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Sample records for mammalian development implications

  1. Mammalian development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.

    2003-01-01

    Life on Earth, and thus the reproductive and ontogenetic processes of all extant species and their ancestors, evolved under the constant influence of the Earth's l g gravitational field. These considerations raise important questions about the ability of mammals to reproduce and develop in space. In this chapter, I review the current state of our knowledge of spaceflight effects on developing mammals. Recent studies are revealing the first insights into how the space environment affects critical phases of mammalian reproduction and development, viz., those events surrounding fertilization, embryogenesis, pregnancy, birth, postnatal maturation and parental care. This review emphasizes fetal and early postnatal life, the developmental epochs for which the greatest amounts of mammalian spaceflight data have been amassed. The maternal-offspring system, the coordinated aggregate of mother and young comprising mammalian development, is of primary importance during these early, formative developmental phases. The existing research supports the view that biologically meaningful interactions between mothers and offspring are changed in the weightlessness of space. These changes may, in turn, cloud interpretations of spaceflight effects on developing offspring. Whereas studies of mid-pregnant rats in space have been extraordinarily successful, studies of young rat litters launched at 9 days of postnatal age or earlier, have been encumbered with problems related to the design of in-flight caging and compromised maternal-offspring interactions. Possibilities for mammalian birth in space, an event that has not yet transpired, are considered. In the aggregate, the results indicate a strong need for new studies of mammalian reproduction and development in space. Habitat development and systematic ground-based testing are important prerequisites to future research with young postnatal rodents in space. Together, the findings support the view that the environment within which young

  2. Dosage Effects of Cohesin Regulatory Factor PDS5 on Mammalian Development: Implications for Cohesinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Chang, Jufang; Fu, Ming; Huang, Jie; Kashyap, Rakesh; Salavaggione, Ezequiel; Jain, Sanjay; Shashikant, Kulkarni; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Uzielli, Maria L. Giovannucci; Dorsett, Dale; Beebe, David C.; Jay, Patrick Y.; Heuckeroth, Robert O.; Krantz, Ian; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), a disorder caused by mutations in cohesion proteins, is characterized by multisystem developmental abnormalities. PDS5, a cohesion protein, is important for proper chromosome segregation in lower organisms and has two homologues in vertebrates (PDS5A and PDS5B). Pds5B mutant mice have developmental abnormalities resembling CdLS; however the role of Pds5A in mammals and the association of PDS5 proteins with CdLS are unknown. To delineate genetic interactions between Pds5A and Pds5B and explore mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability, we generated Pds5A-deficient mice. Curiously, these mice exhibit multiple abnormalities that were previously observed in Pds5B-deficient mice, including cleft palate, skeletal patterning defects, growth retardation, congenital heart defects and delayed migration of enteric neuron precursors. They also frequently display renal agenesis, an abnormality not observed in Pds5B−/− mice. While Pds5A−/− and Pds5B−/− mice die at birth, embryos harboring 3 mutant Pds5 alleles die between E11.5 and E12.5 most likely of heart failure, indicating that total Pds5 gene dosage is critical for normal development. In addition, characterization of these compound homozygous-heterozygous mice revealed a severe abnormality in lens formation that does not occur in either Pds5A−/− or Pds5B−/− mice. We further identified a functional missense mutation (R1292Q) in the PDS5B DNA-binding domain in a familial case of CdLS, in which affected individuals also develop megacolon. This study shows that PDS5A and PDS5B functions other than those involving chromosomal dynamics are important for normal development, highlights the sensitivity of key developmental processes on PDS5 signaling, and provides mechanistic insights into how PDS5 mutations may lead to CdLS. PMID:19412548

  3. Dosage effects of cohesin regulatory factor PDS5 on mammalian development: implications for cohesinopathies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Chang, Jufang; Fu, Ming; Huang, Jie; Kashyap, Rakesh; Salavaggione, Ezequiel; Jain, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Shashikant, Kulkarni; Deardorff, Matthew A; Uzielli, Maria L Giovannucci; Dorsett, Dale; Beebe, David C; Jay, Patrick Y; Heuckeroth, Robert O; Krantz, Ian; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), a disorder caused by mutations in cohesion proteins, is characterized by multisystem developmental abnormalities. PDS5, a cohesion protein, is important for proper chromosome segregation in lower organisms and has two homologues in vertebrates (PDS5A and PDS5B). Pds5B mutant mice have developmental abnormalities resembling CdLS; however the role of Pds5A in mammals and the association of PDS5 proteins with CdLS are unknown. To delineate genetic interactions between Pds5A and Pds5B and explore mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability, we generated Pds5A-deficient mice. Curiously, these mice exhibit multiple abnormalities that were previously observed in Pds5B-deficient mice, including cleft palate, skeletal patterning defects, growth retardation, congenital heart defects and delayed migration of enteric neuron precursors. They also frequently display renal agenesis, an abnormality not observed in Pds5B(-/-) mice. While Pds5A(-/-) and Pds5B(-/-) mice die at birth, embryos harboring 3 mutant Pds5 alleles die between E11.5 and E12.5 most likely of heart failure, indicating that total Pds5 gene dosage is critical for normal development. In addition, characterization of these compound homozygous-heterozygous mice revealed a severe abnormality in lens formation that does not occur in either Pds5A(-/-) or Pds5B(-/-) mice. We further identified a functional missense mutation (R1292Q) in the PDS5B DNA-binding domain in a familial case of CdLS, in which affected individuals also develop megacolon. This study shows that PDS5A and PDS5B functions other than those involving chromosomal dynamics are important for normal development, highlights the sensitivity of key developmental processes on PDS5 signaling, and provides mechanistic insights into how PDS5 mutations may lead to CdLS. PMID:19412548

  4. Development of the Mammalian Kidney.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The basic unit of kidney function is the nephron. In the mouse, around 14,000 nephrons form in a 10-day period extending into early neonatal life, while the human fetus forms the adult complement of nephrons in a 32-week period completed prior to birth. This review discusses our current understanding of mammalian nephrogenesis: the contributing cell types and the regulatory processes at play. A conceptual developmental framework has emerged for the mouse kidney. This framework is now guiding studies of human kidney development enabled in part by in vitro systems of pluripotent stem cell-seeded nephrogenesis. A near future goal will be to translate our developmental knowledge-base to the productive engineering of new kidney structures for regenerative medicine. PMID:26969971

  5. Cell death in mammalian development.

    PubMed

    Penaloza, C; Orlanski, S; Ye, Y; Entezari-Zaher, T; Javdan, M; Zakeri, Z

    2008-01-01

    During embryogenesis there is an exquisite orchestration of cellular division, movement, differentiation, and death. Cell death is one of the most important aspects of organization of the developing embryo, as alteration in timing, level, or pattern of cell death can lead to developmental anomalies. Cell death shapes the embryo and defines the eventual functions of the organs. Cells die using different paths; understanding which path a dying cell takes helps us define the signals that regulate the fate of the cell. Our understanding of cell death in development stems from a number of observations indicating genetic regulation of the death process. With today's increased knowledge of the pathways of cell death and the identification of the genes whose products regulate the pathways we know that, although elimination of some of these gene products has no developmental phenotype, alteration of several others has profound effects. In this review we discuss the types and distributions of cell death seen in developing mammalian embryos as well as the gene products that may regulate the process. PMID:18220829

  6. Global Epigenomic Reconfiguration During Mammalian Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Joseph R.; Urich, Mark; Puddifoot, Clare A.; Johnson, Nicholas D.; Lucero, Jacinta; Huang, Yun; Dwork, Andrew J.; Schultz, Matthew D.; Yu, Miao; Tonti-Filippini, Julian; Heyn, Holger; Hu, Shijun; Wu, Joseph C.; Rao, Anjana; Esteller, Manel; He, Chuan; Haghighi, Fatemeh G.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Behrens, M. Margarita; Ecker, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is implicated in mammalian brain development and plasticity underlying learning and memory. We report the genome-wide composition, patterning, cell specificity, and dynamics of DNA methylation at single-base resolution in human and mouse frontal cortex throughout their lifespan. Widespread methylome reconfiguration occurs during fetal to young adult development, coincident with synaptogenesis. During this period, highly conserved non-CG methylation (mCH) accumulates in neurons, but not glia, to become the dominant form of methylation in the human neuronal genome. Moreover, we found an mCH signature that identifies genes escaping X-chromosome inactivation. Last, whole-genome single-base resolution 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC) maps revealed that hmC marks fetal brain cell genomes at putative regulatory regions that are CG-demethylated and activated in the adult brain and that CG demethylation at these hmC-poised loci depends on Tet2 activity. PMID:23828890

  7. Detection of apoptosis in mammalian development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Penaloza, Carlos; Ye, Yixia; Lockshin, Richard A; Zakeri, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian development is dependent on an intricate orchestration of cell proliferation and death. Deregulation in the levels, localization, and type of cell death can lead to disease and even death of the developing embryo. The mechanisms involved in such deregulation are many; alterations and or manipulations of these can aid in the detection, prevention and possible treatments of any effects this de-regulation may have. Here we describe how cell death can be detected during mammalian development, using diverse staining and microscopy methods, while taking advantage of the advancements in cell death mechanisms, derived from biochemical and teratological studies in the field. PMID:19609762

  8. Glia in mammalian development and disease.

    PubMed

    Zuchero, J Bradley; Barres, Ben A

    2015-11-15

    Glia account for more than half of the cells in the mammalian nervous system, and the past few decades have witnessed a flood of studies that detail novel functions for glia in nervous system development, plasticity and disease. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we review the origins of glia and discuss their diverse roles during development, in the adult nervous system and in the context of disease. PMID:26577203

  9. Apoptotic processes during mammalian preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Dusan; Koppel, Juraj; Maddox-Hyttel, Poul

    2005-07-15

    The paper provides a review of the current state of knowledge on apoptosis during normal preimplantation development based on the literature and on the authors' own findings. Information is focused on the occurrence and the characteristics of spontaneous apoptotic processes. Reports concerning the chronology and the incidence of programmed cell death in mouse, cow, pig and human embryos in early preimplantation stages up to the blastocyst stage are summarized. In addition, specific attributes of the apoptotic process in mammalian preimplantation development are provided, including the description of both morphological and biochemical features of cell death. PMID:15955348

  10. Mammalian Kidney Development: Principles, Progress, and Projections

    PubMed Central

    Little, Melissa H.; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian kidney is a vital organ with considerable cellular complexity and functional diversity. Kidney development is notable for requiring distinct but coincident tubulogenic processes involving reciprocal inductive signals between mesenchymal and epithelial progenitor compartments. Key molecular pathways mediating these interactions have been identified. Further, advances in the analysis of gene expression and gene activity, coupled with a detailed knowledge of cell origins, are enhancing our understanding of kidney morphogenesis and unraveling the normal processes of postnatal repair and identifying disease-causing mechanisms. This article focuses on recent insights into central regulatory processes governing organ assembly and renal disease, and predicts future directions for the field. PMID:22550230

  11. Light-sheet imaging of mammalian development.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Tackling modern cell and developmental biology questions requires fast 3D imaging with sub-cellular resolution over extended periods of time. Fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to image biological samples with high spatial and temporal resolution with molecular specificity. In particular, the highly efficient illumination and detection scheme of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is starting to revolutionize the way we can monitor cellular and developmental processes in vivo. Here we summarize the state-of-the art of light-sheet imaging with a focus on mammalian development - from instrumentation, mounting and sample handling to data processing. PMID:27288888

  12. Mammalian oocyte growth and development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Eppig, J J; O'Brien, M; Wigglesworth, K

    1996-06-01

    This paper is a review of the current status of technology for mammalian oocyte growth and development in vitro. It compares and contrasts the characteristics of the various culture systems that have been devised for the culture of either isolated preantral follicles or the oocyte-granulosa cell complexes form preantral follicles. The advantages and disadvantages of these various systems are discussed. Endpoints for the evaluation of oocyte development in vitro, including oocyte maturation and embryogenesis, are described. Considerations for the improvement of the culture systems are also presented. These include discussions of the possible effects of apoptosis and inappropriate differentiation of oocyte-associated granulosa cells on oocyte development. Finally, the potential applications of the technology for oocyte growth and development in vitro are discussed. For example, studies of oocyte development in vitro could help to identify specific molecules produced during oocyte development that are essential for normal early embryogenesis and perhaps recognize defects leading to infertility or abnormalities in embryonic development. Moreover, the culture systems may provide the methods necessary to enlarge the populations of valuable agricultural, pharmaceutical product-producing, and endangered animals, and to rescue the oocytes of women about to undergo clinical procedures that place oocytes at risk. PMID:9115726

  13. Cell fate regulation in early mammalian development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oron, Efrat; Ivanova, Natalia

    2012-08-01

    Preimplantation development in mammals encompasses a period from fertilization to implantation and results in formation of a blastocyst composed of three distinct cell lineages: epiblast, trophectoderm and primitive endoderm. The epiblast gives rise to the organism, while the trophectoderm and the primitive endoderm contribute to extraembryonic tissues that support embryo development after implantation. In many vertebrates, such as frog or fish, maternally supplied lineage determinants are partitioned within the egg. Cell cleavage that follows fertilization results in polarization of these factors between the individual blastomeres, which become restricted in their developmental fate. In contrast, the mouse oocyte and zygote lack clear polarity and, until the eight-cell stage, individual blastomeres retain the potential to form all lineages. How are cell lineages specified in the absence of a maternally supplied blueprint? This is a fundamental question in the field of developmental biology. The answer to this question lies in understanding the cell-cell interactions and gene networks involved in embryonic development prior to implantation and using this knowledge to create testable models of the developmental processes that govern cell fates. We provide an overview of classic and contemporary models of early lineage development in the mouse and discuss the emerging body of work that highlights similarities and differences between blastocyst development in the mouse and other mammalian species.

  14. Ontogenetic development of the mammalian circadian system.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ontogenetic development of the circadian system in mammals. The developmental changes of overt rhythms are discussed, although the main focus of the review is the underlying neuronal and molecular mechanisms. In addition, the review describes ontogenetic development, not only as a process of morpho-functional maturation. The need of repeated adaptations and readaptations due to changing developmental stage and environmental conditions is also considered. The review analyzes mainly rodent data, obtained from the literature and from the author's own studies. Results from other species, including humans, are presented to demonstrate common features and species-dependent differences. The review first describes the development of the suprachiasmatic nuclei as the central pacemaker system and shows that intrinsic circadian rhythms are already generated in the mammalian fetus. As in adult organisms, the period length is different from 24 h and needs continuous correction by environmental periodicities, or zeitgebers. The investigation of the ontogenetic development of the mechanisms of entrainment reveals that, at prenatal and early postnatal stages, non-photic cues deriving from the mother are effective. Light-dark entrainment develops later. At a certain age, both photic and non-photic zeitgebers may act in parallel, even though the respective time information is 12 h out of phase. That leads to a temporary internal desynchronization. Because rhythmic information needs to be transferred to effector organs, the corresponding neural and humoral signalling pathways are also briefly described. Finally, to be able to transform a rhythmic signal into an overt rhythm, the corresponding effector organs must be functionally mature. As many of these organs are able to generate their own intrinsic rhythms, another aspect of the review is dedicated to the development of peripheral oscillators and mechanisms of their entrainment

  15. Functions of miRNAs during Mammalian Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shun; Jiao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles during mammalian heart development and have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases. The mammalian embryonic heart is mainly derived from four major cell types during development. These include cardiomyocytes, endocardial cells, epicardial cells, and neural crest cells. Recent data have identified various miRNAs as critical regulators of the proper differentiation, proliferation, and survival of these cell types. In this review, we briefly introduce the contemporary understanding of mammalian cardiac development. We also focus on recent developments in the field of cardiac miRNAs and their functions during the development of different cell types. PMID:27213371

  16. Mammalian Cell Competitions, Cell-in-Cell Phenomena and Their Biomedical Implications.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Chen, Z; Sun, Q

    2015-01-01

    Cell competition was first identified four decades ago as a mechanism to eliminate less fit cells during development in Drosophila melanogaster, and later postulated to be involved in tumorigenesis of human beings. However, evidence for a similar mechanism functional in mammals and tumors was missed until recent years. Like cell competition in fly, multiple forms of competition mechanisms were reported in mammalian system, and some of them were found participating in tumor initiation. Lately, entosis, a mechanism of cell cannibalisms responsible for the formation of cell-in-cell structures in human tumors, was identified as a novel member of ever-expanding family of mammalian cell competitions (MaCCs), and proposed to be able to promote clonal selection and tumor evolution. Thus, engulfment by neighboring cells other than the professional phagocytes, an issue still in debate in fly, was clearly demonstrated in mammals to be responsible for loser elimination. Competition mediated by cell-in-cell structures, formed by multiple cannibal mechanisms, constitutes a novel class of MaCCs. This review will summarize current research on mammalian cell competitions, followed by feature and mechanism analysis and their potential implications in the pathology and treatment of human tumors. PMID:26511708

  17. Nucleotide metabolic mismatches in mammalian hearts: implications for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, MH; Smolenski, RT

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human donor organ shortages have led surgeons and scientists to explore the use of animals as alternative organ sources. Acute thrombovascular rejection (AVR) is the main hurdle in xenotransplantation. Disparities in nucleotide metabolism in the vessels of different species may contribute significantly to the microvascular component of AVR. Methods We evaluated the extent of nucleotide metabolism mismatch in selected organs and endothelial cells of different mammals with particular focus on the changes in activity of ecto-5’-nucleotidase (E5’N) elicited by exposure of porcine hearts or endothelial cells to human blood (ex vivo) or human plasma (in vitro). Results E5’N activity in the rat heart was significantly higher than in other species. We noted a significant difference (p<0.001) in E5’N activity between human and pig endothelial cell lines. Initial pig aortic endothelial E5’N activity decreased in vitro after a three-hour exposure to human and porcine plasma while remaining constant in controls. Ex vivo perfusion with fresh human blood for four hours resulted in a significant decrease of E5’N activity in both wild type and transgenic pig hearts overexpressing human decay accelerating factor (p<0.001). Conclusions This study provides evidence that mismatches in basal mammalian metabolic pathways and humoral immunity interact in a xenogeneic environment. Understanding the role of nucleotide metabolism and signalling in xenotransplantation may identify new targets for genetic modifications and may lead to the development of new therapies extending graft survival. PMID:23317713

  18. Phylogenetic memory of developing mammalian dentition.

    PubMed

    Peterkova, Renata; Lesot, Hervé; Peterka, Miroslav

    2006-05-15

    Structures suppressed during evolution can be retraced due to atavisms and vestiges. Atavism is an exceptional emergence of an ancestral form in a living individual. In contrast, ancestral vestige regularly occurs in all members of an actual species. We surveyed data about the vestigial and atavistic teeth in mammals, updated them by recent findings in mouse and human embryos, and discussed their ontogenetic and evolutionary implications. In the mouse incisor and diastema regions, dental placodes are transiently distinct being morphologically similar to the early tooth primordia in reptiles. Two large vestigial buds emerge in front of the prospective first molar and presumably correspond to the premolars eliminated during mouse evolution. The incorporation of the posterior premolar vestige into the lower first molar illustrates the putative mechanism of evolutionary disappearance of the last premolar in the mice. In mutant mice, devious development of the ancestral tooth primordia might lead to their revivification and origin of atavistic supernumerary teeth. Similarity in the developmental schedule between three molars in mice and the respective third and fourth deciduous premolar and the first molar in humans raises a question about putative homology of these teeth. The complex patterning of the vestibular and dental epithelium in human embryos is reminiscent of the pattern of "Zahnreihen" in lower vertebrates. A hypothesis was presented about the developmental relationship between the structures at the external aspect of the dentition in mammals (oral vestibule, pre-lacteal teeth, paramolar cusps/teeth), the tooth glands in reptiles, and the earliest teeth in lower vertebrates. PMID:16463376

  19. Mammalian gamete plasma membranes re-assessments and reproductive implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Establishment of the diploid status occurs with the fusion of female and male gametes. Both the mammalian oocyte and spermatozoa are haploid cells surrounded with plasma membranes that are rich in various proteins playing a crucial role during fertilization. Fertilization is a complex and ordered st...

  20. Some process control/design considerations in the development of a microgravity mammalian cell bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goochee, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to review some of the physical/metabolic factors which must be considered in the development of an operating strategy for a mammalian cell bioreactor. Emphasis is placed on the dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide requirements of growing mammalian epithelial cells. Literature reviews concerning oxygen and carbon dioxide requirements are discussed. A preliminary, dynamic model which encompasses the current features of the NASA bioreactor is presented. The implications of the literature survey and modeling effort on the design and operation of the NASA bioreactor are discussed.

  1. Where hearing starts: the development of the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Basch, Martin L; Brown, Rogers M; Jen, Hsin-I; Groves, Andrew K

    2016-02-01

    The mammalian cochlea is a remarkable sensory organ, capable of perceiving sound over a range of 10(12) in pressure, and discriminating both infrasonic and ultrasonic frequencies in different species. The sensory hair cells of the mammalian cochlea are exquisitely sensitive, responding to atomic-level deflections at speeds on the order of tens of microseconds. The number and placement of hair cells are precisely determined during inner ear development, and a large number of developmental processes sculpt the shape, size and morphology of these cells along the length of the cochlear duct to make them optimally responsive to different sound frequencies. In this review, we briefly discuss the evolutionary origins of the mammalian cochlea, and then describe the successive developmental processes that lead to its induction, cell cycle exit, cellular patterning and the establishment of topologically distinct frequency responses along its length. PMID:26052920

  2. Where hearing starts: The development of the mammalian cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Martin L.; Brown, Rogers M.; Jen, Hsin-I; Groves, Andrew K.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian cochlea is a remarkable sensory organ, capable of perceiving sound over a range of 1012 in pressure and discriminating both infrasonic and ultrasonic frequencies in different species. The sensory hair cells of the mammalian cochlea are exquisitely sensitive, responding to atomic-level deflections at speeds on the order of tens of microseconds. The number and placement of hair cells are precisely determined during inner ear development, and a large number of developmental processes sculpt the shape, size and morphology of these cells along the length of the cochlear duct to make them optimally responsive to different sound frequencies. In this review, we briefly discuss the evolutionary origins of the mammalian cochlea, and then describe the successive developmental processes that lead to its induction, cell cycle exit, cellular patterning and the establishment of topologically distinct frequency responses along its length. PMID:26052920

  3. Lung development of monotremes: evidence for the mammalian morphotype.

    PubMed

    Ferner, Kirsten; Zeller, Ulrich; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2009-02-01

    The reproductive strategies and the extent of development of neonates differ markedly between the three extant mammalian groups: the Monotremata, Marsupialia, and Eutheria. Monotremes and marsupials produce highly altricial offspring whereas the neonates of eutherian mammals range from altricial to precocial. The ability of the newborn mammal to leave the environment in which it developed depends highly on the degree of maturation of the cardio-respiratory system at the time of birth. The lung structure is thus a reflection of the metabolic capacity of neonates. The lung development in monotremes (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, Tachyglossus aculeatus), in one marsupial (Monodelphis domestica), and one altricial eutherian (Suncus murinus) species was examined. The results and additional data from the literature were integrated into a morphotype reconstruction of the lung structure of the mammalian neonate. The lung parenchyma of monotremes and marsupials was at the early terminal air sac stage at birth, with large terminal air sacs. The lung developed slowly. In contrast, altricial eutherian neonates had more advanced lungs at the late terminal air sac stage and postnatally, lung maturation proceeded rapidly. The mammalian lung is highly conserved in many respects between monotreme, marsupial, and eutherian species and the structural differences in the neonatal lungs can be explained mainly by different developmental rates. The lung structure of newborn marsupials and monotremes thus resembles the ancestral condition of the mammalian lung at birth, whereas the eutherian newborns have a more mature lung structure. PMID:19051249

  4. The Role of Autophagy in Mammalian Development

    PubMed Central

    Cecconi, Francesco; Levine, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy is important for the degradation of bulk cytoplasm, long-lived proteins, and entire organelles. In lower eukaryotes, autophagy functions as a cell death mechanism or as a stress response during development. However, autophagy’s significance in vertebrate development, and the role (if any) of vertebrate-specific factors in its regulation, remains unexplained. Through careful analysis of the current autophagy gene mutant mouse models, we propose that in mammals, autophagy may be involved in specific cytosolic rearrangements needed for proliferation, death, and differentiation during embryogenesis and postnatal development. Thus, autophagy is a process of cytosolic “renovation,” crucial in cell fate decisions. PMID:18804433

  5. Studies toward birth and early mammalian development in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronca, April E.

    2003-10-01

    Sustaining life beyond Earth on either space stations or other planets will require a clear understanding of how the space environment affects key phases of mammalian reproduction and development. Pregnancy, parturition (birth) and the early development of offspring are complex processes essential for successful reproduction and the proliferation of mammalian species. While no mammal has yet undergone birth within the space environment, studies spanning the gravity continuum from 0- to 2-g are revealing startling insights into how reproduction and development may proceed under gravitational conditions deviating from those typically experienced on Earth. In this report, I review studies of pregnant Norway rats and their offspring flown in microgravity (μg) onboard the NASA Space Shuttle throughout the period corresponding to mid- to late gestation, and analogous studies of pregnant rats exposed to hypergravity ( ht) onboard the NASA Ames Research Center 24-ft centrifuge. Studies of postnatal rats flown in space or exposed to centrifugation are reviewed. Although many important questions remain unanswered, the available data suggest that numerous aspects of pregnancy, birth and early mammalian development can proceed under altered gravity conditions. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  6. The mammalian oocyte orchestrates the rate of ovarian follicular development

    PubMed Central

    Eppig, John J.; Wigglesworth, Karen; Pendola, Frank L.

    2002-01-01

    The development of both the mammalian oocyte and the somatic cell compartments of the ovarian follicle is highly coordinated; this coordination ensures that the ovulated oocyte is ready to undergo fertilization and subsequent embryogenesis. Disruption of this synchrony results in oocyte developmental failure. Communication between the oocyte and companion somatic cells is essential for successful development of both follicular compartments. However, it was not previously known whether one cell type, either the somatic or the germ cell compartment, determines the overall rate of follicular development. To test the hypothesis that the oocyte orchestrates the rate of follicle development, mid-sized oocytes isolated from secondary follicles were transferred back to primordial follicles, the earliest stage of follicular development. This transfer doubled the rate of follicular development and the differentiation of follicular somatic cells. Oocyte development in these accelerated follicles appeared normal; recovered oocytes were competent to undergo fertilization and embryonic development. These results demonstrate that oocytes orchestrate and coordinate the development of mammalian ovarian follicles and that the rate of follicular development is based on a developmental program intrinsic to the oocyte. PMID:11867735

  7. Post-transcriptional control of the mammalian circadian clock: implications for health and disease.

    PubMed

    Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-06-01

    Many aspects of human physiology and behavior display rhythmicity with a period of approximately 24 h. Rhythmic changes are controlled by an endogenous time keeper, the circadian clock, and include sleep-wake cycles, physical and mental performance capability, blood pressure, and body temperature. Consequently, many diseases, such as metabolic, sleep, autoimmune and mental disorders and cancer, are connected to the circadian rhythm. The development of therapies that take circadian biology into account is thus a promising strategy to improve treatments of diverse disorders, ranging from allergic syndromes to cancer. Circadian alteration of body functions and behavior are, at the molecular level, controlled and mediated by widespread changes in gene expression that happen in anticipation of predictably changing requirements during the day. At the core of the molecular clockwork is a well-studied transcription-translation negative feedback loop. However, evidence is emerging that additional post-transcriptional, RNA-based mechanisms are required to maintain proper clock function. Here, we will discuss recent work implicating regulated mRNA stability, translation and alternative splicing in the control of the mammalian circadian clock, and its role in health and disease. PMID:27108448

  8. Linking development with generation of novelty in mammalian teeth

    PubMed Central

    Jernvall, Jukka

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of mammalian teeth is characterized by the frequent and convergent evolution of new cusps. The evolution of new cusps can be linked to tooth development via population-level variation. This allows testing whether development increases the capacity to evolve, or evolvability, by facilitating and even directing morphological change. In a population sample of living seals, variation in cusp number of individual teeth is from three to five cusps, the variably present cusps being the shortest ones that also develop last. By factoring in recent evidence on development, I show that the variation in cusp number can be explained by a patterning cascade mode of cusp development that cumulatively increases and directs height variation in short cusps. The biased variation in seal tooth cusps supports the recognition of teeth as highly evolvable because only small developmental changes are needed to produce large changes in size and number of small cusps. This evolvability of tooth cusps may have facilitated the fast and independent acquisition of new cusps in mammalian evolution. In phylogenetic studies, small cusps may be unreliable as phylogenetic signals. Population level variation can be a powerful tool in testing and generating hypotheses in developmental evolution studies. PMID:10706636

  9. Regulation of the Embryonic Cell Cycle During Mammalian Preimplantation Development.

    PubMed

    Palmer, N; Kaldis, P

    2016-01-01

    The preimplantation development stage of mammalian embryogenesis consists of a series of highly conserved, regulated, and predictable cell divisions. This process is essential to allow the rapid expansion and differentiation of a single-cell zygote into a multicellular blastocyst containing cells of multiple developmental lineages. This period of development, also known as the germinal stage, encompasses several important developmental transitions, which are accompanied by dramatic changes in cell cycle profiles and dynamics. These changes are driven primarily by differences in the establishment and enforcement of cell cycle checkpoints, which must be bypassed to facilitate the completion of essential cell cycle events. Much of the current knowledge in this area has been amassed through the study of knockout models in mice. These mouse models are powerful experimental tools, which have allowed us to dissect the relative dependence of the early embryonic cell cycles on various aspects of the cell cycle machinery and highlight the extent of functional redundancy between members of the same gene family. This chapter will explore the ways in which the cell cycle machinery, their accessory proteins, and their stimuli operate during mammalian preimplantation using mouse models as a reference and how this allows for the usually well-defined stages of the cell cycle to be shaped and transformed during this unique and critical stage of development. PMID:27475848

  10. Retinoic acid regulates embryonic development of mammalian submandibular salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Wright, Diana M; Buenger, Deanna E; Abashev, Timur M; Lindeman, Robert P; Ding, Jixiang; Sandell, Lisa L

    2015-11-01

    Organogenesis is orchestrated by cell and tissue interactions mediated by molecular signals. Identification of relevant signals, and the tissues that generate and receive them, are important goals of developmental research. Here, we demonstrate that Retinoic Acid (RA) is a critical signaling molecule important for morphogenesis of mammalian submandibular salivary glands (SMG). By examining late stage RA deficient embryos of Rdh10 mutant mice we show that SMG development requires RA in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we find that active RA signaling occurs in SMG tissues, arising earlier than any other known marker of SMG development and persisting throughout gland morphogenesis. At the initial bud stage of development, we find RA production occurs in SMG mesenchyme, while RA signaling occurs in epithelium. We also demonstrate active RA signaling occurs in glands cultured ex vivo, and treatment with an inhibitor of RA signaling blocks growth and branching. Together these data identify RA signaling as a direct regulator of SMG organogenesis. PMID:26278034

  11. Evolution and development of the mammalian cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Zoltán; Kaas, Jon H.; de Carlos, Juan A.; Hevner, Robert F.; Lein, Ed; Němec, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Comparative developmental studies of the mammalian brain can identify key changes that can generate the diverse structures and functions of brains. We have studied how the neocortex of early mammals became organized into functionally distinct areas, and how the current level of cortical cellular and laminar specialization arose from the simpler premammalian cortex. We demonstrate the neocortical organization in early mammals that is most informative for an understanding of how the large, complex human brain evolved from a long line of ancestors. The radial and tangential enlargement of the cortex was driven by changes in the patterns of cortical neurogenesis, including alterations in the proportions of distinct progenitor types. Some cortical cell populations travel to the cortex through tangential migration, others migrate radially. A number of recent studies have begun to characterize the chick, mouse, human and non-human primate cortical transcriptome to help us understand how gene expression relates to the development, and to the anatomical and functional organization of the adult neocortex. Although all mammalian forms share the basic layout of cortical areas, the areal proportions and distributions are driven by distinct evolutionary pressures acting on sensory and motor experiences during the individual ontogenies. PMID:24776993

  12. Studies Toward Birth and Early Mammalian Development in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Successful reproduction is the hallmark of a species' ability to adapt to its environment and must be realized to sustain life beyond Earth. Before taking this immense step, we need to understand the effects of altered gravity on critical phases of mammalian reproduction, viz., those events surrounding pregnancy, birth and the early development of offspring. No mammal has yet undergone birth in space. however studies spanning the gravity continuum from 0 to 2-g are revealing insights into how birth and early postnatal development will proceed in space. In this presentation, I will report the results of behavioral studies of rat mothers and offspring exposed from mid- to late pregnancy to either hypogravity (0-g) or hypergravity (1.5 or 2-g).

  13. Non-coding RNAs in mammalian sexual development.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, L; Wilhelm, D

    2009-01-01

    The present decade is witnessing a paradigm shift in our understanding of gene regulation. RNA, once relegated to an intermediary between DNA and protein, has emerged as a key contributor in the coordination of complex developmental pathways. For sexually reproducing organisms, propagation of the species is accomplished via an elaborate sexual phenotype. In mammals this consists of a highly complex cell lineage that has the capacity for intricate self-differentiation whilst maintaining the potential to generate all cell types upon fertilization. In addition, mammals possess a diverse range of somatic reproductive tissues and organs that often undergo dynamic morphological changes in response to a variety of external and internal cues. Although the protein component required to mediate these processes continues to be vigorously investigated, it is becoming increasingly apparent that an understanding of the non-coding RNA (ncRNA) component is required to develop a comprehensive picture of mammalian sexual development. PMID:20197714

  14. Two stages in the development of a mammalian retinocollicular projection.

    PubMed

    Mark, R F; Freeman, T C; Ding, Y; Marotte, L R

    1993-11-18

    The retinocollicular projection in the marsupial mammal the wallaby Macropus eugenii, has been investigated anatomically to determine the order in the developing projection and electrophysiologically to determine the time of onset of synaptic transmission by recording evoked potentials in the colliculus in response to stimulation of the optic nerve. There are two clear stages: a protracted period when retinal axons grow into the colliculus in coarse retinotopic order with no recordable electrical activity followed by the formation of terminal zones in retinotopically correct positions, the loss of more widely distributed axons and the onset of evoked potentials. The two stages are not seen in non-mammalian vertebrates where the projection is functional from the beginning. PMID:8110999

  15. Mammalian development does not recapitulate suspected key transformations in the evolutionary detachment of the mammalian middle ear.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Chaves, Héctor E; Wroe, Stephen W; Selwood, Lynne; Hinds, Lyn A; Leigh, Chris; Koyabu, Daisuke; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Weisbecker, Vera

    2016-01-13

    The ectotympanic, malleus and incus of the developing mammalian middle ear (ME) are initially attached to the dentary via Meckel's cartilage, betraying their origins from the primary jaw joint of land vertebrates. This recapitulation has prompted mostly unquantified suggestions that several suspected--but similarly unquantified--key evolutionary transformations leading to the mammalian ME are recapitulated in development, through negative allometry and posterior/medial displacement of ME bones relative to the jaw joint. Here we show, using µCT reconstructions, that neither allometric nor topological change is quantifiable in the pre-detachment ME development of six marsupials and two monotremes. Also, differential ME positioning in the two monotreme species is not recapitulated. This challenges the developmental prerequisites of widely cited evolutionary scenarios of definitive mammalian middle ear (DMME) evolution, highlighting the requirement for further fossil evidence to test these hypotheses. Possible association between rear molar eruption, full ME ossification and ME detachment in marsupials suggests functional divergence between dentary and ME as a trigger for developmental, and possibly also evolutionary, ME detachment. The stable positioning of the dentary and ME supports suggestions that a 'partial mammalian middle ear' as found in many mammaliaforms--probably with a cartilaginous Meckel's cartilage--represents the only developmentally plausible evolutionary DMME precursor. PMID:26763693

  16. The role of Six1 in mammalian auditory system development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weiming; Huang, Li; Wei, Zhu-Bo; Silvius, Derek; Tang, Bihui; Xu, Pin-Xian

    2003-09-01

    The homeobox Six genes, homologues to Drosophila sine oculis (so) gene, are expressed in multiple organs during mammalian development. However, their roles during auditory system development have not been studied. We report that Six1 is required for mouse auditory system development. During inner ear development, Six1 expression was first detected in the ventral region of the otic pit and later is restricted to the middle and ventral otic vesicle within which, respectively, the vestibular and auditory epithelia form. By contrast, Six1 expression is excluded from the dorsal otic vesicle within which the semicircular canals form. Six1 is also expressed in the vestibuloacoustic ganglion. At E15.5, Six1 is expressed in all sensory epithelia of the inner ear. Using recently generated Six1 mutant mice, we found that all Six1(+/-) mice showed some degree of hearing loss because of a failure of sound transmission in the middle ear. By contrast, Six1(-/-) mice displayed malformations of the auditory system involving the outer, middle and inner ears. The inner ear development in Six1(-/-) embryos arrested at the otic vesicle stage and all components of the inner ear failed to form due to increased cell death and reduced cell proliferation in the otic epithelium. Because we previously reported that Six1 expression in the otic vesicle is Eya1 dependent, we first clarified that Eya1 expression was unaffected in Six1(-/-) otic vesicle, further demonstrating that the Drosophila Eya-Six regulatory cassette is evolutionarily conserved during mammalian inner ear development. We also analyzed several other otic markers and found that the expression of Pax2 and Pax8 was unaffected in Six1(-/-) otic vesicle. By contrast, Six1 is required for the activation of Fgf3 expression and the maintenance of Fgf10 and Bmp4 expression in the otic vesicle. Furthermore, loss of Six1 function alters the expression pattern of Nkx5.1 and Gata3, indicating that Six1 is required for regional

  17. Histone H3.3 maintains genome integrity during mammalian development

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Chuan-Wei; Shibata, Yoichiro; Starmer, Joshua; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Histone H3.3 is a highly conserved histone H3 replacement variant in metazoans and has been implicated in many important biological processes, including cell differentiation and reprogramming. Germline and somatic mutations in H3.3 genomic incorporation pathway components or in H3.3 encoding genes have been associated with human congenital diseases and cancers, respectively. However, the role of H3.3 in mammalian development remains unclear. To address this question, we generated H3.3-null mouse models through classical genetic approaches. We found that H3.3 plays an essential role in mouse development. Complete depletion of H3.3 leads to developmental retardation and early embryonic lethality. At the cellular level, H3.3 loss triggers cell cycle suppression and cell death. Surprisingly, H3.3 depletion does not dramatically disrupt gene regulation in the developing embryo. Instead, H3.3 depletion causes dysfunction of heterochromatin structures at telomeres, centromeres, and pericentromeric regions of chromosomes, leading to mitotic defects. The resulting karyotypical abnormalities and DNA damage lead to p53 pathway activation. In summary, our results reveal that an important function of H3.3 is to support chromosomal heterochromatic structures, thus maintaining genome integrity during mammalian development. PMID:26159997

  18. Monotreme ossification sequences and the riddle of mammalian skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Weisbecker, Vera

    2011-05-01

    The developmental differences between marsupials, placentals, and monotremes are thought to be reflected in differing patterns of postcranial development and diversity. However, developmental polarities remain obscured by the rarity of monotreme data. Here, I present the first postcranial ossification sequences of the monotreme echidna and platypus, and compare these with published data from other mammals and amniotes. Strikingly, monotreme stylopodia (humerus, femur) ossify after the more distal zeugopodia (radius/ulna, tibia/fibula), resembling only the European mole among all amniotes assessed. European moles also share extreme humeral adaptations to rotation digging and/or swimming with monotremes, suggesting a causal relationship between adaptation and ossification heterochrony. Late femoral ossification with respect to tibia/fibula in monotremes and moles points toward developmental integration of the serially homologous fore- and hindlimb bones. Monotreme cervical ribs and coracoids ossify later than in most amniotes but are similarly timed as homologous ossifications in therians, where they are lost as independent bones. This loss may have been facilitated by a developmental delay of coracoids and cervical ribs at the base of mammals. The monotreme sequence, although highly derived, resembles placentals more than marsupials. Thus, marsupial postcranial development, and potentially related diversity constraints, may not represent the ancestral mammalian condition. PMID:21521190

  19. Autosomal location of genes from the conserved mammalian X in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus): implications for mammalian sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Waters, Paul D; Delbridge, Margaret L; Deakin, Janine E; El-Mogharbel, Nisrine; Kirby, Patrick J; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian sex chromosomes evolved from an ancient autosomal pair. Mapping of human X- and Y-borne genes in distantly related mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates has proved valuable to help deduce the evolution of this unique part of the genome. The platypus, a monotreme mammal distantly related to eutherians and marsupials, has an extraordinary sex chromosome system comprising five X and five Y chromosomes that form a translocation chain at male meiosis. The largest X chromosome (X1), which lies at one end of the chain, has considerable homology to the human X. Using comparative mapping and the emerging chicken database, we demonstrate that part of the therian X chromosome, previously thought to be conserved across all mammals, was lost from the platypus X1 to an autosome. This region included genes flanking the XIST locus, and also genes with Y-linked homologues that are important to male reproduction in therians. Since these genes lie on the X in marsupials and eutherians, and also on the homologous region of chicken chromosome 4, this represents a loss from the monotreme X rather than an additional evolutionary stratum of the human X. PMID:15973504

  20. ANEUPLOIDY TEST DEVELOPMENT: KINETOCHORE STAINING IN MAMMALIAN SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the project was to determine the feasibility of using human-derived antibodies against the chromosomal kinetochore region coupled with immunofluorescence staining as a method for evaluating the induction of aneuploidy in mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. The te...

  1. Development-Inspired Reprogramming of the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Arlotta, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka shared the Nobel Prize for the exciting demonstration that the identity of differentiated cells is not irreversibly determined but can be changed back to a pluripotent state under appropriate instructive signals. The principle that differentiated cells can revert to an embryonic state and even be converted directly from one cell-type into another not only turns fundamental principles of development on their head but also has profound implications for regenerative medicine. Replacement of diseased tissue with newly reprogrammed cells and modeling of human disease are concrete opportunities. Here, we focus on the central nervous system to consider whether and how reprogramming of cell identity may impact regeneration and modeling of a system historically considered immutable and hardwired. PMID:24482482

  2. Effects of simulated weightlessness on mammalian development. Part 1: Development of clinostat for mammalian tissue culture and use in studies on meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolegemuth, D. J.; Grills, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on three aspects of mammalian reproduction: oocyte development, fertilization, and early embryogenesis was studied. Zero-gravity conditions within the laboratory by construction of a clinostat designed to support in vitro tissue culture were simulated and the effects of simulated weightlessness on meiotic maturation in mammalian oocytes using mouse as the model system were studied. The timing and frequency of germinal vesicule breakdown and polar body extrusion, and the structural and numerical properties of meiotic chromosomes at Metaphase and Metaphase of meiosis are assessed.

  3. Implications for Development Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Heather E.

    1979-01-01

    Outlines issues that could affect the opportunities of developing countries to take advantage of the benefits of communication technology. Discusses the allocation of the frequency spectrum and the use of satellite technology. (JMF)

  4. Kremen1 regulates mechanosensory hair cell development in the mammalian cochlea and the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, Joanna F; Thompkins, Cathrine; Noda, Teppei; Nishimura, Koji; Sun, Willy W; Lin, Shuh-Yow; Coffin, Allison; Dabdoub, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Here we present spatio-temporal localization of Kremen1, a transmembrane receptor, in the mammalian cochlea, and investigate its role in the formation of sensory organs in mammal and fish model organisms. We show that Kremen1 is expressed in prosensory cells during cochlear development and in supporting cells of the adult mouse cochlea. Based on this expression pattern, we investigated whether Kremen1 functions to modulate cell fate decisions in the prosensory domain of the developing cochlea. We used gain and loss-of-function experiments to show that Kremen1 is sufficient to bias cells towards supporting cell fate, and is implicated in suppression of hair cell formation. In addition to our findings in the mouse cochlea, we examined the effects of over expression and loss of Kremen1 in the zebrafish lateral line. In agreement with our mouse data, we show that over expression of Kremen1 has a negative effect on the number of mechanosensory cells that form in the zebrafish neuromasts, and that fish lacking Kremen1 protein develop more hair cells per neuromast compared to wild type fish. Collectively, these data support an inhibitory role for Kremen1 in hair cell fate specification. PMID:27550540

  5. Kremen1 regulates mechanosensory hair cell development in the mammalian cochlea and the zebrafish lateral line

    PubMed Central

    Mulvaney, Joanna F.; Thompkins, Cathrine; Noda, Teppei; Nishimura, Koji; Sun, Willy W.; Lin, Shuh-Yow; Coffin, Allison; Dabdoub, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Here we present spatio-temporal localization of Kremen1, a transmembrane receptor, in the mammalian cochlea, and investigate its role in the formation of sensory organs in mammal and fish model organisms. We show that Kremen1 is expressed in prosensory cells during cochlear development and in supporting cells of the adult mouse cochlea. Based on this expression pattern, we investigated whether Kremen1 functions to modulate cell fate decisions in the prosensory domain of the developing cochlea. We used gain and loss-of-function experiments to show that Kremen1 is sufficient to bias cells towards supporting cell fate, and is implicated in suppression of hair cell formation. In addition to our findings in the mouse cochlea, we examined the effects of over expression and loss of Kremen1 in the zebrafish lateral line. In agreement with our mouse data, we show that over expression of Kremen1 has a negative effect on the number of mechanosensory cells that form in the zebrafish neuromasts, and that fish lacking Kremen1 protein develop more hair cells per neuromast compared to wild type fish. Collectively, these data support an inhibitory role for Kremen1 in hair cell fate specification. PMID:27550540

  6. Intracellular protein degradation in mammalian cells: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Erwin; Aguado, Carmen; Cárcel, Jaime; Esteban, Inmaculada; Esteve, Juan Miguel; Ghislat, Ghita; Moruno, José Félix; Vidal, José Manuel; Sáez, Rosana

    2009-08-01

    In higher organisms, dietary proteins are broken down into amino acids within the digestive tract but outside the cells, which incorporate the resulting amino acids into their metabolism. However, under certain conditions, an organism loses more nitrogen than is assimilated in the diet. This additional loss was found in the past century to come from intracellular proteins and started an intensive research that produced an enormous expansion of the field and a dispersed literature. Therefore, our purpose is to provide an updated summary of the current knowledge on the proteolytic machinery involved in intracellular protein degradation and its physiological and pathological relevance, especially addressed to newcomers in the field who may find further details in more specialized reviews. However, even providing a general overview, this is an extremely wide field and, therefore, we mainly focus on mammalian cells, while other cells will be mentioned only for comparison purposes. PMID:19399586

  7. Characterization of BRD4 during Mammalian Postmeiotic Sperm Development

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jessica M.; Donahue, Greg; Wang, Xiaoshi; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella; Luense, Lacey J.; Weller, Angela H.; Bartolomei, Marisa S.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Meyer, Ralph G.; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    During spermiogenesis, the postmeiotic phase of mammalian spermatogenesis, transcription is progressively repressed as nuclei of haploid spermatids are compacted through a dramatic chromatin reorganization involving hyperacetylation and replacement of most histones with protamines. Although BRDT functions in transcription and histone removal in spermatids, it is unknown whether other BET family proteins play a role. Immunofluorescence of spermatogenic cells revealed BRD4 in a ring around the nuclei of spermatids containing hyperacetylated histones. The ring lies directly adjacent to the acroplaxome, the cytoskeletal base of the acrosome, previously linked to chromatin reorganization. The BRD4 ring does not form in acrosomal mutant mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing in spermatids revealed enrichment of BRD4 and acetylated histones at the promoters of active genes. BRD4 and BRDT show distinct and synergistic binding patterns, with a pronounced enrichment of BRD4 at spermatogenesis-specific genes. Direct association of BRD4 with acetylated H4 decreases in late spermatids as acetylated histones are removed from the condensing nucleus in a wave following the progressing acrosome. These data provide evidence of a prominent transcriptional role for BRD4 and suggest a possible removal mechanism for chromatin components from the genome via the progressing acrosome as transcription is repressed and chromatin is compacted during spermiogenesis. PMID:25691659

  8. Mammalian-derived respiratory allergens - implications for diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to furry animals.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Ola B; van Hage, Marianne; Grönlund, Hans

    2014-03-01

    Furry animals cause respiratory allergies in a significant proportion of the population. A majority of all mammalian allergens are spread as airborne particles, and several have been detected in environments where furry animals are not normally kept. The repertoire of allergens from each source belongs to a restricted number of allergen families. Classification of allergen families is particularly important for the characterization of allergenicity and cross-reactivity of allergens. In fact, major mammalian allergens are taken from only three protein families, i.e. the secretoglobin, lipocalin and kallikrein families. In particular, the lipocalin superfamily harbours major allergens in all important mammalian allergen sources, and cross-reactivity between lipocalin allergens may explain cross-species sensitization between mammals. The identification of single allergen components is of importance to improve diagnosis and therapy of allergic patients using component-resolved diagnostics and allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) respectively. Major disadvantages with crude allergen extracts for these applications emphasize the benefits of careful characterization of individual allergens. Furthermore, detailed knowledge of the characteristics of an allergen is crucial to formulate attenuated allergy vaccines, e.g. hypoallergens. The diverse repertoires of individual allergens from different mammalian species influence the diagnostic potential and clinical efficacy of ASIT to furry animals. As such, detailed knowledge of individual allergens is essential for adequate clinical evaluation. This review compiles current knowledge of the allergen families of mammalian species, and discusses how this information may be used for improved diagnosis and therapy of individuals allergic to mammals. PMID:24041755

  9. Implications of recent geological investigations of the Mozambique Channel for the mammalian colonization of Madagascar.

    PubMed Central

    McCall, R A

    1997-01-01

    Madagascar separated from continental Africa during the break-up of Gondwanaland early in the Cretaceous. The presence of several terrestrial mammalian groups on Madagascar is paradoxical as (i) these groups postdate the departure of Madagascar from Africa: and ii) terrestrial mammals are poor dispersers across wide water barriers. Recent geological studies focusing on the Davie Fracture Zone of the Mozambique Channel offer a resolution to this situation, by suggesting the presence of a land-bridge from the mid-Eocene to the early Miocene, an interval that matches the ages of Madagascar's mammalian groups. PMID:9178538

  10. Biophysical features of MagA expression in mammalian cells: implications for MRI contrast

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Anindita; Quiaoit, Karina; Thompson, R. Terry; Prato, Frank S.; Gelman, Neil; Goldhawk, Donna E.

    2014-01-01

    We compared overexpression of the magnetotactic bacterial gene MagA with the modified mammalian ferritin genes HF + LF, in which both heavy and light subunits lack iron response elements. Whereas both expression systems have been proposed for use in non-invasive, magnetic resonance (MR) reporter gene expression, limited information is available regarding their relative potential for providing gene-based contrast. Measurements of MR relaxation rates in these expression systems are important for optimizing cell detection and specificity, for developing quantification methods, and for refinement of gene-based iron contrast using magnetosome associated genes. We measured the total transverse relaxation rate (R2*), its irreversible and reversible components (R2 and R2′, respectively) and the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) in MDA-MB-435 tumor cells. Clonal lines overexpressing MagA and HF + LF were cultured in the presence and absence of iron supplementation, and mounted in a spherical phantom for relaxation mapping at 3 Tesla. In addition to MR measures, cellular changes in iron and zinc were evaluated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, in ATP by luciferase bioluminescence and in transferrin receptor by Western blot. Only transverse relaxation rates were significantly higher in iron-supplemented, MagA- and HF + LF-expressing cells compared to non-supplemented cells and the parental control. R2* provided the greatest absolute difference and R2′ showed the greatest relative difference, consistent with the notion that R2′ may be a more specific indicator of iron-based contrast than R2, as observed in brain tissue. Iron supplementation of MagA- and HF + LF-expressing cells increased the iron/zinc ratio approximately 20-fold, while transferrin receptor expression decreased approximately 10-fold. Level of ATP was similar across all cell types and culture conditions. These results highlight the potential of magnetotactic bacterial gene expression for

  11. Mammalian dwarfins are phosphorylated in response to transforming growth factor beta and are implicated in control of cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Yingling, J M; Das, P; Savage, C; Zhang, M; Padgett, R W; Wang, X F

    1996-01-01

    The dwarfin protein family has been genetically implicated in transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)-like signaling pathways in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. To investigate the role of these proteins in mammalian signaling pathways, we have isolated and studied two murine dwarfins, dwarfin-A and dwarfin-C. Using antibodies against dwarfin-A and dwarfin-C, we show that these two dwarfins and an immunogenically related protein, presumably also a dwarfin, are phosphorylated in a time- and dose-dependent manner in response to TGF-beta. Bone morphogenetic protein 2, a TGF-beta superfamily ligand, induces phosphorylation of only the related dwarfin protein. Thus, TGF-beta superfamily members may use overlapping yet distinct dwarfins to mediate their intracellular signals. Furthermore, transient overexpression of either dwarfin-A or dwarfin-C causes growth arrest, implicating the dwarfins in growth regulation. This work provides strong biochemical and preliminary functional evidence that dwarfin-A and dwarfin-C represent prototypic members of a family of mammalian proteins that may serve as mediators of signaling pathways for TGF-beta superfamily members. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8799132

  12. Embryonic development of circadian clocks in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Dominic; Koch, Christiane E.; Oster, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    In most species, self-sustained molecular clocks regulate 24-h rhythms of behavior and physiology. In mammals, a circadian pacemaker residing in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) receives photic signals from the retina and synchronizes subordinate clocks in non-SCN tissues. The emergence of circadian rhythmicity during development has been extensively studied for many years. In mice, neuronal development in the presumptive SCN region of the embryonic hypothalamus occurs on days 12–15 of gestation. Intra-SCN circuits differentiate during the following days and retinal projections reach the SCN, and thus mediate photic entrainment, only after birth. In contrast the genetic components of the clock gene machinery are expressed much earlier and during midgestation SCN explants and isolated neurons are capable of generating molecular oscillations in culture. In vivo metabolic rhythms in the SCN, however, are observed not earlier than the 19th day of rat gestation, and rhythmic expression of clock genes is hardly detectable until after birth. Together these data indicate that cellular coupling and, thus, tissue-wide synchronization of single-cell rhythms, may only develop very late during embryogenesis. In this mini-review we describe the developmental origin of the SCN structure and summarize our current knowledge about the functional initiation and entrainment of the circadian pacemaker during embryonic development. PMID:25520627

  13. Constraints on Mammalian forelimb development: insights from developmental disparity.

    PubMed

    Ross, Darcy; Marcot, Jonathan D; Betteridge, Keith J; Nascone-Yoder, Nanette; Bailey, C Scott; Sears, Karen E

    2013-12-01

    Tetrapod limb development has been studied extensively for decades, yet the strength and role of developmental constraints in this process remains unresolved. Mammals exhibit a particularly wide array of limb morphologies associated with various locomotion modes and behaviors, providing a useful system for identifying periods of developmental constraint and conserved developmental mechanisms or morphologies. In this study, landmark-based geometric morphometrics are used to investigate levels and patterns of morphological diversity (disparity) among the developing forelimbs of four mammals with diverse limb morphologies: mice, opossums, horses, and pigs. Results indicate that disparity among the forelimbs of these species slightly decreases or stays the same from the appearance of the limb ridge to the bud stage, and increases dramatically from the paddle through tissue regression stages. Heterochrony exhibited by the precocial opossum limb was not found to drive these patterns of morphological disparity, suggesting that the low disparity of the middle stages of limb development (e.g., paddle stage) is driven by processes operating within the limb and is likely not a result of embryo-wide constraint. PMID:24299415

  14. The influence of growth factors on the development of preimplantation mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cueto, L; Gerton, G L

    2001-01-01

    The development of the preimplantation mammalian embryo from a fertilized egg to a blastocyst capable of implanting in the uterus is a complex process. Cell division must be carefully programmed. The embryonic genome must be activated at the appropriate stage of development, and the pattern of gene expression must be carefully coordinated for the initiation of the correct program of differentiation. Cell fates must be chosen to establish specific cell types such as the inner cell mass and the trophectoderm, which give rise to the embryo proper and the placenta, respectively. This review summarizes recent findings concerning the influence of growth factors on the development of preimplantation mammalian embryos. Maternal factors secreted into the lumen of the female reproductive tract as well as substances synthesized by the developing embryo itself help to regulate this process. Studies of embryos in culture and investigations using homologous recombination to create embryos and animals null for specific genes have enabled the identification of several growth factors that appear essential for preimplantation mammalian embryo development. Some of the factors are required maternal factors; others are embryo-derived autocrine and paracrine factors. Studies using molecular biology are beginning to identify differences in the patterns of genes expressed by naturally derived embryos and those developing in culture. The knowledge gained from studies on growth factors, media, embryonic development, and gene expression should help improve culture conditions for embryos and will provide for safer outcomes from assisted reproductive procedures in human and animal clinics. PMID:11750739

  15. A new symmetrodont mammal from China and its implications for mammalian evolution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Wang, Y; Luo, Z; Li, C

    1997-11-13

    A new symmetrodont mammal has been discovered in the Mesozoic era (Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous period) of Liaoning Province, China. Archaic therian mammals, including symmetrodonts, are extinct relatives of the living marsupial and placental therians. However, these archaic therians have been mostly documented by fragmentary fossils. This newfossil taxon, represented by a nearly complete postcranial skeleton and a partial skull with dentition, is the best-preserved symmetrodont mammal yet discovered. It provides a new insight into the relationships of the major lineages of mammals and the evolution of the mammalian skeleton. Our analysis suggests that this new taxon represents a part of the early therian radiation before the divergence of living marsupials and placentals; that therians and multituberculates are more closely related to each other than either group is to other mammalian lineages; that archaic therians lacked the more parasagittal posture of the forelimb of most living therian mammals; and that archaic therians, such as symmetrodonts, retained the primitive feature of a finger-like promontorium (possibly with a straight cochlea) of the non-therian mammals. The fully coiled cochlea evolved later in more derived therian mammals, and is therefore convergent to the partially coiled cochlea of monotremes. PMID:9367151

  16. Mammalian mitochondrial D-loop region structural analysis: identification of new conserved sequences and their functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Sbisà, E; Tanzariello, F; Reyes, A; Pesole, G; Saccone, C

    1997-12-31

    This paper reports the first comprehensive analysis of Displacement loop (D-loop) region sequences from ten different mammalian orders. It represents a systematic evolutionary study at the molecular level on regulatory homologous regions in organisms belonging to a well defined class, mammalia, which radiated about 150 million years ago (Mya). We have aligned and analyzed 26 complete D-loop region sequences available in the literature and the fat dormouse sequence, recently determined in our laboratory. The novelty of our alignment consists of the extensive manual revision of the preliminary output obtained by computer program to optimize sequence similarity, particularly for the two peripheral domains displaying heterogeneity in length and the presence of repeated sequences. The multialignment is available at the WWW site: http://www.ba.cnr.it/dloop.html. Our comparative study has allowed us to identify new conserved sequence blocks present in all the species under consideration and events of insertion/deletion which have important implications in both functional and evolutionary aspects. In particular we have detected two blocks, about 60 bp long, extended termination associated sequences (ETAS1 and ETAS2) conserved in all the organisms considered. Evaluation against experimental work suggests a possible functional role of ETAS1 and ETAS2 in the regulation of replication and transcription and targeted experimental approaches. The analyses on conserved sequence blocks (CSBs) clearly indicate that CSB1 is the only very essential element, common to all mammalian mt genomes, while CSB2 and CSB3 could be involved in different though related functions, probably species specific, and thus more linked to nuclear mitochondrial coevolutionary processes. Our hypothesis on the different functional implications of the conserved elements, CSBs and TASs, reported so far as main regulatory signals, would explain the different conservation of these elements in evolution. Moreover

  17. Complex interactions among mammalian carnivores in Australia, and their implications for wildlife management.

    PubMed

    Glen, Alistair S; Dickman, Chris R

    2005-08-01

    Mammalian carnivore populations are often intensively managed, either because the carnivore in question is endangered, or because it is viewed as a pest and is subjected to control measures, or both. Most management programmes treat carnivore species in isolation. However, there is a large and emerging body of evidence to demonstrate that populations of different carnivores interact with each other in a variety of complex ways. Thus, the removal or introduction of predators to or from a system can often affect other species in ways that are difficult to predict. Wildlife managers must consider such interactions when planning predator control programmes. Integrated predator control will require a greater understanding of the complex relationships between species. In many parts of the world, sympatric species of carnivores have coexisted over an evolutionary time scale so that niche differentiation has occurred, and competition is difficult to observe. Australia has experienced numerous introductions during the past 200 years, including those of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and the feral cat (Felis catus). These species now exist in sympatry with native mammalian predators, providing ecologists with the opportunity to study their interactions without the confounding effects of coevolution. Despite an increasing body of observational evidence for complex interactions among native and introduced predators in Australia, few studies have attempted to clarify these relationships experimentally, and the interactions remain largely unacknowledged. A greater understanding of these interactions would provide ecologists and wildlife managers world-wide with the ability to construct robust predictive models of carnivore communities, and to identify their broader effects on ecosystem functioning. We suggest that future research should focus on controlled and replicated predator removal or addition experiments. The dingo (Canis lupus dingo), as a likely keystone species, should be

  18. Identification of molecular compartments and genetic circuitry in the developing mammalian kidney

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Valerius, M. Todd; Duah, Mary; Staser, Karl; Hansard, Jennifer K.; Guo, Jin-jin; McMahon, Jill; Vaughan, Joe; Faria, Diane; Georgas, Kylie; Rumballe, Bree; Ren, Qun; Krautzberger, A. Michaela; Junker, Jan P.; Thiagarajan, Rathi D.; Machanick, Philip; Gray, Paul A.; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Rowitch, David H.; Stiles, Charles D.; Ma, Qiufu; Grimmond, Sean M.; Bailey, Timothy L.; Little, Melissa H.; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Lengthy developmental programs generate cell diversity within an organotypic framework, enabling the later physiological actions of each organ system. Cell identity, cell diversity and cell function are determined by cell type-specific transcriptional programs; consequently, transcriptional regulatory factors are useful markers of emerging cellular complexity, and their expression patterns provide insights into the regulatory mechanisms at play. We performed a comprehensive genome-scale in situ expression screen of 921 transcriptional regulators in the developing mammalian urogenital system. Focusing on the kidney, analysis of regional-specific expression patterns identified novel markers and cell types associated with development and patterning of the urinary system. Furthermore, promoter analysis of synexpressed genes predicts transcriptional control mechanisms that regulate cell differentiation. The annotated informational resource (www.gudmap.org) will facilitate functional analysis of the mammalian kidney and provides useful information for the generation of novel genetic tools to manipulate emerging cell populations. PMID:22510988

  19. Behavioral biology of mammalian reproduction and development for a space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alberts, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Space Station research includes two kinds of adaption to space: somatic (the adjustments made by an organism, within its lifetime, in response to local conditions), and transgenerational adaption (continuous exposure across sequential life cycles of genetic descendents). Transgenerational effects are akin to evolutionary process. Areas of a life Sciences Program in a space station address the questions of the behavioral biology of mammalian reproduction and development, using the Norway rat as the focus of experimentation.

