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Sample records for major rice ecosystems

  1. Understanding ecosystem services provided by rice fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the concept of ecosystem services is not new, there is revived interest in how these services should be measured, monitored, and valued. Focused research over the last four years has provided insight into the mitigation capabilities of rice fields in the lower Mississippi River Valley of the ...

  2. Residues of chlorantraniliprole in rice field ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Ming; Chai, Wei-Gang; Wu, Yin-Liang

    2012-04-01

    The fate of chlorantraniliprole was studied in rice field ecosystem, and a simple and reliable analytical method was developed for determination of chlorantraniliprole in soil, rice straw, paddy water and brown rice. Chlorantraniliprole residues were extracted from samples with acetonitrile. The extract was cleaned up with QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) method, and determined by high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The average recoveries were 76.9-82.4% from soil, 83.6-89.3% from rice straw, 95.2-103.1% from paddy water and 84.9-87.7% from brown rice. The relative standard deviation was less than 15%. The limits of detection (LODs) of chlorantraniliprole calculated as a sample concentration (S/N ratio of 3) were 0.012 ?g L(-1) for paddy water, 0.15 ?g kg(-1) for soil, brown rice and rice straw. The results of the kinetics study of chlorantraniliprole residue showed that chlorantraniliprole degradation in soil, water and rice straw coincided with C=0.01939e(-0.0434t), C=0.01425e(-0.8111t), and C=1.171e(-0.198t), respectively; the half-lives were about 16.0 d, 0.85 d and 3.50 d, respectively. The degradation rate of chlorantraniliprole in water was the fastest, followed by rice straw. The final residues of chlorantraniliprole on brown rice were lower than maximum residue limit (MRL) of 0.02 mg kg(-1) after 14 d Pre-Harvest Interval (PHI). Therefore, a dosage of 150 mL a.i.hm(-2) was recommended, which could be considered as safe to human beings and animals. PMID:22205044

  3. [Nitrogen cycling in rice-duck mutual ecosystem during double cropping rice growth season].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Chen, Yuan-Quan; Sui, Peng; Gao, Wang-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Raising duck in paddy rice field is an evolution of Chinese traditional agriculture. In May-October 2010, a field experiment was conducted in a double cropping rice region of Hunan Province, South-central China to study the nitrogen (N) cycling in rice-duck mutual ecosystem during early rice and late rice growth periods, taking a conventional paddy rice field as the control. Input-output analysis method was adopted. The N output in the early rice-duck mutual ecosystem was 239.5 kg x hm(-2), in which, 12.77 kg x hm(-2) were from ducks, and the N output in the late rice-duck mutual ecosystem was 338.7 kg x hm(-2), in which, 23.35 kg x hm(-2) were from ducks. At the present N input level, there existed soil N deficit during the growth seasons of both early rice and late rice. The N input from duck sub-system was mainly from the feed N, and the cycling rate of the duck feces N recycled within the system was 2.5% during early rice growth season and 3.5% during late rice growth season. After late rice harvested, the soil N sequestration was 178.6 kg x hm(-2). PMID:22489497

  4. Transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than its non-transgenic counterpart.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangsheng; Wang, Yongmo; Liu, Biao; Zhang, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Rice lines genetically modified with the crystal toxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have experienced rapid development, with biosafety certificates for two Bt rice lines issued in 2009. There has still been no commercial release of these lines yet due to public concerns about human health and environmental risks. Some studies confirmed that Bt rice was as safe as conventional rice to non-target organisms when pesticides were not applied, however, pesticides are still required in Bt rice to control non-lepidopteran pests. In this study, we assessed the environmental effects of two Bt rice lines expressing either the cry1Ab/1Ac or cry2A genes, respectively, by using zooplanktons as indicator species under normal field management practices using pesticides when required. In the whole rice growing season, non-Bt rice was sprayed 5 times while Bt rice was sprayed 2 times, which ensured both rice achieved a normal yield. Field investigations showed that rice type (Bt and non-Bt) significantly influenced zooplankton abundance and diversity, which were up to 95% and 80% lower in non-Bt rice fields than Bt rice fields. Laboratory rearing showed that water from non-Bt rice fields was significantly less suitable for the survival and reproduction of Daphnia magna and Paramecium caudatum in comparison with water from Bt rice fields. Higher pesticide residues were detected in the water from non-Bt than Bt rice fields, accounting for the bad performance of zooplankton in non-Bt field water. Our results demonstrate that Bt rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than non-Bt rice, and its commercialization will be beneficial for biodiversity restoration in rice-based ecosystems. PMID:25105299

  5. Transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Rice Is Safer to Aquatic Ecosystems than Its Non-Transgenic Counterpart

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangsheng; Wang, Yongmo; Liu, Biao; Zhang, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Rice lines genetically modified with the crystal toxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have experienced rapid development, with biosafety certificates for two Bt rice lines issued in 2009. There has still been no commercial release of these lines yet due to public concerns about human health and environmental risks. Some studies confirmed that Bt rice was as safe as conventional rice to non-target organisms when pesticides were not applied, however, pesticides are still required in Bt rice to control non-lepidopteran pests. In this study, we assessed the environmental effects of two Bt rice lines expressing either the cry1Ab/1Ac or cry2A genes, respectively, by using zooplanktons as indicator species under normal field management practices using pesticides when required. In the whole rice growing season, non-Bt rice was sprayed 5 times while Bt rice was sprayed 2 times, which ensured both rice achieved a normal yield. Field investigations showed that rice type (Bt and non-Bt) significantly influenced zooplankton abundance and diversity, which were up to 95% and 80% lower in non-Bt rice fields than Bt rice fields. Laboratory rearing showed that water from non-Bt rice fields was significantly less suitable for the survival and reproduction of Daphnia magna and Paramecium caudatum in comparison with water from Bt rice fields. Higher pesticide residues were detected in the water from non-Bt than Bt rice fields, accounting for the bad performance of zooplankton in non-Bt field water. Our results demonstrate that Bt rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than non-Bt rice, and its commercialization will be beneficial for biodiversity restoration in rice-based ecosystems. PMID:25105299

  6. Tracing the allocation of water in rainfed rice ecosystem by partitioning evapotranspiration of rainfed rice (Oryza Sativa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nay-Htoon, Bhone; Dubbert, Maren; Wei, Xue; Cuntz, Matthias; Ko, Jonghan; Tenhunen, John; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    To understand productive and unproductive water use of crop production, partitioning evapotranspiration (ET ) into evaporation (E) and transpiration (T ) is important. Water movements within the eco-hydrologic cycle of agroecosystems can be traced by stable oxygen isotopes of water (?18O) and plant transpiration and soil evaporation can also be estimated by tracing the ?18O. We quantified the contribution of transpiration to total ecosystem evapotranspiration of rainfed rice field by a stable oxygen isotope approach and FAO 56 dual crop modelling approach. Our study aims to provide quantification of ecosystem water cycle of rainfed rice by partitioning productive and unproductive water use since productivity and water use of rice which is a highly water demanding agroecosystem, is under intense research. Crop season total evapotranspiration fluxes from rainfed rice was mainly dominated by transpiration (T to ET contribution (T /ET ) = 65%) and domination of transpiration over evaporation fluxes was noted since early vegetative stage (Leaf Area Index = 0.8 m2 m-2) until harvesting. T /ET of rainfed rice fluctuated with changes in soil water content (SWC) and the highest T /ET was found at SWC of 0.34 m3 m-3, during seedling stage. Our results demonstrate that partitioning ET by FAO 56 dual crop model is in a good agreement with ?18O isotope based ET partitioning results. Using monthly mean values of leaf resistance and vegetation index derived crop coefficients instead of original fixed parameters of the FAO 56 dual crop model resulted better agreement with ?18O isotope based ET partitioning.

  7. STRAW MANAGEMENT AFFECTING METHANE EMISSIONS FROM DIFFERENT RICE ECOSYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of the greenhouse gas methane from wetland rice fields are generally enhanced by organic inputs into the soil. This study investigates methane emissions and crop residue management at three sites: Los Banos (Philippines), Hangzhou (China), and Prachinburi (Thailand). In Los Banos, the co...

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF BIO-ETHANOL MADE FROM RICE STRAW CONSIDERING LAND OCCUPATION EFFECTS ON ECOSYSTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoshita, Masaharu; Yang, Cuifen; Genchi, Yutaka; Tahara, Kiyotaka; Inaba, Atsushi

    Most of rice straw produced as a byproduct is not or low utilized in Japan. However, it may be available for the production of bio-ethanol without threatening food supply because of its characteristics as one of the lignocellulosic materials. Though it has already been revealed in previous studies that bio-ethanol made from rice straw can contribute to reducing energy consumption and repressing greenhouse gas emissions, effects on ecosystem due to land occupation for rice straw production and ethanol refinery plant have not been evaluated. Thus, environmental impacts of bio-ethanol made from rice straw including effects on ecosystem caused by land occupation were evaluated in this study. Some differences among three representative assessment methods could be found in results of the effect on ecosystem due to land occupation for rice straw production and ethanol refinery plant. However, it is common among all assessment methods that the effect on ecosystem caused by land occupation dominates large part of total environmental impact of ethanol made from rice straw (72-83% of total impact). Bio-ethanol made from rice straw showed larger environmental impact compared to that of gasoline due to land occupation. The improvement of the operating rate and the productivity of ethanol refinery plants is especially necessary for repressing the environm ental impacts related to bio-ethanol production made from rice straw.

  9. Track of fate and primary metabolism of trifloxystrobin in rice paddy ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mengchao; Li, Shuying; Wang, Quansheng; Wei, Peng; Liu, Yanan; Zhu, Guonian; Wang, Mengcen

    2015-06-15

    Trifloxystrobin, a strobilurin fungicide, has been widely applied to control fungal diseases in various crops, especially in rice cultivation. However, its residual profile in rice paddy that was highly linked to its ecological risk still remains poorly understood. To elucidate the fate and primary metabolism of trifloxystrobin in rice paddy, a simple and efficient analytical method was developed using the DisQuE extraction kit combined with GC-?ECD and GC-EI-MS/MS analyses. As a result, methodological recoveries of trifloxystrobin fortified in paddy water, soil and rice straw ranging from 0.005 to 2 mg kg(-1) (mg L(-1) for water) were acquired from 87.6% to 109.1% with relative standard deviation (RSD) from 1.9% to 9.5% (n=5), and the limit of detection (LOD, signal to noise (S/N)=3) and the limit of quantification (LOQ, S/N=10) were 6.3×10(-4) mg L(-1) and 2.09×10(-3) mg L(-1), respectively, which indicates the favorable accuracy, precision and sensitivity of the method for effective monitoring of the trace amounts of residual trifloxystrobin in the rice paddy. Furthermore, dissipation of residual trifloxystrobin was in accordance with the first-order rate equation, showing the half-lives from 0.7 to 7.5 days, illustrating that trifloxystrobin generally degraded in a rapid rate in the rice paddy. Additionally, trifloxystrobin acid identified as the primary metabolite of trifloxystrobin in the rice paddy via GC-EI-MS/MS analysis was found to be dominantly accumulated in the paddy water and maintained up to 2.41 mg L(-1) within 14 days, suggesting that long-term and frequent application of this fungicide may pose a high risk towards aquatic organisms in surrounding aqueous ecosystems through paddy drainage. Taken together, our data serve as a useful tool for monitoring residual trifloxystrobin in rice paddy ecosystem and also provide a basis for in-depth understanding of environmental behavior and ecological risk posed by this fungicide. PMID:25770954

  10. Characterization of rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes on the basis of morpho-physiological and biochemical traits grown under aerobic situation in rainfed ecosystem .

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Dwivedi, Sharad Kumar; Singh, S S; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sundaram, R K; Shivani; Mall, A K

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of aerobic situation on yield, physiological and biochemical traits of advanced breeding lines of rice. Experiment was conducted with two set of rice genotypes under two water regimes (aerobic and irrigated), during three consecutive wet seasons 2010-2012. Significant decrease in yield was observed in rice genotypes grown under aerobic situation as compared to the irrigated ones. Promising rice genotypes having the ability to maintain high plant biomass, harvest index, early vegetative vigour, improved physiological and biochemical traits in terms of relative water content (RWC), leaf area index (LAI), total soluble sugar, starch, protien and proline content help to sustain higher grain yield under aerobic situation. The yield gap between aerobic and irrigated rice ranged between 24% to 68%. Grain yield showed positive correlation with harvest index (0.434), test weight (0.647), plant biomass (0.411) and effective tiller numbers (0.473), whereas spikelet sterility was negative associated (-0.380). The current study suggested that promising genotypes viz., IR77298-14-1-2-130-2, IR84899-B-182-3-1-1-2, IR84887-B-157-38-1-1-3 and IR 84899-B-179-1-1-1-2 for aerobic situation, showing yield advantage due to better performance of physiological and biochemical traits, might be adopted in large area of rainfed ecosystem as well as in irrigated areas where water scarcity was a major problem. PMID:26364481

  11. Major QTLs Control Resistance to Rice Hoja Blanca Virus and Its Vector Tagosodes orizicolus

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luz E.; Lozano, Ivan; Garavito, Andrea; Carabali, Silvio J.; Triana, Monica; Villareal, Natalia; Reyes, Luis; Duque, Myriam C.; Martinez, César P.; Calvert, Lee; Lorieux, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Rice hoja blanca (white leaf) disease can cause severe yield losses in rice in the Americas. The disease is caused by the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV), which is transmitted by the planthopper vector Tagosodes orizicolus. Because classical breeding schemes for this disease rely on expensive, time-consuming screenings, there is a need for alternatives such as marker-aided selection. The varieties Fedearroz 2000 and Fedearroz 50, which are resistant to RHBV and to the feeding damage caused by T. orizicolus, were crossed with the susceptible line WC366 to produce segregating F2:3 populations. The F3 families were scored for their resistance level to RHBV and T. orizicolus. The F2:3 lines of both crosses were genotyped using microsatellite markers. One major QTL on the short arm of chromosome 4 was identified for resistance to RHBV in the two populations. Two major QTL on chromosomes 5 and 7 were identified for resistance to T. orizicolus in the Fd2000 × WC366 and Fd50 × WC366 crosses, respectively. This comparative study using two distinct rice populations allowed for a better understanding of how the resistance to RHBV and its vector are controlled genetically. Simple marker-aided breeding schemes based on QTL information can be designed to improve rice germplasm to reduce losses caused by this important disease. PMID:24240781

  12. New insight for two major rice blast R genes: Pi-ta and Pi-km

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In rice breeding programs across the world, the introgression of major resistance (R) genes remains the most cost-effective method to control blast epidemics caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. During the last two years, we have examined two loci, on chromosome 12 and 11, which harbor ...

  13. Rice SPX-Major Facility Superfamily3, a Vacuolar Phosphate Efflux Transporter, Is Involved in Maintaining Phosphate Homeostasis in Rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuang; Yue, Wenhao; Ying, Yinghui; Wang, Shoudong; Secco, David; Liu, Yu; Whelan, James; Tyerman, Stephen D; Shou, Huixia

    2015-12-01

    To maintain a stable cytosol phosphate (Pi) concentration, plant cells store Pi in their vacuoles. When the Pi concentration in the cytosol decreases, Pi is exported from the vacuole into the cytosol. This export is mediated by Pi transporters on the tonoplast. In this study, we demonstrate that SYG1, PHO81, and XPR1 (SPX)-Major Facility Superfamily (MFS) proteins have a similar structure with yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) low-affinity Pi transporters Phosphatase87 (PHO87), PHO90, and PHO91. OsSPX-MFS1, OsSPX-MFS2, and OsSPX-MFS3 all localized on the tonoplast of rice (Oryza sativa) protoplasts, even in the absence of the SPX domain. At high external Pi concentration, OsSPX-MFS3 could partially complement the yeast mutant strain EY917 under pH 5.5, which lacks all five Pi transporters present in yeast. In oocytes, OsSPX-MFS3 was shown to facilitate Pi influx or efflux depending on the external pH and Pi concentrations. In contrast to tonoplast localization in plants cells, OsSPX-MFS3 was localized to the plasma membrane when expressed in both yeast and oocytes. Overexpression of OsSPX-MFS3 results in decreased Pi concentration in the vacuole of rice tissues. We conclude that OsSPX-MFS3 is a low-affinity Pi transporter that mediates Pi efflux from the vacuole into cytosol and is coupled to proton movement. PMID:26424157

  14. Carbon and water cycling in flooded and rainfed rice (Oryza Sativa) ecosystem: Disentangling agronomical and ecological aspects of water use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nay-Htoon, Bhone; Xue, Wei; Dubbert, Maren; Lindner, Steve; Cuntz, Matthias; Ko, Jonghan; Tenhunen, John; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural crops play an important role in the global carbon and water cycling process and there is intense research to understand and predict carbon and water fluxes, productivity and water use of cultivated crops under climate change. Mechanistic understanding of the trade of between ecosystem water use efficiency and agronomic water use efficiency to maintain higher crop yield and productive water loss is necessary for the ecosystem sustainability. . We compared water and carbon fluxes of paddy and rainfed rice by canopy scale gas exchange measurements, crop growth, and daily evapotranspiration, transpiration and carbon flux modeling. According to our findings, evaporation contributed strongly (maximum 100% to minimum 45%) to paddy rice evapotranspiration while transpiration of rainfed is almost 50 % of daily evapotranspiration. Water use efficiency (WUE) was higher in rainfed rice both from an agronomic (WUEagro, i.e. grain yield per evapotranspiration) and ecosystem (WUEeco, i.e. gross primary production per evapotranspiration) perspective. However, rainfed rice showed also high ecosystem respiration losses and a slightly lower crop yield, demonstrating that higher WUE in rainfed rice comes at the expense of higher respiration losses of assimilated carbon and lower plant production, compared to paddy rice. Our results highlighted the need to partition water and carbon fluxes to improve our mechanistic understanding of water use efficiency and environmental impact of different agricultural practices. Keywords: Rainfed rice, Paddy rice, water use efficiency, Transpiration/Evapotranspiration, ecosystem WUE, agronomic WUE, Evapotranspiration

  15. Differences among Major Taxa in the Extent of Ecological Knowledge across Four Major Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Rebecca; Knowlton, Nancy; Brainard, Russell E.; Caley, M. Julian

    2011-01-01

    Existing knowledge shapes our understanding of ecosystems and is critical for ecosystem-based management of the world's natural resources. Typically this knowledge is biased among taxa, with some taxa far better studied than others, but the extent of this bias is poorly known. In conjunction with the publically available World Registry of Marine Species database (WoRMS) and one of the world's premier electronic scientific literature databases (Web of Science®), a text mining approach is used to examine the distribution of existing ecological knowledge among taxa in coral reef, mangrove, seagrass and kelp bed ecosystems. We found that for each of these ecosystems, most research has been limited to a few groups of organisms. While this bias clearly reflects the perceived importance of some taxa as commercially or ecologically valuable, the relative lack of research of other taxonomic groups highlights the problem that some key taxa and associated ecosystem processes they affect may be poorly understood or completely ignored. The approach outlined here could be applied to any type of ecosystem for analyzing previous research effort and identifying knowledge gaps in order to improve ecosystem-based conservation and management. PMID:22073172

  16. Modeling impacts of water and fertilizer management on ecosystem services from rice rotated crop systems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han; Yu, Chaoqing; Li, Changsheng; Huang, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Yue, Yali; Huang, Guorui

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable intensification in agriculture has stressed the need for management practices that could increase crop yields while simultaneously reducing environmental impacts. It is well recognized that water and nutrient management hold great promise to address these goals. This study uses the DNDC biogeochemical model to stimulate the impacts of water regime and nitrogen fertilizer management interactions on ecosystem services of rice rotated crop systems in China. County-level optimal nitrogen fertilizer application rates under various water management practices were captured and then multiple scenarios of water and nitrogen fertilizer management were set to more than 1600 counties with rice rotations in China. Results indicate that an national average of 15.7±5.9% (the mean value and standard deviation derive from variability of three water management practices) reduction of nitrogen fertilizer inputs can be achieved without significantly sacrificing rice yields. On a national scale, shallow flooding with optimal N application rates appear most potential to enhance ecosystem services, which led to 10.6% reduction of nitrogen fertilizer inputs, 34.3% decrease of total GHG emissions, 2.8% less of overall N loss (NH3 volatilization, denitrification and N leaching) and a 1.7% increase of rice yields compared to the baseline scenario. Regional GHG emissions mitigation derived from water regime change vary with soil properties and the multiple crop index. Among the main production regions of rice in China, the highest reduction happened in Jiangxu, Yunnan, Guizhou and Hubei (more than 40% reduction) with high SOC, high multiple crop index and low clay fraction. The highest reduction of GHG emissions derived from reducing current N application rate to optimal rate appeared in Zhejiang, Guangdong, Jiangsu where the serious over-application of mineral N exit. It was concluded that process models like DNDC would act an essential tool to identify sustainable agricultural management practices and evaluate their impacts on agro-ecosystem services.

  17. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 95 (2003) 289296 Effects of foraging waterfowl in winter flooded rice fields

    E-print Network

    van Kessel, Chris

    2003-01-01

    in Europe and the United States comprise only around 2­3% of the 1,500,000 km2 of rice grown worldwide flooded rice fields on weed stress and residue decomposition J.W. van Groenigena,, E.G. Burnsb, J quantifies the agronomic benefits of foraging waterfowl in winter flooded rice fields in the Sacramento

  18. Differences in net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity between major rice-based cropping systems in China

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Zhengqin; Liu, Yinglie; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaolin; Liu, Pingli; Huang, Taiqing

    2015-01-01

    Double rice (DR) and upland crop-single rice (UR) systems are the major rice-based cropping systems in China, yet differences in net global warming potential (NGWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) between the two systems are poorly documented. Accordingly, a 3-year field experiment was conducted to simultaneously measure methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) in oil rape-rice-rice and wheat-rice (representing DR and UR, respectively) systems with straw incorporation (0, 3 and 6 t/ha) during the rice-growing seasons. Compared with the UR system, the annual CH4, N2O, grain yield and NGWP were significantly increased in the DR system, though little effect on SOC sequestration or GHGI was observed without straw incorporation. Straw incorporation increased CH4 emission and SOC sequestration but had no significant effect on N2O emission in both systems. Averaged over the three study years, straw incorporation had no significant effect on NGWP and GHGI in the UR system, whereas these parameters were greatly increased in the DR system, i.e., by 108% (3 t/ha) and 180% (6 t/ha) for NGWP and 103% (3 t/ha) and 168% (6 t/ha) for GHGI. PMID:26626733

  19. Differences in net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity between major rice-based cropping systems in China.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhengqin; Liu, Yinglie; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaolin; Liu, Pingli; Huang, Taiqing

    2015-01-01

    Double rice (DR) and upland crop-single rice (UR) systems are the major rice-based cropping systems in China, yet differences in net global warming potential (NGWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) between the two systems are poorly documented. Accordingly, a 3-year field experiment was conducted to simultaneously measure methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) in oil rape-rice-rice and wheat-rice (representing DR and UR, respectively) systems with straw incorporation (0, 3 and 6 t/ha) during the rice-growing seasons. Compared with the UR system, the annual CH4, N2O, grain yield and NGWP were significantly increased in the DR system, though little effect on SOC sequestration or GHGI was observed without straw incorporation. Straw incorporation increased CH4 emission and SOC sequestration but had no significant effect on N2O emission in both systems. Averaged over the three study years, straw incorporation had no significant effect on NGWP and GHGI in the UR system, whereas these parameters were greatly increased in the DR system, i.e., by 108% (3 t/ha) and 180% (6 t/ha) for NGWP and 103% (3 t/ha) and 168% (6 t/ha) for GHGI. PMID:26626733

  20. Water management impacts on arsenic behavior and rhizosphere bacterial communities and activities in a rice agro-ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Das, Suvendu; Chou, Mon-Lin; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Yang, Huai-Jen

    2016-01-15

    Although rice cultivated under water-saturated conditions as opposed to submerged conditions has received considerable attention with regard to reducing As levels in rice grain, the rhizosphere microbiome potentially influencing As-biotransformation and bioavailability in a rice ecosystem has rarely been studied. In this study, the impacts of flooded, non-flooded and alternate wetting and drying (AWD) practices on rhizosphere bacterial composition and activities that could potentially impact As speciation and accumulation in rhizosphere soil and pore water, As fractions in rhizosphere soil and As speciation and distribution in plant parts were assessed. The results revealed that in addition to pore water As concentration, non-specifically sorbed As fraction, specifically sorbed As fraction and amorphous iron oxide bound As fraction in soil were bio-available to rice plants. In the flooded treatment, As(III) in the pore water was the predominant As species, accounting for 87.3-93.6% of the total As, whereas in the non-flooded and AWD treatments, As(V) was the dominant As species, accounting for 89.6-96.2% and 73.0-83.0%, respectively. The genera Ohtaekwangia, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Desulfuromonas, Desulfocapsa, Desulfobulbus, and Lacibacter were found in relatively high abundance in the flooded soil, whereas the genera Acinetobacter, Ignavibacterium, Thiobacillus, and Lysobacter were detected in relatively high abundance in the non-flooded soil. Admittedly, the decrease in As level in rice cultivated under the non-flooded and AWD conditions was mostly linked to a relatively high soil redox potential, low As(III) concentration in the soil pore water, a decrease in the relative abundance of As-, Fe- and sulfur-reducing bacteria and an increase in the relative abundance of As-, Fe- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the rhizosphere soil of the rice. This study demonstrated that with substantial reduction in grain As levels and higher water productivity, AWD practice in rice cultivation should be favored over the non-flooded and continuously flooded rice cultivations in As-contaminated sites. PMID:26546760

  1. Marine ecosystems compose the major source (85%) of world fisheries pro-

    E-print Network

    311 Marine ecosystems compose the major source (85%) of world fisheries pro- duction (Garcia), a large diversity of fishes representing varied taxonomic levels, ecological guilds, and life histories, it has become important to develop shortcuts that may pro- vide methods fisheries scientists can use

  2. Decision tools for bacterial blight resistance gene deployment in rice-based agricultural ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Gerbert S.; Sparks, Adam; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Attempting to achieve long-lasting and stable resistance using uniformly deployed rice varieties is not a sustainable approach. The real situation appears to be much more complex and dynamic, one in which pathogens quickly adapt to resistant varieties. To prevent disease epidemics, deployment should be customized and this decision will require interdisciplinary actions. This perspective article aims to highlight the current progress on disease resistance deployment to control bacterial blight in rice. Although the model system rice-Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae has distinctive features that underpin the need for a case-by-case analysis, strategies to integrate those elements into a unique decision tool could be easily extended to other crops. PMID:25999970

  3. Comparison and heritability of major rice end-use quality traits among diverse accessions grown in both tropical and temperate USA environments and genetic marker implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growing environment has been well-documented as playing a large role in effecting the end-use quality traits of rice. Apparent amylose content (AAC) and gelatinization temperature (GT) are considered to be the two most important end-use quality characteristics in rice, defining the major classes tha...

  4. Combination Patterns of Major R Genes Determine the Level of Resistance to the M. oryzae in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ling; Pan, Cunhong; Li, Yuhong; Zhang, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Guangqing; Dai, Zhengyuan; Pan, Xuebiao; Li, Aihong

    2015-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is the most devastating disease of rice and poses a serious threat to world food security. In this study, the distribution and effectiveness of 18 R genes in 277 accessions were investigated based on pathogenicity assays and molecular markers. The results showed that most of the accessions exhibited some degree of resistance (resistance frequency, RF >50%). Accordingly, most of the accessions were observed to harbor two or more R genes, and the number of R genes harbored in accessions was significantly positively correlated with RF. Some R genes were demonstrated to be specifically distributed in the genomes of rice sub-species, such as Pigm, Pi9, Pi5 and Pi1, which were only detected in indica-type accessions, and Pik and Piz, which were just harbored in japonica-type accessions. By analyzing the relationship between R genes and RF using a multiple stepwise regression model, the R genes Pid3, Pi5, Pi9, Pi54, Pigm and Pit were found to show the main effects against M. oryzae in indica-type accessions, while Pita, Pb1, Pik, Pizt and Pia were indicated to exhibit the main effects against M. oryzae in japonica-type accessions. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis revealed that combination patterns of major R genes were the main factors determining the resistance of rice varieties to M. oryzae, such as ‘Pi9+Pi54’, ‘Pid3+Pigm’, ‘Pi5+Pid3+Pigm’, ‘Pi5+Pi54+Pid3+Pigm’, ‘Pi5+Pid3’ and ‘Pi5+Pit+Pid3’ in indica-type accessions and ‘Pik+Pib’, ‘Pik+Pita’, ‘Pik+Pb1’, ‘Pizt+Pia’ and ‘Pizt+Pita’ in japonica-type accessions, which were able to confer effective resistance against M. oryzae. The above results provide good theoretical support for the rational utilization of combinations of major R genes in developing rice cultivars with broad-spectrum resistance. PMID:26030358

  5. Development of pyramidal lines with two major QTLs conferring resistance to sheath blight in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Jena, Kshirod; Bhuiyan, Md Atiqur Rahman; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2014-09-01

    Sheath blight is an emerging threat in rice cultivation. It is animportant disease caused by the soil-borne necrotrophic pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani Kühn. However, to date neither known major genes for quantitative resistance, nor any rice lines immune to this disease has been identified. The disease resistance is quantitative in nature. Numerous genes are involved in this resistance process. There are few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) detected conferring improved resistance against the disease. Teqing and Tetepshowimproved resistance having QTLs, qSB-9 and qSBR11-1, respectively. Since, these QTLs demonstrates additive effects, pyramiding of these QTLs might be an option to increase the sheath blight resistance in rice. Nine rice cultivars were screened at greenhouse conditions. Results showed that Tetep and Teqing had the lowest disease ratings. UKMRC2a new high yielding cultivar was as recipient parent. Crosses between UKMRC2 and Teqing, and UKMRC2 and Tetep were made and confirmed. Subsequently 4-way crosses between the two F1s were performed to develop pyramidal lines.

  6. Persistent natural acidification drives major distribution shifts in marine benthic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Linares, C; Vidal, M; Canals, M; Kersting, D K; Amblas, D; Aspillaga, E; Cebrián, E; Delgado-Huertas, A; Díaz, D; Garrabou, J; Hereu, B; Navarro, L; Teixidó, N; Ballesteros, E

    2015-11-01

    Ocean acidification is receiving increasing attention because of its potential to affect marine ecosystems. Rare CO2 vents offer a unique opportunity to investigate the response of benthic ecosystems to acidification. However, the benthic habitats investigated so far are mainly found at very shallow water (less than or equal to 5 m depth) and therefore are not representative of the broad range of continental shelf habitats. Here, we show that a decrease from pH 8.1 to 7.9 observed in a CO2 vent system at 40 m depth leads to a dramatic shift in highly diverse and structurally complex habitats. Forests of the kelp Laminaria rodriguezii usually found at larger depths (greater than 65 m) replace the otherwise dominant habitats (i.e. coralligenous outcrops and rhodolith beds), which are mainly characterized by calcifying organisms. Only the aragonite-calcifying algae are able to survive in acidified waters, while high-magnesium-calcite organisms are almost completely absent. Although a long-term survey of the venting area would be necessary to fully understand the effects of the variability of pH and other carbonate parameters over the structure and functioning of the investigated mesophotic habitats, our results suggest that in addition of significant changes at species level, moderate ocean acidification may entail major shifts in the distribution and dominance of key benthic ecosystems at regional scale, which could have broad ecological and socio-economic implications. PMID:26511045

  7. Rice SPX-Major Facility Superfamily3, a Vacuolar Phosphate Efflux Transporter, Is Involved in Maintaining Phosphate Homeostasis in Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Yinghui; Wang, Shoudong; Secco, David; Liu, Yu; Whelan, James; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Shou, Huixia

    2015-01-01

    To maintain a stable cytosol phosphate (Pi) concentration, plant cells store Pi in their vacuoles. When the Pi concentration in the cytosol decreases, Pi is exported from the vacuole into the cytosol. This export is mediated by Pi transporters on the tonoplast. In this study, we demonstrate that SYG1, PHO81, and XPR1 (SPX)-Major Facility Superfamily (MFS) proteins have a similar structure with yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) low-affinity Pi transporters Phosphatase87 (PHO87), PHO90, and PHO91. OsSPX-MFS1, OsSPX-MFS2, and OsSPX-MFS3 all localized on the tonoplast of rice (Oryza sativa) protoplasts, even in the absence of the SPX domain. At high external Pi concentration, OsSPX-MFS3 could partially complement the yeast mutant strain EY917 under pH 5.5, which lacks all five Pi transporters present in yeast. In oocytes, OsSPX-MFS3 was shown to facilitate Pi influx or efflux depending on the external pH and Pi concentrations. In contrast to tonoplast localization in plants cells, OsSPX-MFS3 was localized to the plasma membrane when expressed in both yeast and oocytes. Overexpression of OsSPX-MFS3 results in decreased Pi concentration in the vacuole of rice tissues. We conclude that OsSPX-MFS3 is a low-affinity Pi transporter that mediates Pi efflux from the vacuole into cytosol and is coupled to proton movement. PMID:26424157

  8. Major Phenolic Compounds, Antioxidant Capacity and Antidiabetic Potential of Rice Bean (Vigna umbellata L.) in China

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yang; Cheng, Xu-Zhen; Wang, Li-Xia; Wang, Su-Hua; Ren, Guixing

    2012-01-01

    Interest in edible beans as nutraceuticals is increasing. In the present study, the individual phenolic acids, the total phenolic content (TPC), the total flavonoid content (TFC), and the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of 13 varieties of rice beans from China were investigated. Eight phenolic compounds (catechin, epicatechin, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, vitexin, isovitexin, sinapic acid, quercetin) were analyzed on an ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) mass spectrometry (MS) system. The rice bean varieties had significant differences in total phenolic compounds (ranging from 123.09 ± 10.35 to 843.75 ± 30.15 ?g/g), in TPC (ranging from 3.27 ± 0.04 to 6.43 ± 0.25 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g), in TFC (ranging from 55.95 ± 11.16 to 320.39 ± 31.77 mg catechin (CE)/g), in antioxidant activity (ranging from 39.87 ± 1.37 to 46.40 ± 2.18 ?M·TE/g), in ?-glucosidase inhibition activity (ranging from 44.32 ± 2.12 to 68.71 ± 2.19) and in advanced glycation end products formation inhibition activity (ranging from 34.11 ± 0.59 to 75.75 ± 0.33). This study is the first report on phytochemistry and biological activities in rice beans. PMID:22489119

  9. Simulation of future global warming scenarios in rice paddies with an open-field ecosystem warming facility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) in Yangtze River Valley (YRV) suffered serious yield losses in 2003 when extreme heatwave (HW), hampered rice reproductive growth phase (RGP). Climate change induced extreme and asymmetrical fluctuations in temperature during heat sensitive stage of rice growth cycle, i.e., RG...

  10. Dominance Is the Major Genetic Basis of Heterosis in Rice as Revealed by Qtl Analysis Using Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, J.; Li, J.; Yuan, L.; Tanksley, S. D.

    1995-01-01

    A set of 194 F(7) lines derived from a subspecific rice cross showing strong F(1) heterosis was backcrossed to the two parents. The materials (388 BC(1)F(7) lines, 194 F(8) lines, two parents, F(1)) were phenotyped for 12 quantitative traits. A total of 37 significant QTLs (LOD >/= 2.0) was detected through 141 RFLP markers in the BC(1)F(7) populations. Twenty-seven (73%) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected in only one of the BC(1)F(7) populations. In 82% of these cases, the heterozygotes were superior to the respective homozygotes. The remaining 10 (27%) QTLs were detected in both BC(1)F(7) populations, and the heterozygote had a phenotype falling between those of the two homozygotes and in no instances were the heterozygotes found to be superior to both homozygotes. These results suggest that dominance complementation is the major genetic basis of heterosis in rice. This conclusion was strengthened by the finding that there was no correlation between most traits and overall genome heterozygosity and that there were some recombinant inbred lines in the F(8) population having phenotypic values superior to the F(1) for all of the traits evaluated--a result not expected if overdominance was a major contributor to heterosis. Digenic epistasis was not evident. PMID:7498751

  11. Interacting Factors Driving a Major Loss of Large Trees with Cavities in a Forest Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmayer, David B.; Blanchard, Wade; McBurney, Lachlan; Blair, David; Banks, Sam; Likens, Gene E.; Franklin, Jerry F.; Laurance, William F.; Stein, John A. R.; Gibbons, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Large trees with cavities provide critical ecological functions in forests worldwide, including vital nesting and denning resources for many species. However, many ecosystems are experiencing increasingly rapid loss of large trees or a failure to recruit new large trees or both. We quantify this problem in a globally iconic ecosystem in southeastern Australia – forests dominated by the world's tallest angiosperms, Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans). Tree, stand and landscape-level factors influencing the death and collapse of large living cavity trees and the decay and collapse of dead trees with cavities are documented using a suite of long-term datasets gathered between 1983 and 2011. The historical rate of tree mortality on unburned sites between 1997 and 2011 was >14% with a mortality spike in the driest period (2006–2009). Following a major wildfire in 2009, 79% of large living trees with cavities died and 57–100% of large dead trees were destroyed on burned sites. Repeated measurements between 1997 and 2011 revealed no recruitment of any new large trees with cavities on any of our unburned or burned sites. Transition probability matrices of large trees with cavities through increasingly decayed condition states projects a severe shortage of large trees with cavities by 2039 that will continue until at least 2067. This large cavity tree crisis in Mountain Ash forests is a product of: (1) the prolonged time required (>120 years) for initiation of cavities; and (2) repeated past wildfires and widespread logging operations. These latter factors have resulted in all landscapes being dominated by stands ?72 years and just 1.16% of forest being unburned and unlogged. We discuss how the features that make Mountain Ash forests vulnerable to a decline in large tree abundance are shared with many forest types worldwide. PMID:23071486

  12. Rice Nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter presents the symptoms of deficiency and toxicity of the major and minor mineral nutrients in rice, as well as a current synopsis of nutrient transporters and their regulation. The availability of sequences from the recently completed rice genome has furthered the knowledge of how plants...

  13. RICE GENETICS IV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the genome sequencing of the two major subspecies of rice (Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica) and the close genetic relationship of rice with other cereal crops, interest in rice as a model plant system has never been greater. This review of the book Rice Genetics IV, which represents a co...

  14. Spatial abundance and human biting rate of Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus in savannah and rice agro-ecosystems of Central Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mboera, Leonard E G; Bwana, Veneranda M; Rumisha, Susan F; Stanley, Grades; Tungu, Patrick K; Malima, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the spatial variations in malaria mosquito abundance and human biting rate in five villages representing rice-irrigation and savannah ecosystems in Kilosa District, central Tanzania. The study involved five villages namely Tindiga and Malui (wetland/rice irrigation), Twatwatwa and Mbwade (dry savannah) and Kimamba (wet savannah). Indoor mosquitoes were sampled using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light traps in three houses in each village. Anopheles gambiae s.l. molecular identification was carried out using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 936 female mosquitoes were collected. About half (46.9%) were malaria mosquitoes (Anopheles gambiae s.l.=28.6%; An. funestus= 18.3%). A total of 161 (60.1%) of the morphologically identified An. gambiae s.l. (268) and subjected to PCR analysis for speciation were genotyped as An. arabiensis. The An. funestus complex mosquitoes were composed of An. funestus funestus and An. rivulorum at the 5:1 ratio. On average, 17.9 Anopheles mosquitoes were collected per village per day. Two-thirds (62.8%) of the malaria mosquitoes were collected in Malui (rice agro-ecosystem) and the lowest number (2.3%) in Twatwatwa (dry savannah ecosystem). The biting rate per person per night for An. arabiensis+An. funestus s.s. was highest in Malui (46.0) and lowest in Twatwatwa (1.67). The parity rate of the An. funestus mosquitoes was lower compared to that of An. arabiensis and none of the mosquitoes was infected with malaria sporozoites. In conclusion, An. arabiensis is the most abundant malaria vector in Kilosa district and its variation is related to the ecological system. The heterogeneity in malaria mosquito abundance and human biting rate could be used to guide selection of locally appropriated control interventions. PMID:26054517

  15. 13Carbon isotope discrimination in major C4 weeds of rice-implications for root interference studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessing below ground plant interference in rice has been difficult in the past because separation of intertwined weed and crop roots is nearly impossible. A simple 13C depletion method was previously developed for simultaneous quantification of barnyardgrass and rice roots in flooded fields. Thi...

  16. RICE PI-TA GENE IS CLOSELY LINKED WITH RESISTANCE TO THE MAJOR PATHOTYPES OF THE RICE BLAST FUNGUS IN THE U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene, allelic to Pi-ta2, in rice is effective in preventing the infection of Magnaporthe grisea isolates containing the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Pi-ta encodes a putative cytoplasmic receptor that appears to bind to a predicted processed AVR-Pita to elicit a defense response...

  17. Pyramided rice lines harbouring Allium sativum (asal) and Galanthus nivalis (gna) lectin genes impart enhanced resistance against major sap-sucking pests.

    PubMed

    Bharathi, Y; Vijaya Kumar, S; Pasalu, I C; Balachandran, S M; Reddy, V D; Rao, K V

    2011-03-20

    We have developed transgene pyramided rice lines, endowed with enhanced resistance to major sap-sucking insects, through sexual crosses made between two stable transgenic rice lines containing Allium sativum (asal) and Galanthus nivalis (gna) lectin genes. Presence and expression of asal and gna genes in pyramided lines were confirmed by PCR and western blot analyses. Segregation analysis of F? progenies disclosed digenic (9:3:3:1) inheritance of the transgenes. Homozygous F? plants carrying asal and gna genes were identified employing genetic and molecular methods besides insect bioassays. Pyramided lines, infested with brown planthopper (BPH), green leafhopper (GLH) and whitebacked planthopper (WBPH), proved more effective in reducing insect survival, fecundity, feeding ability besides delayed development of insects as compared to the parental transgenics. Under infested conditions, pyramided lines were found superior to the parental transgenics in their seed yield potential. This study represents first report on pyramiding of two lectin genes into rice exhibiting enhanced resistance against major sucking pests. The pyramided lines appear promising and might serve as a novel genetic resource in rice breeding aimed at durable and broad based resistance against hoppers. PMID:21295625

  18. Effects of tillage practices and straw returning methods on greenhouse gas emissions and net ecosystem economic budget in rice-wheat cropping systems in central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. S.; Guo, L. J.; Liu, T. Q.; Li, C. F.; Cao, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    Significant efforts have been devoted to assess the effects of conservation tillage (no-tillage [NT] and straw returning) on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, global warming potential (GWP), greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI), and net economic budget in crop growing seasons. However, only a few studies have evaluated the effects conservation tillage on the net ecosystem economic budget (NEEB) in a rice-wheat cropping system. Therefore, a split-plot field experiment was performed to comprehensively evaluate the effects of tillage practices (i.e., conventional intensive tillage [CT] and NT) and straw returning methods (i.e., straw returning or removal of preceding crop) on the soil total organic carbon (TOC), GHG emissions, GWP, GHGI, and NEEB of sandy loam soil in a rice-wheat cropping system in central China. Conservation tillage did not affect rice and wheat grain yields. Compared with CT and straw removal, NT and straw returning significantly increased the TOC of 0-5 cm soil layer by 2.9% and 7.8%, respectively. However, the TOC of 0-20 cm soil layer was not affected by tillage practices and straw returning methods. NT did not also affect the N2O emissions during the rice and wheat seasons; NT significantly decreased the annual CH4 emissions by 7.5% and the annual GWP by 7.8% compared with CT. Consequently, GHGI under NT was reduced by 8.1%. Similar to NT, straw returning did not affect N2O emissions during the rice and wheat seasons. Compared with straw removal, straw returning significantly increased annual CH4 emissions by 35.0%, annual GWP by 32.0%, and annual GHGI by 31.1%. Straw returning did not also affect NEEB; by contrast, NT significantly increased NEEB by 15.6%. NT without straw returning resulted in the lowest GWP, the lowest GHGI, and the highest NEEB among all treatments. This finding suggested that NT without straw returning may be applied as a sustainable technology to increase economic and environmental benefits. Nevertheless, environmentally straw returning methods should be considered in future studies.

  19. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F.; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs. PMID:25653837

  20. Rice and red rice interference. II. Rice response to population densities of three red rice (Oryza sativa) ecotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice, which grows taller and produces more tillers than domestic rice and shatters most of its seeds early, is a major weed in many rice-growing areas of the world. Field experiments were conducted at Stuttgart, AR in 1997 and 1998 to evaluate the growth response of the Kaybonnet (KBNT) rice cul...

  1. College Last Name First Name Email Class Major Chu Tina tmc8@rice.edu 2016 Biochemistry & Cell Biology, Philosophy, Pre-Med

    E-print Network

    Aazhang, Behnaam

    Mathematical Economic Analysis Joseph Nicholos npj3@rice.edu 2018 Chemistry, Pre-Med Li Zhifan zl20@rice Technologies, Pre-Med Goldstein Perry pmg4@rice.edu 2018 Sport Management, Economics, Managerial Studies

  2. Development of sustainable groundwater extraction practices for a major superficial aquifer supporting a groundwater dependent ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smettem, K. R.; Froend, R.; Davies, M.; Stock, B.; Martin, M.; Robertson, C.; Eamus, D.

    2010-12-01

    Throughout Australia many groundwater dependent ecosystems have been adversely affected by unsympathetic water abstraction practices. In Western Australia, the largest single supply of drinking water for the city of Perth is a superficial aquifer known as the Gnangara Groundwater Mound, located over an area of approximately 2200 km2 within and to the north of the city on the coastal plain. The groundwater resource supplies 60% of Perth’s pubic drinking water supply and 85% of total water demand for all users. Much of the mound is overlain by phreatophytic Banksia woodland that is susceptible to drought stress and death if the root system is separated from the unconfined aquifer for prolonged periods over the hot, dry Mediterranean summer. Drought stress has been exacerbated by diminished rainfall due to a changing climate regime. The aim of this research is to develop guidelines for sustainable groundwater abstraction (timing and volume) that will maintain the long term integrity of the ecosystem and recover up to 5GL/yr from existing borefields. We seek to investigate whether a change in abstraction regime, from ‘peak demand’ summer pumping to winter pumping allows groundwater levels to recover sufficiently prior to summer, thereby maintaining a healthy vegetation system. Hydrological and plant water status parameters were monitored over two winters at research sites with an initial depth to groundwater of less than 5m. During winter and spring, groundwater abstraction at a reduced capacity resulted in a 0.75m drawdown. Operation of the bores did not adversely impact the water status of phreatophytic Banksia at the study sites relative to control sites. Analysis of plant water source partitioning indicated that plants exposed to the winter drawdown were sustained by unsaturated zone soil moisture storage replenished by winter rainfall. When pumping ceased, the water table rose rapidly and plants utilised more groundwater during late spring and summer as the soil water store became depleted. A simple water balance model combined with phreatophyte vulnerability assessment was employed to identify allowable magnitude and rate of drawdown, and duration of bore operation.

  3. LETTER Herbivory makes major contributions to ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycling in tropical forests

    E-print Network

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    potentially affect the diversity and structure of tropical plant communities (Coley & Barone 1996) in part: decomposing more rapidly than plant litter (Fonte & Schowalter 2004), increasing levels of soil N and P and phos- phorus from plants to soil via leaf area loss is similar to, or greater than, other major sources

  4. Water quality of four major lakes in Mississippi, USA: Impacts on human and aquatic ecosystem health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs), harmful microorganisms (pathogens) and toxic metals represent three major agents of water quality deterioration. Better water quality is of utmost importance to water bodies that provide recreational opportunities, even better quality is expected in the water bodies that...

  5. New Seed Dormancy Loci Detected from Weedy Rice-Derived Advanced Populations with Major QTL Alleles Removed from the Background

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Domestication of cereal crops from wild relatives tended to eliminate seed dormancy. Our objective was to identify all the detectable seed dormancy loci that differentiated between a weedy and a cultivated line of rice to understand the impact of domestication on distribution of dormancy genes. Thre...

  6. Genetic diversity and species relationships in the Oryza complex and glufosinate tolerance in rice 

    E-print Network

    Vaughan, Laura Kelly

    2005-08-29

    The weed red rice is a major problem in rice producing areas world wide. All of the red rice in commercial rice fields in the United States has traditionally been considered to be the same species as commercial rice, Oryza ...

