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Sample records for mammary neoplasms experimental

  1. Mammary neoplasms of the bitch.

    PubMed

    Cotchin, E

    1958-01-01

    In this paper, the interrelationships of the neoplasms of the canine mammary gland are investigated. These neoplasms are a group of tumors of a great variety of histological structure and sometimes of uncertain histogenesis. Particular attention is given to the histogenesis of the mucoid, cartilaginous, and bony elements. From 1950-56, a macroscopic and histological examination of mammary neoplasms from 424 bitches (2-17 years of age) was made. The tumors from 381 bitches were removed surgically while the others came from 43 bitches who were examined postmortem. Of the 160 tumors whose location was recorded, 105 occurred in the 2 hinder glands, 19 in the middle glands, and 46 in one or another of the 2 anterior glands. 186 of the 424 bitches bore malignant mammary tumors (87 carcinomas, 73 sarcomas, 27 complex malignant tumors) and 249 had benign tumors (19 simple and 230 complex). 40 of the benign complex tumors contained bone, an additional 63 contained cartilage but no bone, and 67 showed mucoid tissue but no cartilage or bone. It is suggested that there is a predominant proliferation of myoepithelial cells which tend to become embedded in a mucoid or chondroid matrix. The bone in the tumors appears to be formed by endochondral ossification of preformed cartilage, or by intramembranous ossification in the connective tissue of the tumor. Metastases were present in 41 of the 424 bitches. PMID:12311486

  2. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  3. Comparison of metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms to the breast and primary invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sambit K; Kim, Stacey A; DeLair, Deborah F; Bose, Shikha; Laury, Anna R; Chopra, Shefali; Mertens, Richard B; Dhall, Deepti

    2016-08-01

    Metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms to the breast may show considerable morphologic overlap with primary mammary carcinomas, particularly those showing evidence of neuroendocrine differentiation, and may be misdiagnosed as such. Accurate distinction between these two entities is crucial for determination of appropriate clinical management. The histologic and immunohistochemical features of metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms to the breast were studied and compared with the features of primary invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation, which served as controls. Of the metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, 15 were well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors with carcinoid tumor-type morphology and 7 were poorly differentiated/high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas with small-cell or large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma morphology. The majority of the metastatic neoplasms originated in the lung and gastrointestinal tract. There were histologic similarities between metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms and invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation, both of which exhibited neuroendocrine histologic features (nested and trabecular architecture, minimal tubular differentiation, and characteristic nuclear features). Only one case of the invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation was modified Bloom-Richardson grade 1 (largely due to minimal tubular differentiation on most such tumors), and the invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation were often associated with in situ carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry was helpful in distinguishing metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms from invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation. Whereas the majority of invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation were positive for estrogen receptor and GATA3, metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms were typically negative for estrogen receptor and GATA3, and metastatic well

  4. Effect of ovariohysterectomy in bitches with mammary neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Morris, J S; Dobson, J M; Bostock, D E; O'Farrell, E

    1998-06-13

    Ninety bitches with mammary tumours were studied for two years after the surgical removal of the primary tumour(s). Twenty-nine of the bitches had been spayed before the development of the mammary tumour, 22 were spayed when the tumours were removed and 39 were left entire. Fifty-eight of the bitches (64 per cent) had benign tumours and, of these, 15 (26 per cent) developed a new mammary tumour within two years, irrespective of whether the bitch was spayed. The other 32 bitches had malignant tumours which were grouped into 'invasive' and 'well defined' carcinomas. Sixty-three per cent of the spayed bitches and 57 per cent of the entire bitches, with invasive carcinoma were dead within two years of surgery as a result of their mammary tumours. For those with well defined carcinomas the tumour-related death rates were 18 per cent and 33 per cent respectively for the spayed and entire bitches. These findings suggest that ovariohysterectomy when mammary tumours are removed does not have a significant effect on the progression of malignant disease, and that about one in four bitches with a benign mammary tumour is likely to develop a further tumour in another gland. PMID:9670443

  5. Immunohistochemical expression of protein p53 in neoplasms of the mammary gland in bitches.

    PubMed

    Rodo, A; Malicka, E

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of protein p53 in correlation with other tumor traits: histological type, tumor grade and proliferative activity. Material for the investigation comprised mammary gland tumours collected from dogs, the patients of veterinary clinics, during surgical procedures, and archival samples. Alltogether 21 adenomas, 31 complex carcinomas, 35 simple carcinomas and 12 solid carcinomas were qualified for further investigation. No protein p53 expression was found in adenomas. Cancers show positive reaction in 32.5%. The highest percent of p53 positive neoplasms was observed in solid carcinomas and neoplasms with the highest degree of histological malignancy. The smallest number showing this expression was observed in adenomas and the highest was characteristic for solid carcinomas. Considering the tumour grading, it was found that an increase in neoplasm malignancy was positively correlated with the number of the cells showing the expression of protein p53. The differences were statistically significant. Statistically significant positive correlations were observed between the proliferative activity and protein p53 expression. Higher accumulation of protein p53 in more malignant neoplasms suggests that mutations of protein p53 can be responsible for higher proliferation in neoplasms with advanced progression of malignancy. PMID:18683536

  6. Evaluation of immunohistochemical expression of P-glycoprotein in neoplasms of the mammary gland in bitches.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Kozakiewicz, A M; Malicka, E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the P-glycoprotein expression in correlation with other neoplasm traits such as: histological type, the differentiation grade, proliferative activity, expression of the cyclooxygenase-2. Material for the investigation comprised 50 tumours of the mammary gland collected from bitches during surgical procedures performed in Warsaw Veterinary Clinics and Small Animal Clinic of the Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW. All together 8 adenomas, 22 complex carcinomas, 15 simple carcinomas and 5 solid carcinomas. In case of cancers, the degree of histological malignancy was established: 1st degree of histological malignancy--18 neoplasms, 2nd degree of histological malignancy--14 neoplasms and 3rd degree of histological malignancy--10 neoplasms. Evaluations were conducted with histopathological and immunohistochemical methods using suitable antibodies. Proliferative activity was highly dependent on type of the neoplasm and the degree of histological malignancy. The highest value of the mitotic index was characteristic for solid and simple cancers and neoplasms with the highest degree of histological malignancy. Results of expression of the nuclear antigen Ki-67 were similar. Expression of P-glycoprotein was revealed in all types of neoplasms. The expression of P-glycoprotein was identified in cytoplasm and cell membranes of neoplastic cells. Positive expression of P-gp was observed in 76% of cancers. Complex carcinomas were the biggest group among the cancer types which demonstrated positive reaction of P-gp. High expression of P-gp was also established in cancers with the highest degree of malignancy. In bitches aged 9 through 12 years, the cancers featuring a positive reaction of P-gp constituted the most numerous group (63.2%); on the other hand, this cancer type barely appeared in the oldest bitches (10.5%). PMID:20731191

  7. E-cadherin immunohistochemical expression in mammary gland neoplasms in bitches.

    PubMed

    Rodo, A; Malicka, E

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate E-cadherin expression in correlation with other neoplasm traits such as: histological type, the differentiation grade and proliferative activity. Material for the investigation comprised mammary gland tumours, collected from dogs, the patients of veterinary clinics, during surgical procedures and archival samples. All together 21 adenomas, 32 complex carcinomas, 35 simple carcinomas and 13 solid carcinomas were qualified for further investigation. E-cadherin expression was higher in adenomas as compared with carcinomas but lower in solid carcinomas as compared with simple and complex carcinomas. More over, the expression of E-cadherin decreased with the increase in the neoplasm malignancy and proliferative activity (value of the mitotic index and number of cells showing Ki67). The study has shown that the expression of E-cadherin can be used as a prognostic factor. PMID:18540208

  8. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in neoplasms of the mammary gland in bitches.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Kozakiewicz, A M; Malicka, E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the cyclooxygenase-2 expression in correlation with other neoplasm traits such as: histological type, the differentiation grade, proliferative activity, estrogenic receptor, as well as Hsp70 and p53 proteins expression. Material for the investigation comprised mammary gland tumours, collected from dogs, the patients of veterinary clinics, during surgical procedures. All together 14 adenomas, 66 complex carcinomas, 47 simple carcinomas and 6 solid carcinomas were studied. Evaluations were conducted with histopathological and immunohistochemical methods using suitable antibodies. Expression of COX-2 was observed in 95% of cancers, in case of which, the complex cancers constituted the highest percentage (48.4%). The highest expression of COX-2 was revealed in simple and complex cancers and in cancers with the 3rd degree of histological malignancy. The significant correlation between expression of COX-2 and high mean value of the mitotic index was found. The high expression of COX-2 was also correlated with the expression of protein p53 and expression of the protein Hsp 70. Obtained results suggest that cyclooxygenase-2 may be a prognostic factor, but it requires detailed clinical confirmation. PMID:20731190

  9. Immunohistochemical evaluation of expression of heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP90 in mammary gland neoplasms in bitches.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Kozakiewicz, A M; Malicka, E

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins have essential roles in a number of pathophysiologic conditions including carcinogenesis and represent a group of novel molecular markers in cancer management. The aim of this study was to investigate heat shock protein expression in correlation with other neoplasm traits such as: histological type, differentiation grade, proliferative activity, estrogenic receptor expression, and cyclooxygenase-2 and p53 proteins. Material for the investigation comprised 133 tumors of the mammary gland collected from bitches. In total 14 adenomas, 66 complex carcinomas, 47 simple carcinomas and 6 solid carcinomas were collected. Evaluations were conducted with histopathological and immunohistochemical methods using suitable antibodies. Expression of heat shock protein 70 was observed in all types of evaluated neoplasms. A higher average number of cells undergoing expression of heat shock protein 70, which was statistically insignificant, was established in complex and simple cancers and in cancers with the 1st and the 2nd degree of histological malignancy. Expression of heat shock protein 90 was observed in all studied neoplasms; it was very insignificant in adenomas, compared to cancers, and the highest expression was established in the solid cancers, as well as in cancers with the 2nd degree of histological malignancy. This high expression of heat shock protein 90 was correlated with proliferative activity. The results suggest that heat shock protein 90 is involved in canine mammary gland carcinogenesis. The results also suggest that heat shock protein 90 may be a prognostic factor, but this requires detailed clinical confirmation. PMID:22844695

  10. Selective laser hyperthermia of malignant neoplasms: experimental and clinical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfond, Mark L.; Mizgirev, I. V.; Barchuk, A. S.; Hudoley, V. V.; Vasilyev, D. V.; Balluzek, F. V.; Venkov, A. A.; Chaly, Viktor P.; Ter-Martirosyan, Alexander L.

    1999-12-01

    Experimental study of various modes of the semiconductor laser irradiation upon Ehrlich carcinoma in mice was carried out. Optimal patterns for distance laser scanning irradiation resulting in practically complete healing of experimental animals, were found. Selective damage of tumor tissue subjected to laser irradiation at 800 nm was evidenced in the absence of a photosensitizing agent. The results of a clinical trial completely corresponded to the experimental data. The treatment proved to be efficient in all 28 patients.

  11. Trigger effect of infrared femtosecond laser irradiation on neoplasm in experimental cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gening, Tatyana; Voronova, Olga; Zolotovskii, Igor; Sysoliatin, Alexey; Dolgova, Dinara; Abakumova, Tatyana

    2013-02-01

    The present work discusses effect of infrared (IR) femtosecond laser irradiation on neoplasm of white mice with experimental cervical cancer- 5 (CC-5 on the 20th and 30th days after tumor transplantation). Tumor tissue was irradiated by femtosecond erbium doped fiber laser: the wavelength is 1.55 μm, average and peak powers are1,25 mW and 6kW, respectively, irradiation trials n=10. The average energy density (energy dose) on a tissue for two groups of animals was 0,24 J/cm2 and 0,36 J/cm2 for a single trial. Irradiation was followed by biochemical determination of LPO AOS parameters ("Lipid peroxidation-antioxidants" system): malondialdehyde (MDA), activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione-reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST). A subsequent morphological study of tumor tissue was performed. Mathematical analysis of data demonstrates a weak dependence of the studied parameters on energy dose. The latter implies the trigger effect of IR femtosecond laser irradiation on redox-dependent processes in neoplasm at experimental cervical cancer.

  12. Mitigation of DMBA-induced mammary carcinoma in experimental rats by antiangiogenic property of Kalpaamruthaa.

    PubMed

    Sathish, Sivaprakasam; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2011-06-01

    Extra cellular matrix (ECM) and basement membrane (BM) are important layers that regulate cell structure, cell migration, and cellular proliferation. Degradation of both ECM and BM mediated by proteases favors the tumor invasion and promotes angiogenesis. Female Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 180 ± 10 g were categorized into 6 groups. Group-1 animals served as vehicle control. Group-2 to Group-4 animals were administered with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (25 mg/rat dissolved in olive oil, orally) on day 1 of experimental period to induce mammary carcinoma. (After 90 days, mammary carcinoma was confirmed by histopathological examination). Group-3 and Group-4 rats were subsequently treated with Semecarpus anacardium nut milk extract (SA) and Kalpaamruthaa (KA), respectively. Group-5 and Group-6 animals served as drug control for SA and KA, respectively. Pro-angiogenic factors like proteases, cyclooxygenase-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor were elevated in tumor-bearing animals and decreased in SA- and KA-supplemented rats. Increased levels of these angiogenic factors in tumor-bearing rats indicate the progression of mammary tumor. The decreased levels of these angiogenic in SA- and KA-treated rats may be due to the ameliorative effect of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids, tannins, and other compounds present in the drug. PMID:22432686

  13. Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  14. Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  15. Influence of reducing luxury calories in the treatment of experimental mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Bunk, B.; Zhu, P.; Klinga, K.; Berger, M. R.; Schmähl, D.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of dietary calorie intake at three different fat levels on (a) the growth of established methylnitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary carcinoma, (b) the reappearance of mammary carcinomas after surgical removal, and (c) the growth of manifest lesions in animals treated with the cytostatic agent hexadecylphosphocholine (HPC). A reduction of calories by 30% significantly inhibited tumour growth of manifest mammary carcinomas in rats, without having a negative influence on body weight gain. After chemotherapeutic treatment no significant dietary influence was observed besides the high antineoplastic efficacy of HPC, but when feeding calorically restricted diets to surgically treated animals the number of reappearing tumours was considerably smaller (P = 0.06) than after feeding the diets ad libitum. The fat content of the diets did not influence the growth of manifest mammary carcinomas. No significant dietary effects were exerted on oestradiol or testosterone levels in untreated tumour bearing animals. An elevation of oestradiol levels was observed when animals were subjected to HPC and fed a high calorie diet. An elevation of testosterone levels was assessed after surgical treatment of the rats, irrespective of fat content and calorie level. Our results suggest that a reduction of calories can inhibit growth of manifest mammary carcinomas and has impeding effects on tumour development after surgical removal. After effective chemotherapeutic treatment the additional influence of dietary changes was of less relevance. Furthermore, our data do not establish any association between growth inhibition of mammary tumours, caused by the mild caloric restriction, and altered oestradiol or testosterone production. PMID:1616856

  16. STAT3 supports experimental K-RasG12D–induced murine myeloproliferative neoplasms dependent on serine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gough, Daniel J.; Marié, Isabelle J.; Lobry, Camille; Aifantis, Iannis

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and other myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are genetically heterogeneous but frequently display activating mutations in Ras GTPases and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Altered STAT3 activity is observed in up to 50% of AML correlating with poor prognosis. Activated STAT proteins, classically associated with tyrosine phosphorylation, support tumor development as transcription factors, but alternative STAT functions independent of tyrosine phosphorylation have been documented, including roles for serine-phosphorylated STAT3 in mitochondria supporting transformation by oncogenic Ras. We examined requirements for STAT3 in experimental murine K-Ras–dependent hematopoietic neoplasia. We show that STAT3 is phosphorylated on S727 but not Y705 in diseased animals. Moreover, a mouse with a point mutation abrogating STAT3 S727 phosphorylation displayed delayed onset and decreased disease severity with significantly extended survival. Activated K-Ras required STAT3 for cytokine-independent growth of myeloid progenitors in vitro, and mitochondrially restricted STAT3 and STAT3-Y705F, both transcriptionally inert mutants, supported factor-independent growth. STAT3 was dispensable for growth of normal or K-Ras–mutant myeloid progenitors in response to cytokines. However, abrogation of STAT3-S727 phosphorylation impaired factor-independent malignant growth. These data document that serine-phosphorylated mitochondrial STAT3 supports neoplastic hematopoietic cell growth induced by K-Ras. PMID:25150294

  17. Neoplasms in domestic animals: a review of experimental and spontaneous carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Madewell, B. R.

    1981-01-01

    Clues to environmental and host factors in human oncogenesis are derived from clinical or epidemiologic studies; additional evidence is provided by animal experimentation. Induced tumors in animals are useful because of their reproducibility and predictability, allowing detailed study of specific carcinogens or carcinogenic influences. Spontaneously or naturally occurring tumors in domestic animals are of particular interest for comparative studies - these tumors occur in heterogenous outbred populations of animal closely sharing man's environment; their cause is generally unknown; many tumors occur in numbers suitable for detailed investigations; and tumors generally occur in aged animals, thus facilitating study of chronic processes associated with carcinogenesis in nature. PMID:7269640

  18. Experimental diets for the study of lipid influence on the induced mammary carcinoma in rats: I--Diet definition.

    PubMed

    Escrich, E; Solanas, M; Segura, R

    1994-01-01

    There is a considerable variation in the diets used in studies on the influence of dietary fat on rat mammary cancer. In view of the fact that diet is the most remarkable factor in these studies, the aim of this work was to define two experimental diets, one of them normal (N3) and another hyperlipidic (HL20), both allowing the normal growth of the rat and neither of them containing factors that could unspecifically affect mammary carcinogenesis. Semisynthetic diets were selected instead of natural ones. A normal diet (3% corn oil, 18% casein, 67.9% dextrose) and a hyperlipidic diet (20% corn oil, 23% casein, 45.9% dextrose) were defined for the rat. Both diets also contain 5% cellulose, 5.9% salt mix and 0.24% vitamin mix. In order to avoid the influence of the above mentioned unspecific factors, the control of specificity and quality of nutrients is proposed as an essential measure. Moreover, it is also necessary to adopt measures to avoid the presence of fatty acid metabolites, including the calculation of the necessary vitamin E, selenium and sulfur amino acid and the determination of factors potentially able to stimulate or inhibit carcinogenesis such as phenolic antioxidants, retinoids or the trans isomer of fatty acids. On the other had, casein, dextrose, choline and folic acid contents were modified in order to equilibrate the lipid increase experimentally introduced in the HL20 diet or to ensure the normal maintenance of the animals' metabolism. The method used is based on the concept of quality assurance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7772745

  19. Radiologic and histologic presentation of male mammary myofibroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Omar, Lena A; Rojanapremsuk, Theera; Saluja, Karan; Merchant, Kanwal A; Sharma, Pooja B

    2016-07-01

    Mammary myofibroblastoma is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that typically presents in older men and women. Less commonly, these benign tumors may also occur in soft tissues located outside of the breast, in which case they are referred to as mammary-type myofibroblastomas. The histologic composition of this benign spindle cell tumor can be markedly varied. We present a case of a large mammary myofibroblastoma in a male patient and discuss the typical imaging and histologic makeup of these tumors. PMID:27365886

  20. Radiologic and histologic presentation of male mammary myofibroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Rojanapremsuk, Theera; Saluja, Karan; Merchant, Kanwal A.; Sharma, Pooja B.

    2016-01-01

    Mammary myofibroblastoma is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that typically presents in older men and women. Less commonly, these benign tumors may also occur in soft tissues located outside of the breast, in which case they are referred to as mammary-type myofibroblastomas. The histologic composition of this benign spindle cell tumor can be markedly varied. We present a case of a large mammary myofibroblastoma in a male patient and discuss the typical imaging and histologic makeup of these tumors. PMID:27365886

  1. Canine mammary tumours, an overview.

    PubMed

    Sleeckx, N; de Rooster, H; Veldhuis Kroeze, E J B; Van Ginneken, C; Van Brantegem, L

    2011-12-01

    Canine mammary tumours (CMTs) are the most common neoplasms in intact female dogs. Although the prevalence of these tumours decreases in regions where preventive ovari(ohyster)ectomy is performed, it remains an important disease entity in veterinary medicine. Moreover, treatment options are limited in comparison with human breast cancer. Nevertheless, recent human treatment protocols might have potential in bitches suffering from CMTs. PMID:21645126

  2. Mammary gland tumors in captive African hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Gerner, M

    2000-04-01

    From December 1995 to July 1999, eight mammary gland tumors were diagnosed in eight adult captive female African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris). The tumors presented as single or multiple subcutaneous masses along the cranial or caudal abdomen that varied in size for each hedgehog. Histologically, seven of eight (88%) mammary gland tumors were malignant. Tumors were classified as solid (4 cases), tubular (2 cases), and papillary (2 cases). Seven tumors had infiltrated into the surrounding stroma and three tumors had histologic evidence of neoplastic vascular invasion. Three hedgehogs had concurrent neoplasms. These are believed to be the first reported cases of mammary gland tumors in African hedgehogs. PMID:10813628

  3. Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  4. Celecoxib and fish oil: a combination strategy for decreased inflammatory mediators in early stages of experimental mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Negi, Anjana Kumari; Renuka; Bhatnagar, Archana; Agnihotri, Navneet

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammation has been directly linked to cancer progression. Therefore, current study was designed to understand the mechanism of action of chemo-preventive effect of celecoxib and fish oil on inflammatory mediators in experimental mammary carcinoma. Female Wistar rats were distributed into control and DMBA treated groups and further subdivided based on pretreatment with celecoxib and/or fish oil. Inflammation was measured by assessing expression of NF-κB, COX-2 and cytokines. The results indicated an elevation in expression of NF-κB, COX-2 and cytokines' levels (IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10) in DMBA group as compared to controls. On pretreatment with celecoxib and/or fish oil in DMBA treated animals, a significant reduction in expression of NF-κB, COX-2 and cytokines' levels was observed. The decrease was more pronounced with combinatorial regimen than either celecoxib or fish oil alone. To conclude, a combinatorial strategy of celecoxib and fish oil may generate an immune response against the tumor cell by altering cytokine repertoire and decrease the tendency of tumor cells to escape immune surveillance. PMID:26749133

  5. [Cutaneous neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Dummer, R; Beyeler, M; Morcinek, J; Burg, G

    2003-09-01

    The skin is the organ most commonly affected by malignancies. Various cancers of the skin show a dramatic increase in incidence over the last decades. Epithelial skin tumors are most frequently, e.g., basal cell carcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma with its precursors, the actinic keratoses. Melanoma, which is extremely difficult to treat in advanced tumor stages, is dreaded. Besides that, there are other epithelial malignant diseases, e.g. Morbus Bowen and adnexal tumors originating from the skin appendices. Mesenchymal malignant neoplasias such as Morbus Kaposi, angiosarcomas and other dermal sarcomas, are rare. Since the majority of malignant neoplasms is removable and curable by a simple surgical intervention, the knowledge of the different skin tumors is essential for non-dermatologist. PMID:14526630

  6. Pomegranate exerts chemoprevention of experimentally induced mammary tumorigenesis by suppression of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bishayee, Anupam; Mandal, Animesh; Bhattacharyya, Piyali; Bhatia, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    abstract Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women in the United States and discovery and development of safe chemopreventive drugs is urgently needed. The fruit pomegranate (Punica granatum) is gaining importance because of its various health benefits. This study was initiated to investigate chemopreventive potential of a pomegranate emulsion (PE) against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) rat mammary carcinogenesis. The animals were orally administered with PE (0.2–5.0 g/kg), starting 2 wk before and 16 wk following DMBA treatment. PE exhibited a striking reduction of DMBA-induced mammary tumor incidence, total tumor burden, and reversed histopathological changes. PE dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in mammary tumors. Immunohistochemical studies showed that PE increased intratumor Bax, decreased Bcl2 and manifested a proapoptotic shift in Bax/Bcl2 ratio. In addition, our gene expression study showed PE-mediated upregulation of Bad, caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, poly (ADP ribose) polymerase and cytochrome c in mammary tumors. Thus, PE exerts chemoprevention of mammary carcinogenesis by suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis mediated through upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl2 in concert with caspase cascades. Pomegranate bioactive phytoconstituents could be developed as a chemopreventive drug to reduce the risk of breast cancer. PMID:26699876

  7. Pomegranate exerts chemoprevention of experimentally induced mammary tumorigenesis by suppression of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bishayee, Anupam; Mandal, Animesh; Bhattacharyya, Piyali; Bhatia, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women in the United States and discovery and development of safe chemopreventive drugs is urgently needed. The fruit pomegranate (Punica granatum) is gaining importance because of its various health benefits. This study was initiated to investigate chemopreventive potential of a pomegranate emulsion (PE) against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) rat mammary carcinogenesis. The animals were orally administered with PE (0.2-5.0 g/kg), starting 2 wk before and 16 wk following DMBA treatment. PE exhibited a striking reduction of DMBA-induced mammary tumor incidence, total tumor burden, and reversed histopathological changes. PE dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in mammary tumors. Immunohistochemical studies showed that PE increased intratumor Bax, decreased Bcl2 and manifested a proapoptotic shift in Bax/Bcl2 ratio. In addition, our gene expression study showed PE-mediated upregulation of Bad, caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, poly (ADP ribose) polymerase and cytochrome c in mammary tumors. Thus, PE exerts chemoprevention of mammary carcinogenesis by suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis mediated through upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl2 in concert with caspase cascades. Pomegranate bioactive phytoconstituents could be developed as a chemopreventive drug to reduce the risk of breast cancer. PMID:26699876

  8. Mammary myofibrosarcoma: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Stark, Matthew; Hoffmann, Andrew; Xiong, Zhenggang

    2011-01-01

    A case of myofibrosarcoma of breast is reported. A female patient aged 81 years presented with a mammary mass lesion. Histologically, the tumor consisted of neoplastic spindle cells arranged in fascicles and with variably cellularity and hyalinization. Immunohistochemical studies showed expression of vimentin, smooth-muscle actin, and Bcl-2, but not desmin, S-100, C-kit, or CD34. Proliferative index identified by Ki67 was approximately 30%. Electron microscopy revealed variable amount of rough endoplasmic reticulum, myofilaments, fibronexus junctions, and fibronectin fibrils. The histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features of this tumor were consistent with myofibrosarcoma. This case will be one of the very few cases of ultrastructurally confirmed mammary myofibrosarcoma reported in the literature and contributes to the recognition of this rare mammary malignant neoplasm. The literature on mammary myofibrosarcoma and its differential diagnosis is also reviewed. PMID:21545434

  9. Myoepithelial cells in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Céspedes, Raquel; Millán, Yolanda; Guil-Luna, Silvia; Reymundo, Carlos; Espinosa de Los Monteros, Antonio; Martín de Las Mulas, Juana

    2016-01-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms of female dogs. Compared to mammary tumours of humans and cats, myoepithelial (ME) cell involvement is common in canine mammary tumours (CMT) of any subtype. Since ME cell involvement in CMT influences both histogenetic tumour classification and prognosis, correct identification of ME cells is important. This review describes immunohistochemical methods for identification of canine mammary ME cells used in vivo. In addition, phenotypic and genotypic methods to isolate ME cells for in vitro studies to analyse tumour-suppressor protein production and gene expression are discussed. The contribution of ME cells to both histogenetic classifications and the prognosis of CMT is compared with other species and the potential use of ME cells as a method to identify carcinoma in situ is discussed. PMID:26639832

  10. High corn oil and high extra virgin olive oil diets have different effects on the expression of differentiation-related genes in experimental mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Moral, Raquel; Solanas, Montserrat; Garcia, Gemma; Grau, Laura; Vela, Elena; Escrich, Raquel; Escrich, Eduard

    2008-08-01

    Dietary lipids can modify the clinical behavior and morphological features of experimental breast tumors. We previously demonstrated that a high corn oil diet has a tumor-enhancing effect in 7,12-dimethylbenz(alpha)anthracene (DMBA)-induced rat mammary adenocarcinomas, whereas a high olive oil diet acts as a negative modulator of carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated whether these high fat diets modulate the expression of genes related to differentiation. Rats were induced with DMBA and fed a low fat diet, a high corn oil diet, a high olive oil diet, or both high fat diets. The expression levels of the mammary differentiation biomarkers alpha-casein, beta-casein and transferrin and of beta-actin and its transporter zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1) were analyzed by Northern and/or Western blot in the mammary adenocarcinomas. The high fat diets did not induce changes in the expression of caseins, while transferrin expression was increased as a result of the high olive oil diet. beta-actin mRNA levels were higher in the high fat diet groups, though no changes in the protein levels were observed. The expression of ZBP1, a protein reported as having a role in carcinogenesis, was significantly increased by the high corn oil diet. These results suggest that in this model caseins are not good biomarkers of the changes in tumor morphological differentiation conferred by the high fat diets. The modulation of transferrin and ZBP1 expression by the high olive oil and the high corn oil diets could be one of the mechanisms by which such diets have a different influence on mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:18636208

  11. Diverse Bone Morphogenetic Protein Expression Profiles and Smad Pathway Activation in Different Phenotypes of Experimental Canine Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wensman, Helena; Heldin, Nils-Erik; Pejler, Gunnar; Hellmén, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Background BMPs are currently receiving attention for their role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Currently, most BMP expression studies are performed on carcinomas, and not much is known about the situation in sarcomas. Methodology/Principal Findings We have investigated the BMP expression profiles and Smad activation in clones from different spontaneous canine mammary tumors. Spindle cell tumor and osteosarcoma clones expressed high levels of BMPs, in particular BMP-2, -4 and -6. Clones from a scirrhous carcinoma expressed much lower BMP levels. The various clones formed different tumor types in nude mice but only clones that expressed high levels of BMP-6 gave bone formation. Phosphorylated Smad-1/5, located in the nucleus, was detected in tumors derived from clones expressing high levels of BMPs, indicating an active BMP signaling pathway and BMP-2 stimulation of mammary tumor cell clones in vitro resulted in activation of the Smad-1/5 pathway. In contrast BMP-2 stimulation did not induce phosphorylation of the non-Smad pathway p38 MAPK. Interestingly, an increased level of the BMP-antagonist chordin-like 1 was detected after BMP stimulation of non-bone forming clones. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the specific BMP expression repertoire differs substantially between different types of mammary tumors and that BMP-6 expression most probably has a biological role in bone formation of canine mammary tumors. PMID:19771160

  12. Male reproductive system neoplasms. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Experimental prostate carcinogenesis and related biology; Epidemiology of prostatic neoplasms; Preclinical studies of prostatic cancers; Diagnosis and prognosis of prostatic cancer; Therapy of prostatic cancer; Experimental testicular carcinogenesis and related biology; Epidemiology of testicular cancer; Diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of testicular neoplasms; Penile and other reproductive system neoplasms.

  13. General Information about Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  14. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  17. Treatment Options for Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  18. General Information about Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  19. Studies on acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase from rat mammary gland and mammary tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, P M; Feltman, D S; Ahmad, F

    1982-01-01

    The activities of two lipogenic enzymes, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase, were determined in two transplantable mammary adenocarcinomas (13762 and R3230AC) carried by non-pregnant, pregnant and lactating rats, and in mammary tissue of control animals (non-tumour-carrying) of comparable physiological states. During mammary-gland differentiation of control or tumour-carrying animals, the activities of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase in the lactating gland increased by about 40--50-fold over the values found in non-pregnant animals. On the other hand, in tumours carried by lactating dams there were only modest increases (1.5--2-fold) in acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase compared with the neoplasms carried by non-pregnant animals. On the basis of the Km values for different substrates and immunodiffusion and immunotitration data, the fatty acid synthase of neoplastic tissues appeared to be indistinguishable from the control mammary-gland enzyme. However, a comparison of the immunotitration and immunodiffusion experiments indicated that the mammary-gland acetyl-CoA carboxylase might differ from the enzyme present in mammary neoplasms. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6130760

  20. Tissue integration of polyacrylamide hydrogel: an experimental study of periurethral, perivesical, and mammary gland tissue in the pig.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Lise H; Nielsen, John B; Mouritsen, Lone; Sørensen, Michael; Lose, Gunnar

    2008-06-01

    BACKGROUND Polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) is a nondegradable water-based polymer with high viscoelasticity. The gel is used as a tissue filler, the only risk being prolonged infection with anaerobic, contaminating microorganisms if not treated early with broad-spectrum antibiotics. OBJECTIVE With silicone gel as reference, PAAG tissue integration and migration was studied in a longitudinal study of the pig. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-one pigs were used. PAAG and silicone gel were injected into mammary tissue, and PAAG was injected into urethral or bladder wall or the anal canal. Tissues and regional lymph nodes were examined at 1, 1(1/2), 3, 3(1/2), 6, 12, and 14 months, and other lymph nodes and organs were examined at 1, 6, 12, and 14 months. RESULTS PAAG was invaded by macrophages and giant cells that were gradually replaced by a network of fibrous tissue. Silicone gel was seen inside these cells or as large vacuoles, surrounded by a fibrous capsule. Regional lymph nodes contained PAAG only at 1 1/2 months and silicone gel at 12 months. CONCLUSION PAAG is a stable, viscoelastic bulking agent, which unlike silicone gel is slowly integrated within its host tissue via a thin fibrous network. Long-term risk of fibrosis and migration is minimal. PMID:18547185

  1. Mouse mammary tumor biology: a short history.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Kenney, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology, and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration, in 1984, that the mouse mammary gland could be molecularly targeted and used to test the oncogenicity of candidate human genes. Now, very few scientists can avoid using a mouse model to test the biology of their favorite gene. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skills to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this short history of mouse mammary tumor biology is to provide a historical perspective for the benefit of the newcomers. If Einstein was correct in that "we stand on the shoulders of giants," the neophytes should meet their giants. PMID:17433908

  2. Concentrations of tilmicosin in mammary gland secretions of dairy cows following subcutaneous administration of one or two doses of an experimental preparation of tilmicosin and its efficacy against intramammary infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Jesus; Martínez-Cortés, Ismael; López-Ordaz, Reyes; Gutiérrez, Lilia; Sumano, Hector

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the concentration of tilmicosin in mammary gland secretions of dairy cows following administration of an experimental preparation once or twice during the dry period (45-day period immediately prior to calving during which cows are not milked) and to evaluate its efficacy for the treatment of cows with intramammary infections (IMIs) caused by Staphylococcus aureus at dry off (cessation of milking; first day of dry period), compared with that of an intramammary infusion of ceftiofur. ANIMALS 172 cows. PROCEDURES Milk samples were collected for microbiological culture 5 days before dry off and at calving and 15 and 30 days after calving. Cows with Staphylococcus IMIs were randomly assigned to receive an experimental preparation of tilmicosin (20 mg/kg, SC) once at dry off (n = 58) or at dry off and again 20 days later (56) or receive a long-acting intramammary preparation of ceftiofur (500 mg/mammary gland; 56) at dry off. Mammary gland secretions were collected from 5 cows in the tilmicosin-treated groups every 5 days after dry off until calving for determination of tilmicosin concentration. RESULTS Mean maximum concentration of tilmicosin in mammary gland secretions ranged from 14.4 to 20.9 μg/mL after the first dose and was 17.1 μg/mL after the second dose. The bacteriologic cure rate was 100% for all 3 treatments. Tilmicosin was detectable for 0 and 18 days after calving in the milk of cows treated with 1 and 2 doses of tilmicosin, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Administration of an experimental preparation of tilmicosin (20 mg/kg, SC) once to dairy cows at dry off might be useful for the treatment of S aureus IMIs. PMID:27580103

  3. Sebaceous gland carcinoma and mammary gland carcinoma in an African hedgehog (Ateletrix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Matute, Alonso Reyes; Bernal, Adriana Mendez; Lezama, José Ramírez; Guadalupe, Manzano Pech Linaloe; Antonio, Galicia Avalos Marco

    2014-09-01

    A sebaceous carcinoma was diagnosed, together with a mammary carcinoma, in an adult African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). The first neoplasm was located in the subcutaneous tissue of the neck and extended towards the axillary area of the chest. The second was located in the subcutaneous left caudal abdominal region. The purpose of this paper is to report the histopathologic and ultrastructural features of these neoplasms. Although there is little information about diseases affecting this species, it is known that neoplastic disorders are fairly common in African hedgehogs. The mammary carcinoma is considered to be the most common neoplasm in these animals; however, the presentation of sebaceous carcinoma is rare. In hedgehogs, the simultaneous presence of two neoplasms is common, which is why special attention should be paid to the presentation of other tumors during the early detection of a neoplastic process as this will greatly facilitate the optimal treatment and improve the long-term prognosis of affected animals. PMID:25314843

  4. Influence of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genotypes on the prognosis of canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Dias Pereira, P; Lopes, C C; Matos, A J F; Pinto, D; Gärtner, F; Lopes, C; Medeiros, R

    2009-11-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an important enzyme involved in inactivation of catechol estrogens, which are metabolites with carcinogenic properties. Some investigations in human breast cancer associate a genetic polymorphism in the COMT gene (COMT val158met) with an increased risk and poor clinical progression of the disease. In dogs, there are 2 recognized single nucleotide polymorphisms in the COMT gene (COMTG216A and COMTG482A); however, their influence on the outcome of mammary neoplasms has never been investigated. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of COMT in the clinical progression of canine mammary tumors, namely in recurrence, metastasis and survival by testing 2 SNPs (G216A and G482A), and 2 genotypes of the COMT gene. A case series was conducted analyzing genomic DNA samples by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism from 80 bitches with mammary tumors. Animals were submitted to an active follow-up study for a period of 24 months after surgery. We observed that bitches carrying both genetic variations simultaneously are more likely to develop recurrence of mammary lesions. Our results demonstrate a possible role for COMT genotypes in the outcome of mammary neoplasms in the dog. Identifying a genetic factor predictive of recurrence may be useful in selecting the most effective surgical approach for canine mammary neoplasms. PMID:19605895

  5. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Kumaraguruparan, R; Subapriya, R; Balachandran, C; Manohar, B Murali; Thangadurai, A; Nagini, S

    2006-09-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms in female dogs. The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between different clinical stages with activities of phase I and phase II carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes in canine mammary tumours. The levels of cytochrome P450 and cytochrome b5 and the activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), DT-diaphorase (DTD) and NADPH diaphorase in tumour tissues of 25 bitches was estimated. Enhanced levels of cytochrome P450 and b5 and phase II enzyme activities were observed in tumour tissues compared to the corresponding uninvolved adjacent tissues. The magnitude of the changes in phase I and phase II enzyme status was, however, more pronounced in stages I and II compared to stages III and IV. The results suggest that the balance between phase I carcinogen activation and phase II detoxification systems may play an important role in canine mammary tumour development. PMID:16014333

  6. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Beiderwellen, K; Sabet, A; Lauenstein, T C; Lahner, H; Poeppel, T D

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. PMID:27003413

  7. Mammary gland neoplasia in long-term rodent studies.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I H; Russo, J

    1996-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most frequent spontaneous malignancy diagnosed in women in the western world, is continuously increasing in incidence in industrialized nations. Although breast cancer develops in women as the result of a combination of external and endogenous factors such as exposure to ionizing radiation, diet, socioeconomic status, and endocrinologic, familial, or genetic factors, no specific etiologic agent(s) or the mechanisms responsible of the disease has been identified as yet. Thus, experimental models that exhibit the same complex interactions are needed for testing various mechanisms and for assessing the carcinogenic potential of given chemicals. Rodent mammary carcinomas represent such a model to a great extent because, in these species, mammary cancer is a multistep complex process that can be induced by either chemicals, radiation, viruses, or genetic factors. Long-term studies in rodent models have been particularly useful for dissecting the initiation, promotion, and progression steps of carcinogenesis. The susceptibility of the rodent mammary gland to develop neoplasms has made this organ a unique target for testing the carcinogenic potential of specific genotoxic chemicals and environmental agents. Mammary tumors induced by indirect- or direct-acting carcinogens such as 7, 12-dimethlbenz(a)anthracene or N-methyl-N-nitrosourea are, in general, hormone dependent adenocarcinomas whose incidence, number of tumors per animal, tumor latency, and tumor type are influenced by the age, reproductive history, and endocarinologic milieu of the host at the time of carcinogen exposure. Rodent models are informative in the absence of human data. They have provided valuable information on the dose and route of administration to be used and optimal host conditions for eliciting maximal tumorigenic response. Studies of the influence of normal gland development on the pathogenesis of chemically induced mammary carcinomas have clarified the role of differentiation

  8. Apoptosis deregulation in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Raquel; Nunes, Natália de Souza; de Castro, Fabíola Attié

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Philadelphia-chromosome negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms are clonal hematologic diseases characterized by hematopoietic progenitor independence from or hypersensitivity to cytokines. The cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms have not yet been fully clarified. Pathophysiologic findings relevant for myeloproliferative neoplasms are associated with genetic alterations, such as, somatic mutation in the gene that codifies JAK-2 (JAK V617F). Deregulation of the process of programmed cellular death, called apoptosis, seems to participate in the pathogenesis of these disorders. It is known that expression deregulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes promotes cell resistance to apoptosis, culminating with the accumulation of myeloid cells and establishing neoplasms. This review will focus on the alterations in apoptosis regulation in myeloproliferative neoplasms, and the importance of a better understanding of this mechanism for the development of new therapies for these diseases. PMID:24488400

  9. Mammary cancers and pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J M

    1979-01-01

    Uncertainties persist about management and prognosis of mammary cancers that occur during and after pregnancy and during lactation. Pathological features of mammary cancers occurring during pregnancy are the same as those in non-pregnant women and survival rates are comparable. Management should be the same as in non-pregnant patients. Termination of pregnancy does not improve survival but it should be advised if the prognosis is poor. Mastectomy apparently presents little danger to the fetus, though treatment such as chemotherapy and irradiation should be avoided. Women who have received treatment for mammary cancer need not be advised against subsequent pregnancy. Routine ovarian radiation in non-pregnant premenopausal women is not generally to be recommended, since it does not prolong survival and would deprive some of the chance of further pregnancy. In lactating women who develop mammary cancers survival is apparently not adversely affected. Lactation should be suppressed initially and followed by mastectomy. Regimens of immunotherapy, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy may then be begun. Until results of current trials of combined treatments of mammary cancers associated with pregnancy are available, management should be neither aggressive nor tentative. It should be based on a well-balanced concept of applying all available treatments, as in non-pregnant patients. PMID:376044

  10. Intrathoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Very little is known regarding the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in companion animals. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms. Most studies of thoracic neoplasia have focused on the pathology of primary and metastatic neoplasms of the lung with little attention given to diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Although the cited incidence rate for primary respiratory tract neoplasia is low, 8.5 cases per 100,000 dogs and 5.5 cases per 100,000 cats, intrathoracic masses often attract attention out of proportion to their actual importance since they are often readily visualized on routine thoracic radiographs.