  20. DEVELOPMENT, STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF THE MAMMALIAN IN VIVO ASSAYS IN THE PROPOSED TIER I SCREENING BATTERY FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research directly supports the development, standardization and validation of several Tier 1 screening mammalian in vivo assays. Through the development and use of many of these assays for testing specific hypothesis in their respective research programs, these investigato...

  1. Positive selection neighboring functionally essential sites and disease-implicated regions of mammalian reproductive proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reproductive proteins are central to the continuation of all mammalian species. The evolution of these proteins has been greatly influenced by environmental pressures induced by pathogens, rival sperm, sexual selection and sexual conflict. Positive selection has been demonstrated in many of these proteins with particular focus on primate lineages. However, the mammalia are a diverse group in terms of mating habits, population sizes and germ line generation times. We have examined the selective pressures at work on a number of novel reproductive proteins across a wide variety of mammalia. Results We show that selective pressures on reproductive proteins are highly varied. Of the 10 genes analyzed in detail, all contain signatures of positive selection either across specific sites or in specific lineages or a combination of both. Our analysis of SP56 and Col1a1 are entirely novel and the results show positively selected sites present in each gene. Our findings for the Col1a1 gene are suggestive of a link between positive selection and severe disease type. We find evidence in our dataset to suggest that interacting proteins are evolving in symphony: most likely to maintain interacting functionality. Conclusion Our in silico analyses show positively selected sites are occurring near catalytically important regions suggesting selective pressure to maximize efficient fertilization. In those cases where a mechanism of protein function is not fully understood, the sites presented here represent ideal candidates for mutational study. This work has highlighted the widespread rate heterogeneity in mutational rates across the mammalia and specifically has shown that the evolution of reproductive proteins is highly varied depending on the species and interacting partners. We have shown that positive selection and disease are closely linked in the Col1a1 gene. PMID:20149245

  2. Kinetic and Mechanistic Characterization and Versatile Catalytic Properties of Mammalian Glutaredoxin 2: Implications for Intracellular Roles†

    PubMed Central

    Gallogly, Molly M.; Starke, David W.; Leonberg, Amanda K.; Ospina, Susan M. English; Mieyal, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Glutaredoxin (Grx)-catalyzed deglutathionylation of protein–glutathione mixed disulfides (protein-SSG) serves important roles in redox homeostasis and signal transduction, regulating diverse physiological and pathophysiological events. Mammalian cells have two Grx isoforms: Grx1, localized to the cytosol and mitochondrial intermembrane space, and Grx2, localized primarily to the mitochondrial matrix [Pai, H. V., et al. (2007) Antioxid. Redox Signaling 9, 2027–2033]. The catalytic behavior of Grx1 has been characterized extensively, whereas Grx2 catalysis is less well understood. We observed that human Grx1 and Grx2 exhibit key catalytic similarities, including selectivity for protein-SSG substrates and a nucleophilic, double-displacement, monothiol mechanism exhibiting a strong commitment to catalysis. A key distinction between Grx1- and Grx2-mediated deglutathionylation is decreased catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) of Grx2 for protein deglutathionylation (due primarily to a decreased kcat), reflecting a higher pKa of its catalytic cysteine, as well as a decreased enhancement of nucleophilicity of the second substrate, GSH. As documented previously for hGrx1 [Starke, D. W., et al. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 14607–14613], hGrx2 catalyzes glutathione-thiyl radical (GS•) scavenging, and it also mediates GS transfer (protein S-glutathionylation) reactions, where GS• serves as a superior glutathionyl donor substrate for formation of GAPDH-SSG, compared to GSNO and GSSG. In contrast to its lower kcat for deglutathionylation reactions, Grx2 promotes GS-transfer to the model protein substrate GAPDH at rates equivalent to those of Grx1. Estimation of Grx1 and Grx2 concentrations within mitochondria predicts comparable deglutathionylation activities within the mitochondrial subcompartments, suggesting localized regulatory functions for both isozymes. PMID:18816065

  3. Creb1 regulates late stage mammalian lung development via respiratory epithelial and mesenchymal-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Antony, N.; McDougall, A. R.; Mantamadiotis, T.; Cole, T. J.; Bird, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    During mammalian lung development, the morphological transition from respiratory tree branching morphogenesis to a predominantly saccular architecture, capable of air-breathing at birth, is dependent on physical forces as well as molecular signaling by a range of transcription factors including the cAMP response element binding protein 1 (Creb1). Creb1−/− mutant mice exhibit complete neonatal lethality consistent with a lack of lung maturation beyond the branching phase. To further define its role in the developing mouse lung, we deleted Creb1 separately in the respiratory epithelium and mesenchyme. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of a morphological lung defect nor compromised neonatal survival in either conditional Creb1 mutant. Interestingly however, loss of mesenchymal Creb1 on a genetic background lacking the related Crem protein showed normal lung development but poor neonatal survival. To investigate the underlying requirement for Creb1 for normal lung development, Creb1−/− mice were re-examined for defects in both respiratory muscles and glucocorticoid hormone signaling, which are also required for late stage lung maturation. However, these systems appeared normal in Creb1−/− mice. Together our results suggest that the requirement of Creb1 for normal mammalian lung morphogenesis is not dependent upon its expression in lung epithelium or mesenchyme, nor its role in musculoskeletal development. PMID:27150575

  4. Creb1 regulates late stage mammalian lung development via respiratory epithelial and mesenchymal-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Antony, N; McDougall, A R; Mantamadiotis, T; Cole, T J; Bird, A D

    2016-01-01

    During mammalian lung development, the morphological transition from respiratory tree branching morphogenesis to a predominantly saccular architecture, capable of air-breathing at birth, is dependent on physical forces as well as molecular signaling by a range of transcription factors including the cAMP response element binding protein 1 (Creb1). Creb1(-/-) mutant mice exhibit complete neonatal lethality consistent with a lack of lung maturation beyond the branching phase. To further define its role in the developing mouse lung, we deleted Creb1 separately in the respiratory epithelium and mesenchyme. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of a morphological lung defect nor compromised neonatal survival in either conditional Creb1 mutant. Interestingly however, loss of mesenchymal Creb1 on a genetic background lacking the related Crem protein showed normal lung development but poor neonatal survival. To investigate the underlying requirement for Creb1 for normal lung development, Creb1(-/-) mice were re-examined for defects in both respiratory muscles and glucocorticoid hormone signaling, which are also required for late stage lung maturation. However, these systems appeared normal in Creb1(-/-) mice. Together our results suggest that the requirement of Creb1 for normal mammalian lung morphogenesis is not dependent upon its expression in lung epithelium or mesenchyme, nor its role in musculoskeletal development. PMID:27150575

  5. BMP receptor IA is required in mammalian neural crest cells for development of the cardiac outflow tract and ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Stottmann, Rolf W.; Choi, Murim; Mishina, Yuji; Meyers, Erik N.; Klingensmith, John

    2010-01-01

    Summary The neural crest is a multipotent, migratory cell population arising from the border of the neural and surface ectoderm. In mouse, the initial migratory neural crest cells occur at the five-somite stage. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), particularly BMP2 and BMP4, have been implicated as regulators of neural crest cell induction, maintenance, migration, differentiation and survival. Mouse has three known BMP2/4 type I receptors, of which Bmpr1a is expressed in the neural tube sufficiently early to be involved in neural crest development from the outset; however, earlier roles in other domains obscure its requirement in the neural crest. We have ablated Bmpr1a specifically in the neural crest, beginning at the five-somite stage. We find that most aspects of neural crest development occur normally; suggesting that BMPRIA is unnecessary for many aspects of early neural crest biology. However, mutant embryos display a shortened cardiac outflow tract with defective septation, a process known to require neural crest cells and to be essential for perinatal viability. Surprisingly, these embryos die in mid-gestation from acute heart failure, with reduced proliferation of ventricular myocardium. The myocardial defect may involve reduced BMP signaling in a novel, minor population of neural crest derivatives in the epicardium, a known source of ventricular myocardial proliferation signals. These results demonstrate that BMP2/4 signaling in mammalian neural crest derivatives is essential for outflow tract development and may regulate a crucial proliferation signal for the ventricular myocardium. PMID:15073157

  6. The evolution of basal progenitors in the developing non-mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Tadashi; Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Yamashita, Wataru; Wakamatsu, Yoshio; Murakami, Yasunori; Calegari, Federico; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The amplification of distinct neural stem/progenitor cell subtypes during embryogenesis is essential for the intricate brain structures present in various vertebrate species. For example, in both mammals and birds, proliferative neuronal progenitors transiently appear on the basal side of the ventricular zone of the telencephalon (basal progenitors), where they contribute to the enlargement of the neocortex and its homologous structures. In placental mammals, this proliferative cell population can be subdivided into several groups that include Tbr2(+) intermediate progenitors and basal radial glial cells (bRGs). Here, we report that basal progenitors in the developing avian pallium show unique morphological and molecular characteristics that resemble the characteristics of bRGs, a progenitor population that is abundant in gyrencephalic mammalian neocortex. Manipulation of LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched protein) and Cdk4/cyclin D1, both essential regulators of neural progenitor dynamics, revealed that basal progenitors and Tbr2(+) cells are distinct cell lineages in the developing avian telencephalon. Furthermore, we identified a small population of subapical mitotic cells in the developing brains of a wide variety of amniotes and amphibians. Our results suggest that unique progenitor subtypes are amplified in mammalian and avian lineages by modifying common mechanisms of neural stem/progenitor regulation during amniote brain evolution. PMID:26732839

  7. Advances in Mammalian Cell Line Development Technologies for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tingfeng; Yang, Yuansheng; Ng, Say Kong

    2013-01-01

    From 2006 to 2011, an average of 15 novel recombinant protein therapeutics have been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) annually. In addition, the expiration of blockbuster biologics has also spurred the emergence of biosimilars. The increasing numbers of innovator biologic products and biosimilars have thus fuelled the demand of production cell lines with high productivity. Currently, mammalian cell line development technologies used by most biopharmaceutical companies are based on either the methotrexate (MTX) amplification technology or the glutamine synthetase (GS) system. With both systems, the cell clones obtained are highly heterogeneous, as a result of random genome integration by the gene of interest and the gene amplification process. Consequently, large numbers of cell clones have to be screened to identify rare stable high producer cell clones. As such, the cell line development process typically requires 6 to 12 months and is a time, capital and labour intensive process. This article reviews established advances in protein expression and clone screening which are the core technologies in mammalian cell line development. Advancements in these component technologies are vital to improve the speed and efficiency of generating robust and highly productive cell line for large scale production of protein therapeutics. PMID:24276168

  8. The evolution of basal progenitors in the developing non-mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tadashi; Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Yamashita, Wataru; Wakamatsu, Yoshio; Murakami, Yasunori; Calegari, Federico; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The amplification of distinct neural stem/progenitor cell subtypes during embryogenesis is essential for the intricate brain structures present in various vertebrate species. For example, in both mammals and birds, proliferative neuronal progenitors transiently appear on the basal side of the ventricular zone of the telencephalon (basal progenitors), where they contribute to the enlargement of the neocortex and its homologous structures. In placental mammals, this proliferative cell population can be subdivided into several groups that include Tbr2+ intermediate progenitors and basal radial glial cells (bRGs). Here, we report that basal progenitors in the developing avian pallium show unique morphological and molecular characteristics that resemble the characteristics of bRGs, a progenitor population that is abundant in gyrencephalic mammalian neocortex. Manipulation of LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched protein) and Cdk4/cyclin D1, both essential regulators of neural progenitor dynamics, revealed that basal progenitors and Tbr2+ cells are distinct cell lineages in the developing avian telencephalon. Furthermore, we identified a small population of subapical mitotic cells in the developing brains of a wide variety of amniotes and amphibians. Our results suggest that unique progenitor subtypes are amplified in mammalian and avian lineages by modifying common mechanisms of neural stem/progenitor regulation during amniote brain evolution. PMID:26732839

  9. Cellular and molecular events on the development of mammalian thyroid C cells.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Yoko

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid C cells synthesize and secrete calcitonin, a serum calcium-lowering hormone. This review provides our current understanding of mammalian thyroid C cells from the molecular and morphological perspectives. Several transcription factors and signaling molecules involved in the development of C cells have been identified, and genes expressed in the pharyngeal pouch endoderm, neural crest-derived mesenchyme in the pharyngeal arches, and ultimobranchial body play critical roles for the development of C cells. It has been generally accepted, without much-supporting evidence, that mammalian C cells, as well as the avian cells, are derived from the neural crest. However, by fate mapping of neural crest cells in both Wnt1-Cre/R26R and Connexin(Cxn)43-lacZ transgenic mice, we showed that neural crest cells colonize neither the fourth pharyngeal pouch nor the ultimobranchial body. E-cadherin, an epithelial cell marker, is expressed in thyroid C cells and their precursors, the fourth pharyngeal pouch and ultimobranchial body. Furthermore, E-cadherin is colocalized with calcitonin in C cells. Recently, lineage tracing in Sox17-2A-iCre/R26R mice has clarified that the pharyngeal endoderm-derived cells give rise to C cells. Together, these findings indicate that mouse thyroid C cells are endodermal in origin. Developmental Dynamics 245:323-341, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661795

  10. The role of BAF (mSWI/SNF) complexes in mammalian neural development

    PubMed Central

    Son, Esther Y.; Crabtree, Gerald R.

    2015-01-01

    The BAF (mammalian SWI/SNF) complexes are a family of multi-subunit ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers that use ATP hydrolysis to alter chromatin structure. Distinct BAF complex compositions are possible through combinatorial assembly of homologous subunit families and can serve non-redundant functions. In mammalian neural development, developmental stage-specific BAF assemblies are found in ES cells, neural progenitors and postmitotic neurons. In particular, the neural progenitor-specific BAF complexes are essential for controlling the kinetics and mode of neural progenitor cell division, while neuronal BAF function is necessary for the maturation of postmitotic neuronal phenotypes as well as long-term memory formation. The microRNA-mediated mechanism for transitioning from npBAF to nBAF complexes is instructive for the neuronal fate and can even convert fibroblasts into neurons. The high frequency of BAF subunit mutations in neurological disorders underscores the rate-determining role of BAF complexes in neural development, homeostasis and plasticity. PMID:25195934

  11. Development of an Improved Mammalian Overexpression Method for Human CD62L

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Haley A.; Roth, Gwynne; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Shen, Sarek; Rahbari, Kate; Ireland, Joanna; Zou, Zhongcheng; Sun, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously developed a glutamine synthetase (GS)-based mammalian recombinant protein expression system that is capable of producing 5 to 30 mg/L recombinant proteins. The over expression is based on multiple rounds of target gene amplification driven by methionine sulfoximine (MSX), an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase. However, like other stable mammalian over expression systems, a major shortcoming of the GS-based expression system is its lengthy turn-around time, typically taking 4–6 months to produce. To shorten the construction time, we replaced the muti-round target gene amplifications with single-round in situ amplifications, thereby shortening the cell line construction to 2 months. The single-round in situ amplification method resulted in highest recombinant CD62L expressing CHO cell lines producing ~5mg/L soluble CD62L, similar to those derived from the multi-round amplification and selection method. In addition, we developed a MSX resistance assay as an alternative to utilizing ELISA for evaluating the expression level of stable recombinant CHO cell lines. PMID:25286402

  12. Development of an improved mammalian overexpression method for human CD62L.

    PubMed

    Brown, Haley A; Roth, Gwynne; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Shen, Sarek; Rahbari, Kate; Ireland, Joanna; Zou, Zhongcheng; Sun, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    We have previously developed a glutamine synthetase (GS)-based mammalian recombinant protein expression system that is capable of producing 5-30mg/L recombinant proteins. The over expression is based on multiple rounds of target gene amplification driven by methionine sulfoximine (MSX), an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase. However, like other stable mammalian over expression systems, a major shortcoming of the GS-based expression system is its lengthy turn-around time, typically taking 4-6months to produce. To shorten the construction time, we replaced the multi-round target gene amplifications with single-round in situ amplifications, thereby shortening the cell line construction to 2months. The single-round in situ amplification method resulted in highest recombinant CD62L expressing CHO cell lines producing ∼5mg/L soluble CD62L, similar to those derived from the multi-round amplification and selection method. In addition, we developed a MSX resistance assay as an alternative to utilizing ELISA for evaluating the expression level of stable recombinant CHO cell lines. PMID:25286402

  13. An Important Role of Pumilio 1 in Regulating the Development of the Mammalian Female Germline.

    PubMed

    Mak, Winifred; Fang, Caodi; Holden, Tobias; Dratver, Milana Bockhur; Lin, Haifan

    2016-06-01

    Pumilio/FBF (PUF) proteins are a highly conserved family of translational regulators. The Drosophila PUF protein, Pumilio, is crucial for germline establishment and fertility. In mammals, primordial folliculogenesis is a key process that establishes the initial cohort of female mammalian germ cells prior to birth, and this primordial follicle pool is a prerequisite for female reproductive competence. We sought to understand whether PUF proteins have a conserved role in mammals during primordial folliculogenesis and female reproductive competency. In mammals, two homologs of Pumilio exist: Pumilio 1 (Pum1) and Pum2. Here, we report that PUMILIO (PUM) 1 plays an important role in the establishment of the primordial follicle pool, meiosis, and female reproductive competency, whereas PUM2 does not have a detectable function in these processes. Furthermore, we show that PUM1 facilitates the transition of the late meiotic prophase I oocyte from pachytene to diplotene stage by regulating SYCP1 protein. Our study reveals an important role of translational regulation in mammalian female germ cell development. PMID:27170441

  14. Development and evolution of the mammalian limb: adaptive diversification of nails, hooves, and claws.

    PubMed

    Hamrick, M W

    2001-01-01

    Paleontological evidence indicates that the evolutionary diversification of mammals early in the Cenozoic era was characterized by an adaptive radiation of distal limb structures. Likewise, neontological data show that morphological variation in distal limb integumentary appendages (e.g., nails, hooves, and claws) can be observed not only among distantly related mammalian taxa but also among closely related species within the same clade. Comparative analysis of nail, claw, and hoof morphogenesis reveals relatively subtle differences in mesenchymal and epithelial patterning underlying these adult differences in distal limb appendage morphology. Furthermore, studies of regulatory gene expression during vertebrate claw development demonstrate that many of the signaling molecules involved in patterning ectodermal derivatives such as teeth, hair, and feathers are also involved in organizing mammalian distal limb appendages. For example, Bmp4 signaling plays an important role during the recruitment of mesenchymal cells into the condensations forming the terminal phalanges, whereas Msx2 affects the length of nails and claws by suppressing proliferation of germinal epidermal cells. Evolutionary changes in the form of distal integumentary appendages may therefore result from changes in gene expression during formation of mesenchymal condensations (Bmp4, posterior Hox genes), induction of the claw fold and germinal matrix (shh), and/or proliferation of epidermal cells in the claw matrix (Msx1, Msx2). The prevalence of convergences and parallelisms in nail and claw structure among mammals underscores the existence of multiple morphogenetic pathways for evolutionary change in distal limb appendages. PMID:11710767

  15. Variation in mammalian proximal femoral development: comparative analysis of two distinct ossification patterns

    PubMed Central

    Serrat, Maria A; Reno, Philip L; McCollum, Melanie A; Meindl, Richard S; Lovejoy, C Owen

    2007-01-01

    The developmental anatomy of the proximal femur is complex. In some mammals, including humans, the femoral head and greater trochanter emerge as separate ossification centres within a common chondroepiphysis and remain separate throughout ontogeny. In other species, these secondary centres coalesce within the chondroepiphysis to form a single osseous epiphysis much like the proximal humerus. These differences in femoral ontogeny have not been previously addressed, yet are critical to an understanding of femoral mineralization and architecture across a wide range of mammals and may have key implications for understanding and treating hip abnormalities in humans. We evaluated femora from 70 mammalian species and categorized each according to the presence of a ‘separate’ or ‘coalesced’ proximal epiphysis based on visual assessment. We found that ossification type varies widely among mammals: taxa in the ‘coalesced’ group include marsupials, artiodactyls, perissodactyls, bats, carnivores and several primates, while the ‘separate’ group includes hominoids, many rodents, tree shrews and several marine species. There was no clear relationship to body size, phylogeny or locomotion, but qualitative and quantitative differences between the groups suggest that ossification type may be primarily an artefact of femoral shape and neck length. As some osseous abnormalities of the human hip appear to mimic the normal morphology of species with coalesced epiphyses, these results may provide insight into the aetiology and treatment of human hip disorders such as femoroacetabular impingement and early-onset osteoarthritis. PMID:17331175

  16. BMP-FGF Signaling Axis Mediates Wnt-Induced Epidermal Stratification in Developing Mammalian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Jing; Liu, YuDong; Dai, Zhong-Min; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Yang, XueQin; Li, Yan; Qiu, Mengsheng; Fu, Jiang; Hsu, Wei; Chen, YiPing; Zhang, Zunyi

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal stratification of the mammalian skin requires proliferative basal progenitors to generate intermediate cells that separate from the basal layer and are replaced by post-mitotic cells. Although Wnt signaling has been implicated in this developmental process, the mechanism underlying Wnt-mediated regulation of basal progenitors remains elusive. Here we show that Wnt secreted from proliferative basal cells is not required for their differentiation. However, epidermal production of Wnts is essential for the formation of the spinous layer through modulation of a BMP-FGF signaling cascade in the dermis. The spinous layer defects caused by disruption of Wnt secretion can be restored by transgenically expressed Bmp4. Non-cell autonomous BMP4 promotes activation of FGF7 and FGF10 signaling, leading to an increase in proliferative basal cell population. Our findings identify an essential BMP-FGF signaling axis in the dermis that responds to the epidermal Wnts and feedbacks to regulate basal progenitors during epidermal stratification. PMID:25329657

  17. Distinct patterns of gene-specific methylation in mammalian placentas: implications for placental evolution and function.

    PubMed

    Ng, H K; Novakovic, B; Hiendleder, S; Craig, J M; Roberts, C T; Saffery, R

    2010-04-01

    The placenta has arisen relatively recently and is among the most rapidly evolving tissues in mammals. Several different placental barrier and structure types appear to have independently evolved common functional features. Specific patterns of gene expression that determine placental development in humans are predicted to be accompanied by specific profiles of epigenetic modification. However, the stratification of epigenetic modifications into those involved in conserved aspects of placental function, versus those involved in divergent placental features, has yet to begin. As a first step towards this goal, we have investigated the methylation status of a small number of gene-specific methylation events recently identified in human placenta, in a panel of placental tissue from baboon, marmoset, cow, cat, guinea pig and mouse. These represent disparate placental barrier types and structures. In this study we hypothesized that specific epigenetic markings may be associated with placental barrier type or function, independent of phylogeny. However, in contrast to our predictions, the majority of gene-specific methylation appears to track with phylogeny, independent of placental barrier type or other structural features. This suggests that despite the likelihood of epigenetic modification playing a role in the functioning and evolution of different placental subtypes, there is no evidence for an involvement of the gene-specific methylation profiles we have identified, in specifying these differences. Further studies, examining larger numbers of epigenetic modifications across phylogeny, are required to define the role of specific epigenetic modifications in the evolution of distinct placental structures. PMID:20167366

  18. Placental, Matrilineal, and Epigenetic Mechanisms Promoting Environmentally Adaptive Development of the Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Broad, Kevin D.; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Hristova, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of intrauterine development, vivipary, and placentation in eutherian mammals has introduced new possibilities and constraints in the regulation of neural plasticity and development which promote neural function that is adaptive to the environment that a developing brain is likely to encounter in the future. A range of evolutionary adaptations associated with placentation transfers disproportionate control of this process to the matriline, a period unique in mammalian development in that there are three matrilineal genomes interacting in the same organism at the same time (maternal, foetal, and postmeiotic oocytes). The interactions between the maternal and developing foetal hypothalamus and placenta can provide a template by which a mother can transmit potentially adaptive information concerning potential future environmental conditions to the developing brain. In conjunction with genomic imprinting, it also provides a template to integrate epigenetic information from both maternal and paternal lineages. Placentation also hands ultimate control of genomic imprinting and intergenerational epigenetic information transfer to the matriline as epigenetic markers undergo erasure and reprogramming in the developing oocyte. These developments, in conjunction with an expanded neocortex, provide a unique evolutionary template by which matrilineal transfer of maternal care, resources, and culture can be used to promote brain development and infant survival. PMID:27069693

  19. From Meiosis to Mitosis: The Astonishing Flexibility of Cell Division Mechanisms in Early Mammalian Development.

    PubMed

    Bury, L; Coelho, P A; Glover, D M

    2016-01-01

    The execution of female meiosis and the establishment of the zygote is arguably the most critical stage of mammalian development. The egg can be arrested in the prophase of meiosis I for decades, and when it is activated, the spindle is assembled de novo. This spindle must function with the highest of fidelity and yet its assembly is unusually achieved in the absence of conventional centrosomes and with minimal influence of chromatin. Moreover, its dramatic asymmetric positioning is achieved through remarkable properties of the actin cytoskeleton to ensure elimination of the polar bodies. The second meiotic arrest marks a uniquely prolonged metaphase eventually interrupted by egg activation at fertilization to complete meiosis and mark a period of preparation of the male and female pronuclear genomes not only for their entry into the mitotic cleavage divisions but also for the imminent prospect of their zygotic expression. PMID:27475851

  20. Calcium signaling in mammalian egg activation and embryo development: Influence of subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yi-Liang; Williams, Carmen J.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signals drive the fundamental events surrounding fertilization and the activation of development in all species examined to date. Initial studies of Ca2+ signaling at fertilization in marine animals were tightly linked to new discoveries of bioluminescent proteins and their use as fluorescent Ca2+ sensors. Since that time, there has been rapid progress in our understanding of the key functions for Ca2+ in many cell types and the impact of cellular localization on Ca2+ signaling pathways. In this review, which focuses on mammalian egg activation, we consider how Ca2+ is regulated and stored at different stages of oocyte development and examine the functions of molecules that serve as both regulators of Ca2+ release and effectors of Ca2+ signals. We then summarize studies exploring how Ca2+ directs downstream effectors mediating both egg activation and later signaling events required for successful preimplantation embryo development. Throughout this review, we focus attention on how localization of Ca2+ signals influences downstream signaling events, and attempt to highlight gaps in our knowledge that are ripe areas for future research. PMID:22888043

  1. Nutrition and brain development: social policy implications.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Emily M; Finn-Stevenson, Matia

    2002-04-01

    Undernutrition among young children is widespread in the United States and has a detrimental impact on brain development. This article explores the risks associated with undernutrition and the potential for recovery when diet and the environment improve. Three policy implications are discussed: (a) increasing access to federal food programs, (b) promoting breastfeeding, and (c) working toward reducing child poverty. PMID:15792058

  2. Cultural Implications of Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiranpruk, Chaiskran

    A discussion of the cultural effects of economic and, by extension, human resource development in Southeast Asia looks at short- and long-term implications. It is suggested that in the short term, increased competition will affect distribution of wealth, which can promote materialism and corruption. The introduction of labor-saving technology may…

  3. Opportunity to Learn: Implications for Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratz-Snowden, Joan C.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the history of the concept of equal educational opportunity, noting the shift from a separate-but-equal input definition to an opportunity-to-learn process interpretation. Also discussed are implications of the definition of opportunity to learn for professional development and the education of African-American students. (SLD)

  4. FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF A MAMMALIAN DNA ALKALINE UNWINDING BIOASSAY WITH POTENTIAL APPLICATION TO HAZARD IDENTIFICATION FOR CONTAMINANTS FROM ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, the authors detailed a DNA alkaline unwinding assay (DAUA) that can be used to rapidly measure chemically induced strand breaks in mammalian cells. Further developments of the assay include: studies on the relationship between DNA adducts and DNA strand breaks; evaluati...

  5. Development of a Safeguard System Using an Episomal Mammalian Artificial Chromosome for Gene and Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Uno, Narumi; Uno, Katsuhiro; Komoto, Shinya; Suzuki, Teruhiko; Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    The development of a safeguard system to remove tumorigenic cells would allow safer clinical applications of stem cells for the treatment of patients with an intractable disease including genetic disorders. Such safeguard systems should not disrupt the host genome and should have long-term stability. Here, we attempted to develop a tumor-suppressing mammalian artificial chromosome containing a safeguard system that uses the immune rejection system against allogeneic tissue from the host. For proof-of-concept of the safeguard system, B16F10 mouse melanoma cells expressing the introduced H2-K(d) major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I)-allogenic haplotype were transplanted into recipient C57BL/6J mice expressing MHC H2-K(b). Subcutaneous implantation of B16F10 cells into C57BL/6J mice resulted in high tumorigenicity. The volume of tumors derived from B16F10 cells expressing allogenic MHC H2-K(d) was decreased significantly (P < 0.01). Suppression of MHC H2-K(d)-expressing tumors in C57BL/6J mice was enhanced by immunization with MHC H2-K(d)-expressing splenocytes (P < 0.01). These results suggest that the safeguard system is capable of suppressing tumor formation by the transplanted cells. PMID:26670279

  6. Mammalian COPII coat component SEC24C is required for embryonic development in mice.

    PubMed

    Adams, Elizabeth J; Chen, Xiao-Wei; O'Shea, K Sue; Ginsburg, David

    2014-07-25

    COPII-coated vesicles mediate the transport of newly synthesized proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. SEC24 is the COPII component primarily responsible for recruitment of protein cargoes into nascent vesicles. There are four Sec24 paralogs in mammals, with mice deficient in SEC24A, -B, and -D exhibiting a wide range of phenotypes. We now report the characterization of mice with deficiency in the fourth Sec24 paralog, SEC24C. Although mice haploinsufficient for Sec24c exhibit no apparent abnormalities, homozygous deficiency results in embryonic lethality at approximately embryonic day 7. Tissue-specific deletion of Sec24c in hepatocytes, pancreatic cells, smooth muscle cells, and intestinal epithelial cells results in phenotypically normal mice. Thus, SEC24C is required in early mammalian development but is dispensable in a number of tissues, likely as a result of compensation by other Sec24 paralogs. The embryonic lethality resulting from loss of SEC24C occurs considerably later than the lethality previously observed in SEC24D deficiency; it is clearly distinct from the restricted neural tube phenotype of Sec24b null embryos and the mild hypocholesterolemic phenotype of adult Sec24a null mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the four Sec24 paralogs have developed unique functions over the course of vertebrate evolution. PMID:24876386

  7. Impact of maternal malnutrition during the periconceptional period on mammalian preimplantation embryo development.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, M A

    2015-04-01

    During episodes of undernutrition and overnutrition the mammalian preimplantation embryo undergoes molecular and metabolic adaptations to cope with nutrient deficits or excesses. Maternal adaptations also take place to keep a nutritional microenvironment favorable for oocyte development and embryo formation. This maternal-embryo communication takes place via several nutritional mediators. Although adaptive responses to malnutrition by both the mother and the embryo may ensure blastocyst formation, the resultant quality of the embryo can be compromised, leading to early pregnancy failure. Still, studies have shown that, although early embryonic mortality can be induced during malnutrition, the preimplantation embryo possesses an enormous plasticity that allows it to implant and achieve a full-term pregnancy under nutritional stress, even in extreme cases of malnutrition. This developmental strategy, however, may come with a price, as shown by the adverse developmental programming induced by even subtle nutritional challenges exerted exclusively during folliculogenesis and the preimplantation period, resulting in offspring with a higher risk of developing deleterious phenotypes in adulthood. Overall, current evidence indicates that malnutrition during the periconceptional period can induce cellular and molecular alterations in preimplantation embryos with repercussions for fertility and postnatal health. PMID:25498236

  8. A Novel 4EHP-GIGYF2 Translational Repressor Complex Is Essential for Mammalian Development

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Masahiro; Ler, Lian Wee; Fabian, Marc R.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Mullin, Michael; Henderson, Valerie C.; Alain, Tommy; Fonseca, Bruno D.; Karashchuk, Galina; Bennett, Christopher F.; Kabuta, Tomohiro; Higashi, Shinji; Larsson, Ola; Topisirovic, Ivan; Smith, Robert J.; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2012-01-01

    The binding of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) to the mRNA 5′ cap structure is a rate-limiting step in mRNA translation initiation. eIF4E promotes ribosome recruitment to the mRNA. In Drosophila, the eIF4E homologous protein (d4EHP) forms a complex with binding partners to suppress the translation of distinct mRNAs by competing with eIF4E for binding the 5′ cap structure. This repression mechanism is essential for the asymmetric distribution of proteins and normal embryonic development in Drosophila. In contrast, the physiological role of the mammalian 4EHP (m4EHP) was not known. In this study, we have identified the Grb10-interacting GYF protein 2 (GIGYF2) and the zinc finger protein 598 (ZNF598) as components of the m4EHP complex. GIGYF2 directly interacts with m4EHP, and this interaction is required for stabilization of both proteins. Disruption of the m4EHP-GIGYF2 complex leads to increased translation and perinatal lethality in mice. We propose a model by which the m4EHP-GIGYF2 complex represses translation of a subset of mRNAs during embryonic development, as was previously reported for d4EHP. PMID:22751931

  9. Mammalian Brain Development is Accompanied by a Dramatic Increase in Bipolar DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-An; Sun, Zhixiong; Wu, Xiaowei; Rajaram, Veena; Keimig, David; Lim, Jessica; Zhu, Hongxiao; Xie, Hehuang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism critical for tissue development and cell specification. Mammalian brains consist of many different types of cells with assumedly distinct DNA methylation profiles, and thus some genomic loci may demonstrate bipolar DNA methylation pattern, i.e. hypermethylated in one cell subset but hypomethylated in others. Currently, how extensive methylation patterns vary among brain cells is unknown and bipolar methylated genomic loci remain largely unexplored. In this study, we implemented a procedure to infer cell-subset specific methylated (CSM) loci from the methylomes of human and mouse frontal cortices at different developmental stages. With the genome-scale hairpin bisulfite sequencing approach, we demonstrated that the majority of CSM loci predicted likely resulted from the methylation differences among brain cells rather than from asymmetric DNA methylation between DNA double strands. Correlated with enhancer-associated histone modifications, putative CSM loci increased dramatically during early stages of brain development and were enriched for GWAS variants associated with neurological disorder-related diseases/traits. Altogether, this study provides a procedure to identify genomic regions showing methylation differences in a mixed cell population and our results suggest that a set of cis-regulatory elements are primed in early postnatal life whose functions may be compromised in human neurological disorders. PMID:27585862

  10. Mammalian Brain Development is Accompanied by a Dramatic Increase in Bipolar DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming-an; Sun, Zhixiong; Wu, Xiaowei; Rajaram, Veena; Keimig, David; Lim, Jessica; Zhu, Hongxiao; Xie, Hehuang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism critical for tissue development and cell specification. Mammalian brains consist of many different types of cells with assumedly distinct DNA methylation profiles, and thus some genomic loci may demonstrate bipolar DNA methylation pattern, i.e. hypermethylated in one cell subset but hypomethylated in others. Currently, how extensive methylation patterns vary among brain cells is unknown and bipolar methylated genomic loci remain largely unexplored. In this study, we implemented a procedure to infer cell-subset specific methylated (CSM) loci from the methylomes of human and mouse frontal cortices at different developmental stages. With the genome-scale hairpin bisulfite sequencing approach, we demonstrated that the majority of CSM loci predicted likely resulted from the methylation differences among brain cells rather than from asymmetric DNA methylation between DNA double strands. Correlated with enhancer-associated histone modifications, putative CSM loci increased dramatically during early stages of brain development and were enriched for GWAS variants associated with neurological disorder-related diseases/traits. Altogether, this study provides a procedure to identify genomic regions showing methylation differences in a mixed cell population and our results suggest that a set of cis-regulatory elements are primed in early postnatal life whose functions may be compromised in human neurological disorders. PMID:27585862

  11. Expanding the test set: Chemicals with potential to disrupt mammalian brain development.

    PubMed

    Mundy, William R; Padilla, Stephanie; Breier, Joseph M; Crofton, Kevin M; Gilbert, Mary E; Herr, David W; Jensen, Karl F; Radio, Nicholas M; Raffaele, Kathleen C; Schumacher, Kelly; Shafer, Timothy J; Cowden, John

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput test methods including molecular, cellular, and alternative species-based assays that examine critical events of normal brain development are being developed for detection of developmental neurotoxicants. As new assays are developed, a "training set" of chemicals is used to evaluate the relevance of individual assays for specific endpoints. Different training sets are necessary for each assay that would comprise a developmental neurotoxicity test battery. In contrast, evaluation of the predictive ability of a comprehensive test battery requires a set of chemicals that have been shown to alter brain development after in vivo exposure ("test set"). Because only a small number of substances have been well documented to alter human neurodevelopment, we have proposed an expanded test set that includes chemicals demonstrated to adversely affect neurodevelopment in animals. To compile a list of potential developmental neurotoxicants, a literature review of compounds that have been examined for effects on the developing nervous system was conducted. The search was limited to mammalian studies published in the peer-reviewed literature and regulatory studies submitted to the U.S. EPA. The definition of developmental neurotoxicity encompassed changes in behavior, brain morphology, and neurochemistry after gestational or lactational exposure. Reports that indicated developmental neurotoxicity was observed only at doses that resulted in significant maternal toxicity or were lethal to the fetus or offspring were not considered. As a basic indication of reproducibility, we only included a chemical if data on its developmental neurotoxicity were available from more than one laboratory (defined as studies originating from laboratories with a different senior investigator). Evidence from human studies was included when available. Approximately 100 developmental neurotoxicity test set chemicals were identified, with 22% having evidence in humans. PMID:26476195

  12. Analysis of gene–environment interactions in postnatal development of the mammalian intestine

    PubMed Central

    Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Kong, Yong; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Subramanian, Sathish; Ahern, Philip P.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Unlike mammalian embryogenesis, which takes place in the relatively predictable and stable environment of the uterus, postnatal development can be affected by a multitude of highly variable environmental factors, including diet, exposure to noxious substances, and microorganisms. Microbial colonization of the intestine is thought to play a particularly important role in postnatal development of the gastrointestinal, metabolic, and immune systems. Major changes in environmental exposure occur right after birth, upon weaning, and during pubertal maturation into adulthood. These transitions include dramatic changes in intestinal contents and require appropriate adaptations to meet changes in functional demands. Here, we attempt to both characterize and provide mechanistic insights into postnatal intestinal ontogeny. We investigated changes in global intestinal gene expression through postnatal developmental transitions. We report profound alterations in small and large intestinal transcriptional programs that accompany both weaning and puberty in WT mice. Using myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) double knockout littermates, we define the role of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor family member signaling in postnatal gene expression programs and select ontogeny-specific phenotypes, such as vascular and smooth muscle development and neonatal epithelial and mast cell homeostasis. Metaanalysis of the effect of the microbiota on intestinal gene expression allowed for mechanistic classification of developmentally regulated genes by TLR/IL-1R (TIR) signaling and/or indigenous microbes. We find that practically every aspect of intestinal physiology is affected by postnatal transitions. Developmental timing, microbial colonization, and TIR signaling seem to play distinct and specific roles in regulation of gene-expression programs throughout postnatal development. PMID:25691701

  13. Epigenetic regulation of Atoh1 guides hair cell development in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Stojanova, Zlatka P; Kwan, Tao; Segil, Neil

    2015-10-15

    In the developing cochlea, sensory hair cell differentiation depends on the regulated expression of the bHLH transcription factor Atoh1. In mammals, if hair cells die they do not regenerate, leading to permanent deafness. By contrast, in non-mammalian vertebrates robust regeneration occurs through upregulation of Atoh1 in the surviving supporting cells that surround hair cells, leading to functional recovery. Investigation of crucial transcriptional events in the developing organ of Corti, including those involving Atoh1, has been hampered by limited accessibility to purified populations of the small number of cells present in the inner ear. We used µChIP and qPCR assays of FACS-purified cells to track changes in the epigenetic status of the Atoh1 locus during sensory epithelia development in the mouse. Dynamic changes in the histone modifications H3K4me3/H3K27me3, H3K9ac and H3K9me3 reveal a progression from poised, to active, to repressive marks, correlating with the onset of Atoh1 expression and its subsequent silencing during the perinatal (P1 to P6) period. Inhibition of acetylation blocked the increase in Atoh1 mRNA in nascent hair cells, as well as ongoing hair cell differentiation during embryonic organ of Corti development ex vivo. These results reveal an epigenetic mechanism of Atoh1 regulation underlying hair cell differentiation and subsequent maturation. Interestingly, the H3K4me3/H3K27me3 bivalent chromatin structure observed in progenitors persists at the Atoh1 locus in perinatal supporting cells, suggesting an explanation for the latent capacity of these cells to transdifferentiate into hair cells, and highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets in hair cell regeneration. PMID:26487780

  14. Distinct nuclear localization patterns of DNA methyltransferases in developing and mature mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Nasonkin, Igor O; Lazo, Kevin; Hambright, Dustin; Brooks, Matthew; Fariss, Robert; Swaroop, Anand

    2011-07-01

    DNA methyltransferases--DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b--produce methylation patterns that dynamically regulate chromatin remodeling and gene expression. The vertebrate retina provides an ideal model to elucidate molecular control of neurogenesis as all neuronal cell types and Müller glia are generated in a conserved order from common pools of progenitor cells. As a prelude to exploring epigenetic regulation of mammalian retinal development, we investigated the expression of Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b in the mouse retina from embryonic day (E) 10.5 to 10 months of age. High levels of transcripts for all three Dnmt genes were observed in early stages of retinal differentiation, with significantly reduced expression after birth. Although DNMT1 protein is abundant in retinal progenitors at E10.5, it becomes restricted to postmitotic cells by E15.5. Most cells in the postnatal retina show nuclear immunostaining of DNMT1; however, the photoreceptors exhibit distinctive patterns. In rods, weak expression of DNMT1 is detected in perinuclear region and in the nucleus, whereas a strong nuclear labeling is evident in cones. DNMT3a and DNMT3b show a discrete pattern in developing retina with high expression at E11.5, little or no immunostaining by E15.5, and then postnatal expression overlapping with DNMT1 in early born neurons (ganglion, amacrine and horizontal cells, and cones). Robust nuclear localization of DNMTs in cones compared to rods suggests a potential role of DNA methylation in differential remodeling of chromatin in these two specialized neurons. Our studies indicate that DNA methyltransferases contribute to the establishment and maturation of cell fates during retinal development. PMID:21452232

  15. Implications of dealing with airborne substances and reactive oxygen species: what mammalian lungs, animals, and plants have to say?

    PubMed

    Spinelli Oliveira, Elisabeth; Hancock, John T; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo; Isola, Daniel A; Ochs, Matthias; Yu, Jerry; Wilhem Filho, Danilo

    2007-10-01

    element against oxidative assaults. Most importantly, alternative roles of ROS as signaling molecules have been found in all plants and animals. For example, alveolar macrophages produce that act as second messengers, in addition to having a bactericidal role. The nonradical ROS H(2)O(2) signals inflammation in mammalian lungs, apoptosis in different animal tissues, and is also involved in stomatal closure, root development, gene expression, and defense responses of plants. Antioxidant adaptations in some water-breathing animals involve the excretion of H(2)O(2) by diffusion through gas-exchange structures. The fine balance among a multitude of factors and cells makes the difference between damage and protection in animals and plants. Knowledge about the mechanisms and consequences of these molecular interactions is now starting to be integrated. PMID:21672864

  16. Mammalian target of rapamycin is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and heart development in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Shan, Tizhong; Liang, Xinrong; Deng, Changyan; Kuang, Shihuan

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • mTOR is a critical regulator of many biological processes yet its function in heart is not well understood. • MCK-Cre/Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice were established to delete Mtor in cardiomyocytes. • The mTOR-mKO mice developed normally but die prematurely within 5 weeks after birth due to heart disease. • The mTOR-mKO mice had dilated myocardium and increased cell death. • mTOR-mKO hearts had reduced expression of metabolic genes and activation of mTOR target proteins. - Abstract: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive knockout of Mtor leads to embryonic lethality, the in vivo function of mTOR in perinatal development and postnatal growth of heart is not well defined. In this study, we established a muscle-specific mTOR conditional knockout mouse model (mTOR-mKO) by crossing MCK-Cre and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Although the mTOR-mKO mice survived embryonic and perinatal development, they exhibited severe postnatal growth retardation, cardiac muscle pathology and premature death. At the cellular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice had fewer cardiomyocytes due to apoptosis and necrosis, leading to dilated cardiomyopathy. At the molecular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice expressed lower levels of fatty acid oxidation and glycolysis related genes compared to the WT littermates. In addition, the mTOR-mKO cardiac muscle had reduced Myh6 but elevated Myh7 expression, indicating cardiac muscle degeneration. Furthermore, deletion of Mtor dramatically decreased the phosphorylation of S6 and AKT, two key targets downstream of mTORC1 and mTORC2 mediating the normal function of mTOR. These results demonstrate that mTOR is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and cardiac muscle function.

  17. Spontaneous mechanical oscillations: implications for developing organisms.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Karsten; Riveline, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Major transformations of cells during embryonic development are traditionally associated with the activation or inhibition of genes and with protein modifications. The contributions of mechanical properties intrinsic to the matter an organism is made of, however, are often overlooked. The emerging field "physics of living matter" is addressing active material properties of the cytoskeleton and tissues like the spontaneous generation of stress, which may lead to shape changes and tissue flows, and their implications for embryonic development. Here, we discuss spontaneous mechanical oscillations to present some basic elements for understanding this physics, and we illustrate its application to developing embryos. We highlight the role of state diagrams to quantitatively probe the significance of the corresponding physical concepts for understanding development. PMID:21501749

  18. Variation of the neurofilament medium KSP repeat sub-domain across mammalian species: implications for altering axonal structure.

    PubMed

    Barry, D M; Carpenter, C; Yager, C; Golik, B; Barry, K J; Shen, H; Mikse, O; Eggert, L S; Schulz, D J; Garcia, M L

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of larger mammals resulted in a corresponding increase in peripheral nerve length. To ensure optimal nervous system functionality and survival, nerve conduction velocities were likely to have increased to maintain the rate of signal propagation. Increases of conduction velocities may have required alterations in one of the two predominant properties that affect the speed of neuronal transmission: myelination or axonal diameter. A plausible mechanism to explain faster conduction velocities was a concomitant increase in axonal diameter with evolving axonal length. The carboxy terminal tail domain of the neurofilament medium subunit is a determinant of axonal diameter in large caliber myelinated axons. Sequence analysis of mammalian orthologs indicates that the neurofilament medium carboxy terminal tail contains a variable lysine-serine-proline (KSP) repeat sub-domain flanked by two highly conserved sub-domains. The number of KSP repeats within this region of neurofilament medium varies among species. Interestingly, the number of repeats does not change within a species, suggesting that selective pressure conserved the number of repeats within a species. Mapping KSP repeat numbers onto consensus phylogenetic trees reveals independent KSP expansion events across several mammalian clades. Linear regression analyses identified three subsets of mammals, one of which shows a positive correlation in the number of repeats with head-body length. For this subset of mammals, we hypothesize that variations in the number of KSP repeats within neurofilament medium carboxy terminal tail may have contributed to an increase in axonal caliber, increasing nerve conduction velocity as larger mammals evolved. PMID:20008369

  19. Effects of Simulated Weightlessness on Mammalian Development. Part 2: Meiotic Maturation of Mouse Oocytes During Clinostat Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgemuth, D. J.; Grills, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the role of gravity in basic cellular processes that are important during development, the effects of a simulated microgravity environment on mammalian gametes and early embryos cultured in vitro are examined. A microgravity environment is simulated by use of a clinostat, which essentially reorients cells relative to the gravity vector. Initial studies have focused on assessing the effects of clinostat rotation on the meiotic progression of mouse oocytes. Modifications centered on providing the unique in vitro culture of the clinostat requirements of mammalian oocytes and embryos: 37 C temperature, constant humidity, and a 5% CO2 in air environment. The oocytes are observed under the dissecting microscope for polar body formation and gross morphological appearance. They are then processed for cytogenetic analysis.

  20. Wnt signalling pathway parameters for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Wee; Gardiner, Bruce S; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Layton, Meredith J; Smith, David W; Burgess, Antony W

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling regulates cell fate, survival, proliferation and differentiation at many stages of mammalian development and pathology. Mutations of two key proteins in the pathway, APC and β-catenin, have been implicated in a range of cancers, including colorectal cancer. Activation of Wnt signalling has been associated with the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and consequential up-regulation of β-catenin/TCF gene transcription. In 2003, Lee et al. constructed a computational model of Wnt signalling supported by experimental data from analysis of time-dependent concentration of Wnt signalling proteins in Xenopus egg extracts. Subsequent studies have used the Xenopus quantitative data to infer Wnt pathway dynamics in other systems. As a basis for understanding Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, a confocal live cell imaging measurement technique is developed to measure the cell and nuclear volumes of MDCK, HEK293T cells and 3 human colorectal cancer cell lines and the concentrations of Wnt signalling proteins β-catenin, Axin, APC, GSK3β and E-cadherin. These parameters provide the basis for formulating Wnt signalling models for kidney/intestinal epithelial mammalian cells. There are significant differences in concentrations of key proteins between Xenopus extracts and mammalian whole cell lysates. Higher concentrations of Axin and lower concentrations of APC are present in mammalian cells. Axin concentrations are greater than APC in kidney epithelial cells, whereas in intestinal epithelial cells the APC concentration is higher than Axin. Computational simulations based on Lee's model, with this new data, suggest a need for a recalibration of the model.A quantitative understanding of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, in particular human colorectal cancers requires a detailed understanding of the concentrations of key protein complexes over time. Simulations of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells can be initiated with the parameters

  1. Snail Coordinately Regulates Downstream Pathways to Control Multiple Aspects of Mammalian Neural Precursor Development

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Mark A.; Burns, Sarah E.; Yang, Guang; Kaplan, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The Snail transcription factor plays a key role in regulating diverse developmental processes but is not thought to play a role in mammalian neural precursors. Here, we have examined radial glial precursor cells of the embryonic murine cortex and demonstrate that Snail regulates their survival, self-renewal, and differentiation into intermediate progenitors and neurons via two distinct and separable target pathways. First, Snail promotes cell survival by antagonizing a p53-dependent death pathway because coincident p53 knockdown rescues survival deficits caused by Snail knockdown. Second, we show that the cell cycle phosphatase Cdc25b is regulated by Snail in radial precursors and that Cdc25b coexpression is sufficient to rescue the decreased radial precursor proliferation and differentiation observed upon Snail knockdown. Thus, Snail acts via p53 and Cdc25b to coordinately regulate multiple aspects of mammalian embryonic neural precursor biology. PMID:24719096

  2. Mammalian sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  3. Phonological development in young bilinguals: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Core, Cynthia; Scarpelli, Chiara

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews recent research on bilingual phonological development and describes the nature of bilingual phonology, focusing on characteristics of cross-linguistic influence on bilingual phonological abilities. There is evidence of positive and negative transfer (acceleration and deceleration) on children's phonological abilities. Several methodological issues limit the ability to generalize findings from previous research to larger groups of bilingual children (e.g., small sample size, lack of consideration of age of acquisition of each language, and language abilities of the participants). Sources of heterogeneity in language development are presented and discussed. Phonological abilities are related to language abilities in bilingual first language learners of English and Spanish. Empirical evidence from research in our laboratory supports this claim. We discuss implications of research findings and limitations for future research and clinical practice. We provide specific recommendations for bilingual research and for clinical assessment of young bilingual children. PMID:25922995

  4. Genes and Conditions Controlling Mammalian Pre- and Post-implantation Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Anifandis, G.; Messini, C.I.; Dafopoulos, K.; Messinis, I.E.

    2015-01-01

    Embryo quality during the in vitro developmental period is of great clinical importance. Experimental genetic studies during this period have demonstrated the association between specific gene expression profiles and the production of healthy blastocysts. Although the quality of the oocyte may play a major role in embryo development, it has been well established that the post – fertilization period also has an important and crucial role in the determination of blastocyst quality. A variety of genes (such as OCT, SOX2, NANOG) and their related signaling pathways as well as transcription molecules (such as TGF-β, BMP) have been implicated in the pre- and post-implantation period. Furthermore, DNA methylation has been lately characterized as an epigenetic mark since it is one of the most important processes involved in the maintenance of genome stability. Physiological embryo development appears to depend upon the correct DNA methylation pattern. Due to the fact that soon after fertilization the zygote undergoes several morphogenetic and developmental events including activation of embryonic genome through the transition of the maternal genome, a diverse gene expression pattern may lead to clinically important conditions, such as apoptosis or the production of a chromosomically abnormal embryo. The present review focused on genes and their role during pre-implantation embryo development, giving emphasis on the various parameters that may alter gene expression or DNA methylation patterns. The pre-implantation embryos derived from in vitro culture systems (in vitro fertilization) and the possible effects on gene expression after the prolonged culture conditions are also discussed. PMID:25937812

  5. Genome sequence of an Australian kangaroo, Macropus eugenii, provides insight into the evolution of mammalian reproduction and development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We present the genome sequence of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, which is a member of the kangaroo family and the first representative of the iconic hopping mammals that symbolize Australia to be sequenced. The tammar has many unusual biological characteristics, including the longest period of embryonic diapause of any mammal, extremely synchronized seasonal breeding and prolonged and sophisticated lactation within a well-defined pouch. Like other marsupials, it gives birth to highly altricial young, and has a small number of very large chromosomes, making it a valuable model for genomics, reproduction and development. Results The genome has been sequenced to 2 × coverage using Sanger sequencing, enhanced with additional next generation sequencing and the integration of extensive physical and linkage maps to build the genome assembly. We also sequenced the tammar transcriptome across many tissues and developmental time points. Our analyses of these data shed light on mammalian reproduction, development and genome evolution: there is innovation in reproductive and lactational genes, rapid evolution of germ cell genes, and incomplete, locus-specific X inactivation. We also observe novel retrotransposons and a highly rearranged major histocompatibility complex, with many class I genes located outside the complex. Novel microRNAs in the tammar HOX clusters uncover new potential mammalian HOX regulatory elements. Conclusions Analyses of these resources enhance our understanding of marsupial gene evolution, identify marsupial-specific conserved non-coding elements and critical genes across a range of biological systems, including reproduction, development and immunity, and provide new insight into marsupial and mammalian biology and genome evolution. PMID:21854559

  6. Molecular Analysis of Aedes aegypti Classical Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Uncovers an Ortholog of Mammalian PTP-1B Implicated in the Control of Egg Production in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Debora Monteiro; Ahuja, Lalima Gagan; Nunes, Rodrigo Dutra; Cudischevitch, Cecília Oliveira; Daumas-Filho, Carlos Renato Oliveira; Medeiros-Castro, Priscilla; Ventura-Martins, Guilherme; Jablonka, Willy; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Senna, Raquel; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Hartfelder, Klaus; Capurro, Margareth; Atella, Georgia Correa; Mesquita, Rafael Dias; Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that catalyze phosphotyrosine dephosphorylation and modulate cell differentiation, growth and metabolism. In mammals, PTPs play a key role in the modulation of canonical pathways involved in metabolism and immunity. PTP1B is the prototype member of classical PTPs and a major target for treating human diseases, such as cancer, obesity and diabetes. These signaling enzymes are, hence, targets of a wide array of inhibitors. Anautogenous mosquitoes rely on blood meals to lay eggs and are vectors of the most prevalent human diseases. Identifying the mosquito ortholog of PTP1B and determining its involvement in egg production is, therefore, important in the search for a novel and crucial target for vector control. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an analysis to identify the ortholog of mammalian PTP1B in the Aedes aegypti genome. We identified eight genes coding for classical PTPs. In silico structural and functional analyses of proteins coded by such genes revealed that four of these code for catalytically active enzymes. Among the four genes coding for active PTPs, AAEL001919 exhibits the greatest degree of homology with the mammalian PTP1B. Next, we evaluated the role of this enzyme in egg formation. Blood feeding largely affects AAEL001919 expression, especially in the fat body and ovaries. These tissues are critically involved in the synthesis and storage of vitellogenin, the major yolk protein. Including the classical PTP inhibitor sodium orthovanadate or the PTP substrate DiFMUP in the blood meal decreased vitellogenin synthesis and egg production. Similarly, silencing AAEL001919 using RNA interference (RNAi) assays resulted in 30% suppression of egg production. Conclusions/Significance The data reported herein implicate, for the first time, a gene that codes for a classical PTP in mosquito egg formation. These findings raise the possibility that this class of enzymes may be used as novel

  7. Recent advances in developing molecular tools for targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang-il

    2015-01-01

    Various biological molecules naturally existing in diversified species including fungi, bacteria, and bacteriophage have functionalities for DNA binding and processing. The biological molecules have been recently actively engineered for use in customized genome editing of mammalian cells as the molecule-encoding DNA sequence information and the underlying mechanisms how the molecules work are unveiled. Excitingly, multiple novel methods based on the newly constructed artificial molecular tools have enabled modifications of specific endogenous genetic elements in the genome context at efficiencies that are much higher than that of the conventional homologous recombination based methods. This minireview introduces the most recently spotlighted molecular genome engineering tools with their key features and ongoing modifications for better performance. Such ongoing efforts have mainly focused on the removal of the inherent DNA sequence recognition rigidity from the original molecular platforms, the addition of newly tailored targeting functions into the engineered molecules, and the enhancement of their targeting specificity. Effective targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells will enable not only sophisticated genetic studies in the context of the genome, but also widely-applicable universal therapeutics based on the pinpointing and correction of the disease-causing genetic elements within the genome in the near future. PMID:25104401

  8. Mammalian Par3 regulates progenitor cell asymmetric division via Notch signaling in the developing neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Bultje, Ronald S.; Castaneda-Castellanos, David R.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Kriegstein, Arnold R.; Shi, Song-Hai

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division of radial glial progenitors produces neurons while allowing self-renewal; however, little is known about the mechanism that generates asymmetry in daughter cell fate specification. Here we found that mammalian partition defective protein 3 (mPar3), a key cell polarity determinant, exhibits dynamic distribution in radial glial progenitors. While it is enriched at the lateral membrane domain in the ventricular endfeet during interphase, mPar3 becomes dispersed and shows asymmetric localization as cell cycle progresses. Either removal or ectopic expression of mPar3 prevents radial glial progenitors from dividing asymmetrically yet generates different outcomes in daughter cell fate specification. Furthermore, the expression level of mPar3 affects Notch signaling, and manipulations of Notch signaling or Numb expression suppress mPar3 regulation of radial glial cell division and daughter cell fate specification. These results reveal a critical molecular pathway underlying asymmetric cell division of radial glial progenitors in the mammalian neocortex. PMID:19640478

  9. Towards quantitative metabolomics of mammalian cells: development of a metabolite extraction protocol.

    PubMed

    Dietmair, Stefanie; Timmins, Nicholas E; Gray, Peter P; Nielsen, Lars K; Krömer, Jens O

    2010-09-15

    Metabolomics aims to quantify all metabolites within an organism, thereby providing valuable insight into the metabolism of cells. To study intracellular metabolites, they are first extracted from the cells. The ideal extraction procedure should immediately quench metabolism and quantitatively extract all metabolites, a significant challenge given the rapid turnover and physicochemical diversity of intracellular metabolites. We have evaluated several quenching and extraction solutions for their suitability for mammalian cells grown in suspension. Quenching with 60% methanol (buffered or unbuffered) resulted in leakage of intracellular metabolites from the cells. In contrast, quenching with cold isotonic saline (0.9% [w/v] NaCl, 0.5 degrees C) did not damage cells and effectively halted conversion of ATP to ADP and AMP, indicative of metabolic arrest. Of the 12 different extraction methods tested, cold extraction in 50% aqueous acetonitrile was superior to other methods. The recovery of a mixture of standards was excellent, and the concentration of extracted intracellular metabolites was higher than for the other methods tested. The final protocol is easy to implement and can be used to study the intracellular metabolomes of mammalian cells. PMID:20435011

  10. Developing a de novo targeted knock-in method based on in utero electroporation into the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Tsunekawa, Yuji; Terhune, Raymond Kunikane; Fujita, Ikumi; Shitamukai, Atsunori; Suetsugu, Taeko; Matsuzaki, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    Genome-editing technology has revolutionized the field of biology. Here, we report a novel de novo gene-targeting method mediated by in utero electroporation into the developing mammalian brain. Electroporation of donor DNA with the CRISPR/Cas9 system vectors successfully leads to knock-in of the donor sequence, such as EGFP, to the target site via the homology-directed repair mechanism. We developed a targeting vector system optimized to prevent anomalous leaky expression of the donor gene from the plasmid, which otherwise often occurs depending on the donor sequence. The knock-in efficiency of the electroporated progenitors reached up to 40% in the early stage and 20% in the late stage of the developing mouse brain. Furthermore, we inserted different fluorescent markers into the target gene in each homologous chromosome, successfully distinguishing homozygous knock-in cells by color. We also applied this de novo gene targeting to the ferret model for the study of complex mammalian brains. Our results demonstrate that this technique is widely applicable for monitoring gene expression, visualizing protein localization, lineage analysis and gene knockout, all at the single-cell level, in developmental tissues. PMID:27578183

  11. Early mammalian development under conditions of reorientation relative to the gravity vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgemuth, D. J.; Grills, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A clinostat was used to assess the effects of reorientation relative to the gravity vector on mammalian germ cells cultured in vitro. Previous studies using this system revealed an inhibition of meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes. In the present study, the effects of clinostat rotation on in vitro fertilization were examined. The frequency of fertilization of experimental cultures did not vary from that of the clinostat vertical control cultures at either of the rotation rates examined. Importantly, no abnormalities of fertilization, such as parthenogenetic activation, fragmentation, or polyspermy were seen. It is concluded that the initial events of fertilization were unaffected by this treatment, although the developmental potential of these embryos remains to be assessed.