  7. Remote sensing based change analysis of rice environments in Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Gumma, Murali Krishna; Mohanty, Samarendu; Nelson, Andrew; Arnel, Rala; Mohammed, Irshad A; Das, Satya Ranjan

    2015-01-15

    The rainfed rice-growing environment is perhaps one of the most vulnerable to water stress such as drought and floods. It is important to determine the spatial extent of the stress-prone areas to effectively and efficiently promote proper technologies (e.g., stress-tolerant varieties) to tackle the problem of sustainable food production. This study was conducted in Odisha state located in eastern India. Odisha is predominantly a rainfed rice ecosystem (71% rainfed and 29% canal irrigated during kharif-monsoon season), where rice is the major crop and staple food of the people. However, rice productivity in Odisha is one of the lowest in India and a significant decline (9%) in rice cultivated area was observed in 2002 (a drought year). The present study analyzed the temporal rice cropping pattern in various ecosystems and identified the stress-prone areas due to submergence (flooding) and water shortage. The spatial distribution of rice areas was mapped using MODIS (MOD09Q1) 250-m 8-day time-series data (2000-2010) and spectral matching techniques. The mapped rice areas were strongly correlated (R(2) = 90%) with district-level statistics. Also the class accuracy based on field-plot data was 84.8%. The area under the rainfed rice ecosystem continues to dominate, recording the largest share among rice classes across all the years. The use of remote-sensing techniques is rapid, cost-effective, and reliable to monitor changes in rice cultivated area over long periods of time and estimate the reduction in area cultivated due to abiotic stress such as water stress and submergence. Agricultural research institutes and line departments in the government can use these techniques for better planning, regular monitoring of land-use changes, and dissemination of appropriate technologies. PMID:24405761

  8. A major locus qS12, located in a duplicated segment of chromosome 12, causes spikelet sterility in an indica-japonica rice hybrid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Sun, Zhi-Zhong; Yu, Wen; Gu, Ming-Hong; Liu, Qiao-Quan; Li, Yang-Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Chromosome segment duplications are integral in genome evolution by providing a source for the origin of new genes. In the rice genome, besides an ancient polyploidy event known in the rice common ancestor, it had been identified that there was a special segmental duplication involving chromosomes 11 and 12, but the biological role of this duplication remains unknown. In this study, by using a set of chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) and near isogenic lines (NILs) derived from the indica cultivar 9311 and japonica cultivar Nipponbare, a major QTL (qS12) resulting in hybrid male sterility was mapped within ~400 kb region adjacent to the special duplicated segment on the short arm of chromosome 12. Compared to the japonica cultivar Nipponbare, the two sides of the qS12 candidate region were inverted in the indica cultivar 9311. Among 47 of the 111 rice genotypes evaluated by molecular markers, the inverted sides were detected, and found completely homologous to indica cultivar 9311. These results suggested that the two inverted sides protect the sequence in the qS12 regions from recombination. On the short-arm of chromosome 12, two QTLs S-e and S25, in addition to qS12, were previously detected as a distinct segregation distortion and pollen semi-sterility loci. We propose these three hybrid sterility loci are the same locus, and the duplicated segment on chromosome 12 may play a prominent role in diversification, i.e., sub-speciation of cultivated rice. PMID:21792631

  9. Organic Rice Production: Challenges and Opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The market demand for organically produced rice has grown steadily with the majority of the acreage now being located in Texas and California. A wide range of organic products are marketed including conventional long and medium grain rice, aromatic or scented rice, rice with colored bran, and rice f...

  10. Homology modeling of major intrinsic proteins in rice, maize and Arabidopsis: comparative analysis of transmembrane helix association and aromatic/arginine selectivity filters

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Anjali; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2007-01-01

    Background The major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) facilitate the transport of water and neutral solutes across the lipid bilayers. Plant MIPs are believed to be important in cell division and expansion and in water transport properties in response to environmental conditions. More than 30 MIP sequences have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, maize and rice. Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), Nod26-like intrinsic protein (NIPs) and small and basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs) are subfamilies of plant MIPs. Despite sequence diversity, all the experimentally determined structures belonging to the MIP superfamily have the same "hour-glass" fold. Results We have structurally characterized 39 rice and 31 maize MIPs and compared them with that of Arabidopsis. Homology models of 105 MIPs from all three plant species were built. Structure-based sequence alignments were generated and the residues in the helix-helix interfaces were analyzed. Small residues (Gly/Ala/Ser/Thr) are found to be highly conserved as a group in the helix-helix interface of MIP structures. Individual families sometimes prefer one or another of the residues from this group. The narrow aromatic/arginine (ar/R) selectivity filter in MIPs has been shown to provide an important constriction for solute permeability. Ar/R regions were analyzed and compared between the three plant species. Seventeen TIP, NIP and SIP members from rice and maize have ar/R signatures that are not found in Arabidopsis. A subgroup of rice and maize NIPs has small residues in three of the four positions in the ar/R tetrad, resulting in a wider constriction. These MIP members could transport larger solute molecules. Conclusion Small residues are group-conserved in the helix-helix interface of MIP structures and they seem to be important for close helix-helix interactions. Such conservation might help to preserve the hour-glass fold in MIP structures. Analysis and comparison of ar/R selectivity filters suggest that rice and maize MIPs could transport more diverse solutes than Arabidopsis MIPs. Thus the MIP members show conservation in helix-helix interfaces and diversity in aromatic/arginine selectivity filters. The former is related to structural stability and the later can be linked to functional diversity. PMID:17445256

  11. Simultaneous quantification of glyphosate, glufosinate, and their major metabolites in rice and soybean sprouts by gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detector.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Su-Hsiang; Lo, Yi-Wen; Chang, Pi-Chiou; Chou, Shin-Shou; Chang, Hung-Min

    2004-06-30

    Procedures were developed for the simultaneous determination of glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] and glufosinate [dl-homoalanin-4-yl-(methyl)phosphinic acid] and their major metabolites, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and 3-(methylphosphinico)propionic acid (3-MPPA), in rice and soybean sprouts by gas chromatography (GC) equipped with a pulsed flame photometric detector (PFPD). Herbicides and their major metabolites were previously derivatized with TMOA (trimethyl orthoacetate (TMOA) in the presence of acetic acid, and their GC responses versus heating temperature (70-90 degrees C) and heating time (30-120 min) were optimized. It was found that increases in heating temperature and heating time were unfavorable for the derivatization of glyphosate or glufosinate, whereas high temperature and extended reaction time remarkably facilitated that of AMPA and 3-MPPA except at 90 degrees C for an extended reaction time (120 min). Combination of AG1-X8 anion-exchange chromatography with a Florisil cartridge cleanup process was favorable for the GC-PFPD analysis. Four types of derivatives spiked in rice and soybean sprout matrices were eluted, reaching a baseline separation, in a sequence of 3-MPPA, AMPA, glyphosate, and glufosinate within 14 min using a DB-608 capillary column. Recoveries of glyphosate, AMPA, glufosinate, and 3-MPPA (0.5 ppm) spiked in both sample matrices were determined to be 72-81, 71-86, 101-119, and 83-90%, respectively, whereas the coefficient of variation was determined to be <10% in three repeated determinations. The instrumental limits of detection for glyphosate, AMPA, glufosinate, and 3-MPPA in sample matrices were 0.02, 0.03, 0.02, and 0.01 ppm, respectively. The limits of quantification for glyphosate, AMPA, glufosinate, and 3-MPPA in sample matrices were 0.06, 0.10, 0.06, and 0.04 ppm, respectively. PMID:15212448

  12. TWELVE RICE GERMPLASM ACCESSIONS IDENTIFIED WITH NOVEL BLAST RESISTANCE FOR US RICE VARIETY IMPROVEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) germplasm accessions with new major resistance (R-) are constantly sought by rice breeders for use in developing resistant cultivars to control blast (Pyricularia oryza Cav.), a major fungal disease of cultivated rice. Initially, 91 blast resistant rice accessions were select...

  13. Genomic structure of weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy (red) rice is a major pest of cultivated rice in the United States (U.S.) and worldwide, causing decreases in both yield and market value. Previous work has shown that U.S. weedy rice is comprised of two genotypically distinct lineages that are strongly correlated with strawhull awnless (SH) ...

  14. Evolutionary responses by native species to major anthropogenic changes to their ecosystems: Pacific salmon in the Columbia River hydropower system.

    PubMed

    Waples, Robin S; Zabel, Richard W; Scheuerell, Mark D; Sanderson, Beth L

    2008-01-01

    The human footprint is now large in all the Earth's ecosystems, and construction of large dams in major river basins is among the anthropogenic changes that have had the most profound ecological consequences, particularly for migratory fishes. In the Columbia River basin of the western USA, considerable effort has been directed toward evaluating demographic effects of dams, yet little attention has been paid to evolutionary responses of migratory salmon to altered selective regimes. Here we make a first attempt to address this information gap. Transformation of the free-flowing Columbia River into a series of slack-water reservoirs has relaxed selection for adults capable of migrating long distances upstream against strong flows; conditions now favour fish capable of migrating through lakes and finding and navigating fish ladders. Juveniles must now be capable of surviving passage through multiple dams or collection and transportation around the dams. River flow patterns deliver some groups of juvenile salmon to the estuary later than is optimal for ocean survival, but countervailing selective pressures might constrain an evolutionary response toward earlier migration timing. Dams have increased the cost of migration, which reduces energy available for sexual selection and favours a nonmigratory life history. Reservoirs are a benign environment for many non-native species that are competitors with or predators on salmon, and evolutionary responses are likely (but undocumented). More research is needed to tease apart the relative importance of evolutionary vs. plastic responses of salmon to these environmental changes; this research is logistically challenging for species with life histories like Pacific salmon, but results should substantially improve our understanding of key processes. If the Columbia River is ever returned to a quasinatural, free-flowing state, remaining populations might face a Darwinian debt (and temporarily reduced fitness) as they struggle to re-evolve historical adaptations. PMID:18268786

  15. Rice (Oryza) hemoglobins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice (Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a sin...

  16. MOLECULAR CONTROL OF THE RICE BLAST DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe grisea is a major constraint to rice production worldwide. The rice blast system is one of the best-characterized monocot model systems. The goal of this project is to understand molecular mechanisms of disease resistance using rice blast as a model system....

  17. Insights into molecular mechanism of blast resistance in weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy rice is a serious pest in direct-seeded rice fields in the U.S. and worldwide. Under suitable conditions, weedy rice can reduce crop yields up to 70%. However, weedy rice may carry novel disease resistance genes. Rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a major disease wo...

  18. Genetic diversity for rice grain mineral concentrations observed among genetically and geographically giverse rice accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With about half of the world’s people dependent on rice as their main food source, improving the nutritional value of rice could have major impact on human health. While rice in the USA is often artificially fortified, natural enhancement of the rice grain’s nutritional value, i.e. from genetic impr...

  19. Evolutionary insights into the origins of weediness in U.S. red rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy red rice is a widespread, economically challenging problem in Southern U.S. rice fields. The two major U.S. red rice types, strawhull and blackhull, are thought to have arisen independently from Asian rice populations in the distant past. Red rice is a weedy relative of rice, a genomic model...

  20. Rice Distillers Dried Grain Is a Promising Ingredient as a Partial Replacement of Plant Origin Sources in the Diet for Juvenile Red Seabream (Pagrus major)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Lee, Sang-Min

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to test the effects of dietary distillers dried grain (DDG) level on the growth performance, feed utilization, body composition and antioxidant activity of juvenile red seabream (Pagrus major). Six isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets were formulated to contain 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% DDG from rice (designated as DDG0, DDG5, DDG10, DDG15, DDG20, and DDG25), respectively. Juvenile red seabream averaging 10.1±0.05 g were randomly distributed into 400-L tanks in a flow through systems. Three replicate groups of fish were fed one of the experimental diets to visual satiation two times a day for 10 weeks. Survival, weight gain, feed efficiency, protein efficiency ratio and hepatosomatic index of fish were not affected by dietary DDG levels (p>0.05). Proximate and amino acid composition of whole body in juvenile red seabream were not affected by dietary DDG levels (p>0.05). Plasma content of total protein, glucose, cholesterol, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, phospholipid and triglyceride were not affected by dietary DDG levels (p>0.05). 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical and alkyl radical scavenging activities in plasma and liver of fish were not affected by dietary DDG levels (p>0.05). The results of this experiment suggest that DDG has the potential to replace plant origin ingredients such as wheat flour and corn gluten meal and could be used up to 25% in diet without incurring negative effects on the growth performance of juvenile red seabream. PMID:25358367

  1. EFFECTS OF CO2 ON COMPETITION BETWEEN RICE AND BARNYARDGRASS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric CO2 concentration is increasing. ffects of elevated CO2 on rice production could occur not only through direct impacts to rice, but also indirectly via ecosystem responses. hanged competitiveness with elevated CO2 could occur between rice hich has the C3 type of p...

  2. 13Carbon isotope discrimination in roots and shoots of major weed species of southern U.S. rice fields and its potential use for analysis of rice-weed root interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessing below ground plant interference in rice has been difficult in the past because thorough, accurate separation of the intertwined roots of weed and crop is extremely challenging. A d13C depletion method has been developed to assess interactions between roots of barnyardgrass and weed-suppre...

  3. Modeled Sea Level Rise Impacts on Coastal Ecosystems at Six Major Estuaries on Florida’s Gulf Coast: Implications for Adaptation Planning

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Anne P.; Brenner, Jorge; Gordon, Doria R.

    2015-01-01

    The Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) was applied at six major estuaries along Florida’s Gulf Coast (Pensacola Bay, St. Andrews/Choctawhatchee Bays, Apalachicola Bay, Southern Big Bend, Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor) to provide quantitative and spatial information on how coastal ecosystems may change with sea level rise (SLR) and to identify how this information can be used to inform adaption planning. High resolution LiDAR-derived elevation data was utilized under three SLR scenarios: 0.7 m, 1 m and 2 m through the year 2100 and uncertainty analyses were conducted on selected input parameters at three sites. Results indicate that the extent, spatial orientation and relative composition of coastal ecosystems at the study areas may substantially change with SLR. Under the 1 m SLR scenario, total predicted impacts for all study areas indicate that coastal forest (-69,308 ha; -18%), undeveloped dry land (-28,444 ha; -2%) and tidal flat (-25,556 ha; -47%) will likely face the greatest loss in cover by the year 2100. The largest potential gains in cover were predicted for saltmarsh (+32,922 ha; +88%), transitional saltmarsh (+23,645 ha; na) and mangrove forest (+12,583 ha; +40%). The Charlotte Harbor and Tampa Bay study areas were predicted to experience the greatest net loss in coastal wetlands The uncertainty analyses revealed low to moderate changes in results when some numerical SLAMM input parameters were varied highlighting the value of collecting long-term sedimentation, accretion and erosion data to improve SLAMM precision. The changes predicted by SLAMM will affect exposure of adjacent human communities to coastal hazards and ecosystem functions potentially resulting in impacts to property values, infrastructure investment and insurance rates. The results and process presented here can be used as a guide for communities vulnerable to SLR to identify and prioritize adaptation strategies that slow and/or accommodate the changes underway. PMID:26207914

  4. Rice alcohol dehydrogenase 1 promotes survival and has a major impact on carbohydrate metabolism in the embryo and endosperm when seeds are germinated in partially oxygenated water

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Greenway, Hank; Matsumura, Hideo; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Nakazono, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Rice (Oryza sativa) has the rare ability to germinate and elongate a coleoptile under oxygen-deficient conditions, which include both hypoxia and anoxia. It has previously been shown that ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE 1 (ADH1) is required for cell division and cell elongation in the coleoptile of submerged rice seedlings by means of studies using a rice ADH1-deficient mutant, reduced adh activity (rad). The aim of this study was to understand how low ADH1 in rice affects carbohydrate metabolism in the embryo and endosperm, and lactate and alanine synthesis in the embryo during germination and subsequent coleoptile growth in submerged seedlings. Methods Wild-type and rad mutant rice seeds were germinated and grown under complete submergence. At 1, 3, 5 and 7 d after imbibition, the embryo and endosperm were separated and several of their metabolites were measured and compared. Key results In the rad embryo, the rate of ethanol fermentation was halved, while lactate and alanine concentrations were 2·4- and 5·7- fold higher in the mutant than in the wild type. Glucose and fructose concentrations in the embryos increased with time in the wild type, but not in the rad mutant. The rad mutant endosperm had lower amounts of the ?-amylases RAMY1A and RAMY3D, resulting in less starch degradation and lower glucose concentrations. Conclusions These results suggest that ADH1 is essential for sugar metabolism via glycolysis to ethanol fermentation in both the embryo and endosperm. In the endosperm, energy is presumably needed for synthesis of the amylases and for sucrose synthesis in the endosperm, as well as for sugar transport to the embryo. PMID:24431339

  5. Identification of Some Degradation Products of Golden Rice Beta- carotene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Golden Rice (GR2) is genetically modified rice, which can contain as high as 37 ug of beta-carotene per g of dry rice. It was developed to combat vitamin A deficiency (VAD), a major malnutrition problem in many parts of the developing world, especially in South and South Eastern Asia, where rice is ...

  6. Identifying novel resistance genes in rice wild relatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast and sheath blight are major fungal diseases of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L. ) that limit Arkansas rough rice yields and market potential. Resistance to these diseases has been found in rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) A collection of these wild relatives originating from outside the U...

  7. Compare and contrast invasive growths and global gene expressions of rice after infections with rice blast and sheath blight pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast and sheath blight diseases are the two major rice diseases that threaten the stable rice production worldwide. The fungus causing rice blast disease is a hemibiotrophic pathogen where the fungus invades host cells biotrophically whereas the fungus causing sheath blight is a necrotrophic ...

  8. Rice Insect Management. 

    E-print Network

    Drees, Bastiaan M.

    1983-01-01

    ............... . Rice Water Weevil ......................... 4 Fall Armyworm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 6 Grasshoppers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 6 Rice Stink Bug.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 7 Other Insect Pests of Texas Rice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Texas Rice Production Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 9 1983 Rice Insect Control Suggestions .......... \\0 Acknowledgment This publication has been prepared to assist...

  9. The Glycemic Index of Rice and Rice Products: A Review, and Table of GI Values.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Bhupinder; Ranawana, Viren; Henry, Jeyakumar

    2016-01-25

    Rice is the principle staple and energy source for nearly half the world's population and therefore has significant nutrition and health implications. Rice is generally considered a high glycemic index (GI) food, however, this depends on varietal, compositional, processing, and accompaniment factors. Being a major contributor to the glycemic load in rice eating populations, there is increasing concern that the rising prevalence of insulin resistance is as a result of the consumption of large amounts of rice. Devising ways and means of reducing the glycemic impact of rice is therefore imperative. This review gathers studies examining the GI of rice and rice products and provides a critical overview of the current state of the art. A table collating published GI values for rice and rice products is also included. PMID:25590950

  10. Rice Diseases. 

    E-print Network

    Jones, Roger K.

    1987-01-01

    STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR. COLLEGE STATION. TEXAS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This manuscript was prepared by E. B. Reynolds in cooperation with the staffs of the Rice-Pastur Experiment Station... in preparing th section on drying and storage of rough rice. Studies at the Rice-Pasture Experiment Station are cooperative among the Texas Agricultura Experiment Station ; the Field Crops Research Branch, Agricultural Research Service, U. S. Departmen...

  11. Exploring genetic diversity and potential novel disease resistance genes in a collection of rice wild relatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild relatives of rice (Oryza spp.) and introduced rice (O. sativa) germplasm are important sources of novel resistance (R-) genes for rice improvement. Rice sheath blight, caused by Rhizotonia solani, and leaf blast, caused by Magnaportha oryzae, are major fungal diseases of rice worldwide. To id...

  12. IDENTIFYING NOVEL R-GENES IN RICE WILD RELATIVES WITH MICROSATELLITE MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) are an important source of novel R(resistance)-genes for rice improvement. Rice sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, and leaf blast, caused by Magnaporthe grisea, are major fungal diseases of cultivated rice (O. sativa) in the USA and of irrigated rice world...

  13. Preferential Association of Endophytic Bradyrhizobia with Different Rice Cultivars and Its Implications for Rice Endophyte Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Piromyou, Pongdet; Greetatorn, Teerana; Teamtisong, Kamonluck; Okubo, Takashi; Shinoda, Ryo; Nuntakij, Achara; Tittabutr, Panlada; Boonkerd, Nantakorn

    2015-01-01

    Plant colonization by bradyrhizobia is found not only in leguminous plants but also in nonleguminous species such as rice. To understand the evolution of the endophytic symbiosis of bradyrhizobia, the effect of the ecosystems of rice plantations on their associations was investigated. Samples were collected from various rice (Oryza sativa) tissues and crop rotational systems. The rice endophytic bradyrhizobia were isolated on the basis of oligotrophic properties, selective medium, and nodulation on siratro (Macroptilium atropurpureum). Six bradyrhizobial strains were obtained exclusively from rice grown in a crop rotational system. The isolates were separated into photosynthetic bradyrhizobia (PB) and nonphotosynthetic bradyrhizobia (non-PB). Thai bradyrhizobial strains promoted rice growth of Thai rice cultivars better than the Japanese bradyrhizobial strains. This implies that the rice cultivars possess characteristics that govern rice-bacterium associations. To examine whether leguminous plants in a rice plantation system support the persistence of rice endophytic bradyrhizobia, isolates were tested for legume nodulation. All PB strains formed symbioses with Aeschynomene indica and Aeschynomene evenia. On the other hand, non-PB strains were able to nodulate Aeschynomene americana, Vigna radiata, and M. atropurpureum but unable to nodulate either A. indica or A. evenia. Interestingly, the nodABC genes of all of these bradyrhizobial strains seem to exhibit low levels of similarity to those of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens USDA110 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS285. From these results, we discuss the evolution of the plant-bradyrhizobium association, including nonlegumes, in terms of photosynthetic lifestyle and nod-independent interactions. PMID:25710371

  14. Identification and Comparative Expression Profiles of Chemoreception Genes Revealed from Major Chemoreception Organs of the Rice Leaf Folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fang-Fang; Zhao, Zhen-Fei; Yan, Miao-Jun; Zhou, Wen; Zhang, Zan; Zhang, Aijun; Lu, Zhong-Xian; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the olfactory mechanisms in the rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée), a serious pest of rice in Asia, we established six partial transcriptomes from antennae, protarsus, and reproductive organs of male and female adults. A total of 102 transcripts were identified, including 29 odorant receptors (ORs), 15 ionotropic receptors (IRs), 30 odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), 26 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), and 2 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs). The expression patterns of these genes were calculated by fragments per kilobase of exon per million fragments mapped (FPKM) and validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Some transcripts were exclusively expressed in specific organs, such as female protarsus, whereas others were universally expressed, this varied expression profile may provide insights into the specific functions mediated by chemoreception proteins in insects. To the best of our knowledge, among the 102 identified transcripts, 81 are novel and have never been reported before. In addition, it also is the first time that ORs and IRs are identified in C. medinalis. Our findings significantly enhance the currently limited understanding olfactory mechanisms of the olfactory mechanisms underlying the chemoreception system in C. medinalis. PMID:26657286

  15. Impact of six transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis rice lines on four nontarget thrips species attacking rice panicles in the paddy field.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Z R; Tian, J C; Chen, Y; Fang, Q; Hu, C; Peng, Y F; Ye, G Y

    2013-02-01

    As a key component of ecological risk assessments, nontarget effects of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) rice have been tested under laboratory and field conditions for various organisms. A 2-yr field experiment was conducted to observe the nontarget effects of six transgenic rice lines (expressing the Cry1Ab or fused protein of Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac) on four nontarget thrips species including Frankliniella intonsa (Trybom), F. tenuicornis (Uzel), Haplothrips aculeatus (F.), and H. tritici (Kurd), as compared with their rice parental control lines. Two sampling methods including the beat plate and plastic bag method were used to monitor the population densities of the four thrips species for 2 yr. The results showed that the seasonal average densities of four tested thrips species in Bt rice plots were significantly lower than or very similar to those in the non-Bt rice plots depending on rice genotypes, sampling methods, and years. Among all six tested Bt rice lines, transgenic B1 and KMD2 lines suppressed the population of these tested thrips species the most. Our results indicate that the tested Bt rice lines are unlikely to result in high population pressure of thrips species in comparison with non-Bt rice. In some cases, Bt rice lines could significantly suppress thrips populations in the rice ecosystem. In addition, compatibility of Bt rice, with rice host plant resistance to nontarget sucking pests is also discussed within an overall integrated pest management program for rice. PMID:23339799

  16. Development of genetic and molecular toolboxes to control both rice blast and sheath blight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast and sheath blight diseases are the two major constraints for stable rice production in the Southern USA. New genetic and molecular tool boxes have been developed at the USDA-ARS Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center. Resistance (major and minor) genes from rice have been identified...

  17. From QTL to variety-harnessing the benefits of QTLs for drought, flood and salt tolerance in mega rice varieties of India through a multi-institutional network.

    PubMed

    Singh, Renu; Singh, Yashi; Xalaxo, Suchit; Verulkar, S; Yadav, Neera; Singh, Shweta; Singh, Nisha; Prasad, K S N; Kondayya, K; Rao, P V Ramana; Rani, M Girija; Anuradha, T; Suraynarayana, Y; Sharma, P C; Krishnamurthy, S L; Sharma, S K; Dwivedi, J L; Singh, A K; Singh, P K; Nilanjay; Singh, N K; Kumar, Rajesh; Chetia, S K; Ahmad, T; Rai, M; Perraju, P; Pande, Anita; Singh, D N; Mandal, N P; Reddy, J N; Singh, O N; Katara, J L; Marandi, B; Swain, P; Sarkar, R K; Singh, D P; Mohapatra, T; Padmawathi, G; Ram, T; Kathiresan, R M; Paramsivam, K; Nadarajan, S; Thirumeni, S; Nagarajan, M; Singh, A K; Vikram, Prashant; Kumar, Arvind; Septiningshih, E; Singh, U S; Ismail, A M; Mackill, D; Singh, Nagendra K

    2016-01-01

    Rice is a staple cereal of India cultivated in about 43.5Mha area but with relatively low average productivity. Abiotic factors like drought, flood and salinity affect rice production adversely in more than 50% of this area. Breeding rice varieties with inbuilt tolerance to these stresses offers an economically viable and sustainable option to improve rice productivity. Availability of high quality reference genome sequence of rice, knowledge of exact position of genes/QTLs governing tolerance to abiotic stresses and availability of DNA markers linked to these traits has opened up opportunities for breeders to transfer the favorable alleles into widely grown rice varieties through marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB). A large multi-institutional project, "From QTL to variety: marker-assisted breeding of abiotic stress tolerant rice varieties with major QTLs for drought, submergence and salt tolerance" was initiated in 2010 with funding support from Department of Biotechnology, Government of India, in collaboration with International Rice Research Institute, Philippines. The main focus of this project is to improve rice productivity in the fragile ecosystems of eastern, northeastern and southern part of the country, which bear the brunt of one or the other abiotic stresses frequently. Seven consistent QTLs for grain yield under drought, namely, qDTY1.1, qDTY2.1, qDTY2.2, qDTY3.1, qDTY3.2, qDTY9.1 and qDTY12.1 are being transferred into submergence tolerant versions of three high yielding mega rice varieties, Swarna-Sub1, Samba Mahsuri-Sub1 and IR 64-Sub1. To address the problem of complete submergence due to flash floods in the major river basins, the Sub1 gene is being transferred into ten highly popular locally adapted rice varieties namely, ADT 39, ADT 46, Bahadur, HUR 105, MTU 1075, Pooja, Pratikshya, Rajendra Mahsuri, Ranjit, and Sarjoo 52. Further, to address the problem of soil salinity, Saltol, a major QTL for salt tolerance is being transferred into seven popular locally adapted rice varieties, namely, ADT 45, CR 1009, Gayatri, MTU 1010, PR 114, Pusa 44 and Sarjoo 52. Genotypic background selection is being done after BC2F2 stage using an in-house designed 50K SNP chip on a set of twenty lines for each combination, identified with phenotypic similarity in the field to the recipient parent. Near-isogenic lines with more than 90% similarity to the recipient parent are now in advanced generation field trials. These climate smart varieties are expected to improve rice productivity in the adverse ecologies and contribute to the farmer's livelihood. PMID:26566845

  18. MODELING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM RICE-BASED PRODUCTION SYSTEMS: SENSITIVITY AND UPSCALING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A biogeochemical model, Denitrification-Decomposition (DNDC), was modified to enhance its capacity of predicting greenhouse gas emissions from paddy rice ecosystems. The modifications focused on soil redox potential dynamics, paddy rice management, and rice development and growth. The new model was ...

  19. Rice Varieties. 

    E-print Network

    Hodges, R. J.; Bollich, C. N.; Marchetti, M. A.; Webb, B. D.

    1979-01-01

    Detinl' ~: .. ! i ... r-'~ .:~~. ~.i.: ,", I." "' . :,::." ,; 0'. '.~, " -- R. J. Hodges, C. N. Bollich, M. A. Marchetti and B. D. Webb* Cultivated varieties of rice belong to the genus Oryza L., tribe Oryzeae and family Gramineae. Most cultivated... for 20 years or more. All rice varieties grown in the United States are in the species O. sativa L. Commercial varieties are classified according to length of growing season, size and shape of grain and chemical character of the endosperm. Based...

  20. A method for the molecular characterization of rice starch using an aqueous HPSEC-MALLS-RI system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice starch composes approximately 90% of milled rice. It is made up of two major glucose polymers, amylose and amylopectin. The amylose content of rice starch ranges from 0 to 30% w/w. Cooked rice texture and rice starch functional properties are reported to be primarily impacted by amylose content...

  1. Identification of greenhouse gas hot-spots and predicting district-wise GHG Intensities in rice based crop rotations in India using DNDC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeluripati, J. B.; Frolking, S. E.; Li, C.; Nayak, D. R.; Adhya, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    Indian scientific research on rice cultivation has been targeted primarily at enhancing crop productivity for the wide range of soil and climate conditions across India. With the understanding that rice paddies are major source of atmospheric CH4 and N2O, there is a need for careful evaluation of the source strength of this ecosystem, and the influence of soil, water and crop management practices on both CH4 and N2O fluxes. A major challenge in meeting this objective lies in reducing the large uncertainties associated with regional and global level estimates of GHG emissions. Process-based biogeochemical models like DNDC (Denitrification and Decomposition model) can provide important insights into how agricultural management of rice paddies influences water resources, yields and greenhouse gas emissions. To quantify the CH4 and N2­O emissions from rice based crop rotations of India, DNDC model was modified, calibrated and evaluated at different sites across India. The observed N uptake, yields, CH4 and N2O emissions were in agreement with the values predicted by the model. To drive the model across India, a unique database was prepared combining soil/climate/landuse and management information. By linking the spatial database to DNDC, CH4 and N2O emissions from Indian rice based crop rotations for the rice growing season in the year 2000 were simulated on day-by-day basis. CH4 and N2O emissions from rice paddies in India from rice based-growing season were estimated to be 3.8 and 0.1 - 0.08 Tg (1 Tg = 1012 gm). Of the total CH4 emissions 30.6% (1.2 Tg) is emitted from single irrigated rice. 30.0% (1.1 Tg) and 14.46%(0.56 Tg) of total CH4 is emitted from double rice and single rainfed rice cropping system. 32.9% (33.16 Gg) of the total N2O emissions is emitted by upland rice followed by Single rainfed rice cropping system which emits about 19.9%(20.06 Gg) of total N2O . This paper presents a framework on GIS databases and a process-based biogeochemical model for estimation of greenhouse gas emissions from Indian based crop rotations.

  2. Thermomechanical property of rice kernels studied by DMA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The thermomechanical property of the rice kernels was investigated using a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). The length change of rice kernel with a loaded constant force along the major axis direction was detected during temperature scanning. The thermomechanical transition occurred in rice kernel...

  3. Test of Some Hybrid Combinations to Rice Blast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. Blast resistant cultivars are recognized as the most efficacious and economical way to control this disease. Genetic resistance to rice blast is generally governed by a few major genes, often in c...

  4. MAPPING R-GENES IN RICE WILD RELATIVES (ORYZA SPP.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn and leaf blast caused by Magnaporthe grisea (T.T. Herbert) Yaegashi & Udagawa are major fungal diseases of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) are the source of several resistance (R-) genes including those for bla...

  5. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 4 

    E-print Network

    2003-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas June 2003 Volume III Number 4 Texas Rice Rice Diseases Around the World Over 70 plant diseases have been found to affect rice in coun- tries around... the world, with around 25 found in the U.S. For the southern rice belt, blast and sheath blight are obviously major concerns, followed by stem rot, brown spot, narrow brown spot and kernel smut. For areas that are water seeded, seedling blight and water mold...

  6. Approaches to eliminating arsenic hazards in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arsenic (As), which is toxic to plants and animals, is especially problematic to rice since the predominant As species are more soluble and more bioavailable under the reduced conditions of flooded rice culture. Two major problems have received international attention in efforts to minimize potentia...

  7. Water pollution is a major environmental issue Pollutants entering aquatic ecosystems accumulate in sediments and concentrate up the food chain. A good knowledge of the processes controlling the

    E-print Network

    at the surface of substrates in aquatic environments) has excellent potential as a bio-indicator of contamination Human activities disturb the natural biogeochemical cycles of elements in ecosystems. These disturbances of the elements (natural or anthropogenic), quantify their distribution in the sediment column, and reconstruct

  8. Opportunities for the development of rice blast resistant cultivars/germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast is the most serious rice disease in the USA. Both conventional and novel strategies for the development of resistant rice cultivars/germplasm have been employed in the U.S. rice breeding programs. The objectives are to develop molecular markers for stacking major resistance genes into i...

  9. GENETIC ANALYSIS AND RECIPROCAL OUTCROSSING RATES OF RED RICE TYPES IN ARKANSAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice is a severe weed problem in Arkansas rice fields and can intercross at low rates with rice. Using DNA marker analysis and visual observation, red rice accessions obtained from across Arkansas clearly clustered into major groups of awned and awnless types, which were easily distinguishable f...

  10. Confirming QTLs and finding additional Loci responsible for resistance to Sheath Blight in Rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most destructive diseases of rice around the globe, causing severe losses in rice yield and quality annually. Major genes governing resistance to ShB have not been found in cultivated rice worldwide; however...

  11. Avian foods, foraging and habitat conservation in world rice fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, J.D.; Kaminski, R.M.; Reinecke, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, rice (Oryza sativa) agriculture typically involves seasonal flooding and soil tillage, which provides a variety of microhabitats and potential food for birds. Water management in rice fields creates conditions ranging from saturated mud flats to shallow (<30 cm) water, thereby attracting different guilds of birds. Grain not collected during harvest (i.e. waste rice) is typically the most abundant potential food of birds in rice fields, with estimates of seed mass from North America ranging from 66672 kg/ha. Although initially abundant after harvest, waste rice availability can be temporally limited. Few abundance estimates for other foods, such as vertebrate prey or forage vegetation, exist for rice fields. Outside North America, Europe and Japan, little is known about abundance and importance of any avian food in rice fields. Currently, flooding rice fields after harvest is the best known management practice to attract and benefit birds. Studies from North America indicate specific agricultural practices (e.g. burning stubble) may increase use and improve access to food resources. Evaluating and implementing management practices that are ecologically sustainable, increase food for birds and are agronomically beneficial should be global priorities to integrate rice production and avian conservation. Finally, land area devoted to rice agriculture appears to be stable in the USA, declining in China, and largely unquantified in many regions. Monitoring trends in riceland area may provide information to guide avian conservation planning in rice-agriculture ecosystems.

  12. STUDENTS ONLY RICE UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Aazhang, Behnaam

    STUDENTS ONLY RICE UNIVERSITY AUTHORIZATION FOR AUTOMATIC DEPOSITS Name:______________________________________ Student ID #:________________________ I hereby authorize Rice University to initiate credit entries and days' written notification of termination from Rice University. You will need official bank

  13. Characterization of rice blast resistance gene Pi61(t) in rice germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of resistance (R) genes to races of Magnaporthe oryzae in rice germplasm is essential for the development of rice cultivars with long lasting blast resistance. In the present study, one major quantitative trait locus, qPi93-3, was fine mapped using a recombinant inbred line (RIL), F8 ...

  14. RiceCAP: Mapping rice milling yield QTL in a U.S. long grain cross

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole grain milling yield is a major determinant of rice crop value. Because this trait is under quantitative inheritance and is sensitive to variation due to the production environment and post-harvest handling, it is difficult to improve. This study was conducted as part of the USDA NRI RiceCAP pr...

  15. Rice allergenic protein and molecular-genetic approach for hypoallergenic rice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, R; Matsuda, T

    1996-08-01

    Allergenic proteins with a molecular mass of about 14 to 16 kDa were isolated from a rice salt-soluble fraction based on the reactivity with IgE antibodies from patients allergic to rice. cDNA clones encoding these allergenic proteins were isolated from a cDNA library of maturing rice seeds, and the deduced amino acid sequences showed considerable similarity to wheat and barley alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitors, which have recently been identified as major allergens associated with baker's asthma. An antisense RNA strategy was applied to repress the allergen gene expression in maturing rice seeds. Immunoblotting and ELISA analyses of the seeds using a monoclonal antibody to a 16-kDa allergen showed that allergen content of seeds from several transgenic rice plants was markedly lower than that of the seeds from parental wild type rice. PMID:8987539

  16. Biology of rice bug Leptocorisa oratorius (Fabricius) (Hemiptera: Alydidae), population change and alternative host plants.

    PubMed

    Rattanapun, W

    2013-01-01

    Leptocorisa oratorius (Fabricius) (Hemiptera: Alydidae) is a major rice pest which feeds on the sap of stems and rice seeds. Some graminaceous weed species serve as an alternative host of L. oratorius causing outbreaks throughout the rice growing season. Population changes of L. oratorius during both rice growing seasons - wet-season rice and dry-season rice - including the influence of alternative host, barnyard grass Echinochloa crus-galli (Graminaceae) on the development of L. oratorius was studied. Results presented that L. oratorius was the dominant pest species during the late phase of rice growth. Adults of L. oratorius started their migrations to wet-season rice at the vegetative stage of rice growth, while they migrated to dry-season rice at the repropuctive stage of rice growth. Leptocorisa oratorius breds rapidly in rice fields. Meanwhile, other adults migrated to the rice field. The population of adults and nymphs significantly increased from the reproductive stage to grain formation and ripening stage in both rice growing seasons. The population of nymphs was greater than adults but not significantly different in their number of individuals. Leptocorisa oratorius had one generation in each rice growing season. The results of the host plant study indicated that L oratorius developed completely in barnyard grass E. crus-galli as well as rice Oriza sativa (Graminaceae). However, L. oratorius preferred rice to barnyard grass for feeding and oviposition. PMID:25145240

  17. VOLKAN CEVHER Rice University

    E-print Network

    Cevher, Volkan

    VOLKAN CEVHER Rice University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 6100 Main St, MS-380, Houston, TX 77005 Tel: (404) 387­0809, Fax: (713) 348­5685 E-mail: volkan@rice.edu, Web: http://dsp.rice and Electronics (valedictorian) POSITIONS 2007­present Postdoctoral Fellow Advisor: Richard G. Baraniuk Rice

  18. The impact of herbicide-resistant rice technology on phenotypic diversity and population structure of United States weedy rice.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Nilda Roma; Singh, Vijay; Tseng, Te Ming; Black, Howard; Young, Nelson D; Huang, Zhongyun; Hyma, Katie E; Gealy, David R; Caicedo, Ana L

    2014-11-01

    The use of herbicide-resistant (HR) Clearfield rice (Oryza sativa) to control weedy rice has increased in the past 12 years to constitute about 60% of rice acreage in Arkansas, where most U.S. rice is grown. To assess the impact of HR cultivated rice on the herbicide resistance and population structure of weedy rice, weedy samples were collected from commercial fields with a history of Clearfield rice. Panicles from each weedy type were harvested and tested for resistance to imazethapyr. The majority of plants sampled had at least 20% resistant offspring. These resistant weeds were 97 to 199 cm tall and initiated flowering from 78 to 128 d, generally later than recorded for accessions collected prior to the widespread use of Clearfield rice (i.e. historical accessions). Whereas the majority (70%) of historical accessions had straw-colored hulls, only 30% of contemporary HR weedy rice had straw-colored hulls. Analysis of genotyping-by-sequencing data showed that HR weeds were not genetically structured according to hull color, whereas historical weedy rice was separated into straw-hull and black-hull populations. A significant portion of the local rice crop genome was introgressed into HR weedy rice, which was rare in historical weedy accessions. Admixture analyses showed that HR weeds tend to possess crop haplotypes in the portion of chromosome 2 containing the ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE gene, which confers herbicide resistance to Clearfield rice. Thus, U.S. HR weedy rice is a distinct population relative to historical weedy rice and shows modifications in morphology and phenology that are relevant to weed management. PMID:25122473

  19. Identification of Sheath Blight Resistance QTLs in Rice Using Recombinant Inbred Line Population of Lemont X Jasmine 85

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight (RSB) caused by the soil borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most destructive diseases of rice around the globe, causing severe losses in rice yield and quality annually. Major gene(s) governing the resistance to RSB have not been found in cultivated rice worldwide...

  20. Copyright 2002 by the Genetics Society of America Molecular Evidence on the Origin and Evolution of Glutinous Rice

    E-print Network

    Purugganan, Michael D.

    of Glutinous Rice Kenneth M. Olsen1 and Michael D. Purugganan Department of Genetics, North Carolina State, 2002 ABSTRACT Glutinous rice is a major type of cultivated rice with long-standing cultural importance that the origin of glutinous rice is associated with reduced genetic variation characteristic of selection

  1. Hang.Yu@rice.edu lzhong@rice.edu

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Lin

    Hang Yu Hang.Yu@rice.edu Lin Zhong lzhong@rice.edu Ashutosh Sabharwal ashu@rice.edu Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 All current mobile devices are omni

  2. Creation of transgenic rice plants producing small interfering RNA of Rice tungro spherical virus.

    PubMed

    Le, Dung Tien; Chu, Ha Duc; Sasaya, Takahide

    2015-01-01

    Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV), also known as Rice waika virus, does not cause visible symptoms in infected rice plants. However, the virus plays a critical role in spreading Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV), which is the major cause of severe symptoms of rice tungro disease. Recent studies showed that RNA interference (RNAi) can be used to develop virus-resistance transgenic rice plants. In this report, we presented simple procedures and protocols needed for the creation of transgenic rice plants capable of producing small interfering RNA specific against RTSV sequences. Notably, our study showed that 60 out of 64 individual hygromycin-resistant lines (putative transgenic lines) obtained through transformation carried transgenes designed for producing hairpin double-stranded RNA. Northern blot analyses revealed the presence of small interfering RNA of 21- to 24-mer in 46 out of 56 confirmed transgenic lines. Taken together, our study indicated that transgenic rice plants carrying an inverted repeat of 500-bp fragments encoding various proteins of RTSV can produce small interfering RNA from the hairpin RNA transcribed from that transgene. In light of recent studies with other viruses, it is possible that some of these transgenic rice lines might be resistant to RTSV. PMID:25984767

  3. In vitro digestibility and physicochemical properties of milled rice.

    PubMed

    Dhital, Sushil; Dabit, Laura; Zhang, Bin; Flanagan, Bernadine; Shrestha, Ashok K

    2015-04-01

    Rice is a staple diet as well as a major ingredient in many processed foods. The physicochemical and supra-molecular structure of eight rice varieties with amylose content from 9% to 19% were studied to elucidate the factors responsible for variation in enzymatic digestibility of raw and cooked rice. Parboiled rice had a digestion rate coefficient almost 4.5 times higher than the least digestible Low GI rice. The rate coefficient was found to be independent of helical structure and long range molecular order, possibly attributed to the effect of rice flour architecture. Strong swelling and pasting behaviour and lower gelatinisation temperature were linked with apparently higher in vitro digestibility but the relationship was statistically insignificant. It is concluded that the enzymatic susceptibility of rice flours are independent of supra-molecular structure and are most likely controlled by external factors not limited to particle size, presence of intact cell wall and other non-starch polymers. PMID:25442617

  4. Ecosystem Journalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Amy; Mahlin, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    If the organisms in a prairie ecosystem created a newspaper, what would it look like? What important news topics of the ecosystem would the organisms want to discuss? Imaginative and enthusiastic third-grade students were busy pondering these questions as they tried their hands at "ecosystem journalism." The class had recently completed a study of…

  5. Natural ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleishman, Erica; Belnap, Jayne; Cobb, Neil; Enquist, Carolyn A.F.; Ford, Karl; MacDonald, Glen; Pellant, Mike; Schoennagel, Tania; Schmit, Lara M.; Schwartz, Mark; van Drunick, Suzanne; Westerling, Anthony LeRoy; Keyser, Alisa; Lucas, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Natural Ecosystems analyzes the association of observed changes in climate with changes in the geographic distributions and phenology (the timing of blossoms or migrations of birds) for Southwestern ecosystems and their species, portraying ecosystem disturbances—such as wildfires and outbreaks of forest pathogens—and carbon storage and release, in relation to climate change.

  6. Ecosystem Jenga!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umphlett, Natalie; Brosius, Tierney; Laungani, Ramesh; Rousseau, Joe; Leslie-Pelecky, Diandra L.

    2009-01-01

    To give students a tangible model of an ecosystem and have them experience what could happen if a component of that ecosystem were removed; the authors developed a hands-on, inquiry-based activity that visually demonstrates the concept of a delicately balanced ecosystem through a modification of the popular game Jenga. This activity can be…

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF WEEDY RICE POPULATIONS IN THE SOUTHERN U.S. AND THEIR GENE FLOW INTERACTIONS WITH RICE USING DNA MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy (red) rice (Oryza sativa) is a major weed problem in rice (Oryza sativa) in the southern US. Outcrossing between these plant types can lead to gene flow that negatively impacts the rice industry. We have been using SSR molecular marker analysis in combination with phenotypic traits to systema...

  8. The Interaction of Propanil+Thiobencarb with Imazethapyr and Imazamox for Enhanced Red Rice (Oryza spp.) Control in Imidazolinone-Tolerant Rice (Oryza sativa L.) 

    E-print Network

    Jones, Trevor Nelson

    2014-04-28

    OF PROPANIL+THIOBENCARB WITH IMAZETHAPYR AND IMAZAMOX FOR ENHANCED RED RICE (Oryza spp.) CONTROL IN IMIDAZOLINONE-TOLERANT RICE (Oryza sativa L.) A Thesis by TREVOR NELSON JONES Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas... intervals following application to red rice plants……….……………..….....42 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is an important cereal grain and major staple for over 50% of the world’s population (Snyder and Slaton, 2002...

  9. Direct and reverse pollen-mediated gene flow between GM rice and red rice weed

    PubMed Central

    Serrat, X.; Esteban, R.; Peñas, G.; Català, M. M.; Melé, E.; Messeguer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Potential risks of genetically modified (GM) crops must be identified before their commercialization, as happens with all new technologies. One of the major concerns is the proper risk assessment of adventitious presence of transgenic material in rice fields due to cross-pollination. Several studies have been conducted in order to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow from transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) to both conventional rice and red rice weed (O. sativa f. spontanea) under field conditions. Some of these studies reported GM pollen-donor rice transferring GM traits to red rice. However, gene flow also occurs in the opposite direction, in a phenomenon that we have called reverse gene flow, resulting in transgenic seeds that have incorporated the traits of wild red rice. We quantified reverse gene flow using material from two field trials. A molecular analysis based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms was carried out, being complemented with a phenotypic identification of red rice traits. In both field trials, the reverse gene flow detected was greater than the direct gene flow. The rate of direct gene flow varied according to the relative proportions of the donor (GM rice) and receptor (red rice) plants and was influenced by wind direction. The ecological impact of reverse gene flow is limited in comparison with that of direct gene flow because non-shattered and non-dormant seeds would be obtained in the first generation. Hybrid seed would remain in the spike and therefore most of it would be removed during harvesting. Nevertheless, this phenomenon must be considered in fields used for elite seed production and in developing countries where farmers often keep some seed for planting the following year. In these cases, there is a higher risk of GM red rice weed infestation increasing from year to year and therefore a proper monitoring plan needs to be established.

