zhi-Huai Mao

    2007-01-01

    The microscopic structure of rough rice kernel has been investigated using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) after solar drying in order to identify the mechanisms of the initiation and propagation of stress induced cracks. The structure of the endosperm tissue of rice kernel has been found damaged slightly due to drying. Stress induced cracks were evident. The cracks were also found

  14. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research

    E-print Network

    2003-01-01

    from municipal sludge, is not allowed in organic rice production. We are evaluating a Helena nitrogen foliar spray product that is applied at 2-10 lbs N/acre during the reproductive stage of rice growth. Its increased efficiency is attributed to its...

  15. SOLID MECHANICS James R. Rice

    E-print Network

    1 SOLID MECHANICS James R. Rice School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Department of Earth: February 2010 Downloadable at: http://esag.harvard.edu/rice/e0_Solid_Mechanics_94_10.pdf TABLE OF CONTENTS provided on last three pages, pp. 87-89 INTRODUCTION The application of the principles of mechanics to bulk

  16. Impact of agronomic practices on arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice grain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Shen, Jianlin; Wu, Jinshui; Tang, Zhong; Shen, Qirong; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2014-11-01

    Rice is a major source of dietary arsenic (As). The effects of paddy water management, straw incorporation, the applications of nitrogen fertilizer or organic manure, and the additions of biochar on arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice grain were investigated under field conditions over four cropping seasons in Hunan, China. Treatments that promoted anaerobic conditions in the soil, including continuous flooding and straw incorporation, significantly increased the concentration of As, especially methylated As species, in rice grain, whereas N application rate and biochar additions had little or inconsistent effect. Continuous flooding and straw incorporation also increased the abundance of the arsenite methyltransferase gene arsM in the soil, potentially enhancing As methylation in the soil and the uptake of methylated As by rice plants. Intermittent flooding was an effective method to decrease As accumulation in rice grain. PMID:25150455

  17. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 3 

    E-print Network

    2004-01-01

    at Stuttgart, AR, passed away April 24, 2004, af- ter an illness. He was with the USDA-ARS for almost 38 years before retiring in 1992. Immediately after graduating from the University of Illinois in 1955, where he majored in Agronomy and Weed Science, Dr.... Smith was employed by the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a Research Agronomist to lead the weed science research program located at the Univer- sity of Arkansas Rice Research and Extension Center in Stuttgart. His...

  18. Isolation and identification of an allelopathic phenylethylamine in rice.

    PubMed

    Le Thi, Ho; Lin, Chung-Ho; Smeda, Reid J; Leigh, Nathan D; Wycoff, Wei G; Fritschi, Felix B

    2014-12-01

    Allelopathy is the process whereby an organic chemical (allelochemical) released from one plant influences the growth and development of other plants. Allelochemicals produced by specific rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars have potential to manage barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli L.), a major yield-limiting weed species in rice production systems in Asia and North America. In this study, isolation and identification of an allelopathic compound, N-trans-cinnamoyltyramine (NTCT), in a Vietnamese rice cultivar 'OM 5930' was accomplished through bioassay-guided purification using reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled with spectroscopic techniques, including tandem mass spectrometry, high resolution mass spectrometry, as well as one-dimensional and two-dimensional (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The identified compound, NTCT is considered a ?-phenylethylamine. NTCT inhibited root and hypocotyl growth of cress (Lepidium sativum L.), barnyard grass and red sprangletop (Leptochloa chinensis L. Nees) at concentrations as low as 0.24 ?M. The ED50 (concentration required for 50% inhibition) of NTCT on barnyard grass root and hypocotyl elongation were 1.35 and 1.85 ?M, respectively. Results further demonstrated that mortality of barnyard grass and red sprangletop seedlings was >80% at a concentration of 2.4 ?M of NTCT. By 20 days after transplanting, 0.425 nmol of NTCT per OM 5930 rice seedling was released into the culture solution. With concentrations of 42 ?g g(-1) fresh weight, production of NTCT in intact rice plants can be considered high. These findings suggest that developing plants of Vietnamese rice cultivar OM 5930 release NTCT and may be utilized to suppress barnyard grass in rice fields. The potency of NTCT may encourage development of this compound as a bio-herbicide. PMID:25212867

  19. PROTEOMIC AND GENETIC APPROACHES TO IDENTIFYING DEFENSE-RELATED PROTEINS IN RICE CHALLENGED WITH THE FUNGAL PATHOGEN RHIZOCTONIA SOLANI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight, caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia solani, is a major disease of rice worldwide, but little is known about the host response to infection. The objective of this study was to identify proteins and DNA markers in resistant and susceptible rice associated with response to infection by R. s...

  20. Characterization of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in cultivated rice contributing to field resistance to sheath blight ( Rhizoctonia solani )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhikang Li; S. R. M. Pinson; M. A. Marchetti; J. W. Stansel; W. D. Park

    1995-01-01

    Sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most important diseases of rice. Despite extensive searches of the rice germ plasm, the major gene(s) which give complete resistance to the fungus have not been identified. However, there is much variation in quantitatively inherited resistance to R. solani, and this type of resistance can offer adequate protection against the

  1. Floristic composition and abundance of rice?field weeds in four low?country Wet Zone districts of Sri Lanka

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. N. R. Chandrasena

    1988-01-01

    One hundred and thirty six weed species, belonging to twenty nine plant families were recorded from rice weed surveys carried out in four major rice?growing districts of the low country Wet Zone of Sri Lanka, during two consecutive ‘Yala’ seasons in 1984 and 1985. In terms of abundance and distribution Moncotyledon weeds of the Poaceae and Cyperaceae, were found to

  2. Differential response of cultivated and weedy (red) rice to recent and projected increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a principle resource for plant growth; as such, the ongoing increase in its concentration may differentially affect the growth of cultivated and wild types of the same species. Red rice in the U.S. is a weedy relative of cultivated rice that represents a major production con...

  3. Relations between two rice borers in Surinam, Rupela albinella (Cr.) and Diatraea saccharalis (F.), and their hymenopterous larval parasites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. J. Hummelen

    1974-01-01

    In many tropical countries, lepidopterous stem borers are major pests of the rice crop. Study of the rice borers in Surinam, Rupela albinella and Diatraea saccharalis, was made in the Paramaribo area, at the experimental station 'CELOS' during 1971, 1972 and 1973, since data on the ecology and economic importance of these borers were incomplete and almost lacking for the

  4. Association of Alcaligenes faecalis with wetland rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. B. You; W. Song; H. X. Wang; J. P. Li; M. Lin; W. L. Hai

    1991-01-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis isolated from rice roots is widespread in paddy soil of China. It was found to be a close association with rice.A. faecalis accumulate on the rice root surface, and part of them could enter into the rice root. It can grow in the intercellular space, especially inside the root cells, and multiply and fix dinitrogen there.A. faecalis could

  5. Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Neuroengineering

    E-print Network

    Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Neuroengineering Learn more at ece.rice function. At Rice, we develop technologies to understand, repair, replace, enhance, or treat the diseases, the university has established the Rice Center for Neuroengineering (RCNE). The center's goal is to integrate

  6. Tecnologa para todos Sistema Inalmbrico de Rice

    E-print Network

    Tecnología para todos Sistema Inalámbrico de Rice Andrea Trevino Rice University http://www.techforall.org/tfa_wireless.html http://tfa.rice.edu #12;Por qué en Pecan Park? La Misión de TFA: Proporcionar conocimientos a la comunidad. El propósito de Rice: Usar este programa para explorar la siguiente generación del sistema

  7. RICE SEQUENCES OF RELATIONS ANTONIO MONTALBAN

    E-print Network

    Montalbán, Antonio

    RICE SEQUENCES OF RELATIONS ANTONIO MONTALB´AN Abstract. We propose a framework to study computational ways of measuring the complexity of relations. The key notion of this paper is the one of rice sequence of relations, where rice stands for relatively intrinsically computably enumerable. A rice

  8. THE VOLATILE COMPOSITION OF WAXY RICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Waxy rice contains no amylose and has a characteristic aroma described as starchy/grainy. Waxy rice is used in traditional Japanese rice cakes, crackers, and is preferred for making rice wines and sake throughout the Orient. Gas chromatographic/mass spectral data showed a greater presence of lipid...

  9. LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1 Rice University Laser Safety Manual Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 January 2014 #12;LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 2 Introduction The objective of the Rice University Laser Safety program is to assist all levels

  10. Coral Reef Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2007-03-28

    The Coral Reef Ecosystems SciPack explores the unique and diverse ecosystem of the coral reef. The focus is on Standards and Benchmarks related to populations and ecosystems using coral reefs and their immediate environment as an example. Because the Standards and Benchmarks present the concepts of populations and ecosystems generically, without reference to a specific ecosystem or the organisms in the system, coral reefs are used to provide the context through which concepts in a marine ecosystem are explored.In addition to comprehensive inquiry-based learning materials tied to Science Education Standards and Benchmarks, the SciPack includes the following additional components:? Pedagogical Implications section addressing common misconceptions, teaching resources and strand maps linking grade band appropriate content to standards. ? Access to one-on-one support via e-mail to content "Wizards".? Final Assessment which can be used to certify mastery of the concepts.Learning Outcomes:Coral Reef Ecosystems: The Living Reef? Identify coral polyp structures and describe their functions.? Describe photosynthesis in the coral environment.? Describe the evolution of a typical reef system.? Use the shape of an individual coral to identify its common name, and classify entire coral reef ecosystems based on shape and location. ? Describe the process of coral polyp reproduction and growth.? Identify how the features and/or behavioral strategies of coral reef inhabitants enable them to survive in coral reef environments.Coral Reef Ecosystems: The Abiotic Setting? Identify the characteristics of an ecosystem, and describe the interdependence between biotic and abiotic features in an ecosystem.? Describe how the following abiotic factors provide coral with the energy needed to survive and grow within their ecosystem: sunlight, water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide.? Describe the optimal environmental conditions for coral reef growth, and explain the process of coral reef development (including the role of available sunlight and calcium).? Explain how the following environmental factors might affect coral ecosystems: increase in dissolved CO2, changes in global temperatures, increase in ocean water turbidity through water pollution.Coral Reef Ecosystems: Interdependence? Identify and label key components of food chains and food webs in a coral reef ecosystem.? Describe key relationships among plants and animals in the coral reef ecosystem: predator and prey relationships, producer and consumer relationships, and symbiotic relationships (mutualism, commensalisms, parasitism).? Recognize the direction that energy travels through food chains and food webs.? Explain that materials (chemical elements) and natural resources are recycled in coral reef ecosystems and reappear in different forms.? Describe the primary ecological succession events within a typical coral reef ecosystem.Coral Reef Ecosystems: Ecosystems in Crisis? Describe ways in which human activities directly impact coral reef ecosystems (resource and recreational uses).? Describe ways in which human activities indirectly impact coral reef ecosystems (by changing the physical conditions, pollution, changes in the water chemistry, etc.).? Explain how human activity may decrease the reefs ability to recover from natural occurrences. ? Explain the effects of increased predation or disease on a reef ecosystem.? Describe the effect of habitat loss on the reef ecosystem.? Describe the effects of weather and climate change on a healthy and weakened reef ecosystem.

  11. Protein requirements of preschool children consuming rice-milk, rice-toasted mung bean, and rice diets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria A. Isabel Cabrera-Santiago; Carmen L. L. Intengan; Benigan V. Roxas; Bienvenido O. Juliano; Consuelo M. Perez; Anacleta S. Loyola; Emma R. Alejandro; Jovina N. Abadilla; Gracia FE B. Yu; Aida C. Mallillin

    1986-01-01

    Rice-milk and rice-toasted mung bean diets, and a high-protein rice (IR58 milled rice) were evaluated as part of a study on the protein requirements of toddlers consuming rice-based diets following the multilevel N balance method. Milk or mung bean contributed 1\\/3 of dietary N. At a daily energy intake of 418 kJ\\/kg body weight, weight losses were observed for all

  12. Seeing Red: The Origin of Grain Pigmentation in US Weedy Rice

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Briana L.; Reagon, Michael; Hsu, Shih-Chung; Caicedo, Ana L.; Jia, Yulin; Olsen, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Weedy forms of crop species infest agricultural fields worldwide and are a leading cause of crop losses, yet little is known about how these weeds evolve. Red rice (Oryza sativa), a major weed of cultivated rice fields in the US, is recognized by the dark-pigmented grain that gives it its common name. Studies using neutral molecular markers have indicated a close relationship between US red rice and domesticated rice, suggesting that the weed may have originated through reversion of domesticated rice to a feral form. We have tested this reversion hypothesis by examining molecular variation at Rc, the regulatory gene responsible for grain pigmentation differences between domesticated and wild rice. Loss-of-function mutations at Rc account for the absence of proanthocyanidin pigments in cultivated rice grains, and the major rc domestication allele has been shown to be capable of spontaneous reversion to a functional form through additional mutations at the Rc locus. Using a diverse sample of 156 weedy, domesticated, and wild Oryzas, we analyzed DNA sequence variation at Rc and its surrounding 4 Mb genomic region. We find that reversion of domestication alleles does not account for the pigmented grains of weed accessions; moreover, we find that haplotypes characterizing the weed are either absent or very rare in cultivated rice. Sequences from genomic regions flanking Rc are consistent with a genomic footprint of the rc selective sweep in cultivated rice, and are compatible with a close relationship of red rice to Asian Oryzas that have never been cultivated in the US. PMID:20584133

  13. Expressing ScACR3 in rice enhanced arsenite efflux and reduced arsenic accumulation in rice grains.

    PubMed

    Duan, Guilan; Kamiya, Takehiro; Ishikawa, Satoru; Arao, Tomohito; Fujiwara, Toru

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic (As) accumulation in rice grain poses a serious health risk to populations with high rice consumption. Extrusion of arsenite [As(III)] by ScAcr3p is the major arsenic detoxification mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, ScAcr3p homolog is absent in higher plants, including rice. In this study, ScACR3 was introduced into rice and expressed under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. In the transgenic lines, As concentrations in shoots and roots were about 30% lower than in the wild type, while the As translocation factors were similar between transgenic lines and the wild type. The roots of transgenic plants exhibited significantly higher As efflux activities than those of the wild type. Within 24 h exposure to 10 ?M arsenate [As(V)], roots of ScACR3-expressing plants extruded 80% of absorbed As(V) to the external solution as As(III), while roots of the wild type extruded 50% of absorbed As(V). Additionally, by exposing the As-containing rice plants to an As-lacking solution for 24 h, about 30% of the total As derived from pre-treatment was extruded to the external solution by ScACR3-expressing plants, while about 15% of As was extruded by wild-type plants. Importantly, ScACR3 expression significantly reduced As accumulation in rice straws and grains. When grown in flooded soil irrigated with As(III)-containing water, the As concentration in husk and brown rice of the transgenic lines was reduced by 30 and 20%, respectively, compared with the wild type. This study reports a potential strategy to reduce As accumulation in the food chain by expressing heterologous genes in crops. PMID:22107880

  14. Identification of climate-resilient integrated nutrient management practices for rice-rice cropping system--an empirical approach to uphold food security.

    PubMed

    Subash, N; Gangwar, B; Singh, Rajbir; Sikka, A K

    2015-01-01

    Yield datasets of long-term experiments on integrated nutrient management in rice-rice cropping systems were used to investigate the relationship of variability in rainfall, temperature, and integrated nutrient management (INM) practices in rice-rice cropping system in three different agroecological regions of India. Twelve treatments with different combinations of inorganic (chemical fertilizer) and organic (farmyard manure, green manure, and paddy straw) were compared with farmer's conventional practice. The intraseasonal variations in rice yields are largely driven by rainfall during kharif rice and by temperature during rabi rice. Half of the standard deviation from the average monthly as well as seasonal rainfall during kharif rice and 1 °C increase or decrease from the average maximum and minimum temperature during rabi rice has been taken as the classification of yield groups. The trends in the date of effective onset of monsoon indicate a 36-day delay during the 30-year period at Rajendranagar, which is statistically significant at 95 % confidence level. The mean annual maximum temperature shows an increasing trend in all the study sites. The length of monsoon also showed a shrinking trend in the rate of 40 days during the 30-year study period at Rajendranagar representing a semiarid region. At Bhubaneshwar, the application of 50 % recommended NPK through chemical fertilizers and 50 % N through green manure resulted in an overall average higher increase of 5.1 % in system productivity under both excess and deficit rainfall years and also during the years having seasonal mean maximum temperature ?35 °C. However, at Jorhat, the application of 50 % recommended NPK through chemical fertilizers and 50 % N through straw resulted in an overall average higher increase of 7.4 % in system productivity, while at Rajendranagar, the application of 75 % NPK through chemical fertilizers and 25 % N through green manusre resulted in an overall average higher increase of 8.8 % in system productivity. This study highlights the adaptive capacity of different integrated nutrient management practices to rainfall and temperature variability under a rice-rice cropping system in humid, subhumid, and semiarid ecosystems. PMID:24817490

  15. [Exposure degree of important non-target arthropods to Cry2Aa in Bt rice fields].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Ling; Li, Yun-He; Hua, Hong-Xia; Yang, Chang-Ju; Wu, Hong-Jin; Peng, Yu-Fa

    2013-06-01

    Based on the principle of "risk = hazard x exposure", the selected representative nontarget organisms in the assessment of the potential effects of insect-resistant genetically modified (GM) crops on non-target arthropods in laboratory are generally the arthropod species highly exposed to the insecticidal proteins expressed by the GM crops in farmland ecosystem. In order to understand the exposure degree of the important arthropod species to Cry proteins in Bt rice fields, and to select the appropriate non-target arthropods in the risk assessment of insect-resistant GM crops, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was conducted to measure the Cry2Aa protein concentration in the arthropods collected from the cry2Aa rice fields at different rice growth stages. The results showed that there was a significant difference in the Cry2Aa content protein concentration in different arthropod species. Some species did not contain Cry2Aa protein, while some species contained larger amounts of Cry2Aa protein. Relative to the arthropods colleted after rice anthesis, the arthropods colleted in rice anthesis contained relative higher concentrations of Cry2Aa protein, especially for the predacious arthropods. No Cry proteins were detected in parasitic arthropods. This study provided references for the laboratory assessment of the effects of GM rice on nontarget arthropods. PMID:24066553

  16. Aluminium tolerance in rice is antagonistic with nitrate preference and synergistic with ammonium preference

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue Qiang; Guo, Shi Wei; Shinmachi, Fumie; Sunairi, Michio; Noguchi, Akira; Hasegawa, Isao; Shen, Ren Fang

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Acidic soils are dominated chemically by more ammonium and more available, so more potentially toxic, aluminium compared with neutral to calcareous soils, which are characterized by more nitrate and less available, so less toxic, aluminium. However, it is not known whether aluminium tolerance and nitrogen source preference are linked in plants. Methods This question was investigated by comparing the responses of 30 rice (Oryza sativa) varieties (15 subsp. japonica cultivars and 15 subsp. indica cultivars) to aluminium, various ammonium/nitrate ratios and their combinations under acidic solution conditions. Key Results indica rice plants were generally found to be aluminium-sensitive and nitrate-preferring, while japonica cultivars were aluminium-tolerant and relatively ammonium-preferring. Aluminium tolerance of different rice varieties was significantly negatively correlated with their nitrate preference. Furthermore, aluminium enhanced ammonium-fed rice growth but inhibited nitrate-fed rice growth. Conclusions The results suggest that aluminium tolerance in rice is antagonistic with nitrate preference and synergistic with ammonium preference under acidic solution conditions. A schematic diagram summarizing the interactions of aluminium and nitrogen in soil–plant ecosystems is presented and provides a new basis for the integrated management of acidic soils. PMID:23118122

  17. Emergy and ecosystem complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulgiati, Sergio; Brown, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    The question "What drives complexity?" is addressed in this paper. To answer this question, we explore the way energy and material resources of different quality flow through ecosystems and support, directly and indirectly, ecosystems growth and development. Processes of resource transformation throughout the ecosystem build order, cycle materials, generate and sustain information. Energy drives all these processes and energetic principles explain much of what is observed, including energy degradation according to the laws of thermodynamics. Emergy, a quantitative measure of the global environmental work supporting ecosystem dynamics, is used here in order to provide a deeper understanding of complexity growth and decline in ecosystems. Ecosystem complexity is discussed in this paper in relation to changes in structure, organization and functional capacity, as explained by changes in emergy, empower, and transformity.

