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1

Intimate Violence in Male Same-Sex Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite findings suggesting a high prevalence of violence in male same-sex relationships, little is known about the characteristics of this violence. This study explored the general nature of male same-sex intimate violence. The sample consisted of 69 gay and bisexual men, chosen from a randomly selected community sample, who reported at least 1 violent episode in an interview exploring their

Jessica L. Stanley; Kim Bartholomew; Tracy Taylor; Doug Oram; Monica Landolt

2006-01-01

2

Epidemiology of male same-sex behaviour and associated sexual health indicators in low- and middle-income countries: 2003-2007 estimates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To conduct a systematic review of published and unpublished data from research and public health information systems on the prevalence of male-to-male sex in the total male population; as well as among men who have sex with men (MSM), data on prevalence of heterosexual activity and heterosexual unions; prevalence of condom use with male and female partners; and prevalence

K Konda; E R Segura; R Lyerla; Carlos F Caceres

2010-01-01

3

Male Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence: A Descriptive Review and Call for Further Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides an overview of all known publicly available research addressing the extent of men's experiences of same-sex intimate partner violence. Overall, it would seem that intimate partner violence is not just a problem for heterosexual couples. Violence between male same-sex male intimates also occurs at an alarmingly high rate, help is rarely sought from community service providers or

Samantha Jeffries; Matthew Ball

4

A shot in the dark: same-sex sexual behaviour in a deep-sea squid.  

PubMed

Little is known about the reproductive habits of deep-living squids. Using remotely operated vehicles in the deep waters of the Monterey Submarine Canyon, we have found evidence of mating, i.e. implanted sperm packages, on similar body locations in males and females of the rarely seen mesopelagic squid Octopoteuthis deletron. Equivalent numbers of both sexes were found to have mated, indicating that male squid routinely and indiscriminately mate with both males and females. Most squid species are short-lived, semelparous (i.e. with a single, brief reproductive period) and promiscuous. In the deep, dark habitat where O. deletron lives, potential mates are few and far between. We suggest that same-sex mating behaviour by O. deletron is part of a reproductive strategy that maximizes success by inducing males to indiscriminately and swiftly inseminate every conspecific that they encounter. PMID:21937492

Hoving, Hendrik J T; Bush, Stephanie L; Robison, Bruce H

2012-04-23

5

Assisted reproduction in a cohort of same-sex male couples and single men.  

PubMed

To date, there is limited published data on same-sex male couples and single men using assisted reproduction treatment to build their families. The objective of this retrospective study was to better understand treatment considerations and outcomes for this population when using assisted reproduction treatment. A total of 37 same-sex male couples and eight single men (seven homosexual and one heterosexual) who attended the CReATe Fertility Centre for assisted reproduction services were studied. There was a 21-fold increase in the number of same-sex male couples and single men undergoing assisted reproduction treatment since 2003. The mean age was 46years (24-58). Twenty-eight couples (76%) chose to use spermatozoa from both partners to fertilize their donated oocytes. Most men (32 same-sex male couples and seven single men; 87%) obtained oocytes from an anonymous donor, whereas five couples and one single man (13%) had a known donor. Anonymous donors who were open to be contacted by the child after the age of 18 were selected by 67% of patients. Of all 25 deliveries, eight (32%) were sets of twins. All of the twins were half genetic siblings. PMID:23768615

Grover, Stephanie A; Shmorgun, Ziva; Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Baratz, Ari; Librach, Clifford L

2013-08-01

6

Homophobia, Heteronormativism and Hegemonic Masculinity: Male Same-Sex Intimate Violence from the Perspective of Brisbane Service Providers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few studies have explored the problem of male same-sex intimate partner violence, especially in the context of Australia. Utilizing in-depth interviews with gay-friendly service providers in Brisbane, the research presented in this article sought to ascertain whether (a) intimate partner violence occurs in male same-sex intimate relationships, (b) if so, what form this violence takes, (c) what contextual triggers underpin

Melissa Kay; Samantha Jeffries

2010-01-01

7

Relationship Characteristics and HIV Transmission Risk in Same-sex Male Couples in HIV Serodiscordant Relationships  

PubMed Central

Unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) remains a main risk factor for HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) and this is of particular concern for partners of HIV serodiscordant status. However, HIV transmission risk has been demonstrated to vary by the sexual position adopted among partners. Guided by interdependence theory, this study examined how relational factors were differentially associated with risk taking (HIV-positive/insertive and HIV-negative/receptive) and strategic positioning (HIV-positive/receptive and HIV-negative/insertive) UAI withinserodiscordant same-sex male couples. HIV-positive men and their HIV-negative partners (ncouples=91; nindividuals=182) simultaneously but independently completed computerized questionnaires and HIV-positive men had blood drawn for viral load.A minority of couples (30%) engaged in risk taking and/or strategicpositioning unprotected anal sex. Results of multinomial logistic regressionindicated that HIV-negative partners’ levels of relationship commitment were positively associated with the odds of engaging in both risk taking and strategic positioning sexual behaviors. For HIV-negative partners, reports of relationship intimacy, autonomy, and sexual satisfaction were negatively associated with odds of reporting risk taking behavior. In contrast, HIV-positive partners’reported sexual satisfaction was positively associated with odds of engaging in risk taking behavior. Findings suggested that aspects of relational quality may be differentially associated with sexual decision making for same-sex male couples in serodiscordant relationships. Study findings lend support for the incorporation ofdiscussions of HIV risk reduction strategies, enhancing communication between partners, and support for general relationship functioning in HIV care.

Starks, Tyrel J.; Gamarel, Kristi E.; Johnson, Mallory O.

2014-01-01

8

Human males appear more prepared than females to resolve conflicts with same-sex peers.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to investigate sex differences in proximate mechanisms that precede the termination of conflicts. In Study 1, we asked women and men to report their intensity of anger in response to hypothetical, common transgressions involving a same-sex roommate. Direct verbal and physical aggression elicited the highest-intensity anger for both sexes, although overall women reported more intense anger than men to all transgressions. In Study 2, we examined sex differences in subjective and physiological reactions to a conflict using a role-playing scenario. Following recall of a conflict involving direct aggression and role-playing a reaction to it, compared with men, women reported their anger would dissipate less quickly and they would take longer to reconcile. Women also exhibited increased heart rate, but little change in cortisol, whereas men exhibited little change in heart rate but increased cortisol production. We interpret the results as indicating that women are less prepared than men to resolve a conflict with a same-sex peer. PMID:24845881

Benenson, Joyce F; Kuhn, Melissa N; Ryan, Patrick J; Ferranti, Anthony J; Blondin, Rose; Shea, Michael; Charpentier, Chalice; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Wrangham, Richard W

2014-06-01

9

On same-sex sexual behaviors among male bachelors in rural China: evidence from a female shortage context.  

PubMed

Using data from a survey conducted in the rural areas of Anhui Province, this study adopted the crosstabs and logistic regression model to analyze the same-sex sexual behaviors of forced male bachelors and the determinants when compared with married men with same ages. The prevalence of same-sex sexual behaviors among the unmarried men was reported as 17.2%, significantly higher than 8.9% among married men with same ages, indicating that same-sex sexual behaviors could be as a compensation for the absence of female sexual partners to some extent for those marriage squeezed or forced male bachelors. Among all groups, the occurrence of unprotected sexual behaviors were reported above 60%, regardless of marital status and the genders of sexual partners; the scores obtained on knowledge of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among bachelors (AIDS knowledge = 2.85; STDs knowledge = 2.38) are much poorer than those of married men (AIDS knowledge = 3.45; STDs knowledge = 2.79), which might exert potential negative impacts on men's health. PMID:21816858

Yang, Xueyan; Attané, Isabelle; Li, Shuzhuo; Zhang, Qunlin

2012-03-01

10

Same-sex sexual behaviors among male migrants in a context of male "marriage squeeze": results from an exploratory survey in urban Xi'an, China.  

PubMed

The male marriage squeeze in China may increase the prevalence of male same-sex sexual behaviors among unmarried male migrants who lack stable female sexual partners. The same-sex sexual behaviors among unmarried male migrants appear to be at high risk of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), mainly because of a lack of knowledge of these diseases. Using data from the "Survey on Reproductive Health and Family Life of Migrant Male Bachelors in Urban Areas" conducted in Xi'an City, Shaanxi Province, in December 2009 and January 2010, this study compares same-sex sexual behaviors of unmarried with that of married male migrants (including married but separated men who are migrating without their spouse or partner and cohabitating men who are migrating with their spouse or partner). It is reported that the prevalence of same-sex sexual behaviors among unmarried males reaches 11%, more than twice the 5.1% reported by married but separated men and thrice the 3.8% reported by cohabitating men. It also appears that the same-sex sexual behaviors is significantly associated with men's attitudes toward same-sex sexual behaviors (odds ratio = 1.59, p < .001), toward life-long bachelorhood (odds ratio = 1.35, p < .01), and with marital status (odds ratio = 0.37, p < .01). The frequency of condom use appears to be higher among unmarried men than among men who are married, whether or not they migrated with their wives, and is significantly associated with scores on knowledge about HIV/AIDS (estimated coefficient = .12, p < .001) and STIs (estimated coefficient = .22, p < .01). It is also associated with the likelihood of same-sex sexual behaviors (estimated coefficients = .83, p < .01) and marital status (estimated coefficients for married but separated = -.50, p < .05; estimated coefficients for cohabitating = -.77, p < .001). PMID:22782362

Yang, Xueyan; Attané, Isabelle; Li, Shuzhuo; Yang, Bo

2012-11-01

11

Non-monogamy and sexual relationship quality among same-sex male couples.  

PubMed

Relationship arrangements about sex with outside partners are common among gay couples, and meaningful distinctions in psychological and behavioral health correlates have been found among nonmonogamous agreement types. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between sexual agreements and partners' sexual relationship quality. Data were collected from both members of 161 gay male couples (n = 322 individuals). Couples were categorized as monogamous (52.8%), open (13.0%), monogamish (14.9%), and discrepant (19.3%). We used the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) to assess associations of relationship arrangement with four aspects of sexual relationship quality: sexual satisfaction, sexual communication, sexual jealousy, and the occurrence of at-least weekly sex between main partners. We found that sexual arrangements were not associated with sexual satisfaction, communication, or frequency. However, monogamous men reported significantly higher levels of sexual jealousy. Our findings indicate that gay men engage in a range of relationship agreements, and nonmonogamous agreements are associated with levels of sexual relationship quality equivalent to monogamous agreements. PMID:22906124

Parsons, Jeffrey T; Starks, Tyrel J; Gamarel, Kristi E; Grov, Christian

2012-10-01

12

Homosexual behaviour increases male attractiveness to females.  

PubMed

Male homosexual behaviour-although found in most extant clades across the Animal Kingdom-remains a conundrum, as same-sex mating should decrease male reproductive fitness. In most species, however, males that engage in same-sex sexual behaviour also mate with females, and in theory, same-sex mating could even increase male reproductive fitness if males improve their chances of future heterosexual mating. Females regularly use social information to choose a mate; e.g. male attractiveness increases after a male has interacted sexually with a female (mate choice copying). Here, we demonstrate that males of the tropical freshwater fish Poecilia mexicana increase their attractiveness to females not only by opposite-sex, but likewise, through same-sex interactions. Hence, direct benefits for males of exhibiting homosexual behaviour may help explain its occurrence and persistence in species in which females rely on mate choice copying as one component of mate quality assessment. PMID:23234866

Bierbach, David; Jung, Christian T; Hornung, Simon; Streit, Bruno; Plath, Martin

2013-02-23

13

Homosexual behaviour increases male attractiveness to females  

PubMed Central

Male homosexual behaviour—although found in most extant clades across the Animal Kingdom—remains a conundrum, as same-sex mating should decrease male reproductive fitness. In most species, however, males that engage in same-sex sexual behaviour also mate with females, and in theory, same-sex mating could even increase male reproductive fitness if males improve their chances of future heterosexual mating. Females regularly use social information to choose a mate; e.g. male attractiveness increases after a male has interacted sexually with a female (mate choice copying). Here, we demonstrate that males of the tropical freshwater fish Poecilia mexicana increase their attractiveness to females not only by opposite-sex, but likewise, through same-sex interactions. Hence, direct benefits for males of exhibiting homosexual behaviour may help explain its occurrence and persistence in species in which females rely on mate choice copying as one component of mate quality assessment.

Bierbach, David; Jung, Christian T.; Hornung, Simon; Streit, Bruno; Plath, Martin

2013-01-01

14

Personal or relational? Examining sexual health in the context of HIV serodiscordant same-sex male couples  

PubMed Central

Couples’ ability to adopt a “we” orientation has been associated with optimal health outcomes. This study examined how personal and relational motivations are uniquely associated with unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), protected anal intercourse (PAI), and the absence of sexual activity within HIV-serodiscordant same-sex male couples. HIV-positive men and their HIV-negative partners (n = 116 couples, 232 men) completed questionnaires and HIV-positive men had blood drawn for viral load. Results of a multinomial logistic regression illustrated that sexual satisfaction was positively associated with PAI among HIV-negative partners and negatively associated with PAI among HIV-positive partners. Endorsing a “we” orientation was positively associated with PAI among HIV-positive partners. Findings suggest that HIV-positive partners who espouse a “we” orientation may be willing to forgo their personal interests to protect their HIV-negative partners from HIV transmission. Couples-based interventions are warranted to help strengthen relationship dynamics to enhance the sexual health of serodiscordant couples.

Gamarel, K.E.; Starks, T.J; Dilworth, S.E.; Neilands, T.B.; Taylor, J.M.; Johnson, M.O.

2014-01-01

15

The Influences of Attribution, Context, and Heterosexual Self-Presentation on Perceived Appropriateness of Self-Disclosure in Same-Sex Male Friendships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although same-sex male friendships are often characterized as relatively non-disclosive, context normativeness and heterosexual self-presentation may explain variation in the attribution process affecting self-disclosure. In this study, 130 heterosexual men completed a self-presentation scale, read scenarios depicting self-disclosure among male friends in more and less normative contexts, and rated disclosure appropriateness and likely person and situation attributions in each context.

Jonathan M. Bowman

2009-01-01

16

Same-Sex Friendship Formation: Factors Influencing Feelings of Same-Sex Closeness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated social forces interacting with sex and race to produce variations in feelings of same-sex closeness. College student surveys showed little variation by race and sex. Males and females differed in how they related to the same sex, but not in the significance of this bonding. A weak positive relationship existed between same-sex bonding…

Siwatu, Mxolisi Sentwali Bandele

1999-01-01

17

Health, trust, or "just understood": explicit and implicit condom decision-making processes among black, white, and interracial same-sex male couples.  

PubMed

Among gay and bisexual men, primary partners are a leading source of HIV infection. Trust, intimacy, and advancements in HIV treatment may impact same-sex male (SSM) couples' decisions to engage in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). This qualitative study explored how Black, White and interracial couples discussed, and made decisions regarding condoms. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 SSM couples in the New York and San Francisco metropolitan areas. Stratified purposive sampling was used to include Black (n = 16), White (n = 17), and interracial (Black-White) (n = 15) couples. Twenty-six couples were concordant HIV-negative and 22 were HIV-discordant. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Some couples described explicit processes, which involved active discussion, while others described implicit processes, where condom-use decisions occurred without any explicit discussion. These processes also differed by race and HIV status. Black couples tended to report condom-use as "just understood." White, HIV-discordant couples decided not to use condoms, with some identifying the HIV-positive partner's suppressed viral load and high CD4 count as deciding factors. After an unplanned episode of UAI, White, HIV-negative couples tended to discontinue condom use while Black HIV-negative couples decided to revert to using condoms. HIV prevention efforts focused on same-sex, male couples must consider the explicit/implicit nature of condom decision-making processes. Understanding differences in these processes and considering relationship dynamics, across race and HIV status, can promote the development of innovative couple-level, HIV prevention interventions. PMID:23912774

Campbell, Chadwick K; Gómez, Anu Manchikanti; Dworkin, Shari; Wilson, Patrick A; Grisham, Kirk K; McReynolds, Jaih; Vielehr, Peter; Hoff, Colleen

2014-05-01

18

Same-Sex Relationship Violence  

MedlinePLUS

... of violence against women Violence Against Women Same-sex relationship violence Click the red escape button above ... punishments. Return to top More information on Same-sex relationship violence Explore other publications and websites Dating ...

19

Researching Same Sex Domestic Violence: Constructing a Survey Methodology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article discusses the issues and problems that need to be addressed in the development of a comprehensive survey approach to explore same sex domestic violence in relationships involving individuals identifying as lesbian, gay male, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBT&Q). It draws on the most detailed study to date in the UK comparing love and domestic violence in same-sex and

Melanie McCarry; Marianne Hester; Catherine Donovan

2008-01-01

20

Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a review of literature describing intimate partner violence (IPV) in same-sex relationships. The authors present definitions and the prevalence of the main forms of violence-physical, sexual, and emotional-that can occur within same-sex intimate partner relationships, an overview of the existing research that examines the dynamics and broader social context of same-sex IPV, and implications for counseling affected

Christine E. Murray; A. Keith Mobley; Anne P. Buford; Megan M. Seaman-DeJohn

2007-01-01

21

Economic analysis of same-sex marriage.  

PubMed

This article applies the neoclassical microeconomic analysis of marriage as developed by Nobel laureate economist Gary Becker to same-sex marriage. The objective is to demonstrate that the economic analysis of marriage supports allowing same-sex marriage, and that same-sex marriages would strengthen the incentive to marry, increase the efficiency of marriage markets, provide for more children to be raised in two-parent optimum environments, and benefit states economically overall. The article concludes with an overview of the economic impact of same-sex marriages on states based on the analysis, data and fiscal information currently available from researchers and economists in the field. PMID:15189788

Portelli, Christopher J

2004-01-01

22

The Stability of Same-Sex Cohabitation, Different-Sex Cohabitation, and Marriage  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study contributes to the emerging demographic literature on same-sex couples by comparing the level and correlates of union stability among 4 types of couples: (a) male same-sex cohabitation, (b) female same-sex cohabitation, (c) different-sex cohabitation, and (d) different-sex marriage. The author analyzed data from 2 British birth cohort…

Lau, Charles Q.

2012-01-01

23

Children in Same-Sex Marriages  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Russia, sociologists do not have reliable statistical data as to the number of same-sex unions and the number of children being brought up in these families, and non-Russian studies on the topic are flawed and misleading. Russians are said to be antagonistic to the idea of children being raised in same-sex households. People are concerned over…

Solodnikov, V. V.; Chkanikova, A. M.

2009-01-01

24

The Advantage of Same-Sex Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considered are advantages of summer science programs limited to young high school women. Same sex courses are seen to eliminate unconscious gender bias in instruction and counter tendencies for female students to be less involved in science, mathematics, and computer activities. Four specific programs are briefly described. (DB)

Wollam, Jean

1990-01-01

25

Same-Sex Couples: Legal Complexities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors present a typology for organizing our current knowledge regarding same-sex couples in the United States who have and have not established legal ties between partners. This framework is complemented by a discussion of key rulings that define what is legally possible as well as the introduction of "legal consciousness,"…

Oswald, Ramona Faith; Kuvalanka, Katherine A.

2008-01-01

26

InterRacial Same-Sex Abuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Same-sex violence against gay men of Asian descent is a subject frequently neglected by researchers and social workers. However, they may be more vulnerable to intimate violence, especially with a Caucasian partner, due to the accentuated socio-economic differences between them. Lack of culturally and sexually specific services available often leads them to feel helplessness and, therefore, to accept the violence.

Maurice Kwong-Lai Poon

2000-01-01

27

The influence of same-sex marriage on the understanding of same-sex relationships.  

PubMed

This study examines the ways in which legally recognized same-sex marriage affects the understanding of same-sex romantic relationships for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered (LGBT) individuals. Participants (N = 288) responded to an open-ended Web-based survey asking them to describe how legally recognized same-sex marriage influenced their view of their own romantic relationship or romantic relationships in general. Results indicate that legally recognized same-sex marriage impacted participants' understanding of romantic relationships by making existing relationships seem more real and by serving as a tool through which participants realized their desires for ideal potential partner and relationship characteristics. The results suggest that legally recognized same-sex marriage is seen as both beneficial and challenging for samesex couples. PMID:18032290

Lannutti, Pamela J

2007-01-01

28

"Never in Our Lifetime": Legal Marriage for Same-Sex Couples in Long-Term Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We present data from 4 lesbian and 5 gay male same-sex couples who have been together 20 years or more. Couples included those legally married and unmarried, with and without children, and were interviewed within the first year legalized same-sex marriage was enacted in Massachusetts. Using life course theory and case study methodology, we…

Porche, Michelle V.; Purvin, Diane M.

2008-01-01

29

Boys Affiliate More than Girls with a Familiar Same-Sex Peer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence from ethnographic, observational, and experimental studies with humans converges to suggest that males affiliate more than females with unrelated, familiar same-sex peers, but this has never been examined directly. With this aim, we compared frequency of affiliation with a single, randomly chosen, familiar same-sex peer for the two sexes…

Benenson, Joyce F.; Quinn, Amanda; Stella, Sandra

2012-01-01

30

Gender, Ethnicity, Religiosity, and Same-sex Sexual Attraction and the Acceptance of Same-sex Sexuality and Gender Non-conformity  

PubMed Central

This study explored the role of gender, ethnicity, religiosity, and sexual attraction in adolescents’ acceptance of same-sex sexuality and gender non-conformity. Using an intersectionality perspective, we also tested whether the effects of gender, ethnicity, and religiosity on adolescents’ attitudes would function differently in adolescents with and without same-sex attractions. Data for this study were collected by means of a paper questionnaire completed by 1,518 secondary school students (mean age = 14.56 years, SD = 1.05) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The sample was 48.1% female and 51.9% male. Approximately one third of adolescents in the sample were of a non-Western ethnic background (32.3%, n = 491) and 7.5% of the participants (n = 114) reported experiencing same-sex attractions. Results of our analyses showed that adolescents in our sample who were male, of non-Western ethnicity, and who were more religious (as indicated by frequency of religious service attendance), were less accepting of same-sex sexuality and gender non-conformity in comparison to female, Western and less religious peers. We also found a significant interaction effect between religiosity and sexual attractions, but only in relation to evaluation of same-sex attracted, gender nonconforming females. The negative effect of religiosity on acceptance of same-sex attracted, gender non-conforming females was stronger among those adolescents who reported same-sex attractions.

Bos, Henny M. W.; Merry, Michael S.; Sandfort, Theo G. M.

2012-01-01

31

Romantic attachment and relationship functioning in same-sex couples.  

PubMed

The present study was designed to investigate links between dimensions of romantic attachment and relationship functioning in a cross-sectional sample of people in same-sex relationships, with the goals of replicating basic findings from research on heterosexual couples and advancing understanding of unique issues faced by same-sex couples. The sample included 274 female couples, 188 male couples, 34 women whose female partners did not participate, and 39 men whose male partners did not participate. Participants were recruited from geographically diverse regions of the United States and Canada and provided data by responding to pencil-and-paper surveys. Attachment insecurity in both self and partner were linked with poor relationship functioning across a range of variables (satisfaction, commitment, trust, communication, problem intensity). The pattern of results was identical for women and men, but the effects were stronger in male couples for some associations between attachment variables and indices of positive relationship functioning. Monogamy was positively associated with relationship quality only when participants or their partners reported moderate or high levels of attachment anxiety. Contrary to hypothesis, attachment did not moderate links between minority stressors and relationship functioning. PMID:23356467

Mohr, Jonathan J; Selterman, Dylan; Fassinger, Ruth E

2013-01-01

32

Discrimination against same-sex couples in hotel reservation policies.  

PubMed

Discrimination against same-sex couples in hotel reservations policies was investigated. Hotels and bed and breakfast establishments (N = 320) were sent letters from either a same-sex or opposite-sex couple, requesting weekend reservations for a room with one bed. Same-sex couples were granted significantly fewer reservations than opposite-sex couples, suggesting that there was indeed discrimination against same-sex couples. PMID:8827497

Jones, D A

1996-01-01

33

Gay Marriage, Same-Sex Parenting, and America's Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Same-sex marriage, barely on the political radar a decade ago, is a reality in America. How will it affect the well-being of children? Some observers worry that legalizing same-sex marriage would send the message that same-sex parenting and opposite-sex parenting are interchangeable, when in fact they may lead to different outcomes for children.…

Meezan, William; Rauch, Jonathan

2005-01-01

34

Demographics of Same-Sex Couple Households with Children.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Limited research has looked at the distribution of multiple categories of children under the age of 18 residing in same-sex unmarried and same-sex spousal households. This paper specifically examines the socio-demographic characteristics of same-sex coupl...

D. Lofquist K. M. Krivickas

2011-01-01

35

Same-Sex Sexuality and Adolescent Psychological Well-Being: The influence of sexual orientation, early reports of same-sex attraction, and gender  

PubMed Central

Emerging research has shown that those of sexual-minority (SM) status (i.e., those exhibiting same-sex sexuality) report lower levels of psychological well-being. This study aimed to assess whether this relation is largely in place by the onset of adolescence, as it is for other social statuses, or whether it continues to emerge over the adolescent years, a period when SM youth face numerous challenges. Moreover, the moderating influence of sexual orientation (identification), early (versus later) reports of same-sex attractions, and gender were also examined. Using data from Add Health, multiple-group latent growth curve analyses were conducted to examine growth patterns in depressive affect and self-esteem. Results suggested that psychological well-being disparities between SM and non-SM were generally in place by early adolescence. For many, the remainder of adolescence was a recovery period when disparities narrowed over time. Early and stable reporting of same-sex attractions was associated with a greater initial deficit in psychological well-being, especially among males, but it was also associated with more rapid recovery. Independent of the timing and stability of reported same-sex attractions over time, actual sexual orientation largely failed to moderate the relation between SM status and psychological well-being. Importantly, the sizable yet understudied subgroup that identified as heterosexual but reported same-sex attractions appeared to be at substantial risk.

Jager, Justin; Davis-Kean, Pamela E.

2012-01-01

36

Attitudes toward same-sex marriage: the case of Scandinavia.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the variables that explain attitudes toward same-sex marriage. Using recently collected Scandinavian data (from Norway and Sweden) with a high response rate, this study shows that gender, regular participation in religious activities, political ideology, education, whether the respondent lived in the capital city, and attitudes toward gender equality were important for attitudes toward same-sex marriage. Age and income were not important for attitudes toward same-sex marriage. Although both Norwegians and Swedes clearly favor same-sex marriage, Swedes are significantly more positive than Norwegians. PMID:23952927

Jakobsson, Niklas; Kotsadam, Andreas; Jakobsson, Siri Støre

2013-01-01

37

Same-Sex Marriages: Legal Issues, May 9, 2012.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The recognition of same-sex marriages generates debate on both the federal and state levels. Either legislatively or judicially, same-sex marriage is legal in seven states. Other states allow civil unions or domestic partnerships, which grant all or part ...

A. M. Smith

2012-01-01

38

Framing Classroom Discussion of Same-Sex Marriage  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assuming that the issue of same-sex marriage should be discussed in schools, how should the discussion be framed? Michael Hand first distinguishes this question from the related but distinct question of whether discussion on this topic should be steered. He then examines three possible frames for discussion of same-sex marriage: the perfectionist…

Hand, Michael

2013-01-01

39

Gendered (s)explorations among same-sex attracted young people in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper seeks to import a more complex understanding of gendered subjectivity into discussions of young people and homosexuality, and is based on an Australian national survey (n=749) of same-sex attracted youth (SSAY) aged between 14 and 21. Results revealed significant gender differences with regard to patterns of sexual attraction, behaviour and identity labels among participants. For the young men

DEBORAH DEMPSEY; LYNNE HILLIER; LYN HARRISON

2001-01-01

40

Gay marriage, same-sex parenting, and America's children.  

PubMed

Same-sex marriage, barely on the political radar a decade ago, is a reality in America. How will it affect the well-being of children? Some observers worry that legalizing same-sex marriage would send the message that same-sex parenting and opposite-sex parenting are interchangeable, when in fact they may lead to different outcomes for children. To evaluate that concern, William Meezan and Jonathan Rauch review the growing body of research on how same-sex parenting affects children. After considering the methodological problems inherent in studying small, hard-to-locate populations--problems that have bedeviled this literature-the authors find that the children who have been studied are doing about as well as children normally do. What the research does not yet show is whether the children studied are typical of the general population of children raised by gay and lesbian couples. A second important question is how same-sex marriage might affect children who are already being raised by same-sex couples. Meezan and Rauch observe that marriage confers on children three types of benefits that seem likely to carry over to children in same-sex families. First, marriage may increase children's material well-being through such benefits as family leave from work and spousal health insurance eligibility. It may also help ensure financial continuity, should a spouse die or be disabled. Second, same-sex marriage may benefit children by increasing the durability and stability of their parents' relationship. Finally, marriage may bring increased social acceptance of and support for same-sex families, although those benefits might not materialize in communities that meet same-sex marriage with rejection or hostility. The authors note that the best way to ascertain the costs and benefits of the effects of same-sex marriage on children is to compare it with the alternatives. Massachusetts is marrying same-sex couples, Vermont and Connecticut are offering civil unions, and several states offer partner-benefit programs. Studying the effect of these various forms of unions on children could inform the debate over gay marriage to the benefit of all sides of the argument. PMID:16158732

Meezan, William; Rauch, Jonathan

2005-01-01

41

What Asexuality Contributes to the Same-Sex Marriage Discussion  

PubMed Central

While same-sex marriage debates have captured public attention, it is but one component of a broader discussion regarding the role of marriage in a changing society. To inform this discussion, I draw on qualitative, Internet survey data from 102 self-identified asexual individuals. I find that asexual relationships are complicated and nuanced in ways that have implications for a GLBTQ political agenda, including same-sex marriage recognition. In addition, findings indicate that assumptions of sex and sexuality in relationships are problematic and that present language for describing relationships is limiting. Findings suggest a social justice agenda for marginalized sexualities should be broader in scope than same-sex marriage.

Scherrer, Kristin S.

2010-01-01

42

Three-Year Follow-Up of Same-Sex Couples Who Had Civil Unions in Vermont, Same-Sex Couples Not in Civil Unions, and Heterosexual Married Couples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was a 3-year follow-up of 65 male and 138 female same-sex couples who had civil unions in Vermont during the 1st year of that legislation. These couples were compared with 23 male and 61 female same-sex couples in their friendship circles who did not have civil unions and with 55 heterosexual married couples (1 member of each was a…

Balsam, Kimberly F.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Rothblum, Esther D.; Solomon, Sondra E.

2008-01-01

43

Do Children in Single-Parent Households Fare Better Living with Same-Sex Parents?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used data from National Educational Longitudinal Study (with 3,483 and 409 eighth graders living in mother-only and father-only homes, respectively) to test whether children in single-parent homes fare better living with same-sex parent. Of 35 social psychological and educational outcomes studied, found none in which both males and females…

Downey, Douglas B.; Powell, Brian

1993-01-01

44

Feminist epistemology and the politics of method: surveying same sex domestic violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper discusses the development and application of a survey questionnaire for researching domestic violence in same sex relationships. A feminist epistemological approach was used to construct an instrument geared to explore how processes of gendering and power might operate in similar or different ways in abusive lesbian, gay male or heterosexual relationships, while taking into account a range of

Marianne Hester; Catherine Donovan; Eldin Fahmy

2010-01-01

45

Same-Sex Marriages: Legal Issues, November 5, 2012.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report discusses DOMA and legal challenges to it. It reviews legal principles applied to determine the validity of a marriage contracted in another state and surveys the various approaches employed by states to address same-sex marriage. It also exam...

A. M. Smith

2012-01-01

46

Same-Sex Parent Families and Children's Academic Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children in traditional families (i.e., married, 2 biological parents) tend to do better than their peers in nontraditional families. An exception to this pattern appears to be children from same-sex parent families. Children with lesbian mothers or gay fathers do not exhibit the poorer outcomes typically associated with nontraditional families.…

Potter, Daniel

2012-01-01

47

Stress, attachment and partner violence in same-sex relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attachment theory has been utilized in studies of relationship violence with heterosexual samples but not with same-sex samples. The purpose of this exploratory study was to compare two nested models of perpetration of violence derived from literature using structural equation modeling procedures. The sample for this study (N = 87) consisted of 46 gay men and 41 lesbians who had

Shonda M. Craft; Julie M. Serovich; Patrick C. McKenry; Ji-Young Lim

2008-01-01

48

Estimate of Housing Discrimination Against Same-Sex Couples.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this study is to develop the first national estimate of the level of housing discrimination based on sexual orientation; that is, discrimination against same-sex couples--men partnering with men and women partnering with women at the init...

A. Reynolds F. R. Brassier M. Ballou R. Campbell S. Friedman S. Scovill

2013-01-01

49

Homophobia and same-sex partnership legislation in Europe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper seeks to answer the practical question whether the institutionalisation level of same-sex relationships can affect the social acceptance of lesbian women and gay men in Europe, and highlight some of the factors that can potentially determine the incidence of homophobia in 26 European countries. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The study contributes to the literature on acceptance of lesbian

Judit Takács; Ivett Szalma

2011-01-01

50

Same-Sex Attraction and Successful Adolescent Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relation of adolescent same-sex attraction to "successful development" (Baltes, P. B., "Am. Psychol." 32:366-380, 1997). Based on a survey of high-school adolescents, four groups were defined according to the nature of self-reported sexual attraction: exclusively heterosexual (EHA; n=3594); mostly heterosexual (MHA;…

Busseri, Michael A.; Willoughby, Teena; Chalmers, Heather; Bogaert, Anthony R.

2006-01-01

51

Gender Differences in Same-Sex Friendships and Romantic Relationships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An investigation of differences in the friendship patterns of men and of women reported that women appeared to be expressive in their friendship styles while men's same-sex friendships were best characterized as being instrumental. To examine these differences further, a study was conducted which investigated the relationship of friendship and…

Mosley, Norman R.; And Others

52

Modern Prejudice and Same-Sex Parenting: Shifting Judgments in Positive and Negative Parenting Situations  

PubMed Central

The current study compares the effects of traditional and modern anti-homosexual prejudice on evaluations of parenting practices of same-sex and opposite-sex couples. Undergraduate university student participants (N = 436) completed measures of traditional and modern anti-homosexual prejudice and responded to a vignette describing a restaurant scene in which parents react to their child’s undesirable behavior. The parents’ sexual orientation and the quality of their parenting (positive or negative quality) were varied randomly. It was predicted that participants who score higher in modern prejudice would rate the negative parenting behaviors of same-sex parents more negatively than similar behaviors in opposite-sex parents. It was also predicted that this modern prejudice effect would be most pronounced for male participants. Both hypotheses were supported.

MASSEY, SEAN G.; MERRIWETHER, ANN M.; GARCIA, JUSTIN R.

2013-01-01

53

An exploration of prevalence of domestic violence in same-sex relationships.  

PubMed

The prevalence of domestic violence in a sample of 33 men and 33 women currently or previously in same-sex relationships was assessed. Data were collected through a mail survey in the state of Virginia. Of 1000 surveys sent out 66 usable ones were returned (response rate = 6.6%). Analysis indicated that 34 had experienced some form of domestic violence, but significant differences between male and female respondents were not detected. When data from this same-sex sample were compared with those of the heterosexual sample of the National Violence Against Women Survey, intimate partner assault may be more prevalent against gay men than against heterosexual men, but there was no significant difference between lesbians and heterosexual females. PMID:15460368

Owen, Stephen S; Burke, Tod W

2004-08-01

54

Adolescent Same-Sex Romantic Attractions and Relationships: Implications for Substance Use and Abuse  

PubMed Central

Objectives. Nationally representative data were used to examine associations of romantic attractions and relationships with substance use and abuse. Methods. Data from the Add Health Study were examined. Youths reporting same-sex and both-sex romantic attractions and relationships were compared with those reporting opposite-sex attractions. Survey regression and logistic regression were used to control for sample design effects. Results. In the case of certain outcomes, romantic attraction affected males differently than females. Youths with both-sex attractions were at a somewhat higher risk for substance use and abuse than were heterosexual youths; females with same-sex attractions were also at higher risk for some outcomes. Sexual-minority youths varied little from heterosexual youths in regard to trajectories of substance use and abuse. Conclusions. These findings highlight the importance of distinguishing between youths with only same-sex attractions and those with both-sex attractions. These findings also call into question previous findings indicating that sexual-minority youths are automatically “at risk.”

Russell, Stephen T.; Driscoll, Anne K.; Truong, Nhan

2002-01-01

55

Vermont Poised to Approve Same-Sex Civil Unions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Acknowledging that it will likely cost some of them their jobs, on April 19, Vermont's Senate approved a bill establishing marriage-like civil unions for gay couples by a vote of nineteen to eleven. In the face of numerous hostile letters and phone calls, and even vandalism to their cars, the Senators, including two Republicans, displayed considerable courage in approving a measure simply because they believed it was the right thing to do regardless of the political consequences. The vote followed passage of a similar bill in the House, which was introduced after a ruling by the State Supreme Court in December that same-sex couples were being unconstitutionally denied the benefits of marriage. Provided the House approves the slight changes made by the Senate, Democratic Governor Howard Dean has said he will sign the bill, perhaps as early as June. Among other things, the legislation would allow same-sex couples to form civil unions that entitle them to the approximately 300 rights and benefits available to married couples under state law. These couples would still not be entitled to federal benefits available to married couples in regard to taxes and Social Security, and it is highly unlikely that any other state will recognize the unions, at least for the present time. Still, the bill goes well beyond any present legislation and is widely regarded, by supporters and opponents alike, as a milestone for gay civil rights.

De Nie, Michael W.

56

Public health implications of same-sex marriage.  

PubMed

Significantly compromised health care delivery and adverse health outcomes are well documented for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community in the United States compared with the population at large. LGBT individuals subject to societal prejudice in a heterosexist world also suffer from the phenomenon known as "minority stress," with its attendant negative mental and physical health effects. Reports in the medical and social science literature suggest that legal and social recognition of same-sex marriage has had positive effects on the health status of this at-risk community. Improved outcomes are to be expected because of the improved access to health care conferred by marriage benefits under federal or state law and as a result of attenuating the effects of institutionalized stigma on a sexual minority group. PMID:21493934

Buffie, William C

2011-06-01

57

Public Health Implications of Same-Sex Marriage  

PubMed Central

Significantly compromised health care delivery and adverse health outcomes are well documented for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community in the United States compared with the population at large. LGBT individuals subject to societal prejudice in a heterosexist world also suffer from the phenomenon known as “minority stress,” with its attendant negative mental and physical health effects. Reports in the medical and social science literature suggest that legal and social recognition of same-sex marriage has had positive effects on the health status of this at-risk community. Improved outcomes are to be expected because of the improved access to health care conferred by marriage benefits under federal or state law and as a result of attenuating the effects of institutionalized stigma on a sexual minority group.

2011-01-01

58

Sensory regulation of C. elegans male mate-searching behaviour  

PubMed Central

Summary How do animals integrate internal drives and external environmental cues to coordinate behaviours? We address this question studying mate-searching behaviour in C. elegans. C. elgans males explore their environment in search of mates (hermaphrodites) and will leave food if mating partners are absent. However, when mates and food coincide, male exploratory behaviour is suppressed and males are retained on the food source. We show that the drive to explore is stimulated by male specific neurons in the tail, the ray neurons. Periodic contact with the hermaphrodite detected through ray neurons changes the male’s behaviour during periods of no contact and prevents the male from leaving the food source. The hermaphrodite signal is conveyed by male-specific interneurons that are post-synaptic to the rays and that send processes to the major integrative center in the head. This study identifies key parts of the neural circuit that regulates a sexual appetitive behaviour in C. elegans.

Barrios, Arantza; Nurrish, Stephen; Emmons, Scott W.

2009-01-01

59

3 CFR - Extension of Benefits to Same-Sex Domestic Partners of Federal Employees  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Extension of Benefits to Same-Sex Domestic Partners of Federal Employees...2010 Extension of Benefits to Same-Sex Domestic Partners of Federal Employees...in order to extend benefits to the same-sex domestic partners of Federal...

2011-01-01

60

Environmental Perceptions of Students in Same-Sex and Coeducational Physical Education Classes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studying the perceptions of 199 middle school students and 190 high school students about class environment showed that same-sex and coeducational physical-education classes revealed quite different climates. Overall, girls' same-sex classes were perceived most favorably, and boys' same-sex classes were viewed least favorably. (SLD)

Lirgg, Cathy D.

1994-01-01

61

Voting to Ban Same-Sex Marriage: Interests, Values, and Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From 2000 through 2008, initiatives proposing to ban same-sex marriage were on the ballot in 28 states. Although same-sex marriage opponents scored lopsided victories in most cases, voting outcomes varied substantially at the county level. This article examines sources of that variation and argues that opposition to same-sex marriage should be…

McVeigh, Rory; Diaz, Maria-Elena D.

2009-01-01

62

Will Marriage Matter? Effects of Marriage Anticipated by Same-Sex Couples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study used an online survey to explore the anticipated impact of legalized marriage on partners in same-sex couples living in California. These data were gathered prior to the California Supreme Court decision in May 2008 legalizing same-sex marriage, which held sway for 5 months before California Proposition 8 eliminating same-sex

Shulman, Julie L.; Gotta, Gabrielle; Green, Robert-Jay

2012-01-01

63

75 FR 32247 - Extension of Benefits to Same-Sex Domestic  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2, 2010 Extension of Benefits to Same-Sex Domestic Partners of Federal Employees Memorandum...in order to extend benefits to the same-sex domestic partners of Federal employees...where applicable, to the children of same-sex domestic partners of Federal...

2010-06-08

64

77 FR 42909 - Presumption of Insurable Interest for Same-Sex Domestic Partners  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Presumption of Insurable Interest for Same-Sex Domestic Partners AGENCY: Office of Personnel...is amending its regulations to add same-sex domestic partners to the class of persons...to relieve federal employees with same-sex domestic partners from the evidentiary...

2012-07-20

65

76 FR 11684 - Presumption of Insurable Interest for Same-Sex Domestic Partners  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Presumption of Insurable Interest for Same-Sex Domestic Partners AGENCY: Office of Personnel...amend its regulations to include same-sex domestic partners to the class of persons...to relieve federal employees with same-sex domestic partners from the evidentiary...

2011-03-03

66

The influence of political jurisdiction, age, and sex on handholding in public by same-sex couples.  

PubMed

Three hundred-forty lesbians and 62 gay males, largely from North America and in partnered relationships, completed online surveys that explored what handholding means to same-sex couples. The data suggest that lesbians in the United States are more likely now than ¼ century ago to hold hands in public spaces. Younger lesbians are more likely to hold hands in public than older lesbians, and Canadian lesbians hold hands more often in public than American lesbians. In response to the question, "What does handholding mean to you?," 26% of the female respondents from North America overtly referred to public handholding as either a political act or a risky behavior. The number of comments of that nature was similar, regardless of whether the lesbians resided in the United States or Canada. Data suggest that full acceptance of same-sex couples in public spaces has not yet occurred, even in jurisdictions where same-sex couples have the same legal rights as heterosexual couples. Although the sample size for males was too small to analyze the influence of age or political jurisdiction on public handholding, males, in general, were significantly less likely than females to view handholding as a means of staying "connected" with their partners. PMID:24147591

Che, Alison; Siemens, Isaac; Fejtek, Monika; Wassersug, Richard J

2013-11-01

67

Assessing attitude toward same-sex marriage: scale development and validation.  

PubMed

This paper reports the results of three studies conducted to develop, refine, and validate a scale which assessed heterosexual adults' attitudes toward same-sex marriage, the Attitude Toward Same-Sex Marriage Scale (ASSMS). The need for such a scale is evidenced in the increasing importance of same-sex marriage in the political arena of the United States and other nations, as well as the growing body of empirical research examining same-sex marriage and related issues (e.g., Lannutti, 2005; Solomon, Rothblum, & Balsam, 2004). The results demonstrate strong reliability, convergent validity, and predictive validity for the ASSMS and suggest that the ASSMS may be adapted to measure attitudes toward civil unions and other forms of relational recognition for same-sex couples. Gender comparisons using the validated scale showed that in college and non-college samples, women had a significantly more positive attitude toward same-sex marriage than did men. PMID:18689194

Lannutti, Pamela J; Lachlan, Kenneth A

2007-01-01

68

Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among

Jennifer J Power; Amaryll Perlesz; Margot J Schofield; Marian K Pitts; Rhonda Brown; Ruth McNair; Anna Barrett; Andrew Bickerdike

2010-01-01

69

Same sex, no sex, and unaware sex in neurotoxicology.  

