These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Masculinity and Relationship Agreements among Male Same-Sex Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extradyadic sex is a significant source of risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among men in same-sex relationships. Nonmonogamous sexual agreements are common among male same-sex couples and may serve as effective targets for risk reduction interventions; however, there is a dearth of research reporting on the social and cultural determinants of explicit nonmonogamous agreements. In this study, it was

Christopher W. Wheldon; Elizabeth B. Pathak

2010-01-01

2

Patterns of abuse in male same-sex relationships.  

PubMed

Previous studies of abuse in male same-sex relationships have been limited by convenience samples and/or by incomplete assessments of partner abuse. We examined patterns of same-sex partner abuse in a random sample of 284 gay and bisexual men. Respondents reported on perpetration and receipt of physical, psychological, and sexual abuse over multiple time frames, as well as injuries resulting from abuse. Almost all respondents reported psychological abuse, more than one-third reported physical abuse, and 10% reported having engaged in unwanted sexual activity because of partner force or threats of force. More than half of recipients of partner violence reported sustaining injury. We found strong associations between different forms of abuse, and between severity of abuse receipt and perpetration. PMID:18958989

Bartholomew, Kim; Regan, Katherine V; White, Monica A; Oram, Doug

2008-01-01

3

Epidemiology of male same-sex behaviour and associated sexual health indicators in low- and middle-income countries: 2003-2007 estimates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To conduct a systematic review of published and unpublished data from research and public health information systems on the prevalence of male-to-male sex in the total male population; as well as among men who have sex with men (MSM), data on prevalence of heterosexual activity and heterosexual unions; prevalence of condom use with male and female partners; and prevalence

K Konda; E R Segura; R Lyerla; Carlos F Caceres

2010-01-01

4

Same-Sex Rape of Male College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rape of men by other men is a widely neglected yet increasingly recognized form of sexual assault. Information on same-sex rape involving men is frequently absent in campus rape education and prevention programming because the general public and popular culture have traditionally viewed rape in a context of violence against women. Available medical and psychological literature indicates the need for

Michael Scarce

1997-01-01

5

A shot in the dark: same-sex sexual behaviour in a deep-sea squid.  

PubMed

Little is known about the reproductive habits of deep-living squids. Using remotely operated vehicles in the deep waters of the Monterey Submarine Canyon, we have found evidence of mating, i.e. implanted sperm packages, on similar body locations in males and females of the rarely seen mesopelagic squid Octopoteuthis deletron. Equivalent numbers of both sexes were found to have mated, indicating that male squid routinely and indiscriminately mate with both males and females. Most squid species are short-lived, semelparous (i.e. with a single, brief reproductive period) and promiscuous. In the deep, dark habitat where O. deletron lives, potential mates are few and far between. We suggest that same-sex mating behaviour by O. deletron is part of a reproductive strategy that maximizes success by inducing males to indiscriminately and swiftly inseminate every conspecific that they encounter. PMID:21937492

Hoving, Hendrik J T; Bush, Stephanie L; Robison, Bruce H

2012-04-23

6

Relationship characteristics and HIV transmission risk in same-sex male couples in HIV serodiscordant relationships.  

PubMed

Unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) remains a main risk factor for HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) and this is of particular concern for partners of HIV serodiscordant status. However, HIV transmission risk has been demonstrated to vary by the sexual position adopted among partners. Guided by interdependence theory, this study examined how relational factors were differentially associated with risk taking (HIV-positive/insertive and HIV-negative/receptive) and strategic positioning (HIV-positive/receptive and HIV-negative/insertive) UAI within serodiscordant same-sex male couples. HIV-positive men and their HIV-negative partners (n couples = 91; n individuals = 182) simultaneously but independently completed computerized questionnaires and HIV-positive men had blood drawn for viral load. A minority of couples (30 %) engaged in risk taking and/or strategic positioning unprotected anal sex. Results of multinomial logistic regression indicated that HIV-negative partners' levels of relationship commitment were positively associated with the odds of engaging in strategic positioning sexual behaviors. For HIV-negative partners, reports of relationship intimacy, and sexual satisfaction were negatively associated with odds of reporting risk taking behavior. In contrast, HIV-positive partners' reported sexual satisfaction was positively associated with odds of engaging in risk taking behavior. Findings suggested that aspects of relational quality may be differentially associated with sexual decision making for same-sex male couples in serodiscordant relationships. Study findings lend support for the incorporation of discussions of HIV risk reduction strategies, enhancing communication between partners, and support for general relationship functioning in HIV care. PMID:24243004

Starks, Tyrel J; Gamarel, Kristi E; Johnson, Mallory O

2014-01-01

7

Minority Stress in Same-Sex Male Relationships: When Does It Impact Relationship Satisfaction?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The minority stress model (Meyer, 2003) has been proposed to explain higher rates of psychopathology in lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals. However, studies of minority stress have rarely taken into account the interface between minority stress and same-sex relationship processes. In the current study, 142 gay men in romantic relationships completed an online survey assessing minority stress constructs, relationship features,

Charles Kamen; Michelle Burns; Steven R. H. Beach

2011-01-01

8

"Working together to reach a goal": MSM's Perceptions of Dyadic HIV Care for Same-Sex Male Couples  

PubMed Central

Introduction Same-sex serodiscordant male dyads represent a high priority risk group, with approximately one to two-thirds of new HIV infections among MSM attributable to main partnerships. Early initiation and adherence to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) is a key factor in HIV prevention and treatment; however, adherence to HAART in the U.S. is low, with poor retention throughout the continuum of care. This study examines MSM's perceptions of dyadic HIV treatment across the continuum of care to understand preferences for how care may be sought with a partner. Methods We conducted five focus group discussions (FGDs) in Atlanta, GA with 35 men who report being in same-sex male partnerships. Participants discussed perceptions of care using scenarios of a hypothetical same-sex male couple who recently received serodiscordant or seroconcordant positive HIV results. Verbatim transcripts were segmented thematically and systematically analyzed to examine patterns in responses within and between participants and FGDs. Results Participants identified the need for comprehensive dyadic care and differences in care for seroconcordant positive versus serodiscordant couples. Participants described a reciprocal relationship between comprehensive dyadic care and positive relationship dynamics. This combination was described as reinforcing commitment, ultimately leading to increased accountability and treatment adherence. Discussion Results indicate that the act of same-sex male couples “working together to reach a goal” may increase retention to HIV care across the continuum if care is comprehensive, focuses on both individual and dyadic needs, and promotes positive relationship dynamics. PMID:24126448

Goldenberg, Tamar; Clarke, Donato; Stephenson, Rob

2014-01-01

9

On same-sex sexual behaviors among male bachelors in rural China: evidence from a female shortage context.  

PubMed

Using data from a survey conducted in the rural areas of Anhui Province, this study adopted the crosstabs and logistic regression model to analyze the same-sex sexual behaviors of forced male bachelors and the determinants when compared with married men with same ages. The prevalence of same-sex sexual behaviors among the unmarried men was reported as 17.2%, significantly higher than 8.9% among married men with same ages, indicating that same-sex sexual behaviors could be as a compensation for the absence of female sexual partners to some extent for those marriage squeezed or forced male bachelors. Among all groups, the occurrence of unprotected sexual behaviors were reported above 60%, regardless of marital status and the genders of sexual partners; the scores obtained on knowledge of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among bachelors (AIDS knowledge = 2.85; STDs knowledge = 2.38) are much poorer than those of married men (AIDS knowledge = 3.45; STDs knowledge = 2.79), which might exert potential negative impacts on men's health. PMID:21816858

Yang, Xueyan; Attané, Isabelle; Li, Shuzhuo; Zhang, Qunlin

2012-03-01

10

Same-sex sexual behaviors among male migrants in a context of male "marriage squeeze": results from an exploratory survey in urban Xi'an, China.  

PubMed

The male marriage squeeze in China may increase the prevalence of male same-sex sexual behaviors among unmarried male migrants who lack stable female sexual partners. The same-sex sexual behaviors among unmarried male migrants appear to be at high risk of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), mainly because of a lack of knowledge of these diseases. Using data from the "Survey on Reproductive Health and Family Life of Migrant Male Bachelors in Urban Areas" conducted in Xi'an City, Shaanxi Province, in December 2009 and January 2010, this study compares same-sex sexual behaviors of unmarried with that of married male migrants (including married but separated men who are migrating without their spouse or partner and cohabitating men who are migrating with their spouse or partner). It is reported that the prevalence of same-sex sexual behaviors among unmarried males reaches 11%, more than twice the 5.1% reported by married but separated men and thrice the 3.8% reported by cohabitating men. It also appears that the same-sex sexual behaviors is significantly associated with men's attitudes toward same-sex sexual behaviors (odds ratio = 1.59, p < .001), toward life-long bachelorhood (odds ratio = 1.35, p < .01), and with marital status (odds ratio = 0.37, p < .01). The frequency of condom use appears to be higher among unmarried men than among men who are married, whether or not they migrated with their wives, and is significantly associated with scores on knowledge about HIV/AIDS (estimated coefficient = .12, p < .001) and STIs (estimated coefficient = .22, p < .01). It is also associated with the likelihood of same-sex sexual behaviors (estimated coefficients = .83, p < .01) and marital status (estimated coefficients for married but separated = -.50, p < .05; estimated coefficients for cohabitating = -.77, p < .001). PMID:22782362

Yang, Xueyan; Attané, Isabelle; Li, Shuzhuo; Yang, Bo

2012-11-01

11

Personal or relational? Examining sexual health in the context of HIV serodiscordant same-sex male couples  

PubMed Central

Couples’ ability to adopt a “we” orientation has been associated with optimal health outcomes. This study examined how personal and relational motivations are uniquely associated with unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), protected anal intercourse (PAI), and the absence of sexual activity within HIV-serodiscordant same-sex male couples. HIV-positive men and their HIV-negative partners (n = 116 couples, 232 men) completed questionnaires and HIV-positive men had blood drawn for viral load. Results of a multinomial logistic regression illustrated that sexual satisfaction was positively associated with PAI among HIV-negative partners and negatively associated with PAI among HIV-positive partners. Endorsing a “we” orientation was positively associated with PAI among HIV-positive partners. Findings suggest that HIV-positive partners who espouse a “we” orientation may be willing to forgo their personal interests to protect their HIV-negative partners from HIV transmission. Couples-based interventions are warranted to help strengthen relationship dynamics to enhance the sexual health of serodiscordant couples. PMID:23636681

Gamarel, K.E.; Starks, T.J; Dilworth, S.E.; Neilands, T.B.; Taylor, J.M.; Johnson, M.O.

2014-01-01

12

Personal or relational? Examining sexual health in the context of HIV serodiscordant same-sex male couples.  

PubMed

Couples' ability to adopt a "we" orientation has been associated with optimal health outcomes. This study examined how personal and relational motivations are uniquely associated with unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), protected anal intercourse (PAI), and the absence of sexual activity within HIV-serodiscordant same-sex male couples. HIV-positive men and their HIV-negative partners (N = 116 couples, 232 men) completed questionnaires and HIV-positive men had blood drawn for viral load. Results of a multinomial logistic regression illustrated that sexual satisfaction was positively associated with PAI among HIV-negative partners and negatively associated with PAI among HIV-positive partners. Endorsing a "we" orientation was positively associated with PAI among HIV-positive partners. Findings suggest that HIV-positive partners who espouse a "we" orientation may be willing to forgo their personal interests to protect their HIV-negative partners from HIV transmission. Couples-based interventions are warranted to help strengthen relationship dynamics to enhance the sexual health of serodiscordant couples. PMID:23636681

Gamarel, Kristi E; Starks, T J; Dilworth, S E; Neilands, T B; Taylor, J M; Johnson, M O

2014-01-01

13

Health, trust, or "just understood": explicit and implicit condom decision-making processes among black, white, and interracial same-sex male couples.  

PubMed

Among gay and bisexual men, primary partners are a leading source of HIV infection. Trust, intimacy, and advancements in HIV treatment may impact same-sex male (SSM) couples' decisions to engage in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). This qualitative study explored how Black, White and interracial couples discussed, and made decisions regarding condoms. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 SSM couples in the New York and San Francisco metropolitan areas. Stratified purposive sampling was used to include Black (n = 16), White (n = 17), and interracial (Black-White) (n = 15) couples. Twenty-six couples were concordant HIV-negative and 22 were HIV-discordant. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Some couples described explicit processes, which involved active discussion, while others described implicit processes, where condom-use decisions occurred without any explicit discussion. These processes also differed by race and HIV status. Black couples tended to report condom-use as "just understood." White, HIV-discordant couples decided not to use condoms, with some identifying the HIV-positive partner's suppressed viral load and high CD4 count as deciding factors. After an unplanned episode of UAI, White, HIV-negative couples tended to discontinue condom use while Black HIV-negative couples decided to revert to using condoms. HIV prevention efforts focused on same-sex, male couples must consider the explicit/implicit nature of condom decision-making processes. Understanding differences in these processes and considering relationship dynamics, across race and HIV status, can promote the development of innovative couple-level, HIV prevention interventions. PMID:23912774

Campbell, Chadwick K; Gómez, Anu Manchikanti; Dworkin, Shari; Wilson, Patrick A; Grisham, Kirk K; McReynolds, Jaih; Vielehr, Peter; Hoff, Colleen

2014-05-01

14

The role of male-male relationships in partner violence treatment groups: the effects of improving same sex relationships on attachment  

E-print Network

with partner abusers, due to the unique environment that is created where males interact with and establish relationships with other males. This male-male socialization may have potential positive effects on the course and outcome of therapy. This study sought...

Barnes, Ashley D.

2009-05-15

15

Heterosexual Attitudes Toward Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Negative attitudes of heterosexual people toward same-sex marriage relate to the degree to which they are homophobic. However, it has been understudied whether there exists a gender difference in this association. Our results indicated that homophobia was the best predictor of attitudes toward gay male and lesbian marriage, and this was equally true for both heterosexual men and women. However,

David A. Moskowitz; Gerulf Rieger; Michael E. Roloff

2010-01-01

16

Perceived physical competence, enjoyment and effort in same?sex and coeducational physical education classes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perceived competence is a key motivational determinant of physical activity behaviours in adolescents, and motivational determinants are influenced by the class environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate levels of perceived physical competence, enjoyment and effort in class, focusing on gender and class?type differences. Participants were 546 adolescents (289 males, 257 females) who were in same?sex or coeducational

Minjeong Lyu; Diane L. Gill

2011-01-01

17

Prevalence and factors of sexual problems in Chinese males and females having sex with the same-sex partner in Hong Kong: a population-based study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cross-sectional, anonymous telephone survey was conducted to examine sexual problem (SP) among sexually active, Chinese homosexual adults in Hong Kong. Of the homosexual respondents, 49.1% of males and 75.6% of females reported at least one SP, of whom 36.0 and 65.7% of the males and females, respectively, felt very bothered by the SP. The prevalence of SP ranged from

J T F Lau; J H Kim; H-Y Tsui; JTF Lau

2006-01-01

18

Same-Sex Marriage and Equality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some argue that same-sex marriage is not an equal rights issue because, where same-sex marriage is illegal, heterosexuals\\u000a and homosexuals have the exact same right to marry—i.e., the right to marry one adult of the opposite sex. I dispute this\\u000a argument by pointing out that while societies that prohibit same-sex marriage equally permit individual heterosexuals and homosexuals to marry one

Reginald Williams

19

Assessing Attitude Toward Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports the results of three studies conducted to develop, refine, and validate a scale which assessed heterosexual adults' attitudes toward same-sex marriage, the Attitude Toward Same-Sex Marriage Scale (ASSMS). The need for such a scale is evidenced in the increasing importance of same-sex marriage in the political arena of the United States and other nations, as well as

Pamela J. Lannutti; Kenneth A. Lachlan

2007-01-01

20

Managing Same-Sex Sexual Harassment Claims.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines three cases of same-sex sexual harassment claims recognized by the courts under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, including both heterosexual and homosexual incidents involving men and women. Focus is on common threads in the three cases, arguments of the traditional courts, and college and university management of same-sex

Whitehead, Roy, Jr.; Gillis, Graham

1997-01-01

21

Children in Same-Sex Marriages  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Russia, sociologists do not have reliable statistical data as to the number of same-sex unions and the number of children being brought up in these families, and non-Russian studies on the topic are flawed and misleading. Russians are said to be antagonistic to the idea of children being raised in same-sex households. People are concerned over…

Solodnikov, V. V.; Chkanikova, A. M.

2009-01-01

22

An Argument for Same Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Does the fundamental right to marry obligate the state to make the institution of marriage available to same sex couples? I argue yes, it does. The right to marry is unique, composed of both negative and positive liberties. While the government has protected the privacy of same sex couples, this liberty is incomplete without affirmative recognition of the relationship in

Claire B Deason

2006-01-01

23

Dyadic Adjustment and Community Involvement in Same-Sex Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the effects of age and involvement in the gay, lesbian, and bisexual community on dyadic adjustment in 62 male and 54 female same-sex couples. Participants completed the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (Spanier, 1976) and scales of political and social involvement in the gay, lesbian, and bisexual community based on Peplau and Cochran (1981). Those in midlife (35 years

Deborah C. Stearns; John Sabini

1997-01-01

24

Same-Sex Marriage and Legalized Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

At a time when heterosexual marriage rates are declining, many countries and localities are advocating for the rights of lesbians and gay men to enter legalized relationships, including marriage. This article reviews the legal status of same-sex relationships in the U.S. and other countries. Not only does the general public have mixed opinions about same-sex marriage, but so do lesbian

Esther D. Rothblum

2005-01-01

25

The Influence of Same-Sex Marriage on the Understanding of Same-Sex Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the ways in which legally recognized same-sex marriage affects the understanding of same-sex romantic relationships for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered (LGBT) individuals. Participants (N= 288) responded to an open-ended Web-based survey asking them to describe how legally recognized same-sex marriage influenced their view of their own romantic relationship or romantic relationships in general. Results indicate that

Pamela J. Lannutti

2007-01-01

26

Same-Sex Couples: Legal Complexities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors present a typology for organizing our current knowledge regarding same-sex couples in the United States who have and have not established legal ties between partners. This framework is complemented by a discussion of key rulings that define what is legally possible as well as the introduction of "legal consciousness,"…

Oswald, Ramona Faith; Kuvalanka, Katherine A.

2008-01-01

27

Bisexual Attitudes Toward Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Attitudes Toward Same-Sex Marriage Scale (ATSM) has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure when used with heterosexual participants (Pearl & Galupo, 2007). The present research sought to establish the psychometric properties of the ATSM with a sexual minority population, compare bisexual women and men's ATSM scores with those of lesbians and gay men, and to explore

M. Paz Galupo; Marcia L. Pearl

2008-01-01

28

Same-Sex Marriage and Negative Externalities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conventional theory regarding externalities and personal choices implies that in the absence of negative externalities, there is no economic rationale for government to regulate or ban those choices. We evaluate whether legally recognizing (or prohibiting) same-sex marriage has any adverse impact on societal outcomes specifically related to \\

Laura Langbein; Mark A. Yost

2009-01-01

29

Sex Differences in the Value of Parents versus Same-Sex Peers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current research examined the hypothesis that males derive greater benefits than females do from cooperation with same-sex peers versus parents. In Study 1, 194 children, early adolescents, older adolescents, and adults from Brussels, Belgium predicted whether parents or same-sex peers would provide more benefits to a typical individual of their same age and sex. Results showed that at all

Joyce F. Benenson; Québec à Montréal; Henry Markovits

30

"Never in Our Lifetime": Legal Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Long-Term Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We present data from 4 lesbian and 5 gay male same-sex couples who have been together 20 years or more. Couples included those legally married and unmarried, with and without children, and were interviewed within the first year legalized same-sex marriage was enacted in Massachusetts. Using life course theory and case study methodology, we…

Porche, Michelle V.; Purvin, Diane M.

2008-01-01

31

Gender, Ethnicity, Religiosity, and Same-sex Sexual Attraction and the Acceptance of Same-sex Sexuality and Gender Non-conformity.  

PubMed

This study explored the role of gender, ethnicity, religiosity, and sexual attraction in adolescents' acceptance of same-sex sexuality and gender non-conformity. Using an intersectionality perspective, we also tested whether the effects of gender, ethnicity, and religiosity on adolescents' attitudes would function differently in adolescents with and without same-sex attractions. Data for this study were collected by means of a paper questionnaire completed by 1,518 secondary school students (mean age = 14.56 years, SD = 1.05) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The sample was 48.1% female and 51.9% male. Approximately one third of adolescents in the sample were of a non-Western ethnic background (32.3%, n = 491) and 7.5% of the participants (n = 114) reported experiencing same-sex attractions. Results of our analyses showed that adolescents in our sample who were male, of non-Western ethnicity, and who were more religious (as indicated by frequency of religious service attendance), were less accepting of same-sex sexuality and gender non-conformity in comparison to female, Western and less religious peers. We also found a significant interaction effect between religiosity and sexual attractions, but only in relation to evaluation of same-sex attracted, gender nonconforming females. The negative effect of religiosity on acceptance of same-sex attracted, gender non-conforming females was stronger among those adolescents who reported same-sex attractions. PMID:23687403

Collier, Kate L; Bos, Henny M W; Merry, Michael S; Sandfort, Theo G M

2013-06-01

32

Same-sex partner preference in zebra finches: pairing flexibility and choice.  

PubMed

This study examined flexibility and choice in same-sex pair-bonding behavior in adult zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Zebra finches form life-long monogamous relationships and extra pair behavior is very low, making them an ideal species in which to study same-sex pairing. We examined same-sex behaviors using both semi-naturalistic choice paradigms and skewed sex ratios. In the first experiment, we allowed zebra finches to pair in aviaries with equal sex ratios as part of multiple experiments. On average, 6.4 % (N = 78) of unmanipulated pairs were same-sex: all but one was female-female. In a second experiment, we identified pairs from same-sex cages and selected 20 total same-sex pairs (10 of each sex). We then gave pairs a chance to court and pair with members of the opposite sex and observed their behavior for three days. Females did not retain their partner, but most paired with males. In contrast, some males did retain their partner. Similarly, females were more likely to engage in pairing behaviors with males than with their partners or other females whereas males were equally likely to engage in same-sex and opposite-sex pairing behaviors. These findings suggest that same-sex partnerships in zebra finches can be facultative, based on the sex ratio of the group in which they live, but can also be a choice, when opportunities to pair with opposite-sex individuals are possible. Furthermore, it is possible that females are more flexible in this choice of same-sex partnerships than are males. PMID:25190500

Tomaszycki, Michelle L; Zatirka, Brendon P

2014-11-01

33

Gender, masculinity-femininity, and emotional intimacy in same-sex friendship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using multiple regression techniques, this research examines the relationship of gender and of masculinity— femininity to self-reported emotional intimacy in same-sex friendship among male and female college students, a segment of the population for which friendship is thought to be of particular salience. Findings indicate that, as hypothesized, males report significantly lower levels of emotional intimacy in same-sex friendship than

Dorie Giles Williams

1985-01-01

34

What same sex civil partnerships may mean for health.  

PubMed

A growing number of countries have introduced a form of marriage or civil partnership registration for same sex couples. Marriage confers health benefits on heterosexual men and women and similar benefits could arise from same sex civil unions. The authors argue that legal and social recognition of same sex relationships may reduce discrimination, increase the stability of same sex relationships, and lead to better physical and mental health for gay and lesbian people. PMID:16476745

King, Michael; Bartlett, Annie

2006-03-01

35

The Political Is Psychoanalytic: On Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychoanalysis should attend to same-sex marriage for two reasons: (1) Exclusion from marriage harms the mental health of same-sex couples and their children and (2) psychoanalysis is the science of irrationality, and the arguments about same-sex marriage are often highly irrational. The arguments against same-sex marriage, made by senior judges in the United States, are best understood by the von

Mark J. Blechner

2008-01-01

36

What same sex civil partnerships may mean for health  

PubMed Central

A growing number of countries have introduced a form of marriage or civil partnership registration for same sex couples. Marriage confers health benefits on heterosexual men and women and similar benefits could arise from same sex civil unions. The authors argue that legal and social recognition of same sex relationships may reduce discrimination, increase the stability of same sex relationships, and lead to better physical and mental health for gay and lesbian people. PMID:16476745

King, Michael; Bartlett, Annie

2006-01-01

37

Gay Marriage, Same-Sex Parenting, and America's Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Same-sex marriage, barely on the political radar a decade ago, is a reality in America. How will it affect the well-being of children? Some observers worry that legalizing same-sex marriage would send the message that same-sex parenting and opposite-sex parenting are interchangeable, when in fact they may lead to different outcomes for children.…

Meezan, William; Rauch, Jonathan

2005-01-01

38

Interracial Same-Sex Couples' Perceptions of Stress and Coping: An Exploratory Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirteen interracial same-sex couples (8 male, 5 female) participated in a 30-minute dyadic conversation focused on perceptions of stress and coping in their relationship. A qualitative analysis of the transcribed conversations revealed that the majority of couples experienced both race-related and sexual identity–related stress. Almost half of the couples perceived that their identities as same-sex couples were the source of

Sharon S. Rostosky; Ellen D. B. Riggle; Todd A. Savage; Staci D. Roberts; Gilbert Singletary

2008-01-01

39

An empirical analysis of the matching patterns of same-sex and opposite-sex couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

We used 1990 Census data to compare the matching behaviors of four types of cohabiting couples: same-sex male couples, same-sex female couples, opposite-sex unmarried couples, and married couples. In general, we found evidence of positive assortative mating for all traits and across all types of couples. The positive assortative mating, however, is stronger for non-labormarket traits (e.g., age, education) than

Lisa K. Jepsen; Christopher A. Jepsen

2002-01-01

40

Same-Sex Sexuality and Adolescent Psychological Well-Being: The influence of sexual orientation, early reports of same-sex attraction, and gender.  

PubMed

Emerging research has shown that those of sexual-minority (SM) status (i.e., those exhibiting same-sex sexuality) report lower levels of psychological well-being. This study aimed to assess whether this relation is largely in place by the onset of adolescence, as it is for other social statuses, or whether it continues to emerge over the adolescent years, a period when SM youth face numerous challenges. Moreover, the moderating influence of sexual orientation (identification), early (versus later) reports of same-sex attractions, and gender were also examined. Using data from Add Health, multiple-group latent growth curve analyses were conducted to examine growth patterns in depressive affect and self-esteem. Results suggested that psychological well-being disparities between SM and non-SM were generally in place by early adolescence. For many, the remainder of adolescence was a recovery period when disparities narrowed over time. Early and stable reporting of same-sex attractions was associated with a greater initial deficit in psychological well-being, especially among males, but it was also associated with more rapid recovery. Independent of the timing and stability of reported same-sex attractions over time, actual sexual orientation largely failed to moderate the relation between SM status and psychological well-being. Importantly, the sizable yet understudied subgroup that identified as heterosexual but reported same-sex attractions appeared to be at substantial risk. PMID:22505839

Jager, Justin; Davis-Kean, Pamela E

2011-01-01

41

The Same-Sex Marriage Debate in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the issue of same-sex marriage in Australia, from both legal and social perspectives. First, it places the marriage debate in its Australian context, noting the ways in which same-sex relationships have been recognised in Australia other than through marriage. Second, it assesses some of the legal constraints on recognition of same-sex marriage, in particular the current statutory

Kristen Walker

2007-01-01

42

Cutting edge couples : An ethnography of same-sex marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Following the landmark 2003 Ontario Court of Appeal decision legalizing same-sex marriage, some same-sex couples sought to formalize their unions through legal marriage. The purpose of this paper is to explore the personal and political reflections of recently married same-sex couples on the meaning of their marriages for themselves, their partners, their community as well as the implications

Dawn Onishenko; Lea Caragata

2009-01-01

43

Attitudes toward same-sex marriage: the case of Scandinavia.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the variables that explain attitudes toward same-sex marriage. Using recently collected Scandinavian data (from Norway and Sweden) with a high response rate, this study shows that gender, regular participation in religious activities, political ideology, education, whether the respondent lived in the capital city, and attitudes toward gender equality were important for attitudes toward same-sex marriage. Age and income were not important for attitudes toward same-sex marriage. Although both Norwegians and Swedes clearly favor same-sex marriage, Swedes are significantly more positive than Norwegians. PMID:23952927

Jakobsson, Niklas; Kotsadam, Andreas; Jakobsson, Siri Støre

2013-01-01

44

Romantic Attachment and Relationship Functioning in Same-Sex Couples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study was designed to investigate links between dimensions of romantic attachment and relationship functioning in a cross-sectional sample of people in same-sex relationships, with the goals of replicating basic findings from research on heterosexual couples and advancing understanding of unique issues faced by same-sex couples. The…

Mohr, Jonathan J.; Selterman, Dylan; Fassinger, Ruth E.

2013-01-01

45

WEDDING BELL BLUES: Understanding the Same-Sex Marriage Debate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Same-sex marriage proponents defend their position by arguing that government neutrality is violated when the state allows only people of different genders to marry one another. Yet the same-sex marriage position is far from neutral. It asserts that government ought to prefer a view of human nature that sees human institutions, such as marriage and the family, as artificial

Francis J. Beckwith

1996-01-01

46

Origin Stories: Same-Sex Sexuality and Christian Right Politics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we examine dominant Christian conservative narratives of the origins of same-sex sexuality. Critics of the Christian right usually focus on a narrative of choice that Christian right organisations and activists use to explain the origins of same-sex sexuality. A choice narrative grounds a range of political positions and, in many contexts, effectively neutralises both claims of discrimination

Cynthia Burack; Jyl J. Josephson

2005-01-01

47

Three-year follow-up of same-sex couples who had civil unions in Vermont, same-sex couples not in civil unions, and heterosexual married couples.  

PubMed

This study was a 3-year follow-up of 65 male and 138 female same-sex couples who had civil unions in Vermont during the 1st year of that legislation. These couples were compared with 23 male and 61 female same-sex couples in their friendship circles who did not have civil unions and with 55 heterosexual married couples (1 member of each was a sibling to a member of a civil union couple). Despite the legalized nature of their relationships, civil union couples did not differ on any measure from same-sex couples who were not in civil unions. However, same-sex couples not in civil unions were more likely to have ended their relationships than same-sex civil union or heterosexual married couples. Compared with heterosexual married participants, both types of same-sex couples reported greater relationship quality, compatibility, and intimacy and lower levels of conflict. Longitudinal predictors of relationship quality at Time 2 included less conflict, greater level of outness, and a shorter relationship length for men in same-sex relationships and included less conflict and more frequent sex for women in same-sex relationships at Time 1. PMID:18194009

Balsam, Kimberly F; Beauchaine, Theodore P; Rothblum, Esther D; Solomon, Sondra E

2008-01-01

48

Gay marriage, same-sex parenting, and America's children.  

PubMed

Same-sex marriage, barely on the political radar a decade ago, is a reality in America. How will it affect the well-being of children? Some observers worry that legalizing same-sex marriage would send the message that same-sex parenting and opposite-sex parenting are interchangeable, when in fact they may lead to different outcomes for children. To evaluate that concern, William Meezan and Jonathan Rauch review the growing body of research on how same-sex parenting affects children. After considering the methodological problems inherent in studying small, hard-to-locate populations--problems that have bedeviled this literature-the authors find that the children who have been studied are doing about as well as children normally do. What the research does not yet show is whether the children studied are typical of the general population of children raised by gay and lesbian couples. A second important question is how same-sex marriage might affect children who are already being raised by same-sex couples. Meezan and Rauch observe that marriage confers on children three types of benefits that seem likely to carry over to children in same-sex families. First, marriage may increase children's material well-being through such benefits as family leave from work and spousal health insurance eligibility. It may also help ensure financial continuity, should a spouse die or be disabled. Second, same-sex marriage may benefit children by increasing the durability and stability of their parents' relationship. Finally, marriage may bring increased social acceptance of and support for same-sex families, although those benefits might not materialize in communities that meet same-sex marriage with rejection or hostility. The authors note that the best way to ascertain the costs and benefits of the effects of same-sex marriage on children is to compare it with the alternatives. Massachusetts is marrying same-sex couples, Vermont and Connecticut are offering civil unions, and several states offer partner-benefit programs. Studying the effect of these various forms of unions on children could inform the debate over gay marriage to the benefit of all sides of the argument. PMID:16158732

Meezan, William; Rauch, Jonathan

2005-01-01

49

Three-Year Follow-Up of Same-Sex Couples Who Had Civil Unions in Vermont, Same-Sex Couples Not in Civil Unions, and Heterosexual Married Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was a 3-year follow-up of 65 male and 138 female same-sex couples who had civil unions in Vermont during the 1st year of that legislation. These couples were compared with 23 male and 61 female same-sex couples in their friendship circles who did not have civil unions and with 55 heterosexual married couples (1 member of each was

Kimberly F. Balsam; Theodore P. Beauchaine; Esther D. Rothblum; Sondra E. Solomon

2008-01-01

50

Three-Year Follow-Up of Same-Sex Couples Who Had Civil Unions in Vermont, Same-Sex Couples Not in Civil Unions, and Heterosexual Married Couples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was a 3-year follow-up of 65 male and 138 female same-sex couples who had civil unions in Vermont during the 1st year of that legislation. These couples were compared with 23 male and 61 female same-sex couples in their friendship circles who did not have civil unions and with 55 heterosexual married couples (1 member of each was a…

Balsam, Kimberly F.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Rothblum, Esther D.; Solomon, Sondra E.

2008-01-01

51

Close friendship in adulthood: Conversational content between same-sex friends  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to examine ongoing close friendships among same-sex adults. An analysis of frequency and depth of conversational topics was undertaken. The self-reports of female participants showed that they converse more frequently than the male participants about intimate topics and daily and shared activities. Sex differences on depth of topic discussion also emerged, with females reporting greater depth

Elizabeth J. Aries; Fern L. Johnson

1983-01-01

52

Do Children in Single-Parent Households Fare Better Living with Same-Sex Parents?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used data from National Educational Longitudinal Study (with 3,483 and 409 eighth graders living in mother-only and father-only homes, respectively) to test whether children in single-parent homes fare better living with same-sex parent. Of 35 social psychological and educational outcomes studied, found none in which both males and females…

Downey, Douglas B.; Powell, Brian

1993-01-01

53

Exposing Sex Stereotypes in Recent Same-Sex Marriage Jurisprudence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines sex discrimination arguments in recent same-sex marriage cases. Since 1993, when the Hawaii Supreme Court held in Baehr v. Lewin that denying same-sex couples the right to marry could state a claim of sex discrimination, every state high court to consider the issue has rejected the claim. But many recent decisions have in fact relied upon sex-based

Deborah A. Widiss; Elizabeth Rosenblatt; Douglas NeJaime

2007-01-01

54

Citizenship, Same-Sex Marriage, and Feminist Critiques of Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thedebateoversame-sexmarriageintheUnitedStatesisfundamentallyadisagreementaboutthenatureofdemocraticcitizenship andthemeaningoffullinclusionofadultcitizensinthepolity.Thefactsthatmarriagehasbothprivateandpublicdimensions,and is described by policy makers as natural and unchanging even as they write laws to define it create confusion among those who publicly contest same-sex marriage. The feminist critique of marriage provides insight on the issue; its critique, along with the questions raised by same-sex marriage, indicates a need to rethink many aspects of the legal regulation of

Jyl Josephson

2005-01-01

55

Male and female betting behaviour: New perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper uses an analysis of betting decisions made in offcourse betting offices in the UK to explore differences between the nature of male and female betting behaviour. Specifically gender differences in levels of performance, propensity for risk taking and levels of confidence in betting decisions are considered. The results provide some evidence for greater risk propensity amongst male bettors,

A. C. Bruce; J. E. V. Johnson

1994-01-01

56

What Asexuality Contributes to the Same-Sex Marriage Discussion  

PubMed Central

While same-sex marriage debates have captured public attention, it is but one component of a broader discussion regarding the role of marriage in a changing society. To inform this discussion, I draw on qualitative, Internet survey data from 102 self-identified asexual individuals. I find that asexual relationships are complicated and nuanced in ways that have implications for a GLBTQ political agenda, including same-sex marriage recognition. In addition, findings indicate that assumptions of sex and sexuality in relationships are problematic and that present language for describing relationships is limiting. Findings suggest a social justice agenda for marginalized sexualities should be broader in scope than same-sex marriage. PMID:20596244

Scherrer, Kristin S.

2010-01-01

57

Same-Sex Parent Families and Children's Academic Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children in traditional families (i.e., married, 2 biological parents) tend to do better than their peers in nontraditional families. An exception to this pattern appears to be children from same-sex parent families. Children with lesbian mothers or gay fathers do not exhibit the poorer outcomes typically associated with nontraditional families.…

Potter, Daniel

2012-01-01

58

An Economic Analysis of Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

The institution of marriage is the foundation of the family and of society. Even though it is a private institution, it has been regulated by society, depending on the specific time and history, religious perceptions, legal rules or customs, and norms. According to historical judicial interpretation, marriage has been viewed as a heterosexual union, same-sex rela-tionships are precluded from the

Christina Müller

59

Sexual consent behaviors in same-sex relationships.  

PubMed

Consent is a key issue in defining sexual coercion yet few researchers have analyzed sexual consent attitudes and behaviors and, to date, there has been no published research examining sexual consent within same-sex relationships. The main objective of this study was to identify which behaviors people use to ask for and to indicate sexual consent to their same-sex partner(s). A Same-Sex Sexual Consent Scale was developed to measure both initiating and responding consent behaviors in same-sex relationships. Data were collected using an on-line survey from 257 participants (127 men, 130 women). The participants reported using nonverbal behaviors significantly more frequently than verbal behaviors to indicate consent. Exploratory factor analysis for the Initiating and Responding subscales resulted in four factors for each subscale. The four factors for the Initiating Subscale were nonverbal behaviors involving touch, no resistance behaviors, verbal behaviors, and nonverbal behaviors without touch. The factors for the Responding Subscale were no resistance behaviors, verbal behaviors, nonverbal behaviors, and undressing behaviors. There were no significant differences in the initiating behaviors used by men who have sex with men (MSM) and women who have sex with women (WSW); however, when responding to initiating behavior, MSM reported using significantly more nonverbal signals than did WSW. The scale that was developed in this study should be useful for other researchers who wish to study the topic of sexual consent. PMID:15305118

Beres, Melanie A; Herold, Edward; Maitland, Scott B

2004-10-01

60

Exploring the Nature of Same-Sex Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the relationship structure and experiences of 145 people in the United States, aged 50 and above, in long-term, same-sex relationships. A survey assessed relationship satisfaction and roles, caregiving, shared assets, and relationship protection and support. The ENRICH couple scales revealed high scores in communication, conflict resolution, and couple satisfaction. Most participants had taken steps to protect shared

Jean K. Quam; Gary S. Whitford; Lake E. Dziengel; Kelly Abel Knochel

2010-01-01

61

What Asexuality Contributes to the Same-Sex Marriage Discussion  

Microsoft Academic Search

While same-sex marriage debates have captured public attention, it is but one component of a broader discussion regarding the role of marriage in a changing society. To inform this discussion, I draw on qualitative, Internet survey data from 102 self-identified asexual individuals. I find that asexual relationships are complicated and nuanced in ways that have implications for a lesbian, gay,

Kristin S. Scherrer

2010-01-01

62

Same-Sex Attraction and Successful Adolescent Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relation of adolescent same-sex attraction to "successful development" (Baltes, P. B., "Am. Psychol." 32:366-380, 1997). Based on a survey of high-school adolescents, four groups were defined according to the nature of self-reported sexual attraction: exclusively heterosexual (EHA; n=3594); mostly heterosexual (MHA;…

Busseri, Michael A.; Willoughby, Teena; Chalmers, Heather; Bogaert, Anthony R.

2006-01-01

63

Race, Religion, and Opposition to Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine racial differences in support for same-sex marriage, and test whether the emerging black-white gap is a function of religiosity. We explore how religious factors play a crucial role in racial differences, and how secular factors have varying effects on attitudes for whites and African Americans. Copyright (c) 2010 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

Darren E. Sherkat; Kylan Mattias de Vries; Stacia Creek

2010-01-01

64

Religion and Public Opinion about Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this article is to analyze the relationship between religion, measured in terms of religious affiliation and religiosity, and public opinion about same-sex marriage, civil unions, and a federal constitutional amendment that would prohibit gay marriage. Copyright (c) 2006 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

Laura R. Olson; Wendy Cadge; James T. Harrison

2006-01-01

65

CALIFORNIA HIGH COURT VOIDS SAME-SEX MARRIAGES  

Microsoft Academic Search

By unanimous vote, the seven justices of the California Supreme Court ruled on August 12 in Lockyer v. City and County of San Francisco, 95 P.3d 459, 17 Cal. Rptr. 3d 225, that local of- ficials in San Francisco could not unilaterally defy the state's marriage law and issue licenses to same-sex couples. Suggesting that \\

Arthur S. Leonard; Ian Chesir-Teran; Allen Drexel; Joseph Griffin; Alan J. Jacobs; Steven Kolodny; Sharon McGowan; Daniel R Schaffer; Audrey E. Weinberger; Robert Wintemute; Leo Wong

2004-01-01

66

The Absolute Prohibition of Same-sex Marriages in Uganda  

Microsoft Academic Search

Before 2005, the Constitution of Uganda provided in Article 31(1) that ‘men and women of the age of eighteen years and above have the right to marry and to found a family ….’ In 2005, Article 31 was amended by inserting clause (2a) to the effect that ‘marriage between persons of the same sex is prohibited’. The author gives a

Jamil Ddamulira Mujuzi

2009-01-01

67

Divorce-Risk Patterns in Same-Sex \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study provides an investigation into patterns in divorce risks of partners in same-sex marriages, or registered partnerships, in Norway and Sweden. A comparison with patterns in divorce risks in heterosexual marriages is provided. Our study is based on longitudinal information from the population registers of the two countries, covering all persons in partnerships. Our demographic analyses involve information

Gunnar Andersson; Turid Noack; Ane Seierstad; Harald Weedon-Fekjær

68

Same-sex and cross-sex siblings: Activity choices, roles, behavior, and gender stereotypes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty same-sex and cross-sex school-aged sibling pairs were observed in their homes during self-selected activities. The sex role learning index (SERLI) and a sex-typing room analysis were administered for the younger siblings, and maternal questionnaire information was obtained. Sibling gender constellation was associated with reliable differences in activity choices during the unstructured observations. Male dyads interacted less than other sibling

Zolinda Stoneman; Gene H. Brody; Carol E. MacKinnon

1986-01-01

69

Predictors of school engagement among same-sex and heterosexual adoptive parents of Kindergarteners.  

