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  1. Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Strain of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia with Carbapenem Resistance, Isolated from King Abdullah Medical City, Makkah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.; Rchiad, Zineb; Khan, Babar K.; Abdallah, Abdallah M.; Naeem, Raeece; Nikhat Sheerin, Shalam; Solovyev, Victor; Ahmed, Abdalla

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have been regarded as major challenges among health care-associated infections worldwide. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of an MDR Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain isolated in 2014 from King Abdulla Medical City, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. PMID:26472828

  2. Household survey of container-breeding mosquitoes and climatic factors influencing the prevalence of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Makkah City, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Al Thabiany; Dieng, Hamady; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Mahyoub, Jazem A; Turkistani, Abdulhafis M; Mesed, Hatabbi; Koshike, Salah; Satho, Tomomitsu; Salmah, MR Che; Ahmad, Hamdan; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Ramli, Ahmad Saad; Miake, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of container breeding mosquitoes with emphasis on the seasonality and larval habitats of Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti) in Makkah City, adjoining an environmental monitoring and dengue incidence. Methods Monthly visits were performed between April 2008 and March 2009 to randomly selected houses. During each visit, mosquito larvae were collected from indoors and outdoors containers by either dipping or pipetting. Mosquitoes were morphologically identified. Data on temperature, relative humidity, rain/precipitations during the survey period was retrieved from governmental sources and analyzed. Results The city was warmer in dry season (DS) than wet season (WS). No rain occurred at all during DS and even precipitations did fall, wetting events were much greater during WS. Larval survey revealed the co-breeding of Aedes, Culex and Anopheles in a variety of artificial containers in and around homes. 32?109 larvae representing 1st , 2nd, 3rd, and 4th stages were collected from 22?618 container habitats. Culicines was far the commonest and Aedes genus was as numerous as the Culex population. Ae. aegypti larval abundance exhibited marked temporal variations, overall, being usually more abundant during WS. Ten types of artificial containers were found with developing larvae. 70% of these habitats were located indoors. 71.42% of indoor containers were permanent and 28.58% was semi-permanent during WS. Cement tanks was the only container type permanent during DS. Ae. aegypti larval indices (CI, HI, BI) recorded were greater during WS. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicate a high risk of dengue transmission in the holy city. PMID:23569860

  3. Seroepidemiological survey on Rift Valley fever among small ruminants and their close human contacts in Makkah, Saudi Arabia, in 2011.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, A M; Ashshi, A M; Asghar, A H; Abd El-Rahim, I H A; El-Shemi, A G; Zafar, T

    2014-12-01

    This study describes a seroepidemiological survey on Rift Valley fever (RVF) among small ruminants and their close human contacts in Makkah, Saudi Arabia. A total of 500 small ruminants (126 local, 374 imported) were randomly selected from the sacrifice livestock yards of Al-Kaakiah slaughterhouse, in the holy city of Makkah, during the pilgrimage season 1432 H (4-9 November 2011). In addition, blood samples were collected from 100 local workers in close contact with the animals at the slaughterhouse. An RVF competition multi-species enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detecting anti-RVF virus immunoglobulin G (IgG)/ immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies and an RVF IgM-specific ELISA were used for serological investigations. In total, 84 (16.8%) of the 500 sacrificial sheep and goats tested seropositive in the competition ELISA but no IgM antibodies were detected in the IgM-specific assay. All seropositive samples, comprising 17.91% of the imported animals and 13.49% of the local ones, were therefore designated positive for anti-RVF virus IgG antibody. Among the local personnel working in close contact with the animals, 9% tested seropositive in the RVF competition ELISA. The study indicates that two factors may increase the likelihood of an RVF outbreak among sacrificial animals and pilgrims: i) the large-scale importation of small ruminants into Saudi Arabia from the Horn of Africa shortly before the pilgrimage season, and ii) the movement of animals within Saudi Arabia, from the RVF-endemic south-western area (Jizan region) to the Makkah region, particularly in the few weeks before the pilgrimage season. From these findings, it is recommended that i) all regulations concerning the import of animals into Saudi Arabia from Africa should be rigorously applied, particularly the RVF vaccination of all ruminants destined for export at least two weeks before exportation, and ii) the movement of animals from the RVF-endemic south-western area (Jizan region) of Saudi Arabia to the Makkah region should be strictly prohibited. PMID:25812214

  4. Does Attendance Kindergarten Affect on Pupils' Mathematics Achievement of Primary School in Makkah, Saudi Arabia? And What Are the Teachers' Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashkary, Samera Y.; Robinson, John F.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if there are any significant differences in the mathematical attainment of pupils' grade one of primary school in Makkah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (K.S.A) between those pupils who had attended kindergarten and their peers who had not, and whether this effect continued into the second and third grades in…

  5. Climate affected by dust aerosol over arid region of Makkah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, N.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.

    2010-10-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the global climate balance, and therefore they could be important in climate change. Natural variations of aerosols, especially due to dust storm are recognized as a significant climate forcing, that is, a factor that alters the Earth's radiation balance and thus tends to cause a global temperature change. Aerosol optical depth, ?(?) is the most comprehensive variable to characterize aerosol due to atmospheric pollution. The aerosol optical properties in Makkah observed during dust period (March-May) from 2006 to 2009 had been presented in this study. Aerosol optical depths at all wavelengths showed a sharp increase during major dust outbreak in spring when compared with the average for the season. For example at Makkah, aerosol optical depths increase from the spring average value of 0.43+/-0.02 at 550 nm to values >0.70 during major dust event days in 2006. These tend to increasingly of temperature during this period as results of absorbing aerosol effect. In this paper, we used AOD data from Terra MODIS to evaluate the trend of dust aerosol events in Makkah throughout 4 years dataset with supported data of subtype of aerosol and air temperature from CALIPSO and MERRA respectively. The higher values of AOD are corresponding to the low visibility due to presents of high concentration of dust.

  6. Lead pollution in urban and rural Saudi Arabian children

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, P.; Kutbi, I.I. )

    1989-11-01

    In the last two decades, vehicular traffic increased spectacularly in Saudi Arabia, from 243,000 registered motor vehicles in 1973 to over 5 million at present. All these vehicles use leaded gasoline, one of the major sources of lead contamination in the ambient air and dusts in the cities. To evaluate the impact of this high level of environmental lead, scalp hair of 200 school boys, aged 6-8 years, from each of the two cities (Makkah in the western region and Riyadh in the central region) and two Village Groups (one around Makkah city and the other around Riyadh city) were analyzed in this study for lead concentrations. Makkah is one of the oldest and most densely populated cities with congested housing and narrow winding streets. Riyadh on the other hand is the newly developing, planned capital city of Saudi Arabia. The Village Groups were chosen so as to reflect a control environment away from heavy traffic and industrial activity. The usefulness of hair as an important biopsy material for environmental pollution studies has been demonstrated in a large number of studies. Effect of lead on the central nervous system of the children may result in mental retardation and even death in case of acute encephalopathy.

  7. Connecting Students across Universities in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Jarf, Reima Sado

    2005-01-01

    The present study reports results of an experiment in which the author and her students at King Saud University (KSU) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia shared an online grammar course with a professor and his students at Umm Al-Qura University (UQU) in Makkah, Saudi Arabia using www.makkahelearning.net. The experiment proved to be a total failure. Factors…

  8. 75 FR 43919 - Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia: Third City Stop Added to the Trade Mission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ...Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia: Third City Stop Added to the...trade mission to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, December 6-8, 2010. Led by...Commerce official, the mission to Saudi Arabia is intended to include...

  9. Dermatophyte and non dermatophyte fungi in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, Jamal M.; Golah, Hammed A; Khalel, Abdulla S.; Alharbi, Naiyf S.; Mothana, Ramzi A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dermatophytes are a scientific label for a group of three genera (Microsporum, Epidermophyton and Trichophyton) of fungus that causes skin disease in animals and humans. Conventional methods for identification of these fungi are rapid and simple but are not accurate comparing to molecular methods. Objective This study aimed to isolate human pathogenic dermatophytes which cause dermatophytosis in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia and to identify these fungi by using conventional and molecular methods. Methods The study was conducted in Medical Complex, Riyadh and King Saud University. Samples of infected skin, hairs and nails were collected from 112 patients. Diagnosis of skin infections, direct microscopic test, isolation and identification of dermatophytes by conventional and molecular methods were carried out. Results The results indicated that the tinea capitis infection had the highest prevalence among the patients (22.3%) while Tinea barbae had the lowest. In this study the identified dermatophyte isolates belong to nine species as Trichophyton violaceum, Trichophyton verrucosum, Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton schoenleinii, Trichophyton concentricum, Microsporum canis, Microsporum audouinii and Epidermophyton floccosum which cause skin infections were isolated during this study. Non dermatophyte isolates included 5 isolates from Aspergillus spp. 4 isolates from Acremonium potronii and 15 isolates from Candida spp. M. canis were the most common species (25% of isolated dermatophytes). Out of the 52 dermatophyte isolates identified by conventional methods, there were 45 isolates identified by the molecular method. Conclusions The results concluded that approximately M. canis caused a quarter of dermatophyte cases, tinea capitis infection was prevalent and the molecular method was more accurate than conventional methods. PMID:26288566

  10. Assessment of rockfall hazard at Al-Noor Mountain, Makkah city (Saudi Arabia) using spatio-temporal remote sensing data and field investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Ahmed M.; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Al-Kathery, Mohamed; Bathrellos, George D.; Skilodimou, Hariklia D.

    2015-01-01

    Rockfall is one of the major concerns along different urban areas and highways all over the world. Al-Noor Mountain is one of the areas that threaten rockfalls to the Al-Noor escarpment track road and the surrounding urban areas. Thousands of visitors and tourisms use the escarpment track road to visit Hira cave which is located at the top of Al-Noor Mountain. In addition, the surrounding urban areas of Al-Noor Mountain are continuously spreading over the recent years. The escarpment track road and the surrounding urban areas are highly vulnerable and suffers from recurrent rockfall mostly in the rainy season. The steep and highly jointed slope along the different faces of the mountain makes these zones prone to failure due to different actions such as weathering, erosion and anthropogenic effect. Therefore, an attempt has been made in this study to determine the Al-Noor cliff stability, by identifying the unstable areas, and to apply the rockfall simulations. A combination of remote sensing, field study and 2D computer simulation rockfall program were performed to assess surface characteristics of the cliff faces. Bounce height, total and translational kinetic energy, translational velocity, and number of blocks have been estimated. Different unstable zones along the Al-Noor Mountain and escarpment track road were determined using filed investigation and remote sensing based image analysis. In addition the rockfall simulation analysis indicated that rockfall in zone 1 and zone 2 of the Al-Noor Mountain may reach the urban areas, whereas rockfall in zone 3 will not reach the urban areas, and rockfalls along the Al-Noor escarpment track road will have highly impact on the tourists. Proper preventive measures are also suggested to arrest the movement of falling rocks before reaching the urban areas and the Al-Noor escarpment track road. If proper care is taken, then further uncertain rockfall hazards can be prevented.

  11. Pollen Concentration in the Atmosphere of Abha City, Saudi Arabia and its Relationship with Meteorological Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwadie, Hussein M.

    A qualitative and quantitative evaluation of pollen concentration in the atmosphere of Abha city, Saudi Arabia with the relation to meteorological parameters is presented. Investigations were undertaken from January to December 2006 using a Burkard 7 day volumetric spore trap. A total of 6,492 pollen grains m-3 belonging to 50 pollen taxa was detected. Poaceae represented 55.1% of total pollen, Leguminosae (11.7%), Compositae (6.1%), Solanaceae (4.6%) and Cupressaceae (4.2%). Pollen grains were found throughout the year. July represented the highest peak of pollen number and also the highest pollen taxa. The monthly variation of pollen taxa and their relationship to meteorological parameters were investigated. It was found that the pollen concentration is positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with rainfall, relative humidity and wind velocity. May-September represented the months of highest pollen number (95% of total pollen).

  12. Investigating Indoor Radon Levels and Influencing Factors in Primary Schools of Zulfi City, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghamdi, S. S.; Al-Garawi, M. S.; Al-Mosa, Tahani M.; Baig, M. R.

    2011-10-27

    Measurement of indoor Concentrations were performed in Zulfi city of Saudi Arabia, using CR-39 track etch detectors. This investigation focused on the influence of different parameters, namely different locations, school categories, school building types, and room type as well as on the existence of differences in radon concentration at floor levels. We divided the Zulfi city into five regions, keeping in mind their geographical locations between Tuwaiq Mountains and Al-Thuwayrat sands. The measured average radon concentrations for regions 1-5 respectively are: 87.0{+-}14.2 Bq/m{sup 3}, 83.4{+-}6.0 Bq/m{sup 3}, 61.6{+-}6.4 Bq/m{sup 3}, 63.7{+-}5.4 Bq/m{sup 3} and 87.5{+-}6.Bq/m{sup 3} and the minimum concentrations are 28.0 Bq/m{sup 3}, 5.5 Bq/m{sup 3}, 1.1 Bq/m{sup 3}, 1.0 Bq/m{sup 3} and 24 Bq/m{sup 3} respectively. These results are still within normal limits and below the action level of 148 Bqm{sup -3} set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A test of significance using Minitab program was applied to investigate if radon levels in regions are significantly different from each other. We tried all combinations, and found the following results. The ''within regions''(different location) test yielded, region 2 is not significant versus region ''1''(p = 0.783) and versus region ''5''(P = 0.646), whereas it is significant versus region ''3''(P = 0.0160) and also versus region ''4''(p = 0.018). We investigated government and rented school's building also and none was found significantly different (p = 0.052). Floors of the same building were tested in order to examine the radon concentration as a function of storey level. No significant difference was observed at floor levels (p = 0.009). When girl's schools versus Boys and kindergartens schools were tested they were found significantly different. It is believed that this significant difference is due to geographical nature of the area, since most of the girl's schools were selected from regions 2 and 3, these regions are relatively close to the Tuwaiq mountains whereas other regions are near to the Al-Thuwayrat sands.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Satellite-Derived Multi-Year Particulate Data of Saudi Arabia: An Exploratory Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aina, Yusuf A.; van der Merwe, Johannes H.; Alshuwaikhat, Habib M.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of concentrations of fine particulate matter on urban populations have been gaining attention because fine particulate matter exposes the urban populace to health risks such as respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Satellite-derived data, using aerosol optical depth (AOD), have been adopted to improve the monitoring of fine particulate matter. One of such data sources is the global multi-year PM2.5 data (2001–2010) released by the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN). This paper explores the satellite-derived PM2.5 data of Saudi Arabia to highlight the trend of PM2.5 concentrations. It also examines the changes in PM2.5 concentrations in some urbanized areas of Saudi Arabia. Concentrations in major cities like Riyadh, Dammam, Jeddah, Makkah, Madinah and the industrial cities of Yanbu and Jubail are analyzed using cluster analysis. The health risks due to exposure of the populace are highlighted by using the World Health Organization (WHO) standard and targets. The results show a trend of increasing concentrations of PM2.5 in urban areas. Significant clusters of high values are found in the eastern and south-western part of the country. There is a need to explore this topic using images with higher spatial resolution and validate the data with ground observations to improve the analysis. PMID:25350009

  14. NO2 and Cancer Incidence in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ahmadi, Khalid; Al-Zahrani, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution exposure has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of specific cancers. This study investigated whether the number and incidence of the most common cancers in Saudi Arabia were associated with urban air pollution exposure, specifically NO2. Overall, high model goodness of fit (GOF) was observed in the Eastern, Riyadh and Makkah regions. The significant coefficients of determination (r2) were higher at the regional level (r2 = 0.32–0.71), weaker at the governorate level (r2 = 0.03–0.43), and declined slightly at the city level (r2 = 0.17–0.33), suggesting that an increased aggregated spatial level increased the explained variability and the model GOF. However, the low GOF at the lowest spatial level suggests that additional variation remains unexplained. At different spatial levels, associations between NO2 concentration and the most common cancers were marginally improved in geographically weighted regression (GWR) analysis, which explained both global and local heterogeneity and variations in cancer incidence. High coefficients of determination were observed between NO2 concentration and lung and breast cancer incidences, followed by prostate, bladder, cervical and ovarian cancers, confirming results from other studies. These results could be improved using individual explanatory variables such as environmental, demographic, behavioral, socio-economic, and genetic risk factors. PMID:24192792

  15. Prevalence and genotyping of Cryptosporidium in stool samples collected from children in Taif City (Saudi Arabia).

    PubMed

    Shalaby, I; Gherbawy, Y; Jamjoom, M; Banaja, A

    2014-06-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the frequency of Cryptosporidium infections in Taif (Saudi Arabia). Stool samples from children under 10 years by modified Ziehl-Neelson staining and two PCR techniques were used for genotyping experiments. The microscopic examination showed that, eleven samples were positive for presence of Cryptosporidium. With 11 of 100 samples, DNA extraction and subsequent genotyping was successful. By means of RAPD technique, the genetic similarity among the collected isolates was 55%. The 18S rRNA gene sequences confirmed that all Cryptosporidium-isolates belonged to Cryptosporidium parvum. In comparison with reference strains from different species of Cryptosporidium species from GenBank, all collected isolates belonged to Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum clade. The fact that only human genotypes were detected suggests that cryptosporidiosis must primarily be considered as a non zoonotic disease in Taif region. PMID:25134890

  16. 75 FR 43919 - Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia: Third City Stop Added to the Trade Mission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... infrastructure industries to discuss industry developments, opportunities, and sales strategies. Commercial... pushing forward with many of its development projects in the oil and gas sector. In March 2009, the Saudi... petrochemical projects are under development and Saudi Arabia Basic Industries Corporation has $48...

  17. Using geographical information systems for defining the accessibility to health care facilities in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Murad, Abdulkader A

    2014-01-01

    Spatial data play an important role in the planning of health care facilities and their allocation. Today, geographical information systems (GIS) provide useful techniques for capturing, maintaining and analysing health care spatial data; indeed health geoinformatics is an emerging discipline that uses innovative geospatial technology to investigate health issues. The purpose of this paper is to define how GIS can be used for assessing the level of accessibility to health care. The paper identifies the advantages of using GIS in health care planning and covers GIS-based international accessibility with a focus on GIS applications for health care facilities in Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia. A geodatabase that includes location of health services, road networks, health care demand and population districts was created using ArcGIS software. The geodatabase produced is based on collected data and covers issues, such as defining the spatial distribution of health care facilities, evaluating health demand types and modelling health service areas based on analysis of driving-time and straight-line distances. PMID:25599637

  18. Temporal variations of O3 and NOx in the urban background atmosphere of the coastal city Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghamdi, M. A.; Khoder, M.; Harrison, Roy M.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Hussein, T.; Al-Jeelani, H.; Abdelmaksoud, A. S.; Goknil, M. H.; Shabbaj, I. I.; Almehmadi, F. M.; Lihavainen, H.; Kulmala, M.; Hämeri, K.

    2014-09-01

    Ozone is a pollutant of major concern because of its well recognized effects upon human health and crop yields. This study analyses in depth a new dataset for ozone from Jeddah, a coastal city in Saudi Arabia within the Middle Eastern region, for which very few ozone data are currently available, collected between March 2012 and February 2013. The measurements presented include NO, NO2 and ozone as well as relevant meteorological variables. The data show a marked seasonal variation in ozone with highest concentrations in the summer months and lowest average concentrations in the winter. Concentrations also show a substantial difference between weekdays and weekends, with higher NO and NO2 on weekdays, but lower concentrations of ozone. Plots of total oxidant versus NOx concentration indicate background concentrations of ozone (at zero NOx) ranging from 38.2 ppb in January to 59 ppb in May consistent with the northern hemisphere spring maximum in ozone concentrations. The slope of total oxidant/NOx varies from 0.13 in March to 0.68 in August. The two summer months of July and August are anomalous with slopes of around double that of other months, suggesting a higher efficiency of ozone production at lower primary pollutant concentrations arising from much reduced daytime traffic. A substantial weekend/weekday difference in ozone which is higher at weekends appears to be attributable to lower daytime traffic activity and hence reduced emissions of NOx to a “NOx-saturated” atmosphere.

  19. 78 FR 6807 - Critical Infrastructure Protection and Cyber Security Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia and Kuwait...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ...Cyber Security Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, September 28-October...Cyber Security mission to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait City, Kuwait, from...local) and private entities in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. The mission will...

  20. Cancellation of operations in Saudi Arabian hospitals: Frequency, reasons and suggestions for improvements

    PubMed Central

    Dhafar, Khalid O; Ulmalki, Mutaliq A; Felemban, Mohammad A; Mahfouz, Mohammed Eid; Baljoon, Mostafa J.; Gazzaz, Zohair J; Baig, Mukhtiar; Hamish, Noha Mansoor; AlThobaiti, Saeed A.; Al-Hothali, Fouzia Talea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the frequency and reasons of operations cancellation in 25 Makkah region hospitals in Saudi Arabia. Methods: Retrospective evaluation of the rate of surgery cancellation in 25 hospitals of Makkah region was performed in this study. The data of scheduled surgeries from 15 different surgical specialties was collected from January to December 2013. Frequency and reasons of cancellation of elective surgical cases in different specialty were studied with a view to recommend suggestions for improvement. Data was analyzed on SPSS -16. Results: There are 120 operating rooms (OR) in 25 Makkah region hospitals and during the year 2013, a total of 16,211 surgery cases were listed, and 1,238 (7.6%) cases were canceled. Contribution to total cancellation was highest in orthopedic 33.8% followed by general surgery 27.5%, obstetrics 7.7% and ENT 5.2%. According to category, 42.81% rate of cancellation was patient related, 20.03% facility related, 9.45% due to improper work-up, 1.45% associated with anesthesia, 7.19% related to surgeons, and 18.90% other/and not recorded reasons. Conclusions: Present study found 7.6% cancelation rate in Makkah region hospitals and three most common causes for cancellations were patients related, facility related and improper work-up. PMID:26648980

  1. The miswak (chewing stick) and oral health. Studies on oral hygiene practices of urban Saudi Arabians.

    PubMed

    al-Otaibi, Meshari

    2004-01-01

    The miswak, a traditional chewing stick for cleaning teeth, is made from the plant Salvadora persica. For religious and cultural reasons, miswak use is firmly established and widespread in Saudi Arabia and most other Muslim countries. Only recently has scientific evaluation of the miswak been undertaken. The aims of the thesis were: 1) to explore current oral hygiene habits and oral health awareness among urban Saudi Arabians in relation to age, gender and educational level (papers I and II); 2) to compare mechanical plaque removal and gingival health after miswak use and toothbrushing (paper III); 3) to compare the effect of miswak use and toothbrushing on subgingival plaque microflora (paper IV). In papers I and II, structured interviews were conducted with 1200 regular patients at two centres in the city of Makkah, providing dental care for university and military staff and their families, respectively. Consecutive patients were stratified according to gender and age, into 6 age groups from 10 to 60 years, with 50 male or female subjects in each group at each centre. Oral hygiene habits were correlated with the subjects' age, gender, and educational levels and analysed statistically by a generalized linear model and ANOVA. In papers III and IV, the subjects comprised 15 healthy Saudi Arabian male volunteers aged 21 to 36 years, attending the Dental Center at Al-Noor Specialist Hospital in Makkah City. A single-blind, randomised crossover design was used. The Turesky modified Quigley-Hein plaque and Löe-Silness gingival indices and digital photographs of plaque distribution were recorded in Paper III and in Paper IV plaque was sampled for DNA-testing. Inhibition zones around miswak material were examined on agar plates with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and the leukotoxicity of this bacterium was analysed in a bioassay with macrophages +/- miswak extracts (paper IV). In papers I and II, 73% of the subjects used a toothbrush and 65% used a miswak daily. There were significant differences between genders and age groups, and between the centres. Regular miswak use was more prevalent among men (p < 0.01), while women used a toothbrush more often than a miswak (p < 0.05). For the majority (88%) of the individuals, oral hygiene began late, after the age of 7 yrs. Oral hygiene habits were strongly correlated to educational level (p < 0.001). The miswak was preferred by less educated people. Tooth brushing started earlier among the better educated (p < 0.001). In paper III, compared to tooth brushing, use of the miswak resulted in significant reductions in plaque (p < 0.001) and gingival (p < 0.01) indices. In paper IV, A. actinomycetemcomitans was significantly reduced by miswak use (p < 0.05) but not by tooth brushing. These results were supported by the in vitro observations that extracts from S. persica interfered with growth and leukotoxicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans. It was concluded that oral hygiene practice is introduced very late, is strongly correlated to educational level, and that more women prefer toothbrushing to miswak use. It was further concluded that miswak use was at least as effective as toothbrushing for reducing plaque and gingivitis, and that the antimicrobial effect of S. persica is beneficial for prevention/treatment of periodontal disease. There is clearly a need for further oral health education in Saudi Arabia. Because of its close association with Islam, maximum benefits may be achieved by encouraging optimum use of the miswak. Oral hygiene may be improved by complementing traditional miswak use with modern technological developments such as toothbrushing and by tailoring oral hygiene recommendations to educational level. PMID:15224592

  2. Knowledge and attitudes towards AIDS among Saudi and non-Saudi bus drivers.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoneim, I; Khan, M Y; Daffalla, A; Al-Ghamdi, S; Al-Gamal, M

    2002-11-01

    We explored the AIDS knowledge and attitudes of long-distance (non-Saudi) and in-city (Saudi) bus drivers in Saudi Arabia. The 69 non-Saudi drivers tended to score higher on knowledge than the 40 Saudi drivers although there were several gaps in their knowledge. As regards attitude, more Saudis knew that chastity could protect against AIDS and both groups tended to think that they were not the kind of people to get AIDS. Intensive health education and follow up is highly recommended for this sector of workers. PMID:15568448

  3. Quality comparison of tap water vs. bottled water in the industrial city of Yanbu (Saudi Arabia).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Maqbool; Bajahlan, Ahmad S

    2009-12-01

    This study was conducted to compare the quality of bottled water with potabilized desalinated tap water. Fourteen brands of local and imported bottled water samples were collected from the local market and analyzed for physicochemical parameters in the Royal Commission Environmental Laboratory. Results were compared with 5-year continuous monitoring data of tap water from different locations in Madinat Yanbu Al-Sinaiyah (MYAS) including storage tanks of desalination plant. Results show that there was no significant difference in the quality of tap water and bottled water. Bacteriological test was never found positive in the 5-year data in tap water. Similarly, physicochemical analysis shows the persistent quality of tap water. Based on hardness analysis, bottled and tap water are categorized as soft water. Trihalomethanes (THMs) study also indicates that traces of disinfection by products (DBPs) are present in both tap and bottled water and are much less than the World Health Organization and Environmental Protection Agency maximum permissible limits. It is also important to note that the tap water distribution network in MAYS is a high-pressure recirculation network and there is no chance to grow bacteria in stagnant water in pipe lines or houses. Recently, the Royal Commission has replaced the whole drinking water network, which was made of asbestos-cemented pipes with glass-reinforced plastic (GRP) pipes, to avoid any asbestos contaminations. Based on these results, it is concluded that drinking water distributed in the city is of very good and persistent quality, comparable with bottled water. Continuous monitoring also guarantees the safe drinking water to the community. Hence, it is the responsibility of the Royal Commission to encourage the peoples in the city to drink tap water as it is as good as bottled water even better than some of the brands and is monitored regularly. It is also much cheaper compared to bottled water and is available round the clock. Preference for tap water over bottled water will also reduce the production of bottled water that has flooded the market, the enormous strain on the environment, and the pollution due to used empty plastic bottles in the landfill area and will help to keep the city clean. PMID:19011982

  4. Water quality of bottled water in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia: A comparative study with Riyadh municipal and Zamzam water.

    PubMed

    Alfadul, Sulaiman M; Khan, Mujahid A

    2011-01-01

    Nine domestic and three imported bottled water brands were analyzed in Saudi Arabia for various physicochemical water quality parameters. The results of the analysis were compared with the drinking water standards set by different regulatory agencies. The levels of different physicochemical parameters like pH, total dissolved solids (TDS), Ca, Mg, Na, K, NO(3), Cl, and SO(4) of all local and imported bottled water brands met the standards set by different regulatory agencies. Fifteen (15) trace metals viz. Al, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sr, Pb, and Zn were also analyzed in all the samples. Comparison of analyzed results with the reported label values showed considerable variation for different parameters. Variation was also recorded for the analyzed parameters for 3 bottles of the same bottled water brand, both for local and imported bottled waters. Zamzam water was also collected from Makkah Al Mukarrama from different locations and analyzed for various physical and chemical parameters. Bottled waters were also compared with the city municipal water supply and Zamzam water. PMID:21992118

  5. An Assessment of the Readiness of King Fahad Medical City, Saudi Arabia, in Adopting Effective Online Staff Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwadie, Adnan D.

    2011-01-01

    Internet access has grown in Saudi Arabia between 2000 and 2005 by more than 1000% and many governmental organizations are starting to provide part of their services using the internet. In addition, the Ministry of Higher Education has provided funding to all governmental universities to start developing strategies and guidelines for online…

  6. Source Apportionment and Elemental Composition of PM2.5 and PM10 in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Khodeir, Mamdouh; Shamy, Magdy; Alghamdi, Mansour; Zhong, Mianhua; Sun, Hong; Costa, Max; Chen, Lung-Chi; Maciejczyk, Polina

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first comprehensive investigation of PM2.5 and PM10 composition and sources in Saudi Arabia. We conducted a multi-week multiple sites sampling campaign in Jeddah between June and September, 2011, and analyzed samples by XRF. The overall mean mass concentration was 28.4 ± 25.4 ?g/m3 for PM2.5 and 87.3 ± 47.3 ?g/m3 for PM10, with significant temporal and spatial variability. The average ratio of PM2.5/PM10 was 0.33. Chemical composition data were modeled using factor analysis with varimax orthogonal rotation to determine five and four particle source categories contributing significant amount of for PM2.5 and PM10 mass, respectively. In both PM2.5 and PM10 sources were (1) heavy oil combustion characterized by high Ni and V; (2) resuspended soil characterized by high concentrations of Ca, Fe, Al, and Si; and (3) marine aerosol. The two other sources in PM2.5 were (4) Cu/Zn source; (5) traffic source identified by presence of Pb, Br, and Se; while in PM10 it was a mixed industrial source. To estimate the mass contributions of each individual source category, the CAPs mass concentration was regressed against the factor scores. Cumulatively, resuspended soil and oil combustion contributed 77 and 82% mass of PM2.5 and PM10, respectively. PMID:24634602

  7. Influence of lifestyle patterns on perceptions of obesity and overweight among expatriates in Abha city of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Gaffar Sarwar

    2015-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the influence of lifestyle patterns such as watching TV, working with computer and idle sitting time on perceptions of obesity and beliefs about overweight are associated with obesity and overweight amongst Expatriates in Abha. Materials and Methods: The method used in this study was a cross-sectional survey with a self-administered paper-based questionnaire. The survey collected information on lifestyle choices and the risk factors that contribute to obesity. In addition, height and weight were measured. Results: Greater number of our study subjects spent over 2 h/day without any physical activity, specifically accounting for over 2 h/day each in viewing TV, computer, and spending idle time. This increased lack of physical activities was significantly associated with overweight. While the overweight subjects were aware of very wide options for treating their condition, a significant number believed in self-effort in managing their diet and exercise regimen as the best efforts to reduce their overweight. Interestingly very few overweight subjects considered medication or surgery as a potential therapeutic option and 75% of the overweight subjects considered overweight to be of no or only slight concern on wellbeing. Conclusions: Overweight and obesity among expatriates within Saudi Arabia poses an important public health problem. The lack of awareness about the potential impact of obesity on health and optimal treatment options is a serious concern, which needs to be addressed by appropriate public health programs at national level. PMID:26283823

  8. Population distribution and household conditions in Saudi Arabia: reflections from the 2010 Census.

    PubMed

    Abdul Salam, Asharaf; Elsegaey, Ibrahim; Khraif, Rshood; Al-Mutairi, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the largest nation in the Arabian Peninsula is divided into 13 regions, which are of different development levels in terms of both population and public utility infrastructure. More than the other regions, population is high in Al-Riyadh, Makkah Al-Mokarramah, and the Eastern Region, due to urbanization. The current analysis of census results is aimed at understanding (i) regional variations in population and households and (ii) house ownership, type of housing, and housing infrastructure. Saudi Arabia's population is 26,090,555, living in 4,655,127 households with higher concentration in Al-Riyadh, Makkah Al-Mokarramah, and the Eastern Region. One-fourth of the households are in Makkah Al-Mokarrammah while another one-fourth in Al-Riyadh. Households are small with 6 persons in each. The proportion of households in own houses is less than half - mostly Saudi households. Households in the Kingdom live in apartments, traditional houses, villas or floor in a villa with differing proportions across regions and between Saudi and non-Saudi. While apartments are the major type of housing (major regions), traditional houses (Jazan, Al-Baha, Hail, and Aseer regions) and villas (Al-Riyadh region) still exist that are built by concrete (less than four-fifths), block/brick (less than one-fifth), mud (rare), and stone (rare) with varying regional proportions. Infrastructure - electricity, water, and sewage - vary across regions. The major source of electricity is public station followed by private station and private generators. Water source is mainly the public water inside the pipe unit but catchment tank water and well water are used. Three types of sewage system are prevalent in the Kingdom - public sewage, ditch sewage, and private sewage. An inequitable distribution of population across regions shows urbanization, causing an emergence of the modern housing sector influencing house ownership. Developed regions have less ownership, more rentals and office quarters, thus, presuming that development level and migration status are driving house ownership. The impact of infrastructural variations is difficult to interpret as such variations affect the interest of the public sector and customers. A lesser dependence on the public sector requires caution when assessing the situation and when creating policies and provisions to improve quality of life. PMID:25279321

  9. The Al-Du'aythah volcanic cones, Al-Madinah City: implications for volcanic hazards in northern Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcia, H.; Németh, K.; El-Masry, N. N.; Lindsay, J. M.; Moufti, M. R. H.; Wameyo, P.; Cronin, S. J.; Smith, I. E. M.; Kereszturi, G.

    2015-06-01

    The basaltic Al-Du'aythah volcanic cones lie in the northern part of the extensive lava field of Harrat Rahat, and only 13 km from the centre of Al-Madinah City, in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Historical records indicate they may have erupted in AD 641. The four cones are formed by deposits that record a transition from phreatomagmatic to magmatic explosions followed by minor lava effusion. Three cones display elongated tuff rings at the base, and two produced late-stage lava flows. The cones themselves are symmetrical and constructed mostly by the accumulation of ballistically ejected pyroclasts. Spherical bombs and lapilli (cannonball bombs/lapilli), occasionally with country-rock fragments inside (both cored and loaded bombs/lapilli) are common within the tuff ring deposits. LiDAR data show a total volume of 1,664 × 10-6 km3 for the four cones (418 × 10-6 km3 DRE). Whole-rock chemical analyses indicate alkali-basalt compositions (SiO2 44.7-45.9 wt%), with little compositional variation and no relationship between chemistry and eruptive styles. Small differences in composition may reflect variations in fractional crystallisation of clinopyroxene and olivine. A magnetotelluric 2D cross-section shows that the cones are located adjacent to a buried sediment-filled alluvial channel along a NNW-SSE fault dipping to the east. The Al-Du'aythah eruption was related to the ascent of magma through this structure, with the first phase of the eruption triggered by the interaction of the magma with water from the northern Harrat Rahat aquifer that exists in the Al-Madinah basin. This initial water source was rapidly exhausted, while the eruption progressed roughly from north to south and from west to east, the latter motion probably along the fault-controlled feeding dyke. Our work draws attention to the existence of recent explosive phreatomagmatic eruptions in the Al-Madinah basin, which, despite the hyperarid climate of the area, must be considered a potential future eruption hazard.

  10. Urbanization: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Riyadh, the national capital of Saudi Arabia, is shown in 1972, 1990 and 2000. Its population grew in these years from about a half million to more than two million. Saudi Arabia experienced urbanization later than many other countries; in the early 1970s its urban-rural ratio was still about 1:3. By 1990 that had reversed to about 3:1. The city grew through in-migration from rural areas, and from decreases in the death rate while birthrates remained high. The 1972 image is a Landsat MSS scene; the 1990 image is a Landsat Thematic Mapper scene; and the 2000 image is an ASTER scene. All three images cover an area of about 27 x 34 km. The image is centered at 24.6 degrees north latitude, 46.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  11. Determination of 40K, 232Th and 238U activity concentrations in ambient PM2.5 aerosols and the associated inhalation effective dose to the public in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Zytoon, Mohamed A; Aburas, Hani M; Abdulsalam, Mohammed I

    2014-03-01

    Natural radioactivity of soil samples has been studied in many countries of the Arabian Peninsula, including Saudi Arabia. Radiological indices based on soil radioactivity have been widely used in these studies. However, there are no available data about natural radioactivity of fine aerosol particles in such countries. The objective of this study is to determine the activity concentrations of (40)K, (232)Th and (238)U in airborne PM2.5 and the associated internal inhalation radiation dose to the public in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia. Twenty-four air samples in four locations throughout Jeddah were collected and analyzed for PM2.5 and the associated K, Th and U. The activity concentrations of the isotopes (40)K, (232)Th and (238)U were calculated. High atmospheric PM2.5 concentrations (mean: 50.81 ± 34.02 ?g/m(3)) were found. The natural radioactivity associated with PM2.5 due to the isotopes (40)K, (232)Th and (238)U were 301.8 ± 76.1, 11.8 ± 4.2 and 10.8 ± 3.4 Bq/kg, respectively, and the Raeq was calculated as 44.9 ± 14.0 Bq/kg. The inhalation annual effective radiation dose to the public due to natural isotopes of the airborne PM2.5 was in the range 15.03-58.87 nSv/year, depending on the age group. Although these dose values were associated with the PM2.5 fraction only, they were higher than the world references values in air reported in the UNSCEAR, 2000 report. PMID:24462924

  12. Survey of Saudi Arabian drinking water for trihalomethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Fayad, N.M.; Tawabini, B.S. )

    1991-02-01

    Formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) as a result of drinking water chlorination is well documented. The presence of THMs in drinking water may adversely affect human health. The objectives of this study are to determine the concentration levels of THMs in drinking water of eight major cities in Saudi Arabia and to compare these concentrations with Saudi Arabian Water standards, as well as with THMs concentrations reported in drinking water in other parts of the world.

  13. Dust Storm, Red Sea and Saudi Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Outlined against the dark blue water of the Red Sea, a prominent dust storm is making its way across the Red Sea into Saudi Arabia (22.0N, 39.0E) between the Islamic holy cities of Medinah and Mecca. Funneled through a gap in the coastal ranges of southern Sudan near the Ethiopian border, dust storms frequently will blow counter to the prevailing tropical easterly winds of the region.

  14. Renewable success : development of good architecture in the case of Arriyadh Development Authority, Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Alkhabbaz, Mohammed H

    2010-01-01

    ArRiyadh Development Authority (ADA) is an unusual city development authority within the Saudi Arabian government hierarchy. Part of its responsibilities is coordinating and overseeing the design and building of buildings ...

  15. Thunderstorm distribution and frequency in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwehdi, M. H.

    2005-09-01

    A new average annual thunder day map for Saudi Arabia is presented. Based on this map, the distribution of thunderstorms over Saudi Arabia is analysed in terms of the factors related to the lightning performance of transmission lines such as thunderstorm days per year (Td/yr). Lightning activity continues for the present to be represented by thunderstorm frequency, which is routinely recorded at meteorological observation sites. Thunderstorm occurrence at a particular location is usually expressed as the number of days in a calendar year when thunder was heard, averaged over several years. This paper examines thunderstorm days in different areas of Saudi Arabia and specifically those areas where lightning strikes are more frequent; for this purpose, the software ArcGIS is used to produce contour maps which demonstrate areas of concern in Saudi Arabia in the period 1985-2003. Establishing the annual and seasonal Td/yr for Saudi Arabia enables transmission and distribution line engineers to calculate and better design a lightning protection system. Maps of thunder days/year (Td/yr) were constructed on the basis of the database records available on lightning incidence in Saudi Arabia at the Presidency of Meteorology and Environment (PME) (http://www.pme.gov.sa/). Annual thunderstorms are most frequent over the southwestern parts of the country, and generally decrease towards the west and east. Due to its low latitude and less temporal change, the west coast of the Red Sea recorded the lowest Td/yr. A secondary maximum Td/yr is apparent in the southeast to central part of the country. Thunderstorm frequency does not, in general, appear to vary in any consistent way with rainfall. There appears to be no evidence of any widespread temporal trend in thunderstorm frequency. The southern region in general, and especially the cities of Abha, Taif and Al-Baha, has shown greater numbers of thunderstorm days all year round. Similarly, this variation did show higher frequency throughout the year. The development of lightning incidence and the counting of Td/yr, as well as the establishment of annual and seasonal lightning maps of Saudi Arabia, are initiating a new era of producing and archiving thunderstorm maps and data records which serve the PME, the utilities, industry and the public.

  16. NASA Remote Sensing Validation Data: Saudi Arabia

    DOE Data Explorer

    Myers, Daryl R. [NREL; Al-Abbadi, Naif [King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, Energy Research Institite; Wilcox, Steve [NREL

    Since 1995, the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have co-operated to establish a 12 station network of high quality solar radiation monitoring installations across the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. NREL and KACST realized the value of accurate surface solar radiation flux measurements for validation of satellite derived surface and atmospheric solar radiation flux measurements, and is making this data available to support validation of satellite data products related to the NASA Mission to Planet Earth component of the Earth Science Enterprise Earth Observing System (EOS) project to evaluate long term climate trends based on measuements from EOS Terra Platforms. A CIMEL 8 channel sunphotometer for measuring aerosol optical depth at 6 wavelengths and total column water has been deployed at the Solar Village station since February 24, 1999. [Taken from http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/new_data/Saudi_Arabia/

  17. Awareness and attitude of cancer patients about participation in clinical research (CR) in Saudi Arabia. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Sheblaq NR,Traifi S,Al Sakiani M,Gasmelseed A,Abolfotouh MA,Jazieh AR. King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; King Abdul Aziz Medical City for National Guard, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ASCO 2013 Annual Meeting. 2013 May 31. 2013 Jun 04. Chicago, IL.

  18. Update: Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Joy; Nydell, Margaret

    A guide for persons planning on living in or relocating to Saudi Arabia for extended periods of time, this book features information on such topics as entry requirements, transportation, money matters, housing, schools, and insurance. The guide's contents include the following sections: (1) an overview; (2) before leaving; (3) on arrival; (4)…

  19. Adult Education in Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Tim D.; Algren, Mark S.

    Religion pervades all aspects of Saudi Arabia, the conservative home of Islam, where the constitution is the Quran and law is interpreted by religious scholars. A formal adult basic education program was initiated in 1960. As part of the country's modernization since the early 1970s, the Saudi government has begun an enormous nation-building plan…

  20. Saudi Arabia Today. A Teaching Program on the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: (1) Grades 1-3, Our Visit to Saudi Arabia; (2) Grades 4-6, A Modern Kingdom; (3) Junior High School, The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; (4) Senior High School, The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Enrichment, Inc., Williamsburg, VA.

    This package includes materials for students and accompanying teaching guides and posters for teaching about life in contemporary Saudi Arabia for grades 1-8. The student folder for grades 1-3 presents information about the Middle Eastern nation in the form of a boy's letter to a friend back home. In the letter are descriptions of the cities of…

  1. Self-medication in Central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Aljadhey, Hisham; Assiri, Ghada A.; Mahmoud, Mansour A.; Al-Aqeel, Sinaa; Murray, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of self-medication and assess the knowledge, attitudes, and perception of consumers toward self-medication. Methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted over 4 weeks in May 2011 in Riyadh city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Community pharmacies within 5 areas of the city (North, South, West, East, and Middle) were randomly selected for the study. All consumers were approached to participate in the study, with the exception of those buying cosmetic and medicinal equipments. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. Results: A total of 538 out of 707 consumers attending community pharmacies in Riyadh city, agreed to participate in the study. Most responders were male (73%), 23-33 years old (35%), and college graduates (42%). A total of 285 medications were bought without a prescription. Of these, 149 (49%) medications should be dispensed by prescription only, and 155 (51%) were over the counter medications. The most common prescription medications dispensed without prescriptions were antibiotics (22%) and analgesics/antipyretics (19%). The most common reasons for buying medications without a prescription were that the symptoms were too minor to visit a doctor (54%), time saving (40%), and minor illnesses for which the participants knew the required treatment (40%). Overall, most participants had poor knowledge, and negative perceptions regarding self-medication. More than 68% of participants did not know whether the medicine they bought is a prescription-only or over the counter medication. Conclusion: Irresponsible self-medication is common in Saudi Arabia. Future studies should focus on improving the consumers’ awareness of self-medication and the proper use of medications. PMID:25737176

  2. Spatial Autocorrelation of Cancer Incidence in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ahmadi, Khalid; Al-Zahrani, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the geographic distribution of common cancers in Saudi Arabia. We explored the spatial incidence patterns of common cancers in Saudi Arabia using spatial autocorrelation analyses, employing the global Moran’s I and Anselin’s local Moran’s I statistics to detect nonrandom incidence patterns. Global ordinary least squares (OLS) regression and local geographically-weighted regression (GWR) were applied to examine the spatial correlation of cancer incidences at the city level. Population-based records of cancers diagnosed between 1998 and 2004 were used. Male lung cancer and female breast cancer exhibited positive statistically significant global Moran’s I index values, indicating a tendency toward clustering. The Anselin’s local Moran’s I analyses revealed small significant clusters of lung cancer, prostate cancer and Hodgkin’s disease among males in the Eastern region and significant clusters of thyroid cancers in females in the Eastern and Riyadh regions. Additionally, both regression methods found significant associations among various cancers. For example, OLS and GWR revealed significant spatial associations among NHL, leukemia and Hodgkin’s disease (r² = 0.49–0.67 using OLS and r² = 0.52–0.68 using GWR) and between breast and prostate cancer (r² = 0.53 OLS and 0.57 GWR) in Saudi Arabian cities. These findings may help to generate etiologic hypotheses of cancer causation and identify spatial anomalies in cancer incidence in Saudi Arabia. Our findings should stimulate further research on the possible causes underlying these clusters and associations. PMID:24351742

  3. First Dinosaurs from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Kear, Benjamin P.; Rich, Thomas H.; Vickers-Rich, Patricia; Ali, Mohammed A.; Al-Mufarreh, Yahya A.; Matari, Adel H.; Al-Massari, Abdu M.; Nasser, Abdulaziz H.; Halawani, Mohammed A.

    2013-01-01

    Dinosaur remains from the Arabian subcontinent are exceedingly rare, and those that have been documented manifest indeterminate affinities. Consequently the discovery of a small, but diagnostic, accumulation of elements from Campanian-Maastrichtian (?75 Ma) deposits in northwestern Saudi Arabia is significant because it constitutes the first taxonomically identifiable dinosaur material described from the Arabian Peninsula. The fossils include a series of possible lithostrotian titanosaur caudal vertebrae, and some isolated theropod marginal teeth that share unique character states and metric parameters (analyzed using multivariate statistical methods) with derived abelisaurids – this is the first justifiable example of a non-avian carnivorous dinosaur clade from Arabia. The recognition of titanosaurians and abelisaurids from Saudi Arabia extends the palaeogeographical range of these groups along the entire northern Gondwanan margin during the latest Cretaceous. Moreover, given the extreme paucity of coeval occurrences elsewhere, the Saudi Arabian fossils provide a tantalizing glimpse into dinosaurian assemblage diversity within the region. PMID:24386326

  4. First dinosaurs from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Kear, Benjamin P; Rich, Thomas H; Vickers-Rich, Patricia; Ali, Mohammed A; Al-Mufarreh, Yahya A; Matari, Adel H; Al-Massari, Abdu M; Nasser, Abdulaziz H; Attia, Yousry; Halawani, Mohammed A

    2013-01-01

    Dinosaur remains from the Arabian subcontinent are exceedingly rare, and those that have been documented manifest indeterminate affinities. Consequently the discovery of a small, but diagnostic, accumulation of elements from Campanian-Maastrichtian (~ 75 Ma) deposits in northwestern Saudi Arabia is significant because it constitutes the first taxonomically identifiable dinosaur material described from the Arabian Peninsula. The fossils include a series of possible lithostrotian titanosaur caudal vertebrae, and some isolated theropod marginal teeth that share unique character states and metric parameters (analyzed using multivariate statistical methods) with derived abelisaurids - this is the first justifiable example of a non-avian carnivorous dinosaur clade from Arabia. The recognition of titanosaurians and abelisaurids from Saudi Arabia extends the palaeogeographical range of these groups along the entire northern Gondwanan margin during the latest Cretaceous. Moreover, given the extreme paucity of coeval occurrences elsewhere, the Saudi Arabian fossils provide a tantalizing glimpse into dinosaurian assemblage diversity within the region. PMID:24386326

  5. Characteristics and Dental Experiences of Autistic Children in Saudi Arabia: Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murshid, Ebtissam Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report base line information about characteristics, and dental experiences of a group of autistic children in three major cities of Saudi Arabia. Most of the children (76.2%) included in the study were diagnosed with autism before the age of 5 years. More than half of the children (53.7%) had no previous dental…

  6. Effect of Adalimumab on Work Ability Assessed in Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Patients in Saudi Arabia (AWARDS)

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Waleed; Janoudi, Nahid; Noorwali, Abdulsalam; Omran, Narges; Baamer, Matouqa; Assiry, El Hussain; Alrayes, Hanan; Alosaimi, Hanan; Ibrahim, Ashraf; Gohary, Shereen; Mignuet, Joan; Almoallim, Hani

    2015-01-01

    Objectives : Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disabling disease that can jeopardize the ability of affected individuals to participate in paid work. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 6-month course of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonist (adalimumab) on work ability, overall health, and fatigue in RA patients. Methods : Between October 2012 and February 2014, this prospective, observational study enrolled 63 consecutive patients with established adult RA at outpatient clinics in Makkah, Jeddah, Riyadh and Abha (Saudi Arabia). Patients received subcutaneous injections of adalimumab (40 mg every 2 weeks). Outcomes were measured at baseline and 6 months using the following tools: Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI), Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Visual Analog Scale for Fatigue (VAS-F), and work disability self-assessment. Results : All outcomes showed improvements after 6 months of adalimumab therapy. Significant improvements from baseline were observed in absenteeism (64% ± 11.62 to 11.60% ± 11.17 [p<0.0001]), presenteeism (62.15% ± 20.11 to 34.92% ± 20.61 [p<0.0001]), overall work impairment (69.08% ± 18.86 to 40.73% ± 22.29 [p<0.0001]), overall activity impairment (68.46% ± 18.58 to 36.46% ± 20.79 [p<0.0001]), HAQ score (1.69 ± 0.57 to 0.81 ± 0.61 [p<0.0001]), and FSS score (47.08 ± 9.55 to 27.86 ± 13.43 [p<0.0001]). Conclusion : A 6-month course of adalimumab improved work ability, fatigue, and overall health assessments in patients with established RA. Our findings encourage randomized controlled trials investigating the cost-effectiveness and long-term effects of TNF inhibitors on work disability. PMID:26312105

  7. 75 FR 21598 - Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ...Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia AGENCY: International Trade Administration...trade mission to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, December 6-8, 2010. Led by...Commerce official, the mission to Saudi Arabia is intended to include...

  8. Optometric Education in Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuaid, Robert D.; Kusztyk, George M.

    1990-01-01

    The first attempt at optometric education in the Middle East, a program developed at King Saud University (Saudi Arabia), is described. The university's second class of optometrists is being trained in the College of Applied Medical Sciences. Professional identity, limited faculty, and development of resources have been problems. (MSE)

  9. Saudis awaken to their vulnerability

    SciTech Connect

    Tinnin, D.B.

    1980-03-10

    Saudi Arabia is becoming aware that it is vulnerable to internal and external pressures which threaten its security. The strains of rapid modernization and threats from hostile neighbors are undermining the consensus which has held the widely diverse country together in a system of open communication. Influence by the Bedouin (ruling) and the ulama (religious) groups has predominated a traditional society determined to modernize and still remain conservative. Members of the ruling class are seeking to profit from the modernization process, but the common Saudi resists becoming an industrial laborer. Recent events in Mecca, Afghanistan and elsewhere illustrate how political pressures are affecting the country's leadership in the threat of armed conflicts over its oil supplies. (DCK)

  10. Impact of Internet Usage in Saudi Arabia: A Social Perspective

    E-print Network

    Sait, Sadiq M.

    Impact of Internet Usage in Saudi Arabia: A Social Perspective Sadiq M. Sait, KFUPM, Dhahran Arabia Mohammed Faheemuddin, KFUPM, Dhahran - Saudi Arabia ABSTRACT Internet in the Kingdom of Saudi and Society, Social Perspective, Internet Usage, Saudi Arabia INTRODUCTION Society and social systems can

  11. Women and Education in Saudi Arabia: Challenges and Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamdan, Amani

    2005-01-01

    The historical socio-economic and political conditions of Saudi Arabia are an essential aspect of understanding a woman's position in Saudi society. The persistence of women's exclusion from public life in contemporary Saudi Arabia is one of the most heated debates not only among Muslims but also worldwide, as Saudi society comes under more and…

  12. Surface Rupture in Northwest Saudi Arabia

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Wendy McCausland of the USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program and Hani Zahran of the Saudi Geological Survey view the southern end of the surface fault rupture caused by a M5.4 earthquake in the Saudi Arabian desert on May 19, 2009. The ground displacements in the soft sediments of the foreground...

  13. Career Choices Among Saudi Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Faris, Eiad; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 253 final-year students at the four Saudi medical schools found the most frequently-chosen specialties were internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology. Over one-fourth were unsure of career choice. Gender differences were found. Most common locations for postgraduate training were Saudi Arabia and Canada, and a…

  14. Pharmacist, the pharmaceutical industry and pharmacy education in Saudi Arabia: A questionnaire-based study

    PubMed Central

    Bin Saleh, Ghada; Rezk, Naser L.; Laika, Laila; Ali, Anna; El-Metwally, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Saudi Arabia there is an estimated need of more than 100,000 pharmacy graduates to cover all present sectors. The shortage of pharmacists has affected many of these sectors especially the pharmaceutical industry. The contribution of Saudi pharmacists to local pharmaceuticals industry would be extremely beneficial and important for shaping the future of the drug industry within the Kingdom. It is not clear whether future Saudi pharmacists are willing to contribute to local pharmaco-industrial fields. Methods: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was conducted on all final-year pharmacy students in King Saud University (KSU), Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Results: Out of a total of 130 students registered in the final-year of the pharmacy program in KSU, 122 (93.8%) were able to complete the questionnaire. The results showed that the majority (83%) of Saudi pharmacy students indicated that they had not received practical training in the pharmaceutical companies, while only 17.2% of the students felt that they had the knowledge and the skills to work in the pharmaceutical industry after graduation. The majority of the students (66.7%) chose clinical pharmacy as their future career field while only 10.9% indicated willingness to work in a pharmaceutical industry career. Only 8.2% selected working in the pharmaceutical industry. The significant predictor of possibly choosing a career in the local drug industry is a student with a bachelor’s degree (compared to Pharm D degree) in pharmacy (OR = 2.7 [95% CI 1.1–6.3]). Conclusion: Pharmacy students who are enrolled in the capital city of Riyadh are not properly trained to play an influential role in local drug companies. As a result, their level of willingness to have a career in such important business is not promising (more among Pharm D program). Future research in other pharmacy colleges within Saudi Arabia is needed to confirm such results. PMID:26594125

  15. Occlusal Status among 12-16 Year-Old School Children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Asiry, Moshabab A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Identifying occlusal status in a particular population will be valuable in planning the appropriate preventive and treatment programs. The purpose of this study was to assess the status of occlusion among school children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted at Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from September 2012 to June 2013. A total of 1825 Saudis (1007 males and 818 females) of 12-16 years old were randomly selected from 20 schools in different areas of Riyadh city to determine the status of their occlusion. The examiners assessed molar and canine relationships, spacing and crowding, overjet, overbite, anterior and posterior cross bite. These occlusal parameters were examined by two experienced examiners using a mouth mirror, small light source and calibrated fiber ruler. Results: About 60.11% of Saudis presented with Class I molar relationship while 7.12% and 10.13% of the subjects had Class II and III molar relationship, respectively. The most prevalent canine relationship was Class I (54.13%), followed by Class II (12.4%) and Class III (11.2). Normal overjet and overbite were observed in 76% and 67% of the sample, respectively. The prevalence of malocclusion traits were crowding (45.4%), Spacing (26.9%), excessive over jet (16.4%), posterior cross bite (8.9%), anterior open bite (8.4%) and excessive overbite (6.68%). No statistically significant differences were found between the genders about the prevalence of any occlusion traits (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Class I molar relationship, normal overbite, and normal overjet were dominant features among Saudis. Crowding was the most prevalent malocclusion trait, followed by spacing. These findings will help in understanding the occlusion status in order to plan for prevention and treatment of malocclusion in Riyadh city. PMID:26028897

  16. Prevalence of ocular pseudoexfoliation syndrome and associated complications in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saleh, Sulaiman A.; Al-Dabbagh, Najwa M.; Al-Shamrani, Saad M.; Khan, Nusrat M.; Arfin, Misbahul; Tariq, Mohammad; Al-Faleh, Hafez M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PEX), and associated ophthalmic complications among Saudi patients. Methods: The prevalence of PEX and associated ocular co-morbidities were determined among the Saudi patients visiting the Primary Care Clinic of Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between January 2009 and January 2010. A total of 1967 patients were examined biomicoscopically by ophthalmologists to determine the presence of PEX and associated ocular complications. Results: Sixty-nine of the 1967 examined patients (3.5%) showed the presence of PEX with no significant gender difference. There was an age dependent increase in the prevalence of PEX after the age of 50 years. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome was associated with higher intraocular pressure, cataract, and poor vision. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of PEX in male and female Saudi patients. Conclusion: Pseudoexfoliation syndrome is an age-related disorder, and its prevalence increases with age. Further larger population based studies are warranted to assess the prevalence of PEX and associated risk factors. PMID:25630014

  17. Quality assessment of various bottled waters marketed in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Omran, Abdulrasoul M; El-Maghraby, Salem E; Aly, Anwar A; Al-Wabel, Mohammed I; Al-Asmari, Zafer A; Nadeem, Mahmoud E

    2013-08-01

    This study focuses on the chemical analysis of the available brands of domestic bottled water in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia. The distribution of the chemical constituents (major, minor, and trace elements) is determined and compared with the chemical content labeled on the bottles and with drinking water standards of Saudi Arabian, World Health Organization, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The obtained results indicated that except for fluoride and bromate, the concentrations of dissolved salts, soluble cations and anions, nitrate, and trace elements of most bottled waters on sale were within the permissible limits set by standards used. On the other hand, the comparison between determined and reported label values recorded a substantial variation in some parameter values. Results indicated that more than 18 % of the sampled bottled waters exceeded the allowable limits for drinking water. Generated Piper diagrams revealed that the majority of investigated waters were sodium chloride-sulfate type; however, the hydrochemical modeling indicated that all water samples were undersaturated for anhydrite, gypsum, and halite. PMID:23232848

  18. Physical therapy education in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Zafar, Hamayun; Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmed; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To review the physical therapy educational program model, professional curriculum, and gender representation at major universities, as well as the quality and scope of physical therapy practice in Saudi Arabia. [Methods] Information regarding course curriculum, gender representation, and the quality and scope of physical therapy practice was collected from six universities in Saudi Arabia, the Saudi Physical Therapy Association, and the Saudi Health Commission. [Results] The first bachelor’s degree course of physical therapy was started in Saudi Arabia more than 30?years ago. In the last 10?years, the number of universities offering a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy has risen from 6 to 16, of which 14 are governmental and two are private. The 5- to 6?year bachelor’s degree program in physiotherapy includes an internship and preparatory prerequisite courses. Postgraduate study in physical therapy was introduced in 2000. Most universities offer segregated physical therapy courses for male and female students. [Conclusion] The enrollment of students in physical therapy programs in Saudi Arabia is gradually increasing. There are many opportunities to extend the scope of practice and contribute to the health needs of the Arab population and international communities. PMID:26157276

  19. Tertiary care availability and adolescent pregnancy characteristics in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kadri, Hanan M; Madkhali, Azza; Al-Kadi, Mohammed T; Bakhsh, Hanadi; Alruwaili, Nourah N; Tamim, Hani M

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, we aimed to assess the rate of adolescent delivery in a Saudi tertiary health care center and to investigate the association between maternal age and fetal, neonatal, and maternal complications where a professional tertiary medical care service is provided. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed between 2005 and 2010 at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All primigravid Saudi women ?24 weeks gestation, carrying a singleton pregnancy, aged <35 years, and with no chronic medical problems were eligible. Women were divided into three groups based on their age, ie, group 1 (G1) <16 years, group 2 (G2) ?16 up to 19 years, and group 3 (G3) ?19 up to 35 years. Data were collected from maternal and neonatal medical records. We calculated the association between the different age groups and maternal characteristics, as well as events and complications during the antenatal period, labor, and delivery. Results The rates of adolescent delivery were 20.0 and 16.3 per 1,000 births in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Compared with G1 and G2 women, G3 women tended to have a higher body mass index, a longer first and second stage of labor, more blood loss at delivery, and a longer hospital stay. Compared with G1 and G2 women, respectively, G3 women had a 42% and a 67% increased risk of cesarean section, and had a 52% increased risk of instrumental delivery. G3 women were more likely to develop gestational diabetes or anemia, G2 women had a three-fold increased risk of premature delivery (odds ratio 2.81), and G3 neonates had a 50% increased overall risk of neonatal complications (odds ratio 0.51). Conclusion The adolescent birth rate appears to be low in central Saudi Arabia compared with other parts of the world. Excluding preterm delivery, adolescent delivery cared for in a tertiary health care center is not associated with a significantly increased medical risk to the mother, fetus, or neonate. The psychosocial effect of adolescent pregnancy and delivery needs to be assessed. PMID:24729733

  20. Celebrating Saudi Arabia: Using the Five Fundamental Themes of Geography in Order to Discover Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzhugh, William

    2006-01-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a large Arab, Muslim country in the Middle East. It has been an economic and political partner of the United States for many years. This unit, designed for elementary students, provides a text, questions, mapping skills, and fun activities. Students read about Saudi Arabia to gain insights and an appreciation of…

  1. Saudi Arabia's Curriculum of Intolerance with Excerpts from Saudi Ministry of Education Textbooks for Islamic Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Nina; Al-Ahmed, Ali

    2006-01-01

    After September 11, 2001, complaints were voiced around the world, including by the U.S. government, that Saudi Arabian schools demonize the West and the "other." Senior Saudi government spokesmen also acknowledged this as a problem, and have repeatedly pledged that reform is underway or completed. This report was written in response to concerns…

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Almoallim, Hani M.; Alharbi, Laila A.