  11. Persistent mammary hyperplasia in FVB/N mice.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Ana I; Shyamala, G; Galvez, Jose J; Thordarson, Gudmundur; Wakefield, Lalage M; Cardiff, Robert D

    2003-08-01

    The inbred FVB/N mouse strain is widely used for creating transgenic mice. Over the past decade, persistent mammary hyperplasia has been detected in many multiparous FVB/N female mice sent to the University of California, Davis (UCD) Mutant Mouse Pathology Laboratory (MMPL) by a number of different laboratories. However, the experimental details concerning most specimens were not always available. To confirm these empiric findings, experiments were carried out to evaluate the mammary glands of FVB/N mice under controlled conditions. Persistent mammary hyperplasia that related to parity was found. Weeks after their first to fourth pregnancy, 10 FVB/N female mice from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) colony were studied and the mammary glands were evaluated. The percentage of fat pad filled was estimated, using image analysis. Serum samples and the pituitary gland from other FVB/N mice from the LBNL were assayed for prolactin concentration. Multiparous FVB/N females consistently had persistent mammary hyperplasia. Four of seven females in the LBNL colony had hyperplasia after three pregnancies. A few foci of squamous nodules and sporadic carcinomas also were observed. Thus, some FVB/N females may have persistent mammary hyperplasia after three pregnancies without detectable pituitary abnormalities. Mammary carcinomas also may develop sporadically. These background phenotypes must be considered when interpreting the effect of genetic manipulation in FVB/N mice. PMID:14524420

  12. Myeloproliferative Neoplasms in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by aberrant proliferation of one or more myeloid lineages often with increased immature cells in the peripheral blood. The three classical BCR-ABL-negative MPNs are: 1) polycythemia vera (PV), 2) essential thrombocythemia (ET), and 3) primary myelofibrosis (PMF), which are typically disorders of older adults and are exceedingly rare in children. The diagnostic criteria for MPNs remain largely defined by clinical, laboratory and histopathology assessments in adults, but they have been applied to the pediatric population. The discovery of the JAK2 V617F mutation, and more recently, MPL and CALR mutations, are major landmarks in the understanding of MPNs. Nevertheless, they rarely occur in children, posing a significant diagnostic challenge given the lack of an objective, clonal marker. Therefore, in pediatric patients, the diagnosis must rely heavily on clinical and laboratory factors, and exclusion of secondary disorders to make an accurate diagnosis of MPN. This review focuses on the clinical presentation, diagnostic work up, differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of the classical BCR-ABL-negative MPNs (PV, ET and PMF) in children and highlights key differences to the adult diseases. Particular attention will be given to pediatric PMF, as it is the only disorder of this group that is observed in infants and young children, and in many ways appears to be a unique entity compared to adult PMF. PMID:26609329

  13. Myeloproliferative neoplasms and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Barbui, Tiziano; Finazzi, Guido; Falanga, Anna

    2013-09-26

    Major causes of morbidity and mortality in myeloproliferative neoplasms are represented by arterial and venous complications, progression to myelofibrosis, and transformation to acute leukemia. The pathogenesis of thrombosis results from a complex interplay of clinical and disease-related factors. Abnormalities of blood cells arising from the clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells involve not only quantitative changes but also qualitative modifications that characterize the switch of these cells from a resting to a procoagulant phenotype. According to age and previous thrombosis, patients are classified in a "high risk" or "low risk". Novel disease-related determinants such as leukocytosis and JAK2V617F mutational status and/or mutational burden are now under active investigation. In low-risk polycythemia vera patients, only phlebotomy and primary antithrombotic prophylaxis with aspirin is recommended, while in high-risk patients cytotoxic therapy is considered. Whether novel drugs targeting the constitutively active JAK2/STAT pathway will improve the management of thrombosis is a challenge for future studies. PMID:23823316

  14. Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs) Patient Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-28

    Primary Myelofibrosis; Polycythemia Vera; Essential Thrombocythemia; Mastocytosis; Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic, Atypical, BCR-ABL Negative; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Juvenile; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia-not Otherwise Specified; Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases; Neoplasms; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic

  15. Mammary Glands: Developmental Changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mammary gland progresses from the accumulation of a few cells in the embryonic ectoderm to a highly arborescent tubulo-alveolar gland capable of secreting a highly nutritious product for consumption. Throughout this progression, various changes occur during each developmental stage: prenatal, pr...

  16. Of humans and canines: Immunohistochemical analysis of PCNA, Bcl-2, p53, cytokeratin and ER in mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Kumaraguruparan, R; Prathiba, D; Nagini, S

    2006-10-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms in humans and canines. Human and canine mammary tumours share several important epidemiological, clinicopathological and biochemical features. Development of mammary tumours involves accumulation of mutant cells caused by excessive proliferation and insufficient apoptosis or dysregulation of cellular differentiation. The present study was therefore designed to investigate the expression of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis associated proteins together with expression of estrogen receptors (ER) in both human and canine mammary tumours. Thirty breast cancer patients categorized as pre- and postmenopausal, and 30 mammary gland tumours obtained from bitches were included in this study. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Bcl-2, p53, cytokeratin and ER in tumour tissues and adjacent tissues were investigated using immunohistochemical staining. While the expression of PCNA, Bcl-2, p53 and ER was significantly increased, expression of cytokeratin was significantly lower in both human as well as canine mammary tumours compared to corresponding adjacent tissues. The magnitude of the changes was however more pronounced in premenopausal patients compared to postmenopausal patients. The changes in proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation associated proteins in human and canine mammary tumours validate use of the canine model to understand the molecular mechanisms of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:16740286

  17. Role of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor-1 antagonists in treatment of experimentally induced mammary tumor: does montelukast modulate antitumor and immunosuppressant effects of doxorubicin?

    PubMed

    El-Sisi, Alaa El-Din E; Sokar, Samia S; Salem, Tarek A; Abu Risha, Sally E

    2015-11-01

    It has been reported that a leukotriene (LT)-D4 receptor (i.e. cysteinyl LT1 receptor; CysLT1R) has an important role in carcinogenesis. The current study was carried out to assess the possible antitumor effects of montelukast (MON), a CysLT1R antagonist, in a mouse mammary carcinoma model, that is, a solid Ehrlich carcinoma (SEC). Effects of MON on tumor-induced immune dysfunction and the possibility that MON may modulate the antitumor and immunomodulatory effects of doxorubicin (DOX) were also studied. The effects in tumor-bearing hosts of several dosings with MON (10 mg/kg, per os), with and without the added presence of DOX (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), were investigated in vivo; end points evaluated included assessment of tumor volume, splenic lymphocyte profiles/functionality, tumor necrosis factor-α content, as well as apoptosis and expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) among the tumor cells. The data indicate that MON induced significant antitumor activity against the SEC. MON treatments also significantly mitigated both tumor- and DOX-induced declines in immune parameters assessed here. Moreover, MON led to decreased NF-κB nuclear expression and, in doing so, appeared to chemosensitize these tumor cells to DOX-induced apoptosis. PMID:26499992

  18. Characterization of gene expression and activated signaling pathways in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Park, Minhee; Kim, Minhyung; Hwang, Daehee; Park, Misun; Kim, Won Kyu; Kim, Sang Kyum; Shin, Jihye; Park, Eun Sung; Kang, Chang Moo; Paik, Young-Ki; Kim, Hoguen

    2014-04-01

    Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm is an uncommon pancreatic tumor with distinct clinicopathologic features. Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms are characterized by mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1. However, little is known about the gene and microRNA expression profiles of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. Thus, we sought to characterize solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm-specific gene expression and identify the signaling pathways activated in these tumors. Comparisons of gene expression in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm to pancreatic ductal carcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, and non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues identified solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm-specific mRNA and microRNA profiles. By analyzing 1686 (1119 upregulated and 567 downregulated) genes differentially expressed in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm, we found that the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, and androgen receptor signaling pathways, as well as genes involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition, are activated in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. We validated these results experimentally by assessing the expression of β-catenin, WIF-1, GLI2, androgen receptor, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related markers with western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our analysis also revealed 17 microRNAs, especially the miR-200 family and miR-192/215, closely associated with the upregulated genes associated with the three pathways activated in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm and epithelial mesenchymal transition. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm tumorigenesis and its characteristic less epithelial cell differentiation than the other common pancreatic tumors. PMID:24072181

  19. Time to reconsider Spitzoid neoplasms?

    PubMed Central

    Urso, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background: Spitzoid neoplasms may pose significant diagnostic problems because in a fraction of them it is quite difficult or impossible to establish if they are benign or malignant lesions. An extraordinarily large number of studies have been made in attempts to solve this problem; regrettably, the histological criteria proposed and the various special sophisticated techniques employed have proven to be ineffective in making this distinction with confidence. Objectives: To explore the possible causes for this diagnostic failure and an attempt to identify the source of this problem. Method: A historical and technical analysis of the specialized literature is performed, critically evaluating the main points of this controversial topic. Results: The reasons for the diagnostic failure in Spitzoid neoplasms are not clear but could be the result of inappropriate conceptual representation. The analysis of available data and a rational review of old and new assumptions and concepts may suggest a different representation for Spitzoid neoplasms: Spitz nevus, atypical Spitz tumor and Spitzoid melanoma, rather than being three different tumors that are difficult or impossible to distinguish with assurance, could be viewed as one unique entity, Spitz tumor (ST). This tumor is a low-grade malignant neoplasm, in which the amount of intrinsic risk is variable, ranging from very low to high (ST1, ST2, ST3), and malignant potential could be estimated. Conclusions: The proposed alternative representation of Spitzoid neoplasms as a unique tumor may help in overcoming the difficulty in diagnosis of these tumors. PMID:27222771

  20. Staging of neoplasms. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book is divided into ten chapters. The first, an overview of the importance of staging, is followed by separate chapters on computed tomographic (CT) evaluation of lymph node metastases; metastatic disease to the thorax; staging of laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, esophageal, non-small cell lung, and renal carcinoma; and pediatric abdominal malignancies. CT staging of lymphomas is dealt with in a separate chapter. The final chapter summarizes initial experiences with staging of neoplasms by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Other neoplasms, such as pelvic, pancreatic, and gastrointestinal, are not discussed in depth. The book concludes with ten case studies, most of which deal with pelvic and gastrointestinal malignancies.

  1. Influence of ovariectomy at the time of mastectomy on the prognosis for canine malignant mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, T; Kobayashi, T; Takahashi, K; Sugiyama, M

    1996-10-01

    The two-year prognosis for malignant mammary tumours seen in 175 bitches in the Tokyo metropolitan area was assessed based on the extent of mastectomy and on whether an ovariectomy was carried out at the time of mastectomy. The prognosis for the bitches was not influenced by the excision size of the affected mammary glands. Ovariectomy had no effect on the two-year survival rate of the dogs that underwent the tumour excision. There was no significant difference in the two-year survival rate between the dogs ovariectomised prior to mastectomy and those ovariectomised at the time of mastectomy. These results suggest that ovariectomy at the time of mastectomy has no effect on the prognosis in dogs with established neoplasms of the mammary gland. PMID:8912239

  2. Anal Papilloma: An Exceptional Presentation of Fibrocystic Disease in Anogenital Mammary-Like Glands

    PubMed Central

    Subashchandrabose, Priya; Esakkai, Muthuvel; Venugopal, Palani; Kannaiyan, Ilavarasan; Srinivasan, Chitra; Reddy, Punuru Tejashwini; Ebenezer, Evelyn Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Previously ectopic breast tissue was thought to be derived from the caudal remnants of the primitive embryonic milk ridges; anogenital mammary-like glands are presently considered as normal constituents of the anogenital region. We report a case of young female, who presented with an anal papilloma. Histopathological examination revealed extensive fibrocystic changes in anogenital mammary-like glands. To date, a lot of benign changes and a wide range of benign and malignant neoplasms have been reported in these glands. However, extensive fibrocystic change of these glands in anal region is very rare. In addition, fibrocystic disease of anal mammary glands, masquerading clinically as an anal papilloma, has not been reported in literature. Hence, it is essential for clinicians and the pathologists to be aware of such a rare presentation. The features of fibrocystic disease in perianal region are also discussed. PMID:26495147

  3. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Shlomo E.; Heller, Elimelech D.; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  4. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blum, Shlomo E; Heller, Elimelech D; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  5. Altered oxidant-antioxidant profile in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Kumaraguruparan, R; Balachandran, C; Manohar, B Murali; Nagini, S

    2005-05-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms in female dogs. Oxidative stress arising due to overproduction of reactive oxygen species, coupled with altered antioxidant capacities has been implicated in the pathogenesis of all types of cancers. However, the extent of lipid peroxidation and the status of antioxidants in canine mammary tumours have not been investigated. The present study was designed to evaluate the oxidant-antioxidant profile in canine mammary tumours. Lipid peroxidation as evidenced by the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides, and conjugated dienes, as well as the status of the antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase and vitamin C, in tumour tissues of 25 bitches was estimated. Lipid peroxidation in tumour tissues was enhanced compared to the corresponding adjacent uninvolved tissues. This was accompanied by significant elevation in both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. This study suggests that upregulation of antioxidants induced by lipid peroxidation confers a selective growth advantage to tumour cells over their adjacent normal counterparts. PMID:15751580

  6. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myeloproliferative neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. Primary and secondary neoplasms of the spleen

    PubMed Central

    Azar, S.; Al-Hawary, M.M.; Francis, I.R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract With the exception of lymphoma involving the spleen, other primary and secondary neoplasms are rare and infrequently encountered. Primary malignant neoplasms involving the spleen are lymphoma and angiosarcoma. Primary benign neoplasms involving the spleen include hemangioma, lymphangioma, littoral cell angioma and splenic cyst and solid lesions such as hamartoma and inflammatory pseudotumor. PMID:20713317

  8. 9 CFR 311.11 - Neoplasms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Neoplasms. 311.11 Section 311.11... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.11 Neoplasms. (a) An individual organ or other part of a carcass affected with a neoplasm shall be condemned. If there is...

  9. 9 CFR 311.11 - Neoplasms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Neoplasms. 311.11 Section 311.11... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.11 Neoplasms. (a) An individual organ or other part of a carcass affected with a neoplasm shall be condemned. If there is...

  10. 9 CFR 311.11 - Neoplasms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Neoplasms. 311.11 Section 311.11... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.11 Neoplasms. (a) An individual organ or other part of a carcass affected with a neoplasm shall be condemned. If there is...

  11. 9 CFR 311.11 - Neoplasms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Neoplasms. 311.11 Section 311.11... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.11 Neoplasms. (a) An individual organ or other part of a carcass affected with a neoplasm shall be condemned. If there is...

  12. 9 CFR 311.11 - Neoplasms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Neoplasms. 311.11 Section 311.11... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.11 Neoplasms. (a) An individual organ or other part of a carcass affected with a neoplasm shall be condemned. If there is...

  13. Neoplasms in young dogs after perinatal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, S.A.; Lee, A.C.; Angleton, G.M.; Saunders, W.J.; Miller, G.K.; Williams, J.S.; Brewster, R.D.; Long, R.I.

    1986-08-01

    For a study of the life-time effects of irradiation during development, 1,680 beagles were given single, whole-body exposures to /sup 60/Co gamma-radiation at one of three prenatal (preimplantation, embryonic, and fetal) or at one of three postnatal (neonatal, juvenile, and young adult) ages. Mean doses were 0, 0.16, or 0.83 Gy. For comparison with data on childhood cancer after prenatal irradiation, examination was made of tumors occurring in young dogs in this life-span experiment. Up to 4 years of age, 18 dogs had neoplasms diagnosed, 2 of these being in controls. Four dogs that were irradiated in the perinatal (late fetal or neonatal) period died of cancers prior to 2 years of age. This risk was of significant increase compared to the risks for other experimental groups and for the canine population in general. Overall, 71% (5 of 7) of all cancers and 56% (10 of 18) of all benign and malignant neoplasms seen in the first 4 years of life occurred in 29% (480 of 1680) of the dogs irradiated in the perinatal period. These data suggest an increased risk for neoplasia after perinatal irradiation in dogs.

  14. Spontaneous endomyometrial neoplasms in aging Chinese hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Brownstein, D.G.; Brooks, A.L.

    1980-05-01

    Twenty-one endomyometrial neoplasms among 93 nulliparous noninbred Chinese hamsters were evaluated. The median survival time of the 93 females was 1040 days. The median age of hamsters with endomyometrial neoplasms was 1200 days. Neoplasms were classified as carcinomas or malignant mixed muellerian tumors of the endometrium and benign or malignant myometrial neoplasms. There were 13 endometrial adenocarcinomas. Three tumors were mixed adenosquamous carcinomas, which occurred in significantly older Chinese hamsters than did adenocarcinomas. Three malignant mixed muellerian tumors consisted of 2 carcinosarcomas and 1 mixed mesodermal tumor. The 2 myometrial neoplasms were a lelomyoma and a lelomyosarcoma. The classification and relative frequency of these neoplasms were similar to endomyometrial neoplasms of women, which makes Chinese hamsters useful subjects for studies of spontaneous endomyometrial cancers.

  15. Primary Neoplasms of Bones in Mice: Retrospective Study and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kavirayani, A. M.; Sundberg, J. P.; Foreman, O.

    2011-01-01

    To compare and summarize the mechanisms, frequencies of occurrence, and classification schemes of spontaneous, experimental, and genetically engineered, mouse skeletal neoplasms, the literature was reviewed and archived case material at The Jackson Laboratory examined. The frequency of occurrence of spontaneous bone neoplasms was less than 1% for most strains, with the exceptions of osteomas in CF-1 (5.5% and 10% in two studies) and OF-1 outbred strains (35%), and osteosarcomas in NOD/ShiLtJ (11.5%) and NOD derived (7.1%) mice. The frequency was 100% for osteochondromas induced by conditional inactivation of exostoses (multiple) 1 (Ext1) in chondrocytes, osteosarcomas induced by tibial intramedullary inoculation of Moloney’s murine sarcoma virus, and osteosarcomas induced by conditional inactivation of Trp53-with or without inactivation of Rb1-in osteoblast precursors. Spontaneous osteogenic neoplasms were more frequent than spontaneous cartilaginous and vascular types. Malignant neoplasms were more frequent than benign ones. The age of occurrence for spontaneous neoplasms ranged from 37 to 720 (Mean 316.35) days for benign, and 35 to 990 (Mean 299.28) days for malignant neoplasms. In genetically engineered mice, the average age of occurrence ranged from 28 to 70 days for benign, and from 35 to 690 days for malignant neoplasms. Histologically, non-osteogenic neoplasms were similar across strains and mutant stocks; osteogenic neoplasms exhibited greater diversity. This comparison and summarization of mouse bone neoplasms provides valuable information for the selection of strains to create, compare, and validate models of bone neoplasms. PMID:21343597

  16. An Evaluation of a Teat Dip with Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonic Acid in Preventing Bovine Mammary Gland Infection from Experimental Exposure to Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, D. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Brooks, B. W.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of a teat dip with dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (1.94%) for the prevention of intramammary infections was determined in cows experimentally challenged with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus. The infection rates with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus were 62.5% and 75% in undipped quarters, 12.5% and 21.5% in dipped quarters with a reduction rate of 80% and 71% respectively. The significance of some findings in relation to mastitis control are discussed. PMID:17422110

  17. Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J; Flanagan, A

    2000-01-01

    Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease are uncommon intraepithelial adenocarcinomas. Both conditions have similar clinical features, which mimic inflammatory and infective diseases. Histological diagnostic confusion can arise between Paget's disease and other neoplastic conditions affecting the skin, with the most common differential diagnoses being malignant melanoma and atypical squamous disease. The glandular differentiation of both mammary Paget's disease and extramammary Paget's disease is indicated by morphological appearances, the presence of intracellular mucin in many cases, and positive immunohistochemical staining for glandular cytokeratins, epithelial membrane antigen, and carcinoembryonic antigen. This article provides an overview of mammary and extramammary Paget's disease and discusses recent evidence regarding the cell of origin. The concepts of primary and secondary Paget's disease are presented and the differential diagnosis is discussed with reference to immunohistochemical markers that might be of diagnostic value. Key Words: mammary Paget's disease • extramammary Paget's disease PMID:11064666

  18. Estrogens metabolism associated with polymorphisms: influence of COMT G482a genotype on age at onset of canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Dias Pereira, P; Lopes, C C; Matos, A J F; Pinto, D; Gärtner, F; Lopes, C; Medeiros, R

    2008-03-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an important enzyme participating in inactivation of carcinogenic oestrogen metabolites. In humans there is a single nucleotide polymorphism in COMT gene (COMT val158met) that has been associated with an increased risk for developing breast cancer. In dogs, there is a single nucleotide polymorphism in COMT gene (G482A), but its relation with mammary carcinogenesis has never been investigated. The aim of this study was to focus on the evaluation of such polymorphism as a risk factor for the development of mammary tumors in bitches and on the analysis of its relationship with some clinicopathologic features (dog's age and weight, number and histologic type of the lesions, lymph node metastasis) of canine mammary neoplasms. A case-control study was conducted analyzing 90 bitches with mammary tumors and 84 bitches without evidence of neoplastic disease. The COMT G482A polymorphism was analyzed by PCR-RFLP. We found a protective effect of the polymorphism in age of onset of mammary tumors, although we could not establish a significant association between COMT genotype and other clinicopathologic parameters nor with mammary tumor risk overall. Animals carrying the variant allele have a threefold likelihood of developing mammary tumors after 9 years of age in comparison with noncarriers. The Kaplan-Meier method revealed significant differences in the waiting time for onset of malignant disease for A allele carrier (12.46 years) and noncarrier (11.13 years) animals. This investigation constitutes the first case-control study designed to assess the relationship between polymorphic genes and mammary tumor risk in dogs. Our results point to the combined effect of COMT genotype with other genetic and/or environmental risk factors as important key factors for mammary tumor etiopathogenesis. PMID:18424824

  19. Oxytocin binding by myoepithelial cell membranes from involuted mammary tissue.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, A; Olins, G M; Eakle, K A; Bremel, R D

    1983-04-29

    Oxytocin binding activity of myoepithelial cell membranes from mammary tissue was measured under a variety of different experimental conditions. Mammary tissue from non-lactating rats bound oxytocin with a Kd of 9.2 +/- 1.6 nM (+/- S.E.) and indicates that receptors are retained by the myoepithelial cells in a non-lactating state. Ovariectomy of non-lactating rats did not depress the binding activity of the membranes. Administration of the estrogenic compounds estradiol-17 beta and diethylstibestrol at doses which affect uterine weight and are known to increase uterine oxytocin binding did not influence the binding activity of the myoepithelial cells. This indicates that the oxytocin receptors of the mammary gland are not under the same endocrine control as the uterine receptors. PMID:6303330

  20. Expression of prolactin receptors in normal canine mammary tissue, canine mammary adenomas and mammary adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammary tumors represent the most common neoplastic disease in female dogs. Recently, the promoting role of prolactin (PRL) in the development of human breast carcinoma has been shown. Possible proliferative, anti-apoptotic, migratory and angiogenic effects of PRL on human mammary cancer cells in vitro and in vivo were suggested. The effects of PRL are mediated by its receptor, and alterations in receptor expression are likely to play a role in tumor development. Currently, not much data is available about prolactin receptor (PRLR) expression in canine mammary tumors. To set the basis for investigations on the role of PRL in mammary tumorigenesis in this species, prolactin receptor expression was evaluated by semi-quantitative real time PCR and immunohistochemistry on 10 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples each of canine non-neoplastic mammary tissue, mammary adenomas and adenocarcinomas. Results The highest PRLR expression levels were found in normal mammary tissue, while adenomas, and to an even higher degree adenocarcinomas, showed a significant decrease in prolactin receptor expression. Compared to normal tissue, PRLR mRNA was reduced 2.4 fold (p = 0.0261) in adenomas and 4.8 fold (p = 0.008) in adenocarcinomas. PRLR mRNA expression was significantly lower in malignant than in benign lesions (p = 0.0165). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated PRLR expression in all three tissue types with signals mostly limited to epithelial cells. Conclusions Malignant transformation of mammary tissue was associated with a decline in prolactin receptor expression. Further studies are warranted to address the functional significance of this finding. PMID:22647582

  1. CT of soft-tissue neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Weekes, R.G.; McLeod, R.A.; Reiman, H.M.; Pritchard, D.J.

    1985-02-01

    The computed tomographic scans (CT) of 84 patients with untreated soft-tissue neoplasms were studied, 75 with primary and nine with secondary lesions. Each scan was evaluated using several criteria: homogeneity and density, presence and type of calcification, presence of bony destruction, involvement of multiple muscle groups, definition of adjacent fat, border definition, and vessel or nerve involvement. CT demonstrated the lesion in all 84 patients and showed excellent anatomic detail in 64 of the 75 patients with primary neoplasms. The CT findings were characteristic enough to suggest the histology of the neoplasm in only 13 lesions (nine lipomas, three hemangiomas, one neurofibroma). No malignant neoplasm had CT characteristics specific enough to differentiate it from any other malignant tumor. However, malignant neoplasms could be differentiated from benign neoplasms in 88% of the cases.

  2. Expression and role of PGP, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP3 in multidrug resistance of canine mammary cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In both women and female dogs, the most prevalent type of malignant neoplasm is the spontaneous mammary tumor. In dogs, half of these are malignant. The treatment of choice for the canine patients is surgical mastectomy. Unfortunately, it often fails in high-risk, locally invasive mammary tumors as of during the time of the surgery the micro-metastases are present. Moreover, there are neither large studies conducting to prove of the benefit from the chemotherapy in dogs nor established chemotherapy treatment protocols available. Additionally, the effectiveness of each individual chemotherapeutic agent and drug resistance of canine mammary cancer have not yet been characterized. That has become the aim of our study, to assess the expression of PGP, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP3 in canine mammary cancer cell lines and to investigate their role in cancer resistance to vinblastine, cisplatin and cyclophosphamide with using RNAi approach. Results The results suggested that in canine mammary cancer, the vinblastine efflux was mediated by PGP and MRP1 proteins, cisplatin efflux was mediated by all four examined efflux pumps (PGP, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP3), whereas cyclophosphamide resistance was related to BCRP activity. RNAi silencing of these efflux pumps significantly decreased IC50 doses of the examined drugs in canine mammary carcinoma cells. Conclusions Our results have indicated the treatment of cells involving use of the siRNA targeting efflux pumps could be a beneficial approach in the future. PMID:23773525

  3. Insulin receptors in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin binding studies were conducted using mammary membrane preparations to further the authors understanding of insulin's role in regulating mammary metabolism, particularly ruminant mammary metabolism. Specific objectives were to: (1) characterize insulin binding to bovine mammary microsomes and determine if the specificity and kinetics of binding indicate the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland; (2) examine and compare insulin binding by liver and mammary microsomes of the pig and dairy cow; (3) examine insulin binding to bovine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) and evaluate this model's usefulness in assessing insulin receptor regulation in the mammary gland of the cow; (4) examine the effect of dietary fat in insulin binding by rat mammary and liver microsomes. The specificity and kinetics of /sup 125/I-insulin binding of bovine mammary microsomes indicated the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland. Bovine liver and mammary microsomes specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did the corresponding porcine microsomes, and mammary microsomes, regardless of species, specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did liver microsomes. These differences in binding suggest differences in insulin responsiveness between pigs and cattle, as well as between the liver and mammary glands.

  4. Testicular neoplasm diagnosed by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Senay, B A; Stein, B S

    1986-06-01

    The diagnosis of testicular cancer is usually made by the findings of a testicular mass on physical examination. In rare cases a young man will present with retroperitoneal nodes and a normal testicular examination. In such cases a testicular ultrasound may localize the testis which harbors a subclinical neoplasm. In addition serum markers of B-HCG and AFP are essential. As a screening procedure a urine pregnancy test is helpful, since it can be obtained quickly while quantitative B-HCG and APF results are delayed. PMID:3523046

  5. How We Treat Myeloproliferative Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Claire N; McLornan, Donal P; Francis, Yvonne A; Woodley, Claire; Provis, Lizzie; Radia, Deepti H

    2015-06-01

    The present report focuses on management strategies for the myeloproliferative neoplasm according to the structure and processes we use within our center, a large tertiary unit in central London. The standard procedures for achieving an accurate diagnosis and risk stratification and therapeutic strategies for these diseases with a detailed focus on contentious areas are discussed. In the 9 years after the description of the Janus kinase 2 mutation, this field has altered quite radically in several aspects. For example, a new therapeutic paradigm exists, especially for myelofibrosis. We share how our unit has adapted to these changes. PMID:26297273

  6. Consumption of silibinin, a flavonolignan from milk thistle, and mammary cancer development in the C3(1) SV40 T,t antigen transgenic multiple mammary adenocarcinoma (TAg) mouse.

    PubMed

    Verschoyle, Richard D; Brown, Karen; Steward, William P; Gescher, Andreas J

    2008-07-01

    Silibinin is a flavonolignan extracted from milk thistle with cancer chemopreventive activity in preclinical models of prostate and colorectal cancer. A milk thistle extract, of which silibin is a major component, has recently been shown to exacerbate mammary carcinogenesis in two rodent models. We tested the hypothesis that consumption of silibinin or silipide, a silibinin formulation with pharmaceutical properties superior to the unformulated agent, affect breast cancer development in the C3(1) SV40 T,t antigen transgenic multiple mammary adenocarcinoma mouse model. Mice received silibinin or silipide (0.2% silibinin equivalents) with their diet from weaning, and tumour development was monitored by weekly palpation and the number and weight of neoplasms at the end of the experiment. Intervention neither promoted, nor interfered with, tumour development. The result suggests that promotion of carcinogenesis is not a feature of silibinin consistent across rodent models of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:17909802

  7. The Spindle Cell Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell neoplasms are defined as neoplasms that consist of spindle-shaped cells in the histopathology. Spindle cell neoplasms can affect the oral cavity. In the oral cavity, the origin of the spindle cell neoplasms may be traced to epithelial, mesenchymal and odontogenic components. This article aims to review the spindle cell neoplasms of the oral cavity with emphasis on histopathology. PMID:26351482

  8. Uterine adenosarcomas are mesenchymal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Burke, Kathleen A; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Papanastasiou, Anastasios D; Geyer, Felipe C; Macedo, Gabriel S; Martelotto, Luciano G; de Bruijn, Ino; De Filippo, Maria R; Schultheis, Anne M; Ioris, Rafael A; Levine, Douglas A; Soslow, Robert A; Rubin, Brian P; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Weigelt, Britta

    2016-02-01

    Uterine adenosarcomas (UAs) are biphasic lesions composed of a malignant mesenchymal (ie stromal) component and an epithelial component. UAs are generally low-grade and have a favourable prognosis, but may display sarcomatous overgrowth (SO), which is associated with a worse outcome. We hypothesized that, akin to breast fibroepithelial lesions, UAs are mesenchymal neoplasms in which clonal somatic genetic alterations are restricted to the mesenchymal component. To characterize the somatic genetic alterations in UAs and to test this hypothesis, we subjected 20 UAs to a combination of whole-exome (n = 6), targeted capture (n = 13) massively parallel sequencing (MPS) and/or RNA sequencing (n = 6). Only three genes, FGFR2, KMT2C and DICER1, were recurrently mutated, all in 2/19 cases; however, 26% (5/19) and 21% (4/19) of UAs harboured MDM2/CDK4/HMGA2 and TERT gene amplification, respectively, and two cases harboured fusion genes involving NCOA family members. Using a combination of laser-capture microdissection and in situ techniques, we demonstrated that the somatic genetic alterations detected by MPS were restricted to the mesenchymal component. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA sequencing of microdissected samples revealed that epithelial and mesenchymal components of UAs were clonally unrelated. In conclusion, here we provide evidence that UAs are genetically heterogeneous lesions and mesenchymal neoplasms. PMID:26592504

  9. Neurobehavioral presentations of brain neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B K

    1995-07-01

    We studied 8 patients with frontal or temporolimbic neoplasms who had psychiatric presentations to clarify diagnostic criteria for distinguishing psychiatric disease from structural brain lesions and to examine brain-behavior relationships associated with cerebral neoplasms using modern neuroimaging techniques. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of neurobehavioral and neurologic manifestations, tumor histologic features, and the results of treatment. Clinical presentations were correlated with tumor location as determined by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with frontal lobe tumors presented with abulia, personality change, or depression, whereas those with temporolimbic tumors had auditory and visual hallucinations, mania, panic attacks, or amnesia. After treatment, neurobehavioral syndromes abated or resolved in 7 of 8 patients. We recommend that any patient 40 years of age or older with a change in mental state, cognitive or emotional, should have neuroimaging of the brain. Any patient with a psychiatric presentation who has specific neurobehavioral or neurologic findings or an unexpectedly poor response to psychopharmacologic treatment should also have brain imaging. These case reports extend and update observations on the importance of frontal and temporolimbic systems in the pathogenesis of neurobehavioral disorders. PMID:7667978

  10. The Mammary Glands of Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Cline, J. Mark; Wood, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    This review describes the normal biology and physiology of the mammary gland in macaques, including the typical histologic appearance across the life span (development, reproductive maturity, lactation, and senescence). The molecular events regulating breast morphogenesis are described, as well as systemic and local hormonal regulators of mammary gland proliferation, differentiation, and function. Similarities and differences to the human breast are described. Regulatory events are illuminated by discussion of genetically modified mouse models. Tissue response markers, including immunohistochemical markers of proliferation and other hormonally induced changes and studies to date, regarding the effects of exogenous hormones, are briefly summarized. In general, estrogens stimulate progesterone receptor expression and proliferation in the mammary gland, and combinations of estrogens and progestogens cause greater proliferation than estrogens alone. Evaluation of novel chemical agents in macaques requires careful evaluation of age and hormonal context to avoid the confounding effects of mammary gland development, past reproductive history, and other influences on mammary gland morphology. The expression of proliferation markers and progesterone receptors may be used as biomarkers to measure chemically induced hormonal effects. PMID:21475638

  11. T2* relaxation times of intraductal murine mammary cancer, invasive mammary cancer, and normal mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Elizabeth; Fan, Xiaobing; Jansen, Sanaz A.; Markiewicz, Erica J.; Vosicky, James; Newstead, Gillian M.; Conzen, Suzanne D.; Krausz, Thomas; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the feasibility of T2* to be a diagnostic indicator of early breast cancer in a mouse model. T2* is sensitive to susceptibility effects due to local inhomogeneity of the magnetic field, e.g., caused by hemosiderin or deoxyhemoglobin. In these mouse models, unlike in patients, the characteristics of single mammary ducts containing pure intraductal cancer can be evaluated. Methods: The C3(1)SV40Tag mouse model of breast cancer (n = 11) and normal FVB/N mice (n = 6) were used to measure T2* of normal mammary gland tissue, intraepithelial neoplasia, invasive cancers, mammary lymph nodes, and muscle. MRI experiments were performed on a 9.4T animal scanner. High resolution (117 microns) axial 2D multislice gradient echo images with fat suppression were acquired first to identify inguinal mammary gland. Then a multislice multigradient echo pulse sequence with and without fat suppression were performed over the inguinal mammary gland. The modulus of a complex double exponential decay detected by the multigradient echo sequence was used to fit the absolute proton free induction decay averaged over a region of interest to determine the T2* of water and fat signals. Results: The measured T2* values of tumor and muscle are similar (∼15 ms), and almost twice that of lymph nodes (∼8 ms). There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.03) between T2* in normal mammary tissue (13.7 ± 2.9 ms) and intraductal cancers (11 ± 2.0 ms) when a fat suppression pulse was applied. Conclusions: These are the first reported T2* measurements from single mammary ducts. The results demonstrated that T2* measurements may have utility for identifying early pre-invasive cancers in mouse models. This may inspire similar research for patients using T2* for diagnostic imaging of early breast cancer. PMID:22380363

  12. Computed tomography examination of periampullary neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Darweesh, R M; Thorsen, M K; Dodds, W J; Kishk, S M; Lawson, T L; Stewart, E T

    1988-01-01

    The hospital records of 24 patients with periampullary neoplasms were reviewed. The clinical triad of jaundice, pain, and weight loss and the radiographic imaging triad of dilated biliary ducts, dilated pancreatic duct, and periampullary mass should suggest the diagnosis of periampullary neoplasm. PMID:3349797

  13. ELEVATED TRANS-MAMMARY TRANSMISSION OF Toxocara canis LARVAE IN BALB/c MICE

    PubMed Central

    Telmo, Paula de Lima; de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; dos Santos, Cristina Araújo; de Aguiar, Patrícia de Souza; Martins, Lourdes Helena Rodrigues; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; Scaini, Carlos James

    2015-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a widespread zoonosis and is considered an important worldwide public health problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of trans-mammary Toxocara canis infection in newborn BALB/c mice nursed by females experimentally infected with 1,200 eggs after delivery. After 50 days of age, the presence of larvae in different organs of the offspring was investigated. Trans-mammary infection was confirmed in 73.9% of the mice that had been nursed by infected females. These data show a high trans-mammary transmission of T. canis and confirm the significance of this transmission route in paratenic hosts. PMID:25651332

  14. Cellular Foundations of Mammary Tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huebner, Robert J.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The mammary gland is composed of a highly branched network of epithelial tubes, embedded within a complex stroma. The mammary epithelium originates during embryonic development from an epidermal placode. However, the majority of ductal elongation and bifurcation occurs postnatally, in response to steroid hormone and growth factor receptor signaling. The process of pubertal branching morphogenesis involves both elongation of the primary ducts across the length of the fat pad and a wave of secondary branching that elaborates the ductal network. Recent studies have revealed that mammary epithelial morphogenesis is accomplished by transitions between simple and stratified organization. During active morphogenesis, the epithelium is stratified, highly proliferative, has few intercellular junctions, and exhibits incomplete apico-basal polarity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between epithelial architecture, epithelial polarity, and ductal elongation. PMID:24747369

  15. Matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malignant canine mammary tumors represent 50% of all neoplasms in female dogs. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are thought to be involved in tumor progression, and they are also associated with the reactive stroma, which provides structural and vascular support for tumor growth. Results MMP-2, MMP-9 and MT1-MMP were expressed at both the mRNA and protein levels in tumor samples. MMP-2 and MMP-9 immunohistochemical reactions were evident both in the epithelial tumor cells and in the stromal compartment to varying degrees; in particular, the intensity of the MMP-2 staining was stronger in the stromal fibroblasts close to epithelial tumor cells in simple carcinomas than in adenomas. These data were supported by gelatin-zymography; bands for the active form of MMP-2 were found in 94% of carcinoma samples, compared with 17% of benign tumor samples. The gene expression and immunohistochemical results for MT1-MMP were comparable to those for MMP-2. The immunoreactivity for MMP-13 and TIMP-2 was lower in carcinomas than in adenomas, confirming the mRNA data for MMP-13 and the other MMP inhibitors that were evaluated. The active form of MMP-9, but not the active form of MMP-2, was identified in the plasma of all of the tested dogs. Conclusions Our findings suggest that MMP-9, MMP-2 and MT1-MMP, which are synthesized by epithelial cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts, play an important role in malignant canine mammary tumors. The reduction of MMP-13 and TIMP-2 could also be a significant step in malignant transformation. MMP-2 and MT1-MMP could be further evaluated as future biomarkers for predicting the progression and prognosis of canine mammary tumors. PMID:21726449

  16. [Lysophosphatidic acid and malignant neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Jesionowska, Anna; Cecerska-Heryć, Elżbieta; Marczuk, Natalia; Safranow, Krzysztof; Dołęgowska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid compound which plays an important role in the human body, enabling its proper development and functioning. The extracellular LPA is mainly formed of lysophospholipids by the action of autotaxin. LPA activates specific G protein coupled receptors on the cell surface, which results in activation of intracellular signaling pathways, resulting in an increased production of proteins such as VEGF, MMP and uPA. The effect is increased cell proliferation, migration, survival and morphological changes. Aberrant expression of LPA receptors or autotaxin is present in various neoplasms. LPA may be used as a potential diagnostic marker, because its concentrations in the plasma of ovarian cancer patients are significantly higher than in the control group. Scientific research is focused on the searching for the compounds that inhibit the effects of LPA. The promising results of preclinical trials suggest potential usefulness of these compounds in the fight against cancer. PMID:27048092

  17. [Benign neoplasms of female urethra].

    PubMed

    Usunova, I; Vladimirov, V

    2009-01-01

    In clinical practice neoplasms of female urethra are found usually in adult women. They can also be found in adolescent girls and as rare congenital abnormality. Those conditions are most frequently detected during gynecological or urological examination. Symptoms are few. Lesions are situated at the outer orifice of urethra at the broad basis. Authors have diagnosed and treated 331 patients between 26 and 87 years. Electro coagulation has been performed in 185 patients. Surgical excision has been performed in 41 patients. Excision with following electrocoagulation has been performed in 18 patients. Conservative treatment has been performed in 87 patients. Histological sample analysis has provided diagnosis of urethral polyp, caruncle and mucosal prolaps. Second electrocoagulation after surgical excision has been performed in 5 patients. Collaboration between urologists and gynecologists is essential for early diagnosis, prophylaxis and successful treatment of above mentioned diseases. PMID:19496462

  18. Evaluation of immunohistochemical markers of lymphatic and blood vessels in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Sleeckx, N; Van Brantegem, L; Fransen, E; Van den Eynden, G; Casteleyn, C; Veldhuis Kroeze, E; Van Ginneken, C

    2013-05-01

    Canine mammary tumours (CMTs) are the most common neoplasms in intact female dogs. Bitches with spontaneously arising CMTs represent a promising animal model for human breast cancer research. The aim of the present study was to develop an immunohistochemical protocol for the identification of blood and lymphatic vessels in CMTs. Antibodies specific for human lymphatic vessels (prox-1, lyve-1, podoplanin and D2-40) and blood vessels (von Willebrand factor [vWf], CD31 and CD34) were utilized. Serial sections of 18 samples (eight samples of normal canine mammary tissue, five benign and five malignant CMTs) were examined. Antibodies specific for podoplanin, D2-40 and CD34 showed no immunoreactivity with canine tissue. Prox-1 and CD31 were determined to be the most suitable markers for lymphatic and blood vessels, respectively. PMID:23123127

  19. Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: A Contemporary Review.