PubMed

Little research has explored parental engagement in schools in the context of adoptive parent families or same-sex parent families. The current cross-sectional study explored predictors of parents' self-reported school involvement, relationships with teachers, and school satisfaction, in a sample of 103 female same-sex, male same-sex, and heterosexual adoptive parent couples (196 parents) of kindergarten-age children. Parents who reported more contact by teachers about positive or neutral topics (e.g., their child's good grades) reported more involvement and greater satisfaction with schools, regardless of family type. Parents who reported more contact by teachers about negative topics (e.g., their child's behavior problems) reported better relationships with teachers but lower school satisfaction, regardless of family type. Regarding the broader school context, across all family types, parents who felt more accepted by other parents reported more involvement and better parent-teacher relationships; socializing with other parents was related to greater involvement. Regarding the adoption-specific variables, parents who perceived their children's schools as more culturally sensitive were more involved and satisfied with the school, regardless of family type. Perceived cultural sensitivity mattered more for heterosexual adoptive parents' relationships with their teachers than it did for same-sex adoptive parents. Finally, heterosexual adoptive parents who perceived high levels of adoption stigma in their children's schools were less involved than those who perceived low levels of stigma, whereas same-sex adoptive parents who perceived high levels of stigma were more involved than those who perceived low levels of stigma. Our findings have implications for school professionals, such as school psychologists, who work with diverse families. PMID:25267169

Goldberg, Abbie E; Smith, JuliAnna Z

2014-10-01

70

Same-sex social behavior in meadow voles: Multiple and rapid formation of attachments.  

PubMed

Adult meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) are solitary in the spring-summer reproductive season, but during winter months, females and males are socially tolerant and aggregate in groups. This behavioral difference is triggered by day length: female meadow voles housed in short, winter-like day lengths form same-sex partner preferences, whereas those housed in long, summer-like day lengths are less social. The present study demonstrates that same-sex social attachments in short day lengths are not exclusive; females formed concurrent attachments with more than one individual, and with non-kin as well as siblings. Partner preferences between females were established within one day of cohousing and did not intensify with greater durations of cohabitation. Males also formed same-sex social attachments, but unlike female affiliative behavior, male partner preferences were not significantly affected by day length. These data are discussed in the context of field behavior and the physiological mechanisms supporting social behavior in voles. PMID:19419672

Beery, Annaliese K; Routman, David M; Zucker, Irving

2009-04-20

71

Same-sex social behavior in meadow voles: multiple and rapid formation of attachments  

PubMed Central

Adult meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) are solitary in the spring–summer reproductive season, but during winter months, females and males are socially tolerant and aggregate in groups. This behavioral difference is triggered by day length: female meadow voles housed in short, winter-like day lengths form same-sex partner preferences, whereas those housed in long, summer-like day lengths are less social. The present study demonstrates that same-sex social attachments in short day lengths are not exclusive; females formed concurrent attachments with more than one individual, and with non-kin as well as siblings. Partner preferences between females were established within one day of cohousing and did not intensify with greater durations of cohabitation. Males also formed same-sex social attachments, but unlike female affiliative behavior, male partner preferences were not significantly affected by day length. These data are discussed in the context of field behavior and the physiological mechanisms supporting social behavior in voles. PMID:19419672

Beery, Annaliese K.; Routman, David M.; Zucker, Irving

2009-01-01

72

Reported topics of conversation among same?sex adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conversational topics among same?sex adult friends, co?workers, siblings, parents and children were studied. A self?report questionnaire revealed that women's talk tends to focus on family, relationship problems, men, health, pregnancy and menstruation, food, things they've read, movies, television, clothing, and rape. Men talk more about women, sex, money, news, sports, hunting and fishing. No sex difference was found in the

Adelaide Haas; Mark A. Sherman

1982-01-01

73

Gifted adolescents and intimacy in close same-sex friendships  

Microsoft Academic Search

As most research with gifted children has demonstrated that giftedness has a positive effect on popularity and social self-esteem, it was expected that gifted adolescents would demonstrate higher intimacy with their same-sex closest friends and would tend to evince a more secure attachment style than nongifted cohorts. A total of 56 gifted and nongifted 9th graders completed questionnaires regarding their

Ofra Mayseless I

1993-01-01

74

Same-sex marriage and the Irish Constitution  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the recent Irish High Court case of Zappone and Gilligan v. Revenue Commissioners and Others, a challenge to the constitutionality of the state's interpretation of the Irish Tax Code vis-à-vis the foreign marriage of a same-sex couple and their right to marry each other under Irish law. The right to marry and the nature of marriage are

Aisling OSullivan

2009-01-01

75

Same-sex Sexual HarassmentHow the \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides a quick history of sexual-harassment law and looks at the appellate-court opinions that came before the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in a same-sex sexual-harassment case. That latter decision has given rise to the relatively novel equal-opportunity-harasser defense, whereby harassing conduct directed at both men and women, no matter how outrageous, may not be unlawful at all. The

David S. Sherwyn; Ezekiel A. Kaufman; Adam A. Klausner

2000-01-01

76

Modern Prejudice and Same-Sex Parenting: Shifting Judgments in Positive and Negative Parenting Situations  

PubMed Central

The current study compares the effects of traditional and modern anti-homosexual prejudice on evaluations of parenting practices of same-sex and opposite-sex couples. Undergraduate university student participants (N = 436) completed measures of traditional and modern anti-homosexual prejudice and responded to a vignette describing a restaurant scene in which parents react to their child’s undesirable behavior. The parents’ sexual orientation and the quality of their parenting (positive or negative quality) were varied randomly. It was predicted that participants who score higher in modern prejudice would rate the negative parenting behaviors of same-sex parents more negatively than similar behaviors in opposite-sex parents. It was also predicted that this modern prejudice effect would be most pronounced for male participants. Both hypotheses were supported. PMID:23667347

MASSEY, SEAN G.; MERRIWETHER, ANN M.; GARCIA, JUSTIN R.

2013-01-01

77

Prenatal exposure to testosterone and functional cerebral lateralization: a study in same-sex and opposite-sex twin girls  

Microsoft Academic Search

In animals it has been shown that exposure to sex hormones is influenced by intrauterine position. Thus fetuses located between two male fetuses are exposed to higher levels of testosterone (T) than fetuses situated between two female fetuses or one female and one male fetus. In a group of opposite-sex (OS) twin girls and same-sex (SS) twin girls a potential

Celina C. C. Cohen-Bendahan; Jan K. Buitelaar; Stephanie H. M. van Goozen; Peggy T. Cohen-Kettenis

2004-01-01

78

Misconstructing Sexuality in Same-Sex Marriage Jurisprudence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing on sociology, queer studies, \\u0009\\u0009\\u0009and legal scholarship, this Comment develops a textual methodology to study \\u0009\\u0009\\u0009sexuality in court opinions. In \\u0009\\u0009\\u0009particular, this methodology uses inconsistencies between opinions to highlight \\u0009\\u0009\\u0009how courts rely on cultural assumptions. \\u0009\\u0009\\u0009This Comment applies this methodology to eighteen state same-sex \\u0009\\u0009\\u0009marriage cases, identifying four analytic models of sexuality: sexuality \\u0009\\u0009\\u0009consists only of behaviors; sexuality belongs

Jeffrey Kosbie

2011-01-01

79

Effect of same-sex and cross-sex role models on the subsequent academic productivity of scholars  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measured the academic productivity of 4 groups: male PhDs who had male dissertation advisors, female PhDs who had female advisors, male PhDs who had female advisors, and female PhDs who had male advisors (^ins?=?26,^n 30, 25, and 29, respectively). As predicted, scholars in the 2 same-sex conditions published significantly more research than did scholars in the 2 cross-sex conditions. The

Elyse Goldstein

1979-01-01

80

The French Spring of la Manif pour tous: Conservative Protests against Same-Sex  

E-print Network

The French Spring of la Manif pour tous: Conservative Protests against Same-Sex Marriage against same-sex marriage, organized a summer school near Paris to celebrate a year of mobilization in April 2013, legalizing same-sex marriage and the adoption of children by same-sex married couples

Boyer, Edmond

81

The Number of Same-Sex Marriages in a Perfectly Bisexual Population is Asymptot* *ically Normal  

E-print Network

The Number of Same-Sex Marriages in a Perfectly Bisexual Population is Asymptot* *ically Normal "* *Number of same-sex marriages" is 2n_(2_n_-_1 by Maple package SameSexMarriages downloadable from http://www.math.rutgers.edu/~zeilberg/tokhniot/SameSexMarriages

Zeilberger, Doron

82

Adolescent Same-Sex Romantic Attractions and Relationships: Implications for Substance Use and Abuse  

PubMed Central

Objectives. Nationally representative data were used to examine associations of romantic attractions and relationships with substance use and abuse. Methods. Data from the Add Health Study were examined. Youths reporting same-sex and both-sex romantic attractions and relationships were compared with those reporting opposite-sex attractions. Survey regression and logistic regression were used to control for sample design effects. Results. In the case of certain outcomes, romantic attraction affected males differently than females. Youths with both-sex attractions were at a somewhat higher risk for substance use and abuse than were heterosexual youths; females with same-sex attractions were also at higher risk for some outcomes. Sexual-minority youths varied little from heterosexual youths in regard to trajectories of substance use and abuse. Conclusions. These findings highlight the importance of distinguishing between youths with only same-sex attractions and those with both-sex attractions. These findings also call into question previous findings indicating that sexual-minority youths are automatically “at risk.” PMID:11818291

Russell, Stephen T.; Driscoll, Anne K.; Truong, Nhan

2002-01-01

83

Public health implications of same-sex marriage.  

PubMed

Significantly compromised health care delivery and adverse health outcomes are well documented for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community in the United States compared with the population at large. LGBT individuals subject to societal prejudice in a heterosexist world also suffer from the phenomenon known as "minority stress," with its attendant negative mental and physical health effects. Reports in the medical and social science literature suggest that legal and social recognition of same-sex marriage has had positive effects on the health status of this at-risk community. Improved outcomes are to be expected because of the improved access to health care conferred by marriage benefits under federal or state law and as a result of attenuating the effects of institutionalized stigma on a sexual minority group. PMID:21493934

Buffie, William C

2011-06-01

84

Public Health Implications of Same-Sex Marriage  

PubMed Central

Significantly compromised health care delivery and adverse health outcomes are well documented for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community in the United States compared with the population at large. LGBT individuals subject to societal prejudice in a heterosexist world also suffer from the phenomenon known as “minority stress,” with its attendant negative mental and physical health effects. Reports in the medical and social science literature suggest that legal and social recognition of same-sex marriage has had positive effects on the health status of this at-risk community. Improved outcomes are to be expected because of the improved access to health care conferred by marriage benefits under federal or state law and as a result of attenuating the effects of institutionalized stigma on a sexual minority group. PMID:21493934

2011-01-01

85

Same-sex and opposite-sex teacher model influences on science career commitment among high school students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studied the relationship between the science career commitment and the science teacher models of 141 female and 129 male high school students. On the basis of earlier findings, it was predicted that Ss with same-sex teacher models would indicate a higher science career commitment. Furthermore, it was predicted that perceived teacher attractiveness and amount of science-related teacher contact would affect

Jayne E. Stake; Charles R. Granger

1978-01-01

86

Asthma Disparities and Within-Group Differences in a National, Probability Sample of Same-Sex Partnered Adults  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We examined the prevalence and correlates of self-reported lifetime diagnosis of asthma and current asthma among same-sex and opposite-sex partnered adults. Methods. Data were from the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, in which same-sex partnership was a response option to a family planning item in the core questionnaire. Self-reported lifetime diagnosis of asthma and current asthma were examined in logistic regression models adjusted for demographic characteristics and asthma-related confounding factors and stratified by both gender and same-sex partnership status. Results. Significantly higher proportions of same-sex partnered male and female respondents reported lifetime and current asthma compared with their opposite-sex partnered peers. In adjusted analyses, same-sex partnership status remained significantly associated with asthma outcomes among men and women, with odds ratios ranging from 1.57 to 2.34. Conclusions. Results corroborated past studies that indicated asthma disproportionately affects sexual minority populations. The addition of sexual minority status questions to federal survey projects is key to further exploring health disparities in this population. Future studies are needed to investigate the etiology of this disparity. PMID:23865655

Lee, Joseph G. L.; Bossarte, Robert; Silenzio, Vincent M. B.

2013-01-01

87

Shall We Marry? Legal Marriage as a Commitment Event in Same-Sex Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is a part of an exploratory study of 50 married and unmarried same-sex couples in Massachusetts conducted by the Wellesley Centers for Women following legalization of same-sex marriage in Massachusetts in 2004. This article examines whether and how legalization of same-sex marriage impacted same-sex partners’ commitment to one another, presentation to others as a couple, and treatment as

Ellen Schecter; Allison J. Tracy; Konjit V. Page; Gloria Luong

2008-01-01

88

Sperm-depleted males influence the reproductive behaviour of conspecifics.  

PubMed

In many insect species, sperm-depleted males (SDMs, i.e. males that have exhausted their sperm after a given number of matings) remain sexually active and continue to mate females. Here, we investigated the behavioural modifications that occur in both sexes of the parasitoid Asobara tabida Nees (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), after matings by fertile males and sperm-depleted males. We show that (i) virgin females, mated females and females mated to a SDM exhibited different behaviours and that (ii) males responded differently to females depending on whether the females had previously mated with an SDM or not. Our findings demonstrate that SDM influenced the reproductive behaviour of both males and females, especially with regard to male responsiveness and female attractiveness. These findings are discussed in the context of adaptive behaviour and fitness maximization in both males and females. PMID:25182408

Louâpre, Philippe; Llopis, Stéphanie; Martel, Véronique; van Baaren, Joan

2014-11-01

89

Same-sex unions in Europe Some Observations on European Diversity  

E-print Network

1 Same-sex unions in Europe Some Observations on European Diversity Reviews & Critical Commentary, online review, posted on May 8, 2014, http://councilforeuropeanstudies.org/critcom/same-sex-unions-in-europe-some-observations-on- european-diversity/ Maks Banens CMW ­ CNRS, University of Lyon Same-sex unions gained considerable legal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

90

Same-Sex and Cross-Sex Help Exchanges in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined same-sex and cross-sex help exchanges in reading and math classes among third and fifth-grade students. Students sought help more frequently from same sex. Girls, more than boys, reported liking their boy helpers as much as their same-sex helpers. (Author/JAZ)

Nelson-LeGall, Sharon; DeCooke, Peggy A.

1987-01-01

91

Voting to Ban Same-Sex Marriage: Interests, Values, and Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From 2000 through 2008, initiatives proposing to ban same-sex marriage were on the ballot in 28 states. Although same-sex marriage opponents scored lopsided victories in most cases, voting outcomes varied substantially at the county level. This article examines sources of that variation and argues that opposition to same-sex marriage should be…

McVeigh, Rory; Diaz, Maria-Elena D.

2009-01-01

92

Will Marriage Matter? Effects of Marriage Anticipated by Same-Sex Couples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study used an online survey to explore the anticipated impact of legalized marriage on partners in same-sex couples living in California. These data were gathered prior to the California Supreme Court decision in May 2008 legalizing same-sex marriage, which held sway for 5 months before California Proposition 8 eliminating same-sex

Shulman, Julie L.; Gotta, Gabrielle; Green, Robert-Jay

2012-01-01

93

Risk for Reassault in Abusive Female Same-Sex Relationships  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We revised the Danger Assessment to predict reassault in abusive female same-sex relationships. Methods. We used focus groups and interviews to evaluate the assessment tool and identify new risk factors and telephone interviews at baseline and at 1-month follow-up to evaluate the revised assessment. Results. The new assessment tool comprised 8 original and 10 new items. Predictors included increase in physical violence (relative risk ratio [RRR]=1.95; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.84, 4.54), constant jealousy or possessiveness of abuser (RRR = 4.07; 95% CI = 0.61, 27.00), cohabitation (RRR = 1.96; 95% CI = 0.54, 7.12), threats or use of gun by abuser (RRR=1.93; 95% CI=0.79, 4.75), alcoholism or problem drinking of abuser (RRR=1.47; 95% CI=0.79, 2.71), illegal drug use or abuse of prescription medications by abuser (RRR = 1.33; 95% CI = 0.72, 2.46), stalking by abuser (RRR=1.39; 95% CI=0.70, 2.76), failure of individuals to take victim seriously when she sought help (RRR=1.66; 95% CI=0.90, 3.05), victim’s fear of reinforcing negative stereotypes (RRR=1.42; 95% CI=0.73, 2.77), and secrecy of abuse (RRR=1.72; 95% CI=0.74, 3.99). Both unweighted (P < .005) and weighted (P < .004) versions of the revised assessment were significant predictors of reassault. Conclusions. The revised Danger Assessment accurately assesses risk of re-assault in abusive female relationships. PMID:18445801

Glass, Nancy; Perrin, Nancy; Hanson, Ginger; Bloom, Tina; Gardner, Emily; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.

2008-01-01

94

Demographic and Social Issues of Same-Sex Adoptions  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A demographic analysis of adoption would be incomplete unless it addressed the current issue of gay males and lesbians as\\u000a adoptive parents. This chapter addresses social and demographic issues related to gay male and lesbian adoption. First, is\\u000a the background of the social, political, and psychological issues related to gay male and lesbian adoptions. Second, is the\\u000a current (as of

Mary Ann Davis

95

Gender and Age Differences in Same-Sex Aggregation and Social BehaviorA Four-Culture Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children's tendencies to aggregate with same-sex others and to increase spatial experience with age are investigated among 3- to 9-year-olds in four non-Western communities. Also investigated are genderspecific social behaviors, labeled by Eleanor Maccoby as male-styleand female-styleplay. Analysis of naturalistic observations of daily activities indicate that during free time in all cultures, older children (7- and 9-year-olds) are much more

Robert L. Munroe; A. Kimball Romney

2006-01-01

96

The influence of political jurisdiction, age, and sex on handholding in public by same-sex couples.  

PubMed

Three hundred-forty lesbians and 62 gay males, largely from North America and in partnered relationships, completed online surveys that explored what handholding means to same-sex couples. The data suggest that lesbians in the United States are more likely now than ¼ century ago to hold hands in public spaces. Younger lesbians are more likely to hold hands in public than older lesbians, and Canadian lesbians hold hands more often in public than American lesbians. In response to the question, "What does handholding mean to you?," 26% of the female respondents from North America overtly referred to public handholding as either a political act or a risky behavior. The number of comments of that nature was similar, regardless of whether the lesbians resided in the United States or Canada. Data suggest that full acceptance of same-sex couples in public spaces has not yet occurred, even in jurisdictions where same-sex couples have the same legal rights as heterosexual couples. Although the sample size for males was too small to analyze the influence of age or political jurisdiction on public handholding, males, in general, were significantly less likely than females to view handholding as a means of staying "connected" with their partners. PMID:24147591

Che, Alison; Siemens, Isaac; Fejtek, Monika; Wassersug, Richard J

2013-11-01

97

Mental Health Implications of Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marriage is a mental health protective factor and homosexuality is sometimes a risk factor. The combined effect of these factors on mental health was examined in this study. We conducted a secondary analysis of an international, cross-sectional survey completed in 2000 (N = 7,616). We examined risks of suicide ideations and attempts, behavioral problems, and treatment histories for male and

Robin M. Mathy; Shelly K. Kerr; Barbara A. Lehmann

2004-01-01

98

The Same-sex Marriage Debate in Canada and the US: It's the Culture Stupid  

Microsoft Academic Search

What explains why the US and Canada, two countries with similar socio-cultural and political systems, have diverged so dramatically over same-sex unions policy? In 2005, Canada became one of four countries to open marriage to same-sex couples. In that same year the US Congress held votes on a constitutional amendment that would ban same-sex marriage. I argue that these outcomes

Kelly Kollman

99

Insubstantial Burdens: The Case for Government Employee Exemptions to Same-Sex Marriage Laws  

Microsoft Academic Search

The case for accommodating religious objectors to same-sex marriage has met significant resistance on a number of fronts. Some believe that religious exemptions permit objectors to dodge legal duties to serve same-sex couples that would otherwise apply. Critics charge that, if extended to public employees, such exemptions would burden the ability of same-sex couples to marry. Others argue that exemptions

Robin Fretwell Wilson

2010-01-01

100

The Future Impact of Same-Sex Marriage: More Questions Than Answers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Same-sex relationships have already significantly altered family law, by leading to new formal relationship statuses and incorporation of the principle that both of a child’s legal parents can be of the same sex. This essay explores further changes that may lie ahead as same-sex marriage debates increasingly affect both family law and the social meanings of marriage. Marriage as an

Nan D. Hunter

2012-01-01

101

Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among

Jennifer J Power; Amaryll Perlesz; Margot J Schofield; Marian K Pitts; Rhonda Brown; Ruth McNair; Anna Barrett; Andrew Bickerdike

2010-01-01

102

Employment and Benefits Issues Involving Same-Sex Marriages in Massachusetts: An Employer’s Guide  

Microsoft Academic Search

The issue of same-sex marriage has ignited a raucous debate over the contours of the institution of marriage. But lost in the noise are a host of real and very practical concerns faced by employers over the impact of same-sex marriage on employer-sponsored benefit plans and employment practices. Are same-sex spouses entitled to benefits, and under what circumstances? To what

Alden J. Bianchi

2004-01-01

103

Voting to Ban Same-Sex Marriage: Interests, Values, and Communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 2000 through 2008, initiatives proposing to ban same-sex marriage were on the ballot in 28 states. Although same-sex marriage opponents scored lopsided victories in most cases, voting outcomes varied substantially at the county level. This article examines sources of that variation and argues that opposition to same-sex marriage should be strong in communities characterized by the predominance of traditional

Rory McVeigh; D. Diaz Maria-Elena

2009-01-01

104

Gender Politics and the Same-Sex Marriage Debate in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores policy and legal debates over same-sex marriage in the United States, focusing on the indirect effects of the struggle over same-sex marriage and how these implicate the interests of women, including women in heterosexual relationships. The paper highlights the effects of the institutional structures of American politics, which have shaped the same-sex marriage debate in particular ways,

Miriam Smith

2010-01-01

105

Can Romantic Comedy Be Gay?: Hollywood Romance, Citizenship, and Same-Sex Marriage Panic  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article links recent trends in romantic comedy to the debate about same-sex marriage. By comparing contemporary heterosexual romantic comedies to same-sex romantic comedies, it argues that Hollywood colludes with efforts by the state and the conservative Right to ensure that heterosexuality remains the privileged mode of desire and marriage, the sanctioned form of bonding. The unarticulated anxiety over same-sex

Debra A. Moddelmog

2009-01-01

106

Education, State Ballot Initiatives Banning Same-Sex Marriage, and Attitudes Toward Homosexuals in 2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, I seek to determine the effect that the current debate on same-sex marriage has on citizens’ attitudes towards homosexuals. The research to date, centers on what actors and institutional characteristics lead to state restrictions on same-sex marriage. Some researchers have even found that ballot measures regarding same-sex marriage have caused a slight increase in voter turnout among

Adam LaRose

2012-01-01

107

Male sexual harassment alters female social behaviour towards other females.  

PubMed

Male harassment of females to gain mating opportunities is a consequence of an evolutionary conflict of interest between the sexes over reproduction and is common among sexually reproducing species. Male Trinidadian guppies Poecilia reticulata spend a large proportion of their time harassing females for copulations and their presence in female social groups has been shown to disrupt female-female social networks and the propensity for females to develop social recognition based on familiarity. In this study, we investigate the behavioural mechanisms that may lead to this disruption of female sociality. Using two experiments, we test the hypothesis that male presence will directly affect social behaviours expressed by females towards other females in the population. In experiment one, we tested for an effect of male presence on female shoaling behaviour and found that, in the presence of a free-swimming male guppy, females spent shorter amounts of time with other females than when in the presence of a free-swimming female guppy. In experiment two, we tested for an effect of male presence on the incidence of aggressive behaviour among female guppies. When males were present in a shoal, females exhibited increased levels of overall aggression towards other females compared with female only shoals. Our work provides direct evidence that the presence of sexually harassing males alters female-female social behaviour, an effect that we expect will be recurrent across taxonomic groups. PMID:21976624

Darden, Safi K; Watts, Lauren

2012-04-23

108

Same sex, no sex, and unaware sex in neurotoxicology.  

PubMed

Males and females of virtually all species differ in how they respond to their environment. Because such differences exist in almost all biological realms, including disease patterns and therapeutic outcomes, they have evoked calls by various bodies to incorporate their assessment in research. Neurobehavioral indices pose special questions because, unlike outwardly visible markers, they are described by complex functional outcomes or subtle alterations in brain structure. These divergent responses arise because they are inscribed in the genome itself and then by endocrine mechanisms that govern sexual differentiation of the brain during development and operate throughout life. Other organ systems that exhibit sex differences include the liver, an important consideration for neurotoxicology because it may process many toxic chemicals differentially in males and females. Despite the scope and pervasiveness of sex differences, however, they are disregarded by much of neurotoxicology research. Males predominate in behavioral experiments, few such experiments study both sexes, some investigators fail to even describe the sex of their subjects, and in vitro studies tend to wholly ignore sex, even for model systems aimed at neurological disorders that display marked sex differences. The public is acutely aware of sex differences in behavior, as attested by its appetite for books on the topic. It closely follows debates about the proportion of women in professions that feature science and mathematics. Neurotoxicology, especially in the domain of laboratory research, will be hindered in its ability to translate its findings into human health measures if it assigns sex differences to a minor role. It must also be sensitive to how such debates are framed. Often, the differences evoking the most discussion are subtle in scope. They do not lend themselves to the typical analyses conducted by experimenters; that is, reliance on mean differences and null hypothesis testing. PMID:20875453

Weiss, Bernard

2011-10-01

109

Gender-stereotyping and cognitive sex differences in mixed- and same-sex groups.  

PubMed

Sex differences in specific cognitive abilities are well documented, but the biological, psychological, and sociocultural interactions that may underlie these differences are largely unknown. We examined within a biopsychosocial approach how gender stereotypes affect cognitive sex differences when adult participants were tested in mixed- or same-sex groups. A total of 136 participants (70 women) were allocated to either mixed- or same-sex groups and completed a battery of sex-sensitive cognitive tests (i.e., mental rotation, verbal fluency, perceptual speed) after gender stereotypes or gender-neutral stereotypes (control) were activated. To study the potential role of testosterone as a mediator for group sex composition and stereotype boost/threat effects, saliva samples were taken before the stereotype manipulation and after cognitive testing. The results showed the typical male and female advantages in mental rotation and verbal fluency, respectively. In general, men and women who were tested in mixed-sex groups and whose gender stereotypes had not been activated performed best. Moreover, a stereotype threat effect emerged in verbal fluency with reduced performance in gender stereotyped men but not women. Testosterone levels did not mediate the effects of group sex composition and stereotype threat nor did we find any relationship between testosterone and cognitive performance in men and women. Taken together, the findings suggest that an interaction of gender stereotyping and group sex composition affects the performance of men and women in sex-sensitive cognitive tasks. Mixed-sex settings can, in fact, increase cognitive performance as long as gender-stereotyping is prevented. PMID:24923876

Hirnstein, Marco; Coloma Andrews, Lisa; Hausmann, Markus

2014-11-01

110

Female Same-Sex Families in the Dialectics of Marginality and Conformity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article discusses the continuum between the personal and public roles of families, where two women parent together in Slovenia, against the background of the current marginal position of same-sex families in regard to rights and symbolic status, in claiming the position of same-sex parenting in the context of family models as well as in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and

Ana Marija Sobo?an

2011-01-01

111

Client Discourses on the Process of Seeking Same-Sex Couple Counselling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How same-sex couples manage the process of seeking help for their relationships is an under-researched area. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 people who had engaged in same-sex couple counselling, and were analysed using discourse analysis. The ways in which the couples positioned themselves as part of a "minority…

Grove, Jan; Peel, Elizabeth; Owen-Pugh, Valerie

2013-01-01

112

Middle School Students' Perceptions of Coeducational and Same-Sex Physical Education Classes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Middle school students who participated in both single-sex and coeducational physical education (PE) classes completed questionnaires eliciting their opinions on perceived abilities, affinity toward PE, and preferences for coeducational and same-sex classes. Most students liked PE, preferred same-sex classes, and rated themselves highly on PE…

Treanor, Laura; Graber, Kim; Housner, Lynn; Wiegand, Robert

1998-01-01

113

Poaching, promiscuity, and deceit: Combatting mating rivalry in same-sex friendships  

Microsoft Academic Search

If humans faced recurrently over evolutionary history the adaptive problem of competition with same-sex friends for mates, they may have evolved psychological mechanisms designed to prevent and combat mating rivalry with same-sex friends. Four studies were conducted to test hypotheses about the design of these mechanisms. In Studies 1 and 2 (N = 406 and N = 342, respectively) we

APRIL L. BLESKE; TODD K. SHACKELFORD

2001-01-01

114

Multiple Identity Considerations among African American Christian Men Experiencing Same-Sex Attraction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors explored the experiences of African American men who identified as Christian and experienced same-sex attraction. Participants completed an online questionnaire addressing experiences of same-sex attraction; meaning attributed to their attractions; the sharing of their experiences with others; and perceptions regarding the intersection…

Yarhouse, Mark A.; Nowacki-Butzen, Stephanie; Brooks, D. Fredrica

2009-01-01

115

Comparing Trans-Spectrum and Same-Sex-Attracted Youth in Australia: Increased Risks, Increased Activisms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tran-spectrum youth include those who are gender questioning, transgender, intersex, genderqueer, and androgynous. Drawing on data from an Australian study of more than 3,000 same-sex-attracted and trans-spectrum youth aged 14 to 21, this article compares a group of 91 trans-spectrum youth from the study to "cisgender" same-sex-attracted…

Jones, Tiffany; Hillier, Lynne

2013-01-01

116

Same-Sex Patterns and Sex Differences in the Trust-Value Basis of Children's Friendship.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A sample of grade four students reported the secret-sharing and promise-making behavior of classroom peers and judged those classmates on trust and friendship. Findings suggest that the same-sex friendship patterns are maintained by same-sex trust patterns through infrequent secret-sharing with opposite-sex peers and the perception that…

Rotenberg, Ken J.

1986-01-01

117

Legal Recognition of Same-Sex Relationships in the United States: A Social Science Perspective1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whether and how civil society should recognize committed relationships between same- sex partners has become a prominent, often divisive policy issue. The present article reviews relevant behavioral and social science research to assess the validity of key factual claims in this debate. The data indicate that same-sex and heterosexual relationships do not differ in their essential psychosocial dimensions; that a

Gregory M. Herek

118

Connecticut Legislates for Civil Unions and Against Same-Sex Marriages  

Microsoft Academic Search

For only the second time, a state has legislated to provide significant legal recognition for same-sex partners without being under court order to take such an action, as Connecticut en- acted a Civil Union Act (substitute Senate Bill 963, as amended by the House) that essentially provides all the state law rights and responsi- bilities of spouses for those same-sex

Arthur S. Leonard; Alan J. Jacobs; Sharon McGowan; Tara Scavo; Daniel R Schaffer; Robert Wintemute; Leo Wong

2005-01-01

119

Psychosocial Adjustment, School Outcomes, and Romantic Relationships of Adolescents With Same-Sex Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined associations among family type (same-sex vs. opposite-sex parents); family and relationship variables; and the psychosocial adjustment, school outcomes, and romantic attractions and behaviors of adolescents. Participants included 44 12- to 18-year-old adolescents parented by same-sex couples and 44 same-aged adolescents…

Wainright, Jennifer L.; Russell, Stephen T.; Patterson, Charlotte J.

2004-01-01

120

Self Harm and Suicide Risk for Same-Sex Attracted Young People: A Family Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of the risks of self-harm and suicide and in particular the importance of family in mental health outcomes for same-sex attracted young people. Mental health workers can assist families gain confidence in dealing with the news that a young person is same-sex attracted. Implications for practitioners and a model for affirmative…

Brown, Rhonda

2002-01-01

121

Development and Validation of the Attitudes Toward Same-Sex Marriage Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research details the development of a new instrument designed to measure attitudes toward same-sex marriage. Participants were 615 heterosexual women and men, drawn from both student and nonstudent adult populations. Four studies were conducted for the purpose of developing the scale and to establish its psychometric properties. The resulting Attitudes Toward Same-Sex Marriage Scale (ATSM) consists of 17 items,

Marcia L. Pearl; M. Paz Galupo

2007-01-01

122

Religion, politics, and support for same-sex marriage in the United States, 1988–2008  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine how religious and political factors structure support for same-sex marriage in the United States over the last two decades. Using data from the General Social Surveys, we show that respondents who identify more strongly with the Republican Party, sectarian denominations, and those who subscribe to biblical fundamentalism and political conservatism are substantially more opposed to same-sex marriage than

Darren E. Sherkat; Melissa Powell-Williams; Gregory Maddox; Kylan Mattias de Vries

2011-01-01

123

The Construction and Enactment of Same-Sex Marriage in Argentina  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines how same-sex partnership recognition (SSPR) was enacted into policy in Argentina. It begins by looking at the history and structure of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) movements to explain why same-sex marriage, and not civil unions, became the primary goal. Next, it considers what the constitutional and statutory law was before the marriage bill passed

Shawn Schulenberg

2012-01-01

124

Different Rights, Different Perspectives: Observations on the Same-Sex Marriage Debate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Ontario and British Columbia courts of appeal have held that the restriction of marriage to heterosexuals is unconstitutional. Opposing views in same-sex marriage litigation arise from different definitions of "marriage." Proposed federal legislation would legalize same-sex marriage but not resolve the larger, underlying issue of how educators…

Howard, J. Paul R.

2003-01-01

125

Legal Recognition of Same-Sex Relationships in the United States: A Social Science Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whether and how civil society should recognize committed relationships between same-sex partners has become a prominent, often divisive, policy issue. The present article reviews relevant behavioral and social science research to assess the validity of key factual claims in this debate. The data indicate that same-sex and heterosexual…

Herek, Gregory M.

2006-01-01

126

Intact Marriages in which One Partner Dis-Identifies with Experiences of Same-Sex Attraction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study is of heterosexually married couples in which one partner reports having experienced same-sex attraction and both partners report satisfaction with their marriage despite facing such constraints. Analysis suggested a number of themes related to how spouses learned about their partners' experiences of same-sex attraction, motivations for…

Yarhouse, Mark A.; Pawlowski, Lisa M.; Tan, Erica S. N.

2003-01-01

127

CALIFORNIA SUPREME COURT RULES FOR SAME-SEX MARRIAGE; DECLARES SEXUAL ORIENTATION A \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

The California Supreme Court ruled in In re Marriage Cases, 2008 WL 2051892 (May 15, 2008), that same-sex couples are entitled to marry in that state, and that same-sex couples married elsewhere are entitled to have their marriages recognized as valid in California. Furthermore, the court held that sexual orienta- tion is a suspect classification under the Cali- fornia Constitution,

Arthur S. Leonard; Chris Benecke; Glenn Edwards; Alan J. Jacobs; Bryan Johnson; Steven Kolodny; Alvin Lee; Ruth Uselton; Eric Wursthorn; Daniel R Schaffer

128

“Queer Eye” for Social Work: Rethinking Pedagogy and Practice with Same-sex Attracted Young People  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dominant discourses on sexualities construct limited representations and understanding of same-sex attracted young people, often resulting in material and detrimental effects for young people who do not fit the heterosexual mould. Traditionally, social work theory and practice with same-sex attracted young people has relied on ethnic and essentialised models for understanding sexual difference. In the present article, the author reviews

Paul Willis

2007-01-01

129

Counselors' Attitudes toward Domestic Violence in Same-Sex versus Opposite-Sex Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Domestic violence is often perceived to occur only in heterosexual relationships. However, domestic violence is also prevalent in same-sex relationships. The majority of the research indicates that counselors perceive same-sex domestic violence differently than heterosexual domestic violence. This literature review synthesizes the research…

Banks, Jamye R.; Fedewa, Alicia L.

2012-01-01

130

Asymmetric reproductive character displacement in male aggregation behaviour.  

PubMed

Reproductive character displacement--the evolution of traits that minimize reproductive interactions between species--can promote striking divergence in male signals or female mate preferences between populations that do and do not occur with heterospecifics. However, reproductive character displacement can affect other aspects of mating behaviour. Indeed, avoidance of heterospecific interactions might contribute to spatial (or temporal) aggregation of conspecifics. We examined this possibility in two species of hybridizing spadefoot toad (genus Spea). We found that in Spea bombifrons sympatric males were more likely than allopatric males to associate with calling males. Moreover, contrary to allopatric males, sympatric S. bombifrons males preferentially associated with conspecific male calls. By contrast, Spea multiplicata showed no differences between sympatry and allopatry in likelihood to associate with calling males. Further, sympatric and allopatric males did not differ in preference for conspecifics. However, allopatric S. multiplicata were more variable than sympatric males in their responses. Thus, in S. multiplicata, character displacement may have refined pre-existing aggregation behaviour. Our results suggest that heterospecific interactions can foster aggregative behaviour that might ultimately contribute to clustering of conspecifics. Such clustering can generate spatial or temporal segregation of reproductive activities among species and ultimately promote reproductive isolation. PMID:21177683

Pfennig, Karin S; Stewart, Alyssa B

2011-08-01

131

Asymmetric reproductive character displacement in male aggregation behaviour  

PubMed Central

Reproductive character displacement—the evolution of traits that minimize reproductive interactions between species—can promote striking divergence in male signals or female mate preferences between populations that do and do not occur with heterospecifics. However, reproductive character displacement can affect other aspects of mating behaviour. Indeed, avoidance of heterospecific interactions might contribute to spatial (or temporal) aggregation of conspecifics. We examined this possibility in two species of hybridizing spadefoot toad (genus Spea). We found that in Spea bombifrons sympatric males were more likely than allopatric males to associate with calling males. Moreover, contrary to allopatric males, sympatric S. bombifrons males preferentially associated with conspecific male calls. By contrast, Spea multiplicata showed no differences between sympatry and allopatry in likelihood to associate with calling males. Further, sympatric and allopatric males did not differ in preference for conspecifics. However, allopatric S. multiplicata were more variable than sympatric males in their responses. Thus, in S. multiplicata, character displacement may have refined pre-existing aggregation behaviour. Our results suggest that heterospecific interactions can foster aggregative behaviour that might ultimately contribute to clustering of conspecifics. Such clustering can generate spatial or temporal segregation of reproductive activities among species and ultimately promote reproductive isolation. PMID:21177683

Pfennig, Karin S.; Stewart, Alyssa B.

2011-01-01

132

Parent-reported measures of child health and wellbeing in same-sex parent families: a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background It has been suggested that children with same-sex attracted parents score well in psychosocial aspects of their health, however questions remain about the impact of stigma on these children. Research to date has focused on lesbian parents and has been limited by small sample sizes. This study aims to describe the physical, mental and social wellbeing of Australian children with same-sex attracted parents, and the impact that stigma has on them. Methods A cross-sectional survey, the Australian Study of Child Health in Same-Sex Families, was distributed in 2012 to a convenience sample of 390 parents from Australia who self-identified as same-sex attracted and had children aged 0-17 years. Parent-reported, multidimensional measures of child health and wellbeing and the relationship to perceived stigma were measured. Results 315 parents completed the survey (completion rate?=?81%) representing 500 children. 80% of children had a female index parent while 18% had a male index parent. Children in same-sex parent families had higher scores on measures of general behavior, general health and family cohesion compared to population normative data (??=?2.93, 95% CI?=?0.35 to 5.52, P?=?.03; ??=?5.60, 95% CI?=?2.69 to 8.52, P?=?<.001; and ??=?6.01, 95% CI?=?2.84 to 9.17, P?=?<.001 respectively). There were no significant differences between the two groups for all other scale scores. Physical activity, mental health, and family cohesion were all negatively associated with increased stigma (??=?-3.03, 95% CI?=?-5.86 to -0.21, P?=?.04; ??=?-10.45, 95% CI?=?-18.48 to -2.42, P?=?.01; and ??=?-9.82, 95% CI?=?-17.86 to -1.78, P?=?.02 respectively) and the presence of emotional symptoms was positively associated with increased stigma (? =0.94, 95% CI?=?0.08 to 1.81, P?=?.03). Conclusions Australian children with same-sex attracted parents score higher than population samples on a number of parent-reported measures of child health. Perceived stigma is negatively associated with mental health. Through improved awareness of stigma these findings play an important role in health policy, improving child health outcomes. PMID:24952766

2014-01-01

133

Anticipation of the sexual and gender development of children adopted by same-sex couples.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to characterize beliefs surrounding the sexual and gender development of children adopted by lesbian and gay couples. Participants were 768 Portuguese university students. Using a quasiexperimental design, participants were presented with identical descriptions of a couple interested in adopting a child, manipulating couple sexual orientation and child gender. Participants were then asked to anticipate three aspects of the sexual and gender development of the adopted child: sexual orientation, gender role behavior, and gender identity. MANOVAs and follow-up ANOVAs were conducted in order to analyze the data. Results indicated that participants, particularly males, considered children adopted by either lesbian or gay couples to have a lower probability of developing a normative sexual and gender identity than children adopted by heterosexual couples. Both men and women considered that children would emulate the sexual orientation of their same-sex parents, and that a boy's gender role behavior was more at risk if he was adopted by a lesbian couple. Moreover, men were apprehensive about the gender role behavior of a boy adopted by a gay male couple. Overall, these results indicate persistence of biased evaluations of the sexual and gender development of children adopted by lesbian and gay parents. Furthermore, both gender of the participant and gender of the child play an important role in these evaluations. Results are discussed and interpreted as a way of "doing gender" in the context of hegemonic masculinity. PMID:23837556

Gato, Jorge; Fontaine, Anne Marie

2013-01-01

134

Desirable rights: same-sex sexual subjectivities, socio-economic transformations, global flows and boundaries - in India and beyond.  