    2014-01-01

    The status of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Saudi Arabia (SA) was examined from various perspectives based on a systematic literature review and the authors’ personal experiences. In this regard, database and journal search were conducted to identify studies on RA in SA, yielding a total of 43 articles. Although efforts have been made to promote RA research in SA, current studies mostly represent only a few centers and may not accurately portray the national status of RA care. Notably, biological therapies were introduced early for almost all practicing rheumatologists in SA (government and private). However, no national guidelines regarding the management of RA have been developed based on local needs and regulations. Also, while efforts were made to establish RA data registries, they have not been successful. Taken together, this analysis can contribute to the planning of future guidelines and directives for RA care in SA. PMID:25491208

  3. Architecting the Saudi solar manufacturing : using Enterprise Architecture Framework

    E-print Network

    Alsultan, Bassel F. (Bassel Fahad)

    2013-01-01

    The demand for Saudi oil is increasing locally and internationally, and being one of the major oil exporters in the world, the government of Saudi Arabia needs to balance between local consumption and international demand. ...

  4. Knowledge and attitude of health-care professionals in hospitals towards pharmacovigilance in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alshammari, Thamir M; Alamri, Khaled K; Ghawa, Yazeed A; Alohali, Noura F; Abualkol, Shaza A; Aljadhey, Hisham S

    2015-12-01

    Background Drug safety has major implications for patients' lives. However, this concept is still considered new to some healthcare professionals. Objective This study aims to investigate the knowledge and awareness of Saudi healthcare professionals to pharmacovigilance (PV). Setting Governmental and private hospitals at three main cities in Saudi Arabia (Riyadh, Jeddah, and Dammam). Methods A cross-sectional survey among healthcare professionals (pharmacists, physicians, and nurses) within 12 Saudi hospitals was conducted between November and December 2012. The questionnaire consisted of 18 questions assessing the knowledge, awareness, and attitude of healthcare professionals (HCPs) towards science and the concept of PV. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. The data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis Software (SAS 9.3). Main outcome measure Knowledge, attitude and practice of HCPs toward pharmacovigilance. Results Three-hundred and thirty-two healthcare professionals completed the survey (response rate 72 %), 110 (34 %) physicians, 106 (33 %) pharmacists, and 104 (32 %) nurses. More than half of the participants (55 %) did not know the correct definition of PV. Two-thirds of the respondents, 207 (65.5 %), had knowledge of the aim of post-marketing surveillance, yet only 113 (36.9 %) were aware that the National Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety Center is the official body for monitoring adverse drug reaction in Saudi Arabia. In addition, 34.7 % agreed that lack of time could be a major barrier for reporting. The majority of the respondents (78.4 %) believed that reporting was a professional obligation and hospitals should have a drug safety department. Conclusions There was a limited knowledge of pharmacovigilance that could have affected reporting incidence. Educational intervention and a practical training program need to be applied by the drug regulatory body as well as health authorities to enhance the pharmacovigilance and drug safety culture in Saudi Arabia. PMID:26216270

  5. Trends of genitourinary cancer among Saudis

    PubMed Central

    Abomelha, Mohammed S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Saudi Arabia has a low incidence of cancer; the age-standardized rate of cancer is only 83/100,000, compared to the world rate of 181/100,000. Recent reports confirm a yearly increase in cancer in general, and of genitourinary cancer (GUC) in particular. The aim of the study was to assess the trends of GUC among Saudi nationals. Methods All available annual reports of the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR) from 1994 to 2006 were analysed and compared with worldwide data. Results Over a period of 13 years, 7132 GUCs were identified among Saudis, comprising 8.9% of all cancers reported, compared to 12.7% worldwide. The incidence rate of GUC increased over the study period, with the greatest increase in prostate and kidney cancer, at 48% and 33%, respectively. Summary stage data (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results programme) showed late presentation of GUC at the time of diagnosis. An improvement in stage was only found in testicular and prostate cancer, at 79% and 50%, respectively. While prostate and bladder cancer ranked sixth and ninth in the male population, penile cancer continued to be a rare disease. Conclusions The incidence of GUC in Saudi Arabia is still low, but there was a significant increase in prostate and kidney cancer. More effort is needed to detect GUC at an earlier stage. A national cancer control programme is suggested.

  6. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Health Behaviors between Saudi and British Adolescents Living in Urban Areas: Gender by Country Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M.; Al-Nakeeb, Yahya; Duncan, Michael J.; Al-Sobayel, Hana I.; Abahussain, Nada A.; Musaiger, Abdulrahman O.; Lyons, Mark; Collins, Peter; Nevill, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the cross-cultural differences and similarity in health behaviors between Saudi and British adolescents. A school-based cross-sectional study was conducted at four cities in Saudi Arabia (Riyadh and Al-Khobar; N = 1,648) and Britain (Birmingham and Coventry; N = 1,158). The participants (14–18 year-olds) were randomly selected using a multistage stratified cluster sampling technique. Measurements included anthropometric, screen time, validated physical activity (PA) questionnaire and dietary habits. The overweight/obesity prevalence among Saudi adolescents (38.3%) was significantly (p < 0.001) higher than that found among British adolescents (24.1%). The British adolescents demonstrated higher total PA energy expenditure than Saudi adolescents (means ± SE = 3,804.8 ± 81.5 vs. 2,219.9 ± 65.5 METs-min/week). Inactivity prevalence was significantly (p < 0.001) higher among Saudi adolescents (64%) compared with that of British adolescents (25.5%). The proportions of adolescents exceeding 2 h of daily screen time were high (88.0% and 90.8% among Saudis and British, respectively). The majority of Saudi and British adolescents did not have daily intakes of breakfast, fruit, vegetables and milk. MANCOVA showed significant (p < 0.05) gender by country interactions in several lifestyle factors. There was a significant (p < 0.001) gender differences in the ratio of physical activity to sedentary behaviors. In conclusion, Saudi and British adolescents demonstrated some similarities and differences in their PA levels, sedentary behaviors and dietary habits. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors among adolescents appear to be a cross-cultural phenomenon. PMID:24300072

  7. Prevalence of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity among urban Saudi adolescents: gender and regional variations.

    PubMed

    Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M; Abahussain, Nada A; Al-Sobayel, Hana I; Qahwaji, Dina M; Alsulaiman, Nouf A; Musaiger, Abdulrahman O

    2014-12-01

    The nutrition transition with associated lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases has rapidly reached many developing countries, including Saudi Arabia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity among Saudi adolescents. This school-based multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted during 2009-2010 in three major cities in Saudi Arabia: Al-Khobar, Jeddah, and Riyadh. Participants included 2,908 students of secondary schools (1,401 males and 1,507 females) aged 14 to 19 years, randomly selected using a multistage stratified cluster-sampling technique. Weight, height, and waist-circumference were measured; prevalence of overweight and obes- ity was determined using age- and sex-specific BMI cutoff reference standards of the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF). Abdominal obesity was determined using waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) cutoffs (above 0.5). The prevalence of overweight was 19.5% in males and 20.8% in females while that of obesity was 24.1% in males and 14% in females. The prevalence of abdominal obesity in males and females was 35.9% and 30.3% respectively. Higher prevalence of obesity was observed among adolescents in private schools. Across all ages, overweight and obesity ranged from 39.9% to 45.6% in males and from 30.4% to 38.7% in females. ANCOVA, controlling for age, showed significant interaction effects (city by gender). It is concluded that the proportions of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity, observed among Saudi adolescents were remarkably high. Such high prevalence of overweight and obesity is a major public-health concern. PMID:25895197

  8. Prevalence of Overweight, Obesity, and Abdominal Obesity among Urban Saudi Adolescents: Gender and Regional Variations

    PubMed Central

    Abahussain, Nada A.; Al-Sobayel, Hana I.; Qahwaji, Dina M.; Alsulaiman, Nouf A.; Musaiger, Abdulrahman O.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nutrition transition with associated lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases has rapidly reached many developing countries, including Saudi Arabia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity among Saudi adolescents. This school-based multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted during 2009-2010 in three major cities in Saudi Arabia: Al-Khobar, Jeddah, and Riyadh. Participants included 2,908 students of secondary schools (1,401 males and 1,507 females) aged 14 to 19 years, randomly selected using a multistage stratified cluster-sampling technique. Weight, height, and waist-circumference were measured; prevalence of overweight and obesity was determined using age- and sex-specific BMI cutoff reference standards of the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF). Abdominal obesity was determined using waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) cutoffs (above 0.5). The prevalence of overweight was 19.5% in males and 20.8% in females while that of obesity was 24.1% in males and 14% in females. The prevalence of abdominal obesity in males and females was 35.9% and 30.3% respectively. Higher prevalence of obesity was observed among adolescents in private schools. Across all ages, overweight and obesity ranged from 39.9% to 45.6% in males and from 30.4% to 38.7% in females. ANCOVA, controlling for age, showed significant interaction effects (city by gender). It is concluded that the proportions of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity, observed among Saudi adolescents were remarkably high. Such high prevalence of overweight and obesity is a major public-health concern. PMID:25895197

  9. Coronavirus respiratory illness in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed Ali; Rubino, Salvatore

    2012-10-01

    Although viruses that belong to the coronavirus family are known since the 1930s, they only gained public health attention when they were discovered to be the causative agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in China in 2002-2003. On 22 September 2012, the Ministry of Health (MOH) in Saudi Arabia announced the detection of what was described as a "rare pattern" of coronavirus respiratory infection in three individuals, two Saudi citizens and one person from the Gulf Region. Neither Saudi citizen survived the infection. Molecular analysis of the isolates showed that the virus belongs to the genus beta-coronavirus. It is not known if the new isolates are circulating in the population or has recently diverged. The emergence of these novel isolates that resulted in fatal human infection ascertains that health authorities all over the world must be vigilant for the possibility of new global pandemics due to novel viral infection. PMID:23103889

  10. Sexual Behavior in Male Adolescents with Autism and Its Relation to Social-Sexual Skills in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huwaidi, Mohamed A.; Daghustani, Wid H.

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify common sexual behavior among adolescents with autism, where parents and teachers of sixty-one male adolescents from twelve to twenty-one years of age were recruited from three cities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. They were asked to respond to a sexual behavior questionnaire, and a social-sexual skills…

  11. Patients’ Satisfaction with Primary Health Care Centers’ Services, Majmaah, Kingdom of Saudi of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Elsadig Yousif; Sami, Waqas; Alotaibi, Abdullah; Alfarag, Abdulrahman; Almutairi, Ahmed; Alanzi, Fahad

    2015-01-01

    Background PHC Patient’ satisfaction represents a key marker for the quality of health care delivery and this internationally accepted factor needs to be studied repeatedly for smooth functioning of the health care systems. The objectives of the current study were to determine the level of patients’ satisfaction with the primary health care services provided in Majmaah city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; to identify the reasons behind satisfaction or dissatisfaction and to determine the effect of the social factors on the level of satisfaction. Methodology The study was a cross-sectional facility- based. The sample comprised 370 patients selected by stratified and systematic sampling at the health centers’ level and the patients’ level respectively. The data were collected by a pre-tested questionnaire and analyzed by SPSS software. Results Patients’ level of satisfaction was 82%. The reasons behind satisfaction were cleanliness of the facilities and technical competencies of the staff (33.1% and 24.2%). The study showed that the most stated reason behind dissatisfaction was the unsuitable buildings (29%). Significant association was found between the level of patients’ satisfaction about PHC centers services and the respondents’ level of education. Conclusion The level of satisfaction with the services provided by PHC centers in Majmaah is high. The gender, marital status and income have no effect on the level of satisfaction with the services provided by PHC centers. However, the lower educated are more satisfied than the higher educated. Cleanliness, competence of the staff along with respect and good handling are the drivers behind the high level of satisfaction. PMID:26309435

  12. The State of Ambient Air Quality of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, M. M.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Khwaja, H. A.; Siddique, A.; Nayebare, S. R.; Zeb, J.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient air pollution in major cities of Saudi Arabia is a substantial environmental and health concern. A study was undertaken to assess the air quality of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia by the analysis of respirable particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), trace metals (Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, Cd, Sb, and Pb), and water-soluble ions (F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, C2O42-, and NH42+). Sulfur and BC mass concentration ranged 0.99 - 7.39 ?g/m3 and 0.70 - 3.09 ?g/m3, respectively, while the PM2.5 mass concentration ranged 23 - 186 ?g/m3. Maximum BC contribution to PM2.5 was 5.6%. Atmospheric PM2.5 concentrations were well above the 24 h WHO guideline of 20 ?g/m3. Air Quality Index (AQI) indicates that there were 8% days of moderate air quality, 28% days of unhealthy air quality for sensitive groups, 55% days of unhealthy air quality, and 9% days of very unhealthy air quality during the study period. Sulfate SO42- dominated the identifiable components. The major contributors to PM2.5 were soil and crustal material; vehicle emissions (black carbon factor); and fuel oil combustion in industries (sulfur factor), according to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). This study highlights the importance of focusing control strategies not only on reducing PM concentration, but also on the reduction of toxic components of the PM, to most effectively protect human health and the environment.

  13. 78 FR 52213 - Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From India, Korea, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ...Tubular Goods From India, Korea, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Thailand...of imports from India, Korea, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Thailand...tubular goods from India, Korea, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan,...

  14. Cinder Cones in Northwest Saudi Arabia

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Harrat Lunayyir basalt cinder cones and lava flows in Saudi Arabia seen from an aerial perspective. Deposits from the cinder cones cover nearby ridges and form fans at the base of the older non-volcanic ridge in the background. These well-preserved geomorphic forms indicate the relative youth of thi...

  15. Teachers' Online Discussion Forums in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Jarf, Reima

    2006-01-01

    The Ministry of Education in Saudi Arabia has special online discussion forums for teachers as part of its internet website. The study surveys those teachers' online forums and reports the number of participants, number of threads and responses, topics with the highest and lowest posts and the forums role in teachers' professional development and…

  16. Making a Smart Campus in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abuelyaman, Eltayab Salih

    2008-01-01

    Prince Sultan University (PSU) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, has conceptualized what it means to be a smart campus after surveying similar notions worldwide. A "smart" campus requires smart teachers, smart technology, and smart pedagogical centers. It deploys smart teachers and gives them smart tools and ongoing support to do their jobs while…

  17. English Language Teaching Profile: Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    The role and status of English in Saudi Arabia are examined, with attention directed to: (1) English within the education system; (2) teachers of English; (3) English outside the education system; (4) materials support; (5) British support for the teaching of English; and (6) English syllabi at intermediate, secondary, and higher education levels.…

  18. Online Continuing Medical Education in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwadie, Adnan D.

    2013-01-01

    As the largest country in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and its health care system are well positioned to embark on an online learning intervention so that health care providers in all areas of the country have the resources for updating their professional knowledge and skills. After a brief introduction, online continuing medical education is…

  19. Examination of absorptive capacity in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Bassam, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    Because of the oil price and production increases, in the last decade, a huge transfer of wealth and income began moving from the consuming to the oil-producing countries. Moreover, the industrialized developed countries entered a new era of slower economic growth as compared to the pre-OPEC era. The oil-producing countries rates of economic growth, on the other hand, have skyrocketed, and all their economic indicators are steeply upward and positive. During the past decade, therefore, Saudi Arabia has undergone rapid economic growth and development. This newly acquired and still increasing revenue has permitted the government to embark upon a series of ambitious and expensive five-year development plans to industrialize the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia by the year 2000. Because of the limited duration of this development effort and the absence of studies of the process itself as it unfolded in Saudi Arabia, it is not at all clear why this success had been achieved. Therefore, the question to be asked is: How was it possible for Saudi Arabia to have made such rapid progress in the achievement of its development goals. It was determined through this study that the rapid increase in domestic absorptive capacity was due, first of all, to the large increases in oil revenues, which permitted importation and augmentation of cooperant factors. Second, this absorptive capacity also expanded as a result of skillful and insightful planning that was undertaken to eliminate bottlenecks, establish priorities, and maintain a degree of balance.

  20. Archiving Saudi heritage using the holographic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althagafi, A.; Richardson, M.

    2015-03-01

    This paper focuses on the use of the Yuri Nikolaevich DENISYUK holographic recording process to document, archive and display Saudi heritage. The goal of this research is to develop a technique of archiving heritage by using a high-tech holographic process to capture a three-dimensional presentation of ancient jewelry artifacts of the Saudi Heritage in particular. This study concentrates on five particular items of handmade authentic ancient metal jewelry from different parts of Saudi Arabia. When conducting this research experiments were conducted using both red-green sensitive plates sensitive to 633 nm and 532 nm respectively. Material thickness ranged between 1.5 and 3 millimeters were used, consequently in the dark room, varied chemicals for developing the holograms were employed. Red and green laser devices were also used with exposure times between 8 to 18 seconds of laser light dispersion through diffused surfaces in reflection holography. The outcome in each case was varied. The holograms captured the jewelry pieces with all the engravings and minute details, thus archiving the Saudi Heritage of that time. What makes holograms a revolutionary method for presenting valuable and/or ancient artifacts is the fact that they offer a more practical and convenient solution to travel around the world than displaying the originals items. Thus, museum visitors can enjoy and appreciate the precious artifacts otherwise unseen and lost without holography.

  1. Unconventional therapy use among asthma patients in a tertiary care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al Moamary, Mohamed S

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Unconventional therapy (UT) is a therapeutic practice of alternative and complementary medicine that is not currently considered an integral part of modern medical practice. The aim of this article is to investigate the experience of Saudi patients with UT modalities in the treatment of asthma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional study of asthma patients referred to King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during the year 2004. Information was collected using a pre-designed questionnaire administered through interviews. RESULTS: Two hundred consecutive patients with a mean age of 52.3 years (±18.7) were included in this study. Sixty-nine (34.5%) of those patients used some form of UT in the previous year. There was a tendency to use UT among the older age group (P = 0.029) and among those with longer duration of disease (P = 0.009). However, there was no significant correlation observed between the use of UT and gender, FEV1, or disease control. The most commonly used form of UT was recitation of Holy Quran (9%), honey (24.5%), herbs (23.5%), cautery (12%), and blackseed (10%). There was no significant correlation between disease control and the use of modalities. CONCLUSION: Unconventional therapy is frequently practiced by asthma patients in Saudi Arabia, who commonly believe that UT will lead to improvement. The lack of evidence necessitates the fostering of a national project to address the practice of UT. PMID:19561905

  2. Attitudes and practices of complementary and alternative medicine among adolescents in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Abahussain, Nada A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes and use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among Saudi Arabian adolescents. A multistage stratified sampling method was used to select 736 adolescents (358 males, 378 females) aged 15-19 years from secondary schools. The study was carried out in Al-Khobar city, Eastern region of Saudi Arabia. The findings revealed that the use of CAM by adolescents in their lifetime ranged from 1.6% for acupuncture to 58.6% for honey treatment, with significant differences between genders, except in the use of dietary supplements, black cumin, and acupuncture therapies. Females were more likely to use CAM for treating abdominal pains, cold and flu, and cough than males (P < 0.000). Family members and friends (67.7%) were the main source of CAM usage, followed by television (10%), and Internet (8%). Religious and medicinal herb healers were the CAM healers most commonly visited by adolescents. Nearly 21-43% of adolescents had positive attitudes toward CAM, with some significant differences between males and females. It can be concluded that CAM is widely used by Saudi adolescents, but caution should be exercised for the safe usage of some CAM treatments. CAM should not be ignored; however there is an urgent need to establish regulations for CAM usage. PMID:25560362

  3. Population dynamics and tuberculosis: a cross sectional study of an overlooked disease in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bishri, Jamal; Masoodi, Ibrahim; Adnan, Mubarki; Tariq, Malik; Abdullah, Harthi; Abdulgoni, Thubaiti; Bander, Guraibi; Altalhi, Mansoor

    2014-01-01

    Background: International travel, migration and human population movements facilitate the spread of tuberculosis (TB). Objective: To study the impact of poorly screened expatriates working in Saudi Arabia on the local incidence of TBs. Patients and methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in the Chest Disease Hospital, Taif. All confirmed cases of TB from June 2009 to May 2010 admitted to the hospital were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were diagnosed cases of TB (pulmonary & extra-pulmonary) in patients between the ages of 14 to 65 years. Patients with HIV and coexistent malignancies were excluded. The age, gender and ethnic group of each patient was recorded, and patients were divided into two groups. Of the two groups, Group A consisted of Taif residents and group B of patients referred from other cities in the country. Results: Of the 686 cases studied, 370 (54%) were Saudi nationals (Group A = 80 & Group B = 290) and 316 (46%) cases were from other countries. Males outnumbered females and most of the patients were aged 20 to 29 years. The number of cases from the areas close to the pilgrimage sites, i.e. Makah (233) and Jeddah (275), outnumbered those in Taif (110). Conclusions: Our study identifies an increased prevalence of TB cases in areas close to the pilgrimage (Group B). The higher proportion of non-Saudi TB patients in group B is most likely explained by the higher number of poorly screened illegal expatriates in the region. PMID:24454274

  4. A new case for promoting wastewater reuse in Saudi Arabia: bringing energy into the water equation.

    PubMed

    Kajenthira, Arani; Siddiqi, Afreen; Anadon, Laura Diaz

    2012-07-15

    Saudi Arabia is the third-largest per capita water user worldwide and has addressed the disparity between its renewable water resources and domestic demand primarily through desalination and the abstraction of non-renewable groundwater. This study evaluates the potential costs of this approach in the industrial and municipal sectors, exploring economic, energy, and environmental costs (including CO2 emissions and possible coastal impacts). Although the energy intensity of desalination is a global concern, it is particularly urgent to rethink water supply options in Saudi Arabia because the entirety of its natural gas production is consumed domestically, primarily in petrochemical and desalination plants. This burgeoning demand is necessitating the development of more expensive high-sulfur gas resources that could make desalination even pricier. The evolving necessity to conserve non-renewable water and energy resources and mitigate GHG emissions in the region also requires policy makers to weigh in much more considerably the energy and environmental costs of desalination. This paper suggests that in Saudi Arabia, the implementation of increased water conservation and reuse across the oil and natural gas sectors could conserve up to 29% of total industrial water withdrawals at costs recovered over 0-30 years, depending on the specific improvement. This work also indicates that increasing wastewater treatment and reuse in six high-altitude inland cities could save a further $225 million (2009 dollars) and conserve 2% of Saudi Arabia's annual electricity consumption. By these estimates, some anticipated investments in desalination projects could be deferred by improving water efficiency in industry and prioritizing investment in sewage and water distribution networks that would ensure more effective water reclamation and reuse. Simultaneously, such initiatives would conserve non-renewable natural gas resources and could help prevent the lock-in of potentially unnecessary desalination infrastructure that is likely to become more energy and cost efficient in future. PMID:22504624

  5. Tomorrow's City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Emrys

    1979-01-01

    Examines several simple models of cities, discussing possible future changes in city design. The concepts of the megalopolis, linear city, tower block, imploded or miniaturized city, and dispersed city are described. (CS)

  6. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction in the female health care providers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Rouzi, Abdulrahim A; Sahly, Nora; Sawan, Dana; Kafy, Souzan; Alzaban, Faten

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in Saudi and non-Saudi female health care providers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. One -hundred twenty (60 Saudi and 60 non-Saudi) sexually active female health care professionals in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, were anonymously surveyed using the English version of the female sexual function index questionnaire. The individual domain scores for pain, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, pain, and overall score for the Saudi and non-Saudi women were calculated and compared. The two groups were comparable in demographic characteristics. No statistically significant differences were found between Saudi and non-Saudi women in desire (P = .22) and arousal scores (P = .47). However, non-Saudi women had significantly higher lubrication (P < .001), orgasm (P = .015), satisfaction (P = .004), and pain scores (P = .015). The overall scores in Saudi and non-Saudi women were low (23.40 ± 4.50 compared with 26.18 ± 5.97), but non-Saudi women had a significantly higher overall score (P = .005). Taken together, sexual dysfunction is prevalent among Saudi and non-Saudi female health care providers, with Saudi women demonstrating lower scores in four sexual function domains and the overall score. PMID:25601160

  7. Saudi Arabia: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on the Saudi Arabian Oil Co. (Saudi Aramco), the only operator in the country, that has accelerated its production expansion program aimed at boosting capacity from the current 8.5 million bpd to 10 million bpd. Initially expected to be completed by 1999, it now appears a sustainable 10 million bpd rate may be attainable by 1996. By this time next year, at least nine major onshore projects will have been started as well as five offshore. Included will be development of Hawtah, the initial oil discovery in the Central province south of Riyadh. The program also means significantly increased drilling. In fact, 1991 completions should easily double those of last year.

  8. Waters and desalination programs of Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, C.K.; Maadhah, A.G.

    1981-07-01

    Saudi Arabia is an arid desert country without rivers or sweet-water lakes. It does, however, have large amounts of ground water and seawater. These waters must be desalted by some means in order to make them potable. The most frequently used methods for that purpose are: multistage flash (MSF) evaporation, reverse osmosis (RO), and electrodialysis (ED). Because of rapid industrialization of the country, the demand for fresh water has been growing steadily. This, in turn, has resulted in a spectacular growth of the water-desalination industry. This paper discusses the availability and properties of the waters. It gives a detailed description of the major accomplishments and of the ongoing and future programs in the field of water desalination in Saudi Arabia. 14 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  9. Health beliefs and behaviors of Saudi women.

    PubMed

    Ide, B A; Sanli, T

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes perceptions of familiarity with symptoms and beliefs about illnesses based on interviews with 50 Saudi women. The sample was young, with 82% under the age of 40, and not well educated by Western standards, with one-third being illiterate and 80% having no more than a primary school education. More than half lived in households of six or more. Although there was greater awareness of germs as causative factors in illness than previous studies in Saudi Arabia had demonstrated, beliefs in multiple causes, including religious beliefs about disease causation, persisted. There was an apparent lack of understanding of specific causes of various illnesses or of the rationale for preventive measures. This lack of understanding may be related to the low education levels and/or deeply ingrained cultural beliefs. PMID:1475998

  10. Motives for cosmetic procedures in Saudi women.

    PubMed

    Al-Natour, Sahar H

    2014-01-01

    The media-fuelled obsession with beauty in modern society has led more women to seek elective cosmetic procedures to meet the portrayed ideals of beauty in different cultures. This study gives insights into incentives and desires to undergo cosmetic procedures in a conservative society with strict religious practices where women are veiled. Questionnaire data were obtained from 509 Saudi women who responded to a survey distributed randomly to a sample of Saudi women aged 17 to 72 years. At least 1 elective cosmetic procedure was performed in 42% of the women, of whom 77.8% wore a veil. Another 33% considered having a procedure. The motives for seeking a cosmetic procedure were to improve self-esteem in 83.7%, attract a husband in 63.3%, or prevent a husband from seeking another wife in 36.2%. The decision to seek a procedure was affected by the media, with high peer influence. Motivation for elective cosmetic procedures in Saudi women is influenced by a combination of emotional and cultural factors, level of education, marital status, and religious beliefs. The veil is not an impediment for seeking such procedures. The limitation of the study was missing data analysis as some items in the questionnaire were completed inaccurately or left unanswered. PMID:25134311

  11. Decline in menarcheal age among Saudi girls

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Ibrahim A. Al; Ibrahim, Areej A.; Badri, Motasim A.; Dubayee, Mohammed S. Al; Bin-Abbas, Bassam S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate age at menarche and to assess trends in menarcheal age among Saudi women. Methods: A prospective longitudinal study was conducted among healthy prepubertal female school children and adolescents from September 2006 to July 2012 in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Study participants were invited from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. Tanner stage, height, weight, body mass index, and socioeconomic parameters including parent’s level of education were collected. Age at menarche was compared with maternal age at menarche. Results: The study included 265 girls and mothers. Mean±standard deviation (SD) age at menarche for girls was 13.08 ± 1.1 years, and their distribution category across the ?10 years was 4 (1.5%), 11-14 years was 239 (90.2%), and ?15 years was 22 (8.3%) girls. Anthropometric measurements, mother’s level of education, and family income were not statistically significant determining factors associated with age at menarche. Mean ± SD age at menarche for mothers was 13.67 ± 1.4 years, and their distribution category across the ?10 years was 7 (2.6%), 11-14 years was 172 (64.9%), and ?15 years was 86 (32.5%). Girls attained menarche at younger age compared with their mothers (p<0.0001). A downward secular trend in age of menarche was observed (Cuzick test for trend = 0.049). Conclusion: Saudi girls attain menarcheal age earlier than their mothers, reflecting a downward secular trend in menarcheal age. PMID:26593166

  12. Foreign Language Planning in Saudi Arabia: Beyond English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Mark; Almansour, Maram

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from an exploratory study of foreign language planning in Saudi Arabia. In terms of official policy, the sole foreign language taught in Saudi public schools is English. Therefore, researching foreign languages there is often limited to researching the area of English as a Foreign Language. However, evidence shows that…

  13. Blended Learning in Saudi Universities: Challenges and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alebaikan, Reem; Troudi, Salah

    2010-01-01

    This study is an attempt to investigate the nature of obstacles and challenges encountered at Saudi universities while implementing a blended learning approach. A literature review of blended learning rationale and designs, and the status of web-based education in Saudi higher education are demonstrated. Three main challenges of applying blended…

  14. Principals' Perceptions of the School Counsellor Role in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alghamdi, Nawal G.; Riddick, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Many factors in Saudi society have led to a need for counselling services in educational institutions. However, concerns remain that the role of school counsellors in that setting is unclear. An aim of this study was to determine the perceptions of principals concerning the actual and ideal role of intermediate girls school counsellors in Saudi

  15. Special Education in Saudi Arabia: Challenges, Perspectives, Future Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alquraini, Turki

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a brief background of the education system in Saudi Arabia and current special education services and programs for students with disabilities. Additionally, this paper presents the findings of some studies that examined teachers' perspectives regarding the inclusion of students with disabilities. As Saudi Arabia continues its…

  16. Special Education in Saudi Arabia: Challenges, Perspectives, Future Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alquraini, Turki

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a brief background of the education system in Saudi Arabia and current special education services and programs for students with disabilities. Additionally, this paper presents the findings of some studies that examined teachers' perspectives regarding the inclusion of students with disabilities. As Saudi Arabia continues its…

  17. Reference Growth Charts for Saudi Arabian Children and Adolescents

    E-print Network

    Sidorov, Nikita

    Reference Growth Charts for Saudi Arabian Children and Adolescents P. J. Foster & T. Kecojevi and adolescents P. J. Foster and T. Kecojevi´c Abstract The purpose of this study is to provide Saudi Arabian into two separate age groups: infants, birth to 36 months and children and adolescents, age 2 to 19 years

  18. 75 FR 21598 - Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... International Trade Administration Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia AGENCY: International Trade... energy and infrastructure trade mission to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, December 6-8, 2010. Led by a... representatives from a variety of U.S. energy and infrastructure industry suppliers and service providers....

  19. Common Diseases and Some Demographic Characteristics among Saudi Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Haramlah, Ahmed Abdulrahman; Al-Bakr, Fawziah; Merza, Haniah

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the common diseases among Saudi women and their relationship with the level of physical activity and some variables. This study was applied to 1233 Saudi woman in different regions of the Kingdom, and adopted to explore the common diseases: obesity, hypertension, diabetes, cholesterol and asthma. The study results showed…

  20. Receptor modelling study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Mansour A; Alam, Mohammed S; Yin, Jianxin; Stark, Christopher; Jang, Eunhwa; Harrison, Roy M; Shamy, Magdy; Khoder, Mamdouh I; Shabbaj, Ibrahim I

    2015-02-15

    Measurements of 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) have been made in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, with a view to establishing the concentrations in this major city, and quantifying the contributions of major sources. Particulate and vapour forms have been sampled and analysed separately. The concentrations are compared to measurements from other sites in the Middle Eastern region and are towards the lower end of the range, being far lower than concentrations reported from Riyadh (Saudi Arabia), Assiut (Egypt) and Tehran (Iran) but broadly similar to those measured in Damascus (Syria) and higher than those measured in Kuwait. The partitioning between vapour and particle phases is similar to that in data from Egypt and China, but with many compounds showing a higher particle-associated percentage than in Birmingham (UK) possibly reflecting a higher concentration of airborne particulate matter in the former countries. Concentrations in Jeddah were significantly higher at a site close to the oil refinery and a site close to a major ring road than at a suburban site to the north of the city. Application of positive matrix factorisation to the pooled data elicited three factors accounting respectively for 17%, 33% and 50% of the measured sum of PAH and these are interpreted as arising from gasoline vehicles, industrial sources, particularly the oil refinery, and to diesel/fuel oil combustion. PMID:25460975

  1. Tobacco Use among Health Care Workers in Southwestern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mahfouz, Ahmed A.; Shatoor, Abdullah S.; Al-Ghamdi, Badr R.; Hassanein, Mervat A.; Nahar, Shamsun; Farheen, Aesha; Gaballah, Inasse I.; Mohamed, Amani; Rabie, Faten M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study targeted health care workers (HCWs) in Governmental Hospitals and Primary Health Care Centers in Abha City, southwestern Saudi Arabia. An anonymous self-report questionnaire was used to assess tobacco use and the reasons for smoking. The present study included 736 HCWs. The overall prevalence of tobacco use amounted to 26.3% (14.8% current and 11.5% former users). In a binary logistic regression analysis, males were found significantly more prone to smoke compared to females (aOR = 3.081, 95% CI: 2.004–4.739). Similarly, parental history of tobacco use was found to be a significant risk factor (aOR = 1.540, 95% CI: 1.040–2.278). Among current users, 89.9% were interested in quitting and 66.1% tried before to quit. The prevalence of smoking among HCWs in the present study, besides being a public health problem, represents a potential barrier in involving this group as a first line for tobacco control. There is a need for a national intervention programme in the country in a tailored manner for HCWs to control tobacco use parallel to the running national program for public. These interventions should begin early in basic medical education and to be applied continually during one's medical career. PMID:24063018

  2. Gender-Segregated Education in Saudi Arabia: Its Impact on Social Norms and the Saudi Labor Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baki, Roula

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia's gender-segregated higher education system and how it is used to transmit the Kingdom's traditional societal expectations to the employment sector. With Saudi Arabia's current need for economic change, the education system is retarding instead of accelerating reform. A background consisting of…

  3. A comparison on the prevalence and outcomes of gestational versus type 2 diabetes mellitus in 1718 Saudi pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Serehi, Amal Al; Ahmed, Amjad M; Shakeel, Farah; Alkhatani, Khadija; El-Bakri, Nahid K; Buhari, Badr Aldin M; Mohareb, Uhoud Al; Aljohani, Naji

    2015-01-01

    The presence of either diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2) or GDM constitute a high-risk pregnancy. Given the high rate of DMT2 and GDM in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), no study has ever compared whether GDM outcomes are comparable to those with DMT2. The present study aims to compare for the first time, maternal and neonatal outcomes among Saudi patients with GDM, DMT2 and non-DM groups. This is a retrospective study covering data from 1718 pregnant patients admitted at King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, KSA from April 2011 to March 2013. The prevalence of GDM was 13.8%, DMT2 was 0.9%. DMT2 group had the highest mean parity and shortest mean gestational age as compared to other groups. Half of all the subjects in the DMT2 group also experienced preterm labor, as opposed to only 10% in GDM and 14% in the non-DM group, respectively. Finally, neonates delivered by DMT2 mothers had the highest percentage of admissions to NICU (33%) as compared to 10% in the non-DM group and only 5% in the GDM group. Outcomes of the GDM group are almost comparable with the non-DM group. While the results of the present study reflect the efficient management of GDM cases in Saudi patients, DMT2 complicated pregnancies, which are considered to be at a much higher risk for maternal and neonatal complications, should be given equally special attention. PMID:26379970

  4. Obesity and public health in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    DeNicola, Erica; Aburizaiza, Omar S; Siddique, Azhar; Khwaja, Haider; Carpenter, David O

    2015-08-01

    Overweight and obesity are now a global epidemic, with more than one in five people qualifying as obese worldwide. These conditions are accompanied by excessive rates of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) related to overweight, like type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases. Saudi Arabia, which has become increasingly westernized over the past few decades now has one of the highest prevalence rates of overweight and obesity, even in children. This puts the population at great risk for increased rates of NCD mortality. Competing cultures is partly to blame, as the combination of persisting traditional Saudi cultural practices, modern cultural changes, and economic prosperity has created an obesogenic environment that promotes unhealthy eating, sedentary lifestyles, and weight gain. Overweight and obesity are more prevalent in Saudi women than in Saudi men. Interventions targeting the environment are needed in order to promote greater health through healthy eating decisions and increased physical activity or exercise (especially for women). PMID:26351801

  5. GIST in Saudi Arabia: multicentric histopathological genetic study of 75 surgically excised cases.

    PubMed

    Al Hussaini, H F F

    2012-01-01

    The availability of CD117 (Ckit) immunohistochemical testing in most hospital laboratories has facilitated the diagnosis of GIST in cKit positive cases. The aim of this study was to describe the histopathological variations of GIST in Saudi Arabia. The study involved analysis of paraffin blocks of 75 surgically excised GIST and GIST-like stromal tumors obtained from four major referral hospitals in Saudi Arabia (Riyadh Military Hospital, King Abdulaziz Medical City, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center and Aramco's hospital) between 1998 and 2009. Patient sex and age were noted in addition to the following tumor variables: size, site, histological grade and type, immunohistochemical profile and genetic analysis of the cKit mutation. The stomach was the commonest site for tumors and spindle cell type was the most frequently seen variant. Further sub classification of the histopathological type was made in order to recognize the morphological pattern of the tumor. The most common tumor grades seen were of low-risk and high-risk groups. There was one case of familial GISTparaganglioma syndrome and the youngest subject was an 8-year-old girl with high-risk spindle cell gastric GIST. Genetic study in 34 cases revealed exon 11 mutations in all of the cKit genes. PMID:22227543

  6. Assessment of ISSR based molecular genetic diversity of Hassawi rice in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Turki, T.A.; Basahi, Mohammed A.

    2015-01-01

    Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis, using 14 primers was performed to estimate genetic diversity among 27 landraces of Hassawi rice growing in Al-Ahsa region of Saudi Arabia and deposited at King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology with KACST IDs. The average polymorphism produced by 11 selected primers was more than 75%. The analysis of ISSR polymorphism divided the examined rice landraces into two groups; In one group (A), one accession (KACST 191) was clearly delimited as a distant landrace from other 12 landraces grouped in two clusters; cluster I of seven landraces of close geographic distributions; four of them grow at close geographic locations (KACST IDs 32, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187 and 188) and cluster II is comprised of five landraces KACST IDs (190, 308, 352, 353 and 355). In group B, the landraces were more closely related to each other as compared to the landraces of group A. In this group a small cluster of two landraces (KACST 305 & KACST 333) was clearly distant from a large group of three clusters comprised of landraces having KACST IDs 189 & 192, landraces 302, 306, 307, 308 & 310 and landraces with KACST IDs 334, 351, 354, 356 & 357 respectively. These results indicate that ISSR fingerprints are efficient in the identification and resolution of genetic diversity between the landraces of the Hassawi rice and will be an efficient method in the authentication of the rice germplasm in the gene bank of Saudi Arabia. PMID:26288564

  7. Characterization of Nonmethane Hydrocarbons at Three Urban Sites in Western Saudi Arabia, in Lahore (Pakistan), and in Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, B.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, N. J.; Meinardi, S.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Siddique, A.; Zeb, J.; Yu, L. E.; Khwaja, H. A.; Farrukh, M. A.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Favorable conditions to tropospheric ozone (O3) formation are present over the Persian Gulf Region. Ozone is a well known pollutant affecting human health and natural ecosystems. Among the several factors contributing to the formation of the O3 hot spot over the Middle East, the presence of local emissions of its precursors needs to be considered. We report initial measurements of a suite of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), an important component of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which, coupled with nitrogen oxides in the presence of sunlight, are key chemical precursors of tropospheric O3. We measured 63 speciated C2-C10 NMHCs, in addition to methane (CH4) and carbon monoxide (CO) in three cities of Saudi Arabia (Jeddah, Mecca, and Madina; October-November 2012 and April 2013) and in the city of Lahore (Pakistan; December 2012). To put these data into perspective, we compare our results to data collected in Singapore (August-November 2012). We observed enhanced levels in all three Saudi Arabian cities compared to the local background and to those measured in Singapore. However, the Saudi levels are much lower than those measured in Lahore, where the sum of quantified NMHCs is about six times higher. For Madina, enhanced levels of the alkenes, ethyne and CO indicated that vehicle exhaust was the dominant source. In Jeddah and Mecca, the most abundant NMHC were the alkanes (47-61% of total measured NMHCs), which are more closely associated with emissions from natural gas, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and gasoline evaporation. In Lahore, the hydroxyl radical (OH) reactivity, used to evaluate the importance of the different measured species toward ozone production, is three to six times higher than for the Saudi cities, and more than 20 times higher than for Singapore. For all urban areas reported here, among the measured compounds, the alkenes (especially ethene and propene) dominate in terms of OH reactivity because of a combination of their great abundance and relatively fast reaction rates with the hydroxyl radical. In light of the ozone hot spot detected over the Persian/Arabia Gulf our study shows the importance of different classes of NMHCs, or individual species, to the OH reactivity. This information can help policy makers regulate emissions in an attempt to reduce O3 formation by targeting key atmospheric pollutants.

  8. Mastoid cells myiasis in a Saudi man: a case report.

    PubMed

    Al-Abidi, Abdul Aziz; Bello, Cornelius; Al-Ahmari, Mohammed; Fawehinmi, Yinka

    2003-12-01

    We report here the case of myiasis of the mastoid cells in a 50-year old Saudi farmer. Eight larvae of suspected Calliphorid fly were extracted from his right mastoid at examination in the clinic. The larvae almost ate into his brain, using their powerful screw-shaped mouth parts. It is the first report of Calliphorid larvae affecting the mastoid cells from Saudi Arabia. The epidemiological and clinical implications of this finding are discussed below. PMID:15008312

  9. Potential for the International Spread of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in Association with Mass Gatherings in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kamran; Sears, Jennifer; Hu, Vivian Wei; Brownstein, John S; Hay, Simon; Kossowsky, David; Eckhardt, Rose; Chim, Tina; Berry, Isha; Bogoch, Isaac; Cetron, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background: A novel coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causing severe, life-threatening respiratory disease has emerged in the Middle East at a time when two international mass gatherings in Saudi Arabia are imminent. While MERS-CoV has already spread to and within other countries, these mass gatherings could further amplify and/or accelerate its international dissemination, especially since the origins and geographic source of the virus remain poorly understood. Methods: We analyzed 2012 worldwide flight itinerary data and historic Hajj pilgrim data to predict population movements out of Saudi Arabia and the broader Middle East to help cities and countries assess their potential for MERS-CoV importation. We compared the magnitude of travel to countries with their World Bank economic status and per capita healthcare expenditures as surrogate markers of their capacity for timely detection of imported MERS-CoV and their ability to mount an effective public health response. Results: 16.8 million travelers flew on commercial flights out of Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates between June and November 2012, of which 51.6% were destined for India (16.3%), Egypt (10.4%), Pakistan (7.8%), the United Kingdom (4.3%), Kuwait (3.6%), Bangladesh (3.1%), Iran (3.1%) and Bahrain (2.9%). Among the 1.74 million foreign pilgrims who performed the Hajj last year, an estimated 65.1% originated from low and lower-middle income countries. Conclusion: MERS-CoV is an emerging pathogen with pandemic potential with its apparent epicenter in Saudi Arabia, where millions of pilgrims will imminently congregate for two international mass gatherings. Understanding global population movements out of the Middle East through the end of this year's Hajj could help direct anticipatory MERS-CoV surveillance and public health preparedness to mitigate its potential global health and economic impacts. PMID:23884087

  10. Hydrochemical characterization of groundwater in wadi Sayyah, Western Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ahmadi, Masoud Eid

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater is an essential and vital component of our life support system where it is used for drinking, irrigation, and industrial purposes. Wadi Sayyah is one of the most important wadis in the western part of Saudi Arabia to the northeast of Jeddah city. A total of 42 groundwater samples are collected from hand dug wells in this area and they are analyzed for various physical and chemical parameters. The sequence of the abundance of the major ion is in the following order: Ca2+ > Na+ > Mg2+ > K+ and Cl- > SO4 2- > HCO3 - > NO3 -. The dominated hydrochemical facieses of groundwater are: CaCl, and mixed CaMgCl, and the alkaline earths(Ca2+, Mg2+) and strong acids (SO4 2-, Cl-) are dominating over alkalis (Na+, K+) and weak acids (HCO3 -, CO{3/-}). Statistical analysis indicates positive correlation among most of the chemical parameters. Based on the analytical results, groundwater in the study area is generally hard to very hard, fresh to brackish and alkaline in nature. The rock weathering and evaporation are among the most dominant processes in controlling water quality. The chloro-alkali indices illustrate that 80 % of the water samples have positive indicating exchange of Na+ and K+ from water with Mg2+ and Ca2+ from the rock. The suitability of water for drinking and irrigation is determined using WHO standards for drinking; some indices for irrigation purposes and it indicate that the groundwater in the study area can be used for drinking purposes in most of the locations (31 wells), while it is suitable for irrigation uses.

  11. Climate change and animals in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joseph B.; Shobrak, Mohammed; Wilms, Thomas M.; Arif, Ibrahim A.; Khan, Haseeb A.

    2011-01-01

    Global warming is occurring at an alarming rate and predictions are that air temperature (Ta) will continue to increase during this century. Increases in Ta as a result of unabated production of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere pose a threat to the distribution and abundance of wildlife populations worldwide. Although all the animals worldwide will likely be affected by global warming, diurnal animals in the deserts will be particularly threatened in the future because Tas are already high, and animals have limited access to water. It is expected that Saudi Arabia will experience a 3–5 °C in Ta over the next century. For predicting the consequences of global warming for animals, it is important to understand how individual species will respond to higher air temperatures. We think that populations will not have sufficient time to make evolutionary adjustments to higher Ta, and therefore they will be forced to alter their distribution patterns, or make phenotypic adjustments in their ability to cope with high Ta. This report examines how increases in Ta might affect body temperature (Tb) in the animals of arid regions. We chose three taxonomic groups, mammals, birds, and reptiles (Arabian oryx, Arabian spiny-tailed lizard, vultures, and hoopoe larks) from Saudi Arabia, an area in which Ta often reaches 45 °C during midday in summer. When Ta exceeds Tb, animals must resort to behavioral and physiological methods to control their Tb; failure to do so results in death. The observations of this study show that in many cases Tb is already close to the upper lethal limit of around 47° C in these species and therefore allowing their Tb to increase as Ta increases are not an option. We conclude that global warming will have a detrimental impact on a wide range of desert animals, but in reality we know little about the ability of most animals to cope with change in Ta. The data presented should serve as base-line information on Tb of animals in the Kingdom for future scientists in Saudi Arabia as they explore the impact of global warming on animal species. PMID:23961171

  12. Climate change and animals in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Williams, Joseph B; Shobrak, Mohammed; Wilms, Thomas M; Arif, Ibrahim A; Khan, Haseeb A

    2012-04-01

    Global warming is occurring at an alarming rate and predictions are that air temperature (T a) will continue to increase during this century. Increases in T a as a result of unabated production of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere pose a threat to the distribution and abundance of wildlife populations worldwide. Although all the animals worldwide will likely be affected by global warming, diurnal animals in the deserts will be particularly threatened in the future because T as are already high, and animals have limited access to water. It is expected that Saudi Arabia will experience a 3-5 °C in T a over the next century. For predicting the consequences of global warming for animals, it is important to understand how individual species will respond to higher air temperatures. We think that populations will not have sufficient time to make evolutionary adjustments to higher T a, and therefore they will be forced to alter their distribution patterns, or make phenotypic adjustments in their ability to cope with high T a. This report examines how increases in T a might affect body temperature (T b) in the animals of arid regions. We chose three taxonomic groups, mammals, birds, and reptiles (Arabian oryx, Arabian spiny-tailed lizard, vultures, and hoopoe larks) from Saudi Arabia, an area in which T a often reaches 45 °C during midday in summer. When T a exceeds T b, animals must resort to behavioral and physiological methods to control their T b; failure to do so results in death. The observations of this study show that in many cases T b is already close to the upper lethal limit of around 47° C in these species and therefore allowing their T b to increase as T a increases are not an option. We conclude that global warming will have a detrimental impact on a wide range of desert animals, but in reality we know little about the ability of most animals to cope with change in T a. The data presented should serve as base-line information on T b of animals in the Kingdom for future scientists in Saudi Arabia as they explore the impact of global warming on animal species. PMID:23961171

  13. Mental health system in Saudi Arabia: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Naseem Akhtar; Al-Habeeb, Abdulhameed Abdullah; Koenig, Harold G

    2013-01-01

    Background There is evidence that mapping mental health systems (MHSs) helps in planning and developing mental health care services for users, families, and other caregivers. The General Administration of Mental Health and Social Services of the Ministry of Health over the past 4 years has sought to streamline the delivery of mental health care services to health consumers in Saudi Arabia. Objective We overview here the outcome of a survey that assessed the Saudi MHS and suggest strategic steps for its further improvement. Method The World Health Organization Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems was used systematically to collect information on the Saudi MHS in 2009–2010, 4 years after a baseline assessment. Results Several mental health care milestones, especially provision of inpatient mental health services supported by a ratified Mental Health Act, were achieved during this period. However, community mental health care services are needed to match international trends evident in developed countries. Similarly, a larger well-trained mental health workforce is needed at all levels to meet the ever-increasing demand of Saudi society. Conclusion This updated MHS information, discussed in light of international data, will help guide further development of the MHS in Saudi Arabia in the future, and other countries in the Eastern Mediterranean region may also benefit from Saudi experience. PMID:23966783

  14. Individualized medicine enabled by genomics in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The biomedical research sector in Saudi Arabia has recently received special attention from the government, which is currently supporting research aimed at improving the understanding and treatment of common diseases afflicting Saudi Arabian society. To build capacity for research and training, a number of centres of excellence were established in different areas of the country. Among these, is the Centre of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR) at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, with its internationally ranked and highly productive team performing translational research in the area of individualized medicine. Here, we present a panorama of the recent trends in different areas of biomedical research in Saudi Arabia drawing from our vision of where genomics will have maximal impact in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We describe advances in a number of research areas including; congenital malformations, infertility, consanguinity and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, cancer and genomic classifications in Saudi Arabia, epigenetic explanations of idiopathic disease, and pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine. We conclude that CEGMR will continue to play a pivotal role in advances in the field of genomics and research in this area is facing a number of challenges including generating high quality control data from Saudi population and policies for using these data need to comply with the international set up. PMID:25951871

  15. Architectural Academic Tourism: Saudi Chronicles or Social Mobility for Women through Architectural Design and Education in Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Jann, Marga

    2014-07-21

    2 ‘Saudization is the national policy of Saudi Arabia to encourage employment of Saudi nationals in the private sector…’ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saudization last accessed 12 June 2014 3 http://www.inquiryintoislam.com/2010/06/what... ‘bedfellows’. Navigating culture shock, rivalry and/or frequent exploitation as part of the acculturation process was often handled by expatriate colleagues through complacency, complicity, silence, ‘playing dumb’, diplomacy, ‘hidden agendas’, and...

  16. The pharmacoeconomic picture in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alkhenizan, Abdullah

    2014-08-01

    Saudi Arabia is the largest country in the region and it is the largest oil producing country in the world. It is one of the few countries in the world which was not affected significantly by the global economic crisis. Health care spending is led mainly by governmental expenditure. Private sector share of the health care services is supported by the government and increasing. The demands for pharmaceutical products, medical devices and health care services is fueled by the rapidly growing population and the wide spread of chronic diseases. Publications and expertise in the field of pharmacoeconomics is scarce within the country. There is an urgent need to establish a national center for pharmacoeconomics to lead the country efforts in controlling the cost of health care services. Such a center is needed to promote pharmacoeconomics research and train health care professionals in this field. PMID:24953076

  17. Education Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaked, Haim

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several cities in Israel have labeled themselves "Education Cities," concentrating on education as their central theme. Employing qualitative techniques, this article aims to describe, define, and conceptualize this phenomenon as it is being realized in three such cities. Findings show that Education Cities differ from…

  18. 76 FR 7152 - ICT Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia; Application Deadline Extended

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ...International Trade Administration ICT Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia; Application Deadline Extended AGENCY: International...Natalia.Susak@trade.gov. U.S. Commercial Service Saudi Arabia Contacts Ahmed Khayyat, Phone:...

  19. 75 FR 56506 - Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia; Application Deadline Extended

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ...Administration Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia; Application Deadline Extended AGENCY: International...Natalia.Susak@trade.gov. U.S. Commercial Service Saudi Arabia Contacts: Mr. Habeeb Saeed, U.S. Commercial...

  20. 78 FR 23625 - Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of Saudi Arabia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of Saudi Arabia Pursuant to Section 7031(b)(3) of the Department...Section 7031(b)(1) of the Act with respect to Saudi Arabia, and I hereby report the waiver of this...

  1. 75 FR 59782 - Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Government of Saudi Arabia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ...Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Government of Saudi Arabia Pursuant to section 7086(c)(2) of the Department...1) of the Act with respect to the Government of Saudi Arabia, and I hereby waive such restriction. This...

  2. 78 FR 56767 - Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of Saudi Arabia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ...Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of Saudi Arabia Pursuant to Section 7031(b)(3) of the Department...provisions of law in prior year Acts with respect to Saudi Arabia, and I hereby waive this restriction. This...

  3. Trajectory Analysis of Saudi Arabian Dust Storms 1 Michael Notaro 3

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Arabian stations along the northern coast of the Red 28 Sea. Across Saudi 1 Trajectory Analysis of Saudi Arabian Dust Storms 1 2 Michael Arabian dust storms, with focus on 15 associated air parcel trajectories

  4. 78 FR 41421 - Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From India, Korea, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Thailand...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ...Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From India, Korea, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, and...materially retarded, by reason of imports from India, Korea, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine,...