PubMed

Males and females of virtually all species differ in how they respond to their environment. Because such differences exist in almost all biological realms, including disease patterns and therapeutic outcomes, they have evoked calls by various bodies to incorporate their assessment in research. Neurobehavioral indices pose special questions because, unlike outwardly visible markers, they are described by complex functional outcomes or subtle alterations in brain structure. These divergent responses arise because they are inscribed in the genome itself and then by endocrine mechanisms that govern sexual differentiation of the brain during development and operate throughout life. Other organ systems that exhibit sex differences include the liver, an important consideration for neurotoxicology because it may process many toxic chemicals differentially in males and females. Despite the scope and pervasiveness of sex differences, however, they are disregarded by much of neurotoxicology research. Males predominate in behavioral experiments, few such experiments study both sexes, some investigators fail to even describe the sex of their subjects, and in vitro studies tend to wholly ignore sex, even for model systems aimed at neurological disorders that display marked sex differences. The public is acutely aware of sex differences in behavior, as attested by its appetite for books on the topic. It closely follows debates about the proportion of women in professions that feature science and mathematics. Neurotoxicology, especially in the domain of laboratory research, will be hindered in its ability to translate its findings into human health measures if it assigns sex differences to a minor role. It must also be sensitive to how such debates are framed. Often, the differences evoking the most discussion are subtle in scope. They do not lend themselves to the typical analyses conducted by experimenters; that is, reliance on mean differences and null hypothesis testing. PMID:20875453

Weiss, Bernard

2011-10-01

70

A theoretical analysis of sex differences in same-sex friendships  

Microsoft Academic Search

An investigation of sex differences in same-sex friendships was conducted in terms of the intersection and social penetration model of relationship development, and Bem's theory of sex role orientation. The results indicated that there were significant sex differences in the nature of the same-sex friendships studied. In the terminology of Levinger's (“Toward the Analysis of Close Relationships,” Journal of Experimental

Robert J. Barth; Bill N. Kinder

1988-01-01

71

Middle School Students' Perceptions of Coeducational and Same-Sex Physical Education Classes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Middle school students who participated in both single-sex and coeducational physical education (PE) classes completed questionnaires eliciting their opinions on perceived abilities, affinity toward PE, and preferences for coeducational and same-sex classes. Most students liked PE, preferred same-sex classes, and rated themselves highly on PE…

Treanor, Laura; Graber, Kim; Housner, Lynn; Wiegand, Robert

1998-01-01

72

Comparing Trans-Spectrum and Same-Sex-Attracted Youth in Australia: Increased Risks, Increased Activisms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tran-spectrum youth include those who are gender questioning, transgender, intersex, genderqueer, and androgynous. Drawing on data from an Australian study of more than 3,000 same-sex-attracted and trans-spectrum youth aged 14 to 21, this article compares a group of 91 trans-spectrum youth from the study to "cisgender" same-sex-attracted…

Jones, Tiffany; Hillier, Lynne

2013-01-01

73

Predicting Gender Differences in Same-Sex Friendships from Affiliation Motive and Value.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to explore factors that influence gender differences in same-sex friendship behaviors, the present study examined how affiliation motive, as measured by thematic apperception to same-sex cues, and affiliation value, obtained from modified Edwards (1957) Personal Preference Scale, determine type of friendship situation and its particular…

Mazur, Elizabeth

1989-01-01

74

“Queer Eye” for Social Work: Rethinking Pedagogy and Practice with Same-sex Attracted Young People  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dominant discourses on sexualities construct limited representations and understanding of same-sex attracted young people, often resulting in material and detrimental effects for young people who do not fit the heterosexual mould. Traditionally, social work theory and practice with same-sex attracted young people has relied on ethnic and essentialised models for understanding sexual difference. In the present article, the author reviews

Paul Willis

2007-01-01

75

Self Harm and Suicide Risk for Same-Sex Attracted Young People: A Family Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of the risks of self-harm and suicide and in particular the importance of family in mental health outcomes for same-sex attracted young people. Mental health workers can assist families gain confidence in dealing with the news that a young person is same-sex attracted. Implications for practitioners and a model for affirmative…

Brown, Rhonda

2002-01-01

76

Intact Marriages in which One Partner Dis-Identifies with Experiences of Same-Sex Attraction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study is of heterosexually married couples in which one partner reports having experienced same-sex attraction and both partners report satisfaction with their marriage despite facing such constraints. Analysis suggested a number of themes related to how spouses learned about their partners' experiences of same-sex attraction, motivations for…

Yarhouse, Mark A.; Pawlowski, Lisa M.; Tan, Erica S. N.

2003-01-01

77

Legal Recognition of Same-Sex Relationships in the United States: A Social Science Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whether and how civil society should recognize committed relationships between same-sex partners has become a prominent, often divisive, policy issue. The present article reviews relevant behavioral and social science research to assess the validity of key factual claims in this debate. The data indicate that same-sex and heterosexual…

Herek, Gregory M.

2006-01-01

78

Different Rights, Different Perspectives: Observations on the Same-Sex Marriage Debate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Ontario and British Columbia courts of appeal have held that the restriction of marriage to heterosexuals is unconstitutional. Opposing views in same-sex marriage litigation arise from different definitions of "marriage." Proposed federal legislation would legalize same-sex marriage but not resolve the larger, underlying issue of how educators…

Howard, J. Paul R.

2003-01-01

79

Psychologists' Advocacy for the Legal Recognition of Same-Sex Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comments on the article by G. Herek, "Legal recognition of same-sex relationships in the United States: A social science perspective." Herek provided a useful overview of psychological research relevant to the legal recognition of same-sex marriages. Another avenue of advocacy that the American Psychological Association could undertake would be to…

Thyer, Bruce A.

2007-01-01

80

Client Discourses on the Process of Seeking Same-Sex Couple Counselling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How same-sex couples manage the process of seeking help for their relationships is an under-researched area. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 people who had engaged in same-sex couple counselling, and were analysed using discourse analysis. The ways in which the couples positioned themselves as part of a "minority…

Grove, Jan; Peel, Elizabeth; Owen-Pugh, Valerie

2013-01-01

81

The Construction and Enactment of Same-Sex Marriage in Argentina  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines how same-sex partnership recognition (SSPR) was enacted into policy in Argentina. It begins by looking at the history and structure of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) movements to explain why same-sex marriage, and not civil unions, became the primary goal. Next, it considers what the constitutional and statutory law was before the marriage bill passed

Shawn Schulenberg

2012-01-01

82

Counselors' Attitudes toward Domestic Violence in Same-Sex versus Opposite-Sex Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Domestic violence is often perceived to occur only in heterosexual relationships. However, domestic violence is also prevalent in same-sex relationships. The majority of the research indicates that counselors perceive same-sex domestic violence differently than heterosexual domestic violence. This literature review synthesizes the research…

Banks, Jamye R.; Fedewa, Alicia L.

2012-01-01

83

Behavioural and spermatogenic hybrid male breakdown in Nasonia  

PubMed Central

Several reproductive barriers exists within the Nasonia species complex, including allopatry, premating behavioural isolation, postzygotic inviability and Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility. Here we show that hybrid males suffer two additional reproductive disadvantages, an inability to properly court females and decreased sperm production. Hybrid behavioural sterility, characterized by a reduced ability of hybrids to perform necessary courtship behaviours, occurs in hybrids between two species of Nasonia. Hybrid males produced in crosses between N. vitripennis and N. giraulti courted females at a reduced frequency (23-69%), compared to wild-type N. vitripennis and N. giraulti males (>93%). Reduced courtship frequency was not a simple function of inactivity among hybrids. A strong effect of cytoplasmic (mitochondrial) background was also found in N. vitripennis and N. giraulti crosses; F2 hybrids with giraulti cytoplasm showing reduced ability at most stages of courtship. Hybrids produced between a younger species pair, N. giraulti and N. longicornis, were behaviourally fertile. All males possessed motile sperm, but sperm production is greatly reduced in hybrids between the older species pair, N. vitripennis and N. giraulti. This effect on hybrid males, lowered sperm counts rather than non-functional sperm, is different from most described cases of hybrid male sterility and may represent an earlier stage of hybrid sperm breakdown. The results add to previous studies of F2 hybrid inviability and behavioural sterility, and indicated that Wolbachia induced hybrid incompatibility has arisen early in species divergence, relative to behavioural sterility and spermatogenic infertility.

Clark, Michael E.; O'Hara, F. Patrick; Chawla, Ankur; Werren, John H.

2010-01-01

84

Parent-reported measures of child health and wellbeing in same-sex parent families: a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background It has been suggested that children with same-sex attracted parents score well in psychosocial aspects of their health, however questions remain about the impact of stigma on these children. Research to date has focused on lesbian parents and has been limited by small sample sizes. This study aims to describe the physical, mental and social wellbeing of Australian children with same-sex attracted parents, and the impact that stigma has on them. Methods A cross-sectional survey, the Australian Study of Child Health in Same-Sex Families, was distributed in 2012 to a convenience sample of 390 parents from Australia who self-identified as same-sex attracted and had children aged 0-17 years. Parent-reported, multidimensional measures of child health and wellbeing and the relationship to perceived stigma were measured. Results 315 parents completed the survey (completion rate?=?81%) representing 500 children. 80% of children had a female index parent while 18% had a male index parent. Children in same-sex parent families had higher scores on measures of general behavior, general health and family cohesion compared to population normative data (??=?2.93, 95% CI?=?0.35 to 5.52, P?=?.03; ??=?5.60, 95% CI?=?2.69 to 8.52, P?=?<.001; and ??=?6.01, 95% CI?=?2.84 to 9.17, P?=?<.001 respectively). There were no significant differences between the two groups for all other scale scores. Physical activity, mental health, and family cohesion were all negatively associated with increased stigma (??=?-3.03, 95% CI?=?-5.86 to -0.21, P?=?.04; ??=?-10.45, 95% CI?=?-18.48 to -2.42, P?=?.01; and ??=?-9.82, 95% CI?=?-17.86 to -1.78, P?=?.02 respectively) and the presence of emotional symptoms was positively associated with increased stigma (? =0.94, 95% CI?=?0.08 to 1.81, P?=?.03). Conclusions Australian children with same-sex attracted parents score higher than population samples on a number of parent-reported measures of child health. Perceived stigma is negatively associated with mental health. Through improved awareness of stigma these findings play an important role in health policy, improving child health outcomes.

2014-01-01

85

Committee Opinion No. 574: Marriage equality for same-sex couples.  

PubMed

Same-sex couples encounter barriers to health care that include concerns about confidentiality and disclosure, stigma and discriminatory attitudes and treatment, limited access to health care and health insurance, and often a limited understanding of their health risks. Same-sex couples and their families are adversely affected by the lack of legal recognition of their relationships, a problem with major implications for the health of same-sex couples and their families. Tangible harm has come from the lack of financial and health care protections granted to legal spouses, and children are harmed by the lack of protections afforded to families in which partners are married. However, the recent Supreme Court ruling, The United States v Windsor, which afforded equal treatment for legally married same-sex couples will provide many important health and financial benefits. Evidence suggests that marriage confers health benefits to individuals and families, yet a sizable proportion of individuals do not experience these health benefits because of their sexual orientation. Additional data suggest that same-sex couples who live in states with bans on same-sex unions experience adverse health outcomes. Civil marriage is currently available to same-sex couples in only thirteen states and the District of Columbia and honored by one state. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists endorses marriage equality for same-sex couples and equal treatment for these couples and their families and applauds the Supreme Court's decision as an important step in improving access to benefits received by legally married same-sex couples. However, additional efforts are necessary to ensure that same-sex couples in every state can receive these same benefits. PMID:23963426

2013-09-01

86

Anticipation of the sexual and gender development of children adopted by same-sex couples.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to characterize beliefs surrounding the sexual and gender development of children adopted by lesbian and gay couples. Participants were 768 Portuguese university students. Using a quasiexperimental design, participants were presented with identical descriptions of a couple interested in adopting a child, manipulating couple sexual orientation and child gender. Participants were then asked to anticipate three aspects of the sexual and gender development of the adopted child: sexual orientation, gender role behavior, and gender identity. MANOVAs and follow-up ANOVAs were conducted in order to analyze the data. Results indicated that participants, particularly males, considered children adopted by either lesbian or gay couples to have a lower probability of developing a normative sexual and gender identity than children adopted by heterosexual couples. Both men and women considered that children would emulate the sexual orientation of their same-sex parents, and that a boy's gender role behavior was more at risk if he was adopted by a lesbian couple. Moreover, men were apprehensive about the gender role behavior of a boy adopted by a gay male couple. Overall, these results indicate persistence of biased evaluations of the sexual and gender development of children adopted by lesbian and gay parents. Furthermore, both gender of the participant and gender of the child play an important role in these evaluations. Results are discussed and interpreted as a way of "doing gender" in the context of hegemonic masculinity. PMID:23837556

Gato, Jorge; Fontaine, Anne Marie

2013-01-01

87

Comparing violence over the life span in samples of same-sex and opposite-sex cohabitants.  

PubMed

Using data from a nationally representative telephone survey that was conducted from November 1995 to May 1996, this study compares lifetime experiences with violent victimization among men and women with a history of same-sex cohabitation and their counterparts with a history of marriage and/or opposite-sex cohabitation only. The study found that respondents who had lived with a same-sex intimate partner were significantly more likely than respondents who had married or lived with an opposite-sex partner only to have been: (a) raped as minors and adults; (b) physically assaulted as children by adult caretakers; and (c) physically assaulted as adults by all types of perpetrators, including intimate partners. The study also confirms previous reports that intimate partner violence is more prevalent among gay male couples than heterosexual couples. However, it contradicts reports that intimate partner violence is more prevalent among lesbian couples than heterosexual couples. Overall study findings suggest that intimate partner violence is perpetrated primarily by men, whether against same-sex or opposite-sex partners. PMID:10751048

Tjaden, P; Thoennes, N; Allison, C J

1999-01-01

88

Researching domestic violence in same-sex relationships--a feminist epistemological approach to survey development.  

PubMed

The article draws on recently completed research by the authors, involving a detailed study of love and intimate partner violence in same-sex and heterosexual relationships (funded by the ESRC, award RES-000-23-0650). The research, hitherto the most detailed study of its kind in the United Kingdom, included a national same-sex community survey (n = 800) plus four focus groups and interviews with 67 individuals identifying as lesbian, gay, queer, bisexual, transgender, or heterosexual. The article discusses in particular the development of the same-sex community survey, focusing on the epistemological and methodological implications of using a feminist approach. PMID:19363762

Hester, Marianne; Donovan, Catherine

2009-01-01

89

A comparison of the police response to heterosexual versus same-sex intimate partner violence.  

PubMed

It has been argued that the police do not respond to domestic calls involving same-sex couples in the same manner as they respond to calls involving heterosexual couples. A major problem facing researchers examining the police response to cases involving same-sex couples has been the lack of adequately sized samples. In this article, the authors utilize the 2000 National Incident Based Reporting System database, which contains 176,488 intimate partner assaults and intimidation incidents reported to 2,819 police departments in 19 states. The key issue examined is whether similar cases involving same-sex and heterosexual couples result in the same police response. PMID:17420516

Pattavina, April; Hirschel, David; Buzawa, Eve; Faggiani, Don; Bentley, Helen

2007-04-01

90

Shall we marry? Legal marriage as a commitment event in same-sex relationships.  

PubMed

This study is a part of an exploratory study of 50 married and unmarried same-sex couples in Massachusetts conducted by the Wellesley Centers for Women following legalization of same-sex marriage in Massachusetts in 2004. This article examines whether and how legalization of same-sex marriage impacted same-sex partners' commitment to one another, presentation to others as a couple, and treatment as a couple by others. Roughly one-quarter of the couples studied chose not to mark their commitment with ceremonies of any kind, while nearly three-fourths of the couples had either commitment (non-legal) ceremonies, legal weddings, or both. While decisions to legally marry largely were based on gaining legal protections, unforeseen impacts on self and relationships with family, friends, and the larger society revealed multiple layers of meaning. Implications of the study for public policy and social change are discussed. PMID:18826168

Schecter, Ellen; Tracy, Allison J; Page, Konjit V; Luong, Gloria

2008-01-01

91

Norm-Narrowing and Self- and Other-Perceived Aggression in Early-Adolescent Same-Sex and Mixed-Sex Cliques  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the relations between group context and self- and other-perceptions of aggressive behavior in an ethnically-diverse sample of 168 male and female grade 7 adolescents. We used self- and peer-reports of aggression in high- and average-aggressive mixed-sex and same-sex cliques to examine whether group members would assimilate their…

Killeya-Jones, Ley A.; Costanzo, Philip R.; Malone, Patrick; Quinlan, Nicole Polanichka; Miller-Johnson, Shari

2007-01-01

92

Development and preliminary validation of the MMPI2 scale for same-sex priest child molesters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Priests with the disorder of same-sex ephebophilia were investigated, with the purpose of constructing and validating an MMPI-2 scale. The authors performed an item-level analysis, comparing priests in evaluation for same-sex ephebophilia (N = 100) to priests in evaluation for non-sexual psychiatric disorders (N = 100) and the MMPI-2 normative sample of men (N = 1138). The comparison resulted in

Stephen Rossetti; Patricia Anthony; Peter Cimbolic; Thomas L. Wright

1996-01-01

93

Differences and Consistency Between Same-Sex and Other-Sex Peer Relationships During Early Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children's and early adolescents' preference for same-sex peers and the consistency of individual differences in reputation and popularity across the same- and other-sex domains were studied with 3 samples. Findings indicated that individual differences in the same-sex preference (a) derived from children's liking of other-sex peers, (b) were consistent over relatively long intervals, and (c) were related to children's preferences

William M. Bukowski; Cyma Gauze; Betsy Hoza; Andrew F. Newcomb

1993-01-01

94

Empirical Research About Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence: A Methodological Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a systematic review of empirical research examining intimate partner violence among same-sex couples. Seventeen studies that met the inclusion criteria were rated using a 15-item evaluation questionnaire. The results indicated that the existing body of research examining same-sex intimate partner violence demonstrates some common methodological strengths and limitations. The authors conclude with a list of recommendations for

Christine E. Murray; A. Keith Mobley

2009-01-01

95

Empirical research about same-sex intimate partner violence: a methodological review.  

PubMed

This article presents a systematic review of empirical research examining intimate partner violence among same-sex couples. Seventeen studies that met the inclusion criteria were rated using a 15-item evaluation questionnaire. The results indicated that the existing body of research examining same-sex intimate partner violence demonstrates some common methodological strengths and limitations. The authors conclude with a list of recommendations for future research based on the results of this study. PMID:19319742

Murray, Christine E; Mobley, A Keith

2009-01-01

96

Researching Domestic Violence in Same-Sex Relationships—A Feminist Epistemological Approach to Survey Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article draws on recently completed research by the authors, involving a detailed study of love and intimate partner violence in same-sex and heterosexual relationships (funded by the ESRC, award RES-000-23-0650). The research, hitherto the most detailed study of its kind in the United Kingdom, included a national same-sex community survey (n = 800) plus four focus groups and interviews

Marianne Hester; Catherine Donovan

2009-01-01

97

Gender-Role Implications on Same-Sex Intimate Partner Abuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines sociocultural factors that influence how same-sex intimate partner violence is viewed, studied, reported\\u000a and treated, with a specific focus on the effects of gender-role socialization and heterosexism. Further it summarizes the\\u000a similarities and differences experienced by heterosexual and same-sex couples in order to provide a framework for understanding\\u000a the unique factors that must be considered when working

Carrie Brown

2008-01-01

98

Same-sex attraction in a birth cohort: prevalence and persistence in early adulthood  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a continuing debate about the importance of social versus biological factors in the expression of same-sex attraction. Investigation of prevalence, continuities, and changes over time among young adults growing up in a country with a relatively accepting climate to homosexuality is likely to illuminate this debate. Analyses were therefore undertaken of self-reported same-sex attraction at age 21 and

Nigel Dickson; Charlotte Paul; Peter Herbison

2003-01-01

99

Predicting the Support of Same-Sex Relationship Rights Among Social Work Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the 1980s, the United States has seen several instances of legislative action on the topic of same-sex marriages and civil unions. As some studies explored public reactions to such laws, the perspectives of social workers and social work students have mostly been ignored. In addressing part of this oversight, this paper looks at the approval of same-sex relationship rights

Eric Swank; Lisa Raiz

2010-01-01

100

Same-sex cohabitors and health: the role of race-ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status.  

PubMed

A legacy of research finds that marriage is associated with good health. Yet same-sex cohabitors cannot marry in most states in the United States and therefore may not receive the health benefits associated with marriage. We use pooled data from the 1997 to 2009 National Health Interview Surveys to compare the self-rated health of same-sex cohabiting men (n = 1,659) and same-sex cohabiting women (n = 1,634) with that of their different-sex married, different-sex cohabiting, and unpartnered divorced, widowed, and never-married counterparts. Results from logistic regression models show that same-sex cohabitors report poorer health than their different-sex married counterparts at the same levels of socioeconomic status. Additionally, same-sex cohabitors report better health than their different-sex cohabiting and single counterparts, but these differences are fully explained by socioeconomic status. Without their socioeconomic advantages, same-sex cohabitors would report similar health to nonmarried groups. Analyses further reveal important racial-ethnic and gender variations. PMID:23446120

Liu, Hui; Reczek, Corinne; Brown, Dustin

2013-03-01

101

Same-sex Sexuality and Adolescent Psychological Well-being: The Influence of Sexual Orientation, Early Reports of Same-sex Attraction, and Gender  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging research has shown that those of sexual-minority (SM) status (i.e., those exhibiting same-sex sexuality) report lower levels of psychological well-being. This study aimed to assess whether this relation is largely in place by the onset of adolescence, as it is for other social statuses, or whether it continues to emerge over the adolescent years, a period when SM youth

Justin Jager; Pamela E. Davis-Kean

2010-01-01

102

Sexual behaviour and sexually transmitted disease patterns in male homosexuals.  

PubMed Central

Male homosexual behaviour is not simply either "active" or "passive", since penile-anal, mouth-penile, and hand-anal sexual contact is usual for both partners, and mouth-anal contact is not infrequent. A simplified method for recording sexual behaviour--a "sexual behaviour record (SBR)"--can be of value in determining the sites to be investigated and as a basis for further epidemiological questioning. Mouth-anal contact is the reason for the relatively high incidence of diseases caused by bowel pathogens in male homosexuals. Trauma may encourage the entry of micro-organisms and thus lead to primary syphilitic lesions occurring in the anogenital area. Similarly, granuloma inguinale, condylomata acuminata, and amoebiasis may be spread from the bowel of the passive homosexual contact. In addition to sodomy, trauma may be caused by foreign bodies, including stimulators of various kinds, penile adornments, and prostheses. Images

Willcox, R R

1981-01-01

103

In sickness and in health: same-sex marriage laws and sexually transmitted infections.  

PubMed

This paper analyzes the relationship between same-sex marriage laws and sexually transmitted infections in the United States using state-level data from 1981 to 2008. We hypothesize that same-sex marriage laws may directly affect risky homosexual behavior; may affect or mirror social attitudes toward gays, which in turn may affect homosexual behavior; and may affect or mirror attitudes toward non-marital sex, which may affect risky heterosexual behavior. Our findings may be summarized as follows. Laws banning same-sex marriage are unrelated to gonorrhea rates, which are a proxy for risky heterosexual behavior. They are more closely associated with syphilis rates, which are a proxy for risky homosexual behavior. However, these estimates are smaller and less statistically significant when we exclude California, the state with the largest gay population. Also, laws permitting same-sex marriage are unrelated to gonorrhea or syphilis, but variation in these laws is insufficient to yield precise estimates. In sum, the findings point to a modest positive association--if any at all--between same-sex marriage bans and syphilis. PMID:22789462

Francis, Andrew M; Mialon, Hugo M; Peng, Handie

2012-10-01

104

Same-sex sexual partner preference in hormonally and neurologically unmanipulated animals.  

PubMed

Proximate and ultimate biological theories for understanding sexual behavior predict that sexual dimorphism in sexual partner preference should be ubiquitous in the animal kingdom. A review of the literature found evidence for same-sex sexual partner preference in a small number of species (female pukekos, cows, domestic rams, female Uganda kobs, female Japanese macaques). Thus, theoretical predictions concerning the development and evolution of sexual partner preference appear to hold true except for a handful of exceptional species. Why individuals in some animal species exhibit same-sex sexual partner preference remains the object of debate. At a proximate level, domestic rams that exhibit same-sex sexual partner preference have been shown to differ in certain aspects of their neurobiology and physiology from rams that do not exhibit such a preference. It remains unclear, however, as to whether these differences are produced by sex-atypical perinatal exposure to androgens and their estrogenic metabolites. At an ultimate level, numerous functional hypotheses for same-sex sexual partner preference have been tested in female Japanese macaques but have failed to receive support. Understanding why same-sex sexual partner preference evolves in some species may involve abandoning a strictly functional perspective and, instead, approaching the issue from the perspective of each species' unique evolutionary history. PMID:12836731

Vasey, Paul L

2002-01-01

105

Characteristics of Activities That Affect the Development of Women's Same-Sex Relationships.  

PubMed

The author utilized semistructured interviews with 56 women to explore how a wide range of activities affected the development of the participants' same-sex attractions and relationships. The researcher was able to identify and describe some aspects of the process by which eight characteristics of activities that are more or less present in various social contexts have the potential to impact whether these contexts are more or less conducive or hindering to the development of women's same-sex attractions and relationships. Activities were more apt to nurture the development of the participants' same-sex attractions and relationships when the activity (a) included lesbians, (b) was composed primarily of women, (c) affirmed women, (d) facilitated bonding, (e) featured a climate of acceptance of lesbians/gays/bisexuals, (f) did not feature a climate that emphasized heteronormativity, (g) was perceived as gender neutral, and (h) generated or drew participants who were similar to each other. PMID:24885468

Davis-Delano, Laurel R

2014-10-01

106

Invisible victims: same-sex IPV in the National Violence Against Women Survey.  

PubMed

With intimate partner violence (IPV) among same-sex couples largely ignored by policy makers and researchers alike, accurately estimating the size of the problem is important in determining whether this minimal response is justified. As such, the present study is a secondary data analysis of the National Violence Against Women Survey and represents the first multiple variable regression analysis of U.S. adult same-sex IPV prevalence using a nationally representative sample (N = 14,182). Logistic regressions indicate that, independent of sex, respondents with a history of same-sex relationships are more likely to experience verbal, controlling, physical, and sexual IPV. Behaviorally "bisexual" respondents experience the highest IPV rates and are most likely to be victimized by an opposite-sex partner. Implications for future IPV research regarding sexual orientation and gender are discussed. PMID:20829231

Messinger, Adam M

2011-07-01

107

Same-Sex Union Announcements: Precis on a Not so Picayune Matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although some newspapers have voluntarily begun to publish same-sex union announcements, others will continue in their traditional exclusionary practices. Some of those papers can anticipate being accused in court of unlawful discrimination where the law allows that cause of action. Reflexively, those newspapers will in turn erect a defensive shield from such charges by appealing, at least in part, to

James M Donovan

2003-01-01

108

The Angel's Playground: Same-Sex Desires of Physical Education Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines narratives about same-sex desires between teachers and students in physical education, based on the life histories of physical education teachers who described their sexual identities as "gay man," "lesbian," "bisexual," "queer" and racial identities as "White," "Bi-racial," "Latina" and "Armenian-American." Many teachers…

Sykes, Heather

2003-01-01

109

Children of same-sex parents: in and out of the  

Microsoft Academic Search

An estimated 14 million children are parented by gay or lesbian couples. Research indicates that children of same-sex parents are as well adjusted as their peers of opposite-sex parents. However, previous research has yet to examine how these youth negotiate their own process of coming out about their families to others. We sought to identify the patterns, issues and themes

Juliet E. Hart; Jon E. Mourot; Megan Aros

2011-01-01

110

Young Men's Perspectives on Family Support and Disclosure of Same-Sex Attraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) face myriad challenges when deciding to disclose their sexual orientation to family members. Key to this decision is consideration of how disclosure may influence the support they receive from family. This paper explores a diverse sample of YMSM's (N = 43) perspectives on disclosure of their same-sex attractions to key family members

Julie Carpineto; Katrina Kubicek; George Weiss; Ellen Iverson; Michele D. Kipke

2008-01-01

111

Children of same-sex parents: in and out of the closet  

Microsoft Academic Search

An estimated 14 million children are parented by gay or lesbian couples. Research indicates that children of same-sex parents are as well adjusted as their peers of opposite-sex parents. However, previous research has yet to examine how these youth negotiate their own process of coming out about their families to others. We sought to identify the patterns, issues and themes

Juliet E. Hart; Jon E. Mourot; Megan Aros

2012-01-01

112

Registered Domestic Partnerships, Same-Sex Marriage, and the Pursuit of Equality in California  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Policies in California are examined to inform analysts of the process by which legal recognition of same-sex relationships may be achieved. Content analysis was conducted of relevant legislation, court cases, and voter initiatives, along with interviews with state legislators to gain an eyewitness understanding of the social climate surrounding…

Willetts, Marion C.

2011-01-01

113

Overcoming Bias toward Same-Sex Couples: A Case Study from inside an MFT Ethics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article illustrates a teaching case in which a marriage and family therapy (MFT) trainee learned to develop cultural sensitivity toward same-sex couples despite religious beliefs that put her at risk of discriminating against that population. The case took place during a marriage and family therapy ethics course in the spring of 2003. From…

Charles, Laurie L.; Thomas, Dina; Thornton, Matthew L.

2005-01-01

114

When Families Present with Concerns about an Adolescent's Experience of Same-Sex Attraction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the American Association for Marital and Family Therapy's Code of Ethics to explore ways in which marriage and family therapists can provide services within the framework of existing ethical principles and standards for accountability and professionalism to families with an adolescent child experiencing same-sex attraction. (Author/MKA)

Yarhouse, Mark A.

1998-01-01

115

Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples: Counseling Psychologists as Social Change Agents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The denial of civil marriage rights is a specific example of minority stress that can negatively affect the psychosocial well-being of self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals in same-sex partnerships, their families, and their allies. Counseling psychologists have an important role in addressing the…

Rostosky, Sharon S.; Riggle, Ellen D. B.

2011-01-01

116

Serotonin selectively enhances perception and sensory neural responses to stimuli generated by same-sex conspecifics  

PubMed Central

Centrifugal serotonergic fibers innervating sensory brain areas are seen ubiquitously across systems and species but their function remains unclear. Here we examined the functional role of serotonergic innervation onto electrosensory neurons in weakly electric fish by eliciting endogenous release through electrical stimulation as well as exogenous focal application of serotonin in the vicinity of the cell being recorded from. Both approaches showed that the function of serotonergic input onto electrosensory pyramidal neurons is to render them more excitable by reducing the spike afterhyperpolarization amplitude and thereby promoting burst firing. Further, serotonergic input selectively improved neuronal responses to stimuli that occur during interactions between same-sex conspecifics but not to stimuli associated with either prey or that occur during interactions between opposite-sex conspecifics. Finally, we tested whether serotonin-mediated enhanced pyramidal neuron responses to stimuli associated with same-sex conspecifics actually increase perception by the animal. Our behavioral experiments show that exogenous injection and endogenous release of serotonin both increase the magnitude of behavioral responses to stimuli associated with same-sex conspecifics as well as simultaneously decrease aggressive behaviors. Thus, our data indicate that the serotonergic system inhibits aggressive behavior toward same-sex conspecifics, while at the same time increasing perception of stimuli associated with these individuals. This function is likely to be conserved across systems and species.

Deemyad, Tara; Metzen, Michael G.; Pan, Yingzhou; Chacron, Maurice J.

2013-01-01

117

Well-Being among Same-Sex-and Opposite-Sex-Attracted Youth at School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, 53 students who reported being solely or primarily attracted to members of the same sex were matched with 53 peers who reported being attracted solely to members of the opposite sex on various demographic factors as well as exposure to bullying at school. Data relating to tobacco and alcohol use, drug use, health risk behaviors,…

Rivers, Ian; Noret, Nathalie

2008-01-01

118

Structural and Moral Commitment Among Same-Sex Couples: Relationship Duration, Religiosity, and Parental Status  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined ecological predictors of structural and moral commitment among cohabiting same-sex couples. Structural commitment was operationalized as the execution of legal documents, and moral commitment was operationalized as having a commitment ceremony. The authors tested 2 logistic regression models using a subsample of Rainbow Illinois survey respondents. First, the execution of legal documents was examined using the entire

Ramona Faith Oswald; Abbie Goldberg; Kate Kuvalanka; Eric Clausell

2008-01-01

119

Invisible Victims: Same-Sex IPV in the National Violence Against Women Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

With intimate partner violence (IPV) among same-sex couples largely ignored by policy makers and researchers alike, accurately estimating the size of the problem is important in determining whether this minimal response is justified. As such, the present study is a secondary data analysis of the National Violence Against Women Survey and represents the first multiple variable regression analysis of U.S.

Adam M. Messinger

2011-01-01

120

Stress, Attachment Style, and Partner Violence Among Same-Sex Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attachment theory has been utilized in studies of relationship violence with heterosexual samples but not with same-sex samples. The purpose of this exploratory study was to compare two nested models of perpetration of violence derived from literature using structural equation modeling procedures. The sample for this study (N = 87) consisted of 46 gay men and 41 lesbians who had

Shonda M. Craft; Julianne M. Serovich; Patrick C. McKenry; Ji-Young Lim

2008-01-01

121

Risk and protective factors of same-sex intimate partner violence in Hong Kong.  

PubMed

Numerous studies have assessed risk and protective factors for intimate partner violence (IPV) among heterosexual couples around the globe. Nevertheless, few have addressed the same issue among same-sex couples, especially in cultures where same-sex intimate relationships have gained little acceptance. This exploratory study evaluated the substantial risk and protective factors for same-sex IPV based on gender-neutral theories. Three hundred and six Hong Kong residents who have been in a same-sex romantic relationship completed a web-based questionnaire. Logistic regression analyses indicated that relationship conflict and poor anger management were risk factors both of psychological and physical perpetration. Dominance and substance abuse were respectively associated with psychological aggression and physical battering despite their small effect sizes. Psychological aggression was also found to mediate the relationship between conflict and physical assault, and that between anger management and physical assault. Interventions related to the array of risk and protective factors were discussed and recommended. PMID:23295381

Chong, Eddie S K; Mak, Winnie W S; Kwong, Mabel M F

2013-05-01

122

Invisible Victims: Same-Sex IPV in the National Violence against Women Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With intimate partner violence (IPV) among same-sex couples largely ignored by policy makers and researchers alike, accurately estimating the size of the problem is important in determining whether this minimal response is justified. As such, the present study is a secondary data analysis of the National Violence Against Women Survey and…

Messinger, Adam M.

2011-01-01

123

Children of Same-Sex Parents: In and out of the Closet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An estimated 14 million children are parented by gay or lesbian couples. Research indicates that children of same-sex parents are as well adjusted as their peers of opposite-sex parents. However, previous research has yet to examine how these youth negotiate their own process of coming out about their families to others. We sought to identify the…

Hart, Juliet E.; Mourot, Jon E.; Aros, Megan

2012-01-01

124

Identity, Discourse, and Safety in a High School Discussion of Same-Sex Marriage  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholars have called for discussions of same-sex marriage in schools as one way of ending the curricular silence around lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) people. Yet, concerns about how students might talk about LGBTQ people can contribute to teachers' reluctance to initiate such discussions. Queer theory suggests that…

Beck, Terence A.

2013-01-01

125

Same Sex Attraction, Homophobic Bullying and Mental Health of Young People in Northern Ireland  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on the relationship between same-sex attraction, experience of bullying in school and mental health measured using the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12). A random sample of 16 year olds, drawn from the Child Benefit Register, was invited to take part in the 2005 Young Life and Times survey, which is a…

McNamee, Helen; Lloyd, Katrina; Schubotz, Dirk

2008-01-01

126

Same-Sex Attraction, Social Relationships, Psychosocial Functioning, and School Performance in Early Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined whether 13- to 15-year-old adolescents who experience feelings of same-sex attraction (SSA) differ from those without such feelings in the quality of relationships with parents, peers, and class mentors and in psychosocial functioning (health status and school performance). The authors also assessed whether differences in …

Bos, Henny M. W.; Sandfort, Theo G. M.; de Bruyn, Eddy H.; Hakvoort, Esther M.

2008-01-01

127

Parens Patri[Archy]: Adoption, Eugenics, and Same-Sex Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arkansas, Florida, Mississippi, and Utah have laws or regulations prohibiting gay men, lesbian women, same-sex couples, or single parents (heterosexual and homosexual) from serving as adoptive or foster parents. In court filings, Arkansas, Florida, and Utah justify their bans by contending that married couples are the optimal families in which to raise children because families headed by gay or single

Kari E Hong

2003-01-01

128

Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study  

PubMed Central

Background While families headed by same-sex couples have achieved greater public visibility in recent years, there are still many challenges for these families in dealing with legal and community contexts that are not supportive of same-sex relationships. The Work, Love, Play study is a large longitudinal study of same-sex parents. It aims to investigate many facets of family life among this sample and examine how they change over time. The study focuses specifically on two key areas missing from the current literature: factors supporting resilience in same-sex parented families; and health and wellbeing outcomes for same-sex couples who undergo separation, including the negotiation of shared parenting arrangements post-separation. The current paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the design and methods of this longitudinal study and discuss its significance. Methods/Design The Work, Love, Play study is a mixed design, three wave, longitudinal cohort study of same-sex attracted parents. The sample includes lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents in Australia and New Zealand (including single parents within these categories) caring for any children under the age of 18 years. The study will be conducted over six years from 2008 to 2014. Quantitative data are to be collected via three on-line surveys in 2008, 2010 and 2012 from the cohort of parents recruited in Wave1. Qualitative data will be collected via interviews with purposively selected subsamples in 2012 and 2013. Data collection began in 2008 and 355 respondents to Wave One of the study have agreed to participate in future surveys. Work is currently underway to increase this sample size. The methods and survey instruments are described. Discussion This study will make an important contribution to the existing research on same-sex parented families. Strengths of the study design include the longitudinal method, which will allow understanding of changes over time within internal family relationships and social supports. Further, the mixed method design enables triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data. A broad recruitment strategy has already enabled a large sample size with the inclusion of both gay men and lesbians.

2010-01-01

129

Effect of Same-Sex Marriage Laws on Health Care Use and Expenditures in Sexual Minority Men: A Quasi-Natural Experiment  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We sought to determine whether health care use and expenditures among gay and bisexual men were reduced following the enactment of same-sex marriage laws in Massachusetts in 2003. Methods. We used quasi-experimental, prospective data from 1211 sexual minority male patients in a community-based health center in Massachusetts. Results. In the 12 months after the legalization of same-sex marriage, sexual minority men had a statistically significant decrease in medical care visits (mean = 5.00 vs mean = 4.67; P = .05; Cohen's d = 0.17), mental health care visits (mean = 24.72 vs mean = 22.20; P = .03; Cohen's d = 0.35), and mental health care costs (mean = $2442.28 vs mean = $2137.38; P = .01; Cohen's d = 0.41), compared with the 12 months before the law change. These effects were not modified by partnership status, indicating that the health effect of same-sex marriage laws was similar for partnered and nonpartnered men. Conclusions. Policies that confer protections to same-sex couples may be effective in reducing health care use and costs among sexual minority men.

Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Kenneth; Safren, Steven; Bradford, Judith

2012-01-01

130

Adolescent Same-Sex Attraction and Academic Outcomes: The Role of School Attachment and Engagement  

PubMed Central

Schools create environments in which some sexual feelings, behaviors, and relationships are stigmatized, and this may have negative consequences for adolescents with nonheterosexual romantic attractions. This stigma can lead them to withdraw and disengage from school at a critical time of preparation for adulthood, which can compromise opportunities for future success. Previous research has demonstrated that sexual minority youth report greater levels of school-related problems, including a weaker sense of attachment to school and more trouble with teachers and peers. This lack of social integration is likely to affect their educational success. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and the newly collected Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement study provide the first opportunity to fully explore whether and to what extent same-sex attracted youth enter adulthood with an educational disadvantage. In this study, we examine (1) whether same-sex attracted adolescents have lower levels of academic success, (2) if their lower academic success is explained by a lack of social integration at school, and (3) whether these relationships differ for boys and girls. Results suggest that same-sex attracted students, particularly boys, do suffer academically, and that this is in part a result of school-related problems and risk factors such as emotional distress and substance use; however, a great deal of the disadvantage fails to be explained by these factors. Additionally, while same-sex attracted boys show poorer academic performance, same-sex attracted girls do not, suggesting that gender may shape how sexual minority youth experience and respond to marginalizing school environments

Pearson, Jennifer; Muller, Chandra; Wilkinson, Lindsey

2010-01-01

131

Factors influencing male mating behaviour in Gambusia affinis (Baird & Girard) with a coercive mating system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of male and female body size, and correlated characteristics, on male mating behaviour were investigated in the western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis. Because larger females typically have larger broods in Gambusia sp., it was predicted that males would attempt more copulations with larger females. Two-way ANOVA showed that female body size was a significant predictor of male mating behaviour

R. Deaton

2008-01-01

132

The defense of marriage act (DOMA): its impact on those seeking same sex marriages.  

PubMed

Recognition of same-sex marriage has been a goal of many in the gay rights movement. With the passage of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), same-sex relationships will not be afforded the same opportunities as heterosexual relationships. This paper will discuss the process leading to the passage of the DOMA, and will argue that the passage of this piece of legislation was a misuse of Article IV, Section 2 of the United States Constitution, "Full Faith and Credit". The Defense of Marriage Act represents an extraordinary act of Congress, as they have rarely passed legislation under this mandate and have never passed legislation that curtails full faith and credit. Strategies that can be utilized to overcome the constraints of the DOMA will also be included. PMID:15774352

Clarkson-Freeman, Pamela A

2004-01-01

133

Development and validation of the attitudes toward same-sex marriage scale.  

PubMed

This research details the development of a new instrument designed to measure attitudes toward same-sex marriage. Participants were 615 heterosexual women and men, drawn from both student and nonstudent adult populations. Four studies were conducted for the purpose of developing the scale and to establish its psychometric properties. The resulting Attitudes Toward Same-Sex Marriage Scale (ATSM) consists of 17 items, has a one-dimensional factor structure, and exhibits a high degree of reliability. Additional analyses established the construct validity of the ATSM where ATSM scores were highly correlated with scores on the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale (Herek, 1988). ATSM scores followed predicted correlational patterns with select demographics, including educational attainment, religiosity, and political conservatism. The usefulness of this new measure in survey research is discussed. PMID:18032289

Pearl, Marcia L; Galupo, M Paz

2007-01-01

134

Moving from ambivalence to certainty: older same-sex couples marry in Canada.  

PubMed

A qualitative study, within a life course perspective, explored the transition into marriage for mid- to later-life same-sex couples. Twenty individuals (representing 11 couples) were interviewed - 12 lesbians, seven gay men, and one bisexual man. At the time of their marriages, participants were between 42 and 72 years old (average age: 54) and had been with their partners from six months to 19 years (average: 7.5 years). Three processes highlighted the ways in which these same-sex couples' experiences of deciding to marry were influenced by their life course experiences. First, individuals had to integrate marriage into their psyches (integration). Second, they had to consider why they would marry their specific partner (rationale). Third, the study participants demonstrated how their experiences of wedding planning and their wedding characteristics were imbued with intentionality as a result of lifetime experiences of homophobia and/or heterosexism (intentionality). PMID:23701954

Humble, Áine M

2013-06-01

135

Perceptions of and Experience With System Responses to Female Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence.  

PubMed

Female same-sex intimate partner violence (FSSIPV) is a significant problem that affects the physical and mental health and the safety of sexual minority women. A mixed-methods study was conducted to (a) identify risk and protective factors for victimization and perpetration of repeat violence in abusive same-sex relationships and (b) examine participant experiences with system responses (by domestic violence services, criminal justice systems, and health care services) to FSSIPV. The purpose of the article is to report the findings from the qualitative component (e.g., focus groups and individual interviews) of the parent study that are specific to survivors' perceptions of and experiences with domestic violence services, criminal justice systems, and health care services. The findings indicate a significant need across all systems for increased awareness, enhanced understanding, and provision of services specific to survivors of FSSIPV. PMID:21278817

Alhusen, Jeanne L; Lucea, Marguerite B; Glass, Nancy

2010-01-10

136

Boys' and Girls' Play Behavior in Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Pairs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample of 108 boys and girls between 4.0 and 6.0 years of age participated in an experiment designed to examine the effects of sex of participant, sex of peer, and a single versus a double play set on the children's play behavior. Same-sex and opposite-sex pairs of boys and girls were observed while they played for 10 min with

Hanns M. Trautner

1995-01-01

137

Trendlines: Court Decisions, Proposed Legislation, and Their Likely Impact on Binational Same-Sex Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Family is a cornerstone of U.S. immigration policy. The United States grants green cards to every immigrant who is validly married to a U.S. citizen—unless the marriage is to someone of the same sex. The Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) denies federal recognition of so-called samesex marriages. Recent social, political, judicial, and legislative trends suggest the eventual abrogation of DOMA.

Jay Strozdas

2011-01-01

138

Same-Sex Sexual Harassment: A Legal Assessment with Implications for Organizational Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The legal debate over sexual harassment (SH) has taken an interesting turn concerning the controversial issue of same-sex sexual harassment (SSSH). Disagreement among circuit courts' decisions propelled the U.S. Supreme Court to grant full review to the SSSH case of Oncale v. Sundowner Offshore Services, Inc., et al. (1996) [83 F.3d 118 (5th Cir. 1996) [on-line]. Available: http:\\/\\/laws.findlaw.com\\/5th\\/9530510cvl.html]. In a

Deborah Erdos Knapp; Gary A. Kustis

2000-01-01

139

Same-Sex Sexual Harassment: A Legal Assessment with Implications for Organizational Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The legal debate over sexual harassment (SH) has taken an interesting turn concerning the controversial issue of same-sex sexual harassment (SSSH). Disagreement among circuit courts' decisions propelled the U.S. Supreme Court to grant full review to the SSSH case of Oncale v. Sundowner Offshore Services, Inc., et al. (1996) [83 F.3d 118 (5th Cir. 1996) [online]. Available: http:\\/\\/laws.findlaw.com\\/5th\\/9530510cvl.html]. In a

Deborah Erdos Knapp; Gary A. Kustis

2000-01-01

140

Health care barriers and same-sex intimate partner violence: a review of the literature.  