PubMed

Sexual rights are increasingly and unevenly advanced internationally as constitutive of progressive legal possibilities for same-sex desiring subjects. Legislative progress in this area has taken place in the context of recognition of same-sex sexual subjects within the globalising flow of neo-liberal political-economic ideologies in some parts of the word, and resurgent homophobia as a countervailing trend elsewhere (or indeed even within the same context). Ambivalent responses to sexual rights praxis in people's day-to-day lives indicate complex relationships between sexual subjectivity, economy, law, the state, and people's most intimate aspirations. Rights on grounds of same-sex sexualities may or may not be perceived as universally desirable, even among those people who might otherwise be imagined as their beneficiaries. Given this, the relationship between sexual subjectivities, political economies, and rights must be understood in terms of multifaceted refractions, attending to generative and curtailing possibilities - imagined in people's differing responses to free-market capital, legislation, and possibilities for livelihood. These issues are explored in respect of ethnographic work in West Bengal, India, with a particular focus on male-bodied subjects who evince both masculine and feminine subjectivities, and in respect of recent contestations in law, polity, and sexual rights praxis. PMID:25162750

Boyce, Paul

2014-11-01

135

A comparison of the police response to heterosexual versus same-sex intimate partner violence.  

PubMed

It has been argued that the police do not respond to domestic calls involving same-sex couples in the same manner as they respond to calls involving heterosexual couples. A major problem facing researchers examining the police response to cases involving same-sex couples has been the lack of adequately sized samples. In this article, the authors utilize the 2000 National Incident Based Reporting System database, which contains 176,488 intimate partner assaults and intimidation incidents reported to 2,819 police departments in 19 states. The key issue examined is whether similar cases involving same-sex and heterosexual couples result in the same police response. PMID:17420516

Pattavina, April; Hirschel, David; Buzawa, Eve; Faggiani, Don; Bentley, Helen

2007-04-01

136

Psychosocial Adjustment, School Outcomes, and Romantic Relationships of Adolescents With Same-Sex Parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined associations among family type (same-sex vs. opposite-sex parents); family and rela- tionship variables; and the psychosocial adjustment, school outcomes, and romantic attractions and behaviors of adolescents. Participants included 44 12- to 18-year-old adolescents parented by same-sex couples and 44 same-aged adolescents parented by opposite-sex couples, matched on demographic characteristics and drawn from a national sample. Normative analyses

Jennifer L. Wainright; Stephen T. Russell; Charlotte J. Patterson

2004-01-01

137

Delinquency, Victimization, and Substance Use Among Adolescents With Female Same-Sex Parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The question of whether parental sexual orientation has an impact on human development has important implications for psychological theories and for legal policy. This study examined associations among family type (same-sex vs. different-sex parents), family and relationship variables, substance use, delinquency, and victimization of adolescents. Participants included 44 adolescents living with female same-sex couples and 44 adolescents living with different-sex

Jennifer L. Wainright; Charlotte J. Patterson

2006-01-01

138

Predicting the Support of Same-Sex Relationship Rights Among Social Work Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the 1980s, the United States has seen several instances of legislative action on the topic of same-sex marriages and civil unions. As some studies explored public reactions to such laws, the perspectives of social workers and social work students have mostly been ignored. In addressing part of this oversight, this paper looks at the approval of same-sex relationship rights

Eric Swank; Lisa Raiz

2010-01-01

139

Legal Recognition of Same-Sex Relationships in the United States: A Social Science Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whether and how civil society should recognize committed relationships between same-sex partners has become a prominent, often divisive, policy issue. The present article reviews relevant behavioral and social science research to assess the validity of key factual claims in this debate. The data indicate that same-sex and heterosexual relationships do not differ in their essential psychosocial dimensions; that a parent’s

Gregory M. Herek

2006-01-01

140

Civilized Unions, Civilized Rights: Same-Sex Relationships in Aotearoa New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much research on same-sex relationships has involved comparisons with opposite-sex relationships, often in order to develop frameworks to understand the dynamics of such same-sex relationships, or to demonstrate readiness for legal recognition such as marriage or “civil union.” Civil unions for both same- and opposite-sex couples have been legal in New Zealand since April 2005. A large national study of

Mark Henrickson

2010-01-01

141

Attractions and Obstacles While Considering Legally Recognized Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines same-sex couples' attractions to marriage, obstacles that challenged them when considering marriage, and the ways they overcame such obstacles. Participants (N = 263) were members of same-sex couples that were either legally married or engaged to be married. A Web-based survey asked participants to describe the discussions between them and their partners when deciding to marry. Inductive

Pamela J. Lannutti

2008-01-01

142

Religion and Support for Same-Sex Marriage: Implications from the Literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the existing scholarship on the relationship between various religion-related concepts and support for same-sex marriage. From this literature, this paper argues that research examining the influence of religion on attitudes about same-sex marriage must attend not only to religious tradition and religiosity, but also to the everyday theologies (Moon, 2004) that people of faith use to construct

N. Eugene Walls

2010-01-01

143

The demographics of same-sex marriages in Norway and Sweden  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigates the demographics of same-sex marriages—that is, registered partnerships—in Norway and Sweden.\\u000a We give an overview of the demographic characteristics of the spouses of these partnerships, study patterns of their divorce\\u000a risks, and compare the dynamics of same-sex couples with those of heterosexual marriages. We use longitudinal information\\u000a from the population registers of the two countries that

Gunnar Andersson; Turid Noack; Ane Seierstad; Harald Weedon-Fekjaer

2006-01-01

144

Same-Sex Marriage Policy: Advancing Social, Political, and Economic Justice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article serves as an informational and resource tool on the policy topic of same-sex marriage. The authors begin by distinguishing between benefit levels of marriage, civil unions, and domestic partnerships. Chronological and global overviews of same-sex marriage history along with a review of applicable U.S. Constitution amendments that apply to marriage recognition are included. The social, political, and economic

Anthony P. Natale; Julie E. Miller-Cribbs

2012-01-01

145

Conflicts of Law and Policy Relating to Same-Sex Marriage Recognition in Wisconsin  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines how Wisconsin courts will treat the marriages of same-sex couples who were validly married in other states; specifically focusing on recognition of the incidents—such as divorce, property ownership, and inheritance—stemming from those marriages. After examining Wisconsin conflict-of-laws jurisprudence, the article describes the public policy problems that may result if Wisconsin courts do not recognize out-of-state same-sex marriages.

Zachary Willenbrink

2010-01-01

146

Wedding Bell Blues: The Income Tax Consequences of Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, gay and lesbian couples have gone to court to force the government to allow same-sex couples to marry. Largely unnoticed during the debates surrounding same-sex marriages are their economic consequences, including the impact on government tax collections. It is well-known that a couple's joint income tax burden can change with marriage. Many couples, especially two- earner couples with similar

James Robert Alm; M. V. Lee Badgett; Leslie A. Whittington

2000-01-01

147

Argument Forms, Frames, and Value Conflict: Persuasion in the Case of Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Is telling stories politically effective? Recent debates around the efficacy of storytelling have challenged the view that narratives are an effective means of political persuasion. This article empirically examines the persuasiveness of narratives through the lens of recent controversies over same-sex marriage. Through a survey-experiment, I test the effects of different kinds of arguments on heterosexuals' views on same-sex marriage.

Raj Ghoshal

2009-01-01

148

Northern Enlightenment: Legal Recognition of Same-Sex Marriage in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social workers have an ethical and professional responsibility to promote social justice and equality for oppressed groups, including sexual minorities. Advocating for the legal recognition of same-sex marriage is one way to enact this responsibility. The legal recognition of same-sex marriage is a significant accomplishment toward equality for gay and lesbian Canadians—one in which the social work profession played a

Michael R. Woodford; Peter A. Newman; Shari Brotman; Bill Ryan

2010-01-01

149

Is Same-Sex Marriage a Threat to Traditional Marriages?: How Courts Struggle with the Question  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article explores the threat posed by the same-sex marriage to the traditional institution of marriages. It provides a brief overview of the manners of the U.S. courts' legal recognition of same-sex marriage and is contrasted with the approach of the German Federal Constitutional Court. It regarded German's judicial approach of the traditional institution argument, which provides a clearly explained

Patrick Busch

2011-01-01

150

Framing and Coverage of Same-Sex Marriage in U.S. Newspapers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined fairness and balance in the coverage of same-sex marriage by 5 U.S. newspapers, and how source use, newspaper working context, and media frames affect fairness and balance of the coverage. A content analysis of 209 stories found that overall coverage of same-sex marriage was fair and balanced and stories framed as thematic were more likely to be

Xigen Li; Xudong Liu

2010-01-01

151

Same-Sex Marriage and Legalized Relationships: I Do, or Do I?  

Microsoft Academic Search

At a time when heterosexual marriage rates are declining, many countries and localities are advocating for the rights of lesbians and gay men to enter legalized relationships, including marriage. This article reviews the legal status of same-sex relationships in the U.S. and other countries. Not only does the general public have mixed opinions about same-sex marriage, but so do lesbian

Esther D. Rothblum

152

“This is Not a Lesbian Wedding”: Examining Same-Sex Marriage and Bisexual-Lesbian Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the ways in which legally recognized same-sex marriage (SSM) has impacted the lives of cross-sexual orientation same-sex couples. Twenty-six, female-female couples, consisting of one bisexual and one lesbian partner, who were married or engaged to be married in Massachusetts participated in instant messenger interviews about their experiences with SSM. Results indicated that SSM impacted participants' views of

Pamela J. Lannutti

2008-01-01

153

Female same-sex sexuality from a dynamical systems perspective: sexual desire, motivation, and behavior.  

PubMed

Fluidity in attractions and behaviors among same-sex attracted women has been well-documented, suggesting the appropriateness of dynamical systems modeling of these phenomena over time. As dynamical systems modeling offer an approach to explaining the patterns of complex phenomena, it may be apt for explaining variability in female same-sex sexuality. The present research is the first application of this analytical approach to such data. Dynamical systems modeling, and specifically generalized local linear approximation modeling, was used to fit daily diary data on same-sex attractions and behaviors over a 21 day period among a group of 33 sexual minority women characterized as lesbian, bisexual or "fluid" based on their identity histories. Daily measures of women's reported same-sex attractions were fit using a linear oscillator model and its parameters estimated the cyclicity in these attractions. Results supported the existence of a "core sexual orientation" for women in this sample, regardless of how they identified and despite a high degree of variability in daily same-sex attractions. Thus, modeling individual differences in the variability of attractions and behaviors of sexual minority women may be critical to furthering our understanding of female same-sex sexuality and human sexual orientation more broadly. PMID:25193132

Farr, Rachel H; Diamond, Lisa M; Boker, Steven M

2014-11-01

154

Adolescent same-sex attraction and mental health: the role of stress and support.  

PubMed

This study draws on the social stress model from the sociology of mental health to examine the impact of same-sex attraction on depressed mood and suicidal tendencies. Specifically, we hypothesize that across multiple contexts, adolescents with same-sex attractions are likely to experience more social stress and less social support than heterosexual adolescents. In turn, these experiences increase the likelihood of negative mental health outcomes. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 11,911), we find that adolescents with same-sex attraction are more likely than their heterosexual counterparts to report depressed mood and suicidal tendencies. Moreover, stress and social support were found to mediate a substantial part of the relationship between same-sex attraction and depressed mood. In addition, stress and social support mediated about one third of the relationship between same-sex attraction and suicidal tendencies. These findings give strong support for the social stress model. We conclude with a discussion of the role that alienation plays in same-sex-attracted adolescent mental health. PMID:20390994

Teasdale, Brent; Bradley-Engen, Mindy S

2010-01-01

155

Same-sex cohabitors and health: the role of race-ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status.  

PubMed

A legacy of research finds that marriage is associated with good health. Yet same-sex cohabitors cannot marry in most states in the United States and therefore may not receive the health benefits associated with marriage. We use pooled data from the 1997 to 2009 National Health Interview Surveys to compare the self-rated health of same-sex cohabiting men (n = 1,659) and same-sex cohabiting women (n = 1,634) with that of their different-sex married, different-sex cohabiting, and unpartnered divorced, widowed, and never-married counterparts. Results from logistic regression models show that same-sex cohabitors report poorer health than their different-sex married counterparts at the same levels of socioeconomic status. Additionally, same-sex cohabitors report better health than their different-sex cohabiting and single counterparts, but these differences are fully explained by socioeconomic status. Without their socioeconomic advantages, same-sex cohabitors would report similar health to nonmarried groups. Analyses further reveal important racial-ethnic and gender variations. PMID:23446120

Liu, Hui; Reczek, Corinne; Brown, Dustin

2013-03-01

156

Declining Segregation of Same-Sex Partners: Evidence from Census 2000 and 2010  

PubMed Central

Despite recent media and scholarly attention describing the “disappearance” of traditionally gay neighborhoods, urban scholars have yet to quantify the segregation of same-sex partners and determine whether declining segregation from different-sex partners is a wide-spread trend. Focusing on the 100 most populous places in the United States, I use data from the 2000 and 2010 Decennial Census to examine the segregation of same-sex partners over time and its place-level correlates. I estimate linear regression models to examine the role of four place characteristics in particular: average levels of education, aggregate trends in the family life cycle of same-sex partners, violence and social hostility motivated by sexual orientation bias, and representation of same-sex partners in the overall population. On average, same-sex partners were less segregated from different-sex partners in 2010 than in 2000, and the vast majority of same-sex partners lived in environments of declining segregation. Segregation was lower and declined more rapidly in places that had a greater percentage of graduate degree holders. In addition, segregation of female partners was lower in places that had a greater share of female partner households with children. These findings suggest that sexual orientation should be considered alongside economic status, race, and ethnicity as an important factor that contributes to neighborhood differentiation and urban spatial inequality. PMID:24187412

2013-01-01

157

Behavioural responses of male killer whales to a `leapfrogging' vessel  

E-print Network

Behavioural responses of male killer whales to a `leapfrogging' vessel Rob Williams* , David E together to identify whalewatching practices that minimise disturbance to northern resident killer whales of killer whales to an experimental vessel that leapfrogged a whale's predicted path at distances greater

158

Male courtship vibrations delay predatory behaviour in female spiders.  

PubMed

During courtship, individuals transfer information about identity, mating status and quality. However, male web-building spiders face a significant problem: how to begin courting female spiders without being mistaken for prey? Male Argiope spiders generate distinctive courtship vibrations (shudders) when entering a female's web. We tested whether courtship shudders delay female predatory behaviour, even when live prey is present in the web. We presented a live cricket to females during playbacks of shudder vibrations, or white noise, and compared female responses to a control in which we presented a live cricket with no playback vibrations. Females were much slower to respond to crickets during playback of shudder vibrations. Shudder vibrations also delayed female predatory behaviour in a related spider species, showing that these vibrations do not simply function for species identity. These results suggest that male web-building spiders employ a phylogenetically conserved vibratory signal to ameliorate the risk of pre-copulatory cannibalism. PMID:24356181

Wignall, Anne E; Herberstein, Marie E

2013-01-01

159

Female brown-headed cowbirds', Molothrus ater, organization and behaviour reflects male social dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In four large aviaries, we studied social assortment and reproductive behaviour of female brown-headed cowbirds housed with males differing in age class and in corresponding levels of intrasexual interaction. Juvenile and adult females resided with either (1) adult males, (2) juvenile males, (3) adult and juvenile males, or (4) no males. We observed social behaviour of males and females from

Meredith J. West; David J. White; Andrew P. King

2002-01-01

160

Agonistic behaviour in male and female field crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus, and how behavioural context influences its expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous interactions with conspecifics influenced the pattern, frequency and intensity of agonistic behaviour in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Tactile contact appeared to be the most important sensory cue responsible for the observed shifts in behaviour. Contact with other adult males promoted the production of aggressive song both during and after fights between males. However, individually housed males and males

Shelley A. Adamo; Ronald R. Hoy

1995-01-01

161

Stigma and intimacy in same-sex relationships: a narrative approach.  

PubMed

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals in romantic relationships experience stigma, prejudice, and discrimination stemming from widespread social devaluation of same-sex relationships. Research on same-sex couples has demonstrated a negative association between experiences of stigma and relationship quality. However, critical questions remain unanswered regarding how experiences of stigma become more or less meaningful within the context of same-sex relationships. This paper presents a study of the stories that a purposive sample of 99 individuals in same-sex relationships wrote about their relational high points, low points, decisions, and goals, as well as their experiences of stigma directly related to their relationships. Narrative analysis of these stories revealed that participants utilized several psychological strategies for making meaning of their experiences of stigma within the context of their relationships. Some participants framed stigma as having a negative impact on their relationships, while others framed stigma as relevant, but external to their lives. Some participants saw stigma as providing an opportunity to (re)define notions of commitment and relational legitimacy. Additionally, many participants framed stigma as bringing them closer to their partners and strengthening the bond within their relationships. The results of this study illuminate the psychological strategies individuals in same-sex couples use to make meaning of, cope with, and overcome societal devaluation thereby furthering understandings of the association between stigma and intimacy within marginalized relationships. PMID:21355641

Frost, David M

2011-02-01

162

In sickness and in health: same-sex marriage laws and sexually transmitted infections.  

PubMed

This paper analyzes the relationship between same-sex marriage laws and sexually transmitted infections in the United States using state-level data from 1981 to 2008. We hypothesize that same-sex marriage laws may directly affect risky homosexual behavior; may affect or mirror social attitudes toward gays, which in turn may affect homosexual behavior; and may affect or mirror attitudes toward non-marital sex, which may affect risky heterosexual behavior. Our findings may be summarized as follows. Laws banning same-sex marriage are unrelated to gonorrhea rates, which are a proxy for risky heterosexual behavior. They are more closely associated with syphilis rates, which are a proxy for risky homosexual behavior. However, these estimates are smaller and less statistically significant when we exclude California, the state with the largest gay population. Also, laws permitting same-sex marriage are unrelated to gonorrhea or syphilis, but variation in these laws is insufficient to yield precise estimates. In sum, the findings point to a modest positive association--if any at all--between same-sex marriage bans and syphilis. PMID:22789462

Francis, Andrew M; Mialon, Hugo M; Peng, Handie

2012-10-01

163

The Number of Same-Sex Marriages in a Perfectly Bisexual Population is Asymptotically Normal Shalosh B. EKHAD1  

E-print Network

The Number of Same-Sex Marriages in a Perfectly Bisexual Population is Asymptotically Normal gets married. Then the expectation of the random variable "Number of same-sex marriages" is 2n (2 n - 1://www.math.rutgers.edu/~zeilberg/pj.html . Accompanied by Maple package SameSexMarriages downloadable from http://www.math.rutgers.edu/~zeilberg/tokhniot/SameSexMarriages

Zeilberger, Doron

164

Same-sex Marriage: From Europe to the Global Arena with David Paternotte, Free University of Brussels  

E-print Network

Same-sex Marriage: From Europe to the Global Arena with David Paternotte, Free University of Excellence/European Studies Center. While same-sex marriage was long regarded as the privilege of a few activists. Given the diversity of countries where same-sex marriage is currently under discussion

Machery, Edouard

165

Individuals' beliefs about the etiology of same-sex sexual orientation.  

PubMed

We examined the relationships between beliefs about the etiology of having a same-sex sexual orientation, sexual prejudice, and support for gay-relevant legislation using the justification-suppression model of prejudice as our theoretical foundation. Results indicated that more belief that a same-sex sexual orientation was due to nurture factors predicted less support for gay-relevant legislation, and that this relationship was mediated by levels of sexual prejudice. The opposite pattern was found for belief that a same-sex sexual orientation was due to nature factors. This suggests that beliefs about the etiology of sexual orientation may serve as justification (or suppression) factors in the expression of prejudice toward gay men and lesbians. PMID:21902494

Smith, Sara J; Zanotti, Danielle C; Axelton, Amber M; Saucier, Donald A

2011-01-01

166

Enigmatic Liaisons in Lepidoptera: A Review of Same-Sex Courtship and Copulation in Butterflies and Moths  

PubMed Central

Same-sex sexual interactions (SSSI) have been observed in many animal groups and have intrigued evolutionists. In this paper, reports on SSSI in Lepidoptera are reviewed and evolutionary hypotheses that could explain these behaviors are discussed. SSSI have been documented in males of 25 species and in females from role-reversed populations of one species. Four types of SSSI have been reported: pupal guarding, courtship, copulation attempt, and copulation. Although the hypotheses cannot be tested with the limited data, evidence suggests that in some Lepidoptera SSSI could result from selection for imposing costs on other males, or could be a by-product of sexual selection favoring individuals that exhibit high sexual willingness. In agreement with both hypotheses, in the 17 species whose mating systems are known, there is intense competition for mates in the sex exhibiting SSSI. We propose lines of research on SSSI in Lepidoptera. PMID:23452066

Caballero-Mendieta, Nubia; Cordero, Carlos

2012-01-01

167

Factors affecting aggressive behaviour of spawning migratory males towards mature male parr in masu salmon Oncorhynchus masou.  

PubMed

This study examined whether dominant migratory males (adopting fighter tactics) of the masu salmon Oncorhynchus masou would more aggressively attack large mature male parr (adopting sneaker tactics) as large mature male parr are expected to have the potential to cause a greater decrease in fertilization success. The frequency of aggressive behaviour was not related to the body size of males, and it increased with the frequency of interactions with mature male parr. The fertilization success of mature male parr was much lower than migratory males, and no relationship was observed between fertilization success and aggressive behaviour. The low fertilization success of mature male parr, despite infrequent aggressive behaviour by migratory males, indicates that there might be little benefit for migratory males to attack mature male parr more aggressively according to their body size. PMID:20646145

Watanabe, M; Maekawa, K

2010-07-01

168

Androgen changes and flexible rutting behaviour in male giraffes  

PubMed Central

The social organization of giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) imposes a high-cost reproductive strategy on bulls, which adopt a ‘roving male’ tactic. Our observations on wild giraffes confirm that bulls indeed have unsynchronized rut-like periods, not unlike another tropical megaherbivore, the elephant, but on a much shorter timescale. We found profound changes in male sexual and social activities at the scale of about two weeks. This so far undescribed rutting behaviour is closely correlated with changes in androgen concentrations and appears to be driven by them. The short time scale of the changes in sexual and social activity may explain why dominance and reproductive status in male giraffe in the field seem to be unstable. PMID:23925833

Seeber, Peter A.; Duncan, Patrick; Fritz, Herve; Ganswindt, Andre

2013-01-01

169

A Theoretical Analysis of Sex Differences In Same-Sex Friendships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates sex differences in same-sex friendships of 312 undergraduate students in terms of the intersection and social penetration model of relationship development, and Bem's theory of sex role orientation. Finds significant sex-related differences in depth, duration, and involvement. (FMW)

Barth, Robert J.; Kinder, Bill N.

1988-01-01

170

Registered Domestic Partnerships, Same-Sex Marriage, and the Pursuit of Equality in California  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Policies in California are examined to inform analysts of the process by which legal recognition of same-sex relationships may be achieved. Content analysis was conducted of relevant legislation, court cases, and voter initiatives, along with interviews with state legislators to gain an eyewitness understanding of the social climate surrounding…

Willetts, Marion C.

2011-01-01

171

Same-sex practicing men in Tanzania from 1860 to 2010.  

PubMed

This article offers a review of published texts describing sexual relations between men in Tanzania in the period 1860-2010. It explores ways in which men who have sex with men have been named and understood; describes the sexual and social roles associated with differing same-sex identities and subjectivities; tracks politics, policies, and sociocultural expressions relating to sex between men; and explores the ways in which men's same-sex sexual practices have been responded to in the context of health and HIV. Among the impressions emerging from the historical record is that sex between men is not (and has not been) uncommon in Tanzania; that a significant conceptual distinction exists between men who are anally receptive and men who penetrate anally; and that there has been a range of views on, and opinions about, same-sex relations within the wider society. There is evidence that same-sex practicing men in Tanzania have been affected by HIV at least since 1982, with one seroprevalence study indicating that the burden of HIV among men who have sex with men was quite disproportionate as far back as 2007. However, while men who have sex with men have been defined as a "vulnerable population" with respect to HIV in national frameworks since 2003, this had not led to any significant amount of targeted HIV prevention work being reported by either local or international actors by 2010. PMID:24752788

Moen, Kåre; Aggleton, Peter; Leshabari, Melkizedeck T; Middelthon, Anne-Lise

2014-08-01

172

Differential Mental Development of 18 Month-Old Same-Sexed and Opposite-Sexed Twins.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a study which examined the performance of 48 pairs of 18-month-old twins on the Mental Development Scale of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development to determine whether score differences would be found for the three subgroups of identical, fraternal same-sexed, and fraternal opposite-sexed twins. Of the 96 subjects, 46 (23…

Black, Kathryn Norcross; Campbell, Kathleen M.

173

"It's a Catch-22": Same-Sex-Attracted Young People on Coming Out to Parents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores teen-initiated communication with parents about same-sex attraction, coming out, and adolescent sexuality. Reports the findings of a qualitative study on teen and parent reactions as well as a number of strategies which emerged that may help maintain healthy relationships in the face of developing sexuality. (Author/SD)

Hillier, Lynne

2002-01-01

174

Media Influence and Frame Diversity in the Debate Over Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study the author uses content analysis of newspaper articles to analyze the frames used in debates over constitutional amendments that legally prohibit same-sex marriage and other relationship recognition. The findings from this analysis contradict previous research on mediated public discussion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights that find polarization by values of equal rights versus traditional morality.

Katherine McFarland

2011-01-01

175

Growing Up in a Same-Sex Parented Family: The Adolescent Voice of Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study gives voice to a unique group of youngsters who are observed and discussed frequently but rarely engaged in the debate about their development. Emerging research on the adjustment of children being raised by same-sex parents focuses on measuring achievements and outcomes. Missing from the literature are studies that capture the voice of the adolescent and his or her

Marjorie G. Welsh

2011-01-01

176

Parens Patri[Archy]: Adoption, Eugenics, and Same-Sex Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arkansas, Florida, Mississippi, and Utah have laws or regulations prohibiting gay men, lesbian women, same-sex couples, or single parents (heterosexual and homosexual) from serving as adoptive or foster parents. In court filings, Arkansas, Florida, and Utah justify their bans by contending that married couples are the optimal families in which to raise children because families headed by gay or single

Kari E Hong

2003-01-01

177

Measuring Sex Differences in Violence Victimization and Perpetration Within Date and Same-Sex Peer Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines sex differences in the patterns of repeated perpetration and victimization of physical violence and psychological aggression within dating relationships and same-sex peer relationships. Data were obtained from the Youth Violence Survey: Linkages among Different Forms of Violence, conducted in 2004, and administered to all public school students enrolled in grades 7, 9, 11 and 12 (N =

Monica H. Swahn; Thomas R. Simon; Ileana Arias; Robert M. Bossarte

2008-01-01

178

Same-Sex Attraction, Social Relationships, Psychosocial Functioning, and School Performance in Early Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined whether 13- to 15-year-old adolescents who experience feelings of same-sex attraction (SSA) differ from those without such feelings in the quality of relationships with parents, peers, and class mentors and in psychosocial functioning (health status and school performance). The authors also assessed whether differences in …

Bos, Henny M. W.; Sandfort, Theo G. M.; de Bruyn, Eddy H.; Hakvoort, Esther M.

2008-01-01

179

Same Sex Attraction, Homophobic Bullying and Mental Health of Young People in Northern Ireland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on the relationship between same-sex attraction, experience of bullying in school and mental health measured using the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12). A random sample of 16 year olds, drawn from the Child Benefit Register, was invited to take part in the 2005 Young Life and Times survey, which is a…

McNamee, Helen; Lloyd, Katrina; Schubotz, Dirk

2008-01-01

180

Well-Being among Same-Sex-and Opposite-Sex-Attracted Youth at School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, 53 students who reported being solely or primarily attracted to members of the same sex were matched with 53 peers who reported being attracted solely to members of the opposite sex on various demographic factors as well as exposure to bullying at school. Data relating to tobacco and alcohol use, drug use, health risk behaviors,…

Rivers, Ian; Noret, Nathalie

2008-01-01

181

Adolescents' Acceptance of Same-Sex Peers Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Expression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated tenth- and twelfth-grade adolescents' (N less than or equal to 264) judgments about the acceptability of same-sex peers who varied in terms of their sexual orientation (straight, gay or lesbian) and their conformity to gender conventions or norms in regard to appearance and mannerisms or activity. Overall, the results of…

Horn, Staccy S.

2007-01-01

182

Undergraduate Student Perceptions of Argument Resolution, Unity, and Love in Same-Sex-Headed Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines perceptions of same-sex-headed households held by undergraduate students. Participants (N = 165) responded to surveys after reading one of two possible vignettes. Half of the students read a vignette that included gay grandparents as part of a family, while the remaining students read a similar vignette that did not broach the matter of sexual orientation. Themes that

Cynthia Vejar; Linda Oravecz; Diane M. H. Hall

2011-01-01

183

Structural and Moral Commitment Among Same-Sex Couples: Relationship Duration, Religiosity, and Parental Status  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined ecological predictors of structural and moral commitment among cohabiting same-sex couples. Structural commitment was operationalized as the execution of legal documents, and moral commitment was operationalized as having a commitment ceremony. The authors tested 2 logistic regression models using a subsample of Rainbow Illinois survey respondents. First, the execution of legal documents was examined using the entire

Ramona Faith Oswald; Abbie Goldberg; Kate Kuvalanka; Eric Clausell

2008-01-01

184

A Demographic Analysis of Registered Partnerships (legal same-sex unions): The Case of Norway  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1993, Norway became the second country in the world to introduce registered partnerships. As with same-sex marriages, registered partnerships give the same rights and duties as marriages for opposite sex couples, with a few exceptions. The present article describes this ‘new’ demographic event based on Norwegian experiences. Compared to the number of new cases each year of opposite-sex marriages,

Turid Noack; Ane Seierstad; Harald Weedon-fekjær

2005-01-01

185

European institutions, transnational networks and national same-sex unions policy: when soft law hits harder  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a period of just under 20 years, 15 Western European countries have adopted national same-sex union (SSU) laws that legally recognize the gay and lesbian couples who chose to enter them. This rather startling case of convergent policy change has largely slipped under the radar screens of political scientists. This article argues that the European Union (EU), the European

Kelly Kollman

2009-01-01

186

Declaration of Same-Sex Domestic Partnership Employee Information (please print)  

E-print Network

under the terms of that Act. However, we understand that the value and nature of benefits paid to any a Notice of Termination of Same-Sex Domestic Partnership with Employee Benefits. We understand on this form or failure to notify Employee Benefits on a timely basis of loss of eligibility may result

Amin, S. Massoud

187

Japanese Less Open Than Finns Toward a Same-Sex Friend  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research compares responses by adult Finns (N=38) and Japanese (N=105) after they appraised 50 potential conversation topics and rated them in terms of degree of truthfulness toward a same-sex friend. Three topics show no significant difference. Finns rate four topics lower, which deal with money and one's closest relationships. Japanese report 42% less willingness to 'frankly and directly express

Charles McHugh

2002-01-01

188

Serotonin selectively enhances perception and sensory neural responses to stimuli generated by same-sex conspecifics  

PubMed Central

Centrifugal serotonergic fibers innervating sensory brain areas are seen ubiquitously across systems and species but their function remains unclear. Here we examined the functional role of serotonergic innervation onto electrosensory neurons in weakly electric fish by eliciting endogenous release through electrical stimulation as well as exogenous focal application of serotonin in the vicinity of the cell being recorded from. Both approaches showed that the function of serotonergic input onto electrosensory pyramidal neurons is to render them more excitable by reducing the spike afterhyperpolarization amplitude and thereby promoting burst firing. Further, serotonergic input selectively improved neuronal responses to stimuli that occur during interactions between same-sex conspecifics but not to stimuli associated with either prey or that occur during interactions between opposite-sex conspecifics. Finally, we tested whether serotonin-mediated enhanced pyramidal neuron responses to stimuli associated with same-sex conspecifics actually increase perception by the animal. Our behavioral experiments show that exogenous injection and endogenous release of serotonin both increase the magnitude of behavioral responses to stimuli associated with same-sex conspecifics as well as simultaneously decrease aggressive behaviors. Thus, our data indicate that the serotonergic system inhibits aggressive behavior toward same-sex conspecifics, while at the same time increasing perception of stimuli associated with these individuals. This function is likely to be conserved across systems and species. PMID:24218585

Deemyad, Tara; Metzen, Michael G.; Pan, Yingzhou; Chacron, Maurice J.

2013-01-01

189

VOTERS APPROVE STATE CONSTITUTIONAL BANS ON SAME-SEX MARRIAGE IN ELEVEN STATES  

Microsoft Academic Search

In state-wide referenda held in eleven states during the national elections on November 2, voters approved proposed state constitutional amendments to ban same-sex marriage by com- fortable margins. The new amendments were approved by voters in Arkansas, Georgia, Ken- tucky, Michigan, Mississippi, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Ohio, Oregon and Utah. Advanced speculation that the Oregon measure might be narrowly defeated

Arthur S. Leonard; Allen E. Drexel; Joseph Griffin; Alan J. Jacobs; Sharon McGowan; Tara Scavo; Daniel R Schaffer; Audrey E. Weinberger; Robert Wintemute; Leo Wong

190

Baehr v. Lewin: Hawaii Takes a Tentative Step to Legalize Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Baehr v. Lewin, the Supreme Court of Hawaii sparked a controversy that has potential nationwide implications. The court held that three same-sex couples were entitled to an evidentiary hearing to determine if the State can demonstrate that denying the couples the right to marry under the Hawaii Marriage Law furthers compelling state interests. If the State fails its burden,

Marty K. Courson

2010-01-01

191

On the Potential and Perils of Same-Sex Marriage: A Perspective from Queer Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last decade has witnessed a polemical debate over the merits of same-sex marriage. The crux of this acrimonious debate, the question of legalization, has entered the political vernacular, manifesting in Canada in form of the Civil Marriage Act (2005) and in the United States in form of the recently defeated Federal Marriage Amendment (2006). In this paper, I endeavor

Ajnesh Prasad

2008-01-01

192

A Bisex-Queer Critique of Same-Sex Marriage Advocacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The essay positions current same-sex marriage advocacy as an assimilationist\\/conformist, reformist movement and articulates the need for a more radical argument for marriage equality, one based not merely in queer politics but also in queer forms of relationship structure. Drawing from the realm of the personal, the author fashions a queer image of relationships that challenges the boundaries of mainstream

Hameed Herukhuti S. Williams

2008-01-01

193

Seriality and Multicultural Dissent in the Same-Sex Marriage Debate  

Microsoft Academic Search

“Seriality” is a useful critical heuristic for engaging the contours of identity politics, as it recognizes the limits of essentialism and simultaneously acknowledges its frequent necessity for accomplishing goals and building coalitions. Using contemporary debates about same-sex marriage, this essay places seriality into conversation with rhetorical theory to explore the discursive possibilities of this conceptual practice. While seriality focuses explicitly

Jeffrey A. Bennett

2006-01-01

194

Overcoming Bias toward Same-Sex Couples: A Case Study from inside an MFT Ethics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article illustrates a teaching case in which a marriage and family therapy (MFT) trainee learned to develop cultural sensitivity toward same-sex couples despite religious beliefs that put her at risk of discriminating against that population. The case took place during a marriage and family therapy ethics course in the spring of 2003. From…

Charles, Laurie L.; Thomas, Dina; Thornton, Matthew L.

2005-01-01

195

Legislating Unequal Treatment: An Exploration of Public Policy on Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social policy surrounding same-sex marriage has resulted in subsequent changes to public policy. Over the past 15 years, increased discussion surrounding the issue has emerged, inciting the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and the proposed Federal Marriage Amendment (FMA). It is particularly salient for social workers to keep abreast of legislation that is impacting vulnerable and disenfranchised populations. Since the

Jill M. Chonody; Kenneth Scott Smith; Melanie A. Litle

2012-01-01

196

One Statute for Two Spirits: Same-Sex Marriage in Indian Country  

E-print Network

On March 15, 2013, the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians (LTBB) became the third tribal nation to recognize same sex unions. The LTBB statute, Waganakising Odawak Statute 2013-003, defines marriage as “the legal and voluntary union of two...

Kronk, Elizabeth Ann

2013-04-16

197

The Effect of State-Legalized Same-Sex Marriage on Social Security Benefits and Pensions  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the 2004 legalization of same-sex marriage in Massachusetts, many have questioned how the legalization of such marriages at the state level may affect the eligibility for and payment of federal Social Security benefits and private pensions. Social Security benefits are currently paid to the spouses of disabled, retired, or deceased workers entitled to Social Security. However, under current law,

Laura Haltzel; Patrick Purcell

2008-01-01

198

Gay Marriage in Television News: Voice and Visual Representation in the Same-Sex Marriage Debate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing from critical-cultural scholarship, this quantitative content analysis systematically interrogates national network television news coverage of the same-sex marriage debate in 2003 and 2004. Analysis of sourcing patterns and sound bite length indicate the debate was dominated by conventionally “straight” perspectives. While gay and lesbian couples were visually prevalent in news stories, they were largely seen and not heard. Scrutinizing

Leigh M. Moscowitz

2010-01-01

199

Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples: Counseling Psychologists as Social Change Agents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The denial of civil marriage rights is a specific example of minority stress that can negatively affect the psychosocial well-being of self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals in same-sex partnerships, their families, and their allies. Counseling psychologists have an important role in addressing the…

Rostosky, Sharon S.; Riggle, Ellen D. B.

2011-01-01

200

Case note: Same-sex Marriage in South Africa –the constitutional Court's Judgment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Late last year the Constitutional Court of South Africa decided that the exclusion of same-sex couples from the common law definition of marriage and the statutory marriage formula was unconstitutional as it violated the rights of such couples to equality. The Court suspended the declaration of invalidity for one year to allow Parliament to enact new legislation to correct the

Beth Goldblatt

2006-01-01

201

An Analysis of Factors Affecting Attitudes Toward Same-Sex Marriage: Do the Media Matter?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a survey of more than 5,000 American consumers, this study examines connections between attitudes toward same-sex marriage and media consumption. A positive attitude is predicted by being liberal and less religious, supporting gender and racial equality, willing to try anything once, considering television the primary form of entertainment, watching political talk shows, and reading blogs. The theoretical and methodological

Tien-Tsung Lee; Gary R. Hicks

2011-01-01

202

Said and Unsaid: State Legislative Signaling to State Courts over Same Sex Marriage 1990–2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1990 through 2004, same sex marriage emerged as a major policy issue. In responding to this controversial policy issue, many state legislatures demonstrated unusual behavior. A substantial minority of state legislatures continued to introduce new legislative bills on this topic long after the legal position of the respective state would indicate that the state had articulated a recognized and

SCOTT BARCLAY; SHAUNA FISHER

2008-01-01

203

When Families Present with Concerns about an Adolescent's Experience of Same-Sex Attraction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the American Association for Marital and Family Therapy's Code of Ethics to explore ways in which marriage and family therapists can provide services within the framework of existing ethical principles and standards for accountability and professionalism to families with an adolescent child experiencing same-sex attraction. (Author/MKA)

Yarhouse, Mark A.