  10. Sample careers for majors The Career Center

    E-print Network

    that build a strong foundation in the physical and natural sciences. Courses in ecosystem science put Science & Sustainability ECOSYSTEM SCIENCE & SUSTAINABILITY ECOSYSTEM SCIENCE & SUSTAINABILITY For more will continue to grow. Students in our Ecosystem Science and Sustainability major learn to integrate science

  11. Tolerance of anaerobic conditions caused by flooding during germination and early growth in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Miro, Berta; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2013-01-01

    Rice is semi-aquatic, adapted to a wide range of hydrologies, from aerobic soils in uplands to anaerobic and flooded fields in waterlogged lowlands, to even deeply submerged soils in flood-prone areas. Considerable diversity is present in native rice landraces selected by farmers over centuries. Our understanding of the adaptive features of these landraces to native ecosystems has improved considerably over the recent past. In some cases, major genes associated with tolerance have been cloned, such as SUB1A that confers tolerance of complete submergence and SNORKEL genes that control plant elongation to escape deepwater. Modern rice varieties are sensitive to flooding during germination and early growth, a problem commonly encountered in rainfed areas, but few landraces capable of germination under these conditions have recently been identified, enabling research into tolerance mechanisms. Major QTLs were also identified, and are being targeted for molecular breeding and for cloning. Nevertheless, limited progress has been made in identifying regulatory processes for traits that are unique to tolerant genotypes, including faster germination and coleoptile elongation, formation of roots and leaves under hypoxia, ability to catabolize starch into simple sugars for subsequent use in glycolysis and fermentative pathways to generate energy. Here we discuss the state of knowledge on the role of the PDC-ALDH-ACS bypass and the ALDH enzyme as the likely candidates effective in tolerant rice genotypes. Potential involvement of factors such as cytoplasmic pH regulation, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species scavenging and other metabolites is also discussed. Further characterization of contrasting genotypes would help in elucidating the genetic and biochemical regulatory and signaling mechanisms associated with tolerance. This could facilitate breeding rice varieties suitable for direct seeding systems and guide efforts for improving waterlogging tolerance in other crops. PMID:23888162

  12. Relationship between grain yield and quality in rice germplasms grown across different growing areas

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Quan; Chen, Wenfu; Xu, Zhengjin

    2015-01-01

    Rice grain yield and quality are two major foci of rice breeding. In this study, Chinese regional rice test data provide us the unique opportunity to analyze the relationship between yield and quality in rice, because China has an unusually wide range of rice cultivars. We analyzed the relationships between grain yield, yield components, and grain quality of 300 rice germplasms. Japonica was superior in both yield and quality compared with indica. A high setting rate improved the head rice ratio. A higher 1000 grain weight was negatively correlated with quality characteristics but had a positive correlation with yield. A high spikelet density (number of grains per centimeter on the panicle) not only benefits the yield but also the head rice ratio and chalkiness traits. According to our results, global rice production can be increased to at least 8500 kg/ha to meet projected demands in 2025 without sacrificing grain quality. PMID:26175619

  13. Information Technology Rice University

    E-print Network

    Guerrini, Carla

    Information Technology Rice University Document UNIX 1 May 18, 1999 Introduction to the UNIX as an X display server, you may wish to acquire the document, UNIX 2, Introduction to X Windows. ©Rice without written permission from User Services, Rice University. #12;2 Introduction to the UNIX Operating

  14. RICE UNIVERSITY Houston, Texas

    E-print Network

    Pentus, Mati

    RICE UNIVERSITY Houston, Texas Hierarchical Attribute Grammars: Dialects, Applications and Evaluation Algorithms by Alan Carle carle@cs.rice.edu A Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Doctor of Philosophy May, 1992 Rice University Department of Computer Science

  15. The Recursion . . . Extended Rice . . .

    E-print Network

    Gallier, Jean

    The Recursion . . . Extended Rice . . . Creative and . . . Home Page Title Page Page 388 of 405 Go . . . Extended Rice . . . Creative and . . . Home Page Title Page Page 389 of 405 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit Rice . . . Creative and . . . Home Page Title Page Page 390 of 405 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit

  16. Speciation And Distribution Of Arsenic And Localization Of Nutrients In Rice Grains

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As) contamination of rice grains and the generally low concentration of micronutrients in rice have been recognized as a major concern for human health. Here, we investigated the speciation and localization of As and the distribution of (micro)nutrients in rice grains b...

  17. Effect of fertilizer source and rotation on grain quality in non-flooded rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water use is becoming a major issue in rice production. One way farmers are trying to conserve water is by growing rice in irrigated rows instead of permanent flooding. There is no information as to the affect that this management practice will have on rice grain quality. Also, urea which is used as...

  18. Finding high yield genes in weedy red rice to improve new cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice (Oryza rufipogon) is a weedy, wild relative of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) that is considered a major pest in rice production fields. However, researchers have found that it can be a valuable source of disease and insect resistance genes. Researchers with USDA ARS and Cornell University ...

  19. Variations in bran carotenoids levels within and between rice subgroups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a major grain in the human diet and carotenoids are valuable antioxidants. However, little is known about varietal differences in the carotenoid contents of the rice bran. The objective of this study is to determine the relative differences in bran carotenoid levels among...

  20. EVALUATING RICE WILDE RELATIVES (ORYZA SPP.) FOR DISEASE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) are an important source of novel pest resistance genes, as well as tolerance to abiotic stresses and yield enhancing traits. Rice sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn and leaf blast, Magnaporthe grisea (T.T. Herbert) Yaegashi & Udagawa, are major fungal d...

  1. RICE GERMPLASM CHARACTERIZED FOR R-GENES AND POPULATION STRUCTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the USA, newly introduced rice germplasm is one source of novel resistance genes to blast, Magnaporthe grisea, and sheath blight, Rhizoctonia solani, major fungal diseases of irrigated rice (Oryza sativa). Resistance to U.S. blast races was observed in 91 of approximately 1,000 newly introduced ...

  2. Microsatellite markers reveal multiple origins for Italian weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Annabelle; Fogliatto, Silvia; Nick, Peter; Ferrero, Aldo; Vidotto, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Weedy rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the major issues of rice cultivation worldwide. In Italy, it infests about 70% of the total rice area. Different Weedy Rice populations can be distinguished based on variable morphological and physiological traits; however, little is known about genetic differentiation and origin of Italian weedy rice populations. The objective of this study was to genetically and morphologically characterize and compare different Italian weedy rice populations selected on the basis of different phenotypes. The main Italian rice territory was divided into 10 geographical areas in which 40 weedy rice populations were collected and grouped according to the awn traits. All the individuals of the populations were morphologically characterized according to plant and seed traits. Genetic characterization was performed using 19 SSR markers on all the collected accessions, and several rice cultivars, including some very old (late 19th century), nowadays are no longer cultivated. ANOVA showed that morphological plant and seed traits were significantly affected by the collection area and awnedness group. The importance of the awn morphology was also reflected in the Bayesian clustering where, despite a relatively low genetic diversity, the clusters displayed different awn types. An UPGMA dendrogram confirmed the clusters detected in STRUCTURE analysis and also revealed a grouping of certain old cultivars with the weedy rice, suggesting a common origin. PMID:24363904

  3. Genome duplication improves rice root resistance to salt stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Salinity is a stressful environmental factor that limits the productivity of crop plants, and roots form the major interface between plants and various abiotic stresses. Rice is a salt-sensitive crop and its polyploid shows advantages in terms of stress resistance. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of genome duplication on rice root resistance to salt stress. Results Both diploid rice (HN2026-2x and Nipponbare-2x) and their corresponding tetraploid rice (HN2026-4x and Nipponbare-4x) were cultured in half-strength Murashige and Skoog medium with 150 mM NaCl for 3 and 5 days. Accumulations of proline, soluble sugar, malondialdehyde (MDA), Na+ content, H+ (proton) flux at root tips, and the microstructure and ultrastructure in rice roots were examined. We found that tetraploid rice showed less root growth inhibition, accumulated higher proline content and lower MDA content, and exhibited a higher frequency of normal epidermal cells than diploid rice. In addition, a protective gap appeared between the cortex and pericycle cells in tetraploid rice. Next, ultrastructural analysis showed that genome duplication improved membrane, organelle, and nuclei stability. Furthermore, Na+ in tetraploid rice roots significantly decreased while root tip H+ efflux in tetraploid rice significantly increased. Conclusions Our results suggest that genome duplication improves root resistance to salt stress, and that enhanced proton transport to the root surface may play a role in reducing Na+ entrance into the roots. PMID:25184027

  4. Development of practical diagnostic methods for monitoring rice bacterial panicle blight disease and evaluation of rice germplasm for resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was initiated to understand Burkholderia glumae, the major causal agent for bacterial panicle blight disease of rice; to develop practical diagnostic methods for monitoring the disease; and to evaluate rice germplasm for resistance. Burkholderia glumae was frequently isolated from infected p...

  5. Development of practical diagnostic methods for monitoring rice bacterial panicle blight disease and evaluation of rice germplasm for resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was initiated to understand Burkholderia glumae (major causal agent for bacterial panicle blight disease of rice) to develop practical diagnostic methods for monitoring the disease; and to evaluate rice germplasm for resistance. B. glumae was frequently isolated from symptomatic panicles on...

  6. Root-Derived Short-Chain Suberin Diacids from Rice and Rape Seed in a Paddy Soil under Rice Cultivar Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haishi; Ding, Yuanjun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Li, Lianqing; Zhang, Dengxiao; Li, Zichuan; Sun, Jingling; Lashari, Muhammad Siddique; Joseph, Stephen; Meng, Yuanduo; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Pan, Genxing

    2015-01-01

    Suberin-derived substituted fatty acids have been shown to be potential biomarkers for plant-derived carbon (C) in soils across ecosystems. Analyzing root derived suberin compounds bound in soil could help to understand the root input into a soil organic carbon pool. In this study, bound lipids were extracted and identified in root and topsoil samples. Short-chain suberin diacids were quantified under rice (Oryza sativa L.) and rape (Brassica campestris) rotations with different cultivar combinations in a Chinese rice paddy. After removal of free lipids with sequential extraction, the residual bound lipids were obtained with saponification and derivatization before analysis using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Diacids C16 and C18 in bound lipids were detected both in rice and rape root samples, while diacids C20 and C22 were detected only in rape root samples. Accordingly, diacids were quantified in both rhizosphere and bulk soil (0–15 cm). The amount of total root-derived diacids in bulk soil varied in a range of 5.6–9.6 mg/kg across growth stages and crop seasons. After one year-round rice-rape rotation, root-derived suberin diacids were maintained at a level of 7–9 mg/kg in bulk soil; this was higher under a super rice cultivar LY than under a hybrid cultivar IIY. While concentrations of the analyzed diacids were generally higher in rhizosphere than in bulk soil, the total diacid (DA) concentration was higher at the time of rape harvest than at rice harvest, suggesting that rape roots made a major contribution to the preservation of diacids in the paddy. Moreover, the net change in the concentration and the ratios of C16:0 DA to C18:1 DA, and of C16:0 DA to C18:0 DA, over a whole growing season, were greater under LY than under IIY, though there was no difference between cultivars within a single growth stage. Overall, total concentration of root-derived suberin diacids was found to be positively correlated to soil organic carbon concentration both for bulk soil and rhizosphere. However, the turnover and preservation of the root suberin biomolecules with soil property and field conditions deserve further field studies. PMID:25961557

  7. Root-Derived Short-Chain Suberin Diacids from Rice and Rape Seed in a Paddy Soil under Rice Cultivar Treatments.

    PubMed

    Ji, Haishi; Ding, Yuanjun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Li, Lianqing; Zhang, Dengxiao; Li, Zichuan; Sun, Jingling; Lashari, Muhammad Siddique; Joseph, Stephen; Meng, Yuanduo; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Pan, Genxing

    2015-01-01

    Suberin-derived substituted fatty acids have been shown to be potential biomarkers for plant-derived carbon (C) in soils across ecosystems. Analyzing root derived suberin compounds bound in soil could help to understand the root input into a soil organic carbon pool. In this study, bound lipids were extracted and identified in root and topsoil samples. Short-chain suberin diacids were quantified under rice (Oryza sativa L.) and rape (Brassica campestris) rotations with different cultivar combinations in a Chinese rice paddy. After removal of free lipids with sequential extraction, the residual bound lipids were obtained with saponification and derivatization before analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Diacids C16 and C18 in bound lipids were detected both in rice and rape root samples, while diacids C20 and C22 were detected only in rape root samples. Accordingly, diacids were quantified in both rhizosphere and bulk soil (0-15 cm). The amount of total root-derived diacids in bulk soil varied in a range of 5.6-9.6 mg/kg across growth stages and crop seasons. After one year-round rice-rape rotation, root-derived suberin diacids were maintained at a level of 7-9 mg/kg in bulk soil; this was higher under a super rice cultivar LY than under a hybrid cultivar IIY. While concentrations of the analyzed diacids were generally higher in rhizosphere than in bulk soil, the total diacid (DA) concentration was higher at the time of rape harvest than at rice harvest, suggesting that rape roots made a major contribution to the preservation of diacids in the paddy. Moreover, the net change in the concentration and the ratios of C16:0 DA to C18:1 DA, and of C16:0 DA to C18:0 DA, over a whole growing season, were greater under LY than under IIY, though there was no difference between cultivars within a single growth stage. Overall, total concentration of root-derived suberin diacids was found to be positively correlated to soil organic carbon concentration both for bulk soil and rhizosphere. However, the turnover and preservation of the root suberin biomolecules with soil property and field conditions deserve further field studies. PMID:25961557

  8. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for sheath blight resistance in rice using recombinant inbred line population of Lemont X Jasmine 85

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight (RSB) caused by the soil borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most destructive diseases of rice, causing severe losses in rice yield and quality annually. The major gene (s) governing the resistance to RSB have not been found in cultivated rice worldwide. However, ri...

  9. Shelf-sea ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J J

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

  10. AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS,

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic ecosystems are a vital part of the urban water cycle (and of urban areas more broadly), and, if healthy, provide a range of goods and services valued by humans (Meyer 1997). For example, aquatic ecosystems (e.g., rivers, lakes, wetlands) provide potable water, food resou...

  11. Genetic shift in local rice populations during rice breeding programs in the northern limit of rice cultivation in the world.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Kenji; Obara, Mari; Ikegaya, Tomohito; Tamura, Kenichi

    2015-09-01

    The rapid accumulation of pre-existing mutations may play major roles in the establishment and shaping of adaptability for local regions in current rice breeding programs. The cultivated rice, Oryza sativa L., which originated from tropical regions, is now grown worldwide due to the concerted efforts of breeding programs. However, the process of establishing local populations and their origins remain unclear. In the present study, we characterized DNA polymorphisms in the rice variety KITAAKE from Hokkaido, one of the northern limits of rice cultivation in the world. Indel polymorphisms were attributed to transposable element-like insertions, tandem duplications, and non-TE deletions as the original mutation events in the NIPPONBARE and KITAAKE genomes. The allele frequencies of the KITAAKE alleles markedly shifted to the current variety types among the local population from Hokkaido in the last two decades. The KITAAKE alleles widely distributed throughout wild rice and cultivated rice over the world. These have accumulated in the local population from Hokkaido via Japanese landraces as the ancestral population of Hokkaido. These results strongly suggested that combinations of pre-existing mutations played a role in the establishment of adaptability. This approach using the re-sequencing of local varieties in unique environmental conditions will be useful as a genetic resource in plant breeding programs in local regions. PMID:26021294

  12. Ethnobotanical investigation of 'wild' food plants used by rice farmers in Kalasin, Northeast Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Wild food plants are a critical component in the subsistence system of rice farmers in Northeast Thailand. One of the important characteristics of wild plant foods among farming households is that the main collection locations are increasingly from anthropogenic ecosystems such as agricultural areas rather than pristine ecosystems. This paper provides selected results from a study of wild food conducted in several villages in Northeast Thailand. A complete botanical inventory of wild food plants from these communities and surrounding areas is provided including their diversity of growth forms, the different anthropogenic locations were these species grow and the multiplicity of uses they have. Methods Data was collected using focus groups and key informant interviews with women locally recognized as knowledgeable about contemporarily gathered plants. Plant species were identified by local taxonomists. Results A total of 87 wild food plants, belonging to 47 families were reported, mainly trees, herbs (terrestrial and aquatic) and climbers. Rice fields constitute the most important growth location where 70% of the plants are found, followed by secondary woody areas and home gardens. The majority of species (80%) can be found in multiple growth locations, which is partly explained by villagers moving selected species from one place to another and engaging in different degrees of management. Wild food plants have multiple edible parts varying from reproductive structures to vegetative organs. More than two thirds of species are reported as having diverse additional uses and more than half of them are also regarded as medicine. Conclusions This study shows the remarkable importance of anthropogenic areas in providing wild food plants. This is reflected in the great diversity of species found, contributing to the food and nutritional security of rice farmers in Northeast Thailand. PMID:22067578

  13. Greatly Enhanced Arsenic Shoot Assimilation in Rice Leads to

    E-print Network

    Figuerola, Jordi

    compared to aerobic soils for barley and wheat. In rice, the export of As from the shoot to the grain regulation of shoot-to-grain export may occur in wheat and barley, but it was not detected at the shoot by As in the human food- chain needs to be considered in the context of anaerobic verses aerobic ecosystems

  14. [N2O and CH4 emission from Japan rice fields under different long-term fertilization patterns and its environmental impact].

    PubMed

    Luo, Liang-guo; Kondo, Motohiko; Itoh, Sumio

    2010-12-01

    This study intended to investigate the greenhouse gases emission from Japan single cropping paddy fields after 75-year continuous application of ammonium sulfate, composted rice straw with soybean cake, and fresh clover, as well as the environmental impact of the emission. During this long period, field management remained constant in terms of rice cultivation density, irrigation, and equivalent net N fertilization. No significant differences were observed in N2O emission among the fertilization treatments, but the CH4 emission differed significantly between organic amendment and ammonium sulfate application, indicating that long-term organic fertilization didn' t increase N2O emission but promoted CH4 emission. The cumulative global warming potential (GWP) of the CH4 and NO2O from the paddy ecosystem was the greatest (310.7 g CO2e x m(-2)) under fresh clover application, followed by composted rice straw plus soybean cake addition (151 g CO2e x m(-2)), and the least (60.6 g CO2e x m(-2)) under ammonium sulfate application. This study showed that for paddy system, it was CH4 instead of N2O the major factor affecting global warming, and thereby, to control and reduce the CH4 emission from paddy system would be the core in mitigating greenhouse gases emission from paddy field. Long-term consecutive application of composted rice straw plus soybean cake could increase soil organic matter, improve soil fertility, promote rice high-yielding, and as well, mitigate CH4 emission, being the recommendable paddy rice production mode in practice. PMID:21443009

  15. Inorganic arsenic in rice-based products for infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Signes-Pastor, Antonio J; Carey, Manus; Meharg, Andrew A

    2016-01-15

    Inorganic arsenic (Asi) is a chronic, non-threshold carcinogen. Rice and rice-based products can be the major source of Asi for many subpopulations. Baby rice, rice cereals and rice crackers are widely used to feed infants and young children. The Asi concentration in rice-based products may pose a health risk for infants and young children. Asi concentration was determined in rice-based products produced in the European Union and risk assessment associated with the consumption of these products by infants and young children, and compared to an identical US FDA survey. There are currently no European Union or United States of America regulations applicable to Asi in food. However, this study suggests that the samples evaluated may introduce significant concentration of Asi into infants' and young children's diets. Thus, there is an urgent need for regulatory limits on Asi in food, especially for baby rice-based products. PMID:26258711

  16. The use of rice seeds to produce human pharmaceuticals for oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Wakasa, Yuhya; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2013-10-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is the major staple food consumed by half of the world's population. Rice seeds have gained recent attention as bioreactors for the production of human pharmaceuticals such as therapeutic proteins or peptides. Rice seed production platforms have many advantages over animal cell or microbe systems in terms of cost-effectiveness, scalability, safety, product stability and productivity. Rice seed-based human pharmaceuticals are expected to become innovative therapies as edible drugs. Therapeutic proteins can be sequestered within natural cellular compartments in rice seeds and protected from harsh gastrointestinal environments. This review presents the state-of-the-art on the construction of gene cassettes for accumulation of pharmaceutical proteins or peptides in rice seeds, the generation of transgenic rice plants, and challenges involved in the use of rice seeds to produce human pharmaceuticals. PMID:24092672

  17. Air pollutant emissions from rice straw open field burning in India, Thailand and the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Gadde, Butchaiah; Bonnet, Sébastien; Menke, Christoph; Garivait, Savitri

    2009-05-01

    Rice is a widely grown crop in Asia. China (30%) and India (21%) contribute to about half of the world's total rice production. In this study, three major rice-producing countries in Asia are considered, India, Thailand and the Philippines (the later two contributing 4% and 2% of the world's rice production). Rice straw is one of the main field based residues produced along with this commodity and its applications vary widely in the region. Although rice production practises vary from one country to another, open burning of straw is a common practice in these countries. In this study, an approach was followed aiming at (a) determining the quantity of rice straw being subject to open field burning in those countries, (b) congregating pollutant specific emissions factors for rice straw burning, and (c) quantifying the resulting air pollutant emissions. Uncertainties in the results obtained as compared to a global approach are also discussed. PMID:19201513

  18. The Impact of Herbicide-Resistant Rice Technology on Phenotypic Diversity and Population Structure of United States Weedy Rice1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Nilda Roma; Singh, Vijay; Tseng, Te Ming; Black, Howard; Young, Nelson D.; Huang, Zhongyun; Hyma, Katie E.; Gealy, David R.; Caicedo, Ana L.

    2014-01-01

    The use of herbicide-resistant (HR) Clearfield rice (Oryza sativa) to control weedy rice has increased in the past 12 years to constitute about 60% of rice acreage in Arkansas, where most U.S. rice is grown. To assess the impact of HR cultivated rice on the herbicide resistance and population structure of weedy rice, weedy samples were collected from commercial fields with a history of Clearfield rice. Panicles from each weedy type were harvested and tested for resistance to imazethapyr. The majority of plants sampled had at least 20% resistant offspring. These resistant weeds were 97 to 199 cm tall and initiated flowering from 78 to 128 d, generally later than recorded for accessions collected prior to the widespread use of Clearfield rice (i.e. historical accessions). Whereas the majority (70%) of historical accessions had straw-colored hulls, only 30% of contemporary HR weedy rice had straw-colored hulls. Analysis of genotyping-by-sequencing data showed that HR weeds were not genetically structured according to hull color, whereas historical weedy rice was separated into straw-hull and black-hull populations. A significant portion of the local rice crop genome was introgressed into HR weedy rice, which was rare in historical weedy accessions. Admixture analyses showed that HR weeds tend to possess crop haplotypes in the portion of chromosome 2 containing the ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE gene, which confers herbicide resistance to Clearfield rice. Thus, U.S. HR weedy rice is a distinct population relative to historical weedy rice and shows modifications in morphology and phenology that are relevant to weed management. PMID:25122473

  19. Sprinkler Irrigation as an Energy and Water Saving Approach to Rice Production and Management of Riceland Pests 

    E-print Network

    McCauley, Gerry N.; Hossner, Lloyd R.; Nesmith, Douglas M.

    1985-01-01

    Rice is currently produced on approximately 400,000 acres in the Texas Coastal Prairie. This rice consumes 1.8 million acre-feet of water a year or 13 percent of Texas' renewable water resources. The Texas Coastal Prairie is a delicate ecosystem...

  20. QTL Analysis for Resistance to Blast Disease in U.S. Weedy Rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Qi, Xinshuai; Gealy, Dave R; Olsen, Kenneth M; Caicedo, Ana L; Jia, Yulin

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of adaptation is of great importance in evolutionary biology. U.S. weedy rice is well adapted to the local conditions in U.S. rice fields. Rice blast disease is one of the most destructive diseases of cultivated rice worldwide. However, information about resistance to blast in weedy rice is limited. Here, we evaluated the disease reactions of 60 U.S. weedy rice accessions with 14 blast races, and investigated the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with blast resistance in two major ecotypes of U.S. weedy rice. Our results revealed that U.S. weedy rice exhibited a broad resistance spectrum. Using genotyping by sequencing, we identified 28 resistance QTL in two U.S. weedy rice ecotypes. The resistance QTL with relatively large and small effects suggest that U.S. weedy rice groups have adapted to blast disease using two methods, both major resistance (R) genes and QTL. Three genomic loci shared by some of the resistance QTL indicated that these loci may contribute to no-race-specific resistance in weedy rice. Comparing with known blast disease R genes, we found that the R genes at these resistance QTL are novel, suggesting that U.S. weedy rice is a potential source of novel blast R genes for resistant breeding. PMID:25761210

  1. Rice antioxidants: phenolic acids, flavonoids, anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, tocopherols, tocotrienols, ?-oryzanol, and phytic acid

    PubMed Central

    Goufo, Piebiep; Trindade, Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggested that the low incidence of certain chronic diseases in rice-consuming regions of the world might be associated with the antioxidant compound contents of rice. The molecules with antioxidant activity contained in rice include phenolic acids, flavonoids, anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, tocopherols, tocotrienols, ?-oryzanol, and phytic acid. This review provides information on the contents of these compounds in rice using a food composition database built from compiling data from 316 papers. The database provides access to information that would have otherwise remained hidden in the literature. For example, among the four types of rice ranked by color, black rice varieties emerged as those exhibiting the highest antioxidant activities, followed by purple, red, and brown rice varieties. Furthermore, insoluble compounds appear to constitute the major fraction of phenolic acids and proanthocyanidins in rice, but not of flavonoids and anthocyanins. It is clear that to maximize the intake of antioxidant compounds, rice should be preferentially consumed in the form of bran or as whole grain. With respect to breeding, japonica rice varieties were found to be richer in antioxidant compounds compared with indica rice varieties. Overall, rice grain fractions appear to be rich sources of antioxidant compounds. However, on a whole grain basis and with the exception of ?-oryzanol and anthocyanins, the contents of antioxidants in other cereals appear to be higher than those in rice. PMID:24804068

  2. Legislation Affecting the Rice Industry, 1933-56. 

    E-print Network

    Kincannon, John A.

    1956-01-01

    stream_source_info Bull0839.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 58023 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Bull0839.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 * Legislation AffeGng the Rice... major legislation pertaining to rice since the 1933 Agriculture Adjust- ment Act. It cites the major legislative actions taken by the government toward establishing a level of income to rice producers commensurate with other commodities produced within...

  3. Diversity of Global Rice Markets and the Science Required for Consumer-Targeted Rice Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Calingacion, Mariafe; Laborte, Alice; Nelson, Andrew; Resurreccion, Adoracion; Concepcion, Jeanaflor Crystal; Daygon, Venea Dara; Mumm, Roland; Reinke, Russell; Dipti, Sharifa; Bassinello, Priscila Zaczuk; Manful, John; Sophany, Sakhan; Lara, Karla Cordero; Bao, Jinsong; Xie, Lihong; Loaiza, Katerine; El-hissewy, Ahmad; Gayin, Joseph; Sharma, Neerja; Rajeswari, Sivakami; Manonmani, Swaminathan; Rani, N. Shobha; Kota, Suneetha; Indrasari, Siti Dewi; Habibi, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Maryam; Tavasoli, Fatemeh; Suzuki, Keitaro; Umemoto, Takayuki; Boualaphanh, Chanthkone; Lee, Huei Hong; Hung, Yiu Pang; Ramli, Asfaliza; Aung, Pa Pa; Ahmad, Rauf; Wattoo, Javed Iqbal; Bandonill, Evelyn; Romero, Marissa; Brites, Carla Moita; Hafeel, Roshni; Lur, Huu-Sheng; Cheaupun, Kunya; Jongdee, Supanee; Blanco, Pedro; Bryant, Rolfe; Thi Lang, Nguyen; Hall, Robert D.; Fitzgerald, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    With the ever-increasing global demand for high quality rice in both local production regions and with Western consumers, we have a strong desire to understand better the importance of the different traits that make up the quality of the rice grain and obtain a full picture of rice quality demographics. Rice is by no means a ‘one size fits all’ crop. Regional preferences are not only striking, they drive the market and hence are of major economic importance in any rice breeding / improvement strategy. In this analysis, we have engaged local experts across the world to perform a full assessment of all the major rice quality trait characteristics and importantly, to determine how these are combined in the most preferred varieties for each of their regions. Physical as well as biochemical characteristics have been monitored and this has resulted in the identification of no less than 18 quality trait combinations. This complexity immediately reveals the extent of the specificity of consumer preference. Nevertheless, further assessment of these combinations at the variety level reveals that several groups still comprise varieties which consumers can readily identify as being different. This emphasises the shortcomings in the current tools we have available to assess rice quality and raises the issue of how we might correct for this in the future. Only with additional tools and research will we be able to define directed strategies for rice breeding which are able to combine important agronomic features with the demands of local consumers for specific quality attributes and hence, design new, improved crop varieties which will be awarded success in the global market. PMID:24454799

  4. Diversity of global rice markets and the science required for consumer-targeted rice breeding.

    PubMed

    Calingacion, Mariafe; Laborte, Alice; Nelson, Andrew; Resurreccion, Adoracion; Concepcion, Jeanaflor Crystal; Daygon, Venea Dara; Mumm, Roland; Reinke, Russell; Dipti, Sharifa; Bassinello, Priscila Zaczuk; Manful, John; Sophany, Sakhan; Lara, Karla Cordero; Bao, Jinsong; Xie, Lihong; Loaiza, Katerine; El-hissewy, Ahmad; Gayin, Joseph; Sharma, Neerja; Rajeswari, Sivakami; Manonmani, Swaminathan; Rani, N Shobha; Kota, Suneetha; Indrasari, Siti Dewi; Habibi, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Maryam; Tavasoli, Fatemeh; Suzuki, Keitaro; Umemoto, Takayuki; Boualaphanh, Chanthkone; Lee, Huei Hong; Hung, Yiu Pang; Ramli, Asfaliza; Aung, Pa Pa; Ahmad, Rauf; Wattoo, Javed Iqbal; Bandonill, Evelyn; Romero, Marissa; Brites, Carla Moita; Hafeel, Roshni; Lur, Huu-Sheng; Cheaupun, Kunya; Jongdee, Supanee; Blanco, Pedro; Bryant, Rolfe; Thi Lang, Nguyen; Hall, Robert D; Fitzgerald, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    With the ever-increasing global demand for high quality rice in both local production regions and with Western consumers, we have a strong desire to understand better the importance of the different traits that make up the quality of the rice grain and obtain a full picture of rice quality demographics. Rice is by no means a 'one size fits all' crop. Regional preferences are not only striking, they drive the market and hence are of major economic importance in any rice breeding / improvement strategy. In this analysis, we have engaged local experts across the world to perform a full assessment of all the major rice quality trait characteristics and importantly, to determine how these are combined in the most preferred varieties for each of their regions. Physical as well as biochemical characteristics have been monitored and this has resulted in the identification of no less than 18 quality trait combinations. This complexity immediately reveals the extent of the specificity of consumer preference. Nevertheless, further assessment of these combinations at the variety level reveals that several groups still comprise varieties which consumers can readily identify as being different. This emphasises the shortcomings in the current tools we have available to assess rice quality and raises the issue of how we might correct for this in the future. Only with additional tools and research will we be able to define directed strategies for rice breeding which are able to combine important agronomic features with the demands of local consumers for specific quality attributes and hence, design new, improved crop varieties which will be awarded success in the global market. PMID:24454799

  5. OWLnet: The Rice University Engineering Educational Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a computer network developed at the School of Engineering at Rice University which links users to a supporting mainframe and other major computing facilities, and creates an electronic studio for students. Topics discussed include network planning, design, and maintenance; software and courseware used; and implications for other academic…

  6. Global efforts in managing rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a major destructive disease threatening global food security. Resistance (R) genes to M. oryzae are effective in preventing infections by strains of M. oryzae carry the corresponding avirulence (AVR) genes. Effectiveness of genetic resist...

  7. Registration of 'Medark' Rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Medark’ rice is a high-yielding, early maturing, semidwarf, medium-grain cultivar. It originated from the cross ‘Bengal’/’Short Rico’ and is similar in maturity to Bengal. It has improved disease resistance to rice blase, brown spot and straighthead. Medark has a lodging resistance slightly less...

  8. Making rice even healthier!

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice is a naturally healthy food, but what if it could be made even healthier? Would Americans eat more rice if it could be advertised to be a 'New and Improved' source of calcium to promote bone growth, or iron to prevent anemia? Grocery stores are full of foods that are vitamin enhanced to attract...

  9. Registration of 'Cybonnet' Rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Cybonnet’ rice is a high-yielding, short-season, long-grain cultivar. It originated form the cross ‘Cypress’//’Newbonnet’/’Katy’ made at the University of Arkansas Rice Research and Extension Center in Stuttgart, AR. Cybonnet is similar in maturity to ‘Kaybonnet’ and ‘Wells’, is a simidwarf culti...

  10. Elemental-composition and plant-trait patterns in an ionomically and genetically diverse set of rice germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With about half of the worlds people dependent on rice as their main food source, improving the nutritional value of rice could have major impact on human health. The first step toward breeding rice cultivars with enhanced element composition (ionomics) is to understand the genetic diversity availab...

  11. Identification of rice blast resistant gene Pi-z(t) in NSGC using DNA markers and pathogenicity assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease, caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (formerly Magnaporthe grisea) is a major fungal disease threatening rice production worldwide. Genetic resistance in rice to M. oryzae typically belongs to a classic gene-for-gene system where a resistance (R) gene is effective in preventin...

  12. Rice blast disease in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice is an important agricultural commodity in Texas, with an economic impact of more than $1 billion annually. Rice blast, caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases in rice. Texas Rice Belt provides a warm, humid climate favorable for the infection and reproduction of M....

  13. Bioengineering nitrogen acquisition in rice

    E-print Network

    Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    Bioengineering nitrogen acquisition in rice: can novel initiatives in rice genomics and physiology to recombinant DNA technology. Here, we focus on the promise of these moderntechnologies inthe area of nitrogen acquisitionin rice, recognizing that nitrogen deficiency compromises the realization of rice yield potential

  14. The short and the long of it: SD1 polymorphism and the evolution of growth trait divergence in U.S. weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth related traits are thought to enhance competitiveness of agricultural weeds. U.S. weedy rice, a major conspecific weed of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa), displays variation for growth traits. Prior studies have shown that major U.S. weedy rice populations likely evolved from domesticated grou...

  15. Functional diversity of jasmonates in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Shumin; Sun, Ning; Liu, Hongyun; Zhao, Yanhong; Liang, Yuling; Zhang, Liping; Han, Yuanhuai

    2015-12-01

    Phytohormone jasmonates (JA) play essential roles in plants, such as regulating development and growth, responding to environmental changes, and resisting abiotic and biotic stresses. During signaling, JA interacts, either synergistically or antagonistically, with other hormones, such as salicylic acid (SA), gibberellin (GA), ethylene (ET), auxin, brassinosteroid (BR), and abscisic acid (ABA), to regulate gene expression in regulatory networks, conferring physiological and metabolic adjustments in plants. As an important staple crop, rice is a major nutritional source for human beings and feeds one third of the world's population. Recent years have seen significant progress in the understanding of the JA pathway in rice. In this review, we summarize the diverse functions of JA, and discuss the JA interplay with other hormones, as well as light, in this economically important crop. We believe that a better understanding of the JA pathway will lead to practical biotechnological applications in rice breeding and cultivation. PMID:26054241

  16. Developing rice mapping populations as a genetic resource for validation of GWAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian rice (Oryza sativa L.) is divided into two major subspecies, Indica and Japonica with the temperate and tropical japonica subpopulations being part of Japonica. These two subpopulations encompass the majority of the rice grown in the USA. Recently, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) iden...

  17. Physical and thermochemical properties of rice husk

    SciTech Connect

    Mansaray, K.G.; Ghaly, A.E.

    1997-11-01

    Rice husk a major by-product of the rice milling industry, is one of the most commonly available lignocellulosic materials that can be converted to different types of fuels and chemical feedstocks through a variety of thermochemical conversion processes. Proper understanding of the physical and thermochemical properties of rice husk is necessary for the design of thermochemical conversion systems. This study provides information on moisture content, bulk density, particle size, heating values, proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, ash composition, and ash fusibility characteristics for six rice husk varieties. The moisture content ranged from 8.68 to 10.44%, and the bulk density ranged from 86 to 114 kg/m{sup 3}. The results showed excessive volatile release of over 60%, high ash content ranging from 15.30 to 24.60% (dry weight basis), and high silica content of the ash ranging from 90 to 97%. The lower heating values ranged from 13.24 to 16.20 MJ/kg (dry weight basis). The ash fusion temperatures of all the varieties were found to be over 1,600 C. The differences in varietal characteristics have significant effects on the chemical properties of rice husk.

  18. Biofortification of rice with lysine using endogenous histones.

    PubMed

    Wong, H W; Liu, Q; Sun, S S M

    2015-02-01

    Rice is the most consumed cereal grain in the world, but deficient in the essential amino acid lysine. Therefore, people in developing countries with limited food diversity who rely on rice as their major food source may suffer from malnutrition. Biofortification of stable crops by genetic engineering provides a fast and sustainable method to solve this problem. In this study, two endogenous rice lysine-rich histone proteins, RLRH1 and RLRH2, were over-expressed in rice seeds to achieve lysine biofortification. Their protein sequences passed an allergic sequence-based homology test. Their accumulations in rice seeds were raised to a moderate level by the use of a modified rice glutelin 1 promoter with lowered expression strength to avoid the occurrence of physiological abnormalities like unfolded protein response. The expressed proteins were further targeted to protein storage vacuoles for stable storage using a glutelin 1 signal peptide. The lysine content in the transgenic rice seeds was enhanced by up to 35 %, while other essential amino acids remained balanced, meeting the nutritional standards of the World Health Organization. No obvious unfolded protein response was detected. Different degrees of chalkiness, however, were detected in the transgenic seeds, and were positively correlated with both the levels of accumulated protein and lysine enhancement. This study offered a solution to the lysine deficiency in rice, while at the same time addressing concerns about food safety and physiological abnormalities in biofortified crops. PMID:25512028

  19. Use of Amphibians as Indicators of Ecosystem Restoration Success1

    E-print Network

    Mazzotti, Frank

    CIR 1484 Use of Amphibians as Indicators of Ecosystem Restoration Success1 Ken G. Rice, Frank J. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension. Introduction There are 18 native amphibians in southern Florida (Figures 2 and 5). Amphibians are found in virtually all habitats from pine forests to sawgrass

  20. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â... classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice... the class Mixed Milled Rice. 5 For the special grade Undermilled milled rice, see § 868.315(d)....

  1. Impacts of climate change on rice yield: A comparison of four model performances

    SciTech Connect

    Bachelet, D.; Gay, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases are expected to modify temperature and rainfall the next 50-100 years. Mechanisms and hypotheses of plant response to these changes could be incorporated in models predicting crop yield estimates to better understand potential consequences of such changes. Asia is particularly important since demographic forecasts indicate rice supplies worldwide will need to increase by 1.6% annually to the year 2000 to match population growth estimates. The objectives of the paper are (1) review the major hypotheses and/or experimental results regarding rice sensitivity to climate change and (2) evaluate the suitability of existing rice models for assessing the impact of global climate change on rice production. A review of four physiologically-based rice models (RICEMOD, CERES-Rice, MACROS, RICESYS) illustrates their potential to predict rice responses to elevated CO2 and increased temperature.

  2. Evaluation of Environmental Quality Productive Ecosystem Guayas (Ecuador).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo, Wilson; Pardo, Francisco; Sanfeliu, Teófilo; Carrera, Gloria; Jordan, Manuel; Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria

    2015-04-01

    Natural resources are deteriorating very rapidly in the Gulf of Guayaquil and the area of influence in the Guayas Basin due to human activity. Specific problems are generated by the mismanagement of the aquaculture industry affecting the traditional agricultural sectors: rice, banana, sugarcane, cocoa, coffee, and soya also studied, and by human and industrial settlements. The development of industrial activities such as aquaculture (shrimp building for shrimp farming in ponds) and agriculture, have increasingly contributed to the generation of waste, degrading and potentially toxic elements in high concentrations, which can have adverse effects on organisms in the ecosystems, in the health of the population and damage the ecological and environmental balance. The productive Guayas ecosystem, consists of three interrelated ecosystems, the Gulf of Guayaquil, the Guayas River estuary and the Guayas Basin buffer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the environmental quality of the productive Guayas ecosystem (Ecuador), through operational and specific objectives: 1) Draw up the transition coastal zone in the Gulf of Guayaquil, 2) Set temporal spatial variability of soil salinity in wetlands rice, Lower Guayas Basin, 3) evaluate the heavy metals in wetland rice in the Lower Basin of Guayas. The physical and chemical parameters of the soils have been studied. These are indicators of environmental quality. The multivariate statistical method showed the relations of similarities and dissimilarities between variables and parameter studies as stable. Moreover, the boundaries of coastal transition areas, temporal spatial variability of soil salinity and heavy metals in rice cultivation in the Lower Basin of Guayas were researched. The sequential studies included and discussed represent a broad framework of fundamental issues that has been valued as a basic component of the productive Guayas ecosystem. They are determinants of the environmental quality of the Guayas productive ecosystem. Keyword: Evaluation, Environmental Quality, Productive Ecosystem

  3. Introducing non-flooded crops in rice-dominated landscapes: Impact on carbon, nitrogen and water budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauker, Frank; Wassmann, Reiner; Amelung, Wulf; Breuer, Lutz; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Conrad, Ralf; Ekschmitt, Klemens; Goldbach, Heiner; He, Yao; John, Katharina; Kiese, Ralf; Kraus, David; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara; Siemens, Jan; Weller, Sebastian; Wolters, Volkmar

    2013-04-01

    Rice production consumes about 30% of all freshwater used worldwide and 45% in Asia. Turning away from permanently flooded rice cropping systems for mitigating future water scarcity and reducing methane emissions, however, will alter a variety of ecosystem services with potential adverse effects to both the environment and agricultural production. Moreover, implementing systems that alternate between flooded and non-flooded crops increases the risk of disruptive effects. The multi-disciplinary DFG research unit ICON aims at exploring and quantifying the ecological consequences of altered water regimes (flooded vs. non-flooded), crop diversification (irrigated rice vs. aerobic rice vs. maize), and different fertilization strategies (conventional, site-specific, and zero N fertilization). ICON particularly focuses on the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nitrogen, green-house gas (GHG) emissions, water balance, soil biotic processes and other important ecosystem services. The overarching goal is to provide the basic process understanding that is necessary for balancing the revenues and environmental impacts of high-yield rice cropping systems while maintaining their vital ecosystem services. To this aim, a large-scale field experiment has been established at the experimental farm of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI, Philippines). Ultimately, the experimental results are analyzed in the context of management scenarios by an integrated modeling of crop development (ORYZA), carbon and nitrogen cycling (MoBiLE-DNDC), and water fluxes (CMF), providing the basis for developing pathways to a conversion of rice-based systems towards higher yield potentials under minimized environmental impacts. In our presentation, we demonstrate the set-up of the controlled large-scale field experiment for simultaneous assessment of carbon and nitrogen fluxes and water budgets. We show and discuss first results for: - Quantification and assessment of the net-fluxes of CH4, N2O and CO2 from rice-rice and rice-maize rotations. The conversion of flooded to non-flooded cropping systems resulted in pollution swapping of greenhouse gas emissions, shifting from CH4 under wet conditions to N2O under dry conditions. - Quantification and assessment of water budgets and nutrient loss in rice-rice and rice-maize rotations. Switching from rice-rice dominated growing systems to upland rice or maize-rice cropping systems resulted in reduced water use efficiency and increased nitrogen loss. - Quantification and assessment of soil functions affected by soil fauna community structure in flooded and non-flooded cropping rotations. In contrast to temperate soils, earthworms reduced the peaks of microbial C and N decomposition depending on soil water content.

  4. Characterization of rice blast resistance genes in rice germplasm with monogenic lines and pathogenicity assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) genes have been effectively deployed in preventing rice crop losses due to the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. In the present study, we studied the interaction between 24 monogenic lines carrying at least one major R gene, Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pi...

  5. Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 9, Winter Issue 

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas Winter 2002 Volume II Number 9 Texas Rice Texas Agricultural Statistics Service: Making Agriculture Count! continued on page 5 Texas Agricultural.... In ad- dition to the state level estimates, TASS also publishes county esti- mates for major commodities and produces an annual bulletin contain- ing statistics from the previous year for most commodities. The Rice Crop Statistics Report published from...

  6. Phenolic acids and antioxidant activities in husk of different Thai rice varieties.

    PubMed

    Butsat, S; Siriamornpun, S

    2010-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the free and bound phenolic acids as well as their antioxidant activities in husk of 12 Thai rice varieties consisting of pigmented rice and normal rice. The pigmented rice husk gave higher free total phenolic contents than normal rice husk. However, there was no significant difference in bound total phenolic contents between pigmented rice and normal rice husks. Ferulic and p-coumaric acids were the major phenolic acids in the free fraction of pigmented rice husks, whereas vanillic acid was the dominant phenolic acid in the free fraction of normal rice husks. On the other hand, p-coumaric acid was highly found in bound form of both pigmented and normal rice husks. The antioxidant activity of husk extracts was positively correlated with the total free phenolics content and individual of phenolic acids especially ferulic acid. On the basis of this study, it is suggested that the rice husk could be a potential phenolic acid source and may therefore offer an effective source of natural antioxidant. Our findings provide valuable information on phenolic acids composition and antioxidant activity of husk for further food application. PMID:21339150

  7. Mapping paddy rice distribution using multi-temporal Landsat imagery in the Sanjiang Plain, northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cui; Xiao, Xiangming; Dong, Jinwei; Qin, Yuanwei; Wang, Zongming

    2015-07-01

    Information of paddy rice distribution is essential for food production and methane emission calculation. Phenology-based algorithms have been utilized in the mapping of paddy rice fields by identifying the unique flooding and seedling transplanting phases using multi-temporal moderate resolution (500 m to 1 km) images. In this study, we developed simple algorithms to identify paddy rice at a fine resolution at the regional scale using multi-temporal Landsat imagery. Sixteen Landsat images from 2010-2012 were used to generate the 30 m paddy rice map in the Sanjiang Plain, northeast China—one of the major paddy rice cultivation regions in China. Three vegetation indices, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), and Land Surface Water Index (LSWI), were used to identify rice fields during the flooding/transplanting and ripening phases. The user and producer accuracies of paddy rice on the resultant Landsat-based paddy rice map were 90% and 94%, respectively. The Landsat-based paddy rice map was an improvement over the paddy rice layer on the National Land Cover Dataset, which was generated through visual interpretation and digitalization on the fine-resolution images. The agricultural census data substantially underreported paddy rice area, raising serious concern about its use for studies on food security.

  8. Population structure of putative rice-red rice hybrid derivatives in the Southern U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice and red rice can readily intercross in southern U.S. rice fields, however, the extent to which progeny of these rice-red rice hybrids may have successfully moved into red rice populations is unknown. Approximately 430 red rice accessions were obtained from farm samples in 1999 and 2000. Forty...

  9. Retrieving canopy height and density of paddy rice from Radarsat-2 images with a canopy scattering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Xiaohui; Su, Shiliang; Wang, Cuizhen

    2014-05-01

    Quantification of rice biophysical properties is important not only for rice growth monitoring and cropping management, but for understanding carbon cycle in agricultural ecosystems. In this study, a rice canopy scattering model (RCSM) was firstly utilized to simulate rice backscatter with a root mean square error (RMSE) <1 dB in comparison with the C-band, HH-polarization Radarsat-2 images. And then, by integrating the model with a generic algorithm optimization tools (GOAT), canopy height and density were separately retrieved from Radarsat-2 images acquired in three rice growth stages (elongation stage, heading stage and yellow ripening stage). Accuracy analysis showed that the two parameters could be retrieved with the RMSE of 5.4 cm in height, and 26 (#/m2) in density. The study demonstrated the potential of Radarsat-2 SAR data for quantitative mapping of biophysical parameters of paddy rice.

  10. 7 CFR 319.55a - Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam. 319.55a Section...Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam. Rice straw and rice hulls may be imported...

  11. Major depression

    MedlinePLUS

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... Ferri FF. Major depression. In: Ferri FF. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015.

  12. Rapid Recovery of Damaged Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Holly P.; Schmitz, Oswald J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent reports on the state of the global environment provide evidence that humankind is inflicting great damage to the very ecosystems that support human livelihoods. The reports further predict that ecosystems will take centuries to recover from damages if they recover at all. Accordingly, there is despair that we are passing on a legacy of irreparable damage to future generations which is entirely inconsistent with principles of sustainability. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested the prediction of irreparable harm using a synthesis of recovery times compiled from 240 independent studies reported in the scientific literature. We provide startling evidence that most ecosystems globally can, given human will, recover from very major perturbations on timescales of decades to half-centuries. Significance/Conclusions Accordingly, we find much hope that humankind can transition to more sustainable use of ecosystems. PMID:19471645

  13. Competitive N uptake between rice and weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy rice, red rice (Oryza sativa L.), is a serious problem in rice-producing areas of the southern U.S. and various regions worldwide. It competes for production inputs, increases weed control costs, reduces yield and grain quality, and could eliminate economic returns. Research was conducted to...

  14. Selenium characterization in the global rice supply chain.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paul N; Lombi, Enzo; Sun, Guo-Xin; Scheckel, Kirk; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Feng, Xinbin; Zhu, Jianming; Carey, Anne-Marie; Adomako, Eureka; Lawgali, Youseff; Deacon, Claire; Meharg, Andrew A

    2009-08-01

    For up to 1 billion people worldwide, insufficient dietary intake of selenium (Se) is a serious health constraint. Cereals are the dominant Se source for those on low protein diets, as typified by the global malnourished population. With crop Se content constrained largely by underlying geology, regional soil Se variations are often mirrored by their locally grown staples. Despite this, the Se concentrations of much of the world's rice, the mainstay of so many, is poorly characterized, for both total Se content and Se speciation. In this study, 1092 samples of market sourced polished rice were obtained. The sampled rice encompassed dominant rice producing and exporting countries. Rice from the U.S. and India were found to be the most enriched, while mean average levels were lowest in Egyptian rice: approximately 32-fold less than their North American equivalents. By weighting country averages by contribution to either global production or export, modeled baseline values for both were produced. Based on a daily rice consumption of 300 g day(-1), around 75% of the grains from the production and export pools would fail to provide 70% of daily recommended Se intakes. Furthermore, Se localization and speciation characterization using X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES) techniques were investigated in a Se-rich sample. The results revealed that the large majority of Se in the endosperm was present in organic forms. PMID:19731713

  15. Selenium Characterization in the Global Rice Supply Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul N.; Lombi, Enzo; Sun, Guo-Xin; Scheckel, Kirk; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Feng, Xinbin; Zhu, Jianming; Carey, Anne-Marie; Adomako, Eureka; Lawgali, Youseff; Deacon, Claire; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2009-08-13

    For up to 1 billion people worldwide, insufficient dietary intake of selenium (Se) is a serious health constraint. Cereals are the dominant Se source for those on low protein diets, as typified by the global malnourished population. With crop Se content constrained largely by underlying geology, regional soil Se variations are often mirrored by their locally grown staples. Despite this, the Se concentrations of much of the world's rice, the mainstay of so many, is poorly characterized, for both total Se content and Se speciation. In this study, 1092 samples of market sourced polished rice were obtained. The sampled rice encompassed dominant rice producing and exporting countries. Rice from the U.S. and India were found to be the most enriched, while mean average levels were lowest in Egyptian rice: {approx}32-fold less than their North American equivalents. By weighting country averages by contribution to either global production or export, modeled baseline values for both were produced. Based on a daily rice consumption of 300 g day{sup -1}, around 75% of the grains from the production and export pools would fail to provide 70% of daily recommended Se intakes. Furthermore, Se localization and speciation characterization using X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF) and X-ray absorption near edge structure ({mu}-XANES) techniques were investigated in a Se-rich sample. The results revealed that the large majority of Se in the endosperm was present in organic forms.