PubMed

Minority groups experience barriers to accessing and receiving health care. Sexual minorities, which include gay men and lesbians, have no specific defining physical characteristics and are not as easy to identify as other minority groups. Consequently, their unique health care disparities are frequently overlooked. Myths and facts regarding the common barriers to health care, including those specific to same sex intimate partner violence, are explored. PMID:17073394

Freedberg, Pauline

2006-01-01

141

Internalized Sexual Minority Stressors and Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious problem in both same-sex and heterosexual relationships. Although there are numerous\\u000a similarities in the dynamics of IPV, gay men and lesbians experience unique stressors related to their sexual minority status.\\u000a This preliminary, descriptive study examined the relationship among internalized homophobia, stigma consciousness, and openness\\u000a to self-reported IPV victimization and perpetration. Among 581 men

Amana F. Carvalho; Robin J. Lewis; Valerian J. Derlega; Barbara A. Winstead; Claudia Viggiano

142

To have or not to have: Advance planning by same-sex couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-eight same-sex couples were interviewed regarding advance planning documents (e.g., wills and powers of attorney).\\u000a Results revealed motivating and inhibiting factors in decisions whether to execute documents. Couples who had executed advance\\u000a planning documents were motivated by their desire for protection, by their commitment to their relationships, by their families\\u000a of origin, by their friends and life experiences, and by

Ellen D. B. Riggle; Sharon Scales Rostosky; Russell Couch; Carolyn Brodnicki; Jessica Campbell; Todd Savage

2006-01-01

143

Comparisons of intimate partner violence among partners in same-sex and opposite-sex relationships in the United States.  

PubMed

Using 2005-2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data, we examined intimate partner violence (IPV) by same-sex and opposite-sex relationships and by Metropolitan Statistical Area status. Same-sex victims differed from opposite-sex victims in some forms of IPV prevalence, and urban same-sex victims had increased odds of poor self-perceived health status (adjusted odds ratio=2.41; 95% confidence interval=1.17, 4.94). Same-sex and opposite-sex victims experienced similar poor health outcomes, underscoring the need both of inclusive service provision and consideration of sexual orientation in population-based research. PMID:19834003

Blosnich, John R; Bossarte, Robert M

2009-12-01

144

Reported excellent health among men in same-sex and mixed-sex couples: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 1993-2010.  

PubMed

Self-reported excellent health was examined across sexual orientation among male adult couples using 18 years of data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Men in same-sex couples were more likely to report being in excellent health (28.7%) than men in unmarried and married mixed-sex couples (20.4% and 23.2%). After adjusting for other demographic and health factors, men in same-sex couples remained more likely to report excellent health than men in unmarried mixed-sex couples, but not than men in married mixed-sex couples. Reporting only adverse health disparities provides a partial picture of sexual minority health, and discounts the role of resilience and other health promoting factors in these populations. PMID:22853180

Jesdale, Bill M; Mitchell, Jason W

2012-01-01

145

A polycystic kidney-disease gene homologue required for male mating behaviour in C. elegans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stereotyped mating behaviour of the Caenorhabditis elegans male is made up of several substeps: response, backing, turning, vulva location, spicule insertion and sperm transfer. The complexity of this behaviour is reflected in the sexually dimorphic anatomy and nervous system. Behavioural functions have been assigned to most of the male-specific sensory neurons by means of cell ablations; for example, the

Maureen M. Barr; Paul W. Sternberg

1999-01-01

146

Primary and Secondary Socialization Impacts on Support for Same-Sex Marriage after Legalization in the Netherlands  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two years after the legalization of same-sex marriages in the Netherlands, 65% of the Dutch population largely or completely disagrees with the statement "gay marriage should be abolished." This article shows, by way of multinomial logistic regression analysis of survey data, which socializing agents influence one's attitude toward same-sex

Lubbers, Marcel; Jaspers, Eva; Ultee, Wout

2009-01-01

147

Same-Sex Peer Relations and Romantic Relationships during Early Adolescence: Interactive Links to Emotional, Behavioral, and Academic Adjustment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the relationship between early adolescents' involvement in romantic relationships and their emotional, behavioral, and academic adjustment, depending on same-sex peer relationships. Found a negative relationship between romantic involvement and emotional and behavioral adjustment for adolescents who were unpopular with same-sex peers.…

Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Doyle, Anna Beth; Markiewicz, Dorothy; Bukowski, William M.

2002-01-01

148

Young men's perspectives on family support and disclosure of same-sex attraction  

PubMed Central

Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) face myriad challenges when deciding to disclose their sexual orientation to family members. Key to this decision is consideration of how disclosure may influence the support they receive from family. This paper explores a diverse sample of YMSM’s (N = 43) perspectives on disclosure of their same-sex attractions to key family members and its impact on family support. Several stages/categories of disclosure are described and some YMSM seemed to continue to move between categories. Additionally, relationships after disclosure included negotiations between the expression of their sexual orientation and the maintenance of family support.

Carpineto, Julie; Kubicek, Katrina; Weiss, George; Iverson, Ellen; Kipke, Michele D

2011-01-01

149

Correlates of same-sex attractions and behaviors among self-identified heterosexual university students.  

PubMed

Few studies have focused on intragroup variations in sexual orientation and fewer on self-identified heterosexuals with same-sex attractions, fantasies, and/or behaviors. Self-identified heterosexual students at a large public midwestern university (N = 263) completed measures of sexuality and gender, attitudes toward lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people, religious and political beliefs, emotional well-being, and demographics. The sample included 82 individuals (31%; labeled "H+") who endorsed same-sex attraction, fantasy, and/or behavior and 181 (69%; labeled "H") who did not. Women were more likely to be categorized as H+ than men. H+ participants had more positive attitudes toward lesbians and gay and bisexual men and reported more support for LGB-positive public policies than did H participants. H+ participants reported less literalistic beliefs about religious scripture than did H participants. H and H+ groups did not differ significantly on measures of emotional well-being. Results were discussed in the context of recent literature arguing for a more nuanced and gender-differentiated approach toward assessing sexual orientation, as well as literature on the flexibility of sexual orientation and on heterosexual identity development. PMID:22476518

Morales Knight, Luis F; Hope, Debra A

2012-10-01

150

Day length and estradiol affect same-sex affiliative behavior in the female meadow vole  

PubMed Central

Non-sexual social bonding between adult mammals remains poorly understood, despite its importance in many species. Female meadow voles are territorial and nest alone in long summer day lengths when circulating estradiol concentrations are high, but cohabit in groups in short winter photoperiods when estradiol secretion is low. The influence of day length and estradiol on same-sex huddling behavior was assessed in adult female pairs housed together in long day lengths (LDs) or short day lengths (SDs) from weaning. The behavior of intact, ovariectomized, and estradiol-treated ovariectomized females from each photoperiod was assessed during 3 hour partner preference tests. Intact SD voles, unlike intact LD voles, spent the majority of the test in proximity to their cage mates. Estradiol treatment of SD voles significantly reduced time spent huddling with the partner. Neither ovariectomy nor estradiol treatment significantly affected the amount of time LD females spent in contact with their partners. Low estradiol availability is therefore a necessary but not sufficient condition for maintenance of high levels of huddling. These results establish that ovarian hormones interact with photoperiod to affect same-sex social behavior.

Beery, Annaliese K.; Loo, Theresa J.; Zucker, Irving

2008-01-01

151

Exploring urban male non-marital sexual behaviours in Pakistan  

PubMed Central

Background In Pakistan, sexual practices outside marriage are proscribed by law. We aimed to assess the range and magnitude of non-marital sexual behaviours of urban men, focusing on men having sex with men. Methods In this cross sectional survey undertaken in six cities of Pakistan, we interviewed 2400 men aged 16–45 years selected through a multistage systematic sampling design. Sexual behaviours were assessed through a structured questionnaire. Multivariable analysis was used to identify association between various individual level characteristics and probability of engaging in sexual activities involving men. Results Nearly one-third (29 percent) reported having had non-marital sex in their lifetime. Of these men 16 percent reported premarital sex, while 11 percent reported engaging in both pre- and extramarital sex. Only two percent reported exclusive extramarital sex. In total 211 respondents, 9 percent reported ever having had sexual relations with men. While 62 respondents, 2.6 percent reported exclusive sex with males. Factors that were significantly associated with MSM behaviours were being less than 27 years (adjusted OR 5.4, 95% CI 3.8–7.7, p?behaviour were having sexual debut at a younger age i.e. 16–22 years (adjusted OR 12.5, 95% CI: 3.8–40.7, p?

2013-01-01

152

The movements and submergence behaviour of male green turtles at Ascension Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

The movements and submergence behaviour of two male green turtles (Chelonia mydas) on their mating grounds at Ascension Island were investigated by satellite telemetry. During the mating season, males tended to conduct much shorter dives (typically

G. C. Hays; A. C. Broderick; F. Glen; B. Godley; W. Nichols

2001-01-01

153

Sexual Venue Selection and Strategies for Concealment of Same-Sex Behavior Among Non-Disclosing Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women  

PubMed Central

In order to conceal their same-sex behavior, men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) who do not disclose their same-sex behavior to female partners must be cautious in their attempts to find potential male partners. This study interviewed 46 non-gay identified, non-disclosing MSMW to identify the venues where they meet male sexual partners and the strategies they use to reduce the likelihood of discovery when at such venues. Most (74%) reported meeting a male partner in a sexual venue (e.g., bar/club, park) in the past year. Strategies to reduce the risk of discovery while seeking male partners included: 1) avoiding certain venues; 2) attending venues away from home; 3) meeting partners on the Internet, 4) preferring venues that have potential non-sexual uses, 5) having sex at the partner’s place, and 6) limiting their on-site sexual activities. These findings provide insight into the coping strategies these men use to manage the conflicting needs to conceal their behavior and meet sexual partners.

Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Downing, Martin J.; Siegel, Karolynn

2011-01-01

154

The Effects Of Unequal Access To Health Insurance For Same-Sex Couples In California  

PubMed Central

Inequities in marriage laws and domestic partnership benefits may have implications for who bears the burden of health care costs. We examined a recent period in California to illuminate disparities in health insurance coverage faced by same-sex couples. Partnered gay men are less than half as likely (42 percent) as married heterosexual men to get employer-sponsored dependent coverage, and partnered lesbians have an even slimmer chance (28 percent) of getting dependent coverage compared to married heterosexual women. As a result of these much lower rates of employer-provided coverage, partnered lesbians and gay men are more than twice as likely to be uninsured as married heterosexuals. The exclusion of gay men and women from civil marriage and the failure of domestic partnership benefits to provide insurance parity contribute to unequal access to health coverage, with the probable result that more health spending is pushed onto these individuals and onto the public.

Ponce, Ninez A.; Cochran, Susan D.; Pizer, Jennifer C.; Mays, Vickie M.

2013-01-01

155

Same-sex sexual attraction does not spread in adolescent social networks.  

PubMed

Peers have a powerful effect on adolescents' beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors. Here, we examine the role of social networks in the spread of attitudes towards sexuality using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Although we found evidence that both sexual activity (OR = 1.79) and desire to have a romantic relationship (OR = 2.69) may spread from person to person, attraction to same sex partners did not spread (OR = 0.96). Analyses of comparable power to those that suggest positive and significant peer-to-peer influence in sexual behavior fail to demonstrate a significant relationship on sexual attraction between friends or siblings. These results suggest that peer influence has little or no effect on the tendency toward heterosexual or homosexual attraction in teens, and that sexual orientation is not transmitted via social networks. PMID:23842784

Brakefield, Tiffany A; Mednick, Sara C; Wilson, Helen W; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

2014-02-01

156

A critical appraisal of assimilationist and radical ideologies underlying same-sex marriage in LGBT communities in the United States.  

PubMed

Debates over same-sex marriage have reached the main stage of contemporary U.S. politics. The purpose of this essay is to identify and examine how sexual ideologies in U.S. LGBT communities inform and influence relationship construction in general and same-sex marriage in particular. To accomplish this, we first discuss the nature of sexual ideologies. Next, we identify current sexual ideologies in LGBT communities and examine some of their fundamental features and their implications for relationship construction with a focus on same-sex marriage. We conclude with a discussion of what is potentially gained and lost by same-sex matrimonial bonds and explore some of the prospects of relationship construction within LGBT communities in the future. PMID:14567653

Yep, Gust A; Lovaas, Karen E; Elia, John P

2003-01-01

157

Interstate Recognition of Same-Sex Parents in the Wake of Gay Marriage, Civil Unions, and Domestic Partnerships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Article examines the parental rights of a same-sex partner\\/spouse who is neither biologically related to, nor an adoptive parent of, a child being raised by the couple. Using a hypothetical example of a same-sex couple with one child, this Article explores whether the parental rights granted to a non-biological parent by marriage, civil union, or domestic partnership can and

Deborah L Forman

2004-01-01

158

Individual consistency in exploratory behaviour and mating tactics in male guppies.  

PubMed

While behavioural plasticity is considered an adaptation to fluctuating social and environmental conditions, many animals also display a high level of individual consistency in their behaviour over time or across contexts (generally termed 'personality'). However, studies of animal personalities that include sexual behaviour, or functionally distinct but correlated traits, are relatively scarce. In this study, we tested for individual behavioural consistency in courtship and exploratory behaviour in male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in two light environments (high vs. low light intensity). Based on previous work on guppies, we predicted that males would modify their behaviour from sneak mating tactics to courtship displays under low light conditions, but also that the rank orders of courtship effort would remain unchanged (i.e. highly sexually active individuals would display relatively high levels of courtship under both light regimes). We also tested for correlations between courtship and exploratory behaviour, predicting that males that had high display rates would also be more likely to approach a novel object. Although males showed significant consistency in their exploratory and mating behaviour over time (1 week), we found no evidence that these traits constituted a behavioural syndrome. Furthermore, in contrast to previous work, we found no overall effect of the light environment on any of the behaviours measured, although males responded to the treatment on an individual-level basis, as reflected by a significant individual-by-environment interaction. The future challenge is to investigate how individual consistency across different environmental contexts relates to male reproductive success. PMID:24036665

Kelley, Jennifer L; Phillips, Samuel C; Evans, Jonathan P

2013-10-01

159

Courtship tactics in garter snakes: how do a male's morphology and behaviour influence his mating success?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The behavioural determinants of male mating success play a pivotal role in sexual selection, but remain poorly known for most kinds of organisms, including most reptiles. In Manitoba, Canada, large numbers of red-sided garter snakes, Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis, court and mate in early spring near communal overwintering dens. To understand how a male's morphology and behaviour might influence his mating

Richard Shine; Tracy Langkilde; ROBERT T. MASON

2004-01-01

160

Photoperiod Affects Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Aggressive Behaviour in Male Siberian Hamsters (Phodopus sungorus)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many nontropical animals display physiological and behavioural changes in response to seasonal envi- ronmental cues including photoperiod (day length). Male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) housed in short photoperiod undergo testicular regression accompanied by reduced circulating testosterone and decreased reproductive behaviour. By contrast to the majority of small mammals studied, aggressive behaviour is elevated in short-day Siberian hamsters when blood testosterone

J. C. Wen; A. K. Hotchkiss; G. E. Demas; R. J. Nelson

2004-01-01

161

ACHESS - The Australian study of child health in same-sex families: background research, design and methodology  

PubMed Central

Background There are an increasing number of children in Australia growing up with same-sex attracted parents. Although children from same-sex parent families do in general perform well on many psychosocial measures recent research is beginning to consider some small but significant differences when these children are compared with children from other family backgrounds. In particular studies suggest that there is an association between the stigma that same-sex parent families experience and child wellbeing. Research to date lacks a holistic view with the complete physical, mental and social wellbeing of children not yet addressed. In addition, most studies have focused only on families with lesbian parents and have studied only small numbers of children. Methods/design The Australian Study of Child Health in Same-Sex Families (ACHESS) is a national study that aims to determine the complete physical, mental and social wellbeing of Australian children under the age 18?years with at least one parent who self identifies as being same-sex attracted. There will be a particular focus on the impact that stigma and discrimination has on these families. Parent and child surveys will be used to collect data and will be available both online and in paper form. Measures have been chosen whenever possible that have sound conceptual underpinnings, robust psychometric properties and Australian normative data, and include the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ), the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). Discussion ACHESS aims to be the largest study of its kind and will for the first time produce a detailed quantitative analysis of Australian children with same-sex attracted parents. By inviting participants to take part in further research it will also establish a valuable cohort of children, and their families, to launch future waves of research that will help us better understand the health and wellbeing of children with same-sex attracted parents.

2012-01-01

162

Risk of psychiatric disorders among individuals reporting same-sex sexual partners in the National Comorbidity Survey.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the risk of psychiatric disorders among individuals with same-sex sexual partners. METHODS: Data are from the National Comorbidity Survey, a nationally representative household survey. Respondents were asked the number of women and men with whom they had sexual intercourse in the past 5 years. Psychiatric disorders according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Third Edition (DSM-III-R) criteria were assessed with a modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. RESULTS: A total of 2.1% of men and 1.5% of women reported 1 or more same-sex sexual partners in the past 5 years. These respondents had higher 12-month prevalences of anxiety, mood, and substance use disorders and of suicidal thoughts and plans than did respondents with opposite-sex partners only. Decomposition showed that the elevated same-sex 12-month prevalences were largely due to higher lifetime prevalences. Ages at onset and persistence of disorders did not differ between the same-sex and opposite-sex subsamples. CONCLUSIONS: Homosexual orientation, defined as having same-sex sexual partners, is associated with a general elevation of risk for anxiety, mood, and substance use disorders and for suicidal thoughts and plans. Further research is needed to replicate and explore the causal mechanisms underlying this association.

Gilman, S E; Cochran, S D; Mays, V M; Hughes, M; Ostrow, D; Kessler, R C

2001-01-01

163

Gender, topic, and time in observed demand-withdraw interaction in cross- and same-sex couples.  

PubMed

The demand-withdraw interaction pattern has been extensively studied and consistently linked to relationship quality in cross-sex relationships, but it has received little study using observational data in same-sex relationships. Demand-withdraw behavior, which occurs when 1 partner makes a complaint or request for a change and the other partner avoids the request or withdraws from the discussion (Christensen, 1988), was observationally coded in the problem-solving interactions of 75 (20 unmarried lesbian, 15 unmarried gay male, 20 unmarried straight cohabiting, and 20 married straight) couples. Results revealed that same- and cross-sex couples engage in demanding and withdrawing behaviors in highly similar ways. For all couples, partners demanded at a higher level during their own issue than during their partner's issue, and withdrew at a higher level during their partner's issue than during their own issue. Women demanded at higher levels than men, and men withdrew at higher levels than women. All partners were more likely to be in a demanding role during their own topic than during their partner's topic. Polarization was greater in woman-selected than in man-selected topics. Demanding increased over the course of the interaction, whereas no time effect was found for withdrawing. Higher levels of each partner's demanding were associated with lower levels of their own withdrawing and higher levels of their partner's withdrawing. Finally, higher levels of total demand-withdraw behaviors were associated with lower levels of relationship satisfaction for all couple types. Implications of results for refinement of models of demand-withdraw behavior are discussed. PMID:20545396

Baucom, Brian R; McFarland, Pamela T; Christensen, Andrew

2010-06-01

164

Behavioural and Neuroendocrine Adaptations to Repeated Stress during Puberty in Male Golden Hamsters  

Microsoft Academic Search

In adult animals, the consequences of stress are often severe and long lasting. Repeated subjugation in adult male golden hamsters inhibits aggression and increases submissive and avoidant behaviours. By contrast, subjugation during puberty enhances offensive aggression. The goals of this study were to characterize behavioural and neuroendocrine responses of naõ¨ve and repeatedly subjugated juveniles to social defeat and to assess

J. C. Wommack; A. Salinas; R. H. Melloni Jr; Y. Delville

2004-01-01

165

CRS Report for Congress. The Effect of State-Legalized Same-Sex Marriage on Social Security Benefits and Pensions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

With the 2004 legalization of same-sex marriage in Massachusetts, many have questioned how the legalization of such marriages at the state level may affect the eligibility for and payment of federal Social Security benefits and private pensions. Social Se...

L. Haltzel P. Purcell

2008-01-01

166

The Mamas and the Papas: The Invisible Diversity of Families with Same-Sex Parents in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This literature review is intended for administrators, educators, and counselors to generate discussion and awareness of the issues facing families with same-sex parents in the United States, a demographic that is rapidly growing and needing service and attention from its communities. To provide educators with background into how these families…

Rimalower, Lucy; Caty, Caren

2009-01-01

167

Mental Health Differences between Young Adults with and without Same-Sex Contact: A Simultaneous Examination of Underlying Mechanisms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research has documented that sexual minorities are more likely than heterosexual people to experience mental health problems, but little is known about how these disparities emerge. Analysis of data from Miami-Dade County, Florida, shows that young adults reporting same-sex contact have higher levels of depressive symptoms and drug use…

Ueno, Koji

2010-01-01

168

Not in the Hardware Aisle, Please: Same-Sex Marriage, Anti-Gay Activism and My Fabulous Gay Wedding  

Microsoft Academic Search

My Fabulous Gay Wedding was intended from its conception to be “a hot topic, a controversial topic, a topic filled with lots of opportunity for emotional moments.” This article traces a number of contemporary discourses around same-sex marriage that are illuminated, albeit not clarified, by responses to the show, including a boycott of Canadian Tire, a purported sponsor, by a

Wendy Gay Pearson

2006-01-01

169

Relationship Satisfaction, Affectivity, and Gay-Specific Stressors in Same-Sex Couples Joined in Civil Unions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relationship satisfaction, affect, and stress were examined in 313 same-sex couples who had had civil unions in Vermont during the first year of this legislation. Similarity between partners on age and on positive/negative affectivity was related to relationship satisfaction whereas there was no association with similarity in income, education,…

Todosijevic, Jelica; Rothblum, Esther D.; Solomon, Sondra E.

2005-01-01

170

Moral Commitment in Intimate Committed Relationships: A Conceptualization from Cohabiting Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Partners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Diverse types of intimate committed relationships, namely cohabiting same-sex and opposite-sex partnerships, are increasingly prevalent in the United States (Bumpass & Lu, 2000; Garber, 2005; U.S. Census Bureau, 2000). Given the rise in the number of individuals participating in intimate committed relationships outside of the marital context,…

Pope, Amber Leighann

2010-01-01

171

Careful With That Gun: Lee, George, Wax, and Geach on Gay Rights and Same-Sex Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many Americans think that homosexual sex is morally wrong and oppose same-sex marriage. Philosophers trying to defend these views have relied on two strategies. One is to claim that such sex is wrong irrespective of consequences: there is something intrinsic to sex that makes it only licit when it takes place within a heterosexual marriage (in which there is no

Andrew Koppelman

2010-01-01

172

Integrating Identities for Same-Sex Attracted Clients: Using Developmental Counseling and Therapy to Address Sexual Orientation Conflicts  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent decades, much of the focus on counseling with same-sex attracted clients has been on affirming their identity as a sexual minority. However, an overuse of gay-affirmative strategies may devalue clients' other multiple, and often conflicting, identities. Developmental counseling and therapy is presented as one approach for counselors that can effectively address sexual orientation conflicts with clients while exploring

Amber L. Pope; A. Keith Mobley; Jane E. Myers

2010-01-01

173

Rewards and Costs in Adolescent Other-Sex Friendships: Comparisons to Same-Sex Friendships and Romantic Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study used a social exchange framework to examine the features of non-romantic other-sex (OS) friendships compared with same-sex (SS) friendships and romantic relationships. High school seniors (N = 141) completed open-ended interviews about the benefits and costs of having OS friendships, SS friendships, and romantic relationships in…

Hand, Laura Shaffer; Furman, Wyndol

2009-01-01

174

Influence Strategies in Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Friendships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some writers have suggested that males and females differ not only in influencibility, but also in the strategies which they use to influence others. Although general sex differences in friendships may affect influence strategies, there is little research comparing males' and females' friendships. To explore differences between same- and…

Madden, Margaret E.; And Others

175

Mortality Among Men and Women in Same-Sex Marriage: A National Cohort Study of 8333 Danes  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We studied overall mortality in a demographically defined, complete cohort of gay men and lesbians to address recent claims of markedly shorter life spans among homosexual persons. Methods. We calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) starting 1 year after the date of same-sex marriage for 4914 men and 3419 women in Denmark who married a same-sex partner between 1989 and 2004. Results. Mortality was markedly increased in the first decade after same-sex marriage for men who married between 1989 and 1995 (SMR = 2.25; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.01, 2.50), but much less so for men who married after 1995, when efficient HIV/AIDS therapies were available (SMR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.04, 1.68). For women who married their same-sex partner between 1989 and 2004, mortality was 34% higher than was mortality in the general female population (SMR = 1.34; 95% CI = 1.09, 1.63). For women, and for men marrying after 1995, the significant excess mortality was limited to the period 1 to 3 years after the marriage. Conclusions. Despite recent marked reduction in mortality among gay men, Danish men and women in same-sex marriages still have mortality rates that exceed those of the general population. The excess mortality is restricted to the first few years after a marriage, presumably reflecting preexisting illness at the time of marriage. Although further study is needed, the claims of drastically increased overall mortality in gay men and lesbians appear unjustified.

Br?nnum-Hansen, Henrik

2009-01-01

176

Indirect partner choice through manipulation of male behaviour by female fowl, Gallus gallus domesticus.  

PubMed

The direct and indirect consequences of female copulatory behaviour for copulation success have seldom been quantified. In feral fowl, most copulations were forced by males and copulation success was determined by two factors. First, female differential resistance and solicitation directly affected copulation success and were displayed non-randomly with respect to male social status. Second, another female copulatory behaviour, the distress call, had an indirect effect on both copulation success and the quality of copulation partners. Distress calls triggered male attention to a copulation, which increased the probability of higher-ranking males than the copulating male disrupting the copulation and inseminating the calling female. Females preferentially uttered distress calls when mounted by low-ranking males. Both copulation resistance and distress calling influenced copulation success, but only distress calling increased the probability of copulation disruption by other males. Consistent with the effect of direct selection, differential distress calling indirectly biased copulation success in favour of dominant males. Female fowl may thus ameliorate the effect of male sexual coercion by manipulating male behaviour. PMID:11209889

Pizzari, T

2001-01-22

177

Rutting behaviour of territorial and nonterritorial male chamois: is there a home advantage?  

PubMed

Males using alternative male mating tactics (AMTs) may express their mating effort in a variety of ways. In polygynous species with limited sexual dimorphism, differences in male aggressiveness may affect mating opportunities. We recorded the behaviour of 8 territorial and 7 nonterritorial male Alpine chamois Rupicapra rupicapra, a nearly monomorphic ungulate, during the 2011 rut in the Gran Paradiso National Park (Italy), to analyse differences in mating effort and mating opportunities between AMTs. The chamois showed a rich behavioural repertoire (31 behavioural patterns), with a prevalence of indirect aggression. Territorial males had higher frequency of aggressive and courtship behaviour than nonterritorial males over the early rut. Later, nonterritorials increased their mating effort, possibly because of reduced competition with dominant males. Territorial males monopolised all observed mating events. Our results support the hypothesis that chamois may assert dominance through intense aggressiveness rather than through horn size or body mass as found in other polygynous ungulates. Most important, differences in mating effort mediated by AMTs resulted in different mating opportunities; these benefits, however, are traded off against greater costs, due to higher levels of hormone metabolites and parasitism. Data on AMTs flexibility, lifetime reproductive success and survival are needed to clarify the mechanisms underlying the evolution and maintenance of AMTs within chamois populations. PMID:23182914

Corlatti, Luca; Caroli, Martina; Pietrocini, Venusta; Lovari, Sandro

2013-01-01

178

Male mating behaviour and mating systems of bees:an overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considerable interspecific diversity exists among bees in the rendezvous sites where males search for females and in the behaviours employed by males in their efforts to secure matings. I present an evolutionary framework in which to interpret this variation, and highlight the importance for the framework of (i) the distribution of receptive (typically immediate post-emergence) females, which ordinarily translates into

Robert John Paxton

2005-01-01

179

A functional circuit underlying male sexual behaviour in the female mouse brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

In mice, pheromone detection is mediated by the vomeronasal organ and the main olfactory epithelium. Male mice that are deficient for Trpc2, an ion channel specifically expressed in VNO neurons and essential for VNO sensory transduction, are impaired in sex discrimination and male-male aggression. We report here that Trpc2-\\/- female mice show a reduction in female-specific behaviour, including maternal aggression

Tali Kimchi; Jennings Xu; Catherine Dulac

2007-01-01

180

Sex Role Identity, Attitudes Toward the Opposite Sex and Same Sex, and Defense Style  

Microsoft Academic Search

KILMARTIN (1994) suggested that masculine traits may result from externalizing defense style and that when unconscious and unwanted feminine traits about the self occur, they are dealt with in an external way, radier man being directiy resolved by the individual. However, this dieory has received little empirical support. Lobel and Winch (1986) measured defense style among male college students; they

John Maltby; Liza Day

1999-01-01

181

Intimate Relationships among Adolescent Romantic Partners and Same-Sex Friends: Individual and Systemic Perspectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined adolescent intimacy in close friendships and romantic relationships from a systemic perspective. Found qualitative sex-related differences in how partners balance closeness and individuality in the two types of close friendships. Development of an intimate romantic relationship was also found to require greater commitment for males than…

Shulman, Shmuel; Levy-Shiff, Rachel; Kedem, Peri; Alon, Eiton

1997-01-01

182

Contact with gays and lesbians and same-sex marriage support: The moderating role of social context.  

PubMed

Empirical research on the contact hypothesis has paid inadequate attention to the broader social and normative context in which contact occurs. Using data from the nationally representative Portraits of American Life Study, I test whether individuals' core networks moderate the effect of personal contact with gays and lesbians on same-sex marriage attitudes. OLS regression results demonstrate that, though contact is strongly associated with greater support for same-sex marriage, the effect is attenuated for individuals with a higher proportion of religious conservatives in their core network. This moderating effect holds even after controlling for respondents' religiosity and when the sample is limited to self-identified religious liberals and moderates. Future research on intergroup contact should be attentive to other influences within individuals' social contexts and examine how the outcomes of contact across a variety of social boundaries are moderated by these social influences. PMID:23721680

Merino, Stephen M

2013-07-01

183

A Nietzschean Perspective on Church Affiliation and Self-Esteem Among Same-Sex-Attracted Members of the Mormon Church  

Microsoft Academic Search

The conflict between self-identity and religious doctrine is underinvestigated in lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons. This article examines the association between religious affiliation and self-esteem in a sample of 150 same-sex-attracted current and former members of the Mormon Church and proposes a Nietzschean perspective for clinical social work in this population. Cross-sectional data were collected through a Web-based 18-item survey

Daniel Ison; Susan Saltzburg; Sarah E. Bledsoe

2010-01-01

184

Psychology and the politics of same-sex desire in the United States: an analysis of three cases.  

PubMed

Psychological science has assumed an increasingly explicit role in public policies related to same-sex desire in the United States. In this article, we present a historical analysis of the relationship between policy discourse and scientific discourse on homosexuality produced within U.S. psychology over the 20th and early 21st centuries through the lens of three cases: Bowers v. Hardwick (1986), Lawrence v. Texas (2003), and Perry v. Schwarzenegger (2010). Our analysis suggests that, for the majority of its disciplinary history, psychology produced knowledge that supported a status quo of legal and cultural subordination for same-sex-attracted individuals. The discipline's shift in understanding of homosexuality, reflected in a 1975 policy statement of the American Psychological Association, reversed this relationship and opened up space for advocacy for social and political change regarding homosexuality. Our analysis of policy decisions rendered by the courts reveals the increasingly important role psychological science has assumed in challenging the legal subordination of same-sex-attracted individuals, though the basis upon which psychological science has sought to inform policy remains limited. We conclude with a critical discussion of the type of knowledge claims psychologists have traditionally used to advocate for gay and lesbian rights, suggesting the vitality of a narrative approach which can reveal the meaning individuals make of legal subordination and political exclusion. PMID:21936232

Hammack, Phillip L; Windell, Eric P

2011-08-01

185

Lifetime prevalence of suicide symptoms and affective disorders among men reporting same-sex sexual partners: results from NHANES III.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: This study examined lifetime prevalence of suicide symptoms and affective disorders among men reporting a history of same-sex sexual partners. METHODS: In the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, men aged 17 to 39 years were assessed for lifetime history of affective disorders and sexual behavior patterns. The study classified this subset of men into 3 groups: those reporting same-sex sexual partners, those reporting only female sexual partners, and those reporting no sexual partners. Groups were compared for histories of suicide symptoms and affective disorders. RESULTS: A total of 2.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3%, 3.1%) of men reported same-sex sexual partners. These men evidenced greater lifetime prevalence rates of suicide symptoms than men reporting only female partners. However, homosexually/bisexually experienced men were no more likely than exclusively heterosexual men to meet criteria for lifetime diagnosis of other affective disorders. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide further evidence of an increased risk for suicide symptoms among homosexually experienced men. Results also hint at a small, increased risk of recurrent depression among gay men, with symptom onset occurring, on average, during early adolescence.

Cochran, S D; Mays, V M

2000-01-01

186

Scent marking by common voles Microtus arvalis in the presence of a same-sex neighbour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several vole species use scent marked runways radiating from their burrows for foraging and dispersion. These marks are probably\\u000a used for social communication. This 4-day laboratory study investigated the environmental and social causations of marking\\u000a inside pre-existing corridors in male and female common volesMicrotus arvalis (Pallas, 1778). Firstly I tested the novelty and the reinforcement hypotheses in isolated voles, predicting

Alexandre Dobly

2005-01-01

187

Male sexual behaviour not abolished after medial preoptic lesion in adult rats.  

PubMed

N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) was injected into the medial preoptic area (mPOA) of 10 rats to destroy the neurones in this region. Male sexual behaviour was scored before, and on days 2, 6, 10, 17, 24 and 31 after the administration of NMDA. The neurones in the injection site were destroyed in all the rats, but male sexual behaviour was only transiently reduced in the animals with lesions largely restricted to the mPOA. These findings are in contrast to the earlier reports of permanent suppression of sexual behaviour after electrolytic lesion, with damage to the neurones and fibres of passage. The present study shows that the mating behaviour could be expressed even after the destruction of the neurones in the mPOA. PMID:8856702

Kumar, V M; Khan, N A; John, J

1996-06-17

188

Individual plastic responses by males to rivals reveal mismatches between behaviour and fitness outcomes  

PubMed Central

Plasticity in behaviour is of fundamental significance when environments are variable. Such plasticity is particularly important in the context of rapid changes in the socio-sexual environment. Males can exhibit adaptive plastic responses to variation in the overall level of reproductive competition. However, the extent of behavioural flexibility within individuals, and the degree to which rapidly changing plastic responses map onto fitness are unknown. We addressed this by determining the behaviour and fitness profiles of individual Drosophila melanogaster males subjected to up to three episodes of exposure to rivals or no rivals, in all combinations. Behaviour (mating duration) was remarkably sensitive to the level of competition and fully reversible, suggesting that substantial costs arise from the incorrect expression of even highly flexible behaviour. However, changes in mating duration matched fitness outcomes (offspring number) only in scenarios in which males experienced zero then high competition. Following the removal of competition, mating duration, but not offspring production, decreased to below control levels. This indicates that the benefit of increasing reproductive investment when encountering rivals may exceed that of decreasing investment when rivals disappear. Such asymmetric fitness benefits and mismatches with behavioural responses are expected to exert strong selection on the evolution of plasticity.

Bretman, Amanda; Westmancoat, James D.; Gage, Matthew J. G.; Chapman, Tracey

2012-01-01

189

Genetic polymorphism for alternative mating behaviour in lekking male ruff Philomachus pugnax  

Microsoft Academic Search

ALTERNATIVE male mating tactics are widespread among animal taxa1-3, but there are few well documented examples of genetic polymorphisms for them4-6. The dimorphism in male courtship behaviour between independent and satellite ruffs, Philomachm pugnax7,8 (a lekking sandpiper), has often been cited as a potential example but this has been questioned9,10 because of the lack of data11 and the widespread phenotypic

David B. Lank; Constance M. Smith; Olivier Hanotte; Terry Burke; Fred Cooke

1995-01-01

190

Effect of Adult Feeding on Male Mating Behaviour in the Butterfly, Bicyclus anynana (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many species of lepidopterans supplement their nectar diet with foods rich in nitrogen and minerals, which are present only\\u000a in trace amounts in nectar. We examined the effect of adult diet on mating behaviour and spermatophore characteristics in\\u000a male Bicyclus anynana (Butler, 1879) butterflies, which feed on rotten fruits as adults. We found little effect of adult diet\\u000a on male

Z. Lewis; N. Wedell

2007-01-01

191

Suicidal Ideation and Attempt among Adolescents Reporting "Unsure" Sexual Identity or Heterosexual Identity Plus Same-Sex Attraction or Behavior: Forgotten Groups?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To compare risk of suicide ideation and attempts in adolescents with 1) gay, lesbian, or bisexual (GLB) identity, 2) "unsure" identity, or 3) heterosexual identity with same-sex attraction/fantasy or behavior, to heterosexual identity without same-sex attraction/fantasy or behavior. Method: A total of 1,856 students 14 years of age and…

Zhao, Yue; Montoro, Richard; Igartua, Karine; Thombs, Brett D.

2010-01-01

192

Social Work Faculty Support for Same-Sex Marriage: A Cross-National Study of U.S. and Anglophone Canadian MSW Teaching Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attention to same-sex marriage has increased in the past decade. This study examines the perceptions of same-sex marriage among social work faculty. Faculty play a critical role in preparing future social workers for competent, ethical practice--including advocacy for social policies inclusive of sexual minorities. The present study investigates…

Woodford, Michael R.; Luke, Katherine P.; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen I.; Gutierrez, Lorraine

2012-01-01

193

Male clients' behaviours with and perspectives about their last male escort encounter: comparing repeat versus first-time hires.  

PubMed

Research on men who have sex with men suggests that condomless anal intercourse occurs more frequently in established sexual relationships. While comparable data regarding male-for-male escorting is unavailable, research implies that many clients seek emotional as well as physical connections with the men they hire. In 2012, 495 male clients, recruited via daddysreviews.com completed an online survey about their last hiring experience. Most participants were from the USA (85.7%), the UK and Canada (3.2% each). In total, 75% of encounters involved an escort hired for the first time; 25% were with a previously hired escort ('repeat encounter'). The client's age, lifetime number of escorts hired and number hired in the past year were positively associated with the last encounter being a repeat encounter. Cuddling, sharing a meal, drinking alcohol, taking a walk, watching a show and shopping were also positively associated with repeat encounters. Conversely, none of the sexual behaviours were significantly associated with repeat encounters. Repeat encounters were significantly more likely to include non-sexual behaviours alongside sexual activities, but no more likely to involve condomless anal intercourse. Moreover, clients' knowledge of escorts' HIV status was not significantly associated with engaging in condomless anal intercourse with repeat encounters. PMID:24915753

Wolff, Margaret M; Grov, Christian; Smith, Michael D; Koken, Juline A; Parsons, Jeffrey T

2014-08-01

194

Male and female meiotic behaviour of an intrachromosomal insertion determined by preimplantation genetic diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Two related family members, a female and a male balanced carrier of an intrachromosomal insertion on chromosome 7 were referred to our centre for preimplantation genetic diagnosis. This presented a rare opportunity to investigate the behaviour of the insertion chromosome during meiosis in two related carriers. The aim of this study was to carry out a detailed genetic analysis

Leoni Xanthopoulou; Anna Mantzouratou; Anastasia Mania; Suzanne Cawood; Alpesh Doshi; Domenico M Ranieri; Joy DA Delhanty

2010-01-01

195

Social context of HIV risk behaviours among male-to-female transgenders of colour  

Microsoft Academic Search

To explore the social context of drug use and sexual behaviours that put male-to-female (MTF) transgenders at risk for HIV, focus groups were conducted consisting of African American, Latina and Asian and Pacific Islander MTF transgenders (N=48) who reside or work in San Francisco, California. Participants were likely to report having unprotected sex with primary partners to signify love and

T. Nemoto; D. Operario; J. Keatley; D. Villegas

2004-01-01

196

A case study of a male sex offender with zoosexual interests and behaviours  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews assessment, treatment and supervision issues in relation to a high-risk, borderline functioning, male sex offender with zoosexual interests and behaviours. Mr Z was convicted of multiple sexual offences including rape, indecent assault and indecent exposure as well as actual and threatened bodily harm. He was convicted for two counts of attempted buggery of horses and he received

D. T. Wilcox; C. M. Foss; M. L. Donathy

2005-01-01

197

Associative odour learning affects mating behaviour in Aphidius ervi males (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We used the aphid parasitoid Aphidius ervi reared in its host Acyrthosiphon pisum to examine if male sexual attractive responses can be conditioned to an odour (vanilla) that is not present in the natural environment. We used prior mating experience (exposure to females) as a non-conditioning stimulus and vanilla odour as a conditioning stimulus. The behavioural responses were tested in

CRISTIAN A. VILLAGRA; RODRIGO A. VÁSQUEZ; HERMANN M. NIEMEYER

198

The influence of gender role stereotyping on women's experiences of female same-sex intimate partner violence.  

PubMed

Female same-sex intimate partner violence (FSSIPV) is a serious problem that affects the health and safety of lesbian and bisexual women. To begin to address the paucity of research, a mixed methods study was conducted to identify shared and unique risk and protective factors for FSSIPV. This article reports on qualitative findings related to the influence of gender role stereotyping on women's experiences of FSSIPV. Findings indicate that gender role stereotyping shapes women's experiences of FSSIPV by influencing individual, familial, community, and societal perceptions and responses to this phenomenon. PMID:18292372

Hassouneh, Dena; Glass, Nancy

2008-03-01

199

Same-sex marriage, autoimmune thyroid gland dysfunction and other autoimmune diseases in Denmark 1989-2008.  

PubMed

Autoimmune diseases have been little studied in gay men and lesbians. We followed 4.4 million Danes, including 9,615 same-sex married (SSM) persons, for 47 autoimmune diseases in the National Patient Registry between 1989 and 2008. Poisson regression analyses provided first hospitalization rate ratios (RRs) comparing rates between SSM individuals and persons in other marital status categories. SSM individuals experienced no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the risk of autoimmune thyroid dysfunction was increased, notably Hashimoto's thyroiditis (women(SSM), RR = 2.92; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.74-4.55) and Graves' disease (men(SSM), RR = 1.88; 95% CI 1.08-3.01). There was also an excess of primary biliary cirrhosis (women(SSM), RR = 4.09; 95% CI 1.01-10.7), and of psoriasis (men(SSM), RR = 2.48; 95% CI 1.77-3.36), rheumatic fever (men(SSM), RR = 7.55; 95% CI 1.87-19.8), myasthenia gravis (men(SSM), RR = 5.51; 95% CI 1.36-14.4), localized scleroderma (men(SSM), RR = 7.16; 95% CI 1.18-22.6) and pemphigoid (men(SSM), RR = 6.56; 95% CI 1.08-20.6), while Dupuytren's contracture was reduced (men(SSM), RR = 0.64; 95% CI 0.39-0.99). The excess of psoriasis was restricted to same-sex married men with HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 10.5; 95% CI 6.44-15.9), whereas Graves' disease occurred in excess only among same-sex married men without HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 1.99; 95% CI 1.12-3.22). Lesbians and immunologically competent gay men in same-sex marriage face no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the observed increased risk of thyroid dysfunction in these lesbians and gay men deserves further study. PMID:24306355

Frisch, Morten; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard

2014-01-01

200

Developing understanding of same-sex partner bereavement for older lesbian and gay people: implications for social work practice.  

PubMed

There is little research and literature exploring same-sex partner bereavement in later life or end-of-life experiences of lesbian and gay elders in the United Kingdom. This article considers this often overlooked area of social work practice and explores a range of factors emerging from a small explorative study that considers the experience of loss and bereavement for lesbian and gay elders. Discussion of issues emerging include consideration of the wider psycho-social nature of bereavement and end-of-life experiences for lesbian and gay elders, and the implications this has for social work education and practice. PMID:24006957

Fenge, Lee-Ann

2014-01-01

201

Same-sex Versus Other-sex Best Friendship in Early Adolescence: Longitudinal Predictors of Antisocial Behavior Throughout Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the relationship between having other-sex versus same-sex best friends and antisocial behavior throughout\\u000a early adolescence. Participants (N = 955) were recruited in 6th grade and followed longitudinally through 7th, 8th, and 11th grades. Participants were 58% ethnically\\u000a diverse youth and 48% girls. Results indicate that the frequency of other-sex best friendship remained stable from 6th to\\u000a 7th grade but

Cara Lee Arndorfer; Elizabeth A. Stormshak

2008-01-01

202

The effect of same-sex marriage laws on different-sex marriage: evidence from the Netherlands.  