1998-01-01

204

Children of Same-Sex Parents: In and out of the Closet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An estimated 14 million children are parented by gay or lesbian couples. Research indicates that children of same-sex parents are as well adjusted as their peers of opposite-sex parents. However, previous research has yet to examine how these youth negotiate their own process of coming out about their families to others. We sought to identify the…

Hart, Juliet E.; Mourot, Jon E.; Aros, Megan

2012-01-01

205

Free Votes, MPs, and Constituents: The Case of Same-Sex Marriage in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the summer of 2005, with the passage of the Civil Marriage Act, Canada became the third country to extend full rights to same-sex marriages. This article explores passage of the CMA, focusing on parliamentary voting behavior on the free vote used in the House of Commons. Using multivariate empirical analysis we find unusually strong evidence of constituency characteristics influencing

L. Marvin Overby; Christopher Raymond; Zeynep Taydas

2011-01-01

206

Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study  

PubMed Central

Background While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among this sample and examine how they change over time. The study focuses specifically on two key areas missing from the current literature: factors supporting resilience in same-sex parented families; and health and wellbeing outcomes for same-sex couples who undergo separation, including the negotiation of shared parenting arrangements post-separation. The current paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the design and methods of this longitudinal study and discuss its significance. Methods/Design The Work, Love, Play study is a mixed design, three wave, longitudinal cohort study of same-sex attracted parents. The sample includes lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents in Australia and New Zealand (including single parents within these categories) caring for any children under the age of 18 years. The study will be conducted over six years from 2008 to 2014. Quantitative data are to be collected via three on-line surveys in 2008, 2010 and 2012 from the cohort of parents recruited in Wave1. Qualitative data will be collected via interviews with purposively selected subsamples in 2012 and 2013. Data collection began in 2008 and 355 respondents to Wave One of the study have agreed to participate in future surveys. Work is currently underway to increase this sample size. The methods and survey instruments are described. Discussion This study will make an important contribution to the existing research on same-sex parented families. Strengths of the study design include the longitudinal method, which will allow understanding of changes over time within internal family relationships and social supports. Further, the mixed method design enables triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data. A broad recruitment strategy has already enabled a large sample size with the inclusion of both gay men and lesbians. PMID:20211027

2010-01-01

207

Effect of Same-Sex Marriage Laws on Health Care Use and Expenditures in Sexual Minority Men: A Quasi-Natural Experiment  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We sought to determine whether health care use and expenditures among gay and bisexual men were reduced following the enactment of same-sex marriage laws in Massachusetts in 2003. Methods. We used quasi-experimental, prospective data from 1211 sexual minority male patients in a community-based health center in Massachusetts. Results. In the 12 months after the legalization of same-sex marriage, sexual minority men had a statistically significant decrease in medical care visits (mean = 5.00 vs mean = 4.67; P = .05; Cohen's d = 0.17), mental health care visits (mean = 24.72 vs mean = 22.20; P = .03; Cohen's d = 0.35), and mental health care costs (mean = $2442.28 vs mean = $2137.38; P = .01; Cohen's d = 0.41), compared with the 12 months before the law change. These effects were not modified by partnership status, indicating that the health effect of same-sex marriage laws was similar for partnered and nonpartnered men. Conclusions. Policies that confer protections to same-sex couples may be effective in reducing health care use and costs among sexual minority men. PMID:22390442

Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Kenneth; Safren, Steven; Bradford, Judith

2012-01-01

208

Adolescent Same-Sex Attraction and Academic Outcomes: The Role of School Attachment and Engagement  

PubMed Central

Schools create environments in which some sexual feelings, behaviors, and relationships are stigmatized, and this may have negative consequences for adolescents with nonheterosexual romantic attractions. This stigma can lead them to withdraw and disengage from school at a critical time of preparation for adulthood, which can compromise opportunities for future success. Previous research has demonstrated that sexual minority youth report greater levels of school-related problems, including a weaker sense of attachment to school and more trouble with teachers and peers. This lack of social integration is likely to affect their educational success. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and the newly collected Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement study provide the first opportunity to fully explore whether and to what extent same-sex attracted youth enter adulthood with an educational disadvantage. In this study, we examine (1) whether same-sex attracted adolescents have lower levels of academic success, (2) if their lower academic success is explained by a lack of social integration at school, and (3) whether these relationships differ for boys and girls. Results suggest that same-sex attracted students, particularly boys, do suffer academically, and that this is in part a result of school-related problems and risk factors such as emotional distress and substance use; however, a great deal of the disadvantage fails to be explained by these factors. Additionally, while same-sex attracted boys show poorer academic performance, same-sex attracted girls do not, suggesting that gender may shape how sexual minority youth experience and respond to marginalizing school environments PMID:20221417

Pearson, Jennifer; Muller, Chandra; Wilkinson, Lindsey

2010-01-01

209

Development and validation of the attitudes toward same-sex marriage scale.  

PubMed

This research details the development of a new instrument designed to measure attitudes toward same-sex marriage. Participants were 615 heterosexual women and men, drawn from both student and nonstudent adult populations. Four studies were conducted for the purpose of developing the scale and to establish its psychometric properties. The resulting Attitudes Toward Same-Sex Marriage Scale (ATSM) consists of 17 items, has a one-dimensional factor structure, and exhibits a high degree of reliability. Additional analyses established the construct validity of the ATSM where ATSM scores were highly correlated with scores on the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale (Herek, 1988). ATSM scores followed predicted correlational patterns with select demographics, including educational attainment, religiosity, and political conservatism. The usefulness of this new measure in survey research is discussed. PMID:18032289

Pearl, Marcia L; Galupo, M Paz

2007-01-01

210

Perceptions of and Experience With System Responses to Female Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence  

PubMed Central

Female same-sex intimate partner violence (FSSIPV) is a significant problem that affects the physical and mental health and the safety of sexual minority women. A mixed-methods study was conducted to (a) identify risk and protective factors for victimization and perpetration of repeat violence in abusive same-sex relationships and (b) examine participant experiences with system responses (by domestic violence services, criminal justice systems, and health care services) to FSSIPV. The purpose of the article is to report the findings from the qualitative component (e.g., focus groups and individual interviews) of the parent study that are specific to survivors’ perceptions of and experiences with domestic violence services, criminal justice systems, and health care services. The findings indicate a significant need across all systems for increased awareness, enhanced understanding, and provision of services specific to survivors of FSSIPV. PMID:21278817

Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Lucea, Marguerite B.; Glass, Nancy

2011-01-01

211

Moving from ambivalence to certainty: older same-sex couples marry in Canada.  

PubMed

A qualitative study, within a life course perspective, explored the transition into marriage for mid- to later-life same-sex couples. Twenty individuals (representing 11 couples) were interviewed - 12 lesbians, seven gay men, and one bisexual man. At the time of their marriages, participants were between 42 and 72 years old (average age: 54) and had been with their partners from six months to 19 years (average: 7.5 years). Three processes highlighted the ways in which these same-sex couples' experiences of deciding to marry were influenced by their life course experiences. First, individuals had to integrate marriage into their psyches (integration). Second, they had to consider why they would marry their specific partner (rationale). Third, the study participants demonstrated how their experiences of wedding planning and their wedding characteristics were imbued with intentionality as a result of lifetime experiences of homophobia and/or heterosexism (intentionality). PMID:23701954

Humble, Áine M

2013-06-01

212

Sexually selected behaviour: red squirrel males search for reproductive success.  

PubMed

1. Differential male reproductive success is commonplace in mammals and frequently attributed to variation in morphological traits that provide individuals with a competitive advantage in female defence mating systems. Other mammalian mating systems, however, have received comparatively little attention and correlates of male reproductive success in them are less well understood. 2. We studied a free-ranging population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus Erxleben) exhibiting year-round individual territoriality. Males must temporarily vacate their territories to locate spatially dispersed receptive females, thereby setting the stage for a scramble competition mating system. 3. We predicted that both male annual mating success (measured as the number of females copulated with) and annual reproductive success (measured as the number of offspring sired) would be positively correlated with both search ability (measured as the number of oestrous females located over the mating season) and effort (measured as mating season home range size), generating directional sexual selection on these two metrics. 4. Mating season home ranges of males showed, on average, an almost 10-fold increase relative to those measured during the nonmating season, while those of females showed a more moderate twofold increase and both annual mating and reproductive success of males was positively correlated with search ability and search effort. 5. The spatial dispersion of females, resulting from the strict territorial social structure of red squirrels, gave rise to a predicted scramble competition mating system. Furthermore, the strength of sexual selection on behavioural traits in this mating system equalled previous estimates for morphological traits in female defence mating systems. PMID:19040682

Lane, Jeffrey E; Boutin, Stan; Gunn, Melissa R; Coltman, David W

2009-03-01

213

A Comparison of Relationship Satisfaction, Social Support, and Stress Between Women with First and Prior Same-Sex Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this Internet-based study was to determine differences between women in their first same-sex relationships and women who have had same-sex relationships prior to their current relationship. Participants included 754 women within the United States and Canada who were at least 18 years of age and were in an ongoing same-sex relationship of at least six months. Women

Teresa Reeves; Sharon G. Horne

2009-01-01

214

‘Live your liberation – don't lobby for it’: Australian queer student activists' perspectives of same-sex marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

One topic covered in Australian queer university student print media is the legalization of same-sex marriage. The legalization of same-sex marriage is currently generating much debate in Western queer communities. This paper explores Australian queer university student activists' media representation of same-sex marriage, and the debates surrounding its legalization. It uses discourse analysis to examine a selection of queer student

Jessica Rodgers

2010-01-01

215

The Disproportionate Impact of Antigay Family Policies on Black and Latino Same-sex Couple Households  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the racial dynamics of antigay activism, and the particular, disproportionate impact of antigay family\\u000a policies on Black and Latino same-sex couple families. Starting in the mid-1990s, antigay activists have passed dozens of\\u000a laws and constitutional amendments banning and repealing state recognition of gay and lesbian relationships. For two decades\\u000a the antigay movement has portrayed sexual orientation nondiscrimination

Sean Cahill

2009-01-01

216

Emotional closeness in mexican-origin adolescents' relationships with mothers, fathers, and same-sex friends.  

PubMed

Research on the associations between parent-adolescent relationships and friendships among Latinos is limited. Drawing on developmental and ecological perspectives, we examined bidirectional associations between parental warmth and friendship intimacy with same-sex peers from early to late adolescence using a longitudinal cross-lag panel design. Parent-adolescent immigration status and adolescent gender were examined as moderators of these associations. Home interviews were conducted with 246 Mexican American adolescents (51 % female) when they were in early (M = 12.55; SD = .60 years), middle (M = 14.64; SD = .59 years), and late adolescence (M = 17.67; SD = .57 years). Modest declines in paternal warmth were evident from early to late adolescence, but maternal warmth was high and stable across this time period. Girls' intimacy with same-sex friends also was high and stable from early to late adolescence, but boys' intimacy with same-sex friends increased over this time period. In general, findings revealed that adolescents' perceptions of parents' warmth in early adolescence were associated positively with friendship intimacy in middle adolescence, and friendship intimacy in middle adolescence was associated positively with parental warmth in late adolescence. Some associations were moderated by adolescent gender and parent-adolescent immigration status. For example, there was an association from maternal warmth in early adolescence to friendship intimacy in late adolescence only for immigrant youth. These findings suggest that among Mexican American adolescents, their relationships with their mothers, fathers, and same-sex friends are intertwined closely and that gender and immigration status shape some of these associations during adolescence. PMID:23999997

Rodríguez, Sue A; Perez-Brena, Norma J; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

2014-12-01

217

Same-Sex and Cross-Sex Help Exchanges in the Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

For this study, we combined interviews and naturalistic observations of the same children to examine same-sex and cross-sex help exchanges in reading and math classes among third- and fifth-grade boys and girls. Overall, girls were perceived by their classmates to be more academically competent and more likable as helpers than were boys. Nevertheless, girls were not the targets of cross-sex

Sharon A. Nelson-le Gall; Peggy A. DeCooke

1987-01-01

218

Same-sex patterns and sex differences in the trust-value basis of children's friendship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty-six children in fourth grade were required (a) to report the secret-sharing, secret-keeping, promise-making, and promise-keeping behaviors of classroom peers; and (b) to judge those classmates on trust and friendship. Teachers provided observations of the children's friendship interaction. Same-sex patterns were found in observed friendship, friendship ratings, trust, secrets shared, proportion of secrets kept, and promises made. These were less

Ken J. Rotenberg

1986-01-01

219

Pathways to Political Activism among Americans who have Same-Sex Sexual Contact  

Microsoft Academic Search

Empirical systematic studies on political activism among self-identified sexual minorities are sparse and underdeveloped.\\u000a When using three waves of a random national survey of respondents who have sex with people of the same sex (N?=?184), this study tested the predictive capabilities of “resource,” “framing,” and “network” theories of political participation.\\u000a After running discriminant analysis regressions for electoral and protest activities,

Eric Swank; Breanne Fahs

2011-01-01

220

Young Women's Narratives of Same-Sex Sexual Desire in Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to investigate young women's retrospective narratives of their experiences of same-sex sexual desire in adolescence. Seven women aged 19–25 were interviewed. An across-narrative analysis was conducted, producing five major themes. It is anticipated that this research will help to redress the missing discourse of desire in social constructions of younger women's sexuality and contribute

Corinne Logan; Marla Buchanan

2008-01-01

221

Internalized Sexual Minority Stressors and Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious problem in both same-sex and heterosexual relationships. Although there are numerous\\u000a similarities in the dynamics of IPV, gay men and lesbians experience unique stressors related to their sexual minority status.\\u000a This preliminary, descriptive study examined the relationship among internalized homophobia, stigma consciousness, and openness\\u000a to self-reported IPV victimization and perpetration. Among 581 men

Amana F. Carvalho; Robin J. Lewis; Valerian J. Derlega; Barbara A. Winstead; Claudia Viggiano

222

An analysis of factors affecting attitudes toward same-sex marriage: do the media matter?  

PubMed

Using a survey of more than 5,000 American consumers, this study examines connections between attitudes toward same-sex marriage and media consumption. A positive attitude is predicted by being liberal and less religious, supporting gender and racial equality, willing to try anything once, considering television the primary form of entertainment, watching political talk shows, and reading blogs. The theoretical and methodological contributions and real-world implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:22029563

Lee, Tien-Tsung; Hicks, Gary R

2011-01-01

223

“I Kissed A Girl”: Heterosexual Women Who Report Same-Sex Kissing (and More)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, analysis of survey data from 436 self-identified heterosexual females from two southeastern universities reveals that almost half (47.9%) reported having kissed another woman out of sexual experimentation\\/curiosity, almost one-third (31.3%) reported having had a sexual dream of being with another woman, and almost one-fourth (23.2%) reported having had a sexual fantasy of being with another woman. Same-sex

David Knox; Tiffany Beaver; Vaiva Kriskute

2011-01-01

224

Not My Marriage: Third-Person Perception and the Effects of Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Third-person perception (TPP) refers to the belief that others are more influenced by the media than you yourself are. This theory was extended to people’s perceptions of the effects of legalizing same-sex marriage (SSM). It was predicted that people might believe that legalizing SSM would affect others’ marriages, but not their own. It was also predicted that high right-wing authoritarians

Matthew P. Winslow; Rexéna Napier

2012-01-01

225

Religious Opposition to Same-Sex Marriage in Canada: Limits to Multiculturalism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The case of the opposition to legalizing same-sex marriage in Canada is an example of the limits of what will and will not\\u000a be tolerated in the name of multiculturalism. This case offers an interesting perspective on the topic of multiculturalism,\\u000a because it deals with a conflict between those seeking to expand human rights and those seeking to prevent such

Laura Reidel

2009-01-01

226

Same-sex marriage, sodomy laws, and the sexual lives of young people  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gains for lesbian and gay adults demanding the rights to privacy and marriage that they consider their due as U.S. citizens\\u000a do not hold the same promise for young people. Both the 2003 Lawrence v. Texas Supreme Court decision and 2004 successes of the same-sex marriage movement in the United States fail to alter the oppressive\\u000a social conditions in which

Jessica Fields

2004-01-01

227

Herbert Blumer's Theory of Collective Definition and the Battle Over Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the context of Herbert Blumer's seminal work, “Social Problems as Collective Behavior,” symbolic interaction theory is synopsized and then applied to explore the emergence of same-sex marriage as an issue in American legal and legislative systems. Since 1965, a series of key U.S. Supreme Court decisions has more fully defined constitutionally guaranteed rights of privacy, equal protection, and self-determination.

Walter S. Knauff

2007-01-01

228

Obama to Blame? Minority Surge Voters and the Ban on Same-Sex Marriage in Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Did Barack Obama?s successful candidacy for President in 2008 contribute to the passage of Florida?s Amendment 2 by turning out newly registered African Americans who voted for Obama and then cast ballots in favor of constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage? If one looks at reportage by in the mainstream media, punditry in the blogosphere, and self-reflection within the gay community

Daniel Smith; Stephanie Slade

229

Litigating Same-Sex Marriage: Might the Courts Actually Be Bastions of Rationality?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The great political philosopher John Stuart Mill once asked, “Was there any domination which did not appear natural to those that possessed it?” (Mill 1984, 269–270). For same-sex couples seeking access to the institution of marriage, the public sense that marriage is naturally and obviously meant only for opposite-sex couples has been a formidable barrier. The first state supreme courts

Evan Gerstmann

2005-01-01

230

Same-sex sexual harassment: How the “equal opportunity harasser” became a legitimate defense  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides a quick history of sexual-harassment law and looks at the appellate-court opinions that came before the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in a same-sex sexual-harassment case. That latter decision has given rise to the relatively novel equal-opportunity-harasser defense, whereby harassing conduct directed at both men and women, no matter how outrageous, may not be unlawful at all. The

David S. Sherwyn; Ezekiel A. Kaufman; Adam A. Klausner

2000-01-01

231

Female same-sex families in the dialectics of marginality and conformity.  

PubMed

The article discusses the continuum between the personal and public roles of families, where two women parent together in Slovenia, against the background of the current marginal position of same-sex families in regard to rights and symbolic status, in claiming the position of same-sex parenting in the context of family models as well as in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) movement agendas. It briefly outlines the situation in Slovenia in regard to homosexuality, and then moves to discussing the outcomes of the processes and experiences of lesbian mothers that are transgressing the borders of parental and homosexual identities. These outcomes are: "justifying" and demonstrating the "appropriateness" of family life in non-heteronormative families, constructing strategies for claiming a joint parental identity, and building a sense of belonging by forming a community that is both homosexual and parental. The article draws extensively on the lived (motherhood) experiences and stories of families where parents are two female partners and reads them as negotiating a constantly shifting place between a marginal status in the broader society and a conformist character in the perspective of their non-normative sexuality. In the article, it is recognized that same-sex families in Slovenia are entering the political agenda and are thus involved in transforming both contexts-the family and homosexual identities. PMID:21774603

Sobo?an, Ana Marija

2011-01-01

232

Associations between relationship quality and depressive symptoms in same-sex couples.  

PubMed

Extending research based on different-sex (i.e., heterosexual) couples, the authors explored associations between romantic relationship quality and depressive symptoms in a geographically diverse sample (N = 571) of U.S. adults in same-sex relationships. The authors also examined whether this association was moderated by individual characteristics (gender, age, and internalized heterosexism) or relationship factors (relationship length, commitment, and interdependence). Results indicated a moderate negative association between relationship quality and depressive symptoms, echoing findings from different-sex couples. This association was not moderated by gender, age, internalized heterosexism, or relationship length. In contrast, commitment and interdependence did demonstrate moderating effects. Although the negative association between relationship quality and depressive symptoms was present at all levels of commitment and interdependence, it was amplified at higher commitment and interdependence levels. In general, findings contribute to a growing literature suggesting many commonalities between same-sex and opposite sex couples. Specifically, they suggest the importance of relationship quality to the emotional well-being of LGBT adults, supporting clinical interventions and social policies that promote healthy and stable same-sex relationships. PMID:25000131

Whitton, Sarah W; Kuryluk, Amanda D

2014-08-01

233

?AD? Hybrids of Cryptococcus neoformans: Evidence of Same-Sex Mating in Nature and Hybrid Fitness  

PubMed Central

Cryptococcus neoformans is a ubiquitous human fungal pathogen that causes meningoencephalitis in predominantly immunocompromised hosts. The fungus is typically haploid, and sexual reproduction involves two individuals with opposite mating types/sexes, ? and a. However, the overwhelming predominance of mating type (MAT) ? over a in C. neoformans populations limits ?–a mating in nature. Recently it was discovered that C. neoformans can undergo same-sex mating under laboratory conditions, especially between ? isolates. Whether same-sex mating occurs in nature and contributes to the current population structure was unknown. In this study, natural ?AD? hybrids that arose by fusion between two ? cells of different serotypes (A and D) were identified and characterized, providing definitive evidence that same-sex mating occurs naturally. A novel truncated allele of the mating-type-specific cell identity determinant SXI1? was also identified as a genetic factor likely involved in this process. In addition, laboratory-constructed ?AD? strains exhibited hybrid vigor both in vitro and in vivo, providing a plausible explanation for their relative abundance in nature despite the fact that AD hybrids are inefficient in meiosis/sporulation and are trapped in the diploid state. These findings provide insights on the origins, genetic mechanisms, and fitness impact of unisexual hybridization in the Cryptococcus population. PMID:17953489

Lin, Xiaorong; Litvintseva, Anastasia P; Nielsen, Kirsten; Patel, Sweta; Floyd, Anna; Mitchell, Thomas G; Heitman, Joseph

2007-01-01

234

Behavioural surveillance of sexually-related risk behaviours of the Chinese male general population in Hong Kong: A benchmark study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the study was to establish a behavioural surveillance system (BSS) for sexually-related risk behaviours of the Hong Kong adult male general population. Benchmark data were obtained by interviewing 1,020 male respondents, age 18 to 60. The results showed that: (1) 14% of the respondents had engaged in commercial sex in the past six months, (2) 27% of

J. T. F. Lau; P. C. Siah

2001-01-01

235

A polycystic kidney-disease gene homologue required for male mating behaviour in C. elegans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stereotyped mating behaviour of the Caenorhabditis elegans male is made up of several substeps: response, backing, turning, vulva location, spicule insertion and sperm transfer. The complexity of this behaviour is reflected in the sexually dimorphic anatomy and nervous system. Behavioural functions have been assigned to most of the male-specific sensory neurons by means of cell ablations; for example, the

Maureen M. Barr; Paul W. Sternberg

1999-01-01

236

Testosterone correlates of mate guarding, singing and aggressive behaviour in male barn swallows, Hirundo rustica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sexual and social behaviour in male birds is largely controlled by gonadal secretions, most notably testosterone. In this paper the relationships between natural testosterone plasma concentrations and mate guarding, singing and rates of aggression in male barn swallows are reported. Behaviour of individually marked male swallows was observed in three breeding colonies. Individual mate-guarding rate was positively correlated with individual

N. SAINO; A. P. MØLLER

1995-01-01

237

Primary and Secondary Socialization Impacts on Support for Same-Sex Marriage after Legalization in the Netherlands  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two years after the legalization of same-sex marriages in the Netherlands, 65% of the Dutch population largely or completely disagrees with the statement "gay marriage should be abolished." This article shows, by way of multinomial logistic regression analysis of survey data, which socializing agents influence one's attitude toward same-sex

Lubbers, Marcel; Jaspers, Eva; Ultee, Wout

2009-01-01

238

Same-sex Relationships and the Full Faith and Credit Clause: Reducing America to the Lowest Common Denominator  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Article examines the legal and policy implications that arise when a state that expressly prohibits recognition or enforcement of any rights arising from a same-sex relationship is confronted with a request to register and enforce a child custody order issued by another state that gives custody or visitation rights to a biological mother's former same-sex partner. As more states

Rena M Lindevaldsen

2009-01-01

239

Referenda and the District of Columbia's Human Rights Act: Voting on Same-Sex Marriage in the Nation's Capital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beginning with Massachusetts in 2003, the courts and legislatures of many states have had to decide whether same-sex marriage is or should be a fundamental right under their respective constitutions. Although only five states and the District of Columbia legally perform same-sex marriages, a few other jurisdictions are in the process of proposing laws moving in that direction. However, the

Jacob Stewart

2011-01-01

240

Is the union civil? Same-sex marriages, civil unions, domestic partnerships and reciprocal benefits in the USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The legal recognition of same-sex relationships has been a legislative Gordian knot for almost three decades in the United States of America. Few issues have been so polarising as the debate surrounding the opening of marriage to same-sex couples. The aim of this article is to provide a clear picture of the current state of affairs in the United States

I. Curry-Sumner; Scott Curry-Sumner

2008-01-01

241

Members of the Wedding: The Psychological Impact of the Legalization of Same-Sex Marriage in Massachusetts  

Microsoft Academic Search

On May 17, 2004, same-sex marriage was legalized in the commonwealth of Massachusetts. This event had a profound impact not only on the legal status of same-sex couples but also on our emotional and psychic lives. With the option to marry legally comes a set of internal conflicts about belonging and rejection that many of us began to encounter more

Cara A. Segal; Stacey L. Novack

2008-01-01

242

The Impact of the Print Media on the Timing and Direction of Government Action on Same Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

As public opinion has become more supportive of lesbian and gay rights some states have recognized same sex marriage. In this paper we seek to evaluate the relationship between mass media slant, public attitudes and state action. We measure newspaper opinion and state level public opinion on same sex marriage. And we employ statistical methods to determine whether state courts

Scott Barclay; Daniel Chomsky

243

‘Why is our love an issue?’: same-sex marriage and the racial politics of the ordinary  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article analyzes the implicit white racial normativity underpinning the socio-legal struggle for same-sex marriage in Canada. I argue that discursive representations of ‘ordinary lives’ require alignment with terms of neoliberal citizenship – the privacy of property and intimacy – that hold whiteness as the unspoken yet aspirational ideal. As a contestation of heteronormative citizenship, same-sex marriage is not simply

Suzanne Lenon

2011-01-01

244

Young men's perspectives on family support and disclosure of same-sex attraction  

PubMed Central

Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) face myriad challenges when deciding to disclose their sexual orientation to family members. Key to this decision is consideration of how disclosure may influence the support they receive from family. This paper explores a diverse sample of YMSM’s (N = 43) perspectives on disclosure of their same-sex attractions to key family members and its impact on family support. Several stages/categories of disclosure are described and some YMSM seemed to continue to move between categories. Additionally, relationships after disclosure included negotiations between the expression of their sexual orientation and the maintenance of family support. PMID:21423842

Carpineto, Julie; Kubicek, Katrina; Weiss, George; Iverson, Ellen; Kipke, Michele D

2011-01-01

245

Exposure of embryos to an aromatization inhibitor increases copulatory behaviour of male quail.  

PubMed

This experiment examined the possibility that endogenous embryonic androgen contributes to sexual differentiation of behaviour in male or female quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica ), and that it does so via aromatization (conversion to oestrogen). Eggs were injected on day 9 of incubation with oil or ATD (an aromatization inhibitor). As adults, males and females were exposed to short days, injected with testosterone propionate, tested for male-typical behaviour, then injected with oestradiol benzoate and tested for female-typical receptivity. ATD increased the level of male-typical copulatory behaviour in males. Male-typical behaviour in females was not affected, nor was female-typical behaviour in either sex. Thus normal male quail are actually slightly demasculinized by their own androgen during embryonic development, and this process is mediated by aromatization. PMID:24895921

Adkins-Regan, E

1985-08-01

246

Eating behaviours in youths: A comparison between female and male athletes and non-athletes.  

PubMed

This study compared the different factors associated with eating behaviors among young female and male athletes and non-athletes. A total of 580 female and male athletes and 362 female and male non-athletes between 10 and 19 years old participated. We used the subscales of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) to evaluate the factors associated with unhealthy eating behaviors. We found higher scores for females on the diet subscale compared with males, regardless of athletic group (P?male athletes (P?males were more likely to engage in binge eating compared with athletes of the same sex (P?males, regardless of athletic group (P?

Fortes, L de S; Kakeshita, I S; Almeida, S S; Gomes, A R; Ferreira, M E C

2014-02-01

247

Disclosure of same-sex behavior by young Chinese migrant men: context and correlates.  

PubMed

The purpose of the study is to explore the disclosure of same-sex behavior by men who have sex with men (MSM) to different groups of people (i.e. family, friends, coworkers, and doctors) and the associated sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychosocial factors. A self-administered survey was conducted among 307 migrant MSM, aged 18-30, in Beijing in 2009. Most MSM disclosed their same-sex behavior to friends (69%), followed by family (25%), coworkers (25%), and doctors (24%). Factors associated with disclosure to friends included higher levels of perceived stigma, social capital and acculturation in Beijing, and suspecting partner to have a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Factors associated with disclosure to family included lower levels of internalized stigma, higher levels of acculturation in Beijing, and both risk and protective behavioral factors. MSM who disclosed to coworkers reported having worked in more cities, living with coworkers, and lower levels of social capital in Beijing. Disclosure to doctors was related to STD infection, sex partner, and sociodemographic factors. Results indicated that selective disclosure by MSM was situational and context-based. Future HIV/STD intervention needs to take into account factors relevant to their selective disclosure to different audiences. PMID:23654216

Guo, Yan; Li, Xiaoming; Liu, Yinjie; Jiang, Shuling; Tu, Xiaoming

2014-01-01

248

Psychological distress, well-being, and legal recognition in same-sex couple relationships.  

PubMed

Legal recognition of same-sex couple relationships provides at least some material benefits to couple members; however, few studies have examined the associations between legal recognition and psychological distress or well-being. Using an online survey sample of 2,677 lesbian, gay, bisexual (LGB) individuals, participants were placed in 4 groups: single, dating, in a committed relationship, and in a legally recognized relationship. Analyses revealed that participants in committed or legally recognized relationships reported less psychological distress (i.e., internalized homophobia, depressive symptoms, and stress) and more well-being (i.e., the presence of meaning in life) than single participants. Significant group differences and multivariate analyses indicated that participants in a legally recognized relationship reported less internalized homophobia, fewer depressive symptoms, lower levels of stress, and more meaning in their lives than those in committed relationships, even after controlling for other factors. The need for further research on the psychological benefits of legal relationship recognition for same-sex couples is discussed. PMID:20175612

Riggle, Ellen D B; Rostosky, Sharon S; Horne, Sharon G

2010-02-01

249

Individual consistency in exploratory behaviour and mating tactics in male guppies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While behavioural plasticity is considered an adaptation to fluctuating social and environmental conditions, many animals also display a high level of individual consistency in their behaviour over time or across contexts (generally termed ‘personality’). However, studies of animal personalities that include sexual behaviour, or functionally distinct but correlated traits, are relatively scarce. In this study, we tested for individual behavioural consistency in courtship and exploratory behaviour in male guppies ( Poecilia reticulata) in two light environments (high vs. low light intensity). Based on previous work on guppies, we predicted that males would modify their behaviour from sneak mating tactics to courtship displays under low light conditions, but also that the rank orders of courtship effort would remain unchanged (i.e. highly sexually active individuals would display relatively high levels of courtship under both light regimes). We also tested for correlations between courtship and exploratory behaviour, predicting that males that had high display rates would also be more likely to approach a novel object. Although males showed significant consistency in their exploratory and mating behaviour over time (1 week), we found no evidence that these traits constituted a behavioural syndrome. Furthermore, in contrast to previous work, we found no overall effect of the light environment on any of the behaviours measured, although males responded to the treatment on an individual-level basis, as reflected by a significant individual-by-environment interaction. The future challenge is to investigate how individual consistency across different environmental contexts relates to male reproductive success.

Kelley, Jennifer L.; Phillips, Samuel C.; Evans, Jonathan P.

2013-10-01

250

Dispelling "heterosexual African AIDS" in Namibia: same-sex sexuality in the township of Katutura.  

PubMed

This paper questions international public health theories that characterize AIDS in Africa as an unambiguous heterosexual epidemic. It does so by describing the daily sexual lives of a community of Namibian youth who engage in same-sex sexual practices. The author outlines how the ongoing vilification of "homosexuals" by ruling State officials serves as a stigmatizing backdrop against which young people experience and practice their sexuality. Drawing upon 20 months of ethnographic research, the paper discusses the HIV sexual risk perceptions and practices of young men, highlighting the complexities in sexual subjectivity that form within the cultural politics of competing masculinities, state-sponsored anti-homosexual rhetoric and transnational queer rights protest. Bounded and monolithic notions of gender and sexual identity do not lend themselves to HIV risk and vulnerability analysis in this community. PMID:16923647

Lorway, Robert

2006-01-01

251

Overcoming bias toward same-sex couples: a case study from inside an MFT ethics classroom.  

PubMed

This article illustrates a teaching case in which a marriage and family therapy (MFT) trainee learned to develop cultural sensitivity toward same-sex couples despite religious beliefs that put her at risk of discriminating against that population. The case took place during a marriage and family therapy ethics course in the spring of 2003. From two first-person perspectives, the authors illustrate the processes that facilitated the student's change, addressing the class activities, discussions, and pivotal moments of teaching and learning that promoted the student's cultural competency and helped her to resolve this personal and ethical dilemma. A set of classroom techniques (creating a safe environment, using a stance of curiosity, finding alternative learning formats, extrapolating ideas from multiple sources, and capitalizing on students' experiences outside of class) used in the case are detailed throughout the article. PMID:16094815

Charlés, Laurie L; Thomas, Dina; Thornton, Matthew L

2005-07-01

252

Female meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) demonstrate same-sex partner preferences.  

PubMed

Female meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) are territorial during warm months but demonstrate social tolerance under low temperatures. In spring, females nest together and some pairs participate in communal nursing and rearing of young. Because communal nursing involves significant cooperation, selective pair-bonds may develop between 2 nestmates. Using a choice apparatus, the authors determined that (a) captive females demonstrated partner preferences for a nestmate; (b) partner preferences were enduring and persisted after dyadic separation; and (c) following the loss of a nestmate, females did not develop preferences for a new nestmate, even after extended cohabitation. Data support the hypothesis that captive meadow voles develop selective and enduring same-sex social bonds that may, under free-living conditions, facilitate communal nesting and cooperative rearing of young. PMID:14498804

Parker, Karen J; Lee, Theresa M

2003-09-01

253

The Effects Of Unequal Access To Health Insurance For Same-Sex Couples In California  

PubMed Central

Inequities in marriage laws and domestic partnership benefits may have implications for who bears the burden of health care costs. We examined a recent period in California to illuminate disparities in health insurance coverage faced by same-sex couples. Partnered gay men are less than half as likely (42 percent) as married heterosexual men to get employer-sponsored dependent coverage, and partnered lesbians have an even slimmer chance (28 percent) of getting dependent coverage compared to married heterosexual women. As a result of these much lower rates of employer-provided coverage, partnered lesbians and gay men are more than twice as likely to be uninsured as married heterosexuals. The exclusion of gay men and women from civil marriage and the failure of domestic partnership benefits to provide insurance parity contribute to unequal access to health coverage, with the probable result that more health spending is pushed onto these individuals and onto the public. PMID:20576694

Ponce, Ninez A.; Cochran, Susan D.; Pizer, Jennifer C.; Mays, Vickie M.

2013-01-01

254

Psychiatric Symptoms and Same-Sex Sexual Attraction and Behavior in Light of Childhood Gender Atypical Behavior and Parental Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores the relation between the level of current symptoms of depression and anxiety and recalled childhood gender atypical behavior (GAB), and quality of relationships with parents among men and women who reported same-sex sexual attraction or engaged in same-sex sexual behavior and men and women who did not. Matched pairs, 79 men (n = 158) and 148 women (n = 296), with

Katarina Alanko; Pekka Santtila; Katarina Witting; Markus Varjonen; Patrik Jern; Ada Johansson; Bettina von der Pahlen; N. Kenneth Sandnabba

2009-01-01

255

Interstate Recognition of Same-Sex Parents in the Wake of Gay Marriage, Civil Unions, and Domestic Partnerships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Article examines the parental rights of a same-sex partner\\/spouse who is neither biologically related to, nor an adoptive parent of, a child being raised by the couple. Using a hypothetical example of a same-sex couple with one child, this Article explores whether the parental rights granted to a non-biological parent by marriage, civil union, or domestic partnership can and

Deborah L Forman

2004-01-01

256

Same-Sex Relationships and the Full Faith and Credit Clause: Reducing America to the Lowest Common Denominator  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Article examines the legal and policy implications that arise when a state that expressly prohibits recognition or enforcement of any rights arising from a same-sex relationship is confronted with a request to register and enforce a child custody order issued by another state that gives custody or visitation rights to a biological mother’s former same-sex partner. As more states

Rena M. Lindevaldsen

2009-01-01

257

A Critical Appraisal of Assimilationist and Radical Ideologies Underlying Same-Sex Marriage in LGBT Communities in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Debates over same-sex marriage have reached the main stage of contemporary U.S. politics. The purpose of this essay is to identify and examine how sexual ideologies in U.S. LGBT communities inform and influence relationship construction in general and same-sex marriage in particular. To accomplish this, we first discuss the nature of sexual ideologies. Next, we identify current sexual ideologies in

Gust A. Yep; Karen E. Lovaas; John P. Elia

2003-01-01

258

Primary and Secondary Socialization Impacts on Support for Same-Sex Marriage After Legalization in the Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two years after the legalization of same-sex marriages in the Netherlands, 65% of the Dutch population largely or completely disagrees with the statement “gay marriage should be abolished.” This article shows, by way of multinomial logistic regression analysis of survey data, which socializing agents influence one’s attitude toward same-sex marriage after its legalization (FNB2003; N = 2,124). Parents’ attitudes toward

Marcel Lubbers; Eva Jaspers; Wout Ultee

2009-01-01

259

Same-Sex Marriage and Canadian Relationship Recognition—One Step Forward, Two Steps Back: A Critical Liberationist Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reveals how Canadian sexually diverse proponents of same-sex marriage and their allies engaged in a restricted debate based on equality in the lead-up to the legalization of same-sex marriage in Canada. A critical liberationist perspective is injected to expand the narrowed frameworks of this subject. Equality-based arguments are analytically deconstructed, illuminating their implications on Canadian relationship recognition. By

Nick J. Mulé

2010-01-01

260

Beyond Racial Precedents: Loving v. Virginia as an Appropriate Legal Model and Strategy for Same-Sex Marriage Litigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis explores how LGBT marriage activists and lawyers have employed a racial interpretation of due process and equal protection in recent same-sex marriage litigation. Special attention is paid to the Supreme Court's opinion in Loving v. Virginia, the landmark case that declared anti-miscegenation laws unconstitutional. By exploring the use of racial precedent in same-sex marriage litigation and its treatment

Michael J. Csere

2010-01-01

261

Nineteenth-century European psychiatry on same-sex desires: pathology, abnormality, normality and the blurring of boundaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

By interrogating the intellectual foundations of the normal and pathological within nineteenth-century European psychiatry, this article illustrates the extent to which same-sex desires were located on the borderline between the normal and the pathological. First, this article analyses the early-nineteenth-century French and British medical concepts of folie raisonnante, monomania and moral insanity, and their relationship with medical ideas of same-sex

Chiara Beccalossi

2010-01-01

262

Effects of Exogenous Testosterone on Parental Care Behaviours in Male Bluegill Sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus)  

E-print Network

Effects of Exogenous Testosterone on Parental Care Behaviours in Male Bluegill Sunfish (Lepomis of testosterone in paternal care in bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), where males provide both sole defence care, we manipulated testos- terone levels in males using testosterone propionate implants. We

Neff, Bryan D.

263

ACHESS - The Australian study of child health in same-sex families: background research, design and methodology  

PubMed Central

Background There are an increasing number of children in Australia growing up with same-sex attracted parents. Although children from same-sex parent families do in general perform well on many psychosocial measures recent research is beginning to consider some small but significant differences when these children are compared with children from other family backgrounds. In particular studies suggest that there is an association between the stigma that same-sex parent families experience and child wellbeing. Research to date lacks a holistic view with the complete physical, mental and social wellbeing of children not yet addressed. In addition, most studies have focused only on families with lesbian parents and have studied only small numbers of children. Methods/design The Australian Study of Child Health in Same-Sex Families (ACHESS) is a national study that aims to determine the complete physical, mental and social wellbeing of Australian children under the age 18?years with at least one parent who self identifies as being same-sex attracted. There will be a particular focus on the impact that stigma and discrimination has on these families. Parent and child surveys will be used to collect data and will be available both online and in paper form. Measures have been chosen whenever possible that have sound conceptual underpinnings, robust psychometric properties and Australian normative data, and include the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ), the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). Discussion ACHESS aims to be the largest study of its kind and will for the first time produce a detailed quantitative analysis of Australian children with same-sex attracted parents. By inviting participants to take part in further research it will also establish a valuable cohort of children, and their families, to launch future waves of research that will help us better understand the health and wellbeing of children with same-sex attracted parents. PMID:22888859

2012-01-01

264

White Cells Facilitate Opposite- and Same-Sex Mating of Opaque Cells in Candida albicans  

PubMed Central

Modes of sexual reproduction in eukaryotic organisms are extremely diverse. The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans undergoes a phenotypic switch from the white to the opaque phase in order to become mating-competent. In this study, we report that functionally- and morphologically-differentiated white and opaque cells show a coordinated behavior during mating. Although white cells are mating-incompetent, they can produce sexual pheromones when treated with pheromones of the opposite mating type or by physically interacting with opaque cells of the opposite mating type. In a co-culture system, pheromones released by white cells induce opaque cells to form mating projections, and facilitate both opposite- and same-sex mating of opaque cells. Deletion of genes encoding the pheromone precursor proteins and inactivation of the pheromone response signaling pathway (Ste2-MAPK-Cph1) impair the promoting role of white cells (MTLa) in the sexual mating of opaque cells. White and opaque cells communicate via a paracrine pheromone signaling system, creating an environment conducive to sexual mating. This coordination between the two different cell types may be a trade-off strategy between sexual and asexual lifestyles in C. albicans. PMID:25329547

Liang, Weihong; Guan, Guobo; Zhang, Qiuyu; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Huang, Guanghua

2014-01-01

265

The grief experience of same-sex couples within an Irish context: tacit acknowledgement.  

PubMed

This study sought to explore the grief experience of same sex couples. To date, the majority of research in this area has focused on the bereavement experience of individuals whose partner has died from an AIDS/HIV-related illness. The research design used was descriptive exploratory. A multi-pronged sampling strategy was employed to generate participants. Seven people underwent in-depth interviews once the study had received ethical approval. Data were analysed by coding, comparing, and merging codes into higher order themes. Five themes subsequently emerged that captured the essence of the bereavement experience, namely:'tacit acknowledgement'; 'sculpting the distress'; 'multiple losses'; 'seeking support'; and 'journeying anew.' While not all bereaved gay or lesbian partners experience 'disenfranchized grief', particularly if their relationship with the deceased was not hidden, it is clear from the findings of this study that many of the participants did (Doka, 1989;Wallbank, 1998). Health care professionals need to consider their approach to people who identify themselves as gay or lesbian, if they are to provide support structures (formal and informal) to meet their unique needs. PMID:18928134

Glackin, Michelle; Higgins, Agnes

2008-06-01

266

Perceptions of predisposing and protective factors for perinatal depression in same-sex parents.  

PubMed

Increasing numbers of women are choosing to have children in the context of same-sex relationships or as "out" lesbian or bisexual individuals. This study used qualitative methods to assess perceived predisposing and protective factors for perinatal depression in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) women. Two focus groups with LGBQ women were conducted: 1) biological parents of young children and 2) nonbiological parents of young children or whose partners were currently pregnant. Three major themes emerged. Issues related to social support were primary, particularly related to disappointment with the lack of support provided by members of the family of origin. Participants also described issues related to the couple relationship, such as challenges in negotiating parenting roles. Finally, legal and policy barriers (e.g., second parent adoption) were identified as a significant source of stress during the transition to parenthood. Both lack of social support and relationship problems have previously been identified as risk factors for perinatal depression in heterosexual women, and legal and policy barriers may represent a unique risk factor for this population. Therefore, additional study of perinatal mental health among LGBQ women is warranted. PMID:16260356

Ross, Lori E; Steele, Leah; Sapiro, Beth

2005-01-01

267

Ranging behaviour of little bustard males, Tetrax tetrax, in the lekking grounds.  