  16. RICE UNIVERSITY BEAMSWITCH: DIRECTIONAL TRANSMISSION

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Lin

    RICE UNIVERSITY BEAMSWITCH: DIRECTIONAL TRANSMISSION FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT WIRELESS COMMUNICATION guidance and support throughout my research and study at Rice. This work would not be possible without his

  17. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research 

    E-print Network

    2005-01-01

    Manipulation and Its Impact on Texas Rice Yield This study has the objective of understanding the role of su- crose hydrolysis, and the potential impact of its manipulation in commonly used rice varieties in Texas. We are looking at enzyme manipulation during... Rice Special Section Texas Rice Special Section - I Highlighting Research in 2005 Agronomic Management continued on next page Mike Jund, Research Associate and Darrell Hagler, Technician II, with recently retired Dr. Fred Turner (Center), Professor...

  18. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research 

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    Rice Special Section Texas Rice Special Section - I Highlighting Research in 2002 Dr. Fred Turner Dr. Turner’s Soil and Plant Nutrition Project evaluates main and ratoon crop yield and quality of potential Ark, La, Miss and Texas rice varieties as well... as herbicide resistant and hybrid rice varieties. The trials are planted on two different dates and at two locations having different soil types. They also test multiple plant populations and nitrogen rates. The data helps producers and consultants make...

  19. Chesapeake Bay: Introduction to an Ecosystem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the contiguous United States. The Bay and its tidal tributaries make up the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. This document, which focuses of various aspects of this ecosystem, is divided into four major parts. The first part traces the geologic history of the Bay, describes the overall physical structure of…

  20. ESRP approach to using final ecosystem services

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed the ecosystem Services Research Program (ESRP) as one of its major research efforts. The goal of this program is to create “A comprehensive theory and practice for quantifying ecosystem services so that their value and their...

  1. ECOSYSTEM HEALTH: ENERGY INDICATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Ecosystem Health and Ecological Integrity
    2. Historical Background on Ecosystem Health
    3. Energy Systems Analysis, Health and Emergy
    4. Energy and Ecosystems
    5. Direct Measures of Ecosystem Health
    6. Indirect Measures of Ecosystem Health

  2. Degradation of chlorpyrifos in tropical rice soils.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhasis; Adhya, Tapan K

    2015-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos [O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol) phosphorothioate] is used worldwide as an agricultural insecticide against a broad spectrum of insect pests of economically important crops including rice, and soil application to control termites. The insecticide mostly undergoes hydrolysis to diethyl thiophosphoric acid (DETP) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), and negligible amounts of other intermediate products. In a laboratory-cum-greenhouse study, chlorpyrifos, applied at a rate of 10 mg kg(-1) soil to five tropical rice soils of wide physico-chemical variability, degraded with a half-life ranging from 27.07 to 3.82 days. TCP was the major metabolite under both non-flooded and flooded conditions. Chlorpyrifos degradation had significant negative relationship with electrical conductivity (EC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), clay and sand contents of the soils under non-flooded conditions. Results indicate that degradation of chlorpyrifos was accelerated with increase in its application frequency, across the representative rice soils. Management regimes including moisture content and presence or absence of rice plants also influenced the process. Biotic factors also play an important role in the degradation of chlorpyrifos as demonstrated by its convincing degradation in mineral salts medium inoculated with non-sterile soil suspension. PMID:25617866

  3. Huajian Gao James R. Rice

    E-print Network

    Huajian Gao James R. Rice Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 02138 Shear Stress Intensity Factors for a Planar Crack With Slightly Curved Front Recent work (Rice, 1985a be found. Rice (1985a) showed how the knowledge of such solutions enables one to calculate the changes

  4. Rice University Department of Bioengineering

    E-print Network

    Zhang, David Yu

    Page | 1 Rice University Department of Bioengineering Graduate Degree Requirements.D./Ph.D. is offered between the Rice Department of Bioengineering and Baylor College of Medicine. Few students...............................................................................................................14 Students are advised to consult the Rice University General Announcements For additional

  5. Red Rice Research and Control. 

    E-print Network

    Baker, John B.; Baldwin, Ford L.; Bourgeois, W.J.; Cox, Clodis H.; Craigmiles, Julian P.; Dishman, William D.; Eastin, E. Ford; Helpert, Charles W.; Hill, Lewis C.; Huey, Bobby A.; Klosterboer, Arlen D.; Sonnier, Earl A.

    1980-01-01

    and Chemical, Inc., Katy, Texas. Craigmiles, Julian P., The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Beaumont. Dishman, William D., farmer, Beaumont, Texas. Eastin, E. Ford, The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Beaumont. Helpert, Charles W., The Texas... ...................................... 10 E. A. Sonnier RED RICE CONTROL IN ALTERNATE CROPS ................................ 16 F. L. Baldwin ..# RED RICE CONTROL ..................................................lg B. A. Huey and F. L. Baldwin RED RICE HERBICIDE SCREENING TESTS...

  6. Large scale germplasm screening for identification of novel rice blast resistance sources

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M.; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2014-01-01

    Rice is a major cereal crop that contributes significantly to global food security. Biotic stresses, including the rice blast fungus, cause severe yield losses that significantly impair rice production worldwide. The rapid genetic evolution of the fungus often overcomes the resistance conferred by major genes after a few years of intensive agricultural use. Therefore, resistance breeding requires continuous efforts of enriching the reservoir of resistance genes/alleles to effectively tackle the disease. Seed banks represent a rich stock of genetic diversity, however, they are still under-explored for identifying novel genes and/or their functional alleles. We conducted a large-scale screen for new rice blast resistance sources in 4246 geographically diverse rice accessions originating from 13 major rice-growing countries. The accessions were selected from a total collection of over 120,000 accessions based on their annotated rice blast resistance information in the International Rice Genebank. A two-step resistance screening protocol was used involving natural infection in a rice uniform blast nursery and subsequent artificial infections with five single rice blast isolates. The nursery-resistant accessions showed varied disease responses when infected with single isolates, suggesting the presence of diverse resistance genes/alleles in this accession collection. In addition, 289 accessions showed broad-spectrum resistance against all five single rice blast isolates. The selected resistant accessions were genotyped for the presence of the Pi2 resistance gene, thereby identifying potential accessions for isolation of allelic variants of this blast resistance gene. Together, the accession collection with broad spectrum and isolate specific blast resistance represent the core material for isolation of previously unknown blast resistance genes and/or their allelic variants that can be deployed in rice breeding programs. PMID:25324853

  7. Barnyard grasses were processed with rice around 10000 years ago

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Fuller, Dorian Q; Huan, Xiujia; Perry, Linda; Li, Quan; Li, Zhao; Zhang, Jianping; Ma, Zhikun; Zhuang, Yijie; Jiang, Leping; Ge, Yong; Lu, Houyuan

    2015-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is regarded as the only grass that was selected for cultivation and eventual domestication in the Yangtze basin of China. Although both macro-fossils and micro-fossils of rice have been recovered from the Early Neolithic site of Shangshan, dating to more than 10,000 years before present (BP), we report evidence of phytolith and starch microfossils taken from stone tools, both for grinding and cutting, and cultural layers, that indicating barnyard grass (Echinochloa spp.) was a major subsistence resource, alongside smaller quantities of acorn starches (Lithocarpus/Quercus sensu lato) and water chestnuts (Trapa). This evidence suggests that early managed wetland environments were initially harvested for multiple grain species including barnyard grasses as well as rice, and indicate that the emergence of rice as the favoured cultivated grass and ultimately the key domesticate of the Yangtze basin was a protracted process. PMID:26536839

  8. Barnyard grasses were processed with rice around 10000 years ago.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Fuller, Dorian Q; Huan, Xiujia; Perry, Linda; Li, Quan; Li, Zhao; Zhang, Jianping; Ma, Zhikun; Zhuang, Yijie; Jiang, Leping; Ge, Yong; Lu, Houyuan

    2015-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is regarded as the only grass that was selected for cultivation and eventual domestication in the Yangtze basin of China. Although both macro-fossils and micro-fossils of rice have been recovered from the Early Neolithic site of Shangshan, dating to more than 10,000 years before present (BP), we report evidence of phytolith and starch microfossils taken from stone tools, both for grinding and cutting, and cultural layers, that indicating barnyard grass (Echinochloa spp.) was a major subsistence resource, alongside smaller quantities of acorn starches (Lithocarpus/Quercus sensu lato) and water chestnuts (Trapa). This evidence suggests that early managed wetland environments were initially harvested for multiple grain species including barnyard grasses as well as rice, and indicate that the emergence of rice as the favoured cultivated grass and ultimately the key domesticate of the Yangtze basin was a protracted process. PMID:26536839

  9. Effects of Residue Management on Decomposition in Irrigated Rice Fields Are Not Related to Changes in the Decomposer Community.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anja; John, Katharina; Arida, Gertrudo; Auge, Harald; Brandl, Roland; Horgan, Finbarr G; Hotes, Stefan; Marquez, Leonardo; Radermacher, Nico; Settele, Josef; Wolters, Volkmar; Schädler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Decomposers provide an essential ecosystem service that contributes to sustainable production in rice ecosystems by driving the release of nutrients from organic crop residues. During a single rice crop cycle we examined the effects of four different crop residue management practices (rice straw or ash of burned straw scattered on the soil surface or incorporated into the soil) on rice straw decomposition and on the abundance of aquatic and soil-dwelling invertebrates. Mass loss of rice straw in litterbags of two different mesh sizes that either prevented or allowed access of meso- and macro-invertebrates was used as a proxy for decomposition rates. Invertebrates significantly increased total loss of litter mass by up to 30%. Initially, the contribution of invertebrates to decomposition was significantly smaller in plots with rice straw scattered on the soil surface; however, this effect disappeared later in the season. We found no significant responses in microbial decomposition rates to management practices. The abundance of aquatic fauna was higher in fields with rice straw amendment, whereas the abundance of soil fauna fluctuated considerably. There was a clear separation between the overall invertebrate community structure in response to the ash and straw treatments. However, we found no correlation between litter mass loss and abundances of various lineages of invertebrates. Our results indicate that invertebrates can contribute to soil fertility in irrigated paddy fields by decomposing rice straw, and that their abundance as well as efficiency in decomposition may be promoted by crop residue management practices. PMID:26225556

  10. Effects of Residue Management on Decomposition in Irrigated Rice Fields Are Not Related to Changes in the Decomposer Community

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Anja; John, Katharina; Arida, Gertrudo; Auge, Harald; Brandl, Roland; Horgan, Finbarr G.; Hotes, Stefan; Marquez, Leonardo; Radermacher, Nico; Settele, Josef; Wolters, Volkmar; Schädler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Decomposers provide an essential ecosystem service that contributes to sustainable production in rice ecosystems by driving the release of nutrients from organic crop residues. During a single rice crop cycle we examined the effects of four different crop residue management practices (rice straw or ash of burned straw scattered on the soil surface or incorporated into the soil) on rice straw decomposition and on the abundance of aquatic and soil-dwelling invertebrates. Mass loss of rice straw in litterbags of two different mesh sizes that either prevented or allowed access of meso- and macro-invertebrates was used as a proxy for decomposition rates. Invertebrates significantly increased total loss of litter mass by up to 30%. Initially, the contribution of invertebrates to decomposition was significantly smaller in plots with rice straw scattered on the soil surface; however, this effect disappeared later in the season. We found no significant responses in microbial decomposition rates to management practices. The abundance of aquatic fauna was higher in fields with rice straw amendment, whereas the abundance of soil fauna fluctuated considerably. There was a clear separation between the overall invertebrate community structure in response to the ash and straw treatments. However, we found no correlation between litter mass loss and abundances of various lineages of invertebrates. Our results indicate that invertebrates can contribute to soil fertility in irrigated paddy fields by decomposing rice straw, and that their abundance as well as efficiency in decomposition may be promoted by crop residue management practices. PMID:26225556

  11. [Cycling and balance of copper in farmland ecosystem of Jianghan plain in Hubei Province].

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuangfei; Xu, Xiaoqing; Xiang, Yaling; Jin, Xia; Shao, Zhihui

    2003-01-01

    The cycling and balance of copper in 8 cropping systems, i.e., wheat-rice, rice-rice, rape-soybean, rape-peanut, wheat-sesame, wheat-cotton, pepper-cabbage and radish-eggplant in Jianghan plain of Hubei Province were studied. The results showed that the main output of copper was crop harvesting, up to 85.9%-95.1% of total output, and the output of copper by field runoff and soil leaching was low. The main inputs of copper were organic fertilizer, rainfall, falldrop, and natural return. The inputs of copper from inorganic fertilizer and seeds (seedlings) were low. The balance analysis pointed out that copper had an accumulative trend in two patterns of rice and commercial vegetable ecosystem, and was in balance in upland field ecosystem. PMID:12722442

  12. Long-term effect of rice-based farming systems on soil health.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Priyanka; Nayak, A K; Gautam, Priyanka; Lal, B; Shahid, M; Raja, R; Tripathi, R; Bhattacharyya, P; Panda, B B; Mohanty, S; Rao, K S

    2015-05-01

    Integrated rice-fish culture, an age-old farming system, is a technology which could produce rice and fish sustainably at a time by optimizing scarce resource use through complementary use of land and water. An understanding of microbial processes is important for the management of farming systems as soil microbes are the living part of soil organic matter and play critical roles in soil C and N cycling and ecosystem functioning of farming system. Rice-based integrated farming system model for small and marginal farmers was established in 2001 at Central Rice Research Institute, Cuttack, Odisha. The different enterprises of farming system were rice-fish, fish-fingerlings, fruits, vegetables, rice-fish refuge, and agroforestry. This study was conducted with the objective to assess the soil physicochemical properties, microbial population, carbon and nitrogen fractions, soil enzymatic activity, and productivity of different enterprises. The effect of enterprises induced significant changes in the chemical composition and organic matter which in turn influenced the activities of enzymes (urease, acid, and alkaline phosphatase) involved in the C, N, and P cycles. The different enterprises of long-term rice-based farming system caused significant variations in nutrient content of soil, which was higher in rice-fish refuge followed by rice-fish enterprise. Highest microbial populations and enzymatic properties were recorded in rice-fish refuge system because of waterlogging and reduced condition prolonged in this system leading to less decomposition of organic matter. The maximum alkaline phosphatase, urease, and FDA were observed in rice-fish enterprise. However, highest acid phosphatase and dehydrogenase activity were obtained in vegetable enterprise and fish-fingerlings enterprise, respectively. PMID:25913623

  13. Seasonal assessment of greenhouse gas emission from irrigated lowland rice field under infrared warming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice fields are considered as one of the major sources of methane (CH4), and they also emit nitrous oxide (N2O). A field experiment was conducted at the International Rice Research Institute, Philippines, in 2010 – 2011 using a temperature free-air controlled enhancement (T-FACE) system. Our object...

  14. Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain

    E-print Network

    Gauci, Vincent

    Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain Vincent Gauci,1; accepted 20 November 2007; published 30 July 2008. [1] Sulfate in acid rain is known to suppress methane from rice agriculture may be similarly affected by acid rain, a major and increasing pollution problem

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF NOVEL BLAST RESISTANCE GENES IN RICE CULTIVAR ZHE733

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe grisea remains a serious threat to rice production in the U.S. Use of resistant cultivars is the most economic and efficient method to control blast disease. Rice has major genes conferring resistance to M. grisea races containing the corresponding av...

  16. Analysis of the effectiveness of the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The casual agent of rice blast, Magnaporthe oryzae, continues to remain a serious threat for rice production and in general for the world food supply. The most economically and environmentally viable strategy to control this pathogen is the development of cultivars which possess major resistance gen...

  17. Genetic mapping of microsatellite (SSR) markers linked to the rice Pi-i blast resistance gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast is a major fungus disease threat to rice production throughout the world. Genes conferring resistance to blast are a valuable and environmentally-friendly means to minimize crop losses from this serious disease. The Pi-i blast resistance gene has been utilized worldwide as a source of dis...

  18. Seeing red: The origin of grain pigmentation in US weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) is the major weed of cultivated rice fields in the US, where it causes tens of millions of dollars in crop losses annually. This weedy crop-relative is characterized by several traits that are typical of wild Oryza species, including the anthocyanin-pigmented pericarp tha...

  19. Genetic architecture of grain chalk in rice and interactions with a low phytic acid locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain quality characteristics have a major impact on the value of the harvested rice crop. In addition to grain dimensions which determine market classes, translucency is also required for the highest grain quality. Over the last several years, the USA rice industry has been concerned about the incr...

  20. Genetic Diversity for Concentration of Sixteen Mineral Elements Among Diverse Rice Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mineral nutrients such as Ca, Fe, and Zn play critical roles in human health, with over 3 billion people suffering from Fe and Zn deficiencies. Rice provides the major source of nutrition for a large proportion of the world’s population, but unfortunately, rice grain is not a good source of mineral...

  1. Genetic diversity and classification of Oryza sativa with emphasis on Chinese rice germplasm.

    PubMed

    Wang, C-H; Zheng, X-M; Xu, Q; Yuan, X-P; Huang, L; Zhou, H-F; Wei, X-H; Ge, S

    2014-05-01

    Despite extensive studies on cultivated rice, the genetic structure and subdivision of this crop remain unclear at both global and local scales. Using 84 nuclear simple sequence repeat markers, we genotyped a panel of 153 global rice cultivars covering all previously recognized groups and 826 cultivars representing the diversity of Chinese rice germplasm. On the basis of model-based grouping, neighbour-joining tree and principal coordinate analysis, we confirmed the widely accepted five major groups of rice cultivars (indica, aus, aromatic, temperate japonica and tropical japonica), and demonstrated that rayada rice was unique in genealogy and should be treated as a new (the sixth) major group of rice germplasm. With reference to the global classification of rice cultivars, we identified three major groups (indica, temperate japonica and tropical japonica) in Chinese rice germplasm and showed that Chinese temperate japonica contained higher diversity than that of global samples, whereas Chinese indica and tropical japonica maintained slightly lower diversity than that present in the global samples. Particularly, we observed that all seasonal, drought-tolerant and endosperm types occurred within each of three major groups of Chinese cultivars, which does not support previous claims that seasonal differentiation exists in Indica and drought-tolerant differentiation is present in Japonica. It is most likely that differentiation of cultivar types arose multiple times stemming from artificial selection for adaptation to local environments. PMID:24326293

  2. A “Rice Diversity Panel” evaluated for genetic and agro-morphological variation between subpopulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since ancient times, Indica and Japonica have been recognized as the two major subspecies of Asian rice (Oryza sativa L.). First with isozymes and subsequently with DNA markers, five subpopulations indica, aus, temperate japonica, tropical japonica and aromatic/GroupV were identified. A “Rice Diver...

  3. Genetic variation and association mapping of protein concentration in rice using a germplasm collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice protein is an important source of nutrition and energy for a majority of the world’s population. However, the protein concentration in rice can have an impact on its flavor, texture, cooking and processing quality, thus, affecting its acceptability. It is therefore important to know if genet...

  4. Cytoplasmic effects on DNA methylation between male sterile line and its maintainer in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hybrid rice is advantageous over the traditional one on food production, which is important to support the increasing world’s population, especially in the developing countries. Three-line system that has played a major role since the 1970s in rice includes male sterile (A line), its maintainer (B l...

  5. Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) control in herbicide tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.) 

    E-print Network

    Steele, Gregory Lee

    2000-01-01

    Red rice has interfered with production of commercial rice in the United States for over 150 years. Because of the genetic and physiological similarities between red rice and commercial rice, herbicides have been unsuccessful in adequately...

  6. Molecular evolution of shattering loci in U.S. weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Carrie S.; Reagon, Michael; Gross, Briana L.; Olsen, Kenneth M.; Jia, Yulin; Caicedo, Ana L.

    2010-01-01

    Cultivated rice fields worldwide are plagued with weedy rice, a conspecific weed of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.). The persistence of weedy rice has been attributed, in part, to its ability to shatter (disperse) seed prior to crop harvesting. In the United States, separately evolved weedy rice groups have been shown to share genomic identity with exotic domesticated cultivars. Here, we investigate the shattering phenotype in a collection of U.S. weedy rice accessions, as well as wild and cultivated relatives. We find that all U.S. weedy rice groups shatter seeds easily, despite multiple origins, and in contrast to a decrease in shattering ability seen in cultivated groups. We assessed allelic identity and diversity at the major shattering locus, sh4, in weedy rice; we find that all cultivated and weedy rice, regardless of population, share similar haplotypes at sh4, and all contain a single derived mutation associated with decreased seed shattering. Our data constitute the strongest evidence to date of an evolution of weeds from domesticated backgrounds. The combination of a shared cultivar sh4 allele and a highly shattering phenotype, suggests that U.S. weedy rice have re-acquired the shattering trait after divergence from their progenitors through alternative genetic mechanisms. PMID:20584132

  7. A Double Built-In Containment Strategy for Production of Recombinant Proteins in Transgenic Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sinan; Shen, Zhicheng

    2014-01-01

    Using transgenic rice as a bioreactor for mass production of pharmaceutical proteins could potentially reduce the cost of production significantly. However, a major concern over the bioreactor transgenic rice is the risk of its unintended spreading into environment and into food or feed supplies. Here we report a mitigating method to prevent unwanted transgenic rice spreading by a double built-in containment strategy, which sets a selectively termination method and a visual tag technology in the T-DNA for transformation. We created transgenic rice with an inserted T-DNA that harbors a human proinsulin gene fused with the far-red fluorescent protein gene mKate_S158A, an RNAi cassette suppressing the expression of the rice bentazon detoxification enzyme CYP81A6, and an EPSPS gene as the selection marker for transformation. Herbicide spray tests indicated that such transgenic rice plants can be killed selectively by a spray of bentazon at regular field application dosage for rice weed control. Moreover, the transgenic rice seeds were bright red in color due to the fused far-red fluorescent protein, and could be easily visualized under daylight by naked eyes. Thus, the transgenic rice plants reported in this study could be selectively killed by a commonly used herbicide during their growth stage, and their seeds may be detected visually during processing and consumption after harvest. This double built-in containment strategy may greatly enhance the confinement of the transgenic rice. PMID:25531447

  8. Impact of phytic acid on nutrient bioaccessibility and antioxidant properties of dehusked rice.

    PubMed

    Lee, H H; Loh, S P; Bong, C F J; Sarbini, S R; Yiu, P H

    2015-12-01

    Whole grains consumption promotes health benefits, but demonstrates controversial impacts from phytic acid in meeting requirements of good health. Therefore, this study was aimed to determine the nutrient bioaccessibility and antioxidant properties of rice cultivars named "Adan" or "Bario" and deduce the nutritional impact of phytic acid. Majority of the dehusked rice in the collection showed an acceptable level of in-vitro starch digestibility and in-vitro protein digestibility, but were poor in antioxidant properties and bioaccessibility of minerals (Ca, Fe and Zn). The drawbacks identified in the rice cultivars were due to relatively high phytic acid content (2420.6?±?94.6 mg/100 g) and low phenolic content (152.39?±?18.84 ?g GAE/g). The relationship between phytic acid content and mineral bioaccessibility was strongest in calcium (r?=?0.60), followed by iron (r?=?0.40) and zinc (r?=?0.27). Phytic acid content did not significantly correlate with in-vitro starch digestibility and in-vitro protein digestibility but showed a weak relationship with antioxidant properties. These suggest that phytic acid could significantly impair the mineral bioaccessibility of dehusked rice, and also act as an important antioxidant in non-pigmented rice. Bario rice cultivars offered dehusked rice with wide range of in-vitro digestibility of starch and protein, and also pigmented rice as a good source of antioxidants. However, there is a need to reduce phytic acid content in dehusked rice for improved mineral bioaccessibility among Bario rice cultivars. PMID:26604353

  9. Mapping rice in the USA with Earth Observations in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbick, N.; Salas, W.; Mueller, R.; Hanson, M.; Corbiere, M.; McKenzie, A.

    2014-12-01

    The USA is a major rice growing nation and one of the top rice exporters. Weather variability, water resources, and price volatility are current risks to rice production. To support risk management the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic Research Service are tasked with providing area statistics and production estimates. A Decision Support Tool (DST) is being developed to provide real-time estimates of rice extent and indicators of condition. The DST is largely driven by multi-scale Earth Observations including Landsat and MODIS that provide daily and 8-day indices that are sensitive to rice growth status and management practices. A multitemporal Classification And Regression Tree approach ingests multiscale imagery in real time to provide rice crop metrics. We hindcast the archives of Landsat (1984-2014) and MODIS (2002-2014) for California and achieve >80% accuracy by June and >95% accuracy by end of July as compared to the Crop Data Layer and county statistics. Outcomes are similar for the Midsouth rice region. The DST was utilized to assess the impact of current drought in California on rice. We predicted a 20% reduction in rice area based on our near time rice extent projections and assuming yields similar to 2013 and recent USDA average farm price estimates, 2014 production losses associated with the drought will amount to approximately $175 million. Additional results using Radarsat-2 in the Midsouth in preparation of ALOS-2 and Sentintel will be shared.

  10. Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus: a white-backed planthopper-transmitted fijivirus threatening rice production in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guohui; Xu, Donglin; Xu, Dagao; Zhang, Maoxin

    2013-01-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a non-enveloped icosahedral virus with a genome of 10 double-stranded RNA segments, is a novel species in the genus Fijivirus (family Reoviridae) first recognized in 2008. Rice plants infected with this virus exhibit symptoms similar to those caused by Rice black-streaked dwarf virus. Since 2009, the virus has rapidly spread and caused serious rice losses in East and Southeast Asia. Significant progress has been made in recent years in understanding this disease, especially about the functions of the viral genes, rice–virus–insect interactions, and epidemiology and control measures. The virus can be efficiently transmitted by the white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) in a persistent circulative propagative manner but cannot be transmitted by the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) and small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus). Rice, maize, Chinese sorghum (Coix lacryma-jobi) and other grass weeds can be infected via WBPH. However, only rice plays a major role in the virus infection cycle because of the vector’s preference. In Southeast Asia, WBPH is a long-distance migratory rice pest. The disease cycle can be described as follows: SRBSDV and its WBPH vector overwinter in warm tropical or sub-tropical areas; viruliferous WBPH adults carry the virus from south to north via long-distance migration in early spring, transmit the virus to rice seedlings in the newly colonized areas, and lay eggs on the infected seedlings; the next generation of WBPHs propagate on infected seedlings, become viruliferous, disperse, and cause new disease outbreaks. Several molecular and serological methods have been developed to detect SRBSDV in plant tissues and individual insects. Control measures based on protection from WBPH, including seedbed coverage, chemical seed treatments, and chemical spraying of seedlings, have proven effective in China. PMID:24058362

  11. Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus: a white-backed planthopper-transmitted fijivirus threatening rice production in Asia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guohui; Xu, Donglin; Xu, Dagao; Zhang, Maoxin

    2013-01-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a non-enveloped icosahedral virus with a genome of 10 double-stranded RNA segments, is a novel species in the genus Fijivirus (family Reoviridae) first recognized in 2008. Rice plants infected with this virus exhibit symptoms similar to those caused by Rice black-streaked dwarf virus. Since 2009, the virus has rapidly spread and caused serious rice losses in East and Southeast Asia. Significant progress has been made in recent years in understanding this disease, especially about the functions of the viral genes, rice-virus-insect interactions, and epidemiology and control measures. The virus can be efficiently transmitted by the white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) in a persistent circulative propagative manner but cannot be transmitted by the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) and small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus). Rice, maize, Chinese sorghum (Coix lacryma-jobi) and other grass weeds can be infected via WBPH. However, only rice plays a major role in the virus infection cycle because of the vector's preference. In Southeast Asia, WBPH is a long-distance migratory rice pest. The disease cycle can be described as follows: SRBSDV and its WBPH vector overwinter in warm tropical or sub-tropical areas; viruliferous WBPH adults carry the virus from south to north via long-distance migration in early spring, transmit the virus to rice seedlings in the newly colonized areas, and lay eggs on the infected seedlings; the next generation of WBPHs propagate on infected seedlings, become viruliferous, disperse, and cause new disease outbreaks. Several molecular and serological methods have been developed to detect SRBSDV in plant tissues and individual insects. Control measures based on protection from WBPH, including seedbed coverage, chemical seed treatments, and chemical spraying of seedlings, have proven effective in China. PMID:24058362

  12. Enhanced conversion of plant biomass into glucose using transgenic rice-produced endoglucanase for cellulosic ethanol.

    PubMed

    Oraby, Hesham; Venkatesh, Balan; Dale, Bruce; Ahmad, Rashid; Ransom, Callista; Oehmke, James; Sticklen, Mariam

    2007-12-01

    The catalytic domain of Acidothermus cellulolyticus thermostable endoglucanase gene (encoding for endo-1,4-beta-glucanase enzyme or E1) was constitutively expressed in rice. Molecular analyses of T1 plants confirmed presence and expression of the transgene. The amount of E1 enzyme accounted for up to 4.9% of the plant total soluble proteins, and its accumulation had no apparent deleterious effects on plant growth and development. Approximately 22 and 30% of the cellulose of the Ammonia Fiber Explosion (AFEX)-pretreated rice and maize biomass respectively was converted into glucose using rice E1 heterologous enzyme. As rice is the major food crop of the world with minimal use for its straw, our results suggest a successful strategy for producing biologically active hydrolysis enzymes in rice to help generate alcohol fuel, by substituting the wasteful and polluting practice of rice straw burning with an environmentally friendly technology. PMID:17237981

  13. The rice mitochondrial genomes and their variations.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiangjun; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2006-02-01

    Based on highly redundant and high-quality sequences, we assembled rice (Oryza sativa) mitochondrial genomes for two cultivars, 93-11 (an indica variety) and PA64S (an indica-like variety with maternal origin of japonica), which are paternal and maternal strains of an elite superhybrid rice Liang-You-Pei-Jiu (LYP-9), respectively. Following up with a previous analysis on rice chloroplast genomes, we divided mitochondrial sequence variations into two basic categories, intravarietal and intersubspecific. Intravarietal polymorphisms are variations within mitochondrial genomes of an individual variety. Intersubspecific polymorphisms are variations between subspecies among their major genotypes. In this study, we identified 96 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 25 indels, and three segmental sequence variations as intersubspecific polymorphisms. A signature sequence fragment unique to indica varieties was confirmed experimentally and found in two wild rice samples, but absent in japonica varieties. The intersubspecific polymorphism rate for mitochondrial genomes is 0.02% for SNPs and 0.006% for indels, nearly 2.5 and 3 times lower than that of their chloroplast counterparts and 21 and 38 times lower than corresponding rates of the rice nuclear genome, respectively. The intravarietal polymorphism rates among analyzed mitochondrial genomes, such as 93-11 and PA64S, are 1.26% and 1.38% for SNPs and 1.13% and 1.09% for indels, respectively. Based on the total number of SNPs between the two mitochondrial genomes, we estimate that the divergence of indica and japonica mitochondrial genomes occurred approximately 45,000 to 250,000 years ago. PMID:16384910

  14. Rice disease management under organic production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in organic rice production has increased because of the increased market demand for organic rice. Texas organic rice acreage has constantly increased over the last decade, reaching 32,000 acres in 2012. Texas is now the leading state in organic rice production in the U.S. Organic rice is p...

  15. Monsoon variability, crop water requirement, and crop planning for kharif rice in Sagar Island, India.

    PubMed

    Mandal, S; Choudhury, B U; Satpati, L N

    2015-12-01

    In the Sagar Island of Bay of Bengal, rainfed lowland rice is the major crop, grown solely depending on erratic distribution of southwest monsoon (SM) rainfall. Lack of information on SM rainfall variability and absence of crop scheduling accordingly results in frequent occurrence of intermittent water stress and occasional crop failure. In the present study, we analyzed long period (1982-2010) SM rainfall behavior (onset, withdrawal, rainfall and wetness indices, dry and wet spells), crop water requirement (CWR, by Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) 56), and probability of weekly rainfall occurrence (by two-parameter gamma distribution) to assess the variability and impact on water availability, CWR, and rice productivity. Finally, crop planning was suggested to overcome monsoon uncertainties on water availability and rice productivity. Study revealed that the normal onset and withdrawal weeks for SM rainfall were 22nd?±?1 and 43rd?±?2 meteorological weeks (MW), respectively. However, effective monsoon rainfall started at 24th MW (rainfall 92.7 mm, p?>?56.7 % for 50 mm rainfall) and was terminated by the end of 40th MW (rainfall 90.7 mm, p?7 days in duration and reflected a significant (p?rice production vis-à-vis food and livelihood security in vulnerable islands of coastal ecosystem. PMID:25903760

  16. Monsoon variability, crop water requirement, and crop planning for kharif rice in Sagar Island, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, S.; Choudhury, B. U.; Satpati, L. N.

    2015-04-01

    In the Sagar Island of Bay of Bengal, rainfed lowland rice is the major crop, grown solely depending on erratic distribution of southwest monsoon (SM) rainfall. Lack of information on SM rainfall variability and absence of crop scheduling accordingly results in frequent occurrence of intermittent water stress and occasional crop failure. In the present study, we analyzed long period (1982-2010) SM rainfall behavior (onset, withdrawal, rainfall and wetness indices, dry and wet spells), crop water requirement (CWR, by Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) 56), and probability of weekly rainfall occurrence (by two-parameter gamma distribution) to assess the variability and impact on water availability, CWR, and rice productivity. Finally, crop planning was suggested to overcome monsoon uncertainties on water availability and rice productivity. Study revealed that the normal onset and withdrawal weeks for SM rainfall were 22nd ± 1 and 43rd ± 2 meteorological weeks (MW), respectively. However, effective monsoon rainfall started at 24th MW (rainfall 92.7 mm, p > 56.7 % for 50 mm rainfall) and was terminated by the end of 40th MW (rainfall 90.7 mm, p < 59.6 % for 50 mm rainfall). During crop growth periods (seed to seed, 21st to 45th MW), the island received an average weekly rainfall of 65.1 ± 25.9 mm, while the corresponding weekly CWR was 47.8 ± 5.4 mm. Despite net water surplus of 353.9 mm during crop growth periods, there was a deficit of 159.5 mm water during MW of 18-23 (seedling raising) and MW of 41-45 (flowering to maturity stages). Water stress was observed in early lag vegetative stage of crop growth (32nd MW). The total dry spell frequency during panicle initiation and heading stage was computed as 40 of which 6 dry spells were >7 days in duration and reflected a significant (p < 0.05) increasing trend (at 0.22 days year-1) over the years (1982-2010). The present study highlights the adaptive capacity of crop planning including abiotic stress-tolerant cultivars to monsoon rainfall variability for sustaining rainfed rice production vis-à-vis food and livelihood security in vulnerable islands of coastal ecosystem.

  17. RICE MICROSTRUCTURE - COMPARING CULTIVARS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The microstructures of short, medium, long and waxy grain rices were compared for microstructural characteristics using scanning electron and light microscopies. The cultivars in this study included three short grain (Akitakamachi, Koshihikari and S102); three medium grain (Bengal, M202 and M401); f...

  18. Flooded Wild Rice River

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Wild Rice River at Great Bend North Dakota, streamflow 1,890 cubic feet per second.  Photograph taken during spring 2010 flooding looking downstream of the bridge which was clogged with debris.  The river also had flooded over the road approaching the bridge....

  19. Rice: chemistry and technology.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice has taken center stage this last decade, not only as an important provider of nourishment for the world’s population, but as a grain now recognized as having many unique nutritional and functional attributes with potential to be captured in a multitude of value-added food and non-food applicati...

  20. Exploring Japan through Rice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtan, Linda S.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the role of rice in Japanese culture by presenting historical background and teaching activities in a variety of categories, such as language, sociology, history, and contemporary politics. Suggests teachers create cross-cultural comparisons; for example, the role of corn in the United States. Provides a list of teacher resources. (CMK)

  1. Generation of selenium-enriched rice with enhanced grain yield, selenium content and bioavailability through fertilisation with selenite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Dong; Wang, Xu; Wong, Yum-Shing

    2013-12-01

    To fulfill the natural human needs of selenium, selenium biofortification has been carried out in rice (Oryza sativa) in recent years. Despite some improvements have been made, the increase of selenium content in rice was still limited and a large amount of fertilisers are often required, which may cause environmental pullution. In this study, we further improved the selenium biofortification of rice by using less selenium fertilisers (10.5 g selenium/hectare) whereas, largely increasing selenium content in rice grains (up to 51 times vs. control). Furthermore, selenium speciation analysis, in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and antioxidant assays were performed to evaluate the selenium bioaccessibility and bioavailability in selenium-enriched rice grains. The major selenium species found were readily absorbable selenomethionine. Meanwhile, the selenium-enriched rice grains have significantly higher antioxidant bioactivities. In conclusion, this selenium-enriched rice has enormous potential for selenium supplementation in humans. PMID:23870972

  2. Phenol accumulation in a young humic fraction following anaerobic decomposition of rice crop residues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil phenols have been implicated as inhibitors of soil nitrogen (N) cycling within many ecosystems, including irrigated lowland rice (Orzyza sativa, L.) in the Philippines. We measured soil phenol concentrations in two humic fractions at two crop growth stages in each season during a 4-year field s...

  3. Rice Glycosyltransferase (GT) Phylogenomic Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ronald, Pamela

    The Ronald Laboratory staff at the University of California-Davis has a primary research focus on the genes of the rice plant. They study the role that genetics plays in the way rice plants respond to their environment. They created the Rice GT Database in order to integrate functional genomic information for putative rice Glycosyltransferases (GTs). This database contains information on nearly 800 putative rice GTs (gene models) identified by sequence similarity searches based on the Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZy) database. The Rice GT Database provides a platform to display user-selected functional genomic data on a phylogenetic tree. This includes sequence information, mutant line information, expression data, etc. An interactive chromosomal map shows the position of all rice GTs, and links to rice annotation databases are included. The format is intended to "facilitate the comparison of closely related GTs within different families, as well as perform global comparisons between sets of related families." [From http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gt/genInfo.shtml] See also the primary paper discussing this work: Peijian Cao, Laura E. Bartley, Ki-Hong Jung and Pamela C. Ronalda. Construction of a Rice Glycosyltransferase Phylogenomic Database and Identification of Rice-Diverged Glycosyltransferases. Molecular Plant, 2008, 1(5): 858-877.

  4. Interaction between Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. leaf pigment and rice proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xu, Yuan; Zhou, Sumei; Qian, Haifeng; Zhang, Hui; Qi, Xiguang; Fan, Meihua

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the interaction of Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. leaf (VBTL) pigment and rice proteins. In the presence of rice protein, VBTL pigment antioxidant activity and free polyphenol content decreased by 67.19% and 68.11%, respectively, and L(?) of the protein-pigment complex decreased significantly over time. L(?) values of albumin, globulin and glutelin during 60-min pigment exposure decreased by 55.00, 57.14, and 54.30%, respectively, indicating that these proteins had bound to the pigment. A significant difference in protein surface hydrophobicity was observed between rice proteins and pigment-protein complexes, indicating that hydrophobic interaction is a major binding mechanism between VBTL pigment and rice proteins. A significant difference in secondary structures between proteins and protein-pigment complexes was also uncovered, indicating that hydrogen bonding may be another mode of interaction between VBTL pigment and rice proteins. Our results indicate that VBTL pigment can stain rice proteins with hydrophobic and hydrogen interactions. PMID:26471554

  5. Enzyme dynamics in paddy soils of the rice district (NE Italy) under different cropping patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Claudio; Nadimi-Goki, Mandana; Kato, Yoichi; Fornasier, Flavio; Wahsha, Mohammad; Spiandorello, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    The recent widespread interest on soil enzymes is due to the need to develop sensitive indicators of soil quality that reflect the effects of land management on soil and assist land managers in promoting long-term sustainability of terrestrial ecosystems. The activities of six important enzymes involved in C, N, P, and S cycling were investigated in a paddy soil from the Veneto region, Italy, in four different rotation systems (rice-rice-rice: R-R-R; soya-rice-rice: S-R-R; fallow-rice: F-R; pea-soya-rice: P-S-R) with three replications in April (after field preparation, field moist condition), June (after seedling, waterlogged soil condition), August (after tillering stage of rice, waterlogged soil condition) and October (after rice harvesting, drained soil condition) over the 2012 growing season. Our results demonstrated that enzyme activities varied with rotation systems and growth stages in paddy soil. Compared with field moist soil, drained soil condition resulted in a significant increase (P < 0.05) of ?-glucosidase, arylsulfatase, alkaline and acid phosphatases, leucine aminopeptidase (except of fallow-rice), and chitinase activities in all rotations, while compared with drained soil, early waterlogging (in month of June) significantly decreased (P moist soil> late waterlogged>early waterlogged. There was an inhibitory effect of waterlogging (except P-S-R rotation) for both alkaline and acid phosphatases due to high pH and redox conditions. However, the response of enzymes to waterlogging differed with the chemical species and the cropping pattern. The best rotation system for chitinase, leucine aminopeptidase and ?-glucosidase activity (C and N cycles) proved R-R-R, while for arylsulfatase, alkaline and acid phosphatases (P and S cycles) it was the S-R-R. Key Words: enzyme activity, paddy soil, Crop Rotation System, Italy __ Corresponding Author: Mandana Nadimi-Goki, Tel.: +39 3891356251 E-mail address: mandy.nadimi@gmail.com

  6. Rice University Task Force on Information Technology

    E-print Network

    1 Rice University Task Force on Information to review comprehensively Rice's IT structure and adapt it to a changed environment to develop a set of principles and a governance framework for IT at Rice

  7. Influence of pymetrozine on feeding behaviors of three rice planthoppers and a rice leafhopper using electrical penetration graphs.

    PubMed

    He, Yueping; Zhang, Juefeng; Chen, Jianming; Wu, Quancong; Chen, Li; Chen, Liezhong; Xiao, Pengfei; Zhu, Yu Cheng

    2011-12-01

    Pymetrozine reportedly inhibits feeding of plant sap-sucking insects, such as aphids and brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens (Stål)). By using electrical penetration graph (EPG), this study was conducted to investigate any differential effect of pymetrozine on the feeding behaviors of four major rice sap-sucking insect species, 1) N. lugens, 2) white-backed planthopper (Sogatella furcifera (Horváth)), 3) small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus (Fallen)), and 4) green rice leafhopper (Nephotettix cincticeps Uhler). On pymetrozine-free TN1 rice plants, white-backed planthopper and small brown planthopper showed a significantly less activity in the phloem phases than brown planthopper or green rice leafhopper while green rice leafhopper engaged in relatively more xylem ingestion than brown planthopper, white-backed planthopper, and small brown planthopper. On the plants treated with 100 mg liter(-1) of pymetrozine, all four insect species showed significant increases, in total duration of nonprobing and significant decreases in the activities in phloem tissue, while all species showed similar feeding behavior during the pathway and xylem phases. This study revealed that, regardless of whether the insects on untreated plants spent more time feeding on phloem than xylem (brown planthopper) or more time on xylem than phloem (green rice leafhopper) or similar times on phloem and xylem (white-backed planthopper and small brown planthopper), their feeding behavior was disturbed by pymetrozine and exhibited similar patterns of sharp decline in activity in the phloem tissue and a significant increase the nonprobing. PMID:22299348

  8. Contributions of climate, varieties, and agronomic management to rice yield change in the past three decades in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He; Tao, Fulu; Xiao, Dengpan; Shi, Wenjiao; Liu, Fengshan; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Yujie; Wang, Meng; Bai, Huizi

    2015-10-01

    The long-term field experiment data at four representative agro-meteorological stations, together with a crop simulation model, were used to disentangle the contributions of climate change, variety renewal, and fertilization management to rice yield change in the past three decades. We found that during 1981-2009 varieties renewal increased rice yield by 16%-52%, management improvement increased yield by 0-16%, and the contributions of climate change to rice yield varied from — 16% to 10%. Varieties renewal and management improvement offset the negative impacts of climate change on rice production. Among the major climate variables, decreases in solar radiation reduced rice yield on average by 0.1%per year. The impact of temperature change had an explicit spatial pattern. It increased yield by 0.04%-0.4% per year for single rice at Xinbin and Ganyu station and for late rice at Tongcheng station, by contrast reduced yield by 0.2%-0.4% per year for single rice at Mianyang station and early rice at Tongcheng station. During 1981-2009, rice varieties renewal was characterized by increases in thermal requirements, grain number per spike and harvest index. The new varieties were less sensitive to climate change than old ones. The development of high thermal requirements, high yield potential and heat tolerant rice varieties, together with improvement of agronomic management, should be encouraged to meet the challenges of climate change and increasing food demand in future.

  9. Using NOAA/AVHRR based remote sensing data and PCR method for estimation of Aus rice yield in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizamuddin, Mohammad; Akhand, Kawsar; Roytman, Leonid; Kogan, Felix; Goldberg, Mitch

    2015-06-01

    Rice is a dominant food crop of Bangladesh accounting about 75 percent of agricultural land use for rice cultivation and currently Bangladesh is the world's fourth largest rice producing country. Rice provides about two-third of total calorie supply and about one-half of the agricultural GDP and one-sixth of the national income in Bangladesh. Aus is one of the main rice varieties in Bangladesh. Crop production, especially rice, the main food staple, is the most susceptible to climate change and variability. Any change in climate will, thus, increase uncertainty regarding rice production as climate is major cause year-to-year variability in rice productivity. This paper shows the application of remote sensing data for estimating Aus rice yield in Bangladesh using official statistics of rice yield with real time acquired satellite data from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor and Principal Component Regression (PCR) method was used to construct a model. The simulated result was compared with official agricultural statistics showing that the error of estimation of Aus rice yield was less than 10%. Remote sensing, therefore, is a valuable tool for estimating crop yields well in advance of harvest, and at a low cost.

  10. Seed-Mediated Gene Flow Promotes Genetic Diversity of Weedy Rice within Populations: Implications for Weed Management

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhuoxian; Jiang, Xiaoqi; Ratnasekera, Disna; Grassi, Fabrizio; Perera, Udugahapattuwage; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Increased infestation of weedy rice—a noxious agricultural pest has caused significant reduction of grain yield of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) worldwide. Knowledge on genetic diversity and structure of weedy rice populations will facilitate the design of effective methods to control this weed by tracing its origins and dispersal patterns in a given region. To generate such knowledge, we studied genetic diversity and structure of 21 weedy rice populations from Sri Lanka based on 23 selected microsatellite (SSR) loci. Results indicated an exceptionally high level of within-population genetic diversity (He?=?0.62) and limited among-population differentiation (Fst?=?0.17) for this predominantly self-pollinating weed. UPGMA analysis showed a loose genetic affinity of the weedy rice populations in relation to their geographical locations, and no obvious genetic structure among populations across the country. This phenomenon was associated with the considerable amount of gene flow between populations. Limited admixture from STRUCTURE analyses suggested a very low level of hybridization (pollen-mediated gene flow) between populations. The abundant within-population genetic diversity coupled with limited population genetic structure and differentiation is likely caused by the considerable seed-mediated gene flow of weedy rice along with the long-distance exchange of farmer-saved rice seeds between weedy-rice contaminated regions in Sri Lanka. In addition to other effective weed management strategies, promoting the application of certified rice seeds with no weedy rice contamination should be the immediate action to significantly reduce the proliferation and infestation of this weed in rice ecosystems in countries with similar rice farming styles as in Sri Lanka. PMID:25436611

  11. Genome-Wide Association of Rice Blast Disease Resistance and Yield-Related Components of Rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueyan; Jia, Melissa H; Ghai, Pooja; Lee, Fleet N; Jia, Yulin

    2015-12-01

    Robust disease resistance may require an expenditure of energy that may limit crop yield potential. In the present study, a subset of a United States Department of Agriculture rice core collection consisting of 151 accessions was selected using a major blast resistance (R) gene, Pi-ta, marker and was genotyped with 156 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Disease reactions to Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast disease, were evaluated under greenhouse and field conditions, and heading date, plant height, paddy and brown seed weight in two field environments were analyzed, using an association mapping approach. A total of 21 SSR markers distributed among rice chromosomes 2 to 12 were associated with blast resistance, and 16 SSR markers were associated with seed weight, heading date, and plant height. Most noticeably, shorter plants were significantly correlated with resistance to blast, rice genomes with Pi-ta were associated with lighter seed weights, and the susceptible alleles of RM171 and RM6544 were associated with heavier seed weight. These findings unraveled a complex relationship between disease resistance and yield-related components. PMID:26284908

  12. Improved yield and Zn accumulation for rice grain by Zn fertilization and optimized water management.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-yan; Wei, Yan-yan; Dong, Lan-xue; Lu, Ling-li; Feng, Ying; Zhang, Jie; Pan, Feng-shan; Yang, Xiao-e

    2014-04-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency and water scarcity are major challenges in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under an intensive rice production system. This study aims to investigate the impact of water-saving management and different Zn fertilization source (ZnSO4 and Zn-EDTA) regimes on grain yield and Zn accumulation in rice grain. Different water managements, continuous flooding (CF), and alternate wetting and drying (AWD) were applied during the rice growing season. Compared with CF, the AWD regime significantly increased grain yield and Zn concentrations in both brown rice and polished rice. Grain yield of genotypes (Nipponbare and Jiaxing27), on the average, was increased by 11.4%, and grain Zn concentration by 3.9% when compared with those under a CF regime. Zn fertilization significantly increased Zn density in polished rice, with a more pronounced effect of ZnSO4 being observed as compared with Zn-EDTA, especially under an AWD regime. Decreased phytic acid content and molar ratio of phytic acid to Zn were also noted in rice grains with Zn fertilization. The above results demonstrated that water management of AWD combined with ZnSO4 fertilization was an effective agricultural practice to elevate grain yield and increase Zn accumulation and bioavailability in rice grains. PMID:24711357

  13. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-05-01

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using 13C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems.