  18. Gene flow from herbicide-resistant and non-resistant rice into red rice populations in U.S. rice fields: A survey of current evidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse red rice types infest U.S. rice fields. These infestations have remained widespread despite recent successes in controlling red rice in newly-introduced herbicide-resistant rice systems. As a result, the distribution and genetic background of red rice, and the degree to which red rice inte...

  19. Ecosystem Services - Water Purification

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Netlinks

    2002-06-30

    This lesson, provided by Science NetLinks, teaches students the importance of healthy ecosystems by investigating the example of natural water purification. Students will learn how ecosystems remove pollution from the water and how much it costs humans to do this artificially once ecosystems are no longer healthy. The class will then create a "River Newspaper" reporting on the condition of the local environment.

  20. TOWARDS POSITIONAL CLONING OF GENES FOR DORMANCY AND ITS RELATED ADAPTIVE TRAITS FROM WEEDY RICE (ORYZA SATIVA L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An array of physiological and morphological traits, such as seed dormancy, shattering and appendages, and pigmentations on seed covering tissues contribute to the adaptation of weeds in agro-ecosystems. We have developed weedy rice (Oryza sativa) as an experimental system primarily to investigate ge...

  1. Simulating soil organic carbon in a rice-soybean-wheat-soybean chronosequence in Prairie County, Arkansas using the Century model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eleanor Milne; Stephen Williams; Kristofor R. Brye; Mark Easter; Kendrick Killian; Keith Paustian

    It is useful for ecosystem models, such as Century, to be able to estimate soil organic carbon (SOC) turnover in anaerobic as well as aerobic soils. This will allow the inclusion of cropping systems involving flooded rice (Oryza sativa) in online C inventory tools such as COMET-VR. The present study tested the performance of the Century model against a cropped

  2. [Effects of free-air CO2 enrichment on rice canopy microlimate].

    PubMed

    Luo, Weihong; Mayumi, Yoshimoto; Dai, Jianfeng; Zhu, Jianguo; Han, Yong; Liu, Gan

    2002-10-01

    In this study, the free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) system (setup at at Anzhen, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province in 2001) was used to investigate the effects of FACE on rice canopy microclimate. The rice canopy microclimate observations were carried out from August 26 to October 13, 2001, when the rice crops were at the heading to maturing development stage. The results showed that FACE reduced the rice leaf stomatal conductance. The rice leaf stomatal conductance difference between FACE and ambient was larger among upper layer leaves than among lower layer leaves and at heading and milk filling stages than at maturing stage. FACE increased daytime rice canopy temperature but had little effect on nighttime rice canopy temperature. The daytime rice canopy temperature difference between FACE and ambient was larger at heading and milk filling stages than at maturing stage. From heading to flowering, the daily maximum rice canopy temperature difference between FACE and ambient reached 1.2 degrees C under fine weather condition. The average daytime rice canopy temperature from flowering to maturing stage was about 0.43 degree C. Daytime air temperature inside rice canopy was also affected by FACE. Daytime air temperature inside rice canopy was higher in FACE plot than in ambient plot. The value of daytime air temperature difference between FACE and ambient increased with the increase of solar radiation and varied with height. The maximum daytime air temperature difference between FACE and ambient varied between 0.47-1.2 degrees C and 0.37-0.8 degree C at middle of canopy and canopy height, respectively. Air humidity and nighttime air temperature inside rice canopy were not significantly affected by FACE. These results indicate that FACE reducing rice leaf stomatal conductance was the major cause of the increase of canopy temperature and inside canopy air temperature in FACE plot. The higher canopy temperature and inside canopy air temperature in FACE plot resulted in the earlier maturity of rice crop in FACE plot than that in the ambient plot. PMID:12557666

  3. Using a Crop\\/Soil Simulation Model and GIS Techniques to Assess Methane Emissions from Rice Fields in Asia. IV. Upscaling to National Levels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. B. Matthews; R. Wassmann; J. W. Knox; L. V. Buendia

    2000-01-01

    The process-based crop\\/soil model MERES (Methane Emissions from Rice EcoSystems) was used together with daily weather data, spatial soil data, and rice-growing statistics to estimate the annual methane (CH4) emissions from China, India, Indonesia, Philippines, and Thailand under various crop management scenarios. Four crop management scenarios were considered: (a) a 'baseline' scenario assuming no addition of organic amendments or field

  4. Unravelling trophic subsidies of agroecosystems for biodiversity conservation: food consumption and nutrient recycling by waterbirds in Mediterranean rice fields.

    PubMed

    Navedo, Juan G; Hahn, Steffen; Parejo, Manuel; Abad-Gómez, José M; Gutiérrez, Jorge S; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Sánchez-Guzmán, Juan M; Masero, José A

    2015-04-01

    Waterbirds can reallocate a considerable amount of nutrients within agricultural fields and between agriculture sites and wetlands. However their effects on biogeochemical cycles have rarely been quantified. We estimated bird numbers, diet (from stable isotope analysis), food supply, and the food consumption on rice fields by overwintering waterbirds in one of the most important areas for rice production in southwestern Europe and a key area for various migrating and resident waterbird species. Herein, we modelled the nutrient (N and P) recycling in rice fields, and their transport to reservoirs. The energy consumption by waterbirds (96,605±18,311 individuals) on rice fields during winter averaged at 89.9±39.0 kJ·m(-2), with its majority (89.9%) belonging to foraging on rice seeds. Thus, the birds removed about 26% of rice seeds leftover after harvest (estimated in 932.5±504.7 seeds·m(-2) in early winter) wherein common cranes and dabbling ducks (four species) were the most important consumers. Waterbirds foraging and roosting in the rice fields recycled more than 24.1 (1.0 kg·ha(-1)) of N and an additional 5.0 tons (0.2 kg·ha(-1)) of P in the Extremadura's rice fields during winter. Additionally, we estimated that 2.3 tons of N and 550 kg of P were removed from rice fields and transported to reservoirs. The seasonal foraging of wildlife should result in a direct benefit for rice farmers by improving nutrient recycling through defecation by waterbirds with respect to artificial fertilisation. Additionally, rice fields located in the cranes' core wintering areas can provide sufficient food supply to induce habitat shift from their traditional wintering habitat in 'dehesas' to rice fields, which causes indirect socioeconomic benefit through reduced acorn consumption by cranes. Our modelling approach may thus be especially helpful for management decisions regarding rice agroecosystems in areas which are also important for the conservation of migratory waterbirds. PMID:25553543

  5. Suppressive subtraction hybridization reveals that rice gall midge attack elicits plant-pathogen-like responses in rice.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Nidhi; Himabindu, Kudapa; Neeraja, Chiruvuri Naga; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, Jagadish S

    2013-02-01

    The Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), is the third most destructive insect pest of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Till date, 11 gall midge resistance gene loci have been characterized in different rice varieties. To elucidate molecular basis of incompatible (hypersensitive response plus [HR+] type) and compatible rice-gall midge interactions, two suppressive subtraction hybridization cDNA libraries were constructed. These were enriched for differentially expressed transcripts after gall midge infestation in two rice varieties (resistant Suraksha and susceptible TN1). In total, 2784 ESTs were generated and sequenced from the two libraries, of which 1536 were from the resistant Suraksha and 1248 were from the susceptible TN1. Majority (80%) of the ESTs was non-redundant sequences with known functions and was classified into three principal gene ontology (GO) categories and 12 groups. Upregulation of NBS-LRR, Cytochrome P450, heat shock proteins, phenylalanine ammonia lyase and OsPR10? genes from the Suraksha library, as revealed by real-time PCR, indicated that R gene mediated, salicylic acid related defense pathway is likely to be involved in gall midge resistance. Present study suggested that resistance in Suraksha against gall midge is similar in nature to the resistance observed in plants against pathogens. However, in TN1, genes related to primary metabolism and redox were induced abundantly. Results suggested that genes encoding translationally controlled tumor protein and NAC domain proteins are likely to be involved in the gall midge susceptibility. PMID:23257077

  6. Mycorrhizal fungi mediation of terrestrial ecosystem responses to global change

    E-print Network

    Mohan, Jacqueline E.

    Mycorrhizal fungi mediation of terrestrial ecosystem responses to global change: mini a b s t r a c t Mycorrhizal fungi are responsible for most nutrient uptake by the majority of land that explicitly address the role of mycorrhizal influence on ecosystem responses such as biogeochemical fluxes

  7. Ecosystem evolution of Lake Gusinoe (Transbaikal region, Russia)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boris Iosifovich Pisarsky; Alina Mikhailovna Hardina; Hidetoshi Naganawa

    2005-01-01

    Lake Gusinoe is situated on a basin originating from Paleozoic and Mesozoic deposits. The recorded history of the lake's ecosystem evolution is no more than 300 years. The present lake drainage basin was formed mainly in the Cenozoic era, but during the past century, major anthropogenic impacts on the lake have occurred. The human-influenced evolution of the ecosystem began in

  8. Ecosystem nitrogen retention and flushing across a soil texture gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most ecosystems retain a majority of reactive N inputs, transforming reactive mineral N into relatively nonreactive stable organic N. Mechanistic explanations for these observations focus on C-dependent processes, and in particular wide C:N ratios. However, in some ecosystems C-dependent mechanism...

  9. Nutrient enrichment, biodiversity loss, and consequent declines in ecosystem productivity

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Nutrient enrichment, biodiversity loss, and consequent declines in ecosystem productivity Forest in biodiversity, species compo- sition, and ecosystem functioning. It remains unknown whether such shifts in biodiversity and species composition may, them- selves, be major contributors to the total, long-term impacts

  10. International Year of Rice 2004

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The importance of rice as a basic foodstuff to over half of the world's populations can not be underestimated, and it was with this fact in mind that the International Rice Research Institute first developed the idea for the International Year of Rice in 1999. Working in tandem with the United Nations General Assembly, the Institute set up a number of partnerships, conferences, lectures, and research agendas to take place throughout the year 2004 and beyond. The site contains links to numerous important papers, such as the collection available here from the recent conference titled Rice in Global Markets and Sustainable Production Systems, which was held in Rome. Beyond various scholarly and policy-oriented resources, visitors can learn about the rice photography contest, submit recipes to a forthcoming rice-themed cookbook, and explore a kids section that offers some basic facts about rice, along with a short quiz. The site is available in a number of different languages, including Italian, Spanish, French, Arabic, and Japanese.

  11. Coral Reef Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Helen T.

    Coral reefs are geological structures of significant dimensions, constructed over millions of years by calcifying organisms. The present day reef-builders are hard corals belonging to the order Scleractinia, phylum Cnidaria. The greatest concentrations of coral reefs are in the tropics, with highest levels of biodiversity situated in reefs of the Indo-West Pacific region. These ecosystems have provided coastal protection and livelihood to human populations over the millennia. Human activities have caused destruction of these habitats, the intensity of which has increased alarmingly since the latter decades of the twentieth century. The severity of this impact is directly related to exponential growth rates of human populations especially in the coastal areas of the developing world. However, a more recently recognized phenomenon concerns disturbances brought about by the changing climate, manifested mainly as rising sea surface temperatures, and increasing acidification of ocean waters due to greater drawdown of higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Management efforts have so far not kept pace with the rates of degradation, so that the spatial extent of damaged reefs and the incidences of localized extinction of reef species are increasing year after year. The major management efforts to date consist of establishing marine protected areas and promoting the active restoration of coral habitats.

  12. Workable male sterility systems for hybrid rice: Genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, and utilization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Zhong; E, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Hua-Li; Shu, Qing-Yao

    2014-12-01

    The exploitation of male sterility systems has enabled the commercialization of heterosis in rice, with greatly increased yield and total production of this major staple food crop. Hybrid rice, which was adopted in the 1970s, now covers nearly 13.6 million hectares each year in China alone. Various types of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and environment-conditioned genic male sterility (EGMS) systems have been applied in hybrid rice production. In this paper, recent advances in genetics, biochemistry, and molecular biology are reviewed with an emphasis on major male sterility systems in rice: five CMS systems, i.e., BT-, HL-, WA-, LD- and CW- CMS, and two EGMS systems, i.e., photoperiod- and temperature-sensitive genic male sterility (P/TGMS). The interaction of chimeric mitochondrial genes with nuclear genes causes CMS, which may be restored by restorer of fertility (Rf) genes. The PGMS, on the other hand, is conditioned by a non-coding RNA gene. A survey of the various CMS and EGMS lines used in hybrid rice production over the past three decades shows that the two-line system utilizing EGMS lines is playing a steadily larger role and TGMS lines predominate the current two-line system for hybrid rice production. The findings and experience gained during development and application of, and research on male sterility in rice not only advanced our understanding but also shed light on applications to other crops. PMID:26055995

  13. Nitrous oxide emissions from wetland rice-duck cultivation systems in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengfang; Cao, Cougui; Wang, Jingping; Zhan, Ming; Yuan, Weiling; Ahmad, Shahrear

    2009-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from a rice-duck cultivation system in the subtropical region of China and its regulating factors were investigated by using a static chambers technique during rice growth seasons in 2006 and 2007. The experimental field was equally divided into six plots for two different treatments: One was a conventional rice field (CK) and the other was a rice-duck ecosystem (RD). With the same amount of urea applied as basal fertilization, N2O emission fluxes from RD and CK followed a similar seasonal variation trend. During the flooding seasons, the N2O emission flux was not correlated with temperature, but it was significantly related to soil inorganic nitrogen (SIN) (p < 0.01) and soil pH (p < 0.01). After drainage, the N2O emission flux was not correlated with temperature, SIN, and soil pH. Our experimental data showed that peaks of N2O emission flux occurred both in 2 weeks after urea application and after drainage. Compared to CK, RD could significantly increase N2O emission. We evaluated the integrated global warming potentials (GWPs) of a rice-duck cultivation system based on methane (CH4) and N2O emission, which showed that RD could suppress the total amount of CH4 and N2O emissions from rice paddies. Moreover, because the decrease of CH4 emissions from RD compared to CK was far more than the increase of N2O emissions from RD compared to CK, RD greatly reduced integrated GWPs (CH4 + N2O) compared to CK. So, the rice-duck cultivation system is an effective strategy for reducing integrated GWPs of the rice-duck cultivation systems based on CH4 and N2O in southern China and will contribute to alleviating global warming. PMID:18427710

  14. Rice crop monitoring with multitemporal MODIS-Landsat data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Ru; Chen, Chi-Farn; Son, Nguyen-Thanh

    2014-05-01

    Rice is one of the most important cereal crops in the world and is the major crop in Taiwan. However, it is a challenge because rice fields are generally small and fragmental, while crop mapping requires information of crop phenology associating with the high spatiotemporal resolution of remote-sensing data. This problem can be partially overcome by a spatiotemporal fusion to create a new dataset that has a better spatiotemporal resolution. In this study, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Landsat imageries were used because MODIS data, which a spatial resolution of land bands of 500 m and temporal resolution of 1-2 days, were able to achieve the phenological information of rice crops at a large region; while Landsat data demonstrate the effectiveness to collectively map small patches of crop fields at the subnational level due to its spatial resolution of 30 m. However, the temporal resolution of Landsat data is lower (16 days), making it difficult to investigate temporal responses of crop phenology from rice fields. The main objective of this study was to take into account of advantages of MODIS and Landsat imageries to generate a synthetic dataset at Landsat spatial resolution and MODIS temporal resolution for rice crop mapping in Taiwan. The methodology comprised five steps: (1) satellite data for 2011 were pre-processed to account for geometric and radiometric correction of MODIS and Landsat data, (2) MODIS-Landsat data fusion using the Spatial Temporal Adaptive Fusion Model (STARFM), (3) construct the smooth time-series Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data using wavelet transform, (4) rice crop classification using phenological information of crop phenology, and (5) accuracy assessment. The data fusion results for day of year (DOY) 153 were compared with the reference Landsat data (DOY 153) indicated a close correlation (R2 = 0.81). The phenology-based classification results compared with the ground reference data revealed close agreement between these two datasets. The overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient were 82% and 0.75, respectively. The relationship between the MODIS-derived rice areas and those from the government's rice area statistics at the district level was examined, reaffirming a strong correlation between the two datasets with R2 > 0.9. This study demonstrates advantages of MODIS-Landsat data fusion for rice crop mapping in Taiwan. Such an approach used in this study could be applied for other regions to map small patches of crops at a subnational scale.

  15. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research 

    E-print Network

    2001-01-01

    ; Experimental – preflood and early postflood. For more information contact M.O. Way at 409-752-2741ext. 2231 or email moway@aesrg.tamu.edu. Stem Borer Research – Pheromone Trapping Stem borers, primarily Mexican rice borer (MRB), are becoming increasingly... rice borer (MRB) pheromone trap collections in the Texas Rice Belt. 2000. Month of collection County Trapper May Jun Jul Aug Sept Oct Nov Calhoun 1 Havlak - - 110 307 385 560 107 Jackson 1 Lesikar 263 350 275 276 98 102 34 Batchelor 846 832 462 1175...

  16. Varieties of Rice for Texas.

    E-print Network

    Wyche, R. H. (Robert Henry); Beachell, H. M. (Henry Monroe)

    1933-01-01

    30. The short-grain rices are not planted to any great extent in this region. The planting of the short-grain types should continue to be limited to the demand for this type of rice; however, Caloro, Piniling Daniel, and Acadia are good short... I -- T. S. No. Variety Pounds rough rice per acre Louisiana Pearl Nazlampas Naguyon No. 8 No. 30 No. 32 Nugengwa 2000 Pei Gya Nun 2186 Polopot Piniling Daniel Quinalibo Quinamalig 1165 Rexoro Sam Sai 2328 Schindano 216E Shinriki...

  17. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice...

  18. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice...

  19. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice...

  20. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which...

  1. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice...

  2. Rice University | Faculty/Researchers Office of Institutional

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Rice University | Faculty/Researchers Office of Institutional Research Quick Facts Rice Facts Historical Facts Archives About OIR The Office of Institutional Research (OIR) serves Rice University of information to Rice about itself. This organizational intelligence function reflects the demand

  3. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which...

  4. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which...

  5. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice...

  6. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which...

  7. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which...

  8. Majors Exploration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Prentice Hall (Prentice Hall)

    2012-01-05

    Put on your safari hat, open your mind and get ready to enter the world of majors explorations. If you ever wondered about a field of study and whether it is right for you, you are about to find out. You will also learn where majors and fields lead for careers that may interest you. All you need for the journey is the mind of the explorer and a commitment to thoroughly investigating the options which await you.