PubMed

We investigated the ranging behaviour during the breeding season of 18 radiotracked little bustard (Tetrax tetrax) males, a disperse-lekking species inhabiting the cereal pseudo-steppes. The average kernel 95% home range was 60±50 ha and the average cluster 85% area was 17±17 ha. Range structure was as relevant as home range size for explaining the variation in the ranging behaviour of males, which could be partially explained by age, habitat quality and site. Ranging behaviour varied from males defending small and concentrated home ranges with high habitat quality, to males holding larger home ranges composed by several arenas. Our results suggest that social dominance and resource availability may affect ranging behaviour of males during the breeding season. Also, mating systems constraints may play a role on the use of space of males within the lekking ground. The ranging behaviour of a given male may be determined by a tendency to reduce and concentrate the home range as age and social status increase, and several fine-tuning mechanisms adjusting the ranging behaviour to the prevailing environmental or social factors on a given site and year. PMID:22626823

Ponjoan, Anna; Bota, Gerard; Mañosa, Santi

2012-09-01

268

Effects of previous experience on the agonistic behaviour of male crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus.  

PubMed

Male solitary animals frequently enter aggressive interactions with conspecific individuals to protect their territory or to gain access to females. After an agonistic encounter, the loser (subordinate individual) changes its behaviour from aggression to avoidance. We investigated agonistic interactions between pairs of male crickets to understand how dominance is established and maintained. Two naïve males readily entered into agonistic interactions. Fights escalated in a stereotyped manner and were concluded with the establishment of dominance. If individuals were isolated after the first encounter and placed together 15 minutes later, subordinate crickets tended to avoid any further contact with the former dominant opponent. Moreover, subordinate males also avoided unfamiliar dominant and naïve opponents. They displayed aggressive behaviour only towards unfamiliar subordinate opponents. This suggests that the subordinate male change their behaviour depending on the dominance status of the opponent. Dominant crickets, in contrast, displayed aggressive behaviour towards familiar as well as unfamiliar opponents. If the interval between the first and second encounter was longer than 30 minutes, the former subordinate male showed aggressive behaviour again. However, if the subordinate cricket was paired with the same opponent three consecutive times within 45 minutes, it avoided the former dominant opponent for up to 6 hours following the third encounter. Our results suggest that the maintenance of dominance in male crickets depends largely on the behavioural change of subordinate individuals. Possible mechanisms to maintain dominance are discussed. PMID:17116989

Iwasaki, Masazumi; Delago, Antonia; Nishino, Hiroshi; Aonuma, Hitoshi

2006-10-01

269

IMPORTANT BENEFIT UPDATE CONCERNING SAME-SEX SPOUSES The State of Maryland Employee and Retiree Health and Welfare Benefits Program will be  

E-print Network

income. Same sex spouses with a valid marriage certificate will not be required to complete the Domestic and valid marriage certificate within 60 days of the marriage). For a same-sex spouse to be entitledIMPORTANT BENEFIT UPDATE CONCERNING SAME-SEX SPOUSES The State of Maryland Employee and Retiree

Adali, Tulay

270

Altered reproductive behaviours in male mosquitofish living downstream from a sewage treatment plant.  

PubMed

Freshwater environments are common repositories for the discharge of large volumes of domestic and industrial waste, particularly through wastewater effluent. One common group of chemical pollutants present in wastewater are endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which can induce morphological and behavioural changes in aquatic organisms. The aim of this study was to compare the reproductive behaviour and morphology of a freshwater fish, the mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), collected from two sites (wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and a putative pristine site). The mosquitofish is a sexually dimorphic livebearer with a coercive mating system. Males inseminate females using their modified anal fin as an intromittent organ. Despite this, females are able to exert some control over the success of male mating attempts by selectively associating with, or avoiding, certain males over others. Using standard laboratory assays of reproductive behaviour, we found that mosquitofish males living in close proximity to WWTP showed increased mating activity compared to those inhabiting a pristine site. More specifically, during behavioural trials in which males were allowed to interact with females separated by a transparent divider, we found that WWTP-males spent more time associating with females. Concordant with this, when males and females were subsequently allowed to interact freely, WWTP-males also spent more time chasing and orienting towards the females. As a result, females from both sites showed more interest towards the WWTP-site males. Male anal fin morphology, however, did not differ between sites. Our study illustrates that lifetime exposure to WWTP-effluents can greatly affect male behaviour. The results underscore the importance of behaviour as a potential tool for investigating unknown contaminants in the environment. PMID:24569133

Saaristo, Minna; Myers, Jackie; Jacques-Hamilton, Rowan; Allinson, Mayumi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Allinson, Graeme; Pettigrove, Vincent; Wong, Bob B M

2014-04-01

271

Perinatal and chronic hypothyroidism impair behavioural development in male and female rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perinatal and chronic hypothyroidism impair behavioural development in male and female rats. EXP PHYSIOL 00(0) 000-000, 0000. - A lack of thyroid hormone, i.e. hypothyroidism, during early development results in multiple morphological and functional alterations in the developing brain. In the present study, behavioural effects of perinatal and chronic hypothyroidism were assessed during development in both male and female offspring

N. van Wijk; E. Rijntjes; Heijning van de B. J

2008-01-01

272

Same-Sex and Other-Sex Peer Reports: Unique Contributors to Understanding Children’s School Adjustment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study proposed to understand how same-sex and other-sex peer nominations relate differently to teacher reports\\u000a of children’s behaviors and measures of children’s friendships. Students provided peer nominations, mutual friend data, and\\u000a social network data. Teachers rated students’ antisocial behavior and social competence. As expected, other-sex peer social\\u000a preference scores predicted teacher ratings of antisocial behavior, while same-sex peer

Stacy L. Frazier; Marc S. Atkins; Laura Hess Olson; Aaron R. Lyon

2009-01-01

273

Paradoxical effects of chronic corticosterone on forced swim behaviours in aged male and female rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of chronically administered corticosterone on forced swim test and open field test behaviours were explored in aged male and female rats. Though corticosterone has typically been associated with depressive behaviours, recent data have suggested a putative antidepressive effect of corticosterone. The current study used the forced swim test as a model of antidepressant efficacy in order to explore

Lori A. Brotto; Boris B. Gorzalka; Alasdair M. Barr

2001-01-01

274

The Extreme Male Brain Theory and Gender Role Behaviour in Persons with an Autism Spectrum Condition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to the Extreme Male Brain theory persons with autism possess masculinised cognitive traits. In this study masculinisation of gender role behaviour is evaluated in 25 persons with an autism spectrum condition (ASC) and matched controls with gender role behaviour as part of a shortened version of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality…

Stauder, J. E. A.; Cornet, L. J. M.; Ponds, R. W. H. M.

2011-01-01

275

Anxiogenic behaviour induced by 17?-ethynylestradiol in male guppies (Poecilia reticulata).  

PubMed

Behaviour studies are used in toxicology research as they are excellent tools to measure physiological end-points caused by exogenous chemicals. In mammals both reproductive and non-reproductive behaviours have been used for a long period of time, whereas in teleost fishes non-reproductive behaviours have received little attention compared to reproductive behaviours. Recent advances in measuring stress related behaviours in zebrafish have provided additional tools to understand behaviour toxicology in fish. One species with well documented reproductive behaviour disturbed by different toxicants is the guppy, which is better suited than zebrafish for reproductive behaviour studies and therefore might be a better model organism for comparative behaviour studies in fish toxicology. Here we report new applications for non-reproductive behaviours in guppy and test these behaviours on males treated with the endocrine disruptor 17?-ethynylestradiol at environmentally relevant concentrations. 17?-ethynylestradiol increased freezing and bottom-dwelling when fish were placed in a non-familiar aquarium, but did not significantly affect shoaling behaviour. These results are similar to the anxiogenic behaviours seen in rats treated perinatally with 17?-ethynylestradiol and add more concern to the impacts of endocrine disruptors on aquatic wildlife. PMID:21537944

Hallgren, Stefan; Volkova, Kristina; Reyhanian, Nasim; Olsén, K Håkan; Hällström, Inger Porsch

2011-12-01

276

Supplementary feeding affects the breeding behaviour of male European treefrogs (Hyla arborea)  

PubMed Central

Background We investigated the effects of energetic constraints on the breeding behaviour of male European treefrogs Hyla arborea and how calling males allocated additional energy supplied by feeding experiments. Results Presence in the chorus was energetically costly indicated by both fed and unfed males losing weight. Males that were supplied with additional energy did not show longer chorus tenure. Instead, fed males returned sooner to the chorus. Additionally, fed males called more often than control males, a novel response for anurans. A significantly higher calling rate was noted from males even 31 nights after supplementary feeding. Conclusion This strategy of allocating additional energy reserves to increasing calling rate is beneficial given the preference of female hylids for males calling at high rates and a female's ability to detect small incremental increases in calling rate. PMID:19128468

Meuche, Ivonne; Grafe, T Ulmar

2009-01-01

277

Effect of genes, social experience, and their interaction on the courtship behaviour of transgenic Drosophila males.  

PubMed

Behaviour depends (a) on genes that specify the neural and non-neural elements involved in the perception of and responses to sensory stimuli and (b) on experience that can modulate the fine development of these elements. We exposed transgenic and control Drosophila melanogaster males, and their hybrids, to male siblings during adult development and measured the contribution of genes and of experience to their courtship behaviour. The transgene CheB42a specifically targets male gustatory sensillae and alters the perception of male inhibitory pheromones which leads to frequent male-male interactions. The age at which social experience occurred and the genotype of tester males induced a variable effect on the intensity of male homo- and heterosexual courtship. The strong interaction between the effects of genes and of social experience reveals the plasticity of the apparently stereotyped elements involved in male courtship behaviour. Finally, a high intensity of homosexual courtship was found only in males that simultaneously carried a mutation in their white gene and the CheB42a transgene. PMID:16174337

Svetec, Nicolas; Houot, Benjamin; Ferveur, Jean-François

2005-06-01

278

Cognitive and Behavioural Development of Israeli Males with Fragile X and Down Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hebrew translations of the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (KABC) and the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS) were administered to 17 Israeli males with fragile X and 17 with Down syndrome matched for chronological and mental ages. When differences in the initial baselines were considered, the pattern of findings was generally consistent with previous reports. On the K-ABC, the males

Jacob A. Burack; Cory Shulman; Esther Katzir; Tamar Schaap; Julie M. Brennan; Grace Iarocci; Pamela Wilansky; Naomi Amir

1999-01-01

279

Effects of exposure to predatory cues on territorial behaviour of male fathead minnows  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted a laboratory study to determine if male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, altered their territorial behaviour associated with reproduction in response to combinations of visual and chemical cues from northern pike, Esox lucius. We introduced the following stimuli to a territorial male: a brick (control), fathead minnow alarm pheromone, a pike fed brook stickleback, Culea inconstans, or a pike

Hilary M. Jones; Cynthia A. Paszkowski

1997-01-01

280

Legislating the Family: The Effect of State Family Laws on the Presence of Children in Same?Sex Households  

Microsoft Academic Search

Faced with legal animus or outright legal prohibitions on adoption, fostering, or surrogacy, gay men and lesbians could be deterred from family formation. In this article, we use 2000 U.S. Census data to assess the validity of this assumption by examining the effect of positive and negative family laws on the presence of children in the households of same?sex unmarried

AMANDA K. BAUMLE

2011-01-01

281

Legislating the Family: The Effect of State Family Laws on the Presence of Children in Same?Sex Households  

Microsoft Academic Search

Faced with legal animus or outright legal prohibitions on adoption, fostering, or surrogacy, gay men and lesbians could be deterred from family formation. In this article, we use 2000 U.S. Census data to assess the validity of this assumption by examining the effect of positive and negative family laws on the presence of children in the households of same?sex unmarried

AMANDA K. BAUMLE

2010-01-01

282

Careful With That Gun: Lee, George, Wax, and Geach on Gay Rights and Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many Americans think that homosexual sex is morally wrong and oppose same-sex marriage. Philosophers trying to defend these views have relied on two strategies. One is to claim that such sex is wrong irrespective of consequences: there is something intrinsic to sex that makes it only licit when it takes place within a heterosexual marriage (in which there is no

Andrew Koppelman

2010-01-01

283

High School Religious Context and Reports of Same-Sex Attraction and Sexual Identity in Young Adulthood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objectives of this study are to understand the association between high school religious context in adolescence and the reporting of same-sex attraction and sexual identity in young adulthood and how these associations vary by gender. Previous studies have considered how high school contexts shape the well-being of sexual minority youth, yet…

Wilkinson, Lindsey; Pearson, Jennifer

2013-01-01

284

The mamas and the papas: the invisible diversity of families with same?sex parents in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

This literature review is intended for administrators, educators, and counselors to generate discussion and awareness of the issues facing families with same?sex parents in the United States, a demographic that is rapidly growing and needing service and attention from its communities. To provide educators with background into how these families are formed, research exploring the emotional and legal dynamics of

Lucy Rimalower; Caren Caty

2009-01-01

285

Perspectives on Same-Sex Sexualities and Self-Harm amongst Service Providers and Teachers in Hong Kong  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the perspectives of service providers working with Chinese lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) young people in Hong Kong secondary schools and maps the relationships between same-sex sexualities, religion, education and self-harm. Sixteen service providers, including secondary school teachers, social workers based on and off…

Tang, Denise

2014-01-01

286

'Changing Marriage? Messing with Mr. In-Between?: Reflections Upon Media Debates on Same-Sex Marriage in Ireland'  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores some aspects of the emergence of local debates same-sex marriage in the Republic of Ireland. Taking up this issue through an analysis of mediatized reactions to the introduction of German gay marriage in 2001, I point to how we can see evidence of a shift away from Irish traditional relationships between the social, politics and religion, which

Sean Reynolds

2007-01-01

287

Sacrifices that Pay: Polity Membership, Political Opportunities and the Recognition of Same-Sex Marriage in Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the Spanish gay and lesbian movement, and discusses its role in the legalization of same-sex marriages. The main focus is on the interplay between gay and lesbian rights organizations and leftist political parties during a time span that goes back to the late 1970s. In order to shed new light on the links between protest, interest representation

Kerman Calvo

2007-01-01

288

Comparing Institutional and Policy Explanations for the Adoption of State Constitutional Amendments: The Case of Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

The literature on state constitutional amendments remains undeveloped despite recent activity in the area of same-sex marriage policy. Previous studies have assumed that the adoption of state constitutional amendments is governed by routine policy considerations, but there are strong theoretical reasons for expecting attributes of state institutions also to affect adoption. In this study, I compare institutional and policy explanations

Robert J. Hume

2011-01-01

289

Relationship Satisfaction, Affectivity, and Gay-Specific Stressors in Same-Sex Couples Joined in Civil Unions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relationship satisfaction, affect, and stress were examined in 313 same-sex couples who had had civil unions in Vermont during the first year of this legislation. Similarity between partners on age and on positive/negative affectivity was related to relationship satisfaction whereas there was no association with similarity in income, education,…

Todosijevic, Jelica; Rothblum, Esther D.; Solomon, Sondra E.

2005-01-01

290

Sustaining the “Societal and Scriptural Fence”: Cultural, Social, and Political Topographies of Same-Sex Marriage in Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

In June 2006, voters in Alabama overwhelmingly approved a statewide referendum that added a prohibition against same-sex marriage to the state's constitution. This research examines the Alabama vote by “placing” the politics of sexuality within the state's multifaceted web of cultural and social space. We fuse a traditional electoral geography approach with an overall postpositivist cultural and social perspective, beginning

Gerald R. Webster; Thomas Chapman; Jonathan Leib

2010-01-01

291

Moral Commitment in Intimate Committed Relationships: A Conceptualization from Cohabiting Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Partners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Diverse types of intimate committed relationships, namely cohabiting same-sex and opposite-sex partnerships, are increasingly prevalent in the United States (Bumpass & Lu, 2000; Garber, 2005; U.S. Census Bureau, 2000). Given the rise in the number of individuals participating in intimate committed relationships outside of the marital context,…

Pope, Amber Leighann

2010-01-01

292

Influence Strategies in Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Friendships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some writers have suggested that males and females differ not only in influencibility, but also in the strategies which they use to influence others. Although general sex differences in friendships may affect influence strategies, there is little research comparing males' and females' friendships. To explore differences between same- and…

Madden, Margaret E.; And Others

293

Copper reduced mating behaviour in male shore crabs (Carcinus maenas (L.)).  

PubMed

Many crustaceans use pheromones to find mates and induce mating behaviours. If pollutants impair the ability to detect chemosensory cues and respond to pheromone signals, they could profoundly affect mating. In a series of laboratory experiments, the effect of copper (0, 0.1 or 0.5 mg Cu(II) per litre for 5 days) on specific components of the mating behaviour of male shore crab Carcinus maenas was investigated, as well as differences in sensitivity between red and green colour morphs. The results show that copper exposure clearly altered the response of C. maenas males to a pheromone stimulus (pre-moult female urine) presented alone, together with a dummy female (a sponge injected with pre-moult female urine) or with a real female. Crabs exposed to the highest copper treatment took more than twice as long to initiate search activity after pheromone introduction and their search behaviour was less directed. When offered a dummy female, male crabs showed decreased pheromone discrimination in both copper treatments. Stroking was the only mating behaviour significantly affected, with a 90% reduction in red crabs in the highest copper treatment. Additionally, crabs of the highest copper treatment more often pinched the dummy female (non-mating behaviour). Finally, male crabs exposed to copper more often pinched pre-moult females and it took about three times longer to establish cradle-carrying. Thus, copper affects the ability of males to detect female pheromones, perform specific mating behaviours and to form pairs. PMID:16942808

Krång, Anna-Sara; Ekerholm, Mattias

2006-10-25

294

Female foraging and male vigilance in white-tailed ptarmigan ( Lagopus leucurus ): opportunism or behavioural coordination?  

Microsoft Academic Search

For several species of birds, high rates of male vigilance are correlated with high rates of female foraging. This relationship\\u000a is thought to ultimately result in higher reproductive success for females paired with highly vigilant males. However, previous\\u000a research has not examined the behavioural mechanism that produces the correlation between male vigilance and rates of female\\u000a foraging. Foraging females may

Thomas Artiss; Wesley M. Hochachka; Kathy Martin

1999-01-01

295

The roles of kairomones, synomones and pheromones in the chemically-mediated behaviour of male mosquitoes.  

PubMed

Despite decades of intensive study of the chemical ecology of female mosquitoes, relatively little is known about the chemical ecology of males. This short review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the chemicals that mediate male mosquito behaviour. Various trophic interactions including insect-plant, insect-host, and insect-insect responses are emphasized. The relevance of the chemical ecology of male mosquitoes in the context of vector control programmes is discussed. PMID:24055544

Pitts, R Jason; Moz?raitis, Raimondas; Gauvin-Bialecki, Anne; Lempérière, Guy

2014-04-01

296

Family relationships and adolescent well-being: are families equally protective for same-sex attracted youth?  

PubMed

Existing research suggests that sexual minority youth experience lower levels of well-being, in part because they perceive less social support than heterosexual youth. Sexual minority youth with strong family relationships may demonstrate resilience and increased well-being; however, it is also possible that the experience of sexual stigma may make these relationships less protective for sexual minority youth. Using two waves of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we explore the links between same-sex attraction, family relationships, and adolescent well-being in a sample of over 13,000 7th-12th grade adolescents (51 % female, 52 % non-Latino/a white, 17 % Latino, 21 % African American, and 7 % Asian). Specifically, we examine whether lower levels of parental closeness, parental involvement, and family support among same-sex attracted youth explain in part why these youth experience increased depressive symptoms and risk behaviors, including binge drinking, illegal drug use, and running away from home, relative to other-sex attracted youth. Second, we ask whether family relationships are equally protective against depressive symptoms and risk behaviors for same-sex attracted and other-sex attracted youth. We find that same-sex attracted youth, particularly girls, report higher levels of depressive symptoms, binge drinking, and drug use in part because they perceive less closeness with parents and less support from their families. Results also suggest that parental closeness and parental involvement may be less protective against risk behaviors for same-sex attracted boys than for their other-sex attracted peers. Findings thus suggest that interventions targeting the families of sexual minority youth should educate parents about the potentially negative effects of heteronormative assumptions and attitudes on positive adolescent development. PMID:23196375

Pearson, Jennifer; Wilkinson, Lindsey

2013-03-01

297

Courtship behaviour in a lekking species: individual variations and settlement tactics in male little bustard.  

PubMed

We analysed the display behaviour of male little bustard Tetrax tetrax to identify displays that are used in the context of male-male competition and those that are used for attracting females. Courtship was the main activity of males during the breeding season. Calling activity occurred throughout the day, and leks were attended for more than 4 months. Male sexual displays included snort call, wing-flash, and jump display. Snort call was performed throughout the day and mainly involved male-male interactions. In contrast, the wing-flash display was given only at twilight, and was performed most commonly when a female was present, supporting an inter-sexual function for this display. The jump display was performed only in the presence of female at anytime of the day. Analysis of individual variations in display behaviour revealed that intra-individual variation was low compared to inter-individual variation, especially for the jump display. It is, therefore, possible that display rates provide information on male quality. Four male settlement patterns could be defined, singles, paired, lekking and satellite lekking, but only wing-flash display and stamped snort call differed among those categories. We suggest that satellite males are attempting to benefit from proximity to higher status males, in accordance with the hotshot hypothesis of lek evolution. PMID:11470502

Jiguet, F; Bretagnolle, V

2001-08-15

298

Perceived Physical Competence, Enjoyment and Effort in Same-Sex and Coeducational Physical Education Classes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Perceived competence is a key motivational determinant of physical activity behaviours in adolescents, and motivational determinants are influenced by the class environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate levels of perceived physical competence, enjoyment and effort in class, focusing on gender and class-type differences.…

Lyu, Minjeong; Gill, Diane L.

2011-01-01

299

Behavioural and energetic responses to body state in male and female barn swallows (Hirundo rustica).  

PubMed

Females and males often have different roles when attending young. The factors responsible for shifts in the balance of effort when both sexes provision their young are not clear. This study asked if sex-specific behaviour and provisioning rules in barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) were dependent on individual body-state or affected by the state of their provisioning partner. To assess this male and female barn swallows underwent overnight warming manipulations whilst provisioning 10-14 day old nestlings, a time when energetic demands are maximal. The overnight warming treatment reduced thermoregulatory costs and provided birds with extra energy reserves at dawn. Only one member of a pair was manipulated in this way, whilst their partners were left un-manipulated to assess their response to their partner's elevated body-state. The energetic and behavioural responses to these manipulations were followed over the subsequent 24-h. I found that warmed male and female barn swallows increased their energy expenditure and nest visitation rates to the same extent after manipulation, implying a trade-off in resource allocation, which was biased towards reproductive effort. There was no effect of gender. Males paired with manipulated females showed no energetic or behavioural adjustments, however, females paired with manipulated males tended to increase both energy expenditure and nest visitation. This study provides evidence that energy reserves constrain behaviour, and that male and female swallows normally follow the same state-dependent rules when provisioning young. PMID:15846052

Spencer, Karen A

2005-04-01

300

Male alternative reproductive behaviours in a Mediterranean wrasse, Symphodus ocellatus: Evidence from otoliths for multiple life-history pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although alternative reproductive behaviours have been studied extensively, it has only been possible in a few cases to document the underlying life-history pathways and factors that determine their expression. In Symphodus ocellatus, a Mediterranean wrasse, males adopt a variety of behaviours. Within a season, they may invest in territory defence, nest building and broodcare (nesting males); join nesting males in

Suzanne H. Alonzo; Michael Taborsky; Peter Wirtz

301

Use of female nest characteristics in the sexual behaviour of male sockeye salmon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

On three island beaches in Iliamna Lake, Alaska, large numbers of male sockeye salmon gathered and spawned in artificial excavations that mimicked a female's nest immediately prior to spawning, while apparently ignoring the control site. The number of males attracted was correlated positively with changes in the operational sex ratio. In contrast, on the mainland beach examined, no reaction to the artificial nests was apparent. The results are discussed in terms of mate searching behaviour by males, the duration of the spawning period, and associated selection pressures on males to use characteristics of their environment that provide information on availability of females.

Hamon, T.R.; Foote, C.J.; Brown, G.S.

1999-01-01

302

Self-disclosure Modeling in Same-sex and Mixed-sex Unsupervised Groups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effects of videotaped models in eliciting self-disclosure were assessed for men and women in unsupervised groups of one or both sexes. Videotaped modeling was clearly superior to a control condition in increasing self-disclosure. Females generally displayed more self-disclosure than males. (Author)

Annis, Lawrence V.; Perry, Donald F.

1977-01-01

303

Same-sex sexual behavior of men in Kenya: Implications for HIV prevention, programs, and policy  

PubMed Central

Unprotected anal sex has long been recognized as a risk factor for HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM). In Africa, however, general denial of MSM existence and associated stigma discouraged research. To address this gap in the literature, partners conducted the first behavioral surveys of MSM in Kenya. The first study was to assess HIV risk among MSM in Nairobi, and the second study a pre-post intervention study of male sex workers in Mombasa. The 2004 behavioral survey of 500 men in Mombasa revealed that MSM were having multiple sexual partners and failed to access appropriate prevention counseling and care at Kenya clinics. A 2006 capture-recapture enumeration in Mombasa estimated that over 700 male sex workers were active, after which a pre-intervention baseline survey of 425 male sex workers was conducted. Awareness of unprotected anal sex as an HIV risk behavior and consistent condom use with clients was low, and use of oil-based lubricants high. Based on this information, peer educators were trained in HIV prevention, basic counseling skills, and distribution of condoms and lubricants. To assess impact of the interventions, a follow-up survey of 442 male sex workers was implemented in 2008. Exposure to peer educators was significantly associated with increased consistent condom use, improved HIV knowledge, and increased use of water-based lubricants. These results have provided needed information to the Government of Kenya and have informed HIV prevention interventions. PMID:24753921

Van Saen, D.

2012-01-01

304

The Brain Reaction to Viewing Faces of Opposite and Same-Sex Romantic Partners  

Microsoft Academic Search

We pursued our functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of the neural correlates of romantic love in 24 subjects, half of whom were female (6 heterosexual and 6 homosexual) and half male (6 heterosexual and 6 homosexual). We compared the pattern of activity produced in their brains when they viewed the faces of their loved partners with that produced when

Semir Zeki; John Paul Romaya

2010-01-01

305

Intimate Relationships among Adolescent Romantic Partners and Same-Sex Friends: Individual and Systemic Perspectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined adolescent intimacy in close friendships and romantic relationships from a systemic perspective. Found qualitative sex-related differences in how partners balance closeness and individuality in the two types of close friendships. Development of an intimate romantic relationship was also found to require greater commitment for males than…

Shulman, Shmuel; Levy-Shiff, Rachel; Kedem, Peri; Alon, Eiton

1997-01-01

306

Contact with gays and lesbians and same-sex marriage support: The moderating role of social context.  

PubMed

Empirical research on the contact hypothesis has paid inadequate attention to the broader social and normative context in which contact occurs. Using data from the nationally representative Portraits of American Life Study, I test whether individuals' core networks moderate the effect of personal contact with gays and lesbians on same-sex marriage attitudes. OLS regression results demonstrate that, though contact is strongly associated with greater support for same-sex marriage, the effect is attenuated for individuals with a higher proportion of religious conservatives in their core network. This moderating effect holds even after controlling for respondents' religiosity and when the sample is limited to self-identified religious liberals and moderates. Future research on intergroup contact should be attentive to other influences within individuals' social contexts and examine how the outcomes of contact across a variety of social boundaries are moderated by these social influences. PMID:23721680

Merino, Stephen M

2013-07-01

307

A Nietzschean Perspective on Church Affiliation and Self-Esteem Among Same-Sex-Attracted Members of the Mormon Church  

Microsoft Academic Search

The conflict between self-identity and religious doctrine is underinvestigated in lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons. This article examines the association between religious affiliation and self-esteem in a sample of 150 same-sex-attracted current and former members of the Mormon Church and proposes a Nietzschean perspective for clinical social work in this population. Cross-sectional data were collected through a Web-based 18-item survey

Daniel Ison; Susan Saltzburg; Sarah E. Bledsoe

2010-01-01

308

A review of "Sappho in Early Modern England: Female Same-Sex Literary Erotics." by Harriette Andreadis  

E-print Network

52 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS Harriette Andreadis. Sappho in Early Modern England: Female Same- Sex Literary Erotics, 1550-1714. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001. xiii + 254 pp. + 9 illus. $17.00 Paper. Review by MADHAVI MENON, ITHACA... COLLEGE. In a book that claims to be about erotic ellipses, Sappho in Early Modern England is also dependent on one: its evident debt to Foucauldian theory goes both unnamed and unpaid. In general, scholars of Renaissance sexuality draw on Foucault...

Madhavi Menon

2002-01-01

309

Gender Role Self-Concept and Gender-Typed Communication Behavior in Mixed-Sex and Same-Sex Dyads  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus of this study was the relation between both gender role self-concept and gender role attitudes with gender-related behavior of interacting partners. We observed gender-typed communication behaviors of mixed-sex and same-sex dyads and measured gender role self-concept and gender role attitudes. Thirty mixed-sex dyads, 19 women dyads, and 15 men dyads participated in a behavior observation study. The results

Ursula Athenstaedt; Elisabeth Haas; Stephanie Schwab

2004-01-01

310

Parent Practices and HomeSchool Partnerships: A Differential Effect for Children with Same-Sex Coupled Parents?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parents can profoundly influence the long-term academic success of their children. Parental involvement with their children's schools has consistently been associated with much better long-term academic and social outcomes. Unfortunately, same-sex parents often feel disconnected and unwelcome in schools. In order to extend the research supporting parent practices and strong family-school collaboration, the present study used the Early Childhood Longitudinal

Alicia L. Fedewa; Teresa P. Clark

2009-01-01

311

The effect of same-sex marriage laws on different-sex marriage: Evidence from The Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has long been argued that the legalization of same-sex marriage would have a negative impact on marriage. In this paper, I examine what happened to different-sex marriage in the Netherlands after the enactment of two laws: in 1998, a law that provided all couples with an institution almost identical to marriage--registered partnership--, and in 2001, a law that legalized

Mircea Trandafir

2009-01-01

312

Equality Discrepancy Between Women in Same-Sex Relationships: The Mediating Role of Attachment in Relationship Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This internet study explored the mediating effects of anxious and avoidant attachment on the link between relationship equality\\u000a discrepancy and relationship satisfaction among 75 cohabitating U.S. and Canadian women’s same-sex couples. Multiple regression\\u000a results indicated that both anxious and avoidant attachment were found to mediate the relationship between dyadic equality\\u000a discrepancy and relationship satisfaction, suggesting that the more partners perceived

Sharon G. Horne; Wendy J. Biss

2009-01-01

313

System Justification, Right-Wing Conservatism, and Internalized Homophobia: Gay and Lesbian Attitudes toward Same-Sex Parenting in Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adopting a system justification perspective (Jost and Banaji 1994), we investigated the manner and extent to which gay men\\u000a and lesbians might internalize a sense of inferiority when it comes to parenthood. In an Italian sample of gay and lesbian\\u000a individuals, we found that gay men who scored high (versus low) on system justification and right-wing conservatism regarded\\u000a same sex

Maria Giuseppina Pacilli; Alessandro Taurino; John T. Jost; Jojanneke van der Toorn

314

Women's Sexual Satisfaction as a Predictor of Well-Being in Same-Sex Versus Mixed-Sex Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Structural equation modelling was used to assess the strengths of the links between sexual satisfaction and self-reported (a) relationship well-being, (b) mental health, and (c) physical health for women in same-sex (i.e., homosexual, n = 114) versus mixed-sex (i.e., heterosexual, n = 208) relationships. Participants came from a large-scale Internet study. Sexual satisfaction was found to be an extremely strong predictor of relational well-being,

Diane Holmberg; Karen L. Blair; Maggie Phillips

2010-01-01

315

The Cultural Power of Law and the Cultural Enactment of Legality: The Case of Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

legal marriage. Approaching marriage from the perspective of same-sex cou-ples, this research demonstrates that the legal and cultural aspects of marriage are deeply intertwined. Cultural enactments of marriage enact legality even in the absence of official law, and many actors ascribe to law a cultural power that transcends its specific benefits and protections, the power to pro-duce social and cultural

Kathleen E. Hull

2003-01-01

316

Psychology and the politics of same-sex desire in the United States: an analysis of three cases.  

PubMed

Psychological science has assumed an increasingly explicit role in public policies related to same-sex desire in the United States. In this article, we present a historical analysis of the relationship between policy discourse and scientific discourse on homosexuality produced within U.S. psychology over the 20th and early 21st centuries through the lens of three cases: Bowers v. Hardwick (1986), Lawrence v. Texas (2003), and Perry v. Schwarzenegger (2010). Our analysis suggests that, for the majority of its disciplinary history, psychology produced knowledge that supported a status quo of legal and cultural subordination for same-sex-attracted individuals. The discipline's shift in understanding of homosexuality, reflected in a 1975 policy statement of the American Psychological Association, reversed this relationship and opened up space for advocacy for social and political change regarding homosexuality. Our analysis of policy decisions rendered by the courts reveals the increasingly important role psychological science has assumed in challenging the legal subordination of same-sex-attracted individuals, though the basis upon which psychological science has sought to inform policy remains limited. We conclude with a critical discussion of the type of knowledge claims psychologists have traditionally used to advocate for gay and lesbian rights, suggesting the vitality of a narrative approach which can reveal the meaning individuals make of legal subordination and political exclusion. PMID:21936232

Hammack, Phillip L; Windell, Eric P

2011-08-01

317

Male-specific (Z)-9-tricosene stimulates female mating behaviour in the spider Pholcus beijingensis  

PubMed Central

Chemical signals play an important role in spider sexual communication, yet the chemistry of spider sex pheromones remains poorly understood. Chemical identification of male-produced pheromone-mediating sexual behaviour in spiders has also, to our knowledge, not been reported before. This study aimed to examine whether chemically mediated strategies are used by males of the spider Pholcus beijingensis for increasing the probability of copulation. Based on data from gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis, electroantennography assay and a series of behavioural tests, we verified that (Z)-9-tricosene is a male-specific compound in the spider P. beijingensis. This compound acts as an aphrodisiac: it increases the likelihood that a female will mate. Mate-searching males release (Z)-9-tricosene to stimulate sexual behaviour of conspecific females. In the two-choice assay, however, sexually receptive females show no preference to the chambers containing (Z)-9-tricosene. This indicates that the male pheromone of P. beijingensis is not an attractant per se to the conspecific females. This is, to our knowledge, the first identification of a male-produced aphrodisiac pheromone in spiders. PMID:20462911

Xiao, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Jian-Xu; Li, Shu-Qiang

2010-01-01

318

Author's personal copy Learning in the context of sexual behaviour and danger in female and male  

E-print Network

the ecological and evolutionary aspects of such learning (e.g. Dukas 2005a, 2009). Briefly, in three fruit flyAuthor's personal copy Learning in the context of sexual behaviour and danger in female and male pseudoobscura female fruit fly learning speciation Learning in the context of mate choice is important because

Dukas, Reuven

319

Social context of HIV risk behaviours among male-to-female transgenders of colour  

Microsoft Academic Search

To explore the social context of drug use and sexual behaviours that put male-to-female (MTF) transgenders at risk for HIV, focus groups were conducted consisting of African American, Latina and Asian and Pacific Islander MTF transgenders (N=48) who reside or work in San Francisco, California. Participants were likely to report having unprotected sex with primary partners to signify love and

T. Nemoto; D. Operario; J. Keatley; D. Villegas

2004-01-01

320

"Because She Was My First Girlfriend, I Didn't Know Any Different": Making the Case for Mainstreaming Same-Sex Sex/Relationship Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we present the case for those entering/considering same-sex relationships to be included in sex and relationship education in schools. The Government's Guidance on Sex and Relationship Education provides a rationale for including same-sex relationships when it says that schools should meet the needs of all their pupils "whatever…

Donovan, Catherine; Hester, Marianne

2008-01-01

321

Advocacy Coalitions and Punctuated Equilibrium in the Same-Sex Marriage Debate: Learning from Pro-LGBT Policy Changes in Minneapolis and Minnesota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Policy change to actualize same-sex marriage requires planning and practices that can be most effective to advance marriage equality. This case study examines how building and maintaining strong coalitions aided in attainment and preservation of civil rights and protections for same-sex couples in Minnesota. As a historical policy analysis, it dissects collaborative strategies and events that led to a municipal

Lake Dziengel

2010-01-01

322

SameSex Spouses Married in NY State or Other Jurisdictions or Countries The Marriage Equality Act became effective on July 24, 2011. The Act amends the Domestic  

E-print Network

SameSex Spouses Married in NY State or Other Jurisdictions or Countries The Marriage Equality Act are of the same or opposite sex. Spouses of the samesex who are married in New York State as well for health and dental benefits. Important Note: Although same sex spouses are recognized

Hemami, Sheila S.

323

Fluoxetine inhibits aggressive behaviour during parental care in male fighting fish (Betta splendens, Regan).  

PubMed

The increasing presence of aquatic contaminants, such as the pharmaceutical fluoxetine, has raised concerns over potentially disrupting effects on several aspects of fish reproduction. However, the effects of fluoxetine on reproductive and paternal behavior in fish remain understudied, particularly at environmentally relevant concentrations. In the current study, we therefore tested the hypothesis that waterborne fluoxetine at an environmentally relevant concentration (540 ng/l), disrupts specific reproductive and paternal behaviors in male Siamese fighting fish at distinct reproductive phases. A pre-post test design was adopted to investigate specific behavioral responses at the individual fish level in response to male conspecific intruders at two different distances from the nest across four distinct reproductive phases (before bubblenest construction, following bubblenest construction, after spawning and after hatching of the larvae). In the control specimens, the measured behaviours were not different between the spawning times and among the interactions in either distance to nest at the different reproduction phases. Our results indicate that fluoxetine specifically disrupts characteristic paternal territorial aggression behaviour only after spawning and hatching of the larvae, while male behaviour in previous reproductive phases is unaffected by fluoxetine exposure. Results of comparison between males at 1st spawning and specimens exposed to fluoxetine at 2nd spawning showed that the first reaction of the nest-holding males to the intruders, duration of fin spreading, number of bites, and 90° turn, and the frequency of sweeps were different between the spawning times after spawning or hatching of embryos. However, interaction of spawning time and reproduction phase was significant on biting behaviour. These results demonstrate that fluoxetine exposure at environmental concentrations negatively affects territorial defense behaviour in fighting fish during parental care after larval hatching, which may have possible implications on reproductive success and population dynamics. PMID:25213287

Forsatkar, Mohammad Navid; Nematollahi, Mohammad Ali; Amiri, Bagher Mojazi; Huang, Wen-Bin

2014-11-01

324

Male moths bearing transplanted female antennae express characteristically female behaviour and central neural activity.  

PubMed

The primary olfactory centres of the sphinx moth Manduca sexta, the antennal lobes, contain a small number of sexually dimorphic glomeruli: the male-specific macroglomerular complex and the large female glomeruli. These glomeruli play important roles in sex-specific behaviours, such as the location of conspecific females and the selection of appropriate host plants for oviposition. The development of sexually dimorphic glomeruli depends strictly on the ingrowth of sex-specific olfactory receptor cell afferents. In the present study we tested the role of female-specific olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) in mediating female-specific host plant approach behaviour and in determining the response of downstream antennal lobe neurons. We generated male gynandromorphs by excising one imaginal disc from a male larva and replacing it with the antennal imaginal disc from a female donor. Most male gynandromorphs had an apparently normal female antenna and a feminised antennal lobe. These gynandromorphs were tested for flight responses in a wind tunnel towards tomato plants, a preferred host plant for oviposition in M. sexta. Male gynandromorphs landed on host plants as often as normal females, demonstrating that the presence of the induced female-specific glomeruli was necessary and sufficient to produce female-like, odour-oriented behaviour, i.e. orientation towards host plants. We also characterised the physiological and morphological properties of antennal lobe neurons of male gynandromorphs. We found that projection neurons with arborisations in the induced female-specific glomeruli showed physiological responses akin to those of female-specific projection neurons in normal females. These results therefore indicate that ORCs confer specific odour tuning to their glomerular targets and, furthermore, instruct odour-specific behaviour. PMID:20348339

Kalberer, N M; Reisenman, C E; Hildebrand, J G

2010-04-01

325

Same-sex Versus Other-sex Best Friendship in Early Adolescence: Longitudinal Predictors of Antisocial Behavior Throughout Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the relationship between having other-sex versus same-sex best friends and antisocial behavior throughout\\u000a early adolescence. Participants (N = 955) were recruited in 6th grade and followed longitudinally through 7th, 8th, and 11th grades. Participants were 58% ethnically\\u000a diverse youth and 48% girls. Results indicate that the frequency of other-sex best friendship remained stable from 6th to\\u000a 7th grade but

Cara Lee Arndorfer; Elizabeth A. Stormshak

2008-01-01

326

Same-sex sexual relationships in the national social life, health and aging project: making a case for data collection.  

PubMed

This study describes the previously unexplored subsample of respondents who reported at least 1 same-sex sexual relationship (SSSR) in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP). The NSHAP collected data from 3,005 adults (aged 57-85). Approximately 4% (n = 102) of respondents reported at least one SSSR. These sexual minority elders were younger, more educated, were more likely to be working, had fewer social supports, and better physical health. Results may indicate crisis competence in sexual minority elders. Collecting sexual orientation and gender identity data in larger, US-based probability samples would inform the development of appropriate community-based services and supports. PMID:24329542

Brown, Maria T; Grossman, Brian R

2014-01-01

327

Same-sex marriage, autoimmune thyroid gland dysfunction and other autoimmune diseases in Denmark 1989-2008.  