  14. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using 13C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems. PMID:25944542

  15. Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Rice and Wetland Biota: employing integrated indices of processes that drive methylmercury risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagles-Smith, C.; Ackerman, J.; Windham-Myers, L.; Fleck, J.

    2013-12-01

    Wetlands often are associated with elevated methylmercury (MeHg) production and food web bioaccumulation, making them potentially important sources of Hg to surrounding waters and to wetland-dependent fish and wildlife. However, the cycling of MeHg through wetlands can vary markedly with wetland type. Agricultural wetlands such as rice fields can exhibit particularly pronounced MeHg concentrations and bioaccumulation because their biogeochemical, hydrological, and ecological characteristics facilitate the conversion of inorganic mercury (Hg) to MeHg. Rice fields are characterized by a series of seasonal extreme wetting and drying cycles, sulfate-containing fertilizers, and high levels of labile organic carbon, all of which are key processes in the Hg cycle. Rice fields comprise approximately 20% of freshwater habitats and 11% of cultivated land area globally, providing critical wildlife habitat while offering substantial economic, human health, and ecosystem benefits. Thus, there is strong impetus to better understand the drivers of Hg cycling in rice fields and to develop useful management approaches for minimizing Hg risk associated with rice agriculture without compromising rice production. We examined the role of rice wetlands on MeHg bioaccumulation through foodwebs by employing biosentinel caged fish as integrators of MeHg cycling processes. With experimental field studies in California's Central Valley, we placed biosentinel fishes into nine rice wetlands that were subjected to three different harvest strategies, and into nine managed wetlands that encompassed three different hydrological regimes. We simultaneously measured a suite of biogeochemical processes in surface water, sediment, and pore water in order to link the response in fish Hg bioaccumulation with within-field processes that regulate MeHg cycling. Our preliminary results indicate that fish Hg concentrations were 1.6 times higher in rice wetlands than in managed wetlands. Additionally, fish Hg concentrations increased across rice fields from inlets to outlets indicating that in situ processes enhanced MeHg production rice fields, whereas concentrations decreased from inlets to outlets in managed wetlands. Finally, our preliminary results suggest organic carbon associated with rice plants was an important contributor to fish Hg concentrations, whereas plants in managed wetlands were not strongly linked to fish Hg concentrations. Our preliminary findings suggest that there are strong linkages between biogeochemical processes inherent in rice wetlands and MeHg cycling and bioaccumulation, which are further described in a companion presentation by Windham-Myers (this session). These results have important implications for managing MeHg risk in areas with extensive rice agriculture.

  16. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research 

    E-print Network

    2006-01-01

    Institute (IRRI) has initiated large scale mutant generation project using radiation and chemicals as mutagenic agents and rice cul- tivar IR64. Mutants can be spontaneous or induced. Field mutants are naturally occurring but very rare while induced mutants... are more frequent due the mutagenic effect of the chemicals or radiation used. Breeding popu- Very high tillering and dwarf mutant rice. Albino and its variants at seedling stage. Note the all white single row. continued on next page Texas Rice Special...

  17. Fertilizers for Rice in Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Wyche, R. H. (Robert Henry)

    1941-01-01

    ARt)TTC! - ,%. r . , . - TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. R. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 602 JUNE 1941 FERTILIZER FOR RICE IN TEXAS R. H. WYCHE Division of Agonomy AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS... T. 0. WALTON, President [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Fertilizer experiments with rice conducted on Lake Charles and Crowley clap soils at the Rice Experiment Station, Beaumont, Texas, from 1930 to 1940 show definitely that these soils...

  18. Spatiotemporal simulation of changes in rice cropping systems in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Ru; Chen, Chi-Farn; Son, Nguyen-Thanh

    2015-04-01

    With the dramatic development of agro-economics, population growth, and climate change, the rice cropping systems in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (VMD) have been undergoing a major change. Information on rice cropping practices and changes in cropping systems is critical for policymakers to devise successful strategies to ensure food security and rice grain exports for the country. The primary objective of this research is to map rice cropping systems and predict future dynamics of rice cropping systems using MODIS time-series data from 2002 to 2012. A phenology-based classification approach was applied for the classification and assessment of rice cropping systems. Then, the Cellular Automata-Markov (CA-Markov) model was used to simulate future changes in rice-cropping activities. To obtain precise prediction, a calibration of CA-Markov were implemented by using a series of rice crop maps. The comparisons between the classification maps and the ground reference data indicated satisfactory results with overall accuracies above 81%, and Kappa coefficients above 0.75, respectively. The simulated maps of rice cropping systems for 2010-2012 were extrapolated by CA-Markov model based on the trend of rice cropping systems during 2002-2009. The comparison between the predicted scenarios and the classification maps for 2010-2012 presents a reasonably close agreement. In summary, the CA-Markov model with a long-term calibration confirmed the validity of the approach for dynamic modeling of changes in rice cropping systems in the study region. The results obtained from this study demonstrate that the approach produced satisfactory results in terms of accuracy, quantitative forecast, and spatial pattern changes. Thus, projections of future changes would provide useful information for the agricultural policymakers in respect to formulating effective management strategies of rice cropping practices in VMD.

  19. Rice: old or new food?

    PubMed

    Rondanelli, M; Stucchi, E; Zorzetto, E; Ferrari, E

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to focus the attention on the role of rice not only as food, but as a natural dietetic product. In fact, a regular intake of rice may contribute to the well-being of subjects due to the particular positive qualities of this food (high digeribility, high biological value of amino acids, high content of EFA, positive sodium/chloride rate, high content of selenium and silicium, antihypertensive effect) which have been scientifically confirmed. Stress is laid on the particular nutritional composition of rice, underlying the dietetic usefulness of this food and the new frontiers of rice as functional food. PMID:16498359

  20. RICHARD G. BARANIUK Rice University

    E-print Network

    /Founder 1998 Isaac Newton Institute, Cambridge University Rosenbaum Fellow 1996­2000 Rice University Associate Nu) 1998 Rosenbaum Fellowship, Isaac Newton Institute (Cambridge University) 1995 ONR Young

  1. Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    M. Aslam K. Khalil

    2009-07-16

    This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

  2. Genotype x Management interactions influencing susceptibility to rice grain smuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain smuts have historically been considered minor diseases of rice in the United States. In recent years localized infestations of kernel smut and increased prevalence of false smut have raised interest in these diseases. Although major gene resistance has not been described for either disease, ...

  3. Found: Rice that produces grains with improved nutritional value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice provides the major source of nutrition for a large proportion of the world’s population, and is a key ingredient in baby foods in the U.S. Mineral nutrients such as Ca, Fe, and Zn play critical roles in human health, with over 3 billion people suffering from Fe and Zn deficiencies. Unfortunat...

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF MOLECULAR STRATEGIES TO CONTROL RICE SHEATH BLIGHT DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about mechanisms of molecular interaction of host with the necrotrophic pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. After a detailed analysis of the pathogen population in the major rice producing state, Arkansas, the most virulent field isolate was identified among 124 characterized isolates. Th...

  5. Ensuring good rice plant nitrogen assimilation under difficult growing conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen is one of the major nutrients essential for growth and development of rice. Each year growers invest billions of dollars towards fertilizers. However, these applications are efficient only if plants successfully take up, assimilate and retain nitrogen. These processes occur in the roots and...

  6. Identification of blast resistance genes for managing rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. In the present study, an international set of monogenic differentials carrying 24 major blast resistance (R) genes (Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pita2,...

  7. Manually curated database of rice proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gour, Pratibha; Garg, Priyanka; Jain, Rashmi; Joseph, Shaji V.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    ‘Manually Curated Database of Rice Proteins’ (MCDRP) available at http://www.genomeindia.org/biocuration is a unique curated database based on published experimental data. Semantic integration of scientific data is essential to gain a higher level of understanding of biological systems. Since the majority of scientific data is available as published literature, text mining is an essential step before the data can be integrated and made available for computer-based search in various databases. However, text mining is a tedious exercise and thus, there is a large gap in the data available in curated databases and published literature. Moreover, data in an experiment can be perceived from several perspectives, which may not reflect in the text-based curation. In order to address such issues, we have demonstrated the feasibility of digitizing the experimental data itself by creating a database on rice proteins based on in-house developed data curation models. Using these models data of individual experiments have been digitized with the help of universal ontologies. Currently, the database has data for over 1800 rice proteins curated from >4000 different experiments of over 400 research articles. Since every aspect of the experiment such as gene name, plant type, tissue and developmental stage has been digitized, experimental data can be rapidly accessed and integrated. PMID:24214963

  8. Evolutionary transients in the rice transcriptome.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jianguo; Li, Ruiqiang; Zheng, Hongkun; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Li, Heng; Ni, Peixiang; Li, Songgang; Li, Shengting; Wang, Jingquiang; Liu, Dongyuan; McDermott, Jason E.; Samudrala, Ram; Liu, Siqi; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Yu, Jun; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu

    2010-12-01

    The number of protein-coding genes predicted from the rice genome remains much larger than the number of genes for Arabidopsis. Most of the excess rice genes show low similarity to Arabidopsis, and eudicots in general. It is difficult to repudiate these genes because even for the 19,079 non-redundant rice cDNAs that have been sequenced, 34.3% are low similarity. Here, we describe a major contributor to this excess of low similarity genes: the frequent and continued occurrence of gene duplications in plants, and the post- duplicative degradation (i.e. relaxed selection) that is typically expected to occur in one of the two gene copies. The salient feature of this degradation is an increase in Ka/Ks for Ks per available site, respectively. We show that low similarity genes are expressed at lower mRNA and protein levels than other genes, and that regions of the encoded proteins are structurally disordered. Indeed, many are evolutionary “transients” that may be destined to die, even if they remain transcriptionally active for millions of years.

  9. Soil nitric oxide emissions from terrestrial ecosystems in China: a synthesis of modeling and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Li, Dejun

    2014-12-01

    Soils are among the major sources of atmospheric nitric oxide (NO), which play a crucial role in atmospheric chemistry. Here we systematically synthesized the modeling studies and field measurements and presented a novel soil NO emission inventory of terrestrial ecosystems in China. The previously modeled inventories ranged from 480 to 1375 and from 242.8 to 550 Gg N yr-1 for all lands and croplands, respectively. Nevertheless, all the previous modeling studies were conducted based on very few measurements from China. According to the current synthesis of field measurements, most soil NO emission measurements were conducted at croplands, while the measurements were only conducted at two sites for forest and grassland. The median NO flux was 3.2 ng N m-2 s-1 with a fertilizer induced emission factor (FIE) of 0.04% for rice fields, and was 7.1 ng N m-2 s-1 with an FIE of 0.67% for uplands. A novel NO emission inventory of 1226.33 (ranging from 588.24 to 2132.05) Gg N yr-1 was estimated for China's terrestrial ecosystems, which was about 18% of anthropogenic emissions. More field measurements should be conducted to cover more biomes and obtain more representative data in order to well constrain soil NO emission inventory of China.

  10. Soil nitric oxide emissions from terrestrial ecosystems in China: a synthesis of modeling and measurements

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Li, Dejun

    2014-01-01

    Soils are among the major sources of atmospheric nitric oxide (NO), which play a crucial role in atmospheric chemistry. Here we systematically synthesized the modeling studies and field measurements and presented a novel soil NO emission inventory of terrestrial ecosystems in China. The previously modeled inventories ranged from 480 to 1375 and from 242.8 to 550?Gg N yr?1 for all lands and croplands, respectively. Nevertheless, all the previous modeling studies were conducted based on very few measurements from China. According to the current synthesis of field measurements, most soil NO emission measurements were conducted at croplands, while the measurements were only conducted at two sites for forest and grassland. The median NO flux was 3.2?ng N m?2 s?1 with a fertilizer induced emission factor (FIE) of 0.04% for rice fields, and was 7.1?ng N m?2 s?1 with an FIE of 0.67% for uplands. A novel NO emission inventory of 1226.33 (ranging from 588.24 to 2132.05) Gg N yr?1 was estimated for China's terrestrial ecosystems, which was about 18% of anthropogenic emissions. More field measurements should be conducted to cover more biomes and obtain more representative data in order to well constrain soil NO emission inventory of China. PMID:25490942

  11. Consideration of Ecosystem for ICME

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju

    2013-01-01

    As the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) emerges as a hot topic, computation, experimentation, and digital database are identified as its three major components. Efforts are being actively made from various aspects to bring ICME to reality. However, many factors that would affect ICEM development still remain vague. This paper is an attempt to discuss the needs for establishing a database centered ecosystem to facilitate ICEM development.

  12. Maximum outcrossing rate and genetic compatibility between red rice (Oryza sativa) biotypes and Clearfield™ rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although red rice can be selectively controlled with imazethapyr in ClearfieldTM (CL) rice, the transfer of the imazethapyr-resistant gene from CL rice to red rice is an ecological risk. Previous experiments indicated that flowering synchronization and genetic compatibility between cultivated rice a...

  13. Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Learn more at cmc.rice.edu

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Wireless Learn more at cmc.rice.edu or ece.rice in either orthogonal time-slots (TDD) or frequency bands (FDD). In 2010, Rice re-purposed off-the-shelf MIMO Wireless project directed by Prof. Edward Knightly at Rice University aims to develop fundamental

  14. A&M vs. Rice 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Rice is currently produced on approximately 400,000 acres in the Texas Coastal Prairie. This rice consumes 1.8 million acre-feet of water a year or 13 percent of Texas' renewable water resources. The Texas Coastal Prairie ...

  15. Update on organic rice research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic products command a premium in the marketplace and bring greater farmgate value to growers and processors. Although total rice acreage has decreased in Texas over the last ten years, there has been an increase in rice acreage produced under organic management. USDA ARS has conducted research ...

  16. SOLID MECHANICS James R. Rice

    E-print Network

    1 SOLID MECHANICS James R. Rice School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Department of Earth: February 2010 Downloadable at: http://esag.harvard.edu/rice/e0_Solid_Mechanics_94_10.pdf TABLE OF CONTENTS provided on last three pages, pp. 87-89 INTRODUCTION The application of the principles of mechanics to bulk

  17. POULTRY LITTER INDUCES RICE TILLERING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry litter (PL) is used as a soil amendment for numerous crops, including rice. While it is known that rice growth is improved by PL, little study has been carried out to identify the specific growth parameters that are altered. We have identified a marked increase in the number of tillers (sh...

  18. ECOSYSTEM GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermodynamically, ecosystem growth and development is the process by which energy throughflow and stored biomass increase. Several proposed hypotheses describe the natural tendencies that occur as an ecosystem matures, and here, we consider five: minimum entropy production, maxi...

  19. Ontogenetic changes in vitamin C in selected rice varieties

    PubMed Central

    Lisko, Katherine A.; Hubstenberger, John F.; Phillips, Gregory C.; Belefant-Miller, Helen; McClung, Anna; Lorence, Argelia

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid) is a key antioxidant for both plants and animals. In plants, ascorbate is involved in several key physiological processes including photosynthesis, cell expansion and division, growth, flowering, and senescence. In addition, ascorbate is an enzyme cofactor and a regulator of gene expression. During exposure to abiotic stresses, ascorbate counteracts excessive reactive oxygen species within the cell and protects key molecules, including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, from irreversible damage. In this study we focus on understanding how ascorbate levels are controlled in rice (Oryza sativa) during plant development and in response to light intensity and photoperiod. Our results indicate that in rice ascorbate metabolism follows a different pattern compared to other species. In the rice accessions we analyzed, total foliar ascorbate content increases during development and peaks at the vegetative 2–4 and the reproductive 4 stages, whereas other research has shown that in Arabidopsis thaliana and other dicots, ascorbate content declines with plant age. The pattern in rice does not seem to change when plants were grown under increasing light intensity: 150, 400 or 1200–1500 µmol m?2 s?1. We observed little diurnal variation in AsA content in rice and did not see a steady decline during the dark period as has been reported in other species such as Arabidopsis and tomato. The total foliar ascorbate content of twenty-three rice accessions from four major rice subgroups was compared. These genotypes differed as much as eight-fold in ascorbate content at the V2 stage indicating the potential to enhance vitamin C levels in genotypes of global interest via breeding approaches. PMID:23466746

  20. Ecosystem Services Ecosystem Function and the Ecosystem Approach 

    E-print Network

    Vallianou, Koralia

    2013-11-28

    This project focused on mapping the delivery of three ecosystems services each in one case study area in Scotland and then identify how the Scottish policies such as woodland expansion biodiversity, conservation and food production affect the land...

  1. LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1 Rice University Laser Safety Manual Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 January 2014 #12;LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 2 Introduction The objective of the Rice University Laser Safety program is to assist all levels

  2. THE VOLATILE COMPOSITION OF WAXY RICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Waxy rice contains no amylose and has a characteristic aroma described as starchy/grainy. Waxy rice is used in traditional Japanese rice cakes, crackers, and is preferred for making rice wines and sake throughout the Orient. Gas chromatographic/mass spectral data showed a greater presence of lipid...

  3. Rice Computer Science Club Constitution | 1

    E-print Network

    Wallach, Dan

    Rice Computer Science Club Constitution | 1 Constitution Last Revised Apr 01, 2014 #12;Rice Computer Science Club Constitution | 2 Preamble We the members of Rice Computer Science Club, subscribing to the regulations and policies of Rice University, establish this Constitution to govern the matters within our

  4. EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN 2015 1 Rice University

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN 2015 1 Rice University Rice University Exposure Control Plan Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 713 348 4444 February 2015 #12;EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN 2015 2 Rice University Exposure Control Plan Rice University is committed to providing a safe

  5. PROTEOMIC AND GENETIC APPROACHES TO IDENTIFYING DEFENSE-RELATED PROTEINS IN RICE CHALLENGED WITH THE FUNGAL PATHOGEN RHIZOCTONIA SOLANI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight, caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia solani, is a major disease of rice worldwide, but little is known about the host response to infection. The objective of this study was to identify proteins and DNA markers in resistant and susceptible rice associated with response to infection by R. s...

  6. Differential response of cultivated and weedy (red) rice to recent and projected increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a principle resource for plant growth; as such, the ongoing increase in its concentration may differentially affect the growth of cultivated and wild types of the same species. Red rice in the U.S. is a weedy relative of cultivated rice that represents a major production con...

  7. Genetic diversity for grain mineral concentrations among diverse rice germplasm grown gnder aerobic and anaerobic field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice provides the major source of nutrition for a large proportion of the world’s population. Mineral nutrients such as Ca, Fe, and Zn play critical roles in human health, with over 3 billion people suffering from Fe and Zn deficiencies. Unfortunately for those who rely on rice for subsistence, ri...

  8. Efficacy of bacillus biocontrol agents for management of sheath blight and narrow brown leaf spot in organic rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic rice production has significantly increased in the U. S. over the last decade. Growers lack effective tools to manage sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, and narrow brown leaf spot (NBLS), caused by Cercospora janseana, two major diseases affecting organic rice production. An experi...

  9. Remotely Sensed Rice Yield Prediction Using Multi-Temporal NDVI Data Derived from NOAA's-AVHRR

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Xiuzhen; Li, Xinxing; Tian, Hanqin; Pan, Zhuokun

    2013-01-01

    Grain-yield prediction using remotely sensed data have been intensively studied in wheat and maize, but such information is limited in rice, barley, oats and soybeans. The present study proposes a new framework for rice-yield prediction, which eliminates the influence of the technology development, fertilizer application, and management improvement and can be used for the development and implementation of provincial rice-yield predictions. The technique requires the collection of remotely sensed data over an adequate time frame and a corresponding record of the region's crop yields. Longer normalized-difference-vegetation-index (NDVI) time series are preferable to shorter ones for the purposes of rice-yield prediction because the well-contrasted seasons in a longer time series provide the opportunity to build regression models with a wide application range. A regression analysis of the yield versus the year indicated an annual gain in the rice yield of 50 to 128 kg ha?1. Stepwise regression models for the remotely sensed rice-yield predictions have been developed for five typical rice-growing provinces in China. The prediction models for the remotely sensed rice yield indicated that the influences of the NDVIs on the rice yield were always positive. The association between the predicted and observed rice yields was highly significant without obvious outliers from 1982 to 2004. Independent validation found that the overall relative error is approximately 5.82%, and a majority of the relative errors were less than 5% in 2005 and 2006, depending on the study area. The proposed models can be used in an operational context to predict rice yields at the provincial level in China. The methodologies described in the present paper can be applied to any crop for which a sufficient time series of NDVI data and the corresponding historical yield information are available, as long as the historical yield increases significantly. PMID:23967112

  10. Ecosystem Health: Energy Indicators.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Just as for human beings health is a concept that applies to the condition of the whole organism, the health of an ecosystem refers to the condition of the ecosystem as a whole. For this reason, the study and characterization of ecosystems is fundamental to establishing accurate ...

  11. Estuarine Total Ecosystem Metabolism

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total ecosystem metabolism (TEM), both as discrete measurements and as a theoretical concept, has an important history in ecosystem ecology, particularly in estuaries. Some of the earliest ecological studies were developed to determine how energy flowed through an ecosystem and w...

  12. CONFIRMATION OF HYBRIDIZATION BETWEEN RICE AND PHENOTYPICALLY DISTINCT RED RICE TYPES IN ARKANSAS RICE FIELDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review details several key findings from rice-red rice outcrossing evaluations in research plots and in grower fields in Arkansas from 2000 to 2005. Observations from research plots, controlled crosses, and grower fields have provided us with several easily discernable phenotypic traits (e.g. ...

  13. Confirmation of hybridization between rice and phenotypically distinct red rice types in Arkansas rice fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review details several key findings from red-rice rice outcrossing evaluations in research plots and in grower fields in Arkansas from 2000 to 2005. Observations from research plots, controlled crosses, and grower fields have provided us with several easily discernable phenotypic traits (e.g. ...

  14. Seeing red: the origin of grain pigmentation in US weedy rice.

    PubMed

    Gross, Briana L; Reagon, Michael; Hsu, Shih-Chung; Caicedo, Ana L; Jia, Yulin; Olsen, Kenneth M

    2010-08-01

    Weedy forms of crop species infest agricultural fields worldwide and are a leading cause of crop losses, yet little is known about how these weeds evolve. Red rice (Oryza sativa), a major weed of cultivated rice fields in the US, is recognized by the dark-pigmented grain that gives it its common name. Studies using neutral molecular markers have indicated a close relationship between US red rice and domesticated rice, suggesting that the weed may have originated through reversion of domesticated rice to a feral form. We have tested this reversion hypothesis by examining molecular variation at Rc, the regulatory gene responsible for grain pigmentation differences between domesticated and wild rice. Loss-of-function mutations at Rc account for the absence of proanthocyanidin pigments in cultivated rice grains, and the major rc domestication allele has been shown to be capable of spontaneous reversion to a functional form through additional mutations at the Rc locus. Using a diverse sample of 156 weedy, domesticated and wild Oryzas, we analysed DNA sequence variation at Rc and its surrounding 4 Mb genomic region. We find that reversion of domestication alleles does not account for the pigmented grains of weed accessions; moreover, we find that haplotypes characterizing the weed are either absent or very rare in cultivated rice. Sequences from genomic regions flanking Rc are consistent with a genomic footprint of the rc selective sweep in cultivated rice, and they are compatible with a close relationship of red rice to Asian Oryzas that have never been cultivated in the US. PMID:20584133

  15. Marker-assisted backcrossing: a useful method for rice improvement

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Muhammad Mahmudul; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Ismail, Mohd R.; Mahmood, Maziah; Rahim, Harun A.; Alam, Md. Amirul; Ashkani, Sadegh; Malek, Md. Abdul; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The world's population is increasing very rapidly, reducing the cultivable land of rice, decreasing table water, emerging new diseases and pests, and the climate changes are major issues that must be addressed to researchers to develop sustainable crop varieties with resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, recent scientific discoveries and advances particularly in genetics, genomics and crop physiology have opened up new opportunities to reduce the impact of these stresses which would have been difficult if not impossible as recently as the turn of the century. Marker assisted backcrossing (MABC) is one of the most promising approaches is the use of molecular markers to identify and select genes controlling resistance to those factors. Regarding this, MABC can contribute to develop resistant or high-yielding or quality rice varieties by incorporating a gene of interest into an elite variety which is already well adapted by the farmers. MABC is newly developed efficient tool by which using large population sizes (400 or more plants) for the backcross F1 generations, it is possible to recover the recurrent parent genotype using only two or three backcrosses. So far, many high yielding, biotic and abiotic stresses tolerance, quality and fragrance rice varieties have been developed in rice growing countries through MABC within the shortest timeframe. Nowadays, MABC is being used widely in plant breeding programmes to develop new variety/lines especially in rice. This paper reviews recent literature on some examples of variety/ line development using MABC strategy. PMID:26019637

  16. International Consortium of Rice Mutagenesis: resources and beyond

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important crops in the world. The rice community needs to cooperate and share efforts and resources so that we can understand the functions of rice genes, especially those with a role in important agronomical traits, for application in agricultural production. Mutation is a major source of genetic variation that can be used for studying gene function. We will present here the status of mutant collections affected in a random manner by physical/chemical and insertion mutageneses. As of early September 2013, a total of 447, 919 flanking sequence tags from rice mutant libraries with T-DNA, Ac/Ds, En/Spm, Tos17, nDART/aDART insertions have been collected and publicly available. From these, 336,262 sequences are precisely positioned on the japonica rice chromosomes, and 67.5% are in gene interval. We discuss the genome coverage and preference of the insertion, issues limiting the exchange and use of the current collections, as well as new and improved resources. We propose a call to renew all mutant populations as soon as possible. We also suggest that a common web portal should be established for ordering seeds. PMID:24341871

  17. Wheat puroindolines enhance fungal disease resistance in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Balconi, C; Sherwood, J E; Giroux, M J

    2001-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides play a role in the immune systems of animals and plants by limiting pathogen infection and growth. The puroindolines, endosperm-specific proteins involved in wheat seed hardness, are small proteins reported to have in vitro antimicrobial properties. Rice, the most widely used cereal crop worldwide, normally does not contain puroindolines. Transgenic rice plants that constitutively express the puroindoline genes pinA and/or pinB throughout the plants were produced. PIN extracts of leaves from the transgenic plants reduced in vitro growth of Magnaporthe grisea and Rhizoctonia solani, two major fungal pathogens of rice, by 35 to 50%. Transgenic rice expressing pinA and/or pinB showed significantly increased tolerance to M. grisea (rice blast), with a 29 to 54% reduction in symptoms, and R. solani (sheath blight), with an 11 to 22% reduction in symptoms. Puroindolines are effective in vivo in antifungal proteins and could be valuable new tools in the control of a wide range of fungal pathogens of crop plants. PMID:11605965

  18. Global Identification of Genes Specific for Rice Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bingwei; Xu, Meng; Bian, Shiquan; Hou, Lili; Tang, Ding; Li, Yafei; Gu, Minghong; Cheng, Zhukuan; Yu, Hengxiu

    2015-01-01

    The leptotene-zygotene transition is a major step in meiotic progression during which pairing between homologous chromosomes is initiated and double strand breaks occur. OsAM1, a homologue of maize AM1 and Arabidopsis SWI1, encodes a protein with a coiled-coil domain in its central region that is required for the leptotene-zygotene transition during rice meiosis. To gain more insight into the role of OsAM1 in rice meiosis and identify additional meiosis-specific genes, we characterized the transcriptomes of young panicles of Osam1 mutant and wild-type rice plants using RNA-Seq combined with bioinformatic and statistical analyses. As a result, a total of 25,750 and 28,455 genes were expressed in young panicles of wild-type and Osam1 mutant plants, respectively, and 4,400 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; log2 Ratio ? 1, FDR ? 0.05) were identified. Of these DEGs, four known rice meiosis-specific genes were detected, and 22 new putative meiosis-related genes were found by mapping these DEGs to reference biological pathways in the KEGG database. We identified eight additional well-conserved OsAM1-responsive rice meiotic genes by comparing our RNA-Seq data with known meiotic genes in Arabidopsis and fission yeast. PMID:26394329

  19. Gene flow from herbicide-resistant and non-resistant rice into red rice populations in U.S. rice fields: A survey of current evidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse red rice types infest U.S. rice fields. These infestations have remained widespread despite recent successes in controlling red rice in newly-introduced herbicide-resistant rice systems. As a result, the distribution and genetic background of red rice, and the degree to which red rice inte...

  20. Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 6 

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas August 2002 Volume II Number 6 Texas Rice The US Rice Producers Association: Working for Farmers through Market Development and Education Rice cooking... demonstrations and tastings in Mexico City sponsored by USRPA and the Foreign Agricultural Service. continued on back page The US Rice Producers Asso- ciation (USRPA) is a non-profit corporation representing all rice farmers in Mississippi, Missouri and Texas...

  1. LABA1, a Domestication Gene Associated with Long, Barbed Awns in Wild Rice[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Lei; Wang, Diane R.; Tan, Lubin; Fu, Yongcai; Liu, Fengxia; Xiao, Langtao; Zhu, Zuofeng; Fu, Qiang; Sun, Xianyou; Gu, Ping; Cai, Hongwei; McCouch, Susan R.; Sun, Chuanqing

    2015-01-01

    Common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon), the wild relative of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa), flaunts long, barbed awns, which are necessary for efficient propagation and dissemination of seeds. By contrast, O. sativa cultivars have been selected to be awnless or to harbor short, barbless awns, which facilitate seed processing and storage. The transition from long, barbed awns to short, barbless awns was a crucial event in rice domestication. Here, we show that the presence of long, barbed awns in wild rice is controlled by a major gene on chromosome 4, LONG AND BARBED AWN1 (LABA1), which encodes a cytokinin-activating enzyme. A frame-shift deletion in LABA1 of cultivated rice reduces the cytokinin concentration in awn primordia, disrupting barb formation and awn elongation. Sequencing analysis demonstrated low nucleotide diversity and a selective sweep encompassing an ?800-kb region around the derived laba1 allele in cultivated rice. Haplotype analysis revealed that the laba1 allele originated in the japonica subspecies and moved into the indica gene pool via introgression, suggesting that humans selected for this locus in early rice domestication. Identification of LABA1 provides new insights into rice domestication and also sheds light on the molecular mechanism underlying awn development. PMID:26082172

  2. Chinese rice production area adaptations to climate changes, 1949-2010.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengguo; Liu, Zhenhuan; Anderson, Weston; Yang, Peng; Wu, Wenbin; Tang, Huajun; You, Liangzhi

    2015-02-17

    Climate change has great impact on cropping system. Understanding how the rice production system has historically responded to external forces, both natural and anthropogenic, will provide critical insights into how the system is likely to respond in the future. The observed historic rice movement provides insights into the capability of the rice production system to adapt to climate changes. Using province-level rice production data and historic climate records, here we show that the centroid of Chinese rice production shifted northeastward over 370 km (2.98°N in latitude and 1.88°E in longitude) from 1949 to 2010. Using a linear regression model, we examined the driving factors, in particular climate, behind such rice production movement. While the major driving forces of the rice relocation are such social economic factors as urbanization, irrigation investment, and agricultural or land use policy changes, climate plays a significant role as well. We found that temperature has been a significant and coherent influence on moving the rice center in China and precipitation has had a significant but less spatially coherent influence. PMID:25625767

  3. Identification of climate-resilient integrated nutrient management practices for rice-rice cropping system--an empirical approach to uphold food security.

    PubMed

    Subash, N; Gangwar, B; Singh, Rajbir; Sikka, A K

    2015-01-01

    Yield datasets of long-term experiments on integrated nutrient management in rice-rice cropping systems were used to investigate the relationship of variability in rainfall, temperature, and integrated nutrient management (INM) practices in rice-rice cropping system in three different agroecological regions of India. Twelve treatments with different combinations of inorganic (chemical fertilizer) and organic (farmyard manure, green manure, and paddy straw) were compared with farmer's conventional practice. The intraseasonal variations in rice yields are largely driven by rainfall during kharif rice and by temperature during rabi rice. Half of the standard deviation from the average monthly as well as seasonal rainfall during kharif rice and 1 °C increase or decrease from the average maximum and minimum temperature during rabi rice has been taken as the classification of yield groups. The trends in the date of effective onset of monsoon indicate a 36-day delay during the 30-year period at Rajendranagar, which is statistically significant at 95 % confidence level. The mean annual maximum temperature shows an increasing trend in all the study sites. The length of monsoon also showed a shrinking trend in the rate of 40 days during the 30-year study period at Rajendranagar representing a semiarid region. At Bhubaneshwar, the application of 50 % recommended NPK through chemical fertilizers and 50 % N through green manure resulted in an overall average higher increase of 5.1 % in system productivity under both excess and deficit rainfall years and also during the years having seasonal mean maximum temperature ?35 °C. However, at Jorhat, the application of 50 % recommended NPK through chemical fertilizers and 50 % N through straw resulted in an overall average higher increase of 7.4 % in system productivity, while at Rajendranagar, the application of 75 % NPK through chemical fertilizers and 25 % N through green manusre resulted in an overall average higher increase of 8.8 % in system productivity. This study highlights the adaptive capacity of different integrated nutrient management practices to rainfall and temperature variability under a rice-rice cropping system in humid, subhumid, and semiarid ecosystems. PMID:24817490

  4. Identification of climate-resilient integrated nutrient management practices for rice-rice cropping system—an empirical approach to uphold food security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subash, N.; Gangwar, B.; Singh, Rajbir; Sikka, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Yield datasets of long-term experiments on integrated nutrient management in rice-rice cropping systems were used to investigate the relationship of variability in rainfall, temperature, and integrated nutrient management (INM) practices in rice-rice cropping system in three different agroecological regions of India. Twelve treatments with different combinations of inorganic (chemical fertilizer) and organic (farmyard manure, green manure, and paddy straw) were compared with farmer's conventional practice. The intraseasonal variations in rice yields are largely driven by rainfall during kharif rice and by temperature during rabi rice. Half of the standard deviation from the average monthly as well as seasonal rainfall during kharif rice and 1 °C increase or decrease from the average maximum and minimum temperature during rabi rice has been taken as the classification of yield groups. The trends in the date of effective onset of monsoon indicate a 36-day delay during the 30-year period at Rajendranagar, which is statistically significant at 95 % confidence level. The mean annual maximum temperature shows an increasing trend in all the study sites. The length of monsoon also showed a shrinking trend in the rate of 40 days during the 30-year study period at Rajendranagar representing a semiarid region. At Bhubaneshwar, the application of 50 % recommended NPK through chemical fertilizers and 50 % N through green manure resulted in an overall average higher increase of 5.1 % in system productivity under both excess and deficit rainfall years and also during the years having seasonal mean maximum temperature ?35 °C. However, at Jorhat, the application of 50 % recommended NPK through chemical fertilizers and 50 % N through straw resulted in an overall average higher increase of 7.4 % in system productivity, while at Rajendranagar, the application of 75 % NPK through chemical fertilizers and 25 % N through green manusre resulted in an overall average higher increase of 8.8 % in system productivity. This study highlights the adaptive capacity of different integrated nutrient management practices to rainfall and temperature variability under a rice-rice cropping system in humid, subhumid, and semiarid ecosystems.

  5. [Exposure degree of important non-target arthropods to Cry2Aa in Bt rice fields].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Ling; Li, Yun-He; Hua, Hong-Xia; Yang, Chang-Ju; Wu, Hong-Jin; Peng, Yu-Fa

    2013-06-01

    Based on the principle of "risk = hazard x exposure", the selected representative nontarget organisms in the assessment of the potential effects of insect-resistant genetically modified (GM) crops on non-target arthropods in laboratory are generally the arthropod species highly exposed to the insecticidal proteins expressed by the GM crops in farmland ecosystem. In order to understand the exposure degree of the important arthropod species to Cry proteins in Bt rice fields, and to select the appropriate non-target arthropods in the risk assessment of insect-resistant GM crops, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was conducted to measure the Cry2Aa protein concentration in the arthropods collected from the cry2Aa rice fields at different rice growth stages. The results showed that there was a significant difference in the Cry2Aa content protein concentration in different arthropod species. Some species did not contain Cry2Aa protein, while some species contained larger amounts of Cry2Aa protein. Relative to the arthropods colleted after rice anthesis, the arthropods colleted in rice anthesis contained relative higher concentrations of Cry2Aa protein, especially for the predacious arthropods. No Cry proteins were detected in parasitic arthropods. This study provided references for the laboratory assessment of the effects of GM rice on nontarget arthropods. PMID:24066553

  6. Enhanced rice production but greatly reduced carbon emission following biochar amendment in a metal-polluted rice paddy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Afeng; Bian, Rongjun; Li, Lianqing; Wang, Xudong; Zhao, Ying; Hussain, Qaiser; Pan, Genxing

    2015-12-01

    Soil amendment of biochar (BSA) had been shown effective for mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and alleviating metal stress to plants and microbes in soil. It has not yet been addressed if biochar exerts synergy effects on crop production, GHG emission, and microbial activity in metal-polluted soils. In a field experiment, biochar was amended at sequential rates at 0, 10, 20, and 40 t ha(-1), respectively, in a cadmium- and lead-contaminated rice paddy from the Tai lake Plain, China, before rice cropping in 2010. Fluxes of soil carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) were monitored using a static chamber method during the whole rice growing season (WRGS) of 2011. BSA significantly reduced soil CaCl2 extractable pool of Cd, and DTPA extractable pool of Cd and Pb. As compared to control, soil CO2 emission under BSA was observed to have no change at 10 t ha(-1) but decreased by 16-24 % at 20 and 40 t ha(-1). In a similar trend, BSA at 20 and 40 t ha(-1) increased rice yield by 25-26 % and thus enhanced ecosystem CO2 sequestration by 47-55 % over the control. Seasonal total N2O emission was reduced by 7.1, 30.7, and 48.6 % under BSA at 10, 20, and 40 t ha(-1), respectively. Overall, a net reduction in greenhouse gas balance (NGHGB) by 53.9-62.8 % and in greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) by 14.3-28.6 % was observed following BSA at 20 and 40 t ha(-1). The present study suggested a great potential of biochar to enhancing grain yield while reducing carbon emission in metal-polluted rice paddies. PMID:26213131

  7. Unravelling trophic subsidies of agroecosystems for biodiversity conservation: food consumption and nutrient recycling by waterbirds in Mediterranean rice fields.

    PubMed

    Navedo, Juan G; Hahn, Steffen; Parejo, Manuel; Abad-Gómez, José M; Gutiérrez, Jorge S; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Sánchez-Guzmán, Juan M; Masero, José A

    2015-04-01

    Waterbirds can reallocate a considerable amount of nutrients within agricultural fields and between agriculture sites and wetlands. However their effects on biogeochemical cycles have rarely been quantified. We estimated bird numbers, diet (from stable isotope analysis), food supply, and the food consumption on rice fields by overwintering waterbirds in one of the most important areas for rice production in southwestern Europe and a key area for various migrating and resident waterbird species. Herein, we modelled the nutrient (N and P) recycling in rice fields, and their transport to reservoirs. The energy consumption by waterbirds (96,605±18,311 individuals) on rice fields during winter averaged at 89.9±39.0 kJ·m(-2), with its majority (89.9%) belonging to foraging on rice seeds. Thus, the birds removed about 26% of rice seeds leftover after harvest (estimated in 932.5±504.7 seeds·m(-2) in early winter) wherein common cranes and dabbling ducks (four species) were the most important consumers. Waterbirds foraging and roosting in the rice fields recycled more than 24.1 (1.0 kg·ha(-1)) of N and an additional 5.0 tons (0.2 kg·ha(-1)) of P in the Extremadura's rice fields during winter. Additionally, we estimated that 2.3 tons of N and 550 kg of P were removed from rice fields and transported to reservoirs. The seasonal foraging of wildlife should result in a direct benefit for rice farmers by improving nutrient recycling through defecation by waterbirds with respect to artificial fertilisation. Additionally, rice fields located in the cranes' core wintering areas can provide sufficient food supply to induce habitat shift from their traditional wintering habitat in 'dehesas' to rice fields, which causes indirect socioeconomic benefit through reduced acorn consumption by cranes. Our modelling approach may thus be especially helpful for management decisions regarding rice agroecosystems in areas which are also important for the conservation of migratory waterbirds. PMID:25553543

  8. Workable male sterility systems for hybrid rice: Genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, and utilization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Zhong; E, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Hua-Li; Shu, Qing-Yao

    2014-12-01

    The exploitation of male sterility systems has enabled the commercialization of heterosis in rice, with greatly increased yield and total production of this major staple food crop. Hybrid rice, which was adopted in the 1970s, now covers nearly 13.6 million hectares each year in China alone. Various types of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and environment-conditioned genic male sterility (EGMS) systems have been applied in hybrid rice production. In this paper, recent advances in genetics, biochemistry, and molecular biology are reviewed with an emphasis on major male sterility systems in rice: five CMS systems, i.e., BT-, HL-, WA-, LD- and CW- CMS, and two EGMS systems, i.e., photoperiod- and temperature-sensitive genic male sterility (P/TGMS). The interaction of chimeric mitochondrial genes with nuclear genes causes CMS, which may be restored by restorer of fertility (Rf) genes. The PGMS, on the other hand, is conditioned by a non-coding RNA gene. A survey of the various CMS and EGMS lines used in hybrid rice production over the past three decades shows that the two-line system utilizing EGMS lines is playing a steadily larger role and TGMS lines predominate the current two-line system for hybrid rice production. The findings and experience gained during development and application of, and research on male sterility in rice not only advanced our understanding but also shed light on applications to other crops. PMID:26055995

  9. TOWARDS POSITIONAL CLONING OF GENES FOR DORMANCY AND ITS RELATED ADAPTIVE TRAITS FROM WEEDY RICE (ORYZA SATIVA L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An array of physiological and morphological traits, such as seed dormancy, shattering and appendages, and pigmentations on seed covering tissues contribute to the adaptation of weeds in agro-ecosystems. We have developed weedy rice (Oryza sativa) as an experimental system primarily to investigate ge...

  10. Rice crop monitoring with multitemporal MODIS-Landsat data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Ru; Chen, Chi-Farn; Son, Nguyen-Thanh

    2014-05-01

    Rice is one of the most important cereal crops in the world and is the major crop in Taiwan. However, it is a challenge because rice fields are generally small and fragmental, while crop mapping requires information of crop phenology associating with the high spatiotemporal resolution of remote-sensing data. This problem can be partially overcome by a spatiotemporal fusion to create a new dataset that has a better spatiotemporal resolution. In this study, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Landsat imageries were used because MODIS data, which a spatial resolution of land bands of 500 m and temporal resolution of 1-2 days, were able to achieve the phenological information of rice crops at a large region; while Landsat data demonstrate the effectiveness to collectively map small patches of crop fields at the subnational level due to its spatial resolution of 30 m. However, the temporal resolution of Landsat data is lower (16 days), making it difficult to investigate temporal responses of crop phenology from rice fields. The main objective of this study was to take into account of advantages of MODIS and Landsat imageries to generate a synthetic dataset at Landsat spatial resolution and MODIS temporal resolution for rice crop mapping in Taiwan. The methodology comprised five steps: (1) satellite data for 2011 were pre-processed to account for geometric and radiometric correction of MODIS and Landsat data, (2) MODIS-Landsat data fusion using the Spatial Temporal Adaptive Fusion Model (STARFM), (3) construct the smooth time-series Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data using wavelet transform, (4) rice crop classification using phenological information of crop phenology, and (5) accuracy assessment. The data fusion results for day of year (DOY) 153 were compared with the reference Landsat data (DOY 153) indicated a close correlation (R2 = 0.81). The phenology-based classification results compared with the ground reference data revealed close agreement between these two datasets. The overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient were 82% and 0.75, respectively. The relationship between the MODIS-derived rice areas and those from the government's rice area statistics at the district level was examined, reaffirming a strong correlation between the two datasets with R2 > 0.9. This study demonstrates advantages of MODIS-Landsat data fusion for rice crop mapping in Taiwan. Such an approach used in this study could be applied for other regions to map small patches of crops at a subnational scale.

  11. Development of Casparian strip in rice cultivars.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xia; Chen, Tong; Zhou, QingYuan; Xu, Lei; Qu, LeQing; Hua, XueJun; Lin, JinXing

    2011-01-01

    The development of Casparian strips (CSs) on the endo- and exodermis and their chemical components in roots of three cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa) with different salt tolerance were compared using histochemistry and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The development and deposition of suberin lamellae of CSs on the endo- and exodermis in the salt-tolerant cultivar Liaohan 109 was earlier than in the moderately tolerant cultivar Tianfeng 202 and the sensitive cultivar Nipponbare. The detection of chemical components indicated major contributions to the structure of the outer part from aliphatic suberin, lignin, and cell wall proteins and carbohydrates to the rhizodermis, exodermis, sclerenchyma, and one layer of cortical cells in series (OPR) and the endodermal Casparian strip. Moreover, the amounts of these major chemical components in the outer part of the Liaohan 109 root were higher than in Tianfeng 202 and Nipponbare, but there was no distinct difference in endodermal CSs among the three rice cultivars. The results suggest that the exodermis of the salt-tolerant cultivar Liaohan 109 functions as a barrier for resisting salt stress. PMID:21248477

  12. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which...

  13. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which...

  14. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice...

  15. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice...

  16. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which...

  17. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice...

  18. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which...

  19. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice...

  20. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which...

  1. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301 Agriculture...COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice...

  2. RICE UNIVERSITY Replanning: A Powerful Planning Strategy for

    E-print Network

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    RICE UNIVERSITY Replanning: A Powerful Planning Strategy for Systems with Differential Constraints, Rice University Dr. Joe Warren Professor, Computer Science, Rice University Dr. Luay Nakhleh Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Rice University Houston, Texas May 2008 #12;Abstract Motion planning

  3. Rice ECE Corporate Affiliates Program A distinctive membership

    E-print Network

    Rice ECE Corporate Affiliates Program A distinctive membership program. Companies recognize that employing Rice ECE students often translates into market Frantz Junichiro Kono Lin Zhong Contact: Jennifer Hunter Jkh6@rice.edu Ece.rice

  4. Nitrous oxide emissions from wetland rice-duck cultivation systems in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengfang; Cao, Cougui; Wang, Jingping; Zhan, Ming; Yuan, Weiling; Ahmad, Shahrear

    2009-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from a rice-duck cultivation system in the subtropical region of China and its regulating factors were investigated by using a static chambers technique during rice growth seasons in 2006 and 2007. The experimental field was equally divided into six plots for two different treatments: One was a conventional rice field (CK) and the other was a rice-duck ecosystem (RD). With the same amount of urea applied as basal fertilization, N2O emission fluxes from RD and CK followed a similar seasonal variation trend. During the flooding seasons, the N2O emission flux was not correlated with temperature, but it was significantly related to soil inorganic nitrogen (SIN) (p < 0.01) and soil pH (p < 0.01). After drainage, the N2O emission flux was not correlated with temperature, SIN, and soil pH. Our experimental data showed that peaks of N2O emission flux occurred both in 2 weeks after urea application and after drainage. Compared to CK, RD could significantly increase N2O emission. We evaluated the integrated global warming potentials (GWPs) of a rice-duck cultivation system based on methane (CH4) and N2O emission, which showed that RD could suppress the total amount of CH4 and N2O emissions from rice paddies. Moreover, because the decrease of CH4 emissions from RD compared to CK was far more than the increase of N2O emissions from RD compared to CK, RD greatly reduced integrated GWPs (CH4 + N2O) compared to CK. So, the rice-duck cultivation system is an effective strategy for reducing integrated GWPs of the rice-duck cultivation systems based on CH4 and N2O in southern China and will contribute to alleviating global warming. PMID:18427710

  5. Isolation and identification of phenolic antioxidants in black rice bran.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hyun-Il; Shin, Jae-Wook; Song, Geun-Seoup; Kim, Young-Soo

    2015-02-01

    Black rice bran contains phenolic compounds of a high antioxidant activity. In this study, the 40% acetone extract of black rice bran was sequentially fractionated to obtain 5 fractions. Out of the 5 fractions, ethyl acetate fraction was subfractionated using the Sephadex LH-20 chromatography. The antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds in the extracts was investigated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical assay, 2,2-azino-bis-(3-ethylenebenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation assay, reducing power. The subfraction 2 from ethyl acetate fraction had the highest total phenolic contents (TPC) (816.0 ?g/mg) and the lowest EC50 values (47.8 ?g/mL for DPPH radical assay, 112.8 ?g/mL for ABTS radical cation assay, and 49.2 ?g/mL for reducing power). These results were 3.1, 1.3, and 2.6 times lower than those of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), respectively. At a concentration of 100 ?g/mL, the antioxidant activity and TPC of various extracts was closely correlated, with correlation coefficients (R(2) ) higher than 0.86. The major phenolic acid in subfraction 2 was identified as ferulic acid (178.3 ?g/mg) by HPLC and LC-ESI/MS/MS analyses. Our finding identified ferulic acid as a major phenolic compound in black rice bran, and supports the potential use of black rice bran as a natural source of antioxidant. PMID:25597516

  6. Rice scene radiation research plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J.

    1982-01-01

    Data requirements, tasks to be accomplished, and the technical approaches to be used in identifying the characteristics of rice for crop inventories are listed as well as methods for estimating crop development and assessing its conditions.