  12. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Its Role in Early Neural Development and in Adult and Aged Brain Function.

    PubMed

    Garza-Lombó, Carla; Gonsebatt, María E

    2016-01-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) integrates signals triggered by energy, stress, oxygen levels, and growth factors. It regulates ribosome biogenesis, mRNA translation, nutrient metabolism, and autophagy. mTOR participates in various functions of the brain, such as synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, memory, and learning. mTOR is present during early neural development and participates in axon and dendrite development, neuron differentiation, and gliogenesis, among other processes. Furthermore, mTOR has been shown to modulate lifespan in multiple organisms. This protein is an important energy sensor that is present throughout our lifetime its role must be precisely described in order to develop therapeutic strategies and prevent diseases of the central nervous system. The aim of this review is to present our current understanding of the functions of mTOR in neural development, the adult brain and aging. PMID:27378854

  13. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Its Role in Early Neural Development and in Adult and Aged Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Lombó, Carla; Gonsebatt, María E.

    2016-01-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) integrates signals triggered by energy, stress, oxygen levels, and growth factors. It regulates ribosome biogenesis, mRNA translation, nutrient metabolism, and autophagy. mTOR participates in various functions of the brain, such as synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, memory, and learning. mTOR is present during early neural development and participates in axon and dendrite development, neuron differentiation, and gliogenesis, among other processes. Furthermore, mTOR has been shown to modulate lifespan in multiple organisms. This protein is an important energy sensor that is present throughout our lifetime its role must be precisely described in order to develop therapeutic strategies and prevent diseases of the central nervous system. The aim of this review is to present our current understanding of the functions of mTOR in neural development, the adult brain and aging. PMID:27378854

  14. Mammalian aromatases.

    PubMed

    Conley, A; Hinshelwood, M

    2001-05-01

    Aromatase is the enzyme complex that catalyses the synthesis of oestrogens from androgens, and therefore it has unique potential to influence the physiological balance between the sex steroid hormones. Both aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom) and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (reductase), the two essential components of the enzyme complex, are highly conserved among mammals and vertebrates. Aromatase expression occurs in the gonads and brain, and is essential for reproductive development and fertility. Of interest are the complex mechanisms involving alternative promoter utilization that have evolved to control tissue-specific expression in these tissues. In addition, in a number of species, including humans, expression of aromatase has a broader tissue distribution, including placenta, adipose and bone. The relevance of oestrogen synthesis and possibly androgen metabolism in these peripheral sites of expression is now becoming clear from studies in P450arom knockout (ArKO) mice and from genetic defects recognized recently in both men and women. Important species differences in the physiological roles of aromatase expression are also likely to emerge, despite the highly conserved nature of the enzyme system. The identification of functionally distinct, tissue-specific isozymes of P450arom in at least one mammal, pigs, and several species of fish indicates that there are additional subtle, but physiologically significant, species-specific roles for aromatase. Comparative studies of mammalian and other vertebrate aromatases will expand understanding of the role played by this ancient enzyme system in the evolution of reproduction and the adaptive influence of oestrogen synthesis on general health and well being. PMID:11427156

  15. Implications of Water Development for Food Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.; Rosegrant, M. W.

    2001-05-01

    Water development for agriculture-the major water user worldwide-is one of the most critical factors for food security in many regions of the world. The role of water withdrawals in irrigated agriculture and food security has been receiving substantial attention in recent years. This paper will address key questions regarding implications of water development for food security at both regional and global scale, including what is the current status of water availability for agriculture? How will water availability and water demand evolve over the next three decades, taking into account availability and variability in water resources, the water supply infrastructure, and irrigation and nonagricultural water demands? What is the role of irrigation in food production now and in the future? What risk will be put on regional and global food production, demand and trade if municipal and industrial water demand is high, environmental water requirement is increasing, or groundwater overdraft is phased off? What is the contribution of infrastructure investment in enhancing irrigation water supply capacity, improving water use efficiency, and increasing rainfall harvesting particularly in arid and semi-arid regions and countries? These questions are explored through a global modeling framework, IMPACT-Water, developed in the International Food Policy Research Institute. In general, the results show that, under plausible assumptions on developments in irrigation and water investment, the rapid growth in water demand, particularly for domestic and industrial purposes, coupled with the a continued slowdown in investments, could be a serious threat to future growth in food production, causing negative impacts on low-income developing countries and the poor consumers in these countries. Food production, demand and trade and food prices will be increasingly affected by declining water availibility for irrigation. Developing countries, especially those with arid climates, poor

  16. Cortactin is implicated in murine zygotic development

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dan; Zhang, Helin; Blanpied, Thomas A.; Smith, Elizabeth; Zhan, Xi

    2009-01-01

    Cortactin is a cortex-enriched protein implicated in Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. However, the physiological role of cortactin remains unknown. We have generated a mouse strain in which the allele of murine cortactin was disrupted by a gene trapping vector. The resulting heterozygous mice developed normally and were fertile, but embryonic fibroblasts derived from heterozygous animals displayed partial impairment in PDGF-induced membrane ruffling. No homozygous offspring or early embryos even at the two-cell stage were detected. Analysis of oocytes revealed a gradual decrease in the detection of homozygous zygotes after fertilization. In normal oocytes arrested at meiotic metaphase II (MII), cortactin immunoreactivity was detected in an apical layer that overlies the maternal chromosome and overlaps with a polarized cortex enriched with actin. The formation of the polarized cortactin layer was diminished upon treatment with latrunculin B, an actin polymerization inhibitor. After resumption of meiosis II, the majority of cortactin protein was accumulated into the second polar body. Microinjection of MII-arrested eggs with either cortactin antibody or RNA encoding a cortactin mutant deficient in Arp2/3 complex binding disrupted the integrity of the actin cap and inhibited emission of the second polar body triggered by parthenogenesis. Our data suggest that cortactin plays an important role in the mechanics of asymmetric division in oocytes. PMID:20004659

  17. Novel role of the small GTPase Rheb: its implication in endocytic pathway independent of the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kota; Araki, Yasuhiro; Kontani, Kenji; Nishina, Hiroshi; Katada, Toshiaki

    2005-03-01

    The Ras-homologous GTPase Rheb that is conserved from yeast to human appears to be involved not only in cell growth but also in nutrient uptake. Recent biochemical analysis revealed that tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), deactivates Rheb and that phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3k)-Akt/PKB kinase pathway activates Rheb through inhibition of the GAP-mediated deactivation. Although mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is implicated in the downstream target of Rheb, the direct effector(s) and exact functions of Rheb have not been fully elucidated. Here we identified that Rheb expression in cultured cells induces the formation of large cytoplasmic vacuoles, which are characterized as late endocytic (late endosome- and lysosome-like) components. The vacuole formation required the GTP form of Rheb, but not the activation of the downstream mTOR kinase. These results suggest that Rheb regulates endocytic trafficking pathway independent of the previously identified mTOR pathway. The physiological roles of the two Rheb-dependent signaling pathways are discussed in terms of nutrient uptake and cell growth or cell cycle progression. PMID:15809346

  18. Abscisic Acid: A Phytohormone and Mammalian Cytokine as Novel Pharmacon with Potential for Future Development into Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Priya; Sharma, Niharika; Klahn, Philipp; Gereke, Marcus; Bruder, Dunja

    2016-01-01

    The isoprenoid stress-associated phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) has recently been recognized to possess multifaceted biological functions in mammals and to exert potent curative effects in a number of clinically relevant human diseases. Studies with human specimens have unequivocally shown that ABA retains its stress-related functional attributes, previously identified in plants, which contribute to enhanced inflammatory defense mechanisms in mammals. Besides, studies performed in animal models revealed prominent anti-inflammatory properties of ABA as indicated by a marked reduction of immune cell infiltrates at the sites of inflammation. Thus, ABA treatment ultimately leads to the profound improvement of both non-communicable and communicable diseases which are associated with an overall alleviated course of inflammation. In addition to its action on the mammalian immune system, ABA was also shown to exert diverse physiological functions on non-immune components. One of the most remarkable features of ABA is to stimulate and expand mesenchymal stem cells, which may open a new avenue for its potential use in the field of regenerative medicine. Furthermore, ABA has been reported to play an important role in the maintenance of glycemic control. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the significance of ABA in the mammalian system, its prophylactic and therapeutic effects in various disease settings and the future directions for the development of ABA as novel drug candidate for the improved treatment of inflammatory and infectious human diseases. PMID:27048335

  19. The gyrification of mammalian cerebral cortex: quantitative evidence of anisomorphic surface expansion during phylogenetic and ontogenetic development.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, T M; Mwamengele, G L; Dantzer, V; Williams, S

    1996-02-01

    Describing the shapes of 3D objects has proved to be as problematical in biology as in other areas. In an attempt to tackle this problem, established stereological methods (the Cavalieri principle and vertical sectioning) have been used to estimate a 3D shape-dependent quantity which can detect anisomorphic changes and is related to the degree of cortical convolution or gyrification. This isomophy factor is employed to assess phylogenetic and ontogenetic changes in the mammalian cerebral cortex. Gross anatomical differences between cerebral hemispheres of adult domestic mammals (horses, oxen, pigs, goats, dogs, cats and rabbits) were tested by paying attention to species, laterality and sex differences. Human fetal brains were also studied. Mean body weights of domestic mammals varied from 4 kg to 460 kg and brain weights from 10 g to 636 g. Fetuses weighed 39-610 g (crown-rump lengths 85-185 mm) and brain volumes were 4-56 cm3. Isomorphy factors were derived from estimates of hemisphere volumes and cortical surface areas. Hemisphere shape varied between species but no lateral or sex differences were detected. It is concluded that these mammalian brains are, in terms of their gross anatomy, symmetric and not sexually dimorphic. Fetal brains became more convoluted during uterine development. The isomorphy factor offers a convenient measure of gyrification which demonstrates that brains become more convoluted as they enlarge. PMID:8655415

  20. Environmental, ecological, and paleoanthropological implications of the late Pleistocene mammalian fauna from Equus Cave, northern Cape Province, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Richard G.; Cruz-Uribe, Kathryn; Beaumont, Peter B.

    1991-07-01

    The late Pleistocene deposits of Equus Cave, northern Cape Province, South Africa, have provided more than 30,000 taxonomically identifiable mammal bones from 48 species. Context, associations, and features of the bone assemblage implicate brown hyenas as the main accumulators. The fauna is significant mainly because (1) it supplements previous evidence that regional climate was cooler and possibly also somewhat moister during part(s) of the late Pleistocene, but deviated less from the historic norm than in areas farther south; (2) it shows that Bond's springbok, which became extinct in the early Holocene, differed from the surviving common springbok not only in important morphological respects but also in reproductive pattern; and (3) it sustains earlier suggestions that an abundance of carnivores, a paucity of small hard bones, and increase in the cranial/postcranial ratio with species size, and exclusively attritional mortality profiles are features that tend to differentiate assemblages accumulated by brown hyenas from those accumulated by people. In addition, pending firmer dating, the fragmentary human fossils from Equus Cave may support an exclusively African origin for anatomically modern humans.

  1. Mammalian pheromones.

    PubMed

    Liberles, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  2. Mammalian Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d ) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  3. Transnational Education: Current Developments and Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Jianxin

    2009-01-01

    Ever since the transnational education trend took off since the 1980s, transnational education has come to bearing political, economic and cultural implications. Different approaches have been formulated to achieve specific policy objectives by both importing and exporting countries. Such approaches demonstrate a four dimensional composition,…

  4. Discovery of a Novel Prolactin in Non-Mammalian Vertebrates: Evolutionary Perspectives and Its Involvement in Teleost Retina Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xigui; Hui, Michelle N. Y.; Liu, Yun; Yuen, Don S. H.; Zhang, Yong; Chan, Wood Yee; Lin, Hao Ran; Cheng, Shuk Han; Cheng, Christopher H. K.

    2009-01-01

    Background The three pituitary hormones, viz. prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and somatolactin (SL), together with the mammalian placental lactogen (PL), constitute a gene family of hormones with similar gene structure and encoded protein sequences. These hormones are believed to have evolved from a common ancestral gene through several rounds of gene duplication and subsequent divergence. Principal Findings In this study, we have identified a new PRL-like gene in non-mammalian vertebrates through bioinformatics and molecular cloning means. Phylogenetic analyses showed that this novel protein is homologous to the previously identified PRL. A receptor transactivation assay further showed that this novel protein could bind to PRL receptor to trigger the downstream post-receptor event, indicating that it is biologically active. In view of its close phylogenetic relationship with PRL and also its ability to activate PRL receptor, we name it as PRL2 and the previously identified PRL as PRL1. All the newly discovered PRL2 sequences possess three conserved disulfide linkages with the exception of the shark PRL2 which has only two. In sharp contrast to the classical PRL1 which is predominantly expressed in the pituitary, PRL2 was found to be mainly expressed in the eye and brain of the zebrafish but not in the pituitary. A largely reduced inner nuclear layer of the retina was observed after morpholino knockdown of zebrafish PRL2, indicating its role on retina development in teleost. Significance The discovery of this novel PRL has revitalized our understanding on the evolution of the GH/PRL/SL/PL gene family. Its unique expression and functions in the zebrafish eye also provide a new avenue of research on the neuroendocrine control of retina development in vertebrates. PMID:19584915

  5. Women at Midlife: Implications for Theories of Women's Adult Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippert, Laurel

    1997-01-01

    Discusses research on midlife transitions in women and its implications for theories of women's adult development. Presents findings on menopause, the postparental period, and the roles of women at midlife. Offers several theoretical approaches in light of research findings and makes recommendations for future research. Suggests implications for…

  6. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed Central

    Lovering, Ruth C

    2014-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer’s vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer’s vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of ‘heart jogging’ and the direction of ‘heart looping’.  ‘Heart jogging’ is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward ‘jog’. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish ‘heart jogging orthologs’ are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach. PMID:24627794

  7. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed

    Khodiyar, Varsha K; Howe, Doug; Talmud, Philippa J; Breckenridge, Ross; Lovering, Ruth C

    2013-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer's vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer's vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of 'heart jogging' and the direction of 'heart looping'.  'Heart jogging' is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward 'jog'. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish 'heart jogging orthologs' are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach. PMID:24627794

  8. Timing of mammalian peripheral trigeminal system development relative to body size: A comparison of metatherians with rodents and monotremes.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S

    2015-01-01

    Specializations of the trigeminal sensory system are present in all three infraclasses of mammals (metatheria, eutheria, prototheria or monotremata). The trigeminal sensory system has been suggested as a critically important modality for sampling the path to the pouch and detecting the nipple or milk patch, but the degree to which that system may be required to function at birth varies significantly. Archived sections of the snout and brainstem of embryonic and postnatal mammals were used to test the relationship between structural maturity of the two ends of the trigeminal nerve pathway and the body size of mammalian young in metatherians, rodents and monotremes. A system for staging different levels of structural maturity of the vibrissae and trigeminal sensory was applied to embryos, pouch young and hatchlings and correlated with body length. Dasyurids are born at the most immature state with respect to vibrissal and trigeminal sensory nucleus development of any available metatherian, but these components of the trigeminal system are also developmentally advanced relative to body size when dasyurids are compared to other metatherians. Vibrissal and trigeminal sensory nucleus development is at a similar stage of development at birth and for a given body size in non-dasyurid metatherians; and trigeminal sensory nucleus development in monotremes is at a similar stage at birth to metatherians. Rodents reach a far more advanced stage of vibrissal and trigeminal sensory nucleus development at birth than do metatherians, and in the case of the mouse have a more developmentally advanced trigeminal system than all available metatherians at any given body length. Precocious development of the trigeminal sensory pathway relative to body size is evident in dasyurids, as might be expected given the small birth size of those metatherians. Nevertheless, the trigeminal sensory system in metatherians in general is not precocious relative to body size when these species are

  9. A Mammalian Cell Based FACS-Panning Platform for the Selection of HIV-1 Envelopes for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Bruun, Tim-Henrik; Mühlbauer, Katharina; Benen, Thomas; Kliche, Alexander; Wagner, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnMAb) against the HIV-1 envelope (Env) protein has been discovered recently. Despite this progress, vaccination efforts with the aim to re-elicit bnMAbs that provide protective immunity have failed so far. Herein, we describe the development of a mammalian cell based FACS-panning method in which bnMAbs are used as tools to select surface-exposed envelope variants according to their binding affinity. For that purpose, an HIV-1 derived lentiviral vector was developed to infect HEK293T cells at low multiplicity of infection (MOI) in order to link Env phenotype and genotype. For proof of principle, a gp145 Env model-library was established in which the complete V3 domain was substituted by five strain specific V3 loop sequences with known binding affinities to nMAb 447-52D, respectively. Env genes were recovered from selected cells by PCR, subcloned into a lentiviral vector (i) to determine and quantify the enrichment nMAb binders and (ii) to generate a new batch of transduction competent particles. After 2 selection cycles the Env variant with highest affinity was enriched 20-fold and represented 80% of the remaining Env population. Exploiting the recently described bnMAbs, this procedure might prove useful in selecting Env proteins from large Env libraries with the potential to elicit bnMAbs when used as vaccine candidates. PMID:25279768

  10. Dynamic transcriptional symmetry-breaking in pre-implantation mammalian embryo development revealed by single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junchao; Chen, Qi; Li, Xin; Zheng, Xiudeng; Zhang, Ying; Qiao, Jie; Tang, Fuchou; Tao, Yi; Zhou, Qi; Duan, Enkui

    2015-10-15

    During mammalian pre-implantation embryo development, when the first asymmetry emerges and how it develops to direct distinct cell fates remain longstanding questions. Here, by analyzing single-blastomere transcriptome data from mouse and human pre-implantation embryos, we revealed that the initial blastomere-to-blastomere biases emerge as early as the first embryonic cleavage division, following a binomial distribution pattern. The subsequent zygotic transcriptional activation further elevated overall blastomere-to-blastomere biases during the two- to 16-cell embryo stages. The trends of transcriptional asymmetry fell into two distinct patterns: for some genes, the extent of asymmetry was minimized between blastomeres (monostable pattern), whereas other genes, including those known to be lineage specifiers, showed ever-increasing asymmetry between blastomeres (bistable pattern), supposedly controlled by negative or positive feedbacks. Moreover, our analysis supports a scenario in which opposing lineage specifiers within an early blastomere constantly compete with each other based on their relative ratio, forming an inclined 'lineage strength' that pushes the blastomere onto a predisposed, yet flexible, lineage track before morphological distinction. PMID:26395495

  11. The biology of mammalian parenting and its effect on offspring social development.

    PubMed

    Rilling, James K; Young, Larry J

    2014-08-15

    Parents know the transformative nature of having and caring for a child. Among many mammals, giving birth leads from an aversion to infant stimuli to irresistible attraction. Here, we review the biological mechanisms governing this shift in parental motivation in mammals. Estrogen and progesterone prepare the uterus for embryo implantation and placental development. Prolactin stimulates milk production, whereas oxytocin initiates labor and triggers milk ejection during nursing. These same molecules, interacting with dopamine, also activate specific neural pathways to motivate parents to nurture, bond with, and protect their offspring. Parenting in turn shapes the neural development of the infant social brain. Recent work suggests that many of the principles governing parental behavior and its effect on infant development are conserved from rodent to humans. PMID:25124431

  12. Gravity in mammalian organ development: differentiation of cultured lung and pancreas rudiments during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Hardman, P.; Paulsen, A.

    1994-01-01

    Organ culture of embryonic mouse lung and pancreas rudiments has been used to investigate development and differentiation, and to assess the effects of microgravity on culture differentiation, during orbital spaceflight of the shuttle Endeavour (mission STS-54). Lung rudiments continue to grow and branch during spaceflight, an initial result that should allow future detailed study of lung morphogenesis in microgravity. Cultured embryonic pancreas undergoes characteristic exocrine acinar tissue and endocrine islet tissue differentiation during spaceflight, and in ground controls. The rudiments developing in the microgravity environment of spaceflight appear to grow larger than their ground counterparts, and they may have differentiated more rapidly than controls, as judged by exocrine zymogen granule presence.

  13. Cell Arrest and Cell Death in Mammalian Preimplantation Development: Lessons from the Bovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Leidenfrost, Sandra; Boelhauve, Marc; Reichenbach, Myriam; Güngör, Tuna; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Sinowatz, Fred; Wolf, Eckhard; Habermann, Felix A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The causes, modes, biological role and prospective significance of cell death in preimplantation development in humans and other mammals are still poorly understood. Early bovine embryos represent a very attractive experimental model for the investigation of this fundamental and important issue. Methods and Findings To obtain reference data on the temporal and spatial occurrence of cell death in early bovine embryogenesis, three-dimensionally preserved embryos of different ages and stages of development up to hatched blastocysts were examined in toto by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In parallel, transcript abundance profiles for selected apoptosis-related genes were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Our study documents that in vitro as well as in vivo, the first four cleavage cycles are prone to a high failure rate including different types of permanent cell cycle arrest and subsequent non-apoptotic blastomere death. In vitro produced and in vivo derived blastocysts showed a significant incidence of cell death in the inner cell mass (ICM), but only in part with morphological features of apoptosis. Importantly, transcripts for CASP3, CASP9, CASP8 and FAS/FASLG were not detectable or found at very low abundances. Conclusions In vitro and in vivo, errors and failures of the first and the next three cleavage divisions frequently cause immediate embryo death or lead to aberrant subsequent development, and are the main source of developmental heterogeneity. A substantial occurrence of cell death in the ICM even in fast developing blastocysts strongly suggests a regular developmentally controlled elimination of cells, while the nature and mechanisms of ICM cell death are unclear. Morphological findings as well as transcript levels measured for important apoptosis-related genes are in conflict with the view that classical caspase-mediated apoptosis is the major cause of cell death in early bovine development. PMID

  14. Development of coherent neuronal activity patterns in mammalian cortical networks: common principles and local hetereogeneity.

    PubMed

    Egorov, Alexei V; Draguhn, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Many mammals are born in a very immature state and develop their rich repertoire of behavioral and cognitive functions postnatally. This development goes in parallel with changes in the anatomical and functional organization of cortical structures which are involved in most complex activities. The emerging spatiotemporal activity patterns in multi-neuronal cortical networks may indeed form a direct neuronal correlate of systemic functions like perception, sensorimotor integration, decision making or memory formation. During recent years, several studies--mostly in rodents--have shed light on the ontogenesis of such highly organized patterns of network activity. While each local network has its own peculiar properties, some general rules can be derived. We therefore review and compare data from the developing hippocampus, neocortex and--as an intermediate region--entorhinal cortex. All cortices seem to follow a characteristic sequence starting with uncorrelated activity in uncoupled single neurons where transient activity seems to have mostly trophic effects. In rodents, before and shortly after birth, cortical networks develop weakly coordinated multineuronal discharges which have been termed synchronous plateau assemblies (SPAs). While these patterns rely mostly on electrical coupling by gap junctions, the subsequent increase in number and maturation of chemical synapses leads to the generation of large-scale coherent discharges. These patterns have been termed giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) for predominantly GABA-induced events or early network oscillations (ENOs) for mostly glutamatergic bursts, respectively. During the third to fourth postnatal week, cortical areas reach their final activity patterns with distinct network oscillations and highly specific neuronal discharge sequences which support adult behavior. While some of the mechanisms underlying maturation of network activity have been elucidated much work remains to be done in order to fully

  15. Development and evolution of the vestibular sensory apparatus of the mammalian ear

    PubMed Central

    Beisel, Kirk W.; Wang-Lundberg, Yesha; Maklad, Adel; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we will review molecular aspects of vestibular ear development and present them in the context of evolutionary changes and hair cell regeneration. Several genes guide the development of anterior and posterior canals. Although some of these genes are also important for horizontal canal development, this canal strongly depends on a single gene, Otx1. Otx1 also governs the segregation of saccule and utricle. Several genes are essential for otoconia and cupula formation, but protein interactions necessary to form and maintain otoconia or a cupula are not yet understood. Nerve fiber guidance to specific vestibular endorgans is predominantly mediated by diffusible neurotrophic factors that work even in the absence of differentiated hair cells. Neurotrophins, in particular Bdnf, are the most crucial attractive factor released by hair cells. If Bdnf is misexpressed, fibers can be redirected away from hair cells. Hair cell differentiation is mediated by Atoh1. However, Atoh1 may not initiate hair cell precursor formation. Resolving the role of Atoh1 in postmitotic hair cell precursors is crucial for future attempts in hair cell regeneration. Additional analyses are needed before gene therapy can help regenerate hair cells, restore otoconia, and reconnect sensory epithelia to the brain. PMID:16614470

  16. microRNA-dependent Temporal Gene Expression in the Ureteric Bud Epithelium during Mammalian Kidney Development

    PubMed Central

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K.; Lindner, Volkhard; Wessels, Andy; Yu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Background Our previous study on mouse mutants with the ureteric bud (UB) epithelium-specific Dicer deletion (Dicer UB mutants) demonstrated the significance of UB epithelium-derived miRNAs in UB development. Results Our whole-genome transcriptional profiling showed that the Dicer mutant UB epithelium abnormally retained transcriptional features of the early UB epithelium and failed to express many genes associated with collecting duct differentiation. Further, we identified a temporal expression pattern of early UB genes during UB epithelium development in which gene expression was detected at early developmental stages and became undetectable by E14.5. In contrast, expression of early UB genes persisted at later stages in the Dicer mutant UB epithelium and increased at early stages. Our bioinformatics analysis of the abnormally persistently expressed early genes in the Dicer mutant UB epithelium showed significant enrichment of the let-7 family miRNA targets. We further identified a temporal expression pattern of let-7 miRNAs in the UB epithelium that is anti-parallel to that of some early UB genes during kidney development. Conclusions We propose a model in which the let-7 family miRNAs silence the expression of a subset of early genes in the UB epithelium at later developmental stages in order to promote collecting duct differentiation. PMID:25369991

  17. Expression and function of FGF10 in mammalian inner ear development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, Sarah; Wright, Tracy J.; Pirvola, Ulla; Ornitz, David; Beisel, Kirk; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the expression of FGF10 during ear development and the effect of an FGF10 null mutation on ear development. Our in situ hybridization data reveal expression of FGF10 in all three canal crista sensory epithelia and the cochlea anlage as well as all sensory neurons at embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5). Older embryos (E18.5) displayed strong graded expression in all sensory epithelia. FGF10 null mutants show complete agenesis of the posterior canal crista and the posterior canal. The posterior canal sensory neurons form initially and project rather normally by E11.5, but they disappear within 2 days. FGF10 null mutants have no posterior canal system at E18.5. In addition, these mutants have deformations of the anterior and horizontal cristae, reduced formation of the anterior and horizontal canals, as well as altered position of the remaining sensory epithelia with respect to the utricle. Hair cells form but some have defects in their cilia formation. No defects were detected in the organ of Corti at the cellular level. Together these data suggest that FGF10 plays a major role in ear morphogenesis. Most of these data are consistent with earlier findings on a null mutation in FGFR2b, one of FGF10's main receptors. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Regulatory elements of the EKLF gene that direct erythroid cell-specific expression during mammalian development.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li; Chen, Xiaoyong; Chang, Yanjie; Bieker, James J

    2004-06-01

    Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) plays an essential role in enabling beta-globin expression during erythroid ontogeny. It is first expressed in the extraembryonic mesoderm of the yolk sac within the morphologically unique cells that give rise to the blood islands, and then later within the hepatic primordia. The BMP4/Smad pathway plays a critical role in the induction of EKLF, and transient transfection analyses demonstrate that sequences located within less than 1 kb of its transcription initiation site are sufficient for high-level erythroid-specific transcription. We have used transgenic analyses to verify that 950 bp located adjacent to the EKLF start site of transcription is sufficient to generate lacZ expression within the blood islands as well as the fetal liver during embryonic development. Of particular importance are 3 regions, 2 of which overlap endogenous erythroid-specific DNase hypersensitive sites, and 1 of which includes the proximal promoter region. The onset of transgene expression mimics that of endogenous EKLF as it begins by day 7.5 (d7.5) to d8.0. In addition, it exhibits a strict hematopoietic specificity, localized only to these cells and not to the adjacent vasculature at all stages examined. Finally, expression is heterocellular, implying that although these elements are sufficient for tissue-specific expression, they do not shield against the position effects of adjacent chromatin. These analyses demonstrate that a surprisingly small DNA segment contains all the information needed to target a linked gene to the hematopoietic compartment at both early and later stages of development, and may be a useful cassette for this purpose. PMID:14764531

  19. Gene-Chemical Interactions in the Developing Mammalian Nervous System: Effects on Proliferation, Neurogenesis and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Donald A.; Opanashuk, Lisa; Zharkovsky, Aleksander; Weiss, Bernie

    2010-01-01

    The orderly formation of the nervous system requires a multitude of complex, integrated and simultaneously occurring processes. Neural progenitor cells expand through proliferation, commit to different cell fates, exit the cell cycle, generate different neuronal and glial cell types, and new neurons migrate to specified areas and establish synaptic connections. Gestational and perinatal exposure to environmental toxicants, pharmacological agents and drugs of abuse produce immediate, persistent or late-onset alterations in behavioral, cognitive, sensory and/or motor functions. These alterations reflect the disruption of the underlying processes of CNS formation and development. To determine the neurotoxic mechanisms that underlie these deficits it is necessary to analyze and dissect the complex molecular processes that occur during the proliferation, neurogenesis and differentiation of cells. This symposium will provide a framework for understanding the orchestrated events of neurogenesis, the coordination of proliferation and cell fate specification by selected genes, and the effects of well-known neurotoxicants on neurogenesis in the retina, hippocampus and cerebellum. These three tissues share common developmental profiles, mediate diverse neuronal activities and function, and thus provide important substrates for analysis. This paper summarizes four invited talks that were presented at the 12th International Neurotoxicology Association meeting held in Jerusalem, Israel during the summer of 2009. Donald A. Fox described the structural and functional alterations following low-level gestational lead exposure in children and rodents that produced a supernormal electroretinogram and selective increases in neurogenesis and cell proliferation of late-born retinal neurons (rod photoreceptors and bipolar cells), but not Müller glia cells, in mice. Lisa Opanashuk discussed how dioxin [TCDD] binding to the arylhydrocarbon receptor [AhR], a transcription factor that

  20. Fliih, a Gelsolin-Related Cytoskeletal Regulator Essential for Early Mammalian Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Hugh D.; Fountain, Shelley; McLennan, Ian S.; Berven, Leise A.; Crouch, Michael F.; Davy, Deborah A.; Hooper, Jane A.; Waterford, Kynan; Chen, Ken-Shiung; Lupski, James R.; Ledermann, Birgit; Young, Ian G.; Matthaei, Klaus I.

    2002-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster flightless I gene is required for normal cellularization of the syncytial blastoderm. Highly conserved homologues of flightless I are present in Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse, and human. We have disrupted the mouse homologue Fliih by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Heterozygous Fliih mutant mice develop normally, although the level of Fliih protein is reduced. Cultured homozygous Fliih mutant blastocysts hatch, attach, and form an outgrowing trophoblast cell layer, but egg cylinder formation fails and the embryos degenerate. Similarly, Fliih mutant embryos initiate implantation in vivo but then rapidly degenerate. We have constructed a transgenic mouse carrying the complete human FLII gene and shown that the FLII transgene is capable of rescuing the embryonic lethality of the homozygous targeted Fliih mutation. These results confirm the specific inactivation of the Fliih gene and establish that the human FLII gene and its gene product are functional in the mouse. The Fliih mouse mutant phenotype is much more severe than in the case of the related gelsolin family members gelsolin, villin, and CapG, where the homozygous mutant mice are viable and fertile but display alterations in cytoskeletal actin regulation. PMID:11971982

  1. Skeletal development in sloths and the evolution of mammalian vertebral patterning.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Lionel; Weisbecker, Vera; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R; Goswami, Anjali; Asher, Robert J

    2010-11-01

    Mammals show a very low level of variation in vertebral count, particularly in the neck. Phenotypes exhibited at various stages during the development of the axial skeleton may play a key role in testing mechanisms recently proposed to explain this conservatism. Here, we provide osteogenetic data that identify developmental criteria with which to recognize cervical vs. noncervical vertebrae in mammals. Except for sloths, all mammals show the late ossification of the caudal-most centra in the neck after other centra and neural arches. In sloths with 8-10 ribless neck vertebrae, the caudal-most neck centra ossify early, matching the pattern observed in cranial thoracic vertebrae of other mammals. Accordingly, we interpret the ribless neck vertebrae of three-toed sloths caudal to V7 as thoracic based on our developmental criterion. Applied to the unusual vertebral phenotype of long-necked sloths, these data support the interpretation that elements of the axial skeleton with origins from distinct mesodermal tissues have repatterned over the course of evolution. PMID:20956304

  2. Golgb1 regulates protein glycosylation and is crucial for mammalian palate development.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yu; Zhang, Nian; Liu, Han; Xu, Jingyue; Jiang, Rulang

    2016-07-01

    Cleft palate is a common major birth defect for which currently known causes account for less than 30% of pathology in humans. In this study, we carried out mutagenesis screening in mice to identify new regulators of palatogenesis. Through genetic linkage mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a loss-of-function mutation in the Golgb1 gene that co-segregated with cleft palate in a new mutant mouse line. Golgb1 is a ubiquitously expressed large coiled-coil protein, also known as giantin, that is localized at the Golgi membrane. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, we generated and analyzed developmental defects in mice carrying additional Golgb1 loss-of-function mutations, which supported a crucial requirement for Golgb1 in palate development. Through maxillary explant culture assays, we demonstrate that the Golgb1 mutant embryos have intrinsic defects in palatal shelf elevation. Just prior to the developmental stage of palatal shelf elevation in wild-type littermates, Golgb1 mutant embryos exhibit increased cell density, reduced hyaluronan accumulation and impaired protein glycosylation in the palatal mesenchyme. Together, these results demonstrate that, although it is a ubiquitously expressed Golgi-associated protein, Golgb1 has specific functions in protein glycosylation and tissue morphogenesis. PMID:27226319

  3. Skeletal development in sloths and the evolution of mammalian vertebral patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hautier, Lionel; Weisbecker, Vera; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.; Goswami, Anjali; Asher, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Mammals show a very low level of variation in vertebral count, particularly in the neck. Phenotypes exhibited at various stages during the development of the axial skeleton may play a key role in testing mechanisms recently proposed to explain this conservatism. Here, we provide osteogenetic data that identify developmental criteria with which to recognize cervical vs. noncervical vertebrae in mammals. Except for sloths, all mammals show the late ossification of the caudal-most centra in the neck after other centra and neural arches. In sloths with 8–10 ribless neck vertebrae, the caudal-most neck centra ossify early, matching the pattern observed in cranial thoracic vertebrae of other mammals. Accordingly, we interpret the ribless neck vertebrae of three-toed sloths caudal to V7 as thoracic based on our developmental criterion. Applied to the unusual vertebral phenotype of long-necked sloths, these data support the interpretation that elements of the axial skeleton with origins from distinct mesodermal tissues have repatterned over the course of evolution. PMID:20956304

  4. Web Database Development: Implications for Academic Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernekes, Bob

    This paper discusses the preliminary planning, design, and development of a pilot project to create an Internet accessible database and search tool for locating and distributing company data and scholarly work. Team members established four project objectives: (1) to develop a Web accessible database and decision tool that creates Web pages on the…

  5. Culture and Early Language Development: Implications for Assessment and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parada, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study--"Culture and Early Language Development: Implications for Assessment and Intervention"--was to explore and describe the perceptions and beliefs of Salvadoran mothers of low socioeconomic status regarding the language development of their young children in order to identify cultural variations in…

  6. Career Plateauing: Implications for Career Development Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Andrew; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reaction to career plateaus depends on the employee's resources as well as the organization's response. Counseling, training and development, job enrichment, and other activities can minimize the stressful effects of involuntary plateauing. (SK)

  7. First Evidence of DAAM1 Localization During the Post-Natal Development of Rat Testis and in Mammalian Sperm.

    PubMed

    Pariante, Paolo; Dotolo, Raffaele; Venditti, Massimo; Ferrara, Diana; Donizetti, Aldo; Aniello, Francesco; Minucci, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis 1 (DAAM1) is a formin-family protein involved in nucleation of unbranched actin filaments and in cytoskeletal organization through Wnt-Dishevelled PCP pathway, which participates in essential biological processes, such as cell polarity, movement, and adhesion during morphogenesis and organogenesis. While its role has been investigated during development and in somatic cells, its potential association with the germinal compartment and reproduction is still unexplored. In this work, we assessed the possible association of DAAM1 with the morphogenesis of rat testis. We studied its expression and profiled its localization versus actin and tubulin, during the first wave of spermatogenesis and in the adult gonad (from 7 to 60 dpp). We show that, in mitotic phases, DAAM1 shares its localization with actin in Sertoli cells, gonocytes, and spermatogonia. Later, during meiosis, both proteins are found in spermatocytes, while only actin is detectable at the forming blood-testis barrier. DAAM1, then, follows the development of the acrosome system throughout spermiogenesis, and it is finally retained inside the cytoplasmic droplet in mature gametes, as corroborated by additional immunolocalization data on both rat and human sperm. Unlike the DAAM1, actin keeps its localization in Sertoli cells, and tubulin is associated with their protruding cytoplasm during the process. Our data support, for the first time, the hypothesis of a role for DAAM1 in cytoskeletal organization during Mammalian testis morphogenesis and gamete progression, while also hinting at its possible investigation as a morphological marker of germ cell and sperm physiology. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2172-2184, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26831620

  8. Community Leadership Development: Implications for Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northeast Regional Center for Rural Development, University Park, PA.

    Designed for extension personnel who are involved in community leadership (CL) programs, this publication summarizes recent national efforts that could be useful in developing and conducting CL programs, and current leadership theory and literature. Part 1 reports the results of the national survey, initiated in April 1985, of extension staff…

  9. Asymmetry of the Brain: Development and Implications.

    PubMed

    Duboc, Véronique; Dufourcq, Pascale; Blader, Patrick; Roussigné, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Although the left and right hemispheres of our brains develop with a high degree of symmetry at both the anatomical and functional levels, it has become clear that subtle structural differences exist between the two sides and that each is dominant in processing specific cognitive tasks. As the result of evolutionary conservation or convergence, lateralization of the brain is found in both vertebrates and invertebrates, suggesting that it provides significant fitness for animal life. This widespread feature of hemispheric specialization has allowed the emergence of model systems to study its development and, in some cases, to link anatomical asymmetries to brain function and behavior. Here, we present some of what is known about brain asymmetry in humans and model organisms as well as what is known about the impact of environmental and genetic factors on brain asymmetry development. We specifically highlight the progress made in understanding the development of epithalamic asymmetries in zebrafish and how this model provides an exciting opportunity to address brain asymmetry at different levels of complexity. PMID:26442849

  10. Private health insurance: implications for developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Neelam; Savedoff, William

    2005-01-01

    Private health insurance is playing an increasing role in both high- and low-income countries, yet is poorly understood by researchers and policy-makers. This paper shows that the distinction between private and public health insurance is often exaggerated since well regulated private insurance markets share many features with public insurance systems. It notes that private health insurance preceded many modern social insurance systems in western Europe, allowing these countries to develop the mechanisms, institutions and capacities that subsequently made it possible to provide universal access to health care. We also review international experiences with private insurance, demonstrating that its role is not restricted to any particular region or level of national income. The seven countries that finance more than 20% of their health care via private health insurance are Brazil, Chile, Namibia, South Africa, the United States, Uruguay and Zimbabwe. In each case, private health insurance provides primary financial protection for workers and their families while public health-care funds are targeted to programmes covering poor and vulnerable populations. We make recommendations for policy in developing countries, arguing that private health insurance cannot be ignored. Instead, it can be harnessed to serve the public interest if governments implement effective regulations and focus public funds on programmes for those who are poor and vulnerable. It can also be used as a transitional form of health insurance to develop experience with insurance institutions while the public sector increases its own capacity to manage and finance health-care coverage. PMID:15744405

  11. Private health insurance: implications for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sekhri, Neelam; Savedoff, William

    2005-02-01

    Private health insurance is playing an increasing role in both high- and low-income countries, yet is poorly understood by researchers and policy-makers. This paper shows that the distinction between private and public health insurance is often exaggerated since well regulated private insurance markets share many features with public insurance systems. It notes that private health insurance preceded many modern social insurance systems in western Europe, allowing these countries to develop the mechanisms, institutions and capacities that subsequently made it possible to provide universal access to health care. We also review international experiences with private insurance, demonstrating that its role is not restricted to any particular region or level of national income. The seven countries that finance more than 20% of their health care via private health insurance are Brazil, Chile, Namibia, South Africa, the United States, Uruguay and Zimbabwe. In each case, private health insurance provides primary financial protection for workers and their families while public health-care funds are targeted to programmes covering poor and vulnerable populations. We make recommendations for policy in developing countries, arguing that private health insurance cannot be ignored. Instead, it can be harnessed to serve the public interest if governments implement effective regulations and focus public funds on programmes for those who are poor and vulnerable. It can also be used as a transitional form of health insurance to develop experience with insurance institutions while the public sector increases its own capacity to manage and finance health-care coverage. PMID:15744405

  12. Socioeconomic implications of AIDS in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J

    1991-12-01

    The author succinctly presents the socioeconomic impact of AIDs in developing countries in terms of demographic effects; economic impact; and the impact on the formal sector, agriculture, human capital, health, food and nutrition, and women and children. The answer to what can be done is directed to policymakers. First, prevention, which has been urged by WHO, is necessary even in areas sexual behavior. Knowledge is not enough. The use of condoms and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases helps; i.e., Thailand's well established and highly visible program. Blood screening is needed as well as the use of protective medical garments (gloves) and clean syringes. The 2nd approach is to concentrate on designing measures to ameliorate the consequences of the HIV infection. Such strategies may involve providing school fees for orphans, introducing and providing labor saving technology, and disseminating prevention messages. The effort should involve cooperative effort between government, nongovernmental and community organizations. Governments must acknowledge the seriousness of the problem and take action. The donor community is faced with the challenge to identify areas of comparative expertise and coordinate approaches. Without such undertakings, the decline in economic and social progress in developing countries and human tragedy will ensue. WHO estimates that in 1991 9 million adults and 1 million children are HIV infected worldwide, of which 80% are in developing countries. Prior focus on the human toll and the strain on national health care systems obfuscates the present threat to economic and social systems. AIDs victims are young and economically productive adults. AIDs has been difficult to model because of the immunological effect, the long incubation period, and the sexual mode of transmission. The epidemic has spread the quickest in sub Saharan Africa, which accounts for 66% of infection world wide. It is expected that by 2000 increase in AIDs cases in

  13. Migration and its implications for urban development.

    PubMed

    Choguill, C L

    1983-01-01

    Four theoretical concepts frequently found in the migration literature are critically analyzed by applying them to the study of migration and urbanization patterns in Bangladesh. The theoretical concepts considered include the socioeconomic approach, the rural development approach, an approach based on the sexually selective nature of migration flows, and the primary event approach. The restricted validity of these theories for explaining migration patterns in Bangladesh is demonstrated, and a case is made for taking a broader approach to migration analysis. Comments by Jacques Ledent (pp. 82-4), Ingvar Holmberg (pp. 85-8), and Frans J. Willekens (p. 89) are included. PMID:12312867

  14. Infusion pump development and implications for nurses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul

    Infusion pumps are commonplace in today's healthcare settings and their design and development has kept pace with technology over the decades. In the 1970s and 1980s infusion pumps began to emerge in the UK market and were basic, mechanical devices with limited functions. Today, infusion pumps have a plethora of functions and features and a range of alarms to help alert the user and the patient that infusions are nearing completion, have ended or their range of sensors has detected that the infusion pump, or patient, requires attention. The role of the nurse in safely managing this ever-changing technology should not be underestimated. This paper reviews the progress made over the past 40 years in the UK healthcare setting and how the nurses have had to keep up to speed with the technology as it develops. It highlights the importance of fully integrating infusion pumps into intravenous (IV) therapy training and assessment. The important role the nurse plays is highlighted as well as exploring how he or she can help organisations better understand infusion pumps in the day-to-day management of patients undergoing intravenous therapy. PMID:26496875

  15. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a tool to predict chemical activity on mammalian development and identify mechanisms influencing toxicological outcome

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, Philippa H.; Perry, Simon J.; Widdison, Stephanie; Daniels, Shannon; Bondo, Eddie; Lamberth, Clemens; Currie, Richard A.; Flemming, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether a C. elegans bioassay could predict mammalian developmental activity, we selected diverse compounds known and known not to elicit such activity and measured their effect on C. elegans egg viability. 89% of compounds that reduced C. elegans egg viability also had mammalian developmental activity. Conversely only 25% of compounds found not to reduce egg viability in C. elegans were also inactive in mammals. We conclude that the C. elegans egg viability assay is an accurate positive predictor, but an inaccurate negative predictor, of mammalian developmental activity. We then evaluated C. elegans as a tool to identify mechanisms affecting toxicological outcomes among related compounds. The difference in developmental activity of structurally related fungicides in C. elegans correlated with their rate of metabolism. Knockdown of the cytochrome P450s cyp-35A3 and cyp-35A4 increased the toxicity to C. elegans of the least developmentally active compounds to the level of the most developmentally active. This indicated that these P450s were involved in the greater rate of metabolism of the less toxic of these compounds. We conclude that C. elegans based approaches can predict mammalian developmental activity and can yield plausible hypotheses for factors affecting the biological potency of compounds in mammals. PMID:26987796

  16. Isotope Labeling in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arpana; Saxena, Krishna; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Isotope labeling of proteins represents an important and often required tool for the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure and dynamics of proteins. Mammalian expression systems have conventionally been considered to be too weak and inefficient for protein expression. However, recent advances have significantly improved the expression levels of these systems. Here, we provide an overview of some of the recent developments in expression strategies for mammalian expression systems in view of NMR investigations. PMID:22167668

  17. Mechanisms of immunity in hydatid disease: implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbao; Ross, Allen G; McManus, Donald P

    2008-11-15

    The Echinococcus organisms, the cause of echinococcosis (hydatid disease), are parasitic helminths with life cycles involving a carnivorous definitive host (usually dog or fox) and an intermediate host (human, ungulate, or rodent). They are complex multicellular pathogens that, despite being under constant barrage by the immune system, are able to modulate antiparasite immune responses and persist and flourish in their mammalian hosts. Understanding how the immune system deals with these parasites is a major challenge. Recent application of modern molecular and immunological approaches has revealed insights on the nature of immune responses generated during the course of hydatid infection, although many aspects of the Echinococcus-host interplay remain unexplored. This review summarizes current understanding of the immunology of echinococcosis, indicates areas where information is lacking, and shows how knowledge of host protective immunity has been translated into the design and development of anti-Echinococcus vaccines for application in intermediate hosts. PMID:18981082

  18. Live-cell quantification and comparison of mammalian oocyte cytosolic lipid content between species, during development, and in relation to body composition using nonlinear vibrational microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jasensky, Joshua; Boughton, Andrew P; Khmaladze, Alexander; Ding, Jun; Zhang, Chi; Swain, Jason E; Smith, George W; Chen, Zhan; Smith, Gary D

    2016-08-01

    Cytosolic lipids participate in the growth, development, and overall health of mammalian oocytes including many roles in cellular homeostasis. Significant emphasis has been placed on the study of lipids as a dynamic organelle, which in turn requires the development of tools and techniques to quantitate and compare how lipid content relates to cellular structure, function, and normalcy. Objectives of this study were to determine if nonlinear vibrational microscopy (e.g., coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering or CARS microscopy) could be used for live-cell imaging to quantify and compare lipid content in mammalian oocytes during development and in relation to body composition; and compare its efficacy to methods involving cellular fixation and staining protocols. Results of this study demonstrate that CARS is able to identify lipids in live mammalian oocytes, and there exists quantifiable and consistent differences in percent lipid composition across ooctyes of different species, developmental stages, and in relation to body composition. Such a method of live-cell lipid quantification has (i) experimental power in basic cell biology, (ii) practical utility for identifying developmental predictive biomarkers while advancing biology-based oocyte/embryo selection, and (iii) ability to yield rationally supporting technology for decision-making in rodents, domestic species, and human assisted reproduction and/or fertility preservation. PMID:27272931

  19. Some Instructional Implications from a Mathematical Model of Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mierkiewicz, Diane B.

    Cognitive development and various educational implications are discussed in terms of Donald Saari's model of the interaction of a learner and the enviroment and the constraints imposed by the inefficiency of the learner's cognitive system. Saari proposed a hierarchical system of cognitive structures such that the relationships between structures…

  20. Research on Bereavement: Implications for Social Policy Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiely, Margaret C.

    This paper describes the results of an evaluation of the Palliative Care Service, one of the first hospices in North America (Montreal), and the implications of that research for social policy development. The objectives of the research were to evaluate the reliability of predictive assessments of bereavement risk and the effectiveness of…

  1. Effective Organizational Vision: Implications for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Rex D.; Akdere, Mesut

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the existing literature related to organizational vision and discusses its potential implications for human resource development (HRD). Furthermore, the paper aims to provide a forum for debate on the utility and effectiveness of organizational vision and how it is related to HRD and strategic…

  2. Development of Proverb Comprehension in Adolescents: Implications for Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nippold, Marilyn A.; Hegel, Susan L.; Uhden, Linda D.; Bustamante, Silvia

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of the comprehension of proverbs of 200 students (50 each in Grades 6, 8, 10, and 12) found growth in proverb comprehension was most pronounced at two transitional points in development: when students move from late childhood into early adolescence, and again when they move from late adolescence into adulthood. Implications for…

  3. Population Explosion in Africa and its Implications for Economic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinbode, Ade

    1977-01-01

    Analyzes patterns of population growth in Africa, accounts for the population explosion in certain parts of the continent, and discusses implications of the population growth for economic development. Seven tables and two maps are included in the article. (Author/DB)

  4. Aquaporin 0 plays a pivotal role in refractive index gradient development in mammalian eye lens to prevent spherical aberration

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, S. Sindhu; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Intact AQP0 functions as fiber cell-to-fiber cell adhesion protein. • AQP0 facilitates reduction in extracellular space and lens water content. • AQP0 adhesion function aids in lens refractive index gradient (RING) formation. • AQP0 prevents lens spherical aberration by establishing RING. • AQP0 is critical for lens transparency and homeostasis. - Abstract: Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) is a transmembrane channel that constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane protein of the fiber cells in mammalian lens. It is critical for lens transparency and homeostasis as mutations and knockout cause autosomal dominant lens cataract. AQP0 functions as a water channel and as a cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) molecule in the lens. Our recent in vitro studies showed that the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial to establish lens refractive index gradient (RING). However, there is a lack of in vivo data to corroborate the role of AQP0 as a fiber CTCA molecule which is critical for creating lens RING. The present investigation is undertaken to gather in vivo evidence for the involvement of AQP0 in developing lens RING. Lenses of wild type (WT) mouse, AQP0 knockout (heterozygous, AQP0{sup +/−}) and AQP0 knockout lens transgenically expressing AQP1 (heterozygous AQP0{sup +/−}/AQP1{sup +/−}) mouse models were used for the study. Data on AQP0 protein profile of intact and N- and/or C-terminal cleaved AQP0 in the lens by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and SDS–PAGE revealed that outer cortex fiber cells have only intact AQP0 of ∼28 kDa, inner cortical and outer nuclear fiber cells have both intact and cleaved forms, and inner nuclear fiber cells have only cleaved forms (∼26–24 kDa). Knocking out of 50% of AQP0 protein caused light scattering, spherical aberration (SA) and cataract. Restoring the lost fiber cell membrane water permeability (P{sub f}) by transgene AQP1 did not reinstate complete lens transparency and the mouse lenses showed light scattering and SA

  5. A genome-wide screen identifies a single Β-defensin gene cluster in the chicken: implications for the origin and evolution of mammalian defensins

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Yanjing; Hughes, Austin L.; Ando, Junko; Matsuda, Yoichi; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Skinner-Noble, Donald; Zhang, Guolong

    2004-08-13

    Defensins comprise a large family of cationic antimicrobial peptides that are characterized by the presence of a conserved cysteine-rich defensin motif. Based on the spacing pattern of cysteines, these defensins are broadly divided into five groups, namely plant, invertebrate, {alpha}-, {beta}-, and {theta}-defensins, with the last three groups being mostly found in mammalian species. However, the evolutionary relationships among these five groups of defensins remain controversial.

  6. Mammalian prions

    PubMed Central

    Salamat, Muhammad Khalid; Munoz-Montesino, Carola; Moudjou, Mohammed; Rezaei, Human; Laude, Hubert; Béringue, Vincent; Dron, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Upon prion infection, abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) self-perpetuate by conformational conversion of α-helix-rich PrPC into β sheet enriched form, leading to formation and deposition of PrPSc aggregates in affected brains. However the process remains poorly understood at the molecular level and the regions of PrP critical for conversion are still debated. Minimal amino acid substitutions can impair prion replication at many places in PrP. Conversely, we recently showed that bona fide prions could be generated after introduction of eight and up to 16 additional amino acids in the H2-H3 inter-helix loop of PrP. Prion replication also accommodated the insertions of an octapeptide at different places in the last turns of H2. This reverse genetic approach reveals an unexpected tolerance of prions to substantial sequence changes in the protease-resistant part which is associated with infectivity. It also demonstrates that conversion does not require the presence of a specific sequence in the middle of the H2-H3 area. We discuss the implications of our findings according to different structural models proposed for PrPSc and questioned the postulated existence of an N- or C-terminal prion domain in the protease-resistant region. PMID:23232499

  7. U.S. commercial space policies - Implications for developing countries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillam, Isaac T., IV; Stone, Barbara A.

    1987-01-01

    Recent U.S. policy developments on the commercial use of space are summarized and their international implications are considered. Attention is given to successful applications of technology developed in space, including an implantable cancer medication system, an implantable defibrillator, an ultrasonic residual stress monitor, and aquaculture treatment techniques. NASA projects involving bioengineering and rehabilitation applications are summarized, and plans to investigate high-temperature superconductors in space are addressed. Recent agreements entred into by NASA for space commercial studies are reviewed.

  8. Use of a cytogenetic whole-genome comparison to resolve phylogenetic relationships among three species: implications for mammalian systematics and conservation biology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hon-Tsen; Ma, Gwo-Chin; Lee, Dong-Jay; Chin, Shih-Chien; Chen, Ting-Li; Tsao, Hsien-Shao; Lin, Wen-Hsiang; Wu, Sheng-Hai; Lin, Chyi-Chyang; Chen, Ming

    2012-05-01

    The objective was to apply a novel modification of a genome-wide, comparative cytogenetic technique (comparative genomic hybridization, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)), to study species belonging to the myrmecophagous (ant/termite eating) mammalian orders/superorders (Pholidota, Tubulidentata, Carnivora, and Xenarthra), as a model for other applications in mammalian systematics and conservation biology. In this study, CGH was applied to high-quality metaphase spreads of pangolin (Pholidota), using probes of sloth and canine (Xenarthra and Carnivora, respectively) genomic DNA labeled with different fluorophores, thereby facilitating analysis of the visible color spectrum on pangolin karyotypes. Our results posited that pholidotes are closer to carnivores than to xenarthrans, which confirmed the current consensus that myrmecophagy in these mammalian lineages was more likely because of homoplasy (convergent evolution) than being an ancestral character. Since the modified CGH technique used is genome-wide, has chromosome-level resolution, and does not need full genome sequencing, it has considerable potential in systematics and other fields. PMID:22192390

  9. Development of a model system to study leukotriene-induced modification of radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, T.L.; Holahan, E.V.; Catravas, G.N.

    1986-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LT) are an important class of biological mediators, for which no information exists concerning their synthesis following a radiation insult, or on their ability to modify cellular response to a subsequent radiation exposure. LT are derived from arachidonic acid, as are prostaglandins, although by a separate enzyme system. Prostaglandins are able to modify radiosensitivity of mammalian cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the cytoprotective effect induced by prostaglandins may have significance in cancer therapy since certain breast cancers which secrete elevated levels of prostaglandins are more resistant to therapy than similar tumors without the prostaglandin elevation. The objective of this study was to define a model system in which the metabolic fate of the LT could be monitored, and the effort of LT on the ionizing radiation sensitivity of mammalian cells in vitro could also be characterized.