PubMed

It has long been argued that the legalization of same-sex marriage would have a negative impact on marriage. In this article, I examine how different-sex marriage in the Netherlands was affected by the enactment of two laws: a 1998 law that provided all couples with an institution almost identical to marriage (a "registered partnership") and a 2001 law that legalized same-sex marriage for the first time in the world. I first construct a synthetic control for the Netherlands using OECD data for the period 1988-2005 and find that neither law had significant effects on either the overall or different-sex marriage rate. I next construct a unique individual-level data set covering the period 1995-2005 by combining the Dutch Labor Force Survey and official municipal records. The estimates from a discrete-time hazard model with unobserved heterogeneity for the first-marriage decision confirm the findings in the aggregate analysis. The effects of the two laws are heterogeneous, with presumably more-liberal individuals (as defined by their residence or ethnicity) marrying less after passage of both laws and potentially more-conservative individuals marrying more after passage of each law. PMID:24190101

Trandafir, Mircea

2014-02-01

203

Religion and the rainbow struggle: does religion factor into attitudes toward homosexuality and same-sex civil unions in Brazil?  

PubMed

The provision of civil liberties to LGBT persons has become part of a global movement in societies across the world. In Brazil, a recent judicial ruling for the first time established the right for homosexual couples to enter into civil unions, despite the presence of widespread disapproval of homosexuality among the population and opposition from prominent religious groups. Picking up on this issue, the following study examines whether religion may factor into the attitudes Brazilians hold toward homosexuality and same-sex civil unions. Using data from the Brazilian Social Research Survey, we find that the most restrictive views toward homosexuality and the strongest opposition to same-sex civil unions are most prevalent among devoted followers of historical Protestant, Pentecostal, and Catholic faith traditions, whereas adherents of Afro-Brazilian and spiritist religions, as well as those with no religious commitment, are inclined to assume a more tolerant moral posture toward such issues. The findings point to religion as a potential influence in future public policy initiatives and social movements involving LGBT issues in Brazil. PMID:24914634

Ogland, Curtis P; Verona, Ana Paula

2014-09-01

204

Sexual Violence Perpetration by Adolescents in Dating versus Same-Sex Peer Relationships: Differences in Associated Risk and Protective Factors  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Little is known about the risk and protective factors for youth sexual violence (SV) perpetration across different types of relationships. This study examined factors associated with perpetrating SV against a dating partner and a same-sex peer. Methods: Analyses were based on data from a survey conducted in 2004 with public school boys and girls in grades 7, 9, 11, and 12 (N = 4,131) in a high-risk, urban school district in the United States. SV perpetration was defined broadly to include forcing someone, about the same age and of the same or opposite sex as the respondent, to have sex or to do something sexual that they did not want to do. Analyses examined the associations between risk and protective factors and SV perpetration, adjusting for SV victimization and demographic characteristics. Results: Findings revealed that 2.1% of respondents reported perpetration against a same-sex peer and 3.2% reported perpetration against a date during the past 12 months. Victims of SV for each relationship type were more likely than non-victims to perpetrate SV. A combination of factors across the individual, relationship, and community level were significantly associated with SV perpetration and there were both shared and unique factors across the relationship types. Conclusion: Data suggest that programs to prevent SV perpetration for both relationship types should start when students are young, with particular focus on middle school boys. Prevention efforts should have slightly different foci to address these 2 types of SV perpetration.

Basile, Kathleen C.; Hamburger, Merle E.; Swahn, Monica H.; Choi, Colleen

2013-01-01

205

Influence of hashish extract on the social behaviour of encountering male baboons (Papio c. anubis).  

PubMed

The effects of hashish extract (2 mg delta 9-THC/kg)on the social behaviour of encountering male baboons were tested by ethological methods. In the "approaching" male the drug reduced "approach" and the aggressive elements "hit-ground", "brows-back" and "attack" but increased the frequency of "retreat". Social interactions were generally diminished. In the "retreating" male friendly social interactions as "lipsmack" and "touch-back/handle-genitals" were suppressed but the threatening elements "open-mouth" and "tooth-grind" were stimulated. "Retreat" was additionally more frequent. Non-social activities and locomotion were not affected in either of the males. Treating both subjects with hashish resulted in a reduction of "lipsmack", "approach", "fight" and "chase" in the approaching and "lipsmack", "touch-back/handle-genitals", "chase", "retreat" and "flee" in the retreating male. Social activities were generally reduced in both animals. Comparing the behavioural effects of hashish in male baboons to those described in other non-human primates, in rodents but also in man revealed analogous effects in all species. The drug generally impaired social interactions, induced social withdrawal and led to social isolation of the drugged subject. PMID:6291065

Sieber, B

1982-08-01

206

Attraction between sexes: male-female gametocyte behaviour within a Leucocytozoon toddi (Haemosporida).  

PubMed

Understanding the breeding systems of Plasmodium, and the closely related Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon (Apicomplexa: Haemosporida), is fundamental to virulence and transmission research. We report an unusual binding behaviour between gametocytes of Leucocytozoon toddi. This aggregative behaviour was notably characterised by a disparity in the likelihood of clustering by female and male gametocytes. Thus, indicating a possible difference in the 'stickiness' of gametocytes per sex. Overall, 12% of gametocytes in this high-parasitaemia infection (0.269 gametocytes per 100 red blood cells (RBCs)) were incorporated into aggregations involving substantial contact. The gametocyte sexual combinations within aggregations varied significantly from expected according to the background 0.49 sex ratio within this sample, with female-female contacts occurring more and male-male contacts occurring less frequently than expected. A second L. toddi (identical for 709 bp of the cyt b mitochondrial gene) with lower parasitemia (0.035 gametocytes per 100 RBCs) showed no significant binding. Interestingly, the ratios of male gametocytes in both of these parasites were greater than expected under sex-ratio theory and similar to the 50% observed in species with syzygy breeding strategies. We discuss the ramifications of this observation in terms of sex-ratio theory and breeding strategies and provide speculative explanations for this unusual gametocyte behaviour. PMID:18297311

Barraclough, Rosemary K; Duval, Linda; Talman, Arthur M; Ariey, Frédéric; Robert, Vincent

2008-05-01

207

Kin recognition and cannibalistic behaviours by adult male fathead minnows ( Pimephales promelas)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Parental care is an energetically demanding activity that ensures genes are efficiently passed from one generation to the next. According to evolutionary theory, the greatest energetic investment should be directed towards offspring that are most closely related to the parent. Male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, provide this parental investment to developing embryos but not newly hatched larvae. Therefore, selection should favour recognition of embryonic kin to ensure energetic expenditure is optimally invested. In this study, adult male fathead minnows were tested using behavioural assays, with egg cannibalism as an endpoint, to determine whether adult males could discriminate between related and unrelated embryos. Egg cannibalism was highest when adult male fathead minnows were presented with unrelated eggs and lowest when presented with eggs fertilized by the test subject (related eggs). The degree of cannibalism was also a function of breeding status. Unrelated males in breeding condition showed an intermediate response between the low cannibalism demonstrated by related males and the high cannibalism demonstrated by unrelated males in a nonbreeding condition. These results suggest that although male fathead minnows can discriminate between unrelated and related embryos, at least some component of parental investment is a simple function of breeding status.

Green, Warren W.; Mirza, Reehan S.; Pyle, Greg G.

2008-03-01

208

Homosexual inclinations and the passions: A Thomistic theory of the psychogenesis of same-sex attraction disorder.  

PubMed

The Catholic Church has held that every human being is a child of God, and every person deserves to be treated with dignity and love regardless of their actions. The phrase "love the sinner, hate the sin" is a simple summary of the approach the Church takes to loving all human beings. The Church has also held firmly that both homosexual acts and homosexual inclinations are disordered, although the origins or contributing factors of homosexual inclinations are not entirely understood. In this paper, I apply principles from St. Thomas Aquinas's treatise on the passions to show that habitual mis-identification of the cause of pleasure associated with the apprehension of beauty, or misjudgments, may be involved in the psychogenesis of same-sex attraction disorder. PMID:24899749

Kinney, Robert Loyd

2014-05-01

209

Sexual Differentiation of the Human Brain and Male\\/Female Behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Once the differentiation of our sexual organs into male or female is settled, the next thing to be differentiated is the brain.\\u000a The difference in brain structures resulting from the interaction of sex hormones and developing brain cells, is thought to\\u000a be the basis of sex differences in behaviour, in gender identity, in gender roles, in our sexual orientation (hetero-,

Dick F. Swaab

210

Risk of Breast Cancer Mortality Among Women Cohabiting with Same Sex Partners: Findings from the National Health Interview Survey, 1997-2003  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Lesbians and bisexual women are more likely than other women to evidence a unique mix of common breast cancer risk factors. It is not known if this results in greater breast cancer mortality risk. We investigate possible sexual orientation-related differences in risk for fatal breast cancer in a large representative U.S. sample of married and cohabiting women. Methods Between 1997 and 2003, the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) interviewed married or cohabiting female participants, aged 18–80 years inclusively, who reported either a male (n=136,174) or female (n=693) coresidential relationship partner. These records are linked to the National Death Index to provide information on mortality status as of December 31, 2006. Employing these data, we estimated the age-adjusted relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) for mortality attributed to breast cancer using a Cox proportional hazard model. Results Women in same-sex couples, compared to women in different-sex relationships, had greater age-adjusted risk for fatal breast cancer (RR=3.2, CI 1.01-10.21) but did not differ in their overall risk for mortality. Conclusions Our findings provide tentative support that sexual orientation is differentially linked to risk of fatal breast cancer. These findings underscore the need to investigate further breast cancer morbidity and mortality risk among women with minority sexual orientation.

Mays, Vickie M.

2012-01-01

211

Early vaccination with Improvac®: effects on performance and behaviour of male pigs.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of giving a two-dose regimen of gonadotropin-releasing hormone vaccine, Improvac® (Pfizer Ltd), earlier than currently recommended, on performance and behaviour of growing/finishing pigs. Cross-bred male pigs (n = 192) were randomly allocated, within a litter, into four groups at birth: one group of pigs surgically castrated without anaesthesia before one week of age, a second group of early vaccinated pigs given Improvac at 10 and 14 weeks of age, a third group of standard vaccinated pigs given Improvac at 16 and 20 weeks of age, so that the second vaccination was given 4 to 6 weeks before slaughter as recommended by the manufacturer, and a fourth group of entire male pigs. The experiment started when the pigs were 12 weeks old and lasted until 25 weeks of age, when the pigs were slaughtered. The pigs were fed restrictedly. Daily weight gain and feed conversion during the entire raising period did not differ significantly between groups. Estimated lean meat content of early vaccinated and surgically castrated pigs was lower when compared with entire male pigs, whereas standard vaccinated pigs did not differ from entire males. Dressing percentage was higher in early vaccinated and surgically castrated pigs than in standard vaccinated and entire male pigs, partly because of lower size and weight of reproductive organs. For both groups of vaccinated pigs, both problematic and non-problematic behaviours decreased after their second injection, from the levels of entire males to those of surgically castrated pigs. After the second injection, pigs of both vaccination groups performed no mountings, in contrast with entire male pigs of the same age. Skin lesions at slaughter were fewer and less severe for vaccinated pigs compared with entire male pigs. No difference in income per carcass was observed for surgically castrated or vaccinated pigs. However, for entire male pigs the income was lower, as the payment system in Sweden also takes into consideration the additional cost for boar taint analyses and reduced payment for tainted carcasses. Under our experimental conditions, early vaccination with Improvac can be used as an alternative to the recommended schedule to minimise problematic behaviour with unaffected profitability. PMID:22436158

Andersson, K; Brunius, C; Zamaratskaia, G; Lundström, K

2012-01-01

212

Does Physical Abuse, Sexual Abuse, or Neglect in Childhood Increase the Likelihood of Same-sex Sexual Relationships and Cohabitation? A Prospective 30-year Follow-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing cross-sectional research suggests associations between physical and sexual abuse in childhood and same-sex sexual\\u000a orientation in adulthood. This study prospectively examined whether abuse and\\/or neglect in childhood were associated with\\u000a increased likelihood of same-sex partnerships in adulthood. The sample included physically abused (N = 85), sexually abused (N = 72), and neglected (N = 429) children (ages 0–11) with documented cases during 1967–1971 who were

Helen W. Wilson; Cathy Spatz Widom

2010-01-01

213

Drawing Desire: Male Youth and Homoerotic Fan Art  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although Western mass media aimed at juvenile audiences aggressively eliminates any references to same-sex desire and behavior, it inspires a tremendous amount of homoerotic fan art. To determine how same-sex potential is portrayed in juvenile fan art, a content analysis was conducted of 872 male homoerotic images by 442 juvenile male and female artists. Male artists tended to enhance the

Jeffery P. Dennis

2010-01-01

214

Neuroendocrine and behavioural responses to exposure to an infant in male prairie voles.  

PubMed

Paternal behaviour and pair-bond formation are defining characteristics of social monogamy. However, in comparison to pair-bonding, the endocrine factors associated with the male care of young are not well studied. In the present study, plasma concentrations of oxytocin, vasopressin and corticosterone (CORT) were measured in reproductively naïve male prairie voles as a function of exposure to an infant or control manipulations (i.e. handling or exposure to a wooden dowel). Plasma oxytocin concentrations were transiently elevated within 10 min of pup exposure. Although plasma CORT concentration typically increases after handling, after 10 min of pup exposure, the concentration of plasma CORT was not increased, suggesting an attenuation of CORT release by pup exposure. Group differences in the concentrations of plasma hormones were no longer detected at 20 or 60 min after treatment. These patterns of rapid change in the concentrations of plasma oxytocin and CORT were observed in both juvenile and adult males but not detected after control procedures. Plasma vasopressin, assessed only in adult males, did not vary as a function of pup exposure or other manipulations. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, pup exposure also increased activation (as assessed by the measurement of c-Fos) of neurones that stained for either oxytocin or vasopressin, whereas it decreased c-Fos expression in neurones stained for corticotrophin-releasing hormone. In addition, brief pup exposure (20 min) facilitated subsequent partner preference formation when alloparental males and pup attackers were considered as a group. In the context of other studies, these data support the hypothesis that neuroendocrine changes associated with male alloparental behaviour are related to those implicated in pair-bonding. PMID:22356098

Kenkel, W M; Paredes, J; Yee, J R; Pournajafi-Nazarloo, H; Bales, K L; Carter, C S

2012-06-01

215

Behavioural consequences of IVC cages on male and female C57BL/6J mice.  

PubMed

Recent developments in the technology to breed and house laboratory rodents for medical research has produced individually ventilated cage (IVC) systems. These IVC systems produce a cage environment significantly different to conventional cages. As it is not known in detail whether housing mice in IVCs impacts on their baseline and drug-induced behaviours compared to mice of conventional filter-top cages a comprehensive multi-tiered phenotyping strategy was used to test the behavioural consequences of IVC housing in male and female C57BL/6JArc mice. IVC had anxiety-like effects in the elevated plus maze, which were more pronounced in female mice whereas cognition and locomotion of all test mice were not modified by IVC housing. Mice raised in IVC cage systems were socially more active than mice of filter-top systems. Furthermore, males raised in IVC exhibited an increased sensitivity to the locomotor-stimulating effects of acute MK-801 treatment compared to males in conventional cages. In summary, this is the first study revealing the longer-term effects of IVC housing on social behaviours and the locomotor response to an acute MK-801 challenge. In conclusion, researchers upgrading their holding facilities to IVC housing may encounter a shift in experimental outcomes (e.g. post pharmacological challenges) and the behavioural phenotype of test mice. Furthermore, differences between the housing conditions of breeding facilities and test facilities must carefully be considered. Finally, researchers should clarify in detail the type of housing test animals have been exposed to when publishing experimental animal research data. PMID:23415791

Logge, W; Kingham, J; Karl, T

2013-05-01

216

Diversification of egg-deposition behaviours and the evolution of male parental care in darters (Teleostei: Percidae: Etheostomatinae).  

PubMed

Male-only care is the most frequent parental care behaviour in teleost fishes, but little is known about its evolutionary origins and patterns of diversity in species-rich lineages. Darters are a clade of North American freshwater fishes that contain both nonparental care species and species with male-only care. In darters, paternal care takes the form of egg-guarding and other egg-tending behaviours that are dependent on the female mode of egg deposition. Male care has been hypothesized to evolve independently in darters at least three times, and it has been thought to be irreversible. We investigated the diversification of egg-deposition behaviours and the evolution of complex male care using published descriptions of darter reproductive behaviours and a multilocus molecular phylogeny that included all 146 species for which reproductive behaviours are known. We find support for two origins of male-only care behaviour. One origin of paternal care occurred relatively early in the radiation of Etheostoma and is characteristic of a recently discovered clade, Goneaperca. The other origin of male-only care occurred much more recently in a derived clade of Nothonotus. Our analyses of character diversification demonstrate reversals from care to noncare and multiple transitions between egg-deposition behaviours that are not associated with parental care. PMID:22356511

Kelly, N B; Near, T J; Alonzo, S H

2012-05-01

217

The inappropriateness of psycho-social models of risk behaviour for understanding HIV-related risk practices among Glasgow male prostitutes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much the most common models of HIV-related risk behaviour are those psychosocial models derived from studies of health behaviour and tested on large interview samples of American gay men. These models were not appropriate for understanding risk behaviour among 32 Glasgow male prostitutes. Whereas psycho-social models conceive of risk behaviour as volitional and individualistic, ethnographic data indicate that the male

M. J. Bloor; N. P. McKeganey; A. Finlay; M. A. Barnard

1992-01-01

218

Host plant volatiles induce oriented flight behaviour in male European grapevine moths, Lobesia botrana.  

PubMed

The European grapevine moth Lobesia botrana relies on a female produced sex pheromone for long-distance mate finding. Grapevine moth males compete heavily during limited time windows for females. The aim of this study was to investigate the perception of host plant volatiles by grapevine moth males and whether such compounds elicit upwind oriented flights. We compared five host plant headspace extracts by means of gas chromatography linked electroantennogram (EAG) recording. We identified 12 common host plant volatiles (aliphatic esters, aldehydes, and alcohols, aromatic compounds and terpenes) that elicit EAG responses from grapevine moth males and that occur in at least three of the host plant volatile headspace extracts tested. Subsequently the behavioural response of grapevine moth males to four these compounds presented singly and in mixtures (1-hexanol, 1-octen-3-ol, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate and (E)-?-caryophyllene) was recorded in a wind tunnel. Grapevine moth males engaged in upwind flights to all of four compounds when released singly at 10,000 pg/min and to all, except 1-octen-3-ol, when released at 100 pg/min. A blend of the four host plant volatiles released at 10,000 pg/min and mixed at a ratio based on the analysis of Vitis vinifera cv. Solaris volatile emissions attracted significantly more males than any single compound. Grapevine moth males perceive and respond to host plant volatiles at biologically relevant levels indicating that host plant volatiles figure as olfactory cues and that L. botrana males can discern places where the likelihood of encountering females is higher. PMID:21729701

von Arx, Martin; Schmidt-Büsser, Daniela; Guerin, Patrick M

2011-10-01

219

Why small males have big sperm: dimorphic squid sperm linked to alternative mating behaviours  

PubMed Central

Background Sperm cells are the target of strong sexual selection that may drive changes in sperm structure and function to maximize fertilisation success. Sperm evolution is regarded to be one of the major consequences of sperm competition in polyandrous species, however it can also be driven by adaptation to the environmental conditions at the site of fertilization. Strong stabilizing selection limits intra-specific variation, and therefore polymorphism, among fertile sperm (eusperm). Here we analyzed reproductive morphology differences among males employing characteristic alternative mating behaviours, and so potentially different conditions of sperm competition and fertilization environment, in the squid Loligo bleekeri. Results Large consort males transfer smaller (average total length = 73 ?m) sperm to a female's internal sperm storage location, inside the oviduct; whereas small sneaker males transfer larger (99 ?m) sperm to an external location around the seminal receptacle near the mouth. No significant difference in swimming speed was observed between consort and sneaker sperm. Furthermore, sperm precedence in the seminal receptacle was not biased toward longer sperm, suggesting no evidence for large sperm being favoured in competition for space in the sperm storage organ among sneaker males. Conclusions Here we report the first case, in the squid Loligo bleekeri, where distinctly dimorphic eusperm are produced by different sized males that employ alternative mating behaviours. Our results found no evidence that the distinct sperm dimorphism was driven by between- and within-tactic sperm competition. We propose that presence of alternative fertilization environments with distinct characteristics (i.e. internal or external), whether or not in combination with the effects of sperm competition, can drive the disruptive evolution of sperm size.

2011-01-01

220

Behavioural processes in social context: female abductions, male herding and female grooming in hamadryas baboons.  

PubMed

The formation of bonds between strangers is an event that occurs routinely in many social animals, including humans, and, as social bonds in general, they affect the individuals' welfare and biological fitness. The present study was motivated by an interest in the behavioural processes that drive bond formation in a social context of hostility, in which the incumbent partners vary greatly in physical power and reproductive interests, a situation in which individuals of many group-living species find themselves often throughout their lives. We focused on the quantitative analysis of female abductions via male aggressive herding in a nonhuman primate, the hamadryas baboon, in which intersexual bonds are known to be strong. We tested three hypotheses informed by sexual conflict/sexual coercion theory (male herding-as-conditioning and female grooming-as-appeasement) and by socioecological theory (unit size and female competition). The results supported the predictions: males resorted to coercive tactics (aggressive herding) with abducted females, and abducted females elevated the amount of grooming directed at their new unit males; in fact, they escaped from the otherwise negative effect of unit size on female-to-male grooming. These findings reveal that conflicts of interest are natural ingredients underpinning social bonds and that resorting to coercive aggression may be an option especially when partners differ greatly in their physical power. PMID:22391051

Polo, Pablo; Colmenares, Fernando

2012-06-01

221

Role of Gonadal and Adrenal Steroids in the Impairment of the Male Rat’s Sexual Behaviour by Hyperprolactinaemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sexual behaviour of male rats, castrated and testosterone-implanted, declined following induction of hyperprolactinaemia by domperidone. Treatment with oestradiol benzoate did not reverse this effect, and may have accentuated it. Oestradiol also amplified domperidone-induced hyperprolactinaemia. Testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) apparently delayed, but did not prevent, the gradual deterioration in sexual behaviour (prolonged ejaculation latencies) induced by domperidone, but this effect

David J. Bailey; A. Louise Dolan; Paul D. P. Pharoah; Joe Herbert

1984-01-01

222

Back to the future: prohibiting surrogacy for singles, same-sex and shorter-term heterosexual couples in Queensland.  

PubMed

This article considers the regulatory position concerning altruistic surrogacy in Queensland, focusing on the intended changes to the current legal framework announced by the government in June 2012. The previous government had made significant progress by reforming surrogacy laws in 2010. However, that progress is at risk of being reversed. The proposed changes to the law would make it a criminal offence to enter into an altruistic surrogacy arrangement for certain individuals or couples. If enacted, the offence would only apply in altruistic surrogacy cases where the intended parent or parents are either single, in a same-sex relationship, or are in a heterosexual relationship of less than two years. Moreover, if enacted, the offence would apply extra-territorially. The authors argue that these changes represent a retrograde step for the law and urge the government to reconsider. This is based on the fact that they are out of step with current social attitudes, are contrary to the spirit of anti-discrimination laws, and that they are unjustified in terms of child welfare concerns. PMID:23600195

Smith, Malcolm K; Willmott, Lindy; Trowse, Pip; White, Ben

2013-03-01

223

Same-sex cohabiting elders versus different-sex cohabiting and married elders: Effects of relationship status and sex of partner on economic and health outcomes.  

PubMed

In this article, I use pooled data from the 2008-2010 American Community Surveys to examine outcomes for different-sex married, different-sex cohabiting, and same-sex cohabiting elders across several key economic and health indicators, as well as other demographic characteristics. The findings suggest that elders in same-sex cohabiting partnerships differ from those in different-sex marriages and different-sex cohabiting relationships in terms of both financial and health outcomes, and that women in same-sex cohabiting partnerships fare worse than men or women in other couple types. The results indicate that financial implications related to the sex of one's partner might be more predictive of economic and health outcomes in old age, rather than solely access to legal marriage. Nonetheless, findings suggest that individuals in same-sex cohabiting partnerships might experience worse outcomes in old age as a result of cumulative effects across the life course from both the sex of their partner (in the case of female couples) as well as their lack of access to benefits associated with marriage. Accordingly, these findings demonstrate that persons in same-sex cohabiting partnerships require unique policy considerations to address health and economic concerns in old age. PMID:24267753

Baumle, Amanda K

2014-01-01

224

Spawning behaviour and success of mature male Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar ) parr of farmed and wild origin  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined genetic differences in the reproduction of an alternative maturation phenotype in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) by comparing the spawning behaviour and success among farmed, first-generation hybrid, and wild mature male parr raised in similar environments. Parr competed for spawning opportunities in the presence of ei- ther wild or farmed large males. There were no consistent differences among groups

Laura K. Weir; Jeffrey A. Hutchings; Ian A. Fleming; Sigurd Einum

2005-01-01

225

Drawing Desire: Male Youth and Homoerotic Fan Art  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although Western mass media aimed at juvenile audiences aggressively eliminates any references to same-sex desire and behavior, it inspires a tremendous amount of homoerotic fan art. To determine how same-sex potential is portrayed in juvenile fan art, a content analysis was conducted of 872 male homoerotic images by 442 juvenile male and female…

Dennis, Jeffery P.

2010-01-01

226

Developmental exposure to Passiflora incarnata induces behavioural alterations in the male progeny.  

PubMed

Passiflora incarnata is marketed in many countries as a phytomedicine and is prescribed mainly as a sedative and anxiolytic. Even though the directions of most marketed phytomedicines recommend them to be used under medical supervision, reproductive and developmental studies are sparse and not mandatory for regulatory purposes. To evaluate the reproductive and developmental toxicity of P. incarnata, Wistar female rats were gavaged with 30 or 300 mg kg(-1) of this herb from gestational Day (GD) 0 to postnatal Day (PND) 21. P. incarnata treatment did not influence dams' bodyweight or food intake or their reproductive performance (post-implantation loss, litter size, litter weight). There was also no influence on the physical development of pups (bodyweight gain, day of vaginal opening or preputial separation) or their behaviour in the open-field at PND 22, 35 and 75. Sexual behaviour was disrupted in adult male pups exposed to 300 mg kg(-1) of P. incarnata; in this group, only 3 out of 11 pups were sexually competent. This behavioural disruption was not accompanied by alterations in plasma testosterone levels, reproductive-related organs and glands weights or sperm count. It is hypothesised that aromatase inhibition may be involved in the observed effect. PMID:22958428

Bacchi, André D; Ponte, Bianca; Vieira, Milene L; de Paula, Jaqueline C C; Mesquita, Suzana F P; Gerardin, Daniela C C; Moreira, Estefânia G

2013-01-01

227

Neural pathways mediating control of reproductive behaviour in male Japanese quail  

PubMed Central

The sexually dimorphic medial preoptic nucleus (POM) in Japanese quail has for many years been the focus of intensive investigations into its role in reproductive behaviour. The present paper delineates a sequence of descending pathways that finally reach sacral levels of the spinal cord housing motor neurons innervating cloacal muscles involved in reproductive behaviour. We first retrogradely labeled the motor neurons innervating the large cloacal sphincter muscle (mSC) that forms part of the foam gland complex (Seiwert and Adkins-Regan, 1998, Brain Behav Evol 52:61–80) and then putative premotor nuclei in the brainstem, one of which was nucleus retroambigualis (RAm) in the caudal medulla. Anterograde tracing from RAm defined a bulbospinal pathway, terminations of which overlapped the distribution of mSC motor neurons and their extensive dorsally directed dendrites. Descending input to RAm arose from an extensive dorsomedial nucleus of the intercollicular complex (DM-ICo), electrical stimulation of which drove vocalizations. POM neurons were retrogradely labeled by injections of tracer into DM-ICo, but POM projections largely surrounded DM, rather than penetrated it. Thus, although a POM projection to ICo was shown, a POM projection to DM must be inferred. Nevertheless, the sequence of projections in the male quail from POM to cloacal motor neurons strongly resembles that in rats, cats and monkeys for the control of reproductive behaviour, as largely defined by Holstege and co-workers (e.g., Holstege et al., 1997, Neuroscience 80: 587–598).

Wild, J Martin; Balthazart, Jacques

2012-01-01

228

The costs of risky male behaviour: sex differences in seasonal survival in a small sexually monomorphic primate  

PubMed Central

Male excess mortality is widespread among mammals and frequently interpreted as a cost of sexually selected traits that enhance male reproductive success. Sex differences in the propensity to engage in risky behaviours are often invoked to explain the sex gap in survival. Here, we aim to isolate and quantify the survival consequences of two potentially risky male behavioural strategies in a small sexually monomorphic primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus: (i) most females hibernate during a large part of the austral winter, whereas most males remain active and (ii) during the brief annual mating season males roam widely in search of receptive females. Using a 10-year capture–mark–recapture dataset from a population of M. murinus in Kirindy Forest, western Madagascar, we statistically modelled sex-specific seasonal survival probabilities. Surprisingly, we did not find any evidence for direct survival benefits of hibernation—winter survival did not differ between males and females. By contrast, during the breeding season males survived less well than females (sex gap: 16%). Consistent with the ‘risky male behaviour’ hypothesis, the period for lowered male survival was restricted to the short mating season. Thus, sex differences in survival in a promiscuous mammal can be substantial even in the absence of sexual dimorphism.

Kraus, Cornelia; Eberle, Manfred; Kappeler, Peter M

2008-01-01

229

Knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases and sexual behaviours among Malaysian male youths.  

PubMed

This study examines the knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among male youths in Malaysia. A self-administered survey was carried out on a sample of 952 never-married males aged 15-24 years. The respondents were asked about their knowledge of STDs, how these diseases get transmitted and their sexual behaviours. The data showed that 92% of the respondents knew of at least one STD (syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydia, herpes, genital warts, yeast infection, trichomoniasis or HIV/AIDS). About 95% of them knew of at least one method of STD transmission. Urban and tertiary-educated male youths showed a substantially higher proportion of awareness of STDs and transmission methods compared with their rural and less-educated counterparts. The data also indicated that 10% of the study sample admitted to having had sexual experiences. There were still a large proportion of the respondents who were not aware of STDs other than syphilis and HIV/AIDS and the means of transmission, such as multiple sex partners, including those who claimed to be sexually active. Thus there is a need for more concerted efforts to disseminate information on STDs and transmission methods to a wider audience in Malaysia, especially youths in rural areas. PMID:23480474

Awang, Halimah; Wong, Li Ping; Jani, Rohana; Low, Wah Yun

2014-03-01

230

Comparison of Same-Sex Couples Who Were Married in Massachusetts, Had Domestic Partnerships in California, or Had Civil Unions in Vermont  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared 55 men and 78 women who had same-sex marriages in Massachusetts, 101 men and 120 women who had domestic partnerships in California, and 35 men and 86 women who had civil unions in Vermont, all in 2004. Couples were surveyed on demographic and relationship information, conflict, contact with family of origin, social support,…

Rothblum, Esther D.; Balsam, Kimberly F.; Solomon, Sondra E.

2008-01-01

231

The Effect of Requiring Private Employers to Extend Health Benefit Eligibility to Same-Sex Partners of Employees: Evidence from California  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health disparities related to sexual orientation are well documented and may be due to unequal access to a partner's employer-sponsored insurance (ESI). We provide the literature's first evaluation of legislation enacted by California in 2005 that required private employers within the state to treat employees in committed same-sex relationships in…

Buchmueller, Thomas C.; Carpenter, Christopher S.

2012-01-01

232

Validation of a Measure of Psychological Aggression in Same-Sex Couples: Descriptive Data on Perpetration and Victimization and Their Association with Physical Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite its documented elevated prevalence, psychological aggression in couple relationships rarely receives the same degree of attention as physical aggression. Indeed, psychological violence is much more prevalent than physical violence in couples, and its impact can be just as devastating. Research has recently begun to address psychological aggression in same-sex couples, but the most commonly used questionnaire for assessing intimate

Melody Matte; Marie-France Lafontaine

2011-01-01

233

Exploring the "Bisexual Bridge": A Qualitative Study of Risk Behavior and Disclosure of Same-Sex Behavior Among Black Bisexual Men  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We explored factors influencing sexual behavior, disclosure of same-sex behavior, and condom-use practices among Black bisexual men. Methods. We conducted semistructured interviews with 38 Black men in Atlanta, Georgia, who reported having had oral, vaginal, or anal sex with both men and women in the prior 6 months. Results. Participants described approaches to disclosure of same-sex behavior as part of a complex decisional balance influenced by both situational and individual factors and ranging from full disclosure to total secrecy. Influences on sexual behavior and condom-use practices included: (1) type of relationship, (2) gender-specific considerations, (3) perceptions of comfort or trust, and (4) fear of disease or pregnancy. Conclusions. Disclosure of same-sex behavior was not a major influence on the sexual behavior and condom-use practices of the Black bisexual men in our study, who demonstrated heterogeneity in approaches to sexual behavior, disclosure of same-sex behavior, and condom-use practices. Additional research is needed to assess the social determinants of sexual risk for this population. Future HIV-prevention efforts should include initiatives to encourage accuracy in risk assessment and in taking sexual histories in clinical settings.

Arriola, Kimberly Jacob; Jenkins, Tyrrell R.; Dauria, Emily; Patel, Shilpa N.

2010-01-01

234

Stability and change in same-sex attraction, experience, and identity by sex and age in a New Zealand birth cohort.  

PubMed

Gaps remain in knowledge of changes in sexual orientation past adolescence and early adulthood. A longitudinal study of a New Zealand birth cohort was used to examine differences by age and sex in change in sexual attraction between 21 (1993/1994) and 38 years (2010/2011), sexual experiences between 26 and 38 years, and sexual identity between 32 and 38 years. Any same-sex attraction was significantly more common among women than men at all ages. Among women, any same-sex attraction increased up to age 26 (from 8.8 to 16.6 %), then decreased slightly by age 38 (12.0 %); among men, prevalence was significantly higher at age 38 (6.5 %) than 21 (4.2 %), but not in the intermediate assessments. It is likely that the social environment becoming more tolerant was responsible for some of the changes. Same-sex attraction was much more common than same-sex experiences or a same-sex identity, especially among women, with no major sex differences in these latter dimensions. Women exhibited much greater change in sexual attraction between assessments than men; for change in experiences and identity, sex differences were less marked and not statistically confirmed. Changes in the respective dimensions appeared more likely among those initially with mixed attraction and experiences, and among those initially identifying as bisexual, but this did not account for the sex difference in likelihood of change. These results provide contemporary information about the extent and variation of reported sexual attraction, experiences, and identity that we show continues across early and mid-adulthood. PMID:23430085

Dickson, Nigel; van Roode, Thea; Cameron, Claire; Paul, Charlotte

2013-07-01

235

Effect of Bombax ceiba L. on spermatogenesis, sexual behaviour and erectile function in male rats.  

PubMed

A number of herbal drugs are advocated in the traditional Ayurvedic literature for the improvement of overall sexual function. Young roots of Bombax ceiba Linn. (Fam. Bombacaceae) [correction added after online publication 1 August 2011: the family of Bombax ceiba was incorrectly mentioned as Orchidaceae. It has been corrected to Bombacaceae] also known as Semal Musli are used traditionally in Indian subcontinent as sexual stimulant. Its juice is considered nutritive and restorative tonic. Lyophilised aqueous extract of roots was studied for effect on sexual behaviour and spermatogenesis in male albino rats. Administration of 100 mg Kg(-1) body weight of aqueous extract influenced the five parameters evaluated in vivo. Sexual behaviour analysis in the presence of a female rate, serum testosterone level, anabolic effects, epididymal sperm count and seminal fructose level were the parameters evaluated. In B. ceiba extract-treated animals, a gain in body and sexual organ weights was observed. Mount, intromission and ejaculation frequencies were significantly improved (P < 0.05). An increase in serum testosterone levels was also observed, but it was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Seminal fructose content and epididymal sperm count were significantly improved as well. Penile erection index was also higher compared to control group animals. Hesitation time was significantly reduced (P < 0.01), and copulatory rate was doubled in treated animals compared with control group animals. PMID:21806665

Bhargava, C; Thakur, M; Yadav, S K

2012-05-01

236

Short periods of prenatal stress affect growth, behaviour and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in male guinea pig offspring.  

PubMed

Prenatal stress can have profound long-term influences on physiological function throughout the course of life. We hypothesized that focused periods of moderate prenatal stress at discrete time points in late gestation have differential effects on hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in adult guinea pig offspring, and that changes in HPA axis function will be associated with modification of anxiety-related behaviour. Pregnant guinea pigs were exposed to a strobe light for 2 h on gestational days (GD) 50, 51, 52 (PS50) or 60, 61, 62 (PS60) (gestation length approximately 70 days). A control group was left undisturbed throughout pregnancy. Behaviour was assessed in male offspring on postnatal day (PND)25 and PND70 by measurement of ambulatory activity and thigmotaxis (wall-seeking behaviour) in a novel open field environment. Subsequent to behavioural testing, male offspring were cannulated (PND75) to evaluate basal and activated HPA axis function. Body weight was significantly decreased in adult PS50 and PS60 offspring and this effect was apparent soon after weaning. The brain-to-body-weight ratio was significantly increased in adult PS50 males. Basal plasma cortisol levels were elevated in PS50 male offspring throughout the 24 h sampling period compared with controls. In response to an ACTH challenge and to exposure to an acute stressor, PS60 male offspring exhibited elevated plasma cortisol responses. Plasma testosterone concentrations were strikingly decreased in PS50 offspring. Thigmotaxis in the novel environment was increased in PS50 male offspring at PND25 and PND70, suggesting increased anxiety in these animals. In conclusion, prenatal stress during critical windows of neuroendocrine development programs growth, HPA axis function, and stress-related behaviour in adult male guinea pig offspring. Further, the nature of the effect is dependant on the timing of the maternal stress during pregnancy. PMID:15932885

Kapoor, Amita; Matthews, Stephen G

2005-08-01

237

Sexual behaviour and neuronal activation in the vomeronasal pathway and hypothalamus of food-deprived male rats.  

PubMed

As feeding and mating are mutually-exclusive goal-orientated behaviours, we investigated whether brief food deprivation would impair the display of sexual behaviour of male rats. Analysis of performance in a sexual incentive motivation test revealed that, similar to fed males, food-deprived males preferred spending time in the vicinity of receptive females rather than nonreceptive females. Despite this, food-deprived males were more likely to be slow to mate than normally-fed males, and a low dose of the satiety peptide ?-melanocyte-stimulating-hormone attenuated the effect of hunger. Using Fos immunocytochemistry, we compared neuronal activity in the vomeronasal projection pathway in response to oestrous cues from receptive females between food-deprived and fed males. As in fed males, more Fos expression was seen in the rostral part of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and in the medial preoptic area in food-deprived males, confirming that food-deprived males can recognise and respond to female oestrous cues. However, although there was also an increase in Fos expression in the bed nucleus of the accessory tract and in the posteromedial amygdala in fed males, no increases were seen in these areas in food-deprived rats. We also found selective attenuation in the activation of lateral posterior paraventricular nucleus (lpPVN) oxytocin neurones in food-deprived males. Taken together, the data show that, although food-deprived males can still become sexually motivated, copulation is delayed, and this is accompanied by variations in neuronal activity in the vomeronasal projection pathway. We propose that, in hungry rats, the lpPVN oxytocin neurones (which project to the spinal cord and are involved in maintaining penile erection) facilitate the transition from motivation to intromission, and their lack of activation impairs intromission, and thus delays mating. PMID:22309296

Caquineau, C; Leng, G; Douglas, A J

2012-04-01

238

Effect of 50% ethanolic extract of Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & Perry. (clove) on sexual behaviour of normal male rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The flower bud of Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & Perry. (clove) has been used in Unani medicine since ancient times for the treatment of male sexual disorders. The present study is aimed to investigate the effect of 50% ethanolic extract of clove on general mating behaviour, libido, potency along with its likely gastric ulceration and adverse effects on sexually

Tajuddin; Shamshad Ahmad; Abdul Latif; Iqbal Ahmad Qasmi

2004-01-01

239

Local Impacts of Religious Discourses on Rights to Express Same-Sex Sexual Desires in Peri-Urban Rio de Janeiro.  

PubMed

This article reports on a study that examined how religious discourses of inclusion and exclusion-in Roman Catholic, evangelical Protestant, and Afro-Brazilian religious traditions-affected people's rights to express same-sex sexual desires, behaviors, and identities in the socioeconomically marginalized urban periphery of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Using extended ethnographic observation of institutions and religious events over a period of 2 years, the authors identified how sexual rights were constructed within religious discourses and conducted ethnographic interviews with 45 religious leaders. In the low-income and violent urban periphery of Rio de Janeiro, religious leaders and institutions play key roles in molding community inclusion and exclusion. A comparison of the 3 major religious denominations shows a diversity of discourses about same-sex sexual desires and their impacts on community formation. PMID:20161503

García, Jonathan; Laboy, Miguel Muñoz; de Almeida, Vagner; Parker, Richard

2009-09-01

240

Sperm competition affects male behaviour and sperm output in the rainbow darter  

PubMed Central

Rainbow darters, Etheostoma caeruleum, are promiscuous fish with moderate rates of group spawning (between one and five males may simultaneously mate with one female). In this study, I examined male sperm output and male willingness to spawn under different levels of sperm competition intensity. One male and one female were allowed to spawn in an aquarium where they had visual and olfactory access to one of four treatments: four males, one male, zero males, or one female. Theory predicts that males should reduce sperm output when there are more than the average number of males at a group spawning (four-male treatment) and should increase sperm output when there are fewer than average males at a group spawning (one-male treatment). Mean sperm output did not differ among treatments. However, males released more sperm when spawning in the presence of competing males (four-male and one-male treatments pooled) than when spawning in the absence of competing males (zero-male and one-female treatments pooled). Males were also most likely to forego spawning opportunities when sperm competition intensity was high. Furthermore, male willingness to spawn was size dependent. Large males were more likely to forego spawning opportunities under high sperm competition intensity. Large males may be better off waiting for future spawning opportunities when there is a lower potential for sperm competition intensity.

Fuller, R. C.

1998-01-01

241

Health-seeking behaviour of male foreign migrant workers living in a dormitory in Singapore  

PubMed Central

Background Foreign workers’ migrant status may hinder their utilisation of health services. This study describes the health-seeking behaviour and beliefs of a group of male migrant workers in Singapore and the barriers limiting their access to primary healthcare. Methods A cross-sectional study of 525 male migrant workers, ?21 years old and of Indian, Bangladeshi or Myanmar nationality, was conducted at a dormitory via self-administered questionnaires covering demographics, prevalence of medical conditions and health-seeking behaviours through hypothetical scenarios and personal experience. Results 71% (95%CI: 67 to 75%) of participants did not have or were not aware if they had healthcare insurance. 53% (95%CI: 48 to 57%) reported ever having had an illness episode while in Singapore, of whom 87% (95%CI: 82 to 91%) saw a doctor. The number of rest days was significantly associated with higher probability of having consulted a doctor for their last illness episode (p?=?0.026), and higher basic monthly salary was associated with seeing a doctor within 3 days of illness (p?=?0.002). Of those who saw a doctor, 84% (95%CI: 79 to 89%) responded that they did so because they felt medical care would help them to work better. While 55% (95%CI: 36 to 73%) said they did not see a doctor because the illness was not serious, those with lower salaries were significantly more likely to cite inadequate finances (55% of those earning?

2014-01-01

242

Popularity among same-sex and cross-sex peers: A process-oriented examination of links to aggressive behaviors and depressive affect.  

PubMed

Popularity has been linked to heightened aggression and fewer depressive symptoms. The current study extends this literature by examining the unique contributions of same-sex and cross-sex popularity to children's development, as well as potential mediating processes. Third- and 4th-graders (212 boys, 250 girls) provided data at 3 time points over 2 school years. Data included peer-reported popularity, social exclusion, friendships, peer victimization, and aggression and self-reported social self-esteem and depressive affect. Same-sex and cross-sex popularity independently contributed to the prediction of aggression and depressive affect. Popularity was associated with heightened aggression through reduced social exclusion and was indirectly related to lower levels of depressive affect through increased friendships. For boys only, same-sex popularity was further associated with dampened depressive affect through reduced social exclusion and peer victimization and increased social self-esteem. Findings are discussed in light of the potential tradeoffs associated with popularity in preadolescence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24684714

Troop-Gordon, Wendy; Ranney, John D

2014-06-01

243

[Experience assisting an AIDS-infected homosexual patient and his same-sex partner make a do-not-resuscitate decision].  