  5. Caryospora biarmicusis sp.n. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) infecting falcons from the genus Falco in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alyousif, M S; Alfaleh, F A; Al-Shawa, Y R

    2011-04-01

    The oocysts of Caryospora biarmicusis sp.n. is described from the feces of the lanner falcon, Falco biarmicus, from the falcon market in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia. Sporulated oocysts are ovoid in shape, measuring 40.2 x 34.7 (37.5-42.4 x 32.9-35.7) microm; shape index (L/W) is 1.16 (1.08-1.31) microm. The oocyst wall is smooth and bi-layered. Micropyle and polar granule are absent, but an oocyst residuum is present. Sporocysts are spheroid, 20.1 (18.6-21.3) microm; with a smooth single-layered wall, lacking Stieda body. Sporocyst residuum is present as numerous small granules. Sporozoites are stout with a large single refractile body. PMID:21634236

  6. Periodontal treatment needs among Saudi Arabian adults and their relationship to the use of the Miswak.

    PubMed

    al-Khateeb, T L; O'Mullane, D M; Whelton, H; Sulaiman, M I

    1991-12-01

    The main aims of this study were, first, to estimate the need for periodontal care among adult residents of Saudi Arabia using the community periodontal index of treatment need (CPITN) and, second, to quantify the relationship between the frequency of using the 'Miswak' and the need for periodontal care. The Miswak is a stick made from the roots of the Arak tree (Salvadora persica) and is used for oral hygiene purposes by many cultures. A total sample of 480 adults aged 35 to 44 years and 65 years and older from the cities of Mecca and Jeddah was included in the study. The findings indicate that the level of need for periodontal care in the sample chosen is low when compared with the findings of similar studies undertaken in other countries. The frequent use of the 'Miswak' was associated with a lower need for treatment. PMID:1790476

  7. Occupational stress among paramedical staff working in primary health care centers in Abha, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoneim, Ismail

    2003-01-01

    Occupational stress among paramedical staff in Primary Health care centers was not extensively studied as in medical or hospital nursing staff. The aim of the present study was to reveal the work characteristics in the PHC centers in Abha city, Saudi Arabia, with its stressful hazardous conditions as perceived by the working paramedical staff. The study revealed that this staff is facing heavy workload with low decision and control latitude. This is the most hazardous condition generating stress among working populations. As most of them are foreigners the language barrier compounds the problem. It was noticed however that most of them enjoy good social support from both colleagues and home members that might play a modifying role alleviating stress. This group of workers needs special care and continuous evaluation of mental stress induced by their working conditions. PMID:17219902

  8. EFL Teachers' Perceptions, Evaluations and Expectations about English Language Courses as EFL in Saudi Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liton, Hussain Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this study is to explore EFL teachers' perceptions, evaluations and expectations about English language courses as EFL in Saudi tertiary level. In other words, this article aims at creating a new avenue for effective EFL teaching-learning curriculum techniques and syllabus in the Saudi tertiary context. Saudi universities offer credit…

  9. Promoting Cultural Understanding: The Case of the Saudi Arabian Social Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaklobi, Fahad

    A study investigated the role of the Saudi Arabian social studies curriculum in helping Saudi students to understand other cultures. Analysis of the content of social studies textbooks revealed that they cover a wide range of cultural information related to countries from around the world. Saudi students start their cultural education in grade 5…

  10. A Narrative Inquiry into Academic Experiences of Female Saudi Graduate Students at a Comprehensive Doctoral University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandekian, Robyn E.; Weddington, Michael; Birnbaum, Matthew; Keen, J. Katée

    2015-01-01

    Saudi student enrollment in U.S. colleges and universities has nearly tripled since 2009-2010, in large part due to the King Abdullah Scholarship Program. The representation of Saudi females is also increasing due to the loosening of Saudi Arabia's long-standing restrictions on women's travel and acceptable fields of study and careers. This…

  11. Adsorption of cobalt ions from waste water on activated Saudi clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jlil, Saad A.

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to remove the Cobalt ions from wastewater by three types of Saudi clay. These were collected from Tabbuk city (Tabbuk clay), Khiber city (Khiber clay), and Bahhah city (Bahhah clay). The paper also examined the effect of different activators on the enhancement of adsorption capacity of clays for cobalt ions. The results showed minor enhancement in the adsorption capacities of cobalt ions on three types of clays activated by acid treatment. The adsorption capacity of clays improved particularly for Tabbuk clay when treated with hydrogen peroxide as an activator. The adsorption capacity increased from 3.94 to 12.9 mg/g for the untreated and treated Tabbuk clay, respectively. Also, the adsorption capacity of Bahhah clay increased by activating with sodium chloride from 3.44 to 12.55 mg/g for untreated and treated sample, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption data were correlated using five equilibrium equations, namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, BET, and Toth isotherm equations. Langmuir isotherm agreed well with the experimental data of Khiber and Bahhah clay, while Freundlich model and Langmuir-Freundlich model fitted well with the experimental data of Tabbuk and Bahhah clay activated by NaCl. The results showed that Freundlich model fitted well with the experimental data of Tabbuk clay when activated by H2O2 and H2SO4. Finally, the BET model did not describe the experimental data well for the three types of clay after activation.

  12. The status and prospective of environmental radiation monitoring stations in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Holzheimer, Clous

    2014-09-01

    The use of nuclear technology requires an environmental monitoring program to ensure the safety of the environment, and to protect people from the hazards of radioactive materials, and nuclear accidents. Nuclear accidents are unique, for they incur effects that surpass international frontiers, and can even have a long lasting impact on Earth. Such was the case of the Chernobyl accident in the Ukraine on April 6, 1986. For that purpose, international and national efforts come together to observe for any nuclear or radioactive accident. Many states, including Saudi Arabia which oversees the operation of the National Radiation, Environmental and Early Monitoring Stations, The Radiation Monitoring Stations(RMS's) are currently scattered across 35 cities in the country,. These locations are evaluated based on various technological criteria such as border cities, cities of high population density, wind direction, etc. For new nuclear power plants hovering around, it is strongly recommended to increase the number of radiation monitoring stations to warn against any threat that may arise from a nuclear leak or accident and to improve the performance of the existing RMS's. SARA (Spectroscopic Monitoring Station for air) should be implemented due to the high sensitivity to artificial radiation, automatic isotope identification, free of maintenance, and fully independent due to solar power supply (incl. battery backup) and wireless communication (GPRS).

  13. The status and prospective of environmental radiation monitoring stations in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Holzheimer, Clous

    2014-09-30

    The use of nuclear technology requires an environmental monitoring program to ensure the safety of the environment, and to protect people from the hazards of radioactive materials, and nuclear accidents. Nuclear accidents are unique, for they incur effects that surpass international frontiers, and can even have a long lasting impact on Earth. Such was the case of the Chernobyl accident in the Ukraine on April 6, 1986. For that purpose, international and national efforts come together to observe for any nuclear or radioactive accident. Many states, including Saudi Arabia which oversees the operation of the National Radiation, Environmental and Early Monitoring Stations, The Radiation Monitoring Stations(RMS’s) are currently scattered across 35 cities in the country,. These locations are evaluated based on various technological criteria such as border cities, cities of high population density, wind direction, etc. For new nuclear power plants hovering around, it is strongly recommended to increase the number of radiation monitoring stations to warn against any threat that may arise from a nuclear leak or accident and to improve the performance of the existing RMS’s. SARA (Spectroscopic Monitoring Station for air) should be implemented due to the high sensitivity to artificial radiation, automatic isotope identification, free of maintenance, and fully independent due to solar power supply (incl. battery backup) and wireless communication (GPRS)

  14. Characterictics and Sources of Organic Tracers in Atmospheric Particulate Matter from the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushdi, A. I.; El-Mubarak, A. H.; Luis, L.; Mubarak, A. T.; Qurban, M.; Al-Mutlaq, K. F.; Simoneit, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    The formation and sources of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) can affect air quality of metropolitan areas as well as climate change. Their chemical components can be toxic to humans and hazardous to the environment. Saudi Arabia is witnessing new development and industrial activities, which are expected to contribute to natural, regional and anthropogenic PM inputs of organic tracers. This work investigates the characteristics and sources of the extractable organic matter (EOM) in atmospheric suspended PM from the city of Dhahran in the eastern part of Saudi Arabia. The major compounds were an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of branched and cyclic hydrocarbons (12-70% of EOM), plasticizers (7-30% of EOM for aryl phosphates and 4-18% of EOM for phthalates), n-alkanes (3-15% of EOM), hopane biomarkers (0.1-4.2% of EOM), n-alkanones (0.3-1.7% of EOM), PAHs (0.1-0.6% of EOM), sterane biomarkers (0.0-0.1% of EOM), and sterols (0.0-0.1% of EOM). Plasticizers are evidently major compounds (11- 48% of EOM) in the suspended PM of Dhahran, which likely have serious public health effects and environmental consequences. The major sources of these organic tracers are emissions from industrial factories north of the city, plastics and biomass burning, and petroleum product combustion.

  15. The VORISA Project: An Integrated Approach to Assessing Volcanic Hazard and Risk in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, J. M.; Moufti, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has numerous large monogenetic volcanic fields, known locally as 'Harrat'. The largest of these, Harrat Rahat, produced a basaltic fissure eruption in 1256 AD with lava flows travelling within 20 km of the Islamic holy city Al-Madinah. With over 900 visible basaltic and trachytic vents and periodic seismic swarms indicating stalled eruptions, an understanding of the risk of future eruptions in this volcanic field is vital. To systematically address this need we developed the Volcanic Risk in Saudi Arabia (VORISA) Project, a 3-year, multi-disciplinary international research collaboration that integrates geological, geophysical, hazard and risk studies. Detailed mapping and geochemical studies are being combined with new and existing age determinations to determine the style and sequence of events during past basaltic and trachytic eruptions. Data from gravity and magnetotelluric surveys are being integrated with microearthquake data from an 8-station borehole seismic research array to geophysically characterise the structure and nature of the crust, and thus constrain possible physical controls on magma propagation. All available data are being synthesised in hazard models to determine patterns in eruption frequency, magnitude, and style of past activity, as well as the probable location and style of a future event. Combined with geospatial vulnerability data, these hazard models, which include a reconstruction of the 1256 AD eruption, enable us to calculate and communicate volcanic risk to the city of Al-Madinah.

  16. Birth prevalence of non-syndromic orofacial clefts in Saudi Arabia and the effects of parental consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Heba J.; Innes, Nicola P.; Sallout, Bahauddin I.; Alamoudi, Najlaa M.; Hamdan, Mustafa A.; Alhamlan, Nasir; Al-Khozami, Amaal I.; Abdulhameed, Fatma D.; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.; Mossey, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the characteristics and prevalence of non-syndromic orofacial clefting (NSOFC) and assess the effects of parental consanguinity on NSOFC phenotypes in the 3 main cities of Saudi Arabia. Methods: All infants (114,035) born at 3 referral centers in Riyadh, and 6 hospitals in Jeddah and Madinah between January 2010 and December 2011 were screened. The NSOFC cases (n=133) were identified and data was collected through clinical examination and records, and information on consanguinity through parent interviews. The diagnosis was confirmed by reviewing medical records and contacting the infants’ pediatricians. Control infants (n=233) matched for gender and born in the same hospitals during the same period, were selected. Results: The prevalence of NSOFC was 1.07/1000 births in Riyadh, and 1.17/1000 births overall; cleft lip (CL) was 0.47/1000 births, cleft lip and palate (CLP) was 0.42/1000 births, and cleft palate (CP) was 0.28/1000 births. Cleft palate was significantly associated with consanguinity (p=0.047, odds ratio: 2.5, 95% confidence interval: 1 to 6.46), particularly for first cousin marriages. Conclusion: The birth prevalence of NSOFC in Riyadh alone, and in the 3 main cities of Saudi Arabia were marginally lower than the mean global prevalence. While birth prevalence for CLP was comparable to global figures, the CL:CLP ratio was high, and only CP was significantly associated with consanguinity. PMID:26318465

  17. Isotopic composition of Riyadh rainfall, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, Nils; Reshid, Mustefa; Siebert, Christian; Schulz, Stephan; Rausch, Randolf; Knöller, Kay; Weise, Stephan; Al-Saud, Mohammed; Schüth, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Arid countries like Saudi Arabia often depend on fossil groundwater. Hence, thorough studies of the available resources are crucial. In the course of such investigations, analyses of ?18O and ?D are frequently applied to constrain the provenance of the waters and to reconstruct the (paleo)climatic conditions during their recharge. Yet, to be able to evaluate the isotopic signature of the groundwater, one also has to know the isotopic composition of current precipitation. Although a few rain water analyses are available for Central Saudi Arabia in the literature - mostly in unpublished consultant reports - a Local Meteoric Water Line has never been established. To complement the available data, 28 rain events occurring in Riyadh between 2009 and 2013 were studied for their stable isotope composition. Samples were collected as integral samples, i.e., they represent the entire precipitation event. Moreover, one event was sampled several times, aiming at an evaluation of intra-storm variability. During selected storms, a grab sample was taken for 3H analysis. The event samples showed ?18O and ?D values scattering between -6.5 and +9.5 and between -30 and +50 ‰ V-SMOW, respectively. In the course of the event that was sequentially sampled, a proceeding isotopic depletion was observed with respect to both isotopes. The relatively large ranges of ?-values for 18O and D of approximately 7 and 38 ‰ V-SMOW highlight the general need for integral sampling. The obtained grab samples are characterized by moderate 3H concentrations of a few Tritium Units. Further results will be presented and discussed in view of associated weather data (e.g. rain amount and temperature) and the probable moisture sources derived from back-trajectories, which were calculated using HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model; Draxler & Rolph, 2003). References Draxler, R.R. & Rolph, G.D. (2013): HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) Model, access via NOAA ARL READY Website (http://www.arl.noaa.gov/HYSPLIT.php). NOAA Air Resources Laboratory, College Park, MD.

  18. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia cover about 90,000 kin2, one of the largest areas of alkali olivine basalt in the world. These volcanic rocks are in 13 separate fields near the eastern coast of the Red Sea and in the western Arabian Peninsula highlands from Syria southward to the Yemen Arab Republic. The initial phase of rifting of the Arabian Plate from the African Plate began as a wide zone of continental-crust extension manifested by basin and range topography. Freshwater lakes, northwest-trending marine gulfs, and alkali olivine basalt flows occupied these basins. Extensive dike swarms intruded parallel to the proto-Red Sea and marked the first phase of new mafic crust formed by volcanic processes. After a hiatus in volcanic activity, counterclockwise rotation of the Arabian Plate during middle Miocene time changed the stress pattern in the plate and a second phase of extrusion of alkali olivine basalt commenced along north-trending fractures. This stress pattern continues to influence Holocene volcanism. The earliest (pre-uplift) basalts to erupt on the Arabian Plate were predominantly under saturated picrite and ankaramite, whereas those to erupt near the axis of the proto-Red Sea rift zone were tholeiite. The within-plate volcanic rocks evolved from picrite-ankaramite to alkali olivine basalt with minor volumes of fractionated, under-saturated felsic rocks. Continued crustal thinning and dike intrusion along the proto-Red Sea were accompanied by melting of the continental crust to produce silicic magma as part of a bimodal volcanic suite (tholeiite-rhyolite). These magmas were emplaced as dikes, sills, layered bodies, and flows that mark the early construction of the Red Sea crust. Second-phase lavas are predominantly fractionated hawaiites and alkali olivine basalts. Because under saturated and oversaturated silicic magmas represent the second phase of activity, both fractional crystallization of the basaltic magma and melting of the crust are believed to have occurred. The historical record of volcanic activity in Saudi Arabia suggests that volcanism is dormant. The harrats should be evaluated for their potential as volcanic hazards and as sources of geothermal energy. The volcanic rocks are natural traps for groundwater ; thus water resources for agriculture may be significant and should be investigated.

  19. Tensile city

    E-print Network

    Chakkour, Mario Henri

    1987-01-01

    Tensile City is a story that provides the answer to the following question: II If we were to leap forward in time and visit a city of the future, what would learn about our contemporary city ? II The story unfolds when ...

  20. Lifestyle and Dietary Behaviors among Saudi Preschool Children Attending Primary Health Care Centers, Eastern Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Magdy A; Al-Saif, Ghadeer; Albahrani, Suha; Sabra, Amr A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study life styles and dietary behaviors among Saudi preschool children (1-5 years) attending primary health care centers (PHCCs) in Dammam and Qatif areas, eastern province, Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study. Data were collected using structured, interviewer-filled questionnaire. Children and their mothers were encountered during their well-baby clinic visits. A total number of 300 preschool children and their mothers were interviewed during study period. Results. Unsatisfactory areas include smoking fathers (32%), smoking in front of children (11.3%), overweight and obesity among mothers (60.3%), noncompliance using seat belts for both parents (56.3%) and children (68%), children watching television (T.V) more than 2 hours (50%), adherence to exclusive breast feeding (only 20.7%), and late solid food introduction (65.3%). Frequent intake of unhealthy food items was 26%, 25%, and 24% for pizza, burger, and soft drinks. Unfortunately frequent intake of the following unhealthy food items was high: biscuits, deserts/chocolates, and chips which was 78%, 67%, and 72%, respectively. Conclusion. This study provides benchmark about the current situation. It provides health care workers and decision makers with important information that may help to improve health services. PMID:25114804

  1. Lifestyle and Dietary Behaviors among Saudi Preschool Children Attending Primary Health Care Centers, Eastern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Magdy A.; Al-Saif, Ghadeer; Albahrani, Suha; Sabra, Amr A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study life styles and dietary behaviors among Saudi preschool children (1–5 years) attending primary health care centers (PHCCs) in Dammam and Qatif areas, eastern province, Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study. Data were collected using structured, interviewer-filled questionnaire. Children and their mothers were encountered during their well-baby clinic visits. A total number of 300 preschool children and their mothers were interviewed during study period. Results. Unsatisfactory areas include smoking fathers (32%), smoking in front of children (11.3%), overweight and obesity among mothers (60.3%), noncompliance using seat belts for both parents (56.3%) and children (68%), children watching television (T.V) more than 2 hours (50%), adherence to exclusive breast feeding (only 20.7%), and late solid food introduction (65.3%). Frequent intake of unhealthy food items was 26%, 25%, and 24% for pizza, burger, and soft drinks. Unfortunately frequent intake of the following unhealthy food items was high: biscuits, deserts/chocolates, and chips which was 78%, 67%, and 72%, respectively. Conclusion. This study provides benchmark about the current situation. It provides health care workers and decision makers with important information that may help to improve health services. PMID:25114804

  2. Naegeli-Franceschetti-Jadassohn syndrome in a Saudi Arabian family.

    PubMed

    Tubaigy, Salah M; Hassan, H M

    2014-03-01

    In the course of applying to become a soldier, a 23-year-old Saudi Arabian man was found to have no fingerprints. Further medical examination has been carried out for the young man and for the rest of family members including two sisters, mother, and brothers except the father who had died sometime previously. Subsequent medical investigations suggested that he and his two brothers displayed most of the features of the Naegeli-Franceschetti-Jadassohn (NFJ) syndrome. These features included skin changes with hypo- and hyperpigmentation, hypohidrosis, dystrophy of the nails, diffuse thickening of the palms and feet, a lack of fingerprints (dermatoglyphics), and atrophic changes in the skin of the face; there were also dental anomalies. A typical feature of the Naegeli-Franceschetti-Jadassohn syndrome was found in a Saudi Arabian family. The aim of this study was to present this rare condition affecting a Saudi Arabian family and review the current literature on the subject. PMID:24261749

  3. Nurses' willingness to report medication administration errors in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Almutary, Hayfa H; Lewis, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Reporting of medication administration errors (MAEs) is one means by which health care facilities monitor their practice in an attempt to maintain the safest patient environment. This study examined the likelihood of registered nurses (RNs) reporting MAEs when working in Saudi Arabia. It also attempted to identify potential barriers in the reporting of MAE. This study found that 63% of RNs raised concerns about reporting of MAEs in Saudi Arabia-nursing administration was the largest impediment affecting nurses' willingness to report MAEs. Changing attitude to a non-blame system and implementation of anonymous reporting systems may encourage a greater reporting of MAEs. PMID:22722518

  4. Aerosols and water vapor dynamics over the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, Ashraf; El-Askary, Hesham; Al-Shaibani, Abdulaziz; Dogan, Umran

    2014-05-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia contains a vast desert area and the home of some of the largest deserts worldwide. This nature subjects the area to numerous dust storms. This is in addition to local emissions transported from industrial activities. The Arabian Peninsula dust storms have a major impact on air quality and affects dust cycle around the world. The nature of dust also affects air, ground traffics, and human health. Aerosols play a pivotal role in global climate change through their effects on the hydrological cycle and solar energy budget. Recently there have been some trials to study the nature of dust over the kingdom using satellite remote sensing and modeling to investigate the impact of aerosols of natural and anthropogenic origins from both local emissions and long-range transport on the air quality and atmospheric composition, yet a lot more needs to be done. In this study, data obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board of Terra and Aqua satellites are used to analyze aerosols properties over the thirteen provinces of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from April 2003 to January 2012. This analysis will help to characterize aerosol and cloud properties, and the seasonal hydrological factors to establish the relative contributions of aerosols derived from different regions to the different Saudi provinces and their impacts on local atmospheric composition and air quality. During this period, we have examined possible nature and anthropogenic/natural aerosols/dust sources. The analysis is based on important parameters including the aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine mode fraction (FMF), cloud properties including cloud top temperature (CTT), cloud top pressure (CTP) and the water vapor column. Correlation between water vapor and AOD was observed over three provinces which could be a result of pollution aerosols rather than dust and is, hence, acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Increasing anomalous aerosols pattern over 2010-2012 is also observed. Acknowledgement The authors would like to acknowledge the support provided by the King Abdel Aziz City for Science & Technology (KACST) for funding this work under grant No. (MT-110-010). The support provided by the Deanship of Research at King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals (KFUPM) is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ESR1) Gene Polymorphisms in Pre-eclamptic Saudi Patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Beshbishy, Hesham A.; Tawfeek, Manal A.; Al-Azhary, Nevin M.; Mariah, Reham A.; Habib, Fawzia A.; Aljayar, Lamya; Alahmadi, Abrar F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Pre-eclampsia causes maternal mortality worldwide. Estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) gene polymorphisms were responsible for cardiovascular diseases. This case control study was conducted to investigate whether 2 polymorphic genes of ESR1 are associated with pre-eclampsia among Saudi women in Madina city, Saudi Arabia. Methods: Blood samples from 97 pre-eclamptic and 94 healthy pregnant women were analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction method. All the subjects were recruited randomly from outpatient clinics of Madina Maternity Children Hospital (MMCH), Madina, Saudi Arabia, between Dec. 2012 and Jan. 2014. Results: There was no association between pre-eclampsia and PvuII and XbaI ESR1 gene polymorphisms individually. TT/AA and TT/AG genotype combination existed significantly in pre-eclamptic patients compared to control. The frequency of PvuII and XbaI combined TT/AA genotypes between pre-eclamptic women was 36.1% vs 9.6%, however, frequency of PvuII and XbaI combined TT/AG genotypes between pre-eclamptic women was 3.1% vs 17%, compared to control. The homozygous T-A haplotype carriers showed high pre-eclampsia risk, independent of pregnancy, BMI and smoking status (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 3.26, 95% confidence interval (CI):1.71-9.21). The heterozygous T-A haplotype carriers did not differ from that of non-carriers (adjusted OR: 1.12, 95% CI: 0.47-2.75). No association was observed between pre-eclampsia and T-G, C-G and C-A haplotype of PvuII and XbaIESR1 gene polymorphisms. Conclusions: T-A haplotype of homozygous associated with pre eclampsia not heterozygous carriers of ESR 1 PvuII and XbaI gene polymorphisms elicited high risk of pre-eclampsia. GG genotype of XbaI polymorphism decreased pre-eclampsia risk. Further studies using larger sample size are recommended to investigate the ESR 1 gene polymorphisms associated with pre-eclampsia. PMID:26430422

  6. Analysis of the Impact of Major Dust Events on the Aerosols Characteristics over Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, Ashraf; El-Askary, Hesham; Al-Shaibani, Abdulaziz; Hariri, Mustafa M.

    2015-04-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a major source of atmospheric dust. Frequent dust storms blow up and significantly affect human activities, airports and citizens' health. Aerosols optical and physical characteristics are influenced by major dust storms outbreaks. In this, paper, ground based AERONET measurements are integrated with space-borne sensors, namely MODIS and CALIPSO to analyze aerosols' characteristics during March - May of 2009 where a massive dust storm blew up and caused a widespread heavy atmospheric dust load over Saudi Arabia and the same period during 2010, where less dust activities were reported. The MODIS Deep Blue AOD analysis showed similar aerosols pattern over the land, however a substantial variance in aerosol loading during March - May 2009 compared with the same period in 2010 was observed. The angstrom exponent analysis showed that the majority of aerosol measurements in 2009 and 2010 are dominated by coarse-mode particles with angstrom exponent < 0.5. Detailed analysis of aerosol optical properties shows significant influence of coarse mode particles in the enhanced aerosol loading in 2009. The volume depolarization rations (VDR) derived from CALIPSO backscattering measurements is used to find latitudinal profile of mean aerosol optical depth to indicate the type of particles and to discriminate spherical aerosols with non-spherical particles. Acknowledgement The authors would like to acknowledge the support provided by the King Abdel Aziz City for Science & Technology (KACST) for funding this work under grant No. (MT-32-76). The support provided by the Deanship of Research at King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals (KFUPM) is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Geomatics Education in Saudi Arabia: Status, Challenges and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aina, Yusuf Adedoyin

    2009-01-01

    Geospatial technology has been identified as one of the three most important emerging fields along with nanotechnology and biotechnology. The application of the technology is expected to grow and become more diversified in the coming years. In Saudi Arabia, the utilization of geotechnology is growing but still limited compared to the Western…

  8. Novel Gentic Variations Contributing to Asthma Susceptability in Saudi Arabia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-13

    Collection of Clinical Data That Will be Used in This Study and Will Form a Data Bank for Asthma in Saudi Arabia; Identify Known and NOVEL Genetic Risk Factors Contributing to Asthma Susceptibility; Study the Mechanistic Roles of the Genetic Variants Within Major Asthma Susceptibility Genes

  9. Exploring Pedagogical Leadership in Early Years Education in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alameen, Lubna; Male, Trevor; Palaiologou, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    The empirical research for this paper was undertaken with leaders of early years setting in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The investigation sought to establish to what extent it was possible to behave in line with the concept of pedagogical leadership in the twenty-first century in an Arab Muslim monarchy, dominated by Islam, where directive…

  10. University Teacher Educators' Research Engagement: Perspectives from Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borg, Simon; Alshumaimeri, Yousif

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines university teacher educators' engagement with and in educational research. Survey results collected from eighty-two teacher educators at a leading university in Saudi Arabia pointed to modest levels of research activity and also suggested that these individuals held largely technical views of what research is. Their assessments…

  11. Islam's Point of View on Women's Education in Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hariri, Rafeda

    1987-01-01

    Shows links between Islamic doctrine and girls' education in Saudi Arabia providing examples of ways in which the Islamic attitude towards women and social life is applied to educational policy. Summarizes educational opportunities available for girls and women and notes milestones in the 26-year history of girls' education. (JHZ)

  12. Pre-Vocational Preparation in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifton P.

    In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, with few exceptions, occupational specialization programs for male students first become available at the secondary level (grades 10-12). Education is not compulsory, and substantial numbers drop out at all levels. Adolescents who leave school at the primary (elementary) or intermediate (grades 7-9) level must wait…

  13. Observations on Word Order in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprenger, Kristen; Mathur, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the syntactic level of the grammar of Saudi Arabian Sign Language by exploring some word orders that occur in personal narratives in the language. Word order is one of the main ways in which languages indicate the main syntactic roles of subjects, verbs, and objects; others are verbal agreement and nominal case morphology.…

  14. On Selected Phonological Patterns in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomita, Nozomi; Kozak, Viola

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on two selected phonological patterns that appear unique to Saudi Arabian Sign Language (SASL). For both sections of this paper, the overall methodology is the same as that discussed in Stephen and Mathur (this volume), with some additional modifications tailored to the specific studies discussed here, which will be expanded…

  15. Selected Lexical Patterns in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Lesa; Palmer, Jeffrey Levi; Reynolds, Wanette

    2012-01-01

    This combined paper will focus on the description of two selected lexical patterns in Saudi Arabian Sign Language (SASL): metaphor and metonymy in emotion-related signs (Young) and lexicalization patterns of objects and their derivational roots (Palmer and Reynolds). The over-arcing methodology used by both studies is detailed in Stephen and…

  16. On Selected Morphemes in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Carla; Schneider, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Following a year of study of Saudi Arabian Sign Language (SASL), we are documenting our findings to provide a grammatical sketch of the language. This paper represents one part of that endeavor and focuses on a description of selected morphemes, both manual and non-manual, that have appeared in the course of data collection. While some of the…

  17. Controversial and Challenging Concerns Regarding Status of Saudi Preschool Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gahwaji, Nahla

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the geographical, religious, economical, cultural, and educational contexts as they not only influence the status of Saudi preschool teachers but also have shaped early childhood teaching career. It aims to capture and present teachers' subjective experiences as members of the profession through semi-structured interviews to…

  18. Investigating Difficulties of Learning Computer Programming in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alakeel, Ali M.

    2015-01-01

    Learning computer programming is one of the main requirements of many educational study plans in higher education. Research has shown that many students face difficulties acquiring reasonable programming skills during their first year of college. In Saudi Arabia, there are twenty-three state-owned universities scattered around the country that…

  19. The Teacher of English: Pedagogic Relevance in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Intakhab Alam

    2011-01-01

    The present paper attempts to explore the characteristics of an effective teacher of English. Some related factors such as qualification, attributes, roles, and professional ethics have also been dealt with. In Saudi Arabia, the teacher of English plays the most important role in the process of teaching/learning. There are so many factors such as…

  20. Developing a Career Resource for College Students in Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shatkin, Laurence; Atiyeh, Naim

    With the development of Career Oasis, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM ) has pioneered the use of computer-based career guidance in Saudi Arabia. KFUPM contracted with Verbal Media, LLC, an American consulting company, to create a resource that would be available in both Arabic and English, in both online and paper-and-pencil…

  1. 75 FR 54300 - Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... International Trade Administration Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia AGENCY: International Trade... spending to upgrade the country's IT and communications infrastructure. Additionally, the government's... infrastructure projects will also stimulate growth in the ICT sector. Other major factors that will influence...

  2. KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Basic Properties of Reservoir Rocks By Dr. Sidqi A. Abu-Khamsin Professor, Department of Petroleum Engineering © Copyright by Dr. INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 The nature of petroleum 1 1.2 The petroleum reservoir 1 1.3 Significance of rock properties

  3. Large eruption complex odontome in a Saudi patient.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khalid A

    2015-02-01

    Odontomas are odontogenic tumors formed of various dental tissues. They are classified into: central odontomas that are common, eruption odontomas that are rare with only 23 cases reported to date, and peripheral odontomas that are also rare. We present a case of a large complex eruption odontome in a 24-year-old Saudi male.  PMID:25719590

  4. Developing Training Skills: A Saudi Arabian Modular Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shears, Arthur E.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a three-week modular course on training methods that was prepared and run for technical instructors at a telecommunications training institute in Saudi Arabia. Course objectives are reviewed, a tool for identifying the training needs of trainers is discussed, and training development guidelines are described. (Author/LRW)

  5. Saudi Arabian Teachers' Knowledge and Beliefs about ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abed, Mohaned; Pearson, Susan; Clarke, Paula; Chambers, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is considered one of the most frequently diagnosed psychiatric childhood disorders. It affects 3-7% of school-aged children, interfering with their academic performance and social interactions. This study explored the knowledge and beliefs of teachers in Saudi Arabia about children with ADHD. The…

  6. Aetiology of Neonatal Septicaemia in Qatif, Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbashier, Ali M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Of the 1,797 babies admitted to a hospital in Saudi Arabia over a 3-year period, 8% were documented as having NNS. Identified several gram-positive bacteria, several gram-negative bacteria, and candida albicans as etiological agents in the cases of NNS. Determined the antibiotic susceptibility of the bacteria. (BC)

  7. King Fahd University of Petroleum & Dhahran -Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Almulhem, Ahmad

    King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Dhahran - Saudi Arabia Faculty Promotion Regulations in recognition of their academic accomplishments and achievements. King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals effectively in addition to his other responsibilities. The following criteria are to be used in the evaluation

  8. Religious Fundamentalism among Young Muslims in Egypt and Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moaddel, Mansoor; Karabenick, Stuart A.

    2008-01-01

    Religious fundamentalism is conceived as a distinctive set of beliefs and attitudes toward one's religion, including obedience to religious norms, belief in the universality and immutability of its principles, the validity of its claims, and its indispensability for human happiness. Surveys of Egyptian and Saudi youth, ages 18-25, reveal that…

  9. Education and the Satellite: Possibilities for Saudi Arabia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Sharhan, Jamal

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of developments in satellite communications and educational applications focuses on the possibilities of adapting satellite technology for instruction in developing countries. Topics include satellite use in Australia and the United States; and recommendations for the adoption of satellite technology in Saudi Arabia. (Author/LRW)

  10. Special Education in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nader, Anita

    A Study was conducted to investigate education for the handicapped in Saudi Arabian schools. The rationale for special education, the infrastructure, and student population were analyzed. Services were found to be available for the physically handicapped and mentally retarded. Findings also indicated that in the implementation of special…

  11. version 25Apr11b From Saudi Arabia to Venezuela

    E-print Network

    O'Donnell, Tom

    SYLLABUS version 25Apr11b From Saudi Arabia to Venezuela: Energy Resources, Market Factors Blogs: 1. Global Fracking http://globalfracking.blogspot.com/ 2. Middle East and North African Oil http. They will understand the natural-resource and political-economic constraints underlying contemporary energy geo

  12. Sensory processing dysfunction among Saudi children with and without autism

    PubMed Central

    Al-Heizan, Mohammed O.; AlAbdulwahab, Sami S; Kachanathu, Shaji John; Natho, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] There is a dearth of studies that have examined the occurrence of sensory processing dysfunction and its components in Saudi Arabian children with autism. Therefore, this study investigated the manifestation of sensory processing dysfunction in autism and compared the functional components of sensory processing between Saudi Arabian children with and without autism. [Subjects and Methods] A convenience sample of 46 Saudi Arabian children with autism and 30 children without autism participated in this study. The sensory processing functions of both groups were assessed with the Short Sensory Profile. [Results] The overall findings indicated that 84.8% of children with autism demonstrated definite sensory processing dysfunction. The most prevalent sensory processing dysfunctions involved the under-responsive/seeks sensation (89.13%), auditory filtering (73.90%), and tactile sensitivity (60.87%) domains. Most of the children without autism (66.66%) demonstrated typical sensory function; the most prevalent sensory processing dysfunctions involved the tactile sensitivity (33.3%), under-responsive/seeks sensation (23.33%), and movement sensitivity (20%) domains. [Conclusion] Saudi Arabian children with and without autism have clinically significant sensory dysfunctions. However, the prevalence of those sensory dysfunctions in children with autism is significantly higher than in the children without autism. PMID:26157208

  13. Sensory processing dysfunction among Saudi children with and without autism.

    PubMed

    Al-Heizan, Mohammed O; AlAbdulwahab, Sami S; Kachanathu, Shaji John; Natho, Mohan

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] There is a dearth of studies that have examined the occurrence of sensory processing dysfunction and its components in Saudi Arabian children with autism. Therefore, this study investigated the manifestation of sensory processing dysfunction in autism and compared the functional components of sensory processing between Saudi Arabian children with and without autism. [Subjects and Methods] A convenience sample of 46 Saudi Arabian children with autism and 30 children without autism participated in this study. The sensory processing functions of both groups were assessed with the Short Sensory Profile. [Results] The overall findings indicated that 84.8% of children with autism demonstrated definite sensory processing dysfunction. The most prevalent sensory processing dysfunctions involved the under-responsive/seeks sensation (89.13%), auditory filtering (73.90%), and tactile sensitivity (60.87%) domains. Most of the children without autism (66.66%) demonstrated typical sensory function; the most prevalent sensory processing dysfunctions involved the tactile sensitivity (33.3%), under-responsive/seeks sensation (23.33%), and movement sensitivity (20%) domains. [Conclusion] Saudi Arabian children with and without autism have clinically significant sensory dysfunctions. However, the prevalence of those sensory dysfunctions in children with autism is significantly higher than in the children without autism. PMID:26157208

  14. This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2005 SPE Technical Symposium of Saudi Arabia Section held in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, 14-16 May 2005.

    E-print Network

    Al-Majed, Abdulaziz Abdullah

    This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2005 SPE Technical Symposium of Saudi Arabia Section held in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, 14-16 May 2005. This paper was selected for presentation by the author(s). Contents of the paper, as presented, have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum

  15. Numerical simulation diagnostics of a flash flood event in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samman, Ahmad

    On 26 January 2011, a severe storm hit the city of Jeddah, the second largest city in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The storm resulted in heavy rainfall, which produced a flash flood in a short period of time. This event caused at least eleven fatalities and more than 114 injuries. Unfortunately, the observed rainfall data are limited to the weather station at King Abdul Aziz International airport, which is north of the city, while the most extreme precipitation occurred over the southern part of the city. This observation was useful to compare simulation result even though it does not reflect the severity of the event. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) developed at Colorado State University was used to study this storm event. RAMS simulations indicted that a quasi-stationary Mesoscale convective system developed over the city of Jeddah and lasted for several hours. It was the source of the huge amount of rainfall. The model computed a total rainfall of more than 110 mm in the southern part of the city, where the flash flood occurred. This precipitation estimation was confirmed by the actual observation of the weather radar. While the annual rainfall in Jeddah during the winter varies from 50 to 100 mm, the amount of the rainfall resulting from this storm event exceeded the climatological total annual rainfall. The simulation of this event showed that warm sea surface temperature, combined with high humidity in the lower atmosphere and a large amount of convective available potential energy (CAPE) provided a favorable environment for convection. It also showed the presence of a cyclonic system over the north and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, and a subtropical anti-cyclone over Northeastern Africa that contributed to cold air advection bringing cold air to the Jeddah area. In addition, an anti-cyclone (blocking) centered over east and southeastern parts of the Arabian Peninsula and the Arabian Sea produced a low level jet over the southern part of the Red Sea, which transported large water vapor amounts over Jeddah. The simulation results showed that the main driver behind the storm was the interaction between these systems over the city of Jeddah (an urban heat island) that produced strong low-level convergence. Several sensitivity experiments were carried out showed that other variables could have contributed to storm severity as well. Those sensitivity experiments included several simulations in which the following variables were changed: physiographic properties were altered by removing the water surfaces, removing the urban heat island environment from the model, and changing the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei. The results of these sensitivity experiments showed that these properties have significant effects on the storm formation and severity.

  16. 76 FR 77977 - U.S. Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia Riyadh and Dhahran, Saudi...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... petroleum-generated power; as a result it is both developing alternative energy sources, principally nuclear... International Trade Administration U.S. Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia Riyadh... (MAS) units are organizing an Executive-Led Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency Trade Mission to...

  17. Determination of seropositivity for Toxoplasma gondii in sheep, goats and camels slaughtered for food and human consumptions in Riyadh municipal abattoirs, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Abdullah D

    2013-12-01

    Serum samples from 891 sheep, 555 goats and 182 camels slaughtered for food and human consumption from three main municipal abattoirs in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia were tested for antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii by the an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 36.4% (325/891) sheep and 35.3% (196/555) goats and 23.6% (43/182) camels, at a dilution of 1:32 or more for goats and sheep and 1:64 or more for camels. There was no significant difference in infection between sheep, goats and camels in Riyadh City (P>0.05). The results indicated that T. gondii antibodies were wide-spread in the animal populations for human consumption and welfare, and that toxoplasmosis is a widely spread zoonotic infection in Riyadh City. PMID:24640857

  18. Atypical Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this creative challenge, Surrealism and one-point perspective combine to produce images that not only go "beyond the real" but also beyond the ubiquitous "imaginary city" assignment often used to teach one-point perspective. Perhaps the difference is that in the "atypical cities challenge," an understanding of one-point perspective is a means…

  19. Mexico City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... Mexico City has one of the world's most serious air pollution problems. The city is located atop a high plain at an altitude of ... as the orange and red areas, and mountainous areas appear light blue and green. The position of the clouds within the 70-degree image are ...

  20. From barriers to bridges: An investigation on Saudi student mobility (2006-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denman, Brian D.; Hilal, Kholoud T.

    2011-08-01

    Globalisation is often thought to advocate for a single set of beliefs and customs and for a rejection of the need to protect regional cultures and traditions. In the aftermath of 9/11, the rift between Western and Arab cultures has deepened, and there is a patent need for cultural bridges to be built. The government of Saudi Arabia has, by increasing funding for higher education through grants and scholarships, enabled Saudi students to study at overseas universities. A number of non-Saudi students are also enrolled at Saudi Arabian universities. After a brief introduction to the cultural and educational history of the Arab region and Saudi identity, this article turns to contemporary higher education in Saudi Arabia. It introduces the King Abdullah Scholarship Programme and then goes on to present detailed enrolment data for 2006-2009, demonstrating trends and policy changes and identifying patterns in student mobility.

  1. Frequency distribution of sickle cell anemia, sickle cell trait and sickle/beta-thalassemia among anemic patients in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Elsayid, Mohieldin; Al-Shehri, Mohammed Jahman; Alkulaibi, Yasser Abdullah; Alanazi, Abdullah; Qureshi, Shoeb

    2015-01-01

    Background: Notwithstanding, the growing incidence of sickle cell hemoglobinopathies (SCH) such as sickle cell anemia (SCA) or sickle cell disease, sickle/beta-thalassemia; the exact prevalence remains obscure in Saudi Arabia. Hence, this study is an attempt to determine the frequency of SCA and sickle cell trait (SCT) among all anemic patients with SCH treated at the King Abdul-Aziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Furthermore, the hemoglobin (Hb) S and other Hb patterns (Hb AS and Hb F) were also estimated in SCA and SCT patients. Materials and Methods: Results of Hb capillary electrophoresis performed on all patients with SCH from January 2011 to December 2013 were evaluated retrospectively. Results: Of a total of 3332 patient data analyzed, 307 were anemic patients (58% males and 42% females) with SCH. The sickling test showed all the patients to be positive. Hb electrophoresis revealed the incidence of 96.7%, 3.3%, and 0% of the patients suffered from SCA, SCT and sickle/beta-thalassemia, respectively. Patients with SCA had a higher level of Hb F and showed no crisis when compared with other SCA patients who had lower or no Hb F levels. Conclusion: SCA is relatively frequent among males (56.4%) than females out of all patients with SCH. The SCA incidence was more common (48.5%) among children, frequency of SCT among adult age group was 1.6%, while sickle/beta-thalassemia was 0%. PMID:26604627

  2. Environmental, urinary iodine status and prevalence of goitre among schoolchildren in a high altitude area of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohamed Salah; El-Sayed Desouky, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the iodine deficiency, prevalence of goitre among schoolchildren and measuring environmental iodine in Taif city, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional multistage cluster-sampling methodology was done on 1887 schoolchildren. Their urinary iodine concentration (UIC) and goitre prevalence was assessed. Blood level of triiodothyronin, thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating-hormone was carried out for students with normal, mild; moderate and sever iodine deficiency. The iodine content of salt, water and soil was also assessed. Results: Goitre prevalence was 7.4% and about 71% of the participants had UIC less than 100?g/L. An inverse relationship between median UIC and the percent prevalence of goitre was found. The mean serum T3, T4 and TSH were 1.05ng/dL, 6.81µg/dL, and 5.69mIU/L, respectively. A significant positive correlation was found between the mean value of urinary iodine and the mean value of both T3 and T4. While a significant negative correlation between the mean value of urinary iodine and the mean value of TSH was also noted. Conclusions: The results revealed the presence of a potential public health problem of iodine deficiency among school going children in high altitude areas of Saudi Arabia. There is a need to monitor and evaluate the salt iodization process, and distribute adequately iodized salt in the affected areas. PMID:26101502

  3. Attitudes and Practices of Primary Care Physicians in the Management of Overweight and Obesity in Eastern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alshammari (Al-Shammari YF), Yousef Fadhel Fahad

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is a global world-wide health problem in both developing and developed countries. In Saudi Arabia, this problem becomes an alarming disease both during childhood and adulthood among males and females. Primary health care physicians are identified as the first line of defense and contributor to cost-effective for the management and prevention of the disease; they are expected to normalize the weights in the community. Objective The aim of this study was to determine attitudes and practice by physician working in primary health care centers regarding management of obesity in the cities of Dammam and Al-Khobar in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Methods This study is a cross-sectional study that took place from December 2009 to March 2010. A specially made questionnaire with a Cronbach alpha reliability of 0.86 and content validity by 5 experts was used to measure the attitudes and practices from several different aspects of care provided at primary health care centers to obesity were distributed and collected from 76 physicians working in primary health centers in Dammam and 73 in Al-Khobar in Saudi Arabia. One hundred thirty physicians responded (12.8% non-response rate) and became the sample. Results Eighty-three per cent of physicians has negative attitude toward the concept of obesity, and more than two-thirds of primary care physicians see themselves play a key role in the management of obesity; The mean attitude scores of studied nurses was ranged from 2.95±1.06 to 4.34 ±0.82 with an agreement that obesity is considered as a disease and the role of the primary health care physician is not only to refer obese patients to other specialized care as well as difficulties in counseling for weight reduction. However, the majority of physicians gave their obese patients advice on dietary habits and physical activities and also they are sometimes referred obese people to dieticians. Moreover, half of physicians provide educational materials as part of the management and above two third of the studied physicians never use medications in weight reduction. Only one third of them believe that they are well prepared for the treatment of obesity. Conclusion There exist gaps in attitudes contradictory for the management of obesity which indicates Physicians in Eastern Saudi Arabia showed a reasonable level of interest in participating in obesity prevention and management. Accordingly, they need for more education and training in management and prevention of obesity, and should continue education from medical school till post-graduate. PMID:25246882

  4. 78 FR 39712 - Critical Infrastructure Protection and Cyber Security Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia and Kuwait...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ...OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Critical Infrastructure Protection and Cyber Security Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia and Kuwait Clarification and Amendment AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce....

  5. Public awareness of blood donation in Central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A; Al-Assiri, Mohammed H; Al-Omani, Manar; Al Johar, Alwaleed; Al Hakbani, Abdulaziz; Alaskar, Ahmed S

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In Saudi Arabia, voluntary donors are the only source of blood donation. The aim of this study was to assess the level of public knowledge and attitude toward blood donation in Saudi Arabia. Methods Using a previously validated questionnaire that comprises 38 questions to assess the levels of knowledge, attitudes, and motivations towards blood donation, 469 Saudi adults who attended different shopping malls in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were surveyed. Multiple regression analyses were used to identify the significant predictors of blood donation, with the significance set at P<0.05. Results Approximately half of all subjects (53.3%) reported that they had previously donated blood, 39% of whom had donated more than once. The knowledge percentage mean score was 58.07%, denoting a poor level of knowledge, with only 11.9% reporting a good level of knowledge. The attitude percentage mean score towards donation was 75.45%, reflecting a neutral attitude towards donating blood, with 31.6% reporting a positive attitude. Donation was significantly more prevalent among males than females (66% versus 13.3%; P<0.001). After adjustment for confounders, a higher knowledge score (t=2.59; P=0.01), a higher attitude score (t=3.26; P=0.001), and male sex (t=10.45; P<0.001) were significant predictors of blood donation. An inability to reach the blood donation centers and a fear of anemia were the main reasons for females not donating blood (49.9% and 35.7%, respectively), whereas a lack of time was the main reason for males (59.5%). Conclusion Prevalence of blood donation was less than satisfactory among the Saudi public, probably due to misconceptions, poor knowledge, and unfavorable attitude to donation. Educational programs are necessary to increase the level of knowledge and improve the attitude of the Saudi public toward blood donation. Providing mobile blood collection units nearer to individuals’ places of work to reduce their time costs of donating is a necessity. PMID:25152628

  6. A first hazard analysis of the Quaternary Harrat Al-Madinah volcanic field, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Difrawy, M. A.; Runge, M. G.; Moufti, M. R.; Cronin, S. J.; Bebbington, M.

    2013-11-01

    The northern portion of the 20,000 km2 Harrat Rahat basaltic field in NW Saudi Arabia (Harrat Al-Madinah) has hosted some of the most recent volcanic eruptions in the country. Rapid growth of the city of Al-Madinah has spread out onto the lava flows and scoria cones of the Harrat, increasing exposure to any potential renewed volcanism. We present here a first-order probabilistic hazard analysis related to new vent formation and subsequent lava flow from this volcanic field. The 501 visible eruption vent sites were integrated with aeromagnetic survey data (as representative of potential regions of buried volcanic vents) to develop a probability density function for new eruption sites using Gaussian kernel smoothing. This revealed a NNW striking zone of high spatial hazard terminating < 10 km south of the city. Using the properties of the AD1256 eruption lava flows and the spatial PDF, an analysis of lava hazard was carried out. Assuming a future lava-producing eruption, around 25% of the city of Al-Madinah is exposed to a probability of 0.001 to 0.005 of lava inundation. The temporal eruption recurrence rate is estimated at approximately one vent per 3300 years, but the temporal record of the field is so poorly constrained that the lower and upper bounds for the recurrence interval are 13,300 yrs and 70 yrs, respectively. Applying a Poisson temporal model, this results in a worst-case lava inundation recurrence interval of approximately 14,300 years.

  7. Assessment of arsenic in coastal sediments, seawaters and molluscs in the Tarut Island, Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S.; Youssef, Mohamed; Al-Kahtany, Khaled; Al-Otaiby, Naif

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess arsenic on the Tarut coast, Saudi Arabian Gulf, 38 sediment samples, 26 seawater samples and 40 gastropod and bivalve specimens were collected for analyses by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer. The Enrichment Factor (EF), the Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo) and the Contamination Factor (CF) indicated that coastal sediments of Tarut Island are severely enriched, strongly polluted and very highly contaminated with arsenic as a result of anthropogenic inputs. Comparison with arsenic in coastal sediments, seawaters and molluscs in the Red Sea, the Arabian Gulf and abroad coasts suggested that the studied samples have higher concentrations of As. The suggested natural sources of arsenic in the study area are the weathering and decomposition of neighboring deserts. The anthropogenic sources include the land reclamation, petrochemical industries, boat exhaust emissions, oil leakage, desalination plants and sewage effluents. These anthropogenic sources are the dominant sources of As in the study area and mostly came from Al Jubail industrial city to the north.

  8. Assessment of heavy metal contamination in intertidal gastropod and bivalve shells from central Arabian Gulf coastline, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S.; Youssef, Mohamed

    2015-11-01

    In order to assess pollutants and impact of environmental changes along the Saudi Arabian Gulf coast, forty specimens of gastropod and bivalve shells belonging to Diodora funiculata, Lunella coronata, Cerithium caeruleum, Barbatia parva, Pinctada margaritifera, Amiantis umbonella, Acrosterigma assimile and Asaphis violascens from five localities are selected for Fe, Cu, Pb, Mn, Cd, Se, As, Co, B, Cr, Hg, Mo analysis. The analysis indicated that heavy metal values (except Fe) were less than those recorded in molluscan shells from Gulf of Oman, Red Sea and Indian Ocean. D. funiculate, L. coronata, B. parva and P. margaritifera are good accumulators of Cu, As, Cr. The other species gave a nearly constant concentration in all the studied areas. Al Jubail coast recorded the highest heavy metal concentrations (except Mn at Ras Al-Ghar and Se at Al Jubail industrial city). Heavy metal contamination is mostly attributed to anthropogenic sources, especially effluents from petrochemical industries, sewage and desalination plants.

  9. A Review of Hepatoprotective Plants Used in Saudi Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K.; Al-Elaiwi, Abdulrahman M.; Athar, Md Tanwir; Tariq, Mohammad; Al Eid, Ahmed; Al-Asmary, Saeed M.

    2014-01-01

    Liver disease is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality across the world. According to WHO estimates, about 500 million people are living with chronic hepatitis infections resulting in the death of over one million people annually. Medicinal plants serve as a vital source of potentially useful new compounds for the development of effective therapy to combat liver problems. Moreover herbal products have the advantage of better affordability and acceptability, better compatibility with the human body, and minimal side effects and is easier to store. In this review attempt has been made to summarize the scientific data published on hepatoprotective plants used in Saudi Arabian traditional medicine. The information includes medicinal uses of the plants, distribution in Saudi Arabia, ethnopharmacological profile, possible mechanism of action, chemical constituents, and toxicity data. Comprehensive scientific studies on safety and efficacy of these plants can revitalise the treatment of liver diseases. PMID:25587347

  10. A review of hepatoprotective plants used in saudi traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Al-Elaiwi, Abdulrahman M; Athar, Md Tanwir; Tariq, Mohammad; Al Eid, Ahmed; Al-Asmary, Saeed M

    2014-01-01

    Liver disease is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality across the world. According to WHO estimates, about 500 million people are living with chronic hepatitis infections resulting in the death of over one million people annually. Medicinal plants serve as a vital source of potentially useful new compounds for the development of effective therapy to combat liver problems. Moreover herbal products have the advantage of better affordability and acceptability, better compatibility with the human body, and minimal side effects and is easier to store. In this review attempt has been made to summarize the scientific data published on hepatoprotective plants used in Saudi Arabian traditional medicine. The information includes medicinal uses of the plants, distribution in Saudi Arabia, ethnopharmacological profile, possible mechanism of action, chemical constituents, and toxicity data. Comprehensive scientific studies on safety and efficacy of these plants can revitalise the treatment of liver diseases. PMID:25587347

  11. Post occupancy evaluation of primary schools in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Omari, Sana; Woodcock, Andree

    2012-01-01

    The physical school environment has been shown to be important in helping children fulfill their academic potential and in providing appropriate working conditions for staff. However, few tools have been developed that enable multi stakeholder consultation which takes into account the opinions of young students. In Saudi Arabia there has been widespread investment in schools, but few guidelines have been provided to assist design or continuous evaluation. A Post Occupancy Evaluation (POE) method was developed and used to evaluate three international primary schools in Saudi Arabia. The methods identified weaknesses in the three schools and differences in responses from the three groups consulted (children, teachers and parents). Conclusions drawn from the study are that greater efforts need to be made to draw together research about how school facilities can support teaching and learning, increase effectiveness and levels of satisfaction. POE, when used in conjunction with checklists could be used as a means of driving up standards of educational facilities. PMID:22316833

  12. Information Assurance in Saudi Organizations - An Empirical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Syed Irfan; Mirza, Abdulrahman A.; Alghathbar, Khaled

    This paper presents selective results of a survey conducted to find out the much needed insight into the status of information security in Saudi Arabian organizations. The purpose of this research is to give the state of information assurance in the Kingdom and to better understand the prevalent ground realities. The survey covered technical aspects of information security, risk management and information assurance management. The results provide deep insights in to the existing level of information assurance in various sectors that can be helpful in better understanding the intricate details of the prevalent information security in the Kingdom. Also, the results can be very useful for information assurance policy makers in the government as well as private sector organizations. There are few empirical studies on information assurance governance available in literature, especially about the Middle East and Saudi Arabia, therefore, the results are invaluable for information security researchers in improving the understanding of information assurance in this region and the Kingdom.

  13. Pediatric hypertension in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alkahtani, Shaea A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the levels of blood pressure (BP) between male and female adolescents in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia and reference percentiles for Saudi adolescents. A secondary aim was to explore the distribution of BP among the participants based on age and gender. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 146 boys and girls attending intermediate and secondary schools in 2 regions (Al-Mallaha and Al-Mubarraz) in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Weight, random blood glucose, and BP were collected by a team of health educators in the morning of the school day between April and May 2014. Results: Of the current sample of adolescents originally from the Eastern Province, 30% had systolic blood pressure (SBP) of ?140 mm Hg and 22% had diastolic blood pressure of ?90 mm Hg. For girls between 13 and 16 years old, the SBP was greater than the 95th percentile of Saudi national norms. Participants were classified by gender and school stage, and one-way analysis of variance showed significant differences in the means of SBP between intermediate boys (127±2.5 mm Hg) and secondary boys (136±2.1 mm Hg) (p<0.05), and between intermediate boys and intermediate girls (138±1.6 mm Hg) (p<0.01). Conclusion: The increased level of BP among adolescents originally from the Eastern Province raises the need to update the current BP nomograms, considering possible differences for specific geographic areas across the country. Implementing therapeutic life style management in girls’ schools is recommended. PMID:25987114

  14. An Increase of Intelligence in Saudi Arabia, 1977-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batterjee, Adel A.; Khaleefa, Omar; Ali, Khalil; Lynn, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Normative data for 8-15 year olds for the Standard Progressive Matrices in Saudi Arabia were obtained in 1977 and 2010. The 2010 sample obtained higher average scores than the 1977 sample by 0.78d, equivalent to 11.7 IQ points. This represents a gain of 3.55 IQ points a decade over the 33 year period. (Contains 1 table.)

  15. Geological mapping in northwestern Saudi Arabia using LANDSAT multispectral techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blodget, H. W.; Brown, G. F.; Moik, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    Various computer enhancement and data extraction systems using LANDSAT data were assessed and used to complement a continuing geologic mapping program. Interactive digital classification techniques using both the parallel-piped and maximum-likelihood statistical approaches achieve very limited success in areas of highly dissected terrain. Computer enhanced imagery developed by color compositing stretched MSS ratio data was constructed for a test site in northwestern Saudi Arabia. Initial results indicate that several igneous and sedimentary rock types can be discriminated.