  10. Mammalian MagT1 and TUSC3 are required for cellular magnesium uptake and vertebrate embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Clapham, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+) is the second most abundant cation in cells, yet relatively few mechanisms have been identified that regulate cellular levels of this ion. The most clearly identified Mg2+ transporters are in bacteria and yeast. Here, we use a yeast complementary screen to identify two mammalian genes, MagT1 and TUSC3, as major mechanisms of Mg2+ influx. MagT1 is universally expressed in all human tissues and its expression level is up-regulated in low extracellular Mg2+. Knockdown of either MagT1 or TUSC3 protein significantly lowers the total and free intracellular Mg2+ concentrations in mammalian cell lines. Morpholino knockdown of MagT1 and TUSC3 protein expression in zebrafish embryos results in early developmental arrest; excess Mg2+ or supplementation with mammalian mRNAs can rescue the effects. We conclude that MagT1 and TUSC3 are indispensable members of the vertebrate plasma membrane Mg2+ transport system. PMID:19717468

  11. DNA modifications in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaehoon; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a crucial epigenetic mark in mammalian development, genomic imprinting, X-inactivation, chromosomal stability and suppressing parasitic DNA elements. DNA methylation in neurons has also been suggested to play important roles for mammalian neuronal functions, and learning and memory. In this review, we first summarize recent discoveries and fundamental principles of DNA modifications in the general epigenetics field. We then describe the profiles of different DNA modifications in the mammalian brain genome. Finally, we discuss roles of DNA modifications in mammalian brain development and function. PMID:25135973

  12. Women Education and Economic Development in Kenya: Implications for Curriculum Development and Implementation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syomwene, Anne; Kindiki, Jonah Nyaga

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of the relationship between women education and sustainable economic development in Kenya and its implications for curriculum development and implementation processes. The argument advanced in this paper is that the solution to the development problems in Kenya and other developing nations lies on women education.…

  13. South Africa's Economic Development Trajectory: Implications for Skills Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Marina J.; Altman, Miriam

    2005-01-01

    This article argues that skills development in South Africa must be aligned to the economic and political imperatives of reducing unemployment and poverty, while fostering growth and international competitiveness. The legacy of a resource-based economy, overlaid by apartheid policies, has resulted in widespread poverty, inequality and unemployment…

  14. Recovered Alcoholics and Career Development: Implications for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedro, Julie; Mercer, Frances; Iodice, Jody D.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents three issues regarding alcoholism, recovery, and career development. First, alcoholism is a disease that creates health and wellness problems for those it afflicts. It also impacts individual and workplace productivity. Second, alcoholism has a persistent stigmatization. As a result, those alcoholics who are in recovery face…

  15. Teaching as a Social Practice: Implications for Faculty Development.

    PubMed

    D'Eon, Marcel; Overgaard, Valerie; Harding, Sheila Rutledge

    2000-01-01

    What we believe about the nature of teaching has important implications for faculty development. In this article we contrast three different beliefs about the nature of teaching and highlight the implications for faculty development. If teaching were merely a technical enterprise where well trained teachers delivered packaged lessons, a very directive style of faculty development might be appropriate. If teaching were primarily a craft where teachers made personal judgments daily about how and what to teach, then faculty development which encouraged individual reflection and artistry might be more suitable. This article advances the argument that teaching generally (and teaching in medical schools in particular) is best characterized as a type of social practice. Social practices (such as parenting, being polite, and going to university) are purposive, rational, moral, communal, and are identified by their activities. The communal aspect of teaching means, among other things, that the prevailing social norms of faculty at particular institutions of higher education have a large role to play in shaping the practice of teaching. This being the case, faculty development needs to provide teachers the opportunity to address and reshape these powerful social norms where necessary. PMID:12386471

  16. Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development: Instructional Implications and Teachers' Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shabani, Karim; Khatib, Mohamad; Ebadi, Saman

    2010-01-01

    The current paper examines the instructional implications of Vygotsky's (1978) seminal notion of Zone of Proximal Development, originally developed to account for the learning potential of children, and investigates ZPD applications to the concept of teacher professional development. Specific attempt has been made to see how a number of assets at…

  17. Mammalian Endogenous Retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Mager, Dixie L; Stoye, Jonathan P

    2015-02-01

    Over 40% of mammalian genomes comprise the products of reverse transcription. Among such retrotransposed sequences are those characterized by the presence of long terminal repeats (LTRs), including the endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), which are inherited genetic elements closely resembling the proviruses formed following exogenous retrovirus infection. Sequences derived from ERVs make up at least 8 to 10% of the human and mouse genomes and range from ancient sequences that predate mammalian divergence to elements that are currently still active. In this chapter we describe the discovery, classification and origins of ERVs in mammals and consider cellular mechanisms that have evolved to control their expression. We also discuss the negative effects of ERVs as agents of genetic disease and cancer and review examples of ERV protein domestication to serve host functions, as in placental development. Finally, we address growing evidence that the gene regulatory potential of ERV LTRs has been exploited multiple times during evolution to regulate genes and gene networks. Thus, although recently endogenized retroviral elements are often pathogenic, those that survive the forces of negative selection become neutral components of the host genome or can be harnessed to serve beneficial roles. PMID:26104559

  18. Implications of plant glycans in the development of innovative vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Salazar-González, Jorge A; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    Plant glycans play a central role in vaccinology: they can serve as adjuvants and/or delivery vehicles or backbones for the synthesis of conjugated vaccines. In addition, genetic engineering is leading to the development of platforms for the production of novel polysaccharides in plant cells, an approach with relevant implications for the design of new types of vaccines. This review contains an updated outlook on this topic and provides key perspectives including a discussion on how the molecular pharming field can be linked to the production of innovative glycan-based and conjugate vaccines. PMID:26890067

  19. Evolving targets for DEMO: Implications for materials development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Ian; Maisonnier, David; Ward, David

    2009-04-01

    Current reference fusion development scenarios assume the sequential achievement of key milestones. Firstly, the qualification of the plasma physics basis in ITER, together with the qualification of materials for in-vessel components in IFMIF. Secondly, the qualification of components and processes in DEMO. However, the circumstances, within which fusion development planning is undertaken, are changing, and it is becoming reasonable to plan on the assumption that within 20 years ITER and IFMIF will have been successful and the world will be eager for clean, secure energy supplies. This motivates supplementing the reference scenario with the consideration of reduced targets for the economic performance of a first generation of fusion power plants that could be deployed as early as possible, and so reduced targets for the technical performance of early DEMOs. The implications of the reference scenario and variants for fusion materials development are considerable, and these are discussed in this paper.

  20. Implications of pharmacogenomics for drug development and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Konstance, Richard P; Allsbrook, Jennifer S; Schulman, Kevin A

    2005-11-14

    Pharmacogenomics is likely to be among the first clinical applications of the Human Genome Project and is certain to have an enormous impact on the clinical practice of medicine. Herein, we discuss the potential implications of pharmacogenomics on the drug development process, including drug safety, productivity, market segmentation, market expansion, differentiation, and personalized health care. We also review 3 challenges facing the translation of pharmacogenomics into clinical practice: dependence on information technology, limited health care financing, and the scientific uncertainty surrounding validation of specific applications of the technology. To our knowledge, there is currently no formal agenda to promote and cultivate innovation, to develop progressive information technology, or to obtain the financing that would be required to advance the use of pharmacogenomic technologies in patient care. Although the potential of these technologies is driving change in the development of clinical sciences, it remains to be seen which health care systems level needs will be addressed. PMID:16287761

  1. Plasticity as a developing trait: exploring the implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in plasticity have been classically framed as genotype-by-environment interactions, with different genotypes showing different reaction norms in response to environmental conditions. However, research has shown that early experience can be a critical factor in shaping an individual's plasticity to later environmental factors. In other words, plasticity itself can be investigated as a developing trait that reflects the combined action of an individual's genes and previous interactions with the environment. In this paper I explore some implications of the idea that the early environment modulates long-term plasticity, with an emphasis on plasticity in behavioral traits. I begin by focusing on the mechanisms that mediate plasticity at the proximate level, and discussing the possibility that some traits may work as generalized mediators of plasticity by affecting the sensitivity of multiple phenol types across developmental contexts. I then tackle the complex problem of the evolution of reaction norms for plasticity. Next, I consider a number of potential implications for research on parental effects and phenotypic matching, and conclude by discussing how plasticity may become a target of evolutionary conflict between parents and offspring. In total, I aim to show how the idea of plasticity as a developing trait offers a rich source of questions and insights that may inform future research in this area. PMID:26816522

  2. DNA repair in mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Jaroudi, Souraya; SenGupta, Sioban

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cells have developed complex mechanisms to identify DNA damage and activate the required response to maintain genome integrity. Those mechanisms include DNA damage detection, DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which operate together to protect the conceptus from DNA damage originating either in parental gametes or in the embryo's somatic cells. DNA repair in the newly fertilized preimplantation embryo is believed to rely entirely on the oocyte's machinery (mRNAs and proteins deposited and stored prior to ovulation). DNA repair genes have been shown to be expressed in the early stages of mammalian development. The survival of the embryo necessitates that the oocyte be sufficiently equipped with maternal stored products and that embryonic gene expression commences at the correct time. A Medline based literature search was performed using the keywords 'DNA repair' and 'embryo development' or 'gametogenesis' (publication dates between 1995 and 2006). Mammalian studies which investigated gene expression were selected. Further articles were acquired from the citations in the articles obtained from the preliminary Medline search. This paper reviews mammalian DNA repair from gametogenesis to preimplantation embryos to late gestational stages. PMID:17141556

  3. Environmental implications of coal development: an interdisciplinary research team approach

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, W.T.; Brun, L.; Enz, J.; Galitz, D.S.; Li, K.; Whitman, W.C.

    1980-07-01

    In May, 1974 a team of researchers from North Dakota State University launched a project aimed at investigating The Implications of Coal Development on the Atmospheric Environment and Plant Ecosystems of Selected Sites in Western North Dakota. It was an interdisciplinary effort of four basic study areas, namely: Soils, Climatology, Engineering, and Botany. Support was provided by the US Forest Service, USDA, under a Surface Environment and Mining (SEAM) cooperative agreement with the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. The investigations, which lasted 4-1/2 years, were designed to accomplish three primary objectives. First was to analyze the frequency, intensity, and duration of low-level radiation inversions in western North Dakota. The second was to determine the probable dispersion of wastes to the atmosphere from various theoretical operational levels and types of coal development in the specified area. Lastly was evaluation of the effects of probable changes in air quality on the plant ecosystems in the area.

  4. Casz1 is required for cardiomyocyte G1-to-S phase progression during mammalian cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Dorr, Kerry M; Amin, Nirav M; Kuchenbrod, Lauren M; Labiner, Hanna; Charpentier, Marta S; Pevny, Larysa H; Wessels, Andy; Conlon, Frank L

    2015-06-01

    Organ growth occurs through the integration of external growth signals during the G1 phase of the cell cycle to initiate DNA replication. Although numerous growth factor signals have been shown to be required for the proliferation of cardiomyocytes, genetic studies have only identified a very limited number of transcription factors that act to regulate the entry of cardiomyocytes into S phase. Here, we report that the cardiac para-zinc-finger protein CASZ1 is expressed in murine cardiomyocytes. Genetic fate mapping with an inducible Casz1 allele demonstrates that CASZ1-expressing cells give rise to cardiomyocytes in the first and second heart fields. We show through the generation of a cardiac conditional null mutation that Casz1 is essential for the proliferation of cardiomyocytes in both heart fields and that loss of Casz1 leads to a decrease in cardiomyocyte cell number. We further report that the loss of Casz1 leads to a prolonged or arrested S phase, a decrease in DNA synthesis, an increase in phospho-RB and a concomitant decrease in the cardiac mitotic index. Taken together, these studies establish a role for CASZ1 in mammalian cardiomyocyte cell cycle progression in both the first and second heart fields. PMID:25953344

  5. Amino acids and mammary gland development: nutritional implications for milk production and neonatal growth.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Reza; Wu, Zhenlong; Hou, Yongqing; Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    Milk is synthesized by mammary epithelial cells of lactating mammals. The synthetic capacity of the mammary gland depends largely on the number and efficiency of functional mammary epithelial cells. Structural development of the mammary gland occurs during fetal growth, prepubertal and post-pubertal periods, pregnancy, and lactation under the control of various hormones (particularly estrogen, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, progesterone, placental lactogen, and prolactin) in a species- and stage-dependent manner. Milk is essential for the growth, development, and health of neonates. Amino acids (AA), present in both free and peptide-bound forms, are the most abundant organic nutrients in the milk of farm animals. Uptake of AA from the arterial blood of the lactating dam is the ultimate source of proteins (primarily β-casein and α-lactalbumin) and bioactive nitrogenous metabolites in milk. Results of recent studies indicate extensive catabolism of branched-chain AA (leucine, isoleucine and valine) and arginine to synthesize glutamate, glutamine, alanine, aspartate, asparagine, proline, and polyamines. The formation of polypeptides from AA is regulated not only by hormones (e.g., prolactin, insulin and glucocorticoids) and the rate of blood flow across the lactating mammary gland, but also by concentrations of AA, lipids, glucose, vitamins and minerals in the maternal plasma, as well as the activation of the mechanistic (mammalian) target rapamycin signaling by certain AA (e.g., arginine, branched-chain AA, and glutamine). Knowledge of AA utilization (including metabolism) by mammary epithelial cells will enhance our fundamental understanding of lactation biology and has important implications for improving the efficiency of livestock production worldwide. PMID:27042295

  6. The mammalian blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Stephen R; de Barros, Flavia R O; Rossant, Janet; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2016-01-01

    The blastocyst is a mammalian invention that carries the embryo from cleavage to gastrulation. For such a simple structure, it exhibits remarkable diversity in its mode of formation, morphology, longevity, and intimacy with the uterine endometrium. This review explores this diversity in the light of the evolution of viviparity, comparing the three main groups of mammals: monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians. The principal drivers in blastocyst evolution were loss of yolk coupled with evolution of the placenta. An important outcome of blastocyst development is differentiation of two extraembryonic lineages (trophoblast and hypoblast) that contribute to the placenta. While in many species trophoblast segregation is often coupled with blastocyst formation, in marsupials and at least some Afrotherians, these events do not coincide. Thus, many questions regarding the conservation of molecular mechanisms controlling these events are of great interest but currently unresolved. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26799266

  7. cAMP-dependent activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in thyroid cells. Implication in mitogenesis and activation of CDK4.

    PubMed

    Blancquaert, Sara; Wang, Lifu; Paternot, Sabine; Coulonval, Katia; Dumont, Jacques E; Harris, Thurl E; Roger, Pierre P

    2010-07-01

    How cAMP-dependent protein kinases [protein kinase A (PKA)] transduce the mitogenic stimulus elicited by TSH in thyroid cells to late activation of cyclin D3-cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) remains enigmatic. Here we show in PC Cl3 rat thyroid cells that TSH/cAMP, like insulin, activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-raptor complex (mTORC1) leading to phosphorylation of S6K1 and 4E-BP1. mTORC1-dependent S6K1 phosphorylation in response to both insulin and cAMP required amino acids, whereas inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase and glycogen synthase kinase 3 enhanced insulin but not cAMP effects. Unlike insulin, TSH/cAMP did not activate protein kinase B or induce tuberous sclerosis complex 2 phosphorylation at T1462 and Y1571. However, like insulin, TSH/cAMP produced a stable increase in mTORC1 kinase activity that was associated with augmented 4E-BP1 binding to raptor. This could be caused in part by T246 phosphorylation of PRAS40, which was found as an in vitro substrate of PKA. Both in PC Cl3 cells and primary dog thyrocytes, rapamycin inhibited DNA synthesis and retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation induced by TSH and insulin. Although rapamycin reduced cyclin D3 accumulation, the abundance of cyclin D3-CDK4 complexes was not affected. However, rapamycin inhibited the activity of these complexes by decreasing the TSH and insulin-mediated stimulation of activating T172 phosphorylation of CDK4. We propose that mTORC1 activation by TSH, at least in part through PKA-dependent phosphorylation of PRAS40, crucially contributes to mediate cAMP-dependent mitogenesis by regulating CDK4 T172-phosphorylation. PMID:20484410

  8. Recent advances in mammalian protein production

    PubMed Central

    Bandaranayake, Ashok D.; Almo, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian protein production platforms have had a profound impact in many areas of basic and applied research, and an increasing number of blockbuster drugs are recombinant mammalian proteins. With global sales of these drugs exceeding US$120 billion per year, both industry and academic research groups continue to develop cost effective methods for producing mammalian proteins to support preclinical and clinical evaluations of potential therapeutics. While a wide range of platforms have been successfully exploited for laboratory use, the bulk of recent biologics have been produced in mammalian cell lines due to the requirement for post translational modification and the biosynthetic complexity of the target proteins. In this review we highlight the range of mammalian expression platforms available for recombinant protein production, as well as advances in technologies for the rapid and efficient selection of highly productive clones. PMID:24316512

  9. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  10. Slip of the tongue: Implications for evolution and language development.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Gillian S; Rodriguez, Alina

    2015-08-01

    A prevailing theory regarding the evolution of language implicates a gestural stage prior to the emergence of speech. In support of a transition of human language from a gestural to a vocal system, articulation of the hands and the tongue are underpinned by overlapping left hemisphere dominant neural regions. Behavioral studies demonstrate that human adults perform sympathetic mouth actions in imitative synchrony with manual actions. Additionally, right-handedness for precision manual actions in children has been correlated with the typical development of language, while a lack of hand bias has been associated with psychopathology. It therefore stands to reason that sympathetic mouth actions during fine precision motor action of the hands may be lateralized. We employed a fine-grained behavioral coding paradigm to provide the first investigation of tongue protrusions in typically developing 4-year old children. Tongue protrusions were investigated across a range of cognitive tasks that required varying degrees of manual action: precision motor action, gross motor action and no motor actions. The rate of tongue protrusions was influenced by the motor requirements of the task and tongue protrusions were significantly right-biased for only precision manual motor action (p<.001). From an evolutionary perspective, tongue protrusions can drive new investigations regarding how an early human communication system transitioned from hand to mouth. From a developmental perspective, the present study may serve to reveal patterns of tongue protrusions during the motor development of typically developing children. PMID:25966841

  11. Mammalian Interphase Cdks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) drive cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes. Yeasts have a single major Cdk that mediates distinct cell cycle transitions via association with different cyclins. The closest homolog in mammals, Cdk1, drives mitosis. Mammals have additional Cdks—Cdk2, Cdk4, and Cdk6—that represent the major Cdks activated during interphase (iCdks). A large body of evidence has accrued that suggests that activation of iCdks dictates progression though interphase. In apparent contradiction, deficiency in each individual iCdk, respectively, in knockout mice proved to be compatible with live birth and in some instances fertility. Moreover, murine embryos could be derived with Cdk1 as the only functional Cdk. Thus, none of the iCdks is strictly essential for mammalian cell cycle progression, raising the possibility that Cdk1 is the dominant regulator in interphase. However, an absence of iCdks has been accompanied by major shifts in cyclin association to Cdk1, suggesting gain in function. After considerable tweaking, a chemical genetic approach has recently been able to examine the impact of acute inhibition of Cdk2 activity without marked distortion of cyclin/Cdk complex formation. The results suggest that, when expressed at its normal levels, Cdk2 performs essential roles in driving human cells into S phase and maintaining genomic stability. These new findings appear to have restored order to the cell cycle field, bringing it full circle to the view that iCdks indeed play important roles. They also underscore the caveat in knockdown and knockout approaches that protein underexpression can significantly perturb a protein interaction network. We discuss the implications of the new synthesis for future cell cycle studies and anti–Cdk-based therapy of cancer and other diseases. PMID:23634250

  12. Responses to Cell Loss Become Restricted as the Supporting Cells in Mammalian Vestibular Organs Grow Thick Junctional Actin Bands That Develop High Stability

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory hair cell (HC) loss is a major cause of permanent hearing and balance impairments for humans and other mammals. Yet, fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds readily replace HCs and recover from such sensory deficits. It is unknown what prevents replacement in mammals, but cell replacement capacity declines contemporaneously with massive postnatal thickening of F-actin bands at the junctions between vestibular supporting cells (SCs). In non-mammals, SCs can give rise to regenerated HCs, and the bands remain thin even in adults. Here we investigated the stability of the F-actin bands between SCs in ears from chickens and mice and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Pharmacological experiments and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of SC junctions in utricles from mice that express a γ-actin–GFP fusion protein showed that the thickening F-actin bands develop increased resistance to depolymerization and exceptional stability that parallels a sharp decline in the cell replacement capacity of the maturing mammalian ear. The FRAP recovery rate and the mobile fraction of γ-actin–GFP both decreased as the bands thickened with age and became highly stabilized. In utricles from neonatal mice, time-lapse recordings in the vicinity of dying HCs showed that numerous SCs change shape and organize multicellular actin purse strings that reseal the epithelium. In contrast, adult SCs appeared resistant to deformation, with resealing responses limited to just a few neighboring SCs that did not form purse strings. The exceptional stability of the uniquely thick F-actin bands at the junctions of mature SCs may play an important role in restricting dynamic repair responses in mammalian vestibular epithelia. PMID:24478379

  13. Teachers' professional development experiences: Implications for teaching practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, Gabriela N.

    the process of professional learning has been impacted by the respondents' participation in professional development. By engaging in the iterative process of professional learning described here, respondents are transforming their professional development experiences in order to learn from and about their practice over extended periods of time. As professional learners, the respondents act as change agents in their own practice, schools and learning communities. Based on the results, implications for practice and recommendations for further inquiry are also presented.

  14. Bifurcation in epigenetics: Implications in development, proliferation, and diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Cells often exhibit different and stable phenotypes from the same DNA sequence. Robustness and plasticity of such cellular states are controlled by diverse transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, among them the modification of biochemical marks on chromatin. Here, we develop a stochastic model that describes the dynamics of epigenetic marks along a given DNA region. Through mathematical analysis, we show the emergence of bistable and persistent epigenetic states from the cooperative recruitment of modifying enzymes. We also find that the dynamical system exhibits a critical point and displays, in the presence of asymmetries in recruitment, a bifurcation diagram with hysteresis. These results have deep implications for our understanding of epigenetic regulation. In particular, our study allows one to reconcile within the same formalism the robust maintenance of epigenetic identity observed in differentiated cells, the epigenetic plasticity of pluripotent cells during differentiation, and the effects of epigenetic misregulation in diseases. Moreover, it suggests a possible mechanism for developmental transitions where the system is shifted close to the critical point to benefit from high susceptibility to developmental cues.

  15. Functional implication of nucleolin in the mouse first molar development.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Kobayashi, Ieyoshi; Kiyoshima, Tamotsu; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Honda, Jun-ya; Takahashi, Keiko; Enoki, Norio; Akamine, Akifumi; Sakai, Hidetaka

    2007-08-10

    We examined the functional implication of nucleolin in the mouse first molar development. Both the nucleolin mRNA and protein expressions were demonstrated in the odontogenic epithelial cells in the early stage and in the inner enamel epithelial layer in the late stage. The expression pattern of nucleolin corresponded to the proliferating cells in the tooth germ, thus showing that nucleolin could possibly be related to cell proliferation. No in situ signal of nucleolin was found in the primary enamel knot (PEK). Furthermore, nucleolin protein was demonstrated in the PEK by immunohistochemistry. The existence of nucleolin protein in the PEK may possibly be related to the apoptosis in the PEK cells. An inhibition assay using the hemagglutinating virus of Japan-liposome containing nucleolin antisense phosphorothioated oligonucleotide (AS S-ODN) in cultured mouse mandibles at embryonic day (E) 11.0 showed a marked growth inhibition of tooth germ. Moreover, no developmental arrest was found in the cultured tooth germ at E15.0 treated with nucleolin AS S-ODN. Real time PCR was performed to examine the mRNA expression of nucleolin-related genes, and a significant reduction in the midkine mRNA expression was thus observed in the mouse mandible after being treated with nucleolin AS S-ODN. This inhibition assay indicated that nucleolin could thus be involved in the early stage of tooth germ initiation and morphogenesis, possibly by regulating the midkine expression. PMID:17562718

  16. The International Implications of the Development of Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieghart, Paul

    1981-01-01

    Synthesizes issues covered at a conference on microelectronics: production, productivity, and employment; social implications; market mechanisms v government intervention; the role of national governments; data protection laws; and cultural pollution. (SW)

  17. Rhabdomyosarcoma: current challenges and their implications for developing therapies.

    PubMed

    Hettmer, Simone; Li, Zhizhong; Billin, Andrew N; Barr, Frederic G; Cornelison, D D W; Ehrlich, Alan R; Guttridge, Denis C; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Helman, Lee J; Houghton, Peter J; Khan, Javed; Langenau, David M; Linardic, Corinne M; Pal, Ranadip; Partridge, Terence A; Pavlath, Grace K; Rota, Rossella; Schäfer, Beat W; Shipley, Janet; Stillman, Bruce; Wexler, Leonard H; Wagers, Amy J; Keller, Charles

    2014-11-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) represents a rare, heterogeneous group of mesodermal malignancies with skeletal muscle differentiation. One major subgroup of RMS tumors (so-called "fusion-positive" tumors) carries exclusive chromosomal translocations that join the DNA-binding domain of the PAX3 or PAX7 gene to the transactivation domain of the FOXO1 (previously known as FKHR) gene. Fusion-negative RMS represents a heterogeneous spectrum of tumors with frequent RAS pathway activation. Overtly metastatic disease at diagnosis is more frequently found in individuals with fusion-positive than in those with fusion-negative tumors. RMS is the most common pediatric soft-tissue sarcoma, and approximately 60% of all children and adolescents diagnosed with RMS are cured by currently available multimodal therapies. However, a curative outcome is achieved in <30% of high-risk individuals with RMS, including all those diagnosed as adults, those diagnosed with fusion-positive tumors during childhood (including metastatic and nonmetastatic tumors), and those diagnosed with metastatic disease during childhood (including fusion-positive and fusion-negative tumors). This white paper outlines current challenges in RMS research and their implications for developing more effective therapies. Urgent clinical problems include local control, systemic disease, need for improved risk stratification, and characterization of differences in disease course in children and adults. Biological challenges include definition of the cellular functions of PAX-FOXO1 fusion proteins, clarification of disease heterogeneity, elucidation of the cellular origins of RMS, delineation of the tumor microenvironment, and identification of means for rational selection and testing of new combination therapies. To streamline future therapeutic developments, it will be critical to improve access to fresh tumor tissue for research purposes, consider alternative trial designs to optimize early clinical testing of candidate

  18. Simplified Bioreactor For Growing Mammalian Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F.

    1995-01-01

    Improved bioreactor for growing mammalian cell cultures developed. Designed to support growth of dense volumes of mammalian cells by providing ample, well-distributed flows of nutrient solution with minimal turbulence. Cells relatively delicate and, unlike bacteria, cannot withstand shear forces present in turbulent flows. Bioreactor vessel readily made in larger sizes to accommodate greater cell production quantities. Molding equipment presently used makes cylinders up to 30 centimeters long. Alternative sintered plastic techniques used to vary pore size and quantity, as necessary.

  19. Population dynamics in Asia and the Pacific: implications for development.

    PubMed

    1994-03-01

    This article is an excerpt from a recently published article on interactions between population and development in the "Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific, 1993." Topics include the dynamics of change (growth, age structure, sex composition, migration); implications for specific development issues (population and education, population and health, population and employment, and population and the environment); and policy approaches (slowing growth, spatial distribution, and the role of women). The Asian focus is on population policy and fertility declines. Different conditions specific to each country and varying degrees of program success give rise to country-specific differences in rates of growth and declines in fertility. Population compositions and pressures on spatial distribution differ among countries. Development demands differ for education, health, employment, and environmental controls. A common feature is that population is integrated into social and economic development policies. The links between population and the environment are recognized and will be integrated into policy as knowledge emerges. The ESCAP region has about 58% of world population, and fertility has declined to 3.1 children per woman. Fertility declines do not result in demonstrable changes in the rate of population growth, because the proportion of reproductive age women has increased and will continue to do so until 2010. Reductions in fertility are balanced by mortality declines. The annual rate of increase has gradually slowed, however the absolute size is still huge. The goal of the Bali Declaration of 1992 is to reach replacement level fertility of 2.2 children per woman by 2010 in the ESCAP region. The UN median variant projects 2.4 children per woman by 2010. The countries unlikely to reach replacement level fertility are India, the Philippines, Vietnam, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. Age structure will determine the need for services. For example, South Asia will

  20. Identification and expression patterns of novel long non-coding RNAs in neural progenitors of the developing mammalian cortex

    PubMed Central

    Aprea, Julieta; Lesche, Mathias; Massalini, Simone; Prenninger, Silvia; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Dahl, Andreas; Hiller, Michael; Calegari, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding (lnc)RNAs play key roles in many biological processes. Elucidating the function of lncRNAs in cell type specification during organ development requires knowledge about their expression in individual progenitor types rather than in whole tissues. To achieve this during cortical development, we used a dual-reporter mouse line to isolate coexisting proliferating neural stem cells, differentiating neurogenic progenitors and newborn neurons and assessed the expression of lncRNAs by paired-end, high-throughput sequencing. We identified 379 genomic loci encoding novel lncRNAs and performed a comprehensive assessment of cell-specific expression patterns for all, annotated and novel, lncRNAs described to date. Our study provides a powerful new resource for studying these elusive transcripts during stem cell commitment and neurogenesis.

  1. Intellectual disability in Africa: implications for research and service development.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Judith Anne; McConkey, Roy; Adnams, Colleen

    2013-09-01

    Although intellectual disability (ID) is probably the largest impairment grouping on the African continent, few indigenous research and evaluation studies have been undertaken. This article is an initial attempt to relate service delivery issues to an African research agenda. We critically analysed the available literature, drawing on academic publications and those of non-governmental agencies. In this process we identified several key issues for further investigation, namely: understanding ID in African contexts, access to education and health care, the provision of appropriate assistance and support, and income generation. We relate our analysis to the recommendations made in the World Report on Disability but with a specific focus on ID in Africa. The need for mainstreaming and prioritising ID in non-disability related and across impairment programmes is highlighted. We note the importance of families and emphasise the need to draw on informal and traditional forms of care and participation. The need for reliable research evidence to support practice is highlighted. We conclude with a call to action by and on behalf of individuals with ID to be included in the development priorities of the continent. Implications for Rehabilitation Service provision for people with intellectual disabilities in Africa is not always well served by insights obtained from western research agendas. Appropriate and effective rehabilitation requires an understanding of the context and the environment in which the disabled person operates. Indigenous research into the provision of support to families and the inclusion of persons with intellectual disability into mainstream programmes as well as disability specific provision is recommended. PMID:23350758

  2. The Arizona Sun Corridor: Quantifying climatic implications of megapolitan development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, M.; Moustaoui, M.; Mahalov, A.

    2010-12-01

    The local and regional-scale hydro-climatic impacts of land use and land cover change (LULCC) that result from urbanization require attention in light of future urban growth projections and related concerns for environmental sustainability. This is an especially serious issue over the southwestern U.S. where mounting pressure on the area’s natural desert environment and increasingly limited resources (e.g. water) exists, and is likely to worsen, due to unrelenting sprawl and associated urbanization. While previous modeling results have shown the degree to which the built environment has contributed to the region’s warming summertime climate, we use projections of future landscape change over the rapidly urbanizing Arizona Sun Corridor - an anticipated stretch of urban expanse that includes current metro Phoenix and Tucson - as surface boundary conditions to conduct high-resolution (order of 1-km) numerical simulations, over the seasonal timescale, to quantify the climatic effect of this relentlessly growing and increasingly vulnerable region. We use the latest version of the WRF modeling system to take advantage of several new capabilities, including a newly implemented nesting method used to refine the vertical mesh, and a comprehensive multi-story urban canopy scheme. We quantify the impact of projected (circa 2050) Sun Corridor megapolitan area on further development of the urban heat island (UHI), assess changes in the surface energy budget, with important implications for the near surface temperature and stability, and discuss modeled impacts on regional rainfall. Lastly, simulated effects are compared with projected warming due to increasing greenhouse gases (the GCMs from which these results are obtained currently do not take into account effects of urbanizing regions) and quantify the degree to which LULCC over the Arizona Sun Corridor will exacerbate regional anthropogenic climate change. A number of potential mitigation strategies are discussed

  3. Implications of a Bayesian radiocarbon calibration of colonization ages for mammalian megafauna in glaciated New York State after the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feranec, Robert S.; Kozlowski, Andrew L.

    2016-03-01

    To understand what factors control species colonization and extirpation within specific paleoecosystems, we analyzed radiocarbon dates of megafaunal mammal species from New York State after the Last Glacial Maximum. We hypothesized that the timing of colonization and extirpation were both driven by access to preferred habitat types. Bayesian calibration of a database of 39 radiocarbon dates shows that caribou (Rangifer tarandus) were the first colonizers, then mammoth (Mammuthus sp.), and finally American mastodon (Mammut americanum). The timing of colonization cannot reject the hypothesis that colonizing megafauna tracked preferred habitats, as caribou and mammoth arrived when tundra was present, while mastodon arrived after boreal forest was prominent in the state. The timing of caribou colonization implies that ecosystems were developed in the state prior to 16,000 cal yr BP. The contemporaneous arrival of American mastodon with Sporormiella spore decline suggests the dung fungus spore is not an adequate indicator of American mastodon population size. The pattern in the timing of extirpation is opposite to that of colonization. The lack of environmental changes suspected to be ecologically detrimental to American mastodon and mammoth coupled with the arrival of humans shortly before extirpation suggests an anthropogenic cause in the loss of the analyzed species.

  4. Flow characteristics of rivers in northern Australia: Implications for development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petheram, Cuan; McMahon, Thomas A.; Peel, Murray C.

    2008-07-01

    SummaryAnnual, monthly and daily streamflows from 99 unregulated rivers across northern Australia were analysed to assess the general surface water resources of the region and their implications for development. The potential for carry-over storages was assessed using the Gould-Dincer Gamma method, which utilises the mean, standard deviation, skewness and lag-one serial correlation coefficient of annual flows. Runs Analysis was used to describe the characteristics of drought in northern Australia and the potential for 'active' water harvesting was evaluated by Base Flow Separation, Flow Duration Curves and Spells Analysis. These parameters for northern Australia were compared with data from southern Australia and data for similar Köppen class from around the world. Notably, the variability and seasonality of annual streamflow across northern Australia were observed to be high compared with that of similar Köppen classes from the rest of the world (RoW). The high inter-annual variability of runoff means that carry-over storages in northern Australia will need to be considerably larger than for rivers from the RoW (assuming similar mean annual runoff, yield and reliability). For example, in the three major Köppen zones across the North, it was possible (theoretically) to only exploit approximately 33% (Köppen Aw; n = 6), 25% (Köppen BSh; n = 12) and 13% (Köppen BWh; n = 11) of mean annual streamflow (assuming a hypothetical storage size equal to the mean annual flow). Over 90% of north Australian rivers had a Base Flow Index of less than 0.4, 72% had negative annual lag-one autocorrelation values and in half the rivers sampled greater than 80% of the total flow occurred during the 3-month peak period. These data confirm that flow in the rivers of northern Australia is largely event driven and that the north Australian environment has limited natural storage capacity. Hence, there is relatively little opportunity in many northern rivers to actively harvest water

  5. The Wellcome Prize Lecture. A map of auditory space in the mammalian brain: neural computation and development.

    PubMed

    King, A J

    1993-09-01

    The experiments described in this review have demonstrated that the SC contains a two-dimensional map of auditory space, which is synthesized within the brain using a combination of monaural and binaural localization cues. There is also an adaptive fusion of auditory and visual space in this midbrain nucleus, providing for a common access to the motor pathways that control orientation behaviour. This necessitates a highly plastic relationship between the visual and auditory systems, both during postnatal development and in adult life. Because of the independent mobility of difference sense organs, gating mechanisms are incorporated into the auditory representation to provide up-to-date information about the spatial orientation of the eyes and ears. The SC therefore provides a valuable model system for studying a number of important issues in brain function, including the neural coding of sound location, the co-ordination of spatial information between different sensory systems, and the integration of sensory signals with motor outputs. PMID:8240794

  6. BMP-mediated functional cooperation between Dlx5;Dlx6 and Msx1;Msx2 during mammalian limb development.

    PubMed

    Vieux-Rochas, Maxence; Bouhali, Kamal; Mantero, Stefano; Garaffo, Giulia; Provero, Paolo; Astigiano, Simonetta; Barbieri, Ottavia; Caratozzolo, Mariano F; Tullo, Apollonia; Guerrini, Luisa; Lallemand, Yvan; Robert, Benoît; Levi, Giovanni; Merlo, Giorgio R

    2013-01-01

    The Dlx and Msx homeodomain transcription factors play important roles in the control of limb development. The combined disruption of Msx1 and Msx2, as well as that of Dlx5 and Dlx6, lead to limb patterning defects with anomalies in digit number and shape. Msx1;Msx2 double mutants are characterized by the loss of derivatives of the anterior limb mesoderm which is not observed in either of the simple mutants. Dlx5;Dlx6 double mutants exhibit hindlimb ectrodactyly. While the morphogenetic action of Msx genes seems to involve the BMP molecules, the mode of action of Dlx genes still remains elusive. Here, examining the limb phenotypes of combined Dlx and Msx mutants we reveal a new Dlx-Msx regulatory loop directly involving BMPs. In Msx1;Dlx5;Dlx6 triple mutant mice (TKO), beside the expected ectrodactyly, we also observe the hallmark morphological anomalies of Msx1;Msx2 double mutants suggesting an epistatic role of Dlx5 and Dlx6 over Msx2. In Msx2;Dlx5;Dlx6 TKO mice we only observe an aggravation of the ectrodactyly defect without changes in the number of the individual components of the limb. Using a combination of qPCR, ChIP and bioinformatic analyses, we identify two Dlx/Msx regulatory pathways: 1) in the anterior limb mesoderm a non-cell autonomous Msx-Dlx regulatory loop involves BMP molecules through the AER and 2) in AER cells and, at later stages, in the limb mesoderm the regulation of Msx2 by Dlx5 and Dlx6 occurs also cell autonomously. These data bring new elements to decipher the complex AER-mesoderm dialogue that takes place during limb development and provide clues to understanding the etiology of congenital limb malformations. PMID:23382810

  7. Mammalian cardiolipin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Edgard M; Nguyen, Hieu; Hatch, Grant M

    2014-04-01

    Cardiolipin is a major phospholipid in mitochondria and is involved in the generation of cellular energy in the form of ATP. In mammalian and eukaryotic cells it is synthesized via the cytidine-5'-diphosphate-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol phosphate pathway. This brief review will describe some of the more recent studies on mammalian cardiolipin biosynthesis and provide an overview of regulation of cardiolipin biosynthesis. In addition, the important role that this key phospholipid plays in disease processes including heart failure, diabetes, thyroid hormone disease and the genetic disease Barth Syndrome will be discussed. PMID:24144810

  8. Six2 defines and regulates a multipotent self-renewing nephron progenitor population throughout mammalian kidney development

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Akio; Valerius, M. Todd; Mugford, Joshua W.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Self, Michelle; Oliver, Guillermo; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Nephrons, the basic functional units of the kidney, are generated repetitively during kidney organogenesis from a mesenchymal progenitor population. Which cells within this pool give rise to nephrons and how multiple nephron lineages form during this protracted developmental process is unclear. We demonstrate that the Six2-expressing cap mesenchyme represents a multipotent nephron progenitor population. Six2-expressing cells give rise to all cell-types of the main body of the nephron, during all stages of nephrogenesis. Pulse labeling of Six2-expressing nephron progenitors at the onset of kidney development suggests that the Six2-expressing population is maintained by self-renewal. Clonal analysis indicates that at least some Six2-expressing cells are multipotent, contributing to multiple domains of the nephron. Furthermore, Six2 functions cell-autonomously to maintain a progenitor cell status, as cap mesenchyme cells lacking Six2 activity contribute to ectopic nephron tubules, a mechanism dependent on a Wnt9b inductive signal. Taken together, our observations suggest that Six2 activity cell-autonomously regulates a multipotent nephron progenitor population. PMID:18682239

  9. Six2 defines and regulates a multipotent self-renewing nephron progenitor population throughout mammalian kidney development.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akio; Valerius, M Todd; Mugford, Joshua W; Carroll, Thomas J; Self, Michelle; Oliver, Guillermo; McMahon, Andrew P

    2008-08-01

    Nephrons, the basic functional units of the kidney, are generated repetitively during kidney organogenesis from a mesenchymal progenitor population. Which cells within this pool give rise to nephrons and how multiple nephron lineages form during this protracted developmental process are unclear. We demonstrate that the Six2-expressing cap mesenchyme represents a multipotent nephron progenitor population. Six2-expressing cells give rise to all cell types of the main body of the nephron during all stages of nephrogenesis. Pulse labeling of Six2-expressing nephron progenitors at the onset of kidney development suggests that the Six2-expressing population is maintained by self-renewal. Clonal analysis indicates that at least some Six2-expressing cells are multipotent, contributing to multiple domains of the nephron. Furthermore, Six2 functions cell autonomously to maintain a progenitor cell status, as cap mesenchyme cells lacking Six2 activity contribute to ectopic nephron tubules, a mechanism dependent on a Wnt9b inductive signal. Taken together, our observations suggest that Six2 activity cell-autonomously regulates a multipotent nephron progenitor population. PMID:18682239

  10. Cognitive Development during and after College: Implications for Access Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hettich, Paul

    The "epistemological reflection model" of Marcia Baxter Magolda is reviewed, and the implications of her work for the education of college students are considered. Four levels of knowing are postulated by Baxter Magolda; these are "Absolute" knowing, "Transitional" knowing, "Independent" knowing, and "Contextual" knowing. The four stages are…

  11. Cognitive Moral Development and Clinical Performance: Implications for Pharmacy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, David A.; Berger, Bruce A.

    1999-01-01

    A study explored the notion that moral reasoning skills are important to the provision of pharmaceutical care. It compared the moral reasoning skills of two classes of pharmacy students with those of practitioners who scored high on measures of pharmaceutical care and clinical decision making. Implications for pharmacy school admissions and…

  12. Environment, Biology, and Culture: Implications for Adolescent Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn

    1996-01-01

    Introduces this special theme issue examining the roles of socialization, biology, and culture as they affect adaptive and maladaptive developmental outcomes. Problems of adolescence addressed include antisocial behavior, depressive symptoms, substance abuse, low achievement, and eating problems. Considers factors implicated in successful…

  13. Clinical Implications of Dynamic Systems Theory for Phonological Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rvachew, Susan; Bernhardt, Barbara May

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine treatment outcomes in relation to the complexity of treatment goals for children with speech sound disorders. Method: The clinical implications of dynamic systems theory in contrast with learnability theory are discussed, especially in the context of target selection decisions for children with speech sound disorders. Detailed…

  14. Local Citation Analysis of Graduate Biology Theses: Collection Development Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laura Newton

    2011-01-01

    This paper will focus on the citation analysis of graduate masters theses from Carleton University's Biology Department with implications for library collection management decisions. Twenty-five masters theses were studied to determine citation types and percentages, ranking of journals by frequency of citation and by number of authors citing, and…

  15. Cooperative Education in the New Millennium: Implications for Faculty Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Cal

    1997-01-01

    Colleges and universities are being challenged to examine their mission, structure, and delivery of services for two reasons with far-reaching implications for cooperative education. The first is the move from an industrial to a postindustrial economy. The second deals with incorrect assumptions about learning based on outmoded information and…

  16. Implications of Post-Natal Cortical Development for Creativity Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Marjory; Dacey, John

    Man's long period of cerebral growth has important implications for education. The brain goes through major developmental changes after birth, and researchers have suggested that this growth process presents an opportunity for fostering the plasticity of genetically determined connections. Animal studies show that postnatal growth of the brain is…

  17. Epigenetics in preimplantation mammalian development.

    PubMed

    Canovas, Sebastian; Ross, Pablo Juan

    2016-07-01

    Fertilization is a very dynamic period of comprehensive chromatin remodeling, from which two specialized cells result in a totipotent zygote. The formation of a totipotent cell requires extensive epigenetic remodeling that, although independent of modifications in the DNA sequence, still entails a profound cell-fate change, supported by transcriptional profile modifications. As a result of finely tuned interactions between numerous mechanisms, the goal of fertilization is to form a full healthy new individual. To avoid the persistence of alterations in epigenetic marks, the epigenetic information contained in each gamete is reset during early embryogenesis. Covalent modification of DNA by methylation, as well as posttranslational modifications of histone proteins and noncoding RNAs, appears to be the main epigenetic mechanisms that control gene expression. These allow different cells in an organism to express different transcription profiles, despite each cell containing the same DNA sequence. In the context of replacement of spermatic protamine with histones from the oocyte, active cell division, and specification of different lineages, active and passive mechanisms of epigenetic remodeling have been revealed as critical for editing the epigenetic profile of the early embryo. Importantly, redundant factors and mechanisms are likely in place, and only a few have been reported as critical for fertilization or embryo survival by the use of knockout models. The aim of this review is to highlight the main mechanisms of epigenetic remodeling that ensue after fertilization in mammals. PMID:27165992

  18. Evolutionary paths to mammalian cochleae.

    PubMed

    Manley, Geoffrey A

    2012-12-01

    Evolution of the cochlea and high-frequency hearing (>20 kHz; ultrasonic to humans) in mammals has been a subject of research for many years. Recent advances in paleontological techniques, especially the use of micro-CT scans, now provide important new insights that are here reviewed. True mammals arose more than 200 million years (Ma) ago. Of these, three lineages survived into recent geological times. These animals uniquely developed three middle ear ossicles, but these ossicles were not initially freely suspended as in modern mammals. The earliest mammalian cochleae were only about 2 mm long and contained a lagena macula. In the multituberculate and monotreme mammalian lineages, the cochlea remained relatively short and did not coil, even in modern representatives. In the lineage leading to modern therians (placental and marsupial mammals), cochlear coiling did develop, but only after a period of at least 60 Ma. Even Late Jurassic mammals show only a 270 ° cochlear coil and a cochlear canal length of merely 3 mm. Comparisons of modern organisms, mammalian ancestors, and the state of the middle ear strongly suggest that high-frequency hearing (>20 kHz) was not realized until the early Cretaceous (~125 Ma). At that time, therian mammals arose and possessed a fully coiled cochlea. The evolution of modern features of the middle ear and cochlea in the many later lineages of therians was, however, a mosaic and different features arose at different times. In parallel with cochlear structural evolution, prestins in therian mammals evolved into effective components of a new motor system. Ultrasonic hearing developed quite late-the earliest bat cochleae (~60 Ma) did not show features characteristic of those of modern bats that are sensitive to high ultrasonic frequencies. PMID:22983571

  19. Divergence of Mammalian Higher Order Chromatin Structure Is Associated with Developmental Loci

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Emily V.; Bickmore, Wendy A.; Semple, Colin A.

    2013-01-01

    Several recent studies have examined different aspects of mammalian higher order chromatin structure – replication timing, lamina association and Hi-C inter-locus interactions — and have suggested that most of these features of genome organisation are conserved over evolution. However, the extent of evolutionary divergence in higher order structure has not been rigorously measured across the mammalian genome, and until now little has been known about the characteristics of any divergent loci present. Here, we generate a dataset combining multiple measurements of chromatin structure and organisation over many embryonic cell types for both human and mouse that, for the first time, allows a comprehensive assessment of the extent of structural divergence between mammalian genomes. Comparison of orthologous regions confirms that all measurable facets of higher order structure are conserved between human and mouse, across the vast majority of the detectably orthologous genome. This broad similarity is observed in spite of many loci possessing cell type specific structures. However, we also identify hundreds of regions (from 100 Kb to 2.7 Mb in size) showing consistent evidence of divergence between these species, constituting at least 10% of the orthologous mammalian genome and encompassing many hundreds of human and mouse genes. These regions show unusual shifts in human GC content, are unevenly distributed across both genomes, and are enriched in human subtelomeric regions. Divergent regions are also relatively enriched for genes showing divergent expression patterns between human and mouse ES cells, implying these regions cause divergent regulation. Particular divergent loci are strikingly enriched in genes implicated in vertebrate development, suggesting important roles for structural divergence in the evolution of mammalian developmental programmes. These data suggest that, though relatively rare in the mammalian genome, divergence in higher order chromatin

  20. Cold shock response in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Fujita, J

    1999-11-01

    Compared to bacteria and plants, the cold shock response has attracted little attention in mammals except in some areas such as adaptive thermogenesis, cold tolerance, storage of cells and organs, and recently, treatment of brain damage and protein production. At the cellular level, some responses of mammalian cells are similar to microorganisms; cold stress changes the lipid composition of cellular membranes, and suppresses the rate of protein synthesis and cell proliferation. Although previous studies have mostly dealt with temperatures below 20 degrees C, mild hypothermia (32 degrees C) can change the cell's response to subsequent stresses as exemplified by APG-1, a member of the HSP110 family. Furthermore, 32 degrees C induces expression of CIRP (cold-inducible RNA-binding protein), the first cold shock protein identified in mammalian cells, without recovery at 37 degrees C. Remniscent of HSP, CIRP is also expressed at 37 degrees C and developmentary regulated, possibly working as an RNA chaperone. Mammalian cells are metabolically active at 32 degrees C, and cells may survive and respond to stresses with different strategies from those at 37 degrees C. Cellular and molecular biology of mammalian cells at 32 degrees C is a new area expected to have considerable implications for medical sciences and possibly biotechnology. PMID:10943555

  1. Genomics in mammalian cell culture bioprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Wuest, Diane M.; Harcum, Sarah W.; Lee, Kelvin H.

    2013-01-01

    Explicitly identifying the genome of a host organism including sequencing, mapping, and annotating its genetic code has become a priority in the field of biotechnology with aims at improving the efficiency and understanding of cell culture bioprocessing. Recombinant protein therapeutics, primarily produced in mammalian cells, constitute a $108 billion global market. The most common mammalian cell line used in biologic production processes is the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and although great improvements have been made in titer production over the past 25 years, the underlying molecular and physiological factors are not well understood. Confident understanding of CHO bioprocessing elements (e.g. cell line selection, protein production, and reproducibility of process performance and product specifications) would significantly improve with a well understood genome. This review describes mammalian cell culture use in bioprocessing, the importance of obtaining CHO cell line genetic sequences, and the current status of sequencing efforts. Furthermore, transcriptomic techniques and gene expression tools are presented, and case studies exploring genomic techniques and applications aimed to improve mammalian bioprocess performance are reviewed. Finally, future implications of genomic advances are surmised. PMID:22079893

  2. Ecological Network Analysis for Economic Systems: Growth and Development and Implications for Sustainable Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiali; Ulanowicz, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of growth and development is an important issue in economics, because these phenomena are closely related to sustainability. We address growth and development from a network perspective in which economic systems are represented as flow networks and analyzed using ecological network analysis (ENA). The Beijing economic system is used as a case study and 11 input–output (I-O) tables for 1985–2010 are converted into currency networks. ENA is used to calculate system-level indices to quantify the growth and development of Beijing. The contributions of each direct flow toward growth and development in 2010 are calculated and their implications for sustainable development are discussed. The results show that during 1985–2010, growth was the main attribute of the Beijing economic system. Although the system grew exponentially, its development fluctuated within only a small range. The results suggest that system ascendency should be increased in order to favor more sustainable development. Ascendency can be augmented in two ways: (1) strengthen those pathways with positive contributions to increasing ascendency and (2) weaken those with negative effects. PMID:24979465

  3. AP1- and NF-kappaB-binding sites conserved among mammalian WNT10B orthologs elucidate the TNFalpha-WNT10B signaling loop implicated in carcinogenesis and adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-04-01

    WNT signals are context-dependently transduced to canonical and non-canonical signaling cascades. We cloned and characterized wild-type human WNT10B, while another group cloned aberrant human WNT10B with Gly60Asp amino-acid substitution. Proto-oncogene WNT10B is expressed in gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, and cervical cancer. Because WNT10B blocks adipocyte differentiation, coding SNP of WNT10B gene is associated with familial obesity. In 2001, we reported WNT10B upregulation by TNFalpha. Here, comparative integromics analyses on WNT10B orthologs were performed to elucidate the transcriptional mechanism of WNT10B. Chimpanzee WNT10B and cow Wnt10b genes were identified within NW_001223159.1 and AC150975.2 genome sequences, respectively, by using bioinformatics (Techint) and human intelligence (Humint). Chimpanzee WNT10B and cow Wnt10b showed 98.7% and 95.1% total-amino-acid identity with human WNT10B, respectively. N-terminal signal peptide, 24 Cys residues, two Asn-linked glycosylation sites, and Gly60 of human WNT10B were conserved among mammalian WNT10B orthologs. Transcription start site of human WNT10B gene was 106-bp upstream of NM_003394.2 RefSeq 5'-end. Number of GC di-nucleotide repeats just down-stream of WNT10B transcription start site varied among primates and human population. Comparative genomics analyses revealed that double AP1-binding sites in the 5'-flanking promoter region and NF-kappaB-binding site in intron 3 were conserved among human, chimpanzee, cow, mouse, and rat WNT10B orthologs. Because TNFalpha signaling through TNFR1 and TRADD/RIP/TRAF2 complex activates JUN kinase (JNK) and IkappaB kinase (IKK) signaling cascades, conserved AP1- and NF-kappaB-binding sites explain the mechanism of TNFalpha-induced WNT10B upregulation. TNFalpha-WNT10B signaling loop is the negative feedback mechanism of adipogenesis to prevent obesity and metabolic syndrome. On the other hand, TNFalpha-WNT10B signaling loop is

  4. Toward predictive models of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ma'ayan, Avi; Blitzer, Robert D; Iyengar, Ravi

    2005-01-01

    Progress in experimental and theoretical biology is likely to provide us with the opportunity to assemble detailed predictive models of mammalian cells. Using a functional format to describe the organization of mammalian cells, we describe current approaches for developing qualitative and quantitative models using data from a variety of experimental sources. Recent developments and applications of graph theory to biological networks are reviewed. The use of these qualitative models to identify the topology of regulatory motifs and functional modules is discussed. Cellular homeostasis and plasticity are interpreted within the framework of balance between regulatory motifs and interactions between modules. From this analysis we identify the need for detailed quantitative models on the basis of the representation of the chemistry underlying the cellular process. The use of deterministic, stochastic, and hybrid models to represent cellular processes is reviewed, and an initial integrated approach for the development of large-scale predictive models of a mammalian cell is presented. PMID:15869393

  5. Workplace Democracy: A Review of Literature and Implications for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2007-01-01

    A review of workplace democracy revealed that both practice and research need updating. The results are discussed in terms of history, theory, research and practice. Implications for human resource development research and practice are also included. (Contains 2 tables.)

  6. Mammalian Septins Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Macara, Ian G.; Baldarelli, Richard; Field, Christine M.; Glotzer, Michael; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Kennedy, Mary B.; Kinoshita, Makoto; Longtine, Mark; Low, Claudia; Maltais, Lois J.; McKenzie, Louise; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Nishikawa, Toru; Noda, Makoto; Petty, Elizabeth M.; Peifer, Mark; Pringle, John R.; Robinson, Phillip J.; Roth, Dagmar; Russell, S.E. Hilary; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Tanaka, Manami; Tanaka, Tomoo; Trimble, William S.; Ware, Jerry; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.; Zieger, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    There are 10 known mammalian septin genes, some of which produce multiple splice variants. The current nomenclature for the genes and gene products is very confusing, with several different names having been given to the same gene product and distinct names given to splice variants of the same gene. Moreover, some names are based on those of yeast or Drosophila septins that are not the closest homologues. Therefore, we suggest that the mammalian septin field adopt a common nomenclature system, based on that adopted by the Mouse Genomic Nomenclature Committee and accepted by the Human Genome Organization Gene Nomenclature Committee. The human and mouse septin genes will be named SEPT1–SEPT10 and Sept1–Sept10, respectively. Splice variants will be designated by an underscore followed by a lowercase “v” and a number, e.g., SEPT4_v1. PMID:12475938

  7. Mammalian sweet taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G; Hoon, M A; Chandrashekar, J; Zhang, Y; Ryba, N J; Zuker, C S

    2001-08-10

    The sense of taste provides animals with valuable information about the quality and nutritional value of food. Previously, we identified a large family of mammalian taste receptors involved in bitter taste perception (the T2Rs). We now report the characterization of mammalian sweet taste receptors. First, transgenic rescue experiments prove that the Sac locus encodes T1R3, a member of the T1R family of candidate taste receptors. Second, using a heterologous expression system, we demonstrate that T1R2 and T1R3 combine to function as a sweet receptor, recognizing sweet-tasting molecules as diverse as sucrose, saccharin, dulcin, and acesulfame-K. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of the patterns of expression of T1Rs and T2Rs, thus providing a view of the representation of sweet and bitter taste at the periphery. PMID:11509186

  8. Mammalian lipoxygenases and their biological relevance

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Hartmut; Banthiya, Swathi; van Leyen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) form a heterogeneous class of lipid peroxidizing enzymes, which have been implicated in cell proliferation and differentiation but also in the pathogenesis of various diseases with major public health relevance. As other fatty acid dioxygenases LOX oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids to their corresponding hydroperoxy derivatives, which are further transformed to bioactive lipid mediators (eicosanoids and related substances). On the other hand, lipoxygenases are key players in regulation of the cellular redox homeostasis, which is an important element in gene expression regulation. Although the first mammalian lipoxygenases were discovered 40 years ago and although the enzymes have been well characterized with respect to their structural and functional properties the biological roles of the different lipoxygenase isoforms are not completely understood. This review is aimed at summarizing the current knowledge on the physiological roles of different mammalian LOX-isoforms and their patho-physiological function in inflammatory, metabolic, hyperproliferative, neurodegenerative and infectious disorders. PMID:25316652

  9. Rheotaxis guides mammalian sperm

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Kiyoshi; Clapham, David E

    2013-01-01

    Background In sea urchins, spermatozoan motility is altered by chemotactic peptides, giving rise to the assumption that mammalian eggs also emit chemotactic agents that guide spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract to the mature oocyte. Mammalian spermatozoa indeed undergo complex adaptations within the female (the process of capacitation) that are initiated by agents ranging from pH to progesterone, but these factors are not necessarily taxic. Currently, chemotaxis, thermotaxis, and rheotaxis have not been definitively established in mammals. Results Here, we show that positive rheotaxis, the ability of organisms to orient and swim against the flow of surrounding fluid, is a major taxic factor for mouse and human sperm. This flow is generated within 4 hours of sexual stimulation and coitus in female mice; prolactin-triggered oviductal fluid secretion clears the oviduct of debris, lowers viscosity, and generates the stream that guides sperm migration in the oviduct. Rheotaxic movement is demonstrated in capacitated and uncapacitated spermatozoa in low and high viscosity medium. Finally, we show that a unique sperm motion we quantify using the sperm head's rolling rate reflects sperm rotation that generates essential force for positioning the sperm in the stream. Rotation requires CatSper channels, presumably by enabling Ca2+ influx. Conclusions We propose that rheotaxis is a major determinant of sperm guidance over long distances in the mammalian female reproductive tract. Coitus induces fluid flow to guide sperm in the oviduct. Sperm rheotaxis requires rotational motion during CatSper channel-dependent hyperactivated motility. PMID:23453951

  10. Assessment of the expression and role of the α1-nAChR subunit in efferent cholinergic function during the development of the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Roux, Isabelle; Wu, Jingjing Sherry; McIntosh, J Michael; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Hair cell (HC) activity in the mammalian cochlea is modulated by cholinergic efferent inputs from the brainstem. These inhibitory inputs are mediated by calcium-permeable nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) containing α9- and α10-subunits and by subsequent activation of calcium-dependent potassium channels. Intriguingly, mRNAs of α1- and γ-nAChRs, subunits of the "muscle-type" nAChR have also been found in developing HCs (Cai T, Jen HI, Kang H, Klisch TJ, Zoghbi HY, Groves AK. J Neurosci 35: 5870-5883, 2015; Scheffer D, Sage C, Plazas PV, Huang M, Wedemeyer C, Zhang DS, Chen ZY, Elgoyhen AB, Corey DP, Pingault V. J Neurochem 103: 2651-2664, 2007; Sinkkonen ST, Chai R, Jan TA, Hartman BH, Laske RD, Gahlen F, Sinkkonen W, Cheng AG, Oshima K, Heller S. Sci Rep 1: 26, 2011) prompting proposals that another type of nAChR is present and may be critical during early synaptic development. Mouse genetics, histochemistry, pharmacology, and whole cell recording approaches were combined to test the role of α1-nAChR subunit in HC efferent synapse formation and cholinergic function. The onset of α1-mRNA expression in mouse HCs was found to coincide with the onset of the ACh response and efferent synaptic function. However, in mouse inner hair cells (IHCs) no response to the muscle-type nAChR agonists (±)-anatoxin A, (±)-epibatidine, (-)-nicotine, or 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP) was detected, arguing against the presence of an independent functional α1-containing muscle-type nAChR in IHCs. In α1-deficient mice, no obvious change of IHC efferent innervation was detected at embryonic day 18, contrary to the hyperinnervation observed at the neuromuscular junction. Additionally, ACh response and efferent synaptic activity were detectable in α1-deficient IHCs, suggesting that α1 is not necessary for assembly and membrane targeting of nAChRs or for efferent synapse formation in IHCs. PMID:27098031

  11. Three Theories of Psychological Development; Implications for Children's Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, James M.; McIver, F. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    A slide-tape series developed for introduction of developmental and learning theories in freshman dental curriculum is described. Theories of social-emotional development, cognitive development, and theories of conditioning and observational learning are included. (MSE)

  12. Biology of Heme in Mammalian Erythroid Cells and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Heme is a prosthetic group comprising ferrous iron (Fe2+) and protoporphyrin IX and is an essential cofactor in various biological processes such as oxygen transport (hemoglobin) and storage (myoglobin) and electron transfer (respiratory cytochromes) in addition to its role as a structural component of hemoproteins. Heme biosynthesis is induced during erythroid differentiation and is coordinated with the expression of genes involved in globin formation and iron acquisition/transport. However, erythroid and nonerythroid cells exhibit distinct differences in the heme biosynthetic pathway regulation. Defects of heme biosynthesis in developing erythroblasts can have profound medical implications, as represented by sideroblastic anemia. This review will focus on the biology of heme in mammalian erythroid cells, including the heme biosynthetic pathway as well as the regulatory role of heme and human disorders that arise from defective heme synthesis. PMID:26557657

  13. Characteristics of the Successful Researcher and Implications for Faculty Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Carole J.; Schmitz, Constance C.