  9. Earth on Edge: Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Janet Overton

    This site provides information about the six ecosystems on which life on Earth most heavily depends: agricultural, forest, freshwater, grassland, coastal, and urban. It is part of a Public Broadcasting System (PBS) project, which includes a discussion guide. Ecosystems are described as communities of interacting organisms and the physical environment in which they live. The goods and services that ecosystems provide are said to form the foundation of human economies. Ecosystems purify air and water, help to control climate, and produce valuable soil-services. Site users may access a discussion guide to accompany the broadcast of the video/television program, which can be used in colleges, secondary schools, and in community groups. Case studies are taken from the companion book, World Resources 2000-2001: Ecosystems and People: The Fraying Web of Life, and from Pilot Analysis of Global Ecosystems: Agroecosystems (World Resources Institute). This online text includes profiles, case studies, and ecosystem assessments with references to ecosystems around the world. A list of additional resources includes links to environmental organizations, books, and periodicals.

  10. Science Sampler: Ecosystem Jenga!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Diandra L. Leslie-Pelecky

    2009-09-01

    To give students a tangible model of an ecosystem and have them experience what could happen if a component of that ecosystem were removed; the authors developed a hands-on, inquiry-based activity that visually demonstrates the concept of a delicately bal

  11. Ecosystems emerging: 1. conservation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard C. Patten; Milan Straškraba; Sven E. Jørgensen

    1997-01-01

    This second paper in the series on Ecosystems Emerging treats some properties of ecosystems derivable from the single elementary principle of conservation. These go beyond the mere balancing out of the matter and forces of nature.A brief sketch of a conservationless world is given, followed by an elementary background review of energy, matter and information. The main conservative quantities are

  12. Exploring virtual ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antão Vaz Almada; António Eduardo Dias; João Pedro Silva; Emanuel Marques dos Santos; Pedro José Pedrosa; António Sousa Câmara

    1996-01-01

    Browsing In Time & Space (BITS) is an interface designed to explore virtual ecosystems. A virtual ecosystem includes a three dimensional terrain model background, collections of man-made and natural objects, and behavior and interaction rules between the objects and the background. BITS is based on a virtual notepad and pen metaphor and is inspired in the concept of logging. Physical

  13. Where Will Ecosystems Go?

    SciTech Connect

    Janetos, Anthony C.

    2008-09-29

    Climate-induced changes in ecosystems have been both modeled and documented extensively over the past 15-20 years. Those changes occur in the context of many other stresses and interacting factors, but it is clear that many, if not most, ecosystems are sensitive to changing climate.

  14. Environmental Biology - Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dave McShaffrey

    This resource explains how energy and pollutants move through an ecosystem, how ecosystems are balanced and how they may be affected by human activities. Concepts described include the roles of organisms, food chains and food webs, pyramids of biomass, biological magnification, and biogeochemical cycles such as water, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous cycles.

  15. MERCURY IN LAKE MICHIGAN ECOSYSTEM COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercury is a toxic bioaccumulative substance in aquatic ecosystems. National fish advisories for mercury increased 115% from 1993 to 2001 and fish consumption is now a major health concern. The Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study measured the concentrations of mercury in the atmosph...

  16. Ecosystem services and water economics

    E-print Network

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Ecosystem services and water economics Florida Agricultural Commodity & Policy Outlook Conference, Food & Resource Economics Department, University of Florida/IFAS · Part II. Markets for Ecosystem preferences o Technological changes o Market competition o Recent: · Water availability · Ecosystem service

  17. Ecosystem Viable Yields

    E-print Network

    De Lara, Michel; Oliveros-Ramos, Ricardo; Tam, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg, 2002) encouraged the application of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States undertook to restore and exploit their stocks at maximum sustainable yield (MSY), a concept and practice without ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific model. Acknowledging this gap, we propose a definition of "ecosystem viable yields" (EVY) as yields compatible i) with biological viability levels for all time and ii) with an ecosystem dynamics. To the difference of MSY, this notion is not based on equilibrium, but on viability theory, which offers advantages for robustness. For a generic class of multispecies models with harvesting, we provide explicit expressions for the EVY. We apply our approach to the anchovy--hake couple in the Peruvian upwelling ecosystem between the years 1971 and 1981.

  18. Integrated environmental monitoring at remote ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, D.A.; O'Rourke, T.P.; Staley, C.S.; White, G.J.; Wiersma, G.B. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA). Center for Environmental Monitoring and Assessment); Baker, G.A.; Harmon, M.E.; Smith, B.G. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Forest Science); Clayton, J.L. (Forest Service, Boise, ID (USA). Intermountain Research Station); Greene, S.E. (Forest Service, Corvallis, OR (USA

    1988-08-01

    The first annual report reviews progress to date on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory(INEL) research project, Integrated Ecosystem and Pollutant Monitoring at Remote Wilderness Study Sites.'' The two primary objectives of this study are to apply, field test, and conceptually evaluate the US Forest Service guidelines for remote ecosystem monitoring and to provide an ongoing database on selected high-elevation ecosystem attributes, including physical, chemical, and biological parameters. The basic criteria for evaluation of the guidelines are usability, cost-effectiveness, data variability, alternative approaches, ecosystem conceptual approach, and quality assurance. The goal of the project is to identify a list of pollutant measurements and ecological attributes that will provide good, quality-assured data about a particular ecosystem. The present report covers each of the major components of the Forest Service guidelines except for regulatory and management constraints and visibility, which are not part of this project. Therefore, progress to date is provided as separate sections of the report for each of the following components: atomspheric environment, soils, aquatic chemistry, aquatic biology, salmonid fish, and plants (including forest ecosystem). 24 refs., 66 figs., 28 tabs.

  19. Effects of water management, connectivity, and surrounding land use on habitat use by frogs in rice paddies in Japan.

    PubMed

    Naito, Risa; Yamasaki, Michimasa; Lmanishi, Ayumi; Natuhara, Yosihiro; Morimoto, Yukihiro

    2012-09-01

    In Japan, rice paddies play an important role as a substitute habitat for wetland species, and support rich indigenous ecosystems. However, since the 1950s, agricultural modernization has altered the rice paddy environment, and many previously common species are now endangered. It is urgently necessary to evaluate rice paddies as habitats for conservation. Among the species living in rice paddies, frogs are representative and are good indicator species, so we focused on frog species and analyzed the influence of environmental factors on their habitat use. We found four frog species and one subspecies (Hyla japonica, Pelophylax nigromaculatus, Glandirana rugosa, Lithobates catesbeianus, and Pelophylax porosa brevipoda) at our study sites in Shiga prefecture. For all but L. catesbeianus, we analyzed the influence of environmental factors related to rice paddy structure, water management and availability, agrochemical use, connectivity, and land use on breeding and non-breeding habitat use. We constructed generalized additive mixed models with survey date as the smooth term and applied Akaike's information criterion to choose the bestranked model. Because life histories and biological characteristics vary among species, the factors affecting habitat use by frogs are also expected to differ by species. We found that both breeding and non-breeding habitat uses of each studied species were influenced by different combinations of environmental factors and that in most cases, habitat use showed seasonality. For frog conservation in rice paddies, we need to choose favorable rice paddy in relation to surrounding land use and apply suitable management for target species. PMID:22943781

  20. Phenolic profiles and antioxidant activity of black rice bran of different commercially available varieties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming Wei; Zhang, Rui Feng; Zhang, Fang Xuan; Liu, Rui Hai

    2010-07-14

    Increased consumption of whole grains has been associated with reduced risk of developing major chronic diseases. These health benefits have been attributed in part to their unique phytochemicals. Previous studies on black rice mainly focused on anthocyanins. Little is known about the phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activities of different black rice varieties. The objective of this study was to determine the phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activity of rice bran samples from 12 diverse varieties of black rice. The free, bound, and total phenolic contents of black rice bran samples ranged from 2086 to 7043, from 221.2 to 382.7, and from 2365 to 7367 mg of gallic acid equiv/100 g of dry weight (DW), respectively. The percentage contribution of free phenolics to the total ranged from 88.2 to 95.6%. The average values of free, bound, and total phenolic contents of black rice bran were 8, 1.5, and 6 times higher than those of white rice bran, respectively (p < 0.05). The free, bound, and total flavonoid contents of black rice bran samples ranged from 3462 to 12061, from 126.7 to 386.9, and from 3596 to 12448 mg of catechin equiv/100 g of DW, respectively. The percentage contribution of free flavonoids to the total ranged from 96.3 to 97.6%. The average values of free, bound, and total flavonoid contents of black rice bran were 7.4, 1.9, and 6.7 times higher than those of white rice bran, respectively (p < 0.05). The free, bound, and total anthocyanin contents of black rice bran samples ranged from 1227 to 5096, from 4.89 to 8.23, and from 1231 to 5101 mg of cyanidin-3-glucoside equiv/100 g of DW, respectively. The percentage contribution of free anthocyanins to the total ranged from 99.5 to 99.9%. Cyanidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-rutinoside, and peonidin-3-glucoside were detected in black rice bran samples and ranged from 736.6 to 2557, from 22.70 to 96.62, and from 100.7 to 534.2 mg/100 g of DW, respectively. The free, bound, and total antioxidant activities of black rice bran samples ranged from 476.9 to 180, from 47.91 to 79.48, and from 537.5 to 1876 mumol of Trolox equiv/g of DW, respectively. The percentage contribution of free antioxidant activity to the total ranged from 88.7 to 96.0%. The average values of free, bound, and total antioxidant activity of black rice bran were more than 8, 1.5, and 6 times higher than those of white rice bran, respectively (p < 0.05). The total antioxidant activity of black rice bran was correlated to the content of total phenolics, total flavonoids, and total anthocyanins and also was significantly correlated to the contents of cyanidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-rutinoside, and peonidin-3-glucoside. These results indicate that there are significant differences in phytochemical content and antioxidant activity among the different black rice varieties. Black rice bran has higher content of phenolics, flavonoids, and anthocyanins and has higher antioxidant activity when compared to white rice bran. Interestingly, the phenolics, flavonoids, and anthocyanins of black rice bran are mainly present in free form. Knowing the phytochemical profile and antioxidant activity of black rice bran gives insights to its potential application to promote health. PMID:20521821

  1. Impact of Seed Voucher System on Rice Farmers’ Welfare in Nigeria: A Randomized Control Trial Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bola Amoke Awotide; Taiwo Timothy Awoyemi; Aliou Diagne; Vivian E. T. Ojehomon

    2012-01-01

    This study adopted Randomized Control Trial to examine the impact of seed voucher system on farming households’ welfare in Nigeria using cross-sectional data of 600 rice farmers randomly selected from the three major rice ecologies of Nigeria. The WALD estimate reveals that the use of seed voucher increased household Per Capita Expenditure (PCE) by N14705.91. While the result of the

  2. Comparison of gamma-aminobutyric acid production in Thai rice grains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Panatda Jannoey; Hataichanoke Niamsup; Saisamorn Lumyong; Toshisada Suzuki; Takeshi Katayama; Griangsak Chairote

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has many pharmacological functions including being a major inhibitory neurotransmitter. Two\\u000a comparative methods for GABA production in rice grains as main food source in Thailand were investigated in this study. Fermentation\\u000a and germination method were separately carried out using seven selected local grain cultivars in northern Thailand. Red yeast\\u000a rice, obtained from the fermentation method, gave the

  3. Identification of SUB1A alleles from wild rice Oryza rufipogon Griff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhi-Xin Li; E. M. Septiningsih; S. M. Quilloy-Mercado; K. L. McNally; D. J. Mackill

    Submergence stress is a major constraint to rice production in South and Southeast Asia. Most rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars die within a week of complete submergence, while a small number of accessions are submergence-tolerant for up to\\u000a 2 weeks or more. These cultivars have the tolerant allele of the SUB1A gene, one of three ERF genes at this locus on

  4. Evaluation of sorghum genotypes for agronomic and food quality characteristics for pitimi (rice-like product) 

    E-print Network

    Blanchet, Claire Louise Colette

    1987-01-01

    of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: plant Breeding EVALUATION OF SORGHUM GENOTYPES FOR AGRONOMIC AND FOOD QUALITY ~ERISTICS FOR PITIMI (RICE-LIKE PRODUCT) . A Thesis by CLAIRE I OUISE COLETTE BLANCHET Approved... for pitimi (rice-like product) . (December 1987) Claire Louise Colette Blanchet B. S. , Faculty of Agronomy and Veterinary Hedicine, Haiti Chair of Advisory connittee: Dr. Phillips L, ucas The objectives of this study were to evaluate some sorghum...

  5. Broader perspective on ecosystem sustainability: consequences for decision making.

    PubMed

    Sidle, Roy C; Benson, William H; Carriger, John F; Kamai, Toshitaka

    2013-06-01

    Although the concept of ecosystem sustainability has a long-term focus, it is often viewed from a static system perspective. Because most ecosystems are dynamic, we explore sustainability assessments from three additional perspectives: resilient systems; systems where tipping points occur; and systems subject to episodic resetting. Whereas foundations of ecosystem resilience originated in ecology, recent discussions have focused on geophysical attributes, and it is recognized that dynamic system components may not return to their former state following perturbations. Tipping points emerge when chronic changes (typically anthropogenic, but sometimes natural) push ecosystems to thresholds that cause collapse of process and function and may become permanent. Ecosystem resetting occurs when episodic natural disasters breach thresholds with little or no warning, resulting in long-term changes to environmental attributes or ecosystem function. An example of sustainability assessment of ecosystem goods and services along the Gulf Coast (USA) demonstrates the need to include both the resilient and dynamic nature of biogeomorphic components. Mountain road development in northwest Yunnan, China, makes rivers and related habitat vulnerable to tipping points. Ecosystems reset by natural disasters are also presented, emphasizing the need to understand the magnitude frequency and interrelationships among major disturbances, as shown by (i) the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and resulting tsunami, including how unsustainable urban development exacerbates geodisaster propagation, and (ii) repeated major earthquakes and associated geomorphic and vegetation disturbances in Papua New Guinea. Although all of these ecosystem perturbations and shifts are individually recognized, they are not embraced in contemporary sustainable decision making. PMID:23686583

  6. Rice scene radiation research plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J.

    1982-01-01

    Data requirements, tasks to be accomplished, and the technical approaches to be used in identifying the characteristics of rice for crop inventories are listed as well as methods for estimating crop development and assessing its conditions.

  7. Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... drugs, and some may contain a potentially harmful contaminant. This fact sheet provides basic information about red ... supplements. Some red yeast rice products contain a contaminant called citrinin, which can cause kidney failure. Tell ...

  8. Breeding high-yielding drought-tolerant rice: genetic variations and conventional and molecular approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Dixit, Shalabh; Ram, T.; Yadaw, R. B.; Mishra, K. K.; Mandal, N. P.

    2014-01-01

    The increased occurrence and severity of drought stress have led to a high yield decline in rice in recent years in drought-affected areas. Drought research at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) over the past decade has concentrated on direct selection for grain yield under drought. This approach has led to the successful development and release of 17 high-yielding drought-tolerant rice varieties in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Africa. In addition to this, 14 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) showing a large effect against high-yielding drought-susceptible popular varieties were identified using grain yield as a selection criterion. Six of these (qDTY 1.1, qDTY 2.2, qDTY 3.1, qDTY 3.2, qDTY 6.1, and qDTY 12.1) showed an effect against two or more high-yielding genetic backgrounds in both the lowland and upland ecosystem, indicating their usefulness in increasing the grain yield of rice under drought. The yield of popular rice varieties IR64 and Vandana has been successfully improved through a well-planned marker-assisted backcross breeding approach, and QTL introgression in several other popular varieties is in progress. The identification of large-effect QTLs for grain yield under drought and the higher yield increase under drought obtained through the use of these QTLs (which has not been reported in other cereals) indicate that rice, because of its continuous cultivation in two diverse ecosystems (upland, drought tolerant, and lowland, drought susceptible), has benefited from the existence of larger genetic variability than in other cereals. This can be successfully exploited using marker-assisted breeding. PMID:25205576

  9. Differentiation of weedy traits in ALS-resistant red rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice is a weedy form of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) that competes aggressively with rice in the southern U.S., reduces yields and contaminates rice grains. The introduction of ClearfieldTM rice, a nontransgenic, herbicide-resistant rice cultivar a decade ago has led to increased use of imazet...

  10. Rice Young Alumni 6100 Main Street MS 520

    E-print Network

    Palem, Krishna V.

    Rice Young Alumni 6100 Main Street MS 520 Houston, Texas 77005 Phone: 713-348-4057 alumni.rice.edu Rice Houston Young Alumni on Facebook Rice Young Alumni Handbook How to Access Your Rice Young Alumni Resources and Programs Step 1 Create an alumni profile on alumni.rice.edu Step 2 Join your favorite ARA

  11. Storage stability of flour-blasted brown rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brown rice was blasted with rice flour rather than sand in a sand blaster to make microscopic nicks and cuts so that water can easily penetrate into the brown rice endosperm and cook the rice in a shorter time. The flour-blasted American Basmati brown rice, long grain brown rice, and parboiled long...

  12. Response of carbon fluxes to water relations in a savanna ecosystem in South Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. L. Kutsch; N. Hanan; R. J. Scholes; I. McHugh; W. Kubheka; H. Eckhardt; C. Williams

    2008-01-01

    The principal mechanisms that connect carbon fluxes with water relations in savanna ecosystems were studied by using eddy covariance in a savanna ecosystem at Kruger National Park, South Africa. Since the annual drought and rewetting cycle is a major factor influencing the function of savanna ecosystems, this work focused on the close inter-connection between water relations and carbon fluxes. Data

  13. Limited surveillance of fumonisins in brown rice and wheat harvested in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kushiro, Masayo; Zheng, Yazhi; Nagata, Reiko; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Nagashima, Hitoshi

    2009-06-01

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins mainly produced by Fusarium verticillioides, which is a major contaminant of corn. However, there are sporadic reports of fumonisin contamination in wheat worldwide. The rice adherent fungus Gibberella fujikuroi is taxonomically closely related to F. verticillioides. Therefore, the potential risk of fumonisin contamination in rice and wheat is significant. Previously, a sensitive detection method utilizing liquid chromatography with tandem electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS) was developed for the determination of fumonisins in brown rice. In the present study, the incidence of fumonisins in brown rice and wheat harvested in Japan was investigated using LC-ESI-MS-MS. Forty-eight rice samples and 47 wheat samples were screened and analyzed for the major B-type fumonisins: fumonisin B1 (FB1) and fumonisin B2 (FB2). About 1 kg of rice or wheat seed was divided into three subsamples, and 10 g from each subsample was used for the analysis. The limits of detection were 0.012 and 0.011 mg/kg for FBt and FB2, respectively, in rice samples and 0.010 and 0.008 mg/kg for FB1 and FB2, respectively, in wheat samples. The mean (standard deviation) recoveries of FB1 spiked at 0.50 mg/kg into toxin-free rice and wheat samples were 77.6 (4.2)% and 84.5 (3.1)%, respectively. One of the wheat samples was positive for FBt with a value greater than the limit of detection,but no fumonisin was found in any of the rice samples. This is the first report of fumonisins detected in Japanese wheat. PMID:19610350

  14. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research

    E-print Network

    2007-01-01

    temperature and high UV-B radiation on rice plants. In one study, rice plants (Cocodrie) were grown in two nighttime regimes (ambi- ent and ambient plus 5 o C). Plants were sprayed with 3 different chemicals (Salicylic acid, Glycine betaine and Vitamin E... rates and spikelet sterility. All three chemicals (Salicylic acid, Glycine betaine and Vitamin E) limited the damage due to high nighttime temperatures by decreasing respiration rates compared to untreated plants. Enhanced UV-B radiation decreased...