    PubMed

    Tefferi, Ayalew; Pardanani, Animesh

    2015-04-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) constitute the BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms and are characterized by mutually exclusive Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), calreticulin (CALR), and myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene (MPL) mutations; respective frequencies of these mutations are approximately 95%, 0%, and 0% in PV, 60%, 20%, and 3% in ET, and 60%, 25%, and 7% in PMF. These mutations might be accompanied by other mutations that are less specific to myeloproliferative neoplasms but are prognostically relevant, such as additional sex combs-like 1 (ASXL1). Characteristic bone marrow morphology is required for World Health Organization-compliant diagnosis, especially in distinguishing ET from prefibrotic PMF and masked PV. Survival is the longest in ET, although still inferior to that of the age- and sex-matched control population; median survivals for patients younger than 60 years are approximately 33 years for ET, 24 for PV, and 15 for PMF. Major disease complications include thrombosis and leukemic or fibrotic transformation. In PV and ET, risk factors for survival include older age, leukocytosis, and thrombosis, whereas JAK2 mutation in ET is associated with increased risk of thrombosis. In PMF, type 1 or type 1-like CALR mutations are associated with superior and ASXL1 with inferior survival. Prevention of thrombosis in PV is secured by phlebotomy (hematocrit target <45%) and in both PV and ET by low-dose aspirin therapy; high-risk patients derive additional antithrombotic benefit from cytoreductive therapy with hydroxyurea as first-line and interferon-alfa and busulfan as second-line drugs of choice. Although the JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib was recently approved for use in hydroxyurea-resistant PV, its role in routine clinical practice remains debatable. In myelofibrosis, stem cell transplant is the current treatment of choice for genetically or clinically high-risk disease; for all other patients

  20. Neoplasms of the Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Howard; Crichlow, Robert W.; Caplan, Howard S.

    1974-01-01

    Small bowel tumors are unusual lesions exhibiting nonspecific clinical features often diagnosed at an advanced stage. In the cases studied at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania nearly all the 32 patients with malignancies were symptomatic whereas in the 34 patients with benign lesions the condition was discovered as an incidental finding in about half of the patients. Weight loss, palpable mass or anemia usually indicated malignancy. Small bowel radiography was the most useful diagnostic aid in the present series. While the etiology of these lesions is unknown, villous adenomas probably bear a relationship to carcinoma. The association between chronic regional enteritis and small bowel tumors is unestablished but suggestive. An analysis of reported series reveals a disproportionate incidence of additional primary tumors in patients with small bowel neoplasms. Surgical extirpation is indicated for curative treatment. In the present series, resection in hope of cure was carried out in 25 of 32 malignant tumors resulting in eight five-year survivals. One of these latter lived nine years with disseminated malignant carcinoid reflecting the occasional indolent course of this tumor. PMID:4842978

  1. Histopathology of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Nishi, Takayuki; Tanaka, Akira; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) arise from neuroendocrine cells distributed mainly in the mucosa and submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of NENs of the digestive system was changed, categorizing these tumors as grade 1 neuroendocrine tumor (NET), grade-2NET, neuroendocrine carcinoma (large- or small-cell type), or mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Such a classification is based on the Ki-67 index and mitotic count in histological material. For the accurate pathological diagnosis and grading of NENs, it is important to clearly recognize the characteristic histological features of GI-NENs and to understand the correct method of counting Ki-67 and mitoses. In this review, we focus on the histopathological features of GI-NENs, particularly regarding biopsy and cytological diagnoses, neuroendocrine markers, genetic and molecular features, and the evaluation of the Ki-67 index and mitotic count. In addition, we will address the histological features of GI-NEN in specific organs. PMID:23346552

  2. Histopathology of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Nishi, Takayuki; Tanaka, Akira; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) arise from neuroendocrine cells distributed mainly in the mucosa and submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of NENs of the digestive system was changed, categorizing these tumors as grade 1 neuroendocrine tumor (NET), grade-2NET, neuroendocrine carcinoma (large- or small-cell type), or mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Such a classification is based on the Ki-67 index and mitotic count in histological material. For the accurate pathological diagnosis and grading of NENs, it is important to clearly recognize the characteristic histological features of GI-NENs and to understand the correct method of counting Ki-67 and mitoses. In this review, we focus on the histopathological features of GI-NENs, particularly regarding biopsy and cytological diagnoses, neuroendocrine markers, genetic and molecular features, and the evaluation of the Ki-67 index and mitotic count. In addition, we will address the histological features of GI-NEN in specific organs. PMID:23346552

  3. Cerebral thrombosis and myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Artoni, Andrea; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Martinelli, Ida

    2014-11-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are acquired clonal disorders characterized by the proliferation of bone marrow myeloid cells. Different somatic mutations have been recently associated with MPN, the most common being JAK-2 V617F. Among MPN, polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia are particularly associated with an increased risk to develop thrombotic complications, either arterial or venous. Cerebrovascular events (stroke and transient ischemic attacks) are prevalent, accounting for approximately two-thirds of all events. Also cerebral vein thrombosis can complicate MPN and can be the first manifestation of the disease. Risk factors for thrombosis in patients with MPN are related or unrelated to the disease. Among the former there are cellular risk factors, such as increased white blood cell counts, vascular cell activation, endothelial dysfunction, and plasmatic risk factors, such as increased plasma viscosity, reduced levels of protein S, increased thrombin generation. The latter include increased age and previous thrombotic events. In addition, common cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity) contribute to the pathogenesis of arterial events, whereas circumstantial risk factors (particularly oral contraceptive use and pregnancy/puerperium) to that of venous events. Primary prevention of arterial thrombosis with antiplatelet therapy is warranted in the majority of patients with MPN, whereas primary prevention of venous thrombosis is limited to anticoagulant prophylaxis during high-risk situations. Secondary prevention includes long-term antiplatelet therapy for arterial and short- or long-term anticoagulant therapy for venous thrombosis, depending on the risk factors present at the first event. PMID:25217248

  4. Molecular diagnostics of myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Langabeer, Stephen E; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Asp, Julia; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Carillo, Serge; Haslam, Karl; Kjaer, Lasse; Lippert, Eric; Mansier, Olivier; Oppliger Leibundgut, Elisabeth; Percy, Melanie J; Porret, Naomi; Palmqvist, Lars; Schwarz, Jiri; McMullin, Mary F; Schnittger, Susanne; Pallisgaard, Niels; Hermouet, Sylvie

    2015-10-01

    Since the discovery of the JAK2 V617F mutation in the majority of the myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis ten years ago, further MPN-specific mutational events, notably in JAK2 exon 12, MPL exon 10 and CALR exon 9 have been identified. These discoveries have been rapidly incorporated into evolving molecular diagnostic algorithms. Whilst many of these mutations appear to have prognostic implications, establishing MPN diagnosis is of immediate clinical importance with selection, implementation and the continual evaluation of the appropriate laboratory methodology to achieve this diagnosis similarly vital. The advantages and limitations of these approaches in identifying and quantitating the common MPN-associated mutations are considered herein with particular regard to their clinical utility. The evolution of molecular diagnostic applications and platforms has occurred in parallel with the discovery of MPN-associated mutations, and it therefore appears likely that emerging technologies such as next-generation sequencing and digital PCR will in the future play an increasing role in the molecular diagnosis of MPN. PMID:25951317

  5. Premalignant cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Dudeja, Vikas; Allen, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Due to increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, asymptomatic pancreatic cysts are frequently being diagnosed. Many of these cysts have premalignant potential and offer a unique opportunity for cancer prevention. Mucinous cystic neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm are the major premalignant cystic neoplasms of pancreas. The prediction of the risk of malignancy (incidental and future risk of malignant transformation) and balancing the risks of watchful waiting with that of operative management with associated mortality and morbidity is the key to the management of these lesions. We review the literature that has contributed to the development of our approach to the management of these cystic neoplasms. We provide an overview of the key features used in diagnosis and in predicting malignancy. Particular attention is given to the natural history and management decision making. PMID:25726053

  6. Bone morbidity in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Sarah; Ocias, Lukas Frans; Vestergaard, Hanne; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Hermann, Anne Pernille; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2015-08-01

    Patients with the classical Philadelphia chromosome-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms including essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and primary myelofibrosis often suffer from comorbidities, in particular, cardiovascular diseases and thrombotic events. Apparently, there is also an increased risk of osteoporotic fractures among these patients. However, the true prevalence, mechanisms involved and therapeutic implications are not well described. In this review, we summarize what is currently known about possible associations between bone disease and chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Chronic inflammation has been suggested to explain the initiation of clonal development and progression in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Decreased bone mineral density and enhanced fracture risk are well-known manifestations of many chronic systemic inflammatory diseases. As opposed to systemic mastocytosis (SM) where pathogenic mechanisms for bone manifestations probably involve effects of mast cell mediators on bone metabolism, the mechanisms responsible for increased fracture risk in other chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms are not known. PMID:26036168

  7. A Cytogenetic Footprint for Mammary Carcinomas Induced by PhIP in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, A T

    2001-04-01

    PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine), a mutagen/carcinogen belonging to the class of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) found in cooked meats, is a mammary gland carcinogen in rats and has been implicated in the etiology of certain human cancers including breast cancer. To gain insight into the genomic alterations associated with PhIP-induced mammary gland carcinogenesis, we used comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to examine chromosomal abnormalities in rat mammary carcinomas induced by PhIP, and for comparison, by DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene), a potent experimental mammary carcinogen. There was a consistent and characteristic pattern of chromosome-region loss in PhIP-induced carcinomas that clearly distinguished them from carcinomas induced by DMBA.

  8. Computerized tomography in evaluation of hepatic neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, R.F.; Resende, C.; Tishler, J.M.A.; Aldrete, J.S.; Shin, M.S.; Rubin, E.; Rahn, N.H.

    1984-08-01

    The authors reviewed their experience with computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen in 212 patients with histologically documented liver neoplasms seen during a 30-month period. The CT findings in cavernous hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia were specific, and permitted accurate diagnosis of this lesion before biopsy. The CT appearance of all other lesions was variable. CT is useful in providing an accurate evaluation of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic extent of the neoplasm.

  9. Radiation-induced neoplasms of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Skultety, F.M.; Leibrock, L.G.; Severson, G.S.

    1987-04-01

    The histopathology of two patients with radiation-induced neoplasms of the brain following therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancies is described. The second neoplasms were an atypical meningioma and a polymorphous cell sarcoma, respectively. They occurred 12 and 23 years after irradiation (4000 rad), within the original field of irradiation. In both cases, the radiation-induced tumors were histologically distinct from the initial medulloblastomas. Both patients were retreated with local irradiation using permanent implantation of radioactive iodine-125 seeds.

  10. Automated screening of pigmentary skin neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrin, Konstantin G.; Matorin, Oleg V.; Reshetov, Igor V.

    2015-01-01

    We have analysed the clinical symptoms and the malignization signs of pigmented skin neoplasms. We have estimated the complex of clinical parameters which could be measured for the purpose of skin screening diagnostic via digital image processing. Allowable errors of clinical parameter characterization have been calculated, and the origin of these errors has been discussed. Proposed technique for automated screening of pigmentary skin neoplasms should become an effective tool for early skin diagnostics.

  11. Three-Dimensional Cultures of Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an ideal “model organism” for studying tissue specificity and gene expression in mammals: it is one of the few organs that develop after birth and it undergoes multiple cycles of growth, differentiation and regression during the animal’s lifetime in preparation for the important function of lactation. The basic “functional differentiation” unit in the gland is the mammary acinus made up of a layer of polarized epithelial cells specialized for milk production surrounded by myoepithelial contractile cells, and the two-layered structure is surrounded by basement membrane. Much knowledge about the regulation of mammary gland development has been acquired from studying the physiology of the gland and of lactation in rodents. Culture studies, however, were hampered by the inability to maintain functional differentiation on conventional tissue culture plastic. We now know that the microenvironment, including the extracellular matrix and tissue architecture, plays a crucial role in directing functional differentiation of organs. Thus, in order for culture systems to be effective experimental models, they need to recapitulate the basic unit of differentiated function in the tissue or organ and to maintain its three-dimensional (3D) structure. Mouse mammary culture models evolved from basic monolayers of cells to an array of complex 3D systems that observe the importance of the microenvironment in dictating proper tissue function and structure. In this chapter, we focus on how 3D mouse mammary epithelial cultures have enabled investigators to gain a better understanding of the organization, development and function of the acinus, and to identify key molecular, structural, and mechanical cues important for maintaining mammary function and architecture. The accompanying chapter of Vidi et al. describes 3D models developed for human cells. Here, we describe how mouse primary epithelial cells and cell lines—essentially those we use in our

  12. Neoplasms induced by megavoltage radiation in the head and neck region

    SciTech Connect

    Steeves, R.A.; Bataini, J.P.

    1981-04-01

    Radiation-induced cancer, although fortunately a rare complication of radiotherapy, is nonetheless observed occasionally even after megavoltage radiation has been used. Over a 22-year period at the Curie Institute, four patients were found to have malignant neoplasms within the fields of megavoltage treatment given for various cancers of the head and neck region. Three of the neoplasms were sarcomas, two osteogenic and one fibrosarcoma, and the other tumor was a sarcomatoid epithelioma. The latent period ranged from 3 1/2-15 years. Although the evidence is strong that the neoplasms were causally related to the precedent irradiation, it is acknowledged that rare examples of the double primary phenomenon exist, even separated by five or more years, and that only one such instance would induce a large error in the estimated frequency of postirradiation neoplasms. Because clinical estimates after megavoltage irradiation are usually compounded by an association with a relatively high total absorbed dose, the issue of the incidence of postirradiation neoplasms as a function of the type of external beam (orthovoltage vs. megavoltage) may require resolution by experimental means. Another rare sequela of radiotherapy is injury to a peripheral nerve. One of the four patients with a second neoplasm after radiation also developed left hypoglossal nerve palsy 2 1/2 years post-therapy, and left optic nerve atrophy seven years postradiation treatment of a squamous cell carcinoma of the ethmoid and maxillary sinuses. The 51-year-old patient had received a tumor dose of 6800 rads (2043 rets).

  13. Neoplasms induced by megavoltage radiation in the head and neck region

    SciTech Connect

    Steeves, R.A.; Bataini, J.P.

    1981-04-01

    Radiation-induced cancer, although fortunately a rare complication of radiotherapy, is nonetheless observed occasionally even after megavoltage radiation has been used. Over a 22-year period at the Curie Institute, four patients were found to have malignant neoplasms within the fields of megavoltage treatment given for various cancers of the head and neck region. Three of the neoplasms were sarcomas, two osteogenic and one fibrosarcoma, and the other tumor was a sarcomatoid epithelioma. The latent period ranged from 3 1/2 to 15 years. Although the evidence is strong that the neoplasms were causally related to the precedent irradiation, it is acknowledged that rare examples of the double primary phenomenon exist, even separated by five or more years, and that only one such instance would induce a large error in the estimated frequency of postirradiation neoplasms. Because clinical estimates after megavoltage irradiation are usually compounded by an association with a relatively high total absorbed dose, the issue of the incidence of postirradiation neoplasms as a function of the type of external beam (orthovoltage vs megavoltage) may require resolution by experimental means. Another rare sequela of radiotherapy is injury to a peripheral nerve. One of the four patients with a second neoplasm after radiation also developed left hypoglossal nerve palsy 2 1/2 years post-therapy, and left optic nerve atrophy seven years postradiation treatment of a squamous cell carcinoma of the ethmoid and maxillary sinuses. The 51-year-old patient had received a tumor dose of 6800 rads (2043 rets).

  14. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  15. Calreticulin mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-10-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph(-)) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph(-) MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  16. Global coagulation in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, Armando; Chantarangkul, Veena; Gianniello, Francesca; Clerici, Marigrazia; Lemma, Laura; Padovan, Lidia; Gatti, Loredana; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Peyvandi, Flora

    2013-12-01

    In spite of their recognized risk of thrombosis, patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) show little or no abnormalities of traditional coagulation tests, perhaps because these are unable to represent the balance between pro- and anticoagulants nor the effect of platelets and blood cells. We investigated whether global tests such as thrombin generation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or thromboelastometry in whole blood were able to detect signs of procoagulant imbalance in MPN. The endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) of 111 patients and 89 controls was measured in PRP with platelet count adjusted to the original patient- or control-count. Testing was performed with and without thrombomodulin (the physiological protein C activator) and results were expressed as ETP ratios (with/without thrombomodulin). High ETP ratios reflect resistance to thrombomodulin and were taken as indexes of procoagulant imbalance. Patients were also investigated by thromboelastometry that provides such parameters as the clot formation time (CFT) and maximal clot firmness (MCF). Short CFT or high MCF were taken as indexes of procoagulant imbalance. ETP ratios were higher in patients than in controls and were directly correlated with platelet counts and inversely with the plasma levels of free protein S, protein C and antithrombin. Patients on hydroxyurea had lower ETP ratios than those on other treatments. CFT was shorter and MCF was greater in patients than controls; CFT and MCF were correlated with platelet counts. In conclusion, patients with MPN display a procoagulant imbalance detectable by thrombin generation and thromboelastometry. These tests might be useful in the frame of clinical trials to assess their association with the occurrence of thrombosis and with the effect of therapeutic strategies in MPN. PMID:23820940

  17. Value of Mammary Thermography in Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, B. E.; Burn, J. Ian; MacErlean, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Thermographic examinations of the breasts were carried out in 359 women, most of whom had mammary symptoms. Of the 195 patients with abnormal thermograms, 27 had cancer of the breast, 53 had benign lesions, and 115 had no confirmed organic disease. The incidence of false-positive thermograms was 59%. Of the 164 patients with normal thermograms, 116 had no confirmed organic disease, 41 had benign lesions, and 7 had cancer. The incidence of false-negative mammary thermograms was 29%. We conclude that mammary thermography is of no practical value in the differential diagnosis of symptomatic mammary disease. PMID:5022040

  18. Glucose transporter expression in rat mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Burnol, A F; Leturque, A; Loizeau, M; Postic, C; Girard, J

    1990-01-01

    The expression of different glucose transporter isoforms was measured during the development and differentiation of the rat mammary gland. Before conception, when the mammary gland is mainly composed of adipocytes, Glut 4 and Glut 1 mRNAs and proteins were present. During pregnancy, the expression of Glut 4 decreased progressively, whereas that of Glut 1 increased. In the lactating mammary gland only Glut 1 was present, and was expressed at a high level. The absence of Glut 4 suggests that glucose transport is not regulated by insulin in the lactating rat mammary gland. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2396989

  19. Direct preparation protocol to obtain mitotic chromosomes from canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Morais, C S D; Affonso, P R A M; Bitencourt, J A; Wenceslau, A A

    2015-01-01

    Currently, mammary neoplasms in female canines are a serious problem in veterinary clinics. In addition, the canine species is an excellent disease model for human oncology because of the biological and genetic similarities between the species. Cytogenetics has allowed further study of the characterization of neoplasms in canines. We hypothesized that the use of a direct preparation protocol for mitotic chromosome analysis would provide a simple and low cost protocol for use in all laboratories. The objective of this method is to display in a few hours of dividing cells just like the time of collection since cell division in tissue can be obtained. Ten female canines with the spontaneous occurrence of mammary neoplasia were used to test a pioneering direct preparation protocol to obtain mitotic chromosomes. The excised breast tumor tissue fragments were subjected to the protocol consisting of treatment with colchicine, treatment with hypotonic solution, and fixation. Mitotic chromosomes were absent in cell suspensions of only two samples among the 10 materials analyzed, based on the analysis of five blades for each preparation obtained. So, the cell suspension obtained allowed for the observation of eight tissue samples viable for cytogenetic analysis, five of which had excellent numbers of mitotic chromosomes. However, the technique was unsuccessful in producing high-quality cell suspensions because of inadequate condensation and scattering of chromosomes. While adjustments to methodological procedures are needed, this protocol represents a low cost and simplified method to study the cytogenetics of canine tumors. PMID:26782592

  20. Evo-devo of the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, Olav T; Dhouailly, Danielle

    2013-06-01

    We propose a new scenario for mammary evolution based on comparative review of early mammary development among mammals. Mammary development proceeds through homologous phases across taxa, but evolutionary modifications in early development produce different final morphologies. In monotremes, the mammary placode spreads out to form a plate-like mammary bulb from which more than 100 primary sprouts descend into mesenchyme. At their distal ends, secondary sprouts develop, including pilosebaceous anlagen, resulting in a mature structure in which mammary lobules and sebaceous glands empty into the infundibula of hair follicles; these structural triads (mammolobular-pilo-sebaceous units or MPSUs) represent an ancestral condition. In marsupials a flask-like mammary bulb elongates as a sprout, but then hollows out; its secondary sprouts include hair and sebaceous anlagen (MPSUs), but the hairs are shed during nipple formation. In some eutherians (cat, horse, human) MPSUs form at the distal ends of primary sprouts; pilosebaceous components either regress or develop into mature structures. We propose that a preexisting structural triad (the apocrine-pilo-sebaceous unit) was incorporated into the evolving mammary structure, and coupled to additional developmental processes that form the mammary line, placode, bulb and primary sprout. In this scenario only mammary ductal trees and secretory tissue derive from ancestral apocrine-like glands. The mammary gland appears to have coopted signaling pathways and genes for secretory products from even earlier integumentary structures, such as odontode (tooth-like) or odontode-derived structures. We speculate that modifications in signal use (such as PTHrP and BMP4) may contribute to taxonomic differences in MPSU development. PMID:23681303

  1. Mammary Carcinogen-Protein Binding Potentials: Novel and Biologically Relevant Structure-Activity Relationship Model Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, A.R.; Qamar, S.; Carrasquer, C.A.; Holt, P.A.; Maguire, J.M.; Cunningham, S.L.; Trent, J.O.

    2010-01-01

    Previously, SAR models for carcinogenesis used descriptors that are essentially chemical descriptors. Herein we report the development of models with the cat-SAR expert system using biological descriptors (i.e., ligand-receptor interactions) rat mammary carcinogens. These new descriptors are derived from the virtual screening for ligand-receptor interactions of carcinogens, non-carcinogens, and mammary carcinogens to a set of 5494 target proteins. Leave-one-out validations of the ligand mammary carcinogen non-carcinogen model had a concordance between experimental and predicted results of 71% and the mammary carcinogen non-mammary carcinogen model was 72% concordant. The development of a hybrid fragment-ligand model improved the concordances to 85 and 83%, respectively. In a separate external validation exercise, hybrid fragment-ligand models had concordances of 81 and 76%. Analyses of example rat mammary carcinogens including the food mutagen and estrogenic compound PhIP, the herbicide atrazine, and the drug indomethacin, the ligand model identified a number of proteins associated with each compound that had previously been referenced in Medline in conjunction with the test chemical and separately with association to breast cancer. This new modelling approach can enhance model predictivity and help bridge the gap between chemical structure and carcinogenic activity by descriptors that are related to biological targets. PMID:20818582

  2. Modeling and analysis of transport in the mammary glands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quezada, Ana; Vafai, Kambiz

    2014-08-01

    The transport of three toxins moving from the blood stream into the ducts of the mammary glands is analyzed in this work. The model predictions are compared with experimental data from the literature. The utility of the model lies in its potential to improve our understanding of toxin transport as a pre-disposing factor to breast cancer. This work is based on a multi-layer transport model to analyze the toxins present in the breast milk. The breast milk in comparison with other sampling strategies allows us to understand the mass transport of toxins once inside the bloodstream of breastfeeding women. The multi-layer model presented describes the transport of caffeine, DDT and cimetidine. The analysis performed takes into account the unique transport mechanisms for each of the toxins. Our model predicts the movement of toxins and/or drugs within the mammary glands as well as their bioaccumulation in the tissues.

  3. Significance of rat mammary tumors for human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    We have previously indicated that the ideal animal tumor model should mimic the human disease. This means that the investigator should be able to ascertain the influence of host factors on the initiation of tumorigenesis, mimic the susceptibility of tumor response based on age and reproductive history, and determine the response of the tumors induced to chemotherapy. The utilization of experimental models of mammary carcinogenesis in risk assessment requires that the influence of ovarian, pituitary, and placental hormones, among others, as well as overall reproductive events are taken into consideration, since they are important modifiers of the susceptibility of the organ to neoplastic development. Several species, such as rodents, dogs, cats, and monkeys, have been evaluated for these purposes; however, none of them fulfills all the criteria specified previously. Rodents, however, are the most widely used models; therefore, this work will concentrate on discussing the rat rodent model of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25714400

  4. Synthetic progestins differentially promote or prevent DMBA-induced mammary tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Benakanakere, Indira; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Carroll, Candace E.; Hyder, Salman M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent clinical trials demonstrate that combined oral dosing with estrogen and progestin increases the incidence of breast cancer in post-menopausal women. Similarly, in a rat model system of mammary carcinogenesis, the synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) decreases latency and increases incidence of DMBA-induced mammary tumors [Clin Can Res (2006) 12:4062]. The goal of this study was to compare the effects of four clinically-relevant progestins, MPA, norgestrel (N-EL), norethindrone (N-ONE), and megestrol acetate (MGA), on DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis in the rat. The experimental protocol involved implantation of 60-day release progestin pellets four weeks after rats were treated with DMBA. In contrast to the effect of MPA, N-ONE and N-EL, but not MGA, blocked DMBA-dependent carcinogenesis, and a dose-dependent effect on tumor growth was demonstrated for N-EL; MGA did not alter tumor growth. Histopathological studies demonstrated extensive hyperplastic lesions in mammary tissue of progestin-treated animals. Furthermore, following treatment with N-EL or N-ONE, immunohistochemical staining for VEGF in hyperplastic mammary tissue was lower than in animals treated with DMBA plus MPA or DMBA alone. Expression of VEGFR-1, ERα and PR was also lower in hyperplastic mammary tissue in N-EL, N-ONE and MGA treated animals. Interestingly, N-EL stimulated progression of existing mammary tumors in DMBA/MPA treated rats, suggesting stage-specific effects of N-EL in this model. Because N-EL and N-ONE prevent tumor growth in the early stages of DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats, these progestins may have potential as chemopreventive agents in women with no history of breast disease or family history of breast cancer. PMID:20699413

  5. Perinatally Administered Bisphenol A as a Potential Mammary Gland Carcinogen in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Nicole; Davis, Barbara; Schaeberle, Cheryl M.; Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Background: Environmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) affects mammary gland development in rodents and primates. Prenatal exposure to environmentally relevant doses of BPA increased the number of intraductal hyperplasias and ductal carcinomas in situ by 50 days of age in Wistar-Furth rats. Objective: We aimed to determine whether BPA exposure of dams during gestation only or throughout lactation affects the incidence of mammary gland neoplasia in female offspring. Methods: We treated pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats with BPA at 0, 0.25, 2.5, 25, or 250 μg BPA/kg BW/day from gestational day (GD) 9 to birth and from GD9 to postnatal day (PND) 21. Mammary glands from BPA-exposed offspring were examined at four time points for preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. To assess circulating BPA levels, we exposed pregnant rats to vehicle or 250 μg BPA/kg BW/day during gestation only or during gestation/lactation and analyzed sera from dams, fetuses, and nursing pups for total and unconjugated BPA. Results: Total and unconjugated BPA were detected in sera from 100% of dams and fetuses and 33% of pups exposed to 250 μg BPA/kg BW/day. Unconjugated BPA levels in exposed dams and fetuses (gestational) and in exposed dams and pups (gestational/lactational) were within levels found in humans. Preneoplastic lesions developed in BPA-exposed female offspring across all doses as early as PND50. Unexpectedly, mammary gland adenocarcinomas developed in BPA-exposed offspring by PND90. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that developmental exposure to environmentally relevant levels of BPA during gestation and lactation induces mammary gland neoplasms in the absence of any additional carcinogenic treatment. Thus, BPA may act as a complete mammary gland carcinogen. Citation: Acevedo N, Davis B, Schaeberle CM, Sonnenschein C, Soto AM. 2013. Perinatally administered bisphenol A acts as a mammary gland carcinogen in rats. Environ Health Perspect 121:1040–1046; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp

  6. Promoting effects of Chinese pangolin and wild pink medicines on the mammary gland development in immature mice.

    PubMed

    Bayin, Jiragara; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Islam, Mohammad Saiful; Yabuki, Akira; Kanouchi, Hiroaki; Oka, Tatsuzo; Nishinakagawa, Hayao

    2009-10-01

    The effects of the mixture of crude aqueous extracts from Chinese pangolin and wild pink (C+P), traditional Chinese medicine, on the proliferation and differentiation of mammary gland epithelium in intact and ovariectomized immature mice were investigated by light and electron microscopy and BrdU immunohistochemistry. Although there were no significant differences in mammary gland fat pad and parenchyma areas between the intact experimental groups, the numbers of duct branchings and buds were significantly larger in the C+W treated mice than in the control mice. The ratio of BrdU immunopositive cells to total epithelial cells was higher in C+W treated intact mice. Ultrastructurally, epithelial cells of the mammary buds and ducts possessed an oval and lucent nucleus, and ribosomes increased in number or developed to a greater degree in C+W treated intact mice than in the control mice. Conversely, there were no significant differences in any measurements of mammary gland between the experimental groups of ovariectomized mice. BrdU immunoreactive cells were never seen and the ultrastructure of mammary epihelial cells indicated the inactive cell phase in both ovariectomied mice. In comparison between the intact and overiectomized mice, the mammary fat pad area was larger in the ovariectomized mice than in the intact mice, although another four measurements were larger in the intact groups. These observations suggest that administration with C+W could promote the development of mammary glands via ovary in immature mice. PMID:19887738

  7. Comparison of steroid receptor expression in normal, dysplastic, and neoplastic canine and feline mammary tissues.

    PubMed

    Millanta, F; Calandrella, M; Bari, G; Niccolini, M; Vannozzi, I; Poli, A

    2005-12-01

    Steroid receptor expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in neoplastic, hyperplastic/dysplastic, and normal mammary tissue samples removed from 68 queens and 47 bitches, using monoclonal antibodies against human oestrogen-alpha (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR). Mammary lesions were classified according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, and all animals with invasive carcinomas were clinically followed for 2 years. Stromal and/or lymphatic invasion and histological grading were also recorded. In both species, ER expression was significantly higher in healthy tissues, hyperplastic/dysplastic lesions, and benign tumours than in carcinomas. The loss of ER expression was more marked in feline than in canine carcinomas. In queens, PR expression increased in dysplastic lesions and "in situ" carcinomas and decreased in invasive carcinomas, even if parts of these tumours were still PR-positive. In bitches no significant variation in PR expression was observed between normal tissue, dysplasias, and benign neoplasms, but was significantly lower in carcinomas. In both species ER and PR expression in invasive carcinomas did not correlate either with histological parameters or overall survival time. This study demonstrates several differences in steroid hormone dependency between the two species. The percentage of PR-positive feline carcinomas suggests a possible role of progesterone in promoting early tumour cell growth in queens. The low percentage of ER-positive invasive carcinomas further demonstrated the aggressive phenotype and behaviour of feline mammary tumours. PMID:16054892

  8. Diagnosis and management of endocrine gland neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1989-05-01

    Functional and nonfunctional neoplasms of the endocrine glands constitute some of the more challenging diagnostic and therapeutic problems in veterinary cancer medicine. The clinical signs are usually the result of an overproduction of hormones that are normally biosynthesized by the neoplastic endocrine gland (orthoendocrine syndromes), as opposed to those that are the result of hormones that are not normally biosynthesized and secreted by those cells that have undergone neoplastic transformation (paraendocrine syndromes, also known as endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes or ectopic hormone syndromes). The biological effects produced by a neoplasm may be out of proportion to the actual size of the tumor. This report focuses on the clinical signs and syndromes associated with neoplasms of the thyroid, adrenal glands and pancreas. Discussion will focus on the mechanisms producing the clinical signs, diagnosis, staging, therapy and prognosis. 2 tabs.

  9. Radiofrequency ablation technique eradicating palpebral margin neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tian-Yu; Wang, Xing-Lin; Suo, Wei; He, Qing-Hua; Xiao, Hong-Yu

    2011-01-01

    AIM To report the study on radiofrequency ablation technique for eradication of palpebral margin neoplasm and its clinical effects. METHODS One hundred and six cases with the palpebral margin neoplasm were performed surgical removal with radiofrequency ablation technique. The 1-2 months postoperative follow-up was investigated and the lost cases were excluded from statistics. The continuing follow-up lasted about 6-16months. RESULTS One hundred cases underwent one treatment and 6 cases underwent two treatments. Six cases were missed. All the cases followed up healed well without pigmentation or scar left, nor eyelash loss or palpebral margin deformation. No case was recurrent. CONCLUSION Radiofrequency ablation has significant efficiency in eradicating the palpebral margin neoplasm. PMID:22553639

  10. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kallen, Michael E; Naini, Bita V

    2016-09-01

    Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms (IOPNs) are cystic neoplasms with intraductal growth and complex papillae composed of oncocytic cells. IOPNs have been reported both in the pancreas and biliary tree, and are most likely closely related in these 2 locations. In the pancreas, these rare tumors are now considered 1 of the 4 histologic subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Significant differences in histology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetics have been reported between IOPNs and other IPMN subtypes. However, there are limited data regarding the clinical behavior and prognosis of IOPNs in comparison to other subtypes of IPMN. We review features of pancreatic IOPNs and discuss the differential diagnosis of other intraductal lesions in the pancreas. PMID:27575268

  11. Skin neoplasms of dogs in Sydney.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, T L; Howlett, C R; Middleton, D J; Griffiths, D A; Duff, B C

    1987-06-01

    In a survey of dogs in Sydney, mastocytomas (16.1%) and histiocytomas (14.0%) were the most common in a total of 1,000 skin neoplasms. The basal cell and appendage group provided 25.5% of the neoplasms. The prevalence of the various neoplasms, the age of affected dogs, the proportion in the sexes, the common sites of occurrence and prevalence in the different breeds were broadly similar to findings in surveys in other countries, except that in the Syndeny dogs there was a greater prevalence of histiocytomas and haemangiopericytomas, a more common occurrence of histiocytomas in mature dogs, an occurrence of histiocytomas in similar numbers on the head, trunk and limbs, and a remarkably common development of squamous cell carcinomas in Dalmatians. PMID:3115242

  12. Conventional radiological strategy of common gastrointestinal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Zhuo; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the clinical characteristics and imaging features of common gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasms in terms of conventional radiological imaging methods. Barium studies are readily available for displaying primary malignancies and are minimally or not at all invasive. A neoplasm may be manifested as various imaging findings, including mucosal disruption, soft mass, ulcer, submucosal invasion and lumen stenosis on barium studies. Benign tumors typically appear as smoothly marginated intramural masses. Malignant neoplasms most often appear as irregular infiltrative lesions on barium examination. Tumor extension to adjacent GI segments may be indistinct on barium images. Cross-sectional images such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may provide more accurate details of the adjacent organ invasion, omental or peritoneal spread. PMID:25628800

  13. Diagnostic Approach to Eosinophilic Renal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Jorda, Merce; Argani, Pedram; Epstein, Jonathan I.

    2015-01-01

    Context Eosinophilic renal neoplasms include a spectrum of solid and papillary tumors ranging from indolent benign oncocytoma to highly aggressive malignancies. Recognition of the correct nature of the tumor, especially in biopsy specimens, is paramount for patient management. Objective To review the diagnostic approach to eosinophilic renal neoplasms with light microscopy and ancillary techniques. Data Sources Review of the published literature and personal experience. Conclusions The following tumors are in the differential diagnosis of oncocytic renal cell neoplasm: oncocytoma, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC), hybrid tumor, tubulocystic carcinoma, papillary RCC, clear cell RCC with predominant eosinophilic cell morphology, follicular thyroid-like RCC, hereditary leiomyomatosis–associated RCC, acquired cystic disease–associated RCC, rhabdoid RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor translocation RCC, epithelioid angiomyolipoma, and unclassified RCC. In low-grade nonpapillary eosinophilic neoplasms, distinction between oncocytoma and low-grade RCC mostly rests on histomorphology; however, cytokeratin 7 immunostain may be helpful. In high-grade nonpapillary lesions, there is more of a role for ancillary techniques, including immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin 7, CA9, CD10, racemase, HMB45, and Melan-A. In papillary eosinophilic neoplasms, it is important to distinguish sporadic type 2 papillary RCC from microphthalmia transcription factor translocation and hereditary leiomyomatosis–associated RCC. Histologic and cytologic features along with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization tests for TFE3 (Xp11.2) and TFEB [t(6;11)] are reliable confirmatory tests. Eosinophilic epithelial neoplasms with architecture, cytology, and/or immunoprofile not qualifying for either of the established types of RCC should be classified as unclassified eosinophilic RCC and arbitrarily assigned a grade (low or high). PMID:25357116

  14. Radiological and surgical management of thyroid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Takami, H; Ikeda, Y; Miyabe, R; Okinaga, H; Kameyama, K; Fukunari, N

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in the radiological diagnosis in thyroid neoplasms have been achieved by high-resolution ultrasonography and color-Doppler, and the ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy and ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol injection therapy have been developed on the basis of these modalities. Ultrasonography and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy have made minimally invasive thyroid surgery possible. The surgical procedures are classified into three main categories according to the approach, and each approach has its own advantages and disadvantages. Surgeons have to select the most suitable approach from one of these categories of approaches for each patient with a thyroid neoplasm. PMID:15271417

  15. Recently described neoplasms of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical pathology of the sinonasal region (i.e., nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses) is notoriously difficult, due in part to the remarkable diversity of neoplasms that may be encountered in this area. In addition, a number of neoplasms have been only recently described in the sinonasal tract, further compounding the difficulty for pathologists who are not yet familiar with them. This manuscript will review the clinicopathologic features of some of the recently described sinonasal tumor types: NUT midline carcinoma, HPV-related carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features, SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, and adamantinoma-like Ewing family tumor. PMID:26776744

  16. B and T cells are required for mouse mammary tumor virus spread within the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Golovkina, T V; Dudley, J P; Ross, S R

    1998-09-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is an infectious retrovirus transmitted through milk from mother to newborns. MMTV encodes a superantigen (SAg) whose activity is indispensable for the virus life cycle, since a genetically engineered virus with a mutation in the sag gene neither amplified in cells of the immune system of suckling pups nor infected their mammary glands. When wild-type MMTV was injected directly into the mammary glands of uninfected pubescent mice, their lymphoid as well as mammary gland cells became virus infected. To test whether this infection of lymphoid cells was dependent on SAg activity and required for virus spread within the mammary gland, we performed mammary gland injections of wild-type MMTV(C3H) into two strains of transgenic mice that lacked SAg-cognate, V beta 14+ T cells. Neither the MTV-ORF or LEL strains showed infection of their mammary glands. Moreover, no MMTV infection of their peripheral lymphocytes was detected. Similar experiments with mice lacking B cells (mu-chain knockouts) showed no detectable virus spread in the mammary glands or lymphoid tissues. These data suggest that SAg activity and MMTV-infected lymphocytes are required, not only for initial steps of viral infection, but also for virus spread within the mammary gland. Virus spread at late times in infection determines whether MMTV induces mammary tumors. PMID:9725233

  17. Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease*

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lauro Lourival; Lopes, Ione Maria Ribeiro Soares; Lopes, Lauro Rodolpho Soares; Enokihara, Milvia M. S. S.; Michalany, Alexandre Osores; Matsunaga, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Paget's disease, described by Sir James Paget in 1874, is classified as mammary and extramammary. The mammary type is rare and often associated with intraductal cancer (93-100% of cases). It is more prevalent in postmenopausal women and it appears as an eczematoid, erythematous, moist or crusted lesion, with or without fine scaling, infiltration and inversion of the nipple. It must be distinguished from erosive adenomatosis of the nipple, cutaneous extension of breast carcinoma, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, chronic eczema, lactiferous ducts ectasia, Bowen's disease, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma and intraductal papilloma. Diagnosis is histological and prognosis and treatment depend on the type of underlying breast cancer. Extramammary Paget's disease is considered an adenocarcinoma originating from the skin or skin appendages in areas with apocrine glands. The primary location is the vulvar area, followed by the perianal region, scrotum, penis and axillae. It starts as an erythematous plaque of indolent growth, with well-defined edges, fine scaling, excoriations, exulcerations and lichenification. In most cases it is not associated with cancer, although there are publications linking it to tumors of the vulva, vagina, cervix and corpus uteri, bladder, ovary, gallbladder, liver, breast, colon and rectum. Differential diagnoses are candidiasis, psoriasis and chronic lichen simplex. Histopathology confirms the diagnosis. Before treatment begins, associated malignancies should be investigated. Surgical excision and micrographic surgery are the best treatment options, although recurrences are frequent. PMID:25830993

  18. Mammary and extramammary Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Lopes Filho, Lauro Lourival; Lopes, Ione Maria Ribeiro Soares; Lopes, Lauro Rodolpho Soares; Enokihara, Milvia M S S; Michalany, Alexandre Osores; Matsunaga, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Paget's disease, described by Sir James Paget in 1874, is classified as mammary and extramammary. The mammary type is rare and often associated with intraductal cancer (93-100% of cases). It is more prevalent in postmenopausal women and it appears as an eczematoid, erythematous, moist or crusted lesion, with or without fine scaling, infiltration and inversion of the nipple. It must be distinguished from erosive adenomatosis of the nipple, cutaneous extension of breast carcinoma, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, chronic eczema, lactiferous ducts ectasia, Bowen's disease, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma and intraductal papilloma. Diagnosis is histological and prognosis and treatment depend on the type of underlying breast cancer. Extramammary Paget's disease is considered an adenocarcinoma originating from the skin or skin appendages in areas with apocrine glands. The primary location is the vulvar area, followed by the perianal region, scrotum, penis and axillae. It starts as an erythematous plaque of indolent growth, with well-defined edges, fine scaling, excoriations, exulcerations and lichenification. In most cases it is not associated with cancer, although there are publications linking it to tumors of the vulva, vagina, cervix and corpus uteri, bladder, ovary, gallbladder, liver, breast, colon and rectum. Differential diagnoses are candidiasis, psoriasis and chronic lichen simplex. Histopathology confirms the diagnosis. Before treatment begins, associated malignancies should be investigated. Surgical excision and micrographic surgery are the best treatment options, although recurrences are frequent. PMID:25830993

  19. [Modern imaging of liver and pancreatic neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Mátéka, Ilona; Bikhazi, Ziad; Bartha, Éva; Palkó, András

    2015-03-01

    Modern imaging modalities play an outstanding role in the detection, characterization, staging, therapy planning, treatment outcome evaluation and follow-up of patients with liver and pancreatic neoplasms. Diagnostic performance and accuracy of the available modalities are continuously improving therefore, it is necessary to overview from time to time the diagnostic protocols and algorithms. PMID:25763911

  20. Cholescintigraphy: gallbladder nonvisualization secondary to neoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Rosen, P.R.; Nusynowitz, M.L.