    1986-01-01

    To understand better the role of faculty development in training family medicine researchers, the characteristics of productive researchers, their training, and their work environment were examined. Areas reviewed were faculty development and evaluation, career development, professional socialization, organizational development, and faculty…

  14. Heterologous Expression and Purification Systems for Structural Proteomics of Mammalian Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Membrane proteins (MPs) are responsible for the interface between the exterior and the interior of the cell. These proteins are implicated in numerous diseases, such as cancer, cystic fibrosis, epilepsy, hyperinsulinism, heart failure, hypertension and Alzheimer's disease. However, studies on these disorders are hampered by a lack of structural information about the proteins involved. Structural analysis requires large quantities of pure and active proteins. The majority of medically and pharmaceutically relevant MPs are present in tissues at very low concentration, which makes heterologous expression in large-scale production-adapted cells a prerequisite for structural studies. Obtaining mammalian MP structural data depends on the development of methods that allow the production of large quantities of MPs. This review focuses on the different heterologous expression systems, and the purification strategies, used to produce large amounts of pure mammalian MPs for structural proteomics. PMID:18629259

  15. The extended trajectory of hippocampal development: Implications for early memory development and disorder.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rebecca L; Edgin, Jamie O

    2016-04-01

    Hippocampus has an extended developmental trajectory, with refinements occurring in the trisynaptic circuit until adolescence. While structural change should suggest a protracted course in behavior, some studies find evidence of precocious hippocampal development in the first postnatal year and continuity in memory processes beyond. However, a number of memory functions, including binding and relational inference, can be cortically supported. Evidence from the animal literature suggests that tasks often associated with hippocampus (visual paired comparison, binding of a visuomotor response) can be mediated by structures external to hippocampus. Thus, a complete examination of memory development will have to rule out cortex as a source of early memory competency. We propose that early memory must show properties associated with full function of the trisynaptic circuit to reflect "adult-like" memory function, mainly (1) rapid encoding of contextual details of overlapping patterns, and (2) retention of these details over sleep-dependent delays. A wealth of evidence suggests that these functions are not apparent until 18-24 months, with behavioral discontinuities reflecting shifts in the neural structures subserving memory beginning approximately at this point in development. We discuss the implications of these observations for theories of memory and for identifying and measuring memory function in populations with typical and atypical hippocampal function. PMID:26437910

  16. Development of a model describing regulation of casein synthesis by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in response to insulin, amino acids, and acetate.

    PubMed

    Castro, J J; Arriola Apelo, S I; Appuhamy, J A D R N; Hanigan, M D

    2016-08-01

    To improve dietary protein use efficiency in lactating cows, mammary protein synthesis responses to AA, energy substrates, and hormones must be better understood. These entities exert their effects through stimulation of mRNA translation via control of initiation and elongation rates at the cellular level. A central protein kinase of this phenomenon is the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which transfers the nutritional and hormonal stimuli onto a series of proteins downstream through a cascade of phosphorylation reactions that ultimately affect protein synthesis. The objective of this work was to further develop an existing mechanistic model of mTOR phosphorylation responses to insulin and total essential AA to include the effects of specific essential AA and acetate mediated by signaling proteins including protein kinase B (Akt), adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK), and mTOR and to add a representation of milk protein synthesis. Data from 6 experiments in MAC-T cells and mammary tissue slices previously conducted in our laboratory were assembled and used to parameterize the dynamic system of differential equations representing Akt, AMPK, and mTOR in their phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states and the resulting regulation of milk protein synthesis. The model predicted phosphorylated Akt, mTOR, AMPK, and casein synthesis rates with root mean square prediction errors of 16.8, 28.4, 33.0, and 54.9%, respectively. All other dependent variables were free of mean and slope bias, indicating an adequate representation of the data. Whereas mTOR was not very sensitive to changes in insulin or acetate levels, it was highly sensitive to leucine and isoleucine, and this signal appeared to be effectively transduced to casein synthesis. Although prior work had observed a relationship with additional essential AA, and data supporting those conclusions were present in the data set, we were unable to derive significant relationships with any essential

  17. Implications of Land Policy and Rural Development in Botswana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milazi, Dominic

    1988-01-01

    Examines land tenure alteration in relation to rural development programs in Botswana. Development efforts have had a class differentiated effect, aiding the relatively well-off cattle owners, but ignoring the small crop producers. A rural development strategy that benefits all rural groups must contain measures specifically tailored to each. (DHP)

  18. Stages of Teachers' Careers: Implications for Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Judith; And Others

    This monograph on the development of teachers' careers synthesizes researchers' prescriptions for early-, mid-, and late-career professional development; and describes successful programs that demonstrate sensitivity to the stages of teachers' growth. The first chapter, "Teachers' Career Development," reviews current adult- and career-stage…

  19. Capacitation-Associated Glycocomponents of Mammalian Sperm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min

    2016-05-01

    Mammalian fertilization is a series of events that are mostly carbohydrate mediated. The male gamete glycocomponents are extensively synthesized and modified during sperm development and sperm transport in the reproductive tracts. Freshly ejaculated mammalian sperm are required to undergo capacitation, which takes place in the female reproductive system, in order to become fully fertilizable. Several lines of evidence reveal changes in glycosylated sperm constituents during capacitation. Although the contributions of these molecular changes to capacitation are not completely understood, the presence, rearrangement, and/or modification of these sperm glycocomponents have been demonstrated to be important for fertilization. The following review summarizes mammalian sperm glycoconstituents, with emphasis on their molecular changes during capacitation. PMID:26363036

  20. Implications of nursing taxonomies for middle-range theory development.

    PubMed

    Blegen, M A; Tripp-Reimer, T

    1997-03-01

    Given the broad acceptance for the need to develop middle-range theory to support nursing practice, nursing scientists must consider how to proceed with dispatch to develop these theories. This article suggests using the concepts in the newly developing taxonomies of nursing knowledge as the building blocks for these theories. Taxonomies of nursing diagnoses (NANDA), nursing interventions (NIC), and nursing outcomes (NOC) can speed the construction of the theories needed for nursing practice. PMID:9055029

  1. Cultured normal mammalian tissue and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cell aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  2. Nursing and health care reform: implications for curriculum development.

    PubMed

    Bowen, M; Lyons, K J; Young, B E

    2000-01-01

    The health care system is undergoing profound changes. Cost containment efforts and restructuring have resulted in cutbacks in registered nurse (RN) positions. These changes are often related to the increased market penetration by managed care companies. To determine how RN graduates perceive these changes and their impact on the delivery of patient care, Healthcare Environment Surveys were mailed to graduates of the classes of 1986 and 1991. Using the Survey's 5-point Likert Scale, we measured the graduates' satisfaction with their salary, quality of supervision they received, opportunities for advancement, recognition for their job, working conditions, the overall job and the changes in their careers over the previous five year period. Our study suggests that the changes in the health care system are having an impact on how health care is being delivered and the way nurses view their jobs. Respondents reported that insurance companies are exerting increased control over patient care and perceive that the quality of patient care is declining. Increased workloads and an increase in the amount of paperwork were reported. Participants perceived that there were fewer jobs available and that job security was decreasing. The percentage of nurses who see job satisfaction as remaining the same or increasing are a majority. However, the relatively high percent of nurses who see job satisfaction as declining should provide a note of warning. The major implications of this study are that the professional nursing curriculum must be modified to include content on communication, organization, legislative/policy skills, and leadership. The nation's health care system is undergoing profound changes. There are numerous forces at work that are effecting the delivery of care and, consequently, the work of health professionals. These forces include significant efforts at cost containment, restructuring and downsizing of hospitals, and the movement of health care delivery out of acute

  3. Organizational Development and Its Implications for Adult Basic Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohn, Marcia Drew

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter, Marcia Drew Hohn provides an overview of organizational development theory for adult educators interested in applying the lessons of such theory to the strengthening of ABE programs and systems. She begins the chapter with a brief history of the development of organizational theory, noting the progression from a mechanistic…

  4. Psychosexual Development in Infants and Young Children: Implications for Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    Psychosexual development in young children is a topic that early childhood educators often ignore in the belief that children are not sexual beings. This paper discusses psychosexual development in young children, noting that preschoolers are often puzzled by sexual anatomical differences, that children need names for sexual body parts, and that…

  5. Men's Identity Development: Issues and Implications for Residence Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, David A.; Livingston, Wade G.; Havice, Pamela A.; Cawthon, Tony W.

    2012-01-01

    Young men struggle with privilege and oppression in college and university residence halls just as they do in other educational and social contexts. While discussions and research about adolescent and adult identity development continue, little attention has focused on how a male student's identity development can impact residence life cultures on…

  6. Implications of Right Brain Research on Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKinnon, Colin

    The idea that the brain may be more complex and varied in the ways that it responds to and interprets information than is generally recognized suggests that both the left and right hemispheres are in need of total development. In discussing the development of curriculum that will bring into harmony the functions of both brain hemispheres, it is…

  7. Teachers as Learners: Implications of Adult Education for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beavers, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Effective communication with teachers is a critical element of any successful professional development. Teachers are the foundational component of any educational system. It is vital that adequate attention is focused on appropriate and effective training of these teachers. Ideally, professional development offers a means of collaborative support…

  8. RE Student Teachers' Professional Development: Results, Reflections and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ubani, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses some issues related to the professional development of Religious Education (RE) student teachers in initial teacher education based on empirical results on the development of the pedagogical thinking of Finnish RE student teachers during their teacher education. The article begins by describing the concept of professionalism…

  9. Implications of Bilingual Development for Specific Language Impairments in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topbas, Seyhun

    2011-01-01

    The potential impact of bilingualism on children's language development has emerged as a crucial concern for Turkey, but so far it has not been addressed from the point of view of language disorders. This short review examines the potential impact of bilingual language development for language impairments in Turkey, with special emphasis on the…

  10. Humanistic Conceptions of Work: Implications on Proactive Training and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Benhong Rosaline

    Employee training and development (T&D) in business and industry, as a critical function of human resource development, must reflect a whole-health, proactive orientation in helping today's organizations survive in an increasingly competitive market. A proactive T&D orientation is based on humanistic views of work and education and is reflected in…

  11. Implications for a Green Curriculum Application toward Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Elvan; Ertepinar, Hamide; Teksoz, Gaye

    2009-01-01

    The aim of present study was two-fold: (1) to determine university students' familiarity and understandings of "sustainable development", (2) to examine their attitudes toward sustainable development, environmental values, and their behaviors toward sustainable life styles. The data collected by on-line administration of a questionnaire to 958…

  12. Implications of Piagetian Theory for Early Childhood Industrial Arts: Cognitive Development. ACESIA Monograph 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Richard J.

    The two purposes of this paper are to provide the uninitiated reader with a skeletal overview of Piaget's cognitive development theory and to identify general educational implications, especially for the development of early childhood industrial arts (ECIA) programs. The "Piaget Primer" for ECIA educators overviews such topics as (1) the four…

  13. Overview of Integrated Child Development Services Programme in India: Some Policy Implications for Nepal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrestha, Kishor

    This paper presents an overview of the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) program in India, discusses the context of Early Childhood Education (ECE) in Nepal, analyzes the best practices of the ICDS, and draws some policy implications for improving ECE in Nepal. The ICDS program is an integrated child development program with the…

  14. Observations of a Working Class Family: Implications for Self-Regulated Learning Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassallo, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Guardians have been implicated in the development of children's academic self-regulation. In this case study, which involved naturalistic observations and interviews, the everyday practices of a working class family were considered in the context of self-regulated learning development. The family's practices, beliefs, dispositions and home…

  15. Racial Identity Development and Academic Achievement of Academically Gifted African American Students: Implications for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Natalie F.; Dowden, Angel Riddick

    2014-01-01

    Gifted African American students are underrepresented and underserved in gifted education. The current article provides an overview of proper identification, racial identity development implications, psycho-social concerns and the importance of family involvement in the development of gifted African American students. A case study is presented to…

  16. Development of the Adolescent Brain: Implications for Executive Function and Social Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne; Choudhury, Suparna

    2006-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of considerable development at the level of behaviour, cognition and the brain. This article reviews histological and brain imaging studies that have demonstrated specific changes in neural architecture during puberty and adolescence, outlining trajectories of grey and white matter development. The implications of brain…

  17. Career Development and Organizational Justice: Practice and Research Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Kevin C.; Cobb, Anthony T.

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that formal theories of justice and fairness should be integrated into career development theory and practice. Provides a framework using the constructs of distributive, procedural, and interactional justice. (SK)

  18. [Placental developmental defects in cloned mammalian animals].

    PubMed

    Ao, Zheng; Liu, Dewu; Cai, Gengyuan; Wu, Zhenfang; Li, Zicong

    2016-05-01

    The cloning technique, also called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), has been successfully established and gradually applied to various mammalian species. However, the developmental rate of SCNT mammalian embryos is very low, usually at 1% to 5%, which limits the application of SCNT. Placental developmental defects are considered as the main cause of SCNT embryo development inhibition. Almost all of SCNT-derived mammalian placentas exhibit various abnormalities, such as placental hyperplasia, vascular defects and umbilical cord malformation. Mechanistically, these abnormalities result from failure of establishment of correct epigenetic modification in the trophectoderm genome, which leads to erroneous expression of important genes for placenta development-related, particularly imprinted genes. Consequently, aberrant imprinted gene expression gives rise to placental morphologic abnormalities and functional defects, therefore decreases developmental competence of cloned embryos. Currently, although numerous methods that can improve the developmental ability of SCNT-derived embryos have been reported, most of them are unable to substantially enhance the success rate of SCNT due to failure to eliminate the placental development defects. In this review, we summarize placental abnormalities and imprinted gene expression in mammalian cloning, and propose directions for the future research aiming to improve the cloning efficiency. PMID:27232488

  19. Mammalian reproduction: an ecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Bronson, F H

    1985-02-01

    The objectives of this paper are to organize our concepts about the environmental regulation of reproduction in mammals and to delineate important gaps in our knowledge of this subject. The environmental factors of major importance for mammalian reproduction are food availability, ambient temperature, rainfall, the day/night cycle and a variety of social cues. The synthesis offered here uses as its core the bioenergetic control of reproduction. Thus, for example, annual patterns of breeding are viewed as reflecting primarily the caloric costs of the female's reproductive effort as they relate to the energetic costs and gains associated with her foraging effort. Body size of the female is an important consideration since it is correlated with both potential fat reserves and life span. Variation in nutrient availability may or may not be an important consideration. The evolutionary forces that have shaped the breeding success of males usually are fundamentally different from those acting on females and, by implication, the environmental controls governing reproduction probably also often differ either qualitatively or quantitatively in the two sexes. Mammals often live in habitats where energetic and nutrient challenges vary seasonally, even in the tropics. When seasonal breeding is required, a mammal may use a predictor such as photoperiod or a secondary plant compound to prepare metabolically for reproduction. A reasonable argument can be made, however, that opportunistic breeding, unenforced by a predictor, may be the most prevalent strategy extant among today's mammals. Social cues can have potent modulating actions. They can act either via discrete neural and endocrine pathways to alter specific processes such as ovulation, or they can induce nonspecific emotional states that secondarily affect reproduction. Many major gaps remain in our knowledge about the environmental regulation of mammalian reproduction. For one, we have a paucity of information about the

  20. Population growth. Its magnitude and implications for development.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, N

    1984-09-01

    A summary of the 1984 World Development Report is provided. The 3 major points stressed in the report were: 1) rapid population growth adversely affects development, 2) governments must adopt policies to reduce fertility, and 3) policies adopted by many countries have effectively reduced fertility. World population growth began accelerating at 0.5%/year in the 18th century, and by 1950 the annual acceleration rate was 2%. Most of the increase in population size is occurring in less developed countries, and this increase is due in part to the recent decline in mortality experienced by these countries. Of the 80 million individuals who will be added to the world's population in 1984, 70 million will be in the developing countries. Since 1965 the population growth rate for developing countries as a group declined from 2.4% to 2%. However, because of the high proportion of younger aged individuals in developing countries, the decline in fertility is expected to level off. According to World Bank population projections, the world population will stabilize at around 11 billion in 2150. During the interium, the population of developing countries will increase from its present level of 3.6 billion to 8.4 billion, and the population of developed countries will increase from 1.2 billion to 1.4 billion. These projections are probably overly optimistic. The adverse impact on development of rapid population growth is due to several factors. 1st, resources which could be used for investment must instead be used to fulfill the consumption needs of an increased number of people. 2nd, increases in the labor force must be absorbed by the agricultural sector, and this reduces agricultural productivity. 3rd, rapid population growth increases management problems. The adaption of policies by governments to reduce fertility is a necessary step in halting population growth. For poor families, children provide economic security. Therefore, governments must act to improve the economic

  1. Parallel distributed processing: Implications for cognition and development. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, J.L.

    1988-07-11

    This paper provides a brief overview of the connectionist or parallel distributed processing framework for modeling cognitive processes, and considers the application of the connectionist framework to problems of cognitive development. Several aspects of cognitive development might result from the process of learning as it occurs in multi-layer networks. This learning process has the characteristic that it reduces the discrepancy between expected and observed events. As it does this, representations develop on hidden units which dramatically change both the way in which the network represents the environment from which it learns and the expectations that the network generates about environmental events. The learning process exhibits relatively abrupt transitions corresponding to stage shifts in cognitive development. These points are illustrated using a network that learns to anticipate which side of a balance beam will go down, based on the number of weights on each side of the fulcrum and their distance from the fulcrum on each side of the beam. The network is trained in an environment in which weight more frequently governs which side will go down. It recapitulates the states of development seen in children, as well as the stage transitions, as it learns to represent weight and distance information.

  2. Central auditory development in children with cochlear implants: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anu; Dorman, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    A common finding in developmental neurobiology is that stimulation must be delivered to a sensory system within a narrow window of time (a sensitive period) during development in order for that sensory system to develop normally. Experiments with congenitally deaf children have allowed us to establish the existence and time limits of a sensitive period for the development of central auditory pathways in humans. Using the latency of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) as a measure we have found that central auditory pathways are maximally plastic for a period of about 3.5 years. If the stimulation is delivered within that period CAEP latencies reach age-normal values within 3-6 months after stimulation. However, if stimulation is withheld for more than 7 years, CAEP latencies decrease significantly over a period of approximately 1 month following the onset of stimulation. They then remain constant or change very slowly over months or years. The lack of development of the central auditory system in congenitally deaf children implanted after 7 years is correlated with relatively poor development of speech and language skills [Geers, this vol, pp 50-65]. Animal models suggest that the primary auditory cortex may be functionally decoupled from higher order auditory cortex due to restricted development of inter- and intracortical connections in late-implanted children [Kral and Tillein, this vol, pp 89-108]. Another aspect of plasticity that works against late-implanted children is the reorganization of higher order cortex by other sensory modalities (e.g. vision). The hypothesis of decoupling of primary auditory cortex from higher order auditory cortex in children deprived of sound for a long time may explain the speech perception and oral language learning difficulties of children who receive an implant after the end of the sensitive period. PMID:16891837

  3. Producing Newborn Synchronous Mammalian Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    A method and bioreactor for the continuous production of synchronous (same age) population of mammalian cells have been invented. The invention involves the attachment and growth of cells on an adhesive-coated porous membrane immersed in a perfused liquid culture medium in a microgravity analog bioreactor. When cells attach to the surface divide, newborn cells are released into the flowing culture medium. The released cells, consisting of a uniform population of synchronous cells are then collected from the effluent culture medium. This invention could be of interest to researchers investigating the effects of the geneotoxic effects of the space environment (microgravity, radiation, chemicals, gases) and to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies involved in research on aging and cancer, and in new drug development and testing.

  4. Faculty Conceptions of Teaching: Implications for Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varnava Marouchou, Despina

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the need to assist university teachers in thinking carefully about what they are teaching, and how this relates to and coheres with their own professional development, is outlined. The underlying argument being made is that any efforts designed to extend and encourage scholarly teaching require us to consider the faculty experiences…

  5. Some implications of in situ uranium mining technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, C.E.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Cole, R.J.; Keller, D.; Mellinger, P.J.; Wallace, R.W.

    1980-09-01

    A technology assessment was initiated in March 1979 of the in-situ uranium mining technology. This report explores the impediments to development and deployment of this technology and evaluates the environmental impacts of a generic in-situ facility. The report is divided into the following sections: introduction, technology description, physical environment, institutional and socioeconomic environment, impact assessment, impediments, and conclusions. (DLC)

  6. Closing the Gap through Professional Development: Implications for Reading Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doubek, Michael Brandon; Cooper, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the National Urban Alliance for Effective Education (NUA), a nonprofit advocacy organization that engages with school communities through professional development to build relationships with educators, students, parents, and community stakeholders. NUA consultants are former and current university professors, former…

  7. Teachers' Professional Development Experiences: Implications for Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Teresa M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to inquire into the ways in which participation in physical science professional development impacts science teachers' professional learning and ultimately their practice over time. This study strove to provide a greater understanding of teachers' processes as they engage in professional learning and make changes in…

  8. Inattentive Behavior in Childhood: Epidemiology and Implications for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner-Rogers, Jody; Taylor, Alan; Taylor, Eric; Sandberg, Seija

    2000-01-01

    A study compared developmental functioning, social, and environmental backgrounds of 62 overly active children (age 7), 37 with inattentive behavior, and 46 controls. Children with inattentive behavior were more likely to have general cognitive delays, particularly in language development and were more likely to have fathers with low occupational…

  9. Implications of New and Changing Occupations for Instructional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Jill Frymier

    A study was conducted to determine what occupations nationally are new and changing and if they need curriculum development at the vocational education level. The process used to conduct this study involved four steps: identifying new and changing occupations, collecting information about the occupations, locating available instructional…

  10. Fatherhood in Kenyan Ethnic Communities: Implication for Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasser, Jon; Fite, Kathleen; Wadende, Akinyi P.

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the traditional and evolving constructions of fatherhood in Kenyan society, with an emphasis on fatherhood's impact on child development outcomes. Western influence and increased access to technology have changed the role of the Kenyan father, and in turn affected his role in the family. Special attention is given to…

  11. Development of the Visual System and Implications for Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Penny

    2002-01-01

    This article summarizes the early development of the visual system within the context of the other sensory systems and preterm birth and relates this information to early intervention. Retinopathy of prematurely, ocular defects, cortical visual impairment and potential impact of the neonatal intensive care unit environment are discussed. (Contains…

  12. Public Understanding of Sustainable Development: Some Implications for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, William

    2015-01-01

    A number of recent surveys of public opinion claim that there is now widespread acceptance of the need for sustainable development, and that the general public, through its social and consumer activity is already successfully engaged. However, in all this, the focus has primarily been on individual and family behaviours such as recycling and…

  13. Psychosexual Development in Infants and Young Children: Implications for Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2000-01-01

    Discusses preschoolers' interest in and wonder about sexual anatomical differences, and adults' responses to their questions. Presents Freudian stages of psychosexual development, the relationship between sexual identity and gender role, children's preference for single-sex play groups, sex stereotyped toy preferences, and the role of television…

  14. The Influence of Touch on Child Development: Implications for Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Patricia L.

    2000-01-01

    This article outlines historical, socio-cultural, and research information that attests to the fundamental relationship between touch and child development. It describes applications including touch therapies with very low-birthweight infants, with fragile premature infants, and with infants of depressed mothers. (Contains extensive references.)…

  15. Examining Study Attrition: Implications for Experimental Research on Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubitskey, Beth W.; Vath, Richard J.; Johnson, Heather J.; Fishman, Barry J.; Konstantopoulos, Spyros; Park, Gina J.

    2012-01-01

    As teacher professional development research includes more experimental designs, new challenges arise. We examine the threat of participant attrition as an example of the types of problems researchers face. Counter-intuitively, higher levels of recruitment effort were related to higher dropout rates among teachers. We also found that teachers left…

  16. Neurobiology and Child Development: Challenging Current Interpretation and Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    We are currently experiencing an exciting time in early childhood as the Federal Government attempts to develop policies and systems to improve outcomes for our children. Recent advances in research have provided us with much evidence underpinning the new thinking. However, much of this evidence is still subject to interpretation, and it is my…

  17. The Educational Implications of Introducing a NQF for Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The one-year research project on the implementation of NQFs in developing countries was launched by the ILO 2009 in collaboration with the ETF. This article reviews some of the educational issues that arose from the project. The findings of the case studies raise issues that are important for how future research and policy on NQFs is taken…

  18. Creating World-Class Universities: Implications for Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jeongwoo

    2013-01-01

    Many countries are now creating world-class universities (WCUs) as essential parts of their higher education reform agendas, and as national goals. It is legitimate to ask whether every country that aspires to build a WCU can do so--especially developing countries. To answer this question, this paper provides a three-step framework. The first step…

  19. Relational Aggression in School Settings: Definition, Development, Strategies, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Alicia L.; Frey, Andy J.; Walker, Hill M.

    2015-01-01

    Relational aggression (RA) is a nonphysical form of aggression whereby the perpetrator's goal is to inflict or threaten damage to relationships, including harm to the target child's social standing or reputation. This form of aggression may result in long-term psychological harm to victims. This article defines RA, summarizes its development, and…

  20. Adult Children of Alcoholics: Implications for Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Bernadette; Halbrook, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Two characteristics of adult children of alcoholics are external orientation and disruption of ego boundaries, which inhibit the development of a sense of self. The dependent attitudes and behaviors associated with these traits affect work habits, career selection, and work relationships. (SK)

  1. Professional Development for Elementary Science Teachers: Implications for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Patricia; Arrington, Jeff; Whitworth, Jerry

    This project's goal was to design a professional development model to improve the skills of elementary teachers in providing quality science instruction. Surveys have concluded that lack of training, time, and instructional materials are obstacles for elementary science teachers. Eight elementary schools in a mid-sized west central Texas school…

  2. Development of Managers' Emotional Competencies: Mind-Body Training Implication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruicic, Dusan; Benton, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to research about the effect of mind-body training on the development of emotional competencies of managers. Design/methodology/approach: Quasi-experimental design, i.e. before and after (test-retest). Findings: Results showed that the experimental group, after training, achieved around 15 per cent higher scores compared…

  3. Plasticity in the Developing Brain: Implications for Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Michael V.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity allows the central nervous system to learn skills and remember information, to reorganize neuronal networks in response to environmental stimulation, and to recover from brain and spinal cord injuries. Neuronal plasticity is enhanced in the developing brain and it is usually adaptive and beneficial but can also be maladaptive…

  4. Burnout among Career Development Professionals: Preliminary Findings and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forney, Deanna S.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Presents the results of the initial stage of research conducted to explore the relationship between burnout and career development professionals through interviews (N=24). Formulates definition of burnout and identifies burnout symptoms and causes. Results pointed out the individualized nature of burnout, both in terms of symptoms/causes and…

  5. The environmental implications of intensified land use in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Tinker, P. B.

    1997-01-01

    The major agricultural intensifications in the developed world over the last half century have produced a range of important environmental problems. These include pollution, damage to wildlife and landscape and other issues, both on- and off-site. These are largely being controlled by scientific investigation and Government regulation. As developing countries increase agricultural production over the next 30 years, this may also cause even more serious environmental damage.
    The paper distinguishes between production-related on-site damage, and off-site and more extensive effects. Both may involve soil and water effects, such as soil erosion, salinization, siltation, eutrophication and loss of water quality. The use of more agrochemicals can damage water quality, health, wildlife and biodiversity. Loss of habitat from the extension of farming is particularly damaging to biodiversity. A developing off-site problem is the production of greenhouse gases by farming systems, including the conversion of forests to farmland. In the future the introduction of genetically engineered species of plants, animals or microbes will need secure control.
    Work, probably on a catchment basis, is necessary to understand and control these problems. The three main requirements are much better environmental information from the developing world; the selection of environmental indicators to be monitored; and the support of local farmers in protecting the environment. There are encouraging indications of farmer concern and action over obvious on-site damage, but this may not extend to extensive off-site issues. The main danger is that developing food scarcity would cause the environmental issues to be ignored in a race for production.

  6. Crossroads between Bacterial and Mammalian Glycosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Brockhausen, Inka

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial glycosyltransferases (GT) often synthesize the same glycan linkages as mammalian GT; yet, they usually have very little sequence identity. Nevertheless, enzymatic properties, folding, substrate specificities, and catalytic mechanisms of these enzyme proteins may have significant similarity. Thus, bacterial GT can be utilized for the enzymatic synthesis of both bacterial and mammalian types of complex glycan structures. A comparison is made here between mammalian and bacterial enzymes that synthesize epitopes found in mammalian glycoproteins, and those found in the O antigens of Gram-negative bacteria. These epitopes include Thomsen–Friedenreich (TF or T) antigen, blood group O, A, and B, type 1 and 2 chains, Lewis antigens, sialylated and fucosylated structures, and polysialic acids. Many different approaches can be taken to investigate the substrate binding and catalytic mechanisms of GT, including crystal structure analyses, mutations, comparison of amino acid sequences, NMR, and mass spectrometry. Knowledge of the protein structures and functions helps to design GT for specific glycan synthesis and to develop inhibitors. The goals are to develop new strategies to reduce bacterial virulence and to synthesize vaccines and other biologically active glycan structures. PMID:25368613

  7. Preschool child development: implications for investigation of child abuse allegations.

    PubMed

    Sivan, A B

    1991-01-01

    Allegations of mistreatment by adults made by children of preschool age are often dismissed as fictitious with the suggestion that children of this age are prone to fantasy and unable to discriminate fact from fiction. This paper is intended to familiarize those with a general concern about child abuse with the research and theories in child development. Specifically, it reviews those aspects of normal child development which have direct relevance to the question of the veracity of reports made by children ages 2 to 5 years. Examination of the research on children's thought and language, memory and learning, fears, fantasy, and play, as well as the research on the influence of television on children of this age, led to the conclusion that preschoolers base their play on the reality of their experience. PMID:1959080

  8. Implication of epigenetics in pancreas development and disease.

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Evans; Haumaitre, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    Pancreas development is controlled by a complex interaction of signaling pathways and transcription factor networks that determine pancreatic specification and differentiation of exocrine and endocrine cells. Epigenetics adds a new layer of gene regulation. DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs recently appeared as important epigenetic factors regulating pancreas development. In this review, we report recent findings obtained by analyses in model organisms as well as genome-wide approaches that demonstrate the role of these epigenetic regulators in the control of exocrine and endocrine cell differentiation, identity, function, proliferation and regeneration. We also highlight how altered epigenetic processes contribute to pancreatic disorders: diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Uncovering these epigenetic events can help to better understand these diseases, provide novel therapeutical targets for their treatment, and improve cell-based therapies for diabetes. PMID:26696517

  9. The implications of health sector reform for human resources development.

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Ala'; Hornby, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The authors argue that "health for all" is not achievable in most countries without health sector reform that incorporates a process of coordinated health and human resources development. They examine the situation in countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region of the World Health Organization. Though advances have been made, further progress is inhibited by the limited adaptation of traditional health service structures and processes in many of these countries. National reform strategies are needed. These require the active participation of health professional associations and academic training institutions as well as health service managers. The paper indicates some of the initiatives required and suggests that the starting point for many countries should be a rigorous appraisal of the current state of human resources development in health. PMID:11884974

  10. Implications of intelligent, integrated microsystems for product design and development

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS,DAVID R.; MCWHORTER,PAUL J.

    2000-04-19

    Intelligent, integrated microsystems combine some or all of the functions of sensing, processing information, actuation, and communication within a single integrated package, and preferably upon a single silicon chip. As the elements of these highly integrated solutions interact strongly with each other, the microsystem can be neither designed nor fabricated piecemeal, in contrast to the more familiar assembled products. Driven by technological imperatives, microsystems will best be developed by multi-disciplinary teams, most likely within the flatter, less hierarchical organizations. Standardization of design and process tools around a single, dominant technology will expedite economically viable operation under a common production infrastructure. The production base for intelligent, integrated microsystems has elements in common with the mathematical theory of chaos. Similar to chaos theory, the development of microsystems technology will be strongly dependent on, and optimized to, the initial product requirements that will drive standardization--thereby further rewarding early entrants to integrated microsystem technology.

  11. Policy implications in developing a land use management information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landini, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    The current land use map for the city of Los Angeles was developed by the guesstimation process and provides single stage information for each level in the critical geographical hierarchy for land use planning management. Processing and incorporation of LANDSAT data in the land use information system requires special funding; however, computergraphic maps are able to provide a viable information system for city planning and management.

  12. Plasticity in the developing brain: implications for rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Michael V

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity allows the central nervous system to learn skills and remember information, to reorganize neuronal networks in response to environmental stimulation, and to recover from brain and spinal cord injuries. Neuronal plasticity is enhanced in the developing brain and it is usually adaptive and beneficial but can also be maladaptive and responsible for neurological disorders in some situations. Basic mechanisms that are involved in plasticity include neurogenesis, programmed cell death, and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Repetitive stimulation of synapses can cause long-term potentiation or long-term depression of neurotransmission. These changes are associated with physical changes in dendritic spines and neuronal circuits. Overproduction of synapses during postnatal development in children contributes to enhanced plasticity by providing an excess of synapses that are pruned during early adolescence. Clinical examples of adaptive neuronal plasticity include reorganization of cortical maps of the fingers in response to practice playing a stringed instrument and constraint-induced movement therapy to improve hemiparesis caused by stroke or cerebral palsy. These forms of plasticity are associated with structural and functional changes in the brain that can be detected with magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). TMS and other forms of brain stimulation are also being used experimentally to enhance brain plasticity and recovery of function. Plasticity is also influenced by genetic factors such as mutations in brain-derived neuronal growth factor. Understanding brain plasticity provides a basis for developing better therapies to improve outcome from acquired brain injuries. PMID:19489084

  13. Mammalian phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) converts phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) and diacylglycerol (DAG). DAG and IP(3) each control diverse cellular processes and are also substrates for synthesis of other important signaling molecules. PLC is thus central to many important interlocking regulatory networks. Mammals express six families of PLCs, each with both unique and overlapping controls over expression and subcellular distribution. Each PLC also responds acutely to its own spectrum of activators that includes heterotrimeric G protein subunits, protein tyrosine kinases, small G proteins, Ca(2+), and phospholipids. Mammalian PLCs are autoinhibited by a region in the catalytic TIM barrel domain that is the target of much of their acute regulation. In combination, the PLCs act as a signaling nexus that integrates numerous signaling inputs, critically governs PIP(2) levels, and regulates production of important second messengers to determine cell behavior over the millisecond to hour timescale. PMID:23140367

  14. Metabolic costs and evolutionary implications of human brain development.

    PubMed

    Kuzawa, Christopher W; Chugani, Harry T; Grossman, Lawrence I; Lipovich, Leonard; Muzik, Otto; Hof, Patrick R; Wildman, Derek E; Sherwood, Chet C; Leonard, William R; Lange, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    The high energetic costs of human brain development have been hypothesized to explain distinctive human traits, including exceptionally slow and protracted preadult growth. Although widely assumed to constrain life-history evolution, the metabolic requirements of the growing human brain are unknown. We combined previously collected PET and MRI data to calculate the human brain's glucose use from birth to adulthood, which we compare with body growth rate. We evaluate the strength of brain-body metabolic trade-offs using the ratios of brain glucose uptake to the body's resting metabolic rate (RMR) and daily energy requirements (DER) expressed in glucose-gram equivalents (glucosermr% and glucoseder%). We find that glucosermr% and glucoseder% do not peak at birth (52.5% and 59.8% of RMR, or 35.4% and 38.7% of DER, for males and females, respectively), when relative brain size is largest, but rather in childhood (66.3% and 65.0% of RMR and 43.3% and 43.8% of DER). Body-weight growth (dw/dt) and both glucosermr% and glucoseder% are strongly, inversely related: soon after birth, increases in brain glucose demand are accompanied by proportionate decreases in dw/dt. Ages of peak brain glucose demand and lowest dw/dt co-occur and subsequent developmental declines in brain metabolism are matched by proportionate increases in dw/dt until puberty. The finding that human brain glucose demands peak during childhood, and evidence that brain metabolism and body growth rate covary inversely across development, support the hypothesis that the high costs of human brain development require compensatory slowing of body growth rate. PMID:25157149

  15. Metabolic costs and evolutionary implications of human brain development

    PubMed Central

    Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Chugani, Harry T.; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Lipovich, Leonard; Muzik, Otto; Hof, Patrick R.; Wildman, Derek E.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Leonard, William R.; Lange, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The high energetic costs of human brain development have been hypothesized to explain distinctive human traits, including exceptionally slow and protracted preadult growth. Although widely assumed to constrain life-history evolution, the metabolic requirements of the growing human brain are unknown. We combined previously collected PET and MRI data to calculate the human brain’s glucose use from birth to adulthood, which we compare with body growth rate. We evaluate the strength of brain–body metabolic trade-offs using the ratios of brain glucose uptake to the body’s resting metabolic rate (RMR) and daily energy requirements (DER) expressed in glucose-gram equivalents (glucosermr% and glucoseder%). We find that glucosermr% and glucoseder% do not peak at birth (52.5% and 59.8% of RMR, or 35.4% and 38.7% of DER, for males and females, respectively), when relative brain size is largest, but rather in childhood (66.3% and 65.0% of RMR and 43.3% and 43.8% of DER). Body-weight growth (dw/dt) and both glucosermr% and glucoseder% are strongly, inversely related: soon after birth, increases in brain glucose demand are accompanied by proportionate decreases in dw/dt. Ages of peak brain glucose demand and lowest dw/dt co-occur and subsequent developmental declines in brain metabolism are matched by proportionate increases in dw/dt until puberty. The finding that human brain glucose demands peak during childhood, and evidence that brain metabolism and body growth rate covary inversely across development, support the hypothesis that the high costs of human brain development require compensatory slowing of body growth rate. PMID:25157149

  16. New Developments in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Implications for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tabarestani, Sanaz; Movafagh, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Context: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by overproduction of immature and matured myeloid cells in the peripheral blood, bone marrow and spleen. Evidence Acquisition: A hallmark of CML is the presence of (9; 22) (q34; q11) reciprocal translocation, which is cytogenetically visible as Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) and results in the formation of BCR-ABL1 fusion protein. This fusion protein is a constitutively active tyrosine kinase which is necessary and sufficient for malignant transformation. The introduction of imatinib, a BCR-ABL1- targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has revolutionized CML therapy. Subsequently, two other TKIs with increased activity against BCR-ABL1, dasatinib and nilotinib, were developed and approved for CML patients. Nevertheless, CML therapy faces major challenges. Results: The first is the development of resistance to BCR-ABL1 inhibitors in some patients, which can be due to BCR-ABL1 overexpression, differences in cellular drug influx and efflux, activation of alternative signaling pathways, or emergence of BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations during TKI treatment. The second is the limited efficiency of BCR-ABL1-TKIs in blast crisis (BC) CML. The third is the insensitivity of CML stem cells to BCR-ABL1 inhibitors. Conventional chemotherapeutics and BCR-ABL1 inhibitors which act by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis, are ineffective against quiescent CML stem cells. Conclusions: A better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie TKI resistance, progression to BC, genomic instability and stem cell quiescence is essential to develop curative strategies for patients with CML. PMID:27366312

  17. Subglacial extensional fracture development and implications for Alpine Valley evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Kerry; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Amann, Florian; Loew, Simon

    2014-01-01

    stresses induced through exhumation and tectonic processes play a key role in the topographic evolution of alpine valleys. Using a finite difference model combining the effects of tectonics, erosion, and long-term bedrock strength, we assess the development of near-surface in situ stresses and predict bedrock behavior in response to glacial erosion in an Alpine Valley (the Matter Valley, southern Switzerland). Initial stresses are derived from the regional tectonic history, which is characterized by ongoing transtensional or extensional strain throughout exhumation of the brittle crust. We find that bedrock stresses beneath glacial ice in an initial V-shaped topography are sufficient to induce localized extensional fracturing in a zone extending laterally 600 m from the valley axis. The limit of this zone is reflected in the landscape today by a valley "shoulder," separating linear upper mountain slopes from the deep U-shaped inner valley. We propose that this extensional fracture development enhanced glacial quarrying between the valley shoulder and axis and identify a positive feedback where enhanced quarrying promoted valley incision, which in turn increased in situ stress concentrations near the valley floor, assisting erosion and further driving rapid U-shaped valley development. During interglacial periods, these stresses were relieved through brittle strain or topographic modification, and without significant erosion to reach more highly stressed bedrock, subsequent glaciation caused a reduction in differential stress and suppressed extensional fracturing. A combination of stress relief during interglacial periods, and increased ice accumulation rates in highly incised valleys, will reduce the likelihood of repeat enhanced erosion events.

  18. Increased Screen Time: Implications for Early Childhood Development and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Radesky, Jenny S; Christakis, Dimitri A

    2016-10-01

    The authors review trends in adoption of new digital technologies (eg, mobile and interactive media) by families with young children (ages 0-8 years), continued use of television and video games, and the evidence for learning from digital versus hands-on play. The authors also discuss continued concerns about health and developmental/behavioral risks of excessive media use for child cognitive, language, literacy, and social-emotional development. This evidence is then applied to clinical care in terms of the screening questions providers can use, tools available to providers and parents, and changes in anticipatory guidance. PMID:27565361

  19. Understanding parenting in Manitoba First nations: implications for program development.

    PubMed

    Eni, Rachel; Rowe, Gladys

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study introduced the "Manitoba First Nation Strengthening Families Maternal Child Health Pilot Project" program and evaluation methodologies. The study provided a knowledge base for programmers, evaluators, and communities to develop relevant health promotion, prevention, and intervention programming to assist in meeting health needs of pregnant women and young families. Sixty-five open-ended, semistructured interviews were completed in 13 communities. Data analysis was through grounded theory. Three major themes emerged from the data: interpersonal support and relationships; socioeconomic factors; and community initiatives. Complex structural, historical events compromise parenting; capacity and resilience are supported through informal and formal health and social supports. PMID:21633214

  20. Clinical implications of thyroid hormones effects on nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Carreón-Rodríguez, Alfonso; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormones have an important role throughout prenatal and postnatal nervous system development. They are involved in several processes such as neurogenesis, gliogenesis, myelination, synaptogenesis, etc., as shown in many cases of deficiency like congenital hypothyroidism or hypothyroxinemia. Those pathologies if untreated could lead to severe damages in cognitive, motor, neudoendocrine functions among other effects. Some could be reversed after adequate supplementation of thyroid hormones at birth, however there are other cellular processes highly sensitive to low levels of thyroid hormones and lasting a limited period of time during which if thyroid hormone action is lacking or deficient, the functional and structural damages would produce permanent defects. PMID:22523832

  1. Cholinesterases in neural development: new findings and toxicologic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Brimijoin, S; Koenigsberger, C

    1999-01-01

    Developing animals are more sensitive than adults to acute cholinergic toxicity from anticholinesterases, including organophosphorus pesticides, when administered in a laboratory setting. It is also possible that these agents adversely affect the process of neural development itself, leading to permanent deficits in the architecture of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Recent observations indicate that organophosphorus exposure can affect DNA synthesis and cell survival in neonatal rat brain. New evidence that acetylcholinesterase may have a direct role in neuronal differentiation provides additional grounds for interest in the developmental toxicity of anticholinesterases. For example, correlative anatomic studies show that transient bursts of acetylcholinesterase expression often coincide with periods of axonal outgrowth in maturing avian, rodent, and primate brain. Some selective cholinesterase inhibitors effectively suppress neurite outgrowth in model systems like differentiating neuroblastoma cells and explanted sensory ganglia. When enzyme expression is altered by genetic engineering, acetylcholinesterase levels on the outer surface of transfected neurons correlate with ability to extend neurites. Certain of these "morphogenic" effects may depend on protein-protein interactions rather than catalytic acetylcholinesterase activity. Nonetheless, it remains possible that some pesticides interfere with important developmental functions of the cholinesterase enzyme family. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:10229707

  2. Implications and limitations of cellular reprogramming for psychiatric drug development.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Brian T D; Brandel, Michael G; Nye, Jeffrey S; Snyder, Evan Y

    2013-01-01

    Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived from somatic cells of patients have opened possibilities for in vitro modeling of the physiology of neural (and other) cells in psychiatric disease states. Issues in early stages of technology development include (1) establishing a library of cells from adequately phenotyped patients, (2) streamlining laborious, costly hiPSC derivation and characterization, (3) assessing whether mutations or other alterations introduced by reprogramming confound interpretation, (4) developing efficient differentiation strategies to relevant cell types, (5) identifying discernible cellular phenotypes meaningful for cyclic, stress induced or relapsing-remitting diseases, (6) converting phenotypes to screening assays suitable for genome-wide mechanistic studies or large collection compound testing and (7) controlling for variability in relation to disease specificity amidst low sample numbers. Coordination of material for reprogramming from patients well-characterized clinically, genetically and with neuroimaging are beginning, and initial studies have begun to identify cellular phenotypes. Finally, several psychiatric drugs have been found to alter reprogramming efficiency in vitro, suggesting further complexity in applying hiPSCs to psychiatric diseases or that some drugs influence neural differentiation moreso than generally recognized. Despite these challenges, studies utilizing hiPSCs may eventually serve to fill essential niches in the translational pipeline for the discovery of new therapeutics. PMID:24232258

  3. Animal biotechnology: applications and economic implications in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Madan, M L

    2005-04-01

    In most developing countries, biotechnological applications relating to livestock need to be suitable for animal owners who are resource-poor small-scale operators who own little or no land and few animals. Livestock is becoming increasingly important to economic growth in developing countries and the application of biotechnology is largely dictated by commercial considerations and socio-economic goals. Using technology to support livestock production is an integral part of viable agriculture in multi-enterprise systems. Livestock are part of a fragile ecosystem and a rich source of animal biodiversity, as local species and breeds possess genes and traits of excellence. Molecular markers are increasingly being used to identify and select the particular genes that lead to these desirable traits and it is now possible to select superior germ plasm and disseminate it using artificial insemination, embryo transfer and other assisted reproductive technologies. These technologies have been used in the genetic improvement of livestock, particularly in cattle and buffaloes, and the economic returns are significant. However, morbidity and mortality among animals produced using assisted reproductive technologies lead to high economic losses, so the principal application of animal biotechnology at present is in the production of cheap and dependable diagnostic kits and vaccines. Several obstacles limit the application of biotechnology at present: there is a lack of infrastructure and insufficient manpower, so funding is needed if resource-poor farmers are to benefit from biotechnology. PMID:16110883

  4. Rapid microsatellite development for tree peony and its implications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microsatellites are ubiquitous in genomes of various organisms. With the realization that they play roles in developmental and physiological processes, rather than exist as ‘junk’ DNA, microsatellites are receiving increasing attention. Next-generation sequencing allows acquisition of large-scale microsatellite information, and is especially useful for plants without reference genome sequences. Results In this study, enriched DNA libraries of tree peony, a well-known ornamental woody shrub, were used for high-throughput microsatellite development by 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. We obtained 675,221 reads with an average length of 356 bp. The total size of examined sequences was 240,672,018 bp, from which 237,134 SSRs were identified. Of these sequences, 164,043 contained SSRs, with 27% featuring more than one SSR. Interestingly, a high proportion of SSRs (43%) were present in compound formation. SSRs with repeat motifs of 1–4 bp (mono-, di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide repeats) accounted for 99.8% of SSRs. Di-nucleotide repeats were the most abundant. As in most plants, the predominant motif in tree peony was (A/T)n, with (G/C)n less common. The lengths of SSRs were classified into 11 groups. The shortest SSRs (10 bp) represented 1% of the total number, whereas SSRs 21–30 and 101–110 bp long accounted for 26% and 29%, respectively, of all SSRs. Many sequences (42,111) were mapped to CDS (coding domain sequence) regions using Arabidopsis as a reference. GO annotation analysis predicted that CDSs with SSRs performed various functions associated with cellular components, molecular functions, and biological processes. Of 100 validated primer pairs, 24 were selected for polymorphism analysis among 23 genotypes; cluster analysis of the resulting data grouped genotypes according to known relationships, confirming the usefulness of the developed SSR markers. Conclusions The results of our large-scale SSR marker development using tree peony

  5. Evidence for soft bounds in Ubuntu package sizes and mammalian body masses.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Marco; Mandrà, Salvatore; Bassetti, Bruno; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2013-12-24

    The development of a complex system depends on the self-coordinated action of a large number of agents, often determining unexpected global behavior. The case of software evolution has great practical importance: knowledge of what is to be considered atypical can guide developers in recognizing and reacting to abnormal behavior. Although the initial framework of a theory of software exists, the current theoretical achievements do not fully capture existing quantitative data or predict future trends. Here we show that two elementary laws describe the evolution of package sizes in a Linux-based operating system: first, relative changes in size follow a random walk with non-Gaussian jumps; second, each size change is bounded by a limit that is dependent on the starting size, an intriguing behavior that we call "soft bound." Our approach is based on data analysis and on a simple theoretical model, which is able to reproduce empirical details without relying on any adjustable parameter and generates definite predictions. The same analysis allows us to formulate and support the hypothesis that a similar mechanism is shaping the distribution of mammalian body sizes, via size-dependent constraints during cladogenesis. Whereas generally accepted approaches struggle to reproduce the large-mass shoulder displayed by the distribution of extant mammalian species, this is a natural consequence of the softly bounded nature of the process. Additionally, the hypothesis that this model is valid has the relevant implication that, contrary to a common assumption, mammalian masses are still evolving, albeit very slowly. PMID:24324175

  6. Implications of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli genomics for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Sjöling, Åsa; von Mentzer, Astrid; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2015-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality caused by diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries. Despite a wealth of research elucidating the mechanisms of disease, the immunological responses and vaccine development, ETEC is still relatively uncharacterized when it comes to regulation of virulence and detailed immune mechanisms. The recent emergence of next-generation sequencing now offers the possibility to screen genomes of ETEC strains isolated globally to identify novel vaccine targets in addition to those already established. In this review, we discuss how recent findings on ETEC genomics using novel sequencing techniques will aid in finding novel protective antigens that can be used in vaccine approaches. PMID:25540974

  7. Some implications of in situ uranium mining technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, C.E.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Cole, R.J.; Keller, D.; Mellinger, P.J.; Wallace, R.W.

    1980-09-01

    The assessment indicates that there do not appear to be any significant demonstrated negative environmental impacts. Moreover, the impacts of in situ mining compare favorably with those impacts expected from conventional mining techniques. Exposure to radioactive elements is less, atmospheric emissions of radioactive and nonradioactive materials are generally less and socioeconomic impacts are decreased. In fact, because of the generally small and unskilled labor forces associated with in-situ mining, development has provided much needed economic stimulus to economically depressed areas of Texas. There are still, however, several areas of unknowns and several areas of inadequate information that will need to be addressed before a complete quantification evaluation of impacts can be made. These areas include levels of radon emissions and groundwater restoration methods and impacts. Several issues mostly relating to the interaction of industry with state and Federal regulators need to be addressed.

  8. REDD: a reckoning of environment and development implications.

    PubMed

    Ghazoul, Jaboury; Butler, Rhett A; Mateo-Vega, Javier; Koh, Lian Pin

    2010-07-01

    Reducing Emissions from Deforestation (REDD) aims to curb carbon emissions from deforestation by financially compensating forest owners. However, compensation based on the opportunity costs of REDD might underestimate true costs by failing to account for downstream economic values of current land uses, including employment and wealth generated by processing and service industries. A comprehensive analysis of REDD impacts should also include sociopolitical impacts. REDD might exclude people from forest land, causing demographic shifts, and the declining tax revenues from commodity production and associated industries might be a disincentive to government investment in forested regions to the detriment of forest communities and regional development. We argue for the need to recognize and appropriately compensate the full range of economic, social and political net costs of REDD. PMID:20417579

  9. Auxin metabolism rates and implications for plant development.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Eric M; Ackelsberg, Ethan M

    2015-01-01

    Studies of auxin metabolism rarely express their results as a metabolic rate, although the data obtained would often permit such a calculation to be made. We analyze data from 31 previously published papers to quantify the rates of auxin biosynthesis, conjugation, conjugate hydrolysis, and catabolism in seed plants. Most metabolic pathways have rates in the range 10 nM/h-1 μM/h, with the exception of auxin conjugation, which has rates as high as ~100 μM/h. The high rates of conjugation suggest that auxin metabolic sinks may be very small, perhaps as small as a single cell. By contrast, the relatively low rate of auxin biosynthesis requires plants to conserve and recycle auxin during long-distance transport. The consequences for plant development are discussed. PMID:25852709

  10. Determinants of breastfeeding in developing countries: overview and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Huffman, S L

    1984-01-01

    Breastfeeding can play a major role in fertility regulation in developing countries. The effect of breastfeeding is enhanced when the incidence of breastfeeding is high and the duration extended. These factors are more likely to occur when suckling at the breast is frequent. Sociological and behavioral factors can also influence a woman's decision to initiate and terminate breastfeeding. The effects of urbanization, maternal education, and socioeconomic status act through the intervening variables of sociocultural factors, health services, employment status of women, and availability of breastmilk substitutes. Strategies to alter these intervening variables include educational campaigns and support groups for lactating women, changes in health services, availability of child care facilities near employment centers, and enforcement of the international code of marketing of breastmilk substitutes. PMID:6474551

  11. Memory loss in Alzheimer's disease: implications for development of therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Carl A; Budson, Andrew E

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease marked by a constellation of cognitive disturbances, the earliest and most prominent being impaired episodic memory. Episodic memory refers to the memory system that allows an individual to consciously retrieve a previously experienced item or episode of life. Many recent studies have focused on characterizing how AD pathology impacts particular aspects of episodic memory and underlying mental and neural processes. This review summarizes the findings of those studies and discusses the effects of current and promising treatments for AD on episodic memory. The goal of this review is to raise awareness of the strides that cognitive neuroscientists have made in understanding intact and dysfunctional memory. Knowledge of the specific memorial processes that are impaired in AD may be of great value to basic scientists developing novel therapies and to clinical researchers assessing the efficacy of those therapies. PMID:19086882

  12. Metacognitive Capacities for Reflection in Schizophrenia: Implications for Developing Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Lysaker, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Models of schizophrenia, which focus exclusively on discrete symptoms and neurocognitive deficits, risk missing the possibility that a core feature of the disorder involves a reduced capacity to construct complex and integrated representations of self and others. This column details a new methodology that has been used to assess deficits in the metacognitive abilities that allow persons to form complex ideas about themselves and others and to use that knowledge to respond to psychosocial challenges in schizophrenia. Evidence is summarized supporting the reliability and validity of this method, as well as links this work has revealed between metacognition and psychosocial outcomes. It is suggested that this work points to the need to develop interventions which move beyond addressing symptoms and specific skills, and assist persons to recapture lost or atrophied metacognitive capacity and so form the kind of ideas about themselves and others needed, to move meaningfully toward recovery. PMID:24636965

  13. The Concept of Nondeterminism: Its Development and Implications for Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armoni, Michal; Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2009-08-01

    Nondeterminism is a fundamental concept in computer science that appears in various contexts such as automata theory, algorithms and concurrent computation. We present a taxonomy of the different ways that nondeterminism can be defined and used; the categories of the taxonomy are domain, nature, implementation, consistency, execution and semantics. An historical survey shows how the concept was developed from its inception by Rabin & Scott, Floyd and Dijkstra, as well as the interplay between nondeterminism and concurrency. Computer science textbooks and pedagogical software are surveyed to determine how they present the concept; the results show that the treatment of nondeterminism is generally fragmentary and unsystematic. We conclude that the teaching of nondeterminism must be integrated through the computer science curriculum so that students learn to see nondeterminism both in terms of abstract mathematical entities and in terms of machines whose execution is unpredictable.

  14. Auxin metabolism rates and implications for plant development

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Eric M.; Ackelsberg, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of auxin metabolism rarely express their results as a metabolic rate, although the data obtained would often permit such a calculation to be made. We analyze data from 31 previously published papers to quantify the rates of auxin biosynthesis, conjugation, conjugate hydrolysis, and catabolism in seed plants. Most metabolic pathways have rates in the range 10 nM/h–1 μM/h, with the exception of auxin conjugation, which has rates as high as ~100 μM/h. The high rates of conjugation suggest that auxin metabolic sinks may be very small, perhaps as small as a single cell. By contrast, the relatively low rate of auxin biosynthesis requires plants to conserve and recycle auxin during long-distance transport. The consequences for plant development are discussed. PMID:25852709

  15. Development and implication of a human-volcano system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachri, Syamsul; Stötter, Johann; Monreal, Matthias; Sartohadi, Junun

    2014-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the complexity of human-environment systems, models help to define, quantify, describe, or simulate complex interactions. With regards to the human-volcano system, we develop a conceptual model in order to assist analysis of its two basic elements, the physical and the social environment. A field survey of the human environment interaction of two of the most active volcanic areas in Indonesia (Mt. Merapi and Mt. Bromo) and a corresponding literature review from other case studies was carried out. A differentiated understanding of human interaction with hazard potential elements within the human-volcano system is the main focus of the model development. We classified volcanic processes and effects as three pairs of dichotomies: positive or negative impacts, on society or environment in an indirect or direct way. Each volcanically induced process or effect characterized accordingly leads to eight distinct process/effect classes. They are positive direct effects on society (PDS); positive direct effects on natural resources (PDN); positive indirect effects on society (PIS); positive indirect effects on natural resources (PIN); negative direct effects on society (NDS); negative direct effects on natural resources (NDN); negative indirect effects on society (NIS) and lastly negative indirect effects on natural resources (NIN). Such differentiated view of volcanic process/effects bears several advantages. First, whereas volcanic processes have hitherto been viewed as hazards only, it becomes possible now to describe a particular process/effect in a particular context as negative or positive. Secondly, such a categorization makes it possible to account for processes of the human-volcano system that do not have a direct physical expression but are of socio-cultural relevance. Thirdly, the greater degree of differentiation that is made possible when evaluating volcanic processes has significant repercussions on the way volcanic risk must be

  16. Transboundary air pollution in Asia: Model development and policy implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Tracey

    2001-12-01

    This work investigates transboundary air pollution in Asia through atmospheric modeling and public policy analysis. As an example of models actively shaping environmental policy, the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution in Europe (LRTAP) is selected as a case study. The LRTAP Convention is the only mulit- lateral air pollution agreement to date, and results from the RAINS integrated assessment model were heavily used to calculate nationally differentiated emission ceilings. Atmospheric chemistry and transport are included in RAINS through the use of transfer coefficients (or ``source-receptor relationships'') relating pollutant transfer among European nations. Following past work with ATMOS to simulate sulfur species in Asia, here ATMOS is developed to include odd-nitrogen. Fitting with the linear structure of ATMOS and the emphasis on computational efficiency, a simplified chemical scheme developed for use in the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Global Chemical Transport Model (GFDL GCTM) is adopted. The method solves for the interconversions between NOx, HNO3, and PAN based on five reaction rates stored in look-up tables. ATMOS is used to calculate source-receptor relationships for Asia. Significant exchange of NOy occurs among China, North and South Korea, and Japan. On an annual average basis, China contributes 18% to Japan's total nitrate deposition, 46% to North Korea, and 26% to South Korea. Nitrate deposition is an important component of acidification (along with sulfate deposition), contributing 30-50% to the acid burden over most of Japan, and more than 50% to acid deposition in southeast Asia, where biomass burning emits high levels of NOx. In evaluating the policy-relevance of results from the ATMOS model, four factors are taken into account: the uncertainty and limitations of ATMOS, the environmental concerns facing Asia, the current status of the scientific community in relation to regional air pollution in the region, and

  17. Clinical implications of the development of the person.

    PubMed

    Suess, Gerhard J; Sroufe, June

    2005-12-01

    The Minnesota longitudinal study of parents and children from birth to adulthood provides both a theoretical framework and a host of empirical findings that can serve to bridge the gap between research and clinical application. Key among these findings are: (a) the ongoing impact of early relationship experiences throughout the years, even with later experience and circumstances controlled; (b) the cumulative nature of experience and its continual impact with current context; (c) the important role of adult partner relationships; (d) the increasingly active role of the persons themselves in their own development; and (e) the interplay between experience, representation, and ongoing adaptation. These findings, and the theoretical structure underlying them, suggest the need for complex, comprehensive intervention that begins early, with a focus on altering the quality of parent - child relationships. At the same time, additional components, including couples therapy and efforts to alter the child's inner constructions of experience, are clearly suggested. One must attend to forces maintaining children on maladaptive developmental pathways once established, as well as understanding the factors that initiated such pathways. PMID:16332582

  18. Animal Models for Influenza Viruses: Implications for Universal Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Margine, Irina; Krammer, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the human population. Depending on the virulence of the influenza virus strain, as well as the immunological status of the infected individual, the severity of the respiratory disease may range from sub-clinical or mild symptoms to severe pneumonia that can sometimes lead to death. Vaccines remain the primary public health measure in reducing the influenza burden. Though the first influenza vaccine preparation was licensed more than 60 years ago, current research efforts seek to develop novel vaccination strategies with improved immunogenicity, effectiveness, and breadth of protection. Animal models of influenza have been essential in facilitating studies aimed at understanding viral factors that affect pathogenesis and contribute to disease or transmission. Among others, mice, ferrets, pigs, and nonhuman primates have been used to study influenza virus infection in vivo, as well as to do pre-clinical testing of novel vaccine approaches. Here we discuss and compare the unique advantages and limitations of each model. PMID:25436508

  19. Cholinergic Functioning in Stimulant Addiction: Implications for Medications Development

    PubMed Central

    Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Mooney, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), the first neurotransmitter discovered, participates in many CNS functions including sensory and motor processing, sleep, nociception, mood, stress response, attention, arousal, memory, motivation and reward. These diverse cholinergic effects are mediated by nicotinic (nAChR) and muscarinic (mAChR) type cholinergic receptors. The goal of this review is to synthesize a growing literature that supports the potential role of ACh as a treatment target for stimulant addiction. ACh interacts with the dopaminergic reward system in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). In the VTA, both nAChR and mAChR stimulate the dopaminergic system. In the NAc, cholinergic interneurons integrate cortical and subcortical information related to reward. In the PFC, the cholinergic system contributes to the cognitive aspects of addiction. Preclinical studies support a facilitative role of nicotinic agonists in the development of stimulant addiction. Muscarinic agonists seem to have an inhibitory role depending on the subtype of mAChR. In human studies acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitors, which increase synaptic ACh levels, have shown promise for the treatment of stimulant addiction. Further studies testing the efficacy of cholinergic medications for stimulant addiction are warranted. PMID:19845415

  20. Developing Biological ISRU: Implications for Life Support and Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I. I.; Allen, C. C.; Garrison, D. H.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Galindo, C.; Mckay, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Main findings: 1) supplementing very dilute media for cultivation of CB with analogs of lunar or Martian regolith effectively supported the proliferation of CB; 2) O2 evolution by siderophilic cyanobacteria cultivated in diluted media but supplemented with iron-rich rocks was higher than O2 evolution by same strain in undiluted medium; 3) preliminary data suggest that organic acids produced by CB are involved in iron-rich mineral dissolution; 4) the CB studied can accumulate iron on and in their cells; 4) sequencing of the cyanobacterium JSC-1 genome revealed that this strain possesses molecular features which make it applicable for the cultivation in special photoreactors on Moon and Mars. Conclusion: As a result of pilot studies, we propose, to develop a concept for semi-closed integrated system that uses CB to extract useful elements to revitalize air and produce valuable biomolecules. Such a system could be the foundation of a self-sustaining extraterrestrial outpost (Hendrickx, De Wever et al., 2005; Handford, 2006). A potential advantage of a cyanobacterial photoreactor placed between LSS and ISRU loops is the possibility of supplying these systems with extracted elements and compounds from the regolith. In addition, waste regolith may be transformed into additional products such as methane, biomass, and organic and inorganic soil enrichment for the cultivation of higher plants.