PubMed

Family members play an important role in the process of writing advance directives. Homosexual men infected with HIV often wish to authorize their intimate same-sex partner or friends rather than immediate family members to make medical decisions on their behalf. Although same-sex marriage is currently illegal in Taiwan, HIV infected homosexual patients are able to write advance directives appointing their same-sex partner to be their surrogate decision maker for end-of-life medical decisions. This case report describes an experience assisting a homosexual patient with HIV to write his advance directives. The nurse assisted the patient and his partner to make a self-determined decision not to resuscitate. Family conferences held to discuss the patient's decisions regarding resuscitation helped legitimize his partner's primary role in making end-of-life healthcare decisions on his behalf. As an advocate for patient rights, nurses should understand the law as it relates to homosexuality and end-of-life decision making, inform patients on the durable power of autonomy, and help execute their advance directives. PMID:23034554

Wang, Shu-Jang; Lai, Pei-Yu; Liou, Siao-Ying; Ko, Wen-Chien; Ko, Nai-Ying

2012-10-01

244

Behavioural evidence of male volatile pheromones in the sex-role reversed wolf spiders Allocosa brasiliensis and Allocosa alticeps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of chemical signals in a sexual context is widespread in the animal kingdom. Most studies in spiders report the use of female pheromones that attract potential sexual partners. Allocosa brasiliensis and Allocosa alticeps are two burrowing wolf spiders that show sex-role reversal. Females locate male burrows and initiate courtship before males perform any detectable visual or vibratory signal. So, females of these species would be detecting chemical or mechanical cues left by males. Our objective was to explore the potential for male pheromones to play a role in mate detection in A. brasiliensis and A. alticeps. We designed two experiments. In Experiment 1, we tested the occurrence of male contact pheromones by evaluating female courtship when exposed to empty burrows constructed by males or females (control). In Experiment 2, we tested the existence of male volatile pheromones by evaluating female behaviour when exposed to artificial burrows connected to tubes containing males, females or empty tubes (control). Our results suggest the occurrence of male volatile pheromones that trigger female courtship in both Allocosa species. The sex-role reversal postulated for these wolf spiders could be driving the consequent reversal in typical pheromone-emitter and detector roles expected for spiders.

Aisenberg, Anita; Baruffaldi, Luciana; González, Macarena

2010-01-01

245

Male mate location behaviour and encounter sites in a community of tropical butterflies: taxonomic and site associations and distinctions.  

PubMed

Male mate location behaviour and encounter sites have been studied in 72 butterfly species at Nagpur, India, and related to taxonomy, morphology, habitat and population parameters. Species can be placed in three broad classes of mate location behaviour: invariant patrolling, invariant perching, and perch-patrol, the latter associated with increasing site fidelity, territorial defence and male assemblages. Significant taxonomic differences occur, closely related species tending to share mate location behaviours. Morphological differences are found with heavier and larger butterflies displaying greater site fidelity and territorial defence, and differences occur between individuals of species which both perch and patrol. Invariant patrolling is particularly associated with tracks through vegetation, host planttrack distributions, and high female to male numbers observed on transects; invariant perching is linked more to edge features than patrolling, and to lower population counts on transects. Species which perch-patrol, defend territories and establish male assemblages are associated with more complex vegetation structures, and have encounter sites at vegetation edges, landforms and predictable resource (host plant) concentrations. Attention is drawn to the importance of distinctive mate encounter sites for the conservation of butterfly species' habitats. PMID:21289445

Tiple, Ashish D; Padwad, Sonali V; Dapporto, Leonardo; Dennis, Roger L H

2010-12-01

246

The Impact of Adult Vitamin D Deficiency on Behaviour and Brain Function in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats  

PubMed Central

Background Vitamin D deficiency is common in the adult population, and this has been linked to depression and cognitive outcomes in clinical populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adult vitamin D (AVD) deficiency on behavioural tasks of relevance to neuropsychiatric disorders in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods Ten-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a control or vitamin D deficient diet for 6 weeks prior to, and during behavioural testing. We first examined a range of behavioural domains including locomotion, exploration, anxiety, social behaviour, learned helplessness, sensorimotor gating, and nociception. We then assessed locomotor response to the psychomimetic drugs, amphetamine and MK-801. Attention and vigilance were assessed using the 5 choice serial reaction time task (5C-SRT) and the 5 choice continuous performance task (5C-CPT) and, in a separate cohort, working memory was assessed using the delay match to sample (DMTS) task. We also examined excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in prefrontal cortex and striatum. Results AVD-deficient rats were deficient in vitamin D3 (<10 nM) and had normal calcium and phosphate levels after 8–10 weeks on the diet. Overall, AVD deficiency was not associated with an altered phenotype across the range of behavioural domains tested. On the 5C-SRT AVD-deficient rats made more premature responses and more head entries during longer inter-trial intervals (ITI) than control rats. On the 5C-CPT AVD-deficient rats took longer to make false alarm (FA) responses than control rats. AVD-deficient rats had increases in baseline GABA levels and the ratio of DOPAC/HVA within the striatum. Conclusions AVD-deficient rats exhibited no major impairments in any of the behavioural domains tested. Impairments in premature responses in AVD-deficient rats may indicate that these animals have specific alterations in striatal systems governing compulsive or reward-seeking behaviour.

Turner, Karly M.; Eyles, Darryl W.; McGrath, John J.; Burne, Thomas H. J.

2013-01-01

247

Barriers to HIV\\/AIDS protective Behaviour among African adolescent males in township secondary schools in Durban, South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory qualitative study investigates possible barriers to HIV preventive behaviour amongst Zulu-speaking, black adolescent males, aged 15–23, in township secondary schools in Durban, South Africa. Perceptions, attitudes, beliefs, and practices concerning HIV prevention and transmission are elicited using semi-structured focus groups and mixed open-ended and closed-ended questionnaires. Thematic analysis of the data is used to identify possible barriers to

Jonathan Tlllotson; Pranitha Maharaj

2001-01-01

248

Housing familiar male wildtype rats together reduces the long-term adverse behavioural and physiological effects of social defeat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social stress in rats is known to induce long-lasting, adverse changes in behaviour and physiology, which seem to resemble certain human psychopathologies, such as depression and anxiety. The present experiment was designed to assess the influence of individual or group housing on the vulnerability of male Wildtype rats to long-term effects of inescapable social defeat. Group-housed rats were individually exposed

M. A. W. Ruis; J. H. A. te Brake; B. Buwalda; S. F. de Boer; P. Meerlo; S. M. Korte; H. J. Blokhuis; J. H. Koolhaas

1999-01-01

249

Effects of marital transitions on changes in dietary and other health behaviours in US male health professionals  

PubMed Central

Study objective: To examine the effect of change in marital status on health behaviours among men. Design: Longitudinal study of repeated measures of marital status and health behaviours collected at four year intervals (1986–90; 1990–94). Setting: US male health professionals. Participants: 38 865 men aged 40–75 in 1986. Main results: Relative to men who stayed married over four years, men who became widowed increased their alcohol consumption. Men who become divorced or widowed experienced decreases in body mass index. Compared with men who remained unmarried, men who remarried exhibited increases in body mass index along with decreased physical activity. Becoming divorced or widowed was associated with decreased vegetable intake while remarriage was linked to greater consumption. Conclusions: Marital termination may adversely affect health and dietary behaviours among men.

Eng, P. M.; Kawachi, I.; Fitzmaurice, G.; Rimm, E.

2005-01-01

250

Patterns of sexual behaviour of male patients before testing HIV-positive in a Cambodian hospital, Phnom Penh  

PubMed Central

Background Sexual behaviours among HIV-positive male patients in Cambodia have not been fully evaluated. Objectives The patterns of sexual behaviours and social factors were compared between married and single men. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional survey of 174 male HIV patients was undertaken during March 1999–June 2000 in Phnom Penh. Results Many participants (61%) reported that they were unaware that their sexual behaviours may have put them at risk of HIV infection. Sexual behaviours included having sex with a sex worker (90%), multiple sexual partners (41%), and both of these behaviours (37%). Two-thirds (69%) reported using a condom when having sex with a sex worker. Condom use with multiple sexual partners was low (24%). A history of condom use with a sex worker was less likely to be reported among married men than single men (P = 0.008). Always using condoms with a sex worker did not differ between married men and single men. Social factors that influenced visiting a sex worker included invitation by a friend (88%), alcohol consumption (74%), and having extra spending money (72%). Multivariate analysis suggests that alcohol consumption (P = 0.008) and having extra spending money (P = 0.02) were strongly associated with visiting a sex worker. Conclusions In Cambodia, HIV-infected men frequently reported a history of using sex workers. Having multiple sex partners or using a sex worker and multiple sexual partners were not rare. Interventions should target men in settings where alcohol is consumed and to encourage married men to use condoms.

Sok, Phan; Harwell, Joseph I.; Dansereau, Lynne; McGarvey, Stephen; Lurie, Mark; Mayer, Kenneth H.

2010-01-01

251

Effects of acute treatment with 8-OH-DPAT and fluoxetine on aggressive behaviour in male song sparrows (Melospiza melodia morphna).  

PubMed

The role of serotonin in modulating male aggressive behaviour was investigated in male song sparrows, Melospiza melodia morphna, using two different serotonergic drugs, fluoxetine and 8-OH-DPAT. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor of the neuronal reuptake pump increasing synaptic concentrations of serotonin, and 8-OH-DPAT is a specific serotonin (5-HT1A) receptor agonist. The serotonergic control of aggression in passerines has not been previously investigated. We examined these behaviours within a controlled setting using a laboratory simulated territorial intrusion, with a hierarchical scale to quantify male-male aggressive behaviour. Utilizing this scale, we quantified the extent of male aggressive behaviour in two experiments. In experiment 1, song sparrows were given 100 micro l, s.c. injections of either fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or 8-OH-DPAT (1 mg/kg). Experiment 2 was a dose-response study using three doses of 8-OH-DPAT (0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg). In both studies, aggressive behaviour was measured 1 h after injection for 10 min in response to the presence of a novel male decoy combined with playback of conspecific song. Both drugs significantly reduced male aggressive behaviour, and 8-OH-DPAT did so in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of the two drugs upon general activity was also measured using infra-red perch hop detectors. Activity levels were not effected by either fluoxetine or 8-OH-DPAT at all of the respective doses, indicating that the reduction in aggressive behaviour was specific. These results demonstrate that, in a passerine species, the serotonergic system negatively regulates male-male aggressive behaviour. These results further demonstrate that aggression can be effectively studied in a laboratory setting and natural aggressive responses can be elicited using this method. PMID:12535157

Sperry, T S; Thompson, C K; Wingfield, J C

2003-02-01

252

School Dropout, Problem Behaviour and Poor Academic Achievement: A Longitudinal View of Portuguese Male Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines school dropouts from the perspective of male adults themselves through interviews with offenders currently serving sentences. Participants were 10 Portuguese male inmates, between the ages of 19 and 46 years of age, incarcerated in two prison facilities on the Azores. Qualitative and interpretative methods were carried out…

Beatriz Saraiva, A.; Pereira, Beatriz O.; Zamith-Cruz, Judite

2011-01-01

253

Divergent evolution of male aggressive behaviour: another reproductive isolation barrier in extremophile poeciliid fishes?  

PubMed

Reproductive isolation among locally adapted populations may arise when immigrants from foreign habitats are selected against via natural or (inter-)sexual selection (female mate choice). We asked whether also intrasexual selection through male-male competition could promote reproductive isolation among populations of poeciliid fishes that are locally adapted to extreme environmental conditions [i.e., darkness in caves and/or toxic hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S)]. We found strongly reduced aggressiveness in extremophile P. oecilia mexicana, and darkness was the best predictor for the evolutionary reduction of aggressiveness, especially when combined with presence of H(2)S. We demonstrate that reduced aggression directly translates into migrant males being inferior when paired with males from non-sulphidic surface habitats. By contrast, the phylogenetically old sulphur endemic P. sulphuraria from another sulphide spring area showed no overall reduced aggressiveness, possibly indicating evolved mechanisms to better cope with H(2)S. PMID:22315695

Bierbach, David; Klein, Moritz; Saßmannshausen, Vanessa; Schlupp, Ingo; Riesch, Rüdiger; Parzefall, Jakob; Plath, Martin

2012-01-01

254

Female and Male Perceptions of Ideal Body Shapes: Distorted Views among Caucasian College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using body silhouettes, 87 college women and 118 college men indicated their own body shapes and shapes they and same-sex and other-sex peers find most attractive. Focus was on whether women overestimate desirability of thin figures among female peers. Males and females misjudged same-sex peers' preferences compared with ideals. (SLD)

Cohn, Lawrence D.; Adler, Nancy E.

1992-01-01

255

Effects of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide on the Nesting Behaviour of Male Pigeons  

Microsoft Academic Search

PRESENT-DAY advances in psychotherapy have added impetus to investigations into the actions of drugs which affect the central nervous system and thus cause changes in behaviour patterns. One such psychomimetic agent, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD-25), exerts both peripheral and central actions1. Some of these effects in various animals and humans are nausea, vertigo, hyperhydrosis, hypersalivation, mydriasis, vasodilation or vasospasm, hypotension

Efrem Rosen; Anthony Iovino

1963-01-01

256

Young Male Prisoners in a Young Offenders' Institution: Their Contact with Suicidal Behaviour by Others  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prison suicide rates are increasing. The impact of witnessing a suicide or how many people do so is unknown. The aim of this study was to find how many young people detained in a Young Offenders' Institution (YOI) have had contact with another's suicide attempt and to test for association between this and own self-harming behaviour. A…

Hales, H.; Davison, S.; Misch, P.; Taylor, P. J.

2003-01-01

257

Smoking behaviours and cessation services among male physicians in China: evidence from a structural equation model  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate smoking prevalence and cessation services provided by male physicians in hospitals in three Chinese cities. Methods Data were collected from a survey of male physicians employed at 33 hospitals in Changsha, Qingdao and Wuxi City (n=720). Exploratory factor analysis was performed to identify latent variables, and confirmatory structural equation modelling analysis was performed to test the relationships between predictor variables and smoking in male physicians, and their provision of cessation services. Results Of the sampled male physicians, 25.7% were current smokers, and 54.0% provided cessation services by counselling (18.8%), distributing self-help materials (17.1%), and providing traditional remedies or medication (18.2%). Factors that predicted smoking included peer smoking (OR 1.14 95% CI 1.03 to 1.26) and uncommon knowledge (OR 0.94 95% CI 0.89 to 0.99), a variable measuring awareness of the association of smoking with stroke, heart attack, premature ageing and impotence in male adults as well as the role of passive smoking in heart attack. Factors that predicted whether physicians provided smoking cessation services included peer smoking (OR 0.82 95% CI 0.76 to 0.89), physicians’ own smoking (OR 0.87 95% CI 0.81 to 0.93), training in cessation (OR 1.36 95% CI 1.27 to 1.45) and access to smoking cessation resources (OR 1.69 95% CI 1.58 to 1.82). Conclusions The smoke-free policy is not strictly implemented at healthcare facilities, and smoking remains a public health problem among male physicians. A holistic approach, including a stricter implementation of the smoke-free policy, comprehensive education on the hazards of smoking, training in standard smoking-cessation techniques and provision of cessation resources, is needed to curb the smoking epidemic among male physicians and to promote smoking cessation services in China.

Huang, Cheng; Guo, Chaoran; Yu, Shaohua; Feng, Yan; Song, Julia; Eriksen, Michael; Redmon, Pam; Koplan, Jeffrey

2013-01-01

258

From spermatocytes to sperm: meiotic behaviour of human male reciprocal translocations  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Human male translocation carriers may present alterations in the meiotic process due to the presence of the translocated chromosomes. The aim of this work was to study the mechanisms that affect meiotic segregation in translocation carriers by analysing different stages of the meiotic process. METHODS: Meiotic studies using fluorescence in-situ hybridization on both spermatocytes and sperm nuclei were performed

M. Oliver-Bonet; J. Navarro; M. Codina-Pascual; C. Abad; M. Guitart; J. Egozcue; J. Benet

2004-01-01

259

The use and abuse of religious beliefs in dividing and conquering between socially marginalized groups: the same-sex marriage debate.  

PubMed

This article discusses the use and abuse of religious beliefs and their role in divide-and-conquer strategies. Divide-and-conquer strategies are engaged to disrupt potential coalitions between and among marginalized group members, specifically sexual minority groups and people of color. Tensions between these groups have been exacerbated by the debate on same-sex marriage and comparisons between the discriminatory treatment of each group. A component of this discussion includes a brief exploration of one of the historical abuses of religious doctrine used to legitimize the marginalization of people of color and sexual minorities in the United States. For African Americans, one form of marginalization was reflected in criminalizing interracial marriage, and for members of sexual minority groups, a form of marginalization is denying group members the right to marry. The author also explores culturally competent and respectful disciplinary and clinical responses to religiously derived prejudice against sexual minority group members and people of color and discusses the implications for multicultural discourse. PMID:19899873

Greene, Beverly

2009-11-01

260

How different are the adult children of parents who have same-sex relationships? Findings from the New Family Structures Study.  

PubMed

The New Family Structures Study (NFSS) is a social-science data-collection project that fielded a survey to a large, random sample of American young adults (ages 18-39) who were raised in different types of family arrangements. In this debut article of the NFSS, I compare how the young-adult children of a parent who has had a same-sex romantic relationship fare on 40 different social, emotional, and relational outcome variables when compared with six other family-of-origin types. The results reveal numerous, consistent differences, especially between the children of women who have had a lesbian relationship and those with still-married (heterosexual) biological parents. The results are typically robust in multivariate contexts as well, suggesting far greater diversity in lesbian-parent household experiences than convenience-sample studies of lesbian families have revealed. The NFSS proves to be an illuminating, versatile dataset that can assist family scholars in understanding the long reach of family structure and transitions. PMID:23017845

Regnerus, Mark

2012-07-01

261

Behavioural risk factors for acquisition of HIV infection and knowledge about AIDS among male professional blood donors in Delhi.  

PubMed Central

In 1989-90 a study was carried out in Delhi of the risk behaviours and epidemiological characteristics exhibited by 15 paid blood donors who were positive for human immunodeficiency (HIV) virus and on 100 paid seronegative donors. All the donors were male. Compared with the seronegative donors, a significantly greater proportion of seropositive donors were unmarried, had lived in at least two cities in the previous 5 years, donated blood at least once per month, were heterosexually promiscuous, and had visited a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases. Awareness about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was poor, and even those donors who had heard of AIDS were ignorant about certain important aspects. The results indicate that, based on the risk factors identified in this study, there is a need to adopt more careful selection criteria for blood donors in India.

Chattopadhya, D.; Riley, L. W.; Kumari, S.

1991-01-01

262

Energy Requirement and Food Intake Behaviour in Young Adult Intact Male Cats with and without Predisposition to Overweight  

PubMed Central

Obesity is a common problem in cats. In the experimental cat family of the institute of animal nutrition besides a “normal” lean phenotype, cats with predisposition to an overweight phenotype are present. To investigate energy requirements and food intake behaviour of intact male cats of different phenotypes, six “normal” lean cats (GL) and six cats disposed to overweight (GO) were used. At the beginning of the experiment, all cats had an ideal body condition score of 5. To reach this the GO cats had to pass a weight-loss program. Energy requirements of the cats were determined using respiration chambers, whereas the amount and frequency of food intake was measured with a feeding station recording the data automatically. Energy requirement at weight constancy of the GO cats was even on fat-free mass (FFM) significantly (P = 0.02) lower (162.6?kJ/kg FFM/d) than that of the “normal” lean cats (246?kJ/kg FFM/d). The GO cats also showed a higher food intake 34.5 ± 1.5?g dry matter/kg body weight0.67 compared to the GL cats (24.0 ± 2.1?g dry matter/kg body weight0.67)(P = 0.001). In conclusion quantifiable differences in food intake and behaviour in cats predisposed to overweight compared to “normal” lean cats were found.

Wichert, Brigitta; Trossen, Julia; Uebelhart, Daniel; Wanner, Marcel; Hartnack, Sonja

2012-01-01

263

A comparison of anthropometric, metabolic, and reproductive characteristics of young adult women from opposite-sex and same-sex twin pairs.  

PubMed

Background: Prenatal exposure to androgens has been linked to masculinization of several traits. We aimed to determine whether putative female intra-uterine exposure to androgens influences anthropometric, metabolic, and reproductive parameters using a twin design. Methods: Two cohorts of Finnish twins born in 1975-1979 and 1983-1987 formed the basis for the longitudinal FinnTwin16 (FT16) and FinnTwin12 (FT12) studies. Self-reported anthropometric characteristics, disease status, and reproductive history were compared between 679 same-sex (SS) and 789 opposite-sex (OS) female twins (mean age?±?SD: 34?±?1.1) from the wave 5 of data collection in FT16. Serum lipid and lipoprotein subclass concentrations measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared in 226 SS and 169 OS female twins (mean age?±?SD: 24?±?2.1) from the wave 4 of data collection in FT12 and FT16. Results: Anthropometric measures, the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus type 2 did not differ significantly between females from SS and OS twin pairs at age 34. Similarly, the prevalence of infertility, age at first pregnancy and number of induced and spontaneous abortions did not differ significantly between these two groups of women. The serum lipid and lipoprotein profile did not differ between females from SS and OS twins at age 24. Conclusion: We found no evidence that androgen overexposure of the female fetus affects obesity, metabolic profile, or reproductive health in young adult females. However, these results do not exclude the possibility that prenatal androgen exposure in females could be adversely associated with these phenotypes later in life. PMID:24639667

Korsoff, Pirkko; Bogl, Leonie H; Korhonen, Päivi; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Rose, Richard J; Kaaja, Risto; Kaprio, Jaakko

2014-01-01

264

Effects of a pyrethroid pesticide on endocrine responses to female odours and reproductive behaviour in male parr of brown trout ( Salmo trutta L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reproductive behaviour of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) from an anadromous stock was studied in a large stream water aquarium. Four adult males and two ovulated females were placed in the aquarium together with eight mature male parr. Four of the parr were exposed during the previous 4 days to two concentrations (0.1 or 1.0?gl?1) of the pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin

Alia Jaensson; Alexander P. Scott; Andrew Moore; Henrik Kylin; K. Håkan Olsén

2007-01-01

265

On the consequences of aggressive male mate-locating behaviour and micro-climate for female host plant use in the butterfly Lycaena hippothoe  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution of ecological resources and their significance for males and females may vary considerably. Intersexual behavioural\\u000a interactions may lead, combined with particular resource configurations, to sexual spatial segregation. We investigated this\\u000a issue relative to host plant use in females of the purple-edged copper butterfly, Lycaena hippothoe. Males exhibited nectar resource-based territoriality, which is an uncommon mate-locating system in butterflies.

Camille Turlure; Hans Van Dyck

2009-01-01

266

"They Didn't Have 'Out There' Gay Parents--They Just Looked Like "Normal" Regular Parents": Investigating Teachers' Approaches to Addressing Same-Sex Parenting and Non-Normative Sexuality in the Elementary School Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we draw on queer theoretical and critical literacy perspectives to investigate elementary school teachers' pedagogical approaches to addressing same-sex parenting and non-normative sexuality in the elementary classroom. Through undertaking case study research, we examine two Australian elementary school teachers' reflections on…

Martino, Wayne; Cumming-Potvin, Wendy

2011-01-01

267

HIV prevalence and related risk behaviours among female partners of male injecting drugs users in Iran: results of a bio-behavioural survey, 2010  

PubMed Central

Objective Sexual partners of injecting drug users (IDUs) are at high risk of HIV infection, yet data for such populations are scarce worldwide, particularly in the Middle East and North African region. This study measured and compared the prevalence of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV), hepatitis B (HBV) and related behavioural factors in male IDUs (MIDUs), their main female sexual partners who were also injecting drug users (FIDUPs) and their main non-injecting female partners (FNIDUPs). Method Using convenience sampling, MIDUs were recruited at drop-in health centres in three cities (Tehran, Mashhad and Shiraz), who in turn recruited their main female partners. Behavioural data were collected using a standard questionnaire, and blood samples were drawn for HIV and HCV antibody testing and HBV surface antigen. Results HIV prevalence was 9.4% (95% CI 2.96% to 26.2%) among MIDUs (n=226), 7.7% (95% CI 1.9% to 26.3%) among FIDUPs (n=42) and 2.8% (95% CI 0.65% to 11.3%) among FNIDUPs (n=184). HCV prevalence was 38.6% (95% CI 20.3% to 60.7%) among MIDUs, 36.6% (95% CI 13.6% to 67.9%) among FIDUPs and 8.4% (95% CI 5.67% to 12.4%) among FNIDUPs. HBV surface antigen prevalence was 3.6% (95% CI 1.5% to 8.3%), 7.3% (95% CI 1.9% to 24.8%) and 1.1% (95% CI 0.3% to 4.7%), respectively. Among MIDUs, 19.5% (95% CI 3.4% to 62.2%) had a history of sexual contact with other men. Mean age at first sexual contact in MIDUs was 19.2 years (95% CI 18.6 to 25.2) and in FIDUPs and FNIDUPs 16.4 years (95% CI 14.1 to 22.1) and 18.2 years (95% CI 15.7 to 23.1), respectively. FIDUPs and FNIDUPs had a higher mean number of sexual partners (other than their main partner) in the previous month than MIDUs (5.5 (95% CI 0 to 14.1) and 2.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 4) vs 1.3 (95% CI 0.37 to 2.2), respectively). FIDUPs tended to use drugs before or during sex with their main and casual partners more often than MIDUs (with main partner: 69% (95% CI 41.5% to 87.5%) vs 54.4% (95% CI 27% to 79.4%), respectively, and with casual partners: 47.6% (95% CI 13.1% to 84.6%) vs 34.1% (95% CI 10% to 70.6%), respectively); however, the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Female partners of MIDUs in Iran and elsewhere are an under studied group. The high rate of HIV, HCV and HBV infection among females who are partners of MIDUs points to the necessity of appropriate injection and sexual risk reduction interventions among this group, to prevent acquisition of HIV, HCV and HBV and their onward transmission to other male partners.

Alipour, Abbas; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Sajadi, Leily; Zolala, Farzaneh

2013-01-01

268

Response of male mice to odours of female mice in different stages of oestrous cycle: self-grooming behaviour and the effect of castration.  

PubMed

The behavioural assays were carried out in a Y-maze wherein intact, castrated and testosterone-treated male mice were exposed to oestrus and non-oestrus urine samples. The intact male mice investigated more frequently and spent more time in the Y-maze arm with oestrus urine than in that with non-oestrus urine. In contrast, the castrated mice were not attracted to oestrus urine, whereas testosterone-treated mice showed preference for oestrus urine. The rate of self-grooming was higher in intact males in case of exposure to oestrus urine while the rate was lower with respect to non-oestrus urine. However, castrated mice exhibited less self-grooming behaviour which was partially restored by testosterone treatment. The results suggest that self-grooming behaviour is an indicator of detection and discrimination of oestrus by males, and supports the androgen role in male chemosensory ability to discriminate between oestrus and non-oestrus female odours. PMID:24617013

Achiraman, Shanmugam; SankarGanesh, Devaraj; Kannan, Soundarapandian; Kamalakkannan, Soundararajan; Nirmala, Natarajan; Archunan, Govindaraju

2014-01-01

269

Lepidium meyenii Walp. improves sexual behaviour in male rats independently from its action on spontaneous locomotor activity.  

PubMed

Lepidium meyenii Walpers (Maca) is traditionally employed in the Andean region for its supposed properties to improve energy and fertility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acute and chronic Maca pulverised root oral administration on rat sexual behaviour. Sixty male sexually experienced rats (20 group) were daily treated for 15 days with Maca 15 mg kg(-1), Maca 75 mg kg(-1) or saline 0.5 ml kg(-1). The following sexual performance parameters were evaluated at first and last day of treatment: 1st mount (ML), 1st intromission (IL), ejaculation (EL) and postejaculatory (PEL) latencies, intercopulatory interval (ICI) and copulatory efficacy (CE). An activity cage test was carried out to evaluate if Maca-induced locomotion changes could indirectly improve rat sexual performances. It was observed that both lower and higher Maca doses acutely decreased ML, IL and ICI in a significant way (P < 0.05), while only the 75 mg kg(-1) dose decreased the PEL (T = 29, P < 0.05). This effect seems to be the only one dose-dependent. After 15 days of treatment, both doses are able to significantly decrease ML, IL, EL and PEL, while the 75 mg kg(-1) dose decreased the ICI (T = 40, P < 0.05) too. IL, EL and PEL variations seem to be dose-related after chronic treatment. Moreover, chronic Maca treatment induced an apparently not dose-related increase in rat locomotion, during the second 10-min period of observation in the activity cage. The late in Maca-induced locomotion modification excludes that improvement of tested sexual performance parameters is related to an increase in rat aspecific activity. Thus, it was concluded that both acute and chronic Maca oral administration significantly improve sexual performance parameters in male rats. PMID:11297856

Cicero, A F; Bandieri, E; Arletti, R

2001-05-01

270

HIV Risk among MSM in Senegal: A Qualitative Rapid Assessment of the Impact of Enforcing Laws That Criminalize Same Sex Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk for HIV in Senegal, with a prevalence of 21.5%. In December 2008, nine male HIV prevention workers were imprisoned for “acts against nature” prohibited by Senegalese law. This qualitative study assessed the impact of these arrests on HIV prevention efforts. A purposive sample of MSM in six regions of

Tonia Poteat; Daouda Diouf; Fatou Maria Drame; Marieme Ndaw; Cheikh Traore; Mandeep Dhaliwal; Chris Beyrer; Stefan Baral

2011-01-01

271

Adult Romantic Relationships as Contexts of Human Development: A Multimethod Comparison of Same-Sex Couples with Opposite-Sex Dating, Engaged, and Married Dyads  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a multimethod, multi-informant comparison of community samples of committed gay male (n=30) and lesbian (n=30) couples with both committed (n=50 young engaged and n=40 older married) and noncommitted (n=109 exclusively dating) heterosexual pairs. Specifically, in this study the quality of same- and opposite-sex relationships…

Roisman, Glenn I.; Clausell, Eric; Holland, Ashley; Fortuna, Keren; Elieff, Chryle

2008-01-01

272

Male and female rats differ in brain cannabinoid CB1 receptor density and function and in behavioural traits predisposing to drug addiction: effect of ovarian hormones.  

PubMed

Sex-dependent differences are frequently observed in the biological and behavioural effects of substances of abuse, including cannabis. We recently demonstrated a modulating effect of sex and oestrous cycle on cannabinoid-taking and seeking behaviours. Here, we investigated the influence of sex and oestrogen in the regulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor density and function, measured by [(3)H]CP55940 and CP55940-stimulated [(35)S]GTP?S binding autoradiography, respectively, in the prefrontal cortex (Cg1 and Cg3), caudate- putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus of male and cycling female rats, as well as ovariectomised (OVX) rats and OVX rats primed with oestradiol (10 µg/rat) (OVX+E). CB1 receptor density was significantly lower in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala of cycling females than in males and in OVX females, a difference that appeared to be oestradiol-dependent, because it was no more evident in the OVX+E group. CP55940-stimulated [(35)S]GTP?S binding was significantly higher in the Cg3 of OVX rats relative to cycling and OVX+E rats. No difference was observed in CB1 receptor density or function in any of the other brain areas analysed. Finally, sex and oestradiol were also found to affect motor activity, social behaviour and sensorimotor gating in rats tested in locomotor activity boxes, social interaction and prepulse inhibition tasks, respectively. Our findings provide biochemical evidence for sex- and hormone- dependent differences in the density and function of CB1 receptors in selected brain regions, and in behaviours associated with greater vulnerability to drug addiction, revealing a more vulnerable behavioural phenotype in female than in male rats. PMID:23829370

Castelli, Maria Paola; Fadda, Paola; Casu, Angelo; Spano, Maria Sabrina; Casti, Alberto; Fratta, Walter; Fattore, Liana

2014-01-01

273

Body Build Perceptions in Male and Female College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results from scores on the Somatotype Rating Scale (SRS) indicated that, while there was close agreement between males and females on the measures, females exhibited more dissatisfaction with their body build and greater congruency between their self-concept and their same-sex stereotype than did males. (Author)

Bailey, Roger C.; Hankins, Norman E.

1979-01-01

274

Males call more from wetter nests: effects of substrate water potential on reproductive behaviours of terrestrial toadlets.  

PubMed Central

Laboratory studies of terrestrial-breeding frogs have demonstrated that wetter substrates produce fitter offspring but the relevance of substrate wetness to adult reproductive strategies is unknown. I hypothesized that male toadlets (Pseudophryne bibronii) would select wetter areas for nesting and would advertise wet nests strongly, and tested these predictions by manipulating water potentials at a breeding site. Males preferred to nest in the wettest areas, and called at greater rates on almost twice as many nights as males occupying drier nests. Overall, males that mated called on significantly more nights than unmated males. Hence, because males occupying wet nests called more, they also mated more and in 19 out of 20 cases, oviposition occurred in wet nests that were suitable for embryonic development. Males occupying drier nests may have risked dehydration by calling, and so were less able to signal to females. Hydration states therefore have the potential to influence the reproductive success of terrestrial male frogs.

Mitchell, N J

2001-01-01

275

Heavy Episodic Drinking and Its Consequences: The Protective Effects of Same-Sex, Residential Living-Learning Communities for Undergraduate Women  

PubMed Central

Gender and living environment are two of the most consistent factors associated with heavy episodic drinking on college campuses. This study aimed to determine group differences in alcohol misuse and its attendant consequences between undergraduate women living in four distinct on-campus residential environments. A Web-based survey was self-administered to a stratified random sample of full-time students attending a large Midwestern University, and living in four distinct on-campus residential environments: 1) single-sex (all female) Residential Learning Communities (RLCs), 2) mixed-sex (male and female) RLCs, 3) single-sex (all female) non-RLCs and 4) mixed-sex (male and female) non-RLCs. Respondents living in single-sex and mixed-sex RLCs had significantly lower rates of alcohol use, heavy episodic drinking and related primary alcohol-related consequences when compared to respondents living in non-RLCs; however, women in single-sex RLCs had the lowest rates. RLCs – particularly single-sex learning communities – appear to provide undergraduate women with an environment that supports lower rates of alcohol use and abuse.

Boyd, Carol J.; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Cranford, James A.; Morales, Michele; Lange, James E.; Reed, Mark B.; Ketchie, Julie M.; Scott, Marcia S.

2008-01-01

276

Heavy episodic drinking and its consequences: the protective effects of same-sex, residential living-learning communities for undergraduate women.  

PubMed

Gender and living environment are two of the most consistent factors associated with heavy episodic drinking on college campuses. This study aimed to determine group differences in alcohol misuse and its attendant consequences between undergraduate women living in four distinct on-campus residential environments. A Web-based survey was self-administered to a stratified random sample of full-time students attending a large Midwestern University, and living in four distinct on-campus residential environments: 1) single-sex (all female) residential learning communities (RLCs), 2) mixed-sex (male and female) RLCs, 3) single-sex (all female) non-RLCs and 4) mixed-sex (male and female) non-RLCs. Respondents living in single-sex and mixed-sex RLCs had significantly lower rates of alcohol use, heavy episodic drinking and related primary alcohol-related consequences when compared to respondents living in non-RLCs; however, women in single-sex RLCs had the lowest rates. RLCs - particularly single-sex learning communities - appear to provide undergraduate women with an environment that supports lower rates of alcohol use and abuse. PMID:18485609

Boyd, Carol J; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Cranford, James A; Morales, Michele; Lange, James E; Reed, Mark B; Ketchie, Julie M; Scott, Marcia S

2008-08-01

277

Children and Parents as Informants of Emotional and Behavioural Problems Predicting Female and Male Adolescent Risk Behaviour: A Longitudinal Cross-Informant Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines whether health risk behaviour in adolescence can be predicted by self- and by parental reports of psychopathology (externalizing and internalizing symptoms) assessed two and four years earlier. A total sample of 366 fourth graders participated in a longitudinal study with measurements taken in grades 4, 6, and 8. In grades 4…

Vierhaus, Marc; Lohaus, Arnold

2008-01-01

278

HIV Risk among MSM in Senegal: A Qualitative Rapid Assessment of the Impact of Enforcing Laws That Criminalize Same Sex Practices  

PubMed Central

Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk for HIV in Senegal, with a prevalence of 21.5%. In December 2008, nine male HIV prevention workers were imprisoned for “acts against nature” prohibited by Senegalese law. This qualitative study assessed the impact of these arrests on HIV prevention efforts. A purposive sample of MSM in six regions of Senegal was recruited by network referral. 26 in-depth interviews (IDIs) and 6 focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted in July–August 2009. 14 key informants were also interviewed. All participants reported pervasive fear and hiding among MSM as a result of the December 2008 arrests and publicity. Service providers suspended HIV prevention work with MSM out of fear for their own safety. Those who continued to provide services noticed a sharp decline in MSM participation. An effective response to the HIV epidemic in Senegal should include active work to decrease enforcement of this law.

Poteat, Tonia; Diouf, Daouda; Drame, Fatou Maria; Ndaw, Marieme; Traore, Cheikh; Dhaliwal, Mandeep; Beyrer, Chris; Baral, Stefan

2011-01-01

279

Males as infant protectors in Hanuman langurs ( Presbytis entellus ) living in multimale groups – defence pattern, paternity and sexual behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypotheses about the evolution of gregariousness and social organisation in primates are based on ecological explanations\\u000a as well as on social factors such as conspecific threat (especially infanticide by males). The social explanation fits well\\u000a with the conditions found in strepsirrhine primates and furthermore explains why infanticide in anthropoid primates living\\u000a in one-male groups mainly occurs when the resident male

Carola Borries; Kristin Launhardt; Cornelia Epplen; Jörg T. Epplen; Paul Winkler

1999-01-01

280

Being drunk and high during sex is not associated with condom use behaviours: a study of high-risk young Black males.  

PubMed

Objective To assess the relationship between the frequency of being drunk and high during sex, and condom use errors and problems (CUEP) among a sample of high-risk young Black males recruited from the United States. Methods: Data were collected in clinics treating sexually transmissible infections in three cities in the southern United States. Males 15-23 years of age (n=697) who identified as African-American and reported recent (past 2 months) condom use were eligible. Measures of alcohol and drug use, as well as condom use behaviours were assessed by audio-computer assisted self-interview. Eighteen CUEP were included in this assessment. Results: Sixteen bivariate correlations were obtained. The magnitude of the coefficients was small, ranging from 0.01 to 0.13. Only three were significant. These were positive associations between the frequency of being drunk and the frequency of unprotected vaginal sex, as well as the frequency of the 18-item measure of CUEP. A significant correlation was also found between the frequency of being high during sex and the frequency of unprotected vaginal sex. Adjustments for age did not change the findings. Conclusions: Interventions designed to promote safer sex behaviours among young Black males attending sexually transmissible infection clinics are no more likely to benefit patients through the inclusion of messages and training attempting to dissuade the use of alcohol and drugs before or during sex. PMID:24588939

Crosby, Richard A; Milhausen, Robin R; Sanders, Stephanie; Graham, Cynthia A; Yarber, William L

2014-03-01

281

Flight Behaviour of Males of Two Moths, Cadra Cautella and Pectinophora Gossypiella, in Homogeneous Clouds of Pheromone.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Abstract. It is thought that orientation by male moths along pheromone plumes is guided by interception of filaments of pheromone along that plume and that clean air gaps are required for upwind progress. Given that several investigations have determined ...

K. A. Justus R. T. Carde

2002-01-01

282

Between harm and dangers. Oral snuff use, cigarette smoking and problem behaviours in a survey of Swedish male adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The prevalence of smokeless tobacco use (moist snuff) in Sweden is among the highest world-wide, and snuff is gaining popularity as a less harmful alternative to cigarettes. Methods: Patterns of current tobacco use and indicators of behavioural problems were analysed in a sample of 6287 boys participating in a census survey among 9th graders in Stockholm County, Sweden. Results:

M. ROSARIA GALANTI; SEPPO WICKHOLM; HANS GILLJAM

2001-01-01

283

Effects of the aqueous and hexane extracts of Mondia whitei on the sexual behaviour and some fertility parameters of sexually inexperienced male rats.  

PubMed

The effects of Mondia whitei Hook (Skeels) were studied on the sexual behaviour and some fertility parameters of sexually inexperienced male rats. Animals were orally administered 100 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg of body weight (b.w) of either the aqueous or the hexane extracts of Mondia whitei whilst the control group received 10 mL/kg b.w of 0.3% Tween 80 once/day for 14 days. Their sexual behaviour was monitored on days 0, 1, 7 and 14 days of treatment and 14 days post-treatment. Some fertility parameters (index libido, quantal pregnancy, fertility index) of the treated rat were evaluated on day 13 of treatment by pairing it overnight with two proestrus females. Results showed that Mondia whitei extracts significantly (p<0.001) reduced the mount latency and the hexane extract was found to be more efficient than the aqueous extract. The treatment had no significant effect (p>0.05) on intromission, ejaculation and erection. The fertility of the animals remained unaffected. It's concluded that Mondia whitei had sexual enhancement of the sexually inexperienced male rats. PMID:20162070

Watcho, Pierre; Zelefack, Fabien; Nguelefack, Télesphore Benoît; Ngouela, Silvère; Telefo, Phelix Bruno; Kamtchouing, Pierre; Tsamo, Etienne; Kamanyi, Albert

2006-01-01

284

Correlated evolution in parental care in females but not males in response to selection on paternity assurance behaviour.  

PubMed

According to classical parental care theory males are expected to provide less parental care when offspring in a brood are less likely to be their own, but empirical evidence in support of this relationship is equivocal. Recent work predicts that social interactions between the sexes can modify co-evolution between traits involved in mating and parental care as a result of costs associated with these social interactions (i.e. sexual conflict). In burying beetles (Nicrophorus vespilloides), we use artificial selection on a paternity assurance trait, and crosses within and between selection lines, to show that selection acting on females, not males, can drive the co-evolution of paternity assurance traits and parental care. Males do not care more in response to selection on mating rate. Instead, patterns of parental care change as an indirect response to costs of mating for females. PMID:24766255

Head, Megan L; Hinde, Camilla A; Moore, Allen J; Royle, Nick J

2014-07-01

285

Risk behaviours of Hong Kong male residents travelling to mainland China: A potential bridge population for HIV infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective was to assess levels of high-risk sexual behaviour, condom use, sexually transmitted disease (STD) history and AIDS-related perceptions among Hong Kong men returning from China by land; 1,254 systematically sampled subjects were interviewed. Of respondents, 32.5% had sexual intercourse with a commercial sex worker (CSW) in China in the past six months; 11.2% have done so on this

J. T. F. Lau; J. Thomas

2001-01-01

286

Bupropion induced changes in exploratory and anxiety-like behaviour in NMRI male mice depends on the age.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the antidepressant bupropion on anxiety and novelty-seeking in adolescent mice of different ages and adults. Behavioural differences between early adolescent, late adolescent and adult NMRI mice were measured both in the elevated plus-maze and the hole-board tasks following acute administration of bupropion (5, 10, 15, 20mg/kg) or saline. In the plus maze test, early and late adolescent mice treated with bupropion (10, 15mg/kg, respectively) had lower percentages of entries in the open-arms compared to their vehicle controls. Adult mice treated with bupropion did not differ from their vehicle controls. These results suggest that the effect of this drug on anxiety-like behaviour in mice depends on the age, showing adolescents an anxiogenic-like profile. In the hole-board, adolescents showed more elevated levels of novelty-seeking than adults, exhibiting shorter latency to the first head-dip (HD) and a higher number of HD's. Bupropion increases the latency to the first HD and decreases the number of HD's in all age-groups, indicating a decline in exploratory tendency. Findings reveal that the age can modulate the behaviour displayed by mice in both animal models, and that adolescents are more sensitive to bupropion's anxiogenic effects. PMID:23727544

Carrasco, M Carmen; Vidal, Jose; Redolat, Rosa

2013-09-01

287

Perception of self and others in male sex offenders against children: Schema content and its relation to criminal sexual behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty-four civilly committed male sex offenders against children (SOs) chose from a list of traits to describe self, mother, father, best friend, past lover, victim and therapist. Cluster analysis (INDCLAS) uncovered five patterns (i.e. schemas) in Sos’ social perception data: “sexual lover” (past lover described as sexual, arousing, etc. as well as anxious, lonely and worried), “benevolent parent” (mother and

Warren A. Reich; Uri Amit; Harold I. Siegel

2009-01-01

288

Measuring Love: Sexual Minority Male Youths’ Ideal Romantic Characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research examining how sexual minorities characterize love within same-sex relationships is scarce. In this study, the authors examined the validity of Sternberg's triangular theory of love in a sample of sexual minority male youth (N = 447). To test the adequacy of the theory for our population, the authors examined the psychometric properties of the Triadic Love Scale (TLS) and

JosÉ A. Bauermeister; Michelle M. Johns; Emily Pingel; Anna Eisenberg; Matt Leslie Santana; Marc Zimmerman

2011-01-01

289

School Programs for African-American Males ... and Females.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains antecedents, program variations, and rationale for developing single-sex schools for African-American males and females. Such schools share various values and features based on the importance of gender differences. Most programs offer appropriate same-sex role models, help with transition to adulthood, cultural inoculation, strengthened…

Ascher, Carol

1992-01-01

290

Male More than Female Infants Imitate Propulsive Motion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few experimental studies investigate the mechanisms by which young children develop sex-typed activity preferences. Gender self-labeling followed by selective imitation of same-sex models currently is considered a primary socialization mechanism. Research with prenatally androgenized girls and non-human primates also suggests an innate male

Benenson, Joyce F.; Tennyson, Robert; Wrangham, Richard W.