  7. Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the red yeast rice products on the market contain very little monacolin K. These products may ... them that it is against the law to market these products as dietary supplements. Despite the FDA ...

  8. Variability of Grain Arsenic Concentration and Speciation in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) 

    E-print Network

    Pillai, Tushara Raghvan

    2011-02-22

    -1 VARIABILITY OF GRAIN ARSENIC CONCENTRATION AND SPECIATION IN RICE (Oryza sativa L.) A Dissertation by TUSHARA RAGHVAN PILLAI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2009 Major Subject: Molecular and Environmental Plant Sciences VARIABILITY OF GRAIN ARSENIC CONCENTRATION AND SPECIATION IN RICE (Oryza sativa L.) A Dissertation by TUSHARA RAGHVAN PILLAI...

  9. The Effect of Planting Strategies, Imazethapyr Rates, and Application Timings on CLEARFIELD® Hybrid Rice Injury 

    E-print Network

    Turner, Aaron Lyles

    2012-02-14

    STRATEGIES, IMAZETHAPYR RATES, AND APPLICATION TIMINGS ON CLEARFIELD? HYBRID RICE INJURY A Thesis by AARON LYLES TURNER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2011 Major Subject: Agronomy THE EFFECT OF PLANTING STRATEGIES, IMAZETHAPYR RATES, AND APPLICATION TIMINGS ON CLEARFIELD? HYBRID RICE INJURY A Thesis by AARON LYLES TURNER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

  10. Detection of Inorganic Arsenic in Rice Using a Field Test Kit: A Screening Method.

    PubMed

    Bralatei, Edi; Lacan, Severine; Krupp, Eva M; Feldmann, Jörg

    2015-11-17

    Rice is a staple food eaten by more than 50% of the world's population and is a daily dietary constituent in most South East Asian countries where 70% of the rice export comes from and where there is a high level of arsenic contamination in groundwater used for irrigation. Research shows that rice can take up and store inorganic arsenic during cultivation, and rice is considered to be one of the major routes of exposure to inorganic arsenic, a class I carcinogen for humans. Here, we report the use of a screening method based on the Gutzeit methodology to detect inorganic arsenic (iAs) in rice within 1 h. After optimization, 30 rice commodities from the United Kingdom market were tested with the field method and were compared to the reference method (high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, HPLC-ICP-MS). In all but three rice samples, iAs compound can be determined. The results show no bias for iAs using the field method. Results obtained show quantification limits of about 50 ?g kg(-1), a good reproducibility for a field method of ±12%, and only a few false positives and negatives (<10%) could only be recorded at the 2015 European Commission (EC) guideline for baby rice of 100 ?g kg(-1), while none were recorded at the maximum level suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO) and implemented by the EC for polished and white rice of 200 ?g kg(-1). The method is reliable, fast, and inexpensive; hence, it is suggested to be used as a screening method in the field for preselection of rice which violates legislative guidelines. PMID:26506262

  11. Heavy Metal Pollution in a Soil-Rice System in the Yangtze River Region of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhouping; Zhang, Qiaofen; Han, Tiqian; Ding, Yanfei; Sun, Junwei; Wang, Feijuan; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals are regarded as toxic trace elements in the environment. Heavy metal pollution in soil or rice grains is of increasing concern. In this study, 101 pairs of soil and rice samples were collected from the major rice-producing areas along the Yangtze River in China. The soil properties and heavy metal (i.e., Cd, Hg, Pb and Cr) concentrations in the soil and rice grains were analyzed to evaluate the heavy metal accumulation characteristics of the soil-rice systems. The results showed that the Cd, Hg, Pb and Cr concentrations in the soil ranged from 0.10 to 4.64, 0.01 to 1.46, 7.64 to 127.56, and 13.52 to 231.02 mg·kg(-)¹, respectively. Approximately 37%, 16%, 60% and 70% of the rice grain samples were polluted by Cd, Hg, Pb, and Cr, respectively. The degree of heavy metal contamination in the soil-rice systems exhibited a regional variation. The interactions among the heavy metal elements may also influence the migration and accumulation of heavy metals in soil or paddy rice. The accumulation of heavy metals in soil and rice grains is related to a certain extent to the pH and soil organic matter (SOM). This study provides useful information regarding heavy metal accumulation in soil to support the safe production of rice in China. The findings from this study also provide a robust scientific basis for risk assessments regarding ecological protection and food safety. PMID:26703698

  12. Cooking with Rice (not instant) 

    E-print Network

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    (makes 6 servings) What you need 3 cups cooked rice, cooled 2 hard-cooked eggs, chopped ? cup mayonnaise-type salad dressing ? cup finely chopped green onions ? cup chopped sweet pickles... 1 teaspoon prepared mustard ground black pepper (as much as you like) How to make it 1. Wash your hands; make sure your cooking area is clean. 2. Combine the rice, eggs, mayonnaise, onions, pickles, mustard and pepper in a large bowl...

  13. Fertilizers for Rice in Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner); Wyche, R. H. (Robert Henry)

    1929-01-01

    AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 1 BULLETIN NO. 398 , DIVISION OF AGRONOMY FERTILIZERS FOR RICE IN TEXAS GRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. \\\\TALTON, President STATION DMINISTRATION: A. B. CONNER, M. S.. Director R. E. KARPER. M. S...,,nn-n+;,n "4th thm Cphnnl nf Aon~l~lt~lrp Experiments with fertilizers on rice at Substation No. 4, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Beaumont, Texas, show that the soils responded to nitrogen and phosphoric acid, but nitrogen was needed more than...

  14. Varieties of Rice for Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Wyche, R. H. (Robert Henry); Beachell, H. M. (Henry Monroe)

    1933-01-01

    STATION &- A. R. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS JLLETI NOVEMBER, 1933 IN COOPERATION WITH THE DIVISION OF CEREAL CROPS AND DISEASES, BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE , ARIETIES OF RICE FOR TEXAS..., School of Veterinary Medicine. ?As of November 1, 1933 **In cooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture. $In cooperation with Texas Extension Service. Rice is an important crop in the humid part of the Gulf Coast Prairie of Texas. The average...

  15. Differentiation of weedy traits in ALS-resistant red rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice is a weedy form of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) that competes aggressively with rice in the southern U.S., reduces yields and contaminates rice grains. The introduction of ClearfieldTM rice, a nontransgenic, herbicide-resistant rice cultivar a decade ago has led to increased use of imazet...

  16. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to begained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his wirt around this globe of ours. There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountain? Why 35 years ago why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we attend to win, and the others , too.'

  17. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to be gained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. ...Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his writ around this globe of ours. ...There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountian? Why - 35 years ago - why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we intend to win, and the others too.'

  18. Molecular progress on the mapping and cloning of functional genes for blast disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.): current status and future considerations.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, S; Rafii, M Y; Shabanimofrad, M; Ghasemzadeh, A; Ravanfar, S A; Latif, M A

    2016-04-01

    Rice blast disease, which is caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is a recurring problem in all rice-growing regions of the world. The use of resistance (R) genes in rice improvement breeding programmes has been considered to be one of the best options for crop protection and blast management. Alternatively, quantitative resistance conferred by quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is also a valuable resource for the improvement of rice disease resistance. In the past, intensive efforts have been made to identify major R-genes as well as QTLs for blast disease using molecular techniques. A review of bibliographic references shows over 100 blast resistance genes and a larger number of QTLs (?500) that were mapped to the rice genome. Of the blast resistance genes, identified in different genotypes of rice, ?22 have been cloned and characterized at the molecular level. In this review, we have summarized the reported rice blast resistance genes and QTLs for utilization in future molecular breeding programmes to introgress high-degree resistance or to pyramid R-genes in commercial cultivars that are susceptible to M. oryzae. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the significant studies in order to update our understanding of the molecular progress on rice and M. oryzae. This information will assist rice breeders to improve the resistance to rice blast using marker-assisted selection which continues to be a priority for rice-breeding programmes. PMID:25394538

  19. Expansins in deepwater rice internodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyung-Taeg; Kende, H.

    1997-04-01

    Cell walls of deepwater rice internodes undergo long-term extension (creep) when placed under tension in acidic buffers. This is indicative of the action of the cell wall-loosening protein expansion. Wall extension had a pH optimum of around 4.0 and was abolished by boiling. Acid-induced extension of boiled cell walls could be reconstituted by addition of salt-extracted rice or cucumber cell wall proteins. Cucumber expansion antibody recognized a single protein band of 24.5-kD apparent molecular mass on immunoblots of rice cell wall proteins. Expansions were partially purified by concanavalin A affinity chromatography and sulfopropyl (SP) cation-exchange chromatography. The latter yielded two peaks with extension activity (SP20 and SP29), and immunoblot analysis showed that both of these active fractions contained expansion of 24.5-kD molecular mass. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of SP20 expansion is identical to that deduced from the rice expansion cDNA Os-EXP1. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of SP29 expansion matches that deduced from the rice expansion cDNA Os-EXP2 in six of eight amino acids. Our results show that two expansions occur in the cell walls of rice internodes and that they may mediate acid-induced wall extension.

  20. Limited surveillance of fumonisins in brown rice and wheat harvested in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kushiro, Masayo; Zheng, Yazhi; Nagata, Reiko; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Nagashima, Hitoshi

    2009-06-01

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins mainly produced by Fusarium verticillioides, which is a major contaminant of corn. However, there are sporadic reports of fumonisin contamination in wheat worldwide. The rice adherent fungus Gibberella fujikuroi is taxonomically closely related to F. verticillioides. Therefore, the potential risk of fumonisin contamination in rice and wheat is significant. Previously, a sensitive detection method utilizing liquid chromatography with tandem electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS) was developed for the determination of fumonisins in brown rice. In the present study, the incidence of fumonisins in brown rice and wheat harvested in Japan was investigated using LC-ESI-MS-MS. Forty-eight rice samples and 47 wheat samples were screened and analyzed for the major B-type fumonisins: fumonisin B1 (FB1) and fumonisin B2 (FB2). About 1 kg of rice or wheat seed was divided into three subsamples, and 10 g from each subsample was used for the analysis. The limits of detection were 0.012 and 0.011 mg/kg for FBt and FB2, respectively, in rice samples and 0.010 and 0.008 mg/kg for FB1 and FB2, respectively, in wheat samples. The mean (standard deviation) recoveries of FB1 spiked at 0.50 mg/kg into toxin-free rice and wheat samples were 77.6 (4.2)% and 84.5 (3.1)%, respectively. One of the wheat samples was positive for FBt with a value greater than the limit of detection,but no fumonisin was found in any of the rice samples. This is the first report of fumonisins detected in Japanese wheat. PMID:19610350

  1. Syrtis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A prominent dark, triangular albedo feature (dark by contrast with its surroundings) on the Martian equator, centered approximately at 10 °N, 70 °E. It takes its name from the historical name for the larger of two quicksands off the North African coast. Syrtis Major is prominent in telescopic views of the planet, and was in fact the first feature of Mars ever to be recorded, in a sketch made by C...

  2. Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) emergence characteristics and influence on rice (O. sativa) yield at different planting dates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated rice yield losses due to red rice infestation vary by cultivar, red rice density, and duration of interference. The competition effects of red rice could be influenced further by emergence characteristics, red rice biotype, and planting time of cultivated rice. We aimed to characterize th...

  3. Genetic analysis of atypical U.S. red rice phenotypes: indications of prior gene flow in rice fields?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice is a troublesome weed problem in rice fields of the southern U.S. Outcrossing between rice and red rice occurs at low rates, resulting in a broad array of plant types. SSR markers were used to evaluate the genetic backgrounds of atypical red rice types obtained from rice farms in comparis...

  4. Natural rice rhizospheric microbes suppress rice blast infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The natural interactions between plant roots and their rhizospheric microbiome are vital to plant fitness, modulating both growth promotion and disease suppression. In rice (Oryza sativa), a globally important food crop, as much as 30% of yields are lost due to blast disease caused by fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Capitalizing on the abilities of naturally occurring rice soil bacteria to reduce M. oryzae infections could provide a sustainable solution to reduce the amount of crops lost to blast disease. Results Naturally occurring root-associated rhizospheric bacteria were isolated from California field grown rice plants (M-104), eleven of which were taxonomically identified by16S rRNA gene sequencing and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. Bacterial isolates were tested for biocontrol activity against the devastating foliar rice fungal pathogen, M. oryzae pathovar 70–15. In vitro, a Pseudomonas isolate, EA105, displayed antibiosis through reducing appressoria formation by nearly 90% as well as directly inhibiting fungal growth by 76%. Although hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a volatile commonly produced by biocontrol pseudomonads, the activity of EA105 seems to be independent of its HCN production. During in planta experiments, EA105 reduced the number of blast lesions formed by 33% and Pantoea agglomerans isolate, EA106 by 46%. Our data also show both EA105 and EA106 trigger jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) dependent induced systemic resistance (ISR) response in rice. Conclusions Out of 11 bacteria isolated from rice soil, pseudomonad EA105 most effectively inhibited the growth and appressoria formation of M. oryzae through a mechanism that is independent of cyanide production. In addition to direct antagonism, EA105 also appears to trigger ISR in rice plants through a mechanism that is dependent on JA and ET signaling, ultimately resulting in fewer blast lesions. The application of native bacteria as biocontrol agents in combination with current disease protection strategies could aid in global food security. PMID:24884531

  5. Breeding high-yielding drought-tolerant rice: genetic variations and conventional and molecular approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Dixit, Shalabh; Ram, T.; Yadaw, R. B.; Mishra, K. K.; Mandal, N. P.

    2014-01-01

    The increased occurrence and severity of drought stress have led to a high yield decline in rice in recent years in drought-affected areas. Drought research at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) over the past decade has concentrated on direct selection for grain yield under drought. This approach has led to the successful development and release of 17 high-yielding drought-tolerant rice varieties in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Africa. In addition to this, 14 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) showing a large effect against high-yielding drought-susceptible popular varieties were identified using grain yield as a selection criterion. Six of these (qDTY 1.1, qDTY 2.2, qDTY 3.1, qDTY 3.2, qDTY 6.1, and qDTY 12.1) showed an effect against two or more high-yielding genetic backgrounds in both the lowland and upland ecosystem, indicating their usefulness in increasing the grain yield of rice under drought. The yield of popular rice varieties IR64 and Vandana has been successfully improved through a well-planned marker-assisted backcross breeding approach, and QTL introgression in several other popular varieties is in progress. The identification of large-effect QTLs for grain yield under drought and the higher yield increase under drought obtained through the use of these QTLs (which has not been reported in other cereals) indicate that rice, because of its continuous cultivation in two diverse ecosystems (upland, drought tolerant, and lowland, drought susceptible), has benefited from the existence of larger genetic variability than in other cereals. This can be successfully exploited using marker-assisted breeding. PMID:25205576

  6. Coral Reef Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Helen T.

    Coral reefs are geological structures of significant dimensions, constructed over millions of years by calcifying organisms. The present day reef-builders are hard corals belonging to the order Scleractinia, phylum Cnidaria. The greatest concentrations of coral reefs are in the tropics, with highest levels of biodiversity situated in reefs of the Indo-West Pacific region. These ecosystems have provided coastal protection and livelihood to human populations over the millennia. Human activities have caused destruction of these habitats, the intensity of which has increased alarmingly since the latter decades of the twentieth century. The severity of this impact is directly related to exponential growth rates of human populations especially in the coastal areas of the developing world. However, a more recently recognized phenomenon concerns disturbances brought about by the changing climate, manifested mainly as rising sea surface temperatures, and increasing acidification of ocean waters due to greater drawdown of higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Management efforts have so far not kept pace with the rates of degradation, so that the spatial extent of damaged reefs and the incidences of localized extinction of reef species are increasing year after year. The major management efforts to date consist of establishing marine protected areas and promoting the active restoration of coral habitats.

  7. Processing Conditions, Rice Properties, Health and Environment

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Poritosh; Orikasa, Takahiro; Okadome, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Shiina, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Rice is the staple food for nearly two-thirds of the world’s population. Food components and environmental load of rice depends on the rice form that is resulted by different processing conditions. Brown rice (BR), germinated brown rice (GBR) and partially-milled rice (PMR) contains more health beneficial food components compared to the well milled rice (WMR). Although the arsenic concentration in cooked rice depends on the cooking methods, parboiled rice (PBR) seems to be relatively prone to arsenic contamination compared to that of untreated rice, if contaminated water is used for parboiling and cooking. A change in consumption patterns from PBR to untreated rice (non-parboiled), and WMR to PMR or BR may conserve about 43–54 million tons of rice and reduce the risk from arsenic contamination in the arsenic prone area. This study also reveals that a change in rice consumption patterns not only supply more food components but also reduces environmental loads. A switch in production and consumption patterns would improve food security where food grains are scarce, and provide more health beneficial food components, may prevent some diseases and ease the burden on the Earth. However, motivation and awareness of the environment and health, and even a nominal incentive may require for a method switching which may help in building a sustainable society. PMID:21776212

  8. Ecosystem nitrogen retention and flushing across a soil texture gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most ecosystems retain a majority of reactive N inputs, transforming reactive mineral N into relatively nonreactive stable organic N. Mechanistic explanations for these observations focus on C-dependent processes, and in particular wide C:N ratios. However, in some ecosystems C-dependent mechanism...

  9. Resonance-induced multimodal body-size distributions in ecosystems

    E-print Network

    Tlusty, Tsvi

    Resonance-induced multimodal body-size distributions in ecosystems Adam Lamperta,1,2 and Tsvi is a major determinant of ecosystem structure and function. Body-size distributions often are multimodal over the same niche. Here, we suggest an alternative, generic mechanism underlying multimodal size

  10. Nutrient enrichment, biodiversity loss, and consequent declines in ecosystem productivity

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Nutrient enrichment, biodiversity loss, and consequent declines in ecosystem productivity Forest in biodiversity, species compo- sition, and ecosystem functioning. It remains unknown whether such shifts in biodiversity and species composition may, them- selves, be major contributors to the total, long-term impacts

  11. Habitat scale mapping of fisheries ecosystem services values in estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about the variability of ecosystem service values at spatial scales most relevant to local decision makers. Competing definitions of ecosystem services, the paucity of ecological and economic information and the lack of standardization in methodology are major ob...

  12. Different responses of low grain-Cd-accumulating and high grain-Cd-accumulating rice cultivars to Cd stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijuan; Wang, Min; Liu, Zhouping; Shi, Yan; Han, Tiqian; Ye, Yaoyao; Gong, Ning; Sun, Junwei; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a major heavy metal pollutant which is highly toxic to plants and animals. The accumulation of Cd in rice grains is a major agricultural problem in regions with Cd pollution. A hydroponics experiment using low grain-Cd-accumulating rice (xiushui 11) and high grain-Cd-accumulating rice (xiushui 110) was carried out to characterize the different responses of rice cultivars to Cd stress. We found that xiushui 11 was more tolerant to Cd than xiushui 110, and xiushui 11 suffered less oxidative damage. Cell walls played an important role in limiting the amount of Cd that entered the protoplast, especially in xiushui 11. Cd stored in organelles as soluble fractions, leading to greater physiological stress of Cd detoxification. We found that Cd can disturb the ion homeostasis in rice roots because Cd(2+) and Ca(2+) may have a similar uptake route. Xiushui 11 had a faster root-to-shoot transport of Cd, and the expression level of OsPCR1 gene which was predicted related with Cd accumulation in rice was consist with the Cd transport of root-to-shoot in rice and maintain the greater Cd tolerance of xiushui 11. These results suggest there are different Cd detoxification and accumulation mechanisms in rice cultivars. PMID:26318143

  13. Comparative proteomics analysis reveals the mechanism of fertility alternation of thermosensitive genic male sterile rice lines under low temperature inducement.

    PubMed

    Song, Liru; Liu, Zhongqi; Tong, Jianhua; Xiao, Langtao; Ma, Hao; Zhang, Haiqing

    2015-06-01

    Thermosensitive genic male sterile (TGMS) rice line has made great economical contributions in rice production. However, the fertility of TGMS rice line during hybrid seed production is frequently influenced by low temperature, thus leading to its fertility/sterility alteration and hybrid seed production failure. To understand the mechanism of fertility alternation under low temperature inducement, the extracted proteins from young panicles of two TGMS rice lines at the fertility alternation sensitivity stage were analyzed by 2DE. Eighty-three protein spots were found to be significantly changed in abundance, and identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. The identified proteins were involved in 16 metabolic pathways and cellular processes. The young panicles of TGMS rice line Zhu 1S possessed the lower ROS-scavenging, indole-3-acetic acid level, soluble protein, and sugar contents as well as the faster anther wall disintegration than those of TGMS rice line Zhun S. All these major differences might result in that the former is more stable in fertility than the latter. Based on the majority of the 83 identified proteins, together with microstructural, physiological, and biochemical results, a possible fertile alteration mechanism in the young panicles of TGMS rice line under low temperature inducement was proposed. Such a result will help us in breeding TGMS rice lines and production of hybrid seed. PMID:25641954

  14. Molecular dynamics of interactions of rice with rice blast and sheath blight pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to develop the molecular strategies to control rice (Oryzae sativa) diseases, molecular interactions of rice with rice blast [Magnaporthe oryzae, formerly (Magnaporthe grisea] and sheath blight (Rhizoctonia solani) fungi were analyzed. The interaction of rice with M. oryzae follows a b...

  15. Diversity of global rice markets and the science required for consumer-targeted rice breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the ever-increasing global demand for high quality rice in both local production regions and with Western consumers, we have a strong desire to understand better the importance of different quality traits that make up the rice grain and obtain a full picture of rice quality demographics. Rice ...

  16. Factors influencing ALS-resistant gene transfer from CL (tm) rice to red rice.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) is hard to control due to its genetic similarity to cultivated rice. Herbicide-resistant Clearfield ™ (CL) rice now offers an excellent option for red rice control. However, sustainability of CL technology at the producers’ level will be dictated by various factors. Promi...

  17. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels affect community structure of rice root-associated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Takashi; Liu, Dongyan; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ikeda, Seishi; Asakawa, Susumu; Tokida, Takeshi; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Aoki, Naohiro; Ishimaru, Ken; Ujiie, Kazuhiro; Usui, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Hayashi, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) affects rice yields and grain quality. However, the responses of root-associated bacteria to [CO2] elevation have not been characterized in a large-scale field study. We conducted a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment (ambient + 200 ?mol.mol?1) using three rice cultivars (Akita 63, Takanari, and Koshihikari) and two experimental lines of Koshihikari [chromosome segment substitution and near-isogenic lines (NILs)] to determine the effects of [CO2] elevation on the community structure of rice root-associated bacteria. Microbial DNA was extracted from rice roots at the panicle formation stage and analyzed by pyrosequencing the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to characterize the members of the bacterial community. Principal coordinate analysis of a weighted UniFrac distance matrix revealed that the community structure was clearly affected by elevated [CO2]. The predominant community members at class level were Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria in the control (ambient) and FACE plots. The relative abundance of Methylocystaceae, the major methane-oxidizing bacteria in rice roots, tended to decrease with increasing [CO2] levels. Quantitative PCR revealed a decreased copy number of the methane monooxygenase (pmoA) gene and increased methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) in elevated [CO2]. These results suggest elevated [CO2] suppresses methane oxidation and promotes methanogenesis in rice roots; this process affects the carbon cycle in rice paddy fields. PMID:25750640

  18. Cultural perspectives and current consumption changes of cooked rice in Korean diet

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Cooked rice is a staple food for Koreans which provides more than 60% of daily required energy. In 1960's, Koreans ate 600 g-800 g of cooked rice per meal and the energy obtained from cooked rice was almost more than 80% of the daily intake of energy. However, as the economy of Korea improved, the major industry has been shifted from agriculture to various manufacturing industries and the export of those products has been increased thus increasing the national income but decreasing the farming population and thus rice consumption have been decreased. It has been said that the decreased rice consumption is caused solely by decreased farming population but it can also be said that the decreased farming population is caused by decreased rice consumption. As the national income increases, the type of foods people consume have become diversified. Various processed foods such as convenience food or ready-to-eat food have been widespread, which are mostly made of wheat flour rather than rice. PMID:20535379

  19. Distribution and genetic diversity of Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rice and maize dwarf diseases caused by the newly introduced Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) have led to severe economic losses in South China in recent years. The distribution and diversity of SRBSDV have not been investigated in the main rice and maize growing areas in China. In this study, the distribution of SRBSDV in China was determined by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results Between 2009 and 2010, 2404 plant samples (2294 rice, 110 maize samples, and more than 300 cultivars) with dwarf symptoms were collected from fields in 194 counties of 17 provinces in China and SRBSDV was detected. The results indicated that 1545 (64.27%) of samples (both rice and maize) were infected with SRBSDV. SRBSDV was detected widely in Hainan, Guangdong, Guangxi, Yunnan, Guizhou, Chongqing, Fujian, Jiangxi, Hunan, Hubei, Anhui, Jiangsu, and Zhejiang provinces, which suggests SRBSDV is an important pathogen causing rice dwarfing diseases in South China. Phylogenetic analysis of 15 representative virus isolates revealed that SRBSDV isolates in China had high levels of nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities (>97.8%). Conclusions SRBSDV spreads naturally in Yangtze River basin and south region, the location of the major rice production areas. In comparison, the virus rarely spreads north of Yangtze River in North China. Distribution of SRBSDV is consistent with the migrating and existing ranges of its vector WBPH, suggesting that SRBSDV might be introduced into South China along with the migration of viruliferous WBPH. PMID:24131521

  20. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels affect community structure of rice root-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Takashi; Liu, Dongyan; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ikeda, Seishi; Asakawa, Susumu; Tokida, Takeshi; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Aoki, Naohiro; Ishimaru, Ken; Ujiie, Kazuhiro; Usui, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Hayashi, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) affects rice yields and grain quality. However, the responses of root-associated bacteria to [CO2] elevation have not been characterized in a large-scale field study. We conducted a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment (ambient + 200 ?mol.mol(-1)) using three rice cultivars (Akita 63, Takanari, and Koshihikari) and two experimental lines of Koshihikari [chromosome segment substitution and near-isogenic lines (NILs)] to determine the effects of [CO2] elevation on the community structure of rice root-associated bacteria. Microbial DNA was extracted from rice roots at the panicle formation stage and analyzed by pyrosequencing the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to characterize the members of the bacterial community. Principal coordinate analysis of a weighted UniFrac distance matrix revealed that the community structure was clearly affected by elevated [CO2]. The predominant community members at class level were Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria in the control (ambient) and FACE plots. The relative abundance of Methylocystaceae, the major methane-oxidizing bacteria in rice roots, tended to decrease with increasing [CO2] levels. Quantitative PCR revealed a decreased copy number of the methane monooxygenase (pmoA) gene and increased methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) in elevated [CO2]. These results suggest elevated [CO2] suppresses methane oxidation and promotes methanogenesis in rice roots; this process affects the carbon cycle in rice paddy fields. PMID:25750640

  1. Overexpression of an ERF transcription factor TSRF1 improves rice drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Quan, Ruidang; Hu, Shoujing; Zhang, Zhili; Zhang, Haiwen; Zhang, Zhijin; Huang, Rongfeng

    2010-05-01

    One of the major limitations in rice production is a shortage of water. Conventional breeding as well as emerging genetic engineering methods may be used to improve plant stress tolerance. Some transcription factors regulating stress responsive genes have become important target genes for improving plant drought tolerance. Previously, we have shown that a tomato ethylene response factor (ERF) protein TSRF1 that binds to GCC box in the promoters of pathogenesis-related genes positively regulates pathogen resistance in tomato and tobacco, but negatively regulates osmotic response in tobacco. Here, we further report the ability of TSRF1 to regulate osmotic and drought responses in monocot rice. TSRF1 improves the osmotic and drought tolerance of rice seedlings without growth retardation, as determined by physiological analyses of root and leaf growth, leaf water loss and survival rate under stress. In addition, the amounts of proline and soluble sugars in transgenic rice lines increase by 30%-60% compared to those in wild-type plants. Moreover, TSRF1 activates the expression of a putative rice abscisic acid (ABA) synthesis gene SDR, resulting in enhanced ABA sensitivity in transgenic rice. TSRF1 also increases the expression of MYB, MYC and proline synthesis and photosynthesis-related genes, probably by binding to dehydration responsive element and GCC boxes in promoters of the target genes. These results demonstrate that TSRF1 enhances the osmotic and drought tolerance of rice by modulating the increase in stress responsive gene expression. PMID:20233336

  2. GENE FLOW BETWEEN RED RICE AND RICE IN HERBICIDE RESISTANT RICE FIELDS: EVALUATING RISKS AND MANAGEMENT OPTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imidazolinone (IMI)-resistant rice cultivars have been increasingly adopted in the southern U.S. since their initial introduction in 2002, largely due to the newly acquired control of red rice that is now possible in these systems. It is estimated that IMI rice is being grown on 20 to 25% of the ac...

  3. RICE UNIVERSITY Speeding Up Mobile Browsers

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Lin

    RICE UNIVERSITY Speeding Up Mobile Browsers without Infrastructure Support by Zhen Wang A THESIS, Professor Lin Zhong, for his guidance and encour- agement during my study and research at Rice University

  4. Relevance of antarctic microbial ecosystems to exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P.

    1993-01-01

    Antarctic microbial ecosystems which provide biological and physical analogs that can be used in exobiology are studied. Since the access to extraterrestrial habitats is extremely difficult, terrestrial analogs represent the best opportunity for both formulation and preliminary testing of hypothesis about life. Antarctica, as one of few suitable environments on earth is considered to be a major locus of progress in exobiology.

  5. AOML Program Review Oceans and Ecosystems Research

    E-print Network

    Overview · Major Science Questions o What is the impact of climate change and ocean acidification on US coral reefs? · What are the spatiotemporal trends in temperature and ocean acidification on US coral reefs? · What are the ecosystem impacts of ocean acidification on US coral reefs? · How will climate

  6. MERCURY IN LAKE MICHIGAN ECOSYSTEM COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercury is a toxic bioaccumulative substance in aquatic ecosystems. National fish advisories for mercury increased 115% from 1993 to 2001 and fish consumption is now a major health concern. The Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study measured the concentrations of mercury in the atmosph...

  7. Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning David Tilman,1,2 Forest Isbell,1,3 and Jane M. Cowles1 1 2014 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved Keywords biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, stability, and restoration of biodiversity should be a high global priority. 471 Annu.Rev.Ecol.Evol.Syst.2014

  8. Where Will Ecosystems Go?

    SciTech Connect

    Janetos, Anthony C.

    2008-09-29

    Climate-induced changes in ecosystems have been both modeled and documented extensively over the past 15-20 years. Those changes occur in the context of many other stresses and interacting factors, but it is clear that many, if not most, ecosystems are sensitive to changing climate.

  9. The Library as Ecosystem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Ecology is the study of interactions between organisms and their environment, and the academic library could be considered to be an ecosystem, i.e., a "biological organization" in which multiple species must interact, both with one another and with their environment. The metaphor of the library as ecosystem is flexible enough to be applied not…

  10. Ecosystems, Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley. Science Curriculum Improvement Study.

    The Science Curriculum Improvement Study has developed this teacher's guide to "Ecosystems," the sixth part of a six unit life science curriculum sequence. The six basic units, emphasizing organism-environment interactions, are organisms, life cycles, populations, environments, communities, and ecosystems. They make use of scientific and…

  11. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 6 

    E-print Network

    2006-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas August 2006 Volume VI Number 6 Texas Rice How Drying Techniques Effect Head Rice Yield continued on page 5 In the United States, rough rice is typically... harvested at moisture contents (MCs) ranging from 14% to 24%, and subsequently dried to approximately 12% for safe, long- term storage. Some rice is dried in on-farm, bin drying systems. These systems typically use ambient air, which in Texas...

  12. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 1 

    E-print Network

    2004-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas March 2004 Volume IV Number 1 Texas Rice Rice Farmers Support Research February is a busy time for rice farmers, as they make finishing touches... on their fields, and get equip- ment ready for the planting season. But for the 12 farm- ers that serve on the Texas Rice Research Foundation (TRRF) board, there are additional responsibilities that require a significant amount of time, namely, the re- view...

  13. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 1 May 2002) The Science This image is from the region of Syrtis Major, which is dominated by a low-relief shield volcano. This area is believed to be an area of vigorous aeolian activity with strong winds in the east-west direction. The effects of these winds are observed as relatively bright streaks across the image, extending from topographic features such as craters. The brighter surface material probably indicates a smaller relative particle size in these areas, as finer particles have a higher albedo. The bright streaks seen off of craters are believed to have formed during dust storms. A raised crater rim can cause a reduction in the wind velocity directly behind it, which results in finer particles being preferentially deposited in this location. In the top half of the image, there is a large bright streak that crosses the entire image. There is no obvious topographic obstacle, therefore it is unclear whether it was formed in the same manner as described above. This image is located northwest of Nili Patera, a large caldera in Syrtis Major. Different flows from the caldera eruptions can be recognized as raised ridges, representing the edge of a flow lobe. The Story In the 17th century, Holland was in its Golden Age, a time of cultural greatness and immense political and economic influence in the world. In that time, lived a inquisitive person named Christian Huygens. As a boy, he loved to draw and to figure out problems in mathematics. As a man, he used these talents to make the first detailed drawings of the Martian surface - - only 50 years or so after Galileo first turned his telescope on Mars. Mars suddenly became something other than a small red dot in the sky. One of the drawings Huygens made was of a dark marking on the red planet's surface named Syrtis Major. Almost 350 years later, here we are with an orbiter that can show us this place in detail. Exploration lives! It's great we can study this area up close. In earlier periods of history, scientists were fascinated with Syrtis Major because this dark region varied so much through the seasons and years. Some people thought it might be a changing sea, and others thought it might be vegetation. Early spacecraft like Mariner and Viking revealed for the first time that the changes were caused by the wind blowing dust and sand across the surface. What we can see in this image is exactly that: evidence of a lot of wind action. Bright dust patches streak across this image, formed through wind interference from craters and other landforms. These wispy, bright streaks are spread on the surface by a vigorous, east-west wind that kicked up huge dust storms, scattering the fine particles of sand and dust in an almost etherial pattern. The bright streaks in the top part of the image might have formed in a slightly different way, because there is no landform standing in the wind's way. Beneath the bright surface dust are raised ridges that mark the edges of earlier lava flows from Nili Patera, a Martian 'caldera.' A caldera is a collapsed, bowl-shaped depression at the top of a volcano cone. Can you imagine how Christian Huygens would feel if he lived today and could see all of this knowledge unfold? Or how it would feel to be the first person to stand in this dark volcanic and cratered region, knowing how many discovers had paved the way to that moment? Yes, exploration lives!

  14. Ecosystems & Development Paul van Gardingen

    E-print Network

    Society, Ecosystems & Development Paul van Gardingen Professor of International Development & Executive Director, Edinburgh International Development Centre The University of Edinburgh #12;"An ecosystem Assessment) #12;Another Millennium Challenge! #12;Society, Ecosystems & Development · People and communities

  15. SEVEN PILLARS OF ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystem management is widely proposed in the popular and professional literature as the modern and preferred way of managing natural resources and ecosystems. Advocates glowingly describe ecosystem management as an approach that will protect the environment, maintain healthy ec...

  16. Rice husks as a source of high purity silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros, H.; Garza, C.

    1986-05-01

    Silica originating from rice husks has been proposed for use in the manufacture of solar cells. By measuring the concentration of impurities (Fe, Zn, Ca, Mn) found in the washing solutions, the conditions necessary for achieving high purity, including the optimum time, number of washing cycles and the temperature and concentration of the washing solutions ( HCl+ H2O), were chosen. Following this procedure, 99.98% pure silica as obtained. The major impurity was Ca with a concentration of 100 ppm.

  17. Genetic diversity for mycorrhizal symbiosis and phosphate transporters in rice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kwanho; Mattes, Nicolas; Catausan, Sheryl; Chin, Joong Hyoun; Paszkowski, Uta; Heuer, Sigrid

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a major plant nutrient and developing crops with higher P-use efficiency is an important breeding goal. In this context we have conducted a comparative study of irrigated and rainfed rice varieties to assess genotypic differences in colonization with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and expression of different P transporter genes. Plants were grown in three different soil samples from a rice farm in the Philippines. The data show that AM symbiosis in all varieties was established after 4 weeks of growth under aerobic conditions and that, in soil derived from a rice paddy, natural AM populations recovered within 6 weeks. The analysis of AM marker genes (AM1, AM3, AM14) and P transporter genes for the direct Pi uptake (PT2, PT6) and AM-mediated pathway (PT11, PT13) were largely in agreement with the observed root AM colonization providing a useful tool for diversity studies. Interestingly, delayed AM colonization was observed in the aus-type rice varieties which might be due to their different root structure and might confer an advantage for weed competition in the field. The data further showed that P-starvation induced root growth and expression of the high-affinity P transporter PT6 was highest in the irrigated variety IR66 which also maintained grain yield under P-deficient field conditions. PMID:26466747

  18. TOND1 confers tolerance to nitrogen deficiency in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yangjun; Tan, Lubin; Zhu, Zuofeng; Yuan, Lixing; Xie, Daoxin; Sun, Chuanqing

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N), the most important mineral nutrient for plants, is critical to agricultural production systems. N deficiency severely affects rice growth and decreases rice yields. However, excessive use of N fertilizer has caused severe pollution to agricultural and ecological environments. The necessity of breeding of crops that require lower input of N fertilizer has been recognized. Here we identified a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 12, Tolerance Of Nitrogen Deficiency 1 (TOND1), that confers tolerance to N deficiency in the indica cultivar Teqing. Sequence verification of 75 indica and 75 japonica cultivars from 18 countries and regions demonstrated that only 27.3% of cultivars (41 indica cultivars) contain TOND1, whereas 72.7% of cultivars, including the remaining 34 indica cultivars and all 75 japonica cultivars, do not harbor the TOND1 allele. Over-expression of TOND1 increased the tolerance to N deficiency in the TOND1-deficient rice cultivars. The identification of TOND1 provides a molecular basis for breeding rice varieties with improved grain yield despite decreased input of N fertilizers. PMID:25439309

  19. U.S. Rice: Enhancing human health.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vision of the U.S. rice industry is to improve human health through the development of germplasm and technologies for products that capture the unique nutritional benefits of the rice grain. This paper gives an overview of U.S. rice production and markets. New product trends and introductions in...

  20. Rice disease research in organic production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic rice production has increased significantly in the U. S. with 35,000 acres currently under production. Texas organic rice acreage has been increasing steadily over the last 10 years with acreage in 2009 reaching 16,000, accounting for approximately 10% of the total Texas rice acreage. Contro...

  1. Identification of Low Postharvest Yellowing Rice Cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postharvest yellowing (PHY), or stackburn, reduces the value of rice. The identification of a low PHY rice cultivar would be desirable for breeding purposes, as well as for understanding of the PHY phenomenon. A laboratory method was used to survey different cultivars of rice for their ability to ...

  2. Rice bran stabilization using alternative techniques (abstract)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilization of rice bran, a by-product of rice milling characterized with a high economic value, is severely restricted by the activity of endogenous enzymes which typically deteriorate the bran quality. There is a great need to develop alternative techniques for stabilizing rice bran and at the sam...

  3. RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1 Rice University Radiation Safety Manual Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 January 2014 #12;RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 2 INTRODUCTION The goal of the Radiation Safety Manual is to assist lab

  4. RICE UNIVERSITY Kinodynamic Motion Planning for

    E-print Network

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    RICE UNIVERSITY Kinodynamic Motion Planning for High-dimensional Physical Systems by Ioan Alexandru of Science Approved, Thesis Committee: Dr. Lydia E. Kavraki (Chair) Professor, Computer Science, Rice University Dr. Joe Warren Professor, Computer Science, Rice University Dr. Marcia K. O'Malley Assistant

  5. RICE UNIVERSITY Task and Motion Planning for

    E-print Network

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    RICE UNIVERSITY Task and Motion Planning for Mobile Manipulators by Ioan Alexandru S¸ucan A THESIS Committee: Dr. Lydia E. Kavraki, Professor, Chair Computer Science, Rice University Dr. James McLurkin, Assistant Professor Computer Science, Rice University Dr. Marcia K. O'Malley, Associate Professor Mechanical

  6. EXIT INTERVIEW SUMMARY Life after Rice...

    E-print Network

    Aazhang, Behnaam

    EXIT INTERVIEW SUMMARY Life after Rice... Esther ­ You maintain access to Esther after you terminate so you can change your address, view previous Rice pay stubs and obtain your tax information. Keep can contact Human Resources at people@rice.edu or 713- 348-2232 to reset your account. For your future

  7. RICE UNIVERSITY Context for System Resource Management

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Lin

    RICE UNIVERSITY Context for System Resource Management: An Application in Wireless Data Management my advisor, Dr. Lin Zhong, for his guidance and support throughout my academic life at Rice of my teachers from friends. Special thanks to my professors at Rice and Sharif, my teachers at Allameh

  8. Rice University Public Assembly/Special Event

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    Rice University Public Assembly/Special Event Fire and Life Safety Self-Check Form City of Houston shall provide Rice with a Certificate of Insurance that includes: Commercial General Liability ­ minimum $1,000,000 per occurrence Aggregate $2,000,000 Rice named as additional insured All rights

  9. Rice functionality, starch structure and the genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Through collaborative efforts among USDA scientists at Beaumont, Texas, we have gained in-depth knowledge of how rice functionality, i.e. the texture of the cooked rice, rice processing properties, and starch gelatinization temperature, are associated with starch-synthesis genes and starch structure...

  10. Understanding rice heterosis using deep sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterosis is a complex biological phenomenon where the offspring show better performance compared to the inbred parents. Although rice breeders have used heterosis in hybrid rice production for nearly 40 years, the genetic and molecular mechanism underlying the heterosis in rice is still poorly und...

  11. Revised 12/2014 1 RICE UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Aazhang, Behnaam

    Revised 12/2014 1 RICE UNIVERSITY Check Out Form Date Employee Employee ID# Department Contact # We realize that opportunities or events may come up that cause you to leave Rice University to pursue other, in addition to serving as a reference guide for questions you may have at a later date. Last day at Rice

  12. Adaptation to flooding during emergence and seedling growth in rice and weeds, and implications for crop establishment

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Abdelbagi M.; Johnson, David E.; Ella, Evangelina S.; Vergara, Georgina V.; Baltazar, Aurora M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Direct seeding of rice is being adopted in rainfed and irrigated lowland ecosystems because it reduces labour costs in addition to other benefits. However, early flooding due to uneven fields or rainfall slows down seed germination and hinders crop establishment. Conversely, early flooding helps suppress weeds and reduces the costs of manual weeding and/or dependence on herbicides; however, numerous weed species are adapted to lowlands and present challenges for the use of flooding to control weeds. Advancing knowledge on the mechanisms of tolerance of flooding during germination and early growth in rice and weeds could facilitate the development of improved rice varieties and effective weed management practices for direct-seeded rice. Principal results Rice genotypes with a greater ability to germinate and establish in flooded soils were identified, providing opportunities to develop varieties suitable for direct seeding in flooded soils. Tolerance of flooding in these genotypes was mostly attributed to traits associated with better ability to mobilize stored carbohydrates and anaerobic metabolism. Limited studies were undertaken in weeds associated with lowland rice systems. Remaining studies compared rice and weeds and related weed species such as Echinochloa crus-galli and E. colona or compared ecotypes of the same species of Cyperus rotundus adapted to either aerobic or flooded soils. Conclusions Tolerant weeds and rice genotypes mostly developed similar adaptive traits that allow them to establish in flooded fields, including the ability to germinate and elongate faster under hypoxia, mobilize stored starch reserves and generate energy through fermentation pathways. Remarkably, some weeds developed additional traits such as larger storage tubers that enlarge further in deeper flooded soils (C. rotundus). Unravelling the mechanisms involved in adaptation to flooding will help design management options that will allow tolerant rice genotypes to adequately establish in flooded soils while simultaneously suppressing weeds. PMID:22957137

  13. Wetland management and rice farming strategies to decrease methylmercury bioaccumulation and loads from the Cosumnes River Preserve, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Fleck, Jacob; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; McQuillen, Harry; Heim, Wes

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated mercury (Hg) concentrations in caged fish (deployed for 30 days) and water from agricultural wetland (rice fields), managed wetland, slough, and river habitats in the Cosumnes River Preserve, California. We also implemented experimental hydrological regimes on managed wetlands and post-harvest rice straw management techniques on rice fields in order to evaluate potential Best Management Practices to decrease methylmercury bioaccumulation within wetlands and loads to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Total Hg concentrations in caged fish were twice as high in rice fields as in managed wetland, slough, or riverine habitats, including seasonal managed wetlands subjected to identical hydrological regimes. Caged fish Hg concentrations also differed among managed wetland treatments and post-harvest rice straw treatments. Specifically, Hg concentrations in caged fish decreased from inlets to outlets in seasonal managed wetlands with either a single (fall-only) or dual (fall and spring) drawdown and flood-up events, whereas Hg concentrations increased slightly from inlets to outlets in permanent managed wetlands. In rice fields, experimental post-harvest straw management did not decrease Hg concentrations in caged fish. In fact, in fields in which rice straw was chopped and either disked into the soil or baled and removed from the fields, fish Hg concentrations increased from inlets to outlets and were higher than Hg concentrations in fish from rice fields subjected to the more standard post-harvest practice of simply chopping rice straw prior to fall flood-up. Finally, aqueous methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations and export were highly variable, and seasonal trends in particular were often opposite to those of caged fish. Aqueous MeHg concentrations and loads were substantially higher in winter than in summer, whereas caged fish Hg concentrations were relatively low in winter and substantially higher in summer. Together, our results highlight the importance of habitat, seasonal processes, and wetland management practices on Hg cycling and ecological risk in aquatic ecosystems.