  1. Educational Research and Development: Implications for Research Management from a National Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Adolph J.

    This paper explores some of the conditions currently affecting research and development in education and examines their implication for management. These conditions are: (1) the public expectation of quick and sure responses from the R and D effort, and (2) the genuine wish for increased democratization in society and increased responsiveness on…

  2. Improving Instruction in Middle Level Schools: Implications of Neurological Data for Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toepfer, Conrad F., Jr.

    Implications of biophysicist Herman Epstein's research on brain growth periodization, which develop a neurobiological consideration of learning issues for middle school curricula, have created controversy among educators and stimulus for further research. This presentation (1) summarizes the writer's interpretations of these data and implications…

  3. Function as a Determinant of Speech Production--Implications for Language Development in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skull, John

    The function of speech and its implications for studying, understanding, and promoting language development are explored in this paper. Function is considered to be the purpose of the speaker when speaking, variously termed context of situation, situation, context, circumstance, or mode. It is noted that very few studies of speech and speech…

  4. Water Supply Deficiency and Implications for Rural Development in the Niger-Delta Region of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nkwocha, E. E.

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the marginalization of the Niger Delta region of Nigeria in terms of infrastructural and social services provision. This study examined the water supply deficiency and its general implications for rural development within the region. Data and other study characteristics were extracted from 501 subjects drawn from…

  5. A Critical Evaluation of Adult Learning Theories and Implication for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Baiyin

    2004-01-01

    Based on a newly developed holistic theory of knowledge and learning, this paper critically evaluates several contemporary theories of adult learning. Most of existing adult learning theories tend to narrowly define knowledge and learning and fail to offer adequate explanation for adult learning. Implications for HRD theory, research, and practice…

  6. The Status of Professional Development for K-12 Online Teachers: Insights and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kerry; Dawley, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The authors share findings, insights, and implications from "Going Virtual! The Status of Professional Development for K12 Online Teachers," a 2007 report supported by the North American Council for Online Learning (NACOL, now known as iNACOL). The authors conducted a national survey of 259 K-12 online teachers, administrators, and professional…

  7. The Self's Development and Ego Growth: Conceptual Analysis and Implications for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamachek, Don E.

    1985-01-01

    Self development is conceptualized as surrounded by a series of ego rings that spread out from its center. Erikson's first five psychosocial stages are used as the developmental framework within which self-concept, self-esteem, and ego boundaries are viewed as component parts of the self's growth. Counseling implications are used. (Author/BL)

  8. Implications of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for Test Development and Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Janet F.; Benson, Nicholas; Oakland, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Implications of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) on the development and use of tests in school settings are enumerated. We predict increased demand for behavioural assessments that consider a person's activities, participation and person-environment interactions, including measures that: (a) address…

  9. Research Overview: Implications for Staff Development. Higher Education in TAFE. Monograph Series 01/2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin; Wheelahan, Leesa; Billett, Stephen; Kelly, Ann

    2009-01-01

    A project funded through the National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation program investigated higher education programs--mostly bachelor's and associate degrees--offered by technical and further education (TAFE) institutes. This overview highlights some of the implications for staff development identified through this…

  10. Theory Development and Convergence of Human Resource Fields: Implications for Human Performance Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Yonjoo; Yoon, Seung Won

    2010-01-01

    This study examines major theory developments in human resource (HR) fields and discusses implications for human performance technology (HPT). Differentiated HR fields are converging to improve organizational performance through knowledge-based innovations. Ruona and Gibson (2004) made a similar observation and analyzed the historical evolution…

  11. Monitoring and Evaluation of an Early Childhood Development Programme: Implications for Leadership and Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Sarah; Papatheodorou, Theodora; James, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The article aims to discuss preliminary findings from a participatory monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework, used in a community-based early childhood development (ECD) programme in KwaZulu-Natal South Africa, and their implications for leadership and management. The purposes of the M&E were for LETCEE, the implementing organization,…

  12. Stages of Ethnic Identity Development: Implications for Educational Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1983

    This paper reviews the research and theories on ethnic identity development, and draws some implications from these ideas for improving curriculum design for, and instructional effectiveness with, ethnically different students, especially Black Americans. The paradigm of "the developmental stages of ethnic identity transformation" presented relies…

  13. Development of REM sleep drive and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, T.; Good, C.; Mamiya, K.; Skinner, R.D.; Garcia-Rill, E.

    2015-01-01

    REM sleep in the human declines from about 50% of total sleep time (~8 hours) in the newborn to about 15% of total sleep time (~1 hour) in the adult, and this decrease takes place mainly between birth and the end of puberty. We hypothesize that, if this developmental decrease in REM drive does not occur, lifelong increases in REM sleep drive may ensue. In the rat, the developmental decrease in REM sleep occurs between 10 and 30 days after birth, declining from over 70% of total sleep time in the newborn to the adult level of about 15% of sleep time during this period. Rats aged 12–21 days were anaesthetized with Ketamine, decapitated and brainstem slices cut for intracellular recordings. We found that excitatory responses of pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) neurons to NMDA decrease, while responses to kainic acid increase, over this critical period. Serotonergic type 1 agonists have increasing inhibitory responses, while serotonergic type 2 agonists do not change, during this developmental period. The results suggest that, as PPN neurons develop, they are increasingly activated by kainic acid and increasingly inhibited by serotonergic type 1 receptors. These processes may be related to the developmental decrease in REM sleep. Developmental disturbances in each of these systems could induce differential increases in REM sleep drive, accounting for the post-pubertal onset of a number of different disorders manifesting increases in REM sleep drive. Examination of modulation by PPN projections to ascending and descending targets revealed the presence of common signals modulating both ascending arousal-related functions and descending postural/locomotor-related functions. PMID:14527968

  14. Teenage pregnancy in developed countries: determinants and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Jones, E F; Forrest, J D; Goldman, N; Henshaw, S K; Lincoln, R; Rosoff, J I; Westoff, C F; Wulf, D

    1985-01-01

    Because of the high adolescent fertility rates in the US, the Alan Guttmacher Institute (AGI) conducted a 1985 study of adolescent pregnancy and childbearing in 37 developed countries. This was an effort to unveil those factors responsible for determining teenage reproductive behavior. This article presents the data from that study. Birthrates were collected and separated into 2 age groups: for those under 18 and those women 18 to 19 years of age. A 42 variable questionnaire was sent to the public affairs officer of the American embassy and family planning organization in each foreign country to provide additional socioeconomic, behavioral, and educational data. Childbearing was found to be positively correlated with agricultural work, denoting a socioeconomic influence. Adolescent birthrates showed a positive correlation with levels of maternity leaves and benefits offered in the country. The lowest birthrates were found in those countries with the most liberal attitudes toward sex as demonstrated through media representation of female nudity, extent of nudity on public beaches, sales of sexually explicit literature, and media advertising of condoms. A negative correlation was seen for equitable distribution of income and the under 18 birthrate. The older teenage birthrate was found to be lower for countries with higher minimum ages for marriage. They also suggested a responsiveness to government efforts to increase fertility. Some general patterns emerged to explain the high teenage birthrate for the US: it is less open about sexual matters than countries with lower adolescent birthrates and the income in the US is distributed to families of low economic status. A more subtle factor is that although contraception is available, it is not that accessible to young men and women because of the cost. Case studies were presented to provide a more detailed understanding of the reasons for the high adolescent birthrates. Examined are desire for pregnancy, exposure to

  15. Commodification of human tissue: implications for feminist and development ethics.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, Donna

    2002-05-01

    One effect of late capitalism--the commodification of practically everything--is to knock down the Chinese walls between the natural and productive realms, to use a Marxist framework. Women's labour in egg extraction and 'surrogate' motherhood might then be seen as what it is, labour which produces something of value. But this does not necessarily mean that women will benefit from the commodification of practically everything, in either North or South. In the newly developing biotechnologies involving stem cells, the reverse is more likely, particular given the the shortage in the North of the egg donors who will be increasingly necessary to therapeutic cloning. Although most of the ethical debate has focused on the status of the embryo, this is to define ethics with no reference to global or gender justice. There has been little or no debate about possible exploitation of women, particularly of ovum donors from the South. Countries of the South without national ethics committees or guidelines may be particularly vulnerable: although there is increasing awareness of the susceptibility of poorer countries to abuses in research ethics, very little has been written about how they might be affected by the enormously profitable new technologies exploiting human tissue. Even in the UK, although the new Medical Research Council guidelines make a good deal of the 'gift relationship', what they are actually about is commodification. If donors believe they are demonstrating altruism, but biotechnology firms and researchers use the discourse of commodity and profit, we have not 'incomplete commodification' but complete commodification with a plausibly human face. PMID:12872770

  16. Immune Response in Microgravity: Genetic Basis and Countermeasure Development Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risin, Diana; Ward, Nancy E.; Risin, Semyon A.; Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-01-01

    expression were identified in the apoptosis related group (Granzyme B, APO2 ligand and Beta3endonexin). All of them were downregulated. Gene expression changes in MG might appear pivotal in identifying potential molecular targets for countermeasure development. (Supported by NRA OLMSA02 and NSCORT NAG54072 grants).

  17. Stressor and glucocorticoid-dependent induction of the immediate early gene kruppel-like factor 9: implications for neural development and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bonett, Ronald M; Hu, Fang; Bagamasbad, Pia; Denver, Robert J

    2009-04-01

    Krüppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) is a thyroid hormone-induced, immediate early gene implicated in neural development in vertebrates. We analyzed stressor and glucocorticoid (GC)-dependent regulation of KLF9 expression in the brain of the frog Xenopus laevis, and investigated a possible role for KLF9 in neuronal differentiation. Exposure to shaking/confinement stressor increased plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentration, and KLF9 immunoreactivity in several brain regions, which included the medial amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, anterior preoptic area (homologous to the mammalian paraventricular nucleus), and optic tectum (homologous to the mammalian superior colliculus). The stressor-induced KLF9 mRNA expression in the brain was blocked by pretreatment with the GC receptor antagonist RU486, or mimicked by injection of CORT. Treatment with CORT also caused a rapid and dose-dependent increase in KLF9 mRNA in X. laevis XTC-2 cells that was resistant to inhibition of protein synthesis. The action of CORT on KLF9 expression in XTC-2 cells was blocked by RU486, but not by the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone. To test for functional consequences of up-regulation of KLF9, we introduced a KLF9 expression plasmid into living tadpole brain by electroporation-mediated gene transfer. Forced expression of KLF9 in tadpole brain caused an increase in Golgi-stained cells, reflective of neuronal differentiation/maturation. Our results support that KLF9 is a direct, GC receptor target gene that is induced by stress, and functions as an intermediary in the actions of GCs on brain gene expression and neuronal structure. PMID:19036875

  18. GENE EXPRESSION IN PRE-IMPLANTATION MAMMALIAN EMBRYOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pre-implantation mammalian embryo is initially under the control of maternal informational macromolecules that are accumulated during oogenesis. ubsequently, the genetic program of development becomes dependent upon new transcription derived from activation of the embryonic g...

  19. Mammalian Wax Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jeffrey B.; Russell, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Wax monoesters are synthesized by the esterification of fatty alcohols and fatty acids. A mammalian enzyme that catalyzes this reaction has not been isolated. We used expression cloning to identify cDNAs encoding a wax synthase in the mouse preputial gland. The wax synthase gene is located on the X chromosome and encodes a member of the acyltransferase family of enzymes that synthesize neutral lipids. Expression of wax synthase in cultured cells led to the formation of wax monoesters from straight chain saturated, unsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty alcohols and acids. Polyisoprenols also were incorporated into wax monoesters by the enzyme. The wax synthase had little or no ability to synthesize cholesteryl esters, diacylglycerols, or triacylglycerols, whereas other acyltransferases, including the acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 and 2 enzymes and the acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 and 2 enzymes, exhibited modest wax monoester synthesis activities. Confocal light microscopy indicated that the wax synthase was localized in membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. Wax synthase mRNA was abundant in tissues rich in sebaceous glands such as the preputial gland and eyelid and was present at lower levels in other tissues. Coexpression of cDNAs specifying fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1 and wax synthase led to the synthesis of wax monoesters. The data suggest that wax monoester synthesis in mammals involves a two step biosynthetic pathway catalyzed by fatty acyl-CoA reductase and wax synthase enzymes. PMID:15220349

  20. Structure of mammalian metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Kaegi, J.H.R.; Vasak, M.; Lerch, K.; Gilg, D.E.O.; Hunziker, P.; Bernhard, W.R.; Good, M.

    1984-03-01

    All mammalian metallothioneins characterized contain a single polypeptide chain of 61 amino acid residues, among them 20 cysteines providing the ligands for seven metal-binding sites. Native metallothioneins are usually heterogeneous in metal composition, with Zn, Cd, and Cu occurring in varying proportions. However, forms containing only a single metal species, i.e., Zn, Cd, Ni, Co, Hg, Pb, Bi, have now been prepared by in vitro reconstitution from the metal-free apoprotein. By spectroscopic analysis of such derivatives it was established that all cysteine residues participate in metal binding, that each metal ion is bound to four thiolate ligands, and that the symmetry of each complex is close to that of a tetrahedron. To satisfy the requirements of the overall Me/sub 7/(Cys/sup -/)/sub 20/ stoichiometry, the complexes must be combined to form metal-thiolate cluster structures. The actual spatial organization of the clusters and the polypeptide chain remains to be established. An attractive possibility is the arrangement of the tetrahedral metal-thiolates in adamantane-like structures surrounded by properly folded segments of the chain providing the ligands. /sup 1/H-NMR data and infrared absorption measurements are consistent with a tightly folded structure rich in ..beta..-type conformation. 79 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Mammalian Sirtuins and Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoling; Kazgan, Nevzat

    2011-01-01

    Sirtuins are highly conserved NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases and/or ADP-ribosyltransferases that can extend the lifespan of several lower model organisms including yeast, worms and flies. The seven mammalian sirtuins, SIRT1 to SIRT7, have emerged as key metabolic sensors that directly link environmental signals to mammalian metabolic homeostasis and stress response. Recent studies have shed light on the critical roles of sirtuins in mammalian energy metabolism in response to nutrient signals. This review focuses on the involvement of two nuclear sirtuins, SIRT1 and SIRT6, and three mitochondrial sirtuins, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5, in regulation of diverse metabolic processes. PMID:21614150

  2. Mapping post-translational modifications of mammalian testicular specific histone variant TH2B in tetraploid and haploid germ cells and their implications on the dynamics of nucleosome structure.

    PubMed

    Pentakota, Satya Krishna; Sandhya, Sankaran; P Sikarwar, Arun; Chandra, Nagasuma; Satyanarayana Rao, Manchanahalli R

    2014-12-01

    Histones regulate a variety of chromatin templated events by their post-translational modifications (PTMs). Although there are extensive reports on the PTMs of canonical histones, the information on the histone variants remains very scanty. Here, we report the identification of different PTMs, such as acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation of a major mammalian histone variant TH2B. Our mass spectrometric analysis has led to the identification of both conserved and unique modifications across tetraploid spermatocytes and haploid spermatids. We have also computationally derived the 3-dimensional model of a TH2B containing nucleosome in order to study the spatial orientation of the PTMs identified and their effect on nucleosome stability and DNA binding potential. From our nucleosome model, it is evident that substitution of specific amino acid residues in TH2B results in both differential histone-DNA and histone-histone contacts. Furthermore, we have also observed that acetylation on the N-terminal tail of TH2B weakens the interactions with the DNA. These results provide direct evidence that, similar to somatic H2B, the testis specific histone TH2B also undergoes multiple PTMs, suggesting the possibility of chromatin regulation by such covalent modifications in mammalian male germ cells. PMID:25252820

  3. Positive Selection Linked with Generation of Novel Mammalian Dentition Patterns.

    PubMed

    Machado, João Paulo; Philip, Siby; Maldonado, Emanuel; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-01-01

    A diverse group of genes are involved in the tooth development of mammals. Several studies, focused mainly on mice and rats, have provided a detailed depiction of the processes coordinating tooth formation and shape. Here we surveyed 236 tooth-associated genes in 39 mammalian genomes and tested for signatures of selection to assess patterns of molecular adaptation in genes regulating mammalian dentition. Of the 236 genes, 31 (∼13.1%) showed strong signatures of positive selection that may be responsible for the phenotypic diversity observed in mammalian dentition. Mammalian-specific tooth-associated genes had accelerated mutation rates compared with older genes found across all vertebrates. More recently evolved genes had fewer interactions (either genetic or physical), were associated with fewer Gene Ontology terms and had faster evolutionary rates compared with older genes. The introns of these positively selected genes also exhibited accelerated evolutionary rates, which may reflect additional adaptive pressure in the intronic regions that are associated with regulatory processes that influence tooth-gene networks. The positively selected genes were mainly involved in processes like mineralization and structural organization of tooth specific tissues such as enamel and dentin. Of the 236 analyzed genes, 12 mammalian-specific genes (younger genes) provided insights on diversification of mammalian teeth as they have higher evolutionary rates and exhibit different expression profiles compared with older genes. Our results suggest that the evolution and development of mammalian dentition occurred in part through positive selection acting on genes that previously had other functions. PMID:27613398

  4. Molecular sled sequences are common in mammalian proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Kan; Blainey, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work revealed a new class of molecular machines called molecular sleds, which are small basic molecules that bind and slide along DNA with the ability to carry cargo along DNA. Here, we performed biochemical and single-molecule flow stretching assays to investigate the basis of sliding activity in molecular sleds. In particular, we identified the functional core of pVIc, the first molecular sled characterized; peptide functional groups that control sliding activity; and propose a model for the sliding activity of molecular sleds. We also observed widespread DNA binding and sliding activity among basic polypeptide sequences that implicate mammalian nuclear localization sequences and many cell penetrating peptides as molecular sleds. These basic protein motifs exhibit weak but physiologically relevant sequence-nonspecific DNA affinity. Our findings indicate that many mammalian proteins contain molecular sled sequences and suggest the possibility that substantial undiscovered sliding activity exists among nuclear mammalian proteins. PMID:26857546

  5. Molecular sled sequences are common in mammalian proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Kan; Blainey, Paul C

    2016-03-18

    Recent work revealed a new class of molecular machines called molecular sleds, which are small basic molecules that bind and slide along DNA with the ability to carry cargo along DNA. Here, we performed biochemical and single-molecule flow stretching assays to investigate the basis of sliding activity in molecular sleds. In particular, we identified the functional core of pVIc, the first molecular sled characterized; peptide functional groups that control sliding activity; and propose a model for the sliding activity of molecular sleds. We also observed widespread DNA binding and sliding activity among basic polypeptide sequences that implicate mammalian nuclear localization sequences and many cell penetrating peptides as molecular sleds. These basic protein motifs exhibit weak but physiologically relevant sequence-nonspecific DNA affinity. Our findings indicate that many mammalian proteins contain molecular sled sequences and suggest the possibility that substantial undiscovered sliding activity exists among nuclear mammalian proteins. PMID:26857546

  6. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  7. Mammalian cell cultivation in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmünder, Felix K.; Suter, Robert N.; Kiess, M.; Urfer, R.; Nordau, C.-G.; Cogoli, A.

    Equipment used in space for the cultivation of mammalian cells does not meet the usual standard of earth bound bioreactors. Thus, the development of a space worthy bioreactor is mandatory for two reasons: First, to investigate the effect on single cells of the space environment in general and microgravity conditions in particular, and second, to provide researchers on long term missions and the Space Station with cell material. However, expertise for this venture is not at hand. A small and simple device for animal cell culture experiments aboard Spacelab (Dynamic Cell Culture System; DCCS) was developed. It provides 2 cell culture chambers, one is operated as a batch system, the other one as a perfusion system. The cell chambers have a volume of 200 μl. Medium exchange is achieved with an automatic osmotic pump. The system is neither mechanically stirred nor equipped with sensors. Oxygen for cell growth is provided by a gas chamber that is adjacent to the cell chambers. The oxygen gradient produced by the growing cells serves to maintain the oxygen influx by diffusion. Hamster kidney cells growing on microcarriers were used to test the biological performance of the DCCS. On ground tests suggest that this system is feasible.

  8. Development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model pathogen. A system for the genetic identification of gene products required for survival in the mammalian host environment.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, A L; McCusker, J H

    2001-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a close relative of the pathogenic Candida species, is an emerging opportunistic pathogen. An isogenic series of S. cerevisiae strains, derived from a human clinical isolate, were used to examine the role of evolutionarily conserved pathways in fungal survival in a mouse host. As is the case for the corresponding Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans mutants, S. cerevisiae purine and pyrimidine auxotrophs were severely deficient in survival, consistent with there being evolutionary conservation of survival traits. Resistance to the antifungal drug 5-fluorocytosine was not deleterious and appeared to be slightly advantageous in vivo. Of mutants in three amino acid biosynthetic pathways, only leu2 mutants were severely deficient in vivo. Unlike the glyoxylate cycle, respiration was very important for survival; however, the mitochondrial genome made a respiration-independent contribution to survival. Mutants deficient in pseudohyphal formation were tested in vivo; flo11Delta mutants were phenotypically neutral while flo8Delta, tec1Delta, and flo8Delta tec1Delta mutants were slightly deficient. Because of its ease of genetic manipulation and the immense S. cerevisiae database, which includes the best annotated eukaryotic genome sequence, S. cerevisiae is a superb model system for the identification of gene products important for fungal survival in the mammalian host environment. PMID:11606528

  9. Mammalian lipocalin allergens--insights into their enigmatic allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, T; Kinnunen, T; Rytkönen-Nissinen, M

    2012-04-01

    Most of the important mammal-derived respiratory allergens, as well as a milk allergen and a few insect allergens, belong to the lipocalin protein family. As mammalian lipocalin allergens are found in dander, saliva and urine, they disperse effectively and are widely present in the indoor environments. Initially, lipocalins were characterized as transport proteins for small, principally hydrophobic molecules, but now they are known to be involved in many other biological functions. Although the amino acid identity between lipocalins is generally at the level of 20-30%, it can be considerably higher. Lipocalin allergens do not exhibit any known physicochemical, functional or structural property that would account for their allergenicity, that is, the capacity to induce T-helper type 2 immunity against them. A distinctive feature of mammalian lipocalin allergens is their poor capacity to stimulate the cellular arm of the human or murine immune system. Nevertheless, they induce IgE production in a large proportion of atopic individuals exposed to the allergen source. The poor capacity of mammalian lipocalin allergens to stimulate the cellular immune system does not appear to result from the function of regulatory T cells. Instead, the T cell epitopes of mammalian lipocalin allergens are few and those examined have proved to be suboptimal. Moreover, the frequency of mammalian lipocalin allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells is very low in the peripheral blood. Importantly, recent research suggests that the lipocalin allergen-specific T cell repertoires differ considerably between allergic and healthy subjects. These observations are compatible with our hypothesis that the way CD4(+) T-helper cells recognize the epitopes of mammalian lipocalin allergens may be implicated in their allergenicity. Indeed, as several lipocalins exhibit homologies of 40-60% over species, mammalian lipocalin allergens may be immunologically at the borderline of self and non-self, which would not

  10. Development of the Synarcual in the Elephant Sharks (Holocephali; Chondrichthyes): Implications for Vertebral Formation and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Zerina; Boisvert, Catherine; Maksimenko, Anton; Currie, Peter; Trinajstic, Kate

    2015-01-01

    The synarcual is a structure incorporating multiple elements of two or more anterior vertebrae of the axial skeleton, forming immediately posterior to the cranium. It has been convergently acquired in the fossil group ‘Placodermi’, in Chondrichthyes (Holocephali, Batoidea), within the teleost group Syngnathiformes, and to varying degrees in a range of mammalian taxa. In addition, cervical vertebral fusion presents as an abnormal pathology in a variety of human disorders. Vertebrae develop from axially arranged somites, so that fusion could result from a failure of somite segmentation early in development, or from later heterotopic development of intervertebral bone or cartilage. Examination of early developmental stages indicates that in the Batoidea and the ‘Placodermi’, individual vertebrae developed normally and only later become incorporated into the synarcual, implying regular somite segmentation and vertebral development. Here we show that in the holocephalan Callorhinchus milii, uniform and regular vertebral segmentation also occurs, with anterior individual vertebra developing separately with subsequent fusion into a synarcual. Vertebral elements forming directly behind the synarcual continue to be incorporated into the synarcual through growth. This appears to be a common pattern through the Vertebrata. Research into human disorders, presenting as cervical fusion at birth, focuses on gene misexpression studies in humans and other mammals such as the mouse. However, in chondrichthyans, vertebral fusion represents the normal morphology, moreover, taxa such Leucoraja (Batoidea) and Callorhinchus (Holocephali) are increasingly used as laboratory animals, and the Callorhinchus genome has been sequenced and is available for study. Our observations on synarcual development in three major groups of early jawed vertebrates indicate that fusion involves heterotopic cartilage and perichondral bone/mineralised cartilage developing outside the regular skeleton

  11. Advertising for all by the year 2000: public health implications for less developed countries.

    PubMed

    Wallack, L; Montgomery, K

    1992-01-01

    This paper argues that the development of global advertising has significant implications for the public health of less developed countries. These implications can be seen in three areas. First, it is clear that advertising and marketing of lethal or health-compromising products like alcohol and tobacco not only can increase the level of death and disease, but can also produce serious indirect effects upon families, communities, and entire societies. Second, advertising promotes a consumption ethic which can have far-reaching effects that go beyond individual behavior, significantly altering social relationships, and influencing public policies and allocation of scarce resources. Third, advertising can restrict the public's knowledge about health issues by substituting distorted and manipulative sales messages for vital, accurate health information. In addition, revenues from advertising are a primary support for many mass media systems and this further limits the presentation of critical information. PMID:1644908

  12. Payload test philosophy. [implications of STS development at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arman, A.

    1979-01-01

    The implications of STS development for payload testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center are reviewed. The biggest impact of STS may be that instead of testing the entire payload, most of the testing may have to be limited to the subsystem or subassembly level. Particular consideration is given to the Goddard protoflight concept in which the test is geared to the design qualification levels, the test durations being those that are expected during the actual launch sequence.

  13. Freezing mammalian cells for production of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Seth, Gargi

    2012-03-01

    Cryopreservation techniques utilize very low temperatures to preserve the structure and function of living cells. Various strategies have been developed for freezing mammalian cells of biological and medical significance. This paper highlights the importance and application of cryopreservation for recombinant mammalian cells used in the biopharmaceutical industry to produce high-value protein therapeutics. It is a primer that aims to give insight into the basic principles of cell freezing for the benefit of biopharmaceutical researchers with limited or no prior experience in cryobiology. For the more familiar researchers, key cell banking parameters such as the cell density and hold conditions have been reviewed to possibly help optimize their specific cell freezing protocols. It is important to understand the mechanisms underlying the freezing of complex and sensitive cellular entities as we implement best practices around the techniques and strategies used for cryopreservation. PMID:22226818

  14. Comparative reactivity of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants with mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Benjamin S; Love, Dominic T; Hawkins, Clare L

    2014-06-01

    Myeloperoxidase is an important heme enzyme released by activated leukocytes that catalyzes the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with halide and pseudo-halide ions to form various hypohalous acids. Hypohalous acids are chemical oxidants that have potent antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties and, as such, play key roles in the human immune system. However, increasing evidence supports an alternative role for myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants in the development of disease. Excessive production of hypohalous acids, particularly during chronic inflammation, leads to the initiation and accumulation of cellular damage that has been implicated in many human pathologies including atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disease, lung disease, arthritis, inflammatory cancers, and kidney disease. This has sparked a significant interest in developing a greater understanding of the mechanisms involved in myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant-induced mammalian cell damage. This article reviews recent developments in our understanding of the cellular reactivity of hypochlorous acid, hypobromous acid, and hypothiocyanous acid, the major oxidants produced by myeloperoxidase under physiological conditions. PMID:24632382

  15. Fate Mapping Mammalian Corneal Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Alexander; Wakefield, Denis; Di Girolamo, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The anterior aspect of the cornea consists of a stratified squamous epithelium, thought to be maintained by a rare population of stem cells (SCs) that reside in the limbal transition zone. Although migration of cells that replenish the corneal epithelium has been studied for over a century, the process is still poorly understood and not well characterized. Numerous techniques have been employed to examine corneal epithelial dynamics, including visualization by light microscopy, the incorporation of vital dyes and DNA labels, and transplantation of genetically marked cells that have acted as cell and lineage beacons. Modern-day lineage tracing utilizes molecular methods to determine the fate of a specific cell and its progeny over time. Classically employed in developmental biology, lineage tracing has been used more recently to track the progeny of adult SCs in a number of organs to pin-point their location and understand their movement and influence on tissue regeneration. This review highlights key discoveries that have led researchers to develop cutting-edge genetic tools to effectively and more accurately monitor turnover and displacement of cells within the mammalian corneal epithelium. Collating information on the basic biology of SCs will have clinical ramifications in furthering our knowledge of the processes that govern their role in homeostasis, wound-healing, transplantation, and how we can improve current unsatisfactory SC-based therapies for patients suffering blinding corneal disease. PMID:26774909

  16. Analysis of chromosome segregation during mammalian meiosis using combined immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hubridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, P.A.; Embury, P.B.; Mroz, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    Meiotic non-disjunction is thought to occur in 10-20% of all human oocytes, making this the most common genetic abnormality in our species. Aberrant recombination has been implicated in the genesis of these errors; however, direct studies of the meiotic process have been hampered by the lack of material and appropriate technology. We have developed a technique for the evaluation of meiosis in intact mammalian oocytes that combines immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This allows for simultaneous, 3-dimensional visualization of the meiotic spindle, the alignment of the chromosomes on the spindle, and the placement of specific chromosomes. We have used this technology to follow meiotic progression in oocytes from XO female mice to evaluate the behavior of an unsynapsed chromosome during mammalian meiosis. Perturbations in chromosome behavior are evident early in meiosis: during the formation of the first meiotic spindle, the univalent X chromosome is properly positioned. With the onset of anaphase, the single X chromosome most commonly segregates as an intact chromosome, although equational segregation of the X chromatids is seen in a significant minority (approximately 20%) of oocytes. These observations demonstrate that failure of pairing/recombination can result in segregation of sister chromatids at meiosis I. This has obvious implications for human non-disjunction, much of which is thought to be due to recombination deficiencies; accordingly, we are now extending our studies to include analyses of human oocytes.

  17. Differential toxicity of three PCB congeners in developing sea urchin embryos and implication of TEQ approach

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, L.; Suffet, I.; Hose, J.; Bay, S.

    1995-12-31

    The relationship between body burden and toxicity of three individual PCB congeners in developing sea urchin embryos was investigated to evaluate the validity of current predictive models of PCB toxicity in an invertebrate system. The uptake and accumulation of radiolabeled PCB congeners from sea water was measured in the sea urchin embryo tissues and the relative toxicity determined. According to the toxic equivalents (TEQ) approach of assessing risk to mammals, congener 77, a nonortho-substituted congener, is predicted to be more toxic than the diortho-substituted congeners 47 and 153. Using a 72 hour embryo development assay, congener 47 was found to be at least four times as toxic as congener 77, with EC50s of 15.7 and > 72.5 mmol/kg, respectively. Congener 153, a hexachlorobiphenyl, was virtually nontoxic even at the highest dose used. Cytologic and cytogenetic anomalies were studied to find a possibly more sensitive endpoint and to suggest a mechanism of toxicity. The cytogenetic analysis revealed that the PCBs inhibited mitosis. At the highest doses, complete mitotic arrest was observed. Congener 77 was found to be at least two times more toxic than congener 153 but not as toxic as congener 47 using mitotic activity as the endpoint. Thus, the two endpoints of toxicity did not change the order in which the congeners are toxic, but established different EC50s. The relative toxicities of these congeners in this study contradict the structure-activity prediction of the mammalian-based TEQ approach.

  18. Implications of newborn amygdala connectivity for fear and cognitive development at 6-months-of-age.

    PubMed

    Graham, Alice M; Buss, Claudia; Rasmussen, Jerod M; Rudolph, Marc D; Demeter, Damion V; Gilmore, John H; Styner, Martin; Entringer, Sonja; Wadhwa, Pathik D; Fair, Damien A

    2016-04-01

    The first year of life is an important period for emergence of fear in humans. While animal models have revealed developmental changes in amygdala circuitry accompanying emerging fear, human neural systems involved in early fear development remain poorly understood. To increase understanding of the neural foundations of human fear, it is important to consider parallel cognitive development, which may modulate associations between typical development of early fear and subsequent risk for fear-related psychopathology. We, therefore, examined amygdala functional connectivity with rs-fcMRI in 48 neonates (M=3.65 weeks, SD=1.72), and measured fear and cognitive development at 6-months-of-age. Stronger, positive neonatal amygdala connectivity to several regions, including bilateral anterior insula and ventral striatum, was prospectively associated with higher fear at 6-months. Stronger amygdala connectivity to ventral anterior cingulate/anterior medial prefrontal cortex predicted a specific phenotype of higher fear combined with more advanced cognitive development. Overall, findings demonstrate unique profiles of neonatal amygdala functional connectivity related to emerging fear and cognitive development, which may have implications for normative and pathological fear in later years. Consideration of infant fear in the context of cognitive development will likely contribute to a more nuanced understanding of fear, its neural bases, and its implications for future mental health. PMID:26499255

  19. Oral epithelial stem cells – implications in normal development and cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Papagerakis, Silvana; Pannone, Giuseppe; Zheng, Li; About, Imad; Taqi, Nawar; Nguyen, Nghia P.T.; Matossian, Margarite; McAlpin, Blake; Santoro, Angela; McHugh, Jonathan; Prince, Mark E.; Papagerakis, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucosa is continuously exposed to environmental forces and has to be constantly renewed. Accordingly, the oral mucosa epithelium contains a large reservoir of epithelial stem cells necessary for tissue homeostasis. Despite considerable scientific advances in stem cell behavior in a number of tissues, fewer studies have been devoted to the stem cells in the oral epithelium. Most of oral mucosa stem cells studies are focused on identifying cancer stem cells (CSC) in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) among other head and neck cancers. OSCCs are the most prevalent epithelial tumors of the head and neck region, marked by their aggressiveness and invasiveness. Due to their highly tumorigenic properties, it has been suggested that CSC may be the critical population of cancer cells in the development of OSCC metastasis. This review presents a brief overview of epithelium stem cells with implications in oral health, and the clinical implications of the CSC concept in OSCC metastatic dissemination. PMID:24803391

  20. Factors Influencing the Central Nervous System Distribution of a Novel Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitor GSK2126458: Implications for Overcoming Resistance with Combination Therapy for Melanoma Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Vaidhyanathan, Shruthi; Wilken-Resman, Brynna; Ma, Daniel J; Parrish, Karen E; Mittapalli, Rajendar K; Carlson, Brett L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Elmquist, William F

    2016-02-01

    Small molecule inhibitors targeting the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (Braf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase) have had success in extending survival for patients with metastatic melanoma. Unfortunately, resistance may occur via cross-activation of alternate signaling pathways. One approach to overcome resistance is to simultaneously target the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. Recent reports have shown that GSK2126458 [2,4-difluoro-N-(2-methoxy-5-(4-(pyridazin-4-yl)quinolin-6-yl)pyridin-3-yl) benzenesulfonamide], a dual phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, can overcome acquired resistance to Braf and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitors in vitro. These resistance mechanisms may be especially important in melanoma brain metastases because of limited drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that influence the brain distribution of GSK2126458 and to examine the efficacy of GSK2126458 in a novel patient-derived melanoma xenograft (PDX) model. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that GSK2126458 is a substrate for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), two dominant active efflux transporters in the blood-brain barrier. The steady-state brain distribution of GSK2126458 was 8-fold higher in the P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice compared with the wild type. We also observed that when simultaneously infused to steady state, GSK212658, dabrafenib, and trametinib, a rational combination to overcome mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor resistance, all had limited brain distribution. Coadministration of elacridar, a P-gp/Bcrp inhibitor, increased the brain distribution of GSK2126458 by approximately 7-fold in wild-type mice. In the PDX model, GSK2126458 showed efficacy in flank tumors but was ineffective in intracranial melanoma. These results show that

  1. Spatial analysis on future housing markets: economic development and housing implications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Lizhe

    2014-01-01

    A coupled projection method combining formal modelling and other statistical techniques was developed to delineate the relationship between economic and social drivers for net new housing allocations. Using the example of employment growth in Tyne and Wear, UK, until 2016, the empirical analysis yields housing projections at the macro- and microspatial levels (e.g., region to subregion to elected ward levels). The results have important implications for the strategic planning of locations for housing and employment, demonstrating both intuitively and quantitatively how local economic developments affect housing demand. PMID:24892097

  2. Aneuploidy in mammalian somatic cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cimino, M C; Tice, R R; Liang, J C

    1986-01-01

    Aneuploidy is an important potential source of human disease and of reproductive failure. Nevertheless, the ability of chemical agents to induce aneuploidy has been investigated only sporadically in intact (whole-animal) mammalian systems. A search of the available literature from the EMCT Aneuploidy File (for years 1970-1983) provided 112 papers that dealt with aneuploidy in mammalian somatic cells in vivo. 59 of these papers did not meet minimal criteria for analysis and were rejected from subsequent review. Of the remaining 53 papers that dealt with aneuploidy induction by chemical agents in mammalian somatic cells in vivo, only 3 (6%) contained data that were considered to be supported conclusively by adequate study designs, execution, and reporting. These 3 papers dealt with 2 chemicals, one of which, mercury, was negative for aneuploidy induction in humans, and the other, pyrimethamine, was positive in an experimental rodent study. The majority of papers (94%) were considered inconclusive for a variety of reasons. The most common reasons for calling a study inconclusive were (a) combining data on hyperploidy with those on hypoploidy and/or polyploidy, (b) an inadequate or unspecified number of animals and/or cells per animal scored per treatment group, and (c) poor data presentation such that animal-to-animal variability could not be assessed. Suggestions for protocol development are made, and the future directions of research into aneuploidy induction are discussed. PMID:3941670

  3. Structure and function of mammalian aldehyde oxidases.

    PubMed

    Terao, Mineko; Romão, Maria João; Leimkühler, Silke; Bolis, Marco; Fratelli, Maddalena; Coelho, Catarina; Santos-Silva, Teresa; Garattini, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian aldehyde oxidases (AOXs; EC1.2.3.1) are a group of conserved proteins belonging to the family of molybdo-flavoenzymes along with the structurally related xanthine dehydrogenase enzyme. AOXs are characterized by broad substrate specificity, oxidizing not only aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes into the corresponding carboxylic acids, but also hydroxylating a series of heteroaromatic rings. The number of AOX isoenzymes expressed in different vertebrate species is variable. The two extremes are represented by humans, which express a single enzyme (AOX1) in many organs and mice or rats which are characterized by tissue-specific expression of four isoforms (AOX1, AOX2, AOX3, and AOX4). In vertebrates each AOX isoenzyme is the product of a distinct gene consisting of 35 highly conserved exons. The extant species-specific complement of AOX isoenzymes is the result of a complex evolutionary process consisting of a first phase characterized by a series of asynchronous gene duplications and a second phase where the pseudogenization and gene deletion events prevail. In the last few years remarkable advances in the elucidation of the structural characteristics and the catalytic mechanisms of mammalian AOXs have been made thanks to the successful crystallization of human AOX1 and mouse AOX3. Much less is known about the physiological function and physiological substrates of human AOX1 and other mammalian AOX isoenzymes, although the importance of these proteins in xenobiotic metabolism is fairly well established and their relevance in drug development is increasing. This review article provides an overview and a discussion of the current knowledge on mammalian AOX. PMID:26920149

  4. Sirtuins: Guardians of Mammalian Healthspan

    PubMed Central

    Giblin, William; Skinner, Mary E.; Lombard, David B.

    2014-01-01

    The first link between sirtuins and longevity was made 15 years ago in yeast. These initial studies sparked efforts by many laboratories working in diverse model organisms to elucidate the relationships between sirtuins, lifespan, and age-associated dysfunction. Here we discuss the current understanding of how sirtuins relate to aging. We focus primarily on mammalian sirtuins SIRT1, SIRT3, and SIRT6, the three sirtuins for which the most relevant data are available. Strikingly, a large body of evidence now indicates that these and other mammalian sirtuins suppress a variety of age-related pathologies and promote healthspan. Moreover, increased expression of SIRT1 or SIRT6 extends mouse lifespan. Overall, these data point to important roles for sirtuins in promoting mammalian health, and perhaps in modulating the aging process. PMID:24877878

  5. Electroporation into Cultured Mammalian Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Takahashi, Masanori; Osumi, Noriko

    Over the last century, mammalian embryos have been used extensively as a common animal model to investigate fundamental questions in the field of developmental biology. More recently, the establishment of transgenic and gene-targeting systems in laboratory mice has enabled researchers to unveil the genetic mechanisms under lying complex developmental processes (Mak, 2007). However, our understanding of cell—cell interactions and their molecular basis in the early stages of mammalian embryogenesis is still very fragmentary. One of the major problems is the difficulty of precise manipulation and limited accessibility to mammalian embryos via uterus wall. Unfortunately, existing tissue and organotypic culture systems per se do not fully recapitulate three-dimensional, dynamic processes of organogenesis observed in vivo. Although transgenic animal technology and virus-mediated gene delivery are useful to manipulate gene expression, these techniques take much time and financial costs, which limit their use.

  6. Reverse genetics for mammalian reovirus.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Karl W; Ikizler, Miné; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Dermody, Terence S

    2011-10-01

    Mammalian orthoreoviruses (reoviruses) are highly tractable models for studies of viral replication and pathogenesis. The versatility of reovirus as an experimental model has been enhanced by development of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system. Infectious reovirus can be recovered from cells transfected with plasmids encoding cDNAs of each reovirus gene segment using a strategy that does not require helper virus and is independent of selection. In this system, transcription of each gene segment is driven by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, which can be supplied transiently by recombinant vaccinia virus (rDIs-T7pol) or by cells that constitutively express the enzyme. Reverse genetics systems have been developed for two prototype reovirus strains, type 1 Lang (T1L) and type 3 Dearing (T3D). Each reovirus cDNA was encoded on an independent plasmid for the first-generation rescue system. The efficiency of virus recovery was enhanced in a second-generation system by combining the cDNAs for multiple reovirus gene segments onto single plasmids to reduce the number of plasmids from 10 to 4. The reduction in plasmid number and the use of baby hamster kidney cells that express T7 RNA polymerase increased the efficiency of viral rescue, reduced the incubation time required to recover infectious virus, and eliminated potential biosafety concerns associated with the use of recombinant vaccinia virus. Reovirus reverse genetics has been used to introduce mutations into viral capsid and nonstructural components to study viral protein-structure activity relationships and can be exploited to engineer recombinant reoviruses for vaccine and oncolytic applications. PMID:21798351

  7. Transferred and Adapted Models of Secondary Education in Ghana: What Implications for National Development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quist, Hubert O.

    2003-09-01

    The secondary-education models implemented in Ghana since colonial times constitute a classic case of "educational transfer and adaptation". Transferred from England, and in recent years the United States of America and Japan, these models have had a significant impact on Ghana's development in diverse ways. Yet educational research on Ghana has under-recognized this important issue of "educational transfer and adaptation", especially the relationship between these transferred models and national development. This study addresses such neglect by first focusing on those institutions that served as prototypes. Second, it appraises the models pointing out their implications for national development. It is contended that the foreign models that were adapted (indigenised) have been significant instruments for the human- resource and socio-political development of Ghana. However, their emphasis on the academic type of education ultimately has tended to create a situation of dependency particularly with respect to techno-scientific and economic development.

  8. Gestational nanomaterial exposures: microvascular implications during pregnancy, fetal development and adulthood.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, P A

    2016-04-15

    Air pollution particulate matter and engineered nanomaterials are encompassed in the broad definition of xenobiotic particles. While the effects of perinatal air pollution exposure have been investigated, elucidation of outcomes associated with nanomaterial exposure, the focus of this review, is still in its infancy. As the potential uses of nanomaterials, and therefore exposures, increase exponentially so does the need for thorough evaluation. Up to this point, the majority of research in the field of cardiovascular nanotoxicology has focused on the coronary and vascular reactions to pulmonary exposures in young adult, healthy, male models; however, as intentional and unintentional contacts persist, the non-pulmonary risks to under-represented populations become a critical concern. Development of the maternal-fetal circulation during successful mammalian gestation is one of the most unusual complex, dynamic, and acutely demanding physiological systems. Fetal development in a hostile gestational environment can lead to systemic alterations, which may encourage adult disease. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to highlight the few knowns associated with gestational engineered nanomaterial exposure segmented by physiological periods of development or systemic targets: preconception and maternal, gestational, fetal and progeny (Abstract figure). Overall, the limited studies currently available provide compelling evidence of maternal, fetal and offspring dysfunctions after engineered nanomaterial exposure. Understanding the mechanisms associated with these multigenerational effects may allow pregnant women to safely reap the benefits of nanotechnology-enabled products and assist in the implementation of exposure controls to protect the mother and fetus allowing for development of safety by design for engineered nanomaterials. PMID:26332609

  9. Changes in vitelline and utero-placental hemodynamics: implications for cardiovascular development

    PubMed Central

    Linask, Kersti K.; Han, Mingda; Bravo-Valenzuela, Nathalie J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of cardiovascular development have shown an important interplay between heart function, blood flow, and morphogenesis of heart structure during the formation of a four-chambered heart. It is known that changes in vitelline and placental blood flow seemingly contribute substantially to early cardiac hemodynamics. This suggests that in order to understand mammalian cardiac structure-hemodynamic functional relationships, blood flow from the extra-embryonic circulation needs to be taken into account and its possible impact on cardiogenesis defined. Previously published Doppler ultrasound analyses and data of utero-placental blood flow from human studies and those using the mouse model are compared to changes observed with environmental exposures that lead to cardiovascular anomalies. Use of current concepts and models related to mechanotransduction of blood flow and fluid forces may help in the future to better define the characteristics of normal and abnormal utero-placental blood flow and the changes in the biophysical parameters that may contribute to congenital heart defects. Evidence from multiple studies is discussed to provide a framework for future modeling of the impact of experimental changes in blood flow on the mouse heart during normal and abnormal cardiogenesis. PMID:25426076

  10. Technological implications of SNAP reactor power system development on future space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.V.

    1982-11-16

    Nuclear reactor systems are one method of satisfying space mission power needs. The development of such systems must proceed on a path consistent with mission needs and schedules. This path, or technology roadmap, starts from the power system technology data base available today. Much of this data base was established during the 1960s and early 1970s, when government and industry developed space nuclear reactor systems for steady-state power and propulsion. One of the largest development programs was the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. By the early 1970s, a technology base had evolved from this program at the system, subsystem, and component levels. There are many implications of this technology base on future reactor power systems. A review of this base highlights the need for performing a power system technology and mission overview study. Such a study is currently being performed by Rockwell's Energy Systems Group for the Department of Energy and will assess power system capabilities versus mission needs, considering development, schedule, and cost implications. The end product of the study will be a technology roadmap to guide reactor power system development.

  11. Roles of EphA2 in Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Eun; Son, Alexander I.; Zhou, Renping

    2013-01-01

    The Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) has been implicated in the regulation of many aspects of mammalian development. Recent analyses have revealed that the EphA2 receptor is a key modulator for a wide variety of cellular functions. This review focuses on the roles of EphA2 in both development and disease. PMID:24705208

  12. Mammalian-specific genomic functions: Newly acquired traits generated by genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes in mammals

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO-ISHINO, Tomoko; ISHINO, Fumitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mammals, including human beings, have evolved a unique viviparous reproductive system and a highly developed central nervous system. How did these unique characteristics emerge in mammalian evolution, and what kinds of changes did occur in the mammalian genomes as evolution proceeded? A key conceptual term in approaching these issues is “mammalian-specific genomic functions”, a concept covering both mammalian-specific epigenetics and genetics. Genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes are reviewed as the representative, mammalian-specific genomic functions that are essential not only for the current mammalian developmental system, but also mammalian evolution itself. First, the essential roles of genomic imprinting in mammalian development, especially related to viviparous reproduction via placental function, as well as the emergence of genomic imprinting in mammalian evolution, are discussed. Second, we introduce the novel concept of “mammalian-specific traits generated by mammalian-specific genes from LTR retrotransposons”, based on the finding that LTR retrotransposons served as a critical driving force in the mammalian evolution via generating mammalian-specific genes. PMID:26666304

  13. Political Implications of the Southern African Development Community Agenda on Educational Development in the Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nziramasanga, Caiphas T.

    This paper briefly describes the historical development of the Southern African Development Coordination Conference (SADCC) from its roots in 1980 and examines the work of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) today. The objectives of the SADCC are listed from the 1980 declaration and the achievement of those objectives are assessed.…

  14. Public Health Perspectives of Preeclampsia in Developing Countries: Implication for Health System Strengthening

    PubMed Central

    Osungbade, Kayode O.; Ige, Olusimbo K.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Review of public health perspectives of preeclampsia in developing countries and implications for health system strengthening. Methods. Literature from Pubmed (MEDLINE), AJOL, Google Scholar, and Cochrane database were reviewed. Results. The prevalence of preeclampsia in developing countries ranges from 1.8% to 16.7%. Many challenges exist in the prediction, prevention, and management of preeclampsia. Promising prophylactic measures like low-dose aspirin and calcium supplementation need further evidence before recommendation for use in developing countries. Treatment remains prenatal care, timely diagnosis, proper management, and timely delivery. Prevailing household, community, and health system factors limiting effective control of preeclampsia in these countries were identified, and strategies to strengthen health systems were highlighted. Conclusion. Overcoming the prevailing challenges in the control of preeclampsia in developing countries hinges on the ability of health care systems to identify and manage women at high risk. PMID:21547090

  15. Chemosignals, Hormones and Mammalian Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Petrulis, Aras

    2013-01-01

    Many mammalian species use chemosignals to coordinate reproduction by altering the physiology and behavior of both sexes. Chemosignals prime reproductive physiology so that individuals become sexually mature and active at times when mating is most probable and suppress it when it is not. Once in reproductive condition, odors produced and deposited by both males and females are used to find and select individuals for mating. The production, dissemination and appropriate responses to these cues are modulated heavily by organizational and activational effects of gonadal sex steroids and thereby intrinsically link chemical communication to the broader reproductive context. Many compounds have been identified as “pheromones” but very few have met the expectations of that term: a unitary, species-typical substance that is both necessary and sufficient for an experience-independent behavioral or physiological response. In contrast, most responses to chemosignals are dependent or heavily modulated by experience, either in adulthood or during development. Mechanistically, chemosignals are perceived by both main and accessory (vomeronasal) olfactory systems with the importance of each system tied strongly to the nature of the stimulus rather than to the response. In the central nervous system, the vast majority of responses to chemosignals are mediated by cortical and medial amygdala connections with hypothalamic and other forebrain structures. Despite the importance of chemosignals in mammals, many details of chemical communication differ even among closely related species and defy clear categorization. Although generating much research and public interest, strong evidence for the existence of a robust chemical communication among humans is lacking. PMID:23545474

  16. Correlations between Human Development and CO2 emissions: projections and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybski, D.; Costa, L.; Kropp, J.

    2011-12-01

    Although developing countries are called to participate on the efforts of reducing CO2 emissions in order to avoid dangerous climate change, the implications of CO2 reduction targets in human development standards of developing countries remain a matter of debate. We find positive and time dependent correlation between the Human Development Index (HDI) and per capita CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Based on this empirical relation, extrapolated HDI, and three population scenarios extracted from the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment report, we estimate future cumulative CO2 emissions. If current demographic and development trends are maintained, we estimate that by 2050 around 85% of the world's population will live in countries with high HDI (above 0.8) as defined in the United Nations Human Development Report 2009. In particular, we estimate that at least 300Gt of cumulative CO2 emissions between 2000 and 2050 are necessary for the development of developing countries in the year 2000. This value represents 30% of a previously calculated CO2 budget yielding a 75% probability of limiting global warming to 2°C. Since human development has been proved to be time and country dependent, we plead for future climate negotiations to consider a differentiated CO2 emissions reduction scheme for developing countries based on the achievement of concrete development goals.

  17. Implications of Simulation Conceptual Model Development for Simulation Management and Uncertainty Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, Dale K.

    2000-01-01

    A simulation conceptual model is a simulation developers way of translating modeling requirements (i. e., what is to be represented by the simulation or its modification) into a detailed design framework (i. e., how it is to be done), from which the software, hardware, networks (in the case of distributed simulation), and systems/equipment that will make up the simulation can be built or modified. A conceptual model is the collection of information which describes a simulation developers concept about the simulation and its pieces. That information consists of assumptions, algorithms, characteristics, relationships, and data. Taken together, these describe how the simulation developer understands what is to be represented by the simulation (entities, actions, tasks, processes, interactions, etc.) and how that representation will satisfy the requirements to which the simulation responds. Thus the conceptual model is the basis for judgment about simulation fidelity and validity for any condition that is not specifically tested. The more perspicuous and precise the conceptual model, the more likely it is that the simulation development will both fully satisfy requirements and allow demonstration that the requirements are satisfied (i. e., validation). Methods used in simulation conceptual model development have significant implications for simulation management and for assessment of simulation uncertainty. This paper suggests how to develop and document a simulation conceptual model so that the simulation fidelity and validity can be most effectively determined. These ideas for conceptual model development apply to all simulation varieties. The paper relates these ideas to uncertainty assessments as they relate to simulation fidelity and validity. The paper also explores implications for simulation management from conceptual model development methods, especially relative to reuse of simulation components.

  18. Joint Alpharma-Beef Species Symposium: implications of beef heifer development systems and lifetime productivity.

    PubMed

    Endecott, R L; Funston, R N; Mulliniks, J T; Roberts, A J

    2013-03-01

    Research emphasis has been placed on heifer development strategies in recent years, comparing traditional, more intensive systems to more extensive systems using less feed and relying on compensatory gain to reach a target BW. Recent research has indicated that developing heifers to a lighter target BW at breeding (i.e., 50 to 57% of mature BW compared with 60 to 65% BW) reduced development costs and did not impair reproductive performance. Research published through the late 1980s demonstrated greater negative effects of limited postweaning growth on age at puberty and pregnancy rates whereas more recent studies demonstrate less of a negative impact of delayed puberty on pregnancy rate. A limitation of most research concerning influences of nutrition on heifer development and cow reproductive performance is little or limited consideration of long-term implications. Longevity has relatively low heritability; therefore, heifer development and other management strategies have a greater potential to impact cow retention. Establishing the impact of heifer development protocols on longevity is complex, requiring consideration of nutritional factors after the start of breeding and through subsequent calvings. Lower-input heifer development, where all heifers are managed together after the postweaning period, did not impair rebreeding, but continued subsequent restriction in the form of marginal winter supplementation resulted in decreased retention in the breeding herd. Therefore, the compensatory BW gain period for restricted-growth heifers may be important to longevity and lifetime productivity. Adequate growth and development to ensure minimal calving difficulty can be of critical importance for longevity; however, providing additional supplemental feed during postweaning development to accomplish this may be less efficient than later in development. Restricting gain during postweaning development by limiting DMI or developing heifers on dormant winter forage resulted

  19. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  20. Communication for Development: A Personal Experience with Implications for Development Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agunga, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Communication for Development (C4D) is a new academic discipline and profession for addressing human dimension concerns in development, such as local participation, integration and capacity building, which are the main issues limiting aid effectiveness. However, my experience in Malawi, one of the poorest countries in Africa and where a…

  1. Coaching in the Context of Social-Emotional Development: Implications for Targeted Early Childhood Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkins, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to inform professional development in early childhood education (ECE) by examining the use of coaching to improve teacher performance in the classroom. Professional development programs that include coaching, a relationship-based method of enhancing application of newly acquired knowledge and skills, have received…

  2. LncRNAs and Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma - Implications for Pathogenesis and Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Xing; Xu, Jianzhen

    2016-01-01

    LncRNAs are a group of ncRNA species longer than 200 nt, which have fundamental regulatory roles in diverse cellular processes and diseases progression. Esophageal cancer is a serious malignancy with respect to prognosis and mortality rate. It is among the five leading cancer types for the cancer deaths in males of middle age in the United States. In China, esophageal cancer is the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death. The molecular mechanisms of esophageal cancer development are not fully understood, but emerging studies point out that lncRNAs may actively associate with the pathogenesis. In this review, we first provided an introduction of lncRNAs classifications. Then we focused on the recent findings on lncRNA expression and function in esophageal cancer development. Implications for pathogenesis and potential drug developments will also be discussed. PMID:27390601

  3. Key issues in the management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: latest developments and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is a chronic multisystem disease with significant associated morbidity and mortality. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of SLE has led to the development of biologic agents, primarily targeting B cells and others inhibiting costimulatory molecules, type I interferons and cytokines such as interleukin-6. Several of these agents have been studied in clinical trials; some have shown promise while others have yielded disappointing results. Economic and regulatory issues continue to hamper the availability of such therapies for SLE patients. With increasing recognition that recurrent flares of disease activity lead to long-term damage accrual, one of the most important recent developments in patient management has been the concept of treat-to-target in SLE while minimizing patient exposure to excessive corticosteroid and other immunosuppressive therapy. This article reviews these key issues in SLE management, outlining recent developments and clinical implications for patients. PMID:26622325

  4. Mammalian Developmental Genetics in the Twentieth Century

    PubMed Central

    Artzt, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This Perspectives is a review of the breathtaking history of mammalian genetics in the past century and, in particular, of the ways in which genetic thinking has illuminated aspects of mouse development. To illustrate the power of that thinking, selected hypothesis-driven experiments and technical advances are discussed. Also included in this account are the beginnings of mouse genetics at the Bussey Institute, Columbia University, and The Jackson Laboratory and a retrospective discussion of one of the classic problems in developmental genetics, the T/t complex and its genetic enigmas. PMID:23212897

  5. Recognition for Positive Behavior as a Critical Youth Development Construct: Conceptual Bases and Implications on Youth Service Development

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ben M. F.; Siu, Andrew M. H.; Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition for positive behavior is an appropriate response of the social environment to elicit desirable external behavior among the youth. Such positive responses, rendered from various social systems, include tangible and intangible reinforcements. The following theories are used to explain the importance of recognizing positive behavior: operational conditioning, observational learning, self-determination, and humanistic perspective. In the current work, culturally and socially desirable behaviors are discussed in detail with reference to Chinese adolescents. Positive behavior recognition is especially important to adolescent development because it promotes identity formation as well as cultivates moral reasoning and social perspective thinking from various social systems. The significance of recognizing positive behavior is illustrated through the support, tutorage, invitation, and subsidy provided by Hong Kong's social systems in recognition of adolescent volunteerism. The practical implications of positive behavior recognition on youth development programs are also discussed in this work. PMID:22666155

  6. The implications of future building scenarios for long-term building energy research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, W.T.