2011-01-01

291

Behavioural response of sexually naïve and experienced male rats to the smell of 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one and female rat faeces.  

PubMed

Sexually experienced male rats display penile erections when exposed to faeces from mammalian females in oestrus (Rampin et al., Behav Brain Res, 172:169, 2006), suggesting that specific odours indicate female receptiveness across species. However, it is unknown to what extent the sexual response observed results from an odorous conditioning acquired during sexual experience. We tested the behavioural response of male Brown Norway rats both when sexually naïve and experienced to four odours, including oestrous rat faeces and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (methylheptenone; a molecule found in higher concentrations during oestrus in female rats, foxes and horses). Odour had a significant effect on the sexual response of the naïve rats, with oestrus faeces provoking significantly more erections than herb odour, and with methylheptenone and di-oestrus faeces being intermediate. This indicates that sexually naïve male rats have an unconditioned ability to detect oestrous mediated via odour. After gaining sexual experience, the response to methylheptenone, di- and oestrus faeces was significantly higher than that observed with herb odour. These results strongly suggest that methylheptenone is part of the odorous bouquet of oestrus and contributes to the olfactory determination of female receptiveness. PMID:23911690

Nielsen, Birte L; Jerôme, Nathalie; Saint-Albin, Audrey; Rampin, Olivier; Maurin, Yves

2013-08-15

292

Mating Behaviour in Laevicaudatan Clam Shrimp (Crustacea, Branchiopoda) and Functional Morphology of Male Claspers in a Phylogenetic Context: A Video-Based Analysis  

PubMed Central

Clam shrimps are freshwater branchiopod crustaceans which often present complicated breeding systems including asexual reproduction (parthenogenesis) and mixed mating systems (in androdioecious species both selfing and outcrossing occurs due to the co-presence of hermaphrodites and males). Reproductive patterns of Spinicaudata, which contains most clam shrimp species, have received much attention. Another group of clam shrimps, Laevicaudata, which holds a key position in branchiopod phylogeny, has practically not been studied. As a part of the mating process, males clasp to the carapace margin of the females with a pair (or two pairs) of anterior trunk limbs modified as claspers. Previous studies have shown that clasper morphology is important in a phylogenetic context, and that some parts of the claspers in Spinicaudata and Laevicaudata may have undergone a remarkable parallel evolution. Here we have used video microscopy to study aspects of the mating behaviour, egg extrusion, and fertilization in Lynceus brachyurus (Laevicaudata). It is shown that fertilization is likely to be external and that the peculiar tri-lobed lateral lamellae of female's hind body assist in guiding the egg mass to the exopodal egg carriers where they are collected by their distal setation. The functional morphology of the male claspers was studied in detail by close-up video recordings. The movable “finger” of the clasper bends around the female's carapace edge and serves to hold the female during mating. The larger palp grasps around the female carapace margin in a way very similar to the movable “finger”, possibly indirectly providing sensory input on the “finger” position. A brief comparative study of the claspers of a spinicaudatan clam shrimp showed both similarities and differences to the laevicaudatan claspers. The presence of two pairs of claspers in Spinicaudata seems to give males a better hold of the female which may play a role during extended mate guarding.

Sigvardt, Zandra M. S.; Olesen, J?rgen

2014-01-01

293

Family psychosocial characteristics influencing criminal behaviour and mortality - possible mediating factors: a longitudinal study of male and female subjects in the Stockholm Birth Cohort  

PubMed Central

Background Family psychosocial characteristics in childhood have been associated with children's development into criminal behaviour and mortality. This study explored these possible relationships and examined alcohol and/or drug use and mental problems as possible mediating factors, highlighting gender-specific patterns. Methods Data from Swedish subjects born in 1953 (n = 14,294) from the Stockholm Birth Cohort study were examined. Several indicators of adverse family factors and individual problems were included in the present study. The information was derived from various data sources, covering different periods. Gender-specific associations with incidence of criminality (1966-1980) and mortality (1981-2009) were analysed using logistic regression. Furthermore, the population attributable fraction (PAF) was calculated for all variables in the fully adjusted models which were positively related to the outcome. Results Overall incidence of criminality and mortality was (m/f 32.3/6.6) and (m/f 6.1/3.5), respectively. The results showed that all aspects of family psychosocial and individual problems studied were associated with criminality for both genders. Among males, individual problems seemed to partly mediate these relations, but the associations remained statistically significant. Interestingly, the PAF analysis revealed a reduction in criminality of 17.5% when individual problems with alcohol and/or drug use were considered. Among females, a significant impact of alcohol and/or drug use on the association between family psychosocial characteristics and subsequent criminality was obtained. Inclusion of father's occupational class only somewhat reduced the estimates for the genders. Concerning male mortality, father's alcohol abuse was significantly related to an increased risk. When individual criminality was accounted for, the association was substantially reduced but remained statistically significant. Among females, when adjusting for family psychosocial factors, only the association between parents' mental problems and females' mortality was significant. None of the individual problem variables managed to explain this association. Conclusions Family psychosocial characteristics were associated with both subsequent criminal behaviour and mortality. These connections were partly explained by individual risk factors, especially by alcohol and/or drug use. The practical implications of the findings point to the importance of addressing the individual's alcohol and/or drug use in reducing criminal behaviour, which would also lower the mortality rates.

2011-01-01

294

Relationship of self-mutilative behaviours with severity of borderline personality, childhood trauma and impulsivity in male substance-dependent inpatients.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of self-mutilation (SM) with the severity of borderline personality features (BPF), childhood trauma and impulsivity in male substance-dependent inpatients. Participants were consecutively admitted comprising 200 male substance-dependent inpatients. Patients were investigated with the Self-mutilative Behaviour Questionnaire (SMBQ), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28), the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and the Borderline Personality Inventory (BPI). Among 200 subjects, 62.0% (n=124) were considered as the group with SM. Mean scores of CTQ-28 total and subscales (other than emotional abuse), BIS-11 total and attentional impulsiveness subscale and BPI were higher in the SM group. In the regression model, emotional neglect, attentional impulsiveness and drug dependency were the predictors of SM, whereas in the new model in which the severity of BPF was included emotional neglect and the severity of BPF predicted SM. Among those with SMB, physical neglect and the severity of BPF predicted the number of SM episodes. Thus, to better understand SMB among substance-dependent patients, clinicians must carefully evaluate BPF and history of childhood trauma among substance-dependent inpatients. In addition, results suggest that the relationship between SMB and BPF is more prominent in drug-dependent inpatients than alcohol-dependent inpatients. PMID:22494705

Evren, Cuneyt; Cinar, Ozgul; Evren, Bilge; Celik, Selime

2012-11-30

295

Effect of chronic treatment with ladostigil (TV3326) on anxiogenic and depressive-like behaviour and on activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis in male and female prenatally stressed rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The aim of the study is to investigate the effect of ladostigil, a cholinesterase and brain-selective monoamine oxidase (MAO)\\u000a inhibitor, on anxiogenic and depressive-like behaviour and the response of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis to stress\\u000a in prenatally stressed (PS) male and female rats.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Ladostigil (17 mg\\/kg\\/day) was administered daily for 6 weeks to control and PS rats aged 6 weeks. Behaviour was

Tatyana Poltyrev; Elena Gorodetsky; Corina Bejar; Donna Schorer-Apelbaum; Marta Weinstock

2005-01-01

296

The influence of a magnesium-rich marine extract on behaviour, salivary cortisol levels and skin lesions in growing pigs.  

PubMed

Growing pigs can display undesirable behaviours, reflecting or causing poor welfare. Addition of magnesium (Mg) to the diet could reduce these, as Mg supplementation has been associated with improved coping ability in response to stress. This study examined the effect of supplementation with a Mg-rich marine extract-based product (Supplement) on the behaviour, skin and tail lesion scores and salivary cortisol concentrations of growing pigs. At weaning (28 days), 448 piglets were assigned to either Control or Supplement (0.05%) diets in single-sex groups of 14. Four weeks later (c. 17 kg), pigs were blocked according to weight and back test scores. Seven piglets from each pen were mixed with seven from another pen of the same sex and dietary treatment to yield the following groups: control male, Supplement male, control female and Supplement female (n = 4 of each). This marked the start of the 9-week experimental period. Instances of the following behaviours were recorded in each pen for 8 × 2 min periods 1 day/week: aggression (fight, head-knock and bite); harmful (tail-in-mouth, ear-chewing and belly-nosing); and sexual/mounting behaviour. Four focal pigs were selected from each pen, and their behaviour was continuously recorded for 2 × 5 min periods on the same day. Saliva was collected once per week at 1000 h by allowing pigs to chew on a cotton bud for c. 1 min. Salivary cortisol was analysed in duplicate by an enzyme immunoassay. Skin and tail lesions were scored according to severity 1 day/week. There were fewer aggressive incidents in Supplement pens (P < 0.01), and mounting behaviour (performed only by males) was almost three times lower in Supplement than in control pens (P < 0.01). However, there was no effect of Supplement on the incidence of each of the harmful behaviours. Behaviour of the focal pigs showed no treatment effect on the duration or incidence of aggressive behaviour. However, Supplement pigs spent less time performing harmful behaviours compared with control pigs (P < 0.001). Supplement had no effect on the occurrence or severity of tail-biting outbreaks or on tail lesion scores. However, Supplement females had lower skin lesion scores, in particular in the ears and shoulders (P < 0.01). Finally, Supplement pigs had lower salivary cortisol concentrations (P < 0.01). Mounting is a major welfare concern in uncastrated pigs, and therefore this represents an important welfare benefit of Supplement. Reduced salivary cortisol, in conjunction with reduced skin lesion scores in supplemented females, suggests that addition of a Mg-rich marine extract improved pig welfare in this system. PMID:23253104

O'Driscoll, K; O'Gorman, D M; Taylor, S; Boyle, L A

2013-06-01

297

Face Aftereffects Indicate Dissociable, but Not Distinct, Coding of Male and Female Faces  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been claimed that exposure to distorted faces of one sex induces perceptual aftereffects for test faces that are of the same sex, but not for test faces of the other sex (A. C. Little, L. M. DeBruine, & B. C. Jones, 2005). This result suggests that male and female faces have separate neural coding. Given the high degree

Emma Jaquet; Gillian Rhodes

2008-01-01

298

The development of male-oriented behavior in rams.  

PubMed

The sheep offers a unique mammalian model in which to study paradoxical same-sex sexual partner preferences. Variations in sexual partner preferences occur spontaneously with as many as 8% of rams in a population exhibiting a sexual preference for other rams (male-oriented). The current review presents an overview and update of the male-oriented ram model and discusses several theories that have been invoked to explain same-sex preferences in this species. Although our understanding of the biological determinants and underlying neural substrates of sexual attraction and mate selection are far from complete, compelling evidence is discussed that supports the idea that neural substrates regulating sexual partner preferences are organized during prenatal development. The challenge for future research will be to construct an integrated picture of how hormones, genes, and experience shape sexual partner preference. PMID:21215767

Roselli, Charles E; Reddy, Radhika C; Kaufman, Katherine R

2011-04-01

299

The Development of Male-Oriented Behavior in Rams  

PubMed Central

The sheep offers a unique mammalian model in which to study paradoxical same-sex sexual partner preferences. Variations in sexual partner preferences occur spontaneously with as many as 8% of rams in a population exhibiting a sexual preference for other rams (male-oriented). The current review presents an overview and update of the male-oriented ram model and discusses several theories that have been invoked to explain same sex preferences in this species. Although our understanding of the biological determinants and underlying neural substrates of sexual attraction and mate selection are far from complete, compelling evidence is discussed that supports the idea that neural substrates regulating sexual partner preferences are organized during prenatal development. The challenge for future research will be to construct an integrated picture of how hormones, genes, and experience shape sexual partner preference.

Roselli, Charles E.; Reddy, Radhika; Kaufman, Katherine

2011-01-01

300

Silencing of the Hsf gene, the transcriptional regulator of A. gambiae male accessory glands, inhibits the formation of the mating plug in mated females and disrupts their monogamous behaviour.  

PubMed

Discovering the molecular factors that shape the mating behaviour and the fertility of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, the principal vector of human malaria, is regarded as critical to better understand its reproductive success as well as for identifying new leads for malaria control measures. In A. gambiae mating induces complex behavioural and physiological changes in the females, including refractoriness to subsequent mating and induction of egg-laying. In other insects including Drosophila a group of proteins named Accessory gland proteins (Acps), produced by males and transferred with sperm to the female reproductive tract, have been implicated in this post-mating response. Although Acps represent a set of promising candidates for unravelling the mating physiology, their role in inducing behavioural changes in mated A. gambiae females remains largely unknown. In this work, we demonstrate that a down-regulation of a large fraction of Acp genes via silencing of the Acp regulating transcription factor Hsf, abolishes the formation of mating plug in mated females and fails to induce refractoriness of mated female to subsequent inseminations. A significant fraction of females mated to Hsf silenced males (66%) failed to receive the mating plug though seminal fluid had been transferred as documented by the presence of spermatozoa in the female sperm storage organ. Furthermore, nearly all females (95%) mated to HSF-silenced males were re-inseminated when exposed to males carrying EGPF marked sperm. Our findings provide evidence showing that Acp genes regulated by the transcription factor HSF play a key role in the function of the male accessory glands. PMID:23265612

Dottorini, Tania; Persampieri, Tania; Palladino, Pietro; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea

2012-11-01

301

Effects of sex of judge and sex of victim on recommended punishment of a male murderer in a mock scenario.  

PubMed

Two samples of undergraduates (36 women, 7 men; 44 women, 45 men) read a mock transcript in which a murderer's victim was a man or a woman, after which they made prison sentence and death penalty judgments. Female judges gave longer sentences for the female victim than for the male victim, whereas male judges gave longer sentences for the male victim than for the female victim. This same-sex bias suggests that extralegal factors can affect judgments about sentencing. PMID:12416848

McKelvie, Stuart J

2002-10-01

302

Alternative reproductive tactics in male common shrews: relationships between mate-searching behaviour, sperm production, and reproductive success as revealed by DNA fingerprinting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The common shrew (Sorex araneus) is a solitary small mammal with a promiscuous mating system. Previous studies of this species suggest that females typically mate multiply, and that males may adopt alternative mate-searching tactics. We studied two generations of common shrews in a population near Oxford, England. Males were found to adopt two different mate-searching tactics. Those classed as type

P. Stockley; J. B. Searle; D. W. Macdonald; C. S. Jones

1994-01-01

303

Experimental increase of testosterone increases boldness and decreases anxiety in male African striped mouse helpers.  

PubMed

Males of many species can adjust their behaviors to environmental conditions by changing reproductive tactics. Testosterone surges in adult breeding males typically inhibit the expression of paternal care while facilitating the expression of aggression during environmental changes. Similarly, in non-breeding philopatric males of cooperatively breeding species, up-regulation of testosterone may inhibit alloparental care while facilitating dispersal, i.e. males might become bolder and more explorative. We tested this hypothesis in philopatric male African striped mice, Rhabdomys pumilio. Striped mouse males can either remain in their natal groups providing alloparental care or they can disperse seeking mating opportunities. Compared to philopatric males, dispersed males typically show higher testosterone levels and lower corticosterone levels, and more aggression toward pups and same sex conspecifics. We experimentally increased the testosterone levels of the philopatric males kept in their family groups when pups were present. Testosterone-treated males did not differ significantly from control males in alloparental care and in aggression toward same-sex conspecifics. Compared to the control males, testosterone treated males were bolder, more active, and less anxious; they also showed lower corticosterone levels. The philopatric males were sensitive to our testosterone treatment for dispersal- and anxiety-like behavior but insensitive for social behaviors. Our results suggest a role of testosterone in dispersal. PMID:24534177

Raynaud, Julien; Schradin, Carsten

2014-04-22

304

CCNP Heinz Lehmann Award Paper: Interference with AMPA receptor endocytosis: effects on behavioural and neurochemical correlates of amphetamine sensitization in male rats  

PubMed Central

Background Behavioural sensitization has been linked to drug craving in both clinical and preclinical studies of addiction. Increased motor activity is accompanied by enhanced dopamine (DA) release, particularly in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). The neural bases of sensitization are linked to alterations in synaptic connections that also underlie learning and memory. The present study uses an “interference” peptide, Tat-GluA23Y, that blocks long-term depression (LTD) at glutamatergic synapses by disrupting the endocytosis of ?-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs), to explore the role of this form of synaptic plasticity in the induction and maintenance of sensitization. Methods Rats were given 5 injections of d-amphetamine (d-AMPH, 1.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) every second day. Tat-GluA23Y, was administered by 2 different routes (intravenously and intracerebrally to the ventral tegmental area [VTA] or to the NAcc) before each injection of d-AMPH. After a 14-day drug-free period, expression of behavioural sensitization was evoked by a challenge injection of d-AMPH (0.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Dopamine efflux in the NAcc was measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection analyses of brain dialysates on days 1, 9 and 24 of the intravenous peptide experiment. Results Systemic administration of Tat-GluA23Y during the induction phase blocked maintenance of behavioural sensitization and attenuated the maintenance of neurochemical sensitization. Intra-VTA infusion of Tat-GluA23Y before each administration of d-AMPH did not affect induction, but inhibited maintenance and subsequent expression of sensitization, whereas intra-NAcc infusion of the peptide did not affect induction or maintenance of sensitization. Limitations The relevance of behavioural sensitization in rodents is related to the development of craving and does not provide direct measures of drug reinforcement. Conclusion These findings confirm that drug-induced neuroplasticity is labile and may be subject to disruption at a time when long-lasting associations between drug reward and contextual stimuli are formed. Furthermore, the unique ability of Tat-GluA23Y to block maintenance of behavioural sensitization implicates LTD in the consolidation of essential associative memories. Tat-GluA23Y has the unique ability to disrupt functional neuroadaptations triggered by repeated psychostimulant exposure and therefore may protect against the development of craving and drug seeking behaviours.

Choi, Fiona Y.; Ahn, Soyon; Wang, Yu Tian; Phillips, Anthony G.

2014-01-01

305

Increases in self-reported consistent condom use among male clients of female sex workers following exposure to an integrated behaviour change programme in four states in southern India  

PubMed Central

Purpose As part of the Avahan India AIDS Initiative, a behaviour change communication programme sought to increase consistent condom use (CCU) among male clients of female sex workers (FSWs) in four Indian states through the use of outdoor static promotional materials, interpersonal communication and mid-media activities. This paper presents key findings related to programme coverage levels, trends over time in self-reported condom use, and correlations between levels of exposure to programme activities and self-reported condom use. Methods Five stratified two-stage cluster sample surveys were conducted between April 2006 and November 2008 (sample sizes ranged from 1741 to 2041). The independent samples were composed of clients of FSWs in selected clusters. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model whether behavioural outcomes varied between baseline and endline, and whether they varied with levels of exposure to the intervention. Results Over two-thirds of men in each survey round recalled one or two of the main intervention channels. An increase in CCU with FSWs was found between baseline and endline (63.6% vs 86.5; p<0.01). Men exposed to two intervention channels reported higher CCU than men exposed to none or only static outdoor media (89.4% vs 82.0%, p<0.05). This trend was sustained for condom use at last sex (96.2% vs 92.6%, p<0.05). Conclusion Evaluation suggests that a multi-channel behavioural intervention delivered at sites where FSWs are solicited can increase CCU among male clients of FSWs. Further research is needed on the dynamics of exposure to multiple communication channels and the contributions of complementary interventions.

Lipovsek, Varja; Navin, Deepa; Marjara, Pritpal; Sharma, Aseem; Roy, Kali Prosad

2010-01-01

306

Male homosexual behavior in a free-ranging all-male group of Japanese macaques at minoo, Japan.  

PubMed

We documented nine male homosexual consortships within three different male-male dyads in a free-ranging all-male group of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata), at Minoo, Japan. A total of 63 male-male mounts were observed during these consortships. Male homosexual interactions shared most of the behavioral components that have been reported to characterize heterosexual and female homosexual consortships in this species. Convergent behavioral data, including analysis of male-male solicitations, mounting postures, body orientations, inter-mount activities, and third-party male intrusions supported the conclusion that male-male consortships are a sexual phenomenon. We discussed a series of proximate and ultimate hypotheses that purport to account for the occurrence of male homosexual behavior in all-male groups of primates, including humans. This first report of male homosexual interactions in an all-male group of Japanese macaques contributes to the growing database used to provide insights into the developmental processes, causal mechanisms, adaptive significance, and phylogenetic pathways of same-sex sexual behavior. PMID:24867180

Leca, Jean-Baptiste; Gunst, Noëlle; Vasey, Paul L

2014-07-01

307

Working with an Adult Male with Down's Syndrome, Autism and Challenging Behaviour: Evaluation of a Programme of Staff Support and Organizational Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the case of a male with Down syndrome who has been referred to a clinical psychology service due to challenging behaviors. It provides a case history and rationale for the assessment of autism, and describes the positive effects of an intervention for increasing staff awareness of autism. (Contains references.) (CR)

Newman, David W.; Summerhill, Lisa; Mosley, Ellis; Tooth, Claire

2003-01-01

308

Is a Gay Oedipus a Trojan Horse?: Commentary on Lewes’s A Special Oedipal Mechanism in the Development of Male Homosexuality  

Microsoft Academic Search

K. Lewes’s (1998) article is seen as an effort to locate the psychopathology and desiring patterns of some gay men in a variant of the Oedipus complex. This commentary questions the value of the Oedipus complex as a theoretical tool in the psychoanalytic formulation of male same-sex eroticism both on clinical and political grounds. It argues that the embedded primacy

David Schwartz

1999-01-01

309

Testing predictions from the male control theory of men's partner violence.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to test predictions from the male control theory of intimate partner violence (IPV) and Johnson's [Johnson, M. P. (1995). Journal of Marriage and the Family, 57, 282-294] typology. A student sample (N?=?1,104) reported on their use of physical aggression and controlling behavior, to partners and to same-sex non-intimates. Contrary to the male control theory, women were found to be more physically aggressive to their partners than men were, and the reverse pattern was found for aggression to same-sex non-intimates. Furthermore, there were no substantial sex differences in controlling behavior, which significantly predicted physical aggression in both sexes. IPV was found to be associated with physical aggression to same-sex non-intimates, thereby demonstrating a link with aggression outside the family. Using Johnson's typology, women were more likely than men to be classed as "intimate terrorists," which was counter to earlier findings. Overall, these results do not support the male control theory of IPV. Instead, they fit the view that IPV does not have a special etiology, and is better studied within the context of other forms of aggression. PMID:23878077

Bates, Elizabeth A; Graham-Kevan, Nicola; Archer, John

2014-01-01

310

Classifying Relationship and Marital Status among Same-Sex Couples.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For purposes of official statistics, relationship to the householder is often used to build and define household units. These units, in turn, are used to establish measures of well-being such as household income and poverty. In order to accurately portray...

C. Robins N. Bates T. J. DeMaio W. Hicks

2012-01-01

311

First Same-Sex Partner and the Internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the first episode of anal intercourse of young gay and bisexual men (YGBM) who were in the midst\\u000a of their coming-out. Cross-sectional data regarding the first episode of anal intercourse were extracted from Outcomes, a\\u000a longitudinal study on coming-out and sexual behavior of YGBM in the Netherlands. Overall, 45% of respondents reported unprotected\\u000a anal intercourse (UAI)

Dirk Franssens; Harm J. Hospers; Gerjo Kok

2010-01-01

312

Malawi: President pardons convicted same-sex couple.  

PubMed

A Malawian gay couple sentenced to 14 years' hard labour for holding a public engagement ceremony was pardoned by Presidential decree in May 2010 at a press conference alongside United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. PMID:21413612

Sohaili, Vajdon

2010-10-01

313

Heteronormative consensus in the Norwegian same-sex adoption debate?  

PubMed

This article investigates the Norwegian newspaper debate (1998-2002) on the right of homosexual couples to adopt children. It identifies two patterns of meaning within which both anti-adoption and pro-adoption sides of the debate were located: 1) the nuclear family as reference point; and 2) a focus on innate qualities. Parallell to a continuous liberalization of sexualities in Norway we seem to witness a consensus on heteronormativity in Norway on both sides of the debate as the basic axiom in public discussions on homosexuality and adoption. In this article, we explore the nature of the heteronormative arguments and the reason for their appearance in this particular debate. The two patterns of meaning reproduce a perception of lesbians and gays as either a worthy or unworthy minority. These findings may be seen as reflecting fundamental positions regarding the Norwegian modernization project, where both sides of the debate see homosexuality as a central symbol. State feminism may also have played the role of reinforcing gender categories and thereby served as an important condition of possibility for contemporary heteronormativity. PMID:19197645

Anderssen, Norman; Hellesund, Tone

2009-01-01

314

Meaning and Necessity: Can Semantics Stop Same-Sex Marriage?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Think of this paper as an exercise in applied philosophy of language. It has both semantic and deontic concerns. More than about the meaning of ‘marriage,’ it is about how one goes about determining the meaning of social kind terms like ‘marriage’. But it is equally about the place of philosophy of language in the legislative sphere, and inter alia,

Adèle Mercier

2007-01-01

315

Why We Must Try Same-Sex Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators have not been teaching to the learning style of boys, nor have they kept up with recent findings in brain research on the developmental differences between boys and girls. With all the education reform efforts about, with new accountability standards so high, school districts nationwide struggle to balance budgets and increase student…

Laster, Carol

2004-01-01

316

Measuring Love: Sexual Minority Male Youths' Ideal Romantic Characteristics  

PubMed Central

Research examining how sexual minorities characterize love within same-sex relationships is scarce. In this study, we examined the validity of Sternberg's Triangular Theory of Love in a sample of sexual minority male youth (N = 447). To test the adequacy of the theory for our population, we examined the psychometric properties of the Triadic Love Scale (TLS) and tested whether the three underlying constructs of the theory (Intimacy, Passion, and Commitment) emerged when participants were asked to consider their ideal relationship with another man. Using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), we found support for the three-factor solution to characterize sexual minority male youths’ ideal romantic relationship, after minimizing item cross-loadings and adapting the content of the Passion subscale. We discuss the implications of our findings regarding the measurement of the TLS among sexual minority male youth and propose ways to enhance its measurement in future research.

Bauermeister, Jose A.; Johns, Michelle M.; Pingel, Emily; Eisenberg, Anna; Santana, Matt Leslie; Zimmerman, Marc

2011-01-01

317

Singing by male and female Kloss gibbons (Hylobates klossii) in the Peleonan Forest, Siberut Island, Indonesia.  

PubMed

Kloss gibbons (Hylobates klossii) are endemic to the Mentawai Islands in Indonesia and are one of only two gibbon species in which mated pairs do not sing duets. This is the first long-term study of the factors influencing the singing activity of Kloss gibbons within a northern Siberut Island population and follows two previous studies in central Siberut nearly 30 years ago. We collected data on the presence/absence of male and female singing within the study area on 198 days and within a focal group on 47 days. Rainfall during the time period in which they normally sing inhibits singing in both males and females. Our study supports the hypothesis that male and female songs function in intrasexual resource defence, as singing is associated with singing by same-sex neighbours, and same-sex choruses are more likely to occur after one or more days of silence (from that sex), suggesting there is pressure for individuals to communicate with same-sex neighbours regularly. Singing was not coordinated within a mated pair, suggesting that vocal coordination of the pair has been lost with the loss of the duet and that Kloss gibbon songs do not convey information to neighbours about the strength of the pair bond. On days when males sang predawn, females were more likely to sing after dawn and earlier in the morning. Additionally, the number of groups singing in female choruses was positively associated with the number of males that had sung in the predawn male chorus. We suggest that female songs have an intersexual territory defence as well as an intrasexual function. PMID:22941056

Dooley, Helen M; Judge, Debra S; Schmitt, Lincoln H

2013-01-01

318

Males Do Not Reduce the Fitness of Their Female Co-Twins in Contemporary Samples  

PubMed Central

Lummaa et al. (2007) presented historical data collected from twins born in Finland between 1734 and 1888 which suggested that females (N = 31) born as part of an opposite sex (OS) twin pair were 25% less likely to reproduce than female twins (N = 35) born as part of a same sex (SS) pair. They hypothesized that this reduction in fitness was due to masculinization of the female fetus via prenatal effects of the hormones of a male fetus. Because such masculinization would presumably take place in modern populations as well, it would seem important to establish to what degree it does so, and if so, whether reproduction is affected. We therefore address the question of reproduction differences in individual female twins from same-sex (N = 1979) and opposite-sex (N = 913) dizygotic pairs in studies carried out in Australia, the Netherlands, and the United States. In all three samples, there were no differences in the number of children or age of first pregnancies in women from same sex pairs compared to those from opposite sex pairs. Similarly, there were no differences in psychological femininity between women from pairs of the same or opposite sex.

Medland, Sarah E.; Loehlin, John C.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Hatemi, Peter K.; Keller, Mathew C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Eaves, Lindon J.; Martin, Nicholas G.

2014-01-01

319

Male contraception  

PubMed Central

Contraception is an accepted route for the control of population explosion in the world. Traditionally hormonal contraceptive methods have focused on women. Male contraception by means of hormonal and non hormonal methods is an attractive alternative. Hormonal methods of contraception using testosterone have shown good results. Non hormonal reversible methods of male contraception like reversible inhibition of sperm under guidanceare very promising. In this article we have reviewed the current available options for male contraception.

Mathew, Vivek; Bantwal, Ganapathi

2012-01-01

320

[Male contraception].  

PubMed

Contraception allows within a heterosexual couple to have a more fulfilling as possible sexuality while protecting against the occurrence of unintended pregnancy. In a majority of couples, contraception is assumed by women. Currently, male contraceptive methods most commonly used are the male condom and vasectomy. Many other strategies, including hormonal contraceptive regimens, have been proposed and evaluated. The purpose of this review is to present an overview of the various current and future male contraceptive methods. PMID:24412108

Robin, Geoffroy; Marcelli, François; Rigot, Jean-Marc

2014-02-01

321

Decreased prevalence of left-handedness among females with male co-twins: Evidence suggesting prenatal testosterone transfer in humans?  

PubMed Central

Summary Studies of singletons suggest that right-handed individuals may have higher levels of testosterone than do left-handed individuals. Prenatal testosterone levels are hypothesised to be especially related to handedness formation. In humans, female members from opposite-sex twin pairs may experience elevated level of prenatal exposure to testosterone in their intra-uterine environment shared with a male. We tested for differences in rates of left-handedness/right-handedness in female twins from same-sex and opposite-sex twin pairs. Our sample consisted of 4736 subjects, about 70% of all Finnish twins born in 1983–1987, with information on measured pregnancy and birth related factors. Circulating testosterone and estradiol levels at age 14 were available on 771 and 744 of these twins, respectively. We found significantly (p<.006) lower prevalence of left-handedness in females from opposite-sex pairs (5.3%) compared to females from same-sex pairs (8.6%). The circulating levels of neither testosterone nor estradiol related to handedness in either females or males. Nor were there differences in circulating testosterone or estradiol levels between females from opposite-sex and same-sex twin pairs. Birth and pregnancy related factors for which we had information were unrelated to handedness. Our results are difficult to fully explain by postnatal factors, but they offer support to theory that relates testosterone to formation of handedness, and in a population-based sample, are suggestive of effects of prenatal testosterone transfer.

Vuoksimaa, Eero; Peter Eriksson, C. J.; Pulkkinen, Lea; Rose, Richard J.; Kaprio, Jaakko

2010-01-01

322

Sexual selection by male-male competition in natterjack toad choruses  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major controversy of sexual selection theory is whether sexually dimorphic characters used in display by males have arisen through male-male competition, female choice, or both1-4. Here I describe the chorusing behaviour of male natterjack toads (Bufo calamita) and show that the pitch of the advertisement call is an important determinant of male mating success. Playback experiments using synthetic calls

Anthony Arak

1983-01-01

323

High-altitude hypoxia and echocardiographic indices of pulmonary hypertension in male and female chickens at adulthood.  

PubMed

Background:?By combining the chick embryo model with incubation at high altitude (HA), the effects of chronic hypoxia on fetal growth, fetal cardiac and aortic wall remodeling and systemic arterial blood pressure at adulthood were reported. Using non-invasive functional echocardiography, here we investigated the in vivo effects of HA hypoxia on the pulmonary circulation at adulthood in male and female chickens. Methods and Results:?Chick embryos were incubated, hatched and raised at sea level (SL) or at HA. At 6 months of age, functional echocardiography was performed and the body and heart weights were taken. Heart weight was heavier in males but not in female HA chickens compared to their same sex SL counterparts. Similarly, male but not female HA chickens had greater in vivo right ventricular wall thickness compared to their same sex SL counterparts. The tricuspid pressure gradient was greatly enhanced in HA male and HA female chickens. However, the increment in the tricuspid pressure gradient was greater in HA males than in HA females. The pulmonary artery diameter was also enhanced in HA males than in SL males. In contrast, HA did not affect this variable in female chickens. Conclusions:?The data show that chronic hypoxia during development at HA is associated with echocardiocraphic indices of pulmonary hypertension at adulthood in a highly sex-dependent manner.??(Circ J?2014; 78: 1459-1464). PMID:24739224

Salinas, Carlos E; Blanco, Carlos E; Villena, Mercedes; Giussani, Dino A

2014-05-23

324

Androgen Receptors, Sex Behaviour, and Aggression  

PubMed Central

Androgens are intricately involved in reproductive and aggressive behaviours, but the role of the androgen receptor in mediating these behaviours is less defined. Further, activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis can influence each other at the level of the androgen receptor. Knowledge of the mechanisms for androgens’ effects on behaviours through the androgen receptor will guide future studies in elucidating male reproductive and aggressive behaviour repertoires.

Cunningham, Rebecca L.; Lumia, Augustus R.; McGinnis, Marilyn Y.

2012-01-01

325

A comparison of personality characteristics of male and female engineering students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to investigate differences between personality characteristics of female and male freshmen, engineering students. A secondary purpose was to ascertain whether personality characteristics of freshmen, engineering students were different from those of general collegiate students of the same sex. The Millon Index of Personality Styles (MIPS) was administered to a sample of 72 female and 86 male freshmen, engineering students at a private midwestern engineering institution. The MIPS college normative sample of 1,600 college students was used as a comparison group. A total of 24 personality characteristics were assessed in the domains of motivation aims, cognitive modes, and interpersonal behaviors. Four hypotheses, which dealt with comparisons of the engineering samples, were tested by way of discriminant analyses. Two hypotheses, which compared the engineering samples to the collegiate samples of the same sex, were tested by way of t-tests. All six hypotheses yielded significant differences across various personality variables. It was concluded that engineering students of both sexes were more similar than different in personality characteristics. It was also concluded that there were greater personality differences between freshmen male engineering students and male college students than there are between freshmen female engineering students and female college students.

Williams, Erin Beth

326

Remote copulation: male adaptation to female cannibalism.  

PubMed

Sexual cannibalism by females and associated male behaviours may be driven by sexual conflict. One such male behaviour is the eunuch phenomenon in spiders, caused by total genital emasculation, which is a seemingly maladaptive behaviour. Here, we provide the first empirical testing of an adaptive hypothesis to explain this behaviour, the remote copulation, in a highly sexually cannibalistic orb-web spider Nephilengys malabarensis. We demonstrate that sperm transfer continues from the severed male organ into female genitals after the male has been detached from copula. Remote copulation increases the total amount of sperm transferred, and thus probably enhances paternity. We conclude that the mechanism may have evolved in response to sexual cannibalism and female-controlled short copulation duration. PMID:22298805

Li, Daiqin; Oh, Joelyn; Kralj-Fiser, Simona; Kuntner, Matjaz

2012-08-23

327

Sexual behaviour in sleep  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the study was to provide further information related to newly described parasomnia variant, Sexual Behaviour\\u000a in Sleep (SBS, sexsomnia). Previous studies dealt with selected population, typically middle-aged males, featuring extensive\\u000a medico-legal exposure. At the same time, an anecdotal evidence suggested higher involvement of younger population, and skew\\u000a towards balance between genders comparable to those seen in other

Nikola N. Trajanovic; Michael Mangan; Colin M. Shapiro

2007-01-01

328

Male Sterility  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The control of pollen fertility is central to the production of F1-hybrid seed in self-pollinating crops, and is potentially\\u000a applicable to the containment of transgenes deployed in crop plants. Pollen sterility can be achieved through cytoplasmic\\u000a male sterility (CMS) encoded by the plant mitochondrial genome, or through genic male sterility encoded by the nuclear genome.\\u000a Both routes have been exploited

C. D. Chase; A. Ribarits; E. Heberle-Bors

329

Alternative Mating Tactics and Extreme Male Dimorphism in Fig Wasps  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dimorphisms in morphology and behaviour of male fig wasps are among the most extreme in the animal kingdom, and offer excellent opportunities to test the predictions of certain sexual selection models. Winged males resemble their conspecific females closely, but wingless males are so divergent in form that they have repeatedly been classified into different taxa. Wingless males mate within

James M. Cook; Steven G. Compton; E. Allen Herre; Stuart A. West

1997-01-01

330

Mass community cycling events: Who participates and is their behaviour influenced by participation?  

PubMed Central

Background Participation in mass physical activity events may be a novel approach for encouraging inactive or low active adults to trial an active behaviour. The public health applicability of this strategy has not been investigated thoroughly. The purpose of this study to was describe participants in a mass cycling event and examine the subsequent effect on cycling behaviour. Methods A sample of men and women aged 16 years and older (n = 918) who registered online for a mass cycling event reported cycling ability and number of times they rode a bicycle during the month before the event. One month after the event participants completed an online follow-up questionnaire and reported cycling ability, lifestyle physical activity, and number of times they rode a bicycle during the month after the event. McNemar's test was used to examine changes in self-rated cycling ability, and repeated measures mixed linear modeling was used to determine whether average number of monthly bicycle rides changed between pre-event and post-event assessment. Results Participants in the cycling event were predominantly male (72%), 83% rated themselves as competent or regular cyclists, and 68% rated themselves as more active than others of the same sex and age. Half of the survey respondents that rated their cycling ability as low before the event subsequently rated themselves as high one month after the event. Respondents with low pre-event self-rated cycling ability reported an average 4 sessions of bicycle riding the month before the event and an average 6.8 sessions of bicycle riding a month after the event. This increase in average sessions of bicycle riding was significant (p < .0001). Similarly, first-time participants in this particular cycling event significantly increased average sessions of cycling from 7.2 pre-event to 8.9 sessions one month after the event. Conclusion Participants who were novice riders or first time participants significantly increased their number of bicycle rides in the month after the event. Further knowledge about the public health applicability of mass events is needed, and methods for attracting less active and novice individuals to participate remain to be developed.

Bowles, Heather R; Rissel, Chris; Bauman, Adrian

2006-01-01

331

Mouse females devoid of exposure to males during fetal development exhibit increased maternal behavior  

PubMed Central

Many sex differences can be found in the expression of aggression and parental nurturing behaviors. It is important to determine if these are modulated by prenatal conditions. Here, using assisted reproduction technologies, we generated females that were (mixed-sex) or were not (same-sex) exposed to males during fetal development, raised them by cross fostering among fosters’ own female only pups to control for effects of postnatal environment, and compared their reproductive abilities and behavior. There were no differences between females from the two prenatal conditions in estrus cycle length and length of time spent at individual estrus cycle stages. Both types of females had similar ovulation efficiency and bred equally well yielding comparable litter size and progeny sex ratio. Females from the two prenatal conditions were also indistinguishable in social behavior and exhibited normal social responses towards unfamiliar females in the three-chamber social approach and social proximity tests. When urine was collected from both types of females and used as a point source in a scent-marking paradigm, exposed males showed a similar distribution and extent of urinary scent marking to urine from each type of female but tended to engage in higher durations of sniffing the urine from same-sex females. When females were tested in a resident-intruder paradigm three days after giving birth, same-sex females exhibited enhancement of pup grooming and an overall decrease of non-pup activity prior to male intruder introduction, and after introduction were more defensive as evidenced by higher rates of burying, open-mouth threat/lunges, and attacks towards the male, and decreased latencies to display these defensive behaviors. Our results suggest that females devoid of male exposure during fetal development have reproductive abilities similar to those of females from mixed-sex pregnancies, and have normal social interactions with other females. However, they exhibit hyper-maternal behavior both in terms of the care and defense of pups in front of a male intruder, and potentially produce a pheromonal milieu that renders them more attractive to males during olfactory investigations.

Sugawara, Atsushi; Pearson, Brandon L.; Blanchard, D. Caroline; Ward, Monika A.

2011-01-01

332

Male Osteoporosis  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Osteoporosis is now recognized as a major threat to health in aging men. Morbidity and mortality, particularly following hip fracture, are substantial. Whereas trabecular bone loss starts in early adulthood, loss of cortical bone only appears to occur from mid-life onwards. Declining bioavailable estradiol levels play an integral role in male age-associated bone loss. Both pharmacologic and supportive care interventions are important for optimal care in men at increased fracture risk.

Drake, Matthew T.; Khosla, Sundeep

2013-01-01

333

A masculinizing effect on the auditory systems of human females having male co-twins.  

PubMed Central

Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) are continuous, essentially tonal sounds that are produced by many normal-hearing cochleas. In humans, females generally exhibit more SOAEs than males, a sex difference that exists from birth. However, it is shown here that females having male co-twins [opposite-sex dizygotic (OSDZ) females] exhibit about half the average number of SOAEs per ear observed in same-sex female twins or female non-twins. Indeed, the average in OSDZ females is about the same as that seen in males--twins or non-twins. The explanation offered here is that prenatal exposure to high levels of androgens has produced a masculinizing effect on the auditory systems of these OSDZ females. Prenatal masculinizing effects have long been recognized in certain litter-bearing mammals, but their existence in humans is not well-studied.

McFadden, D

1993-01-01

334

Increased egg estradiol concentration feminizes digit ratios of male pheasants (Phasianus colchicus)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The length ratio between individual digits differs between males and females in humans, other mammals, lizards, and one bird species. Sexual dimorphism in digit ratios and variation among individuals of the same sex may depend on differential exposure to androgens and estrogens during embryonic life. Organizational effects of sex hormones could cause the observed correlations between digit ratios and diverse phenotypic traits in humans. However, no study has investigated experimentally the effect of prenatal estrogens on digit ratios. We analyzed the effect of estradiol injection in ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) eggs on digit ratios. Males from control eggs had higher ratios between the second or third and the fourth digit of the right foot compared to females. Estradiol-treated eggs produced males with lower (feminized) right foot second to fourth digit ratio. Thus, we provided the first experimental evidence that prenatal exposure to physiologically high estrogen levels affects bird digit ratios.

Saino, N.; Rubolini, D.; Romano, M.; Boncoraglio, G.

2007-03-01

335

Adolescent male health  

PubMed Central

Although adolescent males have as many health issues and concerns as adolescent females, they are much less likely to be seen in a clinical setting. This is related to both individual factors and the health care system itself, which is not always encouraging and set up to provide comprehensive male health care. Working with adolescent boys involves gaining the knowledge and skills to address concerns such as puberty and sexuality, substance use, violence, risk-taking behaviours and mental health issues. The ability to engage the young male patient is critical, and the professional must be comfortable in initiating conversation about a wide array of topics with the teen boy, who may be reluctant to discuss his concerns. It is important to take every opportunity with adolescent boys to talk about issues beyond the presenting complain, and let them know about confidential care. The physician can educate teens about the importance of regular checkups, and that they are welcome to contact the physician if they are experiencing any concerns about their health or well-being. Parents of preadolescent and adolescent boys should be educated on the value of regular health maintenance visits for their sons beginning in their early teen years.

Westwood, Michael; Pinzon, Jorge

2008-01-01

336

Galanin neurons in the medial preoptic area govern parental behaviour.  

PubMed

Mice display robust, stereotyped behaviours towards pups: virgin males typically attack pups, whereas virgin females and sexually experienced males and females display parental care. Here we show that virgin males genetically impaired in vomeronasal sensing do not attack pups and are parental. Furthermore, we uncover a subset of galanin-expressing neurons in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) that are specifically activated during male and female parenting, and a different subpopulation that is activated during mating. Genetic ablation of MPOA galanin neurons results in marked impairment of parental responses in males and females and affects male mating. Optogenetic activation of these neurons in virgin males suppresses inter-male and pup-directed aggression and induces pup grooming. Thus, MPOA galanin neurons emerge as an essential regulatory node of male and female parenting behaviour and other social responses. These results provide an entry point to a circuit-level dissection of parental behaviour and its modulation by social experience. PMID:24828191

Wu, Zheng; Autry, Anita E; Bergan, Joseph F; Watabe-Uchida, Mitsuko; Dulac, Catherine G

2014-05-15

337

[Male contraception].  

PubMed

Various methods of contraception in men are reviewed. One of the methods of contraception is the use of hormonal agents (estrogens, androgens, antiandrogens, progestins, or their combinations), which block spermatogenesis. More advantageous is the use of nonhormonal agents (alpha-chlorhydrine, 6-chloro-6-deoxyglucose, salsosulfapyridine), which act on the process of sperm maturation in the epididymis. Plant extracts show marked contraceptive activity in men. The preparation gossypol isolated from cotton seeds and roots was found to inhibit male fertility. Various isomers of gossypol decreased sperm mobility by inhibiting the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Major side-effect of gossypol was hepatotoxicity. Glycosides isolated from the herb Tripterigium Wilfordii (TW) were found to have the antifertility activity. The antifertility effect of TW glycosides was dose- dependent: large doses were shown to inhibit spermatogenesis, while small doses were found to decrease sperm motility and viability. TW glycosides were free of toxic side-effects. Another approach to regulation of male fertility is the use of surgical methods of contraception including vasectomy. Development of less invasive and reversible surgical methods showed effectiveness of subcutaneous occlusion of vas deferens with various chemical substances (calcium chloride, p-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate). The best results were achieved with high molecular weight medical polyurethane. PMID:2042728

Khomasuridze, A G; Marshaniia, Z S

1991-01-01

338

Male hypogonadism.  