  14. Degradation of metaflumizone in rice, water and soil under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Cun; Yang, Ting; Wu, Yin-Liang

    2012-12-01

    The degradation behavior of metaflumizone was studied in a rice field ecosystem, and a simple and reliable analytical method was developed for determination of metaflumizone in soil, rice straw, paddy water and brown rice. Metaflumizone residues were extracted from samples with acetonitrile. The extract was cleaned up with QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) method, and determined by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The average recoveries of metaflumizone were 75.2-105.1 percent from soil, rice straw, paddy water and brown rice. The relative standard deviations were less than 15 percent. The limits of quantitation (LOQs) of metaflumizone were 3.0?g/L for paddy water and 3.0?g/kg for other samples. The results of the kinetic study of metaflumizone residue showed that metaflumizone degradation in soil, water and rice straw coincided with C=0.08564e(-0.0505t), C=0.04984e(-0.1982t), C=2.2572e(-0.1533t), respectively; the half-lives were about 13.7d, 3.5d, and 4.5d, respectively. The final residues of metaflumizone on brown rice were lower than maximum residue limit (MRL) of 0.05mg/kg after 28d Pre-Harvest Interval (PHI) at the recommended dosage. Therefore, a dosage of 450mLa.i.ha(-1) with 28 days before harvest was recommended, which could be considered as safe to human beings and animals. PMID:23079740

  15. Broader perspective on ecosystem sustainability: Consequences for decision making

    PubMed Central

    Sidle, Roy C.; Benson, William H.; Carriger, John F.; Kamai, Toshitaka

    2013-01-01

    Although the concept of ecosystem sustainability has a long-term focus, it is often viewed from a static system perspective. Because most ecosystems are dynamic, we explore sustainability assessments from three additional perspectives: resilient systems; systems where tipping points occur; and systems subject to episodic resetting. Whereas foundations of ecosystem resilience originated in ecology, recent discussions have focused on geophysical attributes, and it is recognized that dynamic system components may not return to their former state following perturbations. Tipping points emerge when chronic changes (typically anthropogenic, but sometimes natural) push ecosystems to thresholds that cause collapse of process and function and may become permanent. Ecosystem resetting occurs when episodic natural disasters breach thresholds with little or no warning, resulting in long-term changes to environmental attributes or ecosystem function. An example of sustainability assessment of ecosystem goods and services along the Gulf Coast (USA) demonstrates the need to include both the resilient and dynamic nature of biogeomorphic components. Mountain road development in northwest Yunnan, China, makes rivers and related habitat vulnerable to tipping points. Ecosystems reset by natural disasters are also presented, emphasizing the need to understand the magnitude frequency and interrelationships among major disturbances, as shown by (i) the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and resulting tsunami, including how unsustainable urban development exacerbates geodisaster propagation, and (ii) repeated major earthquakes and associated geomorphic and vegetation disturbances in Papua New Guinea. Although all of these ecosystem perturbations and shifts are individually recognized, they are not embraced in contemporary sustainable decision making. PMID:23686583

  16. Broader perspective on ecosystem sustainability: consequences for decision making.

    PubMed

    Sidle, Roy C; Benson, William H; Carriger, John F; Kamai, Toshitaka

    2013-06-01

    Although the concept of ecosystem sustainability has a long-term focus, it is often viewed from a static system perspective. Because most ecosystems are dynamic, we explore sustainability assessments from three additional perspectives: resilient systems; systems where tipping points occur; and systems subject to episodic resetting. Whereas foundations of ecosystem resilience originated in ecology, recent discussions have focused on geophysical attributes, and it is recognized that dynamic system components may not return to their former state following perturbations. Tipping points emerge when chronic changes (typically anthropogenic, but sometimes natural) push ecosystems to thresholds that cause collapse of process and function and may become permanent. Ecosystem resetting occurs when episodic natural disasters breach thresholds with little or no warning, resulting in long-term changes to environmental attributes or ecosystem function. An example of sustainability assessment of ecosystem goods and services along the Gulf Coast (USA) demonstrates the need to include both the resilient and dynamic nature of biogeomorphic components. Mountain road development in northwest Yunnan, China, makes rivers and related habitat vulnerable to tipping points. Ecosystems reset by natural disasters are also presented, emphasizing the need to understand the magnitude frequency and interrelationships among major disturbances, as shown by (i) the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and resulting tsunami, including how unsustainable urban development exacerbates geodisaster propagation, and (ii) repeated major earthquakes and associated geomorphic and vegetation disturbances in Papua New Guinea. Although all of these ecosystem perturbations and shifts are individually recognized, they are not embraced in contemporary sustainable decision making. PMID:23686583

  17. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 June 2002) The Science This image, located near the equator and 288W (72E), is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth. The Story Cool! It almost looks as if nature has 'painted' comets on the surface of Mars, using craters as comet cores and dust as streaky tails. Of course, that's just an illusion. As in many areas of Mars, the wind is behind the creation of such fantastic landforms. The natural phenomenon seen here gives this particular surface of Mars a very dynamic, fast-moving, almost luminous 'cosmic personality.' The bright, powdery-looking streaks of dust are in the 'wind shadows' of craters, where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. That's because the wind moves across the land in a particular direction, and a raised surface like the rim of a crater 'protects' dust from being completely blown away on the other side. The raised landforms basically act as a buffer. From the streaks seen above, you can tell the wind was blowing in a northeast to southwest direction. Why are the streaks so bright? Because they contrast with the really dark underlying terrain in this volcanic area of Mars. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars because it is made of basalt. Basalt is typically dark gray or black, and forms when a certain type of molten lava cools. The meaning of the word basalt has been traced back to an ancient Ethiopian word 'basal,' which means 'a rock from which you can obtain iron.' That must have made it a very desired material with ancient Earth civilizations long ago. Basalt is actually one of the most abundant types of rock found on Earth. Most of the volcanic islands in the ocean are made of basalt, including the large shield volcano of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, which is often compared to Martian shield volcanoes. Shield volcanoes don't have high, steep, mountain-like sides, but are instead low and broad humps upon the surface. They're created when highly fluid, molten-basalt flows spread out over wide areas. Over several millennia of basaltic layering upon layering, these volcanoes can reach massive sizes like the ones seen on Mars. You can see the wrinkly texture of dark lava flows (now hard and cool) in the above image beneath the brighter dust.

  18. Gibberellin biosynthesis and signal transduction is essential for internode elongation in deepwater rice

    PubMed Central

    Ayano, Madoka; Kani, Takahiro; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kitaoka, Takuya; Kuroha, Takeshi; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn B; Kitano, Hidemi; Nagai, Keisuke; Ashikari, Motoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Under flooded conditions, the leaves and internodes of deepwater rice can elongate above the water surface to capture oxygen and prevent drowning. Our previous studies showed that three major quantitative trait loci (QTL) regulate deepwater-dependent internode elongation in deepwater rice. In this study, we investigated the age-dependent internode elongation in deepwater rice. We also investigated the relationship between deepwater-dependent internode elongation and the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) by physiological and genetic approach using a QTL pyramiding line (NIL-1?+?3?+?12). Deepwater rice did not show internode elongation before the sixth leaf stage under deepwater condition. Additionally, deepwater-dependent internode elongation occurred on the sixth and seventh internodes during the sixth leaf stage. These results indicate that deepwater rice could not start internode elongation until the sixth leaf stage. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the phytohormone contents showed a deepwater-dependent GA1 and GA4 accumulation in deepwater rice. Additionally, a GA inhibitor abolished deepwater-dependent internode elongation in deepwater rice. On the contrary, GA feeding mimicked internode elongation under ordinary growth conditions. However, mutations in GA biosynthesis and signal transduction genes blocked deepwater-dependent internode elongation. These data suggested that GA biosynthesis and signal transduction are essential for deepwater-dependent internode elongation in deepwater rice. Deepwater rice obtained the ability for rapid internode elongation to avoid drowning and adapt to flooded condition. How does it regulate internode elongation? Using both physiological and genetic approach, this paper shows that the plant hormone, gibberellin (GA) regulates internode elongation. PMID:24891164

  19. Molecular Breeding Strategy and Challenges Towards Improvement of Blast Disease Resistance in Rice Crop.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, Sadegh; Rafii, Mohd Y; Shabanimofrad, Mahmoodreza; Miah, Gous; Sahebi, Mahbod; Azizi, Parisa; Tanweer, Fatah A; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Nasehi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a staple and most important security food crop consumed by almost half of the world's population. More rice production is needed due to the rapid population growth in the world. Rice blast caused by the fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most destructive diseases of this crop in different part of the world. Breakdown of blast resistance is the major cause of yield instability in several rice growing areas. There is a need to develop strategies providing long-lasting disease resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, giving protection for a long time over a broad geographic area, promising for sustainable rice production in the future. So far, molecular breeding approaches involving DNA markers, such as QTL mapping, marker-aided selection, gene pyramiding, allele mining and genetic transformation have been used to develop new resistant rice cultivars. Such techniques now are used as a low-cost, high-throughput alternative to conventional methods allowing rapid introgression of disease resistance genes into susceptible varieties as well as the incorporation of multiple genes into individual lines for more durable blast resistance. The paper briefly reviewed the progress of studies on this aspect to provide the interest information for rice disease resistance breeding. This review includes examples of how advanced molecular method have been used in breeding programs for improving blast resistance. New information and knowledge gained from previous research on the recent strategy and challenges towards improvement of blast disease such as pyramiding disease resistance gene for creating new rice varieties with high resistance against multiple diseases will undoubtedly provide new insights into the rice disease control. PMID:26635817

  20. Molecular Breeding Strategy and Challenges Towards Improvement of Blast Disease Resistance in Rice Crop

    PubMed Central

    Ashkani, Sadegh; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Shabanimofrad, Mahmoodreza; Miah, Gous; Sahebi, Mahbod; Azizi, Parisa; Tanweer, Fatah A.; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Nasehi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a staple and most important security food crop consumed by almost half of the world’s population. More rice production is needed due to the rapid population growth in the world. Rice blast caused by the fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most destructive diseases of this crop in different part of the world. Breakdown of blast resistance is the major cause of yield instability in several rice growing areas. There is a need to develop strategies providing long-lasting disease resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, giving protection for a long time over a broad geographic area, promising for sustainable rice production in the future. So far, molecular breeding approaches involving DNA markers, such as QTL mapping, marker-aided selection, gene pyramiding, allele mining and genetic transformation have been used to develop new resistant rice cultivars. Such techniques now are used as a low-cost, high-throughput alternative to conventional methods allowing rapid introgression of disease resistance genes into susceptible varieties as well as the incorporation of multiple genes into individual lines for more durable blast resistance. The paper briefly reviewed the progress of studies on this aspect to provide the interest information for rice disease resistance breeding. This review includes examples of how advanced molecular method have been used in breeding programs for improving blast resistance. New information and knowledge gained from previous research on the recent strategy and challenges towards improvement of blast disease such as pyramiding disease resistance gene for creating new rice varieties with high resistance against multiple diseases will undoubtedly provide new insights into the rice disease control. PMID:26635817

  1. Stability and retention of micronutrients in fortified rice prepared using different cooking methods.

    PubMed

    Wieringa, Frank T; Laillou, Arnaud; Guyondet, Christophe; Jallier, Vincent; Moench-Pfanner, Regina; Berger, Jacques

    2014-09-01

    Fortified rice holds great potential for bringing essential micronutrients to a large part of the world population. However, it is unknown whether differences in cooking methods or in production of rice premix affect the final amount of micronutrient consumed. This paper presents a study that quantified the losses of five different micronutrients (vitamin A, iron, zinc, folic acid, and vitamin B12) in fortified rice that was produced using three different techniques (hot extrusion, cold extrusion, and coating) during cooking and five different cooking methods (absorption method with or without soaking, washing before cooking, cooking in excess water, and frying rice before cooking). Fortified rice premix from six different producers (two for each technique) was mixed with normal rice in a 1:100 ratio. Each sample was prepared in triplicate, using the five different cooking methods, and retention of iron, zinc, vitamin A, vitamin B12, and folic acid was determined. It was found that the overall retention of iron, zinc, vitamin B12, and folic acid was between 75% and 100% and was unaffected by cooking method, while the retention of vitamin A was significantly affected by cooking method, with retention ranging from 0% (excess water) to 80% (soaking), depending on the cooking method and producer of the rice premix. No systematic differences between the different production methods were observed. We conclude that different cooking methods of rice as used in different regions of the world do not lead to a major loss of most micronutrients, with the exception of vitamin A. The factors involved in protecting vitamin A against losses during cooking need to be identified. All production techniques of rice premix yielded similar results, showing that coating is not inferior to extrusion techniques. Standard overages (50%) for vitamin B12 and folic acid are too high. PMID:25134849

  2. Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems

    E-print Network

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural, nitrogen, pesticides Abstract. Soil organisms play principal roles in several ecosystem functions, i decomposition, and acting as an environmental buffer. Agricultural soils would more closely resemble soils

  3. Ecological Engineering 26 (2006) 626 Scientific requirements for ecosystem-based management

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    2006-01-01

    Ecological Engineering 26 (2006) 6­26 Scientific requirements for ecosystem-based management March 2005; accepted 26 September 2005 Abstract Ecosystem-based management requires integration underway or in planning to restore and manage two major coastal ecosystems, the Chesapeake Bay (Chesapeake

  4. Rice, indica (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Hiei, Yukoh; Ishida, Yuji; Komari, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Indica varieties, which are generally recalcitrant to tissue culture and transformation, occupy 80 % of rice cultivation area in the world. Therefore, transformation method for indica rice must be improved greatly so that global rice production would take full advantage of cutting-edge biotechnology. An efficient protocol for indica transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens is hereby described. Immature embryos collected from plants in a greenhouse are cocultivated with A. tumefaciens after pretreatment with heat and centrifuging. The protocol was successfully tested in many elite indica cultivars such as IR8, IR24, IR58025B, IR64, IR72, Suweon 258, and Nanjing 11, yielding between 5 and 15 of independent transgenic plants per immature embryo. The use of immature embryos is recommended because gene transfer to them could be much more efficient and much less genotype dependent than gene transfer to callus. PMID:25300838

  5. Assessment of Impact of Insecticides on Anagrus nilaparvatae (Pang et Wang) (Hymenoptera: Mymanidae), an Egg Parasitoid of the Rice Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The parasitoid Anagrus Nilaparvatae (Pang et Wang) (Hymenoptera: Mymanidae) is a major natural enemy of the rice planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae). It plays an important role in the IPM of the rice planthopper. Contact and oral toxicity and residual effect of fourteen pesticide...

  6. 40 CFR Table 1b to Subpart Zzzz of... - Operating Limitations for Existing, New, and Reconstructed Spark Ignition, 4SRB Stationary RICE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., New, and Reconstructed Spark Ignition, 4SRB Stationary RICE >500 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating... Limitations for Existing, New, and Reconstructed Spark Ignition, 4SRB Stationary RICE >500 HP Located at...

  7. Chromosome Segment Substitution Lines: A Powerful Tool for the Introgression of Valuable Genes from Oryza Wild Species into Cultivated Rice (O. sativa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild species of rice (genus Oryza) contain many useful genes but a vast majority of these genes remain untapped to date because it is often difficult to transfer these genes into cultivated rice (O. sativa L.). Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) and backcross inbred lines (BILs) are power...

  8. A Classroom Exercise for Testing Urban Myth: Does Wedding Rice Cause Birds to Explode or Were Ann Landers, Martha Stewart & Bart Simpson Wrong?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krupa, James J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author first provides the history of the wedding rice myth. He then details an interactive class activity that involved students in his large, non-majors biology classes. These students developed a series of experiments that scientifically determined if rice could be harmful to birds. Finally, he provides suggestions on how…

  9. High-resolution mapping of Rsn1, a locus controlling sensitivity of rice to a necrosis-inducing phytotoxin from Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes disease on all major crop-plant species. Anastomosis group 1-IA is the causal agent of sheath blight of rice (Oryza sativa), one of the most important rice diseases worldwide. R. solani AG-IA produces a necrosis-inducing phytotoxin a...

  10. 40 CFR Table 2a to Subpart Zzzz of... - Emission Limitations for New and Reconstructed 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission Limitations for New and Reconstructed 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500 HP and New and Reconstructed 4SLB Stationary RICE â¥250 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions 2a Table 2a to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63 Protection of Environment...

  11. Growing season net ecosystem CO2 exchange of two desert ecosystems with alkaline soils in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longhui; Chen, Xi; van der Tol, Christiaan; Luo, Geping; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-01-01

    Central Asia is covered by vast desert ecosystems, and the majority of these ecosystems have alkaline soils. Their contribution to global net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) is of significance simply because of their immense spatial extent. Some of the latest research reported considerable abiotic CO2 absorption by alkaline soil, but the rate of CO2 absorption has been questioned by peer communities. To investigate the issue of carbon cycle in Central Asian desert ecosystems with alkaline soils, we have measured the NEE using eddy covariance (EC) method at two alkaline sites during growing season in Kazakhstan. The diurnal course of mean monthly NEE followed a clear sinusoidal pattern during growing season at both sites. Both sites showed significant net carbon uptake during daytime on sunny days with high photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) but net carbon loss at nighttime and on cloudy and rainy days. NEE has strong dependency on PAR and the response of NEE to precipitation resulted in an initial and significant carbon release to the atmosphere, similar to other ecosystems. These findings indicate that biotic processes dominated the carbon processes, and the contribution of abiotic carbon process to net ecosystem CO2 exchange may be trivial in alkaline soil desert ecosystems over Central Asia. PMID:24455157

  12. Effects of Methylcellulose on Fibrolytic Bacterial Detachment and In vitro Degradation of Rice Straw

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ji; Sung, Ha Guyn; Upadhaya, Santi Devi; Ha, Jong K.; Lee, Sung Sill

    2013-01-01

    Two in vitro experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of methylcellulose (MC) on i) bacterial detachment from rice straw as well as ii) inhibition of bacterial attachment and fiber digestibility. To evaluate the effect of MC on fibrolytic bacterial detachment (Exp 1), in vitro bacterial cultures with 0.1% (w/v) MC solution were compared with cultures without MC after 8 h incubation. The effect of MC on inhibition of bacterial attachment was determined by comparing with real-time PCR the populations of F. succinogenes, R. flavefaciens and R. albus established on rice straw pre-treated with 0.1% MC with those on untreated straw after incubation for 0, 6 and 12 h (Exp 2). The major fibrolytic bacterial attachment on rice straw showed significantly lower populations with either the addition of MC to the culture or pre-treated rice straw compared to controls (p<0.05). Also, the digestibility of rice straw with MC was significantly lower compared with control (p<0.05). The F. succinogenes population did not show detachment from rice straw, but showed an inhibition of attachment and proliferation on rice straw in accordance with a decrease of fiber digestion. The detachments of Ruminococcus species co-existed preventing the proliferations with subsequent reduction of fiber degradation by MC during the incubation. Their detachments were induced from stable colonization as well as the initial adhesion on rice straw by MC in in vitro ruminal fermentation. Furthermore, the detachment of R. albus was more sensitive to MC than was R. flavefaciens. These results showed the certain evidence that attachment of major fibrolytic bacteria had an effect on fiber digestion in the rumen, and each of fibrolytic bacteria, F. succinogenes, R. flavefaciens and R. albus had a specific mechanism of attachment and detachment to fiber. PMID:25049729

  13. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Aromatic and Quality Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Landraces from North-Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Mawkhlieng, Bandapkuper; Misra, A. K.; Pattanayak, A.; Harish, G. D.; Singh, S. K.; Ngachan, S. V.; Bansal, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    The North-eastern (NE) India, comprising of Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura, possess diverse array of locally adapted non-Basmati aromatic germplasm. The germplasm collections from this region could serve as valuable resources in breeding for abiotic stress tolerance, grain yield and cooking/eating quality. To utilize such collections, however, breeders need information about the extent and distribution of genetic diversity present within collections. In this study, we report the result of population genetic analysis of 107 aromatic and quality rice accessions collected from different parts of NE India, as well as classified these accessions in the context of a set of structured global rice cultivars. A total of 322 alleles were amplified by 40 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with an average of 8.03 alleles per locus. Average gene diversity was 0.67. Population structure analysis revealed that NE Indian aromatic rice can be subdivided into three genetically distinct population clusters: P1, joha rice accessions from Assam, tai rices from Mizoram and those from Sikkim; P2, chakhao rice germplasm from Manipur; and P3, aromatic rice accessions from Nagaland. Pair-wise FST between three groups varied from 0.223 (P1 vs P2) to 0.453 (P2 vs P3). With reference to the global classification of rice cultivars, two major groups (Indica and Japonica) were identified in NE Indian germplasm. The aromatic accessions from Assam, Manipur and Sikkim were assigned to the Indica group, while the accessions from Nagaland exhibited close association with Japonica. The tai accessions of Mizoram along with few chakhao accessions collected from the hill districts of Manipur were identified as admixed. The results highlight the importance of regional genetic studies for understanding diversification of aromatic rice in India. The data also suggest that there is scope for exploiting the genetic diversity of aromatic and quality rice germplasm of NE India for rice improvement. PMID:26067999

  14. Rice crop mapping and change prediction using multi-temporal satellite images in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. R.; Chen, C. F.; Nguyen, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The rice cropping systems in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (VMD) has been undergoing major changes to cope with developing agro-economics, increasing population and changing climate. Information on rice cropping practices and changes in cropping systems is critical for policymakers to devise successful strategies to ensure food security and rice grain exports for the country. The primary objective of this research is to map rice cropping systems and predict future dynamics of rice cropping systems using the MODIS time-series data of 2002, 2006, and 2010. First, a phenology-based classification approach was applied for the classification and assessment of rice cropping systems in study region. Second, the Cellular Automata-Markov (CA-Markov) models was used to simulate the rice-cropping system map of VMD for 2010. The comparisons between the classification maps and the ground reference data indicated satisfactory results with overall accuracies and Kappa coefficients, respectively, of 81.4% and 0.75 for 2002, 80.6% and 0.74 for 2006 and 85.5% and 0.81 for 2010. The simulated map of rice cropping system for 2010 was extrapolated by CA-Markov model based on the trend of rice cropping systems during 2002~2006. The comparison between predicted scenario and classification map for 2010 presents a reasonably closer agreement. In conclusion, the CA-Markov model performs a powerful tool for the dynamic modeling of changes in rice cropping systems, and the results obtained demonstrate that the approach produces satisfactory results in terms of accuracy, quantitative forecast and spatial pattern changes. Meanwhile, the projections of the future changes would provide useful inputs to the agricultural policy for effective management of the rice cropping practices in VMD.

  15. A systematic review of the influence of rice characteristics and processing methods on postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses.

    PubMed

    Boers, Hanny M; Seijen Ten Hoorn, Jack; Mela, David J

    2015-10-14

    Rice is an important staple food for more than half of the world's population. Especially in Asian countries, rice is a major contributor to dietary glycaemic load (GL). Sustained consumption of higher-GL diets has been implicated in the development of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. Given that a reduction in postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses is generally seen as a beneficial dietary change, it is useful to determine the variation in the range of postprandial glucose (PPG) and insulin (PPI) responses to rice and the primary intrinsic and processing factors known to affect such responses. Therefore, we identified relevant original research articles on glycaemic response to rice through a systematic search of the literature in Scopus, Medline and SciFinder databases up to July 2014. Based on a glucose reference value of 100, the observed glycaemic index values for rice varieties ranged from 48 to 93, while the insulinaemic index ranged from 39 to 95. There are three main factors that appear to explain most of the variation in glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to rice: (1) inherent starch characteristics (amylose:amylopectin ratio and rice cultivar); (2) post-harvest processing (particularly parboiling); (3) consumer processing (cooking, storage and reheating). The milling process shows a clear effect when compared at identical cooking times, with brown rice always producing a lower PPG and PPI response than white rice. However, at longer cooking times normally used for the preparation of brown rice, smaller and inconsistent differences are observed between brown and white rice. PMID:26310311

  16. Iron Biofortification of Myanmar Rice

    PubMed Central

    Aung, May Sann; Masuda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Yamakawa, Takashi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2013-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency elevates human mortality rates, especially in developing countries. In Myanmar, the prevalence of Fe-deficient anemia in children and pregnant women are 75 and 71%, respectively. Myanmar people have one of the highest per capita rice consumption rates globally. Consequently, production of Fe-biofortified rice would likely contribute to solving the Fe-deficiency problem in this human population. To produce Fe-biofortified Myanmar rice by transgenic methods, we first analyzed callus induction and regeneration efficiencies in 15 varieties that are presently popular because of their high-yields or high-qualities. Callus formation and regeneration efficiency in each variety was strongly influenced by types of culture media containing a range of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid concentrations. The Paw San Yin variety, which has a high-Fe content in polished seeds, performed well in callus induction and regeneration trials. Thus, we transformed this variety using a gene expression cassette that enhanced Fe transport within rice plants through overexpression of the nicotianamine synthase gene HvNAS1, Fe flow to the endosperm through the Fe(II)-nicotianamine transporter gene OsYSL2, and Fe accumulation in endosperm by the Fe storage protein gene SoyferH2. A line with a transgene insertion was successfully obtained. Enhanced expressions of the introduced genes OsYSL2, HvNAS1, and SoyferH2 occurred in immature T2 seeds. The transformants accumulated 3.4-fold higher Fe concentrations, and also 1.3-fold higher zinc concentrations in T2 polished seeds compared to levels in non-transgenic rice. This Fe-biofortified rice has the potential to reduce Fe-deficiency anemia in millions of Myanmar people without changing food habits and without introducing additional costs. PMID:23750162

  17. Tillering and panicle branching genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei-hong; Shang, Fei; Lin, Qun-ting; Lou, Chen; Zhang, Jing

    2014-03-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the most important staple food crops in the world, and rice tillering and panicle branching are important traits determining grain yield. Since the gene MONOCULM 1 (MOC 1) was first characterized as a key regulator in controlling rice tillering and branching, great progress has been achieved in identifying important genes associated with grain yield, elucidating the genetic basis of yield-related traits. Some of these important genes were shown to be applicable for molecular breeding of high-yielding rice. This review focuses on recent advances, with emphasis on rice tillering and panicle branching genes, and their regulatory networks. PMID:24345551

  18. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 4 

    E-print Network

    2004-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas June 2004 Volume IV Number 4 Texas Rice 30 th Annual Rice Field Day at the Eagle Lake Station The 30th Annual Rice Field Day at the Eagle Lake Research... Station will be held Tuesday June 29th starting at 4:00 pm. Rice farmers and other industry representatives will gather to learn the latest informa- tion in rice research from Texas A&M and USDA scientists. The Eagle Lake Re- search Station was estab...

  19. Drying Rough Rice in Storage. 

    E-print Network

    Sorenson, J. W. Jr.; Crane, L. E.

    1960-01-01

    stream_source_info Bull0952.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 64888 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Bull0952.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Drying. Rough Rice in Storage Ih... AGRf""' TURP YPERIMENT STAT10 I. TEXAS SUMMARY Research was conducted at the Rice-Pasture Experiment Station near Beaumont during 7 crop years (1952-53 through 1958-59) to determine the engineering problems and the practicability of dry- ing...

  20. Association between rice consumption and selected indicators of dietary and nutritional status using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Eileen; Luo, Hanqi

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating whether white rice, brown rice, and rice flour consumption has any association with selected measures of dietary intake and nutritional status, including various variables of energy intake, major vitamin and mineral intakes, weigh status, blood pressure, cholesterol level, and serum folate level for adults 20 years and older. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2008 and the Food Commodity Intake Database were used. Rice consumers had a significantly higher energy intake, yet they had lower percentage calorie intake from fat and saturated fat. Rice consumers also had significantly higher intakes of a range of nutrients. Rice consumers had lower waist circumference, triceps skinfold, and were significantly more likely to have a body mass index less than or equal to 25. PMID:25602463

  1. Weedy (red) rice: An emerging constraint to global rice production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ongoing increases in the human population necessitate that rice will continue to be an essential aspect of food security for the 21st century. While production must increase in the coming decades to meet demand, such increases will be accompanied by diminished natural resources and rising productio...

  2. Novel Phr1 mutations and the evolution of phenol reaction variation in US weedy rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Briana L.; Skare, Karl J.; Olsen, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Red rice, a major agricultural weed, is phenotypically diverse and possesses traits that are similar to both wild and cultivated rice. The genetic resources available for rice make it possible to examine the molecular basis and evolution of traits characterizing this weed. Here, we assess the phenol reaction – a classical trait for distinguishing among cultivated rice varieties – in red rice at the phenotypic and molecular levels.We phenotyped more than 100 US weed samples for the phenol reaction and sequenced the underlying Phr1 locus in a subset of samples. Data were analyzed in combination with previously published Phr1 data for cultivated rice.Most weed accessions (96.3%) are positive for the phenol reaction, and samples with a negative response carry loss-of-function alleles that are rare or heretofore undocumented. One such allele may have evolved through mutational convergence of a 1-bp frameshift insertion. Haplotype sharing between red rice and US cultivars suggests occasional crop–weed hybridization.Our discovery of previously undocumented nonfunctional phr1 alleles suggests that there are likely to be other loss-of-function mutations segregating in Oryza sativa around the world. Red rice may provide a useful study system for understanding the adaptive significance of Phr1 variation in agricultural settings. PMID:19674331

  3. Patterns of irrigated rice growth and malaria vector breeding in Mali using multi-temporal ERS-2 synthetic aperture radar

    PubMed Central

    Diuk-Wasser, M. A.; Dolo, G.; Bagayoko, M.; Sogoba, N.; Toure, M. B.; Moghaddam, M.; Manoukis, N.; Rian, S.; Traore, S. F.; Taylor, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    We explored the use of the European Remote Sensing Satellite 2 Synthetic Aperture Radar (ERS-2 SAR) to trace the development of rice plants in an irrigated area near Niono, Mali and relate that to the density of anopheline mosquitoes, especially An. gambiae. This is important because such mosquitoes are the major vectors of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa, and their development is often coupled to the cycle of rice development. We collected larval samples, mapped rice fields using GPS and recorded rice growth stages simultaneously with eight ERS-2 SAR acquisitions. We were able to discriminate among rice growth stages using ERS-2 SAR backscatter data, especially among the early stages of rice growth, which produce the largest numbers of larvae. We could also distinguish between basins that produced high and low numbers of anophelines within the stage of peak production. After the peak, larval numbers dropped as rice plants grew taller and thicker, reducing the amount of light reaching the water surface. ERS-2 SAR backscatter increased concomitantly. Our data support the belief that ERS-2 SAR data may be helpful for mapping the spatial patterns of rice growth, distinguishing different agricultural practices, and monitoring the abundance of vectors in nearby villages. PMID:17710188

  4. Investigating the impact of rice blast disease on the livelihood of the local farmers in greater Mwea region of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kihoro, Joseph; Bosco, Njoroge J; Murage, Hunja; Ateka, Elijah; Makihara, Daigo

    2013-12-01

    Rice is the most important cereal crop in Kenya coming third after maize and wheat. It forms a very important diet for a majority of families in Kenya. The demand for rice in Kenya has seen a dramatic increase over the last few years while production has remained low. This is because rice production has been faced by serious constraints notably plant diseases of which the most devastating is rice blast. Rice blast is known to cause approximately 60% -100% yield losses. It is caused by an Ascomycete fungus called Magnaporthe Oryzae. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of rice blast disease on the livelihood of the local farmers in Greater Mwea region and develop a rice blast disease distribution map using GIS approach. The study methodology employed a questionnaire survey which were subjected to sample population of households in the 7 sections with 70 blocks within Mwea region. The collected data was analysed using SAS Version 9.1. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the household characteristics, the farm characteristics and the farmers' perceptions of rice blast disease. In the questionnaire, farmers' response on whether they had been affected by rice blast disease and the total production per acreage was used to develop an attribute table with GPS points. The GPS points were interpolated to create a geographical distribution map of rice blast disease. From the research findings almost all the farmers' had awareness and knowledge of rice blast disease, 98% of the farmers interviewed were aware of rice blast disease. Out of the 98% with knowledge and awareness 76% have been affected by the disease, while 24% have never been affected. Farmers attributed rice blast disease to a range of different causes, including excessive use of nitrogen fertilizer, water shortage, lack of proper drainage canal and due to climate change. Majority of the farmers interviewed (72%) did not engage themselves in any other socio-economic activity even after being affected by the rice blast disease. 15% opted to growing horticultural crops, 7% engaged in trading activities while 2% started livestock raring, wage earning and Boda boda business. PMID:23888278

  5. Stability of Heterogeneous Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang-Yu; Yan, Gang; Barabasi, Alber-Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    Stability of ecosystem measures the tendency of a community to return to equilibrium after environmental perturbation, which is severely constrained by the underlying network structure. Despite significant advances in uncovering the relationship between stability and network structure, little attention has been paid to the impact of the degree heterogeneity that exists in real ecosystems. Here we show that for networks with mixed interactions of competition and mutualism the degree heterogeneity always destabilizes the ecosystem. Surprisingly, for predator-prey interactions (e.g., food webs) high heterogeneity is destabilizing yet moderate heterogeneity is stabilizing. These findings deepen our understanding of the stability of real ecosystems and may also have implications in studying the stability of more general complex dynamical systems.

  6. List identifies threatened ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-09-01

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) announced on 9 September that it will develop a new Red List of Ecosystems that will identify which ecosystems are vulnerable or endangered. The list, which is modeled on the group's Red List of Threatened Species™, could help to guide conservation activities and influence policy processes such as the Convention on Biological Diversity, according to the group. “We will assess the status of marine, terrestrial, freshwater, and subterranean ecosystems at local, regional, and global levels,” stated Jon Paul Rodriguez, leader of IUCN's Ecosystems Red List Thematic Group. “The assessment can then form the basis for concerted implementation action so that we can manage them sustainably if their risk of collapse is low or restore them if they are threatened and then monitor their recovery.”

  7. PERSISTENCE IN MODEL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical models aid in understanding environmental systems and in developing testable hypotheses relevant to the fate and ecological effects of toxic substances in such systems. Within the framework of microcosm or laboratory ecosystem modeling, some differential equation mod...

  8. Ecosystems in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madders, M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the materials and laboratory techniques for the study of food chains and food webs, pyramids of numbers and biomass, energy pyramids, and oxygen gradients. Presents a procedure for investigating the effects of various pollutants on an entire ecosystem. (GS)

  9. Lakes Ecosystem Services Online

    EPA Science Inventory

    Northeastern lakes provide valuable ecosystem services that benefit residents and visitors and are increasingly important for provisioning of recreational opportunities and amenities. Concurrently, however, population growth threatens lakes by, for instance, increasing nutrient ...

  10. Monetising cultural ecosystem services? 

    E-print Network

    Vinci, Igor

    2012-11-29

    ABSTRACT In the context of increasing degradation of the environment, the economic valuation of ecosystem services represents an attempt to quantify the contribution of nature to human wellbeing. This approach has been ...

  11. Graduate studies Ecosystem Science

    E-print Network

    sciences; or genetics, systematics, evolution. ECOSYSTEM SCIENCE Fundamental scientific knowledge require approaches that work with natural and social systems rather than against them. Current and statistics GENETICS, SYSTEMATICS, EVOLUTION Genetics, systematics and evolution allow students

  12. Leptospirosis in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil: An Ecosystem Approach in the Animal-Human Interface

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Maria Cristina; Najera, Patricia; Pereira, Martha M.; Machado, Gustavo; dos Anjos, Celso B.; Rodrigues, Rogério O.; Cavagni, Gabriela M.; Muñoz-Zanzi, Claudia; Corbellini, Luis G.; Leone, Mariana; Buss, Daniel F.; Aldighieri, Sylvain; Espinal, Marcos A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is an epidemic-prone neglected disease that affects humans and animals, mostly in vulnerable populations. The One Health approach is a recommended strategy to identify drivers of the disease and plan for its prevention and control. In that context, the aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of human cases of leptospirosis in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and to explore possible drivers. Additionally, it sought to provide further evidence to support interventions and to identify hypotheses for new research at the human-animal-ecosystem interface. Methodology and findings The risk for human infection was described in relation to environmental, socioeconomic, and livestock variables. This ecological study used aggregated data by municipality (all 496). Data were extracted from secondary, publicly available sources. Thematic maps were constructed and univariate analysis performed for all variables. Negative binomial regression was used for multivariable statistical analysis of leptospirosis cases. An annual average of 428 human cases of leptospirosis was reported in the state from 2008 to 2012. The cumulative incidence in rural populations was eight times higher than in urban populations. Variables significantly associated with leptospirosis cases in the final model were: Parana/Paraiba ecoregion (RR: 2.25; CI95%: 2.03–2.49); Neossolo Litolítico soil (RR: 1.93; CI95%: 1.26–2.96); and, to a lesser extent, the production of tobacco (RR: 1.10; CI95%: 1.09–1.11) and rice (RR: 1.003; CI95%: 1.002–1.04). Conclusion Urban cases were concentrated in the capital and rural cases in a specific ecoregion. The major drivers identified in this study were related to environmental and production processes that are permanent features of the state. This study contributes to the basic knowledge on leptospirosis distribution and drivers in the state and encourages a comprehensive approach to address the disease in the animal-human-ecosystem interface. PMID:26562157

  13. A Built-In Mechanism to Mitigate the Spread of Insect-Resistance and Herbicide-Tolerance Transgenes into Weedy Rice Populations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengyi; Li, Jingjing; Gao, Jianhua; Shen, Zhicheng; Lu, Bao-Rong; Lin, Chaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Background The major challenge of cultivating genetically modified (GM) rice (Oryza sativa) at the commercial scale is to prevent the spread of transgenes from GM cultivated rice to its coexisting weedy rice (O. sativa f. spontanea). The strategic development of GM rice with a built-in control mechanism can mitigate transgene spread in weedy rice populations. Methodology/Principal Findings An RNAi cassette suppressing the expression of the bentazon detoxifying enzyme CYP81A6 was constructed into the T-DNA which contained two tightly linked transgenes expressing the Bt insecticidal protein Cry1Ab and the glyphosate tolerant 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), respectively. GM rice plants developed from this T-DNA were resistant to lepidopteran pests and tolerant to glyphosate, but sensitive to bentazon. The application of bentazon of 2000 mg/L at the rate of 40 mL/m2, which is approximately the recommended dose for the field application to control common rice weeds, killed all F2 plants containing the transgenes generated from the Crop-weed hybrids between a GM rice line (CGH-13) and two weedy rice strains (PI-63 and PI-1401). Conclusions/Significance Weedy rice plants containing transgenes from GM rice through gene flow can be selectively killed by the spray of bentazon when a non-GM rice variety is cultivated alternately in a few-year interval. The built-in control mechanism in combination of cropping management is likely to mitigate the spread of transgenes into weedy rice populations. PMID:22359609

  14. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; et al

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced amore »clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.« less

  15. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Collin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Yingping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  16. Energy flow in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    This project has been using natural isotope abundances to trace major pathways of energy flow to consumers in Imnavait Creek and the tundra ecosystem of the R4D watershed with comparative work in the coastal tundra. We are processing samples collected at the R4D intensive site over the past three years and are comparing these data with similar samples collected from the coastal plain. Our approach is to determine if carbon is accumulating in upland and coastal tundra; to determine the role of eroded peat carbon in the aquatic ecosystem; and to determine the distribution of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the tundra-pond ecosystem to establish the feasibility of using natural differences as tracers.

  17. Energy flow in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1993-05-01

    This project has been using natural isotope abundances to trace major pathways of energy flow to consumers in Imnavait Creek and the tundra ecosystem of the R4D watershed with comparative work in the coastal tundra. We are processing samples collected at the R4D intensive site over the past three years and are comparing these data with similar samples collected from the coastal plain. Our approach is to determine if carbon is accumulating in upland and coastal tundra; to determine the role of eroded peat carbon in the aquatic ecosystem; and to determine the distribution of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the tundra-pond ecosystem to establish the feasibility of using natural differences as tracers.

  18. Time-Course RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals Transcriptional Changes in Rice Plants Triggered by Rice stripe virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Bo Yoon; Jung, Jin Kyo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Rice stripe virus (RSV) has become a major pathogen of rice. To determine how the rice transcriptome is modified in response to RSV infection, we used RNA-Seq to perform a genome-wide gene expression analysis of a susceptible rice cultivar. The transcriptomes of RSV-infected samples were compared to those of mock-treated samples at 3, 7, and 15 days post-infection (dpi). From 8 to 11% of the genes were differentially expressed (>2-fold difference in expression) in RSV-infected vs. noninfected rice. Among them, 532 genes were differentially expressed at all three time points. Surprisingly, 37.6% of the 532 genes are related to transposons. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that many chloroplast genes were down-regulated in infected plants at 3 and 15 dpi. Expression of genes associated with cell differentiation and flowering was significantly down-regulated in infected plants at 15 dpi. In contrast, most of the up-regulated genes in infected plants concern the cell wall, plasma membrane, and vacuole and are known to function in various metabolic pathways and stress responses. In addition, transcripts of diverse transcription factors gradually accumulated in infected plants with increasing infection time. We also confirmed that the expression of gene subsets (including NBS-LRR domain-containing genes, receptor-like kinase genes, and genes involving RNA silencing) was changed by RSV infection. Taken together, we demonstrated that down-regulation of genes related to photosynthesis and flowering was strongly associated with disease symptoms caused by RSV and that up-regulation of genes involved in metabolic pathways, stress responses, and transcription was related to host defense mechanisms. PMID:26305329

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR MARKER FROM THE RICE BLAST AVIRULENCE GEN AVR-PITA FOR SURVEILLANCE OF DURABLE RICE BLAST RESISTANCE CONFERRED BY PI-TA IN ARKANSAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Arkansas, a major resistance gene Pi-ta in rice has been deployed effectively to prevent blast disease. Currently, the US cultivars, Katy, Madison, Kaybonnet, Drew, Cybonnet and Ahrent were confirmed to contain the resistance gene Pi-ta. Pi-ta is effective only when blast pathogen Magnaporthe o...

  20. DMO Dental -Texas Rice University

    E-print Network

    Your Group Plan DMO Dental - Texas Rice University #12;TXCOC-01-12/01 1 Dental Care Plan ID Cards If you are an enrollee with Aetna Dental coverage, you don't need an ID card. When visiting a dentist, simply provide your name, date of birth and Member ID# (or social security number). The dental office can

  1. Huajian Gao James R. Rice

    E-print Network

    Huajian Gao James R. Rice Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 conditions at infinity. Theformulae derived are used to study the configurational stability problem of wavenumber higher than one is configurationally stable under all boundary conditions at infinity

  2. RICE UNIVERSITY Molecules in Motion

    E-print Network

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    RICE UNIVERSITY Molecules in Motion: Computing Structural Flexibility by Amarda Shehu A THESIS in Motion: Computing Structural Flexibility by Amarda Shehu Growing databases of protein sequences in the post-genomic era call for computa- tional methods to extract structure and function from a protein

  3. Agriculture Education. Soybeans and Rice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in agricultural education. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) soybeans, (2) rice, and (3) orientation. Each of the 17 units of instruction follows a typical format: terminal objective, specific…

  4. Outcrossing interactions of early-flowering strawhull and late-flowering blackhull red rice (Oryza sativa) with commercial rice varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice continues to be a challenging weed pest in southern U.S. rice, in part due to the diversity of biotypes and its significant outcrossing potential with herbicide-resistant rice. The outcrossing interactions between red rice and true-breeding rice cultivars are generally well established, bu...

  5. A hybrid machine model of rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe grisea.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Mike; Holcombe, Lucy; Gheorghe, Marian; Talbot, Nick

    2003-01-01

    The fungus, Magnaporthe grisea (Rice blast fungus) is a major agricultural problem affecting rice and related food crops. The way that the fungus invades the host plant and propagates itself is a very important scientific problem and recent advances in research into the genetic basis of these processes can be used to build a simple partial model using hybrid computational modelling techniques. The possible potential benefits of doing this include the use of computer simulation and automated analysis through techniques such as model checking to understand the complex behaviour of such systems. The example is a metaphor for the process of trying to integrate and understand much of the vast amounts of genomic and other data that is being produced in current molecular biology research. PMID:12595120

  6. Setting the bar: Standards for ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Polasky, Stephen; Tallis, Heather; Reyers, Belinda

    2015-06-16

    Progress in ecosystem service science has been rapid, and there is now a healthy appetite among key public and private sector decision makers for this science. However, changing policy and management is a long-term project, one that raises a number of specific practical challenges. One impediment to broad adoption of ecosystem service information is the lack of standards that define terminology, acceptable data and methods, and reporting requirements. Ecosystem service standards should be tailored to specific use contexts, such as national income and wealth accounts, corporate sustainability reporting, land-use planning, and environmental impact assessments. Many standard-setting organizations already exist, and the research community will make the most headway toward rapid uptake of ecosystem service science by working directly with these organizations. Progress has been made in aligning with existing organizations in areas such as product certification and sustainability reporting, but a major challenge remains in mainstreaming ecosystem service information into core public and private use contexts, such as agricultural and energy subsidy design, national income accounts, and corporate accounts. PMID:26082540

  7. Setting the bar: Standards for ecosystem services

    PubMed Central

    Polasky, Stephen; Tallis, Heather; Reyers, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Progress in ecosystem service science has been rapid, and there is now a healthy appetite among key public and private sector decision makers for this science. However, changing policy and management is a long-term project, one that raises a number of specific practical challenges. One impediment to broad adoption of ecosystem service information is the lack of standards that define terminology, acceptable data and methods, and reporting requirements. Ecosystem service standards should be tailored to specific use contexts, such as national income and wealth accounts, corporate sustainability reporting, land-use planning, and environmental impact assessments. Many standard-setting organizations already exist, and the research community will make the most headway toward rapid uptake of ecosystem service science by working directly with these organizations. Progress has been made in aligning with existing organizations in areas such as product certification and sustainability reporting, but a major challenge remains in mainstreaming ecosystem service information into core public and private use contexts, such as agricultural and energy subsidy design, national income accounts, and corporate accounts. PMID:26082540

  8. Seasonal variation of methane flux from coastal saline rice field with the application of different organic manures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, A.; Yeluripati, Jagadeesh B.; Nayak, D. R.; Mahata, K. R.; Santra, S. C.; Adhya, T. K.

    2013-02-01

    A field experiment was conducted in an irrigated saline rice field of Gadakujang (a fishing hamlet of coastal Odisha, India, ravaged by the super cyclone of 1999 and cyclone BOB02 of 2006), to study the effects of locally available organic and fresh green manure amendment to the saline soil on methane (CH4) emission during wet and dry seasons using the conventional closed chamber flux measurement method. In a first report of this kind, CH4 emission vis-à-vis yield improvement of rice with different locally available organic manure application from coastal saline rice field soil of Odisha, is reported. The study confirms that CH4 flux from the saline soil planted to rice is significantly lower than that of irrigated inland non-saline rice field during both wet and dry seasons. Cumulative seasonal CH4 flux from different treatments of the coastal saline rice field ranged between 119.51 and 263.60 kg ha-1 during the wet season and 15.35-100.88 kg ha-1 during the dry season. Lower CH4 emission during the dry season may be attributed to the increased soil salinity (EC1:2) that went up from 0.76 dS m-1 during the wet season to 3.96 dS m-1 during the dry season. Annual CH4 emission per Mg grain yield was significantly low from plots treated with locally available green manure Morning glory (Ipomoea lacunosa) (17.27) with significantly high rice grain yield. Study indicates that Morning glory may be used as a potential green manure to increase grain yield and reduced CH4 emission from the coastal saline rice ecosystems of the tropics.

  9. Whole Genome Sequencing of Elite Rice Cultivars as a Comprehensive Information Resource for Marker Assisted Selection

    PubMed Central

    Duitama, Jorge; Silva, Alexander; Sanabria, Yamid; Cruz, Daniel Felipe; Quintero, Constanza; Ballen, Carolina; Lorieux, Mathias; Scheffler, Brian; Farmer, Andrew; Torres, Edgar; Oard, James; Tohme, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics revealed the genomic background of rice, a staple food for the poor people, and provided the basis to develop large genomic variation databases for thousands of cultivars. Proper analysis of this massive resource is expected to give novel insights into the structure, function, and evolution of the rice genome, and to aid the development of rice varieties through marker assisted selection or genomic selection. In this work we present sequencing and bioinformatics analyses of 104 rice varieties belonging to the major subspecies of Oryza sativa. We identified repetitive elements and recurrent copy number variation covering about 200 Mbp of the rice genome. Genotyping of over 18 million polymorphic locations within O. sativa allowed us to reconstruct the individual haplotype patterns shaping the genomic background of elite varieties used by farmers throughout the Americas. Based on a reconstruction of the alleles for the gene GBSSI, we could identify novel genetic markers for selection of varieties with high amylose content. We expect that both the analysis methods and the genomic information described here would be of great use for the rice research community and for other groups carrying on similar sequencing efforts in other crops. PMID:25923345

  10. Natural variations in Os?TMT contribute to diversity of the ?-tocopherol content in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qiang; Yoon, Min-Young; He, Qiang; Kim, Tae-Sung; Tong, Wei; Choi, Bu-Woong; Lee, Young-Sang; Park, Yong-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Tocopherols and tocotrienols, collectively known as tocochromanols, are lipid-soluble molecules that belong to the group of vitamin E compounds. Among them, ?-tocopherol (??) is one of the antioxidants with diverse functions and benefits for humans and animals. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of these traits would be valuable to improve nutritional quality by breeding in rice. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) has emerged as a powerful strategy for identifying genes or quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying complex traits in plants. To discover the genes or QTLs underlying the naturally occurring variations of ?? content in rice, we performed GWAS using 1.44 million high-quality single-nucleotide polymorphisms acquired from re-sequencing of 137 accessions from a diverse rice core collection. Thirteen candidate genes were found across 2-year phenotypic data, among which gamma-tocopherol methyltransferase (Os?TMT) was identified as the major factor responsible for the ?? content among rice accessions. Nucleotide variations in the coding region of Os?TMT were significantly associated with the ?? content variations, while nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter region of Os?TMT also could partly demonstrate the correlation with ?? content variations, according to our RNA expression analyses. This study provides useful information for genetic factors underlying ?? content variations in rice, which will significantly contribute the research on ?? biosynthesis mechanisms and ?? improvement of rice. PMID:25990214

  11. Unit and internal chain profile of African rice (Oryza glaberrima) amylopectin.

    PubMed

    Gayin, Joseph; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Manful, John; Bertoft, Eric

    2016-02-10

    High-performance anion-exchange chromatography was used to study the unit chain profiles of amylopectins and their ?,?-limit dextrins from two African rice (Oryza glaberrima) accessions-TOG 12440 and IRGC 103759. The samples were compared with two Asian rice (Oryza sativa) samples (cv Koshihikari and cv WITA 4) and one O. sativa×O. glaberrima cross (NERICA 4). The ratio of short:long chains ranged between 12.1 and 13.8, and the ratio of A:B-chains was ?1.0 in all samples. A significant difference was observed in the distribution of internal chains with regards to the proportion of short "fingerprint" B-chains (Bfp-chains), which in the ?,?-limit dextrins have a degree of polymerization (DP) 3-7. The African rice starches and NERICA 4 had higher levels of Bfp-chains, but the major group of short B-chains (DP 8-25) was similar to that of the Asian rice samples. The average chain length (CL), internal chain length (ICL), and total internal chain length (TICL) were similar in all samples. However, the external chain length (ECL) was longer in the African rice samples and NERICA 4. ECL correlated positively and significantly (p<0.05) with gelatinization transition temperatures and enthalpy suggesting differences between the two rice types in cooking properties. PMID:26686152

  12. Thermogravimetric studies on the kinetics of rice hull pyrolysis and the influence of water treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, H.; Wei, Y.C.