  16. Depression and Associated Factors among Adolescent Females in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Raheel, Hafsa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adolescents who suffer from depression early in life, have an increase in suicidal tendency, anxiety, conduct disorders, substance abuse, and continue to be depressed, later on in life. This study was conducted to identify the prevalence and correlates of depression among adolescent girls in Riyadh city in order to carry out early intervention. Methods: A cross-sectional, school-based survey was conducted among 1028 adolescent girls aged 15–19 years in secondary schools of Riyadh city. Riyadh was divided into clusters and within each cluster, both public and private schools were enrolled. From the selected schools students from grade 10–12 were surveyed. Survey was conducted using a structured questionnaire including the beck depression inventory-II, and questions exploring the correlates of depression. Results: About 30% of participants were found to be depressed. Depression was more prevalent among female adolescents whose household income was <12,000 Saudi Riyal/month (odds ratio [OR] 2.17, confidence interval [CI] 0.97–6.84), did not have a good relationship with peers and family members (OR 4.63, CI 2.56–8.41), lived with single parent or alone (OR 1.77, CI 0.97–3.23), been emotionally abused (OR 3.45, CI 2.56–8.41), and those who had been subjected to physical violence, at least once (OR 3.34, CI 1.89–5.91). Conclusions: Strategies need to be developed to identify early signs and symptoms of depression among Saudi female adolescents. Training can be given to groups of students to help their peers, and also to the teachers to identify, and help students identify early signs of depression and provide them with better-coping strategies to combat progression of depression and anxiety among such adolescents. PMID:26445637

  17. Stroke in Saudi Arabia: a review of the recent literature.

    PubMed

    Robert, Asirvatham Alwin; Zamzami, Marwan Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a major cerebrovascular disease resulting in high mortality and persistent disability in adults across the world. Besides coronary heart disease and cancer, stroke is the commonest cause of death in most industrialized countries. Survivors of stroke are often left with severe mental and physical disabilities, which create a major social and economic burden, ranking as the second most common cause of death worldwide and a major source of morbidity. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) is the largest country in the Middle East occupying approximately four-fifths of the Arabian Peninsula supporting a population of more than 28 million. Stroke is becoming a rapidly increasing problem and an important cause of illness and deaths in Saudi Arabia. However, compared with the developed countries, research regarding the incidence, prevalence and their socio-demographic properties of stroke is still insufficient due to lack of appropriate studies being conducted in these specified areas. This review aims to discuss the range of the aspect of stroke in Saudi Arabia from the literature published. PMID:24932325

  18. Parkinson’s Disease in Saudi Patients: A Genetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mubarak, Bashayer R.; Bohlega, Saeed A.; Alkhairallah, Thamer S.; Magrashi, Amna I.; AlTurki, Maha I.; Khalil, Dania S.; AlAbdulaziz, Basma S.; Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; Mustafa, Abeer E.; Alyemni, Eman A.; Alsaffar, Bashayer A.; Tahir, Asma I.; Al Tassan, Nada A.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the major causes of parkinsonism syndrome. Its characteristic motor symptoms are attributable to dopaminergic neurons loss in the midbrain. Genetic advances have highlighted underlying molecular mechanisms and provided clues to potential therapies. However, most of the studies focusing on the genetic component of PD have been performed on American, European and Asian populations, whereas Arab populations (excluding North African Arabs), particularly Saudis remain to be explored. Here we investigated the genetic causes of PD in Saudis by recruiting 98 PD-cases (sporadic and familial) and screening them for potential pathogenic mutations in PD-established genes; SNCA, PARKIN, PINK1, PARK7/DJ1, LRRK2 and other PD-associated genes using direct sequencing. To our surprise, the screening revealed only three pathogenic point mutations; two in PINK1 and one in PARKIN. In addition to mutational analysis, CNV and cDNA analysis was performed on a subset of patients. Exon/intron dosage alterations in PARKIN were detected and confirmed in 2 cases. Our study suggests that mutations in the ORF of the screened genes are not a common cause of PD in Saudi population; however, these findings by no means exclude the possibility that other genetic events such as gene expression/dosage alteration may be more common nor does it eliminate the possibility of the involvement of novel genes. PMID:26274610

  19. Indoor Radon Concentration Levels in Najran Region, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Alyami, S. H.; Al-Ghamdi, S. S.; Baig, M. R.; Al-Garawi, M.S.

    2010-07-07

    Measurement of indoor radon concentration was performed in Najran region in the south west of Saudi Arabia, using CR-39 dosimeter. Despite many previous studies on indoor radon concentrations in Saudi Arabia, the data available are still limited. The objective of this study, which is the first of its kind in the region, is to have preliminary data of radon in this region. Such measurement will contribute towards further studies in this region of Saudi Arabia. The indoor radon concentration was measured in the villages of Fara Al-Jabal and Badr Al-Janoob (about 2000 m above sea level), Hadadah and Al-Khanig (about 1700 m above sea level). It was found that radon distribution in these villages is normal skewed to the right, with a range of 9{+-}5 to 163{+-}32 Bqm{sup -3} and an average of 49{+-}2 Bqm{sup -3}. It was also found that the average radon concentration is independent of altitude. Our findings show that the values are below the safe limit of 150 Bqm{sup -3} set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the USA

  20. The Saudi Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Javed H.; Lababidi, Hani M. S.; Al-Moamary, Mohamed S.; Zeitouni, Mohammed O.; AL-Jahdali, Hamdan H.; Al-Amoudi, Omar S.; Wali, Siraj O.; Idrees, Majdy M.; Al-Shimemri, Abdullah A.; Al Ghobain, Mohammed O.; Alorainy, Hassan S.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.

    2014-01-01

    The Saudi Thoracic Society (STS) launched the Saudi Initiative for Chronic Airway Diseases (SICAD) to develop a guideline for the diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This guideline is primarily aimed for internists and general practitioners. Though there is scanty epidemiological data related to COPD, the SICAD panel believes that COPD prevalence is increasing in Saudi Arabia due to increasing prevalence of tobacco smoking among men and women. To overcome the issue of underutilization of spirometry for diagnosing COPD, handheld spirometry is recommended to screen individuals at risk for COPD. A unique feature about this guideline is the simplified practical approach to classify COPD into three classes based on the symptoms as per COPD Assessment Test (CAT) and the risk of exacerbations and hospitalization. Those patients with low risk of exacerbation (<2 in the past year) can be classified as either Class I when they have less symptoms (CAT < 10) or Class II when they have more symptoms (CAT ? 10). High-risk COPD patients, as manifested with ?2 exacerbation or hospitalization in the past year irrespective of the baseline symptoms, are classified as Class III. Class I and II patients require bronchodilators for symptom relief, while Class III patients are recommended to use medications that reduce the risks of exacerbations. The guideline recommends screening for co-morbidities and suggests a comprehensive management approach including pulmonary rehabilitation for those with a CAT score ?10. The article also discusses the diagnosis and management of acute exacerbations in COPD. PMID:24791168

  1. Dietary Factors Contributing to Osteoporosis among Post Menopausal Saudi Women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaif, Mohammed A.; Khan, Latifa K.; Alhamdan, Adel A. H.; Alorf, Saada M.; Al-Othman, Abdulaziz M.; Makki, Rabab J.

    This study was designed to investigate the dietary components which are likely to contribute to osteoporosis in postmenopausal Saudi women. In the present study, 36 osteoporotic postmenopausal and 25 healthy postmenopausal women as cases and controls respectively were selected from Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The study has designed to collect the data about the general characteristics (age, marital status, education, number of pregnancies, activity level, income and housing), anthropometric measurements, medical history and dietary intake by using both the methods (24 h recall, food frequency questionnaire). Serum samples were analyzed for calcium, phosphorus, vitamin D and Para Thyroid Hormone (PTH) and they were correlated with Bone Mineral Density (BMD). Food intake items were correlated with hip, neck and spin BMD. In results, cases found significantly older than controls and had history of bone fractures. Cases were consumed significantly less dietary calcium than controls. Serum parameters did not show any significant differences. However significant correlation was found between serum level of PTH and calcium with BMD of spine and right neck femur respectively. Banana and Mataziz (locally prepared dish with vegetables) showed positive correlation with hip BMD. A negative significant correlation was found between Arabian coffee and right neck femur BMD. In conclusion, Saudi women require encouragement to consume adequate amounts of calcium, fruits and vegetables in combination with maintaining a daily physical activity and space in child birth.

  2. The Saudi Arabian International Student Experience: From a Gender-Segregated Society to Studying in a Mixed-Gender Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhazmi, Ahmed; Nyland, Berenice

    2013-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia gender segregation is a cultural practice that occurs across all public and private domains. This segregation has shaped the lives of Saudi citizens and is driven socially through cultural and religious discourses and politically through regulation and policy. For Saudi students undertaking their education in western countries, the…

  3. Health Science Students' Perception about Research Training Programs Offered in Saudi Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Kuwaiti, Ahmed; Subbarayalu, Arun Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to examine the perceptions of students of health sciences on research training programs offered at Saudi universities. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional survey design was adopted to capture the perceptions of health science students about research training programs offered at selected Saudi

  4. Learning Critical Thinking in Saudi Arabia: Student Perceptions of Secondary Pre-Service Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allamnakhrah, Alhasan

    2013-01-01

    Saudi scholars have been agitating for education reforms to incorporate critical thinking in education programs. This paper is a qualitative case study undertaken at King Abdul Aziz University and Arab Open University and examines students' perception of learning critical thinking in secondary pre-service teacher education programs in Saudi

  5. Feedback on the Feedback: Sociocultural Interpretation of Saudi ESL Learners' Opinions about Writing Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustafa, Rami F.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study employed informal conversational interviews and semi-structured individual interviews to capture the Saudi students' opinions about the feedback they receive, and about their perceptions on what constitutes helpful feedback. Sociocultural theory was used as the framework of this study. The findings suggest that the Saudi

  6. Factors Influencing Jordanian and Saudi Arabian Teacher Decisions to Pursue the Principalship: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Omari, Aieman Ahmad; Wuzynani, Muhammad M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was carried out to gain a better understanding of how teachers in Jordan and Saudi Arabia view the principalship and identify factors that influence teachers' candidacy to pursue a position as principal. Study participants comprised 800 teachers who worked in public schools in Jordan and Saudi Arabia. Participants rated 2…

  7. Anxiety in Gifted Female Students in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljughaiman, Abdullah; Tan, Mei

    2009-01-01

    This study seeks to identify the extent of anxiety among gifted girls in Saudi Arabia and, further, to determine whether differences in anxiety levels exist according to grade. The study sample consisted of 66 female 6th and 7th graders, 11 to 14 years old, attending public school enrichment programs for gifted students in Jeddah Province, Saudi

  8. Plant-parasitic nematodes associated with olive trees in Al-Jouf region, north Saudi Arabia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A preliminary survey of plant-parasitic nematodes associated with olive was performed in Al-Jouf region, north Saudi Arabia. Olive is a newly introduced crop in this region, and is cultivated in the agricultural enterprises of some of the biggest Saudi agricultural companies. Seedlings are mostly im...

  9. Factors Influencing an Organisation's Intention to Adopt Cloud Computing in Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Factors Influencing an Organisation's Intention to Adopt Cloud Computing in Saudi Arabia Nouf University of Southampton Southampton, United Kingdom rjw1@ecs.soton.ac.uk Abstract--Cloud computing. In developing countries, particularly Saudi Arabia, cloud computing is still not widely adopted. As a result

  10. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Health Informatics Masters Program at KSAU-HS University, Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majid, Altuwaijri

    2007-01-01

    The Saudi health sector has witnessed a significant progress in recent decades with some Saudi hospitals receiving international recognition. However, this progress has not been accompanied by the same advancement in the health informatics field whose applications have become a necessity for hospitals in order to achieve important objectives such…

  11. National Culture-Management Practices: United States and Saudi Arabia Contrasted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashmi, Mahmud S.

    Successful conduct of business in Saudi Arabia requires attitudes and skills significantly different from those needed in the United States. Distinct societal differences can turn winning practices in one culture into failures in another. Despite Saudi Arabia's recent emergence as a wealthy marketplace, traditional values and a unique lifestyle…

  12. Ensuring Effective Impact of Continuing Professional Development: Saudi Science Teachers' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qablan, Ahmad; Mansour, Nassar; Alshamrani, Saeed; Aldahmash, Abdulwali; Sabbah, Saed

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers critique that continuing professional development programs in Saudi Arabia are neither well organized nor are systematic. This study came to assess the impact of CPD opportunities in the country to better suit the professional needs of Saudi science teachers and support them in implementing the reformed instructional practices.…

  13. Excerpts from Saudi Ministry of Education Textbooks for Islamic Studies: Arabic with English Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Religious Freedom, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This appendix is a companion document to "Saudi Arabia's Curriculum of Intolerance with Excerpts from Saudi Ministry of Education Textbooks for Islamic Studies." The appendix includes selected excerpts in Arabic with English translations for currently-used textbooks in grades 1, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12. These excerpts support the report…

  14. Tirbyi in the Muslim World, with a Focus on Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bangura, Abdul Karim

    2004-01-01

    The educational systems of Muslim societies, particularly that of Saudi Arabia, have been under scrutiny, especially after the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York and the Pentagon in Washington, DC. The Saudi educational system is mostly based on Islamic precepts. Nonetheless, the United States government and other…

  15. Evaluating EFL Intermediate Teachers' Performance in the Light of Quality Standards in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Thumali, Amani Dakheel Allah

    2011-01-01

    The present research aimed at four points: First, Identifying the most appropriate standards of EFL Saudi teachers' performance in the light of quality standards. Second, designing an objective and comprehensive evaluation rubric based on quality standards to evaluate EFL Saudi intermediate teachers' performance. Third, determining to what extent…

  16. Growing Up under Pressure: The Cultural and Religious Context of the Saudi System of Gifted Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljughaiman, Abdullah M.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2013-01-01

    This essay presents an overview of the system of gifted education in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. To highlight the characteristics of this system, however, its presentation is preceded by a discussion of particular aspects of Saudi society and its general system of education. These aspects distinctly differentiate the general and gifted systems of…

  17. Saudi Elementary School Science Teachers' Beliefs: Teaching Science in the New Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alghamdi, Amani K. Hamdan; Al-Salouli, Misfer Saud

    2013-01-01

    This study explored Saudi elementary school science teachers' beliefs about the process of teaching and learning science. This involved the exploration of their views about the new Saudi science curriculum, which emphasizes critical thinking and problem solving. Comprehensive interviews were held in 8 schools with 4 male and 6 female--2 of whom…

  18. Eimeria biarmicus sp.n. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) infecting falcons from the genus Falco in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alfaleh, F A; Alyousif, M S; Al-Quraishy, S; Al-Shawa, Y R

    2012-05-01

    The oocysts of Eimeria biarmicus sp. n. were described from the feces of the lanner falcon, Falco biarmicus, collected from the falcon market in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia. The prevalence of infection was 5% (2/40). The majority of the oocysts examined had completed sporulation within 84 h at 24 ± 2°C. Sporulated oocysts are ovoid in shape, measuring 22.4 × 17.9 (20.5-24.7 × 15.8-18.5) ?m; shape index (L/W) is 1.25 (1.14-1.36) ?m. The oocyst wall is smooth and bi-layered. Micropyle and oocyst residuum are absent. A polar granule is present, consisting of 2-4 globules. Sporocysts are ovoid, 10.1 × 6.1 (9.4-11.2 × 5.4-6.8) ?m; with a smooth single-layered wall and a minute Stieda body, but there is no substieda body. The sporocyst residuum consists of numerous small granules. Sporozoites are comma shaped, each contains two refractile bodies. E. biarmicus sp. n. is the second eimerian species described from F. biarmicus. PMID:21997853

  19. Prevalence of Obesity Among Male Adolescents in Arar Saudi Arabia: Future Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alenazi, Shehab A; Koura, Hala M; Zaki, Sherif M; Mohamed, Ayman H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity in adolescence is crucial as it represents an important stage in human life. Dietary habits are greatly associated with lifestyle. Many reports suggested direct relationship between adolescent fatness and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) which will be found in young adult population. Aim: Determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity among male adolescents in Arar city, Saudi Arabia (KSA). We estimated the future risk of developing cardiovascular diseases in this age?group and its possible correlation to different lifestyles and dietary habits. Results: A total of 523 male students with a mean age of 16.7 ± 0.9 years participated in the current study in which 30.4% of those students were obese and 17.2% were overweight. A direct relationship was found between body weight and different dietary and lifestyle habits. The risk of CVD based on waist height ratio (WHtR) was found in 33.5% of participants (30.4% obese, 2.1% overweight and 1% normal weight); moreover, the risk of CVD was strongly related to different dietary and lifestyle habits. Conclusion: Overweight and obesity were high among adolescent male students in Arar, who became susceptible to the risk of CVD. Arar showed the highest rate of obesity all over KSA. Both obesity and risk of CVD were strongly related to bad dietary habits and lifestyle. PMID:26170543

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Hospital Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Fagbo, Shamsudeen F.; Skakni, Leila; Chu, Daniel K.W.; Garbati, Musa A.; Joseph, Mercy

    2015-01-01

    We investigated an outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) at King Fahad Medical City (KFMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during March 29–May 21, 2014. This outbreak involved 45 patients: 8 infected outside KFMC, 13 long-term patients at KFMC, 23 health care workers, and 1 who had an indeterminate source of infection. Sequences of full-length MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from 10 patients and a partial sequence of MERS-CoV from another patient, when compared with other MERS-CoV sequences, demonstrated that this outbreak was part of a larger outbreak that affected multiple health care facilities in Riyadh and possibly arose from a single zoonotic transmission event that occurred in December 2013 (95% highest posterior density interval November 8, 2013–February 10, 2014). This finding suggested continued health care–associated transmission for 5 months. Molecular epidemiology documented multiple external introductions in a seemingly contiguous outbreak and helped support or refute transmission pathways suspected through epidemiologic investigation. PMID:26484549

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Hospital Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Fagbo, Shamsudeen F; Skakni, Leila; Chu, Daniel K W; Garbati, Musa A; Joseph, Mercy; Peiris, Malik; Hakawi, Ahmed M

    2015-11-01

    We investigated an outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) at King Fahad Medical City (KFMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during March 29-May 21, 2014. This outbreak involved 45 patients: 8 infected outside KFMC, 13 long-term patients at KFMC, 23 health care workers, and 1 who had an indeterminate source of infection. Sequences of full-length MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from 10 patients and a partial sequence of MERS-CoV from another patient, when compared with other MERS-CoV sequences, demonstrated that this outbreak was part of a larger outbreak that affected multiple health care facilities in Riyadh and possibly arose from a single zoonotic transmission event that occurred in December 2013 (95% highest posterior density interval November 8, 2013-February 10, 2014). This finding suggested continued health care-associated transmission for 5 months. Molecular epidemiology documented multiple external introductions in a seemingly contiguous outbreak and helped support or refute transmission pathways suspected through epidemiologic investigation. PMID:26484549

  2. Second-Hand Smoking among Intermediate and Secondary School Students in Madinah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zalabani, Abdulmohsen H.; Amer, Soliman M.; Kasim, Khaled A.; Alqabshawi, Reem I.; Abdallah, Ayat R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives. Second-hand smoke (SHS) is an important public health problem worldwide. The study aimed to estimate the prevalence of SHS exposure and its associated risk factors among intermediate and secondary school students. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 3400 students from 34 intermediate and secondary schools in Madinah City, Saudi Arabia. Data about sociodemographic and smoking-related factors and SHS exposure were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results. Of the 3210 students analyzed, the prevalence of SHS exposure was 32.7% 49.3%, and 25% inside, outside, and both inside and outside the home, respectively. The highest risk of SHS exposure was associated with the adolescent's smoking status, parental smoking, close friends smoking, and family structure. The risk was markedly increased in association with parental smoking for exposure inside the home (OR = 6.49; 95% CI = 5.44–7.73) and with close friends smoking for exposure outside the home (OR = 4.16; 95% CI = 3.54–4.77). The risk of SHS, however, was lower among adolescents having knowledge about smoking and highly educated parents. Conclusion. The study revealed a considerably high prevalence of SHS both inside and outside the home among adolescents. Knowledge and beliefs about SHS exposure are the main preventable approach. PMID:26273638

  3. Establishing a National Medical Device Registry in Saudi Arabia: Lessons Learned and Future Work.

    PubMed

    Al-Surimi, Khaled; Househ, Mowafa; Almohandis, Essam; Alshagathrh, Fahd

    2015-01-01

    Medical device evaluation presents several unique challenges due to the great diversity and complexity of medical devices and their rapid technological evolution. There has been a variety of work conducted on the development of disease based registries and health surveillance systems in Saudi Arabia. However, the progress of medical device registry systems and post-market medical device surveillance systems remains in its infancy in Saudi Arabia and within the region. In 2007, a royal decree assigned the responsibility for regulating medical devices to the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (SFDA). Soon afterwards, the SFDA established the Medical Devices National Registry (MDNR) to house medical device information relating to manufacturers, agents, suppliers and end-users. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview on the Medical Device National Registry (MDNR) in Saudi Arabia and describe the current experience and future work of establishing a comprehensive medical device registry and post-market surveillance system in Saudi Arabia. PMID:26152943

  4. City 2020+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, C.; Buttstädt, M.; Merbitz, H.; Sachsen, T.; Ketzler, G.; Michael, S.; Klemme, M.; Dott, W.; Selle, K.; Hofmeister, H.

    2010-09-01

    This research initiative CITY 2020+ assesses the risks and opportunities for residents in urban built environments under projected demographic and climate change for the year 2020 and beyond, using the City of Aachen as a case study. CITY 2020+ develops scenarios, options and tools for planning and developing sustainable future city structures. We investigate how urban environment, political structure and residential behavior can best be adapted, with attention to the interactions among structural, political, and sociological configurations and with their consequences on human health. Demographers project that in the EU-25-States by 2050, approximately 30% of the population will be over age 65. Also by 2050, average tem¬peratures are projected to rise by 1 to 2 K. Combined, Europe can expect enhanced thermal stress and higher levels of particulate matter. CITY 2020+ amongst other sub-projects includes research project dealing with (1) a micro-scale assessment of blockages to low-level cold-air drainage flow into the city centre by vegetation and building structures, (2) a detailed analysis of the change of probability density functions related to the occurrence of heat waves during summer and the spatial and temporal structure of the urban heat island (UHI) (3) a meso-scale analysis of particulate matter (PM) concentrations depending on topography, local meteorological conditions and synoptic-scale weather patterns. First results will be presented specifically from sub-projects related to vegetation barriers within cold air drainage, the assessment of the UHI and the temporal and spatial pattern of PM loadings in the city centre. The analysis of the cold air drainage flow is investigated in two consecutive years with a clearing of vegetation stands in the beginning of the second year early in 2010. The spatial pattern of the UHI and its possible enhancement by climate change is addressed employing a unique setup using GPS devices and temperature probes fixed to several public transport units running all across the city. This is accompanied by an analysis of probability density functions (PDF) for heat waves based on recent climate data and climate projections. A dense net of 40 PM measurement sites is operated in order to obtain the spatial pattern of PM concentration as depending on meteorological condition and location. It is lined out how this climate related sub-projects interact with investigations on social networks, governance issues, buildings structure development and health outcome. Related to the later the chemical composition of PM is analyzed in more detail and related to the spatial patterns of health deficiencies. At a later stage City2020+ will propose new strategies based on cooperation from the fields of medicine, geography, sociology, history, civil engineering, and architecture for adapting the city for future needs. The Project CITY 2020+ is part of the interdisciplinary Project House HumTec (Human Sciences and Technology) at RWTH Aachen University funded by the Excellence Initiative of the German federal and state governments through the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation, DFG).

  5. Isolation of pigeon herpes encephalomyelitis virus in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, M A; el-Sisi, M A; Ismail, O E; Afaleque, A I

    1985-07-01

    A virus was isolated from the brains of pigeons suffering from nervous disorders in different localities of the Eastern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The new isolate caused a high morbidity, ranging from 33% to 50%, and a mortality rate which reached 40%. The virus produced pinpoint greyish pock lesions on the chorioallantoic membrane of embryonated hens' eggs and induced syncytial formation followed by rounding and lysis of the cells in chicken embryo fibroblast cultures. Virus infectivity was significantly reduced following treatment by 20% ether or chloroform. The isolated virus was identified as pigeon herpes encephalomyelitis virus by serum-neutralization, agar gel diffusion and fluorescent antibody staining techniques. PMID:2994283

  6. Analysis of Pronunciation Errors of Saudi ESL Learners

    E-print Network

    Binturki, Turki A.

    2008-08-01

    committed by Arab learners of English on various linguistic areas. On the phonological level, Arab learners of English confuse /p/ and /b/; /f/ and /v/; /i/ and /e/. On the morphological level, the same learners commit typical errors such as: *womens... Najdi dialect because it is the closest dialect to Classical Arabic and also for the lack of previous research regarding this dialect. Five native speakers of Saudi Arabian Najdi dialect studying in the U.S. were chosen to participate in this study. A...

  7. Luminescence dating of the Wabar meteorite craters, Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prescott, J.R.; Robertson, G.B.; Shoemaker, C.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Wynn, J.

    2004-01-01

    Luminescence dating has been used to find the age of meteorite impact craters at Wabar (Al Hadida) in Saudi Arabia. The luminescence characteristics of the shocked material were determined. Using a variety of luminescence dating techniques applied to impactite formed by the meteorite, and to the underlying sand, the age is found to be 290 ?? 38 years. A comparison is made with two possible historically recorded ages. An impact as young as this has implications for the assessment of hazards from the impact on Earth of small meteorites. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Marble brain disease in two Saudi Arabian siblings.

    PubMed

    Muzalef, Abdullah; Alshehri, Mohammed; Al-Abidi, Abdulaziz; Al-Trabolsi, Hassan A

    2005-09-01

    Marble brain disease, also known as Guibaud-Vainsel syndrome, is a syndrome consisting primarily of renal tubular acidosis, cerebral calcification and osteopetrosis. The majority of reports originate from the Middle East. It is an autosomal recessive condition owing to carbonic anhydrase type II deficiency in renal and brain cells with a variant form of osteopetrosis. We report two siblings with this condition from Saudi Arabia. Both cases improved in both somatic growth and mental development after commencing treatment for renal tubular acidosis in the form of alkaline therapy and potassium supplementation. PMID:16156988

  9. Sale of US military aircraft to Saudi Arabia. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bents, E.R.

    1995-05-01

    The end of the Cold War in the late 1980s resulted in a gigantic downsizing and consolidation of America`s defense industries, as domestic demand plummeted and the volume of international arms trading fell. However, in total world arms exports the United States exports more arms than any other nation. The country of Saudi Arabia has been the destination of a disproportionate amount of these weapons. The following account is an examination of the US military aerospace industry, the world military aerospace market, US government policy concerning arms exports, and the Saudi aerospace market. Each of these entities profoundly impacts US-Saudi military aerospace commerce. By individually analyzing the above factors, it will be demonstrated that the supply relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia is dependent on the convergence of several long standing and deep seated aspirations on the part of the three major players: the US Aerospace Industry, the US Government, and the Saudi Government. The US military aerospace industry`s exports are critical to ensure its independent survival, help fund crucial RD programs, and maintain a viable defense high tech industrial base in the U.S. In addition, it wishes to exert a military presence in the Gulf area and nurture relations with Saudi Arabia in particular, as the world`s leading oil producer. The Saudi government requires a military defense anchored in high tech aerospace systems, as well as a dependable and capable military ally such as the US.

  10. Urban dwelling environments in rapidly growing cities : case study, Unayzah, Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Alohali, Yousef Nasser

    1983-01-01

    The study is concerned with two critical issues: a) the housing situation of middle income groups; b) the use of land in new developments. A tentative planning model for urban land development and a survey of existing ...

  11. Menopausal symptoms and quality of life among Saudi women visiting primary care clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    AlDughaither, Aida; AlMutairy, Hind; AlAteeq, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Menopause is associated with somatic, vasomotor, psychological, and sexual complaints that may affect quality of life. We determined the prevalence and severity of menopausal symptoms and their impact on the quality of life among Saudi women visiting primary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from October to November 2010. In total, 119 women aged 45–60 years were randomly interviewed using a questionnaire. Participants were divided into three categories: premenopausal (n=31), perimenopausal (n=49), and postmenopausal (n=39). The Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) assessed the prevalence and severity of eleven menopausal symptoms. Mean scores of menopausal categories were compared for different symptoms. Results The mean age at menopause was 48.3±3 years (median, 49 years). The symptoms reported to be most prevalent were joint and muscle pain (80.7%), physical and mental exhaustion (64.7%), and hot flushes and sweating (47.1%). Somatic and psychological symptoms were highly prevalent in perimenopausal women compared to other groups. The mean overall quality-of-life score was higher in perimenopausal women, while the total MRS score indicated that the symptoms were mild in severity (MRS <9). Conclusion The prevalence of menopausal symptoms was comparable to previous studies in Asian women; however, the prevalence of classic symptoms of hot flushes and night sweats was lower than reported in Western studies. Saudi women reported an MRS score indicating milder severity of symptoms, reflecting better quality of life and ability to cope with climacteric symptoms. PMID:26170720

  12. Desalination impacts on the coastal environment: Ash Shuqayq, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, O A; Phillips, M R; Williams, A T; Gheith, A M; Bantan, R A; Rasul, N M

    2012-04-01

    Ash Shuqayq (Saudi Red Sea coast) is approximately 28km long and characterised by narrow rocky headlands with intermittent pocket beaches. Fifty-two sediment samples from six different environments (beach, dune, sabkha, tidal/lagoon, offshore and wadi) were analysed. Testing showed that beach and dune sands are mainly medium to fine grained, with some very coarse sand (MZ=-0.59ø). Both beach and dune sands are moderately well to moderately sorted, although some are poorly sorted due to an influx of wadi sediments. Sediment source together with littoral reworking contributed to grain size variation. Carbonate content varied between 1.5% and 23%, whilst the organic content varied between 1.1% and 13%. Spatial analysis showed increasing southward carbonate and organic content, with both correlated (r=0.57). Sabkha sediments had significantly higher carbonate percentages (t=2.898; df=18; p<0.01) and results suggested origins are similar for both UAE Arabian Sea and Saudi Arabian Red Sea coasts. X-ray diffractions show beach and dune sediments are mainly composed of detrital quartz and plagioclase feldspar with uncommon amounts of chlorites. Analysis of sediment characteristics, composition and shoreline distribution alongside coastal processes, indicate that high chlorite levels are probably caused by desalination processes. Due to human and ecosystem health consequences and the likely increased demand for desalination plants, similar analyses should be undertaken elsewhere, e.g. the Mediterranean. PMID:22353176

  13. Work-Related Health Disorders among Saudi Computer Users

    PubMed Central

    Jomoah, Ibrahim M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and eye and vision complaints among the computer users of King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Saudi Arabian Airlines (SAUDIA), and Saudi Telecom Company (STC). Stratified random samples of the work stations and operators at each of the studied institutions were selected and the ergonomics of the work stations were assessed and the operators' health complaints were investigated. The average ergonomic score of the studied work station at STC, KAU, and SAUDIA was 81.5%, 73.3%, and 70.3, respectively. Most of the examined operators use computers daily for ? 7 hours, yet they had some average incidences of general complaints (e.g., headache, body fatigue, and lack of concentration) and relatively high level of incidences of eye and vision complaints and musculoskeletal complaints. The incidences of the complaints have been found to increase with the (a) decrease in work station ergonomic score, (b) progress of age and duration of employment, (c) smoking, (d) use of computers, (e) lack of work satisfaction, and (f) history of operators' previous ailments. It has been recommended to improve the ergonomics of the work stations, set up training programs, and conduct preplacement and periodical examinations for operators. PMID:25383379

  14. The Saudi Thoracic Society guidelines for influenza vaccinations

    PubMed Central

    Zeitouni, Mohammed O.; Al Barrak, Ali M.; Al-Moamary, Mohamed S.; Alharbi, Nasser S.; Idrees, Majdy M.; Al Shimemeri, Abdullah A.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses are responsible for the influenza outbreaks that lead to significant burden and cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Based on the core proteins, influenza viruses are classified into three types, A, B, and C, of which only A and B cause significant human disease and so the vaccine is directed against these two subtypes only. The effectiveness of the vaccine depends on boosting the immune system against the serotypes included within it. As influenza viruses undergo periodic changes in their antigen, the vaccine is modified annually to ensure susceptibility. In contrast to other countries, Saudi Arabia faces a unique and challenging situation due to Hajj and Umrah seasons, when millions of people gather at the holy places in Mecca and Madinah, during which influenza outbreaks are commonly found. Such challenges making the adoption of strict vaccination strategy in Saudi Arabia is of great importance. All efforts were made to develop this guideline in an easy-to-read form, making it very handy and easy to use by health care workers. The guideline was designed to provide recommendations for problems frequently encountered in real life, with special consideration for special situations such as Hajj and Umrah seasons and pregnancy. PMID:26664559

  15. The Saudi health care system: a view from the minaret.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Amir A

    2012-01-01

    This review article provides information about the origins, history, evolution and current status of the Saudi healthcare system, which is currently being transformed from a publicly financed and managed welfare system to a market-oriented, employment-based, insurance-driven system. Since its inception in the 1920s, the system has provided free healthcare to all Saudi nationals at publicly owned facilities run by government-employed administrators and healthcare providers. For millions of foreign workers in the country, healthcare at privately owned for-profit facilities has been paid for either by the employer or by the individual. At the completion of the three-stage transition, everyone in the country, whether employed in the public or private sector, is expected to have insurance coverage provided by the employer. All Ministry of Health-owned hospitals will be divested to the private sector, whereas primary health centres are likely to be retained by the government. Many of the operational details of the transition are unclear at this stage and will be worked out in the coming years. This paper provides a context for these changes and highlights some of the existing issues and weaknesses. The article also points to some of the future challenges and cautions against pitfalls involved in the complete transformation of the system. PMID:22555119

  16. Neonatal infections in Saudi Arabia: Association with cytokine gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Adnan A.; Alzaharani, Ali K.; Nasr, Amre

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many studies have reported potential associations between cytokine gene polymorphisms and the development, course, and outcome of sepsis, often with apparently conflicting results. The objective of this study was to investigate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the interleukin (IL)-1? –31 T/C, IL-6 –174 G/C, tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?) –308 G/A, and interferon ? (IFN-?) +874 A/T genes for their possible association with susceptibility to early onset sepsis (EOS) in Saudi newborn infants. A total of 205 newborn infants aged 1-2 days were consecutively enrolled onto the study having met the inclusion criteria (as per the research protocol). DNA was extracted from filter papers using the Chelex-100 method. The cytokines SNP were genotyping using Taqman 5’ nuclease allelic discrimination. For cytokine measurements we used the commercially available Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit. Our results show that the circulating IL-1?, IL-6, TNF-?, and IFN-? were significantly (p < 0.001) elevated in EOS patients compared to suspected and sepsis-free control groups; and IL-1? –31C, IL-6 –174G, TNF-? –308G, and IFN-? +874A alleles were associated with EOS in Saudi infants. In conclusion, analysis of cytokines concentrations and SNP for the four tested genes can be used as a predictor of sepsis outcome in newborns. PMID:26155186

  17. Water contamination and esophageal cancer at Gassim Region, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Amer, M.H.; El-Yazigi, A.; Hannan, M.A.; Mohamed, M.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Between January 1980 and December 1982, 183 patients with histologically confirmed carcinoma of the esophagus who were referred to a tertiary referral hospital were studied. Thirty-two (17%) patients were referred from Gassim Region at the north central part of Saudi Arabia. In contrast, only 5% of total cancer patient referrals were from this area. A case-control study showed a significant regional difference within Saudi Arabia and the most referrals from Gassim area. A prospective case-control study showed persistently high numbers of referrals from that region during 1983-1987. When patients from Gassim Region were compared with those referred from other locations, no statistical differences were noted between the two groups except for the source of drinking water. Water analysis from Gassim area showed a high solid content with elevated levels of calcium, magnesium, and to a lesser extent, chromium iron, cadmium, and cobalt. Traces of petroleum oil were found in five of six water samples from Gassim during 1983, compared with 3 of 49 samples from other areas. Mutagenicity tests on water specimens form Gassim Region indicated the presence of possible carcinogens. It is being suggested that the high prevalence of esophageal cancer in this region may be related to contamination of water by impurities such as petroleum oils. Malnutrition, particularly vitamin A deficiency, as well as other factors may have promoted such malignancies.

  18. Timing of uplift peripheral to the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; Zimmermann, R.A.; Bohannon, R.G.; Schmidt, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    A Prominent escarpment is found along the western margin of the Arabian Shield. Elevations along this escarpment are up to 3200 m above the Red Sea. Between the Red Sea and the crest of the escarpment is a relatively featureless coastal plane that is ??? 50 km across. The coastal plane abruptly gives way to the steep mountainous terrain, the elevation of which increases abruptly towards the high crest. The elevation slowly decreases to the east of the high crest. Forty-four apatite fission-track ages have been determined on rocks from the Proterozoic Arabian Shield in southwestern Saudi Arabia. These ages range from 13.8 to 568 Ma. In general, the youngest ages are found at low elevations along the base of the escarpment near the eastern edge of the coastal plane. The oldest ages are from along and to the east of the crest. The fission-track data from Saudi Arabia show that there was a period of minor uplift and cooling during the Cretaceous. This was followed by a relatively stable period which lasted until the Mid to Upper Miocene. The latest uplift and erosion began slightly younger than 13.8 Ma. This latest episode resulted in a minimum uplift of 3 km and is related to the Red Sea Rift. Samples totally annealed prior to this latest episode of uplift and cooling have not yet reached the surface.

  19. Epidemiology of infant burn in Eastern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alsalman, Abdulla K.; Algadiem, Emran A.; Alalwan, Maysaa A.; Farag, Tarek S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the epidemiology, pattern, outcome, and impact of infant burns in Eastern Saudi Arabia. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of admitted infants charts over 4 years (2008-2013) at the Burn Unit of King Fahad Hospital, Hofuf, Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia. The charts were reviewed for age, gender, etiology, site of injury, total body surface area (TBSA), depth of burn, hospital stay, and discharge status. Results: The total number of admissions to the Burn Unit was 510 cases. Out of these cases, 84 were infants, constituting 16.5% of total admissions. Scald burn was the most common etiology affecting 73 infants (86.9%). The highest percentage of total body surface area was between 5-10%, which occurred in 41 infants (48.8%). The average hospital stay was 10 days. No infant mortality was reported during this period. Conclusion: The prevalence of burns among infants in our hospital is high, and preventive measures must be implemented to decrease the occurrence of burns in this age group. PMID:25737175

  20. Infection control: Knowledge and compliance among Saudi undergraduate dental students

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Tarakji, Bassel; Shugaa-Addin, Bassam; Al-Shamiri, Hashem M.; Alaizari, Nader Ahmed; AlMasri, Ousamah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding infection control procedures among undergraduate dental students. Methods: This was a questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey. A self-administered questionnaire consisting of questions on students’ vaccination status as well as knowledge and attitudes regarding infection control was sent to 600 undergraduate dental students in the fourth, fifth, and sixth year of the Al-Farabi College for Dentistry and Nursing, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS software. The significance level was set at P<0.05. Results: The response rate was 85% (512 out of 600). While the vast majority of students (90%) had been vaccinated against hepatitis, only 37.4% have been assessed for anti-HBs. A total of 98.8% and 90.8% reported always wearing gloves and masks, respectively, during dental procedures. The use of protective eyewear was reported by only 29.2%. A significantly higher proportion of sixth-year students showed a positive attitude toward the treatment of patients with infectious diseases than other students of lower academic years. Approximately one-third of students reported having one or more occupational injuries while treating their patients. Conclusion: Although the students had good knowledge and attitudes regarding infection control, the compliance and practice levels regarding the same were low. Such findings highlight the necessity of continued infection-control education of Saudi dental students. PMID:26199855

  1. Stakeholder value network analysis for the energy system of Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Alonso, Francisco J., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Saudi Arabia is experiencing a considerable escalation in its consumption of electricity, provoked by economic progress and population increase. Such an escalation threatens the economic output of the Kingdom: more oil and ...

  2. Analysis of Shuttle Multispecral Infrared Radiometer measurements of the western Saudi Arabian shield.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, L.C.; Goetz, A.F.H.; Abbott, E.

    1987-01-01

    During the November 12-14, 1981 mission of the space shuttle Columbia, the Shuttle Multispectral Infrared Radiometer (SMIRR) recorded radiances in 10 channels along a 100m wide groundtrack across the western Saudi Arabian shield.-from Authors

  3. 75 FR 67433 - Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Government of Saudi Arabia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ...DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7220] Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Government of Saudi Arabia Pursuant to Section 7041 of the Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations...

  4. Aggregate model and analysis of the energy dynamics in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Al-Ahmed, Khalid A. (Khalid Abdulrahim)

    2012-01-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is facing a crisis in the near future centered on increasing energy consumption. Today, the kingdom consumes approximately 1/3 of its oil production. If no action is taken and the kingdom continues ...

  5. Bionomics of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in the province of Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Doha, Said Abdallah; Samy, Abdallah Mohammed

    2010-11-01

    The bionomics of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) were studied for two successive years (January 1996-December 1997) at 12 collecting stations representing six sectors of the province of Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia. The predominant species...

  6. Molecular nature of alpha-globin genes in the Saudi population.

    PubMed

    Borgio, J Francis

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-thalassemia (?-thal) is a disorder caused by the deletion of single or double ?-globin genes, and/or point mutations in the ?-globin genes. There are 2 common types of ?-globin genes; HBA2 and HBA1. Recently, it has been discovered that the HBA2 gene is replaced by a unique HBA12 gene convert in 5.7% of the Saudi population. The ?-globin genes have been emerging as a molecular target for the treatment of ?-thalassemia (?-thal). Hence, it is essential to understand the molecular nature of ?-globin genes to treat the most prevalent hemoglobin disorders, such as sickle cell disease, ?-thal, and ?-thal prevalent in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Thirty-two different ?-globin genotypes have been observed in the Saudi population. This review outlines the classification of the ?-globin genes on the basis of their molecular nature and complex combinations of ?-globin genes, and their variants predominant in Saudis. PMID:26593158

  7. Strategic use of ICT in the Saudi system of higher education: King Saud University 

    E-print Network

    Alkhatnai, Mubarak Hadi Marie

    2013-11-29

    This study investigates ICT in Saudi HE as represented by the researcher’s own institution: King Saud University (KSU). Using a naturalistic approach in pursuing the inquiry and making use of mixed methods, the research ...

  8. Application of Surrogate Reservoir Model (SRM) to an Onshore Green Field in Saudi Arabia; Case Study

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 151994 Application of Surrogate Reservoir Model (SRM) to an Onshore Green Field in Saudi Arabia of SPE copyright. Abstract Application of the Surrogate Reservoir Model (SRM) to an onshore green field

  9. 75 FR 56506 - Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia; Application Deadline Extended

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia; Application Deadline Extended AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. Timeframe...

  10. Assessment of the Knowledge and Attitudes of Saudi Mothers towards Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sulaiman, Ayman; Kondkar, Altaf A.; Saeedi, Mohammad Y.; Saadallah, Amal; Al-Odaib, Ali; Abu-Amero, Khaled K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the attitude and knowledge of the Saudi mothers toward newborn screening (NBS) program. Methods. A total of 425 Saudi women (only mothers who have at least one pregnancy) participated in the study from different regions in Saudi Arabia and completed the structured questionnaire which sought their views on the NBS services. Results. A majority of the participating women (91.1%) supported the NBS program and felt it was very important and useful. However, knowledge of NBS was found to be very limited and only 34.6% knew that NBS was a test to detect genetic disorders. A lack of communication and counseling to NBS clients by health authorities offering screening is implied. Conclusion. In general, there is a positive attitude towards the NBS program among Saudi women. However, they have several concerns to improve the availability of medication and formulas, genetic counseling, medical interventions, communication, education materials, and awareness. PMID:26543864

  11. Molecular nature of alpha-globin genes in the Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    Borgio, J. Francis

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-thalassemia (?-thal) is a disorder caused by the deletion of single or double ?-globin genes, and/or point mutations in the ?-globin genes. There are 2 common types of ?-globin genes; HBA2 and HBA1. Recently, it has been discovered that the HBA2 gene is replaced by a unique HBA12 gene convert in 5.7% of the Saudi population. The ?-globin genes have been emerging as a molecular target for the treatment of ?-thalassemia (?-thal). Hence, it is essential to understand the molecular nature of ?-globin genes to treat the most prevalent hemoglobin disorders, such as sickle cell disease, ?-thal, and ?-thal prevalent in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Thirty-two different ?-globin genotypes have been observed in the Saudi population. This review outlines the classification of the ?-globin genes on the basis of their molecular nature and complex combinations of ?-globin genes, and their variants predominant in Saudis. PMID:26593158

  12. Mid-Tropospheric Geopotential Height Patterns as Related to Temperature and Precipitation in Saudi Arabia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkolibi, Fahad Mohamad A.

    1995-01-01

    The mid-tropospheric geopotential height patterns and anomalies associated with temperature and precipitation departures from normal in Saudi Arabia were investigated. The mid-tropospheric teleconnection patterns affecting Saudi Arabia and the effect of ENSO's teleconnection on the precipitation of the country were also examined. This investigation covered the seven month period, November to May. MEPA surface data and NMC Northern Hemisphere octagonal grid 700 mb geopotential height data were used in this study. Various techniques such as compositing analyses, regression analyses and correlation analyses were utilized in this study. It was found that Saudi Arabia experiences below normal temperatures when there are strong positive 700 mb geopotential height anomalies over western Europe and the western Mediterranean, strong negative height anomalies over the Icelandic region, and negative height anomalies over northwestern Asia. Alternatively, when western Europe and the western Mediterranean region experience negative height anomalies and the Icelandic region experiences positive height anomalies, Saudi Arabia experiences above normal temperatures. These patterns control the strength and the location of the Mediterranean trough, which plays an important role in the climate of Saudi Arabia. The trough is strong and well west of the country during the warm months, but it is weaker and just on the western edge of the country during the cold months. The pattern and temporal behavior of the mid-tropospheric waves over the eastern Atlantic Ocean and the western Mediterranean and Europe are related to positive precipitation departures in Saudi Arabia. This pattern and temporal behavior can be described as an eastward progression of a strong trough during the three days preceding a precipitation day in Saudi Arabia. During the precipitation day, this trough is located just west of the country, putting Saudi Arabia under cyclonic activity. An investigation of the teleconnection patterns affecting Saudi Arabia indicates that the centers of action over the eastern Atlantic Ocean and the western Mediterranean and Europe are strongly related to the base point over Saudi Arabia. The effect of ENSO teleconnection on the precipitation pattern in Saudi Arabia is represented in a significant lagged relationship between the SOI and precipitation, especially spring precipitation.

  13. Learning Cities as Healthy Green Cities: Building Sustainable Opportunity Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a new generation of learning cities we have called EcCoWell cities (Economy, Community, Well-being). The paper was prepared for the PASCAL International Exchanges (PIE) and is based on international experiences with PIE and developments in some cities. The paper argues for more holistic and integrated development so that…

  14. Air Quality in Mecca and Surrounding Holy Places in Saudi Arabia during Hajj: Initial Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Siddique, A.; Barletta, B.; Blake, N. J.; Gartner, A.; Khwaja, H. A.; Meinardi, S.; Zeb, J.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Arabian Peninsula experiences severe air pollution yet is highly understudied in terms of surface measurements of ozone and its precursors. Every year the air pollution in Saudi Arabia is intensified by additional traffic and activities during Hajj, the world's largest religious pilgrimage that draws 3?4 million pilgrims to Mecca (population of 2 million). Using whole air sampling and high-precision measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and 97 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), we performed an initial survey of air quality in Mecca, its tunnels, and surrounding holy sites during the 2012 Hajj (October 24-27; n = 77). This is the first time such a campaign has been undertaken. Levels of the combustion tracer CO and numerous VOCs were strongly elevated along the pilgrimage route, especially in the tunnels of Mecca, and are a concern for human health. For example CO reached 57 ppmv in the tunnels, exceeding the 30-min exposure guideline of 50 ppmv. Benzene, a known carcinogen, reached 185 ppbv in the tunnels, exceeding the 1-hr exposure limit of 9 ppbv. The gasoline evaporation tracer i-pentane was the most abundant VOC during Hajj, reaching 1200 ppbv in the tunnels. Even though VOC concentrations were generally lower during a follow-up non-Hajj sampling period (April, 2013), many were still comparable to other large cities suffering from poor air quality. Major VOC sources during Hajj included vehicular exhaust, gasoline evaporation, liquefied petroleum gas, and air conditioners. Of the measured compounds, reactive alkenes (associated with gasoline evaporation) and CO showed the strongest potential to form ground-level ozone. Therefore efforts to curb ozone formation likely require dual targeting of both combustive and evaporative fossil fuel sources. However, modeling and other measurements (e.g., nitrogen oxides) are also needed to fully understand Mecca's oxidative environment. We also present specific recommendations to reduce VOC emissions and exposure in Mecca, and to strengthen air quality monitoring especially in Mecca's tunnels.

  15. Indication of the radioactive fallout in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia following the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Alkhomashi, N; Almasoud, Fahad I

    2016-02-01

    On March 2011, a severe damage has occurred to Fukushima Di-iachi nuclear reactor complex in Japan following the huge earthquake and the resulting Tsunami. Consequently, vast amounts of radioactive fallout were released into the atmosphere and contaminated the environment in Japan. Soon after the accident, traces of anthropogenic radionuclides were detected in environmental samples collected in many parts in the northern hemisphere even very far away from Japan creating a global concern. There is no information about radioactive contamination in the Arabian Peninsula caused by the Japanese Fukushima nuclear accident. The first evidence of Fukushima radioactive fallout in Riyadh (24° 43' N, 46° 38' E), Saudi Arabia has been confirmed in April 8, 2011. The airborne fission products (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs were measured in air samples. The radionuclide concentrations were determined by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. Their activity concentrations were studied as a function of time over a period of 20 days at the end of which they had mostly fallen below our limit of detection. The maximum activity concentration of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs in air of, respectively, 323.7 ± 18.5, 17.2 ± 1.0 and 26.0 ± 1.8 ?Bq m(-3) were observed on April 10-11, 2011. The (131)I/(137)Cs and (134)Cs/(137)Cs activity ratio values in air were presented and discussed. Finally, the effective doses to the public of Riyadh city from inhalation of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs due to contribution from Fukushima incident was found far below levels of concern. PMID:26650827

  16. Wooden Bay Window (Rowshan) Conservation in Saudi-Hejazi Heritage Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adas, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    A prominent feature of the architectural style of heritage buildings in western Saudi Arabia (Hijaz) cities such as Jeddah is the extensive use in their facades of projected intricately carved wooden bay window (Rowshan sl, Rawasheen pl). Throughout Balad or the old town in Jeddah, the element of Rowshan can be found made from many different types of woods such as teak, Javan, mahogany, other types of african and middle eastern woods and with different sizes, proportions, and varied intricate ornamentations and motifs. Besides its aesthetic value, the rawasheen and their many components and parts provide other functions such as ventilation, lighting, and spatial and visual privacy for building interiors from the outside. The profound degradation of Rawasheen is impacting the authenticity and heritage value of old buildings in historical Jeddah because of many factors that include: extensive moisture damage, using improper repair methods and joinery techniques to maintain rawasheen, using unsuitable cleaning products and wood paints, and replacing damaged parts with unkown types of wood. In order to prevent any further deterioration of Rawasheen, documentation of rawasheen and its components using recent digital methodologies and the utilization of proper repair techniques must be followed when working with these elements to ensure longevity of conservation, and preservation of value and authenticity.Through the disucssion of Rowshan repair methodology that was developed that include the digital documentation of all intricate details of rowshan panels and wood engraving which allowed replicating damaged elements beyond repair and applied to a listed building in old Jeddah, the paper provides Rowshan repair guidelines which relate to documentation, diagnostic methods, investigations and tests, repair methodology and reinforcement.

  17. Students’ attitude toward use of over the counter medicines during exams in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Almalak, Haya; Albluwi, Ala’a Ibrahim; Alkhelb, Dalal Ahmed; Alsaleh, Hajar Mohmmed; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To explore the use of over the counter (OTC) medicines among students during exams in Riyadh City, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Method A cross-sectional study was designed; using a self-administered twenty-two item online questionnaire for the students’ convenience and easy response disclosure. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) version 13®. Results A total of N = 1596 students participated in this survey, of whom 829 (51.9%) were university students and 767 (48.1%) were high school students. Overall, 80.0% of the respondents disclosed the use of OTC non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for headache and pain relief. In addition, other substances used during the exams were Energy Drinks (5.0%), Flu Medication (5.0%), Vitamins (5.0%) and Antibiotics (5.0%). Female students were found to be more knowledgeable about safety issues concerning the use of OTC medicines (5.11 ± 1.27, p = <0.001) than male students. Ease in access to OTC medicine, availability of pharmacist consultation and advertisement in print and electronic media were the main factors disclosed by the respondents that may result in an increase in the use of OTC products. The use of OTC medicines was generally higher among female students (p = 0.001). Conclusion The use of OTC medication during exams was more among high school and university students. Gender, age and educational institution were found significantly affecting the use of OTC medicines during exams. PMID:24648821

  18. Differences in dentofacial characteristics of Class I malocclusion between Saudi and Japanese adult females

    PubMed Central

    Abbassy, Mona A; Abushal, Amal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective was to compare dentofacial characteristics of Class I malocclusion in Saudi and Japanese adult females. Materials and Methods: Lateral cephalograms of 50 Saudi adult female and 50 Japanese adult female (18–35-year-old) were obtained. All patients were skeletal Class I, angle Class I malocclusion, arch length discrepancy (?10–10 mm), overjet (1–5 mm), overbite (1–5 mm), absence of congenital anomalies, or significant facial asymmetries or congenitally missing tooth other than the 3rd molar and absence of temporomandibular joint problems. Patient cephalograms were traced and digitized. 16 angular measurements and 13 linear measurements of facial form were used. Results: A comparison of the vertical dimension showed that the Saudi females had a significantly larger gonial angle, a significantly larger facial angle and longer lower face height compared to the Japanese females. Dentally, Saudi females had more protruded incisors with increased distances of the posterior teeth to the palatal plane. For the soft tissue dimension, the Saudi subjects had a significantly more prominent nose, retruded lip and a more protruded chin compared with Japanese. Conclusions: There were significant differences in dentofacial morphology between Saudi and Japanese adult females. Both Asian countries have distinct cephalometric features, which should be considered as a reference in treating patients of varying ethnic backgrounds to optimize the final results. PMID:26229950

  19. Chihuahua City

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    IBM, through its Smarter Cities program, working with the Building Performance Lab of the City University of New York (BPL-CUNY) and New York City (NYC) government, has developed an energy dashboard drawing upon the city’s database of information...

  20. Impact of software and hardware technologies on occupational health and safety policies in Saudi Arabian oil refineries.

    PubMed

    Idreis, Hany M; Siqueira, Carlos E; Levenstein, Charles C

    2006-01-01

    This article seeks to examine the impact of technology importation on occupational health and safety in both Saudi Arabian and U.S. oil refining industries. Technologies imported to the Saudi oil industry take two forms: hardware (sophisticated equipment to run oil facilities) and software (policies and regulations pertaining to workers' health and safety, and employment rights installed by Aramco's founding multinational companies). This study utilizes qualitative, historically oriented, cross-national case studies to compare and assess workers' health, safety, and rights in Saudi Aramco with its U.S. counterpart, Motiva Enterprises. Two facilities were chosen to conduct field research: the Saudi Aramco oil refinery at Jeddah and Motiva's refinery at Port Arthur, Texas. The Jeddah refinery is fully owned by Saudi Aramco, thus, representing Aramco's health and safety policies and regulations. The Port Arthur refinery serves as a reference case study for U.S. oil refining facilities. The aspects of occupational health and safety in Saudi Aramco--ExxonMobil's joint ventures SAMREF and LUBREF--also are discussed to examine workers' health policies in both companies. The American oil industry made a significant contribution in establishing the Saudi oil industry, with the cooperation of the Saudi government. Despite having outstanding employment benefits schemes in Saudi Aramco, the presence of an organized work force better serves employee participation in Motiva than in Aramco. Safety systems such as Process Safety Management (PSM)--applied in Motiva--partially exist in Aramco to operate hardware technologies safely. Motiva training systems are better through PACE's Triangle of Prevention (TOP). Both companies follow the same pattern of handling occupational injuries and diseases; however, Saudi government agencies (GOSI) are responsible for compensating and treating injured workers. Saudi workers expressed conditional support for the worker committee program proposed by the Ministry of Labor. American and Saudi workers are concerned about the quality and sufficiency of health and safety training, employment promotion, work pressure, and job uncertainty due to continuous downsizing. This article recommends that Saudi social actors increase safety and health awareness in the work environment by providing intensive occupational safety training to the employees (as demanded by Saudi and American workers), improve labor-management relations through establishing strong cooperative contacts with regional and international trade unions, and establish uniform and standard occupational health and safety regulations for Saudi Aramco and its subsidiaries in order to provide an equal level of protection for Saudi workers. PMID:16943139

  1. Preliminary noise survey and data report of Saudi Arabian data

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R.

    1997-08-01

    From November 1995 to March 1996 a total of 9 broadband temporary stations were deployed across Saudi Arabian shield. These stations consisted of STS-2 seismometers recorded continuously at 40 sps on RefTek dataloggers. All installations were at bedrock sites. Using data sections selected randomly during the deployment, noise studies showed that most stations were exceptionally quiet with noise level near the USGS low noise model for frequencies higher than 0.1 Hz. At lower frequencies, the horizontal components showed increased noise levels, possibly due to instrumental characteristics. High-frequency (greater than 1 Hz) noise varied as much as 10 db between day and night for some stations (RAYN, TAIF) while more isolated stations (HALM) were constant. Seasonal noise levels also varied, with April to June being the quietest months. Slight changes in peak microseism frequency also occurred seasonally.