PubMed

Male hypogonadism is a clinical syndrome that results from failure to produce physiological concentrations of testosterone, normal amounts of sperm, or both. Hypogonadism may arise from testicular disease (primary hypogonadism) or dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary unit (secondary hypogonadism). Clinical presentations vary dependent on the time of onset of androgen deficiency, whether the defect is in testosterone production or spermatogenesis, associated genetic factors, or history of androgen therapy. The clinical diagnosis of hypogonadism is made on the basis of signs and symptoms consistent with androgen deficiency and low morning testosterone concentrations in serum on multiple occasions. Several testosterone-replacement therapies are approved for treatment and should be selected according to the patient's preference, cost, availability, and formulation-specific properties. Contraindications to testosterone-replacement therapy include prostate and breast cancers, uncontrolled congestive heart failure, severe lower-urinary-tract symptoms, and erythrocytosis. Treatment should be monitored for benefits and adverse effects. PMID:24119423

Basaria, Shehzad

2014-04-01

339

Male courtship repeatability and potential indirect genetic benefits in a wolf spider  

Microsoft Academic Search

Indirect benefits derived by females that mate with males that express preferred traits are important to our understanding of 'good genes' models of sexual selection. However, few studies have explored male courtship behaviours with potential indirect benefits conferred to females in order to ascertain whether these behaviours serve as honest indicators of male quality. Using a common species of wolf

Chad D. Hoefler; Allison L. Carlascio; Matthew H. Persons; Ann L. Rypstra

2009-01-01

340

Ferocious fighting between male grasshoppers.  

PubMed

Contests among individuals over mating opportunities are common across diverse taxa, yet physical conflict is relatively rare. Due to the potentially fatal consequences of physical fighting, most animals employ mechanisms of conflict resolution involving signalling and ritualistic assessment. Here we provide the first evidence of ubiquitous escalated fighting in grasshoppers. The chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis) is an Australian alpine specialist, in which males engage in highly aggressive combat over ovipositing females. We describe discrete agonistic behaviours including mandible flaring, mounting, grappling, kicking and biting, and their use depending on the individual's role as challenger or defender. We show that male role predicts damage, with challengers being more heavily damaged than males defending females (defenders). Challengers also possess wider mandibles than defenders, but are similar in other metrics of body size. Our data suggest that fights escalate between males matched in body size and that mandibles are used as weapons in this species. This system represents an exciting opportunity for future research into the evolution of costly fighting behaviour in an otherwise placid group. PMID:23166725

Umbers, Kate D L; Tatarnic, Nikolai J; Holwell, Gregory I; Herberstein, Marie E

2012-01-01

341

Ferocious Fighting between Male Grasshoppers  

PubMed Central

Contests among individuals over mating opportunities are common across diverse taxa, yet physical conflict is relatively rare. Due to the potentially fatal consequences of physical fighting, most animals employ mechanisms of conflict resolution involving signalling and ritualistic assessment. Here we provide the first evidence of ubiquitous escalated fighting in grasshoppers. The chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis) is an Australian alpine specialist, in which males engage in highly aggressive combat over ovipositing females. We describe discrete agonistic behaviours including mandible flaring, mounting, grappling, kicking and biting, and their use depending on the individual’s role as challenger or defender. We show that male role predicts damage, with challengers being more heavily damaged than males defending females (defenders). Challengers also possess wider mandibles than defenders, but are similar in other metrics of body size. Our data suggest that fights escalate between males matched in body size and that mandibles are used as weapons in this species. This system represents an exciting opportunity for future research into the evolution of costly fighting behaviour in an otherwise placid group.

Umbers, Kate D. L.; Tatarnic, Nikolai J.; Holwell, Gregory I.; Herberstein, Marie E.

2012-01-01

342

Exploring the Relationship between Physical Education and Enhancing Behaviour in Pupils with Emotional Behavioural Difficulties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article contributes to an evidence base suggesting that PE offers particular advantages for promoting improved behaviour. The research design involved using statistical approaches to investigate the behaviour of 4 male pupils, aged 15 year old, all of whom were statemented for EBD in mainstream classes. Assessments were made of both Pre- and…

Medcalf, Richard; Marshall, Joe; Rhoden, Clare

2006-01-01

343

Activity Predicts Male Reproductive Success in a Polygynous Lizard  

PubMed Central

Activity patterns and social interactions play a key role in determining reproductive success, although this is poorly understood for species that lack overt social behaviour. We used genetic paternity analysis to quantify both multiple paternity and the relative roles of activity and social behaviour in determining reproductive success in a nondescript Australian lizard. During the breeding season we intensively followed and recorded the behaviour of a group of seven males and 13 females in a naturalistic outdoor enclosure to examine the relative roles of body size, activity and social interactions in determining male fertilization success. We found multiple paternity in 42% of clutches. No single behaviour was a significant predictor of male fertilization success in isolation, but male-female association, interactions and courtship explained 41% of the variation in male fertilization success. Males with the highest number of offspring sired invested heavily in interacting with females but spent very little time in interactions with males. These same males also sired offspring from more clutches. When taken collectively, an index of overall male activity, including locomotion and all social interactions, significantly explained 81% of the variation in the total number of offspring sired and 90% of the variation in the number of clutches in which males sired offspring. We suggest that the most successful male strategy is a form of endurance rivalry in which active mate searching and interactions with females have the greatest fitness benefits.

Keogh, J. Scott; Noble, Daniel W. A.; Wilson, Eleanor E.; Whiting, Martin J.

2012-01-01

344

8-OH-DPAT specifically enhances feeding behaviour in mice: evidence from behavioural competition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The behavioural specificity of the hyperphagic effects of 8-OH-DPAT is a controversial issue. The present study addressed this question through the introduction of behavioural competition. Feeding behaviour in male mice was assessed under both basal (free-feeding) and social conflict conditions. Since, in the latter condition, defence and escape are prepotent responses, elicitation of feeding would be indicative of a specific

J. K. Shepherd; R. J. Rodgers

1990-01-01

345

[Comparison of behaviour concerning smoking tobacco among male and female students who begin their studies in 2007/2008 and 2008/2009 academic years at the Health Science Department].  

PubMed

Despite the many years of systematic antinicotine action worldwide and In Poland, the percentage of people inhaling tobacco smoke in our country is still high. This fact is reflected in the number of people who begin their university career. The cause of a particular anxiety is great popularity of smoking among the students of medical universities and departments. The aim of this work is to present the direction of changes that take place in the behavior concerning smoking tobacco among those starting their education at the Health Science Department. The subject of the analysis is the results of research concerning frequency of smoking among male and female students of the first years of all the chairs of the Health Science Department at the Medical University of ?ód?. In order to collect the empirical material, an auditory survey was used. In the tests carried out in 2007/2008, 479 men and women took part (93.5% of all the students), and in 2008/2009 473 people (93.1% of all the students). In 2007/2008, 34.2% of respondents admitted to smoking (164 people) and the following year 39.7% (188 people). In 2008/2009, among female students of the first years, 27.4% (86 people) of them smoked and among male students 47.3% (78 people). In 2007/2008, 34.2% (164 people) admitted to smoking and the following year 39.7% (188 people). In 2007/2008, among the female students of the first years, 27.4% (86 people) of them smoked and among the male students 47.3% (78 people). In 2008/2009, the ratio of smoking women was 37.1% (104 people) and men 43.5% (84 people). Participation of people inhaling tobacco smoke among those studying at the first year of Health Science Department at the Medical University of ?ód? in 2008/2009 was higher in comparison with the year before. Worryingly grew the number of smoking females, whereas the number of smoking males lowered. PMID:21360936

Kowalska, Alina; Stelmach, W?odzimierz; Kaleta, Dorota; Krakowiak, Jan; Rzeznicki, Adam

2010-01-01

346

Male Pattern Alopecia  

MedlinePLUS

newsletter | contact Share | Hair Loss, Male Pattern Baldness (Male Pattern Alopecia) Information for adults A A A This man has worsening male-pattern hair loss resulting from the medication Tenormin. Overview Male pattern ...

347

Marriage and the Civilizing of Male Sexual Nature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comments on the article by G. M. Herek, "Legal recognition of same-sex relationships in the United States." There are many arguable contentions Herek made in his defense of same-sex marriage. We have chosen to focus on only one in this commentary: What is the active ingredient in marriage that serves the socially advantageous goal of civilizing…

Rosik, Christopher H.; Byrd, A. Dean

2007-01-01

348

The pedestrian behaviour of Spanish adolescents.  

PubMed

Adolescent pedestrians are a particularly vulnerable group of road users. This research tested the applicability of the recently developed Adolescent Road user Behaviour Questionnaire (ARBQ) amongst a sample of 2006 Spanish adolescents. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the full scale found that the original three factors did not adequately fit the data, but an acceptable fit was obtained for the shortened 21-item version of the scale. In line with research from the UK, the present study found that males reported more unsafe road crossing behaviour and playing on the roads, but there was no gender difference for engaging in planned protective behaviour. This research also confirmed that unsafe road crossing behaviour increased with age, while dangerous playing on the road and planned protective behaviours both decreased with age. The present study also confirmed that the ARBQ is a useful tool for investigating the safety-related behaviour of adolescents on the road. PMID:20542553

Sullman, M J M; Gras, M E; Font-Mayolas, S; Masferrer, L; Cunill, M; Planes, M

2011-06-01

349

Being male or living with a female: fear for partners by sex and sexual orientation.  

PubMed

While substantial research attention has been paid to the disproportionately high levels of fear of crime among women relative to men, less attention has been paid to the apparent mirror of this: that men have disproportionately more concern for female partners than women do for male partners. The work that does exist on fear for partners has focused exclusively on different-sex partnerships. The present article proposes and explores several explanations for sex differences in fear for partners among different-sex as well as same-sex partnerships. The analysis uses a sample of persons who live with a partner (155 in same-sex and 2,817 in different-sex partnerships) from a Seattle survey that includes measures of altruistic fear, as well as measures of personal, familial, sexual assault, and sexual identity bias victimizations. Results suggest that female partners inspire more fear regardless of the sex of the respondents, that sex differences persist even after perceptions of danger are accounted for, and that personal fears and fears for children are positively associated with fears for partners and do not explain sex differences in such fears. These results are more consistent with explanations rooted in gendered perceptions of vulnerability and the shadow of sexual assault than explanations rooted in the differential gender socialization of men as protectors or of a limited capacity for fear. PMID:23277470

Drakulich, Kevin M; Rose, Kristin

2013-06-01

350

Bachelor and paired male rufous-and-white wrens use different singing strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

To attract a breeding partner, males may behave differently when they are bachelors compared to when they are paired. Comparisons\\u000a between groups of paired males versus groups of unpaired males in temperate-breeding animals have revealed such differences\\u000a in signalling behaviour. Few studies, however, have explored how individual males alter their signalling behaviour with changes\\u000a in pairing status, and very few

Holly L. Hennin; Nicole K. S. Barker; David W. Bradley; Daniel J. Mennill

2009-01-01

351

Chemosensory cues allow male Tenebrio molitor beetles to assess the reproductive status of potential mates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Males of many insect species, including beetles, choose their mates according to their reproductive status. However, the ways in which male beetles evaluate female reproductive status have received little attention. We tested the existence of male mate choice in the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, by observing mating and courtship behaviour of males given simultaneous access to pairs of females differing

P. Carazo; E. Sanchez; E. Desfilis

2004-01-01

352

The males of Melipona and other stingless bees, and their mothers1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Female behaviour in social Hymenoptera and the queen-worker conflict with respect to male production have been the focus of many studies. Although male production is an investment that is in conflict with investment in colony size, males play a vital role in colony reproduction. This paper reviews the production patterns of male stingless bees, their activities once they have reached

Hayo H. W. VELTHUIS; Vera L. IMPERATRIZ-FONSECA

353

Heterogeneity in the inheritance of alcoholism. A study of male and female twins.  

PubMed

Genetic influence on risk for alcoholism was examined in a US treatment sample of 50 monozygotic (MZ) and 64 dizygotic (DZ) male and 31 MZ and 24 DZ female same-sex twin pairs. For the DSM-III composite diagnosis of Alcohol Abuse and/or Dependence, statistically significant MZ/DZ differences in concordance were found with male, but not female, twins. For specific diagnoses, MZ/DZ differences were found in male subjects for both Alcohol Abuse and Alcohol Dependence, while MZ/DZ differences in female subjects were found only for Alcohol Dependence. The male MZ/DZ concordance difference for composite diagnosis but not for Alcohol Dependence could be accounted for statistically by differences in age of onset between MZ and DZ probands. As with alcohol, differences in MZ/DZ concordance were found for DSM-III composite diagnoses of Other Substance Abuse and/or Dependence with male, but not female, twins. Using Epidemiological Catchment Area data to estimate the population base rates of both alcohol and other substance use disorders allowed for heritability analyses that showed genetic factors to have only a modest influence on overall risk in both sexes (heritability estimates of approximately 0.35 for male subjects and 0.24 for female subjects). However, evidence for heterogeneity in the pattern of inheritance was also found, suggesting forms of alcoholism that may be moderately to highly heritable. PMID:1984758

Pickens, R W; Svikis, D S; McGue, M; Lykken, D T; Heston, L L; Clayton, P J

1991-01-01

354

Genital sores - male  

MedlinePLUS

Sores - male genitals; Ulcers - male genitals ... A common cause of male genital sores are infections that are spread through sexual contact, such as: Genital herpes (small, painful blisters filled with clear or straw-colored fluid) ...

355

Antiepileptic therapy and behaviour disturbances in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to evaluate the effects on behaviour of some anti-epileptic drugs, we studied 300 children treated with phenobarbital and other drugs; their age ranged from 3.1 months to 15.9 years. The children were divided into two groups; group, A: 197 (116 male and 81 female) children, mean age±SD 5.3±2.8 years, treated with phenobarbital; group B: 103 (66 male and

S. Domizio; A. Verrotti; L. A. Ramenghi; G. Sabatino; G. Morgese

1993-01-01

356

Male satin bowerbird problem-solving ability predicts mating success  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mate choice and mate attraction are important behaviours influencing the evolution of elaborate traits. It is possible that male general cognitive performance plays an important role in sexual attractiveness, but there has been no direct test of this hypothesis. Satin bowerbirds,Ptilonorhynchus violaceus, are an excellent species for testing this hypothesis because their complex male courtship, including use of decorations of

Jason Keagy; Jean-François Savard; Gerald Borgia

2009-01-01

357

Degree of male ornamentation affects female preference for conspecific versus heterospecific males.  

PubMed Central

Several studies have shown female preference for conspecific males with the attached artificial ornaments of more elaborate heterospecifics. However, preference for heterospecifics under natural conditions is relatively rare. We tested what factors affect behavioural mechanisms of species isolation using three species of estrildid finch (genus Uraeginthus) that occur in both sympatry and allopatry. These finches differ in degree of sexual dimorphism; male ornamentation; behavioural and morphological similarity; and phylogenetic distance. Paired mate-choice trials were used in which females were presented with a conspecific and heterospecific male to test which of the above between-species differences best predicted the degree of premating isolation. The three species differed in the degree of species-specific mate preference shown. Females from the brighter two species discriminated against dull males, independently of sympatry-allopatry, similarity and phylogenetic distance. Females from the dull species reacted to conspecific males and brighter heterospecific males equally strongly, independently of similarity and phylogenetic distance. In contrast to previous studies, an equal preference for heterospecific and conspecific males was found under natural conditions. It is suggested that differences between closely related species in male ornamentation affect the likelihood that premating isolation will occur due to the fact that sexual selection tends to drive preferences for exaggerated ornamentation.

Collins, Sarah A; Luddem, S T

2002-01-01

358

Factors influencing sexual initiation, multiple partners and condom use among male slum youth in Pune, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the factors that influence sexual behaviours among young unmarried males living in urban slums in India, a population characterised by high vulnerability to STI and HIV infections. Data were collected from 600 unmarried male slum youth to examine the relationships between three outcomes of heterosexual behaviour (age at sexual initiation, number of sexual partners and condom use

Rukmini Potdar; Kristin Mmari

2010-01-01

359

Factors influencing sexual initiation, multiple partners and condom use among male slum youth in Pune, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the factors that influence sexual behaviours among young unmarried males living in urban slums in India, a population characterised by high vulnerability to STI and HIV infections. Data were collected from 600 unmarried male slum youth to examine the relationships between three outcomes of heterosexual behaviour (age at sexual initiation, number of sexual partners and condom use

Rukmini Potdar; Kristin Mmari

2011-01-01

360

Sharing of Potential Nest Sites by Etheostoma olmstedi Males Suggests Mutual Tolerance in an Alloparental Species  

PubMed Central

When reproductive competitors tolerate or cooperate with one another, they may gain particular benefits, such as collectively guarding resources or attracting mates. Shared resources may be those essential to reproduction, such as a breeding site or nest. Using the tessellated darter, a species where males but not females compete over potential nest sites, we examined site use and sharing under controlled conditions of differing competitor density. Sharing was observed even when competitor density was low and individuals could have each occupied a potential nest site without same-sex sharing. Males were more likely to share a nest site with one other when the difference in size between them was larger rather than smaller. There was no evidence that female sharing was dependent on their relative size. Fish were generally more likely to use and share larger sites, in accordance with the greater relative surface area they offered. We discuss how one or both sharing males may potentially benefit, and how male sharing of potential nest sites could relate to female mating preferences. Tessellated darter males are known to provide alloparental care for eggs but this occurs without any social contact between the alloparent and the genetic father of the young. Thus, the suggestion that they may also share sites and maintain social contact with reproductive competitors highlights the importance of increased focus on the potential complexity of reproductive systems.

Stiver, Kelly A.; Wolff, Stephen H.; Alonzo, Suzanne H.

2013-01-01

361

Sharing of potential nest sites by Etheostoma olmstedi males suggests mutual tolerance in an alloparental species.  

PubMed

When reproductive competitors tolerate or cooperate with one another, they may gain particular benefits, such as collectively guarding resources or attracting mates. Shared resources may be those essential to reproduction, such as a breeding site or nest. Using the tessellated darter, a species where males but not females compete over potential nest sites, we examined site use and sharing under controlled conditions of differing competitor density. Sharing was observed even when competitor density was low and individuals could have each occupied a potential nest site without same-sex sharing. Males were more likely to share a nest site with one other when the difference in size between them was larger rather than smaller. There was no evidence that female sharing was dependent on their relative size. Fish were generally more likely to use and share larger sites, in accordance with the greater relative surface area they offered. We discuss how one or both sharing males may potentially benefit, and how male sharing of potential nest sites could relate to female mating preferences. Tessellated darter males are known to provide alloparental care for eggs but this occurs without any social contact between the alloparent and the genetic father of the young. Thus, the suggestion that they may also share sites and maintain social contact with reproductive competitors highlights the importance of increased focus on the potential complexity of reproductive systems. PMID:23468853

Stiver, Kelly A; Wolff, Stephen H; Alonzo, Suzanne H

2013-01-01

362

Consistent condom use with regular, paying, and casual male partners and associated factors among men who have sex with men in Tamil Nadu, India: findings from an assessment of a large-scale HIV prevention program  

PubMed Central

Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) are a marginalized population at high risk for HIV infection. Promoting consistent condom use (CCU) during anal sex is a key risk reduction strategy for HIV prevention among MSM. To inform effective HIV prevention interventions, we examined the factors associated with CCU among MSM with their regular, paying, and casual partners, as well as with all three types of partners combined. Methods Data for this analysis were from a large-scale bio-behavioural survey conducted during 2009–2010 in Tamil Nadu, India. MSM aged 18 years or older were recruited for the survey using time-location cluster sampling at cruising sites in four districts of Tamil Nadu. Binary logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association of CCU with selected socio-demographic characteristics and other contextual factors. Results Among 1618 MSM interviewed, CCU during anal sex with regular, paying, and a casual male partner was 45.3%, 50.8% and 57.9%, respectively. CCU with all three types of partners combined was 52.6%. Characteristics associated with increased odds for CCU with MSM having all three types of partners combined were frequent receptive anal sex acts with regular partners (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-4.65), fewer number of casual partners (AOR 3.41, 95% CI 1.50-7.73) and membership in a community-based organization (CBO) for MSM (AOR 3.54, 95% CI 1.62-7.74). CCU with regular partners was associated with membership in a CBO (AOR 1.96, 95% CI 1.23-3.11), whereas CCU with paying, and casual male partners was associated with perceived higher risk of acquiring HIV (AOR 1.92, 95% CI 1.22-3.01) and exposure to any HIV prevention intervention (AOR 3.62, 95% CI 1.31-10.0), respectively. Being aged 26 years or older, being in debt, and alcohol use were factors associated with inconsistent condom use across partner types. Conclusion HIV interventions among MSM need to promote CCU with all types (regular, paying, and causal) of male partners, and need to reach MSM across all age groups. In addition to enhancing interventions that focus on individual level risk reduction, it is important to undertake structural interventions that promote social acceptance of same-sex sexuality and address contextual barriers to condom use such as alcohol use.

2013-01-01

363

Sexual Selection of Human Cooperative Behaviour: An Experimental Study in Rural Senegal  

PubMed Central

Human cooperation in large groups and between non-kin individuals remains a Darwinian puzzle. Investigations into whether and how sexual selection is involved in the evolution of cooperation represent a new and important research direction. Here, 69 groups of four men or four women recruited from a rural population in Senegal played a sequential public-good game in the presence of out-group observers, either of the same sex or of the opposite sex. At the end of the game, participants could donate part of their gain to the village school in the presence of the same observers. Both contributions to the public good and donations to the school, which reflect different components of cooperativeness, were influenced by the sex of the observers. The results suggest that in this non-Western population, sexual selection acts mainly on men’s cooperative behaviour with non-kin, whereas women’s cooperativeness is mainly influenced by nonsexual social selection.

Tognetti, Arnaud; Berticat, Claire; Raymond, Michel; Faurie, Charlotte

2012-01-01

364

Male breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male breast cancer (MaleBC) is a rare disease, accounting for <1% of all male tumors. During the last few years, there has been an increase in the incidence of this disease, along with the increase in female breast cancer (FBC). Little is known about the etiology of MaleBC: hormonal, environmental and genetic factors have been reported to be involved in

Laura Ottini; Domenico Palli; Sergio Rizzo; Mario Federico; Viviana Bazan; Antonio Russo

2010-01-01

365

Ecological and social influences on the hunting behaviour of wild chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been considerable discussion of the factors that influence the hunting behaviour of male chimpanzees. Explanations invoking social benefits hinge upon the potential for males to share meat with sexually receptive females in exchange for mating ('meat for sex'), or to share meat with other males in exchange for social support ('male social bonding'). Ecological factors may also affect

Ian C. Gilby; Lynn E. Eberly; Lilian Pintea; Anne E. Pusey

2006-01-01

366

Stigma, social inequality, and HIV risk disclosure among Dominican male sex workers?  

PubMed Central

Some quantitative behavioral studies in the USA have concluded that bisexually behaving Latino men are less likely than White men to disclose to their female partners that they have engaged in same-sex risk behavior and/or are HIV-positive, presumably exposing female partners to elevated risk for HIV infection. Nevertheless, very little theoretical or empirical research has been conducted to understand the social factors that promote or inhibit sexual risk disclosure among Latino men who have sex with men (MSM), and much of the existing literature has neglected to contextualize disclosure patterns within broader experiences of stigma and social inequality. This paper examines decisions about disclosure of sex work, same-sex behavior, and sexual risk for HIV among male sex workers in two cities in the Dominican Republic. Data derive from long-term ethnography and qualitative in-depth interviews with 72 male sex workers were used to analyze the relationships among experiences of stigma, social inequality, and patterns of sexual risk disclosure. Thematic analysis of interviews and ethnographic evidence revealed a wide range of stigma management techniques utilized by sex workers to minimize the effects of marginality due to their engagement in homosexuality and sex work. These techniques imposed severe constraints on men’s sexual risk disclosure, and potentially elevated their own and their female partners’ vulnerability to HIV infection. Based on the study’s findings, we conclude that future studies of sexual risk disclosure among ethnic minority MSM should avoid analyzing disclosure as a decontextualized variable, and should seek to examine sexual risk communication as a dynamic social process constrained by hierarchical systems of power and inequality.

Padilla, Mark; Castellanos, Daniel; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Reyes, Armando Matiz; Sanchez Marte, Leonardo E.; Soriano, Martha Arredondo

2010-01-01

367

Temperament and sexual experience affect female sexual behaviour in sheep  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our aim was to study the effect of temperament and sexual experience on female sexual behaviour. We used ewes from a flock that had been genetically selected for ‘calm’ or ‘nervous’ temperament, in which oestrus was synchronized by a 14-day treatment with intravaginal progesterone sponge. Using standardized behavioural tests to measure the proceptivity (initiative in establishing interaction with the male

H. Gelez; D. R. Lindsay; D. Blache; G. B. Martin; C. Fabre-Nys

2003-01-01

368

Odour-source localization system mimicking behaviour of silkworm moth  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new method for localizing odour sources by mimicking the behaviour of silkworm moths is proposed. A male silkworm moth is able to localize its female counterpart by tracking airborne sexual pheromone. Through the observation of this behaviour, we have confirmed that wing vibrations are effective in enhancing the directivity of the odour stimulus. An artificial system with this mechanism

H. Ishida; K. Hayashi; M. Takakusaki; T. Nakamoto; T. Moriizumi; R. Kanzaki

1995-01-01

369

The structure of adolescents' online game behaviours  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to the rapid popularization of the Internet in China, the amount of online game adolescents is increasing quickly. By employing the questionnaire data of adolescent netizens in Zhejiang, Hunan, and Gansu, the present author measures the structure of adolescents' online game behaviours. This research discovers many Chinese adolescent netizens participate in online games, the participation proportion of male adolescent

Shaohua Huang

2009-01-01

370

Sexual behaviours on acute inpatient psychiatric units.  

PubMed

The purpose of the study was to assess the types and frequency of sexual behaviours displayed by patients during the first 2 weeks of admission to acute psychiatric units and what relationship these have to other challenging patient behaviours. The method used was a survey of sexual behaviours, conflict and containment events carried out by 522 patients during the first 2 weeks of admission in 84 wards in 31 hospitals in the South East of England. Incidents of sexual behaviour were common, with 13% of patients responsible for at least one incident. Although exposure was the most frequent of these behaviours, non-consensual sexual touching, was instigated by 1 in 20 patients. There were no differences in the numbers of sexual events between single sex and mixed gender wards. Few associations were found with the demographic features of perpetrators, although all those engaging in public masturbation were male, and male patients were more likely to sexually touch another without their consent. Single sex wards do not seem to necessarily offer significant protection to potentially vulnerable victims. Perpetrators do not seem to be predictable in advance, nor was there any common set or pattern of disruptive behavioural events indicating that a sexual incident was about to occur. PMID:23627653

Bowers, L; Ross, J; Cutting, P; Stewart, D

2014-04-01

371

Maternal reporting of behaviour following very severe blunt head injury.  

PubMed Central

Mothers of 40 very severely head injured male subjects rated their son's behaviour on the Current Behaviour Scale and their ratings were compared with mothers' ratings of 40 control male subjects. The scale was able to discriminate the two groups, by utilising two factors--loss of emotional control and loss of motivation. The mothers' level of emotional distress was closely related to their reporting of loss of emotional control in their sons, but reporting of loss of motivation, or lowered arousal, was strongly predicted by the functional disability of the son. The utility of refining the measurement of post-trauma behaviour is discussed.

Kinsella, G; Packer, S; Olver, J

1991-01-01

372

Psychological and behavioural factors associated with sexual risk behaviour among Slovak students  

PubMed Central

Background Knowledge about the prevalence of sexual risk behaviour (SRB) in adolescence is needed to prevent unwanted health consequences. Studies on SRB among adolescents in Central Europe are rare and mostly rely on a single indicator for SRB. This study aims to assess the association of behavioural and psychological factors with three types of SRB in adolescents in Central Europe. Methods We obtained data on behavioural factors (having been drunk during previous month, smoking during previous week, early sexual initiation), psychological factors (self-esteem, well-being, extroversion, neuroticism, religiousness), and SRB (intercourse under risky conditions, multiple sexual partners, and inconsistent condom use) in 832 Slovak university students (response 94.3%). Results Among those with sexual experience (62%), inconsistent condom use was the most prevalent risk behaviour (81% in females, 72% in males). With the exception of having been drunk in males, no factor was associated with inconsistent condom use. Regarding the other types of SRB, early sexual initiation was most strongly associated. In addition, other, mostly behavioural, factors were associated, in particular having been drunk. Conclusion Results suggest that behavioural factors are more closely related to SRB than psychological factors. Associations differ by type of SRB and gender but offer few clues to target risk groups for inconsistent condom use. Results show a high need for health-promotion programmes in early adolescence that target SRB in conjunction with other health risk behaviours such as alcohol abuse.

Kalina, Ondrej; Geckova, Andrea M; Jarcuska, Pavol; Orosova, Olga; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

2009-01-01

373

Sex specific behavioural alterations in Mas-deficient mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male mice lacking the Mas protooncogene have been shown to exhibit an increased anxiety in the Elevated Plus Maze Task and sustained long-term potentiation in the hippocampus without effect on spatial learning in the Morris Water Maze Task. Here, we report behavioural studies in female mice lacking the Mas protooncogene. As for the males, we analysed the learning and anxiety

Thomas Walther; Jörg-Peter Voigt; Heidrun Fink; Michael Bader

2000-01-01

374

Adult male coatis play with a band of juveniles.  

PubMed

This study examined the play behaviour in one group of coatis (Nasua narica) at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. We incidentally found adult males playing with juvenile coatis, and conducted post-hoc analyses to investigate this interaction. Coati groups consist of adult females and juveniles of both sexes until male juveniles reach two years of age and leave the band to become solitary. Adult males only tolerate juveniles for a brief period during breeding season when the males court females to mate. Outside of the breeding season, adult males are known to prey on juveniles. In this study, when adult males were present with the band, play occurred more than was expected by chance, and adult males engaged in many of these play bouts. Because the mechanisms driving infanticidal behaviour are not well understood, and adult male coatis show a range of behaviours from infanticide to highly affiliative interactions with juveniles, using coatis as a model system may elucidate mechanisms underlying infanticide. PMID:23917562

Logan, C J; Longino, J T

2013-05-01

375

Male Infertility: Management  

MedlinePLUS

... as their preferred approach, this operation uses the optical magnification of a high-powered microscope to provide ... in Children L Low Testosterone M Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Male Infertility Male Infertility: Management Meatal Stenosis ...

376

Male pattern baldness (image)  

MedlinePLUS

Male pattern baldness is a sex-linked characteristic that is passed from mother to child. A man can more accurately predict his chances of developing male pattern baldness by observing his mother's father than by ...

377

Female sticklebacks use male coloration in mate choice and hence avoid parasitized males  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AN important problem in evolutionary biology since the time of Darwin has been to understand why females preferentially mate with males handicapped by secondary sexual ornaments1-3. One hypothesis of sexual selection theory is that these ornaments reliably reveal the male's condition4-6, which can be affected for example by parasites4,7-13. Here we show that in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) the intensity of male red breeding coloration positively correlates with physical condition. Gravid females base their active mate choice on the intensity of the male's red coloration. Choice experiments under green light prevent the use of red colour cues by females, and males that were previously preferred are now chosen no more than randomly, although the courtship behaviour of the males remains unchanged. Parasitieation causes a deterioration in the males' condition and a decrease in the intensity of their red coloration. Tests under both lighting conditions reveal that the females recognize the formerly parasitized males by the lower intensity of their breeding coloration. Female sticklebacks possibly select a male with a good capacity for paternal care14 but if there is additive genetic variation for parasite resistance, then they might also select for resistance genes, as proposed by Hamilton and Zuk4.

Milinski, Manfred; Bakker, Theo C. M.

1990-03-01

378

A mechanism for rapid neurosteroidal regulation of parenting behaviour.  

PubMed

While systemic steroid hormones are known to regulate reproductive behaviour, the actual mechanisms of steroidal regulation remain largely unknown. Steroidogenic enzyme activity can rapidly modulate social behaviour by influencing neurosteroid production. In fish, the enzyme 11?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11?-HSD) synthesizes 11-ketotestosterone (KT, a potent teleost androgen) and deactivates cortisol (the primary teleost glucocorticoid), and both of these steroid hormones can regulate behaviour. Here, we investigated the role of neurosteroidogenesis in regulating parenting in a haremic bidirectionally hermaphroditic fish, Lythrypnus dalli, where males provide all requisite parental care. Using an in vitro assay, we found that an 11?-HSD inhibitor, carbenoxolone (CBX), reduced brain and testicular KT synthesis by 90% or more. We modulated neurosteroid levels in parenting males via intracerebroventricular injection of CBX. Within only 20 min, CBX transiently eliminated parenting behaviour, but not other social behaviour, suggesting an enzymatic mechanism for rapid neurosteroidal regulation of parenting. Consistent with our proposed mechanism, elevating KT levels rescued parenting when paired with CBX, while cortisol alone did not affect parenting. Females paired with the experimental males opportunistically consumed unattended eggs, which reduced male reproductive success by 15%, but some females also exhibited parenting behaviour and these females had elevated brain KT. Brain KT levels appear to regulate the expression of parenting behaviour as a result of changes in neural 11?-HSD activity. PMID:24827441

Pradhan, Devaleena S; Solomon-Lane, Tessa K; Willis, Madelyne C; Grober, Matthew S

2014-07-01

379

When is a male not a male? Sex recognition and choice in two sex-changing species  

Microsoft Academic Search

For dioecious species, choosing a mate of the same sex can have reproductive costs. For sex-changing animals, however, a lack\\u000a of sex recognition may not carry a reproductive cost, as pairs that were initially same-sex can become opposite-sex pairs\\u000a as one partner changes sex. The strength of sex discrimination in sex changers, then, should depend on the duration of mating

Olivia V. Ambrogio; Jan A. Pechenik

2008-01-01

380

Post-copulatory sexual selection and sexual conflict in the evolution of male pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male pregnancy in seahorses, pipefishes and sea dragons (family Syngnathidae) represents a striking reproductive adaptation that has shaped the evolution of behaviour and morphology in this group of fishes. In many syngnathid species, males brood their offspring in a specialized pouch, which presumably evolved to facilitate male parental care. However, an unexplored possibility is that brood pouch evolution was partly

Kimberly A. Paczolt; Adam G. Jones

2010-01-01

381

Is Sperm Really so Cheap? Costs of Reproduction in Male Adders, Vipera berus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reproduction is energetically expensive for males as well as for females, but evolutionary biologists have typically regarded the energy costs of sperm production as trivial compared to the energy costs of overt reproductive behaviours, such as mate-searching, courtship, copulation and male-male combat. Adders (Vipera berus) offer an ideal model system in which to quantify the relative costs of spermatogenesis (and

Mats Olsson; Thomas Madsen; Richard Shine

1997-01-01

382

Female social networks influence male vocal development in brown-headed cowbirds, Molothrus ater  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous work has found that adult female brown-headed cowbirds, who do not sing, shape male vocal structure when in restricted housing. The present work extends this finding to a flock setting to examine the role of social behaviour in shaping male vocal development. We housed juvenile males with either adult or juvenile females in large flocks. Over the course of

Jennifer L. Miller; Andrew P. King; Meredith J. West

2008-01-01

383

Then and Now: Recruitment, Definition, Diversity, and Positive Attributes of Same-Sex Populations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is not my intent to critique individual contributions in this special issue but to assess scholarly progress since the last special issue devoted to sexual orientation in Developmental Psychology (Patterson, 1995). Because not all steps forward can be catalogued in this limited forum, I focus on several long-standing challenges faced by…

Savin-Williams, Ritch C.

2008-01-01

384

Secularism, Multiculturalism and Same-Sex Marriage: A Comment on Brenda Almond's "Education for Tolerance"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although Almond argues that the contemporary West has lost touch with the value of tolerance, I argue that that value applied to those of different religions and sexual orientations is too minimal a standard for a pluralistic society. I suggest, in the spirit of the work of Charles Taylor and Tariq Modood, the more robust standard of respect and…

Blum, Lawrence

2010-01-01

385

Commitment without Marriage: Union Formation among Long-Term Same-Sex Couples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The majority of Americans will marry in their lifetimes, and for many, marriage symbolizes the transition into long-term commitment. However, many Americans cannot legally marry. This article analyzes in-depth interviews with gays and lesbians in long-term partnerships to examine union formation and commitment-making histories. Using a life course…

Reczek, Corinne; Elliott, Sinikka; Umberson, Debra

2009-01-01

386

Citizenship Education and the Politics of Public Participation: The Case of Same-Sex Marriage  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Citizenship education programs promote political participation by young people. These programs risk misrepresenting politics to students by encouraging them to believe that there are universally accepted principles which govern the definition of citizenship and who is entitled to participate in its various dimensions. The article argues that…

Diorio, Joseph A.

2011-01-01

387

Risk Comparison among Youth Who Report Sex with Same-Sex versus Both-Sex Partners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines risk behavior among youth attending support groups for sexual minority youth in Richmond, Virginia, using a structured survey, with particular attention to partner selection and its relationship to risk. Within this generally high-risk group, youth reporting sex partners of both sexes had significantly higher risk profiles,…

Moon, Martha W.; Fornili, Katherine; O'Briant, Amanda L.

2007-01-01

388

Factors affecting relationships of Turkish adolescents with parents and same-sex friends.  

PubMed

The present study attempted to investigate the differences between Turkish late adolescents' relationships with their parents and friends by using Armsden and Greenberg's (1987) scales for measuring attachment. In addition, an attempt at determining predictors of different aspects of attachment was made. The findings were that (a) similar dimensions of attachment emerged from a factor analysis of Turkish data when compared with Armsden and Greenberg's factors, (b) the data provide evidence for the argument that relationships should be studied with an awareness that they exist within a sociological background that includes other relationships, and (c) regression analysis predicting different aspects of attachment indicated that different variables may be important as determinants of men's and women's relationships with significant others. PMID:1875680

Hortaçsu, N; Oral, A; Yasak-Gültekin, Y

1991-06-01

389

Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence: Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Affirmative Outreach and Advocacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is pervasive and crosses all boundaries of sexual orientation, race, and class. Scholars contend that the intimidation of another person through abusive acts and words is not a gender issue. Organizations seeking to offer equitable services to survivors of IPV must intentionally establish themselves as inclusive agencies. This article presents a review of common societal myths

Alysondra Duke; M. Meghan Davidson

2009-01-01

390

Same-Sex Gaze Attraction Influences Mate-Choice Copying in Humans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mate-choice copying occurs when animals rely on the mating choices of others to inform their own mating decisions. The proximate mechanisms underlying mate-choice copying remain unknown. To address this question, we tracked the gaze of men and women as they viewed a series of photographs in which a potential mate was pictured beside an opposite-sex partner; the participants then indicated

Jessica L. Yorzinski; Michael L. Platt; David Reby

2010-01-01

391

Same-Sex Marriage in a Welcoming World: Rights Consciousness of Heterosexuals in Liberal Religious Institutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research suggests that gays and lesbians not only look to the law as an important site of social recognition but\\u000a also pursue strategies to legitimate their relationships outside of the law, such as having commitment ceremonies in religious\\u000a institutions. While previous research suggests that homosexuality is a divisive issue within religious communities, we know\\u000a little about how heterosexual religious

Emily Kazyak

392

Suspicious Closets: Strengthening the Claim to Suspect Classification and Same-Sex Marriage Rights  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ever since gay marriage was legalized in Massachusetts in 2003, the gay marriage debate has consumed much of the American political conscience. While many important questions concerning equal protection, the institution of marriage, and modern conceptions of family have been asked, few have stopped to question what (aside from Judeo-Christian moral issues) makes homosexuals so wrong—so undeserving of the right

Margaret Bichler

2008-01-01

393

A Nationwide Study of Norwegian Beliefs About Same-sex Marriage and Lesbian and Gay Parenthood  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Norway, a gender-neutral Marriage Law that secured equal marriage and parenting rights for lesbian, gay and heterosexual\\u000a couples took effect in January 2009. The aim of the current study was to explore Norwegian beliefs about equal marriage and\\u000a parenting rights for lesbian, gay and heterosexual couples and the welfare of children with lesbian and gay parents. A sample\\u000a of

Ragnhild Hollekim; Hilde Slaatten; Norman Anderssen

394

Same-Sex Schooling. The Progress of Education Reform, 2007. Volume 7, Number 3  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In November 2006, the U.S. Department of Education issued new rules making it easier for schools and districts to use gender-separate classes, programs and activities as a strategy for enhancing educational achievement and opportunity. Education Secretary Margaret Spellings described the revised Title IX regulations as part of a greater effort to…

Weiss, Suzanne

2007-01-01

395

QUEBEC APPEALS COURT OPENS CIVIL MARRIAGE TO SAME-SEX COUPLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

est in the Quebec litigation had disappeared, and that its appeal had become moot. The Court of Appeal then turned to the cross-appeal of Michael Hendricks and Rene LeBoeuf. With the consent of the federal Attor- ney General, the Court of Appeal ended the suspension of the Superior Court's judgment (giving it effect from March 19), and ordered that Hendricks

Robert Wintemute

396

Alterations in hepatic microsomal mixed-function oxidase system during different levels of food restriction in adult male and female rats.  

PubMed

Wistar strain adult male and female rats were given 25, 50 and 75% less food than an ad libitum-fed group of rats for 45 d and the effects of food restriction on hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes, microsomal electron transport components, NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation and glutathione-S-transferase activities were studied. Compared to ad libitum-fed controls, the cytochrome P-450 levels were higher in food restricted male rats, while they were lower in food restricted females. The activities of NADPH cytochrome c reductase were lower in food restricted females than in ad libitum-fed controls. The activities of drug metabolizing enzymes, aminopyrine N-demethylase and acetanilide hydroxylase were higher in food restricted males, whereas in food restricted females these activities were lower than in respective groups fed ad libitum. Microsomal, NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation was higher in 25 and 50% food restricted females while in 50 and 75% food restricted males it was lower than in ad libitum controls of the same sex. The cytosolic glutathione-S-transferase activities were lower in food restricted rats of both the sexes than in the same sexed controls. Another group of male and female rats were given 75% less food than the ad libitum-fed rats and refed for 3 d prior to killing. Here also, the effects of restriction were different between sexes. It is concluded that hepatic microsomal mixed-function oxidase system (MFOS) is altered due to feed restriction and food restriction followed by refeeding, in a sex-related manner. PMID:3958812

Hashmi, R S; Siddiqui, A M; Kachole, M S; Pawar, S S

1986-04-01

397

Applying multiple models to predict clinicians' behavioural intention and objective behaviour when managing children's teeth.  

PubMed

This study used multiple theoretical approaches simultaneously to predict an objectively measured clinical behaviour. The six theoretical approaches were: The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), Common Sense Self-Regulation Model (CS-SRM), Operant Learning Theory (OLT), Action Planning (AP) and the Precaution Adoption Process (PAP), with knowledge as an additional predictor. Data on variables from these models were collected by postal survey. Data on the outcome behaviour, the evidence-based practice of placing fissure sealants, was collected from clinical records. Participants were 133 dentists (64% male) in Scotland. Variables found to predict the behaviour were: intention, attitude, perceived behavioural control, risk perception, outcome expectancies, self efficacy, habit, anticipated consequences, experienced consequences and action planning. The TPB, SCT, AP, OLT and PAP significantly predicted behaviour but the CS-SRM did not. A combined (Stepwise) regression model included only intention and action planning. Post hoc analyses showed action planning mediated effect of intention on behaviour. Taking a theory-based approach creates a replicable methodology for identifying factors predictive of clinical behaviour and for the design and choice of interventions to modify practice as new evidence emerges, increasing current options for improving health outcomes through influencing the implementation of best practice. PMID:20205030

Bonetti, Debbie; Johnston, Marie; Clarkson, Jan; Turner, Steve

2009-09-01

398

Associations between adult attachment dimensions and attitudes toward pain behaviour  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Despite the important role positive reinforcement of pain behaviour is believed to play in chronic pain, there is a paucity of research regarding factors that influence the provision of such reinforcement. Attachment theory suggests that individuals high in attachment avoidance view the pain behaviour of others in a negative manner and would, therefore, provide little reinforcement of pain behaviour. As an initial step in evaluating this model, relationships between attachment dimensions and attitudes toward pain behaviour were examined. Attachment avoidance was hypothesized to be negatively associated with accepting attitudes toward pain behaviour. METHODS: A sample of undergraduate students (n=160) completed the Relationships Structures Questionnaire, which provides global ratings of adult attachment dimensions (anxiety and avoidance) by assessing attachment across four relationship targets (friend, mother, father and romantic partner). Attitudes regarding the acceptability of pain behaviour were assessed using male and female versions of the Appropriate Pain Behaviour Questionnaire (APBQ). RESULTS: Consistent with the hypothesis, attachment avoidance was negatively correlated with both APBQ-Female and APBQ-Male scores. Multiple regression analyses were used to investigate the relationships between the attachment scales and the APBQ scales while statistically adjusting for sex and testing for interaction effects. The findings revealed complex relationships involving interaction effects that provided further support for the hypothesis. CONCLUSIONS: The findings provided support for the hypothesis that attachment avoidance is associated with less accepting attitudes toward pain behaviour. Additional research regarding the role of attachment and attitudes on responses to pain behaviour is warranted.