  15. Molecular mapping of rice chromosomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. McCouch; G. Kochert; Z. H. Yu; Z. Y. Wang; G. S. Khush; W. R. Coffman; S. D. Tanksley

    1988-01-01

    We report the construction of an RFLP genetic map of rice (Oryza sativa) chromosomes. The map is comprised of 135 loci corresponding to clones selected from a PstI genomic library. This molecular map covers 1,389 cM of the rice genome and exceeds the current classical maps by more than 20%. The map was generated from F2 segregation data (50 individuals)

  16. Development of a novel transgenic rice with hypocholesterolemic activity via high-level accumulation of the ?' subunit of soybean ?-conglycinin.

    PubMed

    Cabanos, Cerrone; Kato, Naoki; Amari, Yoshiki; Fujiwara, Keigo; Ohno, Tomoki; Shimizu, Kousuke; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Shimada, Masaya; Kuroda, Masaharu; Masuda, Taro; Takaiwa, Fumio; Utsumi, Shigeru; Nagaoka, Satoshi; Maruyama, Nobuyuki

    2014-08-01

    Soybean 7S globulin, known as ?-conglycinin, has been shown to regulate human plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Furthermore, the ?' subunit of ?-conglycinin has specifically been shown to possess low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol-lowering activity. Therefore, accumulation of the ?' subunit of ?-conglycinin in rice seeds could lead to the production of new functional rice that could promote human health. Herein, we used the low-glutelin rice mutant 'Koshihikari' (var. a123) and suppressed its glutelins and prolamins, the major seed storage proteins of rice, by RNA interference. The accumulation levels of the ?' subunit in the lines with suppressed glutelin and prolamin levels were >20 mg in 1 g of rice seeds, which is considerably higher than those in previous studies. Oral administration of the transgenic rice containing the ?' subunit exhibited a hypocholesterolemic activity in rats; the serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels were significantly reduced when compared to those of the control rice (var. a123). The cholesterol-lowering action by transgenic rice accumulating the ?' subunit induces a significant increase in fecal bile acid excretion and a tendency to increase in fecal cholesterol excretion. This is the first report that transgenic rice exhibits a hypocholesterolemic activity in rats in vivo by using the ?-conglycinin ?' subunit. PMID:24676962

  17. Major depression.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Susan M; Pagalilauan, Genevieve L; Simpson, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Major depression is a common, disabling condition seen frequently in primary care practices. Non-psychiatrist ambulatory providers are increasingly responsible for diagnosing, and primarily managing patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this review is to help primary care providers to understand the natural history of MDD, identify practical tools for screening, and a thoughtful approach to management. Clinically challenging topics like co-morbid conditions, treatment resistant depression and pharmacotherapy selection with consideration to side effects and medication interactions, are also covered. PMID:25134869

  18. Expansins in deepwater rice internodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyung-Taeg; Kende, H. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)] [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Cell walls of deepwater rice internodes undergo long-term extension (creep) when placed under tension in acidic buffers. This is indicative of the action of the cell wall-loosening protein expansion. Wall extension had a pH optimum of around 4.0 and was abolished by boiling. Acid-induced extension of boiled cell walls could be reconstituted by addition of salt-extracted rice or cucumber cell wall proteins. Cucumber expansion antibody recognized a single protein band of 24.5-kD apparent molecular mass on immunoblots of rice cell wall proteins. Expansions were partially purified by concanavalin A affinity chromatography and sulfopropyl (SP) cation-exchange chromatography. The latter yielded two peaks with extension activity (SP20 and SP29), and immunoblot analysis showed that both of these active fractions contained expansion of 24.5-kD molecular mass. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of SP20 expansion is identical to that deduced from the rice expansion cDNA Os-EXP1. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of SP29 expansion matches that deduced from the rice expansion cDNA Os-EXP2 in six of eight amino acids. Our results show that two expansions occur in the cell walls of rice internodes and that they may mediate acid-induced wall extension.

  19. Ecosystem services and the protection, restoration, and management of ecosystems exposed to chemical stressors.

    PubMed

    Maltby, Lorraine

    2013-04-01

    Ecosystem services-the benefits people obtain from ecosystem structures and processes-are essential for human survival and well-being. Chemicals are also an essential component of modern life; however, they may cause adverse ecological effects and reduce ecosystem service provision. Environmental policy makers are increasingly adopting the ecosystem services concept, but applying this approach to the protection, restoration, and management of ecosystems requires the development of new understanding, tools, and frameworks. There is an urgent need to understand and predict the effect of single and multiple stressors on ecosystem service delivery across different spatial scales (local to global), to develop indicators that can be used to quantify and map services and identify synergies and trade-offs between them, to establish protection goals and restoration targets defined in terms of the types and levels of service delivery required, and to develop approaches for the assessment and management of chemical risk to ecosystem services that consider the whole life cycle of products and processes. These are major research challenges for the environmental science community in general and for ecotoxicologists and risk assessors in particular. PMID:23589419

  20. Growing season net ecosystem CO2 exchange of two desert ecosystems with alkaline soils in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longhui; Chen, Xi; van der Tol, Christiaan; Luo, Geping; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-01-01

    Central Asia is covered by vast desert ecosystems, and the majority of these ecosystems have alkaline soils. Their contribution to global net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) is of significance simply because of their immense spatial extent. Some of the latest research reported considerable abiotic CO2 absorption by alkaline soil, but the rate of CO2 absorption has been questioned by peer communities. To investigate the issue of carbon cycle in Central Asian desert ecosystems with alkaline soils, we have measured the NEE using eddy covariance (EC) method at two alkaline sites during growing season in Kazakhstan. The diurnal course of mean monthly NEE followed a clear sinusoidal pattern during growing season at both sites. Both sites showed significant net carbon uptake during daytime on sunny days with high photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) but net carbon loss at nighttime and on cloudy and rainy days. NEE has strong dependency on PAR and the response of NEE to precipitation resulted in an initial and significant carbon release to the atmosphere, similar to other ecosystems. These findings indicate that biotic processes dominated the carbon processes, and the contribution of abiotic carbon process to net ecosystem CO2 exchange may be trivial in alkaline soil desert ecosystems over Central Asia. PMID:24455157

  1. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to be gained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. ...Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his writ around this globe of ours. ...There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountian? Why - 35 years ago - why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we intend to win, and the others too.'

  2. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to begained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his wirt around this globe of ours. There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountain? Why 35 years ago why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we attend to win, and the others , too.'

  3. Quantum and Ecosystem Entropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirwan, A. D.

    2008-06-01

    Ecosystems and quantum gases share a number of superficial similarities including enormous numbers of interacting elements and the fundamental role of energy in such interactions. A theory for the synthesis of data and prediction of new phenomena is well established in quantum statistical mechanics. The premise of this paper is that the reason a comparable unifying theory has not emerged in ecology is that a proper role for entropy has yet to be assigned. To this end, a phase space entropy model of ecosystems is developed. Specification of an ecosystem phase space cell size based on microbial mass, length, and time scales gives an ecosystem uncertainty parameter only about three orders of magnitude larger than Planck’s constant. Ecosystem equilibria is specified by conservation of biomass and total metabolic energy, along with the principle of maximum entropy at equilibria. Both Bose - Einstein and Fermi - Dirac equilibrium conditions arise in ecosystems applications. The paper concludes with a discussion of some broader aspects of an ecosystem phase space.

  4. Coral Reef Ecosystems: Interdependence

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2006-11-01

    This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Coral Reef Ecosystems SciPack. It explores the interdependent relationships between species in the coral reef ecosystem. All populations in the reef ecosystem are a part of and depend on a global food web (a connected set of food chains) through which energy flows in one direction, from the sun into organism and eventually dissipating into the environment as heat. This food web includes ocean plants, the animals that feed on them, and the animals that feed on those animals. Energy is transferred between organisms and their environment along the way. Energy concentration diminishes at each step. The cycles of life continue indefinitely because organisms decompose after death and return food materials to the environment. Learning Outcomes:? Identify and label key components of food chains and food webs in a coral reef ecosystem.? Describe key relationships among plants and animals in the coral reef ecosystem: predator and prey relationships, producer and consumer relationships, and symbiotic relationships (mutualism, commensalisms, parasitism).? Recognize the direction that energy travels through food chains and food webs.? Explain that materials (chemical elements) and natural resources are recycled in coral reef ecosystems and reappear in different forms.? Describe the primary ecological succession events within a typical coral reef ecosystem.

  5. Outcrossing potential between U.S. red rice (Oryza sativa) and Chinese indica rice (Oryza sativa) lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice in southern U.S. rice fields remains a widespread, economically challenging problem despite nearly a decade of rice production systems that include true-breeding rice cultivars and indica-derived hybrid rice with resistance to imazethapyr. Both of these herbicide-resistant rice systems hav...

  6. Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) emergence characteristics and influence on rice (O. sativa) yield at different planting dates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated rice yield losses due to red rice infestation vary by cultivar, red rice density, and duration of interference. The competition effects of red rice could be influenced further by emergence characteristics, red rice biotype, and planting time of cultivated rice. We aimed to characterize th...

  7. Comparative proteomics analysis reveals the mechanism of fertility alternation of thermosensitive genic male sterile rice lines under low temperature inducement.

    PubMed

    Song, Liru; Liu, Zhongqi; Tong, Jianhua; Xiao, Langtao; Ma, Hao; Zhang, Haiqing

    2015-06-01

    Thermosensitive genic male sterile (TGMS) rice line has made great economical contributions in rice production. However, the fertility of TGMS rice line during hybrid seed production is frequently influenced by low temperature, thus leading to its fertility/sterility alteration and hybrid seed production failure. To understand the mechanism of fertility alternation under low temperature inducement, the extracted proteins from young panicles of two TGMS rice lines at the fertility alternation sensitivity stage were analyzed by 2DE. Eighty-three protein spots were found to be significantly changed in abundance, and identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. The identified proteins were involved in 16 metabolic pathways and cellular processes. The young panicles of TGMS rice line Zhu 1S possessed the lower ROS-scavenging, indole-3-acetic acid level, soluble protein, and sugar contents as well as the faster anther wall disintegration than those of TGMS rice line Zhun S. All these major differences might result in that the former is more stable in fertility than the latter. Based on the majority of the 83 identified proteins, together with microstructural, physiological, and biochemical results, a possible fertile alteration mechanism in the young panicles of TGMS rice line under low temperature inducement was proposed. Such a result will help us in breeding TGMS rice lines and production of hybrid seed. PMID:25641954

  8. Lessons on River Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dan Zalles

    The lesson activity titles are: What are systems? (Purpose: to have students understand what a "system" is, in the broadest sense) How is the natural environment of the tribal community a system? (Purpose: to tie what students learned during the year about the tribal community and its natural environment to the concept of what a "system" is) How did settlers of European descent change the tribe's ecosystem? (Purpose: to explore the connections between what European settlers did to the tribe's ecosystem and what the effects have been on the ecosystem) What can be done? What should be done? (Purpose: to explore and evaluate policy options for future environmental sustenance)

  9. Processing Conditions, Rice Properties, Health and Environment

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Poritosh; Orikasa, Takahiro; Okadome, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Shiina, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Rice is the staple food for nearly two-thirds of the world’s population. Food components and environmental load of rice depends on the rice form that is resulted by different processing conditions. Brown rice (BR), germinated brown rice (GBR) and partially-milled rice (PMR) contains more health beneficial food components compared to the well milled rice (WMR). Although the arsenic concentration in cooked rice depends on the cooking methods, parboiled rice (PBR) seems to be relatively prone to arsenic contamination compared to that of untreated rice, if contaminated water is used for parboiling and cooking. A change in consumption patterns from PBR to untreated rice (non-parboiled), and WMR to PMR or BR may conserve about 43–54 million tons of rice and reduce the risk from arsenic contamination in the arsenic prone area. This study also reveals that a change in rice consumption patterns not only supply more food components but also reduces environmental loads. A switch in production and consumption patterns would improve food security where food grains are scarce, and provide more health beneficial food components, may prevent some diseases and ease the burden on the Earth. However, motivation and awareness of the environment and health, and even a nominal incentive may require for a method switching which may help in building a sustainable society. PMID:21776212

  10. Processing conditions, rice properties, health and environment.

    PubMed

    Roy, Poritosh; Orikasa, Takahiro; Okadome, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Shiina, Takeo

    2011-06-01

    Rice is the staple food for nearly two-thirds of the world's population. Food components and environmental load of rice depends on the rice form that is resulted by different processing conditions. Brown rice (BR), germinated brown rice (GBR) and partially-milled rice (PMR) contains more health beneficial food components compared to the well milled rice (WMR). Although the arsenic concentration in cooked rice depends on the cooking methods, parboiled rice (PBR) seems to be relatively prone to arsenic contamination compared to that of untreated rice, if contaminated water is used for parboiling and cooking. A change in consumption patterns from PBR to untreated rice (non-parboiled), and WMR to PMR or BR may conserve about 43-54 million tons of rice and reduce the risk from arsenic contamination in the arsenic prone area. This study also reveals that a change in rice consumption patterns not only supply more food components but also reduces environmental loads. A switch in production and consumption patterns would improve food security where food grains are scarce, and provide more health beneficial food components, may prevent some diseases and ease the burden on the Earth. However, motivation and awareness of the environment and health, and even a nominal incentive may require for a method switching which may help in building a sustainable society. PMID:21776212

  11. Ecosystem approach to management I. "dynamic" ecosystem management v.

    E-print Network

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    1 Ecosystem approach to management I. "dynamic" ecosystem management v. the past "static" approach A. Past Resource Management Approach B. New ecosystem management approach C. Examples II. Using Natural Processes under Ecosystem Management A. Disturbance B. Succession C. Important types of natural

  12. Rice University Policy No. 806 RICE UNIVERSITY TRAVEL, BUSINESS MEETING and ENTERTAINMENT POLICY

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Rice University Policy No. 806 RICE UNIVERSITY TRAVEL, BUSINESS MEETING and ENTERTAINMENT POLICY I. General Policy Rice University pays for appropriate and reasonable expenses for travel, business meetings of the university. Properly Documented: The Rice business purpose is described, the list of attendees (names

  13. Molecular dynamics of interactions of rice with rice blast and sheath blight pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to develop the molecular strategies to control rice (Oryzae sativa) diseases, molecular interactions of rice with rice blast [Magnaporthe oryzae, formerly (Magnaporthe grisea] and sheath blight (Rhizoctonia solani) fungi were analyzed. The interaction of rice with M. oryzae follows a b...

  14. Chemical and cultural practices for red rice control in rice fields in Ebro Delta (Spain)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria del Mar CatalàForner

    1995-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted in 1991 and 1992 in farm fields having natural red rice infestation to test chemical and cultural practices for red rice control. In general treatments including puddling gave a significant reduction of red rice panicle density (average control was 88%). Puddling plus thiobencarb (6.7 kg ai\\/ha) controlled 90% of red rice, but in sandy soils it

  15. Red Yeast Rice Prepared from Thai Glutinous Rice and the Antioxidant Activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Em-on Chairote; Griangsak Chairote; Saisamorn Lumyong

    Red yeast rice which is a product of solid fermentation was prepared from several kinds of Thai glutinous rice (Oryza sativa L.) cv. Korkor 6 (RD6), Kam (Kam) and Sanpatong1 (SPT1). Monascus purpureus CMU001 isolated from available Chinese red yeast rice was used as the fermentation starter. The analysis for the presence of antioxidant activity in red yeast rice was

  16. Current advance methods for the identification of blast resistance genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Tanweer, Fatah A; Rafii, Mohd Y; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Rahim, Harun A; Ahmed, Fahim; Latif, Mohammad A

    2015-05-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most devastating diseases of rice around the world and crop losses due to blast are considerably high. Many blast resistant rice varieties have been developed by classical plant breeding and adopted by farmers in various rice-growing countries. However, the variability in the pathogenicity of the blast fungus according to environment made blast disease a major concern for farmers, which remains a threat to the rice industry. With the utilization of molecular techniques, plant breeders have improved rice production systems and minimized yield losses. In this article, we have summarized the current advanced molecular techniques used for controlling blast disease. With the advent of new technologies like marker-assisted selection, molecular mapping, map-based cloning, marker-assisted backcrossing and allele mining, breeders have identified more than 100 Pi loci and 350 QTL in rice genome responsible for blast disease. These Pi genes and QTLs can be introgressed into a blast-susceptible cultivar through marker-assisted backcross breeding. These molecular techniques provide timesaving, environment friendly and labour-cost-saving ways to control blast disease. The knowledge of host-plant interactions in the frame of blast disease will lead to develop resistant varieties in the future. PMID:25843222

  17. GENE FLOW BETWEEN RED RICE AND RICE IN HERBICIDE RESISTANT RICE FIELDS: EVALUATING RISKS AND MANAGEMENT OPTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imidazolinone (IMI)-resistant rice cultivars have been increasingly adopted in the southern U.S. since their initial introduction in 2002, largely due to the newly acquired control of red rice that is now possible in these systems. It is estimated that IMI rice is being grown on 20 to 25% of the ac...

  18. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 1

    E-print Network

    was identifying the factors that affect rice bran rancidity, and determine the reason for variabil- ity among varieties. During the milling process, rice bran lipids come into contact with lipases, which rapidly hydrolyse the ester bonds of triacylglycerol...

  19. Light Pollution and Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Travis Longcore (University of Southern California; )

    2010-05-20

    Artificial light at night acts as a pollutant, with significant and adverse impacts to ecosystems. It can, for example, cause disorientation or act as an unnatural stimulus to wildlife, and disrupt reproduction for many species.

  20. Self Contained Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A self contained ecosystem developed at Jet Propulsion Laboratory is manufactured by Engineering and Research Associates. It is essentially a no-care aquarium which requires only natural or fluorescent light.

  1. THE COMPUTERIZED ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A generalized discussion of mathematical simulation used on the Great Lakes is presented for the layman. Illustrations of model utilization are presented and the complexities of ecosystem simulation are noted....

  2. Ecosystems in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madders, M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the materials and laboratory techniques for the study of food chains and food webs, pyramids of numbers and biomass, energy pyramids, and oxygen gradients. Presents a procedure for investigating the effects of various pollutants on an entire ecosystem. (GS)

  3. Wetland management and rice farming strategies to decrease methylmercury bioaccumulation and loads from the Cosumnes River Preserve, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Fleck, Jacob; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; McQuillen, Harry; Heim, Wes

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated mercury (Hg) concentrations in caged fish (deployed for 30 days) and water from agricultural wetland (rice fields), managed wetland, slough, and river habitats in the Cosumnes River Preserve, California. We also implemented experimental hydrological regimes on managed wetlands and post-harvest rice straw management techniques on rice fields in order to evaluate potential Best Management Practices to decrease methylmercury bioaccumulation within wetlands and loads to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Total Hg concentrations in caged fish were twice as high in rice fields as in managed wetland, slough, or riverine habitats, including seasonal managed wetlands subjected to identical hydrological regimes. Caged fish Hg concentrations also differed among managed wetland treatments and post-harvest rice straw treatments. Specifically, Hg concentrations in caged fish decreased from inlets to outlets in seasonal managed wetlands with either a single (fall-only) or dual (fall and spring) drawdown and flood-up events, whereas Hg concentrations increased slightly from inlets to outlets in permanent managed wetlands. In rice fields, experimental post-harvest straw management did not decrease Hg concentrations in caged fish. In fact, in fields in which rice straw was chopped and either disked into the soil or baled and removed from the fields, fish Hg concentrations increased from inlets to outlets and were higher than Hg concentrations in fish from rice fields subjected to the more standard post-harvest practice of simply chopping rice straw prior to fall flood-up. Finally, aqueous methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations and export were highly variable, and seasonal trends in particular were often opposite to those of caged fish. Aqueous MeHg concentrations and loads were substantially higher in winter than in summer, whereas caged fish Hg concentrations were relatively low in winter and substantially higher in summer. Together, our results highlight the importance of habitat, seasonal processes, and wetland management practices on Hg cycling and ecological risk in aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Ecosystem Management Strategies Katy Ransone

    E-print Network

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    Ecosystem Management Strategies Katy Ransone Biol 379- Dr. Dever 11/14/13 How we should manage as ecosystem management. The term 'ecosystem' is one that is somewhat loosely defined. In general, it includes all of the biotic (living) and abiotic (non-living) factors in a specified area. With the ecosystem

  5. Allelopathy in Forested Ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Azim U. Mallik

    In the context of forestry, the concept of allelopathy has recently been expanded from a plant to plant interference phenomenon\\u000a to an ecosystem-level phenomenon that is influenced by ecosystem disturbance. This chapter reviews the latest development\\u000a in our understanding of forest allelopathy and the ways in which this new knowledge can be used in sustainable forest management.\\u000a Allelopathic effects of

  6. Exploring an Ecosystem

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National 4-H Council

    2009-01-01

    In this ecology activity, learners make a model water-based ecosystem called a terraqua column. The column (in a large soda bottle) includes pond water, duckweed, sand or gravel, and small snails. Learners observe what happens in their living model and consider such questions as what happens to animals and plants when humans harm an ecosystem. This activity is aligned to National Science Standards (NS.5-8.3 Life Science).