PubMed

Autoimmune diseases have been little studied in gay men and lesbians. We followed 4.4 million Danes, including 9,615 same-sex married (SSM) persons, for 47 autoimmune diseases in the National Patient Registry between 1989 and 2008. Poisson regression analyses provided first hospitalization rate ratios (RRs) comparing rates between SSM individuals and persons in other marital status categories. SSM individuals experienced no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the risk of autoimmune thyroid dysfunction was increased, notably Hashimoto's thyroiditis (women(SSM), RR = 2.92; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.74-4.55) and Graves' disease (men(SSM), RR = 1.88; 95% CI 1.08-3.01). There was also an excess of primary biliary cirrhosis (women(SSM), RR = 4.09; 95% CI 1.01-10.7), and of psoriasis (men(SSM), RR = 2.48; 95% CI 1.77-3.36), rheumatic fever (men(SSM), RR = 7.55; 95% CI 1.87-19.8), myasthenia gravis (men(SSM), RR = 5.51; 95% CI 1.36-14.4), localized scleroderma (men(SSM), RR = 7.16; 95% CI 1.18-22.6) and pemphigoid (men(SSM), RR = 6.56; 95% CI 1.08-20.6), while Dupuytren's contracture was reduced (men(SSM), RR = 0.64; 95% CI 0.39-0.99). The excess of psoriasis was restricted to same-sex married men with HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 10.5; 95% CI 6.44-15.9), whereas Graves' disease occurred in excess only among same-sex married men without HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 1.99; 95% CI 1.12-3.22). Lesbians and immunologically competent gay men in same-sex marriage face no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the observed increased risk of thyroid dysfunction in these lesbians and gay men deserves further study. PMID:24306355

Frisch, Morten; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard

2014-01-01

328

The role of testosterone in male downy woodpeckers in winter home range use, mate interactions and female foraging behaviour  

PubMed Central

Studies of the role of testosterone (T) in birds have typically focused on sexual or aggressive behaviours of males during the breeding period, but males of nonmigratory species may invest in mate and territory long before breeding, and the influence of T in facilitating nonbreeding-season behaviours is poorly understood. We gave free-living male downy woodpeckers, Picoides pubescens, T-implants during the winter to determine whether elevated levels of T increased a male’s ability to exclusively occupy territory-based resources, and whether elevated T strengthened a male’s investment in an existing pair bond relationship. We also explored how a female’s foraging efficiency might be affected by her mate’s behaviour if he had elevated T. We found little difference between control and T-implanted males with regard to home range exclusivity. Surprisingly, male–male display rates were significantly lower in T-implanted males than in controls. Regarding male–female interactions, T-implanted males that experienced high incursion rates from other males maintained more frequent spatial association with their mate, suggesting that T facilitates male behaviours that could restrict the mate’s access to other male birds. Female mates of T-males showed reduced foraging rates, but because male–female aggression was similar between treatment groups, the cause for this reduction is unknown. The results indicate that exogenous T during winter affects a variety of behaviours in male woodpeckers, and proximate influences on pair bond maintenance in winter may be a fruitful avenue for future research. PMID:16932805

KELLAM, JAMES S.; LUCAS, JEFFREY R.; WINGFIELD, JOHN C.

2006-01-01

329

Behind bullying and defending: same-sex and other-sex relations and their associations with acceptance and rejection.  

PubMed

Relatively little is known about bullying and defending behaviors of children in early elementary school. However, this period is crucial for children's development as at this age they start to participate in a stable peer group, and difficulties in social interactions can be detected early by professionals. An interactive animated web-based computer program was used in this study to assess peer relationships among young children. The computerized assessment was conducted among 2,135 children in grades 1-2 from 22 elementary schools to examine the association of bullying, victimization, and defending with being accepted or rejected. Same-sex and other-sex peer relations were distinguished using dyadic data. Both boys and girls were more likely to accept same-sex classmates than other-sex classmates, and boys were more often nominated than girls as perpetrators of bullying against both boys and girls. It was found that bullies were rejected by those for whom they posed a potential threat, and that defenders were preferred by those classmates for whom they were a potential source of protection. Bullies chose victims who were rejected by significant others, but contrary to expectations, children who bullied boys scored low on peer affection. It is possible that these bullies were not strategic enough to select the "right" targets. Overall, the current findings provide evidence for strategies involved in bullying and defending at early age. PMID:23861031

Veenstra, René; Verlinden, Marina; Huitsing, Gijs; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

2013-01-01

330

Being both and acting 'man': exploring patterns of masculinisation among young same-sex-attracted men in Thailand.  

PubMed

Twenty-five same-sex-attracted rural young Thai men were interviewed three times to investigate how their sexual subjectivity changed over an 18-month period after they completed high school and moved into a new life-phase. Many young men grew up with strong gender-based understandings of homosexuality, in which a masculine (top) partner is seen as complementing a feminine (bottom) partner. The discursive division between the masculine and feminine domains became increasingly blurred in the actual practice of dating, forcing the young men to develop new understandings of homosexuality and same-sex relations. The shift from a rural to urban environment, the use of the Internet and the experience of falling in love played important roles in this experimentation with new, increasingly masculine presentations of the self, also influenced by a modern urban masculine aesthetic. The paper concludes that the encounter between 'traditional' gender-based homosexuality and new ideas, in which masculine object-choice is important in defining sexual identity leads to a variety of fluid ideas and expressions. This process created confusion among some, and opportunities for exploration of new ways of defining sexual subjectivities among others. PMID:25118098

de Lind van Wijngaarden, Jan W

2014-10-01

331

Religion and the rainbow struggle: does religion factor into attitudes toward homosexuality and same-sex civil unions in Brazil?  

PubMed

The provision of civil liberties to LGBT persons has become part of a global movement in societies across the world. In Brazil, a recent judicial ruling for the first time established the right for homosexual couples to enter into civil unions, despite the presence of widespread disapproval of homosexuality among the population and opposition from prominent religious groups. Picking up on this issue, the following study examines whether religion may factor into the attitudes Brazilians hold toward homosexuality and same-sex civil unions. Using data from the Brazilian Social Research Survey, we find that the most restrictive views toward homosexuality and the strongest opposition to same-sex civil unions are most prevalent among devoted followers of historical Protestant, Pentecostal, and Catholic faith traditions, whereas adherents of Afro-Brazilian and spiritist religions, as well as those with no religious commitment, are inclined to assume a more tolerant moral posture toward such issues. The findings point to religion as a potential influence in future public policy initiatives and social movements involving LGBT issues in Brazil. PMID:24914634

Ogland, Curtis P; Verona, Ana Paula

2014-09-01

332

The effect of same-sex marriage laws on different-sex marriage: evidence from the Netherlands.  

PubMed

It has long been argued that the legalization of same-sex marriage would have a negative impact on marriage. In this article, I examine how different-sex marriage in the Netherlands was affected by the enactment of two laws: a 1998 law that provided all couples with an institution almost identical to marriage (a "registered partnership") and a 2001 law that legalized same-sex marriage for the first time in the world. I first construct a synthetic control for the Netherlands using OECD data for the period 1988-2005 and find that neither law had significant effects on either the overall or different-sex marriage rate. I next construct a unique individual-level data set covering the period 1995-2005 by combining the Dutch Labor Force Survey and official municipal records. The estimates from a discrete-time hazard model with unobserved heterogeneity for the first-marriage decision confirm the findings in the aggregate analysis. The effects of the two laws are heterogeneous, with presumably more-liberal individuals (as defined by their residence or ethnicity) marrying less after passage of both laws and potentially more-conservative individuals marrying more after passage of each law. PMID:24190101

Trandafir, Mircea

2014-02-01

333

Kin recognition and cannibalistic behaviours by adult male fathead minnows ( Pimephales promelas)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Parental care is an energetically demanding activity that ensures genes are efficiently passed from one generation to the next. According to evolutionary theory, the greatest energetic investment should be directed towards offspring that are most closely related to the parent. Male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, provide this parental investment to developing embryos but not newly hatched larvae. Therefore, selection should favour recognition of embryonic kin to ensure energetic expenditure is optimally invested. In this study, adult male fathead minnows were tested using behavioural assays, with egg cannibalism as an endpoint, to determine whether adult males could discriminate between related and unrelated embryos. Egg cannibalism was highest when adult male fathead minnows were presented with unrelated eggs and lowest when presented with eggs fertilized by the test subject (related eggs). The degree of cannibalism was also a function of breeding status. Unrelated males in breeding condition showed an intermediate response between the low cannibalism demonstrated by related males and the high cannibalism demonstrated by unrelated males in a nonbreeding condition. These results suggest that although male fathead minnows can discriminate between unrelated and related embryos, at least some component of parental investment is a simple function of breeding status.

Green, Warren W.; Mirza, Reehan S.; Pyle, Greg G.

2008-03-01

334

Aggression in bottlenose dolphins: Evidence for sexual coercion, male-male competition, and female tolerance through analysis of tooth-rake marks and behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Aggressive behaviour is rarely observed, but may have a large impact on the social struc- ture, relationships and interactions in animal societies. Long-term behavioural study of Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia, suggests that males are more aggressive than females, and use sexual coercion during the breeding season, but age and sex-specific patterns of aggression have not

Erin M. Scott; Janet Mann; Jana J. Watson-Capps; Brooke L. Sargeant; Richard C. Connor

2005-01-01

335

The role of testosterone in male downy woodpeckers in winter home range use, mate interactions and female foraging behaviour.  

PubMed

Studies of the role of testosterone (T) in birds have typically focused on sexual or aggressive behaviours of males during the breeding period, but males of nonmigratory species may invest in mate and territory long before breeding, and the influence of T in facilitating nonbreeding-season behaviours is poorly understood. We gave free-living male downy woodpeckers, Picoides pubescens, T-implants during the winter to determine whether elevated levels of T increased a male's ability to exclusively occupy territory-based resources, and whether elevated T strengthened a male's investment in an existing pair bond relationship. We also explored how a female's foraging efficiency might be affected by her mate's behaviour if he had elevated T. We found little difference between control and T-implanted males with regard to home range exclusivity. Surprisingly, male-male display rates were significantly lower in T-implanted males than in controls. Regarding male-female interactions, T-implanted males that experienced high incursion rates from other males maintained more frequent spatial association with their mate, suggesting that T facilitates male behaviours that could restrict the mate's access to other male birds. Female mates of T-males showed reduced foraging rates, but because male-female aggression was similar between treatment groups, the cause for this reduction is unknown. The results indicate that exogenous T during winter affects a variety of behaviours in male woodpeckers, and proximate influences on pair bond maintenance in winter may be a fruitful avenue for future research. PMID:16932805

Kellam, James S; Lucas, Jeffrey R; Wingfield, John C

2006-03-01

336

Tied to the nest: male black-capped chickadees decrease dawn chorus movement behaviour when their mate is fertile  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male songbirds typically mate-guard by closely following the female during her fertile period. At dawn, males may sing near the nest or roost to direct their chorus at mates. Recent evidence suggests males may also be involved in singing interactions with neighbours during the dawn chorus. We used a 16- channel acoustic location system to examine the movement behaviour of

Jennifer R. Foote; Lauren P. Fitzsimmons; Daniel J. Mennill; Laurene M. Ratcliffe

2008-01-01

337

Early vaccination with Improvac®: effects on performance and behaviour of male pigs.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of giving a two-dose regimen of gonadotropin-releasing hormone vaccine, Improvac® (Pfizer Ltd), earlier than currently recommended, on performance and behaviour of growing/finishing pigs. Cross-bred male pigs (n = 192) were randomly allocated, within a litter, into four groups at birth: one group of pigs surgically castrated without anaesthesia before one week of age, a second group of early vaccinated pigs given Improvac at 10 and 14 weeks of age, a third group of standard vaccinated pigs given Improvac at 16 and 20 weeks of age, so that the second vaccination was given 4 to 6 weeks before slaughter as recommended by the manufacturer, and a fourth group of entire male pigs. The experiment started when the pigs were 12 weeks old and lasted until 25 weeks of age, when the pigs were slaughtered. The pigs were fed restrictedly. Daily weight gain and feed conversion during the entire raising period did not differ significantly between groups. Estimated lean meat content of early vaccinated and surgically castrated pigs was lower when compared with entire male pigs, whereas standard vaccinated pigs did not differ from entire males. Dressing percentage was higher in early vaccinated and surgically castrated pigs than in standard vaccinated and entire male pigs, partly because of lower size and weight of reproductive organs. For both groups of vaccinated pigs, both problematic and non-problematic behaviours decreased after their second injection, from the levels of entire males to those of surgically castrated pigs. After the second injection, pigs of both vaccination groups performed no mountings, in contrast with entire male pigs of the same age. Skin lesions at slaughter were fewer and less severe for vaccinated pigs compared with entire male pigs. No difference in income per carcass was observed for surgically castrated or vaccinated pigs. However, for entire male pigs the income was lower, as the payment system in Sweden also takes into consideration the additional cost for boar taint analyses and reduced payment for tainted carcasses. Under our experimental conditions, early vaccination with Improvac can be used as an alternative to the recommended schedule to minimise problematic behaviour with unaffected profitability. PMID:22436158

Andersson, K; Brunius, C; Zamaratskaia, G; Lundström, K

2012-01-01

338

Comparative effects of preoptic area infusions of opioid peptides, lesions and castration on sexual behaviour in male rats: studies of instrumental behaviour, conditioned place preference and partner preference  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects on the sexual behaviour of male rats of excitotoxic amino acid-induced lesions of the medial preoptic area-anterior hypothalamic area (mPOA\\/AHA), infusions of ?-endorphin, ?-melanocyte stimulating hormone and naloxone into the mPOA\\/AHA, systemic naloxone and castration were compared using different behavioural paradigms. These included measures of unconditioned copulatory behaviour, instrumental responses for an oestrous female presented under a second-order

A. M. Hughes; B. J. Everitt; J. Herbert

1990-01-01

339

Homosexual inclinations and the passions: A Thomistic theory of the psychogenesis of same-sex attraction disorder.  

PubMed

The Catholic Church has held that every human being is a child of God, and every person deserves to be treated with dignity and love regardless of their actions. The phrase "love the sinner, hate the sin" is a simple summary of the approach the Church takes to loving all human beings. The Church has also held firmly that both homosexual acts and homosexual inclinations are disordered, although the origins or contributing factors of homosexual inclinations are not entirely understood. In this paper, I apply principles from St. Thomas Aquinas's treatise on the passions to show that habitual mis-identification of the cause of pleasure associated with the apprehension of beauty, or misjudgments, may be involved in the psychogenesis of same-sex attraction disorder. PMID:24899749

Kinney, Robert Loyd

2014-05-01

340

Competing Social Movements and Local Political Culture: Voting on Ballot Propositions to Ban Same-Sex Marriage in the U.S. States  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article uses social movement theory to explain variation in local support for proposed constitutional amendments to ban same-sex marriage in 22 states during 2004 and 2006. Copyright (c) 2009 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

Arnold Fleischmann; Laura Moyer

2009-01-01

341

Winners and losers in health insurance: access and type of coverage for women in same-sex and opposite-sex partnerships.  

PubMed

Using data from the American Community Survey, 2009 (N=580,754), we compared rates of health insurance coverage and types of coverage used between women in same-sex and opposite-sex partnerships. This large, national dataset also allowed us to investigate regional variation in insurance coverage for women in same-sex partnerships by comparing "gay-tolerant" states versus other states. Multivariate analyses revealed that women in same-sex partnerships consistently had lower rates of health insurance coverage than married women in opposite-sex partnerships, but always more than unmarried women in opposite-sex partnerships. We also found that state-level variation in gay tolerance did not contribute to the access or type of coverage used by women in same-sex partnerships. PMID:24400654

Pals, Heili; Waren, Warren

2014-01-01

342

I wish to enroll my spouse or *same sex domestic partner in the DSGHP Dependent Plan. *Domestic partnership is subject to filing of an Affidavit of Domestic Partnership.  

E-print Network

I wish to enroll my spouse or *same sex domestic partner in the DSGHP Dependent Plan. *Domestic, ___________________________________________________________ Relation to Student: ( ) Spouse (Copy of Marriage Certificate Attached) ( ) Domestic Partner (Affidavit

Shepherd, Simon

343

Employee Consent Form to Allow the University of California to Claim FICA Tax Refund Relating to Provision of Health Care Benefits to Employee's Same-Sex Spouse  

E-print Network

to Provision of Health Care Benefits to Employee's Same-Sex Spouse Social Security Number of marriage, divorce, etc., enter the name used previously. Address code. Please do not abbreviate the country name. Date of Marriage: ________________State of Marriage

Jacobs, Lucia

344

“It's not just about marriage; it's about antidiscrimination”: The California Supreme Court Decision and the Future of Same-Sex Marriage in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

The equal right to marry for same-sex couples in the United States has garnered increasing public support over time, with a number of state-level laws passed and others currently in contention. Beyond being a couples’ issue, arguments in support of legally recognizing same-sex marriage strike at the heart of LGBT civil rights and antidiscrimination efforts. This interview with Matt Coles,

Peter A. Newman

2010-01-01

345

Does Physical Abuse, Sexual Abuse, or Neglect in Childhood Increase the Likelihood of Same-sex Sexual Relationships and Cohabitation? A Prospective 30-year Follow-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing cross-sectional research suggests associations between physical and sexual abuse in childhood and same-sex sexual\\u000a orientation in adulthood. This study prospectively examined whether abuse and\\/or neglect in childhood were associated with\\u000a increased likelihood of same-sex partnerships in adulthood. The sample included physically abused (N = 85), sexually abused (N = 72), and neglected (N = 429) children (ages 0–11) with documented cases during 1967–1971 who were

Helen W. Wilson; Cathy Spatz Widom

2010-01-01

346

Special Article: The American Academy of Pediatrics Coparent or Second-Parent Adoption by Same-Sex Parents Policy Statement: Its Science, Its Implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In February 2002, the American Academy of Pediatrics released a Policy Statement entitled Coparent or Second-Parent Adoption by Same-Sex Parents encouraging members to “Advocate for initiatives that establish permanency through coparent or second-parent adoption for children of same-sex partners.” The Policy Statement is based upon the best available science and has resulted in a wide-ranging debate on lesbian, gay, bisexual,

Kenneth Haller

2002-01-01

347

A same-sex stepparent shortens a prebreeder's duration on the natal territory: tests of two hypotheses in Florida scrub-jays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prebreeders of the Florida scrub-jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) are less likely to be found on their natal territories with a same-sex stepparent than with parents or an opposite-sex stepparent.\\u000a We tested two models that had been proposed to account for this sexual asymmetry. The dominance hypothesis states that stepparents\\u000a perceive same-sex prebreeders as competitors, primarily for a mate, so behave aggressively

Jill M. Goldstein; Glen E. Woolfenden; Jack P. Hailman

1998-01-01

348

The Push-Pull of Policy Pressure: A Qualitative Exploration of the Experiences of Same-Sex Marriage Policies Among Non-Metropolitan GLB Individuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is a qualitative exploration of the experiences of marriage policies among people in same-sex relationships living in non-metropolitan United States areas. Although numerous studies have investigated the financial and legal costs and benefits of same-sex marriage policies, research examining experiences of the relational effects of these policies is limited. Using a grounded theory methodology, a core category, “the

Julie L. Shulman; Valerie Weck; Stephanie Schwing; Tracy Smith; Erin Coale

2009-01-01

349

The inappropriateness of psycho-social models of risk behaviour for understanding HIV-related risk practices among Glasgow male prostitutes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much the most common models of HIV-related risk behaviour are those psychosocial models derived from studies of health behaviour and tested on large interview samples of American gay men. These models were not appropriate for understanding risk behaviour among 32 Glasgow male prostitutes. Whereas psycho-social models conceive of risk behaviour as volitional and individualistic, ethnographic data indicate that the male

M. J. Bloor; N. P. McKeganey; A. Finlay; M. A. Barnard

1992-01-01

350

Nutritional effects on male calling behaviour in the variable field cricket.  

PubMed

In the variable field cricket, Gryllus lineaticeps, females prefer higher chirp rates and longer chirp durations in male calling song. Higher chirp rates are energetically more expensive to produce, but the energetic cost of calling does not vary with chirp duration. We tested the hypothesis that nutrition affects male chirp rate and chirp duration. Full-sibling brothers of similar age were placed on high- and low-nutrition feeding regimes. There was no effect of feeding regime on male weight; neither group showed a significant change in weight, and the two groups did not differ from each other in weight change. However, males on the high-nutrition feeding regime both called more frequently and called at higher chirp rates when they did call. The two groups did not differ in chirp duration, the duration of pulses within chirps or chirp dominant frequency. These results suggest that females select mates based on one nutrition-dependent call character (chirp rate) and one nutrition-independent call character (chirp duration). In addition, because males in the two groups did not show significant differences in weight change, and because males on the high-nutrition feeding regime engaged in energetically more expensive calling, these results suggest that males invest any excess energy above their basic maintenance requirements in the production of call types that increase their attractiveness to females. The absence of a relationship between body condition and calling song structure for males in the field may be a consequence of this pattern of energy allocation. Copyright 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:10053075

Wagner; Hoback

1999-01-01

351

Personality disorder and offending behaviour: findings from the national survey of male prisoners in England and Wales  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies have related mental disorder and antisocial personality disorder to criminal behaviour, but little is known about the associations with other personality disorders. The aim of this study was to examine independent associations between offending behaviour over the lifetime and personality disorder in a representative sample of male offenders. A two-stage survey was carried out among prisoners in all

Amanda D. L. Roberts; Jeremy W. Coid

2010-01-01

352

Behavioural and hormonal responses to capture stress in the male red-sided garter snake, Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis  

Microsoft Academic Search

We measured the behavioural and hormonal responses to capture stress in male red-sided garter snakes. Four hours of capture stress resulted in no suppression of mating behaviour relative to control individuals. In contrast, the same stress resulted in a significant increase in plasma levels of corticosterone and a significant decrease in plasma levels of testosterone. There was a significant negative

Ignacio T. Moore; Michael P. Lemaster; Robert T. Mason

2000-01-01

353

Handling effects on body weight and behaviour of group-housed male rabbits in a laboratory setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the study described in this paper we focus on the behaviour of male rabbits under modified housing conditions. We investigated whether handling has an effect on the behavioural stress response and whether this response is related to the coping strategy of the rabbits. Furthermore we studied the effect of handling from birth onwards on body weight and dominance.To assess

Cynthia M. Verwer; Geert van Amerongen; Ruud van den Bos; Coenraad F. M. Hendriksen

2009-01-01

354

"Same-Sex Relationship in a Straight World": Individual and Societal Influences on Power and Control in Young Men's Relationships.  

PubMed

Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) continue to experience higher rates of HIV infection than other populations. Recently, there have been recommendations to consider HIV prevention at the dyadic or couple level. Using a dyadic approach to HIV prevention would also address an unaddressed concern related to intimate partner violence (IPV) among YMSM. Although research on IPV among YMSM is still in its infancy, great strides have been made in the past 10 years to describe the prevalence and related correlates of IPV within older adult same-sex relationships. These studies have found rates of IPV among MSM to be similar to rates among heterosexual women, and to be on the rise. The present study is designed to provide insight into how power is conceptualized within YMSM relationships and the role it may play in relationship challenges. This study draws from qualitative data collected from 11 focus groups with 86 YMSM and 26 individual semi-structured interviews to understand relationship challenges and the experiences of YMSM involved in partner violence. YMSM described relationship power as stemming from numerous sources including sexual positioning, gender roles, education, income, prior relationship experiences, and internalized homophobia. The findings have a number of implications for service providers and program design. Interventionists and other researchers need to consider power dynamics and other contextual elements of IPV before effective interventions can be developed for YMSM and other sexual minority populations. PMID:24811283

Kubicek, Katrina; McNeeley, Miles; Collins, Shardae

2015-01-01

355

Chinese male victims in intimate partner violence in the United States: examining help-seeking behaviours through a systems perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few researchers who studied intimate partner violence (IPV) have focused on the relationship between the needs of male victims and their help-seeking behaviours. In addition, there is a lack of research relating to the needs of Chinese male victims of IPV. To facilitate research in this area, the authors utilized a dynamic systems perspective to build a conceptual framework to

Venus Tsui; Monit Cheung

2011-01-01

356

Same-sex cohabiting elders versus different-sex cohabiting and married elders: effects of relationship status and sex of partner on economic and health outcomes.  

PubMed

In this article, I use pooled data from the 2008-2010 American Community Surveys to examine outcomes for different-sex married, different-sex cohabiting, and same-sex cohabiting elders across several key economic and health indicators, as well as other demographic characteristics. The findings suggest that elders in same-sex cohabiting partnerships differ from those in different-sex marriages and different-sex cohabiting relationships in terms of both financial and health outcomes, and that women in same-sex cohabiting partnerships fare worse than men or women in other couple types. The results indicate that financial implications related to the sex of one's partner might be more predictive of economic and health outcomes in old age, rather than solely access to legal marriage. Nonetheless, findings suggest that individuals in same-sex cohabiting partnerships might experience worse outcomes in old age as a result of cumulative effects across the life course from both the sex of their partner (in the case of female couples) as well as their lack of access to benefits associated with marriage. Accordingly, these findings demonstrate that persons in same-sex cohabiting partnerships require unique policy considerations to address health and economic concerns in old age. PMID:24267753

Baumle, Amanda K

2014-01-01

357

Acute trazodone and quipazine treatment attenuates apomorphine-induced aggressive behaviour in male rats without major impact on emotional behaviour or monoamine content post mortem  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have studied the effect of acute trazodone (3–20 mg kg?1) and quipazine (1–3 mg kg?1) treatment on the apomorphine-induced (1 mg kg?1, once daily over 2 weeks) aggressive behaviour in male Wistar rats. All doses of trazodone and quipazine tested attenuated the aggressiveness as evidenced by the abolished intensity of aggressive behaviour and increased time of latency before the

Ruth Rudissaar; Katrin Pruus; Annika Vaarmann; Piret Pannel; Tatjana Skrebuhhova-malmros; Lembit Allikmets; Vallo Matto

2001-01-01

358

Neural pathways mediating control of reproductive behaviour in male Japanese quail  

PubMed Central

The sexually dimorphic medial preoptic nucleus (POM) in Japanese quail has for many years been the focus of intensive investigations into its role in reproductive behaviour. The present paper delineates a sequence of descending pathways that finally reach sacral levels of the spinal cord housing motor neurons innervating cloacal muscles involved in reproductive behaviour. We first retrogradely labeled the motor neurons innervating the large cloacal sphincter muscle (mSC) that forms part of the foam gland complex (Seiwert and Adkins-Regan, 1998, Brain Behav Evol 52:61–80) and then putative premotor nuclei in the brainstem, one of which was nucleus retroambigualis (RAm) in the caudal medulla. Anterograde tracing from RAm defined a bulbospinal pathway, terminations of which overlapped the distribution of mSC motor neurons and their extensive dorsally directed dendrites. Descending input to RAm arose from an extensive dorsomedial nucleus of the intercollicular complex (DM-ICo), electrical stimulation of which drove vocalizations. POM neurons were retrogradely labeled by injections of tracer into DM-ICo, but POM projections largely surrounded DM, rather than penetrated it. Thus, although a POM projection to ICo was shown, a POM projection to DM must be inferred. Nevertheless, the sequence of projections in the male quail from POM to cloacal motor neurons strongly resembles that in rats, cats and monkeys for the control of reproductive behaviour, as largely defined by Holstege and co-workers (e.g., Holstege et al., 1997, Neuroscience 80: 587–598). PMID:23225613

Wild, J Martin; Balthazart, Jacques

2012-01-01

359

Effects of Chlorophytum borivilianum on sexual behaviour and sperm count in male rats.  

PubMed

This study was designed to evaluate the aphrodisiac and spermatogenic potential of the aqueous extract of dried roots of Chlorophytum borivilianum (CB) in rats. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups. Rats were orally treated with (1) CONTROL GROUP: distilled water; (2) CB 125 mg/kg/day; (3) CB 250 mg/kg/day; and (4) Viagra((R)) group: 4 mg/kg/day sildenafil citrate and their sexual behaviour was monitored 3 h later using a receptive female. Their sexual behaviour was evaluated on days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 of treatment by pairing with a pro-oestrous female rat. For sperm count the treatment was continued further in all groups except the Viagra((R)) group for 60 days. At 125 mg/kg, CB had a marked aphrodisiac action, increased libido, sexual vigor and sexual arousal. Similarly, at the higher dose (250 mg/kg) all the parameters of sexual behaviour were enhanced, but showed a saturation effect after day 14. On day 60 the sperm count increased significantly in both the CB groups, 125 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg, in a dose dependent manner. Thus, roots of Chlorophytum borivilianum can be useful in the treatment of certain forms of sexual inadequacies, such as premature ejaculation and oligospermia. PMID:18412148

Kenjale, Rakesh; Shah, Riddhi; Sathaye, Sadhana

2008-06-01

360

What difference does a civil union make? Changing public policies and the experiences of same-sex couples: comment on Solomon, Rothblum, and Balsam (2004).  

PubMed

When Vermont became the first state in the United States to legalize civil unions for same-sex couples, it marked an important milestone in lesbian and gay Americans' struggle for equal rights. Against this background, S. E. Solomon, E. D. Rothblum, and K. F. Balsam's (2004) study, the first to examine experiences of same-sex couples who have undertaken civil unions, is a significant effort. The study provides valuable data about these couples, yet much remains to be learned. Further study of the impact of changing legal landscapes on experiences of same-sex couples and their families has the potential to add significantly to knowledge about contemporary family lives. PMID:15222834

Patterson, Charlotte J

2004-06-01

361

Risk and Ethical Concerns of Hunting Male Elephant: Behavioural and Physiological Assays of the Remaining Elephants  

PubMed Central

Background Hunting of male African elephants may pose ethical and risk concerns, particularly given their status as a charismatic species of high touristic value, yet which are capable of both killing people and damaging infrastructure. Methodology/Principal Findings We quantified the effect of hunts of male elephants on (1) risk of attack or damage (11 hunts), and (2) behavioural (movement dynamics) and physiological (stress hormone metabolite concentrations) responses (4 hunts) in Pilanesberg National Park. For eleven hunts, there were no subsequent attacks on people or infrastructure, and elephants did not break out of the fenced reserve. For three focal hunts, there was an initial flight response by bulls present at the hunting site, but their movements stabilised the day after the hunt event. Animals not present at the hunt (both bulls and herds) did not show movement responses. Physiologically, hunting elephant bulls increased faecal stress hormone levels (corticosterone metabolites) in both those bulls that were present at the hunts (for up to four days post-hunt) and in the broader bull and breeding herd population (for up to one month post-hunt). Conclusions/Significance As all responses were relatively minor, hunting male elephants is ethically acceptable when considering effects on the remaining elephant population; however bulls should be hunted when alone. Hunting is feasible in relatively small enclosed reserves without major risk of attack, damage, or breakout. Physiological stress assays were more effective than behavioural responses in detecting effects of human intervention. Similar studies should evaluate intervention consequences, inform and improve best practice, and should be widely applied by management agencies. PMID:18560517

Burke, Tarryne; Page, Bruce; Van Dyk, Gus; Millspaugh, Josh; Slotow, Rob

2008-01-01

362

Knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases and sexual behaviours among Malaysian male youths.  

PubMed

This study examines the knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among male youths in Malaysia. A self-administered survey was carried out on a sample of 952 never-married males aged 15-24 years. The respondents were asked about their knowledge of STDs, how these diseases get transmitted and their sexual behaviours. The data showed that 92% of the respondents knew of at least one STD (syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydia, herpes, genital warts, yeast infection, trichomoniasis or HIV/AIDS). About 95% of them knew of at least one method of STD transmission. Urban and tertiary-educated male youths showed a substantially higher proportion of awareness of STDs and transmission methods compared with their rural and less-educated counterparts. The data also indicated that 10% of the study sample admitted to having had sexual experiences. There were still a large proportion of the respondents who were not aware of STDs other than syphilis and HIV/AIDS and the means of transmission, such as multiple sex partners, including those who claimed to be sexually active. Thus there is a need for more concerted efforts to disseminate information on STDs and transmission methods to a wider audience in Malaysia, especially youths in rural areas. PMID:23480474

Awang, Halimah; Wong, Li Ping; Jani, Rohana; Low, Wah Yun

2014-03-01

363

Balancing the competing requirements of air-breathing and display behaviour during male-male interactions in Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens.  

PubMed

Air-breathing fish of the Anabantoidei group meet their metabolic requirements for oxygen through both aerial and aquatic gas exchange. Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens are anabantoids that frequently engage in aggressive male-male interactions which cause significant increases in metabolic rate and oxygen requirements. These interactions involve opercular flaring behaviour that is thought to limit aquatic oxygen uptake, and combines with the increase in metabolic rate to cause an increase in air-breathing behaviour. Air-breathing events interrupt display behaviour and increase risk of predation, raising the question of how Siamese fighting fish manage their oxygen requirements during agonistic encounters. Using open-flow respirometry, we measured rate of oxygen consumption in displaying fish to determine if males increase oxygen uptake per breath to minimise visits to the surface, or increase their reliance on aquatic oxygen uptake. We found that the increased oxygen requirements of Siamese fighting fish during display behaviour were met by increased oxygen uptake from the air with no significant changes in aquatic oxygen uptake. The increased aerial oxygen uptake was achieved almost entirely by an increase in air-breathing frequency. We conclude that limitations imposed by the reduced gill surface area of air-breathing fish restrict the ability of Siamese fighting fish to increase aquatic uptake, and limitations of the air-breathing organ of anabantoids largely restrict their capacity to increase oxygen uptake per breath. The resulting need to increase surfacing frequency during metabolically demanding agonistic encounters has presumably contributed to the evolution of the stereotyped surfacing behaviour seen during male-male interactions, during which one of the fish will lead the other to the surface, and each will take a breath of air. PMID:23178457

Alton, Lesley A; Portugal, Steven J; White, Craig R

2013-02-01

364

Behavioural response of female dark-eyed juncos to the experimental removal of their mates: implications for the evolution of male parental care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male dark-eyed juncos, Junco hyemah.s, are monogamous and normally help females leed nestlings. We removed males at hatching of their eggs and examined female parental behaviour in response to male removal. We compared parental behaviour of unaided females (experimentals) with that of (l) lemales aideci by their matcs (control females) and (2) females and their mates working together (control pairs).

LICIA WOLF; ELLEN D. KETTERSON; V NOLANJR

1990-01-01

365

Gender Differences in College Students' Perceptions of Same-Sex Sexual Harassment: The Influence of Physical Attractiveness and Attitudes toward Lesbians and Gay Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined college students' perceptions of same-sex harassment as a function of the observer's gender, the initiator's physical attractiveness, and observers' attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. Ninety-six college students read a scenario portraying a professor's sexual advances toward a student. The Perception of Harassment…

Castillo, Yenys; Muscarella, Frank; Szuchman, Lenore T.

2011-01-01

366

A Clear Stand: Religious Schools Are Being Pressed to Spell Out Their Policies Regarding Gay Students and the Children of Same-Sex Couples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author reports how religious schools are being pressed to spell out their policies regarding gay students and the children of same-sex couples. As homosexuality has become one of the fiercest battlefronts in the "culture wars," religious schools have found it harder to exclude gays or their children without lawsuits or…

Zehr, Mary Ann

2006-01-01

367

Gay and Lesbian Families in the United States: Same-Sex Unmarried Partner Households. A Preliminary Analysis of 2000 United States Census Data.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents information from the 2000 United States Census on gay and lesbian families. It notes that the 2000 numbers for same-sex unmarried partner households are a dramatic increase from 1990, but the total number still represents an undercount of the actual number of gay or lesbian coupled households in the country. The Human Rights…

Smith, David M.; Gates, Gary J.

368

‘I myself had a sweetie …’: re?thinking female same?sex intimacy beyond the institution of marriage and identity politics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is understood as an intervention into current debates around the question of rights in relation to sexuality and in particular to issues of same?sex marriages and alternative family structures. As the interpretation of rights in relation to sexuality generally focuses on gay identities, this article reflects on the effects of these discourses on non?normative modes of sexuality and

Henriette Gunkel

2010-01-01

369

A Window Illuminating the Reservations of Black Men Who Have Sex with Men in Fully Embracing the Institution of Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this discussion is to examine some of the variables that impact black men who have sex with men (MSM) embracing the institution of same-sex marriage. At the cornerstone of this discussion is the notion that one must embark upon a contextual analysis if one hopes to understand human behavior and attitudes. This contextual analysis explores socio-cultural influences,

Carlton W. Parks JR

2010-01-01

370

Intergenerational Transmission of Dating Aggression as a Function of Witnessing Only Same Sex Parents vs. Opposite Sex Parents vs. Both Parents as Perpetrators of Domestic Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the association between witnessing interparental violence as a child, and the risk for perpetrating and being the victim of dating aggression as an adult, in an undergraduate sample. Specifically, this study tested a modeling hypothesis whereby witnessing a same sex parent vs. an opposite sex parent exclusively in the aggressor role would be more highly associated

M. Kay Jankowski; Harold Leitenberg; Kris Henning; Patricia Coffey

1999-01-01

371

‘This has happened since ancient times…it's something that you are born with’: ancestral wives among same-sex sangomas in South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is an abbreviated form of chapter seven of Tommy Boys, Lesbian Men and Ancestral Wives: Female same-sex practices in Africa. The research consists of five life story interviews as part of a larger oral history project of the Gay and Lesbian Archives of South Africa. We demonstrate that there are traditional and institutionalised ways in which those African

Nkunzi Nkabinde; Ruth Morgan

2006-01-01

372

‘It was as useful as a chocolate kettle’: sex education in the lives of same?sex?attracted young people in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sex education is a contested site in the school curriculum as communities grapple with who should teach young people about sex and how it should be taught. In this paper we ask whether same?sex?attracted young people are being exposed to appropriate and relevant sex education at school, and if they are not whether it is necessary that sex education be

Lynne Hillier; Anne Mitchell

2008-01-01

373

Effect of Socioeconomic Status on General and At-Risk High School Boys' Willingness to Accept Same-Sex Peers with LD (Learning Disabilities)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thirty-eight educationally successful and 33 educationally at-risk high school boys from varying SES backgrounds participated in a study to determine their willingness to allow same-sex peers with LD to participate in activities in the school, out-of-school, and both contexts. Kruskal Wallis One-way Analysis of Variance of Ranks results indicated…

Plata, Maximino; Trusty, Jerry

2005-01-01

374

This Get Started Guide will introduce you to Castlight, a tool that will enable Purdue University employees, spouses/same-sex domestic  

E-print Network

to become better health care consumers. User Registration - Start at www.purdue.edu/castlight 1. Click the "Create Account" page. 3. You may invite your spouse/ same-sex domestic partner and adult children covered is adding more prices every month. TIP: If you want to see fewer search results, search within a smaller

Ginzel, Matthew

375

Same-Sex Marriage\\/Constitutionalism and their Centrality to Equality Rights in Hong Kong: A Comparative–Socio-Legal Appraisal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whether an individual has a right to marry another person of the same sex has garnered tremendous judicial, political and scholarly attention in the past decade, and it certainly will continue to do so in the years to come, for such a right is one which sexual minority rights activists consider to be part and parcel of their struggle for

Phil C. W. Chan

2007-01-01

376

The Effect of Requiring Private Employers to Extend Health Benefit Eligibility to Same-Sex Partners of Employees: Evidence from California  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health disparities related to sexual orientation are well documented and may be due to unequal access to a partner's employer-sponsored insurance (ESI). We provide the literature's first evaluation of legislation enacted by California in 2005 that required private employers within the state to treat employees in committed same-sex relationships in…

Buchmueller, Thomas C.; Carpenter, Christopher S.

2012-01-01

377

The relationship between hostility and perceived parental rearing behaviour: A study of male myocardial infarction patients and healthy controls  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between perceived parental rearing behaviour and individual differences in hostility in a sample of 67 middle-aged male myocardial infarction patients and 139 healthy neighbourhood controls. The EMBU was used to measure perceptions of parental rearing behaviour. Hostility was assessed by means of the Cook-Medley Hostility (Ho) scale and the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI). The present

Cor Meesters; Peter Muris

1996-01-01

378

Effect of Bombax ceiba L. on spermatogenesis, sexual behaviour and erectile function in male rats.  

PubMed

A number of herbal drugs are advocated in the traditional Ayurvedic literature for the improvement of overall sexual function. Young roots of Bombax ceiba Linn. (Fam. Bombacaceae) [correction added after online publication 1 August 2011: the family of Bombax ceiba was incorrectly mentioned as Orchidaceae. It has been corrected to Bombacaceae] also known as Semal Musli are used traditionally in Indian subcontinent as sexual stimulant. Its juice is considered nutritive and restorative tonic. Lyophilised aqueous extract of roots was studied for effect on sexual behaviour and spermatogenesis in male albino rats. Administration of 100 mg Kg(-1) body weight of aqueous extract influenced the five parameters evaluated in vivo. Sexual behaviour analysis in the presence of a female rate, serum testosterone level, anabolic effects, epididymal sperm count and seminal fructose level were the parameters evaluated. In B. ceiba extract-treated animals, a gain in body and sexual organ weights was observed. Mount, intromission and ejaculation frequencies were significantly improved (P < 0.05). An increase in serum testosterone levels was also observed, but it was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Seminal fructose content and epididymal sperm count were significantly improved as well. Penile erection index was also higher compared to control group animals. Hesitation time was significantly reduced (P < 0.01), and copulatory rate was doubled in treated animals compared with control group animals. PMID:21806665

Bhargava, C; Thakur, M; Yadav, S K

2012-05-01

379

Behavioural and neuroendocrine adaptations to repeated stress during puberty in male golden hamsters.  