  2. Towards an electronic national injury surveillance system in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, F; Hussain, S A; Mandil, A; Alamro, N

    2015-02-01

    Given the need for a uniform, comprehensive, electronic nationwide surveillance system for injuries in Saudi Arabia, a system was designed with the objectives of establishing an epidemiologic profile of injuries in the country; evaluating injury indicators on an ongoing basis; identifying high-risk groups requiring specific interventions; monitoring and evaluating interventions for effectiveness; and producing reports to assist in planning and resource allocation. A special form for this purpose was designed, modified from validated forms used elsewhere for injury surveillance. This initiative of the Ministry of Health is also expected to help validate data collected by other sectors, such as the Ministry of Interior. This paper reviews the milestones of building the system and aims to prompt a debate within the scientific community, especially within the Eastern Mediterranean Region, about the best way to design injury surveillance systems for the Region in order to fine-tune the proposed system before its full-scale implementation. PMID:25876826

  3. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in an Immigrant Saudi Worker: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Razzak, Mohammad A.; Chanda, Bikash C.; Bhaskar, Khondaker R.H.; Mondal, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), an uncommon disorder in South-East Asia, including Bangladesh, often presents as granulomatous plaque on the exposed areas, with a high index of suspicion required for diagnosis. Here we report the first imported case of CL caused by Leishmania tropica in a migrant Bangladeshi worker in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The case, initially suspected as a case of cutaneous tuberculosis, arrived at specimens reception unit (SRU) of diagnostic labs of icddr,b being referred by the physician for ALS testing for tuberculosis. At his arrival in the SRU, one of the health personnel of the unit who used to work in KSA suspected him as a case of CL. The diagnosis was confirmed by smear microscopy which revealed plenty of amastigotes within macrophages. PCR was performed to confirm the species. He was treated with sodium stibogluconate at Shahid Suhrawardy Medical College Hospital, Dhaka. PMID:25076674

  4. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Geospatial Information Infrastructure - AN Initial Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsultan, S. H.; Rahman, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reviews the current Geographic Information System (Longley et al.) implementation and status in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Based on the review, several problems were identified and discussed. The characteristic of these problems show that the country needs a national geospatial centre. As a new initiative for a national geospatial centre, a study is being conducted especially on best practice from other countries, availability of national committee for standards and policies on data sharing, and the best proposed organization structure inside the administration for the KSA. The study also covers the degree of readiness and awareness among the main GIS stakeholders within the country as well as private parties. At the end of this paper, strategic steps for the national geospatial management centre were proposed as the initial output of the study.

  5. Prevalence of mental retardation among children in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    El-Hazmi, M A F; Al-Swailem, A A; Al-Mosa, N A; Al-Jarallah, A A

    2003-01-01

    This survey determined the prevalence and regional distribution of mental retardation among children in Saudi Arabia. Data were analysed from a population-based national survey conducted during 1996-99, in which 60,630 children aged up to 18 years were screened using IQ tests and questionnaires completed by physicians. The prevalence of mental retardation was 8.9 per 1000 children, a rate similar to that reported in other countries. Moderate or severe retardation was classified in 70.9% of these children. Of the mentally retarded children in the 0-18 years age range, 83.2% were not attending school. Special educational programmes are needed to improve the quality of life of mentally retarded children. PMID:15562727

  6. Mineral exploration, Mahd adh Dhahab District, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worl, Ronald G.

    1978-01-01

    Mahd adh Dhahab is the largest of numerous ancient gold mines scattered through the Precambrian shield of Saudi Arabia and the only one with recent production. During the period 1939-54, 765,768 fine ounces of gold and 1,002,029 ounces of silver were produced from the mines by the Saudi Arabian Mining Syndicate. Ore minerals at Mahd adh Dhahab include free gold and silver, tellurides, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite in and associated with a system of north-trending quartz veins and quartz veinlet stockworks. Pyrite is a common sulfide gangue mineral. Country rocks are a north dipping sequence of pyroclastic and transported pyroclastic rocks of the Hulayfah Group that are locally highly silicified and potassium-feldspathized. The prime target for this exploration program was a north-trending zone of quartz veins and breccias, faults, alteration, and metalization approximately 400 m wide and 1000 m long. The ancient and recent mine workings are located in the northern part of this zone. Although the quartz veins and alteration cut all lithologies, the major metalization is confined to the intersection of veins and agglomerate. Ten holes were diamond drilled to explore geochemical, geological, and geophysical targets in the area. A significant new zone of metalization was discovered 700 m south of the ancient and recent mine workings and within the same major zone of quartz veins, alteration, and faults. Metalization in this southern mineralized zone is at the intersection of the quartz veins and a distinctive and highly altered agglomerate. The total zone of vein and agglomerate intercept is potentially metalized and comprises a block of ground 40 m thick and 400 m wide along the strike of the agglomerate and projected downdip 250 m. Tonnage of this block is 17.2 million tons. The explored zone, approximately 25 percent of the potentially metalized rock, has a potential resource of 1.1 million tons containing 27 g/t gold and 73 g/t silver.

  7. Normal circulating PTH in Saudi healthy individuals with hypovitaminosis D.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Y; Al-Daghri, N M; Alkharfy, K M; Al-Attas, O S; Alokail, M S; Al-Othman, A; Sabico, S; Chrousos, G P

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies in the Middle East have shown an increased incidence of vitamin D deficiency across this region of year-round sunlight. There is scarcity of information, however, as to the levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], the active form of vitamin D, and its associations with cardiometabolic parameters in an Arab cohort and this study aims to fill this gap. In a cross-sectional study, 33 male and 43 female (22 children and 54 adults, total 76) Saudis with previously established low levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] (<50 ng/ml or 20 nmol/l) were recruited. Anthropometrics were obtained and fasting blood samples were taken for a routine measurement of glucose, lipid profile, calcium, and albumin, while serum 25(OH)D, 1,25-(OH)2D, and intact PTH were quantified using specific ELISAs. Serum calcium, intact PTH, and 1,25(OH)2D were all within the normal range in both children and adults in both genders. In all subjects, serum 1,25(OH)2D was not associated with intact PTH, while circulating 1,25(OH)D inversely correlated with systolic blood pressure (p=0.01) and waist circumference (p=0.04). Thus, vitamin D deficient Saudi children and adults with normal levels of 1,25-(OH)2D also had normal circulating calcium and PTH. This study suggests that local cutoffs should be set that will be of clinical significance in the identification of those at true risk for harder end-points, such as secondary hyperparathyroidism and bone-related diseases. PMID:22972177

  8. Characterization of familial breast cancer in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The contribution of genetic factors to the development of breast cancer in the admixed and consanguineous population of the western region of Saudi Arabia is thought to be significant as the disease is early onset. The current protocols of continuous clinical follow-up of relatives of such patients are costly and cause a burden on the usually over-stretched medical resources. Discovering the significant contribution of BRCA1/2 mutations to breast cancer susceptibility allowed for the design of genetic tests that allows the medical practitioner to focus the care for those who need it most. However, BRCA1/2 mutations do not account for all breast cancer susceptibility genes and there are other genetic factors, known and unknown that may play a role in the development of such disease. The advent of whole-exome sequencing is offering a unique opportunity to identify the breast cancer susceptibility genes in each family of sufferers. The polymorphisms/mutations identified will then allow for personalizing the genetic screening tests accordingly. To this end, we have performed whole-exome sequencing of seven breast cancer patients with positive family history of the disease using the Agilent SureSelect™ Whole-Exome Enrichment kit and sequencing on the SOLiD™ platform. Results We have identified several coding single nucleotide variations that were either novel or rare affecting genes controlling DNA repair in the BRCA1/2 pathway. Conclusion The disruption of DNA repair pathways is very likely to contribute to breast cancer susceptibility in the Saudi population. PMID:25923920

  9. Initial results from the Volcanic Risk in Saudi Arabia project: Microearthquakes in the northern Harrat Rahat monogenetic volcanic field, Madinah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenedi, C. L.; Alvarez, M. G.; Abdelwahed, M. F.; Aboud, E.; Lindsay, J. M.; Mokhtar, T. A.; Moufti, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    An 8-station borehole seismic research array is recording microearthquake data in northern Harrat Rahat. This recently active monogenetic volcanic field lies southeast of the Islamic holy city of Madinah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The VORiSA seismographs are operated in collaboration between King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah and the Institute of Earth Science and Engineering, University of Auckland, in New Zealand. The goal of the VORiSA project is to evaluate the seismic and volcanic hazard around Madinah. To this end, we will evaluate the local earthquake activity including the extent to which local earthquakes are tectonic or volcanic. We also will use seismicity to understand the subsurface structure. The analytical goals of the seismic research array are the following: (1) Calculate a new seismic velocity model, (2) Map subsurface structures using seismic tomography, and (3) Explore for fracture zones using shear wave splitting analysis. As compared to seismographs installed on the surface, borehole seismometers detect smaller and more numerous microearthquake signals. The sensitivity and location of the borehole sensors in the VORiSA array are designed to detect these weak signals. The array has a total aperture of 17 km with station spacing at 5 - 10 km. The seismometers are housed in IESE model S21g-2.0, two Hz, 3-component borehole sondes. Sensor depths range from 107 - 121 m. The data acquisition system at each stand-alone station consists of a Reftek 130-01, 6-channel, 24 bit data logger which records at 250 samples per second. The power source is a deep cycle battery with solar recharge. Local temperatures reach extremes of 0° to 50°C, so the battery and recorder are contained in a specially designed underground vault. The vault also provides security in the remote and sparsely populated volcanic field. Recording began on 31 March 2012. An average of one earthquake every three days suggests that currently this is not a highly seismic area. However, seismic swarms, likely related to magmatic intrusion, have occurred in 1999 in Harrat Rahat (~145 earthquakes, M1.4 to 2.3) (Moufti et al., 2010) and in 2009 in Harrat Lunayyir (~30,000 earthquakes up to M5.4) (Pallister et al., 2010). We can locate microearthquakes of Mm = -1 within the array, a significant advantage over the previous surface network. We have characterized instrument noise using power spectrum probability density functions (McNamara and Buland, 2004). All stations show a very high signal to noise ratio; for a near-source M-1 event S/N is ~5. The available data are still too sparse for advanced analysis and currently appear as a cloud of seismicity.

  10. Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet explains the Clean Cities Program and provides contact information for all coalitions and regional offices. It answers key questions such as: What is the Clean Cities Program? What are alternative fuels? How does the Clean Cities Program work? What sort of assistance does Clean Cities offer? What has Clean Cities accomplished? What is Clean Cities International? and Where can I find more information?

  11. An Assessment of Air Quality in the Surrounding Holy Places of Mecca, Saudi Arabia during Hajj

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khwaja, H. A.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Siddique, A.; Hussain, M. M.; Khatib, F.; Zeb, J.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The associations of exposure to air pollution and adverse human health effects have been demonstrated in many epidemiologic studies. Hajj, an annual pilgrimage of Islam, draws millions of pilgrims from more than 200 countries for religious rituals in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The city is surrounded by mountains with a population of 1.7 million, which gets doubles or even more during Hajj. The city centers on the Grand Mosque (Masjid Al-haram), connected with the network of tunnels. Main Hajj pilgrimage route for five days extends 20 km to the east and includes "Mina", "Arafat", and "Muzdalifah". A detailed study was conducted in Mecca, its tunnels, and surrounding holy places during Hajj (October 13-17, 2013). Spatial and temporal variations in total suspended particulate (TSP), PM10 , PM7 , PM2.5 , PM1 , ozone (O3), and black carbon (BC) levels along the route were recorded using portable monitors and GPS to assess the status of air quality. This is the first study to elucidate the exposure to air pollutants among pilgrims. Extremely high levels of all pollutants were observed during the intensive measuring periods. For example, the PM7 , PM2.5 , O3, and BC concentrations of up to 9,433 µg/m3, 484 µg/m3, 444 ppb, and 468 µg/m3, respectively, were observed. Results of this investigation revealed that most routes had on average exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) standards for PM10 and PM2.5 . The reasons for the high air pollutants concentrations are most probably high volume of traffic, construction work, re-suspension of particles, and geographical conditions (arid regions). The pilgrim's longer trip duration lead to their highest whole trip exposure to air pollutants, which indicate that they are possibly subject to higher health risk. Better understanding of air pollution exposure and their determinants in the environments will contribute to the development of more appropriate exposure reductive strategies and have significant public health meanings.

  12. Improving the care of sepsis: Between system redesign and professional responsibility: A roundtable discussion in the world sepsis day, September 25, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Yaseen; Alamry, Ahmed; Levy, Mitchell M.; Taher, Saadi; Marini, Abdellatif M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the roundtable discussion in September 25, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia as part of the World Sepsis Day held in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh. The objectives of the roundtable discussion were to (1) review the chasm between the current management of sepsis and best practice, (2) discuss system redesign and role of the microsystem in sepsis management, (3) emphasize the multidisciplinary nature of the care of sepsis and that improvement of the care of sepsis is the responsibility of all, (4) discuss the bundle concept in sepsis management, and (5) reflect on the individual responsibility of the health care team toward sepsis with a focus on accountability and the moral agent. PMID:24987470

  13. Teacher Knowledge That Supports Student Processes in Learning Mathematics: A Study at All-Female Middle Schools in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsaeed, Maha Saad

    2012-01-01

    Teachers in Saudi Arabia are attempting to advance their teaching in mathematics to address specific reforms by the Ministry of Education. Saudi teachers must improve their students' thinking through engagement in problem solving. This qualitative study investigated how teachers use knowledge of student mathematical learning and how they…

  14. Male Saudi Arabian Freshman Science Majors at Jazan University: Their Perceptions of Parental Educational Practices on Their Science Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alrehaly, Essa D.

    2012-01-01

    Examination of Saudi Arabian educational practices is scarce, but increasingly important, especially in light of the country's pace in worldwide mathematics and science rankings. The purpose of the study is to understand and evaluate parental influence on male children's science education achievements in Saudi Arabia. Parental level of…

  15. The Political, Socio-Economic and Sociocultural Impacts of the King Abdullah Scholarship Program (KASP) on Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilal, Kholoud T.; Scott, Safiyyah; Maadad, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Since 2006, Saudi Arabian politicians, economists and sociologists have had to consider the implications of their country's King Abdullah Scholarship Program (KASP). Because Saudi Arabia has certain religious traditions and economic practices that are sensitive, international scholars are examining from different perspectives the outcomes and…

  16. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 4. Saudi Engineering Solar Energy Applications System Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Literature summarizing a study on the Saudi Arabian solar controlled environment agriculture system is presented. Specifications and performance requirements for the system components are revealed. Detailed performance and cost analyses are used to determine the optimum design. A preliminary design of an engineering field test is included. Some weather data are provided for Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

  17. Addressing the Skills Gap in Saudi Arabia: Does Vocational Education Address the Needs of Private Sector Employers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baqadir, Abdullah; Patrick, Fiona; Burns, George

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the findings of data drawn from doctoral research on the extent to which recent changes in vocational training have addressed a perceived skills gap between the needs of private sector employers and potential workers in Saudi Arabia. While the Saudi government has made efforts to enhance the quality of vocational education,…

  18. A systematic review of population-based dental caries studies among children in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al Agili, Dania Ebrahim

    2012-01-01

    Objective Dental caries critically impacts the health and development of children. Understanding caries experience is an important task for Saudi Arabian policymakers to identify intervention targets and improve oral health. The purpose of this review is to analyze current data to assess the nationwide prevalence and severity of caries in children, to identify gaps in baseline information, and to determine areas for future research. Methods A search of published and unpublished studies in PubMed, Google, and local Saudi medical and dental journals was conducted for the three keywords “dental,” “caries,” and “Saudi Arabia.” The inclusion criteria required that the articles were population-based studies that assessed the prevalence of dental caries in healthy children attending regular schools using a cross-sectional study design of a random sample. Results/discussion The review was comprised of one unpublished thesis and 27 published surveys of childhood caries in Saudi Arabia. The earliest study was published in 1988 and the most recent was published in 2010. There is a lack of representative data on the prevalence of dental caries among the whole Saudi Arabian population. The national prevalence of dental caries and its severity in children in Saudi Arabia was estimated to be approximately 80% for the primary dentition with a mean dmft of 5.0 and approximately 70% for children’s permanent dentition with a mean DMFT score of 3.5. The current estimates indicate that the World Health Organization (WHO) 2000 goals are still unmet for Saudi Arabian children. Conclusion Childhood dental caries is a serious dental public health problem that warrants the immediate attention of the government and the dental profession officials in Saudi Arabia. Baseline data on oral health and a good understanding of dental caries determinants are necessary for setting appropriate oral health goals. Without the ability to describe the current situation, it is not possible to identify whether progress is being made toward these goals. A roadmap with a clear starting point, destination, and pathway is a desperately needed tool to improve the oral health of Saudi Arabian children. PMID:23960549

  19. A Social Media Campaign to Promote Breastfeeding among Saudi Women: A Web-based Survey Study.

    PubMed

    Bahkali, Salwa; Alkharjy, Nora; Alowairdy, Maryam; Househ, Mowafa; Da'ar, Omar; Alsurimi, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged breastfeeding can prevent or limit the severity of a variety of diseases and conditions. Although evidence clearly shows that there are health benefits for breastfeeding, adherence to breastfeeding remains a key challenge facing maternal health providers in Saudi Arabia. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impacts of a social media platform (Twitter) to promote breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia. Between February 10 and March 25, 2015, a web-based questionnaire was administered to evaluate the impacts of a Twitter based educational campaign on the awareness, knowledge, and adherence to breastfeeding behavior for women in Saudi Arabia. The overall response rate among mothers with a newborn child was 83% (n=484). The results showed an increase in the knowledge and awareness of breastfeeding practices and adherence among Twitter followers. The initiation rate of breastfeeding had slightly increased among women who never had previously breastfed. More women reported their willingness to continue exclusive breastfeeding and to stop bottle-feeding. Results also show that an integration of professional breastfeeding support, public health education programs through social media could be an effective tool in promoting breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia. There is a need for further research on designing and implementing a social media based educational outreach program to increase women's awareness, knowledge, and adherence to breastfeeding behavior in Saudi Arabia. PMID:26153006

  20. Evaluation of the mastoid triangle for determining sexual dimorphism: A Saudi population based study.

    PubMed

    Madadin, Mohammed; Menezes, Ritesh G; Al Dhafeeri, Obaid; Kharoshah, Magdy A; Al Ibrahim, Rana; Nagesh, K R; Ramadan, Selma Uysal

    2015-09-01

    Demographic assessment of skeletal remains in forensic investigations includes identification of sex. The present study aimed to develop population-specific, sex-discriminating anthropometric standards for the mastoid triangle of a documented Saudi population using computed tomographic (CT) images of the lateral aspect of the skull. The present study was performed on 206 CT images of a documented Saudi population of known sex and age. The clinical CT images of subjects visiting the Department of Radiology, Dammam Medical Complex, Dammam, Saudi Arabia (KSA) were evaluated to know the validity of the metric assessment of the mastoid triangle for identification of sex in a Saudi population. The distance between asterion to porion (AP), asterion to mastoidale (AM), porion to mastoidale (PM) were measured and the area of the mastoid triangle (AMT) was calculated using these measurements. Discriminant function procedure was used to analyze the data for sexual dimorphism. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that all the 3 sides of the mastoid triangle and AMT were sexually dimorphic in the sampled Saudi population with PM being the best individual parameter in discriminating sex with an accuracy of 69.4%. Whereas, all the parameters combined showed the highest accuracy (71.4%). PMID:26165493

  1. Assessing the current state of dental informatics in saudi arabia: the new frontier.

    PubMed

    Al-Nasser, Lubna; Al-Ehaideb, Ali; Househ, Mowafa

    2014-01-01

    Dental informatics is an emerging field that has the potential to transform the dental profession. This study aims to summarize the current applications of dental informatics in Saudi Arabia and to identify the challenges facing expansion of dental informatics in the Saudi context. Search for published articles and specialized forum entries was conducted, as well as interviews with dental professionals familiar with the topic. Results indicated that digital radiography/analysis and administrative management of dental practice are the commonest applications used. Applications in Saudi dental education included: web-based learning systems, computer-based assessments and virtual technology for clinical skills' teaching. Patients' education software, electronic dental/oral health records and the potential of dental research output from electronic databases are yet to be achieved in Saudi Arabia. Challenges facing Saudi dental informatics include: lack of IT infrastructure/support, social acceptability and financial cost. Several initiatives are taken towards the research in dental informatics. Still, more investments are needed to fully achieve the potential of various application of informatics in dental education, practice and research. PMID:25000042

  2. Identification of 2 novel homozygous mutations in the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase gene in Saudi patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Sarar; Hamad, Muddathir H.; Abu-Amero, Khaled K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this report is to analyze the clinical features, and mutations of the methylmalonyl CoA mutase (MUT) gene in 2 patients with methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) attending King Saud University Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in January 2014. The infants aged 6 days (patient 1) and 3 months (patient 2) with sepsis-like picture, metabolic acidosis, and hyperammonemia were presented. Investigations revealed high propionylcarnitine (C3), elevated urinary methylmalonic acids, 3-hydroxypropionic acids and methylcitrate, consistent with MMA. Sanger-sequencing detected a homozygous novel mutation (c.329A>G; p.Y110C) in the MUT gene in patient 1 and a heterozygous in parents. This mutation is predicted to have a damaging effect on the protein structure and function. In patient 2, we detected a novel homozygous nonsense mutation (c.2200C>T; p.Q734X) and a heterozygous in parents. This mutation leads to a premature stop-codon at codon 734 of the MUT gene. We identified 2 novel mutations in the MUT gene causing isolated MMA. PMID:26318470

  3. Evaluation of the best fit distribution for partial duration series of daily rainfall in Madinah, western Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alahmadi, F.; Rahman, N. A.; Abdulrazzak, M.

    2014-09-01

    Rainfall frequency analysis is an essential tool for the design of water related infrastructure. It can be used to predict future flood magnitudes for a given magnitude and frequency of extreme rainfall events. This study analyses the application of rainfall partial duration series (PDS) in the vast growing urban Madinah city located in the western part of Saudi Arabia. Different statistical distributions were applied (i.e. Normal, Log Normal, Extreme Value type I, Generalized Extreme Value, Pearson Type III, Log Pearson Type III) and their distribution parameters were estimated using L-moments methods. Also, different selection criteria models are applied, e.g. Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), Corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc), Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) and Anderson-Darling Criterion (ADC). The analysis indicated the advantage of Generalized Extreme Value as the best fit statistical distribution for Madinah partial duration daily rainfall series. The outcome of such an evaluation can contribute toward better design criteria for flood management, especially flood protection measures.

  4. Efficacy of Pneumatic Dilatation in Saudi Achalasia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Samarkandi, Sara; Al-Harbi, Tahani; Al-Radhi, Haifa; Almadi, Majid A

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims: Pneumatic dilatation (PD) is one of the effective treatments of achalasia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of pneumatic dilation and patient satisfaction in Saudi achalasia patients. Patients and Methods: We have retrospectively recruited patients with confirmed achalasia, who underwent at least one dilatation session from January 1990 to January 2010 at a single tertiary center. Symptoms, including weight loss, dysphagia, retrosternal pain, and regurgitation, were assessed with the use of the Eckardt score (which ranges from 0 to 12, with higher scores indicating more pronounced symptoms). All patients were called and asked about their Eckardt score in addition to their satisfaction score post the dilatation procedure. The primary outcome was therapeutic success (Eckardt score ? 3) and patient satisfaction at the time of their calls. The secondary outcomes included the need for retreatment and the rate of complications. Results: A total of 29 patients were included, with a mean age of 40.30 (95% CI: 36.1-44.6) and 55.2% of them were males. The mean of the pre-dilatation Eckardt score was 8.3 (95% CI: 7.2-9.4), which dropped to 2.59 (95% CI: 1.7-3.5) after PD (P < 0.01) with a clinical remission of 76.7% after the first dilatation and a total failure in two patients (7%) after the third dilatation. The mean number of dilatations was 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1-1.5) where 50.7% required one dilatation, 19.2% required two dilatations, and 30.1% required three dilatations. The mean of the symptoms-free period was 53.4 months (SD 52.7, range 1-180) with symptoms recurring in 35% of patients within 2 years. The mean of post-PD patient satisfaction was 7.45 (95% CI: 6.2-8.7). Perforation, which was treated conservatively, occurred in one patient (3.5%), whereas bleeding occurred in two patients (7%). Age or gender was not found to be a predictor of Eckardt score improvement on multivariate linear regression analysis. Conclusion: PD is an efficacious procedure in Saudi achalasia patients with a very good overall patient satisfaction with 53.4 months of symptoms-free period after a successful dilatation. PMID:24496157

  5. Apolipoprotein E polymorphisms and primary glaucoma in Saudis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dabbagh, Najwa Mohammed; Al-Dohayan, Nourah; Arfin, Misbahul

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The frequencies of apolipoprotein E (APOE) alleles and genotypes were examined in 230 Saudi subjects including primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG; n=60) and primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG; n=40) patients as well as 130 control subjects. Methods The presence of glaucoma in patients was based on clinical examination and/or ophthalmic records. The APOE allele frequency (?2, ?3, and ?4) was studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by reverse-hybridization and restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques. Results Analysis of data showed a complete absence of ?2 allele and a significantly lower frequency of the ?3 allele in primary glaucoma patients (90.5%) compared to the control subjects (95.7%, p=0.034, relative risk [RR]=0.473, protective fraction [PF]=0.318). The frequency of the ?4 allele was significantly higher in the glaucoma patients (9.5%) compared to the control subjects (4.2%, p=0.034, RR=2.169, etiological fraction [EF]=0.329). The ?3/?3 genotype was more common in controls than patients (p=0.060, RR=0.465, PF=0.322). The difference in genotype (?3/?4) was not statistically significant between the two groups (p=0.283). Genotype ?4/?4 was found only in 3% of patients while being completely absent in the controls (p=0.080). The genotypes, ?2/?2, ?2/?3, and ?2/?4, were absent in both the test and control groups. When patients were divided on the basis of types of glaucoma, POAG patients had a significantly higher frequency of ?4 allele and ?4/?4 genotype than controls whereas there was no significant difference between PACG patient and control groups in frequencies of APOE alleles and genotypes. Conclusions This study indicates that the ?4 allele may be associated with POAG and could be a risk factor while ?3 may be protective for POAG, and APOE polymorphisms may not be associated at all with PACG in Saudis. PMID:19421411

  6. Genetic diversity of Moringa peregrina species in Saudi Arabia with ITS sequences

    PubMed Central

    Alaklabi, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    The genus Moringa was the family of Moringaceae and Moringa oleifera and Moringa peregrina are the most famous species of Moringa. M. peregrina is widely grown in Saudi Arabia, Iran and India. Therefore, based on these reports, this study aimed to investigate the first systematic attempt to regulate the genetic diversity of the species M. peregrina in Saudi Arabian samples collected from several geographic locations using internal transcribed sequences. Genomic DNA was separated by CTAB extraction method and PCR was performed. Later on, DNA sequencing was performed for PCR products with ITS. In conclusion, the present study affords the first report on genetic stability of M. peregrina using ITS analysis in Saudi Arabia. Further studies are suggested in order to study in different regions. PMID:25737651

  7. Assessment of the environmental and genetic factors influencing prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Gosadi, Ibrahim M

    2016-01-01

     Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a combination of factors that increases the risk of cardiovascular atherosclerotic diseases including diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and high blood pressure. Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of death in the adult Saudi population where the increase in cardiovascular-related mortality is augmented by the rise in the prevalence of MS. Metabolic syndrome is a multi-factorial disorder influenced by interactions between genetic and environmental components. This review aims to provide a comprehensive assessment of studied environmental and genetic factors explaining the prevalence of MS in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Additionally, this review aims to illustrate factors related to the population genetics of Saudi Arabia, which might explain a proportion of the prevalence of MS. PMID:26739969

  8. Genetic diversity of Moringa peregrina species in Saudi Arabia with ITS sequences.

    PubMed

    Alaklabi, Abdullah

    2015-03-01

    The genus Moringa was the family of Moringaceae and Moringa oleifera and Moringa peregrina are the most famous species of Moringa. M. peregrina is widely grown in Saudi Arabia, Iran and India. Therefore, based on these reports, this study aimed to investigate the first systematic attempt to regulate the genetic diversity of the species M. peregrina in Saudi Arabian samples collected from several geographic locations using internal transcribed sequences. Genomic DNA was separated by CTAB extraction method and PCR was performed. Later on, DNA sequencing was performed for PCR products with ITS. In conclusion, the present study affords the first report on genetic stability of M. peregrina using ITS analysis in Saudi Arabia. Further studies are suggested in order to study in different regions. PMID:25737651

  9. Tour by Saudi prince Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud prior to mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Tour by Saudi prince Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud, payload specialists for STS 51-G mission, prior to mission. Al-Saud and Abdulmohsen Hamad Al-Bassam, the backup payload specialist, man the controls on the flight deck of the crew compartment trainer in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory (29788); the Saudi payload specialists share the hatch of the crew compartment trainer (29789); Portrait view of Abdulmohsen Hamad Al-Bassam during a visit to the Shuttle mockup and integraion laboratory (29790); Don Sirroco, left, explains the middeck facilities in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory (29791); Portrait view of Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration laboratory (29792); The Saudi payload specialists witness a space food demonstration in the life sciences laboratory at JSC. Al-Saud (left) and Al-Bassam (second left) listen as Rita M. Rapp, food specialist, discusses three preparations of re-hydratable food for space travelers. Lynn S. Coll

  10. "Diagnosing" Saudi health reforms: is NHIS the right "prescription"?

    PubMed

    Al-Sharqi, Omar Zayan; Abdullah, Muhammad Tanweer

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines the health context of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). It reviews health systems development in the KSA from 1925 through to contemporary New Health Insurance System (NHIS). It also examines the consistency of NHIS in view of the emerging challenges. This paper identifies the determinants and scope of contextual consistency. First, it indicates the need to evolve an indigenous, integrated, and comprehensive insurance system. Second, it highlights the access and equity gaps in service delivery across the rural and remote regions and suggests how to bring these under insurance coverage. Third, it suggests how inputs from both the public and private sectors should be harmonized - the "quality" of services in the private healthcare industry to be regulated by the state and international standards, its scope to be determined primarily by open-market dynamics and the public sector welfare-model to ensure "access" of all to essential health services. Fourth, it states the need to implement an evidence-based public health policy and bridge inherent gaps in policy design and personal-level lifestyles. Fifth, it points out the need to produce a viable infrastructure for health insurance. Because social research and critical reviews in the KSA health scenario are rare, this paper offers insights into the mainstream challenges of NHIS implementation and identifies the inherent weaknesses that need attention. It guides health policy makers, economists, planners, healthcare service managers, and even the insurance businesses, and points to key directions for similar research in future. PMID:23047768

  11. Road safety and road traffic accidents in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mansuri, Farah A.; Al-Zalabani, Abdulmohsen H.; Zalat, Marwa M.; Qabshawi, Reem I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the changing trends and crucial preventive approaches to road traffic accidents (RTAs) adopted in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) over the last 2.5 decades, and to analyze aspects previously overlooked. Methods: This systematic review was based on evidence of RTAs in KSA. All articles published during the last 25 years on road traffic accident in KSA were analyzed. This study was carried out from December 2013 to May 2014 in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah, KSA. Results: Road traffic accidents accounted for 83.4% of all trauma admissions in 1984-1989, and no such overall trend was studied thereafter. The most frequently injured body regions as reported in the latest studies were head and neck, followed by upper and lower extremities, which was found to be opposite to that of the studies reported earlier. Hospital data showed an 8% non-significant increase in road accident mortalities in contrast to police records of a 27% significant reduction during the years 2005-2010. Excessive speeding was the most common cause reported in all recent and past studies. Conclusion: Disparity was common in the type of reporting of RTAs, outcome measures, and possible causes over a period of 2.5 decade. All research exclusively looked into the drivers’ faults. A sentinel surveillance of road crashes should be kept in place in the secondary and tertiary care hospitals for all regions of KSA. PMID:25828277

  12. Automated management of radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Jamil, M. F.; Basar, M. R.; Tuwaili, W. R.

    2014-09-30

    For usage of radioactive substances, any facility has to register and take license from relevant authority of the country in which such facility is operating. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the authority for managing radioactive sources and providing licenses to organizations for its usage is the National Center of Radiation Protection (NCRP). This paper describes the system that automates registration and licensing process of the National Center of Radiation Protection. To provide 24×7 accesses to all the customers of NCRP, system is developed as web-based application that provide facility to online register, request license, renew license, check request status, view historical data and reports etc. and other features are provided as Electronic Services that would be accessible to users via internet. The system also was designed to streamline and optimize internal operations of NCRP besides providing ease of access to its customers by implementing a defined workflow through which every registration and license request will be routed. In addition to manual payment option, the system would also be integrated with SADAD (online payment system) that will avoid lengthy and cumbersome procedures associated with manual payment mechanism. Using SADAD payment option license fee could be paid through internet/ATM machine or branch of any designated bank, Payment will be instantly notified to NCRP hence delay in funds transfer and verification of invoice could be avoided, SADAD integration is discussed later in the document.

  13. Uranium and trace elements in phosphate fertilizers--Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Khater, Ashraf E M

    2012-01-01

    Manufactured phosphate fertilizers and their agricultural applications are considerable sources of environmental pollution. In this study, composite samples of phosphate fertilizer (PF) of different physical forms (granular, G, and water soluble powder, L) were collected. The activity concentration of 238U in Bq kg(-1) was measured using gamma ray spectrometers, and the concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead and selenium in mg kg(-1) were measured using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometers (ICP-OES). The main aims of this study were to evaluate PF quality according to its physical form, determine manufacturers (local, L, or imported, I), and estimate the hazardous impacts of long-term phosphate fertilization. There was significant variation in the concentration of uranium and other elements in PF samples. In order to have globally normalized data, it is highly recommended to express the concentration of trace elements as per phosphorus mass instead of fertilizer mass. The annual addition of these elements to soil due to phosphate fertilization was calculated. The possible accumulation of added uranium and other trace elements due to fertilization in the subsurface soil layer and/or shallow underground water should be studied in the soil environment of Saudi Arabia. PMID:22134079

  14. Sunlight and vitamin D status in normal Saudi subjects.

    PubMed

    Sedrani, S H; Elidrissy, A W; El Arabi, K M

    1983-07-01

    Serum levels of the circulating form of vitamin D3, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25-(OH)D3], were determined in 59 university students, 26 males and 33 females, aged 18 to 26 yr and in 24 elderly subjects, 13 males and 11 females, with a mean age of 62 +/- 13 yr. The level of 25-(OH)D3 was significantly lower in the elderly persons (p less than 0.001) than in young students of both sexes, and was significantly higher in females than in males. Serum levels of 1, 25- and 24, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol were measured in adult males and found to be within the normal range. A group of elderly patients were exposed to natural uv light, and the circulating levels of 25-(OH)D3, serum phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase were determined both before and 1 day after the last exposure. The exposure to natural uv light resulted in a 2 1/2-fold increase in the level of 25-(OH)D3 and a significant decrease in the activity of alkaline phosphatase, but no significant change in serum phosphorus concentrations was observed. It is concluded that the low vitamin D3 status in Saudis is mainly due to avoidance of sunlight exposure and other factors discussed below. PMID:6602540

  15. Automated management of radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Jamil, M. F.; Basar, M. R.; Tuwaili, W. R.

    2014-09-01

    For usage of radioactive substances, any facility has to register and take license from relevant authority of the country in which such facility is operating. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the authority for managing radioactive sources and providing licenses to organizations for its usage is the National Center of Radiation Protection (NCRP). This paper describes the system that automates registration and licensing process of the National Center of Radiation Protection. To provide 24×7 accesses to all the customers of NCRP, system is developed as web-based application that provide facility to online register, request license, renew license, check request status, view historical data and reports etc. and other features are provided as Electronic Services that would be accessible to users via internet. The system also was designed to streamline and optimize internal operations of NCRP besides providing ease of access to its customers by implementing a defined workflow through which every registration and license request will be routed. In addition to manual payment option, the system would also be integrated with SADAD (online payment system) that will avoid lengthy and cumbersome procedures associated with manual payment mechanism. Using SADAD payment option license fee could be paid through internet/ATM machine or branch of any designated bank, Payment will be instantly notified to NCRP hence delay in funds transfer and verification of invoice could be avoided, SADAD integration is discussed later in the document.

  16. Use of Dietary Supplements among Professional Athletes in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Aljaloud, Sulaiman O.; Ibrahim, Salam A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the usage patterns of dietary supplements among professional athletes in Saudi Arabia. The survey consisted of sixteen questions divided into four categories: use of supplements, reason for consumption of supplements, personal beliefs about supplements, and behavior. The questionnaires were given to the three teams residing in Riyadh: Al Hilal, Al Nasr, and Al-Shabab. Out of the 105 athletes surveyed, we found that only 98 are currently taking dietary supplements and the mean age and standard deviation were 25.74 ± 2.90. The survey results showed a high percentage of athletes (93.3%; n = 98) using different dietary supplements throughout the season, 43.8% (n = 43) reported using supplements for performance, and 32.6% (n = 32) believed in health benefits as a reason for using dietary supplements. Our results showed that a total of 87 (88.7%), 81 (82.6%), and 51 (52.0%) athletes are consuming sports drinks, vitamin C, and multivitamins, respectively. Meanwhile, those supplements ranking among the least used included omega 6 (18.6%), creatine (16.3%), and Ginkgo biloba (10.2%). A majority of athletes indicated that their use of supplements was for the purpose of improving their health and performance. PMID:23762541

  17. Occurrence of radon in groundwater of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alabdula'aly, Abdulrahman I

    2014-12-01

    Samples were collected from 1025 wells supplying drinking water to the 13 regions of Saudi Arabia and analyzed for radon concentrations. The weighted radon median value for the entire country was found to be 4.62 Bq L(-1) with a range of 0.01-67.4 Bq L(-1). The percentage of samples with radon concentration equal to or greater than 11.1 Bq L(-1) (US EPA proposed MCL) was found to be 19.22%. The range of radon in shallow wells varied between 0.06 and 67.4 Bq L(-1) (median value 5.1 Bq L(-1)) and between 0.06 and 40.9 Bq L(-1) (median value 5.34 Bq L(-1)) for deep wells. However, 50% of the samples had radon concentrations equal to or greater than 4.0 and 2.87 Bq L(-1) for the shallow and deep wells, respectively. Correlation of well depth with radon levels revealed that wells drilled in Saq aquifer consisting of predominantly sandstone with significant shale layers in the upper parts, gave higher median radon levels than in Manjur aquifer which consists of predominantly limestone and sandstone. PMID:25244698

  18. Dental age assessment of Western Saudi children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Alshihri, Amin M.; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the London Atlas of Human Tooth Development and Eruption for age estimation in Saudi Arabian children and adolescents (aged 2–20 years), for forensic odontology application. Materials and methods This cross-sectional survey analyzed orthopantomograms (OPGs) of the complete dentition (including root development) to estimate the deviation from chronological age. Each OPG was de-identified and analyzed individually and classified into age-groups by the lead author, using the methods of the Atlas of Tooth Development. Results OPGs from a total of 252 patients [110 (44%) males, 142 (56%) females] aged 2–20 years (24–240 months) were examined in this study. The average estimated and chronological ages of subjects differed significantly p < 0.001 (143 ± 55.4 vs. 145 ± 57.9 months). Most (65.5%) estimates were within 12 months of subjects’ chronological ages; 19% overestimated and 15.5% underestimated age by >12 months. Conclusion This study, conducted in a sub-population of different origin than the UK sample used for the development of the London Atlas, identified variation in age estimates that may have significant impacts on results. The establishment of a composite international repository of atlas-based data for diverse ethnic sub-populations would be of great value to clinicians across the globe. PMID:26236126

  19. Periodontal health awareness among gynecologists in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Ghousia; Asa’ad, Farah; Baseer, Mohammad Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the knowledge of periodontal disease and pregnancy outcomes among the gynecologists practicing in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 200 randomly chosen gynecologists from Riyadh was carried out by using a structured, self-administered, closed-ended questionnaire. Knowledge of periodontal disease and possible ways of prevention; knowledge of periodontal disease and pregnancy outcomes; and oral self-care attitudes among gynecologists were assessed. Results: One-quarter of the gynecologists knew the meaning of dental plaque. Almost 57.5% believed that the frequency of toothbrushing should be increased during pregnancy. Eighty percent of gynecologists were aware of the serious effects of smoking on the pregnant woman and her child. Less than half (44.5%) believed that there is a relationship between gum disease and premature labor. Gynecologists working in the government sector were significantly more aware about the causes of inflamed gum in pregnancy, gum disease and its prevention, and negative effects of smoking on pregnancy. A significantly higher percentage of male and senior gynecologists aged between 50 and 54 years answered that gum disease would lead to the delivery of a preterm or low-birth-weight infant. Conclusion: Gynecologists considered in the present study showed an acceptable level of knowledge and awareness toward periodontal health and the association between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:26236681

  20. A review of some statistics on breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Jassir, Mohammed; Moizuddin, Syed Khaja; Al-Bashir, Bushra

    2003-01-01

    Breastfeeding is the ideal and most natural way of nurturing infants. The importance of breastfeeding has been proved unequivocally, and UNICEF and WHO have issued guidelines to ensure breastfeeding. Saudi Arabia is a country where the legislation is derived from the Quran and Hadiths. The Holy Quran says that the mothers shall give suck to their offspring for two complete years.... The majority of mothers start breastfeeding their infants but soon introduce bottles. The single most common reason cited for the early introduction of bottle feeding is that the breast milk is insufficient. Because of this tendency, many mothers practice mixed feeding. The duration of breastfeeding varies but in general it is done beyond six months, and various factors affect the duration. Researchers have recently started using the WHO recommended key breastfeeding indicators. In a study these key indicators were found to be very low. The authors feel that there is a need to revise the media campaign for promoting breastfeeding utilizing the instructions and guidance from the Holy Quran and Hadiths. PMID:14653507

  1. Sinkhole detection using electrical resistivity tomography in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Ahmed M.; El-Kaliouby, Hesham; Zabramawi, Yasser A.

    2012-12-01

    Karst phenomena exist in different areas in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, causing serious environmental problems that affect urban development and infrastructure (buildings, roads and highways). One of the most important problems are sinkholes, which most of the time consist of unfilled voids. These sinkholes are formed as a result of the chemical leaching of carbonate and evaporite formations by percolating water. Field investigations show that there are many surface expressions of sinkholes in the area; some appear on the ground surface and others are hidden in the subsurface. Geophysical data were collected at the study area using two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) with different electrode spacings to delineate buried sinkholes and associated subsurface cavities. Our findings indicated that the dipole-dipole method using an electrode spacing of 1 m was successful in detecting a known subsurface sinkhole. According to the ERT method the detected sinkhole depth ranges from 2 to 4 m, its height ranges from 2 to 4 m, and its width ranges from 5 to 7 m. Field observation has verified the geophysical data, especially along the profile A-A\\. Finally, closely spaced ERT profiles were successful in determining the three-dimensional volume of the subsurface sinkhole.

  2. Doctor-patient communication: a skill needed in saudi arabia.

    PubMed

    Elzubier, Ahmed G

    2002-01-01

    Doctor-patient communication is a skill essential for the satisfaction of the patients' needs and expectations. It involves an art that every practicing physician should have. The situations in health care delivery that demands good doctor-patient communication are many. Diabetes care, the management of hypertension, explaining serious disease diagnoses, prognosis, and investigative procedures are some of the common situations where good doctor-patient communication is very essential. Doctor-patient communication assumes a special status in Saudi Arabia where as a result of mixed ethnicity of the manpower in the health service and the expatriate community, there is a vast diversity of languages, health traditions and beliefs. The skill of doctor-patient communication can be developed and improved by the application of the principles of the patient-centered approach, the utilization of patient-oriented evidence that matters, and its inclusion in the undergraduate curriculum in the first few years of medical school. There should be continuous medical education programs for practicing doctors on the skills of doctor-patient communication through seminars and workshops. This would be a further step towards the improvement of the consumer's well-being. PMID:23008663

  3. Fish consumption behavior and rates in native and non-native people in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Batang, Zenon; Alikunhi, Nabeel; Al-Jahdali, Ramzi; Al-Jebreen, Dalal; Aziz, Mohammed A. M.; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz

    2015-01-01

    Fish are a healthy source of protein and nutrients, but contaminants in fish may provide health risks. Determining the risk from contaminants in fish requires site-specific information on consumption patterns. We examine consumption rates for resident and expatriates in the Jeddah region of Saudi Arabia, by species of fish and fishing location. For Saudis, 3.7 % of males and 4.3 % of females do not eat fish; for expatriates, the percent not eating fish is 6.6 % and 6.1 % respectively. Most people eat fish at home (over 90 %), and many eat fish at restaurants (65 % and 48 %, respectively for Saudis and expatriates). Fish eaten at home comes from local fish markets, followed by supermarkets. Saudis included fish in their diets at an average of 1.4±1.2 meals/week at home and 0.8±0.7 meals/week at restaurants, while expats ate 2.0±1.7 meals/week at home and 1.1±1.1 meals/week in restaurants. Overall, Saudis ate 2.2 fish meals/week, while expats ate 3.1 meals/week. Grouper (Epinephelus and Cephalopholis) were eaten by 72% and 60% respectively. Plectropomus pessuliferus was the second favorite for both groups and Hipposcarus harid and Lethrinus lentjan were in 3rd and 4th place in terms of consumption. Average meal size was 68 g for Saudis and 128 g for expatriates. These data can be used by health professionals, risk assessors, and environmental regulators to examine potential risk from contaminants in fish, and to compare consumption rates with other sites. PMID:24926920

  4. State of health economic evaluation research in Saudi Arabia: a review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aqeel, Sinaa A

    2012-01-01

    Background If evaluation of economic evidence is to be used increasingly in Saudi Arabia, a review of the published literature would be useful to inform policy decision-makers of the current state of research and plan future research agendas. The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical review of the state of health economic evaluation research within the Saudi context with regard to the number, characteristics, and quality of published articles. Methods A literature search was conducted on May 8, 2011 to identify health economic articles pertaining to Saudi Arabia in the PubMed, Embase, and EconLit databases, using the following terms alone or in combination: “cost*”, “economics”, “health economics”, “cost-effectiveness”, “cost-benefit”, “cost minimization”, “cost utility analysis”, and “Saudi”. Reference lists of the articles identified were also searched for further articles. The tables of contents of the Saudi Pharmaceutical Journal and the Saudi Medical Journal were reviewed for the previous 5 years. Results The search identified 535 citations. Based on a reading of abstracts and titles, 477 papers were excluded. Upon reviewing the full text of the remaining 58 papers, 43 were excluded. Fifteen papers were included. Ten were categorized as full economic evaluations and five as partial economic evaluations. These articles were published between 1997 and 2010. The majority of the studies identified did not clearly state the perspective of their evaluation. There are many concerns about the methods used to collect outcome and costs data. Only one study used some sort of sensitivity analysis to assess the effects of uncertainty on the robustness of its conclusions. Conclusion This review highlights major flaws in the design, analysis, and reporting of the identified economic analyses. Such deficiencies mean that the local economic evidence available to decision-makers is not very useful. Thus, building research capability in health economics is warranted. PMID:22826634

  5. A qualitative exploration of the major challenges facing pharmacovigilance in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Aljadhey, Hisham; Mahmoud, Mansour A.; Alshammari, Thamir M.; Al-Dhaeefi, Mohammed; Louet, Hervé Le; Perez-Gutthann, Susana; Pitts, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the challenges facing pharmacovigilance in Saudi Arabia and formulate recommendations to improve it from the perspective of healthcare professionals in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This was a qualitative study of 4 focus group discussions with pharmacists, physicians, and academicians held under the auspices of the King Saud University School of Pharmacy and the Center for Medicine in the Public Interest, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A total of 29 eligible healthcare professionals were invited to participate in the discussion. The predefined themes of the study were the current practice and major challenges facing pharmacovigilance in regulatory bodies, hospitals, the community, and academia, as well as recommendations to improve pharmacovigilance practice. Result: Of the 29 participants invited, 27 attended the discussion. Challenges facing regulatory bodies included complicated adverse drug reactions (ADR) reporting forms, lack of feedback on ADRs submitted to the Saudi Food and Drug Authority, lack of decisions from the local authority to withdraw medications, and lack of data on pharmacovigilance. The challenges to pharmacovigilance in hospitals included the lack of knowledge of the significance of ADR reporting, workload, blaming culture, and lack of collaboration between regulatory bodies and hospitals. However, challenges facing pharmaceutical industries included the lack of drug manufacturers in Saudi Arabia and lack of interest in pharmacovigilance. Recommendations to improve pharmacovigilance included the need for communication, stronger regulatory requirements, the need for research, the need for unified ADRs reporting, and continuous education and training. Conclusion: The study has identified the challenges facing pharmacovigilance in Saudi Arabia and made certain recommendations to overcome them. These recommendations might be helpful for regulatory bodies to enhance spontaneous reporting and promote pharmacovigilance. PMID:26318468

  6. Fish consumption behavior and rates in native and non-native people in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Batang, Zenon; Alikunhi, Nabeel; Al-Jahdali, Ramzi; Al-Jebreen, Dalal; Aziz, Mohammed A M; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz

    2014-08-01

    Fish are a healthy source of protein and nutrients, but contaminants in fish may provide health risks. Determining the risk from contaminants in fish requires site-specific information on consumption patterns. We examine consumption rates for resident and expatriates in the Jeddah region of Saudi Arabia, by species of fish and fishing location. For Saudis, 3.7% of males and 4.3% of females do not eat fish; for expatriates, the percent not eating fish is 6.6% and 6.1% respectively. Most people eat fish at home (over 90%), and many eat fish at restaurants (65% and 48%, respectively for Saudis and expatriates). Fish eaten at home comes from local fish markets, followed by supermarkets. Saudis included fish in their diets at an average of 1.4 ± 1.2 meals/week at home and 0.8 ± 0.7 meals/week at restaurants, while expats ate 2.0 ± 1.7 meals/week at home and 1.1 ± 1.1 meals/week in restaurants. Overall, Saudis ate 2.2 fish meals/week, while expats ate 3.1 meals/week. Grouper (Epinephelus and Cephalopholis) were eaten by 72% and 60% respectively. Plectropomus pessuliferus was the second favorite for both groups and Hipposcarus harid and Lethrinus lentjan were in 3rd and 4th place in terms of consumption. Average meal size was 68 g for Saudis and 128 g for expatriates. These data can be used by health professionals, risk assessors, and environmental regulators to examine potential risk from contaminants in fish, and to compare consumption rates with other sites. PMID:24926920

  7. City health development planning.

    PubMed

    Green, Geoff; Acres, John; Price, Charles; Tsouros, Agis

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this evaluation was to review the evolution and process of city health development planning (CHDP) in municipalities participating in the Healthy Cities Network organized by the European Region of the World Health Organization. The concept of CHDP combines elements from three theoretical domains: (a) health development, (b) city governance and (c) urban planning. The setting was the 56 cities which participated in Phase III (1998-2002) of the Network. Evidence was gathered from documents either held in WHO archives or made available from Network cities and from interviews with city representatives. CHDPs were the centrepiece of Phase III, evolving from city health plans developed in Phase II. They are strategic documents giving direction to municipalities and partner agencies. Analysis revealed three types of CHDP, reflecting the realpolitik of each city. For many cities, the process of CHDP was as important as the plan itself. PMID:19914991

  8. New generic and species records for the flora of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jacob; Sivadasan, M; Al-Ansari, A M; Alfarhan, Ahmed; El-Sheikh, Mohamed; Basahi, Mohamed; Alatar, A A

    2014-11-01

    Recent field works in the central and southern regions of Saudi Arabia including agricultural centers have managed to collect four vascular plants new to terrestrial and wetland flora of the country. These new additions include one new genus Malvastrum A. Gray (M. coromandelianum) subsp. capitato-spicatum (O. Kuntze) S.R. Hill, Potamogeton perfoliatus L. (Potamogetonaceae), Euphorbia tirucalli L. (Euphorbiaceae) and Sesuvium portulacastrum (L.) L. (Aizoaceae). Detailed morphological description, distribution and habitat of each of these species are provided along with illustrations and photographs. The report of new additions to the flora of Saudi Arabia indicated that the country needs thorough botanical explorations. PMID:25313281

  9. New generic and species records for the flora of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jacob; Sivadasan, M.; Al-Ansari, A.M.; Alfarhan, Ahmed; El-Sheikh, Mohamed; Basahi, Mohamed; Alatar, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent field works in the central and southern regions of Saudi Arabia including agricultural centers have managed to collect four vascular plants new to terrestrial and wetland flora of the country. These new additions include one new genus Malvastrum A. Gray (M. coromandelianum) subsp. capitato-spicatum (O. Kuntze) S.R. Hill, Potamogeton perfoliatus L. (Potamogetonaceae), Euphorbia tirucalli L. (Euphorbiaceae) and Sesuvium portulacastrum (L.) L. (Aizoaceae). Detailed morphological description, distribution and habitat of each of these species are provided along with illustrations and photographs. The report of new additions to the flora of Saudi Arabia indicated that the country needs thorough botanical explorations. PMID:25313281

  10. PREVALENCE OF DICROCOELIUM DENDRITICUM INFECTION IN SHEEP AT TAIF PROVINCE, WEST SAUDI ARABIA.

    PubMed

    Albogami, Bandar M; Kelany, Abdul Hakeem M; Abu-Zinadah, Osama A

    2015-08-01

    Dicrocoelium dendriticum is a common zoonotic parasite of sheep in many Regions of Saudi Arabia. In chronic infections, this parasite causes biliary cirrhosis in livers of cattle, sheep, or goats and leads to economic losses. This study compared the prevalence of Dicrocoelium dendriticum in local sheep and imported sheep in Taif Province, West Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional survey was carried out in slaughterhouses in Taif Province. A total 2230 local sheep and 21383 imported sheep were studied. The number of injury in imported sheep was observed as 99 representing 0.46% of the number of animals examined, while no record of any injury was observed in local sheep. PMID:26485864

  11. Triage systems: a review of the literature with reference to Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N A

    2010-06-01

    This review evaluates some of the international literature on triage in order to provide evidence-based data for the medical community in Saudi Arabia specifically and the Eastern Mediterranean Region in general. The aim is to encourage national health planners and decision-makers to apply formal triage systems in the emergency departments of general and specialist hospitals and other relevant health settings, including primary and psychiatric care. Research and training on triage is extremely limited in Saudi Arabia and the Region and this review highlights the need for more research on triage systems and for the inclusion of training on triage in medical education programmes. PMID:20799600

  12. Microtremor Measurements Over a Non-Producing Reservoir in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popoola, A. K.; Kaka, S. I.

    2011-12-01

    As part of National Science, Technology and Innovation Plan of the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) program, we are conducting a small-scale pilot passive seismic experiment over a non-producing reservoir to better understand and characterize the origin of various near-surface noises. In this paper, we present the results obtained so far from five stations distributed at various locations of interest over the Dammam Dome structure, which is where the first discovery of oil in Saudi Arabia is situated. One of our stations is located on a concrete foundation structure that used to house the old seismic station at KFUPM. The remaining four stations are situated within the Dammam Dome structure at KFUPM where both middle and upper Rus Formations are exposed. Continuous data was collected at all stations with a Geospace Seismic Recording system manufactured by the OYO Geospace. We systematically selected recordings at all stations at different times of the day in order to check the diurnal variations and site dependences. We analyzed time series data and performed spectral analysis at various frequency range of interest between 0.1-30 Hz. We also looked at microtremor signals between 2 to 3 Hz to see whether or not there exists the correlation between low-frequency microtremors and hydrocarbon bearing structures under the subsurface as reported by various researchers in the region. The results obtained so far show no clear signals between 2-3 Hz. We hope that our ongoing experiment will likely contribute in resolving the ongoing debate on the use of microtremor signals as a direct hydrocarbon indicator by bringing new data and experimental results. Meanwhile, strong signals were consistently observed between 23-25 Hz, specifically at stations located on open grounds. We observed microtremor signals due to site amplifications at frequency < 3Hz with periodic peaks at an average frequency of about10 Hz before the amplification disappears. We also noticed spectral spikes that have likely originated from heavy machinery working at construction sites at a distance which disappear at night.

  13. Increased cesarean section rate in Central Saudi Arabia: a change in practice or different maternal characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kadri, Hanan M; Al-Anazi, Sultana A; Tamim, Hani M

    2015-01-01

    Background Cesarean section (CS) rate has shown an alarming increase. We aimed in this work to identify factors contributing to the increasing rate of CS in central Saudi Arabia. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted at King Abdulaziz Medical City. Two groups of women were included (G1 and G2). G1 had delivered by CS during the year 2002 (CS rate 12%), and G2 had delivered by CS during the year 2009 (CS rate 20%). We compared the included women’s characteristics, neonates, CS indications, and complications. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 15 program. Odds ratios and confidence intervals were calculated to report precision of categorical data results. A P-value of ?0.05 was considered significant. Results A total of 198 women were included in G1 and 200 in G2. Both groups had comparable maternal and fetal characteristics; however, absence of antenatal care has resulted in 70% increase in CS deliveries for G2, P=0.008, OR =0.30, CI 0.12–0.76. Previous vaginal surgeries have contributed to tenfold increase in CS deliveries for G2, P=0.006, OR =10.37, CI 1.32–81.78. G2 had eight times increased CS deliveries than G1 due to intrauterine growth restriction, P=0.02, OR =8.21, CI 1.02–66.25, and 80% increased risk of CS was based on maternal demand, P=0.02, OR =0.20, CI 0.02–1.71. Decision taken by less-experienced staff was associated with 2.5-fold increase in CS deliveries for G2, P=0.002, OR =2.62, CI 1.39–4.93. There was a significant increase in CS deliveries under regional analgesia and shorter duration of hospital stay for G2, P=0.0001 and P=0.001, respectively. G2 women had 2.75-fold increase in neonatal intensive care unit admission, P=0.03, OR =2.75, CI 1.06–7.15. Conclusion CS delivery rate significantly increased within the studied population. The increased rate of CS may be related to a change in physician’s practice rather than a change in maternal characteristics, and it appears to be reducible. PMID:26203285

  14. New Particle Formation Events During 2013 in Hada Al Sham, Saudi-Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitola, K.; Hyvärinen, A.; Lihavainen, H.; Alghamdi, M.; Hussein, T.; Khodeir, M.; Shehata, A.; Laaksonen, A. J.; Kulmala, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    New particle formation (NPF) is the dominant source of aerosol particles in the atmosphere and plays an important role in the global climate (Kulmala et al., 2013). NPF events has been observed in various places around the world (Kulmala et al., 2007). Arabian Peninsula has one of the highest aerosol burdens due to dust storms, local petroleum industry, traffic and advection from southern Asia. Here we present results of new particle formation event analysis from the first full year of measurements in the new measurement station in Hada Al Sham, Saudi-Arabia. The background station in Hada Al Sham (21.802° North, 39.729° East, 254 m a.s.l.) was founded at the end of 2012 on an agricultural test field 60 km to southeast from the city of Jeddah. The terrain around the station is arid desert with very scarce yearly precipitation. There are no local pollution sources. Main instrumentation include: PM2.5 and PM10, number size distribution (7 nm - 10 ?m) and total concentration, absorption and scattering coefficients, and the basic weather parameters. We analysed the twin DMPS data from year 2013 classifying new particle formation events by visual day-to-day method. The days were classified following the principal presented in Dal Maso et al., (2005). The data coverage was 264 days (72.3 %) of the year. 210 Days (79.5 %) were classified as NPF event (Class I and II) days, 37 days (14.0 %) as undefined and 17 days (6.4 %) as non-event days. The analysis of the NPF event days was considered again as the freshly formed particles was observed shrinking after the original growth in most of the NPF event days. Typical event day DMPS data with a shrinking mode of particles is presented in Fig.1. Some of the days involved simultaneous shrinking and growth of the particles. Table 1 summarizes the frequency of each type of event day. Events G S G + S unclear 210 25 102 33 50 Days 100 11.9 48.6 15.7 23.8 (%) Table 1. Reclassification of the event days (classes I and II). G is clear growth, S is clear shrinkage, G + S is both growth and shrinkage and unclear is not clear in either way.ReferencesM. Dal Maso, et al. (2005). Bor. Env. Res., 10, 323-336.M. Kulmala, et al. (2006). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 787-793. M. Kulmala, et al. (2013). Science, 336, 943-946.