  7. Rice Facts -Students : Rice University http://professor.rice.edu/professor/Students4.asp[9/13/2011 11:10:41 AM

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Rice Facts - Students : Rice University http://professor.rice.edu/professor/Students4.asp[9/13/2011 11:10:41 AM] Parents Undergraduates Grad Students Faculty & Researchers Staff Alumni Rice Facts - Students Faculty and Researchers > Office of Institutional Research > Rice Facts - Students Home

  8. Using ecosystem experiments to improve vegetation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medlyn, Belinda E.; Zaehle, Sönke; de Kauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael C.; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul K.; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Colin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Ying-Ping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey M.; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J.

    2015-06-01

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model-Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. By identifying and evaluating the main assumptions causing differences among models, the assumption-centred approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. Here, we explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  9. Texas Rice, Volume V, Number 8 

    E-print Network

    2005-01-01

    identified by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Arkansas. Wengui Yan, a research geneticist at the ARS Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center in Stuttgart, Ark., leads efforts to analyze the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rice Core... to improve straighthead resistance in rice breeding in the southern United States. Stuttgart researchers are also addressing undesirable amylose content levels in indica rice. Amylose content is the characteristic used to describe the difference between dry...

  10. TOND1 confers tolerance to nitrogen deficiency in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yangjun; Tan, Lubin; Zhu, Zuofeng; Yuan, Lixing; Xie, Daoxin; Sun, Chuanqing

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N), the most important mineral nutrient for plants, is critical to agricultural production systems. N deficiency severely affects rice growth and decreases rice yields. However, excessive use of N fertilizer has caused severe pollution to agricultural and ecological environments. The necessity of breeding of crops that require lower input of N fertilizer has been recognized. Here we identified a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 12, Tolerance Of Nitrogen Deficiency 1 (TOND1), that confers tolerance to N deficiency in the indica cultivar Teqing. Sequence verification of 75 indica and 75 japonica cultivars from 18 countries and regions demonstrated that only 27.3% of cultivars (41 indica cultivars) contain TOND1, whereas 72.7% of cultivars, including the remaining 34 indica cultivars and all 75 japonica cultivars, do not harbor the TOND1 allele. Over-expression of TOND1 increased the tolerance to N deficiency in the TOND1-deficient rice cultivars. The identification of TOND1 provides a molecular basis for breeding rice varieties with improved grain yield despite decreased input of N fertilizers. PMID:25439309

  11. Rice responses to rising temperatures - challenges, perspectives and future directions.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, S V K; Murty, M V R; Quick, W P

    2014-08-20

    Phenotypic plasticity in overcoming heat stress-induced damage across hot tropical rice-growing regions is predominantly governed by relative humidity. Expression of transpiration cooling, an effective heat-avoiding mechanism, will diminish with the transition from fully flooded paddies to water-saving technologies, such as direct-seeded and aerobic rice cultivation, thus further aggravating stress damage. This change can potentially introduce greater sensitivity to previously unaffected developmental stages such as floral meristem (panicle) initiation and spikelet differentiation, and further intensify vulnerability at the known sensitive gametogenesis and flowering stages. More than the mean temperature rise, increased variability and a more rapid increase in nighttime temperature compared with the daytime maximum present a greater challenge. This review addresses (1) the importance of vapour pressure deficit under fully flooded paddies and increased vulnerability of rice production to heat stress or intermittent occurrence of combined heat and drought stress under emerging water-saving rice technologies; (2) the major disconnect with high night temperature response between field and controlled environments in terms of spikelet sterility; (3) highlights the most important mechanisms that affect key grain quality parameters, such as chalk formation under heat stress; and finally (4), we model and estimate heat stress-induced spikelet sterility taking South Asia as a case study. PMID:25142172

  12. TOND1 confers tolerance to nitrogen deficiency in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangjun; Tan, Lubin; Zhu, Zuofeng; Yuan, Lixing; Xie, Daoxin; Sun, Chuanqing

    2015-02-01

    Nitrogen (N), the most important mineral nutrient for plants, is critical to agricultural production systems. N deficiency severely affects rice growth and decreases rice yields. However, excessive use of N fertilizer has caused severe pollution to agricultural and ecological environments. The necessity of breeding of crops that require lower input of N fertilizer has been recognized. Here we identified a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 12, Tolerance Of Nitrogen Deficiency 1 (TOND1), that confers tolerance to N deficiency in the indica cultivar Teqing. Sequence verification of 75 indica and 75 japonica cultivars from 18 countries and regions demonstrated that only 27.3% of cultivars (41 indica cultivars) contain TOND1, whereas 72.7% of cultivars, including the remaining 34 indica cultivars and all 75 japonica cultivars, do not harbor the TOND1 allele. Over-expression of TOND1 increased the tolerance to N deficiency in the TOND1-deficient rice cultivars. The identification of TOND1 provides a molecular basis for breeding rice varieties with improved grain yield despite decreased input of N fertilizers. PMID:25439309

  13. Rice functionality, starch structure and the genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Through collaborative efforts among USDA scientists at Beaumont, Texas, we have gained in-depth knowledge of how rice functionality, i.e. the texture of the cooked rice, rice processing properties, and starch gelatinization temperature, are associated with starch-synthesis genes and starch structure...

  14. RICE UNIVERSITY Task and Motion Planning for

    E-print Network

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    RICE UNIVERSITY Task and Motion Planning for Mobile Manipulators by Ioan Alexandru S¸ucan A THESIS Committee: Dr. Lydia E. Kavraki, Professor, Chair Computer Science, Rice University Dr. James McLurkin, Assistant Professor Computer Science, Rice University Dr. Marcia K. O'Malley, Associate Professor Mechanical

  15. RICE UNIVERSITY Kinodynamic Motion Planning for

    E-print Network

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    RICE UNIVERSITY Kinodynamic Motion Planning for High-dimensional Physical Systems by Ioan Alexandru of Science Approved, Thesis Committee: Dr. Lydia E. Kavraki (Chair) Professor, Computer Science, Rice University Dr. Joe Warren Professor, Computer Science, Rice University Dr. Marcia K. O'Malley Assistant

  16. RICE UNIVERSITY The Barbara and David Gibbs

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    RICE UNIVERSITY The Barbara and David Gibbs RECREATION CENTER MEMBERSHIP CANCELLATION FORM Date:____________________________________________________ I authorize Rice University to terminate my request for payroll deduction to pay my membership fees 77005 | Office: ext.4058 | Fax: 713.348.5329 | als5@rice.edu RECREATION CENTER STAFF USE ONLY Approval

  17. Rice University Public Assembly/Special Event

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    Rice University Public Assembly/Special Event Fire and Life Safety Self-Check Form City of Houston shall provide Rice with a Certificate of Insurance that includes: Commercial General Liability ­ minimum $1,000,000 per occurrence Aggregate $2,000,000 Rice named as additional insured All rights

  18. RICE UNIVERSITY The Barbara and David Gibbs

    E-print Network

    RICE UNIVERSITY The Barbara and David Gibbs RECREATION CENTER MEMBERSHIP CANCELLATION FORM Date:____________________________________________________ I authorize Rice University to terminate my request for payroll deduction to pay my membership fees 77005-1827 | Fax: 713.348.5329 | als5@rice.edu RECREATION CENTER STAFF USE ONLY Approval Signature

  19. RICE UNIVERSITY Context for System Resource Management

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Lin

    RICE UNIVERSITY Context for System Resource Management: An Application in Wireless Data Management my advisor, Dr. Lin Zhong, for his guidance and support throughout my academic life at Rice of my teachers from friends. Special thanks to my professors at Rice and Sharif, my teachers at Allameh

  20. Sequence and analysis of rice chromosome 4

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qi Feng; Yujun Zhang; Pei Hao; Shengyue Wang; Gang Fu; Yucheng Huang; Ying Li; Jingjie Zhu; Yilei Liu; Xin Hu; Peixin Jia; Yu Zhang; Qiang Zhao; Kai Ying; Shuliang Yu; Yesheng Tang; Qijun Weng; Lei Zhang; Ying Lu; Jie Mu; Yiqi Lu; Lei S. Zhang; Zhen Yu; Danlin Fan; Xiaohui Liu; Tingting Lu; Yongrui Wu; Tongguo Sun; Haiyan Lei; Tao Li; Hao Hu; Jianping Guan; Mei Wu; Runquan Zhang; Bo Zhou; Zehua Chen; Ling Chen; Zhaoqing Jin; Rong Wang; Haifeng Yin; Zhen Cai; Shuangxi Ren; Gang Lv; Wenyi Gu; Genfeng Zhu; Yuefeng Tu; Jia Jia; Yi Zhang; Jie Chen; Hui Kang; Xiaoyun Chen; Chunyan Shao; Yun Sun; Qiuping Hu; Xianglin Zhang; Wei Zhang; Lijun Wang; Chunwei Ding; Haihui Sheng; Jingli Gu; Shuting Chen; Lin Ni; Fenghua Zhu; Wei Chen; Lefu Lan; Ying Lai; Zhukuan Cheng; Minghong Gu; Jiming Jiang; Jiayang Li; Guofan Hong; Yongbiao Xue; Bin Han

    2002-01-01

    Rice is the principal food for over half of the population of the world. With its genome size of 430 megabase pairs (Mb), the cultivated rice species Oryza sativa is a model plant for genome research. Here we report the sequence analysis of chromosome 4 of O. sativa, one of the first two rice chromosomes to be sequenced completely. The

  1. Red yeast rice: a new hypolipidemic drug

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mélanie Journoud; Peter J. H Jones

    2004-01-01

    Red yeast rice is a source of fermented pigment with possible bioactive effect. Evidence shows that fermented red yeast rice lowers cholesterol levels moderately compared to other statin drugs, but with the added advantage of causing less adverse effects. A review of the body of evidence surrounding the properties of red yeast rice underscores its potential as a new alternative

  2. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 2 

    E-print Network

    2006-01-01

    .....................................................8 Rice Genome Sequence .....................................................9 Disaster Relief for Farmers ............................................ 9 Biodiesel Plant Coming to Dayton ...................................10 State, National... introduced stem boring pest of sugarcane and rice. During his first three months at the Center, he has worked with Mo Way determining the impact of pesticide controls and fertilizer management on rice water weevil infestations. Dr. Ming Chen is the latest...

  3. Is ALL Rice Bran Created Equal?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of whole grain rice is increasing in the U.S. This increase is likely due to increased consumer awareness of the importance of whole grains in the diet. Whole grain rice is superior nutritionally compared to milled rice because, except for carbohyrates, it contains more phytochemicals an...

  4. U.S. Rice: Enhancing human health.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vision of the U.S. rice industry is to improve human health through the development of germplasm and technologies for products that capture the unique nutritional benefits of the rice grain. This paper gives an overview of U.S. rice production and markets. New product trends and introductions in...

  5. Rice disease research in organic production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic rice production has increased significantly in the U. S. with 35,000 acres currently under production. Texas organic rice acreage has been increasing steadily over the last 10 years with acreage in 2009 reaching 16,000, accounting for approximately 10% of the total Texas rice acreage. Contro...

  6. LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2012 RICE UNIVERSITY 1

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2012 RICE UNIVERSITY 1 Rice University Laser Safety Manual Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 December 2012 #12;LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2012 RICE, and general procedures to aid those individuals working in the laser laboratory environment. It is intended

  7. China's Japonica Rice Market: Growth and Competitiveness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Hansen; Frank Fuller; Frederick Gale; Frederick Crook; Eric Wailes; Michelle Moore

    2002-01-01

    China's rice economy is among the world's most diverse with respect to both the number of varieties grown and the different climatic conditions under which rice is produced. China has six agro-climatic zones for producing rice, ranging from the warm and humid tropics in the south, to the cooler subtropics of central China, and to northern China with its much

  8. Gibberellin biosynthesis and signal transduction is essential for internode elongation in deepwater rice

    PubMed Central

    Ayano, Madoka; Kani, Takahiro; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kitaoka, Takuya; Kuroha, Takeshi; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn B; Kitano, Hidemi; Nagai, Keisuke; Ashikari, Motoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Under flooded conditions, the leaves and internodes of deepwater rice can elongate above the water surface to capture oxygen and prevent drowning. Our previous studies showed that three major quantitative trait loci (QTL) regulate deepwater-dependent internode elongation in deepwater rice. In this study, we investigated the age-dependent internode elongation in deepwater rice. We also investigated the relationship between deepwater-dependent internode elongation and the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) by physiological and genetic approach using a QTL pyramiding line (NIL-1?+?3?+?12). Deepwater rice did not show internode elongation before the sixth leaf stage under deepwater condition. Additionally, deepwater-dependent internode elongation occurred on the sixth and seventh internodes during the sixth leaf stage. These results indicate that deepwater rice could not start internode elongation until the sixth leaf stage. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the phytohormone contents showed a deepwater-dependent GA1 and GA4 accumulation in deepwater rice. Additionally, a GA inhibitor abolished deepwater-dependent internode elongation in deepwater rice. On the contrary, GA feeding mimicked internode elongation under ordinary growth conditions. However, mutations in GA biosynthesis and signal transduction genes blocked deepwater-dependent internode elongation. These data suggested that GA biosynthesis and signal transduction are essential for deepwater-dependent internode elongation in deepwater rice. Deepwater rice obtained the ability for rapid internode elongation to avoid drowning and adapt to flooded condition. How does it regulate internode elongation? Using both physiological and genetic approach, this paper shows that the plant hormone, gibberellin (GA) regulates internode elongation. PMID:24891164

  9. Setting the bar: Standards for ecosystem services

    PubMed Central

    Polasky, Stephen; Tallis, Heather; Reyers, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Progress in ecosystem service science has been rapid, and there is now a healthy appetite among key public and private sector decision makers for this science. However, changing policy and management is a long-term project, one that raises a number of specific practical challenges. One impediment to broad adoption of ecosystem service information is the lack of standards that define terminology, acceptable data and methods, and reporting requirements. Ecosystem service standards should be tailored to specific use contexts, such as national income and wealth accounts, corporate sustainability reporting, land-use planning, and environmental impact assessments. Many standard-setting organizations already exist, and the research community will make the most headway toward rapid uptake of ecosystem service science by working directly with these organizations. Progress has been made in aligning with existing organizations in areas such as product certification and sustainability reporting, but a major challenge remains in mainstreaming ecosystem service information into core public and private use contexts, such as agricultural and energy subsidy design, national income accounts, and corporate accounts. PMID:26082540

  10. Radionuclide transport processes in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, F.W.

    1983-04-01

    Some major principles and the status of knowledge concerning the transport of radionuclides through terrestrial ecosystems are reviewed. Fundamental processes which control the flow of radionuclides between ecosystem components such as air, soil, plants, and animals are described, with emphasis on deposition, resuspension, plant uptake, ingestion, and assimilation. Properties of radionuclides, organisms, and ecosystems are examined in relation to their influence on the accumulation of radioactive materials by plants and animals. The effects of the physicochemical nature of the radionuclide; morphology, physiology, and behavior of the organism; and soil, nutrient, and trophic characteristics of the ecosystem are highlighted. Observations in natural ecosystems on radionuclides such as /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 131/I, /sup 3/H, and /sup 239/Pu are used to illustrate current concepts. An assessment of the degree to which the processes controlling radionuclide behavior are understood and of our ability to simulate and predict such behavior with computerized models is offered. Finally, brief comments are made on research needs.

  11. Setting the bar: Standards for ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Polasky, Stephen; Tallis, Heather; Reyers, Belinda

    2015-06-16

    Progress in ecosystem service science has been rapid, and there is now a healthy appetite among key public and private sector decision makers for this science. However, changing policy and management is a long-term project, one that raises a number of specific practical challenges. One impediment to broad adoption of ecosystem service information is the lack of standards that define terminology, acceptable data and methods, and reporting requirements. Ecosystem service standards should be tailored to specific use contexts, such as national income and wealth accounts, corporate sustainability reporting, land-use planning, and environmental impact assessments. Many standard-setting organizations already exist, and the research community will make the most headway toward rapid uptake of ecosystem service science by working directly with these organizations. Progress has been made in aligning with existing organizations in areas such as product certification and sustainability reporting, but a major challenge remains in mainstreaming ecosystem service information into core public and private use contexts, such as agricultural and energy subsidy design, national income accounts, and corporate accounts. PMID:26082540

  12. Red rice control in rice using herbicides plus safeners

    E-print Network

    Price, James Bain

    1977-01-01

    further illustrated the antidotal effects of NA on reducing alachlor injury to sorghum. Chang et al. (2) showed that coating oat seed (Avena sativa L. ) with NA protected the oat crop from barban (4-chloro-2-butynl-m-chlorocarbanilate) injury but did... of rice (O~r za sativa L. ) with NA (1, 8-napthalic anhydride) at 1% by seed weight significantly reduced the phytotoxicity of molinate (S-ethyl hexahydro-1H-azepine-1-carbothioate) applied preplant incorporated to direct seeded rice. NA treatment...

  13. High-resolution mapping of Rsn1, a locus controlling sensitivity of rice to a necrosis-inducing phytotoxin from Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes disease on all major crop-plant species. Anastomosis group 1-IA is the causal agent of sheath blight of rice (Oryza sativa), one of the most important rice diseases worldwide. R. solani AG-IA produces a necrosis-inducing phytotoxin a...