PubMed

In adult animals, the consequences of stress are often severe and long lasting. Repeated subjugation in adult male golden hamsters inhibits aggression and increases submissive and avoidant behaviours. By contrast, subjugation during puberty enhances offensive aggression. The goals of this study were to characterize behavioural and neuroendocrine responses of naïve and repeatedly subjugated juveniles to social defeat and to assess potential recovery from social stress. From the onset of puberty on postnatal day 28 (P28) to mid puberty (P42), animals were either socially subjugated or placed in a clean and empty cage for 20 min daily. The subjugated and control groups were further divided into subgroups and sacrificed under basal conditions or after social defeat on P28, P35 (early puberty), P45 (mid puberty) and P70 (early adulthood). On P35 and P45, repeatedly subjugated juveniles showed a complete inhibition of olfactory investigation (i.e. risk assessment) towards aggressive adults. Repeatedly subjugated also animals had lower postdefeat cortisol levels than controls on P45. Interestingly, basal cortisol levels increased gradually during puberty but did not differ between treatment groups at any point. Repeated subjugation was also associated with increased tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity (ir-TH) within the extended medial amygdala. After a 4-week recovery period, none of these variables differed between subjugated and control groups. In an additional experiment, subjugated adults also had increased ir-TH in the medial extended amygdala, suggesting that these neurones are particularly responsive to social stress. In conclusion, puberty may be a developmental period characterized by behavioural and neuroendocrine plasticity in stress responsiveness. Furthermore, peri-pubertal changes in stress hormones may explain why juvenile hamsters are more resilient to social stress than adults. PMID:15344915

Wommack, J C; Salinas, A; Melloni, R H; Delville, Y

2004-09-01

380

Social context of HIV risk behaviours among male-to-female transgenders of colour.  

PubMed

To explore the social context of drug use and sexual behaviours that put male-to-female (MTF) transgenders at risk for HIV, focus groups were conducted consisting of African American, Latina and Asian and Pacific Islander MTF transgenders (N = 48) who reside or work in San Francisco, California. Participants were likely to report having unprotected sex with primary partners to signify love and emotional connection, as well as to receive gender validation from their partners. In contrast, viewing sex work with customers as a business encouraged intentious to use condoms. Safer sex intentions with customers were frequently undermined by urgent financial needs, which stemmed from transphobia, employment discrimination and costly procedures associated with gender transition. Participants reported using drugs as a way to cope with or escape life stresses associated with relationships, sex work, transphobia and financial hardship. Interventions with at-risk MTF transgenders should address the interpersonal and social context of unsafe sex and drug use, particularly the unique roles of relationship issues with male partners, stigma, discrimination and community norms regarding sex work and drug use. PMID:15370060

Nemoto, T; Operario, D; Keatley, J; Villegas, D

2004-08-01

381

The effect of breeding density and male quality on paternity-assurance behaviours in the house sparrow, Passer domesticus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several factors can influence the risk of cuckoldry through extra-pair paternity for male birds. The number of neighbouring\\u000a males is thought to affect the chance of females engaging in extra-pair copulations, and species which breed both socially\\u000a (colonially) and solitarily provide an ideal opportunity to test the effect of close proximity on extra-pair behaviour and\\u000a paternity guards. In this study,

Herbert Hoi; Hans Tost; Matteo Griggio

2011-01-01

382

Predation threat exerts specific effects on rat maternal behaviour and anxiety-related behaviour of male and female offspring  

E-print Network

January 2009 Available online xxxx Keywords: Predator odour Stress Sex difference Hippocampus NGFI-A GRPredation threat exerts specific effects on rat maternal behaviour and anxiety-related behaviour, Long­Evans rat dams were exposed to the odour of a predator (cat) at two different time points during

Champagne, Frances A.

383

Behavioural therapy based on distraction alleviates impaired fear extinction in male serotonin transporter knockout rats  

PubMed Central

Background The “biological susceptibility” model posits that some individuals, by genetic predisposition, are highly sensitive to environmental stimuli. Exposure to adverse stimuli leads to negative outcomes, and better outcomes follow favourable stimuli. Recent studies indicate that individuals carrying the low-activity (short; s) variant of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT)-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) show an enhanced vulnerability to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Simultaneously, they respond poorly to exposure therapy, the first-line treatment to enhance fear extinction in individuals with PTSD. Given that s-allele carriers also show improved adaptive responding when exposed to positive stimuli, we hypothesized that this trait could be used to offset impaired fear extinction. Methods We explored this hypothesis preclinically using wild-type and 5-HTT knockout (5-HTT?/?) male rats (n = 36) that share behavioural similarities with 5-HTTLPR s-allele carriers. Subsequent to cued fear conditioning, animals were tested for short- (1 and 2 days postconditioning) and long-term (6 days postconditioning) fear extinction in the absence or presence of a secondary “distracting” stimulus predicting the delivery of sucrose pellets. Results Introducing a secondary stimulus predicting sucrose pellets that distracts attention away from the fear-predicting stimulus led to a long-lasting improvement of impaired fear extinction in 5-HTT?/? male rats. Limitations The context-dependency of the efficacy of the “distraction therapy” was not tested. In addition, it remains to be clarified whether the positive valence of the distracting stimulus is critical for the distraction of attention or whether a neutral and/or novel stimulus can induce similar effects. Finally, although of lesser importance from a therapeutic perspective, underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Conclusion These data indicate that positive environmental stimuli can be used to offset heightened responses to negative stimuli, particularly in individuals characterized by inherited 5-HTT downregulation and high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. PMID:22353635

Nonkes, Lourens J.P.; de Pooter, Maaike; Homberg, Judith R.

2012-01-01

384

Working With What We've Got: Perceptions of Barriers and Supports Among Small-Metropolitan Same-Sex Adopting Couples  

PubMed Central

In seeking to adopt, lesbians and gay men may confront various barriers and obstacles. Ideally they have access to a variety of support resources that can help to buffer the negative effects of these barriers. However, lesbians and gay men living in small-metropolitan communities may have limited access to support resources. The current qualitative study examined the perceptions of 37 same-sex couples who were pursuing adoption while living outside of large metropolitan cities, with attention to the barriers these couples encountered during the adoption process, and the resources they drew upon to cope with such challenges. Findings indicated that same sex couples living in small-metropolitan areas confronted several major barriers in the adoption process, such as a lack of geographically accessible gay-friendly adoption agencies. Despite limited access to support, participants showed evidence of notable resourcefulness. For example, participants with limited access to formal support groups sought out informal supports instead. PMID:21949461

Kinkler, Lori A.; Goldberg, Abbie E.

2011-01-01

385

Working With What We've Got: Perceptions of Barriers and Supports Among Small-Metropolitan Same-Sex Adopting Couples.  

PubMed

In seeking to adopt, lesbians and gay men may confront various barriers and obstacles. Ideally they have access to a variety of support resources that can help to buffer the negative effects of these barriers. However, lesbians and gay men living in small-metropolitan communities may have limited access to support resources. The current qualitative study examined the perceptions of 37 same-sex couples who were pursuing adoption while living outside of large metropolitan cities, with attention to the barriers these couples encountered during the adoption process, and the resources they drew upon to cope with such challenges. Findings indicated that same sex couples living in small-metropolitan areas confronted several major barriers in the adoption process, such as a lack of geographically accessible gay-friendly adoption agencies. Despite limited access to support, participants showed evidence of notable resourcefulness. For example, participants with limited access to formal support groups sought out informal supports instead. PMID:21949461

Kinkler, Lori A; Goldberg, Abbie E

2011-10-01

386

The effects of nongender-role stereotyped, same-sex role models in storybooks on the self-esteem of children in grade three  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effect of nonstereotyped, same-sex role models on the self-esteem of children in Grade Three. There were 346 subjects: 315 white Australian, 15 Asian, 3 Aboriginal, 2 African, 5 Middle Eastern, and 6 European. Five groups were formed from these 346 children. Four of the groups were exposed to 12 nongender-role stereotyped stories over 4 weeks that

Jan M. Ochman

1996-01-01

387

Genetic and environmental in£uence on language impairment in 4-year-old same-sex and opposite-sex twins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: We investigated the aetiology of language impairment in 579 four-year-old twins with low language performance and their co-twins, members of 160 MZ twin pairs, 131 same-sex DZ pairs and 102 opposite-sex DZ pairs. Methods: Language impairment in 4-year-olds was defined by scores below the 15th percentile on a general factor derived from an extensive language test battery. Language impairment

Essi Viding; Frank M. Spinath; Thomas S. Price; Dorothy V. M. Bishop; Philip S. Dale; Robert Plomin

2004-01-01

388

Local impacts of religious discourses on rights to express same-sex sexual desires in Peri-Urban Rio de Janeiro  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on a study that examined how religious discourses of inclusion and exclusion—in Roman Catholic, evangelical\\u000a Protestant, and Afro-Brazilian religious traditions—affected people’s rights to express same-sex sexual desires, behaviors,\\u000a and identities in the socioeconomically marginalized urban periphery of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Using extended ethnographic\\u000a observation of institutions and religious events over a period of 2 years, the

Jonathan García; Miguel Muñoz Laboy; Vagner de Almeida; Richard Parker

2009-01-01

389

Understanding male sexual behaviour in planning HIV prevention programmes: lessons from Laos, a low prevalence country  

PubMed Central

Methods Focus group discussions were conducted with a range of young men in Vientiane, Laos; interviews were conducted with male sex workers. A questionnaire survey was conducted with a purposive sample of 800 young men. Results Most young men initiate sex at an early age and have multiple sex partners. Married men are more likely to pay for sex and most sex for money is negotiated in non?brothel settings. Despite high reported condom use for last intercourse with a casual partner, decisions on condom use are subjective. Many men have extramarital sex when their partner is pregnant and post partum. 18.5% of men report having had sex with another man; most of these men also report having sex with women. Moreover, more men report having had anal sex with a woman than with a man. Conclusions Although not a probability sample survey, this study of a broad range of young men in Vientiane reveals sexual behaviours that could lead to accelerated HIV transmission. Education should emphasise the need to use condoms in all sexual encounters outside the primary relationship. This needs special emphasis when the partner is pregnant or post partum. Advice on safe sex with other men needs to be integrated into all sexual health education for young men. PMID:16581739

Toole, M J; Coghlan, B; Xeuatvongsa, A; Holmes, W R; Pheualavong, S; Chanlivong, N

2006-01-01

390

Can testosterone and corticosterone predict the rate of display of male sexual behaviour, development of secondary sexual characters and fertility potential in primary broiler breeders?  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. Genetic selection for growth to enhance production may be associated with stress and with modified physiological and behavioural phenotypes which depress male primary broiler breeder fertility.2. We hypothesised that male serum testosterone (T) and corticosterone (C) concentrations might correlate with fertility, sexual behaviour, and testicular, comb and wattle size.3. Cockerels from two genetic strains (A and B) of primary

S. Mcgary Brougher; I. Estevez; M. A. Ottinger

2005-01-01

391

Popularity among same-sex and cross-sex peers: a process-oriented examination of links to aggressive behaviors and depressive affect.  

PubMed

Popularity has been linked to heightened aggression and fewer depressive symptoms. The current study extends this literature by examining the unique contributions of same-sex and cross-sex popularity to children's development, as well as potential mediating processes. Third- and 4th-graders (212 boys, 250 girls) provided data at 3 time points over 2 school years. Data included peer-reported popularity, social exclusion, friendships, peer victimization, and aggression and self-reported social self-esteem and depressive affect. Same-sex and cross-sex popularity independently contributed to the prediction of aggression and depressive affect. Popularity was associated with heightened aggression through reduced social exclusion and was indirectly related to lower levels of depressive affect through increased friendships. For boys only, same-sex popularity was further associated with dampened depressive affect through reduced social exclusion and peer victimization and increased social self-esteem. Findings are discussed in light of the potential tradeoffs associated with popularity in preadolescence. PMID:24684714

Troop-Gordon, Wendy; Ranney, John D

2014-06-01

392

[Experience assisting an AIDS-infected homosexual patient and his same-sex partner make a do-not-resuscitate decision].  

PubMed

Family members play an important role in the process of writing advance directives. Homosexual men infected with HIV often wish to authorize their intimate same-sex partner or friends rather than immediate family members to make medical decisions on their behalf. Although same-sex marriage is currently illegal in Taiwan, HIV infected homosexual patients are able to write advance directives appointing their same-sex partner to be their surrogate decision maker for end-of-life medical decisions. This case report describes an experience assisting a homosexual patient with HIV to write his advance directives. The nurse assisted the patient and his partner to make a self-determined decision not to resuscitate. Family conferences held to discuss the patient's decisions regarding resuscitation helped legitimize his partner's primary role in making end-of-life healthcare decisions on his behalf. As an advocate for patient rights, nurses should understand the law as it relates to homosexuality and end-of-life decision making, inform patients on the durable power of autonomy, and help execute their advance directives. PMID:23034554

Wang, Shu-Jang; Lai, Pei-Yu; Liou, Siao-Ying; Ko, Wen-Chien; Ko, Nai-Ying

2012-10-01

393

Behavioural evidence of male volatile pheromones in the sex-role reversed wolf spiders Allocosa brasiliensis and Allocosa alticeps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of chemical signals in a sexual context is widespread in the animal kingdom. Most studies in spiders report the use of female pheromones that attract potential sexual partners. Allocosa brasiliensis and Allocosa alticeps are two burrowing wolf spiders that show sex-role reversal. Females locate male burrows and initiate courtship before males perform any detectable visual or vibratory signal. So, females of these species would be detecting chemical or mechanical cues left by males. Our objective was to explore the potential for male pheromones to play a role in mate detection in A. brasiliensis and A. alticeps. We designed two experiments. In Experiment 1, we tested the occurrence of male contact pheromones by evaluating female courtship when exposed to empty burrows constructed by males or females (control). In Experiment 2, we tested the existence of male volatile pheromones by evaluating female behaviour when exposed to artificial burrows connected to tubes containing males, females or empty tubes (control). Our results suggest the occurrence of male volatile pheromones that trigger female courtship in both Allocosa species. The sex-role reversal postulated for these wolf spiders could be driving the consequent reversal in typical pheromone-emitter and detector roles expected for spiders.

Aisenberg, Anita; Baruffaldi, Luciana; González, Macarena

2010-01-01

394

Male sexual harassment and female schooling behaviour in the eastern mosquitofish  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among poeciliid fish, male sexual harassment is often intense and is costly for females. In Gambusia holbrooki, sexual harassment can greatly reduce female foraging efficiency when an isolated female is harassed by a single male and these costs are negatively correlated with male length. However, when females are in groups, male harassment is diluted and female foraging efficiency increases. When

Marco Dadda; Andrea Pilastro; Angelo Bisazza

2005-01-01

395

To determine factors in an initiation of a same-sex relationship in rural China: using ethnographic decision model.  

PubMed

The sexual behaviour and HIV risks among Chinese MSM in rural areas are grossly under-researched. The aims of this study were to explore the process and formation as well as the factors in an initiation of sexual relationship or act in among MSM in this cultural setting. Twenty-four in-depth interviews and observation were conducted in Dali prefecture in two field visits in 2004 and the data were analysed using grounded theory and an ethnographic decision model. We found their sexual relationship can be understood as a negotiation process with self, family and society, some of which (e.g. emotional and physical needs; rationalization in choosing partners) are common in all MSM groups while others (e.g. sex hierarchy or role of family) are geographically and culturally more unique or prominent for rural China. By better understanding of these decision processes, more effective and target-orientated intervention programmes can be implemented fighting against HIV/AIDS in this sexually marginalized sub-group of the population. PMID:17712687

Wong, W C W; Kong, T S K

2007-08-01

396

Effects of trifluoromethyl ketones and related compounds on the EAG and behavioural responses to pheromones in male moths.  

PubMed

Trifluoromethyl ketones (TFMKs) and analogues affect pheromone detection and behaviour in male moths. 3-Octylthio-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-one (OTFP), one of the most effective antiesterase agents, decreased the EAG amplitude and increased the repolarization time in Spodoptera littoralis. It also modified EAG responses of Mamestra brassicae and Heliothis zea to their pheromones and analogues, containing an acetate, an alcohol or an aldehyde function. In addition, OTFP also reduced the amplitude of the EAG response to linalool, a monoterpenic alcohol, but not its kinetics. The responses of male S. littoralis to the pheromone in the wind tunnel were significantly reduced after pre-exposure to vapours of OTFP. Comparison of the activity of other TFMKs and analogues with that of OTFP revealed a good agreement on EAG and behaviour. The effects of TFMKs on the EAG kinetics are discussed considering the hypothesis of an inhibition of the pheromone deactivation in the antenna. PMID:9279464

Renou, M; Lucas, P; Malo, E; Quero, C; Guerrero, A

1997-08-01

397

Food restriction or sleep deprivation: Which exerts a greater influence on the sexual behaviour of male rats?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of food restriction (FR) and paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD), either alone or in combination, on sexual behaviours (mount, intromission and ejaculation) in adult male rats. Diet restriction began at weaning with 6g\\/day of food, and the amount of food was increased by 1g\\/week until it reached 15g\\/day amount (in adulthood).

Tathiana A. Alvarenga; Monica L. Andersen; Javier Velázquez-Moctezuma; Sergio Tufik

2009-01-01

398

Elasmobranch electroreceptive foraging behaviour: male-female interactions, choice and cognitive ability.  

E-print Network

??Aspects of electroreceptive foraging behaviour were investigated in a benthic elasmobranch, Scyliorhinus canicula (small-spotted catshark). The findings build on current knowledge of sexual conflict in… (more)

Kimber, J. A.

2008-01-01

399

Behavioural and hormonal responses to capture stress in the male red-sided garter snake, Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis.  

PubMed

We measured the behavioural and hormonal responses to capture stress in male red-sided garter snakes. Four hours of capture stress resulted in no suppression of mating behaviour relative to control individuals. In contrast, the same stress resulted in a significant increase in plasma levels of corticosterone and a significant decrease in plasma levels of testosterone. There was a significant negative correlation between plasma levels of corticosterone and testosterone in both control and capture-stress groups, suggesting that the increase in corticosterone directly drives the decrease in testosterone. While there was no relation between body size and initial plasma levels of the two steroids, longer individuals had a significantly greater increase in corticosterone following capture stress than did shorter individuals. Snakes display indeterminate growth, suggesting that older individuals have decreased sensitivity to negative feedback in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and thus hypersecrete glucocorticoids. These results suggest that male red-sided garter snakes have uncoupled their behavioural stress response from their hormonal stress response to maximize reproductive opportunities. Copyright 2000 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:10715174

Moore; Lemaster; Mason

2000-03-01

400

Alcohol and club drug use among same-sex attracted young people: associations with frequenting the lesbian and gay scene and other bars and nightclubs.  

PubMed

This study aimed to determine whether the lesbian and gay "scene" of bars and nightclubs is a more common site for club drug use than other bars and clubs. A cross-sectional, online survey was conducted with 254 same-sex attracted women and 318 men aged 18-25 in Sydney, Australia. Drug use was more likely in those who attended any venue type more frequently. Men, but not women, were more likely to report drug use in lesbian and gay venues than other venues. Club drug use may be more normalized within the lesbian and gay scene than elsewhere, particularly among young men. The study's limitations are noted. PMID:23127199

Lea, Toby; Reynolds, Robert; de Wit, John

2013-01-01

401

Sex and the sinner: Comparing religious and nonreligious same-sex attracted adults on internalized homonegativity and distress.  

PubMed

Homonegative prejudice has long been connected with poor psychological outcomes. These have often been purported to include internalized homonegativity (IH), an outcome regarded as especially detrimental given its association with a large number of adverse mental health correlates. Given the evidence that homonegative prejudice often prevails most strongly within many mainstream religious contexts, the current study examined whether religious lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals would possess higher levels of internalized homonegativity than their nonreligious, and formerly religious, LGB counterparts. To test this hypothesis, Christian, formerly Christian, and nonreligious Australian LGB respondents (N = 579), recruited through social media platforms and a diverse range of community groups, completed an online survey assessing IH; religion-sexuality distress; religious and familial homonegativity; sense of self; and outness. Ordinal logistic regressions revealed that Christian LGB respondents possessed significantly more IH than nonreligious respondents. Furthermore, perceiving greater homonegativity in one's religious and familial environments predicted higher levels of distress and IH among Christians specifically. Despite having apostatized, former Christians still reported greater religion-sexuality distress than nonreligious individuals, suggesting that the psychological effects of homonegative religious environments are potentially enduring. Across all respondents, IH was also greater for males, those who were less "out," and those who possessed a weaker sense of self. Findings generally support the premise that religious homonegativity places LGB Christians at additional psychological risk, with particular regard to IH and religion-sexuality identity conflict, and that both personal and interpersonal characteristics may exacerbate this risk. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25265218

Sowe, Babucarr J; Brown, Jac; Taylor, Alan J

2014-09-01

402

Spawning behaviour and sex hormone levels in adult and precocious brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) males and the effect of anosmia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary.   In the present experiment the behaviour and endocrine status of males of the brown trout, Salmo trutta L., (Salmoniformes: Salmonidae) were studied when males were kept in a stream tank with a nest digging female. Groups of\\u000a mature adult males and precocious intact or anosmic male parr were placed with the nesting female so that the group resembled\\u000a a

K. Håkan Olsén; J. Torbjörn Järvi; Ian Mayer; Erik Petersson; Frederieke Kroon

1998-01-01

403

Moderators of the relationship between masculinity and sexual prejudice in men: friendship, gender self-esteem, same-sex attraction, and religious fundamentalism.  

PubMed

Masculinity has been found to predict the sexual prejudice of heterosexual men against gay men. The present study investigated the role of four variables as moderators of the relationships between two masculinity constructs (endorsement of traditional masculinity ideology and gender role conflict) and sexual prejudice in men. The hypothesized moderators were: direct and indirect friendships with gay men, gender self-esteem, acknowledged same-sex attraction, and religious fundamentalism. A total of 383 men completed 8 scales plus a demographic questionnaire. Direct friendship strengthened the positive relationship between masculinity ideology and sexual prejudice, contrary to hypothesis. This finding could mean that high masculinity ideology scores reduced the likelihood that a man with many gay friends would let go of his prejudice. Direct friendship did not moderate the relationship between gender role conflict and sexual prejudice nor did indirect friendship moderate either relationship; however, both forms of friendship predicted prejudice, as hypothesized. Gender self-esteem strengthened the positive relationships between both masculinity variables and sexual prejudice as hypothesized. Same-sex attraction weakened the relationship between gender role conflict and sexual prejudice as hypothesized, but contrary to hypothesis did not moderate the relationship between masculinity ideology and sexual prejudice. Religious fundamentalism predicted prejudice, but showed no significant moderation. The results were discussed in terms of limitations and suggestions for future research and application. In conclusion, this line of investigation appears promising and should be continued and the present findings can be utilized in anti-prejudice social marketing campaigns and in counseling. PMID:24481497

Mellinger, Christopher; Levant, Ronald F

2014-04-01

404

Men and women as perpetrators and victims of sexual aggression in heterosexual and same-sex encounters: a study of first-year college students in Germany.  

PubMed

This study examined the prevalence of sexual aggression and victimization in a large convenience sample of N?=?2,149 first-year college students from different universities in Germany. Participants were asked about both victimization by, and perpetration of, sexual aggression since the age of 14. Both same-sex and heterosexual victim-perpetrator constellations were examined. Prevalence rates were established for different victim-perpetrator relationships (partners, acquaintances, strangers) and for incidents involving alcohol consumption by one or both partners. The overall perpetration rate was 13.2%, for men and 7.6% for women. The overall victimization rate was 35.9% for women and 19.4% for men. A disparity between victimization and perpetration reports was found for both men and women. Perpetration and victimization rates were highest among participants who had sexual contacts with both opposite-sex and same-sex partners. Sexual aggression and victimization rates were higher between current or former partners and acquaintances than between strangers. Alcohol consumption by one or both partners was involved in almost 75% of all victimization and almost 70% of all perpetration incidents. The findings portray a comprehensive picture of the scale of sexual aggression and victimization in college students with different sexual lifestyles. PMID:23629691

Krahé, Barbara; Berger, Anja

2013-01-01

405

Vigilance patterns of wintering Eurasian Wigeon: female benefits from male low-cost behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increased vigilance in male animals has been attributed to mate guarding (male investment hypothesis), to secondary sexual\\u000a characteristics increasing predation risk (male constraint hypothesis) or for the benefit to the female (female benefits\\u000a hypothesis). We studied Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope) while they grazed on dry land, a ‘risky’ foraging situation, at two points during the winter period (pre- and post-pair

Steven J. Portugal; Matthieu Guillemain

2011-01-01

406

On-ground housing in “Mice Drawer System” (MDS) cage affects locomotor behaviour but not anxiety in male mice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present study adult male mice were housed for 21 days in a housing modules of the Mice Drawer System (MDS). MDS is the facility that will support the research on board the International Space Station (ISS). Our investigation focused on: circadian rhythmicity of wide behavioural categories such as locomotor activity, food intake/drinking and resting; emotionality in the elevated plus maze (EPM); body weight. Housing in the MDS determined a strong up-regulation of activity and feeding behaviour and a concomitant decrease in inactivity. Importantly, housing in the MDS disrupted circadian rhythmicity in mice and also determined a decrease in body weight. Finally, when mice were tested in the EPM a clear hyperactivity (i.e. increased total transitions) was found, while no evidence for altered anxiety was detected. In conclusion, housing adult male mice in the MDS housing modules may affect their behaviour, circadian rhythmicity while having no effect on anxiety. It is suggested that to allow adaptation to the peculiar housing allowed by MDS a longer housing duration is needed.

Simone, Luciano; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Palanza, Paola; Parmigiani, Stefano

2008-03-01

407

The effect of neighbours and females on dawn and daytime singing behaviours by male chipping sparrows  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bird song may play an important role for communication among territorial neighbours, but the effect of neighbours on song use is still not well known. My previous field observations suggested that male chipping sparrows, Spizella passerina, use the dawn chorus for interactions among neighbouring males, and use day song for female attraction. To determine how these social factors may influence

Wan-Chun Liu

2004-01-01

408

Mate choice in the grey partridge, Perdix perdix : role of physical and behavioural male traits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The brown breast patch of the male grey partridge, the species' most conspicuous sexually dimorphic trait, was totally or partly bleached out, to test its influence on female preference. In mate-choice experiments, patch size (which was unaffected by early testosterone treatment) appeared to be unimportant: artificially and naturally bred females primarily selected males on the basis of their vocal performance.

LAURA BEANI; FRANCESCO DESSÌ-FULGHERI

1995-01-01

409

School Dropout, Problem Behaviour and Poor Academic Achievement: A Longitudinal View of Portuguese Male Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines school dropouts from the perspective of male adults themselves through interviews with offenders currently serving sentences. Participants were 10 Portuguese male inmates, between the ages of 19 and 46 years of age, incarcerated in two prison facilities on the Azores. Qualitative and interpretative methods were carried out…

Beatriz Saraiva, A.; Pereira, Beatriz O.; Zamith-Cruz, Judite

2011-01-01

410

Male sexual harassment and female schooling behaviour in the eastern mosquitofish  

E-print Network

8 December 2004; published online 21 June 2005; MS. number: 8207) Among poeciliid fish, male sexual that maximizes the reproductive success of one sex is detri- mental to the other sex (Parker 1979). A typical activity of males is costly to the female in terms of conspicuousness to predators (Magurran & Seghers 1994

Pilastro, Andrea

411

Effect of socioeconomic status on general and at-risk high school boys' willingness to accept same-sex peers with LD.  

PubMed

Thirty-eight educationally successful and 33 educationally at-risk high school boys from varying SES backgrounds participated in a study to determine their willingness to allow same-sex peers with LD to participate in activities in the school, out-of-school, and both contexts. Kruskal Wallis One-way Analysis of Valance of Ranks results indicated that, regardless of academic designation, boys from low SES backgrounds were more willing than their counterparts to accept peers with LD. Significant differences among SES groups were found in several activities performed in the out-of-school contexts, especially those with emotional or cognitive connotations. Discussion addresses the importance of training classroom teachers and general education students in maintaining an inclusive environment. PMID:15861617

Plata, Maximino; Trusty, Jerry

2005-01-01

412

Effects of extreme variation in female morph frequencies on the mating behaviour of male damselflies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Female-limited polymorphism is often attributed to selection to avoid excessive male mating attempts. It is encountered in\\u000a various taxonomic groups, but is particularly common in damselflies, where one female morph (andromorph) typically resembles\\u000a the conspecific male in colour pattern, while the other(s) (gynomorph(s)) do not. Two sets of theories have been proposed\\u000a to explain the phenomenon in damselflies, which can

Janice J. Ting; Jessica Bots; Felipe Pérez Jvostov; Hans van Gossum; Thomas N. Sherratt

2009-01-01

413

Arrival timing in subadult and adult Black Redstart males: competition-dependent behaviour?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The different arrival times of 1-year-old and older males is a widely recognised phenomenon in most migrating passerines. The converse pattern, i.e. the yearlings arriving at the breeding grounds at the same time as adults, has been reported only exceptionally. Two hypotheses have been formulated to explain the delayed arrival of yearling males: investment reduction, and energetic constraint hypotheses, respectively.

L. Schwarzová; P. Štros; D. Frynta; R. Fuchs

2010-01-01

414

Preventing behavioural interactions with a male facilitates sex change in female bluebanded gobies, Lythrypnus dalli  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sex change in marine teleost fishes is commonly regulated by social factors. In species that exhibit protogynous sex change,\\u000a such as the bluebanded goby Lythrypnus dalli, the most dominant female typically initiates sex change when a male is removed from the social group. Females can use visual,\\u000a chemical or tactile cues to assess the presence or absence of a male.

Varenka Lorenzi; Ryan L. Earley; Matthew S. Grober

2006-01-01

415

Meiotic behaviour and spermatogenesis in male mice heterozygous for translocation types also occurring in man  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this thesis a start was made with meiotic observations of mouse translocation types - a Robertsonian translocation and a translocation between a metacentric and an acrocentric chromosome - which also occur in man. It is generally accepted that, when no chromosomal rearrangements are involved, man shows a higher level of non-disjunction than the mouse. When the meiotic behaviour of

J. H. Nijhoff

1981-01-01

416

The Relationship between Lifestyle and Campus Eating Behaviours in Male and Female University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Poor nutritional practices and heightened levels of stress, two common attributes of university life, are strongly linked with weight gain and decreased health. Little research has examined the relationships between university students' lifestyle factors and campus eating behaviours; therefore, this study aimed to examine relationships…

Jackson, Rebecca A.; Berry, Tanya R.; Kennedy, Michael D.

2009-01-01

417

Maternal adrenal hormone secretion mediates behavioural alterations induced by prenatal stress in male and female rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prenatal stress in rats has been shown to impair the regulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis and predispose to anxiogenic and depressive-like behaviour. In a previous study, abolition of excess corticosterone (COR) release during stress by maternal adrenalectomy prevented the dysregulation of the HPA axis. In the present study, we determined whether excess maternal COR is also responsible

Gal Zagron; Marta Weinstock

2006-01-01

418

Pre-incarceration HIV risk behaviours of male and female inmates  

Microsoft Academic Search

In most countries, HIV and AIDS rates are higher among inmates than in the general population. As part of a series of studies aimed at examining the plausible links between HIV and incarceration in a State prison system in the United States (US), the present study examined pre-incarceration sexual and injection drug use behaviours of inmates and their demographic correlates.

T. C. Abiona; J. A. Balogun; A. S. Adefuye; P. E. Sloan

2009-01-01

419

Female pigeons, Columba livia, respond to multisensory audio\\/video playbacks of male courtship behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiple signals from different sensory channels can enhance, diminish, or have no effect on one another when they are combined into a multisensory signal. Simultaneous auditory and visual signals are known to be important in avian courtship behaviour, but less is known about how the signal components from the two sensory channels interact and which channel is relied upon more.

Sarah Partan; Sylvana Yelda; Virginia Price; Toru Shimizu

2005-01-01

420

The cultural, social and attitudinal context of male sexual behaviour in urban south-west Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1989 onward a research program based at Ondo State University, Nigeria, investigated the social and behavioural context of the sexually transmitted disease and AIDS epidemics (Orubuloye et al. 1994). Between 1989 and 1993 the researchers reached the conclusion that premarital and extramarital sexual activities were on a sufficient scale in Ondo State to maintain an STD epidemic and possibly

John C. Caldwell; Pat Caldwell

421

Stress, social behaviour, and secondary sexual traits in a male primate.  

PubMed

We examined variation in glucocorticoid levels in the mandrill, a brightly coloured primate species, to identify major social influences on stress hormones, and investigate relationships among glucocorticoid levels, testosterone and secondary sexual ornamentation. We collected a total of 317 fecal samples for 16 adult male mandrills over 13 months, including mating and non-mating periods and periods of both dominance rank stability and instability, and compared fecal glucocorticoid levels with dominance rank, rank stability, presence of receptive females, gastro-intestinal parasite infection, fecal testosterone and facial red coloration. Glucocorticoid levels did not vary systematically with dominance rank, but increased when the dominance hierarchy was unstable, and increased in the presence of receptive females. The relationship between dominance rank and glucocorticoid levels changed direction according to the stability of the dominance hierarchy: glucocorticoid levels were higher in subordinate males under stable conditions, but under conditions of instability higher ranking males had higher glucocorticoid levels. The influence of dominance rank also interacted with the presence of receptive females: glucocorticoids were higher in dominant males than in subordinates, but only during mating periods, suggesting that dominant males are more stressed than subordinates during such periods. These findings support previous studies showing that the relationship between glucocorticoids and dominance rank in male baboons is dependent on the social environment. We also found that males with higher glucocorticoids suffered a higher diversity of gastrointestinal parasite infection, in line with evidence that glucocorticoids suppress the immune system in other species. However, we found no support for the stress-mediated immunocompetence handicap hypothesis for the evolution of condition-dependent ornaments: glucocorticoid and testosterone levels were positively related, rather than the negative relationship predicted by the hypothesis, and we found no relationship between red colour and glucocorticoid levels, suggesting that glucocorticoids do not play a role in translating social conditions or physical health into ornament expression in this species. PMID:20688067

Setchell, Joanna M; Smith, Tessa; Wickings, E Jean; Knapp, Leslie A

2010-11-01

422

Plasticity in male courtship behaviour as a function of light intensity in guppies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The environment is profoundly important in shaping many aspects of animal phenotype, including courtship and mating behaviours.\\u000a Courtship displays rely upon the transmission of visual information from the signaller to the receiver, which means they are\\u000a likely to be less effective in visually poor conditions such as at low light or in turbid ecosystems. One might therefore\\u000a predict that in

Ben B. Chapman; Lesley J. Morrell; Jens Krause

2009-01-01

423

Male Use of Female Sex Work in India: A Nationally Representative Behavioural Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heterosexual transmission of HIV in India is driven by the male use of female sex workers (FSW), but few studies have examined the factors associated with using FSW. This nationally representative study examined the prevalence and correlates of FSW use among 31,040 men aged 15–49 years in India in 2006. Nationally, about 4% of men used FSW in the previous

Michelle F. Gaffey; Srinivasan Venkatesh; Neeraj Dhingra; Ajay Khera; Rajesh Kumar; Paul Arora; Nico Nagelkerke; Prabhat Jha

2011-01-01

424

Behavioural Processes 61 (2003) 101108 Female prairie voles do not choose males based on their  

E-print Network

species of rodents, prairie voles, Microtus ochrogaster, and meadow voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus alternative hypotheses for the function of frequency of scent marking in male prairie voles, Microtus of them. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Mate choice; Microtus; Prairie voles

Dunlap, Aimee Sue

425

How different are the adult children of parents who have same-sex relationships? Findings from the New Family Structures Study.  

PubMed

The New Family Structures Study (NFSS) is a social-science data-collection project that fielded a survey to a large, random sample of American young adults (ages 18-39) who were raised in different types of family arrangements. In this debut article of the NFSS, I compare how the young-adult children of a parent who has had a same-sex romantic relationship fare on 40 different social, emotional, and relational outcome variables when compared with six other family-of-origin types. The results reveal numerous, consistent differences, especially between the children of women who have had a lesbian relationship and those with still-married (heterosexual) biological parents. The results are typically robust in multivariate contexts as well, suggesting far greater diversity in lesbian-parent household experiences than convenience-sample studies of lesbian families have revealed. The NFSS proves to be an illuminating, versatile dataset that can assist family scholars in understanding the long reach of family structure and transitions. PMID:23017845

Regnerus, Mark

2012-07-01

426

Male Moth Songs Tempt Females to Accept Mating: The Role of Acoustic and Pheromonal Communication in the Reproductive Behaviour of Aphomia sociella  

PubMed Central

Background Members of the subfamily Galleriinae have adapted to different selective environmental pressures by devising a unique mating process. Galleriinae males initiate mating by attracting females with either chemical or acoustic signals (or a combination of both modalities). Six compounds considered candidates for the sex pheromone have recently been identified in the wing gland extracts of Aphomia sociella males. Prior to the present study, acoustic communication had not been investigated. Signals mediating female attraction were likewise unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Observations of A. sociella mating behaviour and recordings of male acoustic signals confirmed that males initiate the mating process. During calling behaviour (stationary wing fanning and pheromone release), males disperse pheromone from their wing glands. When a female approaches, males cease calling and begin to produce ultrasonic songs as part of the courtship behaviour. Replaying of recorded courting songs to virgin females and a comparison of the mating efficiency of intact males with males lacking tegullae proved that male ultrasonic signals stimulate females to accept mating. Greenhouse experiments with isolated pheromone glands confirmed that the male sex pheromone mediates long-range female attraction. Conclusion/Significance Female attraction in A. sociella is chemically mediated, but ultrasonic communication is also employed during courtship. Male ultrasonic songs stimulate female sexual display and significantly affect mating efficiency. Considerable inter-individual differences in song structure exist. These could play a role in female mate selection provided that the female's ear is able to discern them. The A. sociella mating strategy described above is unique within the subfamily Galleriinae. PMID:22065997

Kindl, Jiri; Kalinova, Blanka; Cervenka, Milan; Jilek, Milan; Valterova, Irena

2011-01-01

427

Assessment of the Quality of Life of Vulnerable Young Males with Severe Emotional and Behaviour Difficulties in a Residential Setting  

PubMed Central

Sixty-four looked after and accommodated males aged 13–16 had an assessment of their quality of life using Paediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) and Quality of Life in Care (QOLIC). The participants were from a Scottish residential centre for young people with severe emotional and behavioural difficulties. The total sample of 64 participants consists of two distinct groups: residential group (n = 33) and a secure care group (n = 31). Over 3 observations the aim of the study was to identify similarities and differences between the groups and to establish the sensitivity of the PedsQL and the PedsQL in care module (QOLIC) as a measurement instrument for Quality of Life (QoL) in adolescent males. Overall there was a nonsignificant increase in the quality of life of these young people at the centre as measured by PedsQL and QOLIC over 3 observations. No significant differences were detected in the quality of life scores between the two groups using the QOLIC. PMID:24391460

Carroll, D.; Duffy, T.; Martin, C. R.

2013-01-01

428

A Comparison of Anthropometric, Metabolic, and Reproductive Characteristics of Young Adult Women from Opposite-Sex and Same-Sex Twin Pairs  

PubMed Central

Background: Prenatal exposure to androgens has been linked to masculinization of several traits. We aimed to determine whether putative female intra-uterine exposure to androgens influences anthropometric, metabolic, and reproductive parameters using a twin design. Methods: Two cohorts of Finnish twins born in 1975–1979 and 1983–1987 formed the basis for the longitudinal FinnTwin16 (FT16) and FinnTwin12 (FT12) studies. Self-reported anthropometric characteristics, disease status, and reproductive history were compared between 679 same-sex (SS) and 789 opposite-sex (OS) female twins (mean age?±?SD: 34?±?1.1) from the wave 5 of data collection in FT16. Serum lipid and lipoprotein subclass concentrations measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared in 226 SS and 169 OS female twins (mean age?±?SD: 24?±?2.1) from the wave 4 of data collection in FT12 and FT16. Results: Anthropometric measures, the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus type 2 did not differ significantly between females from SS and OS twin pairs at age 34. Similarly, the prevalence of infertility, age at first pregnancy and number of induced and spontaneous abortions did not differ significantly between these two groups of women. The serum lipid and lipoprotein profile did not differ between females from SS and OS twins at age 24. Conclusion: We found no evidence that androgen overexposure of the female fetus affects obesity, metabolic profile, or reproductive health in young adult females. However, these results do not exclude the possibility that prenatal androgen exposure in females could be adversely associated with these phenotypes later in life. PMID:24639667

Korsoff, Pirkko; Bogl, Leonie H.; Korhonen, Paivi; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Rose, Richard J.; Kaaja, Risto; Kaprio, Jaakko

2014-01-01

429

In three brain regions central to maternal behaviour, neither male nor female Phodopus dwarf hamsters show changes in oestrogen receptor alpha distribution with mating or parenthood.  