    1981-08-01

    Whereas the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis is characterized by nonvisualization of the gallbladder with Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid derivatives, nonvisualization is not specific for acute cholecystitis. The first reported case of nonvisualization of the gallbladder due to neoplasm is added to an expanding list of causes of nonvisualization other than the more frequent causes: acute and chronic cholecystitis.

  1. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinming; Shao, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs) and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH)/uniparental disomy (UPD) that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants. PMID:27600067

  2. Neoplasms identified in free-flying birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siegfried, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Nine neoplasms were identified in carcasses of free-flying wild birds received at the National Wildlife Health Laboratory; gross and microscopic descriptions are reported herein. The prevalence of neoplasia in captive and free-flying birds is discussed, and lesions in the present cases are compared with those previously described in mammals and birds.

  3. Association of estrogen receptor-α and progesterone receptor A expression with hormonal mammary carcinogenesis: role of the host microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Montero Girard, Guadalupe; Vanzulli, Silvia I; Cerliani, Juan Pablo; Bottino, María Cecilia; Bolado, Julieta; Vela, Jorge; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia; Benavides, Fernando; Gutkind, Silvio; Patel, Vyomesh; Molinolo, Alfredo; Lanari, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) induces estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and progesterone receptor (PR)-positive ductal invasive mammary carcinomas in BALB/c mice. We sought to reproduce this MPA cancer model in C57BL/6 mice because of their widespread use in genetic engineering. Within this experimental setting, we studied the carcinogenic effects of MPA, the morphologic changes in mammary glands that are induced by MPA and progesterone, and the levels of ER and PR expression in MPA-treated and progesterone-treated mammary glands. Finally, we evaluated whether the differences found between BALB/c and C57BL/6 mouse strains were due to intrinsic differences in epithelial cells. Methods The carcinogenic effect of MPA was evaluated in C57BL/6 mice using protocols proven to be carcinogenic in BALB/c mice. In addition, BALB/c and C57BL/6 females were treated with progesterone or MPA for 1 or 2 months, and mammary glands were excised for histologic studies and for immunohistochemical and Western blot evaluation of ER and PR. Hormone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Isolated mammary epithelial cells were transplanted into cleared fat pads of 21-day-old female Swiss nu/nu mice or control congenic animals. Results MPA failed to induce mammary carcinomas or significant morphologic changes in the mammary glands of C57BL/6 mice. The expression of ER-α and PR isoform A in virgin mice was surprisingly much higher in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mammary glands, and both receptors were downregulated in progestin-treated BALB/c mice (P < 0.05). PR isoform B levels were low in virgin control mice and increased after progestin treatment in both strains. ER-β expression followed a similar trend. No differences in hormone levels were found between strains. Surprisingly, the transplantation of the epithelial mammary gland cells of both strains into the cleared fat pads of Swiss (nu/nu) mice abolished the mammary gland morphologic differences and the ER and PR

  4. Molecular Pathology: Prognostic and Diagnostic Genomic Markers for Myeloid Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Frank C

    2016-09-01

    Application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) on myeloid neoplasms has expanded our knowledge of genomic alterations in this group of diseases. Genomic alterations in myeloid neoplasms are complex, heterogeneous, and not specific to a disease entity. NGS-based panel testing of myeloid neoplasms can complement existing diagnostic modalities and is gaining acceptance in the clinics and diagnostic laboratories. Prospective, randomized trials to evaluate the prognostic significance of genomic markers in myeloid neoplasms are under way in academic medical centers. PMID:27523973

  5. Rare non-epithelial ovarian neoplasms: Pathology, genetics and treatment.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, William D; Gore, Martin; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Rare non-epithelial ovarian neoplasms have posed management challenges for many years. Their rarity means that most specialist practitioners will see one such case every several years, and most generalists may never see a case. The first step in management is to establish the correct diagnosis and this may necessitate specialist pathology review. Here, we review recent developments in the pathology, genetics and treatment of small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT) and sex cord-stromal tumours. Pathologically, these tumours often display morphological overlap with other neoplasms; for example, SCCOHT overlaps with many other "small round blue cell" tumours. Specific immunohistochemical stains, while useful, may not always be definitive. The discovery of somatic mutations in FOXL2 (adult granulosa cell tumours) and germline and somatic mutations in DICER1 (Sertoli-Leydig cell tumours) and SMARCA4 (SCCOHT) has demonstrated the value of molecular investigation as an adjunct to traditional histopathological approaches. In addition, the presence of germline mutations in a significant proportion of some of these neoplasms points to the need for genetic counselling and testing, offering the prospect of prevention and early diagnosis. Treatment of these rare tumours, as a group, should be on the basis of sound oncological principles, given that level 1 evidence will almost always be lacking. The rationale for experimental therapies must be clearly established. In view of the complex issues involved in the management of these conditions, expert opinion in pathology, genetics and treatment may be essential to offer the patient and her family the best chance of a good outcome. PMID:27079213

  6. Mammary carcinoma – current diagnostic methods and symptomatology in imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Popiel, Monika; Mróz-Klimas, Danuta; Kasprzak, Renata; Furmanek, Mariusz

    2012-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer is the most common neoplasm of the female population and its incidence is constantly rising. Social campaigns educating the public about the importance of the problem have been conducted for the past several years. Women are encouraged to self-examine on a monthly basis. Women aged 50–69 years can have an x-ray mammography performed once every 2 years as part of a prophylactic screening program. Ultrasound studies or MR mammography are adjuvant or, in some cases, alternative to x-ray mammography. Nuclear medicine techniques with application of oncophilic markers and receptor studies (this publication will not cover nuclear medicine methods) are not routinely used. Other techniques, such as computed tomography and conventional radiography are of no significance in the diagnostics of mammary cancer. However, together with isotopic methods, they are helpful in staging of the disease. X-ray mammography is, up to date, the only method with proven value in decreasing mortality. It is also the best available method for visualization of microcalicifications. Ultrasound examination is complementary to x-ray mammography as it is a cheap, easily available method of imaging mammary glands with higher glandular tissue content. It is also the most commonly used modality aiding in targeted biopsy of mammary gland. To date, MR mammography, characterized by the highest sensitivity in cancer diagnostics, remained a method reserved for “special tasks”. MR is used for prophylaxis mainly in a population of women with particularly high risk of the disease and in cases where x-ray and ultrasound examinations are insufficient. Picture of mammary carcinoma in imaging studies is heterogeneous. However, it most often presents as an irregularly demarcated mass. Moreover, each modality can aid in visualization of additional features of a lesion such as typical shape of microcalcifications in x-ray mammography, characteristic pattern of contrast enhancement in MR

  7. EGFR and microvessel density in canine malignant mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maria Isabel; Guimarães, Maria João; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Silva-Carvalho, Ricardo; Lopes, Carlos; Queiroga, Felisbina L

    2013-12-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor which has been shown to have an important role in human breast cancer. Its role appears to be associated with increased angiogenesis and metastasis. In order to clarify its role in canine mammary tumours (CMT), 61 malignant neoplasms were studied by using immunohistochemistry, comparing expression of EGFR, microvessel density (MVD) by CD31 immunolabelling and characteristics of tumour aggressiveness. High EGFR immunoexpression was statistically significantly associated with tumour size, tumour necrosis, mitotic grade, histological grade of malignancy and clinical stage. High CD31 immunoreactivity was statistically significantly associated with tubule formation, histological grade of malignancy and clinical stage. A positive correlation between EGFR and CD31 immunoexpression (r = 0.843; P < 0.001) was also observed. Results suggest that an over-expression of EGFR may contribute to increased angiogenesis and aggression in malignant CMT, presenting the possibility of using EGFR inhibitors in the context of metastatic disease treatment. PMID:24091029

  8. Isolation, purification, culture and characterisation of myoepithelial cells from normal and neoplastic canine mammary glands using a magnetic-activated cell sorting separation system.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Céspedes, R; Maniscalco, L; Iussich, S; Martignani, E; Guil-Luna, S; De Maria, R; Martín de Las Mulas, J; Millán, Y

    2013-08-01

    Mammary gland tumours, the most common malignant neoplasm in bitches, often display myoepithelial (ME) cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to isolate, purify, culture and characterise ME cells from normal and neoplastic canine mammary glands. Monodispersed cells from three normal canine mammary glands and five canine mammary tumours were incubated with an anti-Thy1 antibody and isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). Cells isolated from two normal glands (cell lines CmME-N1 and CmME-N2) and four tumours (cell lines CmME-K1 from a complex carcinoma, CmME-K2 from a simple tubulopapillary carcinoma, and CmME-K3 and CmME-K4 from two carcinomas within benign tumours) were cultured in supplemented DMEM/F12 media for 40days. Cell purity was >90%. Tumour-derived ME cell lines exhibited heterogeneous morphology, growth patterns and immunocytochemical expression of cytokeratins, whereas cell lines from normal glands retained their morphology and levels of cytokeratin expression during culture. Cell lines from normal glands and carcinomas within benign tumours grew more slowly than those from simple and complex carcinomas. This methodology has the potential to be used for in vitro analysis of the role of ME cells in the growth and progression of canine mammary tumours. PMID:23583698

  9. A Case of Pigmented Mammary Paget's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Eun; Kang, Myung Seung; Kim, Joung Soo

    2008-01-01

    Pigmented mammary Paget's disease is a uncommon clinicopathologic variant of mammary Paget's disease, and this mimics malignant melanoma both clinically and histopathologically. Herein, we report on a rare case of pigmented mammary Paget's disease. An 81-year-old woman presented with 2.5×1 cm sized, red and brown, eczematous plaque on her right areola, and she'd had this lesion for 3 years. Histopathology showed large, atypical cells with large nuclei and abundant pale cytoplasm throughout the epidermis. Dispersed melanocytes were noted in the epidermis and some of the Paget's cells contained melanin within their cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that the intraepidermal pagetoid cells were positive for cytokeratin 7; in contrast, they were negative for S-100, Periodic-acid Schiff (PAS), Alcian blue at PH 2.5, HMB-45 and carninoembryonic antigen (CEA). We recommend that pigmented mammary Paget's disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of pigmented lesions on the nipple. PMID:27303202

  10. Gordon Research Conference on Mammary Gland Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 conference was the tenth in the series of biennial Gordon Research Conferences on Mammary Gland Biology. Traditionally this conference brings together scientists from diverse backgrounds and experience but with a common interest in the biology of the mammary gland. Investigators from agricultural and medical schools, biochemists, cell and molecular biologists, endocrinologists, immunologists, and representatives from the emerging biotechnology industries met to discuss current concepts and results on the function and regulation of the normal and neoplastic mammary gland in a variety of species. Of the participants, approximately three-fourths were engaged in studying the normal mammary gland function, whereas the other quarter were engaged in studying the neoplastic gland. The interactions between scientists, clinicians, veterinarians examining both normal and neoplastic cell function serves to foster the multi-disciplinary goals of the conference and has stimulated many cooperative projects among participants in previous years.

  11. Lipid Transport in the Lactating Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    McManaman, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells depend on phospholipid (PL) and fatty acid (FA) transport to maintain membrane structure and organization, and to fuel and regulate cellular functions. In mammary glands of lactating animals, copious milk secretion, including large quantities of lipid in some species, requires adaptation and integration of PL and FA synthesis and transport processes to meet secretion demands. At present few details exist about how these processes are regulated within the mammary gland. However, recent advances in our understanding of the structural and molecular biology of membrane systems and cellular lipid trafficking provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the regulation and integration of PL and FA transport processes the lactating mammary gland. This review discusses the PL and FA transport processes required to maintain the structural integrity and organization of the mammary gland and support its secretory functions within the context of current molecular and cellular models of their regulation. PMID:24567110

  12. Bone sarcomas as second malignant neoplasms following childhood cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, W.A. Jr.; Meadows, A.T.; Shimada, H.; Bunin, G.R.; Vawter, G.F. )

    1991-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between histologic variants of bone sarcomas and previous therapy in patients in whom an unrelated malignant neoplasm had been diagnosed during childhood. Sarcomas of bone were the most common second malignant neoplasm (SMN) reported to the Late Effects Study Group, a 13-institution consortium consisting of pediatric oncology centers from western Europe, Canada, and the United States. The authors attempted to relate the histologic subtypes of the 91 bone tumors to clinical factors such as previous therapy and genetic predisposition because morphologic variants have been shown to have biologic significance in other tumors and may have etiologic import. The literature concerning the subtypes of bone tumors, clinical and experimental, is also reviewed. The authors also investigated the effect of several factors on the time interval from the first diagnosis to the SMN (i.e., the bone sarcoma). Anthracyclines significantly shortened the interval by about 3 years. The primary diagnosis also significantly affected the interval, with leukemia/lymphomas having the shortest interval and retinoblastoma the longest. The authors could not demonstrate any significant relationship between morphologic characteristics of the osteosarcoma and predisposing conditions. However, lesions diagnosed as chondrosarcoma and malignant fibrous histiocytoma occurred almost exclusively in patients who had received radiation therapy to the site in which the SMN developed.

  13. Mammary Adipose Tissue-Derived Lysophospholipids Promote Estrogen Receptor-Negative Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Volden, Paul A; Skor, Maxwell N; Johnson, Marianna B; Singh, Puneet; Patel, Feenalie N; McClintock, Martha K; Brady, Matthew J; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2016-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion through G protein-coupled receptors, has been implicated in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including cancer. LPA is converted from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) by the secreted phospholipase autotaxin (ATX). Although various cell types can produce ATX, adipocyte-derived ATX is believed to be the major source of circulating ATX and also to be the major regulator of plasma LPA levels. In addition to ATX, adipocytes secrete numerous other factors (adipokines); although several adipokines have been implicated in breast cancer biology, the contribution of mammary adipose tissue-derived LPC/ATX/LPA (LPA axis) signaling to breast cancer is poorly understood. Using murine mammary fat-conditioned medium, we investigated the contribution of LPA signaling to mammary epithelial cancer cell biology and identified LPA signaling as a significant contributor to the oncogenic effects of the mammary adipose tissue secretome. To interrogate the role of mammary fat in the LPA axis during breast cancer progression, we exposed mammary adipose tissue to secreted factors from estrogen receptor-negative mammary epithelial cell lines and monitored changes in the mammary fat pad LPA axis. Our data indicate that bidirectional interactions between mammary cancer cells and mammary adipocytes alter the local LPA axis and increase ATX expression in the mammary fat pad during breast cancer progression. Thus, the LPC/ATX/LPA axis may be a useful target for prevention in patients at risk of ER-negative breast cancer. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 367-78. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26862086

  14. Modeling mechanical interactions between cancerous mammary acini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jeffrey; Liphardt, Jan; Rycroft, Chris

    2015-03-01

    The rules and mechanical forces governing cell motility and interactions with the extracellular matrix of a tissue are often critical for understanding the mechanisms by which breast cancer is able to spread through the breast tissue and eventually metastasize. Ex vivo experimentation has demonstrated the the formation of long collagen fibers through collagen gels between the cancerous mammary acini responsible for milk production, providing a fiber scaffolding along which cancer cells can disorganize. We present a minimal mechanical model that serves as a potential explanation for the formation of these collagen fibers and the resultant motion. Our working hypothesis is that cancerous cells induce this fiber formation by pulling on the gel and taking advantage of the specific mechanical properties of collagen. To model this system, we employ a new Eulerian, fixed grid simulation method to model the collagen as a nonlinear viscoelastic material subject to various forces coupled with a multi-agent model to describe individual cancer cells. We find that these phenomena can be explained two simple ideas: cells pull collagen radially inwards and move towards the tension gradient of the collagen gel, while being exposed to standard adhesive and collision forces.

  15. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastrointestinal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kakushima, Naomi; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an advanced technique of therapeutic endoscopy for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms. Three steps characterize it: injecting fluid into the submucosa to elevate the lesion, cutting the surrounding mucosa of the lesion, and dissecting the submucosa beneath the lesion. The ESD technique has rapidly permeated in Japan for treatment of early gastric cancer, due to its excellent results of en-bloc resection compared to endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Although there is still room for improvement to lessen its technical difficulty, ESD has recently been applied to esophageal and colorectal neoplasms. Favorable short-term results have been reported, but the application of ESD should be well considered by three aspects: (1) the possibility of nodal metastases of the lesion, (2) technical difficulty such as location, ulceration and operator’s skill, and (3) organ characteristics. PMID:18494043

  16. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Takamaru, Hiroyuki; Mori, Genki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kinjo, Yuzuru; So, Eriko; Abe, Seiichiro; Otake, Yosuke; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an established therapeutic technique for the treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. Because it is typically completed as en bloc resection, this technique provides a complete specimen for precise pathological evaluation. On the other hand, ESD is not as widely applied in treating colorectal neoplasms as with gastric cancers, due to its technical difficulty, longer procedure time, and increased risk of perforation. However, some devices that facilitate ESD and improve the safety of the procedure have been recently reported, and the use of the technique has gradually spread worldwide. Endoscopists who begin to perform ESD need to recognize the indications of ESD, the technical issue involved in this procedure, and its associated complications. This review outlines the methods and certain types of devices used for colorectal ESD. PMID:25333002

  17. Initiation of oncogenic transformation in human mammary epithelial cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that high linear-energy transfer (LET) charged particles can be more effective than x-rays and gamma-rays in inducing oncogenic transformation in cultured cells and tumors in animals. Based on these results, experiments were designed and performed with an immortal human mammary epithelial cell line (H184B5), and several clones transformed by heavy ions were obtained. Cell fusion experiments were subsequently done, and results indicate that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. Chromosome analysis with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques also showed additional translocations in transformed human mammary epithelial cells. In addition, studies with these cell lines indicate that heavy ions can effectively induce deletion, break, and dicentrics. Deletion of tumor suppressor gene(s) and/or formation of translocation through DNA double strand breaks is a likely mechanism for the initiation of oncogenic transformation in human mammary epithelial cells.

  18. [Grading of head and neck neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Agaimy, A; Weichert, W

    2016-07-01

    Tumors of the head and neck form a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms with significant differences in biological behavior and therapeutic strategies. Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity represent the most frequent and, thus, clinically most important malignant neoplasms in this anatomical region. Similar to other neoplasms, grading of head and neck malignancies is based on evaluation of the tumor histology usually including both architectural and cytological features; however, the current consensus grading for head and neck SCC is of limited prognostic and therapeutic value and the reproducibility is low. Therefore, novel grading criteria have been proposed that are based on additional parameters, such as the type of tumor growth pattern at the invasive front (so-called tumor budding). These novel algorithms, however, have not yet been officially endorsed into guidelines. Salivary gland (SG) neoplasms, although less frequent, constitute a second important pathologically and clinically complex group of tumors at this location. In contrast to SCC, grading of these tumors is of high clinical importance. Based on the large variety of carcinoma entities of the SG, both entity-specific (e. g. mucoepidermoid carcinoma) algorithms but also algorithms, which are solely based on the recognition of a specific carcinoma variant with subsequent automatic assignment of the tumor grade (e. g. acinic cell carcinoma and salivary duct carcinoma) are in use. In the sinonasal tract, grading is important for non-intestinal type adenocarcinoma and esthesioneuroblastoma. In this article the most important grading schemes and criteria for head and neck malignancies are presented and their prognostic and therapeutic implications are discussed. PMID:27342593

  19. Granular Cell Tumor: An Uncommon Benign Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Tirthankar; Das, Anupam; Shome, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Das, Dipti; Saha, Abanti

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumor is a distinctly rare neoplasm of neural sheath origin. It mainly presents as a solitary asymptomatic swelling in the oral cavity, skin, and rarely internal organs in the middle age. Histopathology is characteristic, showing polyhedral cells containing numerous fine eosinophilic granules with indistinct cell margins. We present a case of granular cell tumor on the back of a 48-year-old woman which was painful, mimicking an adnexal tumor. PMID:26120181

  20. Benign Diseases and Neoplasms of the Penis.

    PubMed

    Wasco, Matthew J; Shah, Rajal B

    2009-03-01

    This article provides comprehensive review of benign diseases and neoplastic conditions of the penis. It describes and provides representative images of clinical, key pathologic features and ancillary techniques to aid in differential diagnoses. It examines these diseases from the epidemiologic standpoint, looks at environmental and genetic factors, and outlines the new histologic entities for penile neoplasms with distinct outcomes and clinical behavior that have been proposed in recent years. PMID:26838101

  1. [Molecular pathology of plasma cell neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Fend, F

    2010-10-01

    Plasma cell myeloma (PCM) and related immunosecretory disorders are a group of B-cell proliferations with a wide clinical and prognostic spectrum, characterized by the production of monoclonal immunoglobulin by immortalized plasma cells. Recent years have seen an explosion in knowledge on the genetic basis and biology of these diseases, followed by improved clinical risk stratification and the introduction of novel therapeutic concepts, such as treatment with proteasome inhibitors or immunomodulatory substances. PCM is a common malignancy, accounting for approximately 10% of all hematological neoplasms. There is good evidence to support a multistep transformation process in plasma cell neoplasms, which corresponds to clinically discernible disease stages. Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance is a common asymptomatic precursor lesion for PCM which carries an approximately 1% annual risk for progression. Terminal disease stages are characterized by increasing genetic complexity and independence from bone marrow stromal cells and show a rapidly increasing tumour load with severe clinical symptoms. Modern diagnostics of plasma cell neoplasms require inclusion of clinical, morphological, immunophenotypical and cytogenetic features to allow for individual risk assessment and therapy planning. PMID:20852863

  2. Salivary Gland Neoplasms in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Patrick J; Eisele, David W

    2016-01-01

    Salivary gland neoplasms (SGNs) in children are uncommon. Epithelial SGNs (ESGNs) comprise the majority (95%), with the remaining being mesenchymal SGNs (MeSGNs). Pleomorphic adenoma is the most frequently encountered benign neoplasm, mucoepidermoid carcinoma is the most frequent malignant ESGN, and rhabdomyosarcoma is the most frequent malignant MeSGN. ESGN presents in the second decade, whereas MeSGN presents in the first and second decades. Swelling without pain or neurological signs is the main presentation of both benign and malignant neoplasms. Making an accurate preoperative histological diagnosis is important, so a needle biopsy or a perioperative frozen section is useful when there is doubt about the disease status of the patient; the excised tumour margin is also important. Surgical excision should aim to achieve clear margin excision in benign and malignant ESGNs, minimising the need for adjuvant radiotherapy and maximising the long-term likelihood of patient cure. Benign ESGNs are uncommon, and excision is curative, whereas malignant ESGN and MeSGN should be managed by a multidisciplinary paediatric oncology team. PMID:27093697

  3. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2015-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. PMID:27207564

  4. Spleen tyrosine kinase regulates mammary epithelial cell proliferation in mammary glands of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaoming; Lin, Lin; Xing, Weinan; Yang, Yang; Duan, Xiaoyu; Li, Qingzhang; Gao, Xuejun; Lin, Ye

    2016-05-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that has been considered a hematopoietic cell-specific signal transducer involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the role of SYK in normal mammary gland is still poorly understood. Here we show that SYK is expressed in mammary glands of dairy cows. Expression of SYK was higher in dry period mammary tissues than in lactating mammary tissues. Knockdown and overexpression of SYK affected dairy cow mammary epithelial cell proliferation as well as the expression of signal molecules involved in proliferation, including protein kinase B (PKB, also known as AKT1), p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5). Dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that SYK increased the transcriptional activity of the AKT1 promoter, and cis-elements within the AKT1 promoter region from -439 to -84 bp mediated this regulation. These results suggest that SYK affects mammary epithelial cell proliferation by activating AKT1 at the transcriptional level in mammary glands of dairy cows, which is important for the mammary remodeling process in dry cows as well as for increasing persistency of lactation in lactating cows. PMID:26947307

  5. Mammary gland involution is associated with rapid down regulation of major mammary Ca**2+-ATPases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixty percent of calcium in milk is transported across the mammary cells apical membrane by the plasma membrane Ca**2+-ATPase 2 (PMCA2). The effect of abrupt cessation of milk production on the Ca**2+-ATPases and mammary calcium transport is unknown. We found that 24 hours after stopping milk prod...

  6. Morphological and histological characteristics of mammary dysplasias occurring in cell dissociation-derived murine mammary outgrowths

    SciTech Connect

    Ethier, S.P.; Adams, L.M.; Ullrich, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    The morphological and histological characteristics of ductal dysplasias that were observed in mammary outgrowths derived from monodispersed mammary cells of carcinogen-treated mice are described. Mammary outgrowths were derived by injecting either 10(4) or 10(5) enzymatically dissociated mammary cells, obtained from control or carcinogen-treated BALB/c mice, into gland-free mammary fat pads of syngeneic hosts. The mammary dysplasias observed varied considerably in morphological and histological characteristics. The majority of the lesions were ductal in origin and were associated with epithelial hyperplasia which ranged from mild hyperplasia, in which only a few extra layers of epithelium were present, to severe hyperplasia, in which the ducts and end buds were occluded and distended with epithelial cells. In addition, papillary and lobular lesions were observed which were also associated with varying degrees of hyperplasia. The range of mammary dysplasias observed in these outgrowths closely resembles that of lesions associated with the pathogenesis of mammary carcinoma in mice, rats, and humans.

  7. Uncommon presentations of common pancreatic neoplasms: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; De Robertis, Riccardo; Capelli, Paola; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Crosara, Stefano; Gobbo, Stefano; Butturini, Giovanni; Salvia, Roberto; Barbi, Emilio; Girelli, Roberto; Bassi, Claudio; Pederzoli, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms are a wide group of solid and cystic lesions with different and often characteristic imaging features, clinical presentations, and management. Among solid tumors, ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common: it arises from exocrine pancreas, comprises about 90% of all pancreatic neoplasms, and generally has a bad prognosis; its therapeutic management must be multidisciplinary, involving surgeons, oncologists, gastroenterologists, radiologists, and radiotherapists. The second most common solid pancreatic neoplasms are neuroendocrine tumors: they can be divided into functioning or non-functioning and present different degrees of malignancy. Cystic pancreatic neoplasms comprise serous neoplasms, which are almost always benign, mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, which can vary from benign to frankly malignant lesions, and solid pseudopapillary tumors. Other pancreatic neoplasms, such as lymphoma, metastases, or pancreatoblastoma, are rarely seen in clinical practice and have different and sometimes controversial managements. Rare clinical presentations and imaging appearance of the most common pancreatic neoplasms, both solid and cystic, are more frequently seen and clinically relevant than rare pancreatic tumors; their pathologic and radiologic appearances must be known to improve their management. The purpose of this paper is to present some rare or uncommon clinical and radiological presentations of common pancreatic neoplasms providing examples of multi-modality imaging approach with pathologic correlations, thus describing the histopathological bases that can explain the peculiar imaging features, in order to avoid relevant misdiagnosis and to improve lesion management. PMID:25772002

  8. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed without..., swine, and goats shall not be saved for edible purposes. (d) The udders from cows officially...

  9. Paternal selenium deficiency but not supplementation during preconception alters mammary gland development and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Guido, Luiza N; Fontelles, Camile C; Rosim, Mariana P; Pires, Vanessa C; Cozzolino, Silvia M F; Castro, Inar A; Bolaños-Jiménez, Francisco; Barbisan, Luis F; Ong, Thomas P

    2016-10-15

    Breast cancer is a global public health problem and accumulating evidence indicates early-life exposures as relevant factors in the disease risk determination. Recent studies have shown that paternal nutrition can influence offspring health including breast cancer risk. Selenium is a micronutrient with essential role in central aspects of embryogenesis, male fertility and cancer and that has been extensively studied as a chemopreventive agent in several breast cancer experimental models. Thus, we designed an animal study to evaluate whether paternal selenium deficiency or supplementation during preconception could affect the female offspring mammary gland development and breast cancer susceptibility. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed AIN93-G diet containing 0.15 ppm (control diet), 0.05 ppm (deficient diet) or 1 ppm (supplemented diet) of selenium for 9 weeks and mated with control female rats. Mammary carcinogenesis was induced with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) in their female offspring. Paternal selenium deficiency increased the number of terminal end buds, epithelial elongation and cell proliferation in the mammary gland of the female rat offspring and these effects were associated with higher susceptibility to DMBA-induced mammary tumors (increased incidence and higher grade tumors). On the other hand, paternal selenium supplementation did not influence any of these parameters. These results highlight the importance of father's nutrition including selenium status as a relevant factor affecting daughter's breast cancer risk and paternal preconception as a potential developmental stage to start disease preventive strategies. PMID:27270969

  10. Comparative aspects of mammary gland development and homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary glands are crucial to the reproductive strategy of mammals and the milk of domesticated ruminants serves as an important source of nutrients for the human population. The majority of mammary gland development occurs postnatally and the mammary gland undergoes cyclical periods of growth, dif...

  11. Cutaneous metastases of a mammary carcinoma in a llama.

    PubMed Central

    Leichner, T L; Turner, O; Mason, G L; Barrington, G M

    2001-01-01

    An 8-year-old, female llama was evaluated for nonhealing, ulcerative, cutaneous lesions, which also involved the mammary gland. Biopsies of the lesions distant from and within the mammary gland area revealed an aggressive carcinoma. The tumor was confirmed at necropsy to be a mammary gland adenocarcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. Images Figure 1. PMID:11265189

  12. Ability of bovine mammary macrophages to enhance proliferation of autologous blood and mammary secretion lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Concha, C; Holmberg, O

    1990-02-01

    Cells were obtained by centrifuging the mammary secretion of healthy udders of 19 cows during the dry-period and during mid-lactation. The suspended cells were incubated in plastic wells. Those adhered cells classified as mammary macrophages were incubated with pokeweed mitogen (PWM). Autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes were added to wells containing untreated macrophage cultures or cultures pretreated with PWM. In seven cows autologous dry-period mammary lymphocytes were added instead of blood lymphocytes. The macrophages + lymphocyte cultures were subjected to the lymphocyte stimulation test (LST). For comparison, peripheral blood lymphocytes and dry-period secretion lymphocytes were also subjected to the LST in the presence of PWM. In all cases, mitogenic responses were higher in pretreated macrophage cultures than in background control cultures. The stimulation indices (SI) showed that PWM-pretreated dry-period mammary macrophages enhanced the proliferation of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes to a greater extent than did blood lymphocytes plus PWM (49 +/- 10 v. 30 +/- 6; P less than or equal to 0.05). Mammary macrophages taken from the same cows but during midlactation also clearly induced proliferation of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes but to a lesser extent than dry-period macrophages (16 +/- 2 v. 49 +/- 10; 16 +/- 2 v. 30 +/- 6; P less than or equal to 0.01 and P less than or equal to 0.05). The PWM pretreatment of mammary macrophages increased the proliferation of autologous dry-period mammary lymphocytes by at least a factor of three (28 +/- 8 v. 8 +/- 2 P less than or equal to 0.05). The present results indicate that bovine mammary macrophages pretreated with PWM enhance proliferation as well as modulation of mammary and peripheral blood lymphocytes. The modulation of lymphocyte stimulation as demonstrated here in vitro, has great significance regarding aspects of local immunostimulation related to modern treatment of mastitis. PMID

  13. Primary cancer cell culture: mammary-optimized vs conditional reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Alamri, Ahmad M; Kang, Keunsoo; Groeneveld, Svenja; Wang, Weisheng; Zhong, Xiaogang; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Hennighausen, Lothar; Liu, Xuefeng; Furth, Priscilla A

    2016-07-01

    The impact of different culture conditions on biology of primary cancer cells is not always addressed. Here, conditional reprogramming (CRC) was compared with mammary-optimized EpiCult-B (EpiC) for primary mammary epithelial cell isolation and propagation, allograft generation, and genome-wide transcriptional consequences using cancer and non-cancer mammary tissue from mice with different dosages of Brca1 and p53 Selective comparison to DMEM was included. Primary cultures were established with all three media, but CRC was most efficient for initial isolation (P<0.05). Allograft development was faster using cells grown in EpiC compared with CRC (P<0.05). Transcriptome comparison of paired CRC and EpiC cultures revealed 1700 differentially expressed genes by passage 20. CRC promoted Trp53 gene family upregulation and increased expression of epithelial differentiation genes, whereas EpiC elevated expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes. Differences did not persist in allografts where both methods yielded allografts with relatively similar transcriptomes. Restricting passage (<7) reduced numbers of differentially expressed genes below 50. In conclusion, CRC was most efficient for initial cell isolation but EpiC was quicker for allograft generation. The extensive culture-specific gene expression patterns that emerged with longer passage could be limited by reducing passage number when both culture transcriptomes were equally similar to that of the primary tissue. Defining impact of culture condition and passage on the transcriptome of primary cells could assist experimental design and interpretation. For example, differences that appear with passage and culture condition are potentially exploitable for comparative studies targeting specific biological networks in different transcriptional environments. PMID:27267121

  14. Cystic Neoplasms of the Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ribaux, C.; Schnyder, P.

    1990-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are rare and their diagnosis and treatment can be difficult. This report details 7 patients who had histologically proven serous cystadenoma4, mucinous cystadenoma2 and cystadeno carcinoma1. Computed tomography and sonography allowed excellent preoperative assessment but to attempt a distinction between the histological variants may be hazardous. Two tumours were only autopsy findings and 5 patients underwent laparotomy. It is confirmed that potentially malignant mucinous cystadenomas and cytadenocarcinomas should be resected whenever possible; serous cystadenomas are always benign and should therefore be resected only when the diagnosis is doubtful or if they cause symptoms. PMID:2278913

  15. Myeloproliferative neoplasms: Morphology and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Barbui, Tiziano; Thiele, Jürgen; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2016-06-01

    In myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), controversy persists regarding the usefulness and reproducibility of bone marrow (BM) features. Disagreements concerning the WHO classification are mainly focused on the discrimination between essential thrombocythemia (ET) and prefibrotic/early primary myelofibrosis (prePMF) and prodromal polycythemia vera (PV). Criticism mostly refers to lack of standardization of distinctive BM features precluding correct morphological pattern recognition. The distinction between WHO-defined ET and prePMF is not trivial because outcome is significantly worse in prePMF. Morphology was generally considered to be non-specific for the diagnosis of PV. Recent studies have revealed under-diagnosis of morphologically and biologically consistent PV. PMID:26718907

  16. Computed tomography of cardiac pseudotumors and neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Anavekar, Nandan S; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Foley, Thomas A; Morris, Michael F; Martinez, Matthew W; Williamson, Eric E; Glockner, James F; Miller, Dylan V; Breen, Jerome F; Araoz, Philip A

    2010-07-01

    Important features of cardiac masses can be clearly delineated on cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging. This modality is useful in identifying the presence of a mass, its relationship with cardiac and extracardiac structures, and the features that distinguish one type of mass from another. A multimodality approach to the evaluation of cardiac tumors is advocated, with the use of echocardiography, CT imaging and magnetic resonance imaging as appropriately indicated. In this article, various cardiac masses are described, including pseudotumors and true cardiac neoplasms, and the CT imaging findings that may be useful in distinguishing these rare entities are presented. PMID:20705174

  17. Pulmonary disease in gestational trophoblastic neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    McNair, O. M.; Polk, O. D.

    1992-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasms can present as pulmonary nodules without significant disease of the reproductive organs. This article describes a case of metastatic gestational trophoblastic disease to the lungs. This entity must be considered in the differential diagnosis in any female of reproductive age who presents with multiple pulmonary nodules. Thoracotomy has a limited role in the initial evaluation of patients with this disease. However, it may be needed in patients who have evidence of persistent pulmonary disease, despite appropriate therapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1324326

  18. Uterine neoplasms, version 1.2014.

    PubMed

    Koh, Wui-Jin; Greer, Benjamin E; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Apte, Sachin M; Campos, Susana M; Chan, John; Cho, Kathleen R; Cohn, David; Crispens, Marta Ann; Dupont, Nefertiti; Eifel, Patricia J; Fader, Amanda Nickles; Fisher, Christine M; Gaffney, David K; George, Suzanne; Han, Ernest; Huh, Warner K; Lurain, John R; Martin, Lainie; Mutch, David; Remmenga, Steven W; Reynolds, R Kevin; Small, William; Teng, Nelson; Tillmanns, Todd; Valea, Fidel A; McMillian, Nicole; Hughes, Miranda

    2014-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the endometrium (also known as endometrial cancer or more broadly as uterine cancer or carcinoma of the uterine corpus) is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract in the United States. An estimated 49,560 new uterine cancer cases will occur in 2013, with 8190 deaths resulting from the disease. Uterine sarcomas (stromal/mesenchymal tumors) are uncommon malignancies, accounting for approximately 3% of all uterine cancers. The NCCN Guidelines for Uterine Neoplasms describe malignant epithelial carcinomas and uterine sarcomas; each of these major categories contains specific histologic groups that require different management. This excerpt of these guidelines focuses on early-stage disease. PMID:24586086

  19. Significance of caveolin-1 and matrix metalloproteinase 14 gene expression in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, M; Iwano, H; Nishikawa, M; Tochigi, Y; Komatsu, T; Endou, Y; Hirayama, K; Taniyama, H; Kadosawa, T; Yokota, H

    2015-11-01

    Canine mammary tumours (CMTs) are the most common neoplasms affecting female dogs. There is an urgent need for molecular biomarkers that can detect early stages of the disease in order to improve accuracy of CMT diagnosis. The aim of this study was to examine whether caveolin-1 (Cav-1) and matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14) are associated with CMT histological malignancy and invasion. Sixty-five benign and malignant CMT samples and six normal canine mammary glands were analysed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Cav-1 and MMP14 genes were highly expressed in CMT tissues compared to normal tissues. Cav-1 especially was overexpressed in malignant and invasive CMT tissues. When a CMT cell line was cultured on fluorescent gelatin-coated coverslips, localisation of Cav-1 was observed at invadopodia-mediated degradation sites of the gelatin matrix. These findings suggest that Cav-1 may be involved in CMT invasion and that the markers may be useful for estimating CMT malignancy. PMID:26364240

  20. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  1. Canine Mammary Mixed Tumours: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dantas Cassali, Geovanni; Cavalheiro Bertagnolli, Angélica; Ferreira, Enio; Araújo Damasceno, Karine; de Oliveira Gamba, Conrado; Bonolo de Campos, Cecília

    2012-01-01

    Mammary mixed tumours are the most frequent neoplasias in female dogs. In humans, mixed tumours are frequently found in the salivary glands and are known as pleomorphic adenomas. In addition to their histomorphologic similarities, mixed tumours and pleomorphic adenomas have the potential to become malignant and give rise to carcinomas in mixed tumours and carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenoma, respectively. The factors associated with malignant transformation are still poorly known in the case of canine mixed tumours. However, this form of neoplasia tends to be associated with a better prognosis than other malignant histological types. This paper discusses the main features associated with female canine mammary mixed tumours. PMID:23193497

  2. Digestive neuroendocrine neoplasms: A 2016 overview.

    PubMed

    Merola, Elettra; Rinzivillo, Maria; Cicchese, Noemi; Capurso, Gabriele; Panzuto, Francesco; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2016-08-01

    Digestive neuroendocrine neoplasms (DNENs) have an incidence of 2.39 per 100,000 inhabitants per year, and a prevalence of 35 cases per 100,000; the gap between these rates is to be referred to the relatively long survival that characterizes the majority of these tumors, which can be thus considered as chronic oncological diseases. Up to 80% of patients are stage IV since the first diagnosis, presenting a 5-yr overall survival rate of 35%-55% and a twice higher mortality than limited disease. DNENs express somatostatin receptors in more than 80% of cases, detected through immunohistochemistry or functional imaging tests (FITs). This feature identifies patients who may benefit from "cold" somatostatin analogs (SSAs) or peptide receptors radionuclide therapy, although SSAs are sometimes used also with a negative uptake at FITs. The therapeutic options have been recently increased after the identification of molecular pathways involved in DNENs pathogenesis, and the subsequent use of targeted therapies (i.e., Everolimus and Sunitinib) for these neoplasms. This review offers an overview about pancreatic and small bowel NENs, critically underlining the issues that still need to be clarified and the future perspectives to be investigated. PMID:27212431

  3. Management of early gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, Hans; Jensen, Robert T; Cadiot, Guillaume; Stölzel, Ulrich; Klöppel, Günter

    2011-01-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) of the stomach, duodenum, appendix or rectum that are small (≤ 1 cm) and well differentiated can be considered “early” tumors, since they generally have a (very) good prognosis. In the new WHO classification of 2010, these neoplasms are called neuroendocrine tumors/ carcinoids (NETs), grade (G) 1 or 2, and distinguished from poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs), G3. NETs are increasing, with a rise in the age-adjusted incidence in the U.S.A. by about 700 % in the last 35 years. Improved early detection seems to be the main reason for these epidemiological changes. Both the better general availability of endoscopy, and imaging techniques, have led to a shift in the discovery of smaller-sized (≤ 10-20 mm) intestinal NETs/carcinoids and earlier tumor stages at diagnosis. Endoscopic screening is therefore effective in the early diagnosis, not only of colorectal adenocarcinomas, but also of NETs/carcinoids. Endoscopic removal, followed up with endoscopic surveillance is the treatment of choice in NETs/carcinoids of the stomach, duodenum and rectum that are ≤ 10 mm in size, have a low proliferative activity (G1), do not infiltrate the muscular layer and show no angioinvasion. In all the other intestinal NENs, optimal treatment generally needs surgery and/or medical therapy depending on type, biology and stage of the tumor, as well as the individual situation of the patient. PMID:21860682

  4. Advances in the Diagnosis of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Singh, Aviral; Baum, Richard P

    2016-09-01

    Somatostatin receptor PET/CT using (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs, is a mainstay for the evaluation of the somatostatin receptor status in neuroendocrine neoplasms. In addition, the assessment of glucose metabolism by (18)F-FDG PET/CT at diagnosis can overcome probable shortcomings of histopathologic grading. This offers a systematic theranostic approach for the management of neuroendocrine neoplasms, that is, patient selection for the appropriate treatment-surgery, somatostatin analogs, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, targeted therapies like everolimus and sunitinib, or chemotherapy-and also for therapy response monitoring. Novel targets, for example, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in higher-grade tumors and glucagon like peptide-1 receptor in insulinomas, appear promising for imaging. Scandium-44 and Copper-64, especially on account of their longer half-life (for pretherapeutic dosimetry) and cyclotron production (which favors mass production), might be the potential alternatives to (68)Ga for PET/CT imaging. The future of molecular imaging lies in Radiomics, that is, qualitative and quantitative characterization of tumor phenotypes in correlation with tumor genomics and proteomics, for a personalized cancer management. PMID:27553465

  5. Stromal Effects on Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Bryony S.; Werb, Zena

    2002-05-01

    Breast cancer manifests itself in the mammary epithelium, yet there is a growing recognition that mammary stromal cells also play an important role in tumorigenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer, and many of the stromal factors necessary for mammary development also promote or protect against breast cancer. Here we review our present knowledge of the specific factors and cell types that contribute to epithelial-stromal crosstalk during mammary development. To find cures for diseases like breast cancer that rely on epithelial-stromal crosstalk, we must understand how these different cell types communicate with each other.