  15. 2 CITY COUNCIL CITY OF NEW YORK

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    Conservation Committee New York City Audubon Society 17 John E. Pearson 18 Sierra Club - New York City Group 19 14 B E F O R E: 15 JAMES GENNARO 16 Chairperson, 17 COUNCIL MEMBERS: Bill DeBlasio 18 Oliver Koppell of Environmental Protection 7 James Mueller 8 Director of Planning NYC Department of Environmental Protection 9

  16. Jerusalem: City of Dreams, City of Sorrows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricks, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Jerusalem is more than an intriguing global historical city; it is a classroom for liberal learning and international understanding. It had never been a city of one language, one religion and one culture. Looking at the origins of Jerusalem's name indicates its international and multicultural nature. While Israelis designate Jerusalem as their…

  17. What Is Clean Cities?

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-08-01

    This Clean Cities Program fact sheet describes the purpose and scope of this DOE program. Clean Cities facilitates the use of alternative and advanced fuels and vehicles to displace petroleum in the transportation sector.

  18. Harmonic analysis of precipitation climatology in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarawneh, Qassem

    2015-02-01

    Annual rainfall records of 20 stations for 30 years are used in order to detect rainfall regimes and climatic features of Saudi Arabia using harmonic analysis techniques. In this study, the percentages of variance, amplitudes, and phase angles are calculated in order to depict the spatial and temporal characteristics of the country's rainfall. The first harmonic explains 42 % of rainfall variation in the western (W) region. This percentage increases toward east (E) and north (N) with 69 and 67 %, respectively. In the southwest (SW) region, the percentages explain 43 % of rainfall variation. The percentages of variance in W and SW are lower than in the E, NW, and central (C) regions. This implies significant contributions of the second harmonic in W and SW regions with 26 and 16 %, respectively. The high percentages of the second and third harmonics in W and SW regions suggest that these two regions are affected by different weather systems at different times. The SW region has the highest amplitudes of the first, second, and third harmonics. The amplitude of the first harmonic reaches to 21 mm in SW and 9 mm in both C and E regions. The time of maximum rainfall is calculated using phase angle; the result reflects that maximum rainfall is shifted forward on the time axis toward the spring season in SW and C regions, January in E and NW regions, and October and November in the W region. This reveals that the SW region is a completely different climatic region, though some of what affects this region also affects the central region. Conditions in the E and NW regions are mainly affected by Mediterranean weather systems, while the W region is affected by unstable conditions caused by the active Red Sea Trough (RST) in October and November.

  19. HIV-Care Outcome in Saudi Arabia; a Longitudinal Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mozaini, Maha A.; Mansour, Michael K.; Al-Hokail, Abdullah A.; Mohmed, Magid A.; Daham, Munirah A. Bin; Al-Abdely, Hail M.; Frayha, Husn H.; Al-Rabiah, Fahad A.; Alhajjar, Sami H.; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Adra, Chaker N.; Alrajhi, Abdulrahman A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical characteristics of HIV-1 infection in people inhabiting Western, Sub-Saharan African, and South-East Asian countries are well recognized. However, very little information is available with regard to HIV-1 infection and treatment outcome in MENA countries including the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states. Methods Clinical, demographic and epidemiologic characteristics of 602 HIV-1 infected patients followed in the adult Infectious Diseases Clinic of King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia a tertiary referral center were longitudinally collected from 1989 to 2010. Results Of the 602 HIV-1 infected patients in this observation period, 70% were male. The major mode of HIV-1 transmission was heterosexual contact (55%). At diagnosis, opportunistic infections were found in 49% of patients, most commonly being pneumocysitis. AIDS associated neoplasia was also noted in 6% of patients. A hundred and forty-seven patients (24%) died from the cohort by the end of the observation period. The mortality rate peaked in 1992 at 90 deaths per 1000 person-year, whereas the mortality rate gradually decreased to <1% from 1993-2010. In 2010, 71% of the patients were receiving highly active retroviral therapy. Conclusions These data describe the clinical characteristic of HIV-1-infected patients at a major tertiary referral hospital in KSA over a 20-year period. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy resulted in a significant reduction in both morbidity and mortality. Future studies are needed in the design and implementation of targeted treatment and prevention strategies for HIV-1 infection in KSA. PMID:25750760

  20. Ash Shutbah: A possible impact structure in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnos, Edwin; Hofmann, Beda A.; Schmieder, Martin; Al-Wagdani, Khalid; Mahjoub, Ayman; Al-Solami, Abdulaziz A.; Habibullah, Siddiq N.; Matter, Albert; Alwmark, Carl

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated the Ash Shutbah circular structure in central Saudi Arabia (21°37'N 45°39'E) using satellite imagery, field mapping, thin-section petrography, and X-ray diffraction of collected samples. The approximately 2.1 km sized structure located in flat-lying Jurassic Tuwaiq Mountain Limestone has been nearly peneplained by erosional processes. Satellite and structural data show a central area consisting of Dhruma Formation sandstones with steep bedding and tight folds plunging radially outward. Open folding occurs in displaced, younger Tuwaiq Mountain Limestone Formation blocks surrounding the central area, but is absent outside the circular structure. An approximately 60 cm thick, unique folded and disrupted orthoquartzitic sandstone marker bed occurring in the central area of the structure is found 140 m deeper in undisturbed escarpment outcrops located a few hundred meters west of the structure. With exception of a possible concave shatter cone found in the orthoquartzite of the central area, other diagnostic shock features are lacking. Some quartz-rich sandstones from the central area show pervasive fracturing of quartz grains with common concussion fractures. This deformation was followed by an event of quartz dissolution and calcite precipitation consistent with local sea- or groundwater heating. The combination of central stratigraphic uplift of 140 m, concussion features in discolored sandstone, outward-dipping concentric folds in the central area, deformation restricted to the rocks of the ring structure, a complex circular structure of 2.1 km diameter that appears broadly consistent with what one would expect from an impact structure in sedimentary targets, and a possible shatter cone all point to an impact origin of the Ash Shutbah structure. In fact, the Ash Shutbah structure appears to be a textbook example of an eroded, complex impact crater located in flat-lying sedimentary rocks, where the undisturbed stratigraphic section can be studied in escarpment outcrops in the vicinity of the structure.

  1. Visual and neurologic sequelae of methanol poisoning in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Elkhamary, Sahar M.; Asghar, Nasira; Bosley, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To present the visual sequelae of methanol poisoning and to emphasize the characteristics of methanol exposure in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Methods: A retrospective case series was carried out on 50 sequential patients with methanol poisoning seen at the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital and King Saud University Hospitals in Riyadh, KSA between 2008 and 2014. All patients were examined by a neuro-ophthalmologist at least one month after methanol intoxication. Results: All 50 patients were young or middle-aged males. All admitted to drinking unbranded alcohol within 2-3 days before profound or relatively profound, painless, bilateral visual loss. Mean visual acuity in this group was hand motions (logMAR 2.82; range 0.1 - 5.0) with some eye to eye variability within individuals. Worse visual acuity was correlated with advancing age (Pearson correlation: oculus dextrus [right eye] - 0.37, p=0.008; oculus sinister [left eye] - 0.36, p=0.011). All patients had optic atrophy bilaterally, and all tested patients had visual field defects. Tremors with or without rigidity were present in 12 patients, and 11 of 30 patients who had neuroimaging performed had evidence of putaminal necrosis. Conclusion: Methanol intoxication causes visual loss within 12-48 hours due to relatively severe, painless, bilateral optic nerve damage that may be somewhat variable between eyes, and is generally worse with advancing age. The coincidence of bilateral optic nerve damage and bilateral putaminal necrosis in a young or middle-aged male is very suspicious for methanol-induced damage. PMID:25935177

  2. Saqqar: A 34 km diameter impact structure in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, Thomas; Afifi, Abdulkader M.; Stewart, Simon A.; Poelchau, Michael H.; Cook, Douglas J.; Neville, Allen S.

    2015-11-01

    Here we present the first proof of an impact origin for the Saqqar circular structure in northwestern Saudi Arabia (Neville et al. ), with an apparent diameter of 34 km, centered at 29°35'N, 38°42'E. The structure is formed in Cambrian-Devonian siliciclastics and is unconformably overlain by undeformed Cretaceous and Paleogene sediments. The age of impact is not well constrained and lies somewhere between 410 and 70 Ma. The subsurface structure is constrained by 2-D reflection seismic profiles and six drilled wells. First-order structural features are a central uplift that rises approximately 2 km above regional datums, surrounded by a ring syncline. The crater rim is defined by circumferential normal faults. The central uplift and ring syncline correspond to a Bouguer gravity high and an annular ring-like low, respectively. The wells were drilled within the central uplift, the deepest among them exceed 2 km depth. Sandstone core samples from these wells show abundant indicators of a shock metamorphic overprint. Planar deformation features (PDFs) were measured with orientations along (0001), {101¯3}, and less frequently along {101¯1} and {101¯4}. Planar fractures (PFs) predominantly occur along (0001) and {101¯1}, and are locally associated with feather features (FFs). In addition, some shocked feldspar grains and strongly deformed mica flakes were found. The recorded shock pressure ranges between 5 and 15 GPa. The preserved level of shock and the absence of an allochthonous crater fill suggest that Saqqar was eroded by 1-2 km between the Devonian and Maastrichtian. The documentation of unequivocal shock features proves the formation of the Saqqar structure by a hypervelocity impact event.

  3. Trauma care systems in Saudi Arabia: an agenda for action

    PubMed Central

    Al-Naami, Mohammed Y.; Arafah, Maria A.; Al-Ibrahim, Fatimah S.

    2010-01-01

    Saudi Arabia is undergoing a rapid population growth that along with improved socioeconomics has led many individuals to own a car or even a number of cars per family, resulting in a greater number of vehicles on the roads. The reduced focus on good public transportation systems and the dependence on cars for transportation have created a diversity of drivers who are unfamiliar with the local driving rules and lack the basic skills for safe driving. This is in addition to some young drivers who frequently violate traffic laws and tend to speed most of the time. This unplanned expansion in road traffic has resulted in more car accidents, injuries, disabilities, and deaths. Accompanying that is an increased socioeconomic burden, depletion of human resources, emotional and psychological stress on families, and a strain on healthcare facilities. If this continues without prompt intervention, it will lead to increased insurance premiums and may become unmanageable. To minimize this impact, a national or regional multidisciplinary trauma system has to be developed and implemented. A trauma system is a preplanned, comprehensive, and coordinated regional injury response network that includes all facilities with the capability to care for the injured. Essential components of the system include trauma prevention, prehospital care, hospital care, rehabilitation, system administration, trauma care education and training, trauma care evaluation and quality improvement, along with the participation of society. Research has documented a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality from trauma after the implementation of such systems, depending on their efficiency. The purpose of this review is to discuss the problem of road traffic accidents in this country and address the trauma care system as an effective solution. PMID:20103958

  4. Stratigraphy and sedimentation of the Unayzah reservoir, central Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Senalp, M.; Abdulaziz, A.

    1995-08-01

    Significant reserves of Arabian super light oil, condensate, and associated gas occur in the various genetically different sandstone bodies of the upper Permian Unayzah and Khuff Formations in Central Saudi Arabia. The Unayzah Formation which rests unconformably on the older formations is composed of red colored, poorly sorted conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, caliche and nodular anhydrite. Facies changes occur due to the presence of various subenvironments and possible faulting and structural growth in the basin during deposition. However, the entire Unayzah Formation shows an overall fining and thinning-upward sequence. It was deposited as coalescing alluvial fans dominated by braided streams which graded into meandering stream and playa lakes under and to semi-arid conditions. Eolian processes were also inferred. A marked unconformity which is indicated by the occurrence of thick caliche and soil horizons separate the Unayzah and the overlying Khuff Formation. The Khuff Formation consists primarily of marine shale, marl, and fine- to very coarse-grained sandstones in the lower parts; shale, limestone, dolomite, and amhydrite in the upper parts. The sandstones were deposited as incised channel fills and their associated low stand deltaic sediments as a result of fluctuating sea level during the deposition of the Khuff Formation. The base of the incised channels represent a sequence boundary. Red colored and rooted paleosols were formed on the underlying marine sediments. During relative sea level rise, good quality reservoir sands were deposited by aggradation within the incised channels. Sand deposition within the channels terminated at the same time, and the area was covered by shallow marine limestones, shales and marls during maximum sea level highstand. Although the Unayzah reservoir occurs in both the Unayzah and the Khuff Formations because of their different geometry, continuity, and reservoir quality, they have been studied separately.

  5. Assessment of impact of mass movements on the upper Tayyah valley's bridge along Shear escarpment highway, Asir region (Saudi Arabia) using remote sensing data and field investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, A. M.; Al-Kathery, M.; Pradhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    Escarpment highways, roads and mountainous areas in Saudi Arabia are facing landslide hazards that are frequently occurring from time to time causing considerable damage to these areas. Shear escarpment highway is located in the north of the Abha city. It is the most important escarpment highway in the area, where all the light and heavy trucks and vehicle used it as the only corridor that connects the coastal areas in the western part of the Saudi Arabia with the Asir and Najran Regions. More than 10 000 heavy trucks and vehicles use this highway every day. In the upper portion of Tayyah valley of Shear escarpment highway, there are several landslide and erosion potential zones that affect the bridges between tunnel 7 and 8 along the Shear escarpment Highway. In this study, different types of landslides and erosion problems were considered to access their impacts on the upper Tayyah valley's bridge along Shear escarpment highway using remote sensing data and field investigation. These landslides and erosion problems have a negative impact on this section of the highway. Results indicate that the areas above the highway and bridge level between bridge 7 and 8 have different landslides including planar, circular, rockfall failures and debris flows. In addition, running water through the gullies cause different erosional (scour) features between and surrounding the bridge piles and culverts. A detailed landslides and erosion features map was created based on intensive field investigation (geological, geomorphological, and structural analysis), and interpretation of Landsat image 15 m and high resolution satellite image (QuickBird 0.61 m), shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM 90 m), geological and topographic maps. The landslides and erosion problems could exhibit serious problems that affect the stability of the bridge. Different mitigation and remediation strategies have been suggested to these critical sites to minimize and/or avoid these problems in the future.

  6. The association of exposure to the 2009 south war with the physical, psychological, and family well-being of Saudi children

    PubMed Central

    Hatw, Mohamed M. El; Taher, Aly A. El; Hamidi, Ahmed El; Alturkait, Fawziyah A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the nutritional, psychological, behavioral, family adjustment, and psychiatric assessment of Saudi children exposed to the 2009-2010 Jazan war. Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted in Saudi Arabia in July 2010. One hundred and eighty-six children exposed to the South war in Jazan, and 157 unexposed children in King Khaled Military City, Hafr Al Batin were studied for evidence of malnutrition using physical measures, evaluating psychological problems using the Child Behavior Inventory, behavioral problems using the Rutter Scale A2, family adjustment using the McMaster Family adjustment device, and for psychiatric disorders. The association of different socioeconomic variables with the psychological outcome of the exposed group was also studied. Results: The exposed children were well nourished, had more anxiety (p=0.044), better adaptation (p<0.001), less aggression (p=0.025), less deviant behavior (p=0.007), better family adjustment and had more post traumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety, nightmares, and grief reaction. In the exposed children, females had more anxiety (p=0.006), and males had more antisocial behavior (p=0.02). Older children had less deviant behavior (p=0.005), better adaptation (p=0.007) and better planful behavior (p<0.001). Children of elder mothers had better planful behavior (p=0.039). Children from bigger families were less aggressive (p=0.049), and had less antisocial behavior (p=0.04). Conclusion: This study found that children exposed to the Jazan war had more anxiety. Unexpectedly they were well nourished and had higher adaptation, lower antisocial behavior, and better family adjustment. The socioeconomic status was associated with the psychological outcome. PMID:25630008

  7. German City, Jewish Memory

    E-print Network

    Snider, Barry B.

    German City, Jewish Memory Copyrighted Material #12;the tauber institute series for the study www.upne.com Nils Roemer, German City, Jewish Memory:The Story ofWorms David Assaf, Untold Published by University Press of New England Hanover and London German City, Jewish Memory Copyrighted

  8. The Effect of Explicit Instruction of Textual Discourse Markers on Saudi EFL Learners' Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Qahtani, Abdulaziz Ali

    2015-01-01

    Discourse markers (DMs) instruction is currently receiving an increasing amount of attention in the literature on second language learning. As noted by Al-Yaari, Al Hammadi, Alyami, and Almaflehi (2013), and Algouzi (2014), the use of DMs is insufficient to support the development of the language skills, especially reading, of Saudi English as a…

  9. The Effects of Reading Method on the Comprehension Performance of Saudi EFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alshumaimeri, Yousif

    2011-01-01

    In this study I investigated the relative effects of different reading methods on the comprehension performance of Saudi EFL 10th grade male students. The scores of participants who read three comparable passages in three ways (oral, silent and subvocalizing) were compared. Results revealed a significant difference between oral reading and…

  10. Development of skin structure and cutaneous water loss in nestling desert House Sparrows from Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Williams, Jos. B.

    Development of skin structure and cutaneous water loss in nestling desert House Sparrows from Saudi Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: House Sparrows; Skin lipids; Stratum corneum; Multigranular (SC) with its associated lipids, is the principal barrier influencing water permeation through skin

  11. The Effects of Using WebQuests on Reading Comprehension Performance of Saudi EFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alshumaimeri, Yousif A.; Almasri, Meshail M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a report on the effects of using WebQuest on Saudi male EFL students reading comprehension performance. WebQuests expose students to several online resources and require them to gather information about a specific topic. The experimental group received traditional teaching plus WebQuests as supplementary activities. The control group…

  12. Vocational Preparation for Out-of-School Youth in Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifton P.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the Saudi system of prevocational centers, designed to retrieve young male dropouts, prepare them for reentering general education, orient them to job skills, and prepare them for more extensive training at vocational training centers. The curriculum, emphasizing clerical and industrial skills, is also discussed. (SK)

  13. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of human parainfluenza virus type 3 isolated from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Almajhdi, Fahad N; Alshaman, Mohamed S; Amer, Haitham M

    2012-08-01

    Human parainfluenza virus 3 (HPIV-3) is a leading cause of respiratory disease in children worldwide. Previous sequence analyses of the entire virus genome, among different HPIV-3 strains, demonstrated that HN is the most variable gene. There is a dearth of data on HPIV-3 strains circulating in Saudi Arabia. In this report, HPIV-3 was screened in nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from hospitalized children with acute respiratory disease during two successive seasons (2007/08 and 2008/09) using nested RT-PCR. Out of 73 samples collected during 2007/08, seven (9.59%) were positive; while 3 out of 107 samples collected during 2008/09 (2.8%) were positive. Virus isolation in cell culture was successful using HEp2, but not Vero cells. The identity of the isolated viruses was confirmed using immunofluorescence and neutralization assays. To elucidate the genetic characteristics and phylogeny of Saudi HPIV-3 strains, the complete HN gene sequence of two selected Saudi strains was analyzed in comparison to 20 strains isolated by others from different countries worldwide. Both strains showed the highest degree of sequence homology with Indian strains, followed by Chinese and most Japanese strains. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that these strains fell into a distinct Asian lineage. This study is the first in Saudi Arabia to recover HPIV-3 isolates of confirmed identity, and to generate sequence data that may help in understanding virus diversity and evolution. PMID:22711360

  14. Transition Services for Students with Mild Intellectual Disability in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnahdi, Ghaleb

    2013-01-01

    This study examined teachers' attitudes and perceptions toward transition services for students with mild intellectual disability in Saudi Arabia, and also examined the relationship between teachers' attitudes regarding transition services for students with mild intellectual disability and teachers' gender and educational…

  15. Teachers' Continuing Professional Development Programmes in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alghamdi, Ahmed Hassan; Li, Li

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to review the historical development of continuing professional development programmes (CPDPs) for teachers, as well as the policies and objectives of such programmes in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) from the inception of these programmes until now. Styles of CPDPs that the Education Training Centres (ETCs) offer are…

  16. Self Reported Awareness of Child Maltreatment among School Professionals in Saudi Arabia: Impact of CRC Ratification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AlBuhairan, Fadia S.; Inam, Sarah S.; AlEissa, Majid A.; Noor, Ismail K.; Almuneef, Maha A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) was ratified by Saudi Arabia 15 years ago; yet addressing the issue of child maltreatment only began in more recent years. School professionals play a significant role in children's lives, as they spend a great deal of time with them and are hence essential to protecting and identifying…

  17. Characteristics of the Home Context for the Nurturing of Gifted Children in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Sascha; Tan, Mei; Aljughaiman, Abdullah; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates factors in the home environment and their influence on children's analytical, creative, and practical skills. A sample of 294 gifted children (195 male) was recruited from grades 4-7 in Saudi Arabia, where the family context is highly influenced by the principles of Islam. Results did not confirm the effect of birth…

  18. An Exploration of E-Learning Benefits for Saudi Arabia: Toward Policy Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alrashidi, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine policies and solutions addressing (a) improving education for citizens of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and (b) providing alternative instructional delivery methods, including e-learning for those living in remote areas. Theoretical Framework: The theoretical framework of this study was based on the…

  19. Special Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disability in Saudi Arabia: Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnahdi, Ghaleb Hamad

    2014-01-01

    Special education services in Saudi Arabia have received much attention over the past 15 years. This increased attention has been reflected in the increasing amount of such services offered, including services aimed at students with intellectual disability. However, the enormous expansion of special education services was not followed by…

  20. Teaching Arabic and the Preparation of Its Teachers before Service in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alghamdi, Ahmed Hassan; Li, Li

    2012-01-01

    This article aims at discussing facts regarding teaching Arabic, and the curriculum for doing so in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, in order to convey the attention that the Ministry of Education has paid to the teaching and learning of Arabic in public education. It also shows the different developments that have occurred in the contents of the…

  1. Prevalence of the Emotional (Emo) Subculture among University Students in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashaalan, Latifah; Alsukah, Aljawharh; Algadheeb, Nourah Abdulrhman

    2013-01-01

    This research aimed to identify the prevalence of the emotional (emo) subculture among students at Princess Noura bint Abdulrahman University (PNU), Saudi Arabia, and to detect differences in emo behavior and orientation among university departments and academic levels. A questionnaire assessing emo behavior/orientation was developed and…

  2. Special Education Teacher Transition-Related Competencies and Preparation in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnahdi, Ghaleb

    2014-01-01

    Preparing special education teachers to engage in transition services is a critical part of their preparation. This study examined how special education teachers perceive their preparation for transition services in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A total of 350 teachers participated in this study. Data were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA. The findings…

  3. Health Data Standards and Adoption Process: Preliminary Findings of a Qualitative Study in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkraiji, Abdullah; Jackson, Thomas; Murray, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to carry out a critical study of health data standards and adoption process with a focus on Saudi Arabia. Design/methodology/approach: Many developed nations have initiated programs to develop, promote, adopt and customise international health data standards to the local needs. The current status of, and future plans for,…

  4. Child Abuse and Neglect in Saudi Arabia: Journey of Recognition to Implementation of National Prevention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Eissa, Majid; Almuneef, Maha

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To describe increased child abuse and neglect (CAN) reporting and the characteristics of the reports in the context of the development of a system of intervention for one of the hospital-based child protection centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia aligned with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) Article 19.…

  5. Violence against Primary Health Care Workers in Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; El-Wehady, Adel; Amr, Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    This self-report questionnaire study was carried out in Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia to highlight the magnitude, predictors, and circumstances of workplace violence against primary health care (PHC) workers. A total of 1,091 workers completed a self-administered questionnaire. About 28% were exposed to at least one violent event during the past year.…

  6. Saudi EFL Teachers' Readiness and Perceptions of Young Learners Teaching at Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahd Al Malihi, Joza

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate EFL elementary school teachers' perception of their own readiness to teach young learners at Saudi schools as it has been recently introduced at this level. Further, it inspects their major needs that should be considered when developing teacher-training programs. A questionnaire was distributed targeting elementary…

  7. A new dermochelyid turtle from the Late Paleocene-Early Eocene of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Haiyan; Buffetaut, Eric; Thomas, Herbert; Roger, Jack; Halawani, Mohammed; Memesh, Abdallah; Lebret, Patrick

    1999-12-01

    A new dermochelyid sea turtle, Arabemys crassiscutata n. gen, n. sp., is described on the basis of epithecal shell mosaic ossicles from the Late Paleocene—Early Eocene of Saudi Arabia. This is the oldest and the most primitive known representative of the dermochelyids having an epithecal shell mosaic.

  8. AJIS Vol. 12, no. 1 September 2004 E-COMMERCE IN SAUDI ARABIA: ADOPTION AND PERSPECTIVES

    E-print Network

    Sait, Sadiq M.

    AJIS Vol. 12, no. 1 September 2004 54 E-COMMERCE IN SAUDI ARABIA: ADOPTION AND PERSPECTIVES Sadiq M of business and market models, is the concept and application of eCommerce. Today, this erstwhile robust eCommerce architectures tailored to suit their economical-social systems. An interesting case

  9. Socio-demographic Determinants of Compliance among Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Abha, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Mohammad Abdul; Siddiqui, Aesha Farheen

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Saudi Arabia has one of the highest prevalence of diabetes. This study was conducted with the following objectives: (1) To study the socio-demographic profile of diabetic patients in Abha. (2) To find the socio-demographic determinants of compliance among diabetic patients in Abha. Material and Methods: A self administered questionnaire which had detailed the socio-demographic features and various aspects of compliance was used on a random sample of registered diabetics at two primary health care centres of Abha. Results: Most of the patients (70.4 percent) were between 40-60 years age. Most of the patients were men (about 60 percent) and Saudis. Majority of patients did not have a university education. Young patients (age<40) were more compliant with all aspects of management, except medication (23.8 percent). Women were significantly more compliant with exercise (49.7 percent), while men were significantly more compliant with follow up (81.1 percent). Saudi patients were significantly compliant with medication (79.2 percent), while non Saudis were compliant with exercise (62.9 percent). All single patients were diet compliant. Smokers were significantly less compliant with exercise. Patients with normal BMI were significantly more compliant with diet and exercise. Conclusion: Patients were found to be generally less compliant towards the regimen. Socio-demographic factors which were significantly associated with non compliance were age, gender, nationality, educational status, marital status, smoking status and BMI. PMID:24551644

  10. Prevalence and predictors of habitual snoring in a sample of Saudi middle-aged adults

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Siraj O.; Abaalkhail, Bahaa A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of habitual snoring among a sample of middle-aged Saudi adults, and its potential predictors. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from March 2013 until June 2013 in randomly selected Saudi Schools in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The enrolled subjects were 2682 school employees (aged 30-60 years, 52.1% females) who were randomly selected and interviewed. The questionnaire used for the interview included: the Wisconsin Sleep Questionnaire to assess for snoring, medical history, and socio-demographic data. Anthropometric measurements and blood pressure readings were recorded using standard methods. Results: Forty percent of the 2682 enrolled subjects were snorers: 23.5% were habitual snorers, 16.6% were moderate snorers, and 59.9%, were non-snorers. A multivariate analysis revealed that independent predictors of snoring were ageing, male gender, daytime sleepiness, hypertension, family history of both snoring and obstructive sleep apnea, water-pipe smoking, and consanguinity. Conclusion: This study shows that snoring is a common condition among the Saudi population. Previously reported risk factors were reemphasized but consanguinity was identified as a new independent predictive risk factor of snoring. Exploring snoring history should be part of the clinical evaluation. PMID:26219441

  11. Geochemical, UPb zircon, and Nd isotope investigations of the Neoproterozoic Ghawjah Metavolcanic rocks, Northwestern Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Stern, Robert J.

    and Nb and Ta depletions, typical of modern convergent-margin igneous rocks. Ghawjah volcanic rocks have rocks, Northwestern Saudi Arabia Kamal A. Ali a, , Robert J. Stern a , William I. Manton a , Jun­Pb zircon dating Nd isotopes Ghawjah volcanic rocks New geochemical, Nd-isotope and U­Pb zircon data from

  12. 78 FR 52213 - Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From India, Korea, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... publishing the notice in the Federal Register of July 10, 2013 (78 FR 41421). The conference was held in..., Turkey, Ukraine, and Vietnam: Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... imports from India, Korea, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, and...

  13. The Prevalence and Determinants of Tobacco Use among Adolescents in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Agili, Dania E.; Park, Hyoun-Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    Background: Adolescent tobacco use has been a serious public health issue, resulting in longer duration of tobacco use and higher nicotine dependence in adulthood. This study identified the current status of tobacco use among middle schools students in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia and the factors leading to tobacco use, to provide information on how to…

  14. Bringing the Field into the Classroom: A Field Methods Course on Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephen, Anika; Mathur, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    The methodology used in one graduate-level linguistics field methods classroom is examined through the lens of the students' experiences. Four male Deaf individuals from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia served as the consultants for the course. After a brief background information about their country and its practices surrounding deaf education, both…

  15. Fourwing saltbush (Atriplex canescens (Pursh) Nutt. ) germination and establishment under arid environmental conditions of Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hedaithy, S.S.M.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to conduct an autecological investigation of fourwing saltbush (Atriplex canescens (Pursh) Nutt.) in the Al-Gassim region of Saudi Arabia, upon which range rehabilitation could be based. Germination, seedling, transplanting, and water relation characteristics of the species under controlled and field conditions were determined. Most of the field work was conducted at plain and sand dune areas of the Al-Gassim, Saudi Arabia, and supplemented with growth chamber experiments. Seeds of tetrapolid and diploid forms, native to the United States, were introduced to Saudi Arabia, and their performance was determined. The Al-Gassim soil and climatic features were analyzed. Laboratory and field tests proved that fourwing saltbush was able to become established under and tolerate wide ranges of soil and harsh climatic conditions as found in the Al-Gassim. The best temperature range for germination was 15 to 35 C. High salinity in the soil of the plains area was found to be the only soil character that slightly decreased seedling growth, but germination and survival behaviors were not affected. The adaptation to extreme environmental conditions coupled with its known high nutritional forage values makes fourwing saltbush a valuable range plant in the arid regions of Saudi Arabia. As demand on rangeland increases, improved forage plants must have drough and salinity resistance mechanisms, and improved range management techniques should be used to achieve optimum returns.

  16. Molecular Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus among Infected Egyptian and Saudi Arabian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Mohamed MS; Sofy, Ahmed R; Mousa, Adel A; Ahmed, Mohamed A; Alganzory, Mohamed R

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a common cause of liver fibrosis that may lead to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV infection and genotyping among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients using different molecular techniques. HCV RNA viral load was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology. For HCV genotyping, RT-PCR hybridization fluorescence-based method and reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA) were used. A total of 40 anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic hepatitis C were examined for HCV RNA, genotyping, and different laboratory investigations. In the present study, HCV genotypes 4, mixed 4.1b, and 1 were detected in patients of both countries, while genotype 2 was only detected in Saudi Arabian patients. Genotyping methods for HCV showed no difference in the classification at the genotype level. With regard to HCV subtypes, INNO-LiPA assay was a reliable test in HCV genotyping for the detection of major genotypes and subtypes, while RT-PCR-based assay was a good test at the genotype level only. HCV genotype 4 was found to be the predominant genotype among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. In conclusion, data analysis for detecting and genotyping HCV was an important factor for understanding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of HCV among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. PMID:26512201

  17. Scientific Research in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: Potential for Excellence and Indicators of Underdevelopment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alshayea, Ali

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the status of scientific research and development efforts in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and then sheds lights on the potential for excellence in this area in terms of organization and structure, financing and partnership, and human resources. Accordingly, the study reviews both achievements and indicators of underdevelopment…

  18. Making E-Learning Invisible: Experience at King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwalidi, Abdullah; Lefrere, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe progress at King Khalid University (KKU) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in developing and implementing a user-centered road map for teaching and learning, with pervasive e-learning as a core element. They named the approach "Invisible" e-learning. As part of it, they are investigating ways to capture and share expertise, as in…

  19. Website Interface Design: Similarity and Differences between Saudi Arabian and United States University Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alyahya, Dalia Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of the Internet and online learning around the globe makes it more important to understand the differences in website design among cultures. Furthermore, the members of educational institutions around the world rely on the Internet more than ever before in a variety of aspects. Also, web design differs from culture to culture. Saudi

  20. Saqqar Impact Structure: A Buried 34 km Crater in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, T.; Afifi, A. M.; Stewart, S. A.; Poelchau, M. H.; Cook, D. J.; Neville, A. S.

    2015-09-01

    We present evidence for an impact origin of a circular structure with an apparent diameter of 34 km, centered at 29°35’N, 38°42’E, which is partially buried under ~400 m of Cretaceous-Paleogene strata in the Nafud basin in NW Saudi Arabia.

  1. Saudi Arabia: A future regional hub for advanced education, research, science and technology.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2015-10-01

    Saudi Arabia is the largest country of the Arabian Peninsula, blessed with significant natural resources, including oil, gas and minerals. Saudi Arabia has recognised the importance of education in social and economic transformation, and has established a large number of universities, research and advanced technical institutes which have broken the metropolitan boundaries and have been extended to the far-flung areas of the country. There are 68 universities and degree-awarding institutes. The educational budget reached its highest-ever level of $56.56 billion for the year 2014. About 124,000 Saudi students are pursuing higher education in about 500 universities around the world. Saudi Arabia produced 177826 research papers in Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) database and in the year 2014 alone, 26168 research papers were published in indexed science journals with a rising h-index of 144. The country is turning into a regional hub for advanced education, research, science and technology while swiftly shifting from an oil-based to a knowledge-based economy. PMID:26440844

  2. From Barriers to Bridges: An Investigation on Saudi Student Mobility (2006-2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denman, Brian D.; Hilal, Kholoud T.

    2011-01-01

    Globalisation is often thought to advocate for a single set of beliefs and customs and for a rejection of the need to protect regional cultures and traditions. In the aftermath of 9/11, the rift between Western and Arab cultures has deepened, and there is a patent need for cultural bridges to be built. The government of Saudi Arabia has, by…

  3. Rural-to-Urban Transition and the Division of Labor: Evidence from Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisbie, W. Parker; Al-Khalifah, Abdullah H. M.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of data from Saudi Arabia indicates that, despite great departures from typical patterns of urbanization seen in the West, there is a strong association between urbanization and the division of labor as predicted by ecological theory. Contains 38 references. (Author/SV)

  4. Psychiatric Disorders in a Sample of Saudi Arabian Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amr, Mostafa Abdel-Monhem; Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Hablas, Hatem Refaat

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the magnitude of psychiatric disorders and to define socio-demographic and disease-related risk factors in a sample of adolescents with SCD in Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia. The sample consisted of 110 adolescents with SCD and a convenient sample of 202 adolescents without SCD as controls. Psychiatric…

  5. Challenges of Teacher Leadership in a Saudi School: Why Are Teachers Not Leaders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsalahi, Saud Mossa

    2014-01-01

    Teaching as a legitimate profession where teachers could practice their leadership agency as leaders has been under debate over the last two decades. The support for teachers' inclusion in the development of schools as well as their leadership is numerous and varies. There seems to be a few when it comes to teacher leadership in the Saudi context.…

  6. From Western TESOL Classrooms to Home Practice: A Case Study with Two "Privileged" Saudi Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnawi, Osman Z.; Phan, Le Ha

    2015-01-01

    This article is located in the debates concerning the continued problems underlying the cultural politics of English-speaking Western countries' Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) programmes and "Western" pedagogies. It examines two Saudi TESOL teachers' pedagogical enactments in their home teaching contexts after…

  7. Barriers Encountered in the Transfer of Educational Training to Workplace Practice in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almannie, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a critical issue in the practicality of training programs, not only in Saudi Arabia, but also in other developing countries where billions of dollars are spent on training human resources without evaluation of these programs on workplace practice and organization development. This study investigates barriers encountered in…

  8. Saudi Arabia, Cyprus, America and the World: September 11th from Another Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christodoulou, Niki

    This paper employs an autobiographical method using biographical elements from narrated experiences from Cyprus, Saudi Arabia, and the United States, where she has come to study. The paper offers perspectives on the September 11, 2001 tragedy and other acts of terrorism, violence, and mass destruction. It describes how the author's Cyprus…

  9. The Barriers to the Use of ICT in Teaching in Saudi Arabia: A Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Mulhim, Ensaf

    2014-01-01

    The paper reports some of the reasons behind the low use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by teachers. The paper has reviewed a number or studies from different parts of the world and paid greater attention to Saudi Arabia. The literature reveals a number of factors that hinder teachers' use of ICT. This paper will focus on lack…

  10. The Comorbidity of ADHD in the General Population of Saudi Arabian School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alqahtani, Mohammed M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate comorbidity of oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder (CD), anxiety, and depression and to investigate the impaired social and academic developments among children with ADHD in primary school settings in Saudi Arabia. Method: Data for the purpose of this study are obtained from parent and teachers of 652…

  11. Technological Leadership Behavior of High School Headteachers in Asir Region, Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkrdem, Mofareh

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the technological leadership behaviors of Saudi Arabian high school regarding the supply and use of educational technologies based on the educational technology standards developed and approved for school headteachers in many countries. The study was carried out with 135 high school headteachers. In the…

  12. Learning Preferences of Saudi University Students with Native English Speaking Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moores-Abdool, Whitney; Yahya, Noorchaya; Unzueta, Caridad H.

    2009-01-01

    Like many countries building up human and technological resources, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) has embarked on the goal of Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) to its citizens. One goal for the KSA Ministry of Education is increasing acceptance rates at teacher colleges for both genders specializing in English, in addition to…

  13. Saudi Arabia Puts Its Billions behind Western-Style Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Zvika

    2007-01-01

    Saudi Arabia has been developing at breakneck speed since the end of World War II, when oil production transformed this country of Bedouins into one of the richest polities in the world. Its higher-education system, however, has not kept pace. The Ministry of Higher Education was not established until 1975, and its task was to educate a population…

  14. Issues in Integrating Information Technology in Learning and Teaching EFL: The Saudi Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Maini, Yousef Hamad

    2013-01-01

    The Saudi education system is facing a climate of change characterized by an interest in integrating new technology and educational approaches to improve teaching and learning. In this climate, the present paper explores the issues in integrating information technology in learning and teaching English as a foreign language (EFL) in government…

  15. Forming an Institutional Culture with Multinational Administrators and Teachers at Effat College, Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glowacki-Dudka, Michelle; Treff, Marjorie

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the teaching and learning culture of a newly established women's college in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The academic culture at Effat College in 2002 included administrators and teachers from many nations, which created unique challenges in cross-cultural communication. These challenges, in turn, affected the development and…

  16. Methods of Care for Children Living in Orphanages in Saudi Arabia (An Exploratory Field Study)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashaalan, Latifah; Al-zeiby, Ibtisam

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the extent to which caregivers, social workers and psychologists working in orphanages in Saudi Arabia adopt one or more of the following five methods of care when treating children: attention vs. non-attention, equality vs. discrimination, kindness vs. cruelty, acceptance vs. rejection and democracy vs.…

  17. Achieving Competitive Advantage in Human Resource Management in General School District of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al dakeel, Taghreed M.; Almannie, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    The general school district of Riyadh is one of largest in the country of (45) school districts in Saudi Arabia. The school districts play an important roles in the development of education, therefore the objective of the study is to examine the roles of the management in the school districts to see if it is achieving competitive advantage. After…

  18. Education Context and English Teaching and Learning in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alrashidi, Oqab; Phan, Huy

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the education context and English teaching and learning in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The paper is organised into five main sections. The first section offers a brief glance at the social, religious, economic, and political context in KSA. The second section provides an overview of the education system in KSA, which…

  19. Recent incidence and descriptive epidemiological survey of breast cancer in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Saggu, Shalini; Rehman, Hasibur; Abbas, Zahid K.; Ansari, Abid A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To review and analyze the pattern of breast cancer (BC) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Methods: A retrospective descriptive epidemiological review of BC of all diagnosed Saudi female cases from January 1990 to December 2014 was conducted at the Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, KSA. This report contains information obtained from the Saudi Cancer Registry and from King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center. Results: The number of women with BC increased steadily from 1990-2010. On the basis of the number of cases, the percentage distribution of BC appears to be increasing. There were 1152 female BC cases in 2008 in comparison with 1308 in 2009, and 1473 in 2010. Breast cancer ranked first among females accounting for 27.4% of all newly diagnosed female cancers (5378) in the year 2010. The average age at the diagnosis of BC was 48; weighted average was 49.8, and range 43-52. Conclusion: Among Saudi patients, there was a significant increase in the number of cases of BC, which occurs at an earlier age than in Western countries. Continued vigilance, mammographic screening, and patient education are needed to establish early diagnosis and perform optimal treatment. PMID:26446327

  20. Factors Negatively Affect Speaking Skills at Saudi Colleges for Girls in the South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamad, Mona M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated factors negatively affect English language speaking skills in Saudi colleges for girls in the South in terms of: a) Instructors. b) Students. c) Curriculum and textbook. d) English Language teaching methods and exercises. e) Teaching and learning environment. To collect data for the study, a questionnaire papers were…

  1. A Think-Aloud Protocols Investigation of Dictionary Processing Strategies among Saudi EFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhaysony, Maha

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to examine qualitatively how Saudi EFL female students look-up word meanings in their dictionaries while reading. We aimed to identify and describe the look-up strategies used by these students. The subjects of the study were ten third-year English major students. A think-aloud protocol was used in order to gain insights into the…

  2. The intestinal cestode Hymenolepis diminuta as a lead sink for its rat host in the industrial areas of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Gewik, Mohamed M.; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S.

    2013-01-01

    The present study sought to assess the potential of the cestode Hymenolepis diminuta as a bioindicator for lead accumulation in two industrial areas of the city of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Rats (Meriones libycus) were collected from two sites (industrial area II and Salbukh) in Riyadh. In the industrial area II, the mean levels of lead concentrations were found to be 1.96, 1.92, 1.4 and 30.72 ?g/g in the rats’ liver, kidney and intestine, and in H. diminuta, respectively. In Salbukh, meanwhile, the lead concentrations were 1.63, 1.52, 1.20 and 21.31 ?g/g in the rats’ liver, kidney, and intestine, and in H. diminuta, respectively. In addition, in industrial area II, compared with the liver, kidney and intestine of their host, the bioconcentration factors of lead were found to be, respectively, 15.6, 16 and 21.9 times higher in H. diminuta, and were 7.5, 8, and 10.2 times higher in the same organs compared to H. diminuta in Salbukh. The present study, therefore, proved that H. diminuta could be used as a bioindicator for heavy metal contamination in the industrial areas of the city of Riyadh. PMID:25183950

  3. Web-based gis and public participation:an aid to widening female participation in revitalizing outdoor recreational facilities in saudi arabia. a case study in jeddah, saudi arabia 

    E-print Network

    Daghistani, Farouk

    2009-05-15

    about spatial issues to the planning authority, females have no ways unless they behave against the local norms. There is a persistent need for implementing distance participation for women in Saudi Arabia. This research examines whether developing...

  4. Trends of fast food consumption among adolescent and young adult Saudi girls living in Riyadh.

    PubMed

    ALFaris, Nora A; Al-Tamimi, Jozaa Z; Al-Jobair, Moneera O; Al-Shwaiyat, Naseem M

    2015-01-01

    Background : Saudi Arabia has passed through lifestyle changes toward unhealthy dietary patterns such as high fast food consumption. Adolescents and young adults, particularly girls, are the main groups exposed to and affected by these adverse eating behaviors. Objective : The aim of this study was to examine the trends of fast food consumption among adolescent and young adult Saudi girls living in Riyadh, and to compare between them. Design : In a cross-sectional survey, 127 adolescent Saudi girls (13-18 years) and 69 young adult Saudi girls (19-29 years) were randomly recruited to participate in this study. Weight, height, waist circumference, and hip circumference were measured using standardized methods. Twenty-four-hour diet recall and a face-to-face interview food questionnaire were performed. Results : Most of the participants had adequate intake of protein, riboflavin, iron, and sodium, but exhibited low intake for several other nutrients. Among study participants, 95.4% consume restaurants' fast food and 79.1% eat fast food at least once weekly. Burgers and carbonated soft drinks were the main kinds of fast food meals and beverages usually eaten by girls. Adolescent girls who usually ate large portion sizes of fast food had significantly higher mean waist circumference and hip circumference. Participants eat fast food primarily for enjoying the delicious taste, followed by convenience. Restaurants' hygiene and safety standards were the main concern regarding fast food for 62.2% of girls. Finally, international restaurants were preferable by participants to buy fast food compared with local restaurants (70.9% vs. 29.1%). Conclusion : Our findings provide evidence on the high prevalence of fast food consumption among Saudi girls, suggesting an urgent need for community-based nutrition interventions that consider the trends of fast food consumption and targeted eating behaviors of adolescent and young adult girls. PMID:25792229

  5. Trends of fast food consumption among adolescent and young adult Saudi girls living in Riyadh

    PubMed Central

    ALFaris, Nora A.; Al-Tamimi, Jozaa Z.; Al-Jobair, Moneera O.; Al-Shwaiyat, Naseem M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Saudi Arabia has passed through lifestyle changes toward unhealthy dietary patterns such as high fast food consumption. Adolescents and young adults, particularly girls, are the main groups exposed to and affected by these adverse eating behaviors. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the trends of fast food consumption among adolescent and young adult Saudi girls living in Riyadh, and to compare between them. Design In a cross-sectional survey, 127 adolescent Saudi girls (13–18 years) and 69 young adult Saudi girls (19–29 years) were randomly recruited to participate in this study. Weight, height, waist circumference, and hip circumference were measured using standardized methods. Twenty-four-hour diet recall and a face-to-face interview food questionnaire were performed. Results Most of the participants had adequate intake of protein, riboflavin, iron, and sodium, but exhibited low intake for several other nutrients. Among study participants, 95.4% consume restaurants’ fast food and 79.1% eat fast food at least once weekly. Burgers and carbonated soft drinks were the main kinds of fast food meals and beverages usually eaten by girls. Adolescent girls who usually ate large portion sizes of fast food had significantly higher mean waist circumference and hip circumference. Participants eat fast food primarily for enjoying the delicious taste, followed by convenience. Restaurants’ hygiene and safety standards were the main concern regarding fast food for 62.2% of girls. Finally, international restaurants were preferable by participants to buy fast food compared with local restaurants (70.9% vs. 29.1%). Conclusion Our findings provide evidence on the high prevalence of fast food consumption among Saudi girls, suggesting an urgent need for community-based nutrition interventions that consider the trends of fast food consumption and targeted eating behaviors of adolescent and young adult girls. PMID:25792229

  6. Gender dependent association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and circulating leptin in saudi subjects: influence of dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Rahman, Shakilur; Amer, Osama E; Al-Attas, Omar S; McTernan, Philip G; Alokail, Majed S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Leptin and vitamin D play an important role in obesity development and metabolic effects; however, the association between leptin and vitamin D is not well studied in Saudi subjects. We aimed to examine gender dependent association between serum leptin and 25-OH-VitD in adult Saudi subjects. Subjects and Methods: For this cross-sectional study in a cohort of 259 Saudi adults (100 male, age: 46.4 ± 0.9 yr [mean ± SD]; BMI: 27.8 ± 0.5 Kg/m2) and (159 female, age 46.5 ± 0.7 [mean ± SD]; BMI: 28.4 ± 0.4 Kg/m2) anthropometrics, fasting bloods, and biochemical data were collected. Serum leptin and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (vitamin D or 25-OH-VitD) were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Circulating leptin and vitamin D levels were significantly higher in females compared to male (P<0.001 and P<0.01 respectively). Visceral adiposity index (VAI), triglycerides and total cholesterol were significantly higher (P<0.05, P<0.001, and P<0.05, respectively) while HDL-cholesterol were lower (P<0.001) in male compared to female subjects. In males, vitamin D levels were positively associated with leptin (r = 0.196, P<0.05). Conclusion: Vitamin D was positively associated with serum leptin in male Saudi subjects. Additionally, male subjects were found to be dyslipidemic, which might be a responsible factor for this discordant association between vitamin D and leptin in Saudi population. PMID:26379918

  7. Health Beliefs Related to Diabetes Mellitus Prevention among Adolescents in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mutairi, Reem L.; Bawazir, Amen A.; Ahmed, Anwar E.; Jradi, Hoda

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is growing rapidly in the Saudi population. The purpose of this study was to assess the constructs of the health belief model (HBM) as they relate to T2DM lifestyle and prevention behaviours among adolescents. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between May and October 2013 among 426 non-diabetic secondary school students from randomly selected schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. An Arabic version of an adapted English language questionnaire was used to assess knowledge and attitudes related to the severity and prevention of T2DM. A preventative behaviour assessment was also conducted to assess physical activity and dietary habits. Results: The majority of the students (63.4%) had at least one diabetic family member. Obesity was more frequent in males compared to females (P = 0.013). Awareness about the importance of maintaining a healthy body weight to prevent T2DM was lower in males than females (P = 0.037), although males engaged in routine exercise more often (P = 0.001). Males were less likely than females to recognise the risks for T2DM, including obesity (P = 0.030), heredity (P = 0.013) and high fat intake (P = 0.001). Conclusion: An alarmingly high number of Saudi students were unaware of T2DM severity and associated risk factors. Female students were more aware of the benefits of T2DM preventative lifestyle behaviours than males, although males engaged in routine exercise more often. Raising adolescents’ awareness about the primary prevention strategies for T2DM should be a public health priority in Saudi Arabia. The HBM could inform further research on diabetes prevention among Saudi adolescents. PMID:26355752

  8. On the relationship between climatic variables and pressure systems over Saudi Arabia in the winter season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanean, H. M.; Basset, H. Abdel; Hussein, M. A. A.

    2015-05-01

    The synoptic circulation over Saudi Arabia is complicated and frequently governed by the effect of large-scale pressure systems. In this work, we used NCEP-NCAR global data to illustrate the relationship between climatic variables and the main pressure systems that affect the weather and climate of Saudi Arabia, and also to investigate the influence of these pressure systems on surface air temperature (SAT) and rainfall over the region in the winter season. It was found that there are two primary patterns of pressure that influence the weather and climate of Saudi Arabia. The first occurs in cases of a strengthening Subtropical High (SubH), a weakening Siberian High (SibH), a deepening of the Icelandic Low (IceL), or a weakening of the Sudanese Low (SudL). During this pattern, the SubH combines with the SibH and an obvious increase of sea level pressure (SLP) occurs over southern European, the Mediterranean, North Africa, and the Middle East. This belt of high pressure prevents interaction between midlatitude and extratropical systems, which leads to a decrease in the SAT, relative humidity (RH) and rainfall over Saudi Arabia. The second pattern occurs in association with a weakening of the SubH, a strengthening of the SibH, a weakening of the IceL, or a deepening of the SudL. The pattern arising in this case leads to an interaction between two different air masses: the first (cold moist) air mass is associated with the Mediterranean depression travelling from west to east, while the second (warm moist) air mass is associated with the northward oscillation of the SudL and its inverted V-shape trough. The interaction between these two air masses increases the SAT, RH and the probability of rainfall over Saudi Arabia, especially over the northwest and northeast regions.

  9. Calibration of TRMM rainfall climatology over Saudi Arabia during 1998-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almazroui, Mansour

    2011-03-01

    The short-term rainfall climatology regime over Saudi Arabia is obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data for the period 1998-2009. The TRMM rainfall amounts are calibrated with respect to the rain-gauge data recorded at 29 stations across the country. Day-to-day rainfall comparisons show that the TRMM rainfall trends are very similar to the observed data trends, even if a general overestimation in the satellite products must be highlighted. Besides, especially during the wet season, some of the TRMM algorithm runs tend to underestimate the retrieved rainfalls. The TRMM rainfall data also closely follow the observed annual cycle on a monthly scale. The correlation coefficient for rainfall between the TRMM and the rain-gauge data is about 0.90, with a 99% level of significance on the monthly scale. The spatio-temporal distributions of rainfall over Saudi Arabia are analyzed. Besides the four conventional seasons, this analysis consider the wet (November-April) and dry (June-September) seasons, based on the rainfall amounts recorded. Spring is the highest and winter is the second highest rainfall-occurring season, resulting in large amounts of rainfall during the wet season over most of the country. Regional variations in the rainfall climatology over Saudi Arabia are studied through defining four regions. The false alarm ratio, probability of detection, threat score, and skill score are calculated to evaluate the TRMM performance. The country's average annual rainfall measured by the TRMM is 89.42 mm, whereas the observed data is 82.29 mm. Thus, the rainfall in Saudi Arabia is suggested as being the TRMM value multiplied by 0.93 plus 0.04. After this calibration, the TRMM-measured rainfall is almost 100% of the observed data, thereby confirming that TRMM data may be used in a variety of water-related applications in Saudi Arabia.

  10. Incorporating the Delphi Technique to investigate renewable energy technology transfer in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Otaibi, Nasir K.

    Saudi Arabia is a major oil-producing nation facing a rapidly-growing population, high unemployment, climate change, and the depletion of its natural resources, potentially including its oil supply. Technology transfer is regarded as a means to diversify countries' economies beyond their natural resources. This dissertation examined the opportunities and barriers to utilizing technology transfer successfully to build renewable energy resources in Saudi Arabia to diversify the economy beyond oil production. Examples of other developing countries that have successfully used technology transfer to transform their economies are explored, including Japan, Malayasia, and the United Arab Emirates. Brazil is presented as a detailed case study to illustrate its transition to an economy based to a much greater degree than before on renewable energy. Following a pilot study, the Delphi Method was used in this research to gather the opinions of a panel of technology transfer experts consisting of 10 heterogeneous members of different institutions in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, including aviation, telecommunication, oil industry, education, health systems, and military and governmental organizations. In three rounds of questioning, the experts identified Education, Dependence on Oil, and Manpower as the 3 most significant factors influencing the potential for success of renewable energy technology transfer for Saudi Arabia. Political factors were also rated toward the "Very Important" end of a Likert scale and were discussed as they impact Education, Oil Dependence, and Manpower. The experts' opinions are presented and interpreted. They form the basis for recommended future research and discussion of how in light of its political system and its dependence on oil, Saudi Arabia can realistically move forward on renewable energy technology transfer and secure its economic future.

  11. THE INTEGRATION OF TECHNOLOGY INTO SCHOOL CURRICULUM IN SAUDI ARABIA: FACTORS AFFECTING TECHNOLOGY IMPLEMENTATION IN THE CLASSROOM

    E-print Network

    Barri, Moatasim Asaad

    2013-05-31

    from 15 public schools of varying programs, gender, and grade levels across one School District located at Medina, Saudi Arabia. This study was descriptive in nature and its data were collected using the Stages of Concern Questionnaire along...

  12. Learning and self-regulation in translation studies: the experience of students’ in three contrasting undergraduate courses in Saudi Arabia 

    E-print Network

    Al Sahli, Fahad Saad; Alsahli, Fahad Saad

    2012-11-29

    A great expansion is underway in the Saudi higher education system as it moves from an elite to a mass form of higher education. The number of universities, for example, has jumped from eight universities in 2000 to more ...

  13. The indigenous honey bees of Saudi Arabia (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Apis mellifera jemenitica Ruttner): Their natural history and role in beekeeping

    PubMed Central

    Alqarni, Abdulaziz S.; Hannan, Mohammed A.; Owayss, Ayman A.; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Apis mellifera jemenitica Ruttner (= yemenitica auctorum: vide Engel 1999) has been used in apiculture throughout the Arabian Peninsula since at least 2000 BC. Existing literature demonstrates that these populations are well adapted for the harsh extremes of the region. Populations of Apis mellifera jemenitica native to Saudi Arabia are far more heat tolerant than the standard races often imported from Europe. Central Saudi Arabia has the highest summer temperatures for the Arabian Peninsula, and it is in this region where only Apis mellifera jemenitica survives, while other subspecies fail to persist. The indigenous race of Saudi Arabia differs from other subspecies in the region in some morphological, biological, and behavioral characteristics. Further taxonomic investigation, as well as molecular studies, is needed in order to confirm whether the Saudi indigenous bee populations represent a race distinct from Apis mellifera jemenitica, or merely an ecotype of this subspecies. PMID:22140343

  14. Teaching translation at the undergraduate level in Saudi Arabia : the case of Imam Muhammad Ibn Saud Islamic University 

    E-print Network

    Al-Faifi, Ahmad S.A. (Ahmad Salman Ahmad)

    2000-01-01

    Translation teaching touches upon many issues that demand investigation and discussion in detail. This thesis examines the teaching of translation at undergraduate level in Saudi Arabia through a study of the programmes ...

  15. Chemostratigraphy of the Silurian Qusaiba Member, Eastern Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craigie, Neil W.