  14. Ecosystem growth and development.

    PubMed

    Fath, Brian D; Jørgensen, Sven E; Patten, Bernard C; Straskraba, Milan

    2004-11-01

    One of the most important features of biosystems is how they are able to maintain local order (low entropy) within their system boundaries. At the ecosystem scale, this organization can be observed in the thermodynamic parameters that describe it, such that these parameters can be used to track ecosystem growth and development during succession. Thermodynamically, ecosystem growth is the increase of energy throughflow and stored biomass, and ecosystem development is the internal reorganization of these energy mass stores, which affect transfers, transformations, and time lags within the system. Several proposed hypotheses describe thermodynamically the orientation or natural tendency that ecosystems follow during succession, and here, we consider five: minimize specific entropy production, maximize dissipation, maximize exergy storage (includes biomass and information), maximize energy throughflow, and maximize retention time. These thermodynamic orientors were previously all shown to occur to some degree during succession, and here we present a refinement by observing them during different stages of succession. We view ecosystem succession as a series of four growth and development stages: boundary, structural, network, and informational. We demonstrate how each of these ecological thermodynamic orientors behaves during the different growth and development stages, and show that while all apply during some stages only maximizing energy throughflow and maximizing exergy storage are applicable during all four stages. Therefore, we conclude that the movement away from thermodynamic equilibrium, and the subsequent increase in organization during ecosystem growth and development, is a result of system components and configurations that maximize the flux of useful energy and the amount of stored exergy. Empirical data and theoretical models support these conclusions. PMID:15527958

  15. Rice bran proteins: properties and food uses.

    PubMed

    Prakash, J

    1996-07-01

    Rice bran, a good source of protein and fat, is at present underutilized as a food material. The potential of producing rice bran at the global level is 27.3 million t. The presence of enzyme lipase in rice bran causes rapid deterioration of oil to free fatty acids and glycerol. Various stabilization techniques involving heat treatment, low-temperature storage, chemical treatment, control of relative humidity during storage, and simultaneous milling and extraction were evolved to inactivate lipase. Multiple forms of rice bran lipase have been identified. Fractional classification of proteins reveals a high percentage of albumins and globulins. Proteins can be extracted from full-fat or defatted rice bran by alkaline extraction and acid or heat precipitation. Extraction procedures influence the protein content of concentrates, which ranged from 19.4 to 76.1% in concentrates from full-fat rice bran and 17.5 to 85.0% in concentrates from defatted rice bran. The PER of rice bran ranges from 1.59 to 2.04 and that of protein concentrates from 1.99 to 2.19. Available lysine contents of protein concentrates ranged from 54 to 58.8%. The essential amino acid profiles of protein concentrates indicate that threonine and isoleucine are limiting amino acids. Various functional properties of rice bran protein concentrates have also been investigated that are known to be influenced by drying technique and stabilization treatment of rice bran. Rice bran has been used in food as full-fat rice bran, defatted rice bran, and in the form of rice bran oil and protein concentrates. Full-fat and defatted rice bran have been used in bakery products, breakfast cereals, wafers, as a protein supplement, binder ingredients for meats and sausages, and as a beverage base. Incorporation of protein concentrates have been studied in bread, beverages, confections, and weaning foods. PMID:8841730

  16. Rice crop mapping and change prediction using multi-temporal satellite images in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. R.; Chen, C. F.; Nguyen, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The rice cropping systems in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (VMD) has been undergoing major changes to cope with developing agro-economics, increasing population and changing climate. Information on rice cropping practices and changes in cropping systems is critical for policymakers to devise successful strategies to ensure food security and rice grain exports for the country. The primary objective of this research is to map rice cropping systems and predict future dynamics of rice cropping systems using the MODIS time-series data of 2002, 2006, and 2010. First, a phenology-based classification approach was applied for the classification and assessment of rice cropping systems in study region. Second, the Cellular Automata-Markov (CA-Markov) models was used to simulate the rice-cropping system map of VMD for 2010. The comparisons between the classification maps and the ground reference data indicated satisfactory results with overall accuracies and Kappa coefficients, respectively, of 81.4% and 0.75 for 2002, 80.6% and 0.74 for 2006 and 85.5% and 0.81 for 2010. The simulated map of rice cropping system for 2010 was extrapolated by CA-Markov model based on the trend of rice cropping systems during 2002~2006. The comparison between predicted scenario and classification map for 2010 presents a reasonably closer agreement. In conclusion, the CA-Markov model performs a powerful tool for the dynamic modeling of changes in rice cropping systems, and the results obtained demonstrate that the approach produces satisfactory results in terms of accuracy, quantitative forecast and spatial pattern changes. Meanwhile, the projections of the future changes would provide useful inputs to the agricultural policy for effective management of the rice cropping practices in VMD.

  17. Differentially Expressed Genes Distributed Over Chromosomes and Implicated in Certain Biological Processes for Site Insertion Genetically Modified Rice Kemingdao

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Li, Yunhe; Zhao, Jie; Chen, Xiuping; Jian, Guiliang; Peng, Yufa; Qi, Fangjun

    2012-01-01

    Release of genetically modified (GM) plants has sparked off intensive debates worldwide partly because of concerns about potential adverse unintended effects of GM plants to the agro system and the safety of foods. In this study, with the aim of revealing the molecular basis for unintended effects of a single site insertion GM Kemingdao (KMD) rice transformed with a synthetic cry1Ab gene, and bridging unintended effects of KMD rice through clues of differentially expressed genes, comparative transcriptome analyses were performed for GM KMD rice and its parent rice of Xiushui11 (XS11). The results showed that 680 differentially expressed transcripts were identified from 30-day old seedlings of GM KMD rice. The absolute majority of these changed expression transcripts dispersed and located over all rice chromosomes, and existed physical distance on chromosome from the insertion site, while only two transcripts were found to be differentially expressed within the 21 genes located within 100 kb up and down-stream of the insertion site. Pathway and biology function analyses further revealed that differentially expressed transcripts of KMD rice were involved in certain biological processes, and mainly implicated in two types of pathways. One type was pathways implicated in plant stress/defense responses, which were considerably in coordination with the reported unintended effects of KMD rice, which were more susceptible to rice diseases compared to its parent rice XS11; the other type was pathways associated with amino acids metabolism. With this clue, new unintended effects for changes in amino acids synthesis of KMD rice leaves were successfully revealed. Such that an actual case was firstly provided for identification of unintended effects in GM plants by comparative transciptome analysis. PMID:22811617

  18. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Aromatic and Quality Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Landraces from North-Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Mawkhlieng, Bandapkuper; Misra, A. K.; Pattanayak, A.; Harish, G. D.; Singh, S. K.; Ngachan, S. V.; Bansal, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    The North-eastern (NE) India, comprising of Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura, possess diverse array of locally adapted non-Basmati aromatic germplasm. The germplasm collections from this region could serve as valuable resources in breeding for abiotic stress tolerance, grain yield and cooking/eating quality. To utilize such collections, however, breeders need information about the extent and distribution of genetic diversity present within collections. In this study, we report the result of population genetic analysis of 107 aromatic and quality rice accessions collected from different parts of NE India, as well as classified these accessions in the context of a set of structured global rice cultivars. A total of 322 alleles were amplified by 40 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with an average of 8.03 alleles per locus. Average gene diversity was 0.67. Population structure analysis revealed that NE Indian aromatic rice can be subdivided into three genetically distinct population clusters: P1, joha rice accessions from Assam, tai rices from Mizoram and those from Sikkim; P2, chakhao rice germplasm from Manipur; and P3, aromatic rice accessions from Nagaland. Pair-wise FST between three groups varied from 0.223 (P1 vs P2) to 0.453 (P2 vs P3). With reference to the global classification of rice cultivars, two major groups (Indica and Japonica) were identified in NE Indian germplasm. The aromatic accessions from Assam, Manipur and Sikkim were assigned to the Indica group, while the accessions from Nagaland exhibited close association with Japonica. The tai accessions of Mizoram along with few chakhao accessions collected from the hill districts of Manipur were identified as admixed. The results highlight the importance of regional genetic studies for understanding diversification of aromatic rice in India. The data also suggest that there is scope for exploiting the genetic diversity of aromatic and quality rice germplasm of NE India for rice improvement. PMID:26067999

  19. Rice University ECE Department

    E-print Network

    Design Laboratory does not count as specialization. Systems Major or other Hours F/S Year Grade NEURO Specialization Courses NEURO Specialization Courses NEURO Specialization Courses NEURO Specialization Courses Other NEURO Course Neuroengineering Major or other Hours F/S Year Grade Note: Elec 303 is required

  20. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 1 May 2002) The Science This image is from the region of Syrtis Major, which is dominated by a low-relief shield volcano. This area is believed to be an area of vigorous aeolian activity with strong winds in the east-west direction. The effects of these winds are observed as relatively bright streaks across the image, extending from topographic features such as craters. The brighter surface material probably indicates a smaller relative particle size in these areas, as finer particles have a higher albedo. The bright streaks seen off of craters are believed to have formed during dust storms. A raised crater rim can cause a reduction in the wind velocity directly behind it, which results in finer particles being preferentially deposited in this location. In the top half of the image, there is a large bright streak that crosses the entire image. There is no obvious topographic obstacle, therefore it is unclear whether it was formed in the same manner as described above. This image is located northwest of Nili Patera, a large caldera in Syrtis Major. Different flows from the caldera eruptions can be recognized as raised ridges, representing the edge of a flow lobe. The Story In the 17th century, Holland was in its Golden Age, a time of cultural greatness and immense political and economic influence in the world. In that time, lived a inquisitive person named Christian Huygens. As a boy, he loved to draw and to figure out problems in mathematics. As a man, he used these talents to make the first detailed drawings of the Martian surface - - only 50 years or so after Galileo first turned his telescope on Mars. Mars suddenly became something other than a small red dot in the sky. One of the drawings Huygens made was of a dark marking on the red planet's surface named Syrtis Major. Almost 350 years later, here we are with an orbiter that can show us this place in detail. Exploration lives! It's great we can study this area up close. In earlier periods of history, scientists were fascinated with Syrtis Major because this dark region varied so much through the seasons and years. Some people thought it might be a changing sea, and others thought it might be vegetation. Early spacecraft like Mariner and Viking revealed for the first time that the changes were caused by the wind blowing dust and sand across the surface. What we can see in this image is exactly that: evidence of a lot of wind action. Bright dust patches streak across this image, formed through wind interference from craters and other landforms. These wispy, bright streaks are spread on the surface by a vigorous, east-west wind that kicked up huge dust storms, scattering the fine particles of sand and dust in an almost etherial pattern. The bright streaks in the top part of the image might have formed in a slightly different way, because there is no landform standing in the wind's way. Beneath the bright surface dust are raised ridges that mark the edges of earlier lava flows from Nili Patera, a Martian 'caldera.' A caldera is a collapsed, bowl-shaped depression at the top of a volcano cone. Can you imagine how Christian Huygens would feel if he lived today and could see all of this knowledge unfold? Or how it would feel to be the first person to stand in this dark volcanic and cratered region, knowing how many discovers had paved the way to that moment? Yes, exploration lives!

  1. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 7

    E-print Network

    in developing three-line hybrid rice. In 1926, the first documentation of heterosis in rice (Oryza sativa L.) came in a paper published by the American Society of Agronomy by J.W. Jones. Still, producing com- mercial hybrid seed by hand emas- culation.... the only hybrid rice seed com- pany in the U.S. RiceTec traces its origin to the Prince of Liechtenstein Foundation and International Paper Company. Through the joint venture, RiceTec ac- quired Chocolate Bayou Company materials and patents (including...

  2. Intraspecific variability of the facultative meiotic parthenogenetic root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne graminicola) from rice fields in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bellafiore, Stéphane; Jougla, Claire; Chapuis, Élodie; Besnard, Guillaume; Suong, Malyna; Vu, Phong Nguyen; De Waele, Dirk; Gantet, Pascal; Thi, Xuyen Ngo

    2015-07-01

    Twenty years ago, the facultative meiotic parthenogenetic root-knot nematode (RKN), Meloidogyne graminicola, was recognised as an important rice pathogen in South Vietnam. Although this country is one of the most important rice exporters worldwide, a comprehensive picture of the occurrence of M. graminicola in Vietnamese rice fields is still not available. Therefore a nematode survey was carried out with the aim of better understanding the geographical distribution, and the pathogenic and genetic variability of the RKN in Vietnam. From the fields surveyed in a range of ecosystems, 21 RKN populations were recovered from infected rice roots. A diagnostic SCAR marker was developed showing that all Vietnamese populations belong to M. graminicola. Furthermore, sequencing of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) of the rDNA genes confirmed this identification. These populations were then characterised using morphometrics and pathogenicity tests (host plant range diversity, reproduction and virulence diversity) revealing intraspecific variability. We showed that morphometric traits are mainly genetically heritable characters with significant differences among the studied populations. Finally, a distinctive trait signature was found for the populations isolated from the upland rice cultures. All together, our study reveals the prevalence of M. graminicola populations in Vietnamese rice. Further investigations need to be developed to explore the population dynamics and evolutionary history of this species in South East Asia. PMID:26026576

  3. [Interference of allelopathic rice cultivars on barnyardgrass under different water irrigation and rice plant density].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenghao; He, Yong; Wang, Yiping; Yu, Gusong

    2004-09-01

    Pot culture experiments were conducted to examine the effects of water irrigation and rice plant density on the interference of allelopathic rice on barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli). The results showed that under water irrigations, allelopathic rice cultivars Xiayitiao, Gumei 2 and Zhong 156 significantly reduced the plant height of barnyardgrass than non-allelopathic rice cultivars Xiushui 63 and Chunjiang 11. Barnyardgrass plants grew shorter as rice plant density increased. Allelopathic rice cultivars Jizaoxian and Gumei 2 interfered with barnyardgrass, even at their densities as low as 4 plants per pot, and the interference reduced plant height of barnyardgrass significantly compared with the non-rice control. Allelopathic rice cultivars Xiayitiao, Jizaoxian, PI312777, TN1, Gumei 2 and Zhong 156 at 32 rice plants per pot inhibited the growth of barnyardgrass significantly than Chunjiang 11. PMID:15669488

  4. Drying Rough Rice in Storage.

    E-print Network

    Sorenson, J. W. Jr.; Crane, L. E.

    1960-01-01

    content of t l rice was 15.0 to 23.2 percent, wet basis. 'I small-scale bins were used to determine minim1 air flow requirements for drying with unheat air. t Centrifugal and propeller fans were used 1 supply air for drying the rice. All of the fa... 8. Three commercial gas hecrters used in tests at Beaumont. All were equipped with safety controls to cut off the gas supply in the event of flame or power failure. Centrifugal and propeller fans were suitable or behind the fan wheel...

  5. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research

    E-print Network

    2005-01-01

    that the archeological sample was not Carolina Gold, but more closely related to Southeast Asian indica varieties of rice (Oryza sativa). For more information contact Anna McClung, 409-752-5221 ext 2234, email amcclung@ag.tamu.edu Top: Carolina Gold Bottom: Archeological... Sample Other Texas scientists participating in the RiceCAP effort are Dr. Anna McClung (USDA-ARS Breeder), Dr. Bob Fjellstrom (USDA-ARS Molecular Geneticist), Dr. Rodante Tabien (TAES Breeder), and Dr. Arun Sharma (USDA/TAES Postdoctoral Scientist...

  6. LSCHL4 from Japonica Cultivar, Which Is Allelic to NAL1, Increases Yield of Indica Super Rice 93-11

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guang-Heng; Li, Shu-Yu; Wang, Li; Ye, Wei-Jun; Zeng, Da-Li; Rao, Yu-Chun; Peng, You-Lin; Hu, Jiang; Yang, Yao-Long; Xu, Jie; Ren, De-Yong; Gao, Zhen-Yu; Zhu, Li; Dong, Guo-Jun; Hu, Xing-Ming; Yan, Mei-Xian; Guo, Long-Biao; Li, Chuan-You; Qian, Qian

    2014-01-01

    The basic premise of high yield in rice is to improve leaf photosynthetic efficiency and coordinate the source–sink relationship in rice plants. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to morphological traits and chlorophyll content of rice leaves were detected at the stages of heading to maturity, and a major QTL (qLSCHL4) related to flag leaf shape and chlorophyll content was detected at both stages in recombinant inbred lines constructed using the indica rice cultivar 93-11 and the japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Map-based cloning and expression analysis showed that LSCHL4 is allelic to NAL1, a gene previously reported in narrow leaf mutant of rice. Overexpression lines transformed with vector carrying LSCHL4 from Nipponbare and a near-isogenic line of 93-11 (NIL-9311) had significantly increased leaf chlorophyll content, enlarged flag leaf size, and improved panicle type. The average yield of NIL-9311 was 18.70% higher than that of 93-11. These results indicate that LSCHL4 had a pleiotropic function. Exploring and pyramiding more high-yield alleles resembling LSCHL4 for super rice breeding provides an effective way to achieve new breakthroughs in raising rice yield and generate new ideas for solving the problem of global food safety. PMID:24795339

  7. A PCR-based marker for a locus conferring the aroma in Myanmar rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Myint, Khin Myo; Arikit, Siwaret; Wanchana, Samart; Yoshihashi, Tadashi; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Vanavichit, Apichart

    2012-09-01

    Aromatic rice is an important commodity for international trade, which has encouraged the interest of rice breeders to identify the genetic control of rice aroma. The recessive Os2AP gene, which is located on chromosome 8, has been reported to be associated with rice aroma. The 8-bp deletion in exon 7 is an aromatic allele that is present in most aromatic accessions, including the most popular aromatic rice varieties, Jasmine and Basmati. However, other mutations associated with aroma have been detected, but the other mutations are less frequent. In this study, we report an aromatic allele, a 3-bp insertion in exon 13 of Os2AP, as a major allele found in aromatic rice varieties from Myanmar. The insertion is in frame and causes an additional tyrosine (Y) in the amino acid sequence. However, the mutation does not affect the expression of the Os2AP gene. A functional marker for detecting this allele was developed and tested in an aroma-segregating F(2) population. The aroma phenotypes and genotypes showed perfect co-segregation of this population. The marker was also used for screening a collection of aromatic rice varieties collected from different geographical sites of Myanmar. Twice as many aromatic Myanmar rice varieties containing the 3-bp insertion allele were found as the varieties containing the 8-bp deletion allele, which suggested that the 3-bp insertion allele originated in regions of Myanmar. PMID:22576235

  8. Patterns of irrigated rice growth and malaria vector breeding in Mali using multi-temporal ERS-2 synthetic aperture radar

    PubMed Central

    Diuk-Wasser, M. A.; Dolo, G.; Bagayoko, M.; Sogoba, N.; Toure, M. B.; Moghaddam, M.; Manoukis, N.; Rian, S.; Traore, S. F.; Taylor, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    We explored the use of the European Remote Sensing Satellite 2 Synthetic Aperture Radar (ERS-2 SAR) to trace the development of rice plants in an irrigated area near Niono, Mali and relate that to the density of anopheline mosquitoes, especially An. gambiae. This is important because such mosquitoes are the major vectors of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa, and their development is often coupled to the cycle of rice development. We collected larval samples, mapped rice fields using GPS and recorded rice growth stages simultaneously with eight ERS-2 SAR acquisitions. We were able to discriminate among rice growth stages using ERS-2 SAR backscatter data, especially among the early stages of rice growth, which produce the largest numbers of larvae. We could also distinguish between basins that produced high and low numbers of anophelines within the stage of peak production. After the peak, larval numbers dropped as rice plants grew taller and thicker, reducing the amount of light reaching the water surface. ERS-2 SAR backscatter increased concomitantly. Our data support the belief that ERS-2 SAR data may be helpful for mapping the spatial patterns of rice growth, distinguishing different agricultural practices, and monitoring the abundance of vectors in nearby villages. PMID:17710188

  9. Investigating the impact of rice blast disease on the livelihood of the local farmers in greater Mwea region of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kihoro, Joseph; Bosco, Njoroge J; Murage, Hunja; Ateka, Elijah; Makihara, Daigo