  6. GATA3 Expression in Normal Skin and in Benign and Malignant Epidermal and Cutaneous Adnexal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    de Peralta-Venturina, Mariza N.; Balzer, Bonnie L.; Frishberg, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Initial investigations reported GATA3 to be a sensitive and relatively specific marker for mammary and urothelial carcinomas. Recently, GATA3 expression has been described in several other epithelial tumors. However, there has been only limited investigation of GATA3 expression in cutaneous epithelial tumors. The objective of this study was to examine the immunohistochemical expression of GATA3 in a wide variety of cutaneous epithelial neoplasms. GATA3 expression was evaluated in 99 benign and 63 malignant cutaneous epithelial tumors. GATA3 was consistently and usually strongly expressed in clear cell acanthoma, trichofolliculoma, trichoepithelioma, trichilemmoma, sebaceous adenoma, sebaceoma, apocrine hidrocystoma, apocrine tubular papillary adenoma, hidradenoma papilliferum, and syringocystadenoma papilliferum. Hidradenomas exhibited variable positive staining. Most poromas, syringomas, chondroid syringomas, cylindromas, and spiradenomas were negative or only focally and weakly positive. Focal staining was present in all pilomatrixomas. Thirteen of 14 basal cell carcinomas, 21 of 24 squamous carcinomas, and all 6 sebaceous carcinomas exhibited positive staining. The 1 apocrine carcinoma, both mucinous carcinomas, and 2 of 3 microcystic adnexal carcinomas also exhibited positive staining, whereas the 1 eccrine porocarcinoma and the 1 adenoid cystic carcinoma were negative. One of 11 Merkel cell carcinomas exhibited focal weak staining. Our findings demonstrate that GATA3 is expressed in a wide variety of benign and malignant cutaneous epithelial neoplasms. In addition to carcinomas of breast and urothelial origin and other more recently described GATA3-positive tumors, the differential diagnosis of a metastatic tumor of unknown primary origin that expresses GATA3 should also include a carcinoma of cutaneous epithelial origin. PMID:26595821

  7. The Mammary Gland Microenvironment Directs Progenitor Cell Fate In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bussard, Karen M.; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2011-01-01

    The mammary gland is a unique organ that continually undergoes postnatal developmental changes. In mice, the mammary gland is formed via signals from terminal end buds, which direct ductal growth and elongation. Intriguingly, it is likely that the entire cellular repertoire of the mammary gland is formed from a single antecedent cell. Furthermore, in order to produce progeny of varied lineages (e.g., luminal and myoepithelial cells), signals from the local tissue microenvironment influence mammary stem/progenitor cell fate. Data have shown that cells from the mammary gland microenvironment reprogram adult somatic cells from other organs (testes, nerve) into cells that produce milk and express mammary epithelial cell proteins. Similar results were found for human tumorigenic epithelial carcinoma cells. Presently, it is unclear how the deterministic power of the mammary gland microenvironment controls epithelial cell fate. Regardless, signals generated by the microenvironment have a profound influence on progenitor cell differentiation in vivo. PMID:21647291

  8. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF MAMMARY MASSES IN CAPTIVE LIONS (PANTHERA LEO).

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Craig, Linden E; Ramsay, Edward C; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin; Garner, Michael M

    2016-03-01

    A multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 330 pathology accessions from 285 different lions found 15 captive, female African lions (Panthera leo) with confirmed mammary masses. Aside from the presence of a mammary mass, the most common initial clinical sign was inappetence. Histologic diagnoses were predominantly adenocarcinoma (n = 12), though two benign masses (mammary hyperplasia and a mammary cyst) and one squamous cell carcinoma were identified. Nine of 13 malignant tumors had metastasized to lymph nodes or viscera at the time of necropsy. Six lions with adenocarcinoma and two lions with benign mammary masses had received hormonal contraception, though little evidence of mammary lobular hyperplasia was seen in association with the adenocarcinomas. The most common concurrent disease processes found at necropsy were chronic urinary tract disease and other malignancies. These cases demonstrate that mammary malignancies occur in captive lions and frequently metastasize. PMID:27010273

  9. Radiogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Tavakoli, A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cancer induction by space radiations is a major concern for manned space exploration. Accurate assessment of radiation risk at low doses requires basic understanding of mechanism(s) of radiation carcinogenesis. For determining the oncogenic effects of ionizing radiation in human epithelial cells, we transformed a mammary epithelial cell line (185B5), which was immortalized by benzo(a)pyrene, with energetic heavy ions and obtained several transformed clones. These transformed cells showed growth properties on Matrigel similar to human mammary tumor cells. To better understand the mechanisms of radiogenic transformation of human cells, we systematically examined the alterations in chromosomes and cancer genes. Among 16 autosomes examined for translocations, by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, chromosomes 3, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 18 appeared to be normal in transformed cells. Chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 8, and 17 in transformed cells, however, showed patterns different from those in nontransformed cells. Southern blot analyses indicated no detectable alterations in myc, ras, Rb, or p53 genes. Further studies of chromosome 17 by using in situ hybridization with unique sequence p53 gene probe and a centromere probe showed no loss of p53 gene in transformed cells. Experimental results from cell fusion studies indicated that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. The role of genomic instability and tumor suppressor gene(s) in radiogenic transformation of human breast cells remains to be identified.

  10. Childhood ovarian neoplasms in Ibadan, South-western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ajani, Mustapha Akanji; Aramide, Kolawole Olanrewaju; Ajani, Tinuade Adesola; Salami, Ayodeji A.; Okolo, Clement Abu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Childhood ovarian neoplasms are very rare. Little information is available on the relative pattern and frequency of these tumors in Nigerian children. Earlier study done in Ibadan involved ovarian neoplasms in children and adolescents. The aim of this study is to review cases of ovarian neoplasms in children <15 years over a 22½ years period. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study. Twenty-four cases of childhood ovarian neoplasms were seen in patients <15 years of age. These cases were classified using the current World Health Organization histological classification of ovarian tumors. Results: Childhood ovarian neoplasms accounted for 2.8% of all cases of ovarian tumors seen in this period. Fourteen (58.3%) cases of childhood ovarian neoplasms were benign, and 10 (41.7%) were malignant. Mature cystic teratoma occurring in 13 (54.2%) was the most common childhood ovarian neoplasm and was most prevalent between 10 and 14 years of age. Burkitt lymphoma was the most common 4 (40%) malignant childhood ovarian tumor and prevalent between 5 and 14 years of age. Conclusion: Mature cystic teratoma remains the single most common childhood ovarian neoplasms, and Burkitt's lymphoma is the most malignant childhood ovarian tumor in Ibadan, South-western Nigeria. PMID:27397956

  11. Generation and characterization of a breast carcinoma model by PyMT overexpression in mammary epithelial cells of tree shrew, an animal close to primates in evolution.

    PubMed

    Ge, Guang-Zhe; Xia, Hou-Jun; He, Bao-Li; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Liu, Wen-Jing; Shao, Ming; Wang, Chun-Yan; Xiao, Ji; Ge, Fei; Li, Fu-Bing; Li, Yi; Chen, Ceshi

    2016-02-01

    The tree shrew is becoming an attractive experimental animal model for human breast cancer owing to a closer relationship to primates/humans than rodents. Tree shrews are superior to classical primates because tree shrew are easier to manipulate, maintain and propagate. It is required to establish a high-efficiency tree shrew breast cancer model for etiological research and drug assessment. Our previous studies suggest that 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) induce breast tumors in tree shrews with a low frequency (<50%) and long latency (∼ 7-month), making these methods less than ideal. We induced mammary tumors in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) by injection of lentivirus expressing the PyMT oncogene into mammary ducts of 22 animals. Most tree shrews developed mammary tumors with a latency of about three weeks, and by 7 weeks all injected tree shrews had developed mammary tumors. Among these, papillary carcinoma is the predominant tumor type. One case showed lymph node and lung metastasis. Interestingly, the expression levels of phosphorylated AKT, ERK and STAT3 were elevated in 41-68% of PyMT-induced mammary tumors, but not all tumors. Finally, we observed that the growth of PyMT-induced tree shrew mammary tumors was significantly inhibited by Cisplatin and Epidoxorubicin. PyMT-induced tree shrew mammary tumor model may be suitable for further breast cancer research and drug development, due to its high efficiency and short latency. PMID:26296387

  12. Effect of bisphenol A on morphology, apoptosis and proliferation in the resting mammary gland of the adult albino rat.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Marwa A A; Elbakry, Reda H; Bayomy, Naglaa A

    2016-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic oestrogen that is extensively used in a wide range of daily used plastic products. This makes it one of the environmental chemicals that may have impact on human health. Due to its oestrogenic effect, BPA might affect the mammary gland. This study aimed to investigate the influence of BPA on the histological structure of the mammary gland of the adult female albino rat and its effect on epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis status, in addition to its possible modulating effect on estrogen receptor expression. Thirty female adult albino rats were divided into control and experimental groups. The rats in the experimental group were gavaged with 5 mg/kg BPA daily for 8 weeks. The mammary glands were dissected and processed for histological and immunohistochemical stains for Ki-67, activated caspase-3 and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α). BPA induced an increase in the number and size of the acini and ducts in the mammary gland of treated rats with hyperplasia of their lining epithelial cells. The collagen fibre content was significantly increased in the connective tissue stroma separating the ducts. Immunohistochemical results showed a significant increase in Ki-67 and caspase-3, but a non-significant increase in ER-α expression. Bisphenol A induced structural changes and affected the proliferation rate of mammary glands, so it might be one of the predisposing factors for breast cancer. PMID:26877094

  13. Effect of Mutation Order on Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Nangalia, Jyoti; Silber, Yvonne; Wedge, David C.; Grinfeld, Jacob; Baxter, E. Joanna; Massie, Charles E.; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Menon, Suraj; Godfrey, Anna L.; Dimitropoulou, Danai; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Besses, Carles; Döhner, Konstanze; Harrison, Claire N.; Vassiliou, George S.; Vannucchi, Alessandro; Campbell, Peter J.; Green, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cancers result from the accumulation of somatic mutations, and their properties are thought to reflect the sum of these mutations. However, little is known about the effect of the order in which mutations are acquired. METHODS We determined mutation order in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms by genotyping hematopoietic colonies or by means of next-generation sequencing. Stem cells and progenitor cells were isolated to study the effect of mutation order on mature and immature hematopoietic cells. RESULTS The age at which a patient presented with a myeloproliferative neoplasm, acquisition of JAK2 V617F homozygosity, and the balance of immature progenitors were all influenced by mutation order. As compared with patients in whom the TET2 mutation was acquired first (hereafter referred to as “TET2-first patients”), patients in whom the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) mutation was acquired first (“JAK2-first patients”) had a greater likelihood of presenting with polycythemia vera than with essential thrombocythemia, an increased risk of thrombosis, and an increased sensitivity of JAK2-mutant progenitors to ruxolitinib in vitro. Mutation order influenced the proliferative response to JAK2 V617F and the capacity of double-mutant hematopoietic cells and progenitor cells to generate colony-forming cells. Moreover, the hematopoietic stem-and-progenitor-cell compartment was dominated by TET2 single-mutant cells in TET2-first patients but by JAK2–TET2 double-mutant cells in JAK2-first patients. Prior mutation of TET2 altered the transcriptional consequences of JAK2 V617F in a cell-intrinsic manner and prevented JAK2 V617F from up-regulating genes associated with proliferation. CONCLUSIONS The order in which JAK2 and TET2 mutations were acquired influenced clinical features, the response to targeted therapy, the biology of stem and progenitor cells, and clonal evolution in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. (Funded by Leukemia and Lymphoma Research

  14. Dietary genistein stimulates mammary development in gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possible role of the phytoestrogen, genistein, on prepubertal development of mammary glands, hormonal status and bone resorption was investigated in gilts. Forty-five gilts were fed a control diet containing soya (CTLS, n = 15), a control diet without soya (CTL0, n = 15) or the CTLS diet supplem...

  15. Effect of elevated selenium intakes on mammary cell proliferation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Salbe, A.D.; Albanes, D.; Winick, M.; Taylor, P.R.; Levander, O.A. National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Elevated selenium (Se) intakes and calorie restriction (CR) inhibit mammary tumorigenesis in experimental animals. The present study was designed to investigate cell proliferation in the mammary tissue gland. Female weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: control, 40% CR, 4 or 6 ppm Se in water as selenate. Control rats and Se rats were fed a control diet ad lib. CR rats were pair-fed 40% less than controls with a diet providing equal nutrients except carbohydrate calories. After 3 weeks, rats were injected with ({sup 3}H)-thymidine and killed 1 hr later. Se at 4 ppm significantly decreased only the number of ducts, whereas 6 ppm Se decreased both the number of ducts as well as the number and percent of labeled cells. CR had no effect on mammary cell proliferation. These results suggest that elevated Se intakes may protect against mammary tumorigenesis by decreasing cell proliferation, a mechanism which may affect the dose-response of the genotoxic chemicals frequently used as initiating agents in animal experiments.

  16. Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the sinonasal region.

    PubMed

    Bell, Diana; Hanna, Ehab Y; Weber, Randal S; DeMonte, Franco; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Lewis, James S; Cardesa, Antonio; Slootweg, Pieter J; Stenman, Göran; Gnepp, Douglas R; Devaney, Kenneth O; Rodrigo, Juan P; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Wenig, Bruce M; Westra, William H; Bishop, Justin A; Hellquist, Henrik; Hunt, Jennifer L; Kusafuka, Kimihide; Perez-Ordoñez, Bayardo; Williams, Michelle D; Takes, Robert P; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-04-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the sinonasal region, which are relatively uncommon but clinically very important, are reviewed here in the light of current knowledge. Using a definition for neuroendocrine based on phenotypic, histologic, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic features rather than histogenetic criteria, sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinomas are examined with a particular emphasis on the small-cell and large-cell subtypes. This is followed by revisiting olfactory neuroblastoma because it is also a tumor that shows a neuroendocrine phenotype. Kadish clinical and Hyams histologic grading systems as prognosticators of olfactory neuroblastoma are also considered in detail. Finally, controversies regarding sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma as a neuroendocrine tumor are discussed and a possible relationship with high-grade olfactory neuroblastoma is explored. Genetic events and current management of these tumors are also outlined. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2259-E2266, 2016. PMID:26041714

  17. Primary malignant neoplasm of the female urethra

    SciTech Connect

    Ampil, F.L.

    1985-12-01

    This is a retrospective review of 11 cases of primary malignant neoplasm of the female urethra seen at the Louisiana State University Medical Center in Shreveport from 1951 to 1984. The disease was relatively more frequent in the 60- to 79-year age-group. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common among the different observed histopathology. A modified clinical staging system is introduced. At diagnosis, eight of 11 subjects (73%) had locally extensive disease. The majority of the patients were treated with radiotherapy alone or in combination with surgery. The overall severe complication rate was low. The poor results (20% local control and survival) obtained in this small experience suggest that perhaps a study using promising adjuvant chemotherapeutic agents is warranted. A literature review summary of reported radiotherapy results is included.

  18. Increased risk of lymphoid neoplasm in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm: a study of 1,915 patients

    PubMed Central

    Rumi, Elisa; Passamonti, Francesco; Elena, Chiara; Pietra, Daniela; Arcaini, Luca; Astori, Cesare; Zibellini, Silvia; Boveri, Emanuela; Pascutto, Cristiana; Lazzarino, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Within a cohort of 1,915 consecutive patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm followed for a median time of 5.2 years (range 0–33.3), we investigated the occurrence of lymphoid neoplasm with the aim of defining this risk and to investigate the role of genetic predisposing factors. We identified 22 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm who developed lymphoid neoplasm over their lifetime. We found that the risk of developing lymphoid neoplasm was 2.79-fold higher (95% CI, 1.80–4.33; P<0.001) than that of the general Italian population. A tag SNP surrogate for JAK2 GGCC haplotype was used to clarify a potential correlation between lymphoid-myeloid neoplasm occurrence and this genetic predisposing factor. As we did not find any difference in GGCC haplotype frequency between patients with both myeloid and lymphoid neoplasm and patients with myeloid neoplasm, JAK2 GGCC haplotype should not be considered a genetic predisposing factor. No difference in familial clustering was observed between the two groups. PMID:21109692

  19. Incidence of colorectal neoplasms among male pilots

    PubMed Central

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Toledano, Ohad; Galazan, Lior; Hallak, Aharon; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms (adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers) among Israeli military and commercial airline pilots. METHODS: Initial screening colonoscopy was performed on average-risk (no symptoms and no family history) airline pilots at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center (ICPC) in the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Visualized polyps were excised and sent for pathological examination. Advanced adenoma was defined as a lesion >10 mm in diameter, with high-grade dysplasia or villous histology. The results were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched random sample of healthy adults undergoing routine screening at the ICPC. RESULTS: There were 270 pilots (mean age 55.2 ± 7.4 years) and 1150 controls (mean age 55.7 ± 7.8 years). The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was 15.9% among the pilots and 20.6% among the controls (P = 0.097, χ2 test). There were significantly more hyperplastic polyps among pilots (15.5% vs 9.4%, P = 0.004) and a trend towards fewer adenomas (14.8% vs 20.3% P = 0.06). The prevalence of advanced lesions among pilots and control groups was 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively (P = 0.49), and the prevalence of cancer was 0.7% and 0.69%, respectively (P = 0.93). CONCLUSION: There tends to be a lower colorectal adenoma, advanced adenoma and cancer prevalence but a higher hyperplastic polyp prevalence among pilots than the general population. PMID:25083084

  20. Primary neoplasms of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Serour, F; Dona, G; Birkenfeld, S; Balassiano, M; Krispin, M

    1992-01-01

    Primary neoplasms of the small bowel are unusual and constitute 1-5% of all gastrointestinal tract neoplasms. Preoperative diagnostic difficulties, frequent dissemination at the time of the diagnosis, and poor prognosis are characteristic of this pathology. During a period of 26 years we treated 61 patients with tumors of the small bowel, 44 malignant and 18 benign (1 patient had both). The most common symptoms were abdominal pain (62%), weight loss (41%), and gastro-intestinal bleeding (31%). More than half of the patients were treated as emergencies and among the remaining, the most useful diagnostic test was the small intestinal barium study. Seventeen patients were operated on for intestinal obstruction, 6 of them due to intussusception of the tumor, while 8 other patients presented with perforation and 7 with massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Leiomyoma was the most frequent benign lesion. Among malignancies lymphoma was encountered in 38.6%, followed by adenocarcinoma (29.6%) and leiomyosarcoma (22.8%). Lymphoma was predominant among Sephardic Jews. Curative procedures were attempted in all but one of the benign cases and in 21 of the malignant cases. At the time of surgery metastases were present in 23 patients. The postoperative mortality was high (20% and 14% in the benign and malignant groups, respectively) most probably due to the high incidence of emergency surgery in a high risk population. The prognosis of the malignant tumors was poor with a 5-year survival of 18%. Their disappointing course seems to be related to late diagnosis because of nonspecific symptoms and difficulty in bringing the tumor to the fore. Hopefully, a greater awareness will lead to an earlier diagnosis and improve the prognosis. PMID:1548877

  1. Dietary effects of mead acid on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary cancers in female Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    KINOSHITA, YUICHI; YOSHIZAWA, KATSUHIKO; HAMAZAKI, KEI; EMOTO, YUKO; YURI, TAKASHI; YUKI, MICHIKO; KAWASHIMA, HIROSHI; SHIKATA, NOBUAKI; TSUBURA, AIRO

    2016-01-01

    The effect of mead acid (MA; 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid) on the suppression of the development and growth of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary cancer in female Sprague-Dawley rats was examined. The MA diet (2.4% MA) or control (CTR) diet (0% MA) was started at 6 weeks of age, MNU was injected intraperitoneally at 7 weeks of age, and the rats were maintained on the respective diets for the whole experimental period (until 19 weeks of age). All induced mammary tumors were luminal A subtype carcinomas (estrogen and progesterone receptor positive and HER2/neu negative). The MA diet significantly suppressed the initiation and promotion phases of mammary carcinogenesis; MA suppressed the development (incidence, 61.5 vs. 100%; multiplicity, 2.1 vs. 4.5) and the growth (final tumor weight, 427.1 vs. 1,796.3 mg) of mammary cancers by suppressing cell proliferation, but not by accelerating cell death. There were evident changes in the major fatty acid composition of n-3, n-6, and n-9 fatty acids in the serum of the MA diet group; there was a significant increase in MA and significant decreases in oleic acid (OA), linoleic acid, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. In non-tumorous mammary tissue, there was a significant increase in MA and a significant decrease in OA in the MA diet group. The n-6/n-3 ratios in serum and mammary tissue of the MA diet group were significantly decreased. The MA diet suppressed MNU-induced luminal A mammary cancer by lowering cancer cell proliferation. Therefore, MA may be a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent. In addition to hormone therapy, MA supplementation may be a beneficial chemotherapeutic agent for the luminal A subtype of breast cancer. PMID:26870330

  2. CA 15–3 cell lines and tissue expression in canine mammary cancer and the correlation between serum levels and tumour histological grade

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammary tumours are the most common malignancy diagnosed in female dogs and a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in this species. Carbohydrate antigen (CA) 15–3 is a mucinous glycoprotein aberrantly over-expressed in human mammary neoplasms and one of the most widely used serum tumour markers in women with breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the antigenic analogies of human and canine CA 15–3 and to assess its expression in canine mammary cancer tissues and cell lines. Immunohistochemical expression of CA 15–3 was evaluated in 7 canine mammary cancer cell lines and 50 malignant mammary tumours. As a positive control, the human breast carcinoma cell line MCF7 and tissue were used. To assess CA 15–3 staining, a semi-quantitative method was applied. To confirm the specificity and cross-reactivity of an anti-human CA 15–3 antibody to canine tissues, an immunoblot analysis was performed. We also investigated serum CA 15–3 activity to establish whether its expression could be assigned to several tumour characteristics to evaluate its potential use as a serum tumour marker in the canine mammary oncology field. Results Immunocytochemical analysis revealed CA 15–3 expression in all examined canine mammary cancer cell lines, whereas its expression was confirmed by immunoblot only in the most invasive cells (CMT-W1, CMT-W1M, CMT-W2 and CMT-W2M). In the tissue, an immunohistochemical staining pattern was observed in 34 (68%) of the malignant tumours. A high statistical correlation (p = 0.0019) between serum CA 15–3 levels and the degree of tumour proliferation and differentiation was shown, which indicates that the values of this serum marker increase as the tumour stage progresses. Conclusions The results of this study reveal that CA 15–3 is expressed in both canine mammary tumour cell lines and tissues and that serum levels significantly correlate with the histological grade of the malignancy. PMID:22726603

  3. Adipose triglyceride lipase regulates lipid metabolism in dairy goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Luo, Jun; Wang, Hui; Shi, Hengbo; Zhu, Jiangjiang; Sun, Yuting; Yu, Kang; Yao, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) catalyzes the initial step in the lipid lipolysis process, hydrolyzing triglyceride (TG) to produce diacylglycerol (DG) and free fatty acids (FFA). In addition, ATGL regulates lipid storage and release in adipocyte cells. However, its role in mammary gland tissue remains unclear. To assess the role of the ATGL gene in the goat mammary gland, this study analyzed the tissue distribution and expression of key genes together with lipid accumulation after knockdown of the ATGL gene. The mRNA of ATGL was highly expressed in subcutaneous adipose tissue, the lung and the mammary gland with a significant increase in expression during the lactation period compared with the dry period of the mammary gland. Knockdown of the ATGL gene in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs) using siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in both ATGL mRNA and protein levels. Silencing of the ATGL gene markedly increased lipid droplet accumulation and intracellular TG concentration (P<0.05), while it reduced FFA levels in GMECs (P<0.05). Additionally, the expression of HSL for lipolysis, FABP3 for fatty acid transport, PPARα for fatty acid oxidation, ADFP, BTN1A1, and XDH for milk fat formation and secretion was down-regulated (P<0.05) after knockdown of the ATGL gene, with increased expression of CD36 for fatty acid uptake (P<0.05). In conclusion, these data suggest that the ATGL gene plays an important role in triglyceride lipolysis in GMECs and provides the first experimental evidence that ATGL may be involved in lipid metabolism during lactation. PMID:25307872

  4. Effects of 900 MHz GSM wireless communication signals on DMBA-induced mammary tumors in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da; Shen, Yonghao; Kuster, Niels; Fu, Yiti; Chiang, Huai

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether exposure to 900 MHz GSM wireless communication signals enhances mammary tumor development and growth induced by low-dose DMBA. Five hundred female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with a single dose of 35 mg/kg DMBA and then divided into five groups in a blinded fashion: one cage control group and four exposure groups, including three microwave exposure groups and one sham exposure with specific absorption rates (SARs) of 4.0, 1.33, 0.44 and 0 W/kg, respectively. Exposure started on the day after DMBA administration and lasted 4 h/day, 5 days/week for 26 weeks. Rats were weighed and palpated weekly for the presence of tumors and were killed humanely at the end of the 26-week exposure period. All mammary glands were examined histologically. There were no statistically significant differences in body weight between sham- and GSM microwave-exposed groups. No significant differences in overall mammary tumor incidence, latency to tumor onset, tumor multiplicity, or tumor size were observed between microwave- and sham-exposed groups. There was a tendency for reduction of mammary adenocarcinoma incidence in the lowest microwave exposure group (0.44 W/ kg) compared with the sham-exposed group (P = 0.058). Additionally, a higher incidence of adenocarcinoma was noticed in the 4.0 W/kg group from the 15th to 26th weeks, especially in the 19th week (P = 0.358 compared to sham). However, neither tendency was statistically significant; thus this study does not provide evidence that GSM microwave exposure promotes mammary tumor development in rats. In the present study there were significant differences between the cage controls and the experimental groups (sham and exposure). Body weight and mammary tumor (malignant plus benign) incidence in the cage control group were significantly higher than in the sham- and GSM microwave-exposed groups. The latency to the mammary tumor onset was significantly shorter in the cage control

  5. A Compendium of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Biologist: From the Initial Observations in the House Mouse to the Development of Genetically Engineered Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, Robert D.; Kenney, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration in 1984. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skill sets to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this compendium is to extend an “olive branch” while simultaneously deepen the knowledge of the novice mouse mammary tumor biologist as they journey into a field rich in pathology and genetics spanning several centuries. PMID:20961975

  6. A compendium of the mouse mammary tumor biologist: from the initial observations in the house mouse to the development of genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Kenney, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration in 1984. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skill sets to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this compendium is to extend an "olive branch" while simultaneously deepen the knowledge of the novice mouse mammary tumor biologist as they journey into a field rich in pathology and genetics spanning several centuries. PMID:20961975

  7. Assessment of pancreatic neoplasms: review of biopsy techniques.

    PubMed

    Goldin, Steven B; Bradner, Michael W; Zervos, Emmanuel E; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2007-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the 4th leading cause of cancer death annually. Recent technological advances in imaging have led to non-uniformity in the evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms. The following article describes the history behind various biopsy techniques and the rationale for obtaining a biopsy of a pancreatic neoplasm and discusses the benefits and disadvantages of the various pancreatic biopsy techniques, including fine needle aspiration biopsy, Tru-cut needle biopsy, endoscopic brushings/cytology, and endoscopic ultrasound guided biopsies. A treatment algorithm for pancreatic neoplasms is then presented. PMID:17562121

  8. Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.C.; Lichtenstein, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.; Oertel, J.E.; Dachman, A.H.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1985-02-01

    Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas is an uncommon low grade malignant tumor histologically distinct from the usual ductal adenocarcinoma and amenable to cure by surgical excision. It tends to occur in black women in their second or third decade of life and has often been misclassified as nonfunctional islet cell tumor or as cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma. Twelve cases were reviewed. Sonography and CT of solid and pipillary epithelial neoplasms depict a well-demarcated mass that can be solid, mixed cystic and solid, or largely cystic. The radiologic appearance is dependent on the maintenance of the integrity of the neoplasm versus the extent of retrogressive changes that have occurred.

  9. The role of neutralizing antibodies for mouse mammary tumor virus transmission and mammary cancer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Daniela; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) infection establishes chronic germinal centers and a lifelong neutralizing Ab response. We show that removal of the draining lymph node after establishment of the germinal center reaction led to complete loss of neutralizing Abs despite comparable infection levels in peripheral lymphocytes. Importantly, in the absence of neutralization, only the exocrine organs mammary gland, salivary gland, pancreas, and skin showed strikingly increased infection, resulting in accelerated mammary tumor development. Induction of stronger neutralization did not influence chronic infection levels of peripheral lymphoid organs but strongly inhibited mammary gland infection and virus transmission to the next generation. Taken together, we provide evidence that a tight equilibrium in virus neutralization allows limited infection of exocrine organs and controls cancer development in susceptible mouse strains. These experiments show that a strong neutralizing Ab response induced after infection is not able to control lymphoid MMTV infection. Strong neutralization, however, is capable of blocking amplification of mammary gland infection, tumor development, and virus transmission to the next generation. The results also indicate a role of neutralization in natural resistance to MMTV infection.

  10. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman Oneil; al Qadhi, Hani; al Wahibi, Khalifa

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are neoplasms that are characterized by ductal dilation, intraductal papillary growth, and thick mucus secretion. This relatively recently defined pathology is evolving in terms of its etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and treatment guidelines. A PubMed database search was performed. All the relevant abstracts in English language were reviewed and the articles in which cases of IPMN could be identified were further scrutinized. Information of IPMN was derived, and duplication of information in several articles and those with areas of persisting uncertainties were excluded. The recent consensus guidelines were examined. The reported incidence of malignancy varies from 57% to 92% in the main duct-IPMN (MD-IPMN) and from 6% to 46% in the branch duct-IPMN (BD-IPMN). The features of high-risk malignant lesions that raise concern include obstructive jaundice in a patient with a cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, the findings on radiological imaging of a mass lesion of >30 mm, enhanced solid component, and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) of size ≥10 mm; while duct size 5-9 mm and cyst size <3 mm are considered as “worrisome features.” Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are primary investigations in diagnosing and following up on these patients. The role of pancreatoscopy and the analysis of aspirated cystic fluid for cytology and DNA analysis is still to be established. In general, resection is recommended for most MD-IPMN, mixed variant, and symptomatic BD-IPMN. The 5-year survival of patients after surgical resection for noninvasive IPMN is reported to be at 77-100%, while for those with invasive carcinoma, it is significantly lower at 27-60%. The follow-up of these patients could vary from 6 months to 1 year and would depend on the risk stratification for invasive malignancy and the pathology of the resected specimen. The understanding of

  11. Atherosclerosis and the internal mammary arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.N.

    1983-06-01

    One hundred and fifty patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), 14 (9.3%) of whom had coexisting peripheral vascular disease, underwent bilateral internal mammary arteriography to study the incidence and extent of atherosclerosis in these vessels. Significant atherosclerosis of the internal mammary arteries (IMAs) was present in three patients (2%), of whom one had coexisting peripheral vascular disease. Lesions in the IMAs were found either proximally, close to the origin or distally, around the terminal bifurcation. Six of the 14 patients with peripheral vascular disease (4% of total subjects) had significant atherosclerosis of the brachiocephalic arteries. Atherosclerotic involvement of the IMA is very unusual and rarely interferes with the use of these vessels for coronary bypass. More common, however, is atherosclerosis of the subclavian arteries, a contraindication for IMA grafting if the lesion is proximal to the IMA origin.

  12. Adaptive Immune Regulation of Mammary Postnatal Organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Plaks, Vicki; Boldajipour, Bijan; Linnemann, Jelena R; Nguyen, Nguyen H; Kersten, Kelly; Wolf, Yochai; Casbon, Amy-Jo; Kong, Niwen; van den Bijgaart, Renske J E; Sheppard, Dean; Melton, Andrew C; Krummel, Matthew F; Werb, Zena

    2015-09-14

    Postnatal organogenesis occurs in an immune competent environment and is tightly controlled by interplay between positive and negative regulators. Innate immune cells have beneficial roles in postnatal tissue remodeling, but roles for the adaptive immune system are currently unexplored. Here we show that adaptive immune responses participate in the normal postnatal development of a non-lymphoid epithelial tissue. Since the mammary gland (MG) is the only organ developing predominantly after birth, we utilized it as a powerful system to study adaptive immune regulation of organogenesis. We found that antigen-mediated interactions between mammary antigen-presenting cells and interferon-γ (IFNγ)-producing CD4+ T helper 1 cells participate in MG postnatal organogenesis as negative regulators, locally orchestrating epithelial rearrangement. IFNγ then affects luminal lineage differentiation. This function of adaptive immune responses, regulating normal development, changes the paradigm for studying players of postnatal organogenesis and provides insights into immune surveillance and cancer transformation. PMID:26321127

  13. Absence of canine papillomavirus sequences in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Sardon, D; Blundell, R; Burrai, G P; Alberti, A; Tore, G; Passino, E Sanna; Antuofermo, E

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (PVs) are found in human breast cancer tissue; however, it remains controversial as to whether these viruses play a role in the aetiology of this tumour. There has been minimal study of whether PVs are found in normal or abnormal mammary glands of animals. The present study investigated whether a PV sequence could be found in the mammary glands of 33 female dogs by rolling circle amplification and polymerase chain reaction. No PV DNA was found in normal or neoplastic canine mammary tissues, suggesting that canine PVs are probably not involved in the pathogenesis of canine mammary neoplasia. PMID:25435511

  14. Epigenetic regulation of LSD1 during mammary carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yadi; Zhou, Binhua P

    2014-01-01

    Inheritable epigenetic regulation is integral to the dynamic control of gene expression under different stimuli for cellular homeostasis and disease progression. Histone methylation is a common and important type of chromatin modification. LSD1, the first known histone lysine-specific demethylase, operates as a key component of several corepressor complexes during development and in disease states. In this review, we focus on the regulation of LSD1 in mammary carcinogenesis. LSD1 plays a role in promoting mammary tumor metastasis and proliferation and in maintaining mammary cancer stem cells. Therefore, LSD1 represents a viable therapeutic target for effective treatment of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:27308339

  15. Save or sacrifice the internal mammary pedicle during anterior mediastinotomy?

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, Efstratios; Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos A; Chlapoutakis, Serafeim; Prokakis, Christos

    2014-07-01

    Ligation and dissection of internal mammary vessels is the most under-estimated complication of anterior mediastinotomy. However, patients requiring anterior mediastinotomy may experience long survival that makes the development of ischemic heart disease throughout their life possible. Therefore, the un-judicial sacrifice of the internal mammary pedicle may deprive them from the benefit to have their internal mammary artery used as a graft in order to successfully bypass severe left anterior descending artery stenoses. We recommend the preservation of the internal mammary pedicle during anterior mediastinotomy, which should be a common message among our colleagues from the beginning of their training. PMID:24987471

  16. Foxa1 is essential for mammary duct formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yongbing; Skerry, Benjamin; Wang, Xiao; Colin-Cassin, Christelle; Radisky, Derek C; Kaestner, Klaus H; Li, Zhaoyu

    2016-05-01

    The transcription factor forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) plays a critical role in the proliferation of human breast cancer cells, particularly estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive luminal breast cancer cells. However, genetic studies of the requirement for Foxa1 in mammary tumor formation in mice have been hampered by the lack of a conditional gene ablation. We examined three mouse models of mammary-specific ablation of Foxa1 in ductal epithelial cells to identify the best system for complete and mammary-specific ablation of Foxa1. We found that MMTV-Cre and MMTV-rtTA;Tet-On-Cre led to partial deletion of Foxa1 and attenuated mammary duct formation, whereas Krt14-Cre led to complete ablation of Foxa1 and abolished mammary duct formation, in Foxa1(loxP/loxP) mice. These results demonstrate that Foxa1 is essential for mammary duct formation, and reveal a series of mouse models in which mammary expression of Foxa1 can be attenuated or completely blocked. Our study also suggests a potentially powerful model for complete ablation of Foxa1 in mammary epithelial cells using Krt14-driven Cre expression in an inducible manner, such as Krt14-rtTA;Tet-On-Cre. This model system will facilitate further in vivo functional studies of Foxa1 or other factors in mammary gland development and tumor formation and progression. genesis 54:277-285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26919034

  17. [Myeloproliferative neoplasms: pathophysiology and therapeutic strategy].

    PubMed

    Kubuki, Yoko; Hidaka, Tomonori; Shimoda, Kazuya

    2015-10-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) arise from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with genetic abnormalities in combination with mutations in JAK2, MPL or CALR, which induce autosomal JAK-STAT pathway activation, and mutations in epigenetic regulator genes such as TET2 or DNMT3A. The prognosis of patients with polycythemia vera (PV) or essential thrombocythemia (ET) is relatively good, and the therapeutic goal in cases with PV or ET is to prevent thrombohemorrhagic complications. PV or ET patients at least 60 years of age or with a history of thrombosis are in a high-risk category, and are managed with low dose aspirin and cytoreductive therapy. Phlebotomy to maintain Ht<0.45 is also used to manage PV patients. The median survival for Japanese primary myelofibrosis (MF) patients is 3.9 years. Several factors including age>65 years, Hb<10 g/dl, the presence of constitutional symptoms, and the presence of blasts in blood were identified as being associated with shorter survival in MF patients. Those patients in the high-risk category are candidates for allogenic HSC transplantation (allo-HSCT), which is potentially curative but is also associated with higher therapy-related mortality. High-risk MF patients without indications for allo-HSCT are treated with JAK inhibitors, which can markedly ameliorate constitutional symptoms and splenomegaly, and might thereby lead to a degree of improvement in survival. PMID:26458438

  18. Calreticulin Exon 9 Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Background Calreticulin (CALR) mutations were recently discovered in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We studied the frequency and type of CALR mutations and their hematological characteristics. Methods A total of 168 MPN patients (36 polycythemia vera [PV], 114 essential thrombocythemia [ET], and 18 primary myelofibrosis [PMF] cases) were included in the study. CALR mutation was analyzed by the direct sequencing method. Results CALR mutations were detected in 21.9% of ET and 16.7% of PMF patients, which accounted for 58.5% and 33.3% of ET and PMF patients without Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) or myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogenes (MPL) mutations, respectively. A total of five types of mutation were detected, among which, L367fs*46 (53.6%) and K385fs*47 (35.7%) were found to be the most common. ET patients with CALR mutation had lower leukocyte counts and ages compared with JAK2-mutated ET patients. Conclusion Genotyping for CALR could be a useful diagnostic tool for JAK2-or MPL-negative ET or PMF patients. CALR mutation may be a distinct disease group, with different hematological characteristics than that of JAK2-positive patients. PMID:25553276

  19. The Hematopoietic Niche in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Graeff, Annette H.; Nitschke, Roland; Zeiser, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Specialized microanatomical areas of the bone marrow provide the signals that are mandatory for the maintenance and regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells. A complex microenvironment adjacent to the marrow vasculature (vascular niche) and close to the endosteum (endosteal niche) harbors multiple cell types including mesenchymal stromal cells and their derivatives such as CAR cells expressing high levels of chemokines C-X-C motif ligand 12 and early osteoblastic lineage cells, endothelial cells, and megakaryocytes. The characterization of the cellular and molecular networks operating in the HSC niche has opened new perspectives for the understanding of the bidirectional cross-talk between HSCs and stromal cell populations in normal and malignant conditions. A structural and functional remodeling of the niche may contribute to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Malignant HSCs may alter the function and survival of MSCs that do not belong to the neoplastic clone. For example, a regression of nestin+ MSCs by apoptosis has been attributed to neuroglial damage in MPN. Nonneoplastic MSCs in turn can promote aggressiveness and drug resistance of malignant cells. In the future, strategies to counteract the pathological interaction between the niche and neoplastic HSCs may offer additional treatment strategies for MPN patients. PMID:26696752

  20. Guidelines for the management of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chul Won; Bang, Soo-Mee; Jang, Seongsoo; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Ho Young; Kim, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Park, Jinny; Won, Jong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and primary myelofibrosis are collectively known as ‘Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs).’ The discovery of new genetic aberrations such as Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) have enhanced our understanding of the pathophysiology of MPNs. Currently, the JAK2 mutation is not only a standard criterion for diagnosis but is also a new target for drug development. The JAK1/2 inhibitor, ruxolitinib, was the first JAK inhibitor approved for patients with intermediate- to high-risk myelofibrosis and its effects in improving symptoms and survival benefits were demonstrated by randomized controlled trials. In 2011, the Korean Society of Hematology MPN Working Party devised diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines for Korean MPN patients. Subsequently, other genetic mutations have been discovered and many kinds of new drugs are now under clinical investigation. In view of recent developments, we have revised the guidelines for the diagnosis and management of MPN based on published evidence and the experiences of the expert panel. Here we describe the epidemiology, new genetic mutations, and novel therapeutic options as well as diagnostic criteria and standard treatment strategies for MPN patients in Korea. PMID:26552452

  1. Origin and Molecular Pathology of Adrenocortical Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Bielinska, M.; Parviainen, H.; Kiiveri, S.; Heikinheimo, M.; Wilson, D.B.