    1986-12-01

    This report presents a discussion of alternative future scenarios of the building environment to the year 2010 and assesses the implications these scenarios present for long-term building energy R and D. The scenarios and energy R and D implications derived from them are intended to serve as the basis from which a strategic plan can be developed for the management of R and D programs conducted by the Office of Buildings and Community Systems, US Department of Energy. The scenarios and analysis presented here have relevance not only for government R and D programs; on the contrary, it is hoped that the results of this effort will be of interest and useful to researchers in both private and public sector organizations that deal with building energy R and D. Making R and D decisions today based on an analysis that attempts to delineate the nexus of events 25 years in the future are clearly decisions made in the face of uncertainty. Yet, the effective management of R and D programs requires a future-directed understanding of markets, technological developments, and environmental factors, as well as their interactions. The analysis presented in this report is designed to serve that need. Although the probability of any particular scenario actually occurring is uncertain, the scenarios to be presented are sufficiently robust to set bounds within which to examine the interaction of forces that will shape the future building environment.

  7. Amino acids in the cultivation of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Andrew; Keusgen, Michael; von Hagen, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Amino acids are crucial for the cultivation of mammalian cells. This importance of amino acids was realized soon after the development of the first cell lines, and a solution of a mixture of amino acids has been supplied to cultured cells ever since. The importance of amino acids is further pronounced in chemically defined mammalian cell culture media, making the consideration of their biological and chemical properties necessary. Amino acids concentrations have been traditionally adjusted to their cellular consumption rates. However, since changes in the metabolic equilibrium of amino acids can be caused by changes in extracellular concentrations, metabolomics in conjunction with flux balance analysis is being used in the development of culture media. The study of amino acid transporters is also gaining importance since they control the intracellular concentrations of these molecules and are influenced by conditions in cell culture media. A better understanding of the solubility, stability, dissolution kinetics, and interactions of these molecules is needed for an exploitation of these properties in the development of dry powdered chemically defined media for mammalian cells. Due to the complexity of these mixtures however, this has proven to be challenging. Studying amino acids in mammalian cell culture media will help provide a better understanding of how mammalian cells in culture interact with their environment. It would also provide insight into the chemical behavior of these molecules in solutions of complex mixtures, which is important in the understanding of the contribution of individual amino acids to protein structure. PMID:26832172

  8. Evolution and Development of Dual Ingestion Systems in Mammals: Notes on a New Thesis and Its Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Jeffrey R.; Pickler, Rita H.

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, the development of oral feeding is viewed as a continuous, unitary process in which reflex-dominated sucking behavior gives rise to a more varied and volitional feeding behavior. In contrast, we consider the thesis that the infant develops two separable ingestive systems, one for suckling and one for feeding. First, we apply an evolutionary perspective, recognizing that suckling-feeding is a universal, mammalian developmental sequence. We find that in mammalian evolution, feeding systems in offspring were established prior to the evolution of lactation, and therefore suckling is a separable feature that was added to feeding. We next review an experimental literature that characterizes suckling and feeding as separable in terms of their topography, sensory controls, physiological controls, neural substrates, and experience-based development. Together, these considerations constitute a view of “dual ingestive systems.” The thesis, then, is that suckling is not a simple precursor of feeding but is a complete behavior that emerges, forms, and then undergoes a dissolution that overlaps with the emergence of independent feeding. This thesis guides us to focus differently on the challenges of properly managing and facilitating oral ingestion in infants, especially those born preterm, prior to the developmental onset of suckling. PMID:23028391

  9. An Overview of Models of Speaking Performance and Its Implications for the Development of Procedural Framework for Diagnostic Speaking Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Zhongbao

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at developing a procedural framework for the development and validation of diagnostic speaking tests. The researcher reviews the current available models of speaking performance, analyzes the distinctive features and then points out the implications for the development of a procedural framework for diagnostic speaking tests. On…

  10. Evidence for soft bounds in Ubuntu package sizes and mammalian body masses

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, Marco; Mandrà, Salvatore; Bassetti, Bruno; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The development of a complex system depends on the self-coordinated action of a large number of agents, often determining unexpected global behavior. The case of software evolution has great practical importance: knowledge of what is to be considered atypical can guide developers in recognizing and reacting to abnormal behavior. Although the initial framework of a theory of software exists, the current theoretical achievements do not fully capture existing quantitative data or predict future trends. Here we show that two elementary laws describe the evolution of package sizes in a Linux-based operating system: first, relative changes in size follow a random walk with non-Gaussian jumps; second, each size change is bounded by a limit that is dependent on the starting size, an intriguing behavior that we call “soft bound.” Our approach is based on data analysis and on a simple theoretical model, which is able to reproduce empirical details without relying on any adjustable parameter and generates definite predictions. The same analysis allows us to formulate and support the hypothesis that a similar mechanism is shaping the distribution of mammalian body sizes, via size-dependent constraints during cladogenesis. Whereas generally accepted approaches struggle to reproduce the large-mass shoulder displayed by the distribution of extant mammalian species, this is a natural consequence of the softly bounded nature of the process. Additionally, the hypothesis that this model is valid has the relevant implication that, contrary to a common assumption, mammalian masses are still evolving, albeit very slowly. PMID:24324175

  11. Mapping Gray Matter Development: Implications for Typical Development and Vulnerability to Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogtay, Nitin; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have scanned large numbers of children and adolescents repeatedly over time, as their brains develop, tracking volumetric changes in gray and white matter in remarkable detail. Focusing on gray matter changes specifically, here we explain how earlier studies using lobar volumes of specific…

  12. Expression patterns of cotton chloroplast genes during development: implications for development of plastid transformation vectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to express genes of interest in plastids, transformation vectors must be developed that include appropriate promoters to drive expression at effective levels in both green and non-green tissues. Typically, chloroplasts are transformed with vectors that contain ribosomal RNA promoters for h...

  13. The Role of Staff Development in the Professional Development of Teachers: Implications for Inservice Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    The school environment is a very dynamic sphere. Changes continually take place in educational policy, curriculum and in a school's physical and social environment. A teacher who wants to be effective in such an environment has to adapt to these changes. Continuous professional development of teachers is essential to addressing the gaps in…

  14. Understanding the Varying Investments in Researcher and Teacher Development and Enhancement: Implications for Academic Developers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrova, Petia; Hadjianastasis, Marios

    2015-01-01

    The increasing disparity between the research and teaching aspects of academic careers has been an area of concern in different national contexts over a number of decades. Anyone working with educational enhancement will have encountered the binary choice between research development and educational enhancement that academics are forced to make,…

  15. Potential Mammalian Filovirus Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Darin S.; Mills, James N.; Johnson, Karl M.

    2004-01-01

    Ebola and Marburg viruses are maintained in unknown reservoir species; spillover into human populations results in occasional human cases or epidemics. We attempted to narrow the list of possibilities regarding the identity of those reservoir species. We made a series of explicit assumptions about the reservoir: it is a mammal; it supports persistent, largely asymptomatic filovirus infections; its range subsumes that of its associated filovirus; it has coevolved with the virus; it is of small body size; and it is not a species that is commensal with humans. Under these assumptions, we developed priority lists of mammal clades that coincide distributionally with filovirus outbreak distributions and compared these lists with those mammal taxa that have been tested for filovirus infection in previous epidemiologic studies. Studying the remainder of these taxa may be a fruitful avenue for pursuing the identity of natural reservoirs of filoviruses. PMID:15663841

  16. Nanoelectrochemistry of mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Laforge, François O.; Abeyweera, Thushara P.; Rotenberg, Susan A.; Carpino, James; Mirkin, Michael V.

    2008-01-01

    There is a significant current interest in development of new techniques for direct characterization of the intracellular redox state and high-resolution imaging of living cells. We used nanometer-sized amperometric probes in combination with the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) to carry out spatially resolved electrochemical experiments in cultured human breast cells. With the tip radius ≈1,000 times smaller than that of a cell, an electrochemical probe can penetrate a cell and travel inside it without apparent damage to the membrane. The data demonstrate the possibility of measuring the rate of transmembrane charge transport and membrane potential and probing redox properties at the subcellular level. The same experimental setup was used for nanoscale electrochemical imaging of the cell surface. PMID:18178616

  17. Nanoelectrochemistry of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Laforge, François O; Abeyweera, Thushara P; Rotenberg, Susan A; Carpino, James; Mirkin, Michael V

    2008-01-15

    There is a significant current interest in development of new techniques for direct characterization of the intracellular redox state and high-resolution imaging of living cells. We used nanometer-sized amperometric probes in combination with the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) to carry out spatially resolved electrochemical experiments in cultured human breast cells. With the tip radius approximately 1,000 times smaller than that of a cell, an electrochemical probe can penetrate a cell and travel inside it without apparent damage to the membrane. The data demonstrate the possibility of measuring the rate of transmembrane charge transport and membrane potential and probing redox properties at the subcellular level. The same experimental setup was used for nanoscale electrochemical imaging of the cell surface. PMID:18178616

  18. The Mammalian Ovary from Genesis to Revelation

    PubMed Central

    Edson, Mark A.; Nagaraja, Ankur K.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    Two major functions of the mammalian ovary are the production of germ cells (oocytes), which allow continuation of the species, and the generation of bioactive molecules, primarily steroids (mainly estrogens and progestins) and peptide growth factors, which are critical for ovarian function, regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, and development of secondary sex characteristics. The female germline is created during embryogenesis when the precursors of primordial germ cells differentiate from somatic lineages of the embryo and take a unique route to reach the urogenital ridge. This undifferentiated gonad will differentiate along a female pathway, and the newly formed oocytes will proliferate and subsequently enter meiosis. At this point, the oocyte has two alternative fates: die, a common destiny of millions of oocytes, or be fertilized, a fate of at most approximately 100 oocytes, depending on the species. At every step from germline development and ovary formation to oogenesis and ovarian development and differentiation, there are coordinated interactions of hundreds of proteins and small RNAs. These studies have helped reproductive biologists to understand not only the normal functioning of the ovary but also the pathophysiology and genetics of diseases such as infertility and ovarian cancer. Over the last two decades, parallel progress has been made in the assisted reproductive technology clinic including better hormonal preparations, prenatal genetic testing, and optimal oocyte and embryo analysis and cryopreservation. Clearly, we have learned much about the mammalian ovary and manipulating its most important cargo, the oocyte, since the birth of Louise Brown over 30 yr ago. PMID:19776209

  19. Modeling the emergent executive: implications for the structure and development of executive function.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Sandra A

    2014-06-01

    In this Monograph, Buss and Spencer develop a novel theory of preschool executive function (EF) based on the principles of dynamic systems theory (DST). In this commentary, I discuss how this model contributes to our understanding of EF and highlight challenges that remain to be addressed. First, I discuss Buss and Spencer's model in the context of existing theories, and in terms of the processes thought to underlie developmental improvements in card-sorting. Next, I explore implications for our understanding of the structure of EF in early childhood. Finally, I suggest possible extensions of this approach to later development, including whether and how this work might shed light on relations between individual differences in early EF and later developmental outcomes. PMID:24818832

  20. Development of the carapacial ridge: implications for the evolution of genetic networks in turtle shell development.

    PubMed

    Moustakas, Jacqueline E

    2008-01-01

    Paleontologists and neontologists have long looked to development to understand the homologies of the dermal bones that form the "armor" of turtles, crocodiles, armadillos, and other vertebrates. This study shows molecular evidence supporting a dermomyotomal identity for the mesenchyme of the turtle carapacial ridge. The mesenchyme of the carapace primordium expresses Pax3, Twist1, Dermo1, En1, Sim1, and Gremlin at early stages and before overt ossification expresses Pax1. A hypothesis is proposed that this mesenchyme forms dermal bone in the turtle carapace. A comparison of regulatory gene expression in the primordia of the turtle carapace, the vertebrate limb, and the vertebral column implies the exaptation of key genetic networks in the development of the turtle shell. This work establishes a new role for this mesodermal compartment and highlights the importance of changes in genetic regulation in the evolution of morphology. PMID:18184355

  1. Reprogramming mammalian somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Osorio, N; Urrego, R; Cibelli, J B; Eilertsen, K; Memili, E

    2012-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the technique commonly known as cloning, permits transformation of a somatic cell into an undifferentiated zygote with the potential to develop into a newborn animal (i.e., a clone). In somatic cells, chromatin is programmed to repress most genes and express some, depending on the tissue. It is evident that the enucleated oocyte provides the environment in which embryonic genes in a somatic cell can be expressed. This process is controlled by a series of epigenetic modifications, generally referred to as "nuclear reprogramming," which are thought to involve the removal of reversible epigenetic changes acquired during cell differentiation. A similar process is thought to occur by overexpression of key transcription factors to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), bypassing the need for SCNT. Despite its obvious scientific and medical importance, and the great number of studies addressing the subject, the molecular basis of reprogramming in both reprogramming strategies is largely unknown. The present review focuses on the cellular and molecular events that occur during nuclear reprogramming in the context of SCNT and the various approaches currently being used to improve nuclear reprogramming. A better understanding of the reprogramming mechanism will have a direct impact on the efficiency of current SCNT procedures, as well as iPSC derivation. PMID:22979962

  2. Mechanisms of mammalian iron homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pantopoulos, Kostas; Porwal, Suheel Kumar; Tartakoff, Alan; Devireddy, L.

    2012-01-01

    Iron is vital for almost all organisms because of its ability to donate and accept electrons with relative ease. It serves as a cofactor for many proteins and enzymes necessary for oxygen and energy metabolism, as well as for several other essential processes. Mammalian cells utilize multiple mechanisms to acquire iron. Disruption of iron homeostasis is associated with various human diseases: iron deficiency resulting from defects in acquisition or distribution of the metal causes anemia; whereas iron surfeit resulting from excessive iron absorption or defective utilization causes abnormal tissue iron deposition, leading to oxidative damage. Mammals utilize distinct mechanisms to regulate iron homeostasis at the systemic and cellular levels. These involve the hormone hepcidin and iron regulatory proteins, which collectively ensure iron balance. This review outlines recent advances in iron regulatory pathways, as well as in mechanisms underlying intracellular iron trafficking, an important but less-studied area of mammalian iron homeostasis. PMID:22703180

  3. An overview of mammalian pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Yamauchi, Takayoshi; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-05-15

    Mammalian pluripotency is the ability to give rise to all somatic cells as well as the germ cells of an adult mammal. It is a unique feature of embryonic epiblast cells, existing only transiently, as cells pass through early developmental stages. By contrast, pluripotency can be captured and stabilized indefinitely in cell culture and can also be reactivated in differentiated cells via nuclear reprogramming. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are the in vitro carriers of pluripotency and they can inhabit discrete pluripotent states depending on the stage at which they were derived and their culture conditions. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we provide a summary of mammalian pluripotency both in vivo and in vitro, and highlight recent and future applications of PSCs for basic and translational research. PMID:27190034

  4. DAX1/NR0B1 was expressed during mammalian gonadal development and gametogenesis before it was recruited to the eutherian X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Stickels, Robert; Clark, Kevin; Heider, Thomas N; Mattiske, Deidre M; Renfree, Marilyn B; Pask, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (NR0B1) gene is an orphan nuclear receptor that is X-linked in eutherian mammals and plays a critical role in the establishment and function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axis. Duplication or overexpression of NR0B1 in eutherian males causes male to female sex reversal, and mutation and deletions of NR0B1 cause testicular defects. Thus, gene dosage is critical for the function of NR0B1 in normal gonadogenesis. However, NR0B1 is autosomal in all noneutherian vertebrates, including marsupials and monotreme mammals, and two active copies of the gene are compatible with both male and female gonadal development. In the current study, we examined the evolution and expression of autosomal NR0B1 during gonadal development in a marsupial (the tammar wallaby) as compared to the role of its X-linked orthologues in a eutherian (the mouse). We show that NR0B1 underwent rapid evolutionary change when it relocated from its autosomal position in the nonmammalian vertebrates, monotremes, and marsupials to an X-linked location in eutherian mammals. Despite the acquisition of a novel genomic location and a unique N-terminal domain, NR0B1 protein distribution was remarkably similar between mice and marsupials both throughout gonadal development and during gamete formation. A conserved accumulation of NR0B1 protein was observed in developing oocytes, where its function appears to be critical in the early embryo, prior to zygotic genome activation. Together these findings suggest that NR0B1 had a conserved role in gonadogenesis that existed long before it moved to the X chromosome and despite undergoing significant evolutionary change. PMID:25395677

  5. Olfactory sensitivity in mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Wackermannová, M; Pinc, L; Jebavý, L

    2016-07-18

    Olfaction enables most mammalian species to detect and discriminate vast numbers of chemical structures called odorants and pheromones. The perception of such chemical compounds is mediated via two major olfactory systems, the main olfactory system and the vomeronasal system, as well as minor systems, such as the septal organ and the Grueneberg ganglion. Distinct differences exist not only among species but also among individuals in terms of their olfactory sensitivity; however, little is known about the mechanisms that determine these differences. In research on the olfactory sensitivity of mammals, scientists thus depend in most cases on behavioral testing. In this article, we reviewed scientific studies performed on various mammalian species using different methodologies and target chemical substances. Human and non-human primates as well as rodents and dogs are the most frequently studied species. Olfactory threshold studies on other species do not exist with the exception of domestic pigs. Olfactory testing performed on seals, elephants, and bats focused more on discriminative abilities than on sensitivity. An overview of olfactory sensitivity studies as well as olfactory detection ability in most studied mammalian species is presented here, focusing on comparable olfactory detection thresholds. The basics of olfactory perception and olfactory sensitivity factors are also described. PMID:27070753

  6. Molecular identification of ancient and modern mammalian magnesium transporters.

    PubMed

    Quamme, Gary A

    2010-03-01

    A large number of mammalian Mg(2+) transporters have been hypothesized on the basis of physiological data, but few have been investigated at the molecular level. The recent identification of a number of novel proteins that mediate Mg(2+) transport has enhanced our understanding of how Mg(2+) is translocated across mammalian membranes. Some of these transporters have some similarity to those found in prokaryocytes and yeast cells. Human Mrs2, a mitochondrial Mg(2+) channel, shares many of the properties of the bacterial CorA and yeast Alr1 proteins. The SLC41 family of mammalian Mg(2+) transporters has a similarity with some regions of the bacterial MgtE transporters. The mammalian ancient conserved domain protein (ACDP) Mg(2+) transporters are found in prokaryotes, suggesting an ancient origin. However, other newly identified mammalian transporters, including TRPM6/7, MagT, NIPA, MMgT, and HIP14 families, are not represented in prokaryotic genomes, suggesting more recent development. MagT, NIPA, MMgT, and HIP14 transporters were identified by differential gene expression using microarray analysis. These proteins, which are found in many different tissues and subcellular organelles, demonstrate a diversity of structural properties and biophysical functions. The mammalian Mg(2+) transporters have no obvious amino acid similarities, indicating that there are many ways to transport Mg(2+) across membranes. Most of these proteins transport a number of divalent cations across membranes. Only MagT1 and NIPA2 are selective for Mg(2+). Many of the identified mammalian Mg(2+) transporters are associated with a number of congenital disorders encompassing a wide range of tissues, including intestine, kidney, brain, nervous system, and skin. It is anticipated that future research will identify other novel Mg(2+) transporters and reveal other diseases. PMID:19940067

  7. Rapid, modular and reliable construction of complex mammalian gene circuits

    PubMed Central

    Guye, Patrick; Li, Yinqing; Wroblewska, Liliana; Duportet, Xavier; Weiss, Ron

    2013-01-01

    We developed a framework for quick and reliable construction of complex gene circuits for genetically engineering mammalian cells. Our hierarchical framework is based on a novel nucleotide addressing system for defining the position of each part in an overall circuit. With this framework, we demonstrate construction of synthetic gene circuits of up to 64 kb in size comprising 11 transcription units and 33 basic parts. We show robust gene expression control of multiple transcription units by small molecule inducers in human cells with transient transfection and stable chromosomal integration of these circuits. This framework enables development of complex gene circuits for engineering mammalian cells with unprecedented speed, reliability and scalability and should have broad applicability in a variety of areas including mammalian cell fermentation, cell fate reprogramming and cell-based assays. PMID:23847100

  8. Self-efficacy as a positive youth development construct: conceptual bases and implications for curriculum development.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Sandra K M; Hui, Eadaoin K P

    2006-01-01

    Self-efficacy denotes people's beliefs about their capabilities to perform in different situations. It functions as a multilevel and multifaceted set of beliefs that influence how people feel, think, motivate themselves, and behave. Self-efficacy beliefs are informed by enactive attainment, vicarious experience, imaginal experiences, social persuasion, as well as physical and emotional states. These beliefs are mediated by cognitive, motivational, affective, and selection processes to generate actual performance. Self-efficacy development is closely intertwined with a person's experiences, competencies, and developmental tasks in different domains at different life stages. This paper outlines the conceptualization of the construct and presents how its determinants are used in Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes (P.A.T.H.S.), supported by the Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust, to help adolescents cultivate self-efficacy. PMID:17068926

  9. A new mammalian host cell with enhanced survival enables completely serum-free development of high-level protein production cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Diane L; Rossi, Edmund A; Goldenberg, David M; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2011-01-01

    With over 25 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) currently approved and many more in development, there is considerable interest in gaining improved productivity by increasing cell density and enhancing cell survival of production cell lines. In addition, high costs and growing safety concerns with use of animal products have made the availability of serum-free cell lines more appealing. We elected to transfect the myeloma cell line Sp2/0-Ag14 with Bcl2-EEE, the constitutively active phosphomimetic mutant of Bcl2, for extended cell survival. After adaptation of the initial transfectants to serum-independent growth, a clone with superior growth properties, referred to as SpESF, was isolated and further subjected to iterative rounds of stressful growth over a period of 4 months. The effort resulted in the selection of a promising clone, designated SpESFX-10, which was shown to exhibit robust growth and resist apoptosis induced by sodium butyrate or glutamine deprivation. The advantage of SpESFX-10 as a host for generating mAb-production cell lines was demonstrated by its increased transfection efficiency, culture longevity, and mAb productivity, as well as by the feasibility of accomplishing the entire cell line development process, including transfection, subcloning, and cryopreservation, in the complete absence of serum. PMID:21473000

  10. Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award lecture: The multifaceted role of Nodal signaling during mammalian reproduction.

    PubMed

    Park, C B; Dufort, D

    2011-03-01

    Nodal, a secreted signaling protein in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily, has established roles in vertebrate development. However, components of the Nodal signaling pathway are also expressed at the maternal-fetal interface and have been implicated in many processes of mammalian reproduction. Emerging evidence indicates that Nodal and its extracellular inhibitor Lefty are expressed in the uterus and complex interactions between the two proteins mediate menstruation, decidualization and embryo implantation. Furthermore, several studies have shown that Nodal from both fetal and maternal sources may regulate trophoblast cell fate and facilitate placentation as both embryonic and uterine-specific Nodal knockout mouse strains exhibit disrupted placenta morphology. Here we review the established and prospective roles of Nodal signaling in facilitating successful pregnancy, including recent evidence supporting a potential link to parturition and preterm birth. PMID:21195476

  11. Experience as Knowledge in a New Product Development Team: Implications for Knowledge Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to better understand how New Product Development (NPD) team members apply their experiences to meet the task needs of their project. Although "experience" is highly valued in team members, little research has looked specifically at experiences as a type of knowledge, and how this knowledge is used in work settings. This research evaluated nearly 200 instances where team members referenced past experiences during team meetings. During these experience exchanges, team members structured the sharing of their experiences to include three common elements: the source of the experience, the nature of the experience, and the degree of relevance to the current work of the team. The experiences fell into four categories: people (relationships), process, product, and politics. This paper describes how team members structured, applied, and integrated their individual experiences and presents the resulting implications for knowledge management systems that wish to exploit experience knowledge.

  12. Ethnic identity development of internationally adopted children and adolescents: implications for family therapists.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, M L

    1999-01-01

    The life story of the internationally adopted child tends to be an emotional one. How the story is told and retold in the family can have lasting consequences for the child's adjustment and well-being. In telling the story, parents are faced with a unique challenge: To what extent is it desirable to encourage their children, who already struggle with identity issues related to adoption, to identify with their cultures of origin? Therapists working on these issues with multiethnic adoptive families can find little guidance in the family systems literature. To fill this gap, the present article reviews the literature on racial/ethnic identity development and the available research on ethnic identification, self-esteem, and the psychological adjustment of cross-ethnically adopted children and adolescents. Implications for practice include developmental considerations, identifying children and families at risk, and recommendations for those in need of intervention. PMID:9990519

  13. Development of evidenced-based guidelines for PCOS and implications for community health.

    PubMed

    Misso, Marie; Boyle, Jacqueline; Norman, Robert; Teede, Helena

    2014-05-01

    Despite the prevalence and health implications of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), key evidence practice gaps exist including delayed diagnosis, inconsistent management, inadequate support for lifestyle change, and limited attention to psychological and metabolic features. Key contributors to these gaps include a lack of awareness and absence of evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) to inform consumers and health professionals. Intervention was needed to improve awareness, patient experience, early diagnosis, self-management, complication screening, and treatment across reproductive, metabolic, and psychological features driving the authors to establish a national PCOS Alliance. All relevant stakeholders including consumers, researchers, and clinicians codeveloped a vision and based on compellingly need and lobbying, the Australian government funded development of EBGs meeting international standards. To maximize impact, a national dissemination and implementation program was delivered with ongoing evaluation. Activities were recognized by the U.S. National Institute of Health and are being scaled up with the World Health Organization. PMID:24715518

  14. Political and legal implications of developing and operating a satellite power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelrigg, G. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A number of political and legal implications of developing and operating a satellite power system (SPS) are identified and studied in this report. These include the vulnerability of SPS to actions of adversaries, communications impacts, the legality of an SPS in orbit including on-orbit military protection, alleviation of political concerns about deployment and operation of SPS, programmatic planning for SPS and the interaction of SPS with federal regulatory agencies and major departments. In comparing SPS to terrestrial power stations, it is seen that the political problems are neither clearly larger nor clearly smaller--they are clearly different and they are international in nature. If SPS is to become a reality these problems must be dealt with. Five major issues are identified. These must be resolved in order to obtain international acceptance of SPS. However, this study has found no insurmountable obstacles that would clearly prohibit the deployment, operation and protection of an SPS fleet.

  15. Uranium resources and their implications for fission breeder and fusion hybrid development

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.

    1984-05-15

    Present estimates of uranium resources and reserves in the US and the non-Communist world are reviewed. The resulting implications are considered for two proposed breeder technologies: the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) and the fusion hybrid reactor. Using both simple arguments and detailed scenarios from the published literature, conditions are explored under which the LMFBR and fusion hybrid could respectively have the most impact, considering both fuel-supply and economic factors. The conclusions emphasize strong potential advantages of the fusion hybrid, due to its inherently large breeding rate. A discussion is presented of proposed US development strategies for the fusion hybrid, which at present is far behind the LMFBR in its practical application and maturity.

  16. Rapid parallel measurements of macroautophagy and mitophagy in mammalian cells using a single fluorescent biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Sargsyan, A.; Cai, J.; Fandino, L. B.; Labasky, M. E.; Forostyan, T.; Colosimo, L. K.; Thompson, S. J.; Graham, T. E.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in many human diseases and occurs in normal aging. Mitochondrial health is maintained through organelle biogenesis and repair or turnover of existing mitochondria. Mitochondrial turnover is principally mediated by mitophagy, the trafficking of damaged mitochondria to lysosomes via macroautophagy (autophagy). Mitophagy requires autophagy, but is itself a selective process that relies on specific autophagy-targeting mechanisms, and thus can be dissociated from autophagy under certain circumstances. Therefore, it is important to assess autophagy and mitophagy together and separately. We sought to develop a robust, high-throughput, quantitative method for monitoring both processes in parallel. Here we report a flow cytometry-based assay capable of rapid parallel measurements of mitophagy and autophagy in mammalian cells using a single fluorescent protein biosensor. We demonstrate the ability of the assay to quantify Parkin-dependent selective mitophagy in CCCP-treated HeLa cells. In addition, we show the utility of the assay for measuring mitophagy in other cell lines, as well as for Parkin-independent mitophagy stimulated by deferiprone. The assay makes rapid measurements (10,000 cells per 6 seconds) and can be combined with other fluorescent indicators to monitor distinct cell populations, enabling design of high-throughput screening experiments to identify novel regulators of mitophagy in mammalian cells. PMID:26215030

  17. Monoclonal antibody BM89 recognizes a novel cell surface glycoprotein of the L2/HNK-1 family in the developing mammalian nervous system.

    PubMed

    Merkouri, E; Matsas, R

    1992-09-01

    A monoclonal antibody, BM89, obtained with Triton X-114-treated pig synaptic membranes as an immunogen, recognizes a neuronal antigen in the newborn porcine nervous system. By immunohistochemistry, BM89 staining was observed within the neuropil of all areas of the forebrain and spinal cord tested. In addition, BM89 labeled the cell bodies and proximal dendrites of spinal cord neurons. In the peripheral nervous system, BM89 immunoreactivity was present in a subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion neurons and was predominantly associated with non-myelinated axons in peripheral nerves. Initial biochemical characterization of the antigen in pig brain showed that it is an integral membrane glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 41,000. Moreover, it cross-reacts with the L2/HNK-1 carbohydrate epitope expressed by members of a large family of glycoproteins. Homologous antigens with molecular weights of 41,000-43,000 were identified in the rat, rabbit and fetal human brain. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry revealed that the epitope recognized by BM89 is developmentally regulated in the rat nervous system. In cryostat sections from rat cerebellum, spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia, an age-dependent decline of BM89 immunoreactivity was observed during postnatal development. In the cerebellum, the BM89 epitope was very abundant in cells of the external and the internal granular layers between postnatal days 5 and 15. During this period some staining was also identified in the developing molecular layer and the prospective white matter. Subsequently, and in the adult, overall staining was greatly reduced and remaining immunoreactivity was associated only with the internal granular layer. In the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia, staining was very prominent at postnatal day 5; it decreased considerably thereafter and was barely detectable in the adult. Immunostaining of rat brain and dorsal root ganglion cultures revealed that the BM89 antigen is a cell surface

  18. Histone Acetyl Transferase 1 Is Essential for Mammalian Development, Genome Stability, and the Processing of Newly Synthesized Histones H3 and H4

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Prabakaran; Ge, Zhongqi; Sirbu, Bianca; Doughty, Cheryl; Agudelo Garcia, Paula A.; Schlederer, Michaela; Annunziato, Anthony T.; Cortez, David; Kenner, Lukas; Parthun, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferase 1 is an evolutionarily conserved type B histone acetyltransferase that is thought to be responsible for the diacetylation of newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines 5 and 12 during chromatin assembly. To understand the function of this enzyme in a complex organism, we have constructed a conditional mouse knockout model of Hat1. Murine Hat1 is essential for viability, as homozygous deletion of Hat1 results in neonatal lethality. The lungs of embryos and pups genetically deficient in Hat1 were much less mature upon histological evaluation. The neonatal lethality is due to severe defects in lung development that result in less aeration and respiratory distress. Many of the Hat1−/− neonates also display significant craniofacial defects with abnormalities in the bones of the skull and jaw. Hat1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are defective in cell proliferation and are sensitive to DNA damaging agents. In addition, the Hat1−/− MEFs display a marked increase in genome instability. Analysis of histone dynamics at sites of replication-coupled chromatin assembly demonstrates that Hat1 is not only responsible for the acetylation of newly synthesized histone H4 but is also required to maintain the acetylation of histone H3 on lysines 9, 18, and 27 during replication-coupled chromatin assembly. PMID:23754951

  19. Optimizing transient recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ralph F; Wall, Vanessa E; Esposito, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    Transient gene expression (TGE) in mammalian cells has become a routine process for expressing recombinant proteins in cell lines such as human embryonic kidney 293 and Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rapidly increasing need for recombinant proteins requires further improvements in TGE technology. While a great deal of focus has been directed toward optimizing the secretion of antibodies and other naturally secreted targets, much less work has been done on ways to improve cytoplasmic expression in mammalian cells. The benefits to protein production in mammalian cells, particularly for eukaryotic proteins, should be very significant - glycosylation and other posttranslational modifications will likely be native or near-native, solubility and protein folding would likely improve overexpression in heterologous hosts, and expression of proteins in their proper intracellular compartments is much more likely to occur. Improvements in this area have been slow, however, due to limited development of the cell culture processes needed for low-cost, higher-throughput expression in mammalian cells, and the relatively low diversity of DNA vectors for protein production in these systems. Here, we describe how the use of recombinational cloning, coupled with improvements in transfection protocols which increase speed and lower cost, can be combined to make mammalian cells much more amenable for routine recombinant protein expression. PMID:21987258

  20. Phloem development in nematode-induced feeding sites: the implications of auxin and cytokinin

    PubMed Central

    Absmanner, Birgit; Stadler, Ruth; Hammes, Ulrich Z.

    2013-01-01

    Sedentary plant parasitic nematodes such as root-knot nematodes and cyst nematodes induce giant cells or syncytia, respectively, in their host plant's roots. These highly specialized structures serve as feeding sites from which exclusively the nematodes withdraw nutrients. While giant cells are symplastically isolated and obtain assimilates by transporter-mediated processes syncytia are massively connected to the phloem by plasmodesmata. To support the feeding sites and the nematode during their development, phloem is induced around syncytia and giant cells. In the case of syncytia the unloading phloem consists of sieve elements and companion cells and in the case of root knots it consists exclusively of sieve elements. We applied immunohistochemistry to identify the cells within the developing phloem that responded to auxin and cytokinin. Both feeding sites themselves did not respond to either hormone. We were able to show that in root knots an auxin response precedes the differentiation of these auxin responsive cells into phloem elements. This process appears to be independent of B-type Arabidopsis response regulators. Using additional markers for tissue identity we provide evidence that around giant cells protophloem is formed and proliferates dramatically. In contrast, the phloem around syncytia responded to both hormones. The presence of companion cells as well as hormone-responsive sieve elements suggests that metaphloem development occurs. The implication of auxin and cytokinin in the further development of the metaphloem is discussed. PMID:23847644

  1. White Matter Development in Adolescence: The Influence of Puberty and Implications for Affective Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Peper, Jiska S.; Crone, Eveline A.; Dahl, Ronald E.

    2011-01-01

    There have been rapid advances in understanding a broad range of changes in brain structure and function during adolescence, and a growing interest in identifying which of these neurodevelopmental changes are directly linked with pubertal maturation—at least in part because of their potential to provide insights into the numerous emotional and behavioral health problems that emerge during this developmental period. This review focuses on what is known about the influence of puberty on white matter development in adolescence. We focus on white matter because of its role in providing the structural architectural organization of the brain and as a structural correlate of communication within complex neural systems. We begin with a review of studies that report sex differences or sex by age interactions in white matter development as these findings can provide, although indirectly, information relevant to puberty-related changes. Studies are also critically reviewed based on methodological procedures used to assess pubertal maturation and relations with white matter changes. Findings are discussed in light of their implications for the development of neural systems underlying the regulation of emotion and behavior and how alterations in the development of these systems may mediate risk for affective disorders in vulnerable adolescents. PMID:22247751

  2. Sustainable development, demography and sexual and reproductive health: inseparable linkages and their policy implications.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The greatest challenge today is to meet the needs of current and future generations, of a large and growing world population, without imposing catastrophic pressures on the natural environment. Meeting this challenge depends on decisive policy changes in three areas: more inclusive economic growth, greener economic growth, and population policies. This article focuses on efforts to address and harness demographic changes for sustainable development, which are largely outside the purview of the current debate. Efforts to this end must be based on the recognition that demographic changes are the cumulative result of individual choices and opportunities, and that demographic changes are best addressed through policies that enlarge these choices and opportunities, with a focus on ensuring unrestricted and universal access to sexual and reproductive health information and services, empowering women to fully participate in social, economic and political life, and investing in the education of the younger generation beyond the primary level. The article provides a strong argument for why the Programme of Action that was agreed at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) 20 years ago continues to hold important implications and lessons for the formulation of the post-2015 development agenda, which is expected to supersede the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). PMID:24908454

  3. Oxidative stress: implications for the development of diabetic retinopathy and antioxidant therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Tang, Luosheng; Chen, Baihua

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, localized tissue oxidative stress has been implicated as a key component in the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress caused by diabetes-induced metabolic abnormalities is the most common mechanism associated with the pathogenesis of DR for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations results in the activation of several mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of DR. In particular, damage or dysfunction caused by oxidative stress still persists even after glycemia has been normalized. Despite considerable evidence showing the beneficial effects of antioxidants in preventing the development of retinopathy, results from large-scale clinical trials on classic antioxidants are somewhat ambiguous. Scavenging reactive radicals may not be the most ideal antioxidant strategy in DR. Advances in understanding the function of ROS in the development of DR can lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies based on the mechanisms of ROS generation and scavenging. Increasing amounts of data have demonstrated the promising prospect of antioxidant therapy and its beneficial effects in vision protection. Therefore, new strategies that utilize antioxidants as additive therapy should be implemented in the treatment of DR. PMID:25180070

  4. Coping with a diagnosis of breast cancer-literature review and implications for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Al-Azri, Mohammed; Al-Awisi, Huda; Al-Moundhri, Mansour

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women worldwide. Women are at an increased risk of developing both physical and psychological morbidity after diagnosis; however, many use different strategies to cope with the disease. The aim of this article is to review the available literature on the impact of breast cancer diagnoses and the strategies used by women to cope with this disease. The implications of these emerging findings are extrapolated within the context of health services provided in developing countries. Electronic databases were used to search the relevant literature. The findings showed that women who were diagnosed with breast cancer are at risk of developing several psychological morbidities such as depression, anxiety, fatigue, negative thoughts, suicidal thoughts, fear of dying, sense of aloneness, sexual and body images problems, as well as an overall decrease in the quality of life. Several strategies are used by women with breast cancer to cope with the disease, including positive cognitive restructuring, wishful thinking, emotional expression, disease acceptance, increased religious practice, family and social support, and yoga and exercise. Breast cancer diagnoses have been associated with several devastating psychological consequences; however, many women have used different coping strategies to adjust their lives accordingly. Healthcare professionals in developing countries, who work with women with breast cancer, should be aware of the different coping mechanisms that women use when diagnosed with cancer. Integrating a coping strategy into the treatment regimen would constitute an important milestone in the palliative care of patients with breast cancer. PMID:19686231

  5. Oxidative Stress: Implications for the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy and Antioxidant Therapeutic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Luosheng; Chen, Baihua

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, localized tissue oxidative stress has been implicated as a key component in the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress caused by diabetes-induced metabolic abnormalities is the most common mechanism associated with the pathogenesis of DR for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations results in the activation of several mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of DR. In particular, damage or dysfunction caused by oxidative stress still persists even after glycemia has been normalized. Despite considerable evidence showing the beneficial effects of antioxidants in preventing the development of retinopathy, results from large-scale clinical trials on classic antioxidants are somewhat ambiguous. Scavenging reactive radicals may not be the most ideal antioxidant strategy in DR. Advances in understanding the function of ROS in the development of DR can lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies based on the mechanisms of ROS generation and scavenging. Increasing amounts of data have demonstrated the promising prospect of antioxidant therapy and its beneficial effects in vision protection. Therefore, new strategies that utilize antioxidants as additive therapy should be implemented in the treatment of DR. PMID:25180070

  6. Ballistic transfection of mammalian cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, V.A.; Zelenin, A.V.; Zelenina, I.A.

    1995-11-01

    The method of ballistic transfection initially proposed for genetic transformation of plants was used for animal cells in vitro and in situ. The method consists in bombarding the transfected cells with microparticles of heavy metals carrying foreign DNA. Penetrating the cell nucleus, the microparticles transport the introduced gene. Successful genetic transformation of the cultured mouse cells and fish embryos was realized, and this allowed the study of mammalian cells in situ. The performed studies allowed us to demonstrate expression of the reporter genes of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, galactosidase, and neomycin phosphotransferase in the mouse liver, mammary gland and kidney explants, in the liver and cross-striated muscle of mouse and rat in situ, and in developing mouse embryos at the stages of two-cell embryo, morula, and blastocyst. All these genes were introduced by ballistic transfection. In the liver and cross-striated muscle the transgene activity was detected within two to three months after transfection. Thus, the ballistic introduction of the foreign genes in the cells in situ was demonstrated, and this opens possibilities for the use of this method in gene therapy. Methodical aspects of the bombarding and transfection are considered in detail, and the published data on transfection and genetic transformation of mammalian cells are discussed. 41 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  7. An Adaptive Threshold in Mammalian Neocortical Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kalinka, Alex T.; Tomancak, Pavel; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of the neocortex is a hallmark of human evolution. However, determining which adaptive mechanisms facilitated its expansion remains an open question. Here we show, using the gyrencephaly index (GI) and other physiological and life-history data for 102 mammalian species, that gyrencephaly is an ancestral mammalian trait. We find that variation in GI does not evolve linearly across species, but that mammals constitute two principal groups above and below a GI threshold value of 1.5, approximately equal to 109 neurons, which may be characterized by distinct constellations of physiological and life-history traits. By integrating data on neurogenic period, neuroepithelial founder pool size, cell-cycle length, progenitor-type abundances, and cortical neuron number into discrete mathematical models, we identify symmetric proliferative divisions of basal progenitors in the subventricular zone of the developing neocortex as evolutionarily necessary for generating a 14-fold increase in daily prenatal neuron production, traversal of the GI threshold, and thus establishment of two principal groups. We conclude that, despite considerable neuroanatomical differences, changes in the length of the neurogenic period alone, rather than any novel neurogenic progenitor lineage, are sufficient to explain differences in neuron number and neocortical size between species within the same principal group. PMID:25405475

  8. Systems approaches for synthetic biology: a pathway toward mammalian design

    PubMed Central

    Rekhi, Rahul; Qutub, Amina A.

    2013-01-01

    We review methods of understanding cellular interactions through computation in order to guide the synthetic design of mammalian cells for translational applications, such as regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. In doing so, we argue that the challenges of engineering mammalian cells provide a prime opportunity to leverage advances in computational systems biology. We support this claim systematically, by addressing each of the principal challenges to existing synthetic bioengineering approaches—stochasticity, complexity, and scale—with specific methods and paradigms in systems biology. Moreover, we characterize a key set of diverse computational techniques, including agent-based modeling, Bayesian network analysis, graph theory, and Gillespie simulations, with specific utility toward synthetic biology. Lastly, we examine the mammalian applications of synthetic biology for medicine and health, and how computational systems biology can aid in the continued development of these applications. PMID:24130532

  9. Systems approaches for synthetic biology: a pathway toward mammalian design.

    PubMed

    Rekhi, Rahul; Qutub, Amina A

    2013-01-01

    We review methods of understanding cellular interactions through computation in order to guide the synthetic design of mammalian cells for translational applications, such as regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. In doing so, we argue that the challenges of engineering mammalian cells provide a prime opportunity to leverage advances in computational systems biology. We support this claim systematically, by addressing each of the principal challenges to existing synthetic bioengineering approaches-stochasticity, complexity, and scale-with specific methods and paradigms in systems biology. Moreover, we characterize a key set of diverse computational techniques, including agent-based modeling, Bayesian network analysis, graph theory, and Gillespie simulations, with specific utility toward synthetic biology. Lastly, we examine the mammalian applications of synthetic biology for medicine and health, and how computational systems biology can aid in the continued development of these applications. PMID:24130532

  10. Mammalian EGF receptor activation by the rhomboid protease RHBDL2.

    PubMed

    Adrain, Colin; Strisovsky, Kvido; Zettl, Markus; Hu, Landian; Lemberg, Marius K; Freeman, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has several functions in mammalian development and disease, particularly cancer. Most EGF ligands are synthesized as membrane-tethered precursors, and their proteolytic release activates signalling. In Drosophila, rhomboid intramembrane proteases catalyse the release of EGF-family ligands; however, in mammals this seems to be primarily achieved by ADAM-family metalloproteases. We report here that EGF is an efficient substrate of the mammalian rhomboid RHBDL2. RHBDL2 cleaves EGF just outside its transmembrane domain, thereby facilitating its secretion and triggering activation of the EGFR. We have identified endogenous RHBDL2 activity in several tumour cell lines. PMID:21494248

  11. Mammalian EGF receptor activation by the rhomboid protease RHBDL2

    PubMed Central

    Adrain, Colin; Strisovsky, Kvido; Zettl, Markus; Hu, Landian; Lemberg, Marius K; Freeman, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has several functions in mammalian development and disease, particularly cancer. Most EGF ligands are synthesized as membrane-tethered precursors, and their proteolytic release activates signalling. In Drosophila, rhomboid intramembrane proteases catalyse the release of EGF-family ligands; however, in mammals this seems to be primarily achieved by ADAM-family metalloproteases. We report here that EGF is an efficient substrate of the mammalian rhomboid RHBDL2. RHBDL2 cleaves EGF just outside its transmembrane domain, thereby facilitating its secretion and triggering activation of the EGFR. We have identified endogenous RHBDL2 activity in several tumour cell lines. PMID:21494248

  12. Role of ortho-retronasal olfaction in mammalian cortical evolution.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Timothy B; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2016-02-15

    Fossils of mammals and their extinct relatives among cynodonts give evidence of correlated transformations affecting olfaction as well as mastication, head movement, and ventilation, and suggest evolutionary coupling of these seemingly separate anatomical regions into a larger integrated system of ortho-retronasal olfaction. Evidence from paleontology and physiology suggests that ortho-retronasal olfaction played a critical role at three stages of mammalian cortical evolution: early mammalian brain development was driven in part by ortho-retronasal olfaction; the bauplan for neocortex had higher-level association functions derived from olfactory cortex; and human cortical evolution was enhanced by ortho-retronasal smell. PMID:25975561

  13. Immune responses at brain barriers and implications for brain development and neurological function in later life

    PubMed Central

    Stolp, Helen B.; Liddelow, Shane A.; Sá-Pereira, Inês; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Saunders, Norman R.

    2013-01-01

    For a long time the brain has been considered an immune-privileged site due to a muted inflammatory response and the presence of protective brain barriers. It is now recognized that neuroinflammation may play an important role in almost all neurological disorders and that the brain barriers may be contributing through either normal immune signaling or disruption of their basic physiological mechanisms. The distinction between normal function and dysfunction at the barriers is difficult to dissect, partly due to a lack of understanding of normal barrier function and partly because of physiological changes that occur as part of normal development and ageing. Brain barriers consist of a number of interacting structural and physiological elements including tight junctions between adjacent barrier cells and an array of influx and efflux transporters. Despite these protective mechanisms, the capacity for immune-surveillance of the brain is maintained, and there is evidence of inflammatory signaling at the brain barriers that may be an important part of the body's response to damage or infection. This signaling system appears to change both with normal ageing, and during disease. Changes may affect diapedesis of immune cells and active molecular transfer, or cause rearrangement of the tight junctions and an increase in passive permeability across barrier interfaces. Here we review the many elements that contribute to brain barrier functions and how they respond to inflammation, particularly during development and aging. The implications of inflammation–induced barrier dysfunction for brain development and subsequent neurological function are also discussed. PMID:23986663

  14. Modeling stress and drug craving in the laboratory: implications for addiction treatment development

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rajita

    2009-01-01

    Addition is a chronic relapsing illness affected by multiple social, individual and biological factors that significantly impact course and recovery of the illness. Stress interacts with these factors and increases addiction vulnerability and relapse risk, thereby playing a significant role in the course of the illness. This paper reviews our efforts in developing and validating laboratory models of stress and drug cue-related provocation to assess stress responses and stress-related adaptation in addicted individuals compared with healthy controls. Empirical findings from human laboratory and brain imaging studies are presented to show the specific stress-related dysregulation that accompanies the drug-craving state in addicted individuals. In order to adequately validate our laboratory model, we have also carefully examined relapse susceptibility in the addicted individuals and these data are reviewed. The overarching goal of these efforts is to develop a valid laboratory model to identify the stress-related pathophysiology in addiction with specific regard to persistent craving and compulsive seeking. Finally, the significant implications of these findings for the development of novel treatment interventions that target stress processes and drug craving to improve addiction relapse outcomes are discussed. PMID:18945295

  15. Demoralization in health professional practice: development, amelioration, and implications for continuing education.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Demoralization is a feeling state of dejection, hopelessness, and a sense of personal "incompetence" that may be tied to a loss of or threat to one's own goals or values. It has an existential dimension when beliefs and values about oneself are disconfirmed. Numerous sources describe high rates of dissatisfaction and burnout in physicians and other health professionals. This article reviews historical and empirical findings that describe the professional and personal value orientations of physicians and other health professionals. It reviews empirical and theoretical findings to consider the implications of conflict between these values and negatively perceived ethical and values orientations of health care organizations and commercial health care entities. Conflicts between personal and professional values of health professionals and larger health care related organizations and commercial entities with which they are associated may contribute to the development of demoralization and burnout. Physicians and other health professionals frequently experience values related conflicts with larger social, organizational or bureaucratic systems. These conflicts place health professionals at risk for demoralization and burnout. "Remoralization," or renewal of morale, depends on the reestablishment of the potential for fulfillment of one's values in the work environment. This depends on organizational, group, and personal efforts. Continuing education and continuing professional development programs should have a programmatic focus on the importance of a values orientation in health care and support program development aimed at recognizing, addressing, and reducing demoralization and its potential for negative health care consequences for health professionals and patients. PMID:23775912

  16. Posting Behaviour Patterns in an Online Smoking Cessation Social Network: Implications for Intervention Design and Development

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Benjamin; Hoek, Janet; Edwards, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Online Cessation Support Networks (OCSNs) are associated with increased quit success rates, but few studies have examined their use over time. We identified usage patterns in New Zealand's largest OCSN over two years and explored implications for OCSN intervention design and evaluation. Methods We analysed metadata relating to 133,096 OCSN interactions during 2011 and 2012. Metrics covered aggregate network activity, user posting activity and longevity, and between-user commenting. Binary logistic regression models were estimated to investigate the feasibility of predicting low user engagement using early interaction data. Results Repeating periodic peaks and troughs in aggregate activity related not only to seasonality (e.g., New Year), but also to day of the week. Out of 2,062 unique users, 69 Highly Engaged Users (180+ interactions each) contributed 69% of all OCSN interactions in 2012 compared to 1.3% contributed by 864 Minimally Engaged Users (< = 2 items each). The proportion of Highly Engaged Users increased with network growth between 2011 and 2012 (with marginal significance), but the proportion of Minimally Engaged Users did not decline substantively. First week interaction data enabled identification of Minimally Engaged Users with high specificity and sensitivity (AUROC  = 0.94). Implications Results suggest future research should develop and test interventions that promote activity, and hence cessation support, amongst specific user groups or at key time points. For example, early usage information could help identify Minimally Engaged Users for tests of targeted messaging designed to improve their integration into, or re-engagement with, the OCSN. Furthermore, although we observed strong growth over time on varied metrics including posts and comments, this change did not coincide with large gains in first-time user persistence. Researchers assessing intervention effects should therefore examine multiple measures when evaluating

  17. Fate and Metabolism of PBDEs in Mammalian Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) belong to an emerging class of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Although the toxicology of PBDEs is not well developed, they are persistent and bioaccumulative, and therefore, of growing environmental concern. The metabolism of PBDEs in mammalian systems h...

  18. Loss of Panx1 Impairs Mammary Gland Development at Lactation: Implications for Breast Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael K. G.; Plante, Isabelle; Penuela, Silvia; Laird, Dale W.

    2016-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) subunits oligomerize to form large-pore channels between the intracellular and extracellular milieu that have been shown to regulate proliferation, differentiation and cell death mechanisms. These key cellular responses are ultimately necessary for normal tissue development and function but the role of Panx1 in development, differentiation and function in many tissues remains unexplored, including that of the breast. Panx1 was identified to be expressed in the mammary gland through western blot and immunofluorescent analysis and is dynamically upregulated during pregnancy and lactation. In order to evaluate the role of Panx1 in the context of mammary gland development and function, Panx1-/- mice were evaluated in comparison to wild-type mice in the mammary glands of virgin, lactating and involuting mice. Our results revealed that Panx1 ablation did not affect virgin or involuting mammary glands following histological and whole mount analysis. Panx1 was necessary for timely alveolar development during early lactation based on a decreased number of alveolar lumen following histological analysis and reduced proliferation following Ki67 immunofluorescent labelling. Importantly, the loss of Panx1 in lactating mammary glands did not overtly affect epithelial or secretory differentiation of the mammary gland suggesting that Panx1 is not critical in normal mammary gland function. In addition, PANX1 mRNA expression was correlated with negative clinical outcomes in patients with breast cancer using in silico arrays. Together, our results suggest that Panx1 is necessary for timely alveolar development following the transition from pregnancy to lactation, which may have implications extending to patients with breast cancer. PMID:27099931

  19. Mast cells in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Dropp, J J

    1976-01-01

    Mast cells, which had until recently been believed to be not present in the mammalian brain, were studied in the brains of 29 mammalian species. Although there was considerable intraspecific and interspecific variation, mast cells were most numerous within the leptomeninges (especially in those overlying the cerebrum and the dorsal thalamus - most rodents, most carnivores, chimpanzees, squirrel monkeys and elephant), the cerebral cortex (most rodents, tiger, fox, chimpanzee, tarsier, and elephant) and in many nuclei of the dorsal thalamus (most rodents, tiger, lion, and fox). In some mammals, mast cells were also numerous in the stroma of the telencephalic choroid plexuses (chimpanzee, squirrel monkey), the putamen and the claustrum (chimpanzee), the subfornical organ (pack rat, tiger, chimpanzee), the olfactory peduncles (hooded rat, albino rat), the stroma of the diencephalic choroid plexus (lion, chimpanzee, squirrel monkey), the pineal organ (chimpanzee, squirrel monkey), some nuclei of the hypothalamus (tiger), the infundibulum (hooded rat, tiger, fox) the area postrema (pack rat, chinchilla, lion, spider monkey, chimpanzee, fox) and some nuclei and tracts of the metencephalon and the myelencephalon (tiger). Neither the sex of the animal nor electrolytic lesions made in the brains of some of the animals at various times prior to sacrifice appeared to effect the number and the distribution of mast cells. Age-related changes in mast cell number and distribution were detected in the albino rat. PMID:961335

  20. Movement Pattern Variability in Stone Knapping: Implications for the Development of Percussive Traditions

    PubMed Central

    Rein, Robert; Nonaka, Tetsushi; Bril, Blandine

    2014-01-01

    The earliest direct evidence for tool-use by our ancestors are 2.6 million year old stone tools from Africa. These earliest artifacts show that, already, early hominins had developed the required advanced movement skills and cognitive capacities to manufacture stone tools. Currently, it is not well understood, however, which specific movement skills are required for successful stone knapping and accordingly it is unknown how these skills emerged during early hominin evolution. In particular, it is not clear which striking movements are indicative of skilled performance, how striking movement patterns vary with task and environmental constraints, and how movement patterns are passed on within social groups. The present study addresses these questions by investigating striking movement patterns and striking variability in 18 modern stone knappers (nine experienced and nine novices). The results suggest that no single movement pattern characterizes successful stone knapping. Participants showed large inter-individual movement variability of the elementary knapping action irrespective of knapping experience and knapping performance. Changes in task- and environmental constraints led knappers to adapt their elementary striking actions using a combination of individual and common strategies. Investigation of striking pattern similarities within social groups showed only partial overlap of striking patterns across related individuals. The results therefore suggest that striking movement patterns in modern stone knappers are largely specific to the individual and movement variability is not indicative of knapping performance. The implications of these results for the development of percussive traditions are discussed. PMID:25426630

  1. A novel centrosome and microtubules associated subcellular localization of Nogo-A: implications for neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yajing; Gao, Xingchun; Ma, Yue; Gao, Jie; Wang, Zhen; Jin, Weilin

    2014-12-01

    Oligodendrocyte-derived neurite-outgrowth inhibitor Nogo-A and its restriction mechanism are well-known. Recently, Nogo-A is reported to be abundantly expressed in neurons, however, the concrete link between neuronal Nogo-A and neuronal development is poorly understood. In the present study, we used Neuro2A and COS7 cell lines to clarify that Nogo-A largely distributed in the centrosome and microtubules-rich regions. When endogenous Nogo-A was down-regulated with RNA interference, the percentage of cell differentiation and the total neurite length of Neuro2A exposed to valproic acid (VPA) decreased sharply. Furthermore, in primary neurons, acetylated α-tubulin decreased at the tips of neurites where endogenous Nogo-A was still highly expressed. In HEK293FT cell lines, Nogo-A overexpression could redistribute acetylated α-tubulin but not change the level of α-tubulin. Together, our data discovered that centrosome- and microtubules-localized Nogo-A positively regulates neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth of Neuro2A cell lines, implicating the essential roles of subcellular Nogo-A in neuronal development. PMID:25286302

  2. Perspectives on the rhythm–grammar link and its implications for typical and atypical language development

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Reyna L.; Jacobs, Magdalene S.; Schuele, C. Melanie; McAuley, J. Devin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the mounting evidence for shared cognitive mechanisms and neural resources for rhythm and grammar. Evidence for a role of rhythm skills in language development and language comprehension is reviewed here in three lines of research: (a) behavioral and brain data from adults and children, showing that prosody and other aspects of timing of sentences influence online morpho-syntactic processing; (b) co-morbidity of impaired rhythm with grammatical deficits in children with language impairment; and (c) our recent work showing a strong positive association between rhythm perception skills and expressive grammatical skills in young school-age children with typical development. Our preliminary follow-up study presented here revealed that musical rhythm perception predicted variance in six-year-old children’s production of complex syntax, as well as online reorganization of grammatical information (transformation); these data provide an additional perspective on the hierarchical relations potentially shared by rhythm and grammar. A theoretical framework for shared cognitive resources for the role of rhythm in perceiving and learning grammatical structure is elaborated on in light of potential implications for using rhythm-emphasized musical training to improve language skills in children. PMID:25773612

  3. Innervation of lymphoid organs and implications in development, aging, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, D L; Lorton, D; Felten, S Y; Felten, D L

    1992-04-01

    We now have substantial evidence demonstrating noradrenergic sympathetic and peptidergic innervation of both primary and secondary lymphoid organs. We have established criteria for norepinephrine, and some of the neuropeptides, as neurotransmitters, and have found changes in immune responsiveness following pharmacological manipulation of noradrenergic sympathetic or peptidergic nerves. Classic receptor binding studies have demonstrated a wide variety of target cells that possess beta-adrenoceptors and receptors for neuropeptides on cells of the immune system, including lymphocyte subsets, macrophages, accessory cells, or stromal elements. In this chapter we describe noradrenergic and peptidergic innervation of primary and secondary lymphoid organs in development, at maturation and during the normal aging process, and discuss possible functional implications of direct neural signals onto cells of the immune system at critical time points in the lifespan of an animal. Further, we examine for involvement of noradrenergic sympathetic and peptidergic innervation in the development and progression of several autoimmune disorders, including adjuvant-induced arthritis, New Zealand mice strains as a model for hemolytic anemia and lupus-like syndrome, and the experimental allergic encephalomyelitis model for multiple sclerosis. PMID:1319962

  4. Meis1 coordinates a network of genes implicated in eye development and microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Séverine; González-Lázaro, Monica; Beccari, Leonardo; Carramolino, Laura; Martin-Bermejo, Maria Jesus; Amarie, Oana; Mateos-San Martín, Daniel; Torroja, Carlos; Bogdanović, Ozren; Doohan, Roisin; Puk, Oliver; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Graw, Jochen; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Casares, Fernando; Torres, Miguel; Bovolenta, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Microphthalmos is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by reduced eye size and visual deficits of variable degree. Sporadic and hereditary microphthalmos have been associated with heterozygous mutations in genes fundamental for eye development. Yet, many cases are idiopathic or await the identification of molecular causes. Here we show that haploinsufficiency of Meis1, which encodes a transcription factor with evolutionarily conserved expression in the embryonic trunk, brain and sensory organs, including the eye, causes microphthalmic traits and visual impairment in adult mice. By combining analysis of Meis1 loss-of-function and conditional Meis1 functional rescue with ChIP-seq and RNA-seq approaches we show that, in contrast to its preferential association with Hox-Pbx BSs in the trunk, Meis1 binds to Hox/Pbx-independent sites during optic cup development. In the eye primordium, Meis1 coordinates, in a dose-dependent manner, retinal proliferation and differentiation by regulating genes responsible for human microphthalmia and components of the Notch signaling pathway. In addition, Meis1 is required for eye patterning by controlling a set of eye territory-specific transcription factors, so that in Meis1(-/-) embryos boundaries among the different eye territories are shifted or blurred. We propose that Meis1 is at the core of a genetic network implicated in eye patterning/microphthalmia, and represents an additional candidate for syndromic cases of these ocular malformations. PMID:26253404

  5. Nature of Technology: Implications for design, development, and enactment of technological tools in school science classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waight, Noemi; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2012-12-01

    This position paper provides a theory-based explanation informed by philosophy of technology (PoT) of the recurrent documented patterns often associated with attempts to enact technology-supported, inquiry-based approaches in precollege science classrooms. Understandings derived from the history of technological development in other domains (e.g. medicine, transportation, and warfare) reveal numerous parallels that help to explain these recurrent patterns. Historical analyses of major technologies reveal a conglomerate of factors that interact to produce benefits, as well as intended and unintended consequences. On a macro-scale, PoT facilitates understandings of how technologies interact and are impacted by individuals, society, institutions, economy, politics, and culture. At the micro-level, and most relevant to science education, PoT engages the inherent nature of technology along a number of key dimensions: role of culture and values, notions of technological progression, technology as part of systems, technological diffusion, technology as a fix, and the notions of expertise. Overall, the present analysis has implications for the design, development, implementation, and adoption of technological tools for use in precollege science education, and highlights the role of technology as both artifact and process.