    2016-01-01

    Given the unavailability of high resolution biostratigraphic data and difficulties in using lithostratigraphy for stratigraphic correlation, it was decided to employ chemostratigraphy to propose a scheme for the Silurian Qusaiba Member encountered in five wells in Eastern Saudi Arabia. Chemostratigraphy may be defined as a reservoir correlation technique involving the utilization of inorganic geochemical data. Although Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to acquire data for 50 elements, the scheme is based on changes in the following 'key' element ratios: Zr/Th, Cr/Ti, Th/Nb, Zr/P, Y/Yb, Zr/Yb and Y/P. Variations in these parameters are largely dependent on changes in source/provenance, reflecting increases or decreases in the abundances of particular detrital heavy minerals. The scheme comprises a hierarchical order of four zones, seven subzones and four divisions. The zones are labelled C1, C2, C3 and C4 is ascending stratigraphic order, with two, three and two subzones identified in C2, C3 and C4 respectively. In addition to this, chemostratigraphic divisions are noted in two of the subzones. The chemostratigraphic scheme is considered robust as chemozones (general term used to describe any zone, subzone or division) are clearly defined in each well using geochemical profiles and binary diagrams plotted for key element ratios. Furthermore, high levels of statistical confidence are associated with the chemozones and most are correlative between three or more wells. The nonexistence of chemozones in particular wells is mainly explained by the sampling strategy employed. For example, the absence of subzone C3-2 (occurring towards the center of zone C3) in wells 4 and 5 is most likely to be explained by the uppermost part of the Qusaiba Member not being sampled. In other instances, particular chemozones may be missing as a result of erosion/non-deposition on a local scale. One positive aspect of the study is that it was possible to identify the mid-Qusaiba reservoir sandstones which occur within chemozone C3-3 (at the top of zone C3) in each well. Consequently, chemostratigraphy may be utilized to recognize these sandstones in future wells, particularly in subhorizonal ones where their identification may be more difficult using wireline log signatures alone.

  16. Deficiencies Under Plenty of Sun: Vitamin D Status among Adults in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Tuffaha, Marwa; El Bcheraoui, Charbel; Daoud, Farah; Al Hussaini, Hessah Abdulla; Alamri, Fahad; Al Saeedi, Mohammad; Basulaiman, Mohammed; Memish, Ziad A.; AlMazroa, Mohammad A.; Al Rabeeah, Abdullah A.; Mokdad, Ali H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D deficiency has been correlated with several diseases and injuries including diabetes, osteoporosis, fractures, and falls. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), current data on vitamin D status are lacking. Aims: To inform Saudi public health authorities on the current status of blood levels vitamin D deficiency, we analyzed data from the Saudi Health Interview Survey. Materials and Methods: The Saudi Health Interview Survey (SHIS) is a cross-sectional national multistage survey of individuals aged 15 years and above on sociodemographic characteristics, tobacco consumption, diet, physical activity, health care utilization, different health-related behaviors, and self-reported chronic conditions. A total of 10,735 participants completed a health questionnaire and were invited to the local health clinics for biomedical exams. Results: 62.65% of female Saudis and 40.6% of male Saudis aged 15 years and above are deficient in vitamin D. Out of them, less than 1% males and less than 2% females consume vitamin D supplements. Women who have never married and obese individuals are more likely to be deficient in vitamin D, compared to men who were currently married and nonobese individuals. Those consuming vitamin D supplements are less likely to be deficient in vitamin D. Conclusions: Our study showed a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among Saudi men and women, and the results call for an increased awareness to ensure adequate levels of vitamin D for better health in Saudi Arabia. Moreover, our findings are certainly relevant for other countries in the Gulf region or countries with similar cultures, clothing, and religions. PMID:26713293

  17. Distribution of 222Rn concentration in an inhabited area adjacent to the Aja granitic heights of Hail Province, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Kinsara, Abdulraheem Abdulrahman; Shabana, El-Said Ibrahim; Abulfaraj, Waleed Hussain; Qutub, Maher Mohammad Taher

    2015-01-01

    Radon-222 has been measured in groundwater, dwellings, and atmosphere of an inhabited area adjacent to the granitic Aja heights of Hail province, Saudi Arabia. The measurements were carried out in the field using a RAD7 instrument. Twenty-eight water samples, collected from drilled wells scattered in the region, were analyzed. Radon-222 concentration ranged from 2.5-95 kBq m(-3) with an average value of about 30.3 kBq m(-3). The higher values were found in wells drawing water from granitic aquifers. Indoor 222Rn was measured in 20 dwellings of rural areas in Hail city and other towns. Concentrations ranged from 12-125.6 Bq m(-3), with an average value of 54.6 Bq m(-3). Outdoor air 222Rn was measured at 16 sites, with values ranging from 6.2-13.3 Bq m(-3), with an average value of 10.5 Bq m(-3). The estimated average effective dose due to inhalation of 222Rn released from water was 0.08 mSv y(-1). The estimated average annual effective dose due to indoor 222Rn was 1.35 mSv, which lies below the effective dose range (3-10 mSv) given as the recommended action level. Based on the average dose rate values, the excess lifetime cancer risk values were estimated as 69.8 × 10(-4) due to indoor radon and 13.4 × 10(-4) due to outdoor radon. PMID:25437521

  18. Vents to events: determining an eruption event record from volcanic vent structures for the Harrat Rahat, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Melody G.; Bebbington, Mark S.; Cronin, Shane J.; Lindsay, Jan M.; Kenedi, Catherine L.; Moufti, Mohammed Rashad H.

    2014-03-01

    Distributed "monogenetic" volcanic eruptions commonly occur in continental settings without obvious structural alignments or rifting/extensional structures. Nevertheless, these may develop as fissures, representing the surface expression of dykes with a range of orientations, especially when stress regimes vary over time and/or older crustal features and faults are exploited by rising magmas. Dykes reaching the surface as fissures can last hours to months and produce groups of closely aligned vents, hiding the true extent of the source fissure. Grouped or aligned vents in a distributed volcanic environment add complexity to hazard modelling where the majority of eruptions are single-vent, point-source features, represented by cones, craters or domes; i.e. vent groups may represent fissure events, or single eruptions coincidently located but erupted hundreds to tens of thousands of years apart. It is common practice in hazard estimation for intraplate monogenetic volcanism to assume that a single eruption cone or crater represents an individual eruptive event, but this could lead to a significant overestimate of temporal recurrence rates if multiple-site and fissure eruptions were common. For accurate recurrence rate estimates and hazard-event scenarios, a fissure eruption, with its multiple cones, must be considered as a single multi-dimensional eruptive event alongside the single-vent eruptions. We present a statistical method to objectively determine eruptive events from visible vents, and illustrate this using the 968 vents of the 10 Ma to 0.6 ka volcanic field of Harrat Rahat, Saudi Arabia. A further method is presented to estimate the number of hidden vents in a thick volcanic pile. By combining these two methods for Harrat Rahat, we determined an updated spatial recurrence rate estimate, and an average temporal recurrence rate of 7.5 × 10-5 events/year. This new analysis highlights more concentrated regions of higher temporal hazard in parts of Harrat Rahat, which has significant implications for the city of Al-Madinah and surroundings.

  19. First Insight into the Population Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Saudi Arabia? †

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hajoj, Sahal A. M.; Zozio, Thierry; Al-Rabiah, Fahad; Mohammad, Viquar; Al-Nasser, Maryam; Sola, Christophe; Rastogi, Nalin

    2007-01-01

    This study constitutes a first attempt to describe the genetic population structure and drug resistance of the tubercle bacilli circulating in Saudi Arabia. A total of 1,505 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, isolated between 2002 and 2005 from seven regions of Saudi Arabia, were studied. The sample studied showed a male-to-female sex ratio of 1.27, with half of the cases among foreign-born individuals and 47% within the 21- to 40-year-old age group; a total resistance rate of 19.7%; and multiple drug resistance of 4.5%. Upon spoligotyping, a total of 387 individual patterns were obtained (clustering rate, 86.4%; 182 clusters containing between 2 and 130 isolates per cluster). A total of 94% of the strains matched the spoligotype patterns in an international database. Nearly 81% of the isolates in this study belonged to established phylogeographic clades: Central Asian (CAS), 22.5%; ill-defined T clade, 19.5%; East African-Indian (EAI), 13.5%; Haarlem, 7.5%; Latin American-Mediterranean, 7.2%; Beijing, 4.4%; Manu, 2.7%; X, 0.9%; and Bovis, 0.9%. Two clonal complexes with unique spoligotyping signatures (octal codes 703777707770371 and 467777377413771) specific to Saudi Arabia were identified. These belonged to the CAS and EAI clades, respectively, as confirmed upon secondary typing using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRUs). The results obtained underline the predominance of historic clones of principal genetic group 1, which are responsible for roughly 45% of all tuberculosis cases in Saudi Arabia. The high rate of clustering observed might be an indication of rapid ongoing transmission within certain communities and/or subpopulations in Saudi Arabia; nonetheless, spoligotyping is known to overestimate clustering, and only a systematic second-line typing, such as MIRUs, coupled with a better tuberculosis registry and epidemiological investigations would allow us to know the exact rate of ongoing transmission and associated risk factors in Saudi Arabia. PMID:17507515

  20. Geology of the Jabal Riah area, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The Jabal Riah area is in the southern part of the Jibal al Hamdah quadrangle (lat 19?00'00'' to 19?07'S0'' N., long 45?37'30'' to 43?45'00' E.) in the southeastern Precambrian Shield, Asir Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The Jabal Mahanid group of ancient gold mines, which is part of the Jabal Ishmas-Wadi Tathlith gold belt, is in the west-central part of the area. Rocks in the Jabal Riah area consist of Precambrian layered metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks intruded by Precambrian igneous rocks. The metamorphic rocks are, from oldest to youngest, interlayered hornblende and biotite schist, quartz-biotite schist, hornblende schist, serpentinite, and chlorite schist. The igneous rocks are, from oldest to youngest, diorite-gabbro including dikes, granodiorite, monzogranite-granodiorite, leucocratic quartz porphyry, rhyolite, and aplite and pegmatite dikes. A large area of jasper replaces serpentinite. On the valley floors, recent alluvium and pediment deposits overlie the bedrock. The structure of the area is dominated by a dome centered over the eastern border of the area; leucocratic quartz porphyry forms the core of the dome. Minor folds and faults are present. The Jabal Mahanid group of ancient gold mines is on a northwest-trending vein system, and major ancient mine areas are found where the system splits or changes direction. The veins consist of zones of brecciated and crushed rock, which are generally less than 0.5 m wide but may be as wide as 1 m. These zones contain quartz and calcite stringers and commonly are along hornblende schist-serpentinite contacts; however, they also cut both units. Most aplite, pegmatite, and quartz dikes in the area are thin and discontinuous and are intruded along the vein trend. Similar veins, at the same stratigraphic interval, have been found beyond the northeastern part of the map area. The veins contain detectable gold and silver (median gold, approximately 0.14 ppm; median silver, approximately 1 ppm). Gold and silver are most abundant in calcium-rich rocks and veins; silver was not detected in igneous rocks. Altered wall-rock zones are mineralized as much as 10 m away from the veins. Away from the Jabal Mahanid vein-system, silver was detected in the jasper. Gold and silver were detected in minor brecciated and sheared structures and in metasedimentary rocks. Gold was detected in sericitized margins of the leucocratic quartz porphyry, in unaltered rhyolite, and in aplite dikes. The presence of unusual amounts of gold and silver over a wide area is indicated by the ancient gold mines along veins at or near the hornblende schist-serpentinite contact in the map area and to the south in the Hajrah-Hamdah area and by the widespread evidence of precious metals in igneous rocks and other vein structures. A domed-shaped area, approximately 30 km in diameter, is outlined by the hornblende schist-serpentinite contact and has leucocratic quartz prophyry in the middle. Additional study of this area might reveal economic concentrations of gold and silver.

  1. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  2. Innovation and the City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiman, Neil; Forman, Adam; Ko, Jae; Giles, David; Bowles, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    With Washington trapped in budget battles and partisan gridlock, cities have emerged as the best source of government innovation. Nowhere is this more visible than in New York City. Since taking office in 2002, Mayor Bloomberg has introduced a steady stream of innovative policies, from a competition to recruit a new applied sciences campus and a…

  3. Build a City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Jean A.

    1985-01-01

    A week-long build-a-city project is described which lets students become familiar with the history of the five Platonic solids (tetrahedron, octahedron, hexahedron, isosahedron, dodecahedron) and then use these solids to create a city using posterboard and construction paper. (MNS)

  4. The Plains City Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Olphen, Marcela; Rios, Francisco; Berube, William; Dexter, Robin; McCarthy, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This case study portrays a contemporary phenomenon that affects many U.S. school districts. Specifically, the authors address the challenges that the superintendent of the Plains City school district faced as a result of a change in the demographic distribution of his district. The gradual development of the pig farming industry in Plains City

  5. Walkout in Crystal City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrios, Greg

    2009-01-01

    When students take action, they create change that extends far beyond the classroom. In this article, the author, who was a former teacher from Crystal City, Texas, remembers the student walkout that helped launch the Latino civil rights movement 40 years ago. The Crystal City student walkout remains a high point in the history of student activism…

  6. Demonstration and development of control mechanism for radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Kheliewi, A. S.

    2012-06-06

    Saudi Arabia have no nuclear industry. Nevertheless, many radioactive sources, for different purposes, have been used in the country. There is upswing in the number of companies that recruit nuclear technology in their daily work. The National Center for Radiation Protection (NCRP) takes the full commitment and responsibility for monitoring and regulating the movement of radioactive sources in the country. NCRP issues the licenses for import, export, and use of radioactive sources. It, also, protects the country from any trespassing radiation through a sizable net of early warning and radiation monitoring stations along the borders of Saudi Arabia. This paper talks about the procedures of licensing, importing, exporting of radioactive sources. It, also, sheds light on types of implementing radioactive sources in different practices encompass medicine, industry, research. The NCRP has established an electronic web site to ease the communication with all users in the country. This site is yet in the experimental stage.

  7. Status of breeding seabirds on the Northern Islands of the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Shobrak, Mohammed Y.; Aloufi, Abdulhadi A.

    2013-01-01

    We undertook breeding surveys between 2010 and 2011 to assess the status of breeding birds on 16 islands in the northern Saudi Arabia. Sixteen bird species were found breeding at three different seasons; i.e. winter (Osprey), spring (Caspian and Saunder’s Terns), and summer (Lesser Crested, White-cheeked, Bridled Terns). It is postulated that food availability is an important factor influencing the breeding of seabirds in the northern Saudi Arabian Red Sea. Several species laid eggs earlier in northern parts of the Red Sea than in southern parts. The predicted increases in temperatures (Ta) could have a negative effect on species survival in the future, especially on those whose nests that are in the open. Finally, disturbance, predation and egg collection were probably the main immediate threats affecting the breeding seabird species in the northern Red Sea. PMID:24955009

  8. Gastropods from the Campanian-Maastrichtian Aruma Formation, Central Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gameil, Mohamed; El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S.

    2015-03-01

    The gastropod fauna of the Upper Cretaceous Aruma Formation in central Saudi Arabia comprises fifteen species belonging to fifteen genera, fourteen families, and five clades. The species are not abundant at any individual stratigraphic level but are equally and irregularly scattered in the formation. The studied species come mainly from the Hajajah Member of Upper Cretaceous Aruma Formation in central Saudi Arabia. Calliomphalus orientalis (Douvillé, 1916); Coelobolma corbarica Cossmann, 1918; Turritella (Torquesia) figarii Quaas, 1902; Neoptyxis olisiponensis (Sharpe, 1850) and Otostoma (Otostoma) divaricatum (d'Orbigny, 1847) are recorded from the Upper Cretaceous of central Arabia for the first time. The identified species have a close affinity to the Tethyan fauna known from other parts in Asia, Africa and Europe. Herbivores and predators are the dominant trophic groups which may indicate shallow marine lagoonal and relatively open marine environment.

  9. Evaluation of hearing among kindergarten children in Jazan (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia)

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mohamed Rifaat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hearing loss among kindergarten children is considered as a major health problem especially when there is a deficiency in routine hearing screening during the clinical examination. The aim of the study was to detect any pattern of hearing loss among kindergarten children in Jazan (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia). Methods A total of 1220 kindergarten students in Jazan (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia) were subjected to meticulous hearing evaluation using otological examination, Tuning fork tests, pure tone audiometry (PTA), speech audiometry, and tympanometry. Results We found that 18 kindergarten students had type C tympanogram (Eustachian tube dysfunction), 28 had type B tympanogram (secretory otitis media with conductive hearing loss), 4 had chronic otitis media with conductive hearing loss, and 6 had mild sensorineural hearing loss. Conclusions Early detection and eradication of hearing loss improves quality of life outcomes of children which reduces the incidence of social burden from unrecognized hearing loss. PMID:26527196

  10. A study of anthropometric characteristics between Malaysian and Saudi Arabian males aged 20 to 30 years.

    PubMed

    Taha, Zahari; Jomoah, Ibrahim M; Zadry, Hilma Raimona

    2009-06-01

    This study presents a comparison of the anthropometric characteristics of 241 Malaysian and 646 Saudi Arabian males aged 20 to 30 years. The mean values, standard deviation (SD), and 5th and 95th percentile values of 26 measurements and 22 proportions of each group were given. The results showed that there were significant differences in a number of body dimensions between these populations, except for eye height and elbow height (standing) and height, eye height, shoulder height, and elbow height (sitting). These results are important for the ergonomic design of workstations, personal protective equipment, tools, interface systems and furniture: The presented data may be useful for providing a safer, more productive and user-friendly workplace for Malaysian and Saudi Arabian populations. PMID:20034316

  11. Out-of-hospital adult cardiac arrests in a university hospital in central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Salleeh, Hashim M. Bin; Gabralla, Khalid A.; Leggio, William J.; Aseri, Zohair A. Al

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To report the characteristics of adult out-of-hospital arrest patients and their outcomes in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods: This is a prospective descriptive study of out-of-hospital adult arrests incident transported to King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between July 2012 and September 2013. Results: A total of 96 adult patients were enrolled in this study. Males represented 62.5% of the participants. The mean age of the study population was 58.9 years, and specifically 30.8 years for traumatic arrests, and 62.9 for non-traumatic. An over-all mortality rate of 95.8% was documented, as well as a low rate of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation being performed, and a family member transported most patients to the hospital. Conclusion: A low survival rate for non-traumatic out-of-hospital adult arrest patients and a 100% mortality rate in traumatic arrests were discovered. PMID:26318464

  12. Status of breeding seabirds on the Northern Islands of the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Shobrak, Mohammed Y; Aloufi, Abdulhadi A

    2014-07-01

    We undertook breeding surveys between 2010 and 2011 to assess the status of breeding birds on 16 islands in the northern Saudi Arabia. Sixteen bird species were found breeding at three different seasons; i.e. winter (Osprey), spring (Caspian and Saunder's Terns), and summer (Lesser Crested, White-cheeked, Bridled Terns). It is postulated that food availability is an important factor influencing the breeding of seabirds in the northern Saudi Arabian Red Sea. Several species laid eggs earlier in northern parts of the Red Sea than in southern parts. The predicted increases in temperatures (Ta ) could have a negative effect on species survival in the future, especially on those whose nests that are in the open. Finally, disturbance, predation and egg collection were probably the main immediate threats affecting the breeding seabird species in the northern Red Sea. PMID:24955009

  13. Metal concentrations in pearl oyster, Pinctada radiata, collected from Saudi Arabian coast of the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Sadig, M.; Alam, I.

    1989-01-01

    The Arabian Gulf is a shallow semi-closed water body. Several industrial complexes have been established along its coast line during the past decade. The effluent from these facilities is being discharged into the Gulf. These discharges pose potential hazards to the marine environment of the Arabian Gulf. The Saudi Arabian government is striving to protect the marine environment of the Gulf and has commissioned several studies to assess the damage from the industrial and municipal discharges. In these studies, marine organisms, for example, fish, clams, sea urchins, oysters, and plankton, along with sediments and seawater, have been analyzed for various pollutants. This study reports metal concentrations in pearl oysters collected from the Saudi Arabian coastal areas of the Arabian Gulf.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis co-infection in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alrajhi, A A; Nematallah, A; Abdulwahab, S; Bukhary, Z

    2002-11-01

    Our study determined the rate of screening tuberculosis patients for HIV co-infection and the HIV seroprevalence among them. We retrospectively reviewed medical charts of 437 patients diagnosed with tuberculosis from 1995-2000 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Screening was done for 178 (41%) patients: 2 (1.1%) of these were found to be HIV positive. Prior to screening, 4 patients were already known to be HIV positive. Males were screened more often than females (45% and 36% respectively). All HIV positive patients were males. Screening was not affected by origin of the patient, history of prior tuberculosis or treatment, type of tuberculosis involvement or resistance to first line anti-tuberculosis agents. In Saudi Arabia, screening for HIV in tuberculosis patients remains underutilized. Among screened patients, seropositivity was low. PMID:15568451

  15. Great cities look small

    E-print Network

    Sim, Aaron; Barahona, Mauricio; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2015-01-01

    Great cities connect people; failed cities isolate people. Despite the fundamental importance of physical, face-to-face social-ties in the functioning of cities, these connectivity networks are not explicitly observed in their entirety. Attempts at estimating them often rely on unrealistic over-simplifications such as the assumption of spatial homogeneity. Here we propose a mathematical model of human interactions in terms of a local strategy of maximising the number of beneficial connections attainable under the constraint of limited individual travelling-time budgets. By incorporating census and openly-available online multi-modal transport data, we are able to characterise the connectivity of geometrically and topologically complex cities. Beyond providing a candidate measure of greatness, this model allows one to quantify and assess the impact of transport developments, population growth, and other infrastructure and demographic changes on a city. Supported by validations of GDP and HIV infection rates ac...

  16. Prevalence and pattern of refractive errors among primary school children in Al Hassa , Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Wadaani, Fahd Abdullah; Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Ali, Ayub; Khan, Atuar Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Some 12.8 million in the age group 5-15 years are visually impaired from uncorrected or inadequately corrected refractive errors. In Saudi Arabia, the size of this public health problem is not well defined especially among primary schoolchildren. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence and pattern of refractive errors among primary school children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia.  A total of 2246 Saudi primary school children aged 6 to 14 years of both genders were selected using multistage sampling method form 30 primary schools located in the three different areas of Al Hassa. School children were interviewed to collect demographics and vision data using a special data collection form followed by screening for refractive errors by trained optometrists within the school premises using a standardized protocol. Assessment of visual acuity and ocular motility evaluation were carried out and cover-uncover test was performed. Children detected with defective vision were referred for further examination employing subjective refraction with auto refractometer and objective refraction using streak retinoscopy after 1% cyclopentolate. Of the screened school children (N=2002), the overall prevalence of refractive errors was 13.7% (n=274), higher among females (Odds ratio, OR=1.39, P=0.012) and significantly more among students of rural residence (OR=2.40, P=0.001). The prevalence of refractive errors was disproportionately more among those aged 12-14 years (OR=9.02, P=0.001). Only 9.4% of students with poor vision were wore spectacles for correction. Myopia was the most commonly encountered refractive error among both genders (65.7% of the total errors encountered). Uncorrected refractive errors affected a sizable portion of primary school children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia. Primary schoolchildren especially females, rural and older children represents high risk group for refractive errors for which the included children were unaware. PMID:23283044

  17. Prevalence of restless legs syndrome and associated risk factors among middle-aged Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Siraj Omar; Abaalkhail, Bahaa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: The prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in the general population ranges from 5 to 15%; however, locally, such data are scarce. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of RLS in the middle-aged Saudi population. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study that was conducted from February 2013 to June 2013 in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The target study population was Saudi school employees. Saudi employees aged 30-60 years were randomly selected and interviewed individually. Trained interviewers completed the Wisconsin Sleep Questionnaire, questions about demographics, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale to measure daytime sleepiness, and questions regarding symptoms of RLS based on the criteria defined by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG). RESULTS: This survey revealed that 8.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): (7.35-9.45)) of the 2,682 participants (62.5% of them were males) had RLS. There was no age effect on the prevalence of RLS. RLS was found to be significantly associated with other sleep disorders, including excessive daytime sleepiness and habitual snoring. A univariate analysis revealed significant correlation of many factors with the RLS, including gender, consanguinity, snoring, diabetes, hypertension, asthma, chronic bronchitis, and smoking. However, when a multivariate logistic regression analysis performed, RLS continued to be associated with male gender, diabetes, asthma, and habitual snoring only. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of RLS is 8.4%, which is within the range reported by Western studies. However, unlike findings of most studies, RLS significantly affects males more than females. In addition, snoring, asthma, and consanguinity are potential new risk factors for RLS. PMID:26229562

  18. Exploring the Sociodemographic and Clinical Features of Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hajoj, Sahal; Shoukri, Mohammed; Memish, Ziad; AlHakeem, Raafat; AlRabiah, Fahad; Varghese, Bright

    2015-01-01

    Background Saudi Arabia annually reports a relatively higher proportion (28–32%) of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) cases in comparison to other global regions. However, there were few studies conducted so far to determine the sociodemographic factors and clinical manifestations associated with EPTB at a nationwide level. Methodology A retrospective analysis on culture positive EPTB isolates collected from all the provinces of the country were conducted for a period of 12 months to determine the spectrum of diversity in EPTB infection sites and the confounding factors. A detailed clinical and demographical data analysis was carried out along with first line drug susceptibility testing. Principal Findings Intra-thoracic and extra-thoracic lymph nodes (44.6%) were the most common sites of infection followed by gastrointestinal (17.3%) and central nervous systems (11.8%). Male patients were mostly infected (58.8%), in contrary to the global trend. Any drug resistance was observed in 23.1% isolates with a 2.1% of multi-drug resistance. HIV reactivity was found only in 2.2% cases. A higher proportion of Saudi nationals (58.8%) were infected compared to the immigrants, descending mostly from South Asia (34.4%) and South East Asia (31.2%). The Saudi population predominated with all forms of EPTB while immigrants showed no significant variations. Conclusions Saudi Arabia faces a serious threat from EPTB, particularly to the central nervous system and gastrointestinal systems. More effective diagnostic strategies and control measures must be implemented to reduce the high rate of EPTB in the country. In addition, these findings warrant further detailed research to explore all related comorbid conditions of EPTB development, particularly the host-related factors. PMID:25647300

  19. Large-Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Esophagus: A Case from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Kuriry, Hadi; Swied, Abdul Monem

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas of the esophagus are very rare, and the majority are high grade (poorly differentiated). They occur most frequently in males in their sixth and seventh decades of life. There have been no concrete data published on clinical features or on prognosis. We report a case of large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the esophagus in a 66-year-old Saudi female with progressive dysphagia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy revealed an esophageal ulcerated mass. PMID:26600769

  20. Developing a generic model for total quality management in higher education in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shafei, Ahmad I; Bin Abdulrahman, Khalid; Al-Qumaizi, Khalid I; El-Mardi, Abdelmoniem S

    2015-04-01

    The field of higher education has been progressing at a rapid pace in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia over the past decade, with doubling the number of government and private universities and colleges. Quality and accreditation are of great importance to higher education institutes world-wide. Thus, developing a generic model for quality management in higher education is badly needed in the country. PMID:25803588

  1. The optimal currency-peg for an oil exporting country: The case of Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Almasbahi, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    In a world of generalized floating exchange rates, it is not enough to solve the problem of exchange rate policy by determining whether to peg or float the currency under consideration. It is also necessary to choose to what major currency to peg. The main purpose of this study is to investigate and determine empirically the optimum currency peg for the Saudi riyal. To accomplish this goal, a simple conventional trade model, that includes variables found in many other studies of import and export demand, was used. In addition, an exchange rate term was added as a separate independent variable in the import and export demand equations in order to assess the effect of exchange rate on the trade flows. The criteria for the optimal currency peg in this study were based on two factors. First, the error statistics for projected imports and exports using alternative exchange rate regimes. Second, variances of projected imports, exports and trade balance using alternative exchange rate regimes. The exchange rate has a significant impact on the Saudia Arabian trade flows which implies that changes in the riyals value affect the Saudi trade deficit. Moreover, the exchange rate has a more powerful effect on its aggregate imports than on the world demand for its exports. There is also a strong support for the hypothesis that the exchange rate affects the value of the Saudi bilateral trade with its five major trade partners. On the aggregate level, the SDR peg seems to be the best currency peg for the Saudi riyal since it provides the best prediction errors and the lowest variance for the trade balance. Finally, on the disaggregate level, the US dollar provides the best performance and yields the best results among all the six currency pegs considered in this study.

  2. A new species of Leptadenia (Apocynaceae) and two other new records from southwestern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Masrahi, Yahya S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptadenia jazanica Y. Masrahi from the province of Jazan, southwestern Saudi Arabia is described as a new species and illustrated. The species differs from the other known nearest species of the genus, Leptadenia pyrotechnica, by decumbent to scrambling habit of stems and persistent leaves. In the same province also two new records belonging to the genera Canavalia (Fabaceae) and Craterostigma (Scrophulariaceae) were collected; they were identified as Canavalia virosa (Roxb.) Wight & Arn. and Craterostigma plantagineum Hochst. PMID:26288569

  3. Determining the causal relationships among balanced scorecard perspectives on school safety performance: case of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alolah, Turki; Stewart, Rodney A; Panuwatwanich, Kriengsak; Mohamed, Sherif

    2014-07-01

    In the public schools of many developing countries, numerous accidents and incidents occur because of poor safety regulations and management systems. To improve the educational environment in Saudi Arabia, the Ministry of Education seeks novel approaches to measure school safety performance in order to decrease incidents and accidents. The main objective of this research was to develop a systematic approach for measuring Saudi school safety performance using the balanced scorecard framework philosophy. The evolved third generation balanced scorecard framework is considered to be a suitable and robust framework that captures the system-wide leading and lagging indicators of business performance. The balanced scorecard architecture is ideal for adaptation to complex areas such as safety management where a holistic system evaluation is more effective than traditional compartmentalised approaches. In developing the safety performance balanced scorecard for Saudi schools, the conceptual framework was first developed and peer-reviewed by eighteen Saudi education experts. Next, 200 participants, including teachers, school executives, and Ministry of Education officers, were recruited to rate both the importance and the performance of 79 measurement items used in the framework. Exploratory factor analysis, followed by the confirmatory partial least squares method, was then conducted in order to operationalise the safety performance balanced scorecard, which encapsulates the following five salient perspectives: safety management and leadership; safety learning and training; safety policy, procedures and processes; workforce safety culture; and safety performance. Partial least squares based structural equation modelling was then conducted to reveal five significant relationships between perspectives, namely, safety management and leadership had a significant effect on safety learning and training and safety policy, procedures and processes, both safety learning and training and safety policy, procedures and processes had significant effects on workforce safety culture, and workforce safety culture had a significant effect on safety performance. PMID:24589246

  4. Association between sleeping hours and cardiometabolic risk factors for metabolic syndrome in a Saudi Arabian population

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, Jason; Wu, Fen; Chen, Yu; Shamy, Magdy; Alghamdi, Mansour A; Khoder, Mamdouh I; Alkhatim, Alser A; Abdou, Mamdouh H; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Epidemiological and molecular studies have shown that sleep duration is associated with metabolic syndrome (MtS), a disease that is on the rise in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We aim to investigate the association between sleep duration and selected cardiometabolic risk factors of MtS in a Saudi Arabian population. Setting Secondary care was given to the participants. There were 2 participating centres, shopping malls in North and South Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Participants We recruited 2686 participants over a 1-year study period. Participants were selected based on their willingness. The only criterion for exclusion was living in the area (North or South Jeddah) for less than 15?years. Planned and primary outcome measures Participants were measured for blood sugar levels, blood pressure and body mass index. All participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire. Results There was a positive association between longer sleep duration and obesity, hypertension and hyperglycaemia. The adjusted ORs for obesity, hypertension and hyperglycaemia were 1.54 (95% CI 1.20 to 1.98), 1.89 (95% CI 1.45 to 2.48) and 1.59 (95% CI 1.19 to 2.13), respectively, in participants sleeping >8?h/night, as compared with those sleeping 7?h. The positive associations between longer sleep duration, defined as sleeping >7?h, and the disease status, did not differ from other risk factors such as physical activity and nutrition. Conclusions This is the first epidemiological study reporting on the association between sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk factors of MtS in a Saudi Arabian population. Sleep durations of 8?h or greater were found to be associated with all 3 cardiometabolic risk factors: obesity, hypertension and hyperglycaemia, and this relationship was not confounded by quality of nutrition or physical activity levels. PMID:26621514

  5. The desire to utilize postmastectomy breast reconstruction in Saudi Arabian women

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Basim A.; Samargandi, Osama A.; Alghamdi, Hattan A.; Sayegh, Anas A.; Hakeem, Yasir J.; Merdad, Leena; Merdad, Adnan A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To study factors that influence the desire to utilize breast reconstruction after mastectomy, and to investigate the barriers to reconstruction among women in Saudi Arabia. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study at 2 surgical centers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to all breast cancer patients attending the surgery clinics for follow-up after mastectomy between January and March 2013. Ninety-one patients met the study inclusion criteria. The first part of the questionnaire covered the demographic and socioeconomic information regarding factors that might influence the desire to utilize breast reconstruction including possible barriers. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the significant predictors of the desire to undergo reconstruction. Results: Overall, 16.5% of patients underwent breast reconstruction after mastectomy. Young age and high educational attainment were significantly associated with an increased desire to undergo reconstruction. The main barriers to reconstruction were the lack of adequate information on the procedure (63%), concerns on the complications of the procedure (68%), and concerns on the reconstruction interfering with the detection of recurrence (54%). Conclusion: Age and educational level were significant predictors of the desire to utilize breast reconstruction. Furthermore, modifiable barriers included the lack of knowledge and misconceptions on the procedure. Addressing these issues may increase the rate of breast reconstruction in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25737172

  6. Trabasa - Traditional Architecture Recorded by Means of Building Archaeology in Saudi Arabia: Workshop in Jeddah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, U.; Jäger-Klein, C.; Mayer, I.; Mortada, H.; Styhler-Ayd?n, G.

    2013-07-01

    Saudi Arabia has a rich architectural heritage that can be found in all regions of the vast country. Except for a small number of publications the recording and documentation of the traditional built environment was not content of detailed scientific investigations so far. But with the increasing decay of the architectural heritage the interest for this kind of research is rising. A mirror of this efforts is the National Built Heritage Forum, annual conference, launched in 2010 by his excellency Prince Sultan bin Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud and the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities (SCTA). In that frame Saudi universities are intensifying research and educational programs for the research of traditional architecture. In 2008 the Department of Architecture of the College of Environmental Design at the King Abdulaziz University established a cooperation with the Department of History of Architecture and Building Archaeology of the Vienna University of Technology with the aim to start an exchange of knowledge and experience in building archaeology and building survey. An important part of this cooperation was a workshop for staff and students in the historic centre of Jeddah. The aim was to train methods and techniques on typical examples in the old town of Jeddah, Al Balad. This paper is describing the layout of the workshop, the process of the work and examples of the results.

  7. Completeness of adverse drug reactions reports of the Saudi adverse event reporting system

    PubMed Central

    Alshammari, Thamir M.; Al-Kathiri, Wa’ad H.; Louet, Hervé Le; Aljadhey, Hisham S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess completeness of reports in the Saudi Adverse Event Reporting System (SAERS), which is a part of the Saudi Food and Drug Authority pharmacovigilance system for monitoring the safety of medications. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia using the reports that were received between December 2009 and June 2012 in the SAERS. The completeness was assessed by reviewing the components of the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) form, and how many fields were completed. Descriptive statistics are reported. Result: There were 14,783 reports during the study period. Eighty percent of these reports were spontaneous reports. Information related to the drug (99%) and adverse events (98%) of the reports were completed. While the patient’s demographic data were completed only in 38% of all reports, the least completed item in the ADRs form was the reporter information (15%). The most reported drug class was tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (7%), whereas events involving the respiratory organ system were the most frequently reported (4.5%). Conclusion: Although the SAERS is considered new, it has a high number of reports. More efforts are needed to improve the completeness of the SAERS to be a good source to assess the signals between events and suspected drugs, especially when there is a high number of reports. PMID:26108586

  8. Long-term compliance with continuous positive airway pressure in Saudi patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    BaHammam, Ahmed S.; Alassiri, Suhail S.; Al-Adab, Aisha H.; Alsadhan, Ibrahim M.; Altheyab, Abdullah M.; Alrayes, Abdalla H.; Alkhawajah, Mohammad M.; Olaish, Awad H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compliance and define predictors of CPAP compliance among Saudi patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after applying an educational program. Methods: This prospective cohort study included consecutive patients diagnosed to have OSA based on polysomnography between January 2012 and January 2014 in King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. All patients had educational sessions on OSA and CPAP therapy before sleep study, and formal hands-on training on CPAP machines on day one, day 7, and day 14 after diagnosis. The follow-up in the clinic was carried out at one, 4, and 10 months after initiating CPAP therapy. Continuous positive airway pressure compliance was assessed objectively. Logistic regression model was used to assess the predictors of CPAP adherence. Results: The study comprised 156 patients with a mean age of 51.9±12.1 years, body mass index of 38.4±10.6 kg/m2, and apnea hypopnea index of 63.7±39.3 events/hour. All patients were using CPAP at month one, 89.7% at month 4, and 83% at month 10. The persistence of CPAP-related side effects and comorbid bronchial asthma remained as independent predictors of CPAP compliance at the end of the study. Conclusion: With intensive education, support, and close monitoring, more than 80% of Saudi patients with OSA continued to use CPAP after 10 months of initiating CPAP therapy. PMID:26219440

  9. Incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 complications among Saudi adult patients at primary health care center

    PubMed Central

    Alsenany, Samira; Al Saif, Amer

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed type 2 diabetes and its role in complications among adult Saudi patients. [Subjects] Patients attending four primary health care centers in Jeddah were enrolled. [Methods] A cross-sectional design study among Saudi patients attending Ministry of Health primary health care centers in Jeddah was selected for use by the Primary Health Care administration. Patients were interviewed with structured questionnaires to determine the presence of diabetes and risk factors using questions about the history of any disease. [Results] Diabetes mellitus was present in 234 subjects during the data collection period (March–June 2014). Mean patient age was 58 years; diabetes prevalence was 42% in males and 58% in females. The mean age for diabetes onset in males and females was 34 and 39 years, respectively. There was a higher incidence of obesity (75%) associated with a sedentary lifestyle (body mass index ?25) in females (N= 96; 40%) compared with males (N= 87; 36%). In this study, >44% of individuals aged 55 or older had severe to uncontrolled diabetes with long-term complications. The age-adjusted incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease was 38% and 24%, respectively, showing a clear incidence of diabetes associated with cardiovascular disease in Saudi Arabia. [Conclusion] This study found that a multifactorial approach to managing diabetes complication risks is needed. PMID:26180307

  10. A country on the verge of malaria elimination--the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Michael; Al-Zahrani, Mohammed H; Coleman, Marlize; Hemingway, Janet; Omar, Abdiasiis; Stanton, Michelle C; Thomsen, Eddie K; Alsheikh, Adel A; Alhakeem, Raafat F; McCall, Phillip J; Al Rabeeah, Abdullah A; Memish, Ziad A

    2014-01-01

    Significant headway has been made in the global fight against malaria in the past decade and as more countries enter the elimination phase, attention is now focused on identifying effective strategies to shrink the malaria map. Saudi Arabia experienced an outbreak of malaria in 1998, but is now on the brink of malaria elimination, with just 82 autochthonous cases reported in 2012. A review of published and grey literature was performed to identify the control strategies that have contributed to this achievement. The number of autochthonous malaria cases in Saudi Arabia decreased by 99.8% between 1998 and 2012. The initial steep decline in malaria cases coincided with a rapid scaling up of vector control measures. Incidence continued to be reported at low levels (between 0.01 and 0.1 per 1,000 of the population) until the adoption of artesunate plus sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine as first line treatment and the establishment of a regional partnership for a malaria-free Arabian Peninsula, both of which occurred in 2007. Since 2007, incidence has decreased by nearly an order of magnitude. Malaria incidence is now very low, but a high proportion of imported cases, continued potential for autochthonous transmission, and an increased proportion of cases attributable to Plasmodium vivax all present challenges to Saudi Arabia as they work toward elimination by 2015. PMID:25250619

  11. Apolipoprotein E Gene Polymorphism and Serum Lipid Profile in Saudi Patients with Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Al Harthi, Fahad; Huraib, Ghaleb Bin; Zouman, Abdulrahman; Arfin, Misbahul; Tariq, Mohammad; Al-Asmari, Abdulrahaman

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene variants have been reported to influence psoriasis risk. However, data is limited to a few ethnicities and no similar study has been performed in middle eastern populations. We investigated this association in Saudi psoriasis patients. Methods. Saudi subjects (294) were genotyped for APOE gene using APOE StripAssay kit. Results. The frequencies of alleles ?2, ?4, and genotypes ?3/?4 and ?3/?2 were significantly higher in psoriasis patients compared with those in controls. The frequency of ?3 allele and ?3/?3 genotype was significantly lower in patients. Other genotypes, ?2/?4, ?2/?2, and ?4/?4, were absent in both groups. The serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL levels were significantly higher in psoriasis patients contrary to HDL level. Patients with APOE ?4 had significantly higher levels of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, whereas those with the ?2 had higher HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. Conclusion. APOE alleles ?2, ?4, and genotypes ?2/?3 and ?4/?3 are associated with psoriasis and can be a risk factor while allele ?3 and genotype ?3/?3 may be protective for psoriasis in Saudis. Results of lipid profile support that psoriasis is one of the independent risk factors for hyperlipidemia and emphasize the need of screening cardiovascular diseases in psoriatic patients. PMID:24782577

  12. Knowledge and practice of implant-retained restorations among dental students in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Fahim; Shah, Altaf Hussain; Zafar, Mohammad Sohail; Kola, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and practice of implant retained restorations (IRR) among senior dental students in Saudi Arabia. Methods: Four hundred questionnaires were distributed among senior dental students of five dental schools in Saudi Arabia. Student’s knowledge was assessed regarding which implant restoration [cement retained restoration (CRR) or screw retained restoration (SRR)] better provides the desired clinical properties. Students’ practice of IRR, perception of their knowledge and need for further education related to IRR were also assessed. Descriptive statistics and chi-square test were employed to assess collected data. Results: Three hundred and fifty four senior dental students responded at a response rate of 88.5%. Thirty three percent respondents did not have any practical experience of IRR. Students showed a clear preference for CRR with regards to aesthetics (71.4%), passive fit (55.3%), fabrication ease (57.3%) and fracture resistance (40%). SRR were considered to provide better retention (59.6%), soft tissue health (51.1%) and ease of retrievability (72%). Nearly 40% of students agreed that they did not get sufficient information related to IRR in undergraduate courses. Conclusions: Clinical training of IRR is compromised in the undergraduate curriculum in dental schools of Saudi Arabia. The knowledge of dental students regarding IRR was broadly in line with current evidence. PMID:26430416

  13. A Country on the Verge of Malaria Elimination – The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Michael; Al-Zahrani, Mohammed H.; Coleman, Marlize; Hemingway, Janet; Omar, Abdiasiis; Stanton, Michelle C.; Thomsen, Eddie K.; Alsheikh, Adel A.; Alhakeem, Raafat F.; McCall, Phillip J.; Rabeeah, Abdullah A. Al; Memish, Ziad A.

    2014-01-01

    Significant headway has been made in the global fight against malaria in the past decade and as more countries enter the elimination phase, attention is now focused on identifying effective strategies to shrink the malaria map. Saudi Arabia experienced an outbreak of malaria in 1998, but is now on the brink of malaria elimination, with just 82 autochthonous cases reported in 2012. A review of published and grey literature was performed to identify the control strategies that have contributed to this achievement. The number of autochthonous malaria cases in Saudi Arabia decreased by 99.8% between 1998 and 2012. The initial steep decline in malaria cases coincided with a rapid scaling up of vector control measures. Incidence continued to be reported at low levels (between 0.01 and 0.1 per 1,000 of the population) until the adoption of artesunate plus sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine as first line treatment and the establishment of a regional partnership for a malaria-free Arabian Peninsula, both of which occurred in 2007. Since 2007, incidence has decreased by nearly an order of magnitude. Malaria incidence is now very low, but a high proportion of imported cases, continued potential for autochthonous transmission, and an increased proportion of cases attributable to Plasmodium vivax all present challenges to Saudi Arabia as they work toward elimination by 2015. PMID:25250619

  14. Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Gender Risks for Adolescent Obesity in Southwestern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mahfouz, Ahmed A.; Shatoor, Abdullah S.; Khan, Mohamed Y.; Daffalla, Asim A.; Mostafa, Osama A.; Hassanein, Mervat A.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate gender differences in obesity and related behavior among adolescent school boys and girls in southwestern Saudi Arabia. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional study on a stratified sample of 1,249 adolescent boys and 620 adolescent girls, was conducted in southwestern Saudi Arabia. They were interviewed and examined for weight and height using standardized techniques. Results: The prevalence of obesity and overweight in the present study amounted to 23.2% among boys and 29.4% among girls. The following significant risk factors were identified; being a female [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) =1.372, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.099-1.753] and lack of class physical exercise (aOR =1.452, 95% CI =1.149-2.117). Conclusion: Obesity among adolescents is a public health problem in Southwestern Saudi Arabia. The problem is more prevalent among girls. Thus, there is a need for a national programme in the country to prevent and control obesity among adolescents. PMID:21912058

  15. Broad accommodation of rift-related extension recorded by dyke intrusion in Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.; McCausland, W.A.; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Lu, Zhiming; Zahran, H.M.; El, Hadidy S.; Aburukbah, A.; Stewart, I.C.F.; Lundgren, P.R.; White, R.A.; Moufti, M.R.H.

    2010-01-01

    The extensive harrat lava province of Arabia formed during the past 30 million years in response to Red Sea rifting and mantle upwelling. The area was regarded as seismically quiet, but between April and June 2009 a swarm of more than 30,000 earthquakes struck one of the lava fields in the province, Harrat Lunayyir, northwest Saudi Arabia. Concerned that larger damaging earthquakes might occur, the Saudi Arabian government evacuated 40,000 people from the region. Here we use geologic, geodetic and seismic data to show that the earthquake swarm resulted from magmatic dyke intrusion. We document a surface fault rupture that is 8?km long with 91?cm of offset. Surface deformation is best modelled by the shallow intrusion of a north-west trending dyke that is about 10?km long. Seismic waves generated during the earthquakes exhibit overlapping very low- and high-frequency components. We interpret the low frequencies to represent intrusion of magma and the high frequencies to represent fracturing of the crystalline basement rocks. Rather than extension being accommodated entirely by the central Red Sea rift axis, we suggest that the broad deformation observed in Harrat Lunayyir indicates that rift margins can remain as active sites of extension throughout rifting. Our analyses allowed us to forecast the likelihood of a future eruption or large earthquake in the region and informed the decisions made by the Saudi Arabian government to return the evacuees.

  16. Health care services provided to type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid A.; Al-Manaa, Hamad A.; Khoja, Tawfik A.; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H.; Aburisheh, Khaled H.; Youssef, Amira M.; Alotaibi, Metib S.; Al-Gamdi, Ali A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess health care services provided to type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and diabetes health care expenditure in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Methods: This study was part of a nationwide, household, population based cross-sectional survey conducted at the University Diabetes Center, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2007 and December 2009 covering 13 administrative regions of the Kingdom. Using patients’ interview questionnaires, health care services data were collected by trained staff. Results: A total of 5,983 diabetic patients were chosen to assess health care services and expenditure. Approximately 92.2% of health services were governmental and the remaining 7.8% were in private services. The mean annual number of visits to physicians was 6.5±3.9 and laboratories was 5.1±3.9. Diabetic patients required one admission every 3 years with a mean admission duration of 13.3±28.3 days. General practitioners managed 85.9% of diabetic cases alone, or shared with internists and/or endocrinologists. Health care expenditure was governmental in 90% of cases, while it was personal in 7.7% or based on insurance payment in 2.3%. Conclusion: Health services and its expenditure provided to diabetic citizens in Saudi Arabia are mainly governmental. Empowerment of the role of both the private sector and health insurance system is badly needed, aside from implementing proper management guidelines to deliver good services at different levels. PMID:26446334

  17. Oral hygiene, dietary pattern and smoking habits of Bedouin (nomadic Arabs) population in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Almas, K; al-Amri, M; al-Eid, A; al-Shahrani, S

    2003-09-01

    The estimated population of the Bedouins are up to two million in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, but relatively little information is available about them. The aim of the study was to assess the oral hygiene dietary pattern and smoking habits of Saudi Bedouins population around Medina, Qaseen and Khamis Moshayte areas. Five hundred and twenty five Bedouins (296 male, 229 female) with the age range 2-90 years were interviewed and examined clinically over a period of four months (July to October 1998). It was found that 25% of the subjects were miswak users, 30% used miswak and tooth brush, while 26% never cleaned their teeth. Almost 50% of the subjects were regular in their oral hygiene habits. Seventy percent were rice eaters while meat and dates were second and third preference. Tea was the most common drink with 2-3 teaspoons of sugar per cup. Only ten percent were cigarette smokers and less than 5% used shisha (traditional smoking pipe). It is concluded from the study that within the surveyed Bedouin population one fourth of them never cleaned their teeth while almost the same number used miswak (Chewing stick) to clean their teeth. Rice was the most common food item, while tea with refined sugar was the most common drink. Only 15% were smoker. Further research is needed with a larger and a more representative sample of Bedouins from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. PMID:14705374

  18. Analyzing privacy requirements: A case study of healthcare in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ebad, Shouki A; Jaha, Emad S; Al-Qadhi, Mohammed A

    2016-01-01

    Developing legally compliant systems is a challenging software engineering problem, especially in systems that are governed by law, such as healthcare information systems. This challenge comes from the ambiguities and domain-specific definitions that are found in governmental rules. Therefore, there is a significant business need to automatically analyze privacy texts, extract rules and subsequently enforce them throughout the supply chain. The existing works that analyze health regulations use the U.S. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act as a case study. In this article, we applied the Breaux and Antón approach to the text of the Saudi Arabian healthcare privacy regulations; in Saudi Arabia, privacy is among the top dilemmas for public and private healthcare practitioners. As a result, we extracted and analyzed 2 rights, 4 obligations, 22 constraints, and 6 rules. Our analysis can assist requirements engineers, standards organizations, compliance officers and stakeholders by ensuring that their systems conform to Saudi policy. In addition, this article discusses the threats to the study validity and suggests open problems for future research. PMID:25325796

  19. Nosocomial infections in ambulances and effectiveness of ambulance fumigation techniques in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alrazeeni, Daifallah; Al Sufi, Mohammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate infection control and the incidence of bacterial pathogens in Emergency Medical Service (EMS) ambulances in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The effectiveness of fumigation techniques used for these ambulances to minimize the spread of infection to transported patients and pre-hospital care providers was also assessed. Methods: Based on previous literature review indicating a higher propensity of microbial load, 3 areas within the ambulance, such as, stretcher handle, oxygen flow meter knob, and interior handle of the rear door were selected for specimen collection. Swab samples were collected both in the day and night shift, after the intended disinfection and cleaning (before and after fumigation). Micro-organisms were identified using standard procedures. This phase-I study was conducted at the Emergency Medical Services Department, Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz College of Emergency Medical Services, Al Malaz, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between October and November 2013, wherein a total of 10 ambulances from the Saudi Red Crescent Authority in Riyadh were selected for inclusion in the study. Results: The specimens from all 10 ambulances showed similar results. In post disinfection and before fumigation, swab samples showed positive cultures that grew moderate to large quantities of environmental and skin flora. However, almost all organisms were susceptible to the fumigation technique. Conclusion: This study confirms the importance of evaluating the frequency and efficiency of various fumigation techniques as an ambulance is a potential reservoir for microbial transmission to patients and staff. PMID:25399212

  20. Is the Epidemiology of Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever Changing? : A Three-Year Overview in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Memish, Ziad A.; Fagbo, Shamsudeen F.; Osman Ali, Ahmed; AlHakeem, Rafat; Elnagi, Fathelrhman M.; Bamgboye, Elijah A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever disease is yet to be fully understood since the virus was isolated in 1994 in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Setting Preventive Medicine department, Ministry of Health, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Design Retrospective analysis of all laboratory confirmed cases of Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever disease collected through active and passive surveillance from 1st-January 2009 to December, 31, 2011. Results Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever (AHFV) disease increased from 59 cases in 2009 to 93 cases in 2011. Cases are being discovered outside of the region where it was initially diagnosed in Saudi Arabia. About a third of cases had no direct contact with animals or its products. Almost all cases had gastro-intestinal symptoms. Case fatality rate was less than 1%. Conclusions Findings in this study showed the mode of transmission of AHFV virus may not be limited to direct contact with animals or its products. Gastro-intestinal symptoms were not previously documented. Observed low case fatality rate contradicted earlier reports. Close monitoring of the epidemiology of AHFV is recommended to aid appropriate diagnosis. Housewives are advised to wear gloves when handling animals and animal products as a preventive measure. PMID:24516520

  1. Perceptions of medical students towards antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Harakeh, Steve; Almatrafi, Musab; Ungapen, Haifa; Hammad, Rotana; Olayan, Feras; Hakim, Reema; Ayoub, Mohammed; Bakhsh, Noura; Almasaudi, Saad B; Barbour, Elie; Bahijri, Suhad; Azhar, Esam; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Qari, Yousef; Kumosani, Taha; Harakeh, Zeena; Ahmad, Muhammad S; Cals, JochenW L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This survey evaluates knowledge, attitudes and practices of medical students towards use of antibiotics for upper respiratory infections (URTIs). Methodology Cross-sectional questionnaire study among 1042 randomly selected medical students in Saudi Arabia. Results Respondents were mostly Saudis (97.5%), had previous knowledge of antibiotics (99.7%) and their usage (98.3%) against bacterial infections (93.7%). 18.1% thought that they could be used for viral infections. Nearly all students (97.2%) used antibiotics themselves during the previous year and self-medication without a prescription was high at 49% of cases. Most antibiotics were taken for URTI symptoms (61.8%). Female medical students had better knowledge on antibiotic effectiveness against bacteria and viruses, and overall knowledge increased with study year. Health seeking behaviour rates for symptoms of RTI and associated estimated necessity for antibiotics varied but were highest for cough with yellow/green phlegm. Conclusions The depth of knowledge that healthcare professionals have in relation to the proper use of antibiotics is essential in spreading the right message within communities. This is the first large study among medical students in Saudi Arabia, shedding important light on areas for improvement in the medical curriculum as well as antibiotic practices of medical students themselves. PMID:26175907

  2. Prostatic diseases under focus in a university hospital in Eastern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Nemer, Areej M. Al; Aldamanhori, Reem B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the spectrum of pathologies diagnosed in prostatic biopsies of Saudi men, and test whether the frequency of diagnosing the malignant fraction has been changed over the last 15 years, and assess the association between chronic inflammation (CI) with both benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and cancer (PCa), and investigate the histological findings of cases presented with acute urinary retention (AUR) clinically. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study including all prostatic biopsies accessed in the files in the Surgical Pathology Laboratory of King Fahd University Hospital, Alkhobar, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia over 15 years (1999-2013) for Saudi men. Age, procedure indication, and final diagnoses were retrieved and slides were reviewed. Results: There were 360 cases included in this study with a median age of 65 year-old. The BPH comprised the most (64.7%), while PCa accounted for 89 cases, 13.5% of which were incidental. Most cases of both BPH and PCa were diagnosed in the seventh decade. The frequency of diagnosing PCa did not show a solid rise or fall over time. Chronic inflammation is more related to BPH than to PCa. Only CI showed a significant statistical association with AUR. Conclusion: Prostatic diseases show a stable trend over time. While CI is a common dominator for both BPH and PCa, it is associated more with BPH. Among all histological findings, only CI is related to the clinical presentation of AUR. PMID:26593165

  3. Evaluating the Variation of Dust Emission and Its Controlling Factors over Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, M.; Yang, Z.; Tao, W.; Stenchikov, G. L.; Kalenderski, S.

    2012-12-01

    Dust event significantly influences surface radiation and energy balance, and also results in a variety of environmental problems. Saudi Arabia (16°-33°N, 34°- 56°E) is mainly covered by the Arabian Desert, and dust storm is a severe environmental problem in this region. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observed aerosol optical depth (AOD), which has the newly developed satellite aerosol algorithm called "Deep Blue" integrated, were used to investigate the dust emissions in the research region during 2004-2009. In order to explore the reasons for dust emission variations, we analyzed the precipitation from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). Besides precipitations, dust emission is also associated with land surface conditions. Therefore, the influences of surface vegetation distribution and elevation on dust emissions were inspected with hyperresolution modeling, which integrated the MODIS Land Cover Type product into the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4). Our main conclusions are: 1) during 2004-2009, most severe dust events happened in June and July, and centralized in southeastern Saudi Arabia; 2) the first and the second highest AOD values in each year were rising; 3) AOD seasonal mean was also increasing in boreal spring and summer; 4) these variations are associated with precipitation variations in Saudi Arabia; 5) dust emissions are sensitive to surface vegetation distributions, and reducing the areas covered by trees and grasslands results in increased dust emissions.