    2008-01-01

    Neoplastic adrenocortical lesions are common in humans and several species of domestic animals. Although there are unanswered questions about the origin and evolution of adrenocortical neoplasms, analysis of human tumor specimens and animal models indicates that adrenocortical tumorigenesis involves both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Chromosomal changes accumulate during tumor progression, and aberrant telomere function is one of the key mechanisms underlying chromosome instability during this process. Epigenetic changes serve to expand the size of the uncommitted adrenal progenitor population, modulate their phenotypic plasticity (i.e., responsiveness to extracellular signals), and increase the likelihood of subsequent genetic alterations. Analyses of heritable and spontaneous types of human adrenocortical tumors have documented alterations in either cell surface receptors or their downstream effectors that impact neoplastic transformation. Many of the mutations associated with benign human adrenocortical tumors result in dysregulated cyclic AMP signaling, whereas key factors/signaling pathways associated with adrenocortical carcinomas include dysregulated expression of the IGF2 gene cluster, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. A better understanding of the factors and signaling pathways involved in adrenal tumorigenesis is necessary to develop targeted pharmacologic and genetic therapies. PMID:19261630

  2. Splanchnic vein thrombosis in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Mallika; McVinnie, Kathryn; Burroughs, Andrew K

    2013-09-01

    Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) is one of the most important complications of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Although MPN are common causes of SVT, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this predisposition, their epidemiology and natural history are not fully understood. Studies have concentrated on the generalized prothrombotic environment generated by MPN and their relationship with abnormal blood counts, thereby furthering our knowledge of arterial and venous thrombosis in this population. In contrast, there are few studies that have specifically addressed SVT in the context of MPN. Recent research has demonstrated in patients with MPN the existence of factors increasing the risk of SVT such as the presence of the JAK2 V617F mutation and its 46/1 haplotype. Features unique to the circulating blood cells, splanchnic vasculature and surrounding micro-environment in patients with MPN have been described. There are also abnormalities in local haemodynamics, haemostatic molecules, the spleen, and splanchnic endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells. This review considers these important advances and discusses the contribution of individual anomalies that lead to the development of SVT in both the pre-neoplastic and overt stage of MPN. Clinical issues relating to epidemiology, recurrence and survival in these patients have also been reviewed and their results discussed. PMID:23855810

  3. Epigenetic Dysregulation in Virus-Associated Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Minarovits, Janos; Demcsák, Anett; Banati, Ferenc; Niller, Hans Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The oncoproteins of human tumor viruses regularly interact with the cellular epigenetic machinery. Such interactions alter the epigenome of the host cell and reprogram its gene expression pattern. Altered levels or redistribution of (cytosine-5)-DNA methyltransferases and changes in the cellular methylome were observed in Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis D virus (HDV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human papillomavirus (HPV) associated neoplasms and cell lines. Methylation-mediated silencing of cellular promoters was also noted in Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) positive Merkel cell carcinomas, and, as discussed elsewhere, in EBV-associated malignancies and adenovirus-induced rodent tumors as well. Promoter activation also occurred, either associated with DNA hypomethylation or with the induction of euchromatic histone modifications by viral oncoproteins. It is worthy to notice that HCV infection induced large, hypomethylated blocks of cellular chromatin, although the exact molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. In hepatoma cells expressing HBx, the oncoprotein encoded by the HBV genome, demethylation of the repetitive satellite 2 sequences was observed, due to downregulation of the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B. Tax and HBZ, the oncoproteins of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I), can both activate and silence distinct cellular promoters by interacting with cellular enzymes involved in histone modification. PMID:26659264

  4. SOLID PSEUDOPAPILLARY NEOPLASM OF THE PANCREAS

    PubMed Central

    CARLOTTO, Jorge Roberto Marcante; TORREZ, Franz Robert Apodaca; GONZALEZ, Adriano Miziara; LINHARES, Marcelo Moura; TRIVIÑO, Tarcisio; HERANI-FILHO, Benedito; GOLDENBERG, Alberto; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus; LOBO, Edson José

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare tumor of the pancreas. However, it´s etiology still maintain discussions. Aim: To analyze it´s clinical data, diagnosis and treatment. Methods: A retrospective study of medical records of all patients treated from January 1997 until July 2015. Results: Were identified 17 cases. Most patients were women (94.11%) and the average age was 32.88 years. The main complaint was abdominal mass (47.05%). The most frequent location was in the body/tail of the pancreas (72.22%) and the most frequently performed surgery was distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy (64.70%). No patient had metastases at diagnosis. Conservative surgery for pancreatic parenchyma was performed in only three cases. The rate of complications in the postoperative period was 35.29% and the main complication was pancreatic fistula (29.41%). No patient underwent adjuvant treatment. Conclusions: The treatment is surgical and the most common clinical presentation is abdominal mass. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was the most frequently performed surgery for its treatment. PMID:27438034

  5. Liver Resection in Children with Hepatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Judson G.; Altman, R. Peter; Arensman, Robert M.; Matlak, Michael E.; Leikin, Sanford L.

    1978-01-01

    In the past ten years, 28 patients with primary tumors of the liver have been treated. There were 11 benign tumors, including four hamartomas, three patients with focal nodular hyperplasia, and two each with congenital cysts and hemangioma. Hamartomas and masses of focal nodular hyperplasia should be excised when possible, but both are benign lesions; therefore life threatening excisions at the porta hepatis should be avoided. Cysts are often resectable, but when occupying all lobes of the liver, they can be successfully managed by marsupialization into the free peritoneal cavity. If resectable, hemangiomas should be removed; when occupying most of the liver as they often do, patients may be subject to platelet trapping or to cardiac failure. In some instances these lesions have been controlled by steroids, radiation therapy or hepatic artery ligation. Of 17 malignant tumors seen, 12 proved to be hepatoblastomas. Nine of the 12 patients underwent liver resection, of whom four are cured, (33%). There were three children with hepatocellular carcinomas and two with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. One child from each of these groups is cured by surgical excision. At present the only known cures in children with primary malignant liver neoplasms have been achieved by operative removal. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:206216

  6. Mammary stem cells: expansion and animal productivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Identification and characterization of mammary stem cells and progenitor cells from dairy animals is important in the understanding of mammogenesis, tissue turnover, lactation persistency and regenerative therapy. It has been realized by many investigators that altered lactation, long dry periods (non-milking period between two consecutive lactation cycles), abrupt cessation of lactation (common in water buffaloes) and disease conditions like mastitis, greatly reduce milk yield thus render huge financial losses within the dairy sector. Cellular manipulation of specialized cell types within the mammary gland, called mammary stem cells (MaSCs)/progenitor cells, might provide potential solutions to these problems and may improve milk production. In addition, MaSCs/progenitor cells could be used in regenerative therapy against tissue damage caused by mastitis. This review discusses methods of MaSC/progenitor cell manipulation and their mechanisms in bovine and caprine animals. Author believes that intervention of MaSCs/progenitor cells could lessen the huge financial losses to the dairy industry globally. PMID:25057352

  7. PKA signaling drives mammary tumorigenesis through Src.

    PubMed

    Beristain, A G; Molyneux, S D; Joshi, P A; Pomroy, N C; Di Grappa, M A; Chang, M C; Kirschner, L S; Privé, G G; Pujana, M A; Khokha, R

    2015-02-26

    Protein kinase A (PKA) hyperactivation causes hereditary endocrine neoplasias; however, its role in sporadic epithelial cancers is unknown. Here, we show that heightened PKA activity in the mammary epithelium generates tumors. Mammary-restricted biallelic ablation of Prkar1a, which encodes for the critical type-I PKA regulatory subunit, induced spontaneous breast tumors characterized by enhanced type-II PKA activity. Downstream of this, Src phosphorylation occurs at residues serine-17 and tyrosine-416 and mammary cell transformation is driven through a mechanism involving Src signaling. The phenotypic consequences of these alterations consisted of increased cell proliferation and, accordingly, expansion of both luminal and basal epithelial cell populations. In human breast cancer, low PRKAR1A/high SRC expression defines basal-like and HER2 breast tumors associated with poor clinical outcome. Together, the results of this study define a novel molecular mechanism altered in breast carcinogenesis and highlight the potential strategy of inhibiting SRC signaling in treating this cancer subtype in humans. PMID:24662820

  8. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  9. Tweak induces mammary epithelial branching morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, Jennifer S; Cho, Sandy; Browning, Beth; Zheng, Timothy S; Lincecum, John M; Wang, Monica Z; Hsu, Yen-Ming; Burkly, Linda C

    2005-04-14

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily regulate cell survival and proliferation and have been implicated in cancer. Tweak (TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis) has pleiotropic biological functions including proapoptotic, proangiogenic and proinflammatory activities. We explored a role for Tweak in mammary gland transformation using a three-dimensional model culture system. Tweak stimulates a branching morphogenic phenotype, similar to that induced by pro-oncogenic factors, in Eph4 mammary epithelial cells cultured in matrigel. Increased proliferation and invasiveness are observed, with a concomitant inhibition of functional differentiation. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are significantly increased following Tweak treatment. Notably, MMP inhibitors are sufficient to block the branching phenotype induced by Tweak. The capacity to promote proliferation, inhibit differentiation and induce invasion suggests a role for Tweak in mammary gland tumorigenesis. Consistent with this, we have observed elevated protein levels of the Tweak receptor, Fn14, in human breast tumor cell lines and xenograft models as well as in primary human breast tumors. Together, our results suggest that the Tweak/Fn14 pathway may be protumorigenic in human breast cancer. PMID:15735761

  10. Elevated Erythropoietin and Multicystic Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Nai, Qiang; Regeti, Kalyani; Arshed, Sabrina; Hossain, Mohammed Amzad; Zhang, Ping; Luo, Hongxiu; Singh, Shilpi; Mathew, Teena; Islam, Mohammed; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla M.; Duhl, Jozsef

    2015-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are more frequently recognized due to the widespread use of improved imaging techniques. There are a variety of pancreatic cystic lesions with different clinical presentations and malignant potentials, and their management depends on the type of the cysts. Although the early recognition of a cystic neoplasm with malignant potential provides an opportunity of early surgical treatment, the precise diagnosis of the cystic neoplasm can be a challenge, largely due to the lack of reliable biomarkers of malignant transformation. We report a case of a large, multicystic neoplasm within the body and tail of the pancreas complicated by elevated erythropoietin, which is likely related to the malignant transformation of the pancreatic neoplasm. PMID:25873882

  11. Elevated erythropoietin and multicystic neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Nai, Qiang; Regeti, Kalyani; Arshed, Sabrina; Hossain, Mohammed Amzad; Zhang, Ping; Luo, Hongxiu; Singh, Shilpi; Mathew, Teena; Islam, Mohammed; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla M; Duhl, Jozsef

    2015-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are more frequently recognized due to the widespread use of improved imaging techniques. There are a variety of pancreatic cystic lesions with different clinical presentations and malignant potentials, and their management depends on the type of the cysts. Although the early recognition of a cystic neoplasm with malignant potential provides an opportunity of early surgical treatment, the precise diagnosis of the cystic neoplasm can be a challenge, largely due to the lack of reliable biomarkers of malignant transformation. We report a case of a large, multicystic neoplasm within the body and tail of the pancreas complicated by elevated erythropoietin, which is likely related to the malignant transformation of the pancreatic neoplasm. PMID:25873882

  12. Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma and Other Plasma Cell Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma and Other Plasma Cell ... plasma cell neoplasms that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma and Other Plasma Cell ...

  13. General Information about Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma Cell Neoplasms Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. The importance of the macroscopic classification of colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yasushi; Iwadate, Mineo

    2010-07-01

    The importance and prevalence of the superficial lesions in the colon and rectum caught worldwide public attention in 2008 when Soetikno and colleagues reported the prevalence of non-polypoid (flat and depressed) colorectal neoplasms in asymptomatic and symptomatic adults in North America and the public media disseminated their findings. The publication put to rest the question of whether or not the flat and depressed colorectal neoplasms exist in Western countries; flat and depressed colorectal neoplasms can be found throughout the world. In this article, the author highlights the importance of the macroscopic classification of the colorectal neoplasm and emphasizes the distinction between so-called flat lesions (IIa and IIb) and 0-IIc (superficial depressed) neoplastic colorectal lesions. PMID:20656244

  15. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  16. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  18. Investigation of Three Approaches to Address Fear of Recurrence Among Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-09

    Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Breast Carcinoma; Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Cancer of Breast; Mammary Neoplasm, Human; Human Mammary Carcinoma; Malignant Tumor of Breast; Mammary Cancer; Mammary Carcinoma; Anxiety; Fear; Neoplasm Remission, Spontaneous; Spontaneous Neoplasm Regression; Regression, Spontaneous Neoplasm; Remission, Spontaneous Neoplasm; Spontaneous Neoplasm Remission

  19. Plurihormonal Cosecretion by a Case of Adrenocortical Oncocytic Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Corrales, J J; Robles-Lázaro, C; Sánchez-Marcos, A I; González-Sánchez, M C; Antúnez-Plaza, P; Miralles, J M

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms (oncocytomas) are extremely rare; only approximately 159 cases have been described so far. The majority are nonfunctional and benign. We describe an unusual case of a functional oncocytoma secreting an excess of glucocorticoids (cortisol) and androgens (androstenedione and DHEAS), a pattern of plurihormonal cosecretion previously not reported in men, presenting with endocrine manifestations of Cushing's syndrome. The neoplasm was considered to be of uncertain malignant potential (borderline) according to the Lin-Weiss-Bisceglia criteria. PMID:27413559

  20. Plurihormonal Cosecretion by a Case of Adrenocortical Oncocytic Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Corrales, J. J.; Robles-Lázaro, C.; Sánchez-Marcos, A. I.; González-Sánchez, M. C.; Antúnez-Plaza, P.; Miralles, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms (oncocytomas) are extremely rare; only approximately 159 cases have been described so far. The majority are nonfunctional and benign. We describe an unusual case of a functional oncocytoma secreting an excess of glucocorticoids (cortisol) and androgens (androstenedione and DHEAS), a pattern of plurihormonal cosecretion previously not reported in men, presenting with endocrine manifestations of Cushing's syndrome. The neoplasm was considered to be of uncertain malignant potential (borderline) according to the Lin-Weiss-Bisceglia criteria. PMID:27413559

  1. HER-2 and EGFR mRNA Expression and Its Relationship with Versican in Malignant Matrix-Producing Tumors of the Canine Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Karine Araújo; Ferreira, Enio; Estrela-Lima, Alessandra; Gamba, Conrado de Oliveira; Miranda, Fernanda Freitas; Alves, Mariana Rezende; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; de Barros, André Luís Branco; Cassali, Geovanni Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Versican expression promotes tumor growth by destabilizing focal cell contacts, thus impeding cell adhesion and facilitating cell migration. It not only presents or recruits molecules to the cell surface, but also modulates gene expression levels and coordinates complex signal pathways. Previously, we suggested that the interaction between versican and human epidermal growth factor receptors may be directly associated with tumor aggressiveness. Thus, the expression of EGFR and HER-2 in these neoplasms may contribute to a better understanding of the progression mechanisms in malignant mammary tumors. The purpose of this study was to correlate the gene and protein expressions of EGFR and HER2 by RNA In Situ Hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively, and their relationship with the versican expression in carcinomas in mixed tumors and carcinosarcomas of the canine mammary gland. The results revealed that EGFR mRNA expression showed a significant difference between in situ and invasive carcinomatous areas in low and high versican expression groups. Identical results were observed in HER-2 mRNA expression. In immunohistochemistry analysis, neoplasms with low versican expression showed greater EGFR immunostaining in the in situ areas than in invasive areas, even as the group presenting high versican expression displayed greater EGFR and HER-2 staining in in situ areas. Significant EGFR and HER-2 mRNA and protein expressions in in situ carcinomatous sites relative to invasive areas suggest that these molecules play a role during the early stages of tumor progression. PMID:27490467

  2. HER-2 and EGFR mRNA Expression and Its Relationship with Versican in Malignant Matrix-Producing Tumors of the Canine Mammary Gland.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Karine Araújo; Ferreira, Enio; Estrela-Lima, Alessandra; Gamba, Conrado de Oliveira; Miranda, Fernanda Freitas; Alves, Mariana Rezende; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; de Barros, André Luís Branco; Cassali, Geovanni Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Versican expression promotes tumor growth by destabilizing focal cell contacts, thus impeding cell adhesion and facilitating cell migration. It not only presents or recruits molecules to the cell surface, but also modulates gene expression levels and coordinates complex signal pathways. Previously, we suggested that the interaction between versican and human epidermal growth factor receptors may be directly associated with tumor aggressiveness. Thus, the expression of EGFR and HER-2 in these neoplasms may contribute to a better understanding of the progression mechanisms in malignant mammary tumors. The purpose of this study was to correlate the gene and protein expressions of EGFR and HER2 by RNA In Situ Hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively, and their relationship with the versican expression in carcinomas in mixed tumors and carcinosarcomas of the canine mammary gland. The results revealed that EGFR mRNA expression showed a significant difference between in situ and invasive carcinomatous areas in low and high versican expression groups. Identical results were observed in HER-2 mRNA expression. In immunohistochemistry analysis, neoplasms with low versican expression showed greater EGFR immunostaining in the in situ areas than in invasive areas, even as the group presenting high versican expression displayed greater EGFR and HER-2 staining in in situ areas. Significant EGFR and HER-2 mRNA and protein expressions in in situ carcinomatous sites relative to invasive areas suggest that these molecules play a role during the early stages of tumor progression. PMID:27490467

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Recently, with the rapid scanning time and improved image quality, outstanding advances in magnetic resonance (MR) methods have resulted in an increase in the use of MRI for patients with a variety of pancreatic neoplasms. MR multi-imaging protocol, which includes MR cross-sectional imaging, MR cholangiopancreatography and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography, integrates the advantages of various special imaging techniques. The non-invasive all-in-one MR multi-imaging techniques may provide the comprehensive information needed for the preoperative diagnosis and evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms. Pancreatic neoplasms include primary tumors and pancreatic metastases. Primary tumors of the pancreas may be mainly classified as ductal adenocarcinomas, cystic tumors and islet cell tumors (ICT). Pancreatic adenocarcinomas can be diagnosed in a MRI study depending on direct evidence or both direct and indirect evidence. The combined MRI features of a focal pancreatic mass, pancreatic duct dilatation and parenchymal atrophy are highly suggestive of a ductal adenocarcinoma. Most cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are either microcystic adenomas or mucinous cystic neoplasms. Intraductal papillary mucinous tumors are the uncommon low-grade malignancy of the pancreatic duct. ICT are rare neoplasms arising from neuroendocrine cells in the pancreas or the periampullary region. ICT are classified as functioning and non-functioning. The most frequent tumors to metastasize to the pancreas are cancers of the breast, lung, kidney and melanoma. The majority of metastases present as large solitary masses with well-defined margins. PMID:17650223

  4. Cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands with concomitant perihilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tsuneyuki; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ito, Takaaki; Okamura, Yukiyasu; Sugiura, Teiichi; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2016-02-21

    We report a case of a 75-year-old man with cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands detected preoperatively by radiologic examination. Enhanced computed tomography showed a low-density mass 2.2 cm in diameter in the right hepatic hilum and a cystic lesion around the common hepatic duct. Under a diagnosis of perihilar cholangiocarcinoma, right hepatectomy with caudate lobectomy and bile duct resection were performed. Pathological examination revealed perihilar cholangiocarcinoma mainly involving the right hepatic duct. The cystic lesion was multilocular and covered by columnar lining epithelia exhibiting increased proliferative activity and p53 nuclear expression; it also contained foci of micropapillary and glandular proliferation. Therefore, the lesion was diagnosed as a cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands and resembled flat branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. Histological examination showed the lesion was discontinuous with the perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry showed the cystic neoplasm was strongly positive for MUC6 and that the cholangiocarcinoma was strongly positive for MUC5AC and S100P. These results suggest these two lesions have different origins. This case warrants further study on whether this type of neoplasm is associated with concomitant cholangiocarcinoma as observed in pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with concomitant pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma. PMID:26900302

  5. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Ji, Jianguang; Försti, Asta

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC)-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis). By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation. PMID:27355450

  6. [Classification and clinicopathological characteristics of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Zengshan, L I

    2016-05-25

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms are a rare, heterogeneous group of neoplasms. The incidence has increased greatly during the past 40 years, partially due to the advanced endoscopic and imaging techniques. As a type of neoplasm with the specific morphology and immunophenotype, its nomenclature and classification have also been changed considerably over the past 40 years, from the past "carcinoid" to the current "neuroendocrine neoplasm". WHO currently recommends two-tiered classification, neuroendocrine tumors and neuroendocrine cancer, according to the differentiation, morphology and proliferation index. However, the neoplasms from different sites have different phenotypes, biological behaviors, and accordingly the different staging systems for the indication on prognosis and therapy selection. Recent research indicates that the tumor from different sites could express different molecular markers which are useful for the further study of molecular features, as well as the evaluation of the site of primary tumor. Along with the progress of the research on molecular mechanisms, including signal transduction, epigenetics and tumor microenviroment, the mode of diagnosis and treatment would also be changed accordingly. In this article, new advances in classification, clinical and pathological features and molecular mechanism of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms will be reviewed. PMID:27045236

  7. Cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands with concomitant perihilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Tsuneyuki; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ito, Takaaki; Okamura, Yukiyasu; Sugiura, Teiichi; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old man with cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands detected preoperatively by radiologic examination. Enhanced computed tomography showed a low-density mass 2.2 cm in diameter in the right hepatic hilum and a cystic lesion around the common hepatic duct. Under a diagnosis of perihilar cholangiocarcinoma, right hepatectomy with caudate lobectomy and bile duct resection were performed. Pathological examination revealed perihilar cholangiocarcinoma mainly involving the right hepatic duct. The cystic lesion was multilocular and covered by columnar lining epithelia exhibiting increased proliferative activity and p53 nuclear expression; it also contained foci of micropapillary and glandular proliferation. Therefore, the lesion was diagnosed as a cystic micropapillary neoplasm of peribiliary glands and resembled flat branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. Histological examination showed the lesion was discontinuous with the perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry showed the cystic neoplasm was strongly positive for MUC6 and that the cholangiocarcinoma was strongly positive for MUC5AC and S100P. These results suggest these two lesions have different origins. This case warrants further study on whether this type of neoplasm is associated with concomitant cholangiocarcinoma as observed in pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with concomitant pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma. PMID:26900302

  8. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Ji, Jianguang; Försti, Asta

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC)-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis). By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation. PMID:27355450

  9. DNA copy number losses in human neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Knuutila, S; Aalto, Y; Autio, K; Björkqvist, A M; El-Rifai, W; Hemmer, S; Huhta, T; Kettunen, E; Kiuru-Kuhlefelt, S; Larramendy, M L; Lushnikova, T; Monni, O; Pere, H; Tapper, J; Tarkkanen, M; Varis, A; Wasenius, V M; Wolf, M; Zhu, Y

    1999-09-01

    This review summarizes reports of recurrent DNA sequence copy number losses in human neoplasms detected by comparative genomic hybridization. Recurrent losses that affect each of the chromosome arms in 73 tumor types are tabulated from 169 reports. The tables are available online at http://www.amjpathol.org and http://www. helsinki.fi/ approximately lglvwww/CMG.html. The genes relevant to the lost regions are discussed for each of the chromosomes. The review is supplemented also by a list of known and putative tumor suppressor genes and DNA repair genes (see Table 1, online). Losses are found in all chromosome arms, but they seem to be relatively rare at 1q, 2p, 3q, 5p, 6p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 12p, and 20q. Losses and their minimal common overlapping areas that were present in a great proportion of the 73 tumor entities reported in Table 2 (see online) are (in descending order of frequency): 9p23-p24 (48%), 13q21 (47%), 6q16 (44%), 6q26-q27 (44%), 8p23 (37%), 18q22-q23 (37%), 17p12-p13 (34%), 1p36.1 (34%), 11q23 (33%), 1p22 (32%), 4q32-qter (31%), 14q22-q23 (25%), 10q23 (25%), 10q25-qter (25%),15q21 (23%), 16q22 (23%), 5q21 (23%), 3p12-p14 (22%), 22q12 (22%), Xp21 (21%), Xq21 (21%), and 10p12 (20%). The frequency of losses at chromosomes 7 and 20 was less than 10% in all tumors. The chromosomal regions in which the most frequent losses are found implicate locations of essential tumor suppressor genes and DNA repair genes that may be involved in the pathogenesis of several tumor types. PMID:10487825

  10. Calreticulin (CALR) mutation in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenyi

    2015-01-01

    As a heterogeneous group of disease, myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) have confused hematologists and hematopathologists with their protean clinical presentations and myriads of morphologies. A thought of classifying MPNs based on molecular alterations has gained popularity because there is increasing evidence that molecular or chromosomal alterations have a better correlation with clinical presentation, response to therapies, and prognosis than conventional morphological classification. This type of efforts has been facilitated by the advancement of molecular technologies. A significant number of gene mutations have been identified in MPNs with JAK2 and MPL being the major ones. However, a significant gap is present in that many cases of MPNs do not harbor any of these mutations. This gap is recently filled by the discovery of Calreticulin (CALR) mutation in MPNs without JAK2 or MPL mutation and since then, the clinical and molecular correlation in MPNs has become a hot research topic. There seems to be a fairly consistent correlation between CALR mutation and certain hematological parameters such as a high platelet count and a better prognosis in MPNs with CALR mutation. However, controversies are present regarding the risks of thrombosis, interactions of CALR with other gene mutation, the role of CALR in the pathogenesis, and the optimal treatment strategies. In addition, there are many questions remain to be answered, which all boiled down to the molecular mechanisms by which CALR causes or contributes to MPNs. Here, we summarized current published literatures on CALR mutations in MPNs with an emphasis on the clinical-molecular correlation. We also discussed the controversies and questions remain to be answered. PMID:27358884

  11. Genetic–pathologic characterization of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yonggoo; Park, Joonhong; Jo, Irene; Lee, Gun Dong; Kim, Jiyeon; Kwon, Ahlm; Choi, Hayoung; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Han, Kyungja; Eom, Ki-Seong; Cho, Byung-Sik; Lee, Sung-Eun; Yang, Jinyoung; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Hyunjung; Ko, Yoon Ho; Park, Haeil; Jin, Jong Youl; Lee, Seungok; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Kim, Myungshin

    2016-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by the proliferation of one or more myeloid lineages. The current study demonstrates that three driver mutations were detected in 82.6% of 407 MPNs with a mutation distribution of JAK2 in 275 (67.6%), CALR in 55 (13.5%) and MPL in 6 (1.5%). The mutations were mutually exclusive in principle except in one patient with both CALR and MPL mutations. The driver mutation directed the pathologic features of MPNs, including lineage hyperplasia, laboratory findings and clinical presentation. JAK2-mutated MPN showed erythroid, granulocytic and/or megakaryocytic hyperplasia whereas CALR- and MPL-mutated MPNs displayed granulocytic and/or megakaryocytic hyperplasia. The lineage hyperplasia was closely associated with a higher mutant allele burden and peripheral cytosis. These findings corroborated that the lineage hyperplasia consisted of clonal proliferation of each hematopoietic lineage acquiring driver mutations. Our study has also demonstrated that bone marrow (BM) fibrosis was associated with disease progression. Patients with overt fibrosis (grade ⩾2) presented an increased mutant allele burden (P<0.001), an increase in chromosomal abnormalities (P<0.001) and a poor prognosis (P<0.001). Moreover, among patients with overt fibrosis, all patients with wild-type JAK2/CALR/MPL (triple-negative) showed genomic alterations by genome-wide microarray study and revealed the poorest overall survival, followed by JAK2-mutated MPNs. The genetic–pathologic characteristics provided the information for understanding disease pathogenesis and the progression of MPNs. The prognostic significance of the driver mutation and BM fibrosis suggests the necessity of a prospective therapeutic strategy to improve the clinical outcome. PMID:27444979

  12. A comparative review of melanocytic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Smith, S H; Goldschmidt, M H; McManus, P M

    2002-11-01

    malignant melanocytic neoplasms or predicting survival time. PMID:12450197

  13. Genetic-pathologic characterization of myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonggoo; Park, Joonhong; Jo, Irene; Lee, Gun Dong; Kim, Jiyeon; Kwon, Ahlm; Choi, Hayoung; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Han, Kyungja; Eom, Ki-Seong; Cho, Byung-Sik; Lee, Sung-Eun; Yang, Jinyoung; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Hyunjung; Ko, Yoon Ho; Park, Haeil; Jin, Jong Youl; Lee, Seungok; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Kim, Myungshin

    2016-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by the proliferation of one or more myeloid lineages. The current study demonstrates that three driver mutations were detected in 82.6% of 407 MPNs with a mutation distribution of JAK2 in 275 (67.6%), CALR in 55 (13.5%) and MPL in 6 (1.5%). The mutations were mutually exclusive in principle except in one patient with both CALR and MPL mutations. The driver mutation directed the pathologic features of MPNs, including lineage hyperplasia, laboratory findings and clinical presentation. JAK2-mutated MPN showed erythroid, granulocytic and/or megakaryocytic hyperplasia whereas CALR- and MPL-mutated MPNs displayed granulocytic and/or megakaryocytic hyperplasia. The lineage hyperplasia was closely associated with a higher mutant allele burden and peripheral cytosis. These findings corroborated that the lineage hyperplasia consisted of clonal proliferation of each hematopoietic lineage acquiring driver mutations. Our study has also demonstrated that bone marrow (BM) fibrosis was associated with disease progression. Patients with overt fibrosis (grade ⩾2) presented an increased mutant allele burden (P<0.001), an increase in chromosomal abnormalities (P<0.001) and a poor prognosis (P<0.001). Moreover, among patients with overt fibrosis, all patients with wild-type JAK2/CALR/MPL (triple-negative) showed genomic alterations by genome-wide microarray study and revealed the poorest overall survival, followed by JAK2-mutated MPNs. The genetic-pathologic characteristics provided the information for understanding disease pathogenesis and the progression of MPNs. The prognostic significance of the driver mutation and BM fibrosis suggests the necessity of a prospective therapeutic strategy to improve the clinical outcome. PMID:27444979

  14. Myeloproliferative neoplasms: Current molecular biology and genetics.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Kolsoum

    2016-02-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal disorders characterized by increased production of mature blood cells. Philadelphia chromosome-negative MPNs (Ph-MPNs) consist of polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). A number of stem cell derived mutations have been identified in the past 10 years. These findings showed that JAK2V617F, as a diagnostic marker involving JAK2 exon 14 with a high frequency, is the best molecular characterization of Ph-MPNs. Somatic mutations in an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, named calreticulin (CALR), is the second most common mutation in patients with ET and PMF after JAK2 V617F mutation. Discovery of CALR mutations led to the increased molecular diagnostic of ET and PMF up to 90%. It has been shown that JAK2V617F is not the unique event in disease pathogenesis. Some other genes' location such as TET oncogene family member 2 (TET2), additional sex combs-like 1 (ASXL1), casitas B-lineage lymphoma proto-oncogene (CBL), isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH1/IDH2), IKAROS family zinc finger 1 (IKZF1), DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS), enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), tumor protein p53 (TP53), runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) and high mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) have also identified to be involved in MPNs phenotypes. Here, current molecular biology and genetic mechanisms involved in MNPs with a focus on the aforementioned factors is presented. PMID:26697989

  15. Milk prolactin response and quarter milk yield after experimental infection with coagulase-negative staphylococci in dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Piccart, K; Piepers, S; Verbeke, J; de Sousa, N M; Beckers, J F; De Vliegher, S

    2015-07-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the most common bacteria involved in subclinical mastitis in dairy cows. Remarkably, CNS-infected dairy heifers produce more milk than uninfected heifers. Because the lactation hormone prolactin (PRL) is also involved in mammary gland immunity, we investigated the milk PRL response and the mammary quarter milk yield following experimental CNS challenge. Eight healthy Holstein-Friesian heifers in mid-lactation were experimentally infected using a split-udder design with 3 different CNS strains: one Staphylococcus fleurettii (from sawdust bedding) and 2 Staphylococcus chromogenes strains (one isolate from a teat apex, the other isolate from a chronic intramammary infection). Three mammary quarters per heifer were simultaneously inoculated with 1.0×10(6) cfu, whereas the remaining mammary quarter was infused with sterile phosphate-buffered saline, serving as a control. An existing radioimmunoassay was modified, validated, and used to measure PRL frozen-thawed milk at various time points until 78h after challenge. The mean milk PRL level tended to be higher in the CNS-challenged mammary quarters compared with the control mammary quarters (7.56 and 6.85ng/mL, respectively). The increase in PRL over time was significantly greater in the CNS-challenged mammary quarters than in the control mammary quarters. However, no difference was found in the PRL response when comparing each individual CNS strain with the control mammary quarters. The mean mammary quarter milk yield tended to be lower in the CNS-infected mammary quarters than in the control mammary quarters (1.73 and 1.98kg per milking, respectively). The greatest milk loss occurred in the mammary quarters challenged with the intramammary strain of S. chromogenes. Future observational studies are needed to elucidate the relation between PRL, the milk yield, and the inflammatory condition, or infection status, of the mammary gland. PMID:25981074

  16. Correlation between histologic diagnosis mean nucleolar organizer region count and prognosis in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Bostock, D E; Moriarty, J; Crocker, J

    1992-09-01

    In this study, surgically excised mammary tumors from 98 bitches were graded histologically, and the grade was compared with the mean nucleolar organizer region (NOR) count in silver-stained paraffin-embedded sections. Histologically benign tumors, papillary adenocarcinomas, and intraductal carcinomas showed relatively little variation; the mean count for each category was between three and four NOR per nucleus. There was, however, a significant increase in the NOR counts in tubular and solid carcinomas. This increase was most pronounced for tumors that showed evidence of infiltration into the surrounding connective tissues. The mean NOR count for noninfiltrative carcinomas was 5.1, and that for invasive carcinomas was 7.3 (P less than 0.03). The mean NOR count for individual carcinomas ranged from 2.0 to 12.3, and a significant correlation was found between an increased NOR count and tumor-related death during the first post-surgical year. The 39 bitches in which the tumor had an NOR count less than 8.0 had a generally favorable prognosis; only six (15%) died as a result of the original neoplasm. In contrast, 18/21 dogs (85%) with a carcinoma having an NOR count greater than 8.0 died from the tumor during the first post-surgical year. A similar, although less pronounced result was obtained specifically for invasive carcinomas, in which 3/12 (25%) tumors with an NOR count less than 6.0 resulted in the death of the host, compared with 17/20 (85%) that had an NOR count greater than 6. By using this technique, it is possible to identify a subgroup of bitches with invasive mammary carcinomas that have a very poor prognosis following apparently adequate surgical ablation of the primary tumor. PMID:1413404

  17. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma (MASC) of salivary gland in four Mexican patients

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Domínguez-Malagón, Hugo; Michal, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The Clinco-pathological, immunohistochemical and molecular findings of four cases of Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma (MASC) of salivary glands found in Mexico are described. The cases were extracted from 253 salivary gland tumors from a single institution in Mexico City. The 85 candidates for initial selection were: low grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) (N=70 ), acinic cell cancinoma (AciCC) (N=14), papillary cystadenocarcinoma (N=1), and adenocarcinoma NOS (N=0). Tumors with some histological features consistent with MASC (N= 17, 6.7%) were studied by immunohistochemistry for mammaglobin, STAT5, and S-100 protein and four cases were positive (1.5%), thus the diagnosis of MASC was established, and these were submitted for molecular studies for ETV6-NTRK3. Fusion gene was demonstrated in three cases, two had been erroneously diagnosed as poorly granulated AciCC, and one as low grade MEC with microcystic pattern. Female gender predominated (3:1); one occurred in the parotid, two in minor salivary glands and one in the submaxillary gland; infiltrating borders, atypical mitosis and lymph node metastases were seen in the parotideal tumor. Two patients with major salivary gland tumors are alive and well at 10 and 20 months respectively, the two patients with minor salivary gland tumors are lost. It can be concluded that is important to think in MASC in poorly granulated AciCC and low grade MEC with microcystic pattern. Immunohistochemisty studies confirm the diagnosis, preferentially supported by molecular studies. MASC may follow aggressive behavior or transform into a high grade neoplasm. Key words:Acinic cell carcinoma, ETV6-NTRK3, Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma, secretory breast carcinoma. PMID:25481229

  18. An autoregulatory enhancer controls mammary-specific STAT5 functions

    PubMed Central

    Metser, Gil; Shin, Ha Youn; Wang, Chaochen; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Oh, Sumin; Villarino, Alejandro V.; O'Shea, John J.; Kang, Keunsoo; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STATs) are principal transcription factors downstream of cytokine receptors. Although STAT5A is expressed in most tissues it remains to be understood why its premier, non-redundant functions are restricted to prolactin-induced mammary gland development and function. We report that the ubiquitously expressed Stat5a/b locus is subject to additional lineage-specific transcriptional control in mammary epithelium. Genome-wide surveys of epigenetic status and transcription factor occupancy uncovered a putative mammary-specific enhancer within the intergenic sequences separating the two Stat5 genes. This region exhibited several hallmarks of genomic enhancers, including DNaseI hypersensitivity, H3K27 acetylation and binding by GR, NFIB, ELF5 and MED1. Mammary-specific STAT5 binding was obtained at two canonical STAT5 binding motifs. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing was used to delete these sites in mice and determine their biological function. Mutant animals exhibited an 80% reduction of Stat5 levels in mammary epithelium and a concomitant reduction of STAT5-dependent gene expression. Transcriptome analysis identified a class of mammary-restricted genes that was particularly dependent on high STAT5 levels as a result of the intergenic enhancer. Taken together, the mammary-specific enhancer enables a positive feedback circuit that contributes to the remarkable abundance of STAT5 and, in turn, to the efficacy of STAT5-dependent mammary physiology. PMID:26446995

  19. Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cell Lineages and Parenchymal Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary development proceeds from an aggregation of cells in the ventral ectoderm to the establishment of an elaborate tree of alveoli, ducts, and cisternae. However, despite abundant data on endocrine regulation of ruminant mammary growth, we know comparatively little about cell lineages, express...

  20. Bovine mammary stem cells: Cell biology meets production agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue ...

  1. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qing Cissy; Verheyen, Esther M.; Zeng, Yi Arial

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology. PMID:27420097

  2. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing Cissy; Verheyen, Esther M; Zeng, Yi Arial

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology. PMID:27420097

  3. Pim-1 kinase expression during murine mammary development

    SciTech Connect

    Gapter, Leslie A.; Magnuson, Nancy S.; Ng, Ka-yun; Hosick, Howard L. . E-mail: hosick@wsu.edu

    2006-07-07

    Pim-1 kinase phosphorylates substrates whose activities are linked to proliferation, survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although pim-1 is induced by hormones and cytokines, the hormonal control and contribution of Pim-1 to mammary gland development have not been evaluated. We examined Pim-1 expression in mammary cell lines, investigated whether Pim-1 levels could be altered in breast epithelia by mammogenic hormones, and evaluated Pim-1 expression during mammary development. We found that Pim-1 was elevated in most mammary carcinoma cell lines and progesterone increased Pim-1 protein to some extent in non-tumorigenic mammary epithelia. Pim-1 expression in situ was consistent with the documented profile of progesterone activity in mouse mammary glands. Pim-1 nuclear localization correlated with cytoplasmic distribution for its substrate, p21{sup CIP/Waf1}, and we found that Pim-1 and p21 associate in vitro. Our results suggest that Pim-1 expression may be regulated by progesterone during mammary development and Pim-1 associates with p21 in mammary epithelial cells.

  4. Roles of Fas and Fas ligand during mammary gland remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Joon; Sapi, Eva; Brown, Wendi; Nilsen, Jon; Tartaro, Karrie; Kacinski, Barry M.; Craft, Joseph; Naftolin, Frederick; Mor, Gil

    2000-01-01

    Mammary involution is associated with degeneration of the alveolar structure and programmed cell death of mammary epithelial cells. In this study, we evaluated the expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) in the mammary gland tissue and their possible role in the induction of apoptosis of mammary cells. FasL-positive cells were observed in normal mammary epithelium from pregnant and lactating mice, but not in nonpregnant/virgin mouse mammary tissue. Fas expression was observed in epithelial and stromal cells in nonpregnant mice but was absent during pregnancy. At day 1 after weaning, high levels of both Fas and FasL proteins and caspase 3 were observed and coincided with the appearance of apoptotic cells in ducts and glands. During the same period, no apoptotic cells were found in the Fas-deficient (MRL/lpr) and FasL-deficient (C3H/gld) mice. Increase in Fas and FasL protein was demonstrated in human (MCF10A) and mouse (HC-11) mammary epithelial cells after incubation in hormone-deprived media, before apoptosis was detected. These results suggest that the Fas-FasL interaction plays an important role in the normal remodeling of mammary tissue. Furthermore, this autocrine induction of apoptosis may prevent accumulation of cells with mutations and subsequent neoplastic development. Failure of the Fas/FasL signal could contribute to tumor development. PMID:11086022

  5. A Comparison of Fresh Frozen vs. Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Specimens of Canine Mammary Tumors via Branched-DNA Assay.