  6. Emerging diseases and implications for Millennium Development Goals in Africa by 2015 - an overview.

    PubMed

    Aluwong, Tagang; Bello, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    Emerging zoonotic diseases have assumed increasing fundamental importance in both public and animal health, as the last few years have seen a steady increase of new cases, each emerging from an unsuspected geographic area and causing serious problems, often leading to mortalities among animals and humans. The reasons for disease emergence or re-emergence are multiple and include certain major factors, such as expansion of the human population, climate change and globalisation of trade. Further contributing issues, such as the increased movement of animal species, microbial evolution, ecological disruption, changes in human behaviour, all imply that emerging diseases will not only continue to occur, but the rate of their emergence will also increase. These will constitute constraints for the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals by African Governments by 2015. There is no doubt that the current trend calls for more and stronger partnerships between national and international organisations, veterinary and medical communities, environmentalists, academics and policy-makers of various governments on the continent within the context of the global 'One Health' movement. This article attempts to analyse the impact of emerging diseases and the implications for the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals in Africa by the year 2015. PMID:20560123

  7. Neurobiology of Empathy and Callousness: Implications for the Development of Antisocial Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Vitacco, Michael J.; Graf, Alexander R.; Gostisha, Andrew J.; Merz, Jenna L.; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Information on the neurobiology of empathy and callousness provides clinicians an opportunity to develop sophisticated understanding of mechanisms underpinning antisocial behavior and its counterpart, moral decision making. This paper provides an integrated in-depth review of hormones (e.g., peripheral steroid hormones like cortisol) and brain structures (e.g., insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and amygdala) implicated in empathy, callousness and psychopathic-like behavior. The overarching goal of this paper is to relate these hormones and brain structures to moral decision-making. This review will begin in the brain, but will then integrate information about biological functioning in the body, specifically stress-reactivity. Our aim is to integrate understanding of neural processes with hormones like cortisol, both of which have demonstrated relationships to empathy, psychopathy, and antisocial behavior. The review proposes neurobiological impairments in individuals who display little empathy are not necessarily due to a reduced ability to understand the emotions of others. Instead, evidence suggests individuals who show little arousal to the distress of others likewise show decreased physiological arousal to their own distress; one manifestation of reduced stress reactivity may be a dysfunction in empathy which supports psychopathic-like constructs (e.g., callousness). This integration will assist in the development of objective methodologies that can inform and monitor treatment interventions focused on decreasing antisocial behavior. PMID:19319834

  8. Perspectives on the rhythm-grammar link and its implications for typical and atypical language development.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Reyna L; Jacobs, Magdalene S; Schuele, C Melanie; McAuley, J Devin

    2015-03-01

    This paper reviews the mounting evidence for shared cognitive mechanisms and neural resources for rhythm and grammar. Evidence for a role of rhythm skills in language development and language comprehension is reviewed here in three lines of research: (1) behavioral and brain data from adults and children, showing that prosody and other aspects of timing of sentences influence online morpho-syntactic processing; (2) comorbidity of impaired rhythm with grammatical deficits in children with language impairment; and (3) our recent work showing a strong positive association between rhythm perception skills and expressive grammatical skills in young school-age children with typical development. Our preliminary follow-up study presented here revealed that musical rhythm perception predicted variance in 6-year-old children's production of complex syntax, as well as online reorganization of grammatical information (transformation); these data provide an additional perspective on the hierarchical relations potentially shared by rhythm and grammar. A theoretical framework for shared cognitive resources for the role of rhythm in perceiving and learning grammatical structure is elaborated on in light of potential implications for using rhythm-emphasized musical training to improve language skills in children. PMID:25773612

  9. THE DEVELOPMENT OF DESIGNS FOR CURRICULUM RESEARCH, IMPLICATION OF THE CONFERENCE ON FUNDAMENTAL PROCESSES IN EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRUNER, JEROME S.

    A REPORT ON IMPLICATIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH ACTIVITY TO BE SPONSORED BY THE U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION WAS PREPARED AS AN ADDENDUM TO THE CHAIRMAN'S REPORT OF THE WOODS HOLE CONFERENCE ON FUNDAMENTAL PROCESSES IN EDUCATION, HELD UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES DURING SEPTEMBER 1959. IMPLICATIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH WERE…

  10. Marijuana, Spice ‘herbal high’, and early neural development: implications for rescheduling and legalization

    PubMed Central

    Psychoyos, Delphine; Vinod, K. Yaragudri

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug by pregnant women in the world. In utero exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), a major psychoactive component of marijuana, is associated with an increased risk for anencephaly and neurobehavioural deficiencies in the offspring, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities, and memory impairment. Recent studies demonstrate that the developing central nervous system (CNS) is susceptible to the effects of Δ9-THC and other cannabimimetics, including the psychoactive ingredients of the branded product ‘Spice’ branded products. These exocannabinoids interfere with the function of an endocannabinoid (eCB) system, present in the developing CNS from E12.5 (week 5 of gestation in humans), and required for proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neurons. Until recently, it was not known whether the eCB system is also present in the developing CNS during the initial stages of its ontogeny, i.e. from E7.0 onwards (week 2 of gestation in humans), and if so, whether this system is also susceptible to the action of exocannabinoids. Here, we review current data, in which the presence of an eCB system during the initial stage of development of the CNS is demonstrated. Furthermore, we focus on recent advances on the effect of canabimimetics on early gestation. The relevance of these findings and potential adverse developmental consequences of in utero exposure to ‘high potency’ marijuana, Spice branded products and/or cannabinoid research chemicals during this period is discussed. Finally, we address the implication of these findings in terms of the potential dangers of synthetic cannabinoid use during pregnancy, and the ongoing debate over legalization of marijuana. PMID:22887867

  11. NPPB and ACAN, Two Novel SHOX2 Transcription Targets Implicated in Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    Hisado-Oliva, Alfonso; Belinchón, Alberta; Gorbenko-del Blanco, Darya; Rodriguez, Jose Ignacio; Benito-Sanz, Sara; Campos-Barros, Angel; Heath, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    SHOX and SHOX2 transcription factors are highly homologous, with even identical homeodomains. Genetic alterations in SHOX result in two skeletal dysplasias; Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD) and Langer mesomelic dysplasia (LMD), while no human genetic disease has been linked to date with SHOX2. SHOX2 is, though, involved in skeletal development, as shown by different knockout mice models. Due to the high homology between SHOX and SHOX2, and their functional redundancy during heart development, we postulated that SHOX2 might have the same transcriptional targets and cofactors as SHOX in limb development. We selected two SHOX transcription targets regulated by different mechanisms: 1) the natriuretic peptide precursor B gene (NPPB) involved in the endochondral ossification signalling and directly activated by SHOX; and 2) Aggrecan (ACAN), a major component of cartilage extracellular matrix, regulated by the cooperation of SHOX with the SOX trio (SOX5, SOX6 and SOX9) via the protein interaction between SOX5/SOX6 and SHOX. Using the luciferase assay we have demonstrated that SHOX2, like SHOX, regulates NPPB directly whilst activates ACAN via its cooperation with the SOX trio. Subsequently, we have identified and characterized the protein domains implicated in the SHOX2 dimerization and also its protein interaction with SOX5/SOX6 and SHOX using the yeast-two hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Immunohistochemistry of human fetal growth plates from different time points demonstrated that SHOX2 is coexpressed with SHOX and the members of the SOX trio. Despite these findings, no mutation was identified in SHOX2 in a cohort of 83 LWD patients with no known molecular defect, suggesting that SHOX2 alterations do not cause LWD. In conclusion, our work has identified the first cofactors and two new transcription targets of SHOX2 in limb development, and we hypothesize a time- and tissue-specific functional redundancy between SHOX and SHOX2. PMID:24421874

  12. Hypothesis on the dual origin of the Mammalian subplate.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Juan F; Wang, Wei Zhi; Oeschger, Franziska M; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Tung, Wan Ling; García-Moreno, Fernando; Holm, Ida Elizabeth; Villalón, Aldo; Molnár, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    The development of the mammalian neocortex relies heavily on subplate. The proportion of this cell population varies considerably in different mammalian species. Subplate is almost undetectable in marsupials, forms a thin, but distinct layer in mouse and rat, a larger layer in carnivores and big-brained mammals as pig, and a highly developed embryonic structure in human and non-human primates. The evolutionary origin of subplate neurons is the subject of current debate. Some hypothesize that subplate represents the ancestral cortex of sauropsids, while others consider it to be an increasingly complex phylogenetic novelty of the mammalian neocortex. Here we review recent work on expression of several genes that were originally identified in rodent as highly and differentially expressed in subplate. We relate these observations to cellular morphology, birthdating, and hodology in the dorsal cortex/dorsal pallium of several amniote species. Based on this reviewed evidence we argue for a third hypothesis according to which subplate contains both ancestral and newly derived cell populations. We propose that the mammalian subplate originally derived from a phylogenetically ancient structure in the dorsal pallium of stem amniotes, but subsequently expanded with additional cell populations in the synapsid lineage to support an increasingly complex cortical plate development. Further understanding of the detailed molecular taxonomy, somatodendritic morphology, and connectivity of subplate in a comparative context should contribute to the identification of the ancestral and newly evolved populations of subplate neurons. PMID:21519390

  13. Clinical drugs that interact with St. John's wort and implication in drug development.

    PubMed

    Di, Yuan Ming; Li, Chun Guang; Xue, Charlie Changli; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2008-01-01

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, SJW) is one of the most commonly used herbal antidepressants for the treatment of minor to moderate depression. A major safety concern about SJW is its ability to alter the pharmacokinetics and/or clinical response of a variety of clinically important drugs that have distinctive chemical structure, mechanism of action and metabolic pathways. This review highlights and updates the knowledge on clinical interactions of prescribed drugs with SJW and the implication in drug development. A number of clinically significant interactions of SJW have been identified with conventional drugs, including anticancer agents (imatinib and irinotecan), anti-HIV agents (e.g. indinavir, lamivudine and nevirapine), anti-inflammatory agents (e.g. ibuprofen and fexofenadine), antimicrobial agents (e.g. erythromycin and voriconazole), cardiovascular drugs (e.g. digoxin, ivabradine, warfarin, verapamil, nifedipine and talinolol), central nervous system agents (e.g. amitriptyline, buspirone, phenytoin, methadone, midazolam, alprazolam, and sertraline), hypoglycaemic agents (e.g. tolbutamide and gliclazide), immuno-modulating agents (e.g. cyclosporine and tacrolimus), oral contraceptives, proton pump inhibitor (e.g. omeprazole), respiratory system agent (e.g. theophylline), statins (e.g. atorvastatin and pravastatin). Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic components may play a role in the interactions of drugs with SJW. For pharmacokinetic changes of drugs by SJW, induction of cytochrome P450s (e.g. CYP2C9 and 3A4) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are considered the major mechanism. Thus, it is not a surprise that many drugs that interact with SJW are substrates of CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and P-gp. A comprehensive understanding of clinical drugs that interact with SJW has important implications in drug development. New drugs may be designed to minimize interactions with SJW; and new SJW formulations may be designed to avoid drug interactions. Further clinical and

  14. Experimental Particle Physics in the LHC Era and Possible Implications for Development in Africa (467th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Assamagan, Ketevi

    2011-03-16

    Assamagan presented a talk titled “Experimental Particle Physics in the LHC Era and Possible Implications for Development in Africa,” in which he discussed the latest happenings at the LHC and ATLAS, and how African institutes’ participation in research at the LHC relates to the goals of the African School of Physics.

  15. A Narrative of an Action Research Study in Preschool: Choice Points and Their Implications for Professional and Organisational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Against the background of Swedish preschool's historical and traditional functions in Swedish society, this article focuses on some of the choice points and their implications for professional and organisational development in preschool. By combining feminist pragmatism and feminist action research, some analytical points are made regarding the…

  16. A Study of Social and Political Acumen in Dynamic Educational Leadership and the Implications for Leadership Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinn, Andra

    2008-01-01

    Two questions are posed in this study: What is the role of social and political acumen in dynamic educational leadership, and what are the implications for leadership development programs? The philosophical, psychological, and the sociological characteristics of leadership were investigated to understand the role of social and political acumen in…

  17. Trends in International Trade in Higher Education: Implications and Options for Developing Countries. Education Working Paper Series, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashir, Sajitha

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes the trends, underlying factors and implications of the trade in higher education services. The term "trade in higher education" refers to the purchase of higher education services from a foreign country using domestic resources. The objectives of this paper are to provide policy makers in developing countries, World Bank staff,…

  18. The Outcomes of Chinese Visiting Scholars' Experiences at Canadian Universities: Implications for Faculty Development at Chinese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Qin; Jiang, Yumei

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the outcomes of the overseas experiences of Chinese visiting scholars and the implications of visiting scholar programs for faculty development at Chinese universities. On the basis of semi-structured interviews with 17 returned Chinese visiting scholars who spent six to 12 months in a faculty of education at one of five…

  19. Education for Sustainable Development in Ethnic Autonomous Areas of China: A Comparison of Two Curriculum Initiatives and Their Educational Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoo, Yishin

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the educational implications of two curriculum initiatives in China that have produced curricular materials promoting education for sustainable development (ESD) in minority-populated ethnic autonomous areas in China. The two curriculum projects present distinctive discourses, conceptions, models, frameworks and scopes of ESD…

  20. Implications of Our Developing Understanding of Risk and Protective Factors in the Treatment of Adult Male Sexual Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes our developing knowledge of factors that contribute added risk of sexual recidivism (risk factors) and factors that are associated with a reduced risk of sexual recidivism (protective factors). Specific implications for the design of future treatment programs are drawn. This information is contrasted with the common foci of…

  1. A phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase gene family in Dictyostelium discoideum: biological roles of putative mammalian p110 and yeast Vps34p PI 3-kinase homologs during growth and development.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, K; Takegawa, K; Emr, S D; Firtel, R A

    1995-01-01

    Three groups of phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinases convert PI into PI(3)phosphate, PI(4)phosphate, PI(4,5) bisphosphate, and PI(3,4,5)trisphosphate. These phosphoinositides have been shown to function in vesicle-mediated protein sorting, and they serve as second-messenger signaling molecules for regulating cell growth. To further elucidate the mechanism of regulation and function of phosphoinositides, we cloned genes encoding five putative PI kinases from Dictyostelium discoideum. Database analysis indicates that D. discoideum PIK1 (DdPIK1), -2, and -3 are most closely related to the mammalian p110 PI 3-kinase, DdPIK5 is closest to the yeast Vps34p PI 3-kinase, and DdPIK4 is most homologous to PI 4-kinases. Together with other known PI kinases, a superfamily of PI kinase genes has been defined, with all of the encoded proteins sharing a common highly conserved catalytic core domain. DdPIK1, -2, and -3 may have redundant functions because disruption of any single gene had no effect on D. discoideum growth or development. However, strains in which both of the two most highly related genes, DdPIK1 and DdPIK2, were disrupted showed both growth and developmental defects, while double knockouts of DdPIK1 and DdPIK3 and DdPIK2 and DdPIK3 appear to be lethal. The delta Ddpik1 delta Ddpik2 null cells were smaller than wild-type cells and grew slowly both in association with bacteria and in axenic medium when attached to petri plates but were unable to grow in suspension in axenic medium. When delta Ddpik1 delta Ddpik2 null cells were plated for multicellular development, they formed aggregates having multiple tips and produced abnormal fruiting bodies. Antisense expression of DdPIK5 (a putative homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae VPS34) led to a defect in the growth of D. discoideum cells on bacterial lawns and abnormal development. DdPIK5 complemented the temperature-sensitive growth defect of a Schizosaccharomyces pombe delta Svps34 mutant strain, suggesting DdPIK5

  2. The impact of Quaternary Ice Ages on mammalian evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Lister, Adrian M

    2004-01-01

    The Quaternary was a time of extensive evolution among mammals. Most living species arose at this time, and many of them show adaptations to peculiarly Quaternary environments. The latter include continental northern steppe and tundra, and the formation of lakes and offshore islands. Although some species evolved fixed adaptations to specialist habitats, others developed flexible adaptations enabling them to inhabit broad niches and to survive major environmental changes. Adaptation to short-term (migratory and seasonal) habitat change probably played a part in pre-adapting mammal species to the longer-term cyclical changes of the Quaternary. Fossil evidence indicates that environmental changes of the order of thousands of years have been sufficient to produce subspeciation, but speciation has typically required one hundred thousand to a few hundred thousand years, although there are both shorter and longer exceptions. The persistence of taxa in environments imposing strong selective regimes may have been important in forcing major adaptive change. Individual Milankovitch cycles are not necessarily implicated in this process, but nor did they generally inhibit evolutionary change among mammals: many evolutionary divergences built over multiple climatic cycles. Deduction of speciation timing requires input from fossils and modern phenotypic and breeding data, to complement and constrain mitochondrial DNA coalescence dates which appear commonly to overestimate taxic divergence dates and durations of speciation. Migrational and evolutionary responses to climate change are not mutually exclusive but, on the contrary, may be synergistic. Finally, preliminary analysis suggests that faunal turnover, including an important element of speciation, was elevated in the Quaternary compared with the Neogene, at least in some biomes. Macroevolutionary species selection or sorting has apparently resulted in a modern mammalian fauna enriched with fast-reproducing and/or adaptively

  3. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann-Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann-Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  4. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann–Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann–Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  5. Trapping mammalian protein complexes in viral particles

    PubMed Central

    Eyckerman, Sven; Titeca, Kevin; Van Quickelberghe, Emmy; Cloots, Eva; Verhee, Annick; Samyn, Noortje; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Timmerman, Evy; De Sutter, Delphine; Lievens, Sam; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Gevaert, Kris; Tavernier, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cell lysis is an inevitable step in classical mass spectrometry–based strategies to analyse protein complexes. Complementary lysis conditions, in situ cross-linking strategies and proximal labelling techniques are currently used to reduce lysis effects on the protein complex. We have developed Virotrap, a viral particle sorting approach that obviates the need for cell homogenization and preserves the protein complexes during purification. By fusing a bait protein to the HIV-1 GAG protein, we show that interaction partners become trapped within virus-like particles (VLPs) that bud from mammalian cells. Using an efficient VLP enrichment protocol, Virotrap allows the detection of known binary interactions and MS-based identification of novel protein partners as well. In addition, we show the identification of stimulus-dependent interactions and demonstrate trapping of protein partners for small molecules. Virotrap constitutes an elegant complementary approach to the arsenal of methods to study protein complexes. PMID:27122307

  6. Report of the NASA Mammalian Developmental Biology Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Development is considered to encompass all aspects of the mammalian life span from initial initial germ cell production through the complete life cycle to death of the organism. Thus, gamete production, fertilization, embryogenesis, implantation, fetogenesis, birth, peri- and postnatal maturation, and aging were all considered as stages of a development continuum relevant to problems of Space Biology. Deliberations thus far have been limited to stages of the development cycle from fertilization to early postnatal life. The deliberations are detailed.

  7. Evolutionary development of embryonic cerebrospinal fluid composition and regulation: an open research field with implications for brain development and function.

    PubMed

    Bueno, David; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Within the consolidated field of evolutionary development, there is emerging research on evolutionary aspects of central nervous system development and its implications for adult brain structure and function, including behaviour. The central nervous system is one of the most intriguing systems in complex metazoans, as it controls all body and mind functions. Its failure is responsible for a number of severe and largely incurable diseases, including neurological and neurodegenerative ones. Moreover, the evolution of the nervous system is thought to be a critical step in the adaptive radiation of vertebrates. Brain formation is initiated early during development. Most embryological, genetic and evolutionary studies have focused on brain neurogenesis and regionalisation, including the formation and function of organising centres, and the comparison of homolog gene expression and function among model organisms from different taxa. The architecture of the vertebrate brain primordium also reveals the existence of connected internal cavities, the cephalic vesicles, which in fetuses and adults become the ventricular system of the brain. During embryonic and fetal development, brain cavities and ventricles are filled with a complex, protein-rich fluid called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, CSF has not been widely analysed from either an embryological or evolutionary perspective. Recently, it has been demonstrated in higher vertebrates that embryonic cerebrospinal fluid has key functions in delivering diffusible signals and nutrients to the developing brain, thus contributing to the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells, and to the expansion and patterning of the brain. Moreover, it has been shown that the composition and homeostasis of CSF are tightly controlled in a time-dependent manner from the closure of the anterior neuropore, just before the initiation of primary neurogenesis, up to the formation of functional choroid plexuses. In

  8. Propositions of Schroedinger and Dyson: Implications for program development in secondary school biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser-Antonowich, Roxanne

    The purpose of this study is to ascertain whether there is a linkage between the special case of New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Science as they represent biology, and the propositions of Schrodinger and Dyson. The aim of the study is to derive implications for program development in secondary school biology. Critical review reveals that the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Science do not provide linkage to biology and the propositions of Erwin Schrodinger and Freeman Dyson. If life is characterized by replication and metabolism, then Schrodinger and Dyson present a plausible argument toward describing life as reciprocal forms and functions that characterize a living system. Examination revealed that Schrodinger, in stating that life can be characterized by the processes of replication and metabolism, emphasized replication and virtually ignored metabolism. Dyson also acknowledges the relationship of metabolism to replication. Examination of Dyson revealed that rather than describing metabolism as a characterization of life, he advances the origin of metabolism and its connection to the origin of life. If metabolism and replication characterize life and if the origin of life is within the domain of biology, then Schrodinger's and Dyson's propositions are central to the characterization of biology. If program development for secondary school biology requires accurate description of its domain, then it is necessary to acknowledge the complexity of life forms. There is as yet no universally accepted general description of life and no reasonable consensus for something to be termed living. If the conditions for something to be termed living are the capacity to reproduce self as maintained by Schrodinger, and the capacity for self-organization preserved through natural selection as proposed by Dyson, then these conditions form the basis for program development.

  9. Geyser Decline and Extinction in New Zealand—Energy Development Impacts and Implications for Environmental Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrick, Kenneth A.

    2007-06-01

    Geysers are rare natural phenomena that represent increasingly important recreation, economic, and scientific resources. The features of geyser basins, including hot springs, mud pots, and fumaroles, are easily damaged by human development. In New Zealand, the extinction of more than 100 geysers provides important lessons for the environmental management of the world’s remaining geyser basins. The impacts on New Zealand’s geysers are described in sequential “phases,” including the following: the first use of geothermal resources by the indigenous people—the Maori; early European-style tourism and spa development; streamside geyser decline caused by river level modification at the Spa geyser basin; multiple geyser basin extinctions caused by industrial-scale geothermal well withdrawal at Wairakei; the drowning of geysers at Orakeikorako after the filling of a hydroelectric reservoir; and geyser decline caused by geothermal well heating systems in Rotorua City. The crisis in Rotorua prompted preservation of the few remaining geysers at Whakarewarewa—the last major geyser basin in New Zealand. The New Zealand government ordered the geothermal wells within 1.5 km of Pohutu Geyser, Whakarewarewa, to be closed, which was a locally controversial measure. The well closure program resulted in a partial recovery of the Rotorua geothermal reservoir, but no extinct geysers recovered. The implications of recent geothermal computer modeling and future planning are discussed. The New Zealand case suggests that the protection of geysers requires strong regulations that prevent incompatible development at the outset, a prescription that is especially relevant for the future management of the geothermal fields adjacent to the geyser basins of Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A.

  10. Pedagogical implications of approaches to study in distance learning: developing models through qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Carnwell, R

    2000-05-01

    The need for flexibility in the delivery of nurse education has been identified by various initiatives including: widening the entry gate; continuous professional development; and the specialist practitioner. Access to degree level programmes is creating the need to acquire academic credit through flexible learning. The aim of this study was to further develop relationships between the need for guidance, materials design and learning styles and strategies and how these impact upon the construction of meaning. The study is based on interviews of 20 female community nurses purposively selected from the 96 respondents who had previously completed a survey questionnaire. The interviews were underpinned by theories relating to learning styles and approaches to study. Of particular concern was how these variables are mediated by student context, personal factors and materials design, to influence the need for support and guidance. The interview transcripts were first analysed using open and axial coding. Three approaches to study emerged from the data - systematic waders, speedy-focusers and global dippers - which were linked to other concepts and categories. Categories were then assigned numerical codes and subjected to logistical regression analysis. The attributes of the three approaches to study, arising from both qualitative and quantitative analysis, are explained in detail. The pedagogical implications of the three approaches to study are explained by their predicted relationships to other variables, such as support and guidance, organization of study, materials design and role of the tutor. The global dipper approach is discussed in more detail due to its association with a variety of predictor variables, not associated with the other two approaches to study. A feedback model is then developed to explore the impact of guidance on the global dipper approach. The paper makes recommendations for guidance to students using different approaches to study in distance

  11. Geyser decline and extinction in New Zealand: energy development impacts and implications for environmental management.

    PubMed

    Barrick, Kenneth A

    2007-06-01

    Geysers are rare natural phenomena that represent increasingly important recreation, economic, and scientific resources. The features of geyser basins, including hot springs, mud pots, and fumaroles, are easily damaged by human development. In New Zealand, the extinction of more than 100 geysers provides important lessons for the environmental management of the world's remaining geyser basins. The impacts on New Zealand's geysers are described in sequential "phases," including the following: the first use of geothermal resources by the indigenous people-the Maori; early European-style tourism and spa development; streamside geyser decline caused by river level modification at the Spa geyser basin; multiple geyser basin extinctions caused by industrial-scale geothermal well withdrawal at Wairakei; the drowning of geysers at Orakeikorako after the filling of a hydroelectric reservoir; and geyser decline caused by geothermal well heating systems in Rotorua City. The crisis in Rotorua prompted preservation of the few remaining geysers at Whakarewarewa -- the last major geyser basin in New Zealand. The New Zealand government ordered the geothermal wells within 1.5 km of Pohutu Geyser, Whakarewarewa, to be closed, which was a locally controversial measure. The well closure program resulted in a partial recovery of the Rotorua geothermal reservoir, but no extinct geysers recovered. The implications of recent geothermal computer modeling and future planning are discussed. The New Zealand case suggests that the protection of geysers requires strong regulations that prevent incompatible development at the outset, a prescription that is especially relevant for the future management of the geothermal fields adjacent to the geyser basins of Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A. PMID:17453282

  12. Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

    2011-08-26

    Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

  13. How difficult is inference of mammalian causal gene regulatory networks?

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Djordje; Yang, Andrian; Zadoorian, Armella; Rungrugeecharoen, Kevin; Ho, Joshua W K

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) play a central role in systems biology, especially in the study of mammalian organ development. One key question remains largely unanswered: Is it possible to infer mammalian causal GRNs using observable gene co-expression patterns alone? We assembled two mouse GRN datasets (embryonic tooth and heart) and matching microarray gene expression profiles to systematically investigate the difficulties of mammalian causal GRN inference. The GRNs were assembled based on > 2,000 pieces of experimental genetic perturbation evidence from manually reading > 150 primary research articles. Each piece of perturbation evidence records the qualitative change of the expression of one gene following knock-down or over-expression of another gene. Our data have thorough annotation of tissue types and embryonic stages, as well as the type of regulation (activation, inhibition and no effect), which uniquely allows us to estimate both sensitivity and specificity of the inference of tissue specific causal GRN edges. Using these unprecedented datasets, we found that gene co-expression does not reliably distinguish true positive from false positive interactions, making inference of GRN in mammalian development very difficult. Nonetheless, if we have expression profiling data from genetic or molecular perturbation experiments, such as gene knock-out or signalling stimulation, it is possible to use the set of differentially expressed genes to recover causal regulatory relationships with good sensitivity and specificity. Our result supports the importance of using perturbation experimental data in causal network reconstruction. Furthermore, we showed that causal gene regulatory relationship can be highly cell type or developmental stage specific, suggesting the importance of employing expression profiles from homogeneous cell populations. This study provides essential datasets and empirical evidence to guide the development of new GRN inference methods for

  14. Nonadditive effects of PAHs on Early Vertebrate Development: mechanisms and implications for risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Billiard, Sonya M.; Meyer, Joel N.; Wassenberg, Deena M.; Hodson, Peter V.; Di Giulio, Richard T.

    2008-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants. Traditionally, much of the research has focused on the carcinogenic potential of specific PAHs, such as benzo(a)pyrene, but recent studies using sensitive fish models have shown that exposure to PAHs alters normal fish development. Some PAHs can induce a teratogenic phenotype similar to that caused by planar halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, such as dioxin. Consequently, mechanism of action is often equated between the two classes of compounds. Unlike dioxins, however, the developmental toxicity of PAH mixtures is not necessarily additive. This is likely related to their multiple mechanisms of toxicity and their rapid biotransformation by CYP1 enzymes to metabolites with a wide array of structures and potential toxicities. This has important implications for risk assessment and management as the current approach for complex mixtures of PAHs usually assumes concentration addition. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of teratogenicity caused by single PAH compounds and by mixtures and the importance of these latest findings for adequately assessing risk of PAHs to humans and wildlife. Throughout, we place particular emphasis on research on the early life stages of fish, which has proven to be a sensitive and rapid developmental model to elucidate effects of hydrocarbon mixtures. PMID:18156145

  15. Long-Term Implications of Welfare Reform for the Development of Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Cherlin, Andrew J.; Guttmannova, Katarina; Fomby, Paula; Ribar, David C.; Coley, Rebekah Levine

    2011-01-01

    We draw upon the 3-wave longitudinal dataset called Welfare Children and Families: A Three-City Study to examine the long-term implications for adolescents and young adults (N=783) of mothers’ welfare receipt and labor force participation from 1999 to 2005. In general, changes in mothers’ work and welfare patterns were not associated with deterioration or improvement in youth development (ages 16 to 20 years at wave 3). The few significant associations suggested that youth whose mothers increased employment (net of welfare participation) were more likely to show declines in serious behavior problems and delinquency compared to youth whose mothers were unemployed or employed part-time during the study period. Welfare roll exits (controlling for employment experiences) were unrelated to adolescent and young adult outcomes. Mothers’ employment transitions were linked to improvements in household income and mothers’ self esteem in addition to reductions in financial strain and their own illegal activities. However, these associations did not explain the relation between maternal employment and youths’ improved behavior. These results do not support the predictions of either the supporters or the opponents of welfare reform, an outcome we discuss. PMID:21966077

  16. Developmental biology of the innate immune response: implications for neonatal and infant vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Philbin, Victoria Jane; Levy, Ofer

    2009-01-01

    Molecular characterization of mechanisms by which human pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect danger signals has greatly expanded our understanding of the innate immune system. PRRs include Toll-like receptors (TLRs), nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs), retinoic acid inducible gene-like receptors (RLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). Characterization of the developmental expression of these systems in the fetus, newborn and infant is incomplete but has yielded important insights into neonatal susceptibility to infection. Activation of PRRs on antigen-presenting cells enhances co-stimulatory function, and thus PRRs agonists are potential vaccine adjuvants, some of which are already in clinical use. Thus study of PRRs has also revealed how previously mysterious immunomodulators are able to mediate their actions, including the vaccine adjuvant aluminum hydroxide (Alum) whose adjuvant activity depends on its ability to activate a cytosolic protein complex known as the Nacht Domain Leucine-Rich Repeat and PYD-Containing Protein 3 (NALP3) inflammasome leading to IL-1ß production. Progress in characterizing PRRs is thus informing and expanding the design of improved adjuvants. This review summarizes recent developments in the field of innate immunity with special emphasis on developmental expression in the fetus, newborn and infant and its implications for the design of more effective neonatal and infant vaccines. PMID:19918215

  17. Agonistic behaviour in juvenile southern rock lobster, Jasusedwardsii (Decapoda, Palinuridae): implications for developing aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Carter, Chris G; Westbury, Heath; Crear, Bradley; Simon, Cedric; Thomas, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The Southern rock lobster, Jasusedwardsii, is a temperate species of spiny lobster with established well managed fisheries in Australia and New Zealand. It has also been under consideration as a species with aquaculture potential. Agonistic behaviour has important consequences under aquaculture conditions that encompass direct effects, such as damage or death of protagonists, and indirect effects on growth that relate to resource access, principally food and refuge. This study aimed to identify and characterize behaviours and to make a preliminary investigation of their occurrence under tank culture. Juvenile Jasusedwardsii were examined in a flow-through seawater system using a remote video camera system. Twenty-nine behaviours were divided into three sub-groups: aggressive (11), avoidance (6) and others (12). Aggressive behaviours included attacks, pushing, lifting, clasping and carrying an opponent. Avoidance behaviours included moving away in a backwards-, forwards- or side-stepping motion as well as with more vigorous tail flips. These behaviours were components of twelve behavioural groups that described contact, attack and displacement between individuals. Activity was crepuscular with two clear peaks, one in the morning and the other in the evening. The occurrence of behavioural groups was not different between the morning and evening. The frequency of aggressive behaviours was not affected by changes made to stocking density or access to food. The implications of agonistic behaviours are discussed further in relation to developing aquaculture. PMID:25561845

  18. Transitions on and off AFDC: implications for parenting and children's cognitive development.

    PubMed

    Smith, J R; Brooks-Gunn, J; Kohen, D; McCarton, C

    2001-01-01

    The goal of current national and state legislation on welfare reform is to decrease the number of people who are dependent on public assistance, most of whom are mothers and their young children. Mothers' patterns of welfare receipt in the 3 years following the birth of a child were examined vis-à-vis their associations with maternal emotional distress (General Health Questionnaire), provision of learning experiences (Home Observation of the Measurement of the Environment), parenting behavior, and the child's cognitive test score (Stanford-Binet) in the third year of life. The data set was the Infant Health and Development Program, an eight-site randomized clinical trial designed to test the efficacy of educational and family support services in reducing developmental delays in low-birthweight, preterm infants (N = 833). Strong negative associations were found between receiving welfare and parenting behavior and child outcomes at age 3 years. Outcomes varied depending on when the mother received public assistance (earlier or later in her child's first 3 years) and family poverty status on leaving welfare. The parenting behavior of mothers who had left welfare by their child's third birthday was more likely to be authoritarian if she had left public assistance without also leaving poverty. Implications of these findings for the well-being of children in low-income families are discussed. PMID:11699685

  19. Generation X: implications for faculty recruitment and development in academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Janet; Brown, Ann J

    2005-03-01

    Differences and tensions between the Baby Boom generation (born 1945-1962) and Generation X (born 1963-1981) have profound implications for the future of academic medicine. By and large, department heads and senior faculty are Boomers; today's residents and junior faculty are Generation X'ers. Looking at these issues in terms of the generations involved offers insights into a number of faculty development challenges, including inadequate and inexpert mentoring, work-life conflicts, and low faculty morale. These insights suggest strategies for strengthening academic medicine's recruitment and retention of Generation X into faculty and leadership roles. These strategies include (1) improving career and academic advising by specific attention to mentoring "across differences"--for instance, broaching the subject of formative differences in background during the initial interaction; adopting a style that incorporates information-sharing with engagement in problem solving; offering frequent, frank feedback; and refraining from comparing today to the glories of yesterday; to support such improvements, medical schools should recognize and evaluate mentoring as a core academic responsibility; (2) retaining both valued women and men in academic careers by having departments add temporal flexibility and create and legitimize less-than-full-time appointments; and (3) providing trainees and junior faculty with ready access to educational sessions designed to turn their "intellectual capital" into "academic career capital."Given the trends discussed in this article, such supports and adaptations are indicated to assure that academic health centers maintain traditions of excellence. PMID:15734801

  20. The two-component model of memory development, and its potential implications for educational settings.

    PubMed

    Sander, Myriam C; Werkle-Bergner, Markus; Gerjets, Peter; Shing, Yee Lee; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2012-02-15

    We recently introduced a two-component model of the mechanisms underlying age differences in memory functioning across the lifespan. According to this model, memory performance is based on associative and strategic components. The associative component is relatively mature by middle childhood, whereas the strategic component shows a maturational lag and continues to develop until young adulthood. Focusing on work from our own lab, we review studies from the domains of episodic and working memory informed by this model, and discuss their potential implications for educational settings. The episodic memory studies uncover the latent potential of the associative component in childhood by documenting children's ability to greatly improve their memory performance following mnemonic instruction and training. The studies on working memory also point to an immature strategic component in children whose operation is enhanced under supportive conditions. Educational settings may aim at fostering the interplay between associative and strategic components. We explore possible routes towards this goal by linking our findings to recent trends in research on instructional design. PMID:22682913

  1. Body Size in Mammalian Paleobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damuth, John; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    1990-11-01

    This valuable collection of essays presents and evaluates techniques of body-mass estimation and reviews current and potential applications of body-size estimates in paleobiology. Papers discuss explicitly the errors and biases of various regression techniques and predictor variables, and the identification of functionally similar groups of species for improving the accuracy of estimates. At the same time other chapters review and discuss the physiological, ecological, and behavioral correlates of body size in extant mammals; the significance of body-mass distributions in mammalian faunas; and the ecology and evolution of body size in particular paleofaunas. Coverage is particularly detailed for carnivores, primates, and ungulates, but information is also presented on marsupials, rodents, and proboscideans.

  2. Determinants of Mammalian Nucleolar Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Katherine I.; Surovtseva, Yulia; Merkel, Janie; Baserga, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleolus is responsible for the production of ribosomes, essential machines which synthesize all proteins needed by the cell. The structure of human nucleoli is highly dynamic and is directly related to its functions in ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of this organelle, the intricate relationship between nucleolar structure and function remains largely unexplored. How do cells control nucleolar formation and function? What are the minimal requirements for making a functional nucleolus? Here we review what is currently known regarding mammalian nucleolar formation at nucleolar organizer regions (NORs), which can be studied by observing the dissolution and reformation of the nucleolus during each cell division. Additionally, the nucleolus can be examined by analyzing how alterations in nucleolar function manifest in differences in nucleolar architecture. Furthermore, changes in nucleolar structure and function are correlated with cancer, highlighting the importance of studying the determinants of nucleolar formation. PMID:25670395

  3. The implications of renewable energy research and development: Policy scenario analysis with experience and learning effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobos, Peter Holmes

    This dissertation analyzes the current and potential future costs of renewable energy technology from an institutional perspective. The central hypothesis is that reliable technology cost forecasting can be achieved through standard and modified experience curves implemented in a dynamic simulation model. Additionally, drawing upon region-specific institutional lessons highlights the role of market, social, and political institutions throughout an economy. Socio-political influences and government policy pathways drive resource allocation decisions that may be predominately influenced by factors other than those considered in a traditional market-driven, mechanistic approach. Learning in economic systems as a research topic is an attractive complement to the notion of institutional pathways. The economic implications of learning by doing, as first outlined by Arrow (1962), highlight decreasing production costs as individuals, or more generally the firm, become more familiar with a production process. The standard approach in the literature has been to employ a common experience curve where cumulative production is the only independent variable affecting costs. This dissertation develops a two factor experience curve, adding research, development and demonstration (RD&D) expenditures as a second variable. To illustrate the concept in the context of energy planning, two factor experience curves are developed for wind energy technology and solar photovoltaic (PV) modules under different assumptions on learning rates for cumulative capacity and the knowledge stock (a function of past RD&D efforts). Additionally, a one factor experience curve and cost trajectory scenarios are developed for concentrated solar power and geothermal energy technology, respectively. Cost forecasts are then developed for all four of these technologies in a dynamic simulation model. Combining the theoretical framework of learning by doing with the fields of organizational learning and

  4. Signal transduction in mammalian oocytes during fertilization.

    PubMed

    Machaty, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian embryo development begins when the fertilizing sperm triggers a series of elevations in the oocyte's intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration. The elevations are the result of repeated release and re-uptake of Ca(2+) stored in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Ca(2+) release is primarily mediated by the phosphoinositide signaling system of the oocyte. The system is stimulated when the sperm causes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) into inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG); IP3 then binds its receptor on the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum that induces Ca(2+) release. The manner in which the sperm generates IP3, the Ca(2+) mobilizing second messenger, has been the subject of extensive research for a long time. The sperm factor hypothesis has eventually gained general acceptance, according to which it is a molecule from the sperm that diffuses into the ooplasm and stimulates the phosphoinositide cascade. Much evidence now indicates that the sperm-derived factor is phospholipase C-zeta (PLCζ) that cleaves PIP2 and generates IP3, eventually leading to oocyte activation. A recent addition to the candidate sperm factor list is the post-acrosomal sheath WW domain-binding protein (PAWP), whose role at fertilization is currently under debate. Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane is also important as, in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), the oscillations run down prematurely. In pig oocytes, the influx that sustains the oscillations seems to be regulated by the filling status of the stores, whereas in the mouse other mechanisms might be involved. This work summarizes the current understanding of Ca(2+) signaling in mammalian oocytes. PMID:26453398

  5. Engineered Trehalose Permeable to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abazari, Alireza; Meimetis, Labros G.; Budin, Ghyslain; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Weissleder, Ralph; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose is a naturally occurring disaccharide which is associated with extraordinary stress-tolerance capacity in certain species of unicellular and multicellular organisms. In mammalian cells, presence of intra- and extracellular trehalose has been shown to confer improved tolerance against freezing and desiccation. Since mammalian cells do not synthesize nor import trehalose, the development of novel methods for efficient intracellular delivery of trehalose has been an ongoing investigation. Herein, we studied the membrane permeability of engineered lipophilic derivatives of trehalose. Trehalose conjugated with 6 acetyl groups (trehalose hexaacetate or 6-O-Ac-Tre) demonstrated superior permeability in rat hepatocytes compared with regular trehalose, trehalose diacetate (2-O-Ac-Tre) and trehalose tetraacetate (4-O-Ac-Tre). Once in the cell, intracellular esterases hydrolyzed the 6-O-Ac-Tre molecules, releasing free trehalose into the cytoplasm. The total concentration of intracellular trehalose (plus acetylated variants) reached as high as 10 fold the extracellular concentration of 6-O-Ac-Tre, attaining concentrations suitable for applications in biopreservation. To describe this accumulation phenomenon, a diffusion-reaction model was proposed and the permeability and reaction kinetics of 6-O-Ac-Tre were determined by fitting to experimental data. Further studies suggested that the impact of the loading and the presence of intracellular trehalose on cellular viability and function were negligible. Engineering of trehalose chemical structure rather than manipulating the cell, is an innocuous, cell-friendly method for trehalose delivery, with demonstrated potential for trehalose loading in different types of cells and cell lines, and can facilitate the wide-spread application of trehalose as an intracellular protective agent in biopreservation studies. PMID:26115179

  6. Mechanoaccumulative Elements of the Mammalian Actin Cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Schiffhauer, Eric S; Luo, Tianzhi; Mohan, Krithika; Srivastava, Vasudha; Qian, Xuyu; Griffis, Eric R; Iglesias, Pablo A; Robinson, Douglas N

    2016-06-01

    To change shape, divide, form junctions, and migrate, cells reorganize their cytoskeletons in response to changing mechanical environments [1-4]. Actin cytoskeletal elements, including myosin II motors and actin crosslinkers, structurally remodel and activate signaling pathways in response to imposed stresses [5-9]. Recent studies demonstrate the importance of force-dependent structural rearrangement of α-catenin in adherens junctions [10] and vinculin's molecular clutch mechanism in focal adhesions [11]. However, the complete landscape of cytoskeletal mechanoresponsive proteins and the mechanisms by which these elements sense and respond to force remain to be elucidated. To find mechanosensitive elements in mammalian cells, we examined protein relocalization in response to controlled external stresses applied to individual cells. Here, we show that non-muscle myosin II, α-actinin, and filamin accumulate to mechanically stressed regions in cells from diverse lineages. Using reaction-diffusion models for force-sensitive binding, we successfully predicted which mammalian α-actinin and filamin paralogs would be mechanoaccumulative. Furthermore, a "Goldilocks zone" must exist for each protein where the actin-binding affinity must be optimal for accumulation. In addition, we leveraged genetic mutants to gain a molecular understanding of the mechanisms of α-actinin and filamin catch-bonding behavior. Two distinct modes of mechanoaccumulation can be observed: a fast, diffusion-based accumulation and a slower, myosin II-dependent cortical flow phase that acts on proteins with specific binding lifetimes. Finally, we uncovered cell-type- and cell-cycle-stage-specific control of the mechanosensation of myosin IIB, but not myosin IIA or IIC. Overall, these mechanoaccumulative mechanisms drive the cell's response to physical perturbation during proper tissue development and disease. PMID:27185555

  7. Tick-induced allergies: mammalian meat allergy, tick anaphylaxis and their significance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Serious tick-induced allergies comprise mammalian meat allergy following tick bites and tick anaphylaxis. Mammalian meat allergy is an emergent allergy, increasingly prevalent in tick-endemic areas of Australia and the United States, occurring worldwide where ticks are endemic. Sensitisation to galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) has been shown to be the mechanism of allergic reaction in mammalian meat allergy following tick bite. Whilst other carbohydrate allergens have been identified, this allergen is unique amongst carbohydrate food allergens in provoking anaphylaxis. Treatment of mammalian meat anaphylaxis involves avoidance of mammalian meat and mammalian derived products in those who also react to gelatine and mammalian milks. Before initiating treatment with certain therapeutic agents (e.g., cetuximab, gelatine-containing substances), a careful assessment of the risk of anaphylaxis, including serological analysis for α-Gal specific-IgE, should be undertaken in any individual who works, lives, volunteers or recreates in a tick endemic area. Prevention of tick bites may ameliorate mammalian meat allergy. Tick anaphylaxis is rare in countries other than Australia. Tick anaphylaxis is secondarily preventable by prevention and appropriate management of tick bites. Analysis of tick removal techniques in tick anaphylaxis sufferers offers insights into primary prevention of both tick and mammalian meat anaphylaxis. Recognition of the association between mammalian meat allergy and tick bites has established a novel cause and effect relationship between an environmental exposure and subsequent development of a food allergy, directing us towards examining environmental exposures as provoking factors pivotal to the development of other food allergies and refocusing our attention upon causation of allergy in general. PMID:25653915

  8. Annual Research Review: The neurobehavioral development of multiple memory systems: implications for childhood and adolescent psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Jarid; Marsh, Rachel; Peterson, Bradley S.; Packard, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that mammalian memory is organized into multiple brains systems, including a “cognitive” memory system that depends upon the hippocampus and a stimulus-response “habit” memory system that depends upon the dorsolateral striatum. Dorsal striatal-dependent habit memory may in part influence the development and expression of some human psychopathologies, particularly those characterized by strong habit-like behavioral features. The present review considers this hypothesis as it pertains to psychopathologies that typically emerge during childhood and adolescence. These disorders include Tourette syndrome, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, eating disorders, and autism spectrum disorders. Human and nonhuman animal research shows that the typical development of memory systems comprises the early maturation of striatal-dependent habit memory and the relatively late maturation of hippocampal-dependent cognitive memory. We speculate that the differing rates of development of these memory systems may in part contribute to the early emergence of habit-like symptoms in childhood and adolescence. In addition, abnormalities in hippocampal and striatal brain regions have been observed consistently in youth with these disorders, suggesting that the aberrant development of memory systems may also contribute to the emergence of habit-like symptoms as core pathological features of these illnesses. Considering these disorders within the context of multiple memory systems may help elucidate the pathogenesis of habit-like symptoms in childhood and adolescence, and lead to novel treatments that lessen the habit-like behavioral features of these disorders. PMID:24286520

  9. Typology of Hydrologic Prediction Challenges and Implications for Trustworthy Model Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.

    2011-12-01

    for model representation as well as model diagnostics may be developed. The implications of these ideas for developing trustworthy models will be discussed. For some additional details see: Kumar, P. (2011), Typology of hydrologic predictability, Water Resour. Res., 47, W00H05, doi:10.1029/2010WR009769.

  10. Welfare dynamics, support services, mothers' earnings, and child cognitive development: implications for contemporary welfare reform.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, H

    1999-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY; N = 614), addresses the gap in the research literature regarding the effects of welfare reform on children. Key questions addressed include whether welfare dynamics and support services relevant to welfare reform, both measured across the first 5 years of life, are associated with mothers' earnings in the 6th year and three child cognitive outcomes in the 7th and 8th years: Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT) math and reading scores, and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT). Welfare dynamics are represented by total time on welfare, degree of cycling on and off welfare, and degree to which welfare and work are combined. Support services measured include three forms of child care (relative, babysitter, and center-based), as well as three forms of human capital supports (child support, job training, and education). Controlling for a range of background factors and for different patterns of welfare use across the first 5 years, small positive associations with mother's earnings were found for child support, education, and job training. Small positive associations also were found between child support and both math and reading scores. Finally positive associations of medium effect size were found between center care and both mothers' earnings and child PPVT scores. Although effect sizes are generally small, the results suggest the potential value of welfare reform approaches that emphasize long-term human capital development. Interactions between welfare dynamics and support services suggest subgroup differences. Specifically, positive effects of support services on earnings are strongest among mothers with higher levels of human capital (higher levels of work while on welfare, lower total time on welfare). Babysitter care appears to have negative effects on both reading and math scores of children whose mothers report low levels of work while on welfare

  11. An immunogenomic stratification of colorectal cancer: Implications for development of targeted immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Neeraj; Beggs, Andrew D; Willcox, Benjamin E; Middleton, Gary W

    2015-01-01

    Although tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) density is prognostic and predictive in colorectal cancer (CRC), the impact of tumor genetics upon colorectal immunobiology is unclear. Identification of genetic factors that influence the tumor immunophenotype is essential to improve the effectiveness of stratified immunotherapy approaches. We carried out a bioinformatics analysis of CRC data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) involving two-dimensional hierarchical clustering to define an immune signature that we used to characterize the immune response across key patient groups. An immune signature termed The Co-ordinate Immune Response Cluster (CIRC) comprising 28 genes was coordinately regulated across the patient population. Four patient groups were delineated on the basis of cluster expression. Group A, which was heavily enriched for patients with microsatellite instability (MSI-H) and POL mutations, exhibited high CIRC expression, including the presence of several inhibitory molecules: CTLA4, PDL1, PDL2, LAG3, and TIM3. In contrast, RAS mutation was enriched in patient groups with lower CIRC expression. This work links the genetics and immunobiology of colorectal tumorigenesis, with implications for the development of stratified immunotherapeutic approaches. Microsatellite instability and POL mutations are linked with high mutational burden and high immune infiltration, but the coordinate expression of inhibitory pathways observed suggests combination checkpoint blockade therapy may be required to improve efficacy. In contrast, RAS mutant tumors predict for a relatively poor immune infiltration and low inhibitory molecule expression. In this setting, checkpoint blockade may be less efficacious, highlighting a requirement for novel strategies in this patient group. PMID:25949894

  12. Mammalian Carboxylesterase 5: Comparative Biochemistry and Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Roger S; Cox, Laura A; VandeBerg, John L

    2008-01-01

    Carboxylesterase 5 (CES5) (also called cauxin or CES7) is one of at least five mammalian CES gene families encoding enzymes of broad substrate specificity and catalysing hydrolytic and transesterification reactions. In silico methods were used to predict the amino acid sequences, secondary structures and gene locations for CES5 genes and gene products. Amino acid sequence alignments of mammalian CES5 enzymes enabled identification of key CES sequences previously reported for human CES1, as well as other sequences that are specific to the CES5 gene family, which were consistent with being monomeric in subunit structure and available for secretion into body fluids. Predicted secondary structures for mammalian CES5 demonstrated significant conservation with human CES1 as well as distinctive mammalian CES5 like structures. Mammalian CES5 genes are located in tandem with the CES1 gene(s), are transcribed on the reverse strand and contained 13 exons. CES5 has been previously reported in high concentrations in the urine (cauxin) of adult male cats, and within a protein complex of mammalian male epididymal fluids. Roles for CES5 may include regulating urinary levels of male cat pheromones; catalysing lipid transfer reactions within mammalian male reproductive fluids; and protecting neural tissue from drugs and xenobiotics. PMID:19727319

  13. Assessing the accuracy of software predictions of mammalian and microbial metabolites

    EPA Science Inventory

    New chemical development and hazard assessments benefit from accurate predictions of mammalian and microbial metabolites. Fourteen biotransformation libraries encoded in eight software packages that predict metabolite structures were assessed for their sensitivity (proportion of ...

  14. Comparative Mammalian Cell Toxicity of N-DBPs and C-DBPs

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to generate a quantitative, direct comparison amongst classes of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs), we developed and calibrated in vitro mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assays to integrate the analytical biology with the analytical chemistry of ...

  15. Production of Human papillomavirus pseudovirions in plants and their use in pseudovirion-based neutralisation assays in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Renate L; Kennedy, Paul; Huddy, Suzanne M; Bethke, Susanne; Hendrikse, Megan; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Rybicki, Edward P

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) cause cervical cancer and have recently also been implicated in mouth, laryngeal and anogenital cancers. There are three commercially available prophylactic vaccines that show good efficacy; however, efforts to develop second-generation vaccines that are more affordable, stable and elicit a wider spectrum of cross-neutralising immunity are still ongoing. Testing antisera elicited by current and candidate HPV vaccines for neutralizing antibodies is done using a HPV pseudovirion (PsV)-based neutralisation assay (PBNA). PsVs are produced by transfection of mammalian cell cultures with plasmids expressing L1 and L2 capsid proteins, and a reporter gene plasmid, a highly expensive process. We investigated making HPV-16 PsVs in plants, in order to develop a cheaper alternative. The secreted embryonic alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene and promoter were cloned into a geminivirus-derived plant expression vector, in order to produce circular dsDNA replicons. This was co-introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana plants with vectors expressing L1 and L2 via agroinfiltration, and presumptive PsVs were purified. The PsVs contained DNA, and could be successfully used for PBNA with anti-HPV antibodies. This is the first demonstration of the production of mammalian pseudovirions in plants, and the first demonstration of the potential of plants to make DNA vaccines. PMID:26853456

  16. Production of Human papillomavirus pseudovirions in plants and their use in pseudovirion-based neutralisation assays in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Lamprecht, Renate L; Kennedy, Paul; Huddy, Suzanne M; Bethke, Susanne; Hendrikse, Megan; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Rybicki, Edward P

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) cause cervical cancer and have recently also been implicated in mouth, laryngeal and anogenital cancers. There are three commercially available prophylactic vaccines that show good efficacy; however, efforts to develop second-generation vaccines that are more affordable, stable and elicit a wider spectrum of cross-neutralising immunity are still ongoing. Testing antisera elicited by current and candidate HPV vaccines for neutralizing antibodies is done using a HPV pseudovirion (PsV)-based neutralisation assay (PBNA). PsVs are produced by transfection of mammalian cell cultures with plasmids expressing L1 and L2 capsid proteins, and a reporter gene plasmid, a highly expensive process. We investigated making HPV-16 PsVs in plants, in order to develop a cheaper alternative. The secreted embryonic alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene and promoter were cloned into a geminivirus-derived plant expression vector, in order to produce circular dsDNA replicons. This was co-introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana plants with vectors expressing L1 and L2 via agroinfiltration, and presumptive PsVs were purified. The PsVs contained DNA, and could be successfully used for PBNA with anti-HPV antibodies. This is the first demonstration of the production of mammalian pseudovirions in plants, and the first demonstration of the potential of plants to make DNA vaccines. PMID:26853456

  17. Mammalian Tribbles Homologs at the Crossroads of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cunard, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    In 2000, investigators discovered Tribbles, a Drosophila protein that coordinates morphogenesis by inhibiting mitosis. Further work has delineated Xenopus (Xtrb2), Nematode (Nipi-3), and mammalian homologs of Drosophila tribbles, which include TRB1, TRB2, and TRB3. The sequences of tribbles homologs are highly conserved, and despite their protein kinase structure, to date they have not been shown to have kinase activity. TRB family members play a role in the differentiation of macrophages, lymphocytes, muscle cells, adipocytes, and osteoblasts. TRB isoforms also coordinate a number of critical cellular processes including glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammation, cellular stress, survival, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. TRB family members modulate multiple complex signaling networks including mitogen activated protein kinase cascades, protein kinase B/AKT signaling, mammalian target of rapamycin, and inflammatory pathways. The following review will discuss metazoan homologs of Drosophila tribbles, their structure, expression patterns, and functions. In particular, we will focus on TRB3 function in the kidney in podocytes. This review will also discuss the key signaling pathways with which tribbles proteins interact and provide a rationale for developing novel therapeutics that exploit these interactions to provide better treatment options for both acute and chronic kidney disease. PMID:24490110

  18. Possible mechanisms of mammalian immunocontraception.

    PubMed

    Barber, M R; Fayrer-Hosken, R A

    2000-03-01

    Ecological and conservation programs in ecosystems around the world have experienced varied success in population management. One of the greatest problems is that human expansion has led to the shrinking of wildlife habitat and, as a result, the overpopulation of many different species has occurred. The pressures exerted by the increased number of animals has caused environmental damage. The humane and practical control of these populations has solicited the scientific community to arrive at a safe, effective, and cost-efficient means of population control. Immunocontraception using zona pellucida antigens, specifically porcine zona pellucida (pZP), has become one of the most promising population control tools in the world today, with notable successes in horses and elephants. A conundrum has risen where pZP, a single vaccine, successfully induces an immunocontraceptive effect in multiple species of mammals. This review describes the most current data pertaining to the mammalian zona pellucida and immunocontraception, and from these studies, we suggest several potential mechanisms of immunocontraception. PMID:10706942

  19. Mammalian mitochondrial beta-oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, S; Bartlett, K; Pourfarzam, M

    1996-01-01

    The enzymic stages of mammalian mitochondrial beta-oxidation were elucidated some 30-40 years ago. However, the discovery of a membrane-associated multifunctional enzyme of beta-oxidation, a membrane-associated acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and characterization of the carnitine palmitoyl transferase system at the protein and at the genetic level has demonstrated that the enzymes of the system itself are incompletely understood. Deficiencies of many of the enzymes have been recognized as important causes of disease. In addition, the study of these disorders has led to a greater understanding of the molecular mechanism of beta-oxidation and the import, processing and assembly of the beta-oxidation enzymes within the mitochondrion. The tissue-specific regulation, intramitochondrial control and supramolecular organization of the pathway is becoming better understood as sensitive analytical and molecular techniques are applied. This review aims to cover enzymological and organizational aspects of mitochondrial beta-oxidation together with the biochemical aspects of inherited disorders of beta-oxidation and the intrinsic control of beta-oxidation. PMID:8973539

  20. Ghrelin Receptors in Non-Mammalian Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R) was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996. The endogenous ligand, ghrelin, was discovered 3 years later, in 1999, and our understanding of the physiological significance of the ghrelin system in vertebrates has grown steadily since then. Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized. In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates. PMID:23882259