    1998-10-01

    Rice hulls were pyrolyzed in a thermogravimetric analyzer in a helium atmosphere to determine the kinetic parameters of devolatilization reactions. The pyrolysis experiments were conducted by heating rice hulls from room temperature to 1173 K at constant heating rates of 3, 10, 30, 60, and 100 K/min. The global mass loss during rice hull pyrolysis was successfully simulated by a combination of four independent parallel reactions, the decompositions of four major components in rice hulls: moisture, hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin. The activation energy for the decomposition of the nonmoisture components was in the order cellulose > hemicellulose > lignin. It was also found in the present study that the pyrolytic behaviors were significantly influenced by water wash prior to pyrolysis. The water wash elevates the peak temperature and the activation energy for the decomposition of each component of rice hulls. The volatile yields resulting from cellulose and hemicellulose decompositions during rice hull pyrolysis increase due to the water treatment, whereas those from lignin decomposition and the char yield decrease.

  13. Effect of gamma irradiation on starch viscosity and physicochemical properties of different rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dianxing; Shu, Qingyao; Wang, Zhonghua; Xia, Yingwu

    2002-08-01

    Three types of rice cultivars (indica, japonica and hybrid rice) with similar intermediate apparent amylose content (AAC) as well as early indica rice cultivars with different amounts of AAC were selected for studying the effects of gamma irradiation on starch viscosity, physicochemical properties and starch granule structure. Four major parameters of RVA profile, that was determined by a rapid visco analyser (RVA, Model-3D), peak viscosity, hot pasting viscosity, cool pasting viscosity, and setback viscosity, were considerably decreased with increasing dose levels. Gamma irradiation reduced the amylose contents in the cultivars with low AAC, intermediate AAC, and glutinous rice, but had no effects on the high AAC cultivar. No visible changes in gelatinization temperature were detected after irradiation, but the peak time was reduced with the dose levels. Gel consistency was significantly increased in the tested cultivars, especially in the high AAC indica rice. The starch granules were somewhat deformed by gamma irradiation. These results suggested that it is promising to use gamma irradiation to improve rice eating or cooking quality.

  14. Ecosystem growth and development.

    PubMed

    Fath, Brian D; Jørgensen, Sven E; Patten, Bernard C; Straskraba, Milan

    2004-11-01

    One of the most important features of biosystems is how they are able to maintain local order (low entropy) within their system boundaries. At the ecosystem scale, this organization can be observed in the thermodynamic parameters that describe it, such that these parameters can be used to track ecosystem growth and development during succession. Thermodynamically, ecosystem growth is the increase of energy throughflow and stored biomass, and ecosystem development is the internal reorganization of these energy mass stores, which affect transfers, transformations, and time lags within the system. Several proposed hypotheses describe thermodynamically the orientation or natural tendency that ecosystems follow during succession, and here, we consider five: minimize specific entropy production, maximize dissipation, maximize exergy storage (includes biomass and information), maximize energy throughflow, and maximize retention time. These thermodynamic orientors were previously all shown to occur to some degree during succession, and here we present a refinement by observing them during different stages of succession. We view ecosystem succession as a series of four growth and development stages: boundary, structural, network, and informational. We demonstrate how each of these ecological thermodynamic orientors behaves during the different growth and development stages, and show that while all apply during some stages only maximizing energy throughflow and maximizing exergy storage are applicable during all four stages. Therefore, we conclude that the movement away from thermodynamic equilibrium, and the subsequent increase in organization during ecosystem growth and development, is a result of system components and configurations that maximize the flux of useful energy and the amount of stored exergy. Empirical data and theoretical models support these conclusions. PMID:15527958

  15. Terrestrial Ecosystem Responses to Global Change: A Research Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Ecosystems Working Group,

    1998-09-23

    Uncertainty about the magnitude of global change effects on terrestrial ecosystems and consequent feedbacks to the atmosphere impedes sound policy planning at regional, national, and global scales. A strategy to reduce these uncertainties must include a substantial increase in funding for large-scale ecosystem experiments and a careful prioritization of research efforts. Prioritization criteria should be based on the magnitude of potential changes in environmental properties of concern to society, including productivity; biodiversity; the storage and cycling of carbon, water, and nutrients; and sensitivity of specific ecosystems to environmental change. A research strategy is proposed that builds on existing knowledge of ecosystem responses to global change by (1) expanding the spatial and temporal scale of experimental ecosystem manipulations to include processes known to occur at large scales and over long time periods; (2) quantifying poorly understood linkages among processes through the use of experiments that manipulate multiple interacting environmental factors over a broader range of relevant conditions than did past experiments; and (3) prioritizing ecosystems for major experimental manipulations on the basis of potential positive and negative impacts on ecosystem properties and processes of intrinsic and/or utilitarian value to humans and on feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. Models and experiments are equally important for developing process-level understanding into a predictive capability. To support both the development and testing of mechanistic ecosystem models, a two-tiered design of ecosystem experiments should be used. This design should include both (1) large-scale manipulative experiments for comprehensive testing of integrated ecosystem models and (2) multifactor, multilevel experiments for parameterization of process models across the critical range of interacting environmental factors (CO{sub 2}, temperature, water, nutrients). With limited resources, these complementary experiments should be focused in high-priority ecosystems, with experimental treatments designed to address the major uncertainties in each system. Critical ecosystems, both managed and unmanaged, have been identified using the above criteria and key uncertainties in current understanding of ecosystem processes used to identify critical issues and experiments. The sizes of both the whole-ecosystem experiments and the multifactor experimental treatment units must be based on the sizes of the dominant organisms, the scale of major processes in each system, and the spatial heterogeneity of each system. For example, large-scale ecosystem manipulations in temperate forests should evaluate at a minimum CO{sub 2} and temperature and could be conducted on small, gauged catchments. The multifactor process experiments should address all major environmental driving variables, and the treatment units should be large enough to include multiple individuals of the major tree species. This approach represents a fundamental shift in the scale and integration of experimental ecosystem research: from the current small-scale, single- or two-factor experiments in simple natural or artificial ecosystems to highly coordinated, large-scale, replicated experiments in complex ecosystems, with multiple interacting factors being evaluated at two (or more) complementary levels of spatial scale and process resolution. These experiments will require an unprecedented long-term funding commitment and concentration of large-scale experimental research at a few major sites, with significant new investment in infrastructure to support large interdisciplinary teams of scientists.

  16. Electrophysiological responses of the rice leaffolder, cnaphalocrocis medinalis (lepidoptera: pyralidae), to rice plant volatiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The electrophysiological activities of 38 synthetic volatiles that were known to be released from the rice plants (Poaceae: Oryza spp.) were studied using electroantennogram (EAG) recording technique on male and female antennae of the rice leaffolder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée) (Lepidoptera: ...

  17. Evaluation of glufosinate for the control of red rice (Oryza sativa) in commercial rice (Oryza sativa) 

    E-print Network

    Hessler, Melanie Dawn

    1999-01-01

    Research was conducted in 1996 and 1997 to 1) evaluate weed management systems in transferrin 'Gulfmont' rice with glufosinate, 2) evaluate the tolerance of selected red rice ecotypes to glufosinate at different application rates and growth stages...

  18. Quantification of dilatory resistance in four rice cultivars to rice blast 

    E-print Network

    Katsar, Catherine Susan

    1993-01-01

    Dilatory resistance of two rice Cultivars, Jackson and Maybelle, to rice blast was expressed as decreases in different components of resistance. Incubation period was found to be more important in determining dilatory resistance than the other...

  19. Energy use pattern in rice milling industries-a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Goyal, S K; Jogdand, S V; Agrawal, A K

    2014-11-01

    Rice milling industry is one of the most energy consuming industries. Like capital, labour and material, energy is one of the production factors which used to produce final product. In economical term, energy is demand-derived goods and can be regarded as intermediate good whose demand depends on the demand of final product. This paper deals with various types of energy pattern used in rice milling industries viz., thermal energy, mechanical energy, electrical energy and human energy. The important utilities in a rice mill are water, air, steam, electricity and labour. In a rice mill some of the operations are done manually namely, cleaning, sun drying, feeding paddy to the bucket elevators, weighing and packaging, etc. So the man-hours are also included in energy accounting. Water is used for soaking and steam generation. Electricity is the main energy source for these rice mills and is imported form the state electricity board grids. Electricity is used to run motors, pumps, blowers, conveyors, fans, lights, etc. The variations in the consumption rate of energy through the use of utilities during processing must also accounted for final cost of the finished product. The paddy milling consumes significant quantity of fuels and electricity. The major energy consuming equipments in the rice milling units are; boilers and steam distribution, blowers, pumps, conveyers, elevators, motors, transmission systems, weighing, etc. Though, wide variety of technologies has been evolved for efficient use of energy for various equipments of rice mills, so far, only a few have improved their energy efficiency levels. Most of the rice mills use old and locally available technologies and are also completely dependent on locally available technical personnel. PMID:26396286

  20. In-Situ Quantification of Microbial Processes Controlling Methane Emissions From Rice Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Cho, R.; Zeyer, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas contributing to global warming. Among other sources, rice (paddy) soils represent a major nonpoint source of biogenic methane. In flooded paddy soils methane is produced under anaerobic conditions. Conversely, methanotrophic microorganisms oxidize methane to carbon dioxide in the root zone of rice plants, thus reducing overall methane emissions to the atmosphere. We present a novel combination of methods to quantify methanogenesis and methane oxidation in paddy soils and to link methane turnover to net emissions of rice plants. To quantify methane turnover in the presence of high methane background concentrations, small-scale push-pull tests (PPTs) were conducted in paddy soils using stable isotope-labeled substrates. Deuterated acetate and 13-C bicarbonate were employed to discern and quantify acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, while 13-C methane was employed to quantify methane oxidation. During 2.5 hr-long PPTs, 140 mL of a test solution containing labeled substrates and nonreactive tracers (Ar, Br-) was injected into paddy soils of potted rice plants. After a short rest period, 480 mL of test solution/pore water mixture was extracted from the same location. Methane turnover was then computed from extraction-phase breakthrough curves of substrates and/or products, and nonreactive tracers. To link methane turnover to net emissions, methane emissions from paddy soils and rice plants were individually determined immediately preceding PPTs using static flux chambers. We will present results of a series of experiments conducted in four different potted rice plants. Preliminary results indicate substantial variability in methane turnover and net emission between different rice plants. The employed combination of methods appears to provide a robust means to quantitatively link methane turnover in paddy soils to net emissions from rice plants.

  1. Energy flow in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1988-12-31

    Natural isotope abundances to trace major pathways of energy flow to consumers in Imnavait Creek and the tundra ecosystem of the R4D watershed with comparative work in the coastal tundra. Our overall goals are to a determine if carbon is accumulating in upland and coastal tundra; determine the role of eroded peat carbon in the aquatic ecosystem; and to determine the distribution of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the tundra-pond ecosystem to establish the feasibility of using natural differences as tracers. Past work on fishes, birds, and the prey species of insects and aquatic crustaceans has shown that peat carbon is very important in the energy supply supporting the food webs over the course of the year. Obligate freshwater fishes from the coastal lakes and Colville River have been shown to contain up to 60 percent peat carbon at the end of the winter season. In contrast, migratory shorebirds and passerines contained much smaller radiocarbon abundances in summer, indicating a major shift to recent in situ primary production in pond and stream ecosystems in summer months. For the past two years, we have narrowed our focus to the processes supplying carbon to the beaded stream system at MS-117 and have concentrated on determining the transfer and accumulation rates of carbon in the watershed.

  2. Energy flow in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Natural isotope abundances to trace major pathways of energy flow to consumers in Imnavait Creek and the tundra ecosystem of the R4D watershed with comparative work in the coastal tundra. Our overall goals are to a determine if carbon is accumulating in upland and coastal tundra; determine the role of eroded peat carbon in the aquatic ecosystem; and to determine the distribution of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the tundra-pond ecosystem to establish the feasibility of using natural differences as tracers. Past work on fishes, birds, and the prey species of insects and aquatic crustaceans has shown that peat carbon is very important in the energy supply supporting the food webs over the course of the year. Obligate freshwater fishes from the coastal lakes and Colville River have been shown to contain up to 60 percent peat carbon at the end of the winter season. In contrast, migratory shorebirds and passerines contained much smaller radiocarbon abundances in summer, indicating a major shift to recent in situ primary production in pond and stream ecosystems in summer months. For the past two years, we have narrowed our focus to the processes supplying carbon to the beaded stream system at MS-117 and have concentrated on determining the transfer and accumulation rates of carbon in the watershed.

  3. 21 CFR 573.160 - Ammoniated rice hulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Listing § 573.160 Ammoniated rice hulls. The food additive ammoniated rice hulls may be safely used in...obtained by the treatment of ground rice hulls with monocalcium phosphate...percentage of equivalent crude protein from the nonprotein...

  4. 21 CFR 573.160 - Ammoniated rice hulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Listing § 573.160 Ammoniated rice hulls. The food additive ammoniated rice hulls may be safely used in...obtained by the treatment of ground rice hulls with monocalcium phosphate...percentage of equivalent crude protein from the nonprotein...

  5. 21 CFR 573.160 - Ammoniated rice hulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Listing § 573.160 Ammoniated rice hulls. The food additive ammoniated rice hulls may be safely used in...obtained by the treatment of ground rice hulls with monocalcium phosphate...percentage of equivalent crude protein from the nonprotein...

  6. 21 CFR 573.160 - Ammoniated rice hulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Listing § 573.160 Ammoniated rice hulls. The food additive ammoniated rice hulls may be safely used in...obtained by the treatment of ground rice hulls with monocalcium phosphate...percentage of equivalent crude protein from the nonprotein...

  7. 21 CFR 573.160 - Ammoniated rice hulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Listing § 573.160 Ammoniated rice hulls. The food additive ammoniated rice hulls may be safely used in...obtained by the treatment of ground rice hulls with monocalcium phosphate...percentage of equivalent crude protein from the nonprotein...

  8. Rice University Summer Institute of Statistics July 29th, 2011

    E-print Network

    Rojo, Javier

    Rice University Summer Institute of Statistics May 23rd ­ July 29th, 2011 NOTE: Although not yet EMAIL Javier Rojo jrojo@stat.rice.edu RUSIS Statistics Department, MS-138 FAX Rice University (713) 348

  9. A Chromosome Segment Substitution Library of Weedy Rice for Genetic Dissection of Complex Agronomic and Domestication Traits

    PubMed Central

    Subudhi, Prasanta K.; De Leon, Teresa; Singh, Pradeep K.; Parco, Arnold; Cohn, Marc A.; Sasaki, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) are a powerful alternative for locating quantitative trait loci (QTL), analyzing gene interactions, and providing starting materials for map-based cloning projects. We report the development and characterization of a CSSL library of a U.S. weedy rice accession ‘PSRR-1’ with genome-wide coverage in an adapted rice cultivar ‘Bengal’ background. The majority of the CSSLs carried a single defined weedy rice segment with an average introgression segment of 2.8 % of the donor genome. QTL mapping results for several agronomic and domestication traits from the CSSL population were compared with those obtained from two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations involving the same weedy rice accession. There was congruence of major effect QTLs between both types of populations, but new and additional QTLs were detected in the CSSL population. Although, three major effect QTLs for plant height were detected on chromosomes 1, 4, and 8 in the CSSL population, the latter two escaped detection in both RIL populations. Since this was observed for many traits, epistasis may play a major role for the phenotypic variation observed in weedy rice. High levels of shattering and seed dormancy in weedy rice might result from an accumulation of many small effect QTLs. Several CSSLs with desirable agronomic traits (e.g. longer panicles, longer grains, and higher seed weight) identified in this study could be useful for rice breeding. Since weedy rice is a reservoir of genes for many weedy and agronomic attributes, the CSSL library will serve as a valuable resource to discover latent genetic diversity for improving crop productivity and understanding the plant domestication process through cloning and characterization of the underlying genes. PMID:26086245

  10. Mitigation options for methane emissions from rice fields in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Lantin, R.S.; Buendia, L.V.; Wassmann, R.

    1996-12-31

    The contribution of Philippine rice production to global methane emission and breakthroughs in methane emission studies conducted in the country are presented in this paper. A significant impact in the reduction of GHG emissions from agriculture can be achieved if methane emissions from ricefields can be abated. This study presents the contribution of Philippine rice cultivation to global methane emission and breakthroughs in methane emission studies in the country which address the issue of mitigation. Using the derived emission factors from local measurements, rice cultivation contributes 566.6 Gg of methane emission in the Philippines. This value is 62% of the total methane emitted from the agriculture sector. The emission factors employed which are 78% of the IPCC value for irrigated rice and 95% for rainfed rice were derived from measurements with an automatic system taken during the growth duration in the respective ecosystems. Plots drained for 2 weeks at midtillering and before harvest gave a significant reduction in methane emission as opposed to continuously flooded plots and plots drained before harvest. The cultivar Magat reduced methane emission by 50% as compared to the check variety IR72. The application of ammonium sulfate instead of urea reduced methane emission by 10% to 34%. Addition of 6 t ha{sup {minus}1} phosphogypsum in combination with urea reduced emission by 74% as opposed to plots applied with urea alone. It is also from the results of such measurements that abatement strategies are based as regards to modifying treatments such as water management, fertilization, and choice of rice variety. It is not easy to identify and recommend mitigation strategies that will fit a particular cropping system. However, the identified mitigation options provide focus for the abatement of methane emission from ricefields.

  11. Biogeochemical Processes in Microbial Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines process rates that shape Earth's environment, create the biomarker sedimentary and atmospheric signatures of life and define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred. In order to understand how microorganisms have shaped the global environment of Earth and potentially, other worlds, we must develop an experimental paradigm that links biogeochemical processes with ever-changing temporal and spatial distributions of microbial population, and their metabolic properties. Photosynthetic microbial mats offer an opportunity to define holistic functionality at the millimeter scale. At the same time, their Biogeochemistry contributes to environmental processes on a planetary scale. These mats are possibly direct descendents of the most ancient biological communities; communities in which oxygenic photosynthesis might have been invented. Mats provide one of the best natural systems to study how microbial populations associate to control dynamic biogeochemical gradients. These are self-sustaining, complete ecosystems in which light energy absorbed over a diel (24 hour) cycle drives the synthesis of spatially-organized, diverse biomass. Tightly-coupled microorganisms in the mat have specialized metabolisms that catalyze transformations of carbon, nitrogen. sulfur, and a host of other elements.

  12. PIXE analyses of cesium in rice grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Keizo; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Terakawa, Atsuki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Ishizaki, Azusa; Fujishiro, Fumito; Arai, Hirotsugu; Osada, Naoyuki; Karahashi, Masahiro; Nozawa, Yuichiro; Yamauchi, Shosei; Kikuchi, Kosuke; Koshio, Shigeki; Watanabe, Koji

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear power plant accident released vast amounts of radioactive material into the environment. For instance, 134Cs and 137Cs have half-lives of about 2 and 30 years, respectively, and emit many harmful gamma rays. In 2012, rice with radioactivity >100 Bq/kg was occasionally reported in Fukushima prefecture. To determine where and how cesium accumulates in rice, we grew rice in soil containing stable cesium and investigated the distribution of cesium in rice using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). This study found that cesium is accumulated in bran and germ at high concentrations, and white rice contains 40% of the cesium found in brown rice.

  13. Understanding transitions in rice paddy extent and management in the Vietnamese Mekong River Delta using Landsat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontgis, C. P.; Schneider, A.; Ozdogan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Rice is a staple food crop for the majority of the world's population, yet paddy fields are threatened by urban expansion, climate change, and degraded agricultural land. For example, Vietnam, the second largest exporter of rice globally, grows most of its rice in the Mekong River Delta at the country's southern tip, yet this low-lying and heavily populated area is proving susceptible to land cover changes in the area. To properly monitor and manage the rice crops in this region, remote sensing of satellite imagery has been particularly useful; however, most efforts to map regional paddy area utilize coarse resolution MODIS or AVHRR data since the high temporal resolution of these datasets can overcome missing data issues due to clouds. Here, we aim to map the landscape using finer-scale Landsat data by generating dense time stacks over multiple growing seasons. First, we exploit dense stacks of data for circa 2000 and circa 2010 to classify rice using vegetation trajectories (EVI and NDWI). Next, these pixel-based rice maps are combined with image-based segments (generated using the open-source Mean-shift region-growing segmentation algorithm, which has been proven to optimally identify clusters within an image) to generate a polygon-based rice map using the majority rule. Results show that this method can map rice paddy agriculture with over 90% accuracy at a much finer spatial resolution than has ever been produced. Finally, this work also aims to differentiate between double- and triple-cropped rice paddies in the region, again by exploiting EVI trajectories, in an effort to determine how management practices have changed over the decade-long study period. Increasing the number of annual cropping cycles over the area can lead to soil degradation and lower yields per harvest, albeit larger total annual yields, so monitoring these practices is vital to understanding the sustainability of these agricultural systems.

  14. 7 CFR 319.55a - Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...false Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam. 319.55a Section 319.55a ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Rice Quarantine § 319.55a Administrative...

  15. 7 CFR 319.55a - Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...false Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam. 319.55a Section 319.55a ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Rice Quarantine § 319.55a Administrative...

  16. 7 CFR 319.55a - Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...false Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam. 319.55a Section 319.55a ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Rice Quarantine § 319.55a Administrative...

  17. 7 CFR 319.55a - Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...false Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam. 319.55a Section 319.55a ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Rice Quarantine § 319.55a Administrative...

  18. 76 FR 78021 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the Rice Solar Energy, LLC, Rice Solar...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ...Availability of the Record of Decision for the Rice Solar Energy, LLC, Rice Solar Energy Project (RSEP) and California Desert Conservation...blm.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Rice Solar Energy, LLC, a subsidiary of SolarReserve, LLC...

  19. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of rice blast resistance using rice mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induced mutation can be useful for studying resistance gene controlled plant immunity. Resulting knowledge should benefit the development of strategies for crop protection. The Pi-ta gene in rice has been effectively deployed for preventing rice blast disease-the most devastating disease of rice wo...

  20. COMPARISON OF PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES AND STARCH STRUCTURE OF RED RICE AND CULTIVATED RICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixteen red rice accessions from southern United States were studied for their physical, milling, pasting and thermal properties, chemical composition, and starch fine structure relative to cultivated medium-grain and long-grain rice varieties. All red rice samples were medium-grain but their physic...

  1. Global Gene Expression of Rice after Infections with Rice Blast and Sheath blight Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa) production worldwide has been challenged by increased new virulent pathogens. Over the years, genetic diversity needed for fighting diseases has been decreasing in cultivated rice around the globe. This presents a real challenge for rice crop protection. In an effort to develo...

  2. Influence of Water to Rice Ratio on Cooked Rice Flavor and Texture.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water to rice ratio is known to affect cooked rice texture, whereas, the effects on flavor are largely unknown. To determine the impact of the amount of water during cooking on flavor and texture descriptive attributes, three- water to rice ratios consisting of low (less than ideal), medium (ideal)...

  3. Gene transfer rate from CL rice to diverse red rice biotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The future and sustainability of ClearfieldTM (CL) technology at the producers’ level will be dictated by various factors. Among many, prominent factors which affect the transfer of ALS-resistant gene from CL rice to red rice are: disparity in red rice biotypes and CL cultivars; flowering time of re...

  4. Linguaggio universale, riduzioni, e teorema di Rice Linguaggio universale, riduzioni, e teorema di Rice

    E-print Network

    Rossi, Francesca

    Linguaggio universale, riduzioni, e teorema di Rice Linguaggio universale, riduzioni, e teorema di Rice #12;Il linguaggio universale Il linguaggio universale Lu e' l'insieme delle stringhe binarie che, riduzioni, e teorema di Rice #12;Il problema dell'arresto Data una TM M, definiamo H(M) l'insieme delle

  5. Factors affecting the outcrossing rate between Clearfield rice and red rice (Oryza sativa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The commercialization of imazethapyr-resistant (Clearfield[TM], CL) rice in the southern United States has raised serious concerns about gene flow to red rice, producing imazethapyr-resistant red rice populations. Our objectives were to determine the impact of planting date, CL cultivars, and red ri...

  6. Total and inorganic arsenic in rice and rice bran purchased in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ruangwises, Suthep; Saipan, Piyawat; Tengjaroenkul, Bundit; Ruangwises, Nongluck

    2012-04-01

    Concentrations of total and inorganic arsenic were determined in 180 samples of polished and brown rice of three rice types, namely white, jasmine, and sticky, and 44 samples of rice bran from these three rice types purchased in Thailand. Concentrations (expressed in nanograms per gram) of inorganic arsenic in polished white, jasmine, and sticky rice were 68.3 ± 17.6 (with a range of 45.0 to 106), 68.4 ± 15.6 (41.7 to 101), and 75.9 ± 24.8 (43.5 to 156), respectively, while those in the three brown rice samples were 124 ± 34.4 (74.5 to 193), 120 ± 31.6 (73.1 to 174), and 131 ± 35.6 (78.0 to 188), respectively. Inorganic arsenic concentrations (expressed in nanograms per gram) in rice bran produced from the three rice types were 633 ± 182 (375 to 919), 599 ± 112 (447 to 824), and 673 ± 195 (436 to 1,071), respectively. Rice bran contained concentrations of total and inorganic arsenic approximately seven and nine times higher, respectively, than those found in the corresponding polished rice. The levels of inorganic arsenic in the three rice types of both polished and brown rice were within the only published regulatory limit of 200 ng/g. PMID:22488070

  7. Screening and association mapping of rice blast disease resistance using a diverse collection of rice germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast, caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae B. Couch, is a very serious disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.) worldwide. Incorporation of new blast resistance genes into breeding lines is an important objective of many rice breeding programs. A diverse collection of 409 O. sativa accessions des...

  8. Development of disease-resistant rice using regulatory components of induced disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases cause huge crop losses annually. In response to pathogen attacks, plants activate defense systems that are mediated through various signaling pathways. The salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway is the most powerful of these pathways. Several regulatory components of the SA signaling pathway have been identified, and are potential targets for genetic manipulation of plants’ disease resistance. However, the resistance associated with these regulatory components is often accompanied by fitness costs; that is, negative effects on plant growth and crop yield. Chemical defense inducers, such as benzothiadiazole and probenazole, act on the SA pathway and induce strong resistance to various pathogens without major fitness costs, owing to their ‘priming effect.’ Studies on how benzothiadiazole induces disease resistance in rice have identified WRKY45, a key transcription factor in the branched SA pathway, and OsNPR1/NH1. Rice plants overexpressing WRKY45 were extremely resistant to rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and bacterial leaf blight disease caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the two major rice diseases. Disease resistance is often accompanied by fitness costs; however, WRKY45 overexpression imposed relatively small fitness costs on rice because of its priming effect. This priming effect was similar to that of chemical defense inducers, although the fitness costs were amplified by some environmental factors. WRKY45 is degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome system, and the dual role of this degradation partly explains the priming effect. The synergistic interaction between SA and cytokinin signaling that activates WRKY45 also likely contributes to the priming effect. With a main focus on these studies, I review the current knowledge of SA-pathway-dependent defense in rice by comparing it with that in Arabidopsis, and discuss potential strategies to develop disease-resistant rice using signaling components. PMID:25431577

  9. Name: Major: Minor: ____________________

    E-print Network

    Ashline, George

    Name: Major: Major: Minor: ____________________ Advisor: Advisor: Minor: I. MAJOR COURSES (list all: ______________ Current Overall GPA: (2.9 required) Advisor's Signature:___________________________________________________ Date:_____________________________ 2nd Major Advisor's Signature

  10. Sea Ice Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Polar sea ice is one of the largest ecosystems on Earth. The liquid brine fraction of the ice matrix is home to a diverse array of organisms, ranging from tiny archaea to larger fish and invertebrates. These organisms can tolerate high brine salinity and low temperature but do best when conditions are milder. Thriving ice algal communities, generally dominated by diatoms, live at the ice/water interface and in recently flooded surface and interior layers, especially during spring, when temperatures begin to rise. Although protists dominate the sea ice biomass, heterotrophic bacteria are also abundant. The sea ice ecosystem provides food for a host of animals, with crustaceans being the most conspicuous. Uneaten organic matter from the ice sinks through the water column and feeds benthic ecosystems. As sea ice extent declines, ice algae likely contribute a shrinking fraction of the total amount of organic matter produced in polar waters.

  11. Plant ecology. Anthropogenic environmental changes affect ecosystem stability via biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Yann; Tilman, David; Isbell, Forest; Seabloom, Eric W; Borer, Elizabeth T; Reich, Peter B

    2015-04-17

    Human-driven environmental changes may simultaneously affect the biodiversity, productivity, and stability of Earth's ecosystems, but there is no consensus on the causal relationships linking these variables. Data from 12 multiyear experiments that manipulate important anthropogenic drivers, including plant diversity, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, fire, herbivory, and water, show that each driver influences ecosystem productivity. However, the stability of ecosystem productivity is only changed by those drivers that alter biodiversity, with a given decrease in plant species numbers leading to a quantitatively similar decrease in ecosystem stability regardless of which driver caused the biodiversity loss. These results suggest that changes in biodiversity caused by drivers of environmental change may be a major factor determining how global environmental changes affect ecosystem stability. PMID:25883357

  12. Rice Supply, Demand and Related Government Programs. 

    E-print Network

    Kincannon, John A.

    1957-01-01

    Related Government Program Rough rice. United States, 1934-55 in cooperation with the U.NITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION. TEXAS SUMMARY. The change in production of rice during... 1930-54 was influenced more by changes in acreage than by changes in yield. Changes in yield influenced changes in production more than changes in acreage in 1955-56. The United States produces less than 2 percent of the world's rice...

  13. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 6 

    E-print Network

    2004-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas August 2004 Volume IV Number 6 Texas Rice Bacterial and Fungal Endophytes in Rice Endophytes are plant-associ- ated organisms that often form mutualistic.../endophyte associations, may infer resistance to insects such as aphids and armyworms. The following is a layman’s review of research conducted by scientists worldwide on endophytic continued on page 4 associations that pertain to rice pro- duction. To lay the groundwork...

  14. Black Kernel and White Tip of Rice

    E-print Network

    Martin, Alan L. (Alan La Mott); Altstatt, G. E. (George E.)

    1940-01-01

    . TEXAS AGRICU LTU RAL EXPERl M ENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 584 MARCH 1940 DIVISION OF PLANT PATHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY Black Kernel and White Tip of Rice - AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE... OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President L [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Black kernel and white tip of rice are common troubles causing losses to rice growers each year. Laboratory and field experi- ments indicate that black kernel can be reduced...

  15. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 7 

    E-print Network

    2004-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas September 2004 Volume IV Number 7 Texas Rice Hybrid Rice: Another Tool in Varietal Improvement The breeding method in which crosses are made between two... emasculated maize, the inability to emasculate the seed parent had been the pri- mary barrier to the utilization of het- erosis in many self-pollinated species, such as rice. Research con- ducted by Jones and Clark provided a solution to the problem...

  16. Texas Rice, Volume 1, Number 1 

    E-print Network

    2001-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas March 2001 Volume I Number 1 History of the Beaumont Station Continued on page 12 Belle and Joseph Eloi Broussard Texas Rice Rice culture in Texas origi...- nated around Baytown in 1850 and was developed into a commercial crop by the late 1890’s. One of the oldest business institutions in Jefferson County is the Beaumont Rice Mill established in 1892 by Joseph Eloi Broussard, a legendary figure...

  17. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Ecosystem Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith Marcoe

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub-catena". The extent of detailed mapping is the interpreted Holocene geologic floodplain of the tidal Columbia River and its tributaries to the estimated head of tide. The extent of this dataset also includes tributary valleys that are not mapped in detail. The upstream extents of tributary valleys are an estimation of the limit of Columbia River influence and are for use as containers in future analyses. The geologic floodplain is the geomorphic surface that is actively accumulating sediment through occasional overbank deposition. Most features within the geologic floodplain are considered to be formed during the recent (Holocene-epoch) climatic regime. There are bedrock and pre-Holocene sedimentary deposits included where they are surrounded by Holocene sediment accumulations or have been shaped by Holocene floods. In some places, Holocene landforms such as landslides, tributary fans, and coastal dunes are mapped that extend outside of the modern floodplain. This map is not a floodplain hazard map or delineation of actual flood boundaries. Although wetlands are included in the Classification, they are based on different criteria than jurisdictional wetlands. The extent of mapping may differ from the actual limit of tidal influence.

  18. Historical changes in arctic freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Terry D; Wrona, Frederick J; Reist, James D; Gibson, John J; Hobbie, John E; Lévesque, Lucie M J; Vincent, Warwick F

    2006-11-01

    Various types of ecosystem-based climate proxies have been used to assess past arctic change. Although lotic records are relatively poor because of the constant reworking of riverine material, high-quality lentic data have been assembled back to the end of the Pleistocene and deglaciation of the circumpolar Arctic. In general, climatic variations in the Holocene, partly due to changes in the shrinking effect of glacier coverage, produced significant temporal and spatial variations in arctic hydrology and freshwater ecosystems. Of particular note were the vast expansions of northern peatlands during major protracted periods of wetting. More recent lake biota and sedimentiological data reflect the general warming trend that has occurred over the last one to two centuries and indicate major changes to freshwater characteristics such as ice-cover duration and thermal stratification. Such data provide an excellent baseline against which future effects of climate change can be both projected and measured. PMID:17256638

  19. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  20. Catastrophic shifts in ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffer, Marten; Carpenter, Steve; Foley, Jonathan A.; Folke, Carl; Walker, Brian

    2001-10-01

    All ecosystems are exposed to gradual changes in climate, nutrient loading, habitat fragmentation or biotic exploitation. Nature is usually assumed to respond to gradual change in a smooth way. However, studies on lakes, coral reefs, oceans, forests and arid lands have shown that smooth change can be interrupted by sudden drastic switches to a contrasting state. Although diverse events can trigger such shifts, recent studies show that a loss of resilience usually paves the way for a switch to an alternative state. This suggests that strategies for sustainable management of such ecosystems should focus on maintaining resilience.

  1. Creation of Resveratrol-Enriched Rice for the Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome and Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baek, So-Hyeon; Shin, Woon-Chul; Ryu, Hak-Seung; Lee, Dae-Woo; Moon, Eunjung; Seo, Chun-Sun; Hwang, Eunson; Lee, Hyun-Seo; Ahn, Mi-Hyun; Jeon, Youngju; Kang, Hyeon-Jung; Lee, Sang-Won; Kim, Sun Yeou; D’Souza, Roshan; Kim, Hyeon-Jin; Hong, Seong-Tshool; Jeon, Jong-Seong

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol has been clinically shown to possess a number of human health benefits. As a result, many attempts have been made to engineer resveratrol production in major cereal grains but have been largely unsuccessful. In this study, we report the creation of a transgenic rice plant that accumulates 1.9 µg resveratrol/g in its grain, surpassing the previously reported anti-metabolic syndrome activity of resveratrol through a synergistic interaction between the transgenic resveratrol and the endogenous properties of the rice. Consumption of our transgenic resveratrol-enriched rice significantly improved all aspects of metabolic syndrome and related diseases in animals fed a high-fat diet. Compared with the control animals, the resveratrol-enriched rice reduced body weight, blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol by 24.7%, 22%, 37.4%, 27%, and 59.6%, respectively. The resveratrol-enriched rice from our study may thus provide a safe and convenient means of preventing metabolic syndrome and related diseases without major lifestyle changes or the need for daily medications. These results also suggest that future transgenic plants could be improved if the synergistic interactions of the transgene with endogenous traits of the plant are considered in the experimental design. PMID:23483945

  2. Information Commons for Rice (IC4R)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the most important staple food for a large part of the world's human population and also a key model organism for plant research. Here, we present Information Commons for Rice (IC4R; http://ic4r.org), a rice knowledgebase featuring adoption of an extensible and sustainable architecture that integrates multiple omics data through community-contributed modules. Each module is developed and maintained by different committed groups, deals with data collection, processing and visualization, and delivers data on-demand via web services. In the current version, IC4R incorporates a variety of rice data through multiple committed modules, including genome-wide expression profiles derived entirely from RNA-Seq data, resequencing-based genomic variations obtained from re-sequencing data of thousands of rice varieties, plant homologous genes covering multiple diverse plant species, post-translational modifications, rice-related literatures and gene annotations contributed by the rice research community. Unlike extant related databases, IC4R is designed for scalability and sustainability and thus also features collaborative integration of rice data and low costs for database update and maintenance. Future directions of IC4R include incorporation of other omics data and association of multiple omics data with agronomically important traits, dedicating to build IC4R into a valuable knowledgebase for both basic and translational researches in rice. PMID:26519466

  3. Information Commons for Rice (IC4R).

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the most important staple food for a large part of the world's human population and also a key model organism for plant research. Here, we present Information Commons for Rice (IC4R; http://ic4r.org), a rice knowledgebase featuring adoption of an extensible and sustainable architecture that integrates multiple omics data through community-contributed modules. Each module is developed and maintained by different committed groups, deals with data collection, processing and visualization, and delivers data on-demand via web services. In the current version, IC4R incorporates a variety of rice data through multiple committed modules, including genome-wide expression profiles derived entirely from RNA-Seq data, resequencing-based genomic variations obtained from re-sequencing data of thousands of rice varieties, plant homologous genes covering multiple diverse plant species, post-translational modifications, rice-related literatures and gene annotations contributed by the rice research community. Unlike extant related databases, IC4R is designed for scalability and sustainability and thus also features collaborative integration of rice data and low costs for database update and maintenance. Future directions of IC4R include incorporation of other omics data and association of multiple omics data with agronomically important traits, dedicating to build IC4R into a valuable knowledgebase for both basic and translational researches in rice. PMID:26519466

  4. Research on Rice Production in Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Reynolds, E. B.

    1954-01-01

    are grown, all of the er should be applied as a top-dressing 30 to 40 days after seeding. le use of 45 to 50 inches of water for irrigation produced as large a yield of rice as larger amounts ?r. Draining rice fields once during the season increased... as for providing year-long grazing of nutri- tious forage for beef cattle on rice farms. PREPARATION OF THE SEEDBED The main purpose of preparing a seedbed for rice is to obtain a good, mellow surface layer that will be favorable for seeding, germination...

  5. Experimental studies to obtain rice malt.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, Elena L M; Brenna, Oreste V

    2010-07-14

    The production of a rice malt that could be used as an ingredient in gluten-free foodstuffs, especially for brewing purposes, was studied. Different rice varieties were characterized through morphological description and chemical-physical analyses. Each rice variety was germinated in the laboratory in jute bags for different periods. To produce a rice malt with a good diastatic power, steeping and airing conditions, as well as time and temperature during germination, were studied. The endogenous enzymatic activities, which developed during the malting process and which characterize the diastatic power of the obtained rice malts, were also measured. The conditions of the malting process and the drying step were checked and optimized to produce rice malt with the desired color and aroma. Once the most efficient malting procedure had been chosen, the most suitable rice variety underwent the germination and kilning process in a pilot plant. Some saccharification tests were performed in the laboratory to verify the sugar content of worts obtained from the produced rice malts and whether they could be successfully fermented. The results showed that a good rice malt could be obtained, even if it has a lower enzymatic activity than barley malt. PMID:20524666

  6. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 1 

    E-print Network

    2003-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas March 2003 Volume III Number 1 Texas Rice Alternative Uses for Rice Waste continued on page 9 Over the past ten years there has been a strong push... to investi- gate the potential uses of ‘waste’ materials from the rice industry, in- cluding straw and hulls. These projects are the result of both envi- ronmental and economic issues. In California’s Sacramento Val- ley, where 500,000 acres of rice...

  7. Texas Rice, Volume V, Number 5 

    E-print Network

    2005-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas July 2005 Volume V Number 5 Texas Rice 58 th Annual Rice Field Day From 1500 lbs/A in 1939 to 8000 lbs/A today - that is the impact of rice research... in Texas. And not just yields have improved - but disease resistance, days to maturity, milling yields and cooking quality. Scientists at the Texas A&M Research Center in Beaumont have worked for nearly 100 years to improve rice production so our farmers...

  8. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 4 

    E-print Network

    2006-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas June 2006 Volume VI Number 4 Texas Rice 32nd Annual Eagle Lake Rice Field Day continued on page 4 Dr. Garry McCauley, one of the speakers on the field... tour, will be discussing hybrid rice research. The 32nd Annual Rice Field Day at the Eagle Lake Research Station will be held Tuesday June 27 th starting at 4:00 pm. With all the new developments in produc- tion and crop protection, farmers and other...

  9. Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 3 

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas May 2002 Volume II Number 3 Texas Rice In many Asian lan- guages the term for ‘rice’ is synonymous with ‘food’ or ‘life’, which indicates the importance... of this ancient grain. Worldwide, 23% of all calories consumed come from rice. In some countries such as Cambo- dia, that number may be as high as 80%. In the U.S. only 8% of our total calories come from rice, but that number is increasing every year as Ameri...

  10. Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 2 

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    =ISO-8859-1 Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas April 2002 Volume II Number 2 Texas Rice Red Rice: Classification, Containment and Control continued on page10 What exactly... is the noxious weed known as red rice ? Scien- tists used to think that all red rice found in the United States could be classified as Oryza sativa sub- species indica. That was before Dr. William Park and his team of graduate students, along with Dr. Mike...

  11. Texas Rice, Volume 1, Number 3 

    E-print Network

    2001-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas May 2001 Volume I Number 3 Texas Rice For example, folklore tells us that when the Kachins of northern Myanmar (Burma) were sent forth from the center... of the Earth, they were given the seeds of rice and were directed to a wondrous coun- try where everything was perfect and where rice grew well. Rice is an integral part of their creation myth and remains today as their leading crop and most preferred food...

  12. Texas Rice, Volume 1, Number 4 

    E-print Network

    2001-01-01

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas June 2001 Volume I Number 4 Texas Rice The 27 th Annual Eagle Lake Rice Field Day Join farmers, scientists and industry representatives from across... Texas to learn about the latest advancements in rice research. Located 20 miles southeast of Columbus, Eagle Lake is in the heart of the western rice belt. With fine sandy loam to silt loam top- soil, and a hardpan impermeable to water only 3 to 6...

  13. Fungal endophyte Phomopsis liquidambari affects nitrogen transformation processes and related microorganisms in the rice rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xiao-Mi; Ma, Hai-Yan; Yang, Teng; Jia, Yong; Zhou, Jun; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The endophytic fungus Phomopsis liquidambari performs an important ecosystem service by assisting its host with acquiring soil nitrogen (N), but little is known regarding how this fungus influences soil N nutrient properties and microbial communities. In this study, we investigated the impact of P. liquidambari on N dynamics, the abundance and composition of N cycling genes in rhizosphere soil treated with three levels of N (urea). Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and diazotrophs were assayed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis at four rice growing stages (S0: before planting, S1: tillering stage, S2: grain filling stage, and S3: ripening stage). A significant increase in the available nitrate and ammonium contents was found in the rhizosphere soil of endophyte-infected rice under low N conditions. Moreover, P. liquidambari significantly increased the potential nitrification rates, affected the abundance and community structure of AOA, AOB, and diazotrophs under low N conditions in the S1 and S2 stages. The root exudates were determined due to their important role in rhizosphere interactions. P. liquidambari colonization altered the exudation of organic compounds by rice roots and P. liquidambari increased the concentration of soluble saccharides, total free amino acids and organic acids in root exudates. Plant-soil feedback mechanisms may be mediated by the rice-endophyte interaction, especially in nutrient-limited soil. PMID:26441912

  14. Fungal endophyte Phomopsis liquidambari affects nitrogen transformation processes and related microorganisms in the rice rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xiao-Mi; Ma, Hai-Yan; Yang, Teng; Jia, Yong; Zhou, Jun; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The endophytic fungus Phomopsis liquidambari performs an important ecosystem service by assisting its host with acquiring soil nitrogen (N), but little is known regarding how this fungus influences soil N nutrient properties and microbial communities. In this study, we investigated the impact of P. liquidambari on N dynamics, the abundance and composition of N cycling genes in rhizosphere soil treated with three levels of N (urea). Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and diazotrophs were assayed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis at four rice growing stages (S0: before planting, S1: tillering stage, S2: grain filling stage, and S3: ripening stage). A significant increase in the available nitrate and ammonium contents was found in the rhizosphere soil of endophyte-infected rice under low N conditions. Moreover, P. liquidambari significantly increased the potential nitrification rates, affected the abundance and community structure of AOA, AOB, and diazotrophs under low N conditions in the S1 and S2 stages. The root exudates were determined due to their important role in rhizosphere interactions. P. liquidambari colonization altered the exudation of organic compounds by rice roots and P. liquidambari increased the concentration of soluble saccharides, total free amino acids and organic acids in root exudates. Plant-soil feedback mechanisms may be mediated by the rice-endophyte interaction, especially in nutrient-limited soil. PMID:26441912

  15. The diversity of rice phytocystatins.

    PubMed

    Christoff, Ana Paula; Margis, Rogerio

    2014-12-01

    Phytocystatins encompass a family of plant competitive cysteine proteinase inhibitors. They are encoded by part of a conserved monophyletic group of genes that are found in all eukaryotes. The primary targets of phytocystatins are papain-like cysteine proteinases. However, a group of larger phytocystatins is also able to inhibit proteinases such as legumains. Phytocystatins have been implicated in several physiological processes and act within an intricate proteolytic regulatory network. The present work characterizes the gene family of rice phytocystatins, which contains twelve genes with different features. Phylogenetic analyses cluster rice phytocystatins into three main groups. Group 1 is composed of OcI, OcIII and OcXII and is nearly ubiquitous and highly expressed in plants under normal and stressed conditions including salt, wounding, ABA or a fungal elicitor such as chitosan. Rice phytocystatins can contribute to plant senescence and may exhibit an inverse correlation between their gene expression and the activities of their target proteinases. This work contributes to clarifying the roles of individual phytocystatin genes in plant processes such as germination and response to environmental stresses. PMID:25098420

  16. Viral-inducible Argonaute18 confers broad-spectrum virus resistance in rice by sequestering a host microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianguo; Yang, Zhirui; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Lijia; Ye, Ruiqiang; Ji, Yinghua; Zhao, Shanshan; Ji, Shaoyi; Liu, Ruofei; Xu, Le; Zheng, Hong; Zhou, Yijun; Zhang, Xin; Cao, Xiaofeng; Xie, Lianhui; Wu, Zujian; Qi, Yijun; Li, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Viral pathogens are a major threat to rice production worldwide. Although RNA interference (RNAi) is known to mediate antiviral immunity in plant and animal models, the mechanism of antiviral RNAi in rice and other economically important crops is poorly understood. Here, we report that rice resistance to evolutionarily diverse viruses requires Argonaute18 (AGO18). Genetic studies reveal that the antiviral function of AGO18 depends on its activity to sequester microRNA168 (miR168) to alleviate repression of rice AGO1 essential for antiviral RNAi. Expression of miR168-resistant AGO1a in ago18 background rescues or increases rice antiviral activity. Notably, stable transgenic expression of AGO18 confers broad-spectrum virus resistance in rice. Our findings uncover a novel cooperative antiviral activity of two distinct AGO proteins and suggest a new strategy for the control of viral diseases in rice. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05733.001 PMID:25688565

  17. Management and fertility control ecosystem carbon allocation to biomass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campioli, Matteo; Vicca, Sara; Janssens, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Carbon (C) allocation within the ecosystem is one of the least understood processes in plant- and geo-sciences. The proportion of the C assimilated through photosynthesis (gross primary production, GPP) that is used for biomass production (BP) is a key variable of the C allocation process and it has been termed as biomass production efficiency (BPE). We investigated the potential drivers of BPE using a global dataset of BP, GPP, BPE and ancillary ecosystem characteristics (vegetation properties, climatic and environmental variables, anthropogenic impacts) for 131 sites comprising six major ecosystem types: forests, grasslands, croplands, tundra, boreal peatlands and marshes. We obtained two major findings. First, site fertility is the key driver of BPE across forests, with nutrient-rich forests allocating 58% of their photosynthates to BP, whereas this fraction is only 42% for nutrient-poor forests. Second, by disentangling the effect of management from the effect of fertility and by integrating all ecosystem types, we observed that BPE is globally not driven by the 'natural' site fertility, but by the positive effect brought by management on the nutrient availability. This resulted in managed ecosystems having substantially larger BPE than natural ecosystems. These findings will crucially improve our elucidation of the human impact on ecosystem functioning and our predictions of the global C cycle.

  18. Mapping quantitative trait loci of rice to blast using physiological races of the fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has known for sometime that genetic resistance to blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae are controlled by major resistance (R) and minor resistance genes. Minor resistance genes each of them providing different extent of resistance have been identified on different rice chromosome as quantitative tr...

  19. QTL analysis for resistance to pre-harvest sprouting in rice (Oryza sativa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pre-harvest sprouting (PHS) is caused by early breaking of seed dormancy. In Sichuan, a major producer of hybrid rice seed production in China, PHS in hybrid seeds originated from ‘G46A’ parent may result in severe yield loss and cause serious damage to agricultural production. We developed an F2 po...

  20. Progress in development of male sterile germplasm for hybrid rice breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, there are two types of male sterility mainly commercialized in hybrid rice production, three-line type or cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and two-line type or environmental male sterility (EMS). The great majority belongs to the CMS and there are four strategies that have been proven suc...