    PubMed

    Lüder Ripoli, Florenza; Mohr, Annika; Conradine Hammer, Susanne; Willenbrock, Saskia; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Hennecke, Silvia; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Nolte, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Mammary neoplasms are the tumors most affecting female dogs and women. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are an invaluable source of archived biological material. Fresh frozen (FF) tissue is considered ideal for gene expression analysis. However, strategies based on FFPE material offer several advantages. Branched-DNA assays permit a reliable and fast workflow when analyzing gene expression. The aim of this study was to assess the comparability of the branched-DNA assay when analyzing certain gene expression patterns between FF and FFPE samples in canine mammary tumors. RNA was isolated from 109 FFPE samples and from 93 FF samples of different canine mammary tissues. Sixteen (16) target genes (Tp53; Myc; HMGA1; Pik3ca; Mcl1; MAPK3; FOXO3; PTEN; GATA4; PFDN5; HMGB1; MAPK1; BRCA2; BRCA1; HMGA2; and Her2) were analyzed via branched-DNA assay (b-DNA). ACTB, GAPDH, and HPRT1 were used as data normalizers. Overall, the relative gene expression of the two different origins of samples showed an agreement of 63%. Still, care should be taken, as FFPE specimens showed lower expression of the analyzed targets when compared to FF samples. The fact that the gene expression in FFPE proved to be lower than in FF specimens is likely to have been caused by the effect of storage time. ACTB had the best performance as a data normalizer. PMID:27187374

  6. A Comparison of Fresh Frozen vs. Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Specimens of Canine Mammary Tumors via Branched-DNA Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lüder Ripoli, Florenza; Mohr, Annika; Conradine Hammer, Susanne; Willenbrock, Saskia; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Hennecke, Silvia; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Nolte, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Mammary neoplasms are the tumors most affecting female dogs and women. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are an invaluable source of archived biological material. Fresh frozen (FF) tissue is considered ideal for gene expression analysis. However, strategies based on FFPE material offer several advantages. Branched-DNA assays permit a reliable and fast workflow when analyzing gene expression. The aim of this study was to assess the comparability of the branched-DNA assay when analyzing certain gene expression patterns between FF and FFPE samples in canine mammary tumors. RNA was isolated from 109 FFPE samples and from 93 FF samples of different canine mammary tissues. Sixteen (16) target genes (Tp53; Myc; HMGA1; Pik3ca; Mcl1; MAPK3; FOXO3; PTEN; GATA4; PFDN5; HMGB1; MAPK1; BRCA2; BRCA1; HMGA2; and Her2) were analyzed via branched-DNA assay (b-DNA). ACTB, GAPDH, and HPRT1 were used as data normalizers. Overall, the relative gene expression of the two different origins of samples showed an agreement of 63%. Still, care should be taken, as FFPE specimens showed lower expression of the analyzed targets when compared to FF samples. The fact that the gene expression in FFPE proved to be lower than in FF specimens is likely to have been caused by the effect of storage time. ACTB had the best performance as a data normalizer. PMID:27187374

  7. Canine mammary tumors: a review and consensus of standard guidelines on epithelial and myoepithelial phenotype markers, HER2, and hormone receptor assessment using immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Peña, L; Gama, A; Goldschmidt, M H; Abadie, J; Benazzi, C; Castagnaro, M; Díez, L; Gärtner, F; Hellmén, E; Kiupel, M; Millán, Y; Miller, M A; Nguyen, F; Poli, A; Sarli, G; Zappulli, V; de las Mulas, J Martín

    2014-01-01

    Although there have been several studies on the use of immunohistochemical biomarkers of canine mammary tumors (CMTs), the results are difficult to compare. This article provides guidelines on the most useful immunohistochemical markers to standardize their use and understand how outcomes are measured, thus ensuring reproducibility of results. We have reviewed the biomarkers of canine mammary epithelial and myoepithelial cells and identified those biomarkers that are most useful and those biomarkers for invasion and lymph node micrometastatic disease. A 10% threshold for positive reaction for most of these markers is recommended. Guidelines on immunolabeling for HER2, estrogen receptors (ERs), and progesterone receptors (PRs) are provided along with the specific recommendations for interpretation of the results for each of these biomarkers in CMTs. Only 3+ HER2-positive tumors should be considered positive, as found in human breast cancer. The lack of any known response to adjuvant endocrine therapy of ER- and PR-positive CMTs prevents the use of the biological positive/negative threshold used in human breast cancer. Immunohistochemistry results of ER and PR in CMTs should be reported as the sum of the percentage of positive cells and the intensity of immunolabeling (Allred score). Incorporation of these recommendations in future studies, either prospective or retrospective, will provide a mechanism for the direct comparison of studies and will help to determine whether these biomarkers have prognostic significance. Finally, these biomarkers may ascertain the most appropriate treatment(s) for canine malignant mammary neoplasms. PMID:24227007

  8. Somatic CALR Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with Nonmutated JAK2

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Van Loo, P.; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O’Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.-Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.P.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.P.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. RESULTS Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. CONCLUSIONS Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with

  9. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: The Role of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, C.; van Diest, P.J.; Vooijs, M.

    2014-01-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies. PMID:21506923

  10. Huntingtin regulates mammary stem cell division and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Elias, Salah; Thion, Morgane S; Yu, Hua; Sousa, Cristovao Marques; Lasgi, Charlène; Morin, Xavier; Humbert, Sandrine

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation during mammary gland morphogenesis. Here, we report the presence of huntingtin, the protein mutated in Huntington's disease, in mouse mammary basal and luminal cells throughout mammogenesis. Keratin 5-driven depletion of huntingtin results in a decreased pool and specification of basal and luminal progenitors, and altered mammary morphogenesis. Analysis of mitosis in huntingtin-depleted basal progenitors reveals mitotic spindle misorientation. In mammary cell culture, huntingtin regulates spindle orientation in a dynein-dependent manner. Huntingtin is targeted to spindle poles through its interaction with dynein and promotes the accumulation of NUMA and LGN. Huntingtin is also essential for the cortical localization of dynein, dynactin, NUMA, and LGN by regulating their kinesin 1-dependent trafficking along astral microtubules. We thus suggest that huntingtin is a component of the pathway regulating the orientation of mammary stem cell division, with potential implications for their self-renewal and differentiation properties. PMID:24749073

  11. ZEB2 and ZEB1 expression in a spontaneous canine model of invasive micropapillary carcinoma of the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Gamba, C O; Campos, L C; Negreiros-Lima, G L; Maciel-Lima, K; Sousa, L P; Estrela-Lima, A; Ferreira, E; Cassali, G D

    2014-12-01

    ZEB1 and ZEB2 have been recently related to cancer prognosis. We investigated their expression and its association with clinicopathological parameters and overall survival in invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC), which is a metastasising neoplasm of the canine mammary gland. Immunohistochemical evaluation showed nuclear and cytoplasmic staining for ZEB2 and nuclear staining for ZEB1. 'In situ' areas presented higher positivity for cytoplasmic ZEB2 than invasive areas of IMPC did (p = 0.03). ZEB1 positivity was associated with a low histological grade (p = 0.01). A shorter overall survival rate was observed in IMPCs that were positive for cytoplasmic ZEB2 (p = 0.04). Antibodies specificity in canine species was confirmed by western blot. Our results indicated that cytoplasmic ZEB2 appears to be an important factor in the early stages of malignancy and predicts a poor overall survival rate for IMPC in this canine mammary cancer model. ZEB1 downregulation appears to be associated with the dedifferentiation process of IMPC. PMID:25447746

  12. β-Glucan modulates the lipopolysaccharide-induced innate immune response in rat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Ma, Haitian; Miao, Jinfeng; Huang, Guoqing; Tong, Mingqing; Zou, Sixiang

    2013-02-01

    Mastitis, caused by mammary pathogenic bacteria which are frequent implications of Escherichia coli, is an important disease affecting women and dairy animals worldwide. The β-glucan binding of dectin-1 can induce its own intracellular signaling and can mediate a variety of cellular responses. This work was to investigate the effect of β-glucan on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response and related innate immune signaling in primary rat mammary epithelial cells. Cells were treated with serum-free medium added with a DMSO solution containing β-glucans at concentrations of 0, 1, 5, 25 μmol/L for 12h, and then exposed to 10 μg/mL LPS for 40 min. Moreover, cells were pretreated with BAY 11-7082 to inhibit NF-κB and then successively exposed to 5 μmol/L β-glucan, 10 μg/mL LPS, 5 μmol/L β-glucan and 10 μg/mL LPS, according to the specific experimental design. Normal control cultures contained an equal volume of DMSO, which was collected at the same time. After incubating rat mammary epithelial cells for 40 min with 10 μg/mL LPS, TLR4, MyD88 and NF-κB expression all increased (P<0.05), as did the secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β (P<0.05), but IκB and β-casein expression both decreased (P<0.05). Treatment with different concentrations of β-glucan for 12h activated Dectin1/Syk, which subsequently suppressed TLR4, MyD88 and NF-κB expression and TNF-α and IL-1β secretion. However, it restored the IκB and β-casein expression that had been induced by the 40 min incubation with 10 μg/mL LPS. Pretreatment with BAY 11-7082 at 10 µmol/L for 2h partially prevented NF-κB induction by LPS, but the presence of β-glucan prevented this inactivation. BAY 11-7082 could not simultaneously inhibit LPS induction of TLR4, MyD88 and β-glucan activation of Dectin1/Syk in rat mammary epithelial cells. These findings demonstrated that β-glucan activation of Dectin1/Syk attenuated LPS induction of TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB and inhibited the LPS

  13. Mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Boutinaud, Marion; Herve, Lucile; Lollivier, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Milk is produced in the udder by mammary epithelial cells (MEC). Milk contains MEC, which are gradually exfoliated from the epithelium during lactation. Isolation of MEC from milk using immunomagnetic separation may be a useful non-invasive method to investigate transcriptional regulations in ruminants’ udder. This review aims to describe the process of isolating MEC from milk, to provide an overview on the studies that use this method to analyze gene expression by qRT PCR and to evaluate the validity of this method by analyzing and comparing the results between studies. In several goat and cow studies, consistent reductions in alpha-lactalbumin mRNA levels during once-daily milking (ODM) and in SLC2A1 mRNA level during feed restriction are observed. The effect of ODM on alpha-lactalbumin mRNA level was similarly observed in milk isolated MEC and mammary biopsy. Moreover, we and others showed decreasing alpha-lactalbumin and increasing BAX mRNA levels with advanced stages of lactation in dairy cows and buffalo. The relevance of using the milk-isolated MEC method to analyze mammary gene expression is proven, as the transcript variations were also consistent with milk yield and composition variations under the effect of different factors such as prolactin inhibition or photoperiod. However, the RNA from milk-isolated MEC is particularly sensitive to degradation. This could explain the differences obtained between milk-isolated MEC and mammary biopsy in two studies where gene expression was compared using qRT-PCR or RNA Sequencing analyses. As a conclusion, when the RNA quality is conserved, MEC isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary mRNA to study various factors that impact milk yield and composition (ODM, feeding level, endocrine status, photoperiod modulation, and stage of lactation). PMID:26579195

  14. Expression of growth hormone in canine mammary tissue and mammary tumors. Evidence for a potential autocrine/paracrine stimulatory loop.

    PubMed Central

    van Garderen, E.; de Wit, M.; Voorhout, W. F.; Rutteman, G. R.; Mol, J. A.; Nederbragt, H.; Misdorp, W.

    1997-01-01

    The role of progestins in the pathogenesis of breast cancer in women remains controversial. To advance this discussion, we report the demonstration and localization of progestin-induced biosynthesis of growth hormone (GH) in canine mammary gland tissue. Nontumorous mammary tissues and tumors, both benign and malignant, were obtained from private household dogs. Immunoreactive GH was localized in mammary epithelial cells and correlated with the presence of GH mRNA. Local synthesis of GH was also proven immunoelectron microscopically by demonstrating GH-containing secretory granules. Cellular GH production in nontumorous tissues was more extensive during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase of the ovarian cycle or during exposure to synthetic progestins than during anestrus. GH was also associated with areas of hyperplastic mammary epithelium, which may indicate that locally produced GH enhances proliferation, acting in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. In 41 of 44 tumors, GH was present. Of 3 GH-negative tumor samples, 2 were from progestin-depleted, castrated bitches. In nonmalignant mammary tissues, GH production is stimulated by progesterone and synthetic progestins interacting with progesterone receptors. In some progesterone-receptor-negative malignant tumors, GH expression was found, indicating loss of this control. Progestin-induced GH probably participates in the cyclic development of the mammary gland but may promote mammary tumorigenesis by stimulating proliferation of susceptible, and sometimes transformed, mammary epithelial cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9060840

  15. Expression of growth hormone in canine mammary tissue and mammary tumors. Evidence for a potential autocrine/paracrine stimulatory loop.

    PubMed

    van Garderen, E; de Wit, M; Voorhout, W F; Rutteman, G R; Mol, J A; Nederbragt, H; Misdorp, W

    1997-03-01

    The role of progestins in the pathogenesis of breast cancer in women remains controversial. To advance this discussion, we report the demonstration and localization of progestin-induced biosynthesis of growth hormone (GH) in canine mammary gland tissue. Nontumorous mammary tissues and tumors, both benign and malignant, were obtained from private household dogs. Immunoreactive GH was localized in mammary epithelial cells and correlated with the presence of GH mRNA. Local synthesis of GH was also proven immunoelectron microscopically by demonstrating GH-containing secretory granules. Cellular GH production in nontumorous tissues was more extensive during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase of the ovarian cycle or during exposure to synthetic progestins than during anestrus. GH was also associated with areas of hyperplastic mammary epithelium, which may indicate that locally produced GH enhances proliferation, acting in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. In 41 of 44 tumors, GH was present. Of 3 GH-negative tumor samples, 2 were from progestin-depleted, castrated bitches. In nonmalignant mammary tissues, GH production is stimulated by progesterone and synthetic progestins interacting with progesterone receptors. In some progesterone-receptor-negative malignant tumors, GH expression was found, indicating loss of this control. Progestin-induced GH probably participates in the cyclic development of the mammary gland but may promote mammary tumorigenesis by stimulating proliferation of susceptible, and sometimes transformed, mammary epithelial cells. PMID:9060840

  16. Genistein-mediated inhibition of mammary stromal adipocyte differentiation limits expansion of mammary stem/progenitor cells by paracrine signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary adiposity may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by releasing cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that promote mammary epithelial proliferation. We evaluated the effects of soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) on the adipogenic differentiation of a SV40-immortalized mou...

  17. Early Effects of Blueberry and Concord Grape Intake on Rat Mammary Gland Development Suggest Potential Protective Mechanisms for Mammary Tumorigenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries (BB) and Concord grapes (CG) are rich in anthocyanins and other polyphenols, which may be linked to reduced incidence of chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis in animal models. We evaluated the early effects of dietary exposure to BB and CG on mammary glands of female rat offspring. ...

  18. Prevalence of neoplasms in definite and probable mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2016-07-01

    There are some indications that the prevalence of benign and malign neoplasms is increased in patients with a mitochondrial disorder (MID). This study aimed at calculating the prevalence of malign and benign neoplasms in MID patients compared to the general population. Among 103 adult patients with definite or probable MID 16 had a malignancy (15.5%) and 11 (10.7%) a benign neoplasm. Four patients had thyroid cancer, three patients had prostate cancer, two patients each colon cancer, or ovarian cancer, and one each lung cancer, basalioma, Paget carcinoma of the skin, Bowen disease, renal cancer, and urinary bladder cancer. One patient had two carcinomas. Five patients had lipomas, two thyroid adenoma, and one each meningeoma, ovarian adenoma, hemangioma of the liver, and pituitary adenoma. Compared to the general population, the prevalence of malignancies was 3-4 fold increased in definite and probable MIDs. Compared to a cohort of myotonic dystrophy type-1 patients, the prevalence was 1.4 fold increased. In conclusion, adult MID patients seem to carry an increased risk to develop malignancy or a benign neoplasm. Females with a MID seem to be predominantly at risk to develop a neoplasm. PMID:27181047

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-binding protein null mutation results in defective mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuzhi; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zhu, Yiwei Tony; Rao, Sambasiva M; Zhu, Yi-Jun

    2005-03-18

    A conditional null mutation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-binding protein (PBP) gene was generated to understand its role in mammary gland development. PBP-deficient mammary glands exhibited retarded ductal elongation during puberty, and decreased alveolar density during pregnancy and lactation. PBP-deficient mammary glands could not produce milk to nurse pups during lactation. Both the mammary ductal elongation in response to estrogen treatment and the mammary lobuloalveolar proliferation stimulated by estrogen plus progesterone were attenuated in PBP-deficient mammary glands. The proliferation index was decreased in PBP-deficient mammary glands. PBP-deficient mammary epithelial cells expressed abundant beta-casein, whey acidic protein, and WDNM1 mRNA, indicating a relatively intact differentiated function. PBP-deficient epithelial cells were unable to form mammospheres, which were considered to be derived from mammary progenitor/stem cells. We conclude that PBP plays a pivotal role in the normal mammary gland development. PMID:15647257

  20. Reduction in mammary tumorigenesis in the rat by cabbage and cabbage residue.

    PubMed

    Bresnick, E; Birt, D F; Wolterman, K; Wheeler, M; Markin, R S

    1990-07-01

    Mammary cancer was induced in female Sprague-Dawley rats by a single injection of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and rats were randomized to control fat (5%) and high fat (24.6%) diets. In addition, dried cabbage (5 and 10%) and collards (5%) were included in the diets of some animals. No statistically significant differences were observed in food consumption, body wt gain and caloric intake between the MNU-treated and control groups in the rats fed the low-fat diet. However, the groups fed the high-fat diet consumed more than the rats maintained on the control diet. The rats on the control fat diet containing cabbage exhibited a significantly lower incidence of mammary cancer than rats that were fed the control-fat diet without cabbage. This effect was not observed in comparable rats on the high-fat diet. The inhibitory effect on mammary tumorigenesis was demonstrated using a residue obtained from cabbage by exhaustive extraction with methanol, methylene chloride and petroleum ether. These studies reinforce the efficacy of cabbage as a 'suppressor' of cancer in experimental model systems under control-fat dietary conditions. PMID:2372873

  1. Thymic neoplasm: a rare disease with a complex clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Omar M.; Cassano, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    Thymic neoplasms constitute a broad category of rare lesions with a wide spectrum of pathologic characteristics and clinical presentations which therefore require a high index of suspicion to diagnose. The natural history of the disease is seldom predictable, anywhere from an indolent to an aggressively malignant course. Although the classification and staging of these lesions are complex and controversial, complete radical surgical resection remains the gold standard of therapy. Radiation and chemotherapy are important elements of the multimodality approach to treating these patients and it is important for thoracic surgeons to work closely with their colleagues in other disciplines in the management of and future research endeavors in thymic neoplasm. In this review, we discuss the evaluation of the patient with an anterior mediastinal mass, the classification and staging of thymic neoplasms, the role of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy in treating this disease, as well as future directions in research for novel targeted therapies. PMID:23585946

  2. [A case of mucinous cystic neoplasm of the liver].

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Ryoji; Amizuka, Hisato; Matsubara, Yu; Yoshizaki, Koji; Sakamoto, Jun; Sato, Ryu; Kimura, Keisuke; Nishimori, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Tomoyuki

    2015-07-01

    We present a case of resected mucinous cystic neoplasm of the liver in a 71-year-old woman admitted to our hospital with epigastric discomfort. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed a multi-locular cystic tumor measuring 35 mm in diameter in segment IV of the liver. Left hepatic lobectomy was performed based on the diagnosis of mucinous cystic neoplasm of the liver; subsequent histology revealed that the tumor was multi-locular, cystic, and lined with a single layer of columnar epithelium with low-grade atypia and was associated with a typical ovarian-like stroma. There was no evidence (imaging or histological) to support communication of the cyst with the intrahepatic bile duct, despite modest bile deposition being observed in the cystic wall. The definitive diagnosis was mucinous cystic neoplasm with low-grade intrahepatic epithelial neoplasia. PMID:26155869

  3. [Prospect of transanal minimally invasive surgery for rectal neoplasm].

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhanlong; Ye, Yingjiang; Xie, Qiwei; Jiang, Kewei; Wang, Shan

    2015-05-01

    Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) is a kind of minimally invasive surgery that local resection or total mesorectal excision for rectal neoplasm is performed through the use of multichannel port(single port) transanally. Compared to transanal endoscopic microsurgery(TEM) approach, TAMIS offers an alternative to TEM for rectal neoplasm, and shows the advantage of lower cost and shorter learning curve. TAMIS approach has been used not only in the local resection of rectal neoplasm but also in transanal total mesorectal excision (transanal TME), which is also called TAMIS-TME, in recent four years. The safety and efficacy of TAMIS approach has been shown in the currently published literatures. However, TAMIS approach has to wait for more evidence-based data with larger-scale and longer follow-up to get its validation. PMID:26013854

  4. The role of JAK2 abnormalities in hematologic neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Alabdulaali, Mohammed K.

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, an activating mutation in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) was identified in a significant proportion of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, mainly polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis. Many types of mutations in the JAK-STAT pathway have been identified, the majority are related to JAK2. Currently JAK2 mutations are important in the area of diagnosis of myeloid neoplasms, but its role beyond the confirmation of clonality is growing and widening our knowledge about these disorders. In addition to that, clinical trials to target JAK2-STAT pathway will widen our knowledge and hopefully will offer more therapeutic options. In this review, we will discuss the role of JAK2 abnormalities in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, classification, severity and management of hematologic neoplasms.

  5. Surgery for Malignant Sublingual and Minor Salivary Gland Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Patrick J; Ferris, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Malignant sublingual gland neoplasms are rare, early-stage neoplasms presenting as painless non-ulcerated masses in the antero-lateral floor of the mouth. The majority of patients present with advanced disease, with symptoms of pain or anaesthesia of the tongue. Malignant minor salivary gland neoplasms are more common, the majority (>80%) of which present in the oral cavity, most frequently in the palatal area, as painless masses or as obstructive symptoms in the head and neck region. The most frequent pathologies are adenoid cystic carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma (>85%), with the majority presenting at an advanced stage (III/IV). Wide tumour-free surgical margin excision is the treatment of choice, followed by radiotherapy, after discussion of the multidisciplinary head and neck cancer tumour board. Improvements in survival and quality of life have been achieved since the introduction of endoscopic and robotic surgeries for many minor salivary gland malignancies. PMID:27092950

  6. A hybrid agent-based model of the developing mammary terminal end bud.

    PubMed

    Butner, Joseph D; Chuang, Yao-Li; Simbawa, Eman; Al-Fhaid, A S; Mahmoud, S R; Cristini, Vittorio; Wang, Zhihui

    2016-10-21

    Mammary gland ductal elongation is spearheaded by terminal end buds (TEBs), where populations of highly proliferative cells are maintained throughout post-pubertal organogenesis in virgin mice until the mammary fat pad is filled by a mature ductal tree. We have developed a hybrid multiscale agent-based model to study how cellular differentiation pathways, cellular proliferation capacity, and endocrine and paracrine signaling play a role during development of the mammary gland. A simplified cellular phenotypic hierarchy that includes stem, progenitor, and fully differentiated cells within the TEB was implemented. Model analysis finds that mammary gland development was highly sensitive to proliferation events within the TEB, with progenitors likely undergoing 2-3 proliferation cycles before transitioning to a non-proliferative phenotype, and this result is in agreement with our previous experimental work. Endocrine and paracrine signaling were found to provide reliable ductal elongation rate regulation, while variations in the probability a new daughter cell will be of a proliferative phenotype were seen to have minimal effects on ductal elongation rates. Moreover, the distribution of cellular phenotypes within the TEB was highly heterogeneous, demonstrating significant allowable plasticity in possible phenotypic distributions while maintaining biologically relevant growth behavior. Finally, simulation results indicate ductal elongation rates due to cellular proliferation within the TEB may have a greater sensitivity to upstream endocrine signaling than endothelial to stromal paracrine signaling within the TEB. This model provides a useful tool to gain quantitative insights into cellular population dynamics and the effects of endocrine and paracrine signaling within the pubertal terminal end bud. PMID:27475843

  7. N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea as a mammary carcinogenic agent.

    PubMed

    Faustino-Rocha, Ana I; Ferreira, Rita; Oliveira, Paula A; Gama, Adelina; Ginja, Mário

    2015-12-01

    The administration of chemical carcinogens is one of the most commonly used methods to induce tumors in several organs in laboratory animals in order to study oncologic diseases of humans. The carcinogen agent N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) is the oldest member of the nitroso compounds that has the ability to alkylate DNA. MNU is classified as a complete, potent, and direct alkylating compound. Depending on the animals' species and strain, dose, route, and age at the administration, MNU may induce tumors' development in several organs. The aim of this manuscript was to review MNU as a carcinogenic agent, taking into account that this carcinogen agent has been frequently used in experimental protocols to study the carcinogenesis in several tissues, namely breast, ovary, uterus, prostate, liver, spleen, kidney, stomach, small intestine, colon, hematopoietic system, lung, skin, retina, and urinary bladder. In this paper, we also reviewed the experimental conditions to the chemical induction of tumors in different organs with this carcinogen agent, with a special emphasis in the mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:26386719

  8. Periareolar techniques for mammary reduction and elevation.

    PubMed

    de Benito, J; Sanza, I F

    1993-01-01

    Between June 1990 and June 1992 we carried out 56 breast operations: 18 reductions, 32 mastopexies, and 6 implant changes. The surgical techniques used in all cases basically consisted of three phases: the periareolar incision, the creation of the superior pedicle with two medial and lateral flaps, and the "anchoring," crossed by both flaps in order to hold up the mammary gland. The diameter of the "doughnut" of skin that we had to deepidermize varied between 5 and 15 cm, thus raising the nipple-areola complex by as much as 10 cm. The volume of tissue removed from the hypertrophic breast ranged from 70 to 520 g. In 24 of the 32 mastopexies, the use of a silicone implant was necessary in order to provide greater volume, texture, and better mammary contour. In these cases the size of the prostheses varied between 120 and 300 cc. All patients completed the postop followup in the normal way. Only three patients suffered a slight dehiscence of the periareolar suture, which was solved within a few days of the operation by means of a Friedreich. The periareolar cutaneous pleats and the hardness of the breast gradually disappeared, as predicted, within a period of 3-4 months; afterward the breast looked perfectly natural. PMID:8273533

  9. Prognostic factors in canine mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Misdorp, W; Hart, A A

    1976-04-01

    From a follow-up study of dogs surgically treated for mammary cancer, ten characteristics were analyzed statistically with special reference to their association with prognosis (expressed as survival for 2 years). The interrelations among five of the characteristics were also tested. The histologic type (descending range in malignancy: sarcomas greater than simple carcinomas greater than complex carcinomas), mode of growth (highly infiltrating greater than moderately infiltrating greater than expansive), clinical stage of complex carcinomas (large tumors and/or tumors involving the skin or underlying tissue greater than small, well-defined tumors), and size (greater than 15 cm greater than 11-15 cm greater than 5-10 cm greater than 0-5 cm) were of definite prognostic importance. The histologic grade was of possible prognostic importance. Localization, type of surgical therapy (mastectomy, block-dissection), growth in lymph vessels, involvement of regional lymph nodes, and duration of symptoms before treatment were not important to prognosis. A comparison between the factors associated with the prognosis of canine and human mammary cancer showed many similarities. However, the involvement of regional lymph nodes, important in women, was not so in bitches. PMID:1255797

  10. Progesterone induces adult mammary stem cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Purna A; Jackson, Hartland W; Beristain, Alexander G; Di Grappa, Marco A; Mote, Patricia A; Clarke, Christine L; Stingl, John; Waterhouse, Paul D; Khokha, Rama

    2010-06-10

    Reproductive history is the strongest risk factor for breast cancer after age, genetics and breast density. Increased breast cancer risk is entwined with a greater number of ovarian hormone-dependent reproductive cycles, yet the basis for this predisposition is unknown. Mammary stem cells (MaSCs) are located within a specialized niche in the basal epithelial compartment that is under local and systemic regulation. The emerging role of MaSCs in cancer initiation warrants the study of ovarian hormones in MaSC homeostasis. Here we show that the MaSC pool increases 14-fold during maximal progesterone levels at the luteal dioestrus phase of the mouse. Stem-cell-enriched CD49fhi cells amplify at dioestrus, or with exogenous progesterone, demonstrating a key role for progesterone in propelling this expansion. In aged mice, CD49fhi cells display stasis upon cessation of the reproductive cycle. Progesterone drives a series of events where luminal cells probably provide Wnt4 and RANKL signals to basal cells which in turn respond by upregulating their cognate receptors, transcriptional targets and cell cycle markers. Our findings uncover a dynamic role for progesterone in activating adult MaSCs within the mammary stem cell niche during the reproductive cycle, where MaSCs are putative targets for cell transformation events leading to breast cancer. PMID:20445538

  11. Surface scanning: an application to mammary surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigotti, Camilla; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio

    1998-04-01

    The possibility of mathematically describing the body surface represents a useful tool for several medical sectors, such as prosthetics or plastic surgery, and could improve diagnosis and objective evaluation of deformities and the follow-up of progressive diseases. The approach presented is based on the acquisition of a surface scanned by a laser beam. The 3D coordinates of the spot generated on the surface by the laser beam are computed by an automatic image analyzer. Using at least two different views of the subject, the 3D coordinates are obtained by stereophotogrammetry. A software package for graphic representation and extraction of linear superficial and volumetric features from the acquired surface has been developed and some preliminary results with mammary reconstruction are presented. A good mammary reconstruction after mastectomy must achieve two results. First, the reconstruction should follow the patients' wishes and second, the reconstructed breast should be as similar as possible to the contralateral one. To achieve these goals, a knowledge of breast volume, area, and shape features are essential for the surgeon. In such a context, this system could be a valuable tool in improving breast reconstructive surgery.

  12. STAT signaling in mammary gland differentiation, cell survival and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Haricharan, S; Li, Y

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is a unique organ that undergoes extensive and profound changes during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, lactation and involution. The changes that take place during puberty involve large-scale proliferation and invasion of the fat-pad. During pregnancy and lactation, the mammary cells are exposed to signaling pathways that inhibit apoptosis, induce proliferation and invoke terminal differentiation. Finally, during involution the mammary gland is exposed to milk stasis, programed cell death and stromal reorganization to clear the differentiated milk-producing cells. Not surprisingly, the signaling pathways responsible for bringing about these changes in breast cells are often subverted during the process of tumorigenesis. The STAT family of proteins is involved in every stage of mammary gland development, and is also frequently implicated in breast tumorigenesis. While the roles of STAT3 and STAT5 during mammary gland development and tumorigenesis are well studied, others members, e.g. STAT1 and STAT6, have only recently been observed to play a role in mammary gland biology. Continued investigation into the STAT protein network in the mammary gland will likely yield new biomarkers and risk factors for breast cancer, and may also lead to novel prophylactic or therapeutic strategies against breast cancer. PMID:23541951

  13. Mammary gland-specific ablation of focal adhesion kinase reduces the incidence of p53-mediated mammary tumour formation

    PubMed Central

    van Miltenburg, M H A M; van Nimwegen, M J; Tijdens, I; Lalai, R; Kuiper, R; Klarenbeek, S; Schouten, P C; de Vries, A; Jonkers, J; van de Water, B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Elevated expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) occurs in numerous human cancers including colon-, cervix- and breast cancer. Although several studies have implicated FAK in mammary tumour formation induced by ectopic oncogene expression, evidence supporting a role for FAK in spontaneous mammary tumour development caused by loss of tumour suppressor genes such as p53 is lacking. Alterations in the tumour suppressor gene p53 have been implicated in over 50% of human breast cancers. Given that elevated FAK expression highly correlates with p53 mutation status in human breast cancer, we set out to investigate the importance of FAK in p53-mediated spontaneous mammary tumour development. Methods: To directly assess the role of FAK, we generated mice with conditional inactivation of FAK and p53. We generated female p53lox/lox/FAK+/+/WapCre, p53lox/lox/FAKflox/+/WapCre and p53lox/lox/FAKflox/−/WapCre mice, and mice with WapCre-mediated conditional expression of p53R270H, the mouse equivalent of human p53R273H hot spot mutation, together with conditional deletion of FAK, P53R270H/+/FAKlox/+/WapCre and p53R270H/+/FAKflox/−/WapCre mice. All mice were subjected to one pregnancy to induce WapCre-mediated deletion of p53 or expression of p53 R270H, and Fak genes flanked by two loxP sites, and subsequently followed the development of mammary tumours. Results: Using this approach, we show that FAK is important for p53-induced mammary tumour development. In addition, mice with the mammary gland-specific conditional expression of p53 point mutation R270H, the mouse equivalent to human R273H, in combination with conditional deletion of Fak showed reduced incidence of p53R270H-induced mammary tumours. In both models these effects of FAK were related to reduced proliferation in preneoplastic lesions in the mammary gland ductal structures. Conclusions: Mammary gland-specific ablation of FAK hampers p53-regulated spontaneous mammary tumour formation. Focal adhesion

  14. Molecular Pathology: Predictive, Prognostic, and Diagnostic Markers in Lymphoid Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Ho, Caleb; Kluk, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Lymphoid neoplasms show great diversity in morphology, immunophenotypic profile, and postulated cells of origin, which also reflects the variety of genetic alterations within this group of tumors. This review discusses many of the currently known genetic alterations in selected mature B-cell and T-cell lymphoid neoplasms, and their significance as diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic markers. Given the rapidly increasing number of genetic alterations that have been described in this group of tumors, and that the clinical significance of many is still being studied, this is not an entirely exhaustive review of all of the genetic alterations that have been reported. PMID:27523974

  15. Management of Large Ovarian Neoplasms in Pediatric and Adolescent Females.

    PubMed

    Amies Oelschlager, Anne-Marie E; Gow, Kenneth W; Morse, Christopher B; Lara-Torre, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The overwhelming majority of ovarian cysts in pediatric and adolescent girls are physiologic; however, large simple and complex ovarian lesions often require surgical intervention due to the increased risk of neoplasia. In this review article, we discuss the preoperative evaluation and intraoperative management of large ovarian neoplasms. We review the current literature regarding long term ovarian function and fertility, rates of recurrence and residual disease, and novel surgical approaches. Managing large ovarian neoplasms in the pediatric and adolescent population requires careful preoperative and intraoperative care to optimally resect neoplasia while maximizing fertility and minimizing pain. PMID:26165911

  16. Production and Release of Antimicrobial and Immune Defense Proteins by Mammary Epithelial Cells following Streptococcus uberis Infection of Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Pisanu, Salvatore; Marogna, Gavino; Cubeddu, Tiziana; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Cacciotto, Carla; Campesi, Franca; Schianchi, Giuseppe; Rocca, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Investigating the innate immune response mediators released in milk has manifold implications, spanning from elucidation of the role played by mammary epithelial cells (MECs) in fighting microbial infections to the discovery of novel diagnostic markers for monitoring udder health in dairy animals. Here, we investigated the mammary gland response following a two-step experimental infection of lactating sheep with the mastitis-associated bacterium Streptococcus uberis. The establishment of infection was confirmed both clinically and by molecular methods, including PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization of mammary tissues. Proteomic investigation of the milk fat globule (MFG), a complex vesicle released by lactating MECs, enabled detection of enrichment of several proteins involved in inflammation, chemotaxis of immune cells, and antimicrobial defense, including cathelicidins and calprotectin (S100A8/S100A9), in infected animals, suggesting the consistent involvement of MECs in the innate immune response to pathogens. The ability of MECs to produce and release antimicrobial and immune defense proteins was then demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and confocal immunomicroscopy of cathelicidin and the calprotectin subunit S100A9 on mammary tissues. The time course of their release in milk was also assessed by Western immunoblotting along the course of the experimental infection, revealing the rapid increase of these proteins in the MFG fraction in response to the presence of bacteria. Our results support an active role of MECs in the innate immune response of the mammary gland and provide new potential for the development of novel and more sensitive tools for monitoring mastitis in dairy animals. PMID:23774600

  17. Production and release of antimicrobial and immune defense proteins by mammary epithelial cells following Streptococcus uberis infection of sheep.

    PubMed

    Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Marogna, Gavino; Cubeddu, Tiziana; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Cacciotto, Carla; Campesi, Franca; Schianchi, Giuseppe; Rocca, Stefano; Uzzau, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Investigating the innate immune response mediators released in milk has manifold implications, spanning from elucidation of the role played by mammary epithelial cells (MECs) in fighting microbial infections to the discovery of novel diagnostic markers for monitoring udder health in dairy animals. Here, we investigated the mammary gland response following a two-step experimental infection of lactating sheep with the mastitis-associated bacterium Streptococcus uberis. The establishment of infection was confirmed both clinically and by molecular methods, including PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization of mammary tissues. Proteomic investigation of the milk fat globule (MFG), a complex vesicle released by lactating MECs, enabled detection of enrichment of several proteins involved in inflammation, chemotaxis of immune cells, and antimicrobial defense, including cathelicidins and calprotectin (S100A8/S100A9), in infected animals, suggesting the consistent involvement of MECs in the innate immune response to pathogens. The ability of MECs to produce and release antimicrobial and immune defense proteins was then demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and confocal immunomicroscopy of cathelicidin and the calprotectin subunit S100A9 on mammary tissues. The time course of their release in milk was also assessed by Western immunoblotting along the course of the experimental infection, revealing the rapid increase of these proteins in the MFG fraction in response to the presence of bacteria. Our results support an active role of MECs in the innate immune response of the mammary gland and provide new potential for the development of novel and more sensitive tools for monitoring mastitis in dairy animals. PMID:23774600

  18. Sequencing the transcriptome of milk production: milk trumps mammary tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of normal human mammary gland development and function have mostly relied on cell culture, limited surgical specimens, and rodent models. Although RNA extracted from human milk has been used to assay the mammary transcriptome non-invasively, this assay has not been adequately validated in primates. Thus, the objectives of the current study were to assess the suitability of lactating rhesus macaques as a model for lactating humans and to determine whether RNA extracted from milk fractions is representative of RNA extracted from mammary tissue for the purpose of studying the transcriptome of milk-producing cells. Results We confirmed that macaque milk contains cytoplasmic crescents and that ample high-quality RNA can be obtained for sequencing. Using RNA sequencing, RNA extracted from macaque milk fat and milk cell fractions more accurately represented RNA from mammary epithelial cells (cells that produce milk) than did RNA from whole mammary tissue. Mammary epithelium-specific transcripts were more abundant in macaque milk fat, whereas adipose or stroma-specific transcripts were more abundant in mammary tissue. Functional analyses confirmed the validity of milk as a source of RNA from milk-producing mammary epithelial cells. Conclusions RNA extracted from the milk fat during lactation accurately portrayed the RNA profile of milk-producing mammary epithelial cells in a non-human primate. However, this sample type clearly requires protocols that minimize RNA degradation. Overall, we validated the use of RNA extracted from human and macaque milk and provided evidence to support the use of lactating macaques as a model for human lactation. PMID:24330573

  19. Bilateral internal mammary arteries: evidence and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, J. James B.; Wilson, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral internal mammary artery (BIMA) grafts are used for coronary revascularisation by only a minority of surgeons, despite a growing body of evidence suggesting improved survival when compared to use of only one internal mammary artery with additional saphenous vein grafts. Herein we review the evidence supporting revascularisation with BIMA and suggest reasons why the majority of surgeons use only one internal mammary artery. We discuss technical considerations, various graft combinations and the use of BIMA to facilitate anaortic off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB). PMID:23977638

  20. Cystic renal neoplasms and renal neoplasms associated with cystic renal diseases in adults: cross-sectional imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Garg, Deepak; Prasad, Srinivasa R; Vikram, Raghu

    2012-01-01

    Cystic renal neoplasms in adults are a heterogeneous group of tumors with characteristic histogenesis, pathological findings, and variable biological profiles. They include disparate entities that are either biologically benign (lymphangioma, cystic nephroma, and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor) or malignant (cystic renal cell carcinoma, multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma, and primary renal synovial sarcoma). Renal cystic diseases are characterized by cystic changes of the kidneys due to hereditary, developmental, or acquired etiology. Cystic renal diseases such as acquired cystic kidney disease, von Hippel-Lindau disease, and tuberous sclerosis are associated with the development of a wide spectrum of benign and malignant renal neoplasms. Most cystic renal tumors and cystic disease-associated renal neoplasms show characteristic cross-sectional imaging findings that permit accurate diagnosis. In addition, cross-sectional imaging is pivotal in the follow-up and surveillance of adult cystic tumors of the kidney. PMID:23192202

  1. Oestrogen and progesterone receptor expression in subtypes of canine mammary tumours in intact and ovariectomised dogs.

    PubMed

    Mainenti, M; Rasotto, R; Carnier, P; Zappulli, V

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate as a potential prognostic indicator the relationship between histological subtype of canine mammary tumours (CMTs) and oestrogen-α (ORα) and progesterone (PR) receptor expression. Using immunohistochemistry, receptor expression in neoplastic epithelial cells was assessed in 12 different subtypes in 113 CMTs (34 benign, 79 malignant) and 101 surrounding normal tissues. Sixty-eight and 45 CMTs were from intact and ovariectomised bitches, respectively. Histological subtype strongly influenced ORα/PR expression: simple and complex adenomas as well as simple tubular carcinomas exhibited the greatest expression, whereas immunohistochemical labelling for these receptors was weakest in carcinoma and malignant myoepitheliomas, as well as in solid/anaplastic carcinomas and comedocarcinomas. Receptor expression was generally higher in benign relative to malignant neoplasms, and in the latter it was significantly lower in ovariectomised vs. intact bitches. Lymphatic invasion, mitotic index, nodule diameter, and tumour grade were significantly associated with ORα/PR expression. Although not found to be an independent prognostic indicator, tumours from dogs with <10% cells with ORα/PR expression had a poorer prognosis. Lymphatic invasion, the state of the margins of excision, and mitotic index were found to be independent prognostic indicators. Overall, the results suggest that differences in histological subtype and whether or not a bitch has been ovariectomised should be considered when evaluating the significance of ORα and PR expression in CMTs. PMID:24980810

  2. Chemoprevention of mammary tumor virus-induced and chemical carcinogen-induced rodent mammary tumors by natural plant products.