  4. Prevalence of non-strongyle gastrointestinal parasites of horses in Riyadh region of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    AL Anazi, Abdullah D.; Alyousif, Mohamed S.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to provide recent data on the occurrence of non-strongyle intestinal parasite infestation in horses in the Riyadh region of Saudi Arabia as a basis for developing parasite control strategies. We conducted necropsy for 45 horses from September 2006 to November 2007 in the Riyadh region, Saudi Arabia. 39 out of 45 horses were infected with intestinal parasites with an infestation rate of 86.6%. Infestations with seven nematode species and two species of Gasterophilus larva were found. The most prevalent parasites were Strongyloides westeri (64.4%) and Parascaris equorum (28.8%) followed by Habronema muscae (22.2%). Trichostrongylus axei and Oxyuris equi were less common at (11.1%) and (8.8%), respectively. Habronema megastoma and Setaria equine were found in two horses only (4.4%). Gasterophilus intestinalis larvae were recovered from 39 horses (86.6%) and Gasterophilus nasalis larvae were found in 17 horses (37.7%). Season had a significant effect on the prevalence of P. equorum and G. nasalis, while age of horses had a significant effect only on the prevalence of P. equorum. The husbandry in Saudi Arabia appears to be conductive to parasites transmitted in stables or by insects rather than in pasture. PMID:23961139

  5. Prevalence of non-strongyle gastrointestinal parasites of horses in Riyadh region of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Anazi, Abdullah D; Alyousif, Mohamed S

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to provide recent data on the occurrence of non-strongyle intestinal parasite infestation in horses in the Riyadh region of Saudi Arabia as a basis for developing parasite control strategies. We conducted necropsy for 45 horses from September 2006 to November 2007 in the Riyadh region, Saudi Arabia. 39 out of 45 horses were infected with intestinal parasites with an infestation rate of 86.6%. Infestations with seven nematode species and two species of Gasterophilus larva were found. The most prevalent parasites were Strongyloides westeri (64.4%) and Parascaris equorum (28.8%) followed by Habronema muscae (22.2%). Trichostrongylus axei and Oxyuris equi were less common at (11.1%) and (8.8%), respectively. Habronema megastoma and Setaria equine were found in two horses only (4.4%). Gasterophilus intestinalis larvae were recovered from 39 horses (86.6%) and Gasterophilus nasalis larvae were found in 17 horses (37.7%). Season had a significant effect on the prevalence of P. equorum and G. nasalis, while age of horses had a significant effect only on the prevalence of P. equorum. The husbandry in Saudi Arabia appears to be conductive to parasites transmitted in stables or by insects rather than in pasture. PMID:23961139

  6. Outcomes of a type 2 diabetes education program adapted to the cultural contexts of Saudi women

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bannay, Hana R.; Jongbloed, Lyn E.; Jarus, Tal; Alabdulwahab, Sami S.; Khoja, Tawfik A.; Dean, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the outcomes of a pilot intervention of a type 2 diabetes (T2D) education program, based on international standards, and adapted to the cultural and religious contexts of Saudi women. Methods: This study is an experiment of a pilot intervention carried out between August 2011 and January 2012 at the primary health clinics in Dammam. Women at risk of or diagnosed with T2D (N=35 including dropouts) were assigned to one of 2 groups; an intervention group participated in a pilot intervention of T2D education program, based on international standards and tailored to their cultural and religious contexts; and a usual care group received the usual care for diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Outcomes included blood glucose, body composition, 6-minute walk distance, life satisfaction, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge. The intervention group participated in a focus group of their program experience. Data analysis was based on mixed methods. Results: Based on 95% confidence interval comparisons, improvements were noted in blood sugar, 6-minute walk distance, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge in participants of the intervention group. They also reported improvements in lifestyle-related health behaviors after the education program. Conclusion: Saudi women may benefit from a T2D education program based on international standards and adapted to their cultural and religious contexts. PMID:26108595

  7. Evaluation of the potential cardioprotective activity of some Saudi plants against doxorubicin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Osama M; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B; Abdallah, Hossam M; Nagy, Ayman A; Mohamadin, Ahmed M; Abdel-Sattar, Essam A

    2012-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an anthracycline antibiotic widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of several tumours. However, its cardiac toxicity limits its use at maximum therapeutic doses. Most studies implicated increased oxidative stress as the major determinant of DOX cardiotoxicity. The local Saudi flora is very rich in a variety of plants of quite known folkloric or traditional medicinal uses. Tribulus macropterus Boiss., Olea europaea L. subsp. africana (Mill.) P. S. Green, Tamarix aphylla (L.) H. Karst., Cynomorium coccineum L., Cordia myxa L., Calligonum comosum L' Hér, and Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal are Saudi plants known to have antioxidant activities. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential protective effects of methanolic extracts of these seven Saudi plants against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. Two plants showed promising cardioprotective potential in the order Calligonum comosum > Cordia myxa. The two plant extracts showed potent in vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant properties. They significantly protected against DOX-induced alterations in cardiac oxidative stress markers (GSH and MDA) and cardiac serum markers (CK-MB and LDH activities). Additionally, histopathological examination indicated a protection against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. In conclusion, C. comosum and C. myxa exerted protective activity against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, which is, at least partly, due to their antioxidant effect. PMID:22888535

  8. Great cities look small

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Aaron; Yaliraki, Sophia N.; Barahona, Mauricio; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Great cities connect people; failed cities isolate people. Despite the fundamental importance of physical, face-to-face social ties in the functioning of cities, these connectivity networks are not explicitly observed in their entirety. Attempts at estimating them often rely on unrealistic over-simplifications such as the assumption of spatial homogeneity. Here we propose a mathematical model of human interactions in terms of a local strategy of maximizing the number of beneficial connections attainable under the constraint of limited individual travelling-time budgets. By incorporating census and openly available online multi-modal transport data, we are able to characterize the connectivity of geometrically and topologically complex cities. Beyond providing a candidate measure of greatness, this model allows one to quantify and assess the impact of transport developments, population growth, and other infrastructure and demographic changes on a city. Supported by validations of gross domestic product and human immunodeficiency virus infection rates across US metropolitan areas, we illustrate the effect of changes in local and city-wide connectivities by considering the economic impact of two contemporary inter- and intra-city transport developments in the UK: High Speed 2 and London Crossrail. This derivation of the model suggests that the scaling of different urban indicators with population size has an explicitly mechanistic origin. PMID:26179988

  9. Great cities look small.

    PubMed

    Sim, Aaron; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2015-08-01

    Great cities connect people; failed cities isolate people. Despite the fundamental importance of physical, face-to-face social ties in the functioning of cities, these connectivity networks are not explicitly observed in their entirety. Attempts at estimating them often rely on unrealistic over-simplifications such as the assumption of spatial homogeneity. Here we propose a mathematical model of human interactions in terms of a local strategy of maximizing the number of beneficial connections attainable under the constraint of limited individual travelling-time budgets. By incorporating census and openly available online multi-modal transport data, we are able to characterize the connectivity of geometrically and topologically complex cities. Beyond providing a candidate measure of greatness, this model allows one to quantify and assess the impact of transport developments, population growth, and other infrastructure and demographic changes on a city. Supported by validations of gross domestic product and human immunodeficiency virus infection rates across US metropolitan areas, we illustrate the effect of changes in local and city-wide connectivities by considering the economic impact of two contemporary inter- and intra-city transport developments in the UK: High Speed 2 and London Crossrail. This derivation of the model suggests that the scaling of different urban indicators with population size has an explicitly mechanistic origin. PMID:26179988

  10. Is irrigation with partial desalinated seawater a policy option for saving freshwater in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Multsch, Sebastian; Alquwaizany, Abdulaziz S.; Lehnert, Karl-H.; Frede, Hans-Georg; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    The agriculture sector consumes with 88 % a majority of the almost fossil water resources in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Irrigation with saline water has been highlighted to be a promising technique to reduce fresh water consumption. Current desalination techniques, further developments, salt tolerant crop types and improved irrigation systems can potentially redesign future perspectives for irrigation agriculture, in particular by considering the growing desalination capacity in KSA (5 million m3 day-1 in 2003). Hence, we have analyzed the potential of using desalinated and partial desalinated seawater for growing crops in KSA by considering scenarios of salinity levels and desalination costs. The desalination process has been modelled with the ROSA© software considering a reverse osmosis (RO) plant. The spatial decision support system SPARE:WATER has been applied to assess the water footprint of crops (WFcrop). In order to maintain high crop yields, salts need to be washed out from the rooting zone, which requires the application of additional salt-free water. Therefore, high crop yields come along with additional water requirements and increased desalination effort and increased costs for proving high quality water. As an example, growing wheat with partial desalinated seawater from the Arabian Gulf with a RO plant has been investigated. Desalination reduces the salinity level from 76 dS m-1 to 0.5 dS m-1 considering two RO cycles, with cost of desalinized water in the range of 0.5 to 1.2 m-3. We acknowledge that cost only refer to desalination without considering others such as transport, water pumping or crop fertilization. The study shows that Boron is the most problematic salt component, because it is difficult to remove by RO and toxic in high concentrations for crops (wheat threshold of 0.5 to 1.0 mg l-1). The nationwide average WFcrop of wheat under surface irrigation is 2,628 m3 t-1 considering high water quality of 1 dS m-1 and 3,801 m3 t-1 at 12 dS m-1. Using sprinkler or drip irrigation systems the WFcrop decreases of about 20 % and 34 %, respectively. It can be shown that a salinity level larger than 9 dS m-1 increases leaching water requirement of wheat over proportional and that a salinity level of 9 dS m-1 reduces cost for irrigation water by about 11 % in comparison to the irrigation with nearly fresh water quality of 1 dS m-1. A trade-off analyses reveals that making desalinated seawater use profitable, cost need to be reduced below 0.2 m-3 for sprinkler and drip irrigation and even below 0.1 m-3 for widespread used surface irrigation systems. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Saudi Arabia, for funding the research Project No. 33-900 entitled 'Technology for desalinated seawater use in agriculture'.

  11. City Lights of Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Growth in 'mega-cities' is altering the landscape and the atmosphere in such a way as to curtail normal photosynthesis. By using data from The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System, researchers have been able to look at urban sprawl by monitoring the emission of light from cities at night. By overlaying these 'light maps' onto other data such as soil and vegetation maps, the research shows that urbanization can have a variable but measurable impact on photosynthetic productivity. For more information, read Bright Lights, Big City Image by the NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio

  12. The Identification of Issues Serving as Barriers to Positive Educational Experiences for Saudi Arabian Students Studying in the State of Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, V. Jean

    2009-01-01

    The United States has experienced unrivaled success in attracting international students for higher education studies. Saudi Arabia has sponsored students for study in the United States since 1950, with the number of students on scholarship varying according to the fluctuation in oil prices. The cultures of Saudi Arabia and the United States…

  13. The Social Validation of Behaviors Included in the Critical Events Index of the Systematic Screening for Behavior Disorders in Male Saudi Arabia Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwan, Emad

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (a) identify which behaviors from the Systematic Screening for Behavior Disorders (SSBD) Critical Events Index occur in male Saudi Arabia primary schools and how often teachers perceive their occurrence; (b) determine the extent of concern male Saudi Arabia primary school teachers report regarding these behaviors;…

  14. Selected Dietary Nutrients and the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Males and Females in Saudi Arabia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M.; Khan, Nasiruddin; Alkharfy, Khalid M.; Al-Attas, Omar S.; Alokail, Majed S.; Alfawaz, Hanan A.; Alothman, Abdulaziz; Vanhoutte, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, the rapid economic development in Saudi Arabia resulted in an unbalanced dietary intake pattern within the general population. Consequently, metabolic syndrome was also documented to be highly prevalent in the Middle-East region. We aimed to examine the relationship between selected dietary nutrient intakes and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the general adult population of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In this cross-sectional study, 185 adult Saudis aged 19 to 60 years (87 males and 98 females (mean age 35.6 ± 13.2 and 37.6 ± 11.7 years, respectively)) were included. The criteria for metabolic syndrome were based on the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) criteria, and the dietary food intake was assessed by two 24-h dietary recall methods. The odd ratios (ORs) of metabolic syndrome risk across quartiles of selected dietary nutrients were significantly lower for carbohydrates and proteins, as well as for vitamins A, C, E and K, calcium, zinc and magnesium (p < 0.05 for all) in the female group with metabolic syndrome than those without. The pattern of daily dietary intake of selected nutrients among the general population of Saudi Arabia raises concern, and this dietary imbalance could increase the risk of metabolic syndrome, particularly in adult Saudi females. PMID:24284611

  15. The time lapse experiment in Al Wasse water pumping field in Saudi Arabia by an ultra-stable seismic source (ACROSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlAnezi, Ghunaim; Kasahara, Junzo; AlDamegh, Khaled S.; Lafouza, Omar; AlYousef, Khaled; Almalki, Fahad; Nishiyama, Eichiro

    2015-04-01

    We have developed the time lapse technology for EOR (enhanced oil recovery) and CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) using a very stable and continuous seismic source called ACROSS (Accurately Controlled Routinely Operated Signal System) with multi-geophones. Since 2011, we have tested this technology in the context of carbonate rocks in Saudi Arabia. The Al Wasee water pumping site approximately 120 km east of Riyadh city has been selected as a trail-site. The intention is to observe the changes in aquifers induced by pumping operations. One ACROSS source unit was installed at the Al Wasee site in December 2011 and we are continuing the field test. The instrument has been operated from 10 to 50 Hz with 40 tons-f at 50 Hz. Using alternatively clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations we can synthesize vertical and horizontal forces, respectively. 31 3C-geophones in 2 km x 3 km area and four nearby 3Cgeophones have been used to monitor the seismic changes from pumping the water. The one and half month data between December 2012 and February 2013 show continuous and clear change of observed waveforms for all 31 stations while the source signature did not change. The change is closest and fastest at the station #42. The cause of continuous change with time is interpreted as pumping of water by 64 wells located in this field.

  16. Description of Rhadinorhynchus dorsoventrospinosus (Acanthocephala: Rhadinor-hynchidae) from the red spot emperor Lethrinus lentjan with new host and locality records in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Ghamdi, Ali Othman

    2013-04-01

    Adult worms of Rhadinorhynchus dorsoventrospinosus (Acanthocephala: Rhadinor-hynchidae) were collected from the small intestine of the red spot emperor Lethrinus lentjan (family Lethrinidae) from locations along the Red Sea at Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia. Twenty three out of 70 fish specimens (32.9%) were found to be naturally infected. The parasite was described using photo research Zeiss microscopy and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Light microscopic studies revealed that the adult worm possessed a proboscis which was long, cylindrical with a uniform width measured 0.44 +/- 0.02 (0.38-0.46) mm in length and 0.1 +/- 10.02 (0.09-0.15) mm in width. Proboscis hooks observed by scanning electron microscopy were large, uniform in size (14-16 rows of 26 hooks each) with a row of longer hooks at the base. Comparison between the present described species and four species of the same genus was done, it was observed that there was only one comparable species, R dorsoventrospinosus resembled the present parasite in the general morphology and differed from others, so the present studied species is classified as R. dorsoventrospinosus with new host and locality records. PMID:23697027

  17. City sewer collectors biocorrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksia&¸zdot; ek, Mariusz

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the biocorrosion of city sewer collectors impregnated with special polymer sulphur binders, polymerized sulphur, which is applied as the industrial waste material. The city sewer collectors are settled with a colony of soil bacteria which have corrosive effects on its structure. Chemoautotrophic nitrifying bacteria utilize the residues of halites (carbamide) which migrate in the city sewer collectors, due to the damaged dampproofing of the roadway and produce nitrogen salts. Chemoorganotrophic bacteria utilize the traces of organic substrates and produce a number of organic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, citric, oxalic and other). The activity of microorganisms so enables the origination of primary and secondary salts which affect physical properties of concretes in city sewer collectors unfavourably.

  18. Between house and city

    E-print Network

    Kallus, Rachel Admati

    1982-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the relationships between a residential building type and the city, this thesis explores the quality of the urban context resulting from the assemblage of these buildings. The investigation takes ...

  19. New norc city/

    E-print Network

    Reyes, Ulises

    2015-01-01

    People in cities in select parts of the world are on the cusp of a paradigm never before experienced by previous generations. The demographic-economic paradox tells us there is an inverse correlation found between wealth ...

  20. Light in the city

    E-print Network

    Srinivasan, Kavita, 1976-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis focuses on enhancing the awareness of light for the pedestrian,and using light as a way of revealing the structure of the city and its relation to the cosmos. It proposes that aesthetic qualities of light inform ...

  1. The Sustainable City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangloff, Deborah

    1995-01-01

    Focuses on methods to make cities more sustainable through the processes of energy efficiency, pollution and waste reduction, capture of natural processes, and the merger of ecological, economic, and social factors. (LZ)

  2. Tyler- Smith City HTC 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    The Capital City of Munich spends more than 40 million Euros (~50 million US$) annually for the supply of heat, electricity and water to its own buildings. This amount for energy consumption equals a production of carbon dioxide of approximately...

  3. City College of New York CITY FACTS, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Univ. of New York, NY. City Coll.

    CITY FACTS is an annual publication of the City College of New York's (CCNY's) Institutional Research Office. It contains four main sections: Executive Summary and Commentary on CITY FACTS Tables, Student Data over the Past Decade, Employee and Financial Data, and Reference Sources. A brief commentary on each of the City Facts tables is included…

  4. Sinking coastal cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkens, G.; Bucx, T.; Dam, R.; de Lange, G.; Lambert, J.

    2015-11-01

    In many coastal and delta cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. A major cause for severe land subsidence is excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will sink below sea level. Land subsidence increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. In addition, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs for (infra)structure. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. As subsidence is often spatially variable and can be caused by multiple processes, an assessment of subsidence in delta cities needs to answer questions such as: what are the main causes? What is the current subsidence rate and what are future scenarios (and interaction with other major environmental issues)? Where are the vulnerable areas? What are the impacts and risks? How can adverse impacts be mitigated or compensated for? Who is involved and responsible to act? In this study a quick-assessment of subsidence is performed on the following mega-cities: Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Dhaka, New Orleans and Bangkok. Results of these case studies will be presented and compared, and a (generic) approach how to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas is provided.

  5. The Saudi Human Genome Program: An oasis in the desert of Arab medicine is providing clues to genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Project Team, Saudi Genome

    2015-01-01

    Oil wells, endless deserts, stifling heat, masses of pilgrims, and wealthy-looking urban areas still dominate the widespread mental image of Saudi Arabia. Currently, this image is being extended to include a recent endeavor that is reserving a global share in the limelight as one of the top ten genomics projects currently underway: the Saudi Human Genome Program (SHGP). With sound funding, dedicated resources, and national determination, the SHGP targets the sequencing of 100,000 human genomes over the next five years to conduct world-class genomics-based biomedical research in the Saudi population. Why this project was conceived and thought to be feasible, what is the ultimate target, and how it operates are the questions we answer in this article. PMID:26583887

  6. Vanadium and nickel content of Nowruz spill tar flakes on the Saudi Arabian coastline and their probable environmental impact

    SciTech Connect

    Sadiq, M.; Zaidi, T.H.

    1984-06-01

    The Arabian Gulf is experiencing the worst oil spill in its history. The spill originates from two war damaged Iranian oil wells in the Nowruz oil field. Much of the oil is entering Saudi Arabian waters and washes ashore in the form of tar like flakes. In late March and early April 1983, fish, snake, turtle, and bird kills of different magnitude were noted along the Saudi Arabian coastline. In the early days of the spill Saudi Arabian authorities suspected sources other than the Nowruz spill to be causing the kills. Research was initiated to identify the origin of tar like flakes, their environmental impact and the cause of fish, snake, turtle and bird kills. This paper discusses some of the results of this research.

  7. Learning Cities on the Move

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The modern Learning City concept emerged from the work of OECD on lifelong learning with streams of Learning Cities and Educating Cities having much in common but having little contact with each other. While the early development of Learning Cities in the West has not been sustained, the present situation is marked by the dynamic development of…

  8. City Lights: America's Boldest Mayors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggers, William D.

    1993-01-01

    Although the plight of cities seems nearly hopeless, three new-style big city mayors have emerged to try ideas deserving study by other cities. Edward Rendell of Philadelphia (Pennsylvania), John Norquist of Milwaukee (Wisconsin), and Stephen Goldsmith of Indianapolis (Indiana) are demonstrating that U.S. cities can be made to work. (SLD)

  9. Sinking Coastal Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkens, G.; Stuurman, R.; De Lange, G.; Bucx, T.; Lambert, J.

    2014-12-01

    In many coastal cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will continue to sink, even below sea level. The ever increasing industrial and domestic demand for water in these cities results in excessive groundwater extraction, causing severe subsidence. In addition, coastal cities are often faced with larger natural subsidence, as they are built on thick sequences of soft soil. The impacts of subsidence are further exacerbated by climate-induced sea level rise. Land subsidence results in two types damage: foremost it increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. Secondly, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs of roads and transportation networks, sewage systems, buildings and foundations. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. To survey the extent of groundwater associated subsidence, we conducted a quick-assessment of subsidence in a series of mega-cities (Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Dhaka, New Orleans and Bangkok). For each city research questions included: what are the main causes, how much is the current subsidence rate and what are predictions, where are the vulnerable areas, what are the impacts and risks, how can adverse impacts can be mitigated or compensated for, and what governmental bodies are involved and responsible to act? Using the assessment, this paper discusses subsidence modelling and measurement results from the selected cities. The focus is on the importance of delayed settlement after increases in hydraulic heads, the role of the subsurface composition for subsidence rates and best practice solutions for subsiding cities. For the latter, urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management and related spatial planning strategies are just examples of the options available. The discussions in this paper form the building blocks for a much-needed research agenda that aims to deliver a strategy to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas.

  10. Current care services provided for patients with COPD in the Eastern province in Saudi Arabia: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Alsubaiei, Mohammed E; Cafarella, Paul A; Frith, Peter A; McEvoy, R Doug; Effing, Tanja W

    2015-01-01

    Background COPD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The prevalence rate of COPD in the general Saudi population is estimated to be 2.4% and 14.2% among smokers. Not much is known about current health care services for patients with COPD in Saudi Arabia. The objective of this study was to determine the current care services for patients with COPD provided by government hospitals in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. Directors of the Department of Internal Medicine from all 22 general government hospitals that are under the responsibility of the Ministry of Health or the Ministry of Higher Education in this region were asked to participate. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Results The study results indicated that there are limited hospital facilities for patients with COPD: no respiratory departments in any of the included hospitals, no spirometry in 77.3% of the hospitals, no intensive care units in 63.7% of the hospitals, and no pulmonary rehabilitation program in any of the hospitals. Among the included 22 hospitals, 24 respiratory physicians, 29 respiratory therapists, and three physiotherapists were involved in COPD care. Conclusion In conclusion, current care services provided by government hospitals in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia for patients with COPD do not meet international recommendations for COPD management. Increased awareness, knowledge, and implementation of COPD guidelines by health care providers will most probably improve COPD management in Saudi Arabia. In addition, the government could improve dissemination of information about COPD management through national programs and by offering specific education regarding respiratory diseases. PMID:26604736

  11. Earth's City Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Earth's city lights was created with data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Originally designed to view clouds by moonlight, the OLS is also used to map the locations of permanent lights on the Earth's surface. The brightest areas of the Earth are the most urbanized, but not necessarily the most populated. (Compare western Europe with China and India.) Cities tend to grow along coastlines and transportation networks. Even without the underlying map, the outlines of many continents would still be visible. The United States interstate highway system appears as a lattice connecting the brighter dots of city centers. In Russia, the Trans-Siberian railroad is a thin line stretching from Moscow through the center of Asia to Vladivostok. The Nile River, from the Aswan Dam to the Mediterranean Sea, is another bright thread through an otherwise dark region. Even more than 100 years after the invention of the electric light, some regions remain thinly populated and unlit. Antarctica is entirely dark. The interior jungles of Africa and South America are mostly dark, but lights are beginning to appear there. Deserts in Africa, Arabia, Australia, Mongolia, and the United States are poorly lit as well (except along the coast), along with the boreal forests of Canada and Russia, and the great mountains of the Himalaya. The Earth Observatory article Bright Lights, Big City describes how NASA scientists use city light data to map urbanization. Image by Craig Mayhew and Robert Simmon, NASA GSFC, based on DMSP data

  12. Impact of the March 2009 dust event in Saudi Arabia on aerosol optical properties, meteorological parameters, sky temperature and emissivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrabi, A.; Alharbi, B.; Tapper, N.

    2011-04-01

    On 10th March 2009 a widespread and severe dust storm event that lasted several hours struck Riyadh, and represented one of the most intense dust storms experienced in Saudi Arabia in the last two decades. This short-lived storm caused widespread and heavy dust deposition, zero visibility and total airport shutdown, as well as extensive damage to buildings, vehicles, power poles and trees across the city of Riyadh. Changes in Meteorological parameters, aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent ?, infrared (IR) sky temperature and atmospheric emissivity were investigated before, during, and after the storm. The analysis showed significant changes in all of the above parameters due to this event. Shortly after the storm arrived, air pressure rapidly increased by 4 hPa, temperature decreased by 6 °C, relative humidly increased from 10% to 30%, the wind direction became northerly and the wind speed increased to a maximum of 30 m s -1. AOD at 550 nm increased from 0.396 to 1.71. The Angstrom exponent ? rapidly decreased from 0.192 to -0.078. The mean AOD at 550 nm on the day of the storm was 0.953 higher than during the previous clear day, while ? was -0.049 in comparison with 0.323 during the previous day. Theoretical simulations using SMART software showed remarkable changes in both spectral and broadband solar radiation components. The global and direct radiation components decreased by 42% and 68%, respectively, and the diffuse components increased by 44% in comparison with the previous clear day. IR sky temperatures and sky emissivity increased by 24 °C and 0.3, respectively, 2 h after the arrival of the storm. The effect of aerosol loading by the storm on IR atmospheric emission was investigated using MODTRAN software. It was found that the effect of aerosols caused an increase of the atmospheric emission in the atmospheric window (8-14 ?m) such that the window emissions resembled those of a blackbody and the atmospheric window was almost closed.

  13. Risk of obstructive sleep apnea among Saudis with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Siraj Omar; Alkhouli, Abeer; Howladar, Mohannad; Ahmad, Ibrahim; Alshohaib, Saad; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed; Krayem, Ayman

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients was reported to be 10-fold that in the general population. OSA can worsen the clinical symptoms and cardiovascular complications of ESRD. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of symptoms and risk of OSA among Saudi patients with ESRD. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This multi-center, cross-sectional study was conducted in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between June 2012 and September 2013. METHODS: The prevalence of OSA was assessed using the Berlin questionnaire. The presence of daytime sleepiness was evaluated using the Epworth sleepiness scale. Data were also collected on the medical history, clinical, and laboratory findings of participants. RESULTS: In all, 355 patients (61% male) were enrolled (mean age: 45.5 ± 15.4 years). The overall prevalence of high-risk of OSA was 44.2% (males, 47.3%; females, 44.8%; P = 0.65). The prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) was 74%. Controlling for age, gender and body mass index, multivariate analysis revealed that hypertension and hepatitis C infection were the only comorbidities significantly associated with OSA (odds ratio [OR]: 3.827 and 0.559; confidence interval [CI]: 2.120-6.906 and 0.324-0.964; P < 0.0001 and 0.036, respectively). OSA was also strongly associated with EDS (OR: 3.054; CI: 1.676-5.565; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: In Saudi Arabia, the risk of OSA is more common in ESRD patients than in the general population. OSA is strongly associated with EDS. Interestingly, a significant negative correlation between OSA and hepatitis C infection was noted, which warrants further investigation.

  14. Heterogeneity and diversity of ABO and Rh blood group genes in select Saudi Arabian populations.

    PubMed

    AlSuhaibani, E S; Kizilbash, N A; Malik, S

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the diversity of ABO and Rh blood group genes in the Saudi Arabian population, we assembled the phenotypic data of approximately 66,000 subjects from ten representative Saudi populations: Al-Khobar, Riyadh, Tabuk/Madina Al-Munawaara, Jeddah, Abha, South region, Sakaka, Domah, Al-Qurayat, and Sweer. The frequencies of p[A], q[B], and r[O] alleles at the ABO locus were observed to be 0.1688, 0.1242, and 0.7070, respectively, and the frequency of the D allele at the Rh locus was 0.7138. The heterozygosities at the ABO and Rh loci were 0.4563 and 0.4086, respectively, while the combined heterozygosity was 0.4324. Homogeneity tests revealed the population of Abha to be the most heterogeneous while that of Tabuk/Madina was found to be the least heterogeneous. Homogeneity was higher among the Northern populations while Southern populations demonstrated subdivisions and stratification. Gene diversity analyses yielded a total heterozygosity value of 0.4449. The coefficient of gene differentiation was 0.0090. Nei's genetic distance analyses showed that there was close affinity between the populations of Al-Khobar and Riyadh. The largest differences were observed between the populations of Sakaka and Domah. Furthermore, negative correlations were found between p[A] and r[O] alleles, and between q[B] and r[O] alleles at the ABO locus. Clinal analyses revealed that the r[O] allele showed an increasing trend from North-East to South-West, and conversely the q[B] allele exhibited a decreasing trend at these coordinates. These analyses present interesting aspects of the blood group allele distribution across the geography of Saudi Arabia. PMID:26214466

  15. Status of respiratory care profession in Saudi Arabia: A national survey

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Ghazi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory care (RC) is an allied health profession that involves assessing and treating patients who have pulmonary diseases. Research indicates that respiratory therapists’ (RT's) involvement in caring for patients with respiratory disorders improves important outcome measures. In Kingdome of Saudi Arabia (KSA), RC has been practiced by RTs for more than 30 years. OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate the status of the RC workforce in Saudi Arabia in terms of demographic distribution, number, education, and RC service coverage. METHODS: We used a specially designed survey to collect data. A list of 411 working hospitals in KSA was obtained. All hospitals were contacted to inquire if RC is practiced by RTs. Data were collected from hospitals that employ RTs. RESULTS: Only 88 hospitals, 21.4% of total hospitals in the country, have RTs. Out of the 244 Ministry of Health (MOH) hospitals, only 31 hospitals (12.7%) employ RTs. There are 1,477 active RTs in KSA. Twenty-five percent of them, or 371, are Saudis. The majority of the RT workforce (60%) work for non-MOH government hospitals, and almost half the total RTs work in Riyadh province. About 60% of RTs work in critical care settings. RC coverage of critical care was 44.5% of ideal. The overall RT-to-ICU bed ratio was 1:11. The ratio was 1:9 for non-MOH government hospitals, and 1:20 for MOH hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: We report the first insightful data on RC workforce in KSA. These data should be used by educational institutions and health policy makers to plan better RC coverage in the country. PMID:25593609

  16. Apolipoprotein E polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia among Saudis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmary, Saeed Mohammad; Kadasah, Saeed; Arfin, Misbahul; Tariq, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes influence the phenotype of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's and Parkinson disease and may affect schizophrenia pathogenesis. This study was undertaken to determine the association between APOE gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia in the Saudi population. Material and methods APOE allele and genotype frequencies were studied in 380 Saudi subjects including schizophrenia patients and matched controls using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-hybridization techniques. Results The frequencies of the APOE allele ?2 and genotypes ?2/?3 and ?2/?4 were significantly higher in the schizophrenia patients as compared to controls, suggesting that the ?2 allele and its heterozygous genotypes may increase the susceptibility to schizophrenia. In contrast, the frequencies of the ?3 allele and ?3/?3 genotype were lower in patients as compared to controls, suggesting a protective effect of APOE ?3 for schizophrenia. This study indicated that APOE ?4 was differentially associated with schizophrenia depending on the symptoms as the frequency of the ?4 allele was significantly higher in schizophrenia patients with positive symptoms. By contrast, no significant association between APOE ?4 and schizophrenia patients with negative symptoms was observed. Genotypes ?2/?2 and ?4/?4 were absent in patients and controls. Moreover, the age of onset was significantly lower in patients with the APOE ?2/?3 genotype. There was no significant difference in the frequencies of APOE alleles and genotypes between male and female schizophrenia patients. Conclusions The results of this study clearly show that APOE alleles and genotypes are associated with risk of developing schizophrenia and early age of onset in Saudis. PMID:26322100

  17. First study of pattern of anaphylaxis in a large tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Rashid; Rehan Khaliq, Agha M.; Al Otaibi, Talal; Al Hashim, Samia; Al Gazlan, Sulaiman

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaphylaxis is a serious allergic reaction that may cause death. The signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis have not been examined in the Saudi population before. Objective The present study examined the signs, symptoms, triggers, and demographic patterns of patients treated for anaphylaxis at a large tertiary care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods All the patients who were prescribed new prescriptions of adrenaline auto-injectors (AAs) between February 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 were included in this study. Information was collected using a standardized form. Results There were 238 patients who were analyzed. The median age at the time of first AA prescription was 15.5 years. Female to male ratio was 52:48 and 54% of the subjects were more than 18 years of age. There were some differences in the presenting signs and symptoms observed in our study compared with similar studies from around the world. Urticaria and angioedema were the most common at about 70% across all ages, followed by shortness of breath at 28%. Some triggers were found to be more common in our region. Food was the commonest trigger for anaphylaxis including tree nuts, egg, and sesame. Drug allergy was also a common trigger, with penicillins and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs being the commonest. Regarding insect allergy, samsam ant was the commonest trigger in our study. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study on anaphylaxis in Saudi Arabia. Some of the manifestations of anaphylaxis are significantly different in our population study compared to previously published data from other parts of the world. While managing anaphylaxis, we should be mindful of these differences. This improved understanding should help reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with anaphylaxis in our region. PMID:26539404

  18. Breast Cancer Screening in Saudi Arabia: Free but Almost No Takers

    PubMed Central

    El Bcheraoui, Charbel; Basulaiman, Mohammed; Wilson, Shelley; Daoud, Farah; Tuffaha, Marwa; AlMazroa, Mohammad A.; Memish, Ziad A.; Al Saeedi, Mohammed; Mokdad, Ali H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mammography ensures early diagnosis and a better chance for treatment and recovery from breast cancer. We conducted a national survey to investigate knowledge and practices of breast cancer screening among Saudi women aged 50 years or older in order to inform the breast cancer national health programs. Materials and Methods The Saudi Health Interview Survey is a national multistage survey of individuals aged 15 years or older. The survey included questions on socio-demographic characteristics, tobacco consumption, diet, physical activity, health-care utilization, different health-related behaviors, and self-reported chronic conditions. Female respondents were asked about knowledge and practices of self and clinical breast exams, as well as mammography. Results Between April and June 2013, a total of 10,735 participants completed the survey. Among respondents, 1,135 were women aged 50 years or older and were included in this analysis. About 89% of women reported not having a clinical breast exam in the past year, and 92% reported never having a mammogram. Women living in Al Sharqia had the highest rate of mammography use. Women who were educated, those who had received a routine medical exam within the last two years, and those who were diagnosed with hypertension were more likely to have had a mammogram in the past two years. Discussion Our results show very low rates of breast cancer screening in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, a country with free health services. This calls for educational campaigns to improve breast cancer screening. Addressing the barriers for breast cancer screening is a public health imperative. PMID:25774520

  19. Trauma patterns in patients attending the Emergency Department of Jazan General Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hokkam, Emad; Gonna, Abdelaziz; Zakaria, Ossama; El-shemally, Amany

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Modern civilization and the sharp rise in living standards have led to dramatic changes in trauma pattern in Saudi Arabia. This study aimed to describe the different patterns of injuries of patients attending the Emergency Department of Jazan General Hospital (JGH) in the southwest corner of Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A total number of 1 050 patients were enrolled in the study. A pre-organized data sheet was prepared for each patient attended the Emergency Department of JGH from February 2012 to January 2013. It contains data about socio-demographics, trauma data, clinical evaluation results, investigations as well as treatment strategies. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 25.3±16.8 years. Most (45.1%) of the patients were at age of 18–30 years. Males (64.3%) were affected by trauma more common than females. More than half (60.6%) of the patients were from urban areas. The commonest kind of injury was minor injury (60%), followed by blunt trauma (30.9%) and then penetrating trauma (9.1%). The mean time from the incident to arrival at hospital was 41.3±79.8 minutes. The majority (48.2%) of the patients were discharged after management of trivial trauma, whereas 2.3% were admitted to ICU, 7.7% transferred to inpatient wards, and 17.7% observed and subsequently discharged. The mortality rate of the patients was 2.6%. CONCLUSION: Trauma is a major health problem, especially in the young population in Saudi Arabia. Blunt trauma is more frequent than penetrating trauma, with road traffic accidents accounting for the majority. PMID:25802567

  20. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Zafar, Hamayun; Iqbal, Zaheen A.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Musculoskeletal disorders are common causes of work-related disability in different professions involving the frequent practice of lifting, stooping, twisting, prolonged sitting, or standing. The dental profession is one such profession. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia, the factors associated with them, and their consequences and to propose preventive measures for them. [Subjects and Methods] A self-administered online questionnaire was sent to 225 members of the Saudi Dental Association. It included questions on demographic and professional characteristics, general medical history, and history of work-related musculoskeletal disorders before and after joining the dental profession. [Results] The questionnaire was completed by 65% of the respondents. Among them 85% reported that they had developed some pain due to work after joining the dental profession, and 42% reported that they were suffering pain at the time of the survey. Besides lower back, shoulder, and neck regions, the hands, upper back, and other regions like the elbows, buttocks, thighs, leg, and feet were areas in which they pain. [Conclusion] The prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia is high, affecting their daily activities, sometimes even forcing them to change their work setting. Age, gender, specialty of work, work setting, number of contact hours with patients, etc., were all found to be related to their work-related pain. We need to emphasize the role of ergonomics, counseling, proper techniques of patient handling, etc., during the training of dental professionals so that they can work efficiently. PMID:25995567

  1. Estimating PM 10 air concentrations from dust storms in Iraq, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Roland R.; Gillette, Dale A.; Kirkpatrick, Jeffrey S.; Heller, Jack

    A model for the emission of PM 10 dust has been constructed using the concept of a threshold friction velocity which is dependent on surface roughness. Surface roughness in turn was correlated with geomorphology or soil properties for Kuwait, Iraq, part of Syria, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Oman. The PM 10 emission algorithm was incorporated into a Lagrangian transport and dispersion model. PM 10 air concentrations were computed from August 1990 through August 1991. The model predicted about the right number of dust events over Kuwait (events occur 18% of the time). The model results agreed quantitatively with measurements at four locations in Saudi Arabia and one in Kuwait for one major dust event (>1000 ?g/m 3). However, for smaller scale dust events (200-1000 ?g/m 3), especially at the coastal sampling locations, the model substantially over-predicted the air concentrations. Part of the over-prediction was attributed to the entrainment of dust-free air by the sea breeze, a flow feature not represented by the large-scale gridded meteorological data fields used in the model computation. Another part of the over-prediction was the model's strong sensitivity to threshold friction velocity and the surface soil texture coefficient (the soil emission factor), and the difficulty in accurately representing these parameters in the model. A comparison of the model predicted PM 10 spatial pattern with the TOMS satellite aerosol index (AI) yielded a spatial pattern covering a major portion of Saudi Arabia that was quite similar to the observed AI pattern.

  2. Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Properties in the Asir region of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axisa, Duncan; Kucera, Paul; Burger, Roelof; Li, Runjun; Collins, Don; Freney, Evelyn; Posada, Rafael; Buseck, Peter

    2010-05-01

    In recent advertent and inadvertent weather modification studies, a considerable effort has been made to understand the impact of varying aerosol properties and concentration on cloud properties. Significant uncertainties exist with aerosol-cloud interactions for which complex microphysical processes link the aerosol and cloud properties. Under almost all environmental conditions, increased aerosol concentrations within polluted air masses will enhance cloud droplet concentration relative to that in unperturbed regions. The interaction between dust particles and clouds are significant, yet the conditions in which dust particles become cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are uncertain. In order to quantify this aerosol effect on clouds and precipitation, a field campaign was launched in the Asir region of Saudi Arabia as part of a Precipitation Enhancement Feasibility Study. Ground measurements of aerosol size distributions, hygroscopic growth factor, CCN concentrations as well as aircraft measurements of cloud hydrometeor size distributions were done in the Asir region of Saudi Arabia in August 2009. Research aircraft operations focused primarily on conducting measurements in clouds that are targeted for cloud top-seeding, on their microphysical characterization, especially the preconditions necessary for precipitation; understanding the evolution of droplet coalescence, supercooled liquid water, cloud ice and precipitation hydrometeors is necessary if advances are to be made in the study of cloud modification by cloud seeding. Non-precipitating mixed-phase clouds less than 3km in diameter that developed on top of the stable inversion were characterized by flying at the convective cloud top just above the inversion. Aerosol measurements were also done during the climb to cloud base height. The presentation will include a summary of the analysis and results with a focus on the unique features of the Asir region in producing convective clouds, characterization of the aerosol prior to convective development and the microphysical properties of convective clouds in the Asir region of Saudi Arabia.

  3. Finding the Lost City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Nicholas Clapp, a filmmaker and archeology enthusiast, had accumulated extensive information concerning Ubar, the fabled lost city of ancient Arabia. When he was unable to identify its exact location, however, he turned to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for assistance in applying orbital remote sensing techniques. JPL scientists searched NASA's shuttle imaging radar, as well as Landsat and SPOT images and discovered ancient caravan tracks. This enabled them to prepare a map of the trails, which converged at a place known as Ash Shisr. An expedition was formed, which found structures and artifacts from a city that predates previous area civilization by a thousand years. Although it will take time to validate the city as Ubar, the discovery is a monumental archeological triumph.

  4. Ultrafine particles in cities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Morawska, Lidia; Birmili, Wolfram; Paasonen, Pauli; Hu, Min; Kulmala, Markku; Harrison, Roy M; Norford, Leslie; Britter, Rex

    2014-05-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs; diameter less than 100 nm) are ubiquitous in urban air, and an acknowledged risk to human health. Globally, the major source for urban outdoor UFP concentrations is motor traffic. Ongoing trends towards urbanisation and expansion of road traffic are anticipated to further increase population exposure to UFPs. Numerous experimental studies have characterised UFPs in individual cities, but an integrated evaluation of emissions and population exposure is still lacking. Our analysis suggests that the average exposure to outdoor UFPs in Asian cities is about four-times larger than that in European cities but impacts on human health are largely unknown. This article reviews some fundamental drivers of UFP emissions and dispersion, and highlights unresolved challenges, as well as recommendations to ensure sustainable urban development whilst minimising any possible adverse health impacts. PMID:24503484

  5. Modern and Traditional Methods for Measuring Money Supply: The Case of Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Barnett, William A.; Alkhareif, Ryadh M.

    2015-02-25

    Stud. 2015, 3, 49–55; doi:10.3390/ijfs3010049 International Journal of Financial Studies ISSN 2227-7072 www.mdpi.com/journal/ijfs Article Modern and Traditional Methods for Measuring Money Supply: The Case of Saudi Arabia William A. Barnett 1... used by central banks worldwide. Those monetary indexes are derived from a simple accounting identity. The implicit assumption made when using simple-sum monetary aggregates is that all components are perfect OPEN ACCESS Int. J. Financial Stud. 2015...

  6. Assessing the role of optometrists in the control of systemic hypertension in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L; Ogbuehi, Kelechi C; Almubrad, Turki M

    2013-01-01

    The low level of awareness, treatment, and control of systemic hypertension is a global problem, but it is much more serious in Saudi Arabia. This study examines the contribution made by Saudi optometrists in detection and management of patients with systemic hypertension. We surveyed a sample of 250 optometrists practicing in Saudi Arabia to evaluate the level of knowledge and awareness of their role in combating systemic hypertension. A 48.4% response rate was obtained from practicing optometrists. Of those responding, optometrists were very positive towards the use of blood pressure (BP) monitors in optometric practice on a routine basis. Forty-six percent of the optometrists had access to a BP monitor, and about 93% of these respondents actually used the monitors during clinic consultations. Automated monitors were the most common (54%). Fifty-one percent and 49% of the optometrists reported that they did routinely question their patients about high BP and about their current BP medications, respectively. The less frequently asked question concerned the cholesterol level of the patient (21%). The tests most widely used by the optometrists while examining hypertensive patients was direct ophthalmoscopy with red free filter (56%) and the least was binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy (21%). Optometrists were more likely to refer patients suspected of systemic hypertension on the basis of elevated BP (74%) and presence of retinal hemorrhages (72%), but were less likely to refer patients with changes in arteriolar reflex (41%). The opinions were very positive towards the routine monitoring of BP within the Saudi optometry profession, as optometrists indicated that they had time within an eye examination to measure BP, it was financially rewarding (56% of respondents), and patients appreciated it (64% of respondents). Despite half of the optometrists having access to BP monitors (predominantly automated devices), many of the optometrists were unsure if they were trained enough to monitor BP in such patients. There is urgent need to train optometrists on the use of BP devices, interpretation of readings, and use of additional diagnostic tests during such eye examinations. PMID:23582875

  7. The occurrence of emerging trace organic chemicals in wastewater effluents in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alidina, Mazahirali; Hoppe-Jones, Christiane; Yoon, Min; Hamadeh, Ahmed F; Li, Dong; Drewes, Jörg E

    2014-04-15

    Emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrCs) released into the environment via discharge of wastewater effluents have been detected in rivers and lakes worldwide, raising concerns due to their potential persistence, toxicity and bioaccumulation. This study provides the first reconnaissance of TOrC occurrence in wastewater effluents within Saudi Arabia. Four wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs 1-4) located in Western Saudi Arabia were sampled hourly over twelve-hour periods, for a total of six sampling events. All samples were analyzed for a wide range of TOrC encompassing pharmaceuticals, personal care products and household chemicals. Treatment and capacities of the plants varied from non-nitrifying to full biological nutrient removal providing a representative cross section of different types of plants operational within the country. A comparison of TOrC occurrence in effluents in Saudi Arabia with respective effluent qualities in the United States revealed similar levels for most TOrC. Overall, the occurrence of TOrC was higher at two of the plants. The higher TOrC concentrations at WWTP 1 are likely due to the non-nitrifying biological treatment process. The unique TOrC occurrence observed in the WWTP 3 effluent was unlike any other plant and was attributed to the influence of a large number of international visitors in its sewershed. The occurrence of TOrC in this plant was not expected to be representative of the occurrence elsewhere in the country. Bimodal diurnal variation expected for a range of TOrC was not observed, though some hourly variation in TOrC loading was noted for WWTP 3. Since water reclamation and reuse have received increasing interest in Saudi Arabia within the last few years, results from this study provide a good foundation in deciding whether advanced treatment is necessary to attenuate TOrC deemed to be of concern in effluents, or if natural treatment such as managed aquifer recharge provides sufficient protection to public health. PMID:24531125

  8. Lead and chromium concentrations in the potable water of the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, H.M.A.; Mustafa, H.T.; Rihan, T.I. )

    1989-10-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and United States Public Health Service (USPHS) standards for drinking water recommend an upper limit concentration of 0.05 mg/L for both lead and chromium. The authors studied the cadmium and zinc concentrations in the potable water of the Eastern Province of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. They report here the results of the study of lead and chromium concentrations in the potable water of the same area to provide a more complete profile of the levels of heavy metals in the potable water of the Eastern Province.

  9. Levels of sup 137 Cs and natural radioactivity in Saudi Arabian soil

    SciTech Connect

    Abulfarai, W.; Abdul-Majid, S. )

    1991-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, there was concern about contamination from the radioactive plume reaching Saudi Arabia. Cesium-137 concentration in the soil was measured to determine the degree of contamination from the accident. The concentrations of {sup 40}K, {sup 214}Bi, and {sup 228}Ac were determined as well. Bismuth-214 is a member of the {sup 238}U series, while {sup 228}Ac is from the {sup 238}Th series. Each of these isotopes emits several well-resolved photons of relatively high intensity per disintegration.

  10. Primary prevention with statins in cardiovascular diseases: A Saudi Arabian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, D.; Jahan, K.; Habibullah, K.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) constitutes one of the major causes of deaths and disabilities, globally claiming 17.3 million lives a year. Incidence of CVD is expected to rise to 25 million by 2030, and Saudi Arabia, already witnessing a rapid rise in CVDs, is no exception. Statins are the drugs of choice in established CVDs. In the recent past, evidence was increasingly suggesting benefits in primary prevention. But over the last decade Saudi Arabia has a witnessed significant rise in CVD-related deaths. Smoking, high-fat, low-fiber dietary intake, lack of exercise, sedentary life, high blood cholesterol and glucose levels were reported as frequent CVD-risk factors among Saudis, who may therefore be considered for primary prevention with statin. The prevalence of dyslipidemia, in particular, indicates that treatment should be directed at reducing the disorder with lipid-modifying agents and therapeutic lifestyle changes. The recent American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines has reported lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) target levels, prescribed by the 2011 European Society of Cardiology (ESC)/the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS). The new ACC/AHA guidelines have overemphasized the use of statin while ignoring lipid targets, and have recommended primary prevention with moderate-intensity statin to individuals with diabetes aged 40–75 years and with LDL-C 70–189 mg/dL. Treatment with statin was based on estimated 10-year atherosclerotic-CVD (ASCVD) risk in individuals aged 40–75 years with LDL-C 70 to 189 mg/dL and without clinical ASCVD or diabetes. Adoption of the recent ACC/AHA guidelines will lead to inclusion of a large population for primary prevention with statins, and would cause over treatment to some who actually would not need statin therapy but instead should have been recommended lifestyle modifications. Furthermore, adoption of this guideline may potentially increase the incidences of statin intolerance and side-effects. On the other hand, the most widely used lipid management guideline, the 2011 ESC/EAC guidelines, targets lipid levels at different stages of disease activity before recommending statins. Hence, the 2011 ESC/EAC still offers a holistic and pragmatic approach to treating lipid abnormalities in CVD. Therefore, it is the 2011 ESC/EAC guidelines, and not the recent ACC/AHA guidelines, that should be adopted to draw guidance on primary prevention of CVD in Saudi Arabia. PMID:26136632

  11. Survey of trace elements in household and bottled drinking water samples collected in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    al-Saleh, I; al-Doush, I

    1998-05-27

    Total dissolved beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), strontium (Sr), vanadium (V) and zinc (Zn) were measured in the drinking water of 101 households and 21 samples of retail bottled waters purchased in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to ascertain the water quality for human consumption. The Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrometer (ICP) was used for analysis. First-draw Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn concentrations decreased significantly after 10 min of flushing in the morning. Cd, Fe, Hg, Ni and Zn in some cases exceeded the guideline limits recommended by the EEC and WHO. PMID:9646527

  12. Primary prevention with statins in cardiovascular diseases: A Saudi Arabian perspective.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, D; Jahan, K; Habibullah, K

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) constitutes one of the major causes of deaths and disabilities, globally claiming 17.3 million lives a year. Incidence of CVD is expected to rise to 25 million by 2030, and Saudi Arabia, already witnessing a rapid rise in CVDs, is no exception. Statins are the drugs of choice in established CVDs. In the recent past, evidence was increasingly suggesting benefits in primary prevention. But over the last decade Saudi Arabia has a witnessed significant rise in CVD-related deaths. Smoking, high-fat, low-fiber dietary intake, lack of exercise, sedentary life, high blood cholesterol and glucose levels were reported as frequent CVD-risk factors among Saudis, who may therefore be considered for primary prevention with statin. The prevalence of dyslipidemia, in particular, indicates that treatment should be directed at reducing the disorder with lipid-modifying agents and therapeutic lifestyle changes. The recent American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines has reported lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) target levels, prescribed by the 2011 European Society of Cardiology (ESC)/the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS). The new ACC/AHA guidelines have overemphasized the use of statin while ignoring lipid targets, and have recommended primary prevention with moderate-intensity statin to individuals with diabetes aged 40-75 years and with LDL-C 70-189 mg/dL. Treatment with statin was based on estimated 10-year atherosclerotic-CVD (ASCVD) risk in individuals aged 40-75 years with LDL-C 70 to 189 mg/dL and without clinical ASCVD or diabetes. Adoption of the recent ACC/AHA guidelines will lead to inclusion of a large population for primary prevention with statins, and would cause over treatment to some who actually would not need statin therapy but instead should have been recommended lifestyle modifications. Furthermore, adoption of this guideline may potentially increase the incidences of statin intolerance and side-effects. On the other hand, the most widely used lipid management guideline, the 2011 ESC/EAC guidelines, targets lipid levels at different stages of disease activity before recommending statins. Hence, the 2011 ESC/EAC still offers a holistic and pragmatic approach to treating lipid abnormalities in CVD. Therefore, it is the 2011 ESC/EAC guidelines, and not the recent ACC/AHA guidelines, that should be adopted to draw guidance on primary prevention of CVD in Saudi Arabia. PMID:26136632

  13. Age discrimination among basalt flows using digitally enhanced LANDSAT imagery. [Saudi Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blodget, H. W.; Brown, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    Digitally enhanced LANDSAT MSS data were used to discriminate among basalt flows of historical to Tertiary age, at a test site in Northwestern Saudi Arabia. Spectral signatures compared favorably with a field-defined classification that permits discrimination among five groups of basalt flows on the basis of geomorphic criteria. Characteristics that contributed to age definition include: surface texture, weathering, color, drainage evolution, and khabrah development. The inherent gradation in the evolution of geomorphic parameters, however, makes visual extrapolation between areas subjective. Therefore, incorporation of spectrally-derived volcanic units into the mapping process should produce more quantitatively consistent age groupings.

  14. Experiences of obesity among Saudi Arabian women contemplating bariatric surgery: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    PubMed

    Alqout, Ohud; Reynolds, Frances

    2014-05-01

    This study explored experiences of obesity, its perceived causes and motives for surgery, as described by seven Saudi women contemplating bariatric surgery. The women experienced cultural restrictions on their physical and social activities. Obesity embodied these restrictions, attracting stigma and moral failure. Traditional clothing, foods, hospitality norms and limited outdoor female activities were regarded as barriers to weight loss. Bariatric surgery was chosen to protect health and to access normative female roles. Some were encouraged by relatives who had undergone surgery. Opting for surgery reflected both participants' sense of powerlessness to self-manage weight and the social acceptability, within their family context, of this biomedical approach. PMID:23479306

  15. Criteria for a good referral system for psychiatric patients: the view from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N A; van der Molen, H T; Schmidt, H G; Al-Habeeb, T A; Magzoub, M E M

    2009-01-01

    The development and implementation of quality referral systems reflects sound national health planning. This review appraised the data on referral systems, in particular psychiatric referrals, with special reference to Saudi Arabia. A computer search was made of relevant literature in the past 2 decades. The rate and process of referring patients through referral letters varies globally across practice settings and is initiated by an array of factors linked with health consumers, health providers and delivery systems. Referral systems, including consultation-liaison services, are an essential component of any health care organization for offering a complete range of good quality, specialized health services. PMID:20218152

  16. Middle Jurassic non-marine siliciclastic facies in southern central Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Aswad, Ahmad A.

    1995-04-01

    Middle Jurassic deposits of Saudi Arabia show distinct lateral facies variation, where the carbonates in the north are replaced by siliciclastic rocks in the south. In southern central Saudi Arabia, the Middle Jurassic deposits are composed exclusively of siliciclastic rocks, mainly sandstone with minor shale and siltstone, and rare conglomerate. Five stratigraphical sections were measured and studied along the southern Tuwaiq escarpments, where these rocks are well-exposed. A fluvial depositional environment is proposed here for the Middle Jurassic rocks in southern central Saudi Arabia based on sedimentological and petrological evidence. Eight different lithofacies were recognized in these deposits and each is described and interpreted. Cyclic sedimentation is prominent in all the sections studied; the most frequent transition is from medium-coarse pebbly sand to fine sands/silts/muds indicating a transition from sand flat or channel bar deposition, in which the upper flow regime dominates, to overbank deposition, where the lower flow regime prevails. Sandy bedform and downstream-accretion macroforms are the most common fluvial architectural elements. A braided stream system is the most appropriate model for these rocks, but the geomorphology of the streams was not constant in either space or time. However, the streams were braided most of the time, especially in the vicinity of the upstream source area in the southern highlands, and they changed their morphology gradually northward to become more sinuous, but never reached the stage where they become true meandering rivers. The change in stream morphology affected the distribution of fluviual facies and resulted in the presence of a proximal fluvial facies dominating in the south and a distal facies prevailing in the north. The streams flowed from south to north with little or no contribution from east-flowing tributaries. At this time, the Central Arabian Arch was a negative, submerged structural feature subsiding under the accumulating shelf carbonate sediments, whereas the Hadramaut and Mukalla Arches were positive features controlling the sedimentation pattern in southern central Arabia. Although the Middle Jurassic rocks, both in the north and in the south, form a slightly diachronous, contiguous sedimentary body, they differ from each other significantly. Therefore, it is recommended here that the Middle Jurassic siliciclastic facies in southern central Saudi Arabia be separated from the Dhruma Formation and be recognized as a new stratigraphical unit with formational rank.

  17. Mental and Social Health Atlas I in Saudi Arabia: 2007-08.

    PubMed

    Al-Habeeb, A A; Qureshi, N A

    2010-05-01

    Based on the World Health Organization's Mental Health Atlas, the first Mental and Social Health Atlas in Saudi Arabia describes the historical background of mental health and social services in the country and identifies several deficiencies in the system including infrastructure and logistics and lack of epidemiological data. There is now great progress in strategic planning for developing and improving mental health care services across the nation, with suggestions to develop psychiatric services for identified special populations, to establish community mental health care services, to improve research and training in mental health, and to update mental health annual information systems using advanced information technology. PMID:20799560

  18. Arms for oil - oil for arms: an analysis of President Carter's 1978 planes package deal sale to Egypt, Israel, and Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovee, R.U.

    1983-01-01

    The central argument presented in the dissertation attributes the intense controversy surrounding the sale of 60 F-15s to Saudi Arabia to an inherent Saudi challenge to American-Israeli special relationship. Whether regarded as causal or symptomatic, approval of the sale confirmed the existence of new American-Saudi special relationship. The arguments advanced by opponents and proponents of the sale, however, obscured this issue since they were presented in terms of how the sale would affect the respective military positions of Saudi Arabia and Israel. Thus, the arguments against the sale were based on the premise that the 60 F-15s would fundamentally alter the prevailing distribution of military power to Israel's disadvantage. Proponents of the sale, on the other hand, based their arguments on the assumption that the F-15s were needed to meet legitimate Saudi security concerns which had little or nothing to do with the Arab-Israeli conflcit. Furthermore, the Carter Administration argued that the F-15 sale was a crucial demonstration of American support of moderate Arab regimes against challenges from radical forces, some of whom were propelled by the Soviet Union. They pledged Saudi support of the late Egyptian President Sadat's peace initiative with Israel. Saudi moderation, proponents argued, best serves US oil interests, by maintaining acceptable oil price and production levels.

  19. City of Castle Hills State of the City and Recommendations 

    E-print Network

    Bright, Elise; Croxell, Christina

    2003-01-01

    Two courses focused on assessing the demographics, economics, environment, aesthetics, land use, transportation, and city history. Newspaper articles, maps, Census Data, field trip, examination of the city budget, planning efforts, and zoning were...

  20. Arthur Heights Baldwin City

    E-print Network

    Farlington Faulkner Fern Filler Five Points Fleming Forest Hills Fort Riley Four Corners Fox Town Fredonia Frontenac Fruitland Ft. Scott Fuller Furley Galena Galesburg Garden City Garden Plain Gardner Garland Gas Lafontaine Lake of the Forest Lake Quivira Lake Ridge Lake Shore Lake View Lakeland Estates Lakeside Acres