    2013-12-01

    Rice is the most important cereal crop in Kenya coming third after maize and wheat. It forms a very important diet for a majority of families in Kenya. The demand for rice in Kenya has seen a dramatic increase over the last few years while production has remained low. This is because rice production has been faced by serious constraints notably plant diseases of which the most devastating is rice blast. Rice blast is known to cause approximately 60% -100% yield losses. It is caused by an Ascomycete fungus called Magnaporthe Oryzae. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of rice blast disease on the livelihood of the local farmers in Greater Mwea region and develop a rice blast disease distribution map using GIS approach. The study methodology employed a questionnaire survey which were subjected to sample population of households in the 7 sections with 70 blocks within Mwea region. The collected data was analysed using SAS Version 9.1. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the household characteristics, the farm characteristics and the farmers' perceptions of rice blast disease. In the questionnaire, farmers' response on whether they had been affected by rice blast disease and the total production per acreage was used to develop an attribute table with GPS points. The GPS points were interpolated to create a geographical distribution map of rice blast disease. From the research findings almost all the farmers' had awareness and knowledge of rice blast disease, 98% of the farmers interviewed were aware of rice blast disease. Out of the 98% with knowledge and awareness 76% have been affected by the disease, while 24% have never been affected. Farmers attributed rice blast disease to a range of different causes, including excessive use of nitrogen fertilizer, water shortage, lack of proper drainage canal and due to climate change. Majority of the farmers interviewed (72%) did not engage themselves in any other socio-economic activity even after being affected by the rice blast disease. 15% opted to growing horticultural crops, 7% engaged in trading activities while 2% started livestock raring, wage earning and Boda boda business. PMID:23888278

  10. Characterisation of a novel softened rice product.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masahiro; Kato, Kumiko; Umene, Shingo; Masunaga, Hiroaki

    2014-02-15

    We developed a novel softened rice by permeating rice with enzymes that catalyse its decomposition. Herein, we characterised the softened rice (SR) and compared it to normal cooked rice (CR) and rice gruel (RG). SR resembled CR but not RG in appearance. Texture analysis showed that SR was the least firm, adhesive, and cohesive of the three rice preparations. SR contained almost the same amount of nutrition per unit mass as CR and twofold as much as RG. Analysis of digests of energy-equivalent amounts of the three rice preparations indicated that SR digests had the lowest quantity of residue and highest quantity of dissolved carbohydrate, maltose and glucose. The molecular weight (MW) range of SR constituents was 10(3)-10(5), whilst those of CR and RG constituents were mainly 10(5)-10(6). These results suggested that enzymatic decomposition of SR improves ease of eating, nutrition value, and digestibility at once. PMID:24128491

  11. Discovery of chemically induced mutations in rice by TILLING

    PubMed Central

    Till, Bradley J; Cooper, Jennifer; Tai, Thomas H; Colowit, Peter; Greene, Elizabeth A; Henikoff, Steven; Comai, Luca

    2007-01-01

    Background Rice is both a food source for a majority of the world's population and an important model system. Available functional genomics resources include targeted insertion mutagenesis and transgenic tools. While these can be powerful, a non-transgenic, unbiased targeted mutagenesis method that can generate a range of allele types would add considerably to the analysis of the rice genome. TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes), a general reverse genetic technique that combines traditional mutagenesis with high throughput methods for mutation discovery, is such a method. Results To apply TILLING to rice, we developed two mutagenized rice populations. One population was developed by treatment with the chemical mutagen ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS), and the other with a combination of sodium azide plus methyl-nitrosourea (Az-MNU). To find induced mutations, target regions of 0.7–1.5 kilobases were PCR amplified using gene specific primers labeled with fluorescent dyes. Heteroduplexes were formed through denaturation and annealing of PCR products, mismatches digested with a crude preparation of CEL I nuclease and cleaved fragments visualized using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In 10 target genes screened, we identified 27 nucleotide changes in the EMS-treated population and 30 in the Az-MNU population. Conclusion We estimate that the density of induced mutations is two- to threefold higher than previously reported rice populations (about 1/300 kb). By comparison to other plants used in public TILLING services, we conclude that the populations described here would be suitable for use in a large scale TILLING project. PMID:17428339

  12. Microbial characterization of toluene-degrading denitrifying consortia obtained from terrestrial and marine ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y.-J. An; Y.-H. Joo; I.-Y. Hong; H.-W. Ryu; K.-S. Cho

    2004-01-01

    The degradation characteristics of toluene coupled to nitrate reduction were investigated in enrichment culture and the microbial communities of toluene-degrading denitrifying consortia were characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique. Anaerobic nitrate-reducing bacteria were enriched from oil-contaminated soil samples collected from terrestrial (rice field) and marine (tidal flat) ecosystems. Enriched consortia degraded toluene in the presence of nitrate as

  13. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 June 2002) The Science This image, located near the equator and 288W (72E), is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth. The Story Cool! It almost looks as if nature has 'painted' comets on the surface of Mars, using craters as comet cores and dust as streaky tails. Of course, that's just an illusion. As in many areas of Mars, the wind is behind the creation of such fantastic landforms. The natural phenomenon seen here gives this particular surface of Mars a very dynamic, fast-moving, almost luminous 'cosmic personality.' The bright, powdery-looking streaks of dust are in the 'wind shadows' of craters, where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. That's because the wind moves across the land in a particular direction, and a raised surface like the rim of a crater 'protects' dust from being completely blown away on the other side. The raised landforms basically act as a buffer. From the streaks seen above, you can tell the wind was blowing in a northeast to southwest direction. Why are the streaks so bright? Because they contrast with the really dark underlying terrain in this volcanic area of Mars. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars because it is made of basalt. Basalt is typically dark gray or black, and forms when a certain type of molten lava cools. The meaning of the word basalt has been traced back to an ancient Ethiopian word 'basal,' which means 'a rock from which you can obtain iron.' That must have made it a very desired material with ancient Earth civilizations long ago. Basalt is actually one of the most abundant types of rock found on Earth. Most of the volcanic islands in the ocean are made of basalt, including the large shield volcano of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, which is often compared to Martian shield volcanoes. Shield volcanoes don't have high, steep, mountain-like sides, but are instead low and broad humps upon the surface. They're created when highly fluid, molten-basalt flows spread out over wide areas. Over several millennia of basaltic layering upon layering, these volcanoes can reach massive sizes like the ones seen on Mars. You can see the wrinkly texture of dark lava flows (now hard and cool) in the above image beneath the brighter dust.

  14. A Built-In Mechanism to Mitigate the Spread of Insect-Resistance and Herbicide-Tolerance Transgenes into Weedy Rice Populations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengyi; Li, Jingjing; Gao, Jianhua; Shen, Zhicheng; Lu, Bao-Rong; Lin, Chaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Background The major challenge of cultivating genetically modified (GM) rice (Oryza sativa) at the commercial scale is to prevent the spread of transgenes from GM cultivated rice to its coexisting weedy rice (O. sativa f. spontanea). The strategic development of GM rice with a built-in control mechanism can mitigate transgene spread in weedy rice populations. Methodology/Principal Findings An RNAi cassette suppressing the expression of the bentazon detoxifying enzyme CYP81A6 was constructed into the T-DNA which contained two tightly linked transgenes expressing the Bt insecticidal protein Cry1Ab and the glyphosate tolerant 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), respectively. GM rice plants developed from this T-DNA were resistant to lepidopteran pests and tolerant to glyphosate, but sensitive to bentazon. The application of bentazon of 2000 mg/L at the rate of 40 mL/m2, which is approximately the recommended dose for the field application to control common rice weeds, killed all F2 plants containing the transgenes generated from the Crop-weed hybrids between a GM rice line (CGH-13) and two weedy rice strains (PI-63 and PI-1401). Conclusions/Significance Weedy rice plants containing transgenes from GM rice through gene flow can be selectively killed by the spray of bentazon when a non-GM rice variety is cultivated alternately in a few-year interval. The built-in control mechanism in combination of cropping management is likely to mitigate the spread of transgenes into weedy rice populations. PMID:22359609

  15. Translational genomics-rice research in agriculture research service

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the US accounts for only approximately 1.6 % of the total world rice production, it provides about 15% of the rice in world trade, and its rice is known for its high quality. Rice is a model for genomic study of monocots and thus, numerous broad-spectrum research activities involving rice ...

  16. Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering

    E-print Network

    Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering Learn more at ece.rice.edu The Computer Engineering group at Rice University has a long track record of innovative research in physical current methods in silicon. Rice ECE Graduate Studies The faculty in ECE at Rice perform experimental

  17. Economic Impacts of Blackbird Damage to the Rice Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOHN L. CUMMINGS; STEPHANIE A. SHWIFF; SHELAGH K. TUPPER

    2005-01-01

    In cooperation with the Louisiana Rice Research Board, the Louisiana State University Rice Research Station and the USA Rice Federation, we conducted a questionnaire survey in 2002 to estimate the economic impacts of blackbirds on the rice industry in Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, California, and Missouri. Survey areas in rice producing states were identified based on the 2001 National Agricultural Statistic

  18. Grays Lake Ecosystem

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This case study looks at the marsh ecosystem of Grays Lake in southeast Idaho, and is hosted by the Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center (NPWRC). Grays Lake has been the focus of numerous research studies to understand factors affecting breeding water birds, habitat management practices, populations, and geological factors. This report gives general information about the Grays Lake ecosystem, including climate, habitats, plant communities, wildlife, water, and geology. More specific details are given through flora and fauna lists, historical and cultural overviews, details about the Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge, and research information on management of wetlands.

  19. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  20. Molecular Screening of Blast Resistance Genes in Rice using SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Singh, A. K.; Singh, P. K.; Arya, Madhuri; Singh, N. K.; Singh, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rice Blast is the most devastating disease causing major yield losses in every year worldwide. It had been proved that using resistant rice varieties would be the most effective way to control this disease. Molecular screening and genetic diversities of major rice blast resistance genes were determined in 192 rice germplasm accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The genetic frequencies of the 10 major rice blast resistance genes varied from 19.79% to 54.69%. Seven accessions IC337593, IC346002, IC346004, IC346813, IC356117, IC356422 and IC383441 had maximum eight blast resistance gene, while FR13B, Hourakani, Kala Rata 1–24, Lemont, Brown Gora, IR87756-20-2-2-3, IC282418, IC356419, PKSLGR-1 and PKSLGR-39 had seven blast resistance genes. Twenty accessions possessed six genes, 36 accessions had five genes, 41 accessions had four genes, 38 accessions had three genes, 26 accessions had two genes, 13 accessions had single R gene and only one accession IC438644 does not possess any one blast resistant gene. Out of 192 accessions only 17 accessions harboured 7 to 8 blast resistance genes. PMID:25774106

  1. Molecular Screening of Blast Resistance Genes in Rice using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Singh, P K; Arya, Madhuri; Singh, N K; Singh, U S

    2015-03-01

    Rice Blast is the most devastating disease causing major yield losses in every year worldwide. It had been proved that using resistant rice varieties would be the most effective way to control this disease. Molecular screening and genetic diversities of major rice blast resistance genes were determined in 192 rice germplasm accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The genetic frequencies of the 10 major rice blast resistance genes varied from 19.79% to 54.69%. Seven accessions IC337593, IC346002, IC346004, IC346813, IC356117, IC356422 and IC383441 had maximum eight blast resistance gene, while FR13B, Hourakani, Kala Rata 1-24, Lemont, Brown Gora, IR87756-20-2-2-3, IC282418, IC356419, PKSLGR-1 and PKSLGR-39 had seven blast resistance genes. Twenty accessions possessed six genes, 36 accessions had five genes, 41 accessions had four genes, 38 accessions had three genes, 26 accessions had two genes, 13 accessions had single R gene and only one accession IC438644 does not possess any one blast resistant gene. Out of 192 accessions only 17 accessions harboured 7 to 8 blast resistance genes. PMID:25774106

  2. Evaluation of estimated daily intake (EDI) of cadmium and lead for rice (Oryza sativa L.) in calcareous soils

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The excessive amounts of cadmium and lead in food chain can cause health problems for humans and ecosystem. Rice is an important food in human diet. Therefore this study was conducted in order to investigate cadmium and Lead concentrations in seed rice (Oryza saliva) of paddy fields in southwest of Iran. A total of 70 rice seed samples were collected from paddy fields in five regions of Khuzestan province, Southwest Iran, during harvesting time. In the samples cadmium and Lead concentrations were measured. To assess the daily intake of Cadmium and Lead by rice, daily consumption of rice was calculated. The results showed that average concentrations of Cadmium and Lead in rice seeds were 273.6 and 121.8??g/kg, respectively. Less than 72% of rice seed samples had Cadmium concentrations above 200??g/kg (i.e. Guide value for cadmium); and less than 3% had Lead concentrations above 150??g/kg (i.e. Guide value for Lead). The estimated daily intakes of cadmium by the local population was calculated to 0.59??g/day?kg bw, which corresponds to 59% of the tolerable daily intakes (i.e. 1??g/day?kg bw). Eleven out of 70 samples (15.71%) exceed the tolerable daily intakes. The dietary intakes for Lead in the local population ranged from 0.22 to 0.47??g/day?kg bw. Tolerable daily intakes for Lead is 3.6??g/day?kg bw. As a whole, long term consumption of the local rice may bear high risk of heavy metal exposure to the consumer in the study region. PMID:23566692

  3. Placing ecosystem sustainability within the context of dynamic earth systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidle, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    Because the concept of ecosystem sustainability and the practice of sustainable land management both have long-term foci, it is necessary to view these from the perspective of dynamic rather than static systems. In addition to the typical static system approach for assessing ecosystem sustainability, three additional perspectives are presented. These are resilient systems, systems where tipping points occur, and systems subject to episodic geophysical resetting. Ecosystem resilience accommodates both natural and anthropogenic stressors and should be considered to properly frame many ecosystem assessments. A more complex problem emerges when stressors push systems to tipping points, causing a regime shift. Both chronic anthropogenic activities (e.g., over-grazing, forest conversion, poor irrigation practices) and natural changes (e.g., climate anomalies, geochemical weathering, tectonic uplift, vegetative succession) can exhaust ecosystem resilience leading to a rapid change in state. Anthropogenic perturbations can also lower the initiation threshold and increase the magnitude and frequency of certain natural disasters, increasing the likelihood of ecosystem change. Furthermore, when major episodic geophysical events (e.g., large earthquakes, tsunami, and floods; widespread volcanic activity and landslides) exceed thresholds of ecosystem resilience they may reset the attributes of entire systems or landscapes. Large disasters can initiate a cascade of linked events, as in the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, where tsunami, fires, landslides, artificial fillslope collapses, radioactive releases, and associated health effects occurred. Understanding the potential for natural change (both chronic and episodic) in ecosystems is essential not only to the environmental aspect of sustainability but also to economic and social aspects. Examples are presented for: (1) ecosystems vulnerable to tipping points (Yunnan, China) and (2) ecosystems reset by earthquakes and tsunami (Papua New Guinea and eastern Japan). While these geophysical perturbations and shifts in ecosystems are individually recognized, they are not fully embraced by contemporary sustainability thinking or decision management.

  4. Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?

    E-print Network

    Berkowitz, Alan R.

    as ecosystem scientists investigate more fully the controls on the C balance of the biosphere. However of a complete organic C balance for an ecosystem, which can be written as: DCorg ¼ GPP þ I À Re À E À Oxnb ð1Þ In aquatic ecosystems, NEP is usually measured directly from the mass balance of oxygen (O2) or carbon

  5. Natural ecosystem design and control imperatives for sustainable ecosystem services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard C. Patten

    2010-01-01

    Sustainability of ecosystem services to humanity will depend on knowledge of how ecosystems work in their natural states, which can then be carried over to managed states. The objective of this paper is to describe four properties of ecosystems taken as natural conditions to be maintained under exploitation. Three of these are design properties: near-steady-state or extremal dynamics, dominance of

  6. Methane emission from rice paddies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Seiler; A. Holzapfel-Pschorn; R. Conrad; D. Scharffe

    1983-01-01

    Methane release rates from rice paddies have been measured in Andalusia, Spain, during almost a complete vegetation period in 1982 using the static box system. The release rates ranged between 2 and 14 mg\\/m2\\/h and exhibited a strong seasonal variation with low values during the tillering stage and shortly before harvest, while maximum values were observed at the end of

  7. Agriculture Education. Soybeans and Rice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in agricultural education. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) soybeans, (2) rice, and (3) orientation. Each of the 17 units of instruction follows a typical format: terminal objective, specific…

  8. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research

    E-print Network

    2004-01-01

    and Plant Nutrition Project is also evaluating a nitrogen foliar spray from Helena named “CoRoN”. The product is applied at 2 to 10 lbs N/A during the reproductive stage of rice growth. This year we are testing CoRoN with and without fungicide. And finally...

  9. WEB FREE RICE Yuhei YAMAUCHI

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    ;12 4 Monogatari 10 Monogatari Conomi WEB Monogatari IC 2 TV TV #12;13 200 WEB FREE RICE 1 10 ? ? 2009 Philosophy Editor:Joshua Knobe,Shaun Nichols Published by Oxford University Press, USA,July 15,2008 WEB

  10. The impact of herbicide-resistant rice technology on phenotypic diversity and population structure of United States weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of imazethapyr herbicide-resistant (HR) Clearfield® rice (Oryza sativa L.) to control weedy rice has increased in the past 12 years to comprise about 60% of rice acreage in Arkansas, where 43% of rice in the USA was planted in 2013. To assess the impact of HR cultivated rice on herbicide res...

  11. Management and fertility control ecosystem carbon allocation to biomass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campioli, Matteo; Vicca, Sara; Janssens, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Carbon (C) allocation within the ecosystem is one of the least understood processes in plant- and geo-sciences. The proportion of the C assimilated through photosynthesis (gross primary production, GPP) that is used for biomass production (BP) is a key variable of the C allocation process and it has been termed as biomass production efficiency (BPE). We investigated the potential drivers of BPE using a global dataset of BP, GPP, BPE and ancillary ecosystem characteristics (vegetation properties, climatic and environmental variables, anthropogenic impacts) for 131 sites comprising six major ecosystem types: forests, grasslands, croplands, tundra, boreal peatlands and marshes. We obtained two major findings. First, site fertility is the key driver of BPE across forests, with nutrient-rich forests allocating 58% of their photosynthates to BP, whereas this fraction is only 42% for nutrient-poor forests. Second, by disentangling the effect of management from the effect of fertility and by integrating all ecosystem types, we observed that BPE is globally not driven by the 'natural' site fertility, but by the positive effect brought by management on the nutrient availability. This resulted in managed ecosystems having substantially larger BPE than natural ecosystems. These findings will crucially improve our elucidation of the human impact on ecosystem functioning and our predictions of the global C cycle.

  12. Ecosystem theory and the unexpected: implications for environmental toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, R.V.; Waide, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    The necessity of considering in research, the components of ecosystems as parts of the dynamic whole is emphasized. Certainly a major focus of toxic substance programs should be understanding effects on the state of the whole ecosystem. In the first section the notion of the system as it emerges from hierarchy theory is developed. The next section emphasizes the ecosystem as a biogeochemical system. Next the focus is placed explicitly on the system-component problem, and ecological examples of problems involved in extrapolating from component measurements to system behaviors are given. Recommendations for toxic substances research are included.

  13. Top 10 principles for designing healthy coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaydos, Joseph K.; Dierauf, Leslie; Kirby, Grant; Brosnan, Deborah; Gilardi, Kirsten; Davis, Gary E.