McWilliams, Lachlan A; Murphy, Paul DJ; Bailey, S Jeffrey

2010-01-01

399

Sedentary behaviour in youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this review is to describe the amount of time children spend in sedentary behaviour and to determine if there are specific factors that associate with sedentary behaviour in children. The following search terms were used to identify relevant articles: sedentary behaviour, inactivity, television, computer, video games, small screen, sitting, prevalence, patterns, correlates, factors and determinants. The databases

Russell R Pate; Jonathan A Mitchell; Wonwoo Byun; Marsha Dowda

2011-01-01

400

Somnambulistic sexual behaviour (sexsomnia)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Somnambulism or sleepwalking is a viable defence on the basis of automatism. The behaviours that occur during sleepwalking can be highly complex and include sexual behaviour of all types. Somnambulistic sexual behaviour (also called sexsomnia, sleep sex) is considered a variant of sleepwalking disorder as the overwhelming majority of people with Sexsomnia have a history of parasomnia and a family

Irshaad Osman Ebrahim

2006-01-01

401

Mosquito mating behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mating is one aspect of behaviour that has been much ignored in mosquito biology. Yet, the success of a transgenic release strategy depends on normal, competitive mating between introduced and wild individuals. An overview is presented of current knowledge of mating behaviour in Culicidae, including timing of mating, means of sperm transfer, refractory behaviour and multiple mating. Most lacunae were

Willem Takken; Carlo Costantini; Guimogo Dolo; Ahmed Hassanali; N'Fale Sagnon; Eli Osir

2006-01-01

402

Predicting Adolescents' Pedestrian Behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The present study was conducted to (a) test the predictive validity of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB; Ajzen, 1985) with respect to three examples of adolescents’ road crossing behaviour, (b) to test the hypothesis that the TPB mediates the effects of demographic and exposure variables on behaviour, and (c) to identify beliefs to target in road safety interventions

Mark A. Elliott

2004-01-01

403

Costs of female odour in males of the parasitic wasp Lariophagus distinguendus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The display of female traits by males is widespread in the animal kingdom. In several species, this phenomenon has been shown to function adaptively as a male mating strategy to deceive sexual rivals (female mimicry). Freshly emerged males of the parasitic wasp Lariophagus distinguendus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) are perceived by other males as if they were females because of a very similar composition of cuticular hydrocarbons which function as a sex pheromone in this species inducing courtship behaviour in males. Within 32 h, however, males deactivate the pheromone and are no longer courted by other males. In this paper, behavioural experiments were performed to test hypotheses on potential costs and benefits associated with the female odour in young males. We did not find any benefits, but demonstrated that young males were significantly more often outrivaled in male-male contests when competing with two older males for a female. Also, young males were significantly more often mounted in homosexual courtship events during these contests. Thus, display of female traits by males is not necessarily beneficial, and in fact, can be disadvantageous. We suggest that these costs have favoured the evolution of the pheromone deactivation mechanism in L. distinguendus males. The function of cuticular hydrocarbons as a female courtship pheromone in L. distinguendus might have evolved secondarily from a primary function relevant for both genders, and the deactivation of the signal in males might have caused a shift of specificity of the chemical signal from the species level to the sex level.

Ruther, Joachim; Steiner, Sven

2008-06-01

404

Context consistency and seasonal variation in boldness of male two-spotted gobies.  

PubMed

In order to attribute the behaviour of an animal to its personality it is important to study whether certain behavioural traits show up consistently across a variety of contexts. The aim of this study was to investigate whether breeding state males of the two-spotted goby, Gobiusculus flavescens, showed consistent degree of boldness when tested in four different behaviour assays. We also wanted to investigate whether boldness varied over the breeding season in accordance with changes in male-male competition for matings. We used two standard assays (the emergence test and the open field test), and two simple assays related to threat response. Repeated runs of each of the tests were highly correlated, and we found significant correlations between all four assays. Thus, we have documented both a within and a between-context consistency in risk-taking behaviour. Furthermore, we found that goby males studied during the middle of the breeding season were bolder than males studied at the end of the season. Since male two-spotted gobies face strongly decreasing male-male competition as the season progresses, the benefit of being bold for the mating success of the males may differ over the time of the breeding season. The difference in behaviour found over the season thus corresponds well with the sexual dynamics of this model species. PMID:24671255

Magnhagen, Carin; Wacker, Sebastian; Forsgren, Elisabet; Myhre, Lise Cats; Espy, Elizabeth; Amundsen, Trond

2014-01-01

405

Context Consistency and Seasonal Variation in Boldness of Male Two-Spotted Gobies  

PubMed Central

In order to attribute the behaviour of an animal to its personality it is important to study whether certain behavioural traits show up consistently across a variety of contexts. The aim of this study was to investigate whether breeding state males of the two-spotted goby, Gobiusculus flavescens, showed consistent degree of boldness when tested in four different behaviour assays. We also wanted to investigate whether boldness varied over the breeding season in accordance with changes in male-male competition for matings. We used two standard assays (the emergence test and the open field test), and two simple assays related to threat response. Repeated runs of each of the tests were highly correlated, and we found significant correlations between all four assays. Thus, we have documented both a within and a between-context consistency in risk-taking behaviour. Furthermore, we found that goby males studied during the middle of the breeding season were bolder than males studied at the end of the season. Since male two-spotted gobies face strongly decreasing male-male competition as the season progresses, the benefit of being bold for the mating success of the males may differ over the time of the breeding season. The difference in behaviour found over the season thus corresponds well with the sexual dynamics of this model species.

Magnhagen, Carin; Wacker, Sebastian; Forsgren, Elisabet; Cats Myhre, Lise; Espy, Elizabeth; Amundsen, Trond

2014-01-01

406

A linkage between DNA markers on the X chromosome and male sexual orientation  

SciTech Connect

The role of genetics in male sexual orientation was investigated by pedigree and linkage analyses on 114 families of homosexual men. Increased rates of same-sex orientation were found in the maternal uncles and male cousins of these subjects, but not in their fathers or paternal relatives, suggesting the possibility of sex-linked transmission in a portion of the population. DNA linkage analysis of a selected group of 40 families in which there were two gay brothers and no indication of nonmaternal transmission revealed a correlation between homosexual orientation and the inheritance of polymorphic markers on the X chromosome in approximately 64 percent of the sib-pairs tested. The linkage to markers on Xq28, the subtelomeric region of the long arm of the sex chromosome, had a multipoint lod score of 4.0(P = 10[sup [minus]5]), indicating a statistical confidence level of more than 99 percent that at least one subtype of male sexual orientation is genetically influenced.

Hamer, D.H.; Hu, S.; Magnuson, V.L.; Hu, N.; Pattatucci, A.M.L.

1993-07-16

407

Left-handed sperm removal by male Calopteryx damselflies (Odonata).  

PubMed

Male genitalia in several insect species are asymmetry in right and left shape. However, the function of such asymmetric male genitalia is still unclear. We found that the male genitalia of the damselfly Calopteryx cornelia (Odonata: Calopterygidae) are morphologically symmetric just after emergence but asymmetric after reproductive maturation. Males remove rival sperm stored in the female bursa copulatrix (single spherical sac) and the following spermatheca (Y-shaped tubular sac) prior to their own ejaculation to prevent sperm competition. Males possess the aedeagus with a recurved head to remove bursal sperm and a pair of spiny lateral processes to remove spermathecal sperm. The right lateral process is less developed than the left, and sperm stored in the right spermathecal tube are rarely removed. Experiments involving surgical cutting of each lateral process demonstrated that only the left process functions in spermathecal sperm removal. Thus, males of C. cornelia are left-handed in their sperm removal behaviour at copulation. PMID:24711986

Tsuchiya, Kaori; Hayashi, Fumio

2014-01-01

408

Alternative reproductive tactics in the territorial damselfly Calopteryx maculata : sneaking by older males  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  We conducted daily censuses on a marked population of the damselflyCalopteryx maculata for two complete breeding seasons to document the reproductive tactics of individual males. Overall, 78% of the 600 males\\u000a studied defended territories and 14% of those territorial males were also observed engaged in sneaking behaviour on some days.\\u000a When sneaking, males did not defend territories but attempted to

Adrian Forsyth; Robert D. Montgomerie

1987-01-01

409

Gay Male Aging  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of empirically-based publications on gay male gerontology was conducted. A total of 58 articles is presented. Findings indicate that the long-held negative stereotypes of gay male elders are unwarranted and have been repeatedly debunked. Happiness and successful adaptation to old age are possible and are frequently reported by older gay men. Substantial and unique competencies in old age

Jim Wahler; Sarah G. Gabbay

1997-01-01

410

Male butterflies bounce back  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

About five years ago, on the islands of Samoa, most of the male Hypolimnas bolina butterflies, also known as the Eggfly or Blue Moon butterfly, disappeared. Now, scientists report that the males have made a comeback and are almost as common as females.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS;)

2007-07-12

411

Black Male Rising  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author reports on Ohio's bevy of education initiatives that take aim at helping African-American male students succeed. The Todd Anthony Bell National Resource Center for the African American Male at The Ohio State University is one of several initiatives that help African-American men succeed in Ohio. All the programs focus on individual…

Feintuch, Howard

2010-01-01

412

High Proportion of Male Faeces in Jaguar Populations  

PubMed Central

Faeces provide relevant biological information which includes, with the application of genetic techniques, the sex and identity of individuals that defecated, thus providing potentially useful data on the behaviour and ecology of individuals, as well as the dynamics and structure of populations. This paper presents estimates of the sex ratio of different felid species (jaguar, Panthera onca; puma, Puma concolor; and ocelot/margay, Leopardus pardalis/Leopardus wiedi) as observed in field collected faeces, and proposes several hypotheses that could explain the strikingly high proportion of faeces from male jaguars. The proportion of male and female faeces was estimated using a non-invasive faecal sampling method in 14 study areas in Mexico and Brazil. Faecal samples were genetically analysed to identify the species, the sex and the individual (the latter only for samples identified as belonging to jaguars). Considering the three species, 72.6% of faeces (n?=?493) were from males; however, there were significant differences among them, with the proportion from males being higher for jaguars than for pumas and ocelots/margays. A male-bias was consistently observed in all study areas for jaguar faeces, but not for the other species. For jaguars the trend was the same when considering the number of individuals identified (n?=?68), with an average of 4.2±0.56 faeces per male and 2.0±0.36 per female. The observed faecal marking patterns might be related to the behaviour of female jaguars directed toward protecting litters from males, and in both male and female pumas, to prevent interspecific aggressions from male jaguars. The hypothesis that there are effectively more males than females in jaguar populations cannot be discarded, which could be due to the fact that females are territorial and males are not, or a tendency for males to disperse into suboptimal areas for the species.

Palomares, Francisco; Roques, Severine; Chavez, Cuauhtemoc; Silveira, Leandro; Keller, Claudia; Sollmann, Rahel; do Prado, Denise Mello; Torres, Patricia Carignano; Adrados, Begona; Godoy, Jose Antonio; de Almeida Jacomo, Anah Tereza; Torres, Natalia Mundim; Furtado, Mariana Malzoni; Lopez-Bao, Jose Vicente

2012-01-01

413

High proportion of male faeces in jaguar populations.  

PubMed

Faeces provide relevant biological information which includes, with the application of genetic techniques, the sex and identity of individuals that defecated, thus providing potentially useful data on the behaviour and ecology of individuals, as well as the dynamics and structure of populations. This paper presents estimates of the sex ratio of different felid species (jaguar, Panthera onca; puma, Puma concolor; and ocelot/margay, Leopardus pardalis/Leopardus wiedi) as observed in field collected faeces, and proposes several hypotheses that could explain the strikingly high proportion of faeces from male jaguars. The proportion of male and female faeces was estimated using a non-invasive faecal sampling method in 14 study areas in Mexico and Brazil. Faecal samples were genetically analysed to identify the species, the sex and the individual (the latter only for samples identified as belonging to jaguars). Considering the three species, 72.6% of faeces (n?=?493) were from males; however, there were significant differences among them, with the proportion from males being higher for jaguars than for pumas and ocelots/margays. A male-bias was consistently observed in all study areas for jaguar faeces, but not for the other species. For jaguars the trend was the same when considering the number of individuals identified (n?=?68), with an average of 4.2±0.56 faeces per male and 2.0±0.36 per female. The observed faecal marking patterns might be related to the behaviour of female jaguars directed toward protecting litters from males, and in both male and female pumas, to prevent interspecific aggressions from male jaguars. The hypothesis that there are effectively more males than females in jaguar populations cannot be discarded, which could be due to the fact that females are territorial and males are not, or a tendency for males to disperse into suboptimal areas for the species. PMID:23285226

Palomares, Francisco; Roques, Séverine; Chávez, Cuauhtémoc; Silveira, Leandro; Keller, Claudia; Sollmann, Rahel; do Prado, Denise Mello; Torres, Patricia Carignano; Adrados, Begoña; Godoy, José Antonio; de Almeida Jácomo, Anah Tereza; Tôrres, Natália Mundim; Furtado, Mariana Malzoni; López-Bao, José Vicente

2012-01-01

414

Seasonal colour and antipredator behaviour in Etheostoma (Percidae).  

PubMed

This study examined how colour varies across season and sex in the fantail darter Etheostoma flabellare and the banded darter Etheostoma zonale. Etheostoma flabellare has male-only parental care and exhibited slight sexual dimorphism in overall colour, with no discernible effect of season on colour; whereas E. zonale does not have parental care and exhibited substantial sexual dimorphism in colour, but only in the breeding season. Additionally, antipredator behaviour of E. zonale was compared between males that were fully coloured during the breeding season and males that were partially coloured at that time, but the effects of colour and season were not consistent across males. PMID:24588710

Moran, R L; von Ende, C N; King, B H

2014-04-01

415

Prevalence of Consensual Male-Male Sex and Sexual Violence, and Associations with HIV in South Africa: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study  

PubMed Central

Background In sub-Saharan Africa the population prevalence of men who have sex with men (MSM) is unknown, as is the population prevalence of male-on-male sexual violence, and whether male-on-male sexual violence may relate to HIV risk. This paper describes lifetime prevalence of consensual male–male sexual behavior and male-on-male sexual violence (victimization and perpetration) in two South African provinces, socio-demographic factors associated with these experiences, and associations with HIV serostatus. Methods and Findings In a cross-sectional study conducted in 2008, men aged 18–49 y from randomly selected households in the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal provinces provided anonymous survey data and dried blood spots for HIV serostatus assessment. Interviews were completed in 1,737 of 2,298 (75.6%) of enumerated and eligible households. From these households, 1,705 men (97.1%) provided data on lifetime history of same-sex experiences, and 1,220 (70.2%) also provided dried blood spots for HIV testing. 5.4% (n?=?92) of participants reported a lifetime history of any consensual sexual activity with another man; 9.6% (n?=?164) reported any sexual victimization by a man, and 3.0% (n?=?51) reported perpetrating sexual violence against another man. 85.0% (n?=?79) of men with a history of consensual sex with men reported having a current female partner, and 27.7% (n?=?26) reported having a current male partner. Of the latter, 80.6% (n?=?21/26) also reported having a female partner. Men reporting a history of consensual male–male sexual behavior are more likely to have been a victim of male-on-male sexual violence (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]?=?7.24; 95% CI 4.26–12.3), and to have perpetrated sexual violence against another man (aOR?=?3.10; 95% CI 1.22–7.90). Men reporting consensual oral/anal sex with a man were more likely to be HIV+ than men with no such history (aOR?=?3.11; 95% CI 1.24–7.80). Men who had raped a man were more likely to be HIV+ than non-perpetrators (aOR?=?3.58; 95% CI 1.17–10.9). Conclusions In this sample, one in 20 men (5.4%) reported lifetime consensual sexual contact with a man, while about one in ten (9.6%) reported experience of male-on-male sexual violence victimization. Men who reported having had sex with men were more likely to be HIV+, as were men who reported perpetrating sexual violence towards other men. Whilst there was no direct measure of male–female concurrency (having overlapping sexual relationships with men and women), the data suggest that this may have been common. These findings suggest that HIV prevention messages regarding male–male sex in South Africa should be mainstreamed with prevention messages for the general population, and sexual health interventions and HIV prevention interventions for South African men should explicitly address male-on-male sexual violence. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

Dunkle, Kristin L.; Jewkes, Rachel K.; Murdock, Daniel W.; Sikweyiya, Yandisa; Morrell, Robert

2013-01-01

416

First-degree relatives with behavioural adverse effects on statins  

PubMed Central

Irritability, aggression and other adverse behavioural effects have been associated with the use of statins (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) and other drug classes. A number of studies have also linked low cholesterol with aggression and violence. This paper presents the cases of two first-degree male relative patients (father and son) identified by self-referral to the University of California in San Diego Statin Effects Study. Both patients experienced behavioural adverse effects on statins including irritability and aggression, however neither patient recognised a significant change in their behaviour. This may be the first report of behavioural adverse effects manifested on statins by first-degree male relatives, which may suggest possible familial/biological predisposition. These cases also highlight the issue of externalisation by patients of the origin of interpersonal discord, which may serve as an obstacle to adverse effects reporting and lead to negative outcomes for patients, and for those around them.

Reilly, David; Cham, Stephanie; Golomb, Beatrice Alexandra

2011-01-01

417

Predictors of male microchimerism.  

PubMed

The association between microchimerism acquired primarily through pregnancy and later disease is of increasing scientific interest. Because this line of research is new and little is known about the nature of microchimerism, studies of microchimerism are potentially vulnerable to error from confounding and reverse causation. To address the issue of confounding, we conducted an analysis of predictors of male microchimerism in 272 female participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort. Buffy coat DNA was tested for Y chromosome presence as a marker of male microchimerism. First, we used logistic regression and thereafter random forest modeling to evaluate the ability of a range of reproductive, lifestyle, hospital or clinic visit history, and other variables to predict whether women tested positive for male microchimerism. We found some indication that current use of contraceptive pills and hormone replacement therapy reduced the odds of testing positive for male microchimerism. However, prediction of male microchimerism presence was poor based on the available variables. Studies of the possible role of male microchimerism in maternal health and disease are therefore unlikely to be heavily confounded by the variables examined in the present investigation. More research focused on acquisition, retention and clearing of male cells in the maternal circulation is needed. PMID:22926759

Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Gadi, Vijayakrishna K; Tjønneland, Anne

2012-01-01

418

Hormones in insect behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hormones play an important role in insect behaviour. These hormones are mainly the neurohormones of the brain and of the corpus\\u000a cardiacum, the juvenile hormone of the corpus allatum and the ecdysone of the prothoracic glands. These produce either releaser\\u000a effects or modifier effects. Hormonal modulation of neurophysiological activity controlling various aspects of behaviour,\\u000a hormonal influence of reproductive behaviour in

V K K Prabhu

1985-01-01

419

Differences in prolactin levels between three alternative male reproductive tactics in striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio)  

PubMed Central

In male fishes, birds and mammals, increased prolactin secretion is thought to play a role in species showing paternal behaviours. This hypothesis was investigated in the striped mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio). This paper compares serum prolactin levels in 71 free-living male striped mice following three different reproductive tactics: (i) paternal group-living breeders, (ii) alloparental philopatric group-living males, and (iii) roaming non-paternal solitary males. Prolactin levels of breeding males were significantly higher than that of roamers. Alloparental philopatric males had low prolactin levels, which concur with studies of cooperatively breeding mammals, but contrasts with studies of cooperatively breeding birds. Both breeding males and females showed a decrease in prolactin levels after the breeding season, but not alloparental philopatric males. Prolactin levels were correlated with neither corticosterone levels nor age. These results are in agreement with the hypothesis that prolactin is one proximate mechanism of male reproductive tactics, possibly regulating differences in male parental care.

Schradin, Carsten

2008-01-01

420

Males on guard: paternity defences in violet-green swallows and tree swallows  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paternity-defence behaviour in two congeners, violet-green swallows,Tachycineta thalassina, and tree swallows,T. bicolor, was compared to identify ecological factors that influence how males avoid being cuckolded. Measurements of the proportion of time that mates spent together, their following behaviour and the rate of within-pair copulations revealed that male violet-green swallows allocated more time to guarding mates than nests and copulated with

BARBARA A. BEASLEY

1996-01-01

421

Early maternal investment in male and female African elephant calves  

Microsoft Academic Search

The suckling behaviour of 130 freeranging elephant calves aged between birth and 4.5 years old was examined in Amboseli National Park, Kenya. Analyses of frequencies of suckling and durations of suckling bouts showed that males attempted to suckle more often, were more successful at their attempts, and as a result were estimated to have a higher milk intake than did

Phyllis C. Lee; Cynthia J. Moss

1986-01-01

422

Social modulation of androgen levels in male teleost fish  

Microsoft Academic Search

Androgens are classically thought of as the sex steroids controlling male reproduction. However, in recent years evidence has accumulated showing that androgens can also be affected by the interactions between conspecifics, suggesting reciprocal interactions between androgens and behaviour. These results have been interpreted as an adaptation for individuals to adjust their agonistic motivation and to cope with changes in their

Rui F. Oliveira; Katharina Hirschenhauser; Luis A. Carneiro; Adelino V. M. Canario

2002-01-01

423

The importance of novelty: Male-female interactions among blue-black grassquits in captivity.  

PubMed

Mate choice is a primary mechanism driving the evolution of sexually selected traits such as elaborate displays and ornaments. In a majority of taxa studied to date, females are seen to actively sample and evaluate multiple males, presumably to optimize mating opportunities. During this process females may encounter males both familiar and novel, a distinction that might influence how mate choice proceeds. Using a socially monogamous passerine, the blue-black grassquit (Volatinia jacarina), we studied how females respond to novel versus familiar ("paired") males, and how encounters with novel males influence subsequent interactions with their paired males. Additionally, we measured the hormonal response of males after visualizing their paired females interacting with novel males. We found that females were attentive to novel males irrespective of these males' phenotypic attributes, suggesting that in these interactions novelty is highly relevant. After exposure to novel males, females tended to respond aggressively towards their paired males; by contrast, the behaviour of males towards their paired females did not change. Moreover, we did not detect any hormonal responses of males to viewing their paired females interacting with novel males. Together these results suggest that the distinction between familiarity and novelty may hold special relevance for females in mate choice, a finding that bears upon our understanding of the evolution of extra-pair paternity and reproductive behaviour. PMID:24406508

Dias, Raphael I; Oliveira, Rui F; Podos, Jeffrey; Macedo, Regina H

2014-03-01

424

Forebrain gene expression predicts deficits in sensorimotor gating after isolation rearing in male rats.  

PubMed

Compared to socially housed (SH) rats, adult isolation-reared (IR) rats exhibit phenotypes relevant to schizophrenia (SZ), including reduced prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle. PPI is normally regulated by the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAC). We assessed PPI, auditory-evoked local field potentials (LFPs) and expression of seven PPI- and SZ-related genes in the mPFC and NAC, in IR and SH rats. Buffalo (BUF) rats were raised in same-sex groups of 2-3 (SH) or in isolation (IR). PPI was measured early (d53) and later in adulthood (d74); LFPs were measured approximately on d66. Brains were processed for RT-PCR measures of mPFC and NAC expression of Comt, Erbb4, Grid2, Ncam1, Slc1a2, Nrg1 and Reln. Male IR rats exhibited PPI deficits, most pronounced at d53; male and female IR rats had significantly elevated startle magnitude on both test days. Gene expression levels were not significantly altered by IR. PPI levels (d53) were positively correlated with mPFC expression of several genes, and negatively correlated with NAC expression of several genes, in male IR but not SH rats. Late (P90) LFP amplitudes correlated significantly with expression levels of 6/7 mPFC genes in male rats, independent of rearing. After IR that disrupts early adult PPI in male BUF rats, expression levels of PPI- and SZ-associated genes in the mPFC correlate positively with PPI, and levels in the NAC correlate negatively with PPI. These results support the model that specific gene-behavior relationships moderate the impact of early-life experience on SZ-linked behavioral and neurophysiological markers. PMID:24076151

Swerdlow, Neal R; Light, Gregory A; Trim, Ryan S; Breier, Michelle R; Hines, Samantha R; Powell, Susan B

2013-11-15

425

Males and Eating Disorders  

MedlinePLUS

... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Males and Eating Disorders Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents For ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo: PhotoDisc Eating disorders primarily affect girls and women, but boys and ...

426

Object-horning in goitered gazelle: agonistic or marking behaviour?  

PubMed

We studied object-horning behaviour in goitered gazelles in the natural, arid environment of Kazakhstan over a 6-year period. We found that object-horning was used by adult males mostly as a threat display during territorial conflicts. Therefore object-horning was observed most frequently in territorial single males during the rut in November-December. Object-horning, though, also had a marking effect, with the males' use of this behaviour leaving visible traces that advertized the location of preorbital and urination-defecation scent marks. Therefore, this pattern also was observed linked with preorbital marking and urination-defecation marking behaviours, especially during the rut. Goitered gazelle males chose the most abundant and eatable shrubs for object horning. In contrast to other gazelle species, object-horning in goitered gazelle was observed much more frequently and at the same rate as preorbital and urination-defecation scent markings. This, then, proved a more vigorous and aggressive level of rutting behaviour of the goitered gazelle compared to tropical gazelles, and most likely connected to the short rutting period in the studied species. We concluded, therefore, that object-horning was a manifold phenomenon that played a very important role in goitered gazelle agonistic displays, but without loosing the marking intention of this behaviour. PMID:24365541

Blank, David; Yang, Weikang

2014-03-01

427

Subordinate male cichlids retain reproductive competence during social suppression.  

PubMed

Subordinate males, which are excluded from reproduction often save energy by reducing their investment in sperm production. However, if their position in a dominance hierarchy changes suddenly they should also rapidly attain fertilization capability. Here, we asked how social suppression and ascension to dominance influences sperm quality, spermatogenesis and reproductive competence in the cichlid Astatotilapia burtoni, where reproduction is tightly coupled to social status. Dominant territorial (T) males are reproductively active while subordinate non-territorial (NT) males are suppressed, but given the opportunity, NT males will perform dominance behaviours within minutes and attain T male testes size within days. Using the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label germ cell proliferation, we found that the spermatogenic cycle takes approximately 11-12 days, and social status had no effect on proliferation, suggesting that spermatogenesis continues during reproductive suppression. Although sperm velocity did not differ among social states, NT males had reduced sperm motility. Remarkably, males ascending in status showed sperm motility equivalent to T males within 24 h. Males also successfully reproduced within hours of social opportunity, despite four to five weeks of suppression and reduced testis size. Our data suggest that NT males maintain reproductive potential during suppression possibly as a strategy to rapidly improve reproductive fitness upon social opportunity. PMID:21733892

Kustan, Jacqueline M; Maruska, Karen P; Fernald, Russell D

2012-02-01

428

Population and behaviour genetics of Drosophila ananassae.  

PubMed

Drosophila ananassae is a cosmopolitan and domestic species. It occupies a unique status among the Drosophila species due to certain peculiarities in its genetic behaviour. The most unusual feature of this species is spontaneous male recombination in appreciable frequency. The present review summarizes the work done on population and behaviour genetics of D. ananassae from India. Population dynamics of three cosmopolitan inversions has been studied in Indian populations of D. ananassae and it is evident from the results that there is a considerable degree of genetic divergence at the level of inversion polymorphism. In general, the populations from south India show more differentiation than those from the north. These three cosmopolitan inversions, which are coextensive with the species, exhibit heterosis. Interracial hybridization does not lead to breakdown of heterosis, which suggests that evidence for coadaptation is lacking in geographic populations of D. ananassae. Heterosis appears to be simple luxuriance rather than populational heterosis (coadaptation). Unlinked inversions occur in random associations, indicating no interchromosomal interactions. However, two inversions of the third chromosome often show strong linkage disequilibrium in laboratory populations, which is due to epistatic gene interaction and suppression of crossing-over. Genetic variations for certain allozyme polymorphism and sternopleural bristle phenotypes in Indian populations of D. ananassae have also been observed. A number of investigations have also been carried out on certain aspects of behaviour genetics of Indian D. ananassae. There is evidence for sexual isolation within D. ananassae. Significant variations in mating propensity of several isofemale strains, inversion karyotypes, the diminishing effects of certain mutations on sexual activity of males and positive response to selection for high and low mating propensity provide evidence for genetic control of sexual behaviour in D. ananassae. Males contribute more to variation and thus are more subject to intra-sexual selection than females. Evidence for rare male mating advantage has also been presented. Geographic strains of D. ananassae show variation with respect to oviposition site preference. The results of studies on pupation site preference, which is an important component of larval behaviour, suggest that larval pupation behaviour in D. ananassae is under polygenic control with a substantial amount of additive genetic variation. PMID:9081860

Singh, B N

1996-05-01

429

Brief Report: Binge Drinking among High-Risk Male and Female Adolescents in Israel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major factor attributed to the problem and consequences of underage alcohol use is binge drinking. The objective of this study was to examine binge drinking and other alcohol-related problem behaviour among high-risk male and female adolescents who were from alternative schools and programs because of learning and/or behaviour problems.…

Isralowitz, Richard; Reznik, Alex

2006-01-01

430

Male Hormonal Contraception  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis has been established\\u000a over the last three decades. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone\\u000a alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required\\u000a of which progestins are favored. Current clinical trials concentrate

E. Nieschlag

431

Thyroid and male reproduction  

PubMed Central

Male reproduction is governed by the classical hypothalamo-hypophyseal testicular axis: Hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and the gonadal steroid, principally, testosterone. Thyroid hormones have been shown to exert a modulatory influence on this axis and consequently the sexual and spermatogenic function of man. This review will examine the modulatory influence of thyroid hormones on male reproduction.

Kumar, Anand; Shekhar, Skand; Dhole, Bodhana

2014-01-01

432

Cultivating male allies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Females make large investments in their children and compete among themselves to establish and maintain privileged relationships\\u000a with male allies who demonstrate both an ability and a willingness to provide fitness-enhancing advantages. Various “strategies”\\u000a and their more numerous, associated “tactics” are utilized in the competition. Alleged strategies include using sexuality,\\u000a producing offspring, assisting the male in his own intrasexual contests,

Bonnie Lori Hooks; Penny Anthon Green

1993-01-01

433

Counseling Gay Male Clients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prior to the removal of homosexuality from the DSM-II in 1973, practicing clinicians tended to focus on one goal in treating gay male clients (i.e., attempting to “convert” gay men to heterosexuality). However, as views toward homosexuality began to change in mental health, therapeutic goals in working with gay males concomitantly changed. Unfortunately, practitioners have had limited treatment efficacy (i.e.,

John H. Dunkle

1994-01-01

434

High efficient of females of B-type Bemisia tabaci as males in transmitting the whitefly-borne tomato yellow leaf curl virus to tomato plant with Q-PCR method confirmation.  

PubMed

It has been previously reported that TYLCV can be transmitted from viruliferous males to non-viruliferous females and from viruliferous females to non-viruliferous males, but not between insects of the same sex; female whiteflies transmit TYLCV-Is with higher efficiency than males through symptoms recognition and viral DNA identification in tomato test plants (one insect per plant, with 48 h AAP and 48 h IAP). However, it remains unclear whether non-infected female and male could obtain same virus from TYLCV-infected tomato plants, and whether TYLCV-infected female and male could transmit same virus to non-viruliferous tomato plants. To address this issue, quantitative real-time PCR were applied to detect TYLCV content in adults or tomato plant. The acquisition and transmission experiments showed that both female and male can acquire and transmit the virus and no acquisition capability difference was observed between newly emerged female and male, however, female demonstrated superior transmission capability than male. Moreover, gene expressions profilings of GroEL and Hamiltonella in non-viruliferous and viruliferous female was all higher than that in male. These results further indicated that sex is an important factor affecting TYLCV transmission efficiency in B. tabaci. PMID:23336021

Xie, Wen; Xu, Yan-Xia; Jiao, Xiao-Guo; Zhang, You-Jun

2012-11-01

435

High efficient of females of B-type Bemisia tabaci as males in transmitting the whitefly-borne tomato yellow leaf curl virus to tomato plant with Q-PCR method confirmation  

PubMed Central

It has been previously reported that TYLCV can be transmitted from viruliferous males to non-viruliferous females and from viruliferous females to non-viruliferous males, but not between insects of the same sex; female whiteflies transmit TYLCV-Is with higher efficiency than males through symptoms recognition and viral DNA identification in tomato test plants (one insect per plant, with 48 h AAP and 48 h IAP). However, it remains unclear whether non-infected female and male could obtain same virus from TYLCV-infected tomato plants, and whether TYLCV-infected female and male could transmit same virus to non-viruliferous tomato plants. To address this issue, quantitative real-time PCR were applied to detect TYLCV content in adults or tomato plant. The acquisition and transmission experiments showed that both female and male can acquire and transmit the virus and no acquisition capability difference was observed between newly emerged female and male, however, female demonstrated superior transmission capability than male. Moreover, gene expressions profilings of GroEL and Hamiltonella in non-viruliferous and viruliferous female was all higher than that in male. These results further indicated that sex is an important factor affecting TYLCV transmission efficiency in B. tabaci.

Xie, Wen; Xu, Yan-xia; Jiao, Xiao-guo; Zhang, You-jun

2012-01-01

436

Change and employee behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study the relationship between perceived change implementation in an organization is related to employee self-rated behaviour. The change implementation processes measured were communication, support and participation. The relationship between these processes and employee behaviour was examined by testing a theoretical model, in which two mediating concepts are used: the psychological contract and employee job attitudes. The research was

René Schalk; Jennifer W. Campbell; Charissa Freese

1998-01-01

437

Territorial meadow pipit males ( Anthus pratensis; Passeriformes) become more aggressive in female presence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although mate guarding as prevention of extra-pair copulation is common among birds, evidence for aggressive behaviour involving physical contact related to mate guarding in passerines is scarce and cases of the presence of one partner directly influencing the aggressiveness of the other are lacking. We investigated the intra-specific territorial behaviour of male meadow pipits ( Anthus pratensis; Passeriformes: Motacillidae) at the beginning of the breeding season by placing a pipit model accompanied by an intra-specific song playback in the territory of socially paired males and compared the responses of males whose mates were physically present during trials with those whose females were out of sight. The level of aggression of males was significantly higher in the presence of the female; half of the males in this group physically attacked the model (the most intense and risky aggressive behaviour). Physical attacks did not occur among males whose female was absent during the trial; response to the playback by most of these males was only weak. This pattern may be related to the prevention of extra-pair copulation; if the risks involved in the conflict are outweighed by potential loss of paternity, such aggressive mate guarding may pay off. The apparently overlooked effect on the territorial behaviour of a partner’s passive physical presence during conflict should be further evaluated because it may be important for the design and interpretation of results of behavioural experiments.

Petrusková, Tereza; Petrusek, Adam; Pavel, Václav; Fuchs, Roman

2007-08-01

438

Territorial meadow pipit males (Anthus pratensis; Passeriformes) become more aggressive in female presence.  

PubMed

Although mate guarding as prevention of extra-pair copulation is common among birds, evidence for aggressive behaviour involving physical contact related to mate guarding in passerines is scarce and cases of the presence of one partner directly influencing the aggressiveness of the other are lacking. We investigated the intra-specific territorial behaviour of male meadow pipits (Anthus pratensis; Passeriformes: Motacillidae) at the beginning of the breeding season by placing a pipit model accompanied by an intra-specific song playback in the territory of socially paired males and compared the responses of males whose mates were physically present during trials with those whose females were out of sight. The level of aggression of males was significantly higher in the presence of the female; half of the males in this group physically attacked the model (the most intense and risky aggressive behaviour). Physical attacks did not occur among males whose female was absent during the trial; response to the playback by most of these males was only weak. This pattern may be related to the prevention of extra-pair copulation; if the risks involved in the conflict are outweighed by potential loss of paternity, such aggressive mate guarding may pay off. The apparently overlooked effect on the territorial behaviour of a partner's passive physical presence during conflict should be further evaluated because it may be important for the design and interpretation of results of behavioural experiments. PMID:17406850

Petrusková, Tereza; Petrusek, Adam; Pavel, Václav; Fuchs, Roman

2007-08-01

439

Somnambulistic sexual behaviour (sexsomnia).  

PubMed

Somnambulism or sleepwalking is a viable defence on the basis of automatism. The behaviours that occur during sleepwalking can be highly complex and include sexual behaviour of all types. Somnambulistic sexual behaviour (also called sexsomnia, sleep sex) is considered a variant of sleepwalking disorder as the overwhelming majority of people with Sexsomnia have a history of parasomnia and a family history of sleepwalking. Sexual behaviour during a sleep automatism can vary from explicit sexual vocalisations, to violent masturbation, to complex sexual acts including anal, oral and vaginal penetration. A recent case in England is reported where the defendant was acquitted on 3 charges of rape on the basis of automatism due to somnambulistic sexual behaviour. PMID:16564199

Ebrahim, Irshaad Osman

2006-05-01

440

Genetics of impulsive behaviour  

PubMed Central

Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery.

Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

2013-01-01

441

Veterinarians' perceptions of behaviour support in small-animal practice  

PubMed Central

Veterinarians are professionals considered to be at the forefront of animal welfare, including behaviour medicine. However, concerns raised, both within the profession and without, highlight that the support offered is not optimal, due to deficiencies in veterinary training, which focuses on physical aspects and overlooks psychological aspects. This preliminary study explored the experiences and perceptions of six veterinarians (three male, three female, age range: 23–55?years) in two UK small-animal practices. Seventeen annual booster consultations were videoed and conversations thematically analysed for welfare topics discussed. Both veterinarians and clients completed questionnaires to gather demographic information and perspectives. All veterinarians recognised behaviour as a component of their caseload, and acknowledged that clients expected them to provide behaviour support. Veterinarians varied in their experiences of and confidence in providing behaviour support. Five felt unable to meet client expectations; four did not feel their training had prepared them sufficiently. Only one provided dedicated behaviour consultations, the others referred cases. All provided suggestions for behaviour skills needed for new veterinary graduates. The study has afforded an insight into the experiences of a small opportunistic sample of veterinarians. The data indicated important limitations regarding time available in general consultations to discuss behaviour concerns, and practitioner knowledge and skill in detection, anamnesis, assessment and provision of appropriate behaviour information. Suggestions for veterinary training in behaviour are provided.

Roshier, A. L.; McBride, E. A.

2013-01-01

442

Behaviours Associated with Acoustic Communication in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)  

PubMed Central

Background Sound production is widespread among fishes and accompanies many social interactions. The literature reports twenty-nine cichlid species known to produce sounds during aggressive and courtship displays, but the precise range in behavioural contexts is unclear. This study aims to describe the various Oreochromis niloticus behaviours that are associated with sound production in order to delimit the role of sound during different activities, including agonistic behaviours, pit activities, and reproduction and parental care by males and females of the species. Methodology/Principal Findings Sounds mostly occur during the day. The sounds recorded during this study accompany previously known behaviours, and no particular behaviour is systematically associated with sound production. Males and females make sounds during territorial defence but not during courtship and mating. Sounds support visual behaviours but are not used alone. During agonistic interactions, a calling Oreochromis niloticus does not bite after producing sounds, and more sounds are produced in defence of territory than for dominating individuals. Females produce sounds to defend eggs but not larvae. Conclusion/Significance Sounds are produced to reinforce visual behaviours. Moreover, comparisons with O. mossambicus indicate two sister species can differ in their use of sound, their acoustic characteristics, and the function of sound production. These findings support the role of sounds in differentiating species and promoting speciation. They also make clear that the association of sounds with specific life-cycle roles cannot be generalized to the entire taxa.

Longrie, Nicolas; Poncin, Pascal; Denoel, Mathieu; Gennotte, Vincent; Delcourt, Johann; Parmentier, Eric

2013-01-01

443

Assessing the Validity of Sexual Behaviour Reports in a Whole Population Survey in Rural Malawi  

PubMed Central

Background Sexual behaviour surveys are widely used, but under-reporting of particular risk behaviours is common, especially by women. Surveys in whole populations provide an unusual opportunity to understand the extent and nature of such under-reporting. Methods All consenting individuals aged between 15 and 59 within a demographic surveillance site in northern Malawi were interviewed about their sexual behaviour. Validity of responses was assessed by analysis of probing questions; by comparison of results with in-depth interviews and with Herpes simplex type-2 (HSV-2) seropositivity; by comparing reports to same sex and opposite sex interviewers; and by quantifying the partnerships within the local community reported by men and by women, adjusted for response rates. Results 6,796 women and 5,253 men (83% and 72% of those eligible) consented and took part in sexual behaviour interviews. Probing questions and HSV-2 antibody tests in those who denied sexual activity identified under-reporting for both men and women. Reports varied little by sex or age of the interviewer. The number of marital partnerships reported was comparable for men and women, but men reported about 4 times as many non-marital partnerships. The discrepancy in reporting of non-marital partnerships was most marked for married women (men reported about 7 times as many non-marital partnerships with married women as were reported by married women themselves), but was only apparent in younger married women. Conclusions We have shown that the under-reporting of non-marital partnerships by women was strongly age-dependent. The extent of under-reporting of sexual activity by young men was surprisingly high. The results emphasise the importance of triangulation, including biomarkers, and the advantages of considering a whole population.

Glynn, Judith R.; Kayuni, Ndoliwe; Banda, Emmanuel; Parrott, Fiona; Floyd, Sian; Francis-Chizororo, Monica; Nkhata, Misheck; Tanton, Clare; Hemmings, Joanne; Molesworth, Anna; Crampin, Amelia C.; French, Neil

2011-01-01

444

Grouping piglets by sex at weaning reduces aggressive behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this work was to reduce aggressive behaviour when piglets are grouped at weaning.The experiment assessed whether it is better to group piglets by sex at weaning or to mix them in male–female groups. Large White piglets were weaned at 28 days and assigned to 4 conditions, with 6 groups of animals\\/condition: (L-MF) 4 males and 4 females

Violaine Colson; Pierre Orgeur; Valérie Courboulay; Sébastien Dantec; Aline Foury; Pierre Mormède

2006-01-01

445

Genetics of male fertility.  

PubMed

Early in embryogenesis, cells that are destined to become germ cells take on a different destiny from other cells in the embryo. The germ cells are not programmed to perform "vital" functions but to perpetuate the species through the transfer of genetic materials to the next generation. To fulfill their destiny, male germ cells undergo meiosis and extensive morphogenesis that transforms the round-shaped cells into freely motile sperm propelled by a beating flagellum to seek out their missing half. Apparently, extra genes and additional regulatory mechanisms are required to achieve all these unique features, and an estimated 11 % of genes are involved in fertility in Drosophila (Hackstein et al., Trends Genet 16(12):565-572, 2000). If comparative numbers of male fertility genes are needed in mammals, extra risks of male fertility problems are associated with disruptive mutations in those genes. Among human male infertility cases, approximately 22 % were classified as "idiopathic," a term used to describe diseases of unknown causes, with idiopathic oligozoospermia being the most common semen abnormality (11.2 %) (Comhaire et al., Int J Androl (Suppl 7):1-53, 1987). "Idiopathic" is a widely used adjective that is used to reflect our lack of understanding of the genetics of male fertility. Fortunately, after more than two decades of phenotypic studies using knockout mice and identifying genes disrupted in spontaneous mutant mice, we have unveiled new and unexpected aspects of crucial gene functions for fertility. Other efforts to categorize genes involved in male fertility in mammals have suggested a total of 1,188 genes (Hermo et al., Microsc Res Tech 73(4):241-494, 2010). Although intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) can be used to bypass many fertilization obstacles to achieve fertilization with only a few extracted sperm, the widespread use of ICSI without proper knowledge for genetic testing and counseling could still potentially propagate pleiotropic gene mutations associated with male infertility and other genetic diseases (Alukal and Lamb, Urol Clin North Am 35(2):277-288, 2008). In this chapter, we give a brief account of major events during the development of male germ cells and focus on the functions of several crucial genes that have been studied in mutant mouse models and are potential causes of human male infertility. PMID:24782004

Lin, Yi-Nan; Matzuk, Martin M

2014-01-01

446

Techniques of Male Circumcision  

PubMed Central

Male circumcision is a controversial subject in surgical practice. There are, however, clear surgical indications of this procedure. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends newborn male circumcision for its preventive and public health benefits that has been shown to outweigh the risks of newborn male circumcision. Many surgical techniques have been reported. The present review discusses some of these techniques with their merits and drawbacks. This is an attempt to inform the reader on surgical aspects of male circumcision aiding in making appropriate choice of a technique to offer patients. Pubmed search was done with the keywords: Circumcision, technique, complications, and history. Relevant articles on techniques of circumcision were selected for the review. Various methods of circumcision including several devices are in use for