PubMed

Oestrogen receptor (ER)alpha immunoreactivity in three brain regions relevant to maternal behaviour (medial preoptic area, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and medial amygdala) was measured in two species of dwarf hamster that both mate during a postpartum oestrous but differ in expression of paternal behaviour. Male and female Phodopus campbelli and Phodopus sungorus were sampled as sexually naive adults, following mating to satiety, and as new parents. In all brain regions, females expressed higher levels of ER alpha than males. Species did not have an effect on ER alpha distribution except in the medial amygdala, where P. sungorus females had higher expression levels than all other groups. Behavioural status was not associated with altered ER alpha expression. These results were not expected for females and suggest that a primary activational role for oestrogen, acting through ER alpha in these regions, does not generalize to maternal behaviour in Phodopus. In males, these results are consistent with previous manipulations of the ER alpha ligand, oestrogen, and suggest that paternal behaviour in P. campbelli is likely to be regulated by developmental effects of oestrogen on the brain during early life (similar to Microtus ochrogaster), rather than through activation by oestrogen at the time of fatherhood (similar to Peromyscus californicus). PMID:19094078

Timonin, M E; Cushing, B S; Wynne-Edwards, K E

2008-12-01

430

XY chromosome behaviour in the germ-line of the human male: A FISH analysis of spatial orientation, chromatin condensation and pairing  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have used multicolour fluorescencein situ hybridization to study the behaviour of the X and Y chromosomes in relation to a representative autosome, chromosome 1, on air-dried testicular preparations from normal fertile human males. In a proportion of Sertoli cells at interphase as well as spermatogonial metaphases there is an apparent selective undercondensation of the heterochromatic block of the long

Susan J. Armstrong; Amanda J. Kirkham; Maj A. Hultén

1994-01-01

431

HIV prevalence and related risk behaviours among female partners of male injecting drugs users in Iran: results of a bio-behavioural survey, 2010  

PubMed Central

Objective Sexual partners of injecting drug users (IDUs) are at high risk of HIV infection, yet data for such populations are scarce worldwide, particularly in the Middle East and North African region. This study measured and compared the prevalence of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV), hepatitis B (HBV) and related behavioural factors in male IDUs (MIDUs), their main female sexual partners who were also injecting drug users (FIDUPs) and their main non-injecting female partners (FNIDUPs). Method Using convenience sampling, MIDUs were recruited at drop-in health centres in three cities (Tehran, Mashhad and Shiraz), who in turn recruited their main female partners. Behavioural data were collected using a standard questionnaire, and blood samples were drawn for HIV and HCV antibody testing and HBV surface antigen. Results HIV prevalence was 9.4% (95% CI 2.96% to 26.2%) among MIDUs (n=226), 7.7% (95% CI 1.9% to 26.3%) among FIDUPs (n=42) and 2.8% (95% CI 0.65% to 11.3%) among FNIDUPs (n=184). HCV prevalence was 38.6% (95% CI 20.3% to 60.7%) among MIDUs, 36.6% (95% CI 13.6% to 67.9%) among FIDUPs and 8.4% (95% CI 5.67% to 12.4%) among FNIDUPs. HBV surface antigen prevalence was 3.6% (95% CI 1.5% to 8.3%), 7.3% (95% CI 1.9% to 24.8%) and 1.1% (95% CI 0.3% to 4.7%), respectively. Among MIDUs, 19.5% (95% CI 3.4% to 62.2%) had a history of sexual contact with other men. Mean age at first sexual contact in MIDUs was 19.2 years (95% CI 18.6 to 25.2) and in FIDUPs and FNIDUPs 16.4 years (95% CI 14.1 to 22.1) and 18.2 years (95% CI 15.7 to 23.1), respectively. FIDUPs and FNIDUPs had a higher mean number of sexual partners (other than their main partner) in the previous month than MIDUs (5.5 (95% CI 0 to 14.1) and 2.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 4) vs 1.3 (95% CI 0.37 to 2.2), respectively). FIDUPs tended to use drugs before or during sex with their main and casual partners more often than MIDUs (with main partner: 69% (95% CI 41.5% to 87.5%) vs 54.4% (95% CI 27% to 79.4%), respectively, and with casual partners: 47.6% (95% CI 13.1% to 84.6%) vs 34.1% (95% CI 10% to 70.6%), respectively); however, the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Female partners of MIDUs in Iran and elsewhere are an under studied group. The high rate of HIV, HCV and HBV infection among females who are partners of MIDUs points to the necessity of appropriate injection and sexual risk reduction interventions among this group, to prevent acquisition of HIV, HCV and HBV and their onward transmission to other male partners. PMID:24064986

Alipour, Abbas; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Sajadi, Leily; Zolala, Farzaneh

2013-01-01

432

"They Didn't Have 'Out There' Gay Parents--They Just Looked Like "Normal" Regular Parents": Investigating Teachers' Approaches to Addressing Same-Sex Parenting and Non-Normative Sexuality in the Elementary School Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we draw on queer theoretical and critical literacy perspectives to investigate elementary school teachers' pedagogical approaches to addressing same-sex parenting and non-normative sexuality in the elementary classroom. Through undertaking case study research, we examine two Australian elementary school teachers' reflections on…

Martino, Wayne; Cumming-Potvin, Wendy

2011-01-01

433

Opposing roles of the nucleus accumbens and anterior lateral hypothalamic area in the control of sexual behaviour in the male rat.  

PubMed

Opposing roles have been implicated for the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and anterior portion of the lateral hypothalamic area (aLHA) in the regulation of sexual behaviour in male rats based on in vivo neurochemical correlates. The present study provides functional evidence supporting this hypothesis by examining the effects of lesions to these structures on copulation, noncontact erection and receptive female preference. Sexually naïve male Long-Evans rats received either bilateral 1.0- micro L injections of NMDA (10 micro g/ micro L/side) or vehicle (shams) into either the aLHA or the NAc. During repeated tests of copulation most of the sham-lesioned males, but few of the aLHA-lesioned and NAc-lesioned males, copulated to ejaculation. Most of the NAc-lesioned males also failed to intromit, whereas the majority of the aLHA-lesioned males intromitted repeatedly. During exposure to an inaccessible receptive female behind a wire-mesh screen, aLHA-lesioned males displayed facilitation of noncontact erections, whereas NAc-lesioned males displayed impaired noncontact erections. Conversely, during simultaneous exposure to inaccessible receptive and nonreceptive females in different compartments, all males spent more time in the proximity of the receptive female. These findings indicate that the aLHA plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of sexual arousal and an excitatory role in the regulation of ejaculation. Conversely, the NAc plays an excitatory role in the regulation in sexual arousal. PMID:14984420

Kippin, Tod E; Sotiropoulos, Veneta; Badih, Julia; Pfaus, James G

2004-02-01

434

Effects of space allowance and earthen floor on welfare-related physiological and behavioural responses in male blue foxes.  

PubMed

Welfare-related physiological and behavioural responses were studied in farm-bred male blue foxes (Alopex lagopus). Three different-sized cages (80-cm long [CL80], 120-cm long [CL120], and 240-cm long [CL240]; each 105-cm wide x 70-cm high) with wire-mesh floors and one enlarged cage (CL240E) with both wire-mesh floor (240-cm long x 105-cm wide x 70-cm high) and earthen floor (80-cm long x 105-cm wide x 70-cm high) were compared. N = 30 males for each group. The experiments lasted from weaning in July to pelting in December. Statistical analyses were based on the models accounting for litter as a block effect. Breaking strength of tibia was highest for foxes having access to both wire-mesh and ground floors (CL240E). Stress-induced hyperthermia was evident during capture and immobilisation. The highest rectal temperature (mean +/- SEM) was found in CL240E (capture: 39.6 +/- 0.09 degrees C, restraint:40.0 +/- 0.09 degrees C) and the lowest in CL80 (capture: 39.1 +/- 0.09 degrees C, restraint: 39.7 +/- 0.09 degrees C). Likewise, capture time (median; interquartile range) in the home cage was highest in CL240E (29; 18 to 44) and lowest in CL80 (12; 9 to 14). During capture, foxes tended to withdraw to the farthest site within the cage. CL240E foxes typically showed the most fear towards human. The most confident animals were found in CL80. The cortisol:creatinine ratio (median; interquartile range) obtained from circadian urine did not reveal statistically significant differences among CL80 (3. 5; 2.6 to 4.1), CL120 (2.3; 1.5 to 3.8) and CL240 (2.3, 1.5 to 3.7). The earthen flooring complicated the urine sampling and conclusions for CL240E (1.7; 1.2 to 2.2). CL240E foxes were the most active and explorative on both wire-mesh- and ground-floored open-field arenas. Altogether, 53% of furs from CL240E were classified as very dirty. Dirtiness of furs in other test groups was slight. In conclusion, the present results did not reveal an unambiguous superiority of any of the studied cage options for well-being of farmed blue foxes. PMID:10913798

Korhonen, H; Niemelä, P; Jauhiainen, L; Tupasela, T

435

The Prevalence and Determinants of HIV Risk Behaviours and Perceived Threat of Infection in Canadian Federal Penitentiaries: Results from a National Survey of Male Inmates  

Microsoft Academic Search

While the extent to which HIV\\/AIDS has entered correctional facilities has been documented, less is known about the prevalence of HIV\\/AIDS high-risk behaviours among inmates: intravenous drug use, unprotected sex, tattooing, and piercing. The Correctional Service of Canada's National Inmate Survey provided a unique opportunity to gather this information. Questionnaires were administered to a randomly selected sample of 4,500 male

Michel A. S. Larivière; David Robinson

1999-01-01

436

Is Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interview (ACASI) Useful in Risk Behaviour Assessment of Female and Male Sex Workers, Mombasa, Kenya?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAudio computer-assisted self-interview (ACASI) may elicit more frequent reporting of socially sensitive behaviours than face-to-face (FtF)-interview. However, no study compared responses to both methods in female and male sex workers (FSW; MSW) in Africa.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsWe sequentially enrolled adults recruited for an HIV-1 intervention trial into a comparative study of ACASI and FtF-interview, in a clinic near Mombasa, Kenya. Feasibility and

Elisabeth M. van der Elst; Haile Selassie Okuku; Phellister Nakamya; Allan Muhaari; Alun Davies; R. Scott McClelland; Matthew A. Price; Adrian D. Smith; Susan M. Graham; Eduard J. Sanders; Nitika Pant Pai

2009-01-01

437

Is Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interview (ACASI) Useful in Risk Behaviour Assessment of Female and Male Sex Workers, Mombasa, Kenya?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Audio computer-assisted self-interview (ACASI) may elicit more frequent reporting of socially sensitive behaviours than face-to-face (FtF)-interview. However, no study compared responses to both methods in female and male sex workers (FSW; MSW) in Africa. Methodology\\/Principal Findings: We sequentially enrolled adults recruited for an HIV-1 intervention trial into a comparative study of ACASI and FtF-interview, in a clinic near Mombasa,

Elisabeth M. van der Elst; Haile Selassie Okuku; Phellister Nakamya; Allan Muhaari; Alun Davies; R. Scott McClelland; Matthew A. Price; Adrian D. Smith; Susan M. Graham; Eduard J. Sanders

2009-01-01

438

HIV Risk among MSM in Senegal: A Qualitative Rapid Assessment of the Impact of Enforcing Laws That Criminalize Same Sex Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk for HIV in Senegal, with a prevalence of 21.5%. In December 2008, nine male HIV prevention workers were imprisoned for “acts against nature” prohibited by Senegalese law. This qualitative study assessed the impact of these arrests on HIV prevention efforts. A purposive sample of MSM in six regions of

Tonia Poteat; Daouda Diouf; Fatou Maria Drame; Marieme Ndaw; Cheikh Traore; Mandeep Dhaliwal; Chris Beyrer; Stefan Baral

2011-01-01

439

Adult Romantic Relationships as Contexts of Human Development: A Multimethod Comparison of Same-Sex Couples with Opposite-Sex Dating, Engaged, and Married Dyads  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a multimethod, multi-informant comparison of community samples of committed gay male (n=30) and lesbian (n=30) couples with both committed (n=50 young engaged and n=40 older married) and noncommitted (n=109 exclusively dating) heterosexual pairs. Specifically, in this study the quality of same- and opposite-sex relationships…

Roisman, Glenn I.; Clausell, Eric; Holland, Ashley; Fortuna, Keren; Elieff, Chryle

2008-01-01

440

Could dromedary camels develop stereotypy? The first description of stereotypical behaviour in housed male dromedary camels and how it is affected by different management systems.  

PubMed

Dromedary camel husbandry has recently been evolving towards a semi-intensive system, due to the changes in use of the animal and the settlement of nomadic populations. Captivity could restrict its social activities, limiting the expression of various behavioural needs and causing the manifestation of stereotypy. The aims of this trial were, firstly, to identify and describe some stereotypical behaviours in captive male dromedary camels used for artificial insemination and, secondly, to study the effects on them of the following husbandry management systems: i) housing in single boxes for 24 hours (H24), ii) housing in single boxes for 23 hours with one hour free in the paddock (H23), and iii) housing in single boxes for 22 hours 30 min with 1 h of paddock time and 30 min exposure to a female camel herd (ExF). Every day, the camels were filmed in their single box in the morning for 30 minutes to record their behavioural activities and a focal animal sampling ethogram was filled in. In this study, male camels showed both oral and locomotor stereotypy most frequently when the bulls were reared in H24. Overall, this preliminary study is a starting point in the identification of stereotypies in male camels, reporting the positive effects of spending one hour outdoor and of social interaction with females. PMID:24586522

Padalino, Barbara; Aubé, Lydiane; Fatnassi, Meriem; Monaco, Davide; Khorchani, Touhami; Hammadi, Mohamed; Lacalandra, Giovanni Michele

2014-01-01

441

Body Build Perceptions in Male and Female College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results from scores on the Somatotype Rating Scale (SRS) indicated that, while there was close agreement between males and females on the measures, females exhibited more dissatisfaction with their body build and greater congruency between their self-concept and their same-sex stereotype than did males. (Author)

Bailey, Roger C.; Hankins, Norman E.

1979-01-01

442

Social grouping and maternal behaviour in feral horses ( Equus caballus ): the influence of males on maternal protectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The risk of infant injury or mortality influences maternal behaviour, particularly protectiveness. Mares are found in bands with a single stallion or bands with more than one stallion in which paternity is less certain. We investigated maternal behaviour in relation to band type. Mares in bands with more than one stallion were more protective of their foals, particularly when stallions

Elissa Z. Cameron; Wayne L. Linklater; Kevin J. Stafford; Edward O. Minot

2003-01-01

443

Heavy Episodic Drinking and Its Consequences: The Protective Effects of Same-Sex, Residential Living-Learning Communities for Undergraduate Women  

PubMed Central

Gender and living environment are two of the most consistent factors associated with heavy episodic drinking on college campuses. This study aimed to determine group differences in alcohol misuse and its attendant consequences between undergraduate women living in four distinct on-campus residential environments. A Web-based survey was self-administered to a stratified random sample of full-time students attending a large Midwestern University, and living in four distinct on-campus residential environments: 1) single-sex (all female) Residential Learning Communities (RLCs), 2) mixed-sex (male and female) RLCs, 3) single-sex (all female) non-RLCs and 4) mixed-sex (male and female) non-RLCs. Respondents living in single-sex and mixed-sex RLCs had significantly lower rates of alcohol use, heavy episodic drinking and related primary alcohol-related consequences when compared to respondents living in non-RLCs; however, women in single-sex RLCs had the lowest rates. RLCs – particularly single-sex learning communities – appear to provide undergraduate women with an environment that supports lower rates of alcohol use and abuse. PMID:18485609

Boyd, Carol J.; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Cranford, James A.; Morales, Michele; Lange, James E.; Reed, Mark B.; Ketchie, Julie M.; Scott, Marcia S.

2008-01-01

444

Children and Parents as Informants of Emotional and Behavioural Problems Predicting Female and Male Adolescent Risk Behaviour: A Longitudinal Cross-Informant Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines whether health risk behaviour in adolescence can be predicted by self- and by parental reports of psychopathology\\u000a (externalizing and internalizing symptoms) assessed two and four years earlier. A total sample of 366 fourth graders participated\\u000a in a longitudinal study with measurements taken in grades 4, 6, and 8. In grades 4 and 6 the children completed the

Marc Vierhaus; Arnold Lohaus

2008-01-01

445

Sexual hazards, life experiences and social circumstances among male sex workers in Nigeria.  

PubMed

The sexual health and rights needs of male sex workers in Nigeria remain poorly understood and served. Men who sell sex are at high risk of discrimination and violation because of laws criminalising same-sex activity and sex work. This paper examines the experiences, social circumstances, vulnerabilities and sexual hazards experienced by male sex workers in Nigeria. In-depth interviews were used to explore the experiences of six male sex workers who were selected by means of convenience sampling from among those who came for counselling. Findings reveal that economic disadvantage drives some men to engage in sex work and risky sexual behaviour. Subsequently, sex work may put their lives and health at risk as a result of violation by the police and clients, including ritual murder. Men's extreme vulnerability points to the need for appropriate interventions to improve well-being. Sexual health and rights programmes must identify ways of making male sex workers less vulnerable to abuse, and devise strategies for protecting their health and human rights, while empowering them economically to reduce their dependency on often risky sexual behaviour for livelihoods. PMID:23252939

Okanlawon, Kehinde; Adebowale, Ayo Stephen; Titilayo, Ayotunde

2013-01-01

446

HIV behavioural risks and the role of work environment among Chinese male sex workers in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male sex workers are a highly marginalised group in Hong Kong and it is increasingly so with an influx of them travelling from mainland China to work as “freelance” sex workers. This study aimed to measure important work environment variables that might affect the likelihood of condom use among male sex workers working in Hong Kong. A cross-sectional survey of

William C. W. Wong; Phil W. S. Leung; C. W. Li

2012-01-01

447

Dominance relationships and behavioural correlates of individual spawning success in farmed and wild male Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary 1. Variance in competitive ability among males should lead to a corresponding skew in reproductive success. Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar ) males form dominance hierarchies during spawning, such that the dominant individuals are predicted to realize the highest reproductive success. However, the degree to which this occurs depends on various genetic and environmental factors. 2. We investigated the

LAURA K. WEIR; JEFFREY A. HUTCHINGS; IAN A. FLEMING; SIGURD EINUM

2004-01-01

448

The relationship between social status, behaviour, growth and steroids in male helpers and breeders of a cooperatively breeding cichlid  

E-print Network

2006 Available online 19 April 2006 Abstract We tested whether subordinate helper males of the Lake Tanganyika cooperatively breeding cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher show elevated excretion levels of the stress

449

Risk behaviours of Hong Kong male residents travelling to mainland China: A potential bridge population for HIV infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective was to assess levels of high-risk sexual behaviour, condom use, sexually transmitted disease (STD) history and AIDS-related perceptions among Hong Kong men returning from China by land; 1,254 systematically sampled subjects were interviewed. Of respondents, 32.5% had sexual intercourse with a commercial sex worker (CSW) in China in the past six months; 11.2% have done so on this

J. T. F. Lau; J. Thomas

2001-01-01

450

Perception of self and others in male sex offenders against children: Schema content and its relation to criminal sexual behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty-four civilly committed male sex offenders against children (SOs) chose from a list of traits to describe self, mother, father, best friend, past lover, victim and therapist. Cluster analysis (INDCLAS) uncovered five patterns (i.e. schemas) in Sos’ social perception data: “sexual lover” (past lover described as sexual, arousing, etc. as well as anxious, lonely and worried), “benevolent parent” (mother and

Warren A. Reich; Uri Amit; Harold I. Siegel

2009-01-01

451

The effects of environmental enrichment and intermittent lighting on the behaviour and welfare of male domestic turkeys  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under commercial and experimental conditions, domestic turkeys frequently cause injuries to pen-mates, sometimes fatally, by repeated pecking. Environmental enrichment or intermittent lighting patterns might be used to mitigate such injurious pecking. This study examined the responses to four treatments (two rooms\\/treatment) of eight groups of 50 non-beak trimmed, male domestic turkeys from day-of hatching to 21 weeks of age. One

C. M Sherwin; P. D Lewis; G. C Perry

1999-01-01

452

Coercion, Neutrality, and Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a recent article, Daniel Brudney suggests that leaving the question of religious establishment to the majoritarian process,\\u000a rather than making establishment or nonestablishment a constitutional principle, need not contravene liberal principles. What\\u000a he terms modest noncoercive establishment protects the free exercise of religious liberty and does not use force. It makes\\u000a only limited use of the public voice and

Emily R. Gill

453

Mating Behaviour in Laevicaudatan Clam Shrimp (Crustacea, Branchiopoda) and Functional Morphology of Male Claspers in a Phylogenetic Context: A Video-Based Analysis  

PubMed Central

Clam shrimps are freshwater branchiopod crustaceans which often present complicated breeding systems including asexual reproduction (parthenogenesis) and mixed mating systems (in androdioecious species both selfing and outcrossing occurs due to the co-presence of hermaphrodites and males). Reproductive patterns of Spinicaudata, which contains most clam shrimp species, have received much attention. Another group of clam shrimps, Laevicaudata, which holds a key position in branchiopod phylogeny, has practically not been studied. As a part of the mating process, males clasp to the carapace margin of the females with a pair (or two pairs) of anterior trunk limbs modified as claspers. Previous studies have shown that clasper morphology is important in a phylogenetic context, and that some parts of the claspers in Spinicaudata and Laevicaudata may have undergone a remarkable parallel evolution. Here we have used video microscopy to study aspects of the mating behaviour, egg extrusion, and fertilization in Lynceus brachyurus (Laevicaudata). It is shown that fertilization is likely to be external and that the peculiar tri-lobed lateral lamellae of female's hind body assist in guiding the egg mass to the exopodal egg carriers where they are collected by their distal setation. The functional morphology of the male claspers was studied in detail by close-up video recordings. The movable “finger” of the clasper bends around the female's carapace edge and serves to hold the female during mating. The larger palp grasps around the female carapace margin in a way very similar to the movable “finger”, possibly indirectly providing sensory input on the “finger” position. A brief comparative study of the claspers of a spinicaudatan clam shrimp showed both similarities and differences to the laevicaudatan claspers. The presence of two pairs of claspers in Spinicaudata seems to give males a better hold of the female which may play a role during extended mate guarding. PMID:24392104

Sigvardt, Zandra M. S.; Olesen, J?rgen

2014-01-01

454

Rethinking sexual initiation: pathways to identity formation among gay and bisexual Mexican male youth.  

PubMed

The topic of same-sex sexual initiation has generally remained understudied in the literature on sexual identity formation among sexual minority youth. This article analyzes the narratives of same-sex sexual initiation provided by 76 gay and bisexual Mexican immigrant men who participated in interviews for the Trayectos Study, an ethnographic study of sexuality and HIV risk. These participants were raised in a variety of locations throughout Mexico, where they also realized their same-sex attraction and initiated their sexual lives with men. We argue that Mexican male same-sex sexuality is characterized by three distinct patterns of sexual initiation--one heavily-based on gender roles, one based on homosociality, and one based on object choice--which inform the men's interpretations regarding sexual roles, partner preferences, and sexual behaviors. We analyzed the social factors and forms of cultural/sexual socialization that lead sexual minority youth specifically to each of these three patterns of sexual initiation. Our findings confirm the importance of studying same-sex sexual initiation as a topic in its own right, particularly as a tool to gain a greater understanding of the diversity of same-sex sexual experiences and sexual identities within and among ethnic/cultural groups. PMID:20838869

Carrillo, Héctor; Fontdevila, Jorge

2011-12-01

455

Is Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interview (ACASI) Useful in Risk Behaviour Assessment of Female and Male Sex Workers, Mombasa, Kenya?  

PubMed Central

Background Audio computer-assisted self-interview (ACASI) may elicit more frequent reporting of socially sensitive behaviours than face-to-face (FtF)-interview. However, no study compared responses to both methods in female and male sex workers (FSW; MSW) in Africa. Methodology/Principal Findings We sequentially enrolled adults recruited for an HIV-1 intervention trial into a comparative study of ACASI and FtF-interview, in a clinic near Mombasa, Kenya. Feasibility and acceptability of ACASI, and a comparative analysis of enrolment responses between ACASI and FtF on an identical risk assessment questionnaire were evaluated. In total, 139 women and 259 men, 81% of eligible cohort participants, completed both interviews. ACASI captured a higher median number of regular (2 vs. 1, p<0.001, both genders) and casual partners in the last week (3 vs. 2, p?=?0.04 in women; 2 vs. 1, p<0.001 in men). Group sex (21.6 vs. 13.5%, p<0.001, in men), intravenous drug use (IDU; 10.8 vs. 2.3%, p<0.001 in men; 4.4 vs. 0%, p?=?0.03 in women), and rape (8.9 vs. 3.9%, p?=?0.002, in men) were reported more frequently in ACASI. A surprisingly high number of women reported in ACASI that they had paid for sex (49.3 vs. 5.8%, p<0.001). Behaviours for recruitment (i.e. anal sex, sex work, sex between males) were reported less frequently in ACASI. The majority of women (79.2%) and men (69.7%) felt that answers given in ACASI were more honest. Volunteers who were not able to take ACASI (84 men, and 37 women) mostly lacked reading skills. Conclusions/Significance About 1 in 5 cohort participants was not able to complete ACASI, mostly for lack of reading skills. Participants who completed ACASI were more likely to report IDU, rape, group sex, and payment for sex by women than when asked in FtF interview. ACASI appears to be a useful tool for high risk behaviour assessments in the African context. PMID:19412535

van der Elst, Elisabeth M.; Okuku, Haile Selassie; Nakamya, Phellister; Muhaari, Allan; Davies, Alun; McClelland, R. Scott; Price, Matthew A.; Smith, Adrian D.; Graham, Susan M.; Sanders, Eduard J.

2009-01-01

456

Relationship of self-mutilative behaviours with severity of borderline personality, childhood trauma and impulsivity in male substance-dependent inpatients.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of self-mutilation (SM) with the severity of borderline personality features (BPF), childhood trauma and impulsivity in male substance-dependent inpatients. Participants were consecutively admitted comprising 200 male substance-dependent inpatients. Patients were investigated with the Self-mutilative Behaviour Questionnaire (SMBQ), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28), the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and the Borderline Personality Inventory (BPI). Among 200 subjects, 62.0% (n=124) were considered as the group with SM. Mean scores of CTQ-28 total and subscales (other than emotional abuse), BIS-11 total and attentional impulsiveness subscale and BPI were higher in the SM group. In the regression model, emotional neglect, attentional impulsiveness and drug dependency were the predictors of SM, whereas in the new model in which the severity of BPF was included emotional neglect and the severity of BPF predicted SM. Among those with SMB, physical neglect and the severity of BPF predicted the number of SM episodes. Thus, to better understand SMB among substance-dependent patients, clinicians must carefully evaluate BPF and history of childhood trauma among substance-dependent inpatients. In addition, results suggest that the relationship between SMB and BPF is more prominent in drug-dependent inpatients than alcohol-dependent inpatients. PMID:22494705

Evren, Cuneyt; Cinar, Ozgul; Evren, Bilge; Celik, Selime

2012-11-30

457

Effects of inhibition of gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion on the response to novel objects in young male and female sheep.  

PubMed

This study investigated the actions of blocking the GnRH receptor using a specific agonist on the response of male and female sheep to a novel object placed in their pen. The study is part of a series performed on 46 same sex twin animals. One of the pair received a subcutaneous implant of the GnRH agonist Goserelin acetate every four weeks while the other remained untreated. Implantation began immediately prior to puberty; at 8 weeks in the males and 28 weeks in the females (as timing of puberty is sex specific). To determine the effects of agonist treatment on the reproductive axis blood samples were collected for measurement of testosterone in the males and progesterone in the females. In addition the volume of the scrotum was determined. The present study aimed to determine whether there are sexually differentiated behavioural responses to a novel object at different stages of brain development (8, 28 and 48 weeks of age) and whether these responses are altered by GnRHa treatment. Approach behaviour towards and interactions with the novel object were monitored as was the number of vocalisations per unit time during the test period. GnRHa treatment suppressed testosterone concentrations and testicular growth in the males and progesterone release in the females. Sheep vocalised significantly more prior to weaning (8 weeks of age) than post weaning (28 and 48 weeks of age) suggesting stress on separation from their dams. Our current study shows that males are more likely to leave their conspecifics to approach a novel object than females. As this behaviour was not altered by suppression of the reproductive axis we suggest that, although sex differences are more obviously expressed in the phenotype after puberty, these may be developed during adolescence but not primarily altered during puberty by sex hormones. PMID:24485485

Robinson, Jane E; Evans, Neil P; Dumbell, Rebecca; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Ropstad, Erik; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit Hebold

2014-02-01

458

Behavioural vs. molecular sources of conflict between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA: the role of male-biased dispersal in a Holarctic sea duck.  

PubMed

Genetic studies of waterfowl (Anatidae) have observed the full spectrum of mitochondrial (mt) DNA population divergence, from apparent panmixia to deep, reciprocally monophyletic lineages. Yet, these studies often found weak or no nuclear (nu) DNA structure, which was often attributed to male-biased gene flow, a common behaviour within this family. An alternative explanation for this 'conflict' is that the smaller effective population size and faster sorting rate of mtDNA relative to nuDNA lead to different signals of population structure. We tested these alternatives by sequencing 12 nuDNA introns for a Holarctic pair of waterfowl subspecies, the European goosander (Mergus merganser merganser) and the North American common merganser (M. m. americanus), which exhibit strong population structure in mtDNA. We inferred effective population sizes, gene flow and divergence times from published mtDNA sequences and simulated expected differentiation for nuDNA based on those histories. Between Europe and North America, nuDNA ?(ST) was 3.4-fold lower than mtDNA ?(ST) , a result consistent with differences in sorting rates. However, despite geographically structured and monophyletic mtDNA lineages within continents, nuDNA ?(ST) values were generally zero and significantly lower than predicted. This between- and within-continent contrast held when comparing mtDNA and nuDNA among published studies of ducks. Thus, male-mediated gene flow is a better explanation than slower sorting rates for limited nuDNA differentiation within continents, which is also supported by nonmolecular data. This study illustrates the value of quantitatively testing discrepancies between mtDNA and nuDNA to reject the null hypothesis that conflict simply reflects different sorting rates. PMID:22582867

Peters, Jeffrey L; Bolender, Kimberly A; Pearce, John M

2012-07-01

459

Effect of chronic treatment with ladostigil (TV3326) on anxiogenic and depressive-like behaviour and on activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis in male and female prenatally stressed rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The aim of the study is to investigate the effect of ladostigil, a cholinesterase and brain-selective monoamine oxidase (MAO)\\u000a inhibitor, on anxiogenic and depressive-like behaviour and the response of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis to stress\\u000a in prenatally stressed (PS) male and female rats.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Ladostigil (17 mg\\/kg\\/day) was administered daily for 6 weeks to control and PS rats aged 6 weeks. Behaviour was

Tatyana Poltyrev; Elena Gorodetsky; Corina Bejar; Donna Schorer-Apelbaum; Marta Weinstock

2005-01-01

460

Effects of environmental conditions on food consumption in female and male rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present experiment examined food and water consumption under different housing conditions in 20 female and 20 male Wistar rats. Food and water consumption were measured for 6 h a day following an 18-h same-sex crowded or individual housing period for each of 6 days. All subjects were individually housed during the 6-h measurement period and had access to food

Kelly J. Brown; Neil E. Grunberg

1996-01-01

461

Cannabis and Other Illicit Drugs: Comorbid Use and Abuse\\/Dependence in Males and Females  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cannabis and other illicit drugs are often used or abused comorbidly. Two competing theories to explain this comorbidity are (i) the phenotypic causation (gateway) model and (ii) the correlated liabilities model. We used data from 1191 male and 934 female same-sex twin pairs to test 13 genetically informative models of comorbidity. Models were fit separately for use and abuse\\/dependence in

Arpana Agrawal; Michael C. Neale; Carol. A. Prescott; Kenneth S. Kendler

2004-01-01

462

The development of male-oriented behavior in rams.  

PubMed

The sheep offers a unique mammalian model in which to study paradoxical same-sex sexual partner preferences. Variations in sexual partner preferences occur spontaneously with as many as 8% of rams in a population exhibiting a sexual preference for other rams (male-oriented). The current review presents an overview and update of the male-oriented ram model and discusses several theories that have been invoked to explain same-sex preferences in this species. Although our understanding of the biological determinants and underlying neural substrates of sexual attraction and mate selection are far from complete, compelling evidence is discussed that supports the idea that neural substrates regulating sexual partner preferences are organized during prenatal development. The challenge for future research will be to construct an integrated picture of how hormones, genes, and experience shape sexual partner preference. PMID:21215767

Roselli, Charles E; Reddy, Radhika C; Kaufman, Katherine R

2011-04-01

463

Relative abundance of males to females affects behaviour, condition and immune function in a captive population of dark-eyed juncos Junco hyemalis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relative numbers of males and females in breeding groups may vary from expected values owing to a variety of factors. To determine how sex ratio might influence individual phenotypes in a captive population of dark-eyed juncos Junco hyemalis during the breeding season, we established three treatment groups: a male-biased (2:1), equal (1:1), and female-biased group (1:2). Within-group density (birds\\/m2) was

Timothy J. Greives; Joseph M. Casto; Ellen D. Ketterson

2007-01-01

464

Self-grooming as a sexually dimorphic communicative behaviour in meadow voles,Microtus pennsylvanicus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-grooming may provide a means for broadcasting scent to conspecifics. Four experiments investigated this hypothesis in meadow voles. In the first experiment, male voles but not female voles groomed more in response to scent from an opposite-sex conspecific than a same-sex conspecific. In the second experiment, male voles groomed more in response to ovariectomized females receiving replacement oestradiol than to

MICHAEL H. FERKIN; EVAN S. SOROKIN; ROBERT E. JOHNSTON

1996-01-01

465

Albinism and mouse behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the behavioural effects of the gene for albinism (c-locus) in mice. For this purpose, homozygous albino mutants were compared with heterozygous pigmented mice, all males, in three experimental situations: 1. In order to obtain a general picture of the behavioural phenotype, the frequencies of 22 acts and postures displayed by solitary mice in a large observation cage

J. H. F. van Abeelen; H. W. Kroes

1967-01-01

466

Male pipefish prefer ornamented females  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the sex-role reversed pipefish Syngnathus typhle females compete for access to males and males are choosy. Females display a temporary ornament, a striped pattern. We show here for the first time in a sex role-reversed species that ornament display predicts how much time a female will devote to competitive behaviours, that males prefer ornamented females over nonornamented ones, and

Anders Berglund; Gunilla Rosenqvist

2001-01-01

467

Working with an Adult Male with Down's Syndrome, Autism and Challenging Behaviour: Evaluation of a Programme of Staff Support and Organizational Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the case of a male with Down syndrome who has been referred to a clinical psychology service due to challenging behaviors. It provides a case history and rationale for the assessment of autism, and describes the positive effects of an intervention for increasing staff awareness of autism. (Contains references.) (CR)

Newman, David W.; Summerhill, Lisa; Mosley, Ellis; Tooth, Claire

2003-01-01

468

Pain and discomfort in male piglets during surgical castration with and without local anaesthesia as determined by vocalisation and defence behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surgical castration of male piglets without anaesthesia is routine in domestic pig production causing serious distress and impairment of welfare. Thus, the EU is seeking alternatives, with local anaesthesia being one of the possible candidates. The aim of the present study was to compare surgical castration without anaesthesia (castration by cutting the spermatic cords [C]) with castration under local anaesthesia

Martin S. Leidig; Barbara Hertrampf; Klaus Failing; Anselm Schumann; Gerald Reiner

2009-01-01

469

The association between bullying behaviour, arousal levels and behaviour problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research into bullying behaviour has identified two main categories of bullying behaviour, direct bullying and relational bullying, within which different profiles are evident, namely ‘pure’ bullies, ‘pure’ victims, bully\\/victims and neutral children. The current study examined the relationship between direct and relational bullying profiles, arousal levels, and behaviour problems. 242 (males: 121, females: 121) Secondary school pupils (mean age 13.5

Sarah Woods; Eleanor White

2005-01-01

470

Male homosexual behavior in a free-ranging all-male group of Japanese macaques at minoo, Japan.  

PubMed

We documented nine male homosexual consortships within three different male-male dyads in a free-ranging all-male group of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata), at Minoo, Japan. A total of 63 male-male mounts were observed during these consortships. Male homosexual interactions shared most of the behavioral components that have been reported to characterize heterosexual and female homosexual consortships in this species. Convergent behavioral data, including analysis of male-male solicitations, mounting postures, body orientations, inter-mount activities, and third-party male intrusions supported the conclusion that male-male consortships are a sexual phenomenon. We discussed a series of proximate and ultimate hypotheses that purport to account for the occurrence of male homosexual behavior in all-male groups of primates, including humans. This first report of male homosexual interactions in an all-male group of Japanese macaques contributes to the growing database used to provide insights into the developmental processes, causal mechanisms, adaptive significance, and phylogenetic pathways of same-sex sexual behavior. PMID:24867180

Leca, Jean-Baptiste; Gunst, Noëlle; Vasey, Paul L

2014-07-01

471

Is a Gay Oedipus a Trojan Horse?: Commentary on Lewes’s A Special Oedipal Mechanism in the Development of Male Homosexuality  

Microsoft Academic Search

K. Lewes’s (1998) article is seen as an effort to locate the psychopathology and desiring patterns of some gay men in a variant of the Oedipus complex. This commentary questions the value of the Oedipus complex as a theoretical tool in the psychoanalytic formulation of male same-sex eroticism both on clinical and political grounds. It argues that the embedded primacy

David Schwartz

1999-01-01

472

Allometric variation among juvenile, adult male and female eastern bearded dragons Pogona barbata (Cuvier, 1829), with comments on the behavioural implications.  

PubMed

The functional significance of allometric change in reptiles has received limited attention and the reason for such changes has been regarded as 'obscure'. In this paper we report data on the Australian Pogona barbata, the eastern bearded dragon, from across their range and review changes in allometric growth among juveniles, and adult males and females and consider the functional relevance of these changes. There were significant differences in the population for mass, tail length, tail width, rear leg length and jaw length. These differences were consistent with differences required in locomotor performance and thus habitat use, together with access to different preferred dietary components. PMID:21236651

Wotherspoon, Danny; Burgin, Shelley

2011-02-01

473

Increased egg estradiol concentration feminizes digit ratios of male pheasants ( Phasianus colchicus )  

Microsoft Academic Search

The length ratio between individual digits differs between males and females in humans, other mammals, lizards, and one bird\\u000a species. Sexual dimorphism in digit ratios and variation among individuals of the same sex may depend on differential exposure\\u000a to androgens and estrogens during embryonic life. Organizational effects of sex hormones could cause the observed correlations\\u000a between digit ratios and diverse

N. Saino; D. Rubolini; M. Romano; G. Boncoraglio

2007-01-01

474

Behaviour of dispersing deer mice ( Peromyscus maniculatus )  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.The behaviour of dispersing and resident deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) was compared in three laboratory tests to determine if dispersers differed behaviourally from residents.2.The hypothesis that behavioural differences have a genetic basis was examined by correlating genotype at three electrophoretically detectable blood protein loci with scores on the behaviour tests. Among resident males, level of aggression (as measured in neutral

Daphne J. Fairbairn

1978-01-01

475

Testing predictions from the male control theory of men's partner violence.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to test predictions from the male control theory of intimate partner violence (IPV) and Johnson's [Johnson, M. P. (1995). Journal of Marriage and the Family, 57, 282-294] typology. A student sample (N?=?1,104) reported on their use of physical aggression and controlling behavior, to partners and to same-sex non-intimates. Contrary to the male control theory, women were found to be more physically aggressive to their partners than men were, and the reverse pattern was found for aggression to same-sex non-intimates. Furthermore, there were no substantial sex differences in controlling behavior, which significantly predicted physical aggression in both sexes. IPV was found to be associated with physical aggression to same-sex non-intimates, thereby demonstrating a link with aggression outside the family. Using Johnson's typology, women were more likely than men to be classed as "intimate terrorists," which was counter to earlier findings. Overall, these results do not support the male control theory of IPV. Instead, they fit the view that IPV does not have a special etiology, and is better studied within the context of other forms of aggression. PMID:23878077

Bates, Elizabeth A; Graham-Kevan, Nicola; Archer, John

2014-01-01

476

Plasticity in adult development: experience with young males enhances mating competence in adult male cowbirds, Molothrus ater  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The social environment can play an important role in organizing organisms' behavioural development. We studied the effect on adult male cowbirds' communication and mating- related behaviour of being housed in social groups with juvenile males. In two large outdoor aviaries, we housed adult males, juvenile females and adult females either with or without juvenile males. Conditions remained intact from

David J. White; Andrew P. King; Meredith J. West

2002-01-01

477

Same-Sex Marriage and Context-Specific Kinship Terms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates whether married gays and lesbians in Massachusetts are using the kinship terms commonly associated with marriage in referring to and introducing their marriage partners and, if not, whether alternative terms are being used in a variety of social contexts. We demonstrate through survey and interview data that marriage-related terms are used discriminately, are consciously chosen, and are

Patricia Ould; C. Julie Whitlow

2011-01-01

478

Same-Sex Relationships and Women with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Limited existing research looking at homosexuality and people with intellectual disabilities has identified a low level of knowledge, homophobic attitudes and negative experiences for gay men. Mainstream research has identified traditional gender role beliefs to be highly associated with negative attitudes towards homosexuality. This…

Burns, Jan; Davies, Danielle

2011-01-01

479

Heteronormative Consensus in the Norwegian Same-Sex Adoption Debate?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article investigates the Norwegian newspaper debate (1998–2002) on the right of homosexual couples to adopt children. It identifies two patterns of meaning within which both anti-adoption and pro-adoption sides of the debate were located: 1) the nuclear family as reference point; and 2) a focus on innate qualities. Parallell to a continuous liberalization of sexualities in Norway we seem

Norman Anderssen; Tone Hellesund

2009-01-01

480

Same-Sex Marriage in South Africa: A Constitutional Possibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The South African Constitution is unlike any other in the world in terms of its inclusion of sexual orientation. The Constitutional Court has taken a clear position in interpreting the Bill of Rights and implementing its goal of protecting individuals and groups from discrimination. The Sodomy, Immigration, and Spousal Benefits Cases demonstrate that the Constitutional Court recognizes that homosexuals have

Mary P. Byrn

2002-01-01

481

Federal Employee Benefits and Same-Sex Partnerships  

Microsoft Academic Search

[Excerpt] The federal government provides a variety of benefits to its 8 million employees and annuitants. Among these benefits are health insurance; enhanced dental and vision benefits; survivor benefits; retirement and disability benefits; family, medical, and emergency leave; and reimbursement of relocation costs. Pursuant to Title 5 U.S.C. Chapters 89, 89A, 89B and other statutes, millions of federal employees may

Wendy R Ginsberg

2010-01-01

482

Gender pairing and bargaining—Beware the same sex!  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the influence of gender and gender pairing on economic decision making in an experimental two-person bargaining game\\u000a where the other party’s gender is known to both actors. We find that (1) gender per se has no significant effect on behavior, whereas (2) gender pairing systematically affects behavior. In particular, we observe much more competition and retaliation and, thus,

Matthias Sutter; Ronald Bosman; Martin G. Kocher; Frans van Winden

2009-01-01

483