    2008-01-01

    Like other coastal zones around the world, the inland sea ecosystem of Washington (USA) and British Columbia (Canada), an area known as the Salish Sea, is changing under pressure from a growing human population, conversion of native forest and shoreline habitat to urban development, toxic contamination of sediments and species, and overharvest of resources. While billions of dollars have been spent trying to restore other coastal ecosystems around the world, there still is no successful model for restoring estuarine or marine ecosystems like the Salish Sea. Despite the lack of a guiding model, major ecological principles do exist that should be applied as people work to design the Salish Sea and other large marine ecosystems for the future. We suggest that the following 10 ecological principles serve as a foundation for educating the public and for designing a healthy Salish Sea and other coastal ecosystems for future generations: (1) Think ecosystem: political boundaries are arbitrary; (2) Account for ecosystem connectivity; (3) Understand the food web; (4) Avoid fragmentation; (5) Respect ecosystem integrity; (6) Support nature's resilience; (7) Value nature: it's money in your pocket; (8) Watch wildlife health; (9) Plan for extremes; and (10) Share the knowledge.

  14. Terrestrial ecosystem responses to global change: A research strategy

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Uncertainty about the magnitude of global change effects on terrestrial ecosystems and consequent feedbacks to the atmosphere impedes sound policy planning at regional, national, and global scales. A strategy to reduce these uncertainties must include a substantial increase in funding for large-scale ecosystem experiments and a careful prioritization of research efforts. Prioritization criteria should be based on the magnitude of potential changes in environmental properties of concern to society, including productivity; biodiversity; the storage and cycling of carbon, water, and nutrients; and sensitivity of specific ecosystems to environmental change. A research strategy is proposed that builds on existing knowledge of ecosystem responses to global change by (1) expanding the spatial and temporal scale of experimental ecosystem manipulations to include processes known to occur at large scales and over long time periods; (2) quantifying poorly understood linkages among processes through the use of experiments that manipulate multiple interacting environmental factors over a broader range of relevant conditions than did past experiments; and (3) prioritizing ecosystems for major experimental manipulations on the basis of potential positive and negative impacts on ecosystem properties and processes of intrinsic and/or utilitarian value to humans and on feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere.

  15. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 18 May 2004 This image of Syrtis Major was acquired August 20, 2002, during northern spring.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.8, Longitude 79.5 East (280.5 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Assimilation of satellite color observations in a coupled ocean GCM-ecosystem model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    1992-01-01

    Monthly average coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) estimates of chlorophyll concentration were assimilated into an ocean global circulation model(GCM) containing a simple model of the pelagic ecosystem. The assimilation was performed in the simplest possible manner, to allow the assessment of whether there were major problems with the ecosystem model or with the assimilation procedure. The current ecosystem model performed well in some regions, but failed in others to assimilate chlorophyll estimates without disrupting important ecosystem properties. This experiment gave insight into those properties of the ecosystem model that must be changed to allow data assimilation to be generally successful, while raising other important issues about the assimilation procedure.

  17. Introduction Ecosystem management has been

    E-print Network

    65(2) 1 Introduction Ecosystem management has been vigorously debated at many meetings, conferences, and workshops (Inter- agency Ecosystem Management Task Force, 1995; Malone, 1995; Stanley, 1995; Christensen et

  18. Ecosystem Restoration Research at GWERD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division, Ada, OK Mission: Conduct research and technical assistance to provide the scientific basis to support the development of strategies and technologies to protect and restore ground water, surface water, and ecosystems impacted b...

  19. Energetics of an Aquatic Ecosystem

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    William H. Leonard (University of Nebraska; )

    1982-06-21

    This activity is meant to give students an understanding of aquatic ecosystems and the processes and concepts that they are composed of and to give students a feel for how ecosystems affect the larger community.

  20. POEM: PESTICIDE ORCHARD ECOSYSTEM MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticide Orchard Ecosystem Model (POEM) is a mathematical model of organophosphate pesticide movement in an apple orchard ecosystem. In addition submodels on invertebrate population dynamics are included. The fate model allows the user to select the pesticide, its applicatio...

  1. Rice University | Faculty | Researchers Undergraduates Grad Students Faculty & Researchers Staff Alumni

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Rice University | Faculty | Researchers Undergraduates Grad Students Faculty & Researchers Staff At a Glance About Rice Rice Facts 2009 Students and Postdoctoral Appointees Entering Class Enrollment Resources Administration Historical Facts Archives About OIR Rice News Feed Font Size Rice Facts Students

  2. Effect of gamma irradiation on starch viscosity and physicochemical properties of different rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dianxing; Shu, Qingyao; Wang, Zhonghua; Xia, Yingwu

    2002-08-01

    Three types of rice cultivars (indica, japonica and hybrid rice) with similar intermediate apparent amylose content (AAC) as well as early indica rice cultivars with different amounts of AAC were selected for studying the effects of gamma irradiation on starch viscosity, physicochemical properties and starch granule structure. Four major parameters of RVA profile, that was determined by a rapid visco analyser (RVA, Model-3D), peak viscosity, hot pasting viscosity, cool pasting viscosity, and setback viscosity, were considerably decreased with increasing dose levels. Gamma irradiation reduced the amylose contents in the cultivars with low AAC, intermediate AAC, and glutinous rice, but had no effects on the high AAC cultivar. No visible changes in gelatinization temperature were detected after irradiation, but the peak time was reduced with the dose levels. Gel consistency was significantly increased in the tested cultivars, especially in the high AAC indica rice. The starch granules were somewhat deformed by gamma irradiation. These results suggested that it is promising to use gamma irradiation to improve rice eating or cooking quality.

  3. Whole Genome Sequencing of Elite Rice Cultivars as a Comprehensive Information Resource for Marker Assisted Selection

    PubMed Central

    Duitama, Jorge; Silva, Alexander; Sanabria, Yamid; Cruz, Daniel Felipe; Quintero, Constanza; Ballen, Carolina; Lorieux, Mathias; Scheffler, Brian; Farmer, Andrew; Torres, Edgar; Oard, James; Tohme, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics revealed the genomic background of rice, a staple food for the poor people, and provided the basis to develop large genomic variation databases for thousands of cultivars. Proper analysis of this massive resource is expected to give novel insights into the structure, function, and evolution of the rice genome, and to aid the development of rice varieties through marker assisted selection or genomic selection. In this work we present sequencing and bioinformatics analyses of 104 rice varieties belonging to the major subspecies of Oryza sativa. We identified repetitive elements and recurrent copy number variation covering about 200 Mbp of the rice genome. Genotyping of over 18 million polymorphic locations within O. sativa allowed us to reconstruct the individual haplotype patterns shaping the genomic background of elite varieties used by farmers throughout the Americas. Based on a reconstruction of the alleles for the gene GBSSI, we could identify novel genetic markers for selection of varieties with high amylose content. We expect that both the analysis methods and the genomic information described here would be of great use for the rice research community and for other groups carrying on similar sequencing efforts in other crops. PMID:25923345

  4. The effects of climate change on United States rice yields and California wheat yields

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, T.A.; Geng, S. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The USA produces 7.9 million tons of rice (Oryza sativa L.), 28% of which is exported to developing countries. Rice is one of the most important grain crops both in the USA and the world. Therefore it is important to understand the impact of weather and climate change on rice yields and production. In the USA rice is produced in California and the Gulf Coast states. It is anticipated that global climate change will have a major influence on agricultural practices and crop selection in these states. This study uses simulation techniques to quantify the potential magnitude of this influence. In addition, the impact of climate change on fall planted dryland spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in California is evaluated. Results indicate that rice yields decrease by between 14 and 24% in the Gulf Coast states and between 11 and 21% in California. In both regions the decrease in rice yields were due primarily to the large increase in summer temperatures. On the other hand, dryland fall planted spring wheat yields in California increase by 62 and 125%. This is because of the increased rainfall and temperatures during the winter months in California.

  5. Oral immunotherapy for allergic diseases using transgenic rice seeds: current state and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Mayumi; Nishimura, Tomoe; Kaminuma, Osamu; Mori, Akio; Hiroi, Takachika

    2013-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) has been shown to provide clinical benefit for patients with allergic diseases. At present, subcutaneous and sublingual ITs are mainly authorized for clinical treatment. Oral administration of allergens seems to be the easiest way to achieve IT, though it has yet to be translated to the clinical setting, mainly due to the requirement of a large amount of allergens. Plants, especially rice seeds, have recently been recognized as superior allergen carriers for oral administration, because of their high productivity, stability and safety. Therefore, in order to establish clinically applicable oral IT, we have been developing transgenic rice seeds (Tg rice), in which major epitopes of cedar pollen allergens or house-dust mites (HDM) are expressed. The efficacy of this orally administered Tg rice was confirmed in murine models of allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma. In the safety study of the Tg rice, no adverse effects on cynomolgus macaques were observed. In this review, we summarized the current state and future prospects of allergen-specific IT, focusing particularly on oral IT with allergen-expressing Tg rice. PMID:23711869

  6. Managing an NFC Ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald Madlmayr; Josef Langer; Josef Scharinger

    2008-01-01

    Whereas several NFC trials are already established around the world, currently there are no mass rolls out yet. This is due to several technical as well as administrative issues that have to be dealt with before rolling out such a system. In this paper we present an approach for managing the B2B relations in an near field communication (NFC) ecosystem

  7. Biocomplexity in mangrove ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Feller, I C; Lovelock, C E; Berger, U; McKee, K L; Joye, S B; Ball, M C

    2010-01-01

    Mangroves are an ecological assemblage of trees and shrubs adapted to grow in intertidal environments along tropical coasts. Despite repeated demonstration of their economic and societal value, more than 50% of the world's mangroves have been destroyed, 35% in the past two decades to aquaculture and coastal development, altered hydrology, sea-level rise, and nutrient overenrichment. Variations in the structure and function of mangrove ecosystems have generally been described solely on the basis of a hierarchical classification of the physical characteristics of the intertidal environment, including climate, geomorphology, topography, and hydrology. Here, we use the concept of emergent properties at multiple levels within a hierarchical framework to review how the interplay between specialized adaptations and extreme trait plasticity that characterizes mangroves and intertidal environments gives rise to the biocomplexity that distinguishes mangrove ecosystems. The traits that allow mangroves to tolerate variable salinity, flooding, and nutrient availability influence ecosystem processes and ultimately the services they provide. We conclude that an integrated research strategy using emergent properties in empirical and theoretical studies provides a holistic approach for understanding and managing mangrove ecosystems. PMID:21141670

  8. The Coral Reef Ecosystem

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-04-19

    Students examine a coral reef ecosystem to learn about its living and non-living parts and how they interact. They apply what they have learned to explore the world's biomes, including how the animals in each are adapted to their environment.

  9. TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM SIMULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Terrestrial Habitats Project at the Western Ecology Division (Corvallis, OR) is developing tools and databases to meet the needs of Program Office clients for assessing risks to wildlife and terrestrial ecosystems. Because habitat is a dynamic condition in real-world environm...

  10. Case Study: Ecosystem Transformations

    E-print Network

    Nippert, Jesse

    142 Chapter 15 Case Study: Ecosystem Transformations Along The Colorado Front Range: Prairie Dog-tailed prairie dog. Directional changes in climate and atmospheric chemistry are altering the environment foothills and mixed-grass to short-grass prairie. Among these direc- tional changes are elevated average

  11. Boston Harbor Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) site is designed to summarize and make available results of scientific research conducted in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts since 1985. A computer image of the harbor indicates ecosystem zones with descriptions (watershed, estuary, inner shelf, and basin), sewage outfall sites, and rock types. Links are provided for more information on this region.

  12. Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    E-print Network

    McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

    2004-01-01

    TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

  13. Isoflavone content and profile comparisons of cooked soybean-rice mixtures: electric rice cooker versus electric pressure rice cooker.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Yu, Bo-Ra; Park, Inmyoung; Kim, Seung-Hyun

    2014-12-10

    This study examined the effects of heat and pressure on the isoflavone content and profiles of soybeans and rice cooked together using an electric rice cooker (ERC) and an electric pressure rice cooker (EPRC). The total isoflavone content of the soybean-rice mixture after ERC and EPRC cooking relative to that before cooking was ?90% in soybeans and 14-15% in rice. Malonylglucosides decreased by an additional ?20% in EPRC-cooked soybeans compared to those cooked using the ERC, whereas glucosides increased by an additional ?15% in EPRC-cooked soybeans compared to those in ERC-cooked soybeans. In particular, malonylgenistin was highly susceptible to isoflavone conversion during soybean-rice cooking. Total genistein and total glycitein contents decreased in soybeans after ERC and EPRC cooking, whereas total daidzein content increased in EPRC-cooked soybeans (p < 0.05). These results may be useful for improving the content of nutraceuticals, such as isoflavones, in soybeans. PMID:25394170

  14. Construction of a rice glycoside hydrolase phylogenomic database and identification of targets for biofuel research

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rita; Cao, Peijian; Jung, Ki-Hong; Sharma, Manoj K.; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2013-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GH) catalyze the hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds in cell wall polymers and can have major effects on cell wall architecture. Taking advantage of the massive datasets available in public databases, we have constructed a rice phylogenomic database of GHs (http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gh/). This database integrates multiple data types including the structural features, orthologous relationships, mutant availability, and gene expression patterns for each GH family in a phylogenomic context. The rice genome encodes 437 GH genes classified into 34 families. Based on pairwise comparison with eight dicot and four monocot genomes, we identified 138 GH genes that are highly diverged between monocots and dicots, 57 of which have diverged further in rice as compared with four monocot genomes scanned in this study. Chromosomal localization and expression analysis suggest a role for both whole-genome and localized gene duplications in expansion and diversification of GH families in rice. We examined the meta-profiles of expression patterns of GH genes in twenty different anatomical tissues of rice. Transcripts of 51 genes exhibit tissue or developmental stage-preferential expression, whereas, seventeen other genes preferentially accumulate in actively growing tissues. When queried in RiceNet, a probabilistic functional gene network that facilitates functional gene predictions, nine out of seventeen genes form a regulatory network with the well-characterized genes involved in biosynthesis of cell wall polymers including cellulose synthase and cellulose synthase-like genes of rice. Two-thirds of the GH genes in rice are up regulated in response to biotic and abiotic stress treatments indicating a role in stress adaptation. Our analyses identify potential GH targets for cell wall modification. PMID:23986771

  15. In-Situ Quantification of Microbial Processes Controlling Methane Emissions From Rice Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Cho, R.; Zeyer, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas contributing to global warming. Among other sources, rice (paddy) soils represent a major nonpoint source of biogenic methane. In flooded paddy soils methane is produced under anaerobic conditions. Conversely, methanotrophic microorganisms oxidize methane to carbon dioxide in the root zone of rice plants, thus reducing overall methane emissions to the atmosphere. We present a novel combination of methods to quantify methanogenesis and methane oxidation in paddy soils and to link methane turnover to net emissions of rice plants. To quantify methane turnover in the presence of high methane background concentrations, small-scale push-pull tests (PPTs) were conducted in paddy soils using stable isotope-labeled substrates. Deuterated acetate and 13-C bicarbonate were employed to discern and quantify acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, while 13-C methane was employed to quantify methane oxidation. During 2.5 hr-long PPTs, 140 mL of a test solution containing labeled substrates and nonreactive tracers (Ar, Br-) was injected into paddy soils of potted rice plants. After a short rest period, 480 mL of test solution/pore water mixture was extracted from the same location. Methane turnover was then computed from extraction-phase breakthrough curves of substrates and/or products, and nonreactive tracers. To link methane turnover to net emissions, methane emissions from paddy soils and rice plants were individually determined immediately preceding PPTs using static flux chambers. We will present results of a series of experiments conducted in four different potted rice plants. Preliminary results indicate substantial variability in methane turnover and net emission between different rice plants. The employed combination of methods appears to provide a robust means to quantitatively link methane turnover in paddy soils to net emissions from rice plants.

  16. Effectiveness of loess in rejuvenating soil and ecosystem properties in a high leaching environment, West Coast, New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Eger; P. C. Almond; L. M. Condron

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of major disturbances, humid terrestrial ecosystems tend over long time scales towards deficiency of biogeochemically accessible nutrients. This phenomenon has been implicated in ecosystem retrogression. Aeolian deposition has been shown to be an important mitigating effect on nutrient depletion in soils and ecosystems of old landsurfaces (e.g. Hawaii, Amazon Basin). Significant nutrient loss has been demonstrated on

  17. Morphological stability and metabolic activity of rice (Oryza sativa L.) protoplasts in media supplemented with polyamines and divalent cations 

    E-print Network

    Adhikary, Bharat Raj

    1979-01-01

    MORPHOLOGICAL STABILITY AND METABOLIC ACTIVITY OF RICE (ORYZA SATIVA L. ) PROTOPLASTS IN MEDIA SUPPLEMENTED WITH POLYAMINES AND DIVALENT CATIONS A Thesis by BHARAT RAJ ADHIKARY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Genetics MORPHOLOGICAL STABILITY AND METABOLIC ACTIVITY QF RICE (ORYZA SATIVA L. ) PROTOPLASTS IN MEDIA SUPPLEMENTED WITH POLYAMINES AND DIVALENT...

  18. Expression analysis of the glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase gene families in young rice ( Oryza sativa) seedlings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xue-Qiang Zhao; Wei-Ming Shi

    2006-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) serve for primary assimilation of N in higher plants. When NH4+ is the major inorganic N source, rice plants must assimilate NH4+ quickly in roots through the GS\\/GOGAT cycle to ameliorate the toxic effect of excess NH4+. The sequence of the rice genome is almost complete, facilitating the identification of the GS and

  19. Genetic dissection of root growth in rice (Oryza sativa L.).II: mapping quantitative trait loci using molecular markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. Price; A. D. Tomos

    1997-01-01

    Drought is a major abiotic stress of upland rice, and good root growth has been associated with drought avoidance. We report\\u000a on the genetic mapping of root growth traits in an F2 population derived from two drought-resistant rice varieties, ‘Bala’ and ‘Azucena’. Restriction fragment length polymorphism\\u000a (RFLP) between the parents was 32%, and a molecular map with 71 marker loci

  20. A Chromosome Segment Substitution Library of Weedy Rice for Genetic Dissection of Complex Agronomic and Domestication Traits

    PubMed Central

    Subudhi, Prasanta K.; De Leon, Teresa; Singh, Pradeep K.; Parco, Arnold; Cohn, Marc A.; Sasaki, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) are a powerful alternative for locating quantitative trait loci (QTL), analyzing gene interactions, and providing starting materials for map-based cloning projects. We report the development and characterization of a CSSL library of a U.S. weedy rice accession ‘PSRR-1’ with genome-wide coverage in an adapted rice cultivar ‘Bengal’ background. The majority of the CSSLs carried a single defined weedy rice segment with an average introgression segment of 2.8 % of the donor genome. QTL mapping results for several agronomic and domestication traits from the CSSL population were compared with those obtained from two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations involving the same weedy rice accession. There was congruence of major effect QTLs between both types of populations, but new and additional QTLs were detected in the CSSL population. Although, three major effect QTLs for plant height were detected on chromosomes 1, 4, and 8 in the CSSL population, the latter two escaped detection in both RIL populations. Since this was observed for many traits, epistasis may play a major role for the phenotypic variation observed in weedy rice. High levels of shattering and seed dormancy in weedy rice might result from an accumulation of many small effect QTLs. Several CSSLs with desirable agronomic traits (e.g. longer panicles, longer grains, and higher seed weight) identified in this study could be useful for rice breeding. Since weedy rice is a reservoir of genes for many weedy and agronomic attributes, the CSSL library will serve as a valuable resource to discover latent genetic diversity for improving crop productivity and understanding the plant domestication process through cloning and characterization of the underlying genes. PMID:26086245