    PubMed

    Bhide, S V; Azuine, M A; Lahiri, M; Telang, N T

    1994-01-01

    The natural plant products turmeric, beta-carotene, catechin, and betel leaf extract were evaluated for their antitumor effects on mammary tumorigenesis in murine mammary tumor expressing C3H (Jax) mice and in Wistar rats treated with the chemical carcinogen 7-12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). Administration of turmeric through the diet and of beta-carotene, catechin, and betel leaf extract through the drinking water to virgin female C3H mice resulted in decreased tumor incidence and tumor burden. Administering 5% turmeric in the diet from 2 months of age showed suppression of mammary tumor virus-related reverse transcriptase activity and of preneoplastic changes in the mammary glands. Furthermore, feeding turmeric from 6 months of age resulted in a 100% inhibition of mammary tumors. In the DMBA model of rat mammary tumorigenesis, administration of turmeric, catechin, and betel leaf extract resulted in decreased tumor burden and tumor incidence, and a delay in the onset of mammary tumors. PMID:7526904

  3. Lactation stage-dependent expression of transporters in rat whole mammary gland and primary mammary epithelial organoids.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Samuel E; Alcorn, Jane

    2010-04-01

    Since solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play pivotal roles in the transport of both nutrients and drugs into breast milk, drug-nutrient transport interactions at the lactating mammary gland are possible. Our purpose was to characterize lactation stage-dependent changes in transporter expression in rat mammary gland and isolated mammary epithelial organoids (MEO) to provide additional insight for the safe use of maternal medications during breastfeeding. We used quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assess the temporal expression patterns of SLC and ABC transporters in rat mammary gland and isolated MEO at different stages of lactation. In whole mammary gland five distinct patterns of expression emerged relative to late gestation: (i) decreasing throughout lactation (Mdr1a, Mdr1b, Mrp1, Octn2, Ent2, Ent3, Ncbt2, Mtx1); (ii) prominent increase in early lactation, which may remain elevated or decline with advancing lactation (Octn1, Cnt2, Cnt3, Ent1, Pept1, Pept2); (iii) constant but decreasing later in lactation (Octn3, Dmt1); (iv) increasing until mid-to-late lactation (Oct1, Cnt1); and (v) prominent increase late in lactation (Ncbt1). In isolated MEO (an enriched source of mammary epithelial cells) major differences in expression patterns were noted for Octn3, Ncbt1, and Mtx1, but otherwise were reasonably similar with the whole mammary gland. In conclusion our study augments existing data on transporter expression in the lactating mammary gland. These data should facilitate investigations into lactation-stage dependent changes in drug or nutrient milk-to-serum concentration ratios, the potential for drug- or disease-transporter interactions, and mechanistic studies of transporter function in the lactating mammary gland. PMID:19702690

  4. The Continuing Value of Ultrastructural Observation in Central Nervous System Neoplasms in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Rae; Park, Sung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms are the second most common childhood malignancy after leukemia and the most common solid organ neoplasm in children. Diagnostic dilemmas with small specimens from CNS neoplasms are often the result of multifactorial etiologies such as frozen or fixation artifact, biopsy size, or lack of knowledge about rare or unfamiliar entities. Since the late 1950s, ultrastructural examination has been used in the diagnosis of CNS neoplasms, though it has largely been replaced by immunohistochemical and molecular cytogenetic studies. Nowadays, pathologic diagnosis of CNS neoplasms is achieved through intraoperative cytology, light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and molecular cytogenetic results. However, the utility of electron microscopy (EM) in the final diagnosis of CNS neoplasms and investigation of its pathogenetic origin remains critical. Here, we reviewed the distinguishing ultrastructural features of pediatric CNS neoplasms and emphasize the continuing value of EM in the diagnosis of CNS neoplasms. PMID:26459406

  5. Diagnosis, classification and grading of canine mammary tumours as a model to study human breast cancer: an Clinico-Cytohistopathological study with environmental factors influencing public health and medicine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human “Elston and Ellis grading method” was utilized in dogs with mammary tumor to examine its relation to prognosis in this species, based on a 2-year follow-up period. Although cytopathology is widely used for early diagnosis of human neoplasms, it is not commonly performed in veterinary medicine. Our objectives in this study were to identify cytopathology criteria of malignancy for canine mammary tumors and the frequency of different types of mammary lesions and their relationship with histologic grade was investigated. Another aim of this study was to differentiate the simple and adenocarcinoma tumors from the complex or mixed tumor described by Elston and Ellis grading method. Methods The study was performed in 15 pure or mixed-breed female dogs submitted to surgical resections of mammary tumours. The mammary tumours were excised by simple mastectomy or regional mastectomy, with or without the superficial inguinal lymph nodes. Female dogs were mainly terriers (9 dogs) or mixed (3 dogs), the 3 other animals were a German shepherd, Dachshund and Pekingese. Before surgical excision of the tumour, FNAC was performed using a 0.6 mm diameter needle attached to a 10 ml syringe held in a standard metal syringe holder. The cytological sample was smeared onto a glass slide and either air-dried for May-Grünwald-stain, or ethanol-fixed for Papanicolaou stain and masses were surgically removed, the tumours were grossly examined and tissue samples were fixed in 10%-buffered-formalin and embedded in paraffin. Sections 4 μm thick were obtained from each sample and H&E stained. Results We obtained a correct cytohistological correlation in 14/15 cases (93.3%) when all cytopathological examinations were considered. Of the 15 cases examined, 2(13.3%) had well-differentiated (grade I), 6(40%) had moderately differentiated (grade II) and 7(46.7%) had poorly differentiated (grade III) tumours. Classification of all canine mammary gland lesions revealed 13

  6. COMPARATIVE HISTOPATHOLOGY OF GONADAL NEOPLASMS IN MARINE BIVALVE MOLLUSCS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative histology of gonadal neoplasms in 14 marine bivalve species or hybrids from 5 countries described in the literature and/or archived in the Registry of Tumors in Lower Animals (RTLA), Washington, DC, USA, revealed 3 basic histotypes. undreds of cases were of germ cell ...

  7. Plasmocytoma, multiple myeloma and plasma cell neoplasms in orofacial region.

    PubMed

    Zajko, J; Czako, L; Galis, B

    2016-01-01

    A neoplastic proliferation of B cell lymphocyte is called plasma cell neoplasms, results from malignant plasma cells transformation in bone marrow. The authors present a clinical study and overview of this pathology in maxillofacial region for six years (Tab. 2, Ref. 14). PMID:27546545

  8. Cutaneous epithelioid angiosarcoma: a neoplasm with potential pitfalls in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mobini, Narciss

    2009-03-01

    Angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare neoplasm. Cutaneous AS is the most common form of AS. The epithelioid variant of the disease, however, is a rare entity. This subset can histologically mimic non-vascular neoplasms and impose serious challenges in reaching the correct diagnosis. We present five patients with cutaneous epithelioid angiosarcoma (EAS); in none, the clinical diagnosis included a vascular lesion. Three patients had history of breast conservation surgery with/without radiation therapy. Other patients had no previous radiation, and there was no lymphedema in any of the cases. The histopathological examination of the biopsy specimens by hematoxylin and eosin method was not suggestive of a malignant vascular neoplasm initially and the differential diagnoses included carcinoma, malignant melanoma and atypical lymphoid infiltrate. Only after performing immunohistochemical studies that included vascular markers, a definitive diagnosis was possible. Some cases showed unusual histopathological features. Cutaneous EAS is a rare variant of cutaneous AS that can mimic a variety of more common, non-vascular neoplasms, creating a major pitfall in the diagnosis. A careful and thorough histopathological examination and a high index of suspicion, along with appropriate immunohistochemical evaluation, can help reach a correct diagnosis and provide optimal patient care. PMID:19220634

  9. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN): a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ming Sheng; Lemmert, Karla; Enjeti, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare and aggressive haematological malignancy in the elderly, with a high frequency of cutaneous and bone marrow involvement and poor prognosis. We report a case of BPDCN with classic presentation and discuss its treatment and the value of different investigation tools used in diagnosis and response assessment. PMID:26791132

  10. Lifestyle Behaviors as Predictors of Malignant Neoplasm Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, L. S.; And Others

    The relationship between lifestyle behaviors and the onset of neoplasm development has been researched extensively. This study took a multivariate approach in attempting to identify lifestyle variables which could predict group membership among subjects diagnosed as having cancer and those subjects who have not been diagnosed as having cancer.…

  11. Mammary stem cell research in veterinary science: an update.

    PubMed

    Borena, Bizunesh M; Bussche, Leen; Burvenich, Christian; Duchateau, Luc; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2013-06-15

    The mammary gland is an organ with a remarkable regenerative capacity that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation, and involution. Growing evidence suggests that these changes are driven by the coordinated division and differentiation of mammary stem cell populations (MaSC). Whereas information regarding MaSC and their role in comparative mammary gland physiology is readily available in human and mice, such information remains scarce in most veterinary mammal species such as cows, horses, sheep, goats, pigs, and dogs. We believe that a better knowledge on the MaSC in these species will not only help to gain more insights into mammary gland (patho) physiology in veterinary medicine, but will also be of value for human medicine. Therefore, this review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell isolation and characterization in different mammals of veterinary importance. PMID:23360296

  12. Use of tamoxifen in the control of canine mammary neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Morris, J S; Dobson, J M; Bostock, D E

    1993-11-27

    Ninety-three bitches which had undergone mammary tumour surgery were entered into a clinical trial to examine the effects of ovariohysterectomy (spaying) at the time of mammary surgery and the use of the drug tamoxifen in preventing the recurrence of the tumour and/or the development of new mammary tumours. Twenty-three of the bitches which had been spayed were allocated tamoxifen but only 18 of them complied with the treatment and in nine of these the treatment was stopped owing to side effects (mostly oestrogenic). Too few animals were studied to draw conclusions about the possible preventative effects of tamoxifen on mammary neoplasia, but the high percentage of bitches affected by oestrogen-like side effects may reduce the compliance of owners and prevent tamoxifen being widely used in dogs. PMID:8116156

  13. Developmental biology: cell fate in the mammary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most breast cancers have their origin in the luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland. Defining how a master regulator controls the development of this cell lineage could provide important hints about why this should be. ...

  14. Metabolic adaptations in goat mammary tissue during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Wilde, C J; Henderson, A J; Knight, C H

    1986-01-01

    Metabolic adaptations of goat mammary tissue during pregnancy and lactation were monitored in serial biopsies of the tissue. Changes in the synthetic capacity of secretory cells were studied by combining measurements of enzyme activities with short-term culture of mammary explants to measure lactose, casein and total protein synthesis. By these criteria, the main phase of mammary differentiation began in late pregnancy and was essentially complete by Week 5 of lactation, coinciding with the achievement of peak milk yield. While milk yield declined after Week 5, the activities of key enzymes expressed per mg DNA and the rates of lactose and casein synthesis in mammary explants were maintained over a considerable period. The results suggest that changes in the synthetic capacity of epithelial cells may account for much of the rise in milk yield in early lactation, but are not responsible for the declining phase of milk production characteristic of lactation in ruminants. PMID:2868125

  15. Lessons Learned from Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Jaquelin P; Golovkina, Tatyana V; Ross, Susan R

    2016-03-31

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), which was discovered as a milk-transmitted, infectious, cancer-inducing agent in the 1930s, has been used as an animal model for the study of retroviral infection and transmission, antiviral immune responses, and breast cancer and lymphoma biology. The main target cells for MMTV infection in vivo are cells of the immune system and mammary epithelial cells. Although the host mounts an immune response to the virus, MMTV has evolved multiple means of evading this response. MMTV causes mammary tumors when the provirus integrates into the mammary epithelial and lymphoid cell genome during viral replication and thereby activates cellular oncogene expression. Thus, tumor induction is a by-product of the infection cycle. A number of important oncogenes have been discovered by carrying out MMTV integration site analysis, some of which may play a role in human breast cancer. PMID:27034391

  16. Gene expression and epigenetic profiles of mammary gland tissue: insight into the differential predisposition of four rat strains to mammary gland cancer.

    PubMed

    Luzhna, Lidia; Kutanzi, Kristy; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-02-01

    Rats are excellent experimental models for studying breast cancer, but rat strains differ in susceptibility. Among the four strains used in this study, Fischer rats are less susceptible to spontaneous breast cancer, yet they are highly prone to extremely severe metastatic and drug-resistant tumors, in those case where they actually develop the disease. In contrast, Sprague Dawley rats are the most susceptible to spontaneous breast cancer among the strains. ACI rats are highly prone to estrogen-induced cancer. Long-Evans rats are commonly used in mammary gland carcinogenesis studies. The molecular mechanisms of differential breast cancer susceptibility among rat strains are not well understood. Here, gene expression analysis was conducted in the mammary gland tissue of four rat strains--August × Copenhagen Irish (ACI), Long Evans, Fischer-344 and Sprague Dawley--to evaluate possible explanations for the differing breast cancer predispositions. According to the DAVID functional annotation analysis, there were at least eleven, five, and one significantly different pathways, respectively, in Fischer-344, Long-Evans and Sprague Dawley rats, in comparison to ACI rats. Two strains, Fischer-344 and Long-Evans, displayed differential expression in the complement and coagulation cascades, chemokine signaling, PPAR signaling, renin-angiotensin system, ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion and glutathione metabolism pathways. The only pathway that was significantly different between the Sprague Dawley and the ACI rats was the ribosome pathway. Our data indicate that general cancer susceptibility and predisposition to the development of aggressive and metastatic cancer are independent genetic conditions. Moreover, we have identified several important differences in the basal epigenetic profile of four rat strains with varying degrees of susceptibility to spontaneous and induced mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25813725

  17. Mammary tumors induce select cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Pyter, Leah M; Cochrane, Sally F; Ouwenga, Rebecca L; Patel, Priyesh N; Pineros, Vanessa; Prendergast, Brian J

    2010-08-01

    Cancer, in addition to many other chronic diseases, is associated with serious and problematic behavioral symptoms, including cognitive impairments. In humans, various factors likely contribute to cancer-associated cognitive deficits including disease awareness and chemotherapy; however, the endogenous biological factors arising from tumor development may also play a causal role. In the present study, rats with mammary tumors exhibited impaired spatial reference memory on a radial arm maze and amnesia for familiar objects in an object recognition memory test. In contrast, their performance in the Morris water maze and in fear conditioning tests was comparable to that of controls. These select cognitive impairments were accompanied by elevations in hippocampal interleukin-1beta mRNA expression, but were not associated with decreases in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression. Together the results indicate that peripheral tumors alone are sufficient to induce increases in hippocampal cytokine expression and select deficits in hippocampal-dependent memory tasks. PMID:20188817

  18. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  19. Technical note: Isolation and characterization of porcine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dahanayaka, S; Rezaei, R; Porter, W W; Johnson, G A; Burghardt, R C; Bazer, F W; Hou, Y Q; Wu, Z L; Wu, G

    2015-11-01

    Within the mammary gland, functional synthesis of milk is performed by its epithelial (alveolar) cells. The availability of a stable mammary epithelial cell line is essential for biochemical studies to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for nutritional regulation of lactation. Therefore, porcine mammary epithelial cells (PMEC) were isolated from mammary glands of a 9-mo-old nonpregnant and nonlactating gilt and cultured to establish a nonimmortalized cell line. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin-18 (an intermediate filament specific for epithelial cells), β-casein (a specific marker for mammary epithelial cells), and α-lactalbumin. In culture, the PMEC doubled in number every 24 h and maintained a cobblestone morphology, typical for cultured epithelial cells, for at least 15 passages. Addition of 0.2 to 2 μg/mL prolactin to culture medium for 3 d induced the production of β-casein and α-lactalbumin by PMEC in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we have successfully developed a useful PMEC line for future studies of cellular and molecular regulation of milk synthesis by mammary epithelial cells of the sow. PMID:26641038

  20. TCDD exposure disrupts mammary epithelial cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Loretta L.; Lew, Betina J.; Lawrence, B. Paige

    2011-01-01

    Mammary gland growth and differentiation during pregnancy is a developmental process that is sensitive to the toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). TCDD is a widespread environmental contaminant and a potent ligand for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We demonstrate reduced β-casein protein induction in mouse mammary glands and in cultured SCp2 mammary epithelial cells following exposure to TCDD. SCp2 cells exposed to TCDD also show reduced cell clustering and less alveolar-like structure formation. SCp2 cells express transcriptionally active AhR, and exposure to TCDD induces expression of the AhR target gene CYP1B1. Exposure to TCDD during pregnancy reduced expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin in the mammary gland and decreased phosphorylation of STAT5, a known regulator of β-casein gene expression. These data provide morphological and molecular evidence that TCDD-mediated AhR activation disrupts structural and functional differentiation of the mammary gland, and present an in vitro model for studying the effects of TCDD on mammary epithelial cell function. PMID:19490989

  1. A case of MUC5AC-positive intraductal neoplasm of the pancreas classified as an intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm?

    PubMed

    Muraki, Takashi; Uehara, Takeshi; Sano, Kenji; Oota, Hiroyoshi; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Asaka, Shiho; Tateishi, Ayako; Otsuki, Toshiaki; Shingu, Kunihiko; Matoba, Hisanori; Kobayashi, Shota; Ichimata, Shojiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Itou, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    This report describes a unique case of intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasm (ITPN) of the pancreas in order to clarify its oncogenesis and more precisely classify pancreatic intraductal neoplasms. A 74-year-old man visited our institution for follow-up of acute pancreatitis. Imaging examinations revealed a hypovascular intraductal mass in the head of the pancreas with progressive dilation of the pancreatic duct, atrophy of the pancreatic parenchyma, and a non-mucinous appearance. A pancreatoduodenectomy was performed to identify this pancreatic intraductal neoplasm. Macroscopically, the tumor was a solid nodular mass with no visibly secreted mucin obstructing the dilated ducts. Histologically, it had a homogeneous appearance with nodules of back-to-back tubular glands and occasional papillary elements, and there were no apparent transitions to areas with less marked cytoarchitectural atypia. Although the intraductal neoplastic growth corresponded to an ITPN, immunohistochemical staining revealed partial positivity for MUC5AC, for which ITPNs are characteristically negative. Somatic mutations in KRAS, GNAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA were not detected. A loss of MUC5AC expression and mutations in KRAS and GNAS are key elements in the diagnosis of ITPN. Thus, it was difficult to distinguish the present case as a pancreatobiliary-type (PB-type) intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) or a phenotypic variant of ITPN. As it is possible that some cases of PB-type IPMN and ITPN overlap, the precise classification of these rare lesions may require re-evaluation. PMID:26586167

  2. Second neoplasms following megavoltage radiation for pediatric tumors

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, W.A.; Dusenbery, K.E.; Potish, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Because ionizing radiation is a known carcinogen, diligent long term follow-up; in children exposed to therapeutic radiation is required. Since 1954 a large cohort of children receiving megavoltage RT at the University of Minnesota have been closely followed, and we now update our previous reports on the nature and risk of second neoplasms in this patient population. We have followed 487 children who were treated with megavoltage radiation therapy (RT) between 1/1/1954 and 12/31/1980. Patients at the time of RT ranged in age from 2 weeks to 17 years (median 6.2 years) and were treated for a variety of benigh (n=39) and malignant (n=448) conditions. The most common indications for RT were ALL (n=160), primary brain tumors (n=79), Hodgkin`s Disease (n=56), Wilms Tumor (n=36), neuroblastoma (n=33), and Histiocytosis X (n=24). Median follow-up of surviving patients is 19.9 years (range 4.8 to 39.9 years) with a total of 9832 patient years of follow-up accrued. Only 14 (2.9%) of patients were lost to follow-up and were censored at the time of last follow-up. Kaplan Meier actuarial survival estimates for all patients was 93% (95% C.I.90-95%) at 20 years and 86% (95% C.I. 81-90.5%) at 30 years. Forty-two (8.6%) patients developed second neoplasms from 3.8 to 32 years (median 15 years) after RT. The cumulative risk of developing a second neoplasm was 17% at 20 years. The most common second neoplasms were breast cancer (n=8), meningiomas (n-6) and skin cancers (n=7), all of which were within the RT fields, and developed at a median of 18, 16 and 21 years after RT, respectively. Of the 42 patients with second neoplasms, 16 died either of the second neoplasm (n=15) or of recurrent primary tumor (n=1). Risk factors associated with developing a second malignancy included age >10 years at RT (p=0.009), and an initial diagnosis of Hodgkin`s Disease (p<0.0001).

  3. Neuropilin-2 promotes branching morphogenesis in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Bae, Donggoo; Pursell, Bryan; Gouvin, Lindsey M; Lu, Shaolei; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2011-07-01

    Although the neuropilins were characterized as semaphorin receptors that regulate axon guidance, they also function as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors and contribute to the development of other tissues. Here, we assessed the role of NRP2 in mouse mammary gland development based on our observation that NRP2 is expressed preferentially in the terminal end buds of developing glands. A floxed NRP2 mouse was bred with an MMTV-Cre strain to generate a mammary gland-specific knockout of NRP2. MMTV-Cre;NRP2(loxP/loxP) mice exhibited significant defects in branching morphogenesis and ductal outgrowth compared with either littermate MMTV-Cre;NRP2(+/loxP) or MMTV-Cre mice. Mechanistic insight into this morphological defect was obtained from a mouse mammary cell line in which we observed that VEGF(165), an NRP2 ligand, induces branching morphogenesis in 3D cultures and that branching is dependent upon NRP2 as shown using shRNAs and a function-blocking antibody. Epithelial cells in the mouse mammary gland express VEGF, supporting the hypothesis that this NRP2 ligand contributes to mammary gland morphogenesis. Importantly, we demonstrate that VEGF and NRP2 activate focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and promote FAK-dependent branching morphogenesis in vitro. The significance of this mechanism is substantiated by our finding that FAK activation is diminished significantly in developing MMTV-Cre;NRP2(loxP/loxP) mammary glands compared with control glands. Together, our data reveal a VEGF/NRP2/FAK signaling axis that is important for branching morphogenesis and mammary gland development. In a broader context, our data support an emerging hypothesis that directional outgrowth and branching morphogenesis in a variety of tissues are influenced by signals that were identified initially for their role in axon guidance. PMID:21693513

  4. Primary Intracranial Myoepithelial Neoplasm: A Potential Mimic of Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Choy, Bonnie; Pytel, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Myoepithelial neoplasms were originally described in the salivary glands but their spectrum has been expanding with reports in other locations, including soft tissue. Intracranial cases are exceptionally rare outside the sellar region where they are assumed to be arising from Rathke pouch rests. Two cases of pediatric intracranial myoepithelial neoplasm in the interhemispheric fissure and the right cerebral hemisphere are reported here. Imaging studies suggest that the second case was associated with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination. Both cases showed typical variation in morphology and immunophenotype between more epithelioid and more mesenchymal features. The differential diagnosis at this particular anatomic location includes meningioma, which can show some overlap in immunophenotype since both tumors express EMA as well as GLUT1. One case was positive for EWSR1 rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization. One patient is disease free at last follow-up while the other succumbed to the disease within days illustrating the clinical spectrum of these tumors. PMID:26510861

  5. Neoplastic disease after liver transplantation: Focus on de novo neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Burra, Patrizia; Rodriguez-Castro, Kryssia I

    2015-01-01

    De novo neoplasms account for almost 30% of deaths 10 years after liver transplantation and are the most common cause of mortality in patients surviving at least 1 year after transplant. The risk of malignancy is two to four times higher in transplant recipients than in an age- and sex-matched population, and cancer is expected to surpass cardiovascular complications as the primary cause of death in transplanted patients within the next 2 decades. Since exposure to immunosuppression is associated with an increased frequency of developing neoplasm, long-term immunosuppression should be therefore minimized. Promising results in the prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence have been reported with the use of mTOR inhibitors including everolimus and sirolimus and the ongoing open-label prospective randomized controlled SILVER. Study will provide more information on whether sirolimus-containing vs mTOR-inhibitor-free immunosuppression is more efficacious in reducing HCC recurrence. PMID:26269665

  6. Transoral robotic surgery for base of tongue neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sayin, I; Fakhoury, R; Prasad, V M N; Remacle, M; Lawson, G

    2015-01-01

    Surgery to the base of tongue (BOT) in the presence of neoplasm is a challenging topic for head and neck surgeons. This area is difficult to access and includes important neurovascular structures such as the hypoglossal nerve and lingual artery. The pivotal role of the tongue base in swallowing makes planning the surgical approach more challenging. The surgical approaches vary from open neck/mandibulotomy to transoral laser surgery (TLS) which have significant disadvantages. After introduction of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) to otolaryngology practice with the da Vinci Surgical system, we have in our armamentarium a new approach to the BOT. The improved exposure with new retractors, 3-dimensional (3-D) visualization and magnification and advanced motion capacity allow for increased ease to perform surgery in this difficult area. In recent years, several articles published the data about safety and feasibility of TORS for various conditions. This article presents our approach to the BOT for neoplasms including malignant and benign lesions. PMID:26891531

  7. Molecular classification of myeloproliferative neoplasms-pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Moosa; Harrison, Claire

    2013-12-01

    Dameshek first postulated a common myeloproliferative heritage for the myeloproliferative disorders, now termed neoplasms. This prescient observation was validated by the description of a common mutation in exon 14 of JAK2 for patients with essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and primary myelofibrosis. In recent years, our knowledge of the molecular abnormalities underpinning these disorders has expanded significantly. At the same time, we have continued to use a classification based largely upon the first clinical descriptions of these entities, which sometimes proves problematic in differentiating between these conditions and normal reactive processes, myelodysplasia and between the myeloproliferative neoplasm entities themselves. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of a molecular classification and its potential utility in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics. PMID:24091831

  8. Lesions and Neoplasms of the Penis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Heller, Debra S

    2016-01-01

    In addition to practitioners who care for male patients, with the increased use of high-resolution anoscopy, practitioners who care for women are seeing more men in their practices as well. Some diseases affecting the penis can impact on their sexual partners. Many of the lesions and neoplasms of the penis occur on the vulva as well. In addition, there are common and rare lesions unique to the penis. A review of the scope of penile lesions and neoplasms that may present in a primary care setting is presented to assist in developing a differential diagnosis if such a patient is encountered, as well as for practitioners who care for their sexual partners. A familiarity will assist with recognition, as well as when consultation is needed. PMID:26579840

  9. Central Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Primary Odontogenic or Osseous Neoplasm?

    PubMed

    Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, central cemento-ossifying fibroma is classified by the World Health Organization as a primary bone-forming tumor of the jaws. However, histopathologically, it is often indistinguishable from cemento-osseous dysplasias in that it forms osteoid and cementicles (cementum droplets) in varying proportions. It is believed that pluripotent cells within the periodontal membrane can be stimulated to produce either osteoid or woven bone and cementicles when stimulated. If this is true, cemento-ossifying fibroma would be better classified as a primary odontogenic neoplasm arising from the periodontal ligament. Cemento-ossifying fibromas also do not occur in the long bones. The present report compares several entities that fall within the diagnostic realm of benign fibro-osseous lesions and reviews the evidence for reclassifying central cemento-ossifying fibroma as a primary odontogenic neoplasm. PMID:26608158

  10. Further investigations of the etiology of subcutaneous neoplasms in native gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, A.D.; Ostrander, G.K.

    1995-10-01

    Aspects of the etiology of subcutaneous spindle-cell neoplasms in feral gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) collected from Lake of the Arbuckles, Oklahoma, were investigated. Field collections of adult and juvenile gizzard shad were conducted to determine the prevalence and seasonality of neoplasms and site specificity of neoplasms-bearing fish. Overall neoplasm prevalence for adult gizzard shad was 22.1%; no juveniles exhibited neoplasms. Neoplasm occurrence did not appear seasonal. Neoplasm-bearing gizzard shad were found at all three sampling sites within Lake of the Arbuckles with similar neoplasm prevalence rates (Guy Sandy Creek 22.1%, Rock creek, 17.9%, and Buckhorn Creek 22.4%). No gizzard shad (juvenile or adult) collected from Lake Carl Blackwell, Oklahoma, the reference site, exhibited neoplasms. Water, sediment, and shad liver tissue from Lake of the Arbuckles and the reference site were analyzed for total recoverable metals (cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, and lead, by graphite furnace atomic absorption). Chromium, copper, and nickel were found in the water samples at concentrations of >1 to 8.6 {micro}g/L. Low concentrations (>1 to 13.6 {micro}g/g wet weight) of all the metals were found in the sediment and liver tissue for both sites. Heavy metal contamination does not appear linked to neoplasm occurrence. To determine if a nonbacterial infectious agent was responsible for tumor formation, cell-free neoplasm homogenates were injected into healthy rainbow trout. Neoplasms were not transmitted into rainbow trout. Neoplasms were not transmitted into rainbow trout. The etiology of these neoplasms remains unknown.

  11. INDUCTION OF MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor knockout ( ERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted Er signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute t...

  12. Askin tumor: A rare neoplasm of thoracopulmonary region

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ankur; Abhinay, Abhishek; Kumar, Abhishek; Prasad, Rajniti; Ghosh, Amrita; Mishra, Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Askin tumor is a rare neoplasm of thoracopulmonary region. But it mimics other common pediatric disorders, such as empyema, lymphoma, and tuberculosis, posing a great diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the treating clinicians. So it is of utmost importance to make an early diagnosis and proper referral/treatment in such cases. We highlighted diagnostic challenge, treatment, and favorable outcome of a case that presented to us. PMID:27051109

  13. Early development of multiple epithelial neoplasms in Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krasagakis, K; Ioannidou, D J; Stephanidou, M; Manios, A; Panayiotides, J G; Tosca, A D

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of Netherton syndrome manifested as congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, trichorrhexis invaginata and atopy, who in early adulthood developed multiple, aggressive epithelial neoplasms in sun-exposed areas of the skin, in areas with papillomatous skin hyperplasia and at the left parotid region. The occurrence of cutaneous neoplasia has been reported in syndromes with congenital ichthyosis and suggests that the underlying genetic defects may cause the development of cancer in prone patients. PMID:12920370

  14. Raman spectroscopic characterization on cervical neoplasm in biopsy direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hsiao Hsin; Tsai, Yan Sheng; Wang, Tao Yuan; Chu, Shou Chia; Chiang, Huihua Kenny

    2007-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy was applied to distinguish the spectroscopic information between normal cervical tissues (14) and cervical neoplasia (17), including low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (6) and high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (11). Standard pathological sections of these cervical tissues were measured from superficial to stroma layers. We have normalized significant Raman peaks, 1250 and 1579-1656 cm -1 by taking a ratio over a stationary Raman at 1004 cm -1, and successfully discriminated between normal and neoplasm cervical tissues.

  15. Tracheal paraganglioma: an unusual neoplasm of the upper airway.

    PubMed

    Metzdorff, Mark T; Seaman, Joseph C; Opperman, David A; Goates, Jeffrey J; Musani, Ali I

    2012-05-01

    Paraganglioma of the trachea is a rare neoplasm, with fewer than 15 cases reported. A 40-year-old man presented with stridor and hemoptysis. Bronchoscopy demonstrated a tumor of the posterior trachea and biopsy initially suggested typical carcinoid. The patient underwent surgical resection uneventfully and made a good recovery. Final pathology disclosed the tumor to be a paraganglioma based on immunohistology. The pathophysiology and treatment of this tumor are discussed. PMID:22541208

  16. High grade neuroendocrine neoplasm of the antrum and orbit.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, Peter W; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Stagner, Anna M; Gilani, Sapideh; Fay, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine malignancies-tumors characterized by the production of dense-core secretory granules-are most often encountered in the lungs and can also be found in extrapulmonary sites. Our patient had a primary neuroendocrine tumor of the antrum with an elusive cell of origin that secondarily invaded the inferior orbit. In the sinuses, neuroendocrine tumors may be confused with infectious sinusitis or squamous cell carcinoma. There are no known pathognomonic clinical or radiographic signs to distinguish these tumors from other conditions. Diagnosis depends on a biopsy with histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis to identify biomarkers such as synaptophysin, chromogranin, CD56 and neuron specific enolase. Our patient's tumor defied precise immunohistochemical characterization because of its primitive character and erratic biomarker expression. The diagnosis oscillated between a neuroendocrine carcinoma and an ectopic esthesioneuroblastoma grade IV-hence the use of the more generic nosologic category of neuroendocrine neoplasm without specifying a neuronal or epithelial origin. Data to guide management are limited, particularly in the ophthalmic literature, and derive from experience with tumors of the sinonasal compartments. In the present case of a sino-orbital high grade neuroendocrine neoplasm, regional lymph node metastases developed shortly after presentation. The tumor has responded well to chemotherapy and radiation, but recurrence is often encountered within 2 years in this class of neoplasms. PMID:26077631

  17. Surgical Management of Minor Salivary Gland Neoplasms of the Palate

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brian A.; Burkey, Brian B.; Netterville, James L.; Butcher, R. Brent; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Minor salivary gland tumors are uncommon, accounting for up to 15% of salivary gland neoplasms. We describe our experience with both benign and malignant tumors of the palatal minor salivary glands, focusing on the extent of resection and options for defect reconstruction. Study Design: Retrospective review of medical records. Results: From 1994 to 2002, 37 patients with primary neoplasms originating in the palatal minor salivary glands were treated at a single institution. Patients ranged in age from the second to the seventh decades, with a female preponderance. Twenty-four percent of the lesions were benign. The most common malignant tumor encountered was low grade polymorphous adenocarcinoma, followed by mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma. The extent of surgical resection was dictated by tumor pathology and evidence of perineural spread, and defects were reconstructed with a variety of techniques. Postoperative complications included velopharyngeal insufficiency, flap fistulization or loss, and trismus. After 1 month to 8 years of follow-up, 1 patient has died with regional and systemic metastases. Conclusions: Neoplasms of the minor salivary glands in the palate may be excised, with limits dictated by tumor histopathology and perineural invasion. Improved functional results may be achieved by immediately reconstructing the defects with rotational flaps, reserving free flaps for more extensive defects of the maxilla and infratemporal fossa. PMID:21603498

  18. Prophylactic hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in patients with epithelial appendiceal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tuvin, Daniel; Berger, Yaniv; Aycart, Samantha N; Shtilbans, Tatiana; Hiotis, Spiros; Labow, Daniel M; Sarpel, Umut

    2016-05-01

    Background Prophylactic hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is a promising approach for preventing peritoneal carcinomatosis in high-risk patients. We report our initial experience with prophylactic HIPEC in a series of patients with appendiceal neoplasms. Methods We retrospectively reviewed our prospectively maintained database to identify patients who underwent HIPEC in the absence of peritoneal disease. Patients with previously documented peritoneal surface disease were excluded. Data regarding clinical, operative and pathological features were analysed. Results Out of 322 HIPEC procedures performed between March 2007and August 2015, we identified 16 patients who underwent surgery with prophylactic intent. Primary diagnoses included high-grade and low-grade appendiceal neoplasms. Most patients presented originally with appendiceal perforation; all patients underwent initial surgery during which the appendix or right colon were resected. Following a median time interval of 2.2 months, a second surgery performed at our institution consisted of completion of omentectomy, partial colectomy and oophorectomy, with administration of prophylactic HIPEC (using mitomycin C). A totally laparoscopic approach was attempted and achieved in 11 patients in whom the median duration of surgery, estimated intraoperative blood loss and length of hospitalisation were 251 min, 100 cm(3) and 4 days, respectively. There were no cases of major perioperative morbidity or mortality. Conclusions Prophylactic HIPEC for appendiceal neoplasms is feasible, safe and may be performed laparoscopically. Larger studies with long-term follow-up are needed to determine whether a survival benefit is associated with this treatment. PMID:27050712

  19. Clinical parameters predictive of malignancy of thyroid follicular neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, N.L.; Gordon, M.; Germann, E.; Robins, R.E.; McGregor, G.I. )

    1991-05-01

    Needle aspiration biopsy is commonly employed in the evaluation of thyroid nodules. Unfortunately, the cytologic finding of a 'follicular neoplasm' does not distinguish between a thyroid adenoma and a follicular cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical parameters that characterize patients with an increased risk of having a thyroid follicular cancer who preoperatively have a 'follicular neoplasm' identified by needle aspiration biopsy. A total of 395 patients initially treated at Vancouver General Hospital and the British Columbia Cancer Agency between the years of 1965 and 1985 were identified and their data were entered into a computer database. Patients with thyroid adenomas were compared to patients with follicular cancer using the chi-square test and Student's t-test. Statistically significant parameters that distinguished patients at risk of having a thyroid cancer (p less than 0.05) included age greater than 50 years, nodule size greater than 3 cm, and a history of neck irradiation. Sex, family history of goiter or neoplasm, alcohol and tobacco use, and use of exogenous estrogen were not significant parameters. Patients can be identified preoperatively to be at an increased risk of having a follicular cancer and accordingly appropriate surgical resection can be planned.

  20. Tryptophan autofluorescence imaging of neoplasms of the human colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Renkoski, Timothy; Graves, Logan R.; Rial, Nathaniel S.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki Liana; Nfonsom, Valentine; Pugh, Judith; Tiwari, Piyush; Gavini, Hemanth; Utzinger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Detection of flat neoplasia is a major challenge in colorectal cancer screening, as missed lesions can lead to the development of an unexpected `incident' cancer prior to the subsequent endoscopy. The use of a tryptophan-related autofluorescence has been reported to be increased in murine intestinal dysplasia. The emission spectra of cells isolated from human adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa of the colon were studied and showed markedly greater emission intensity from cancerous cells compared to cells obtained from the surrounding normal mucosa. A proto-type multispectral imaging system optimized for ultraviolet macroscopic imaging of tissue was used to obtain autofluorescence images of surgical specimens of colonic neoplasms and normal mucosa after resection. Fluorescence images did not display the expected greater emission from the tumor as compared to the normal mucosa, most probably due to increased optical absorption and scattering in the tumors. Increased fluorescence intensity in neoplasms was observed however, once fluorescence images were corrected using reflectance images. Tryptophan fluorescence alone may be useful in differentiating normal and cancerous cells, while in tissues its autofluorescence image divided by green reflectance may be useful in displaying neoplasms.

  1. Small-Bowel Neoplasms: Role of MRI Enteroclysis

    PubMed Central

    Faggian, Angela; Fracella, Maria Rosaria; D'Alesio, Grazia; Alabiso, Maria Eleonora; Feragalli, Beatrice; Miele, Vittorio; Iasiello, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Small-bowel neoplasms are the 3%–6% of all gastrointestinal tract neoplasms. Due to the rarity of these lesions, the low index of clinical suspicion, and the inadequate radiologic examinations or incorrect interpretation of radiologic findings, a delay in diagnosis of 6–8 months from the first symptoms often occurs. Even if conventional enteroclysis and capsule endoscopy are the most common procedures used to accurately depict the bowel lumen and mucosal surface, their use in evaluating the mural and extramural extents of small-bowel tumors is limited. Instead multidetector computed tomographic enteroclysis and magnetic resonance enteroclysis have the potential to simultaneously depict intraluminal, mural, and extraintestinal abnormalities. In particular MR enteroclysis has an excellent soft tissue contrast resolution and multiplanar imaging capability. It can provide anatomic, functional, and real time information without the need of ionizing radiation. MR findings, appearances of the lesions, combined with the contrast-enhancement behavior and characteristic of the stenosis are important to differentiate small-bowel neoplasm from other nonneoplastic diseases. PMID:26819616

  2. Incidence of mammary tumors in the canine population living in the Veneto region (Northeastern Italy): Risk factors and similarities to human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vascellari, Marta; Capello, Katia; Carminato, Antonio; Zanardello, Claudia; Baioni, Elisa; Mutinelli, Franco

    2016-04-01

    Although mammary gland tumors (MT) are the most-common type of tumor in intact female dogs, there is little information about their incidence in dog population. Data on MT in female dogs was retrieved from the Animal Tumor registry of dogs and cats of Venice and Vicenza provinces during 2005-2013 and was analyzed to visualize crude incidence rates by breed and across age categories. Overall, 2744 mammary tumors were reported accounting for 54% of all tumors in female dogs. The annual incidence rate (IR) was 250 cases per 100,000 dogs. The most frequent malignant tumors were complex carcinomas, consisting of both epithelial and myoepithelial tissues (IR=71.89), and simple carcinomas (IR=62.59). The MT incidence rate increased through the study period; particularly in the last 4 years, and malignant neoplasms occurred more frequently (70%) than the benign counterparts (30%). Seventy-four percent of tumors were diagnosed in intact females, and the mean age at diagnosis was significantly higher for spayed dogs than for intact ones. MT were less frequent in dogs younger than 6 years and increased up to approximately 60% for ages between 8 and 13 years. The purebred dogs had a higher probability to have a malignant neoplasm than mixed-breed dogs, particularly in dogs younger than 7 years, and the Samoyed, Dobermann, Schnauzer and Yorkshire Terrier breeds were more inclined to develop malignant MT. The incidence of MT in dogs is increasing, and IRs are comparable to that in women. The epidemiological similarities between dogs and women support the validity of canine MT as a model for human breast cancer. PMID:26948297

  3. Effects of phenylalanine and threonine oligopeptides on milk protein synthesis in cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M M; Wu, Y M; Liu, H Y; Liu, J X

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of phenylalanine (Phe) and threonine (Thr) oligopeptides on αs1 casein gene expression and milk protein synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Primary mammary epithelial cells were obtained from Holstein dairy cows and incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium-F12 medium (DMEM/F12) containing lactogenic hormones (prolactin and glucocorticoids). Free Phe (117 μg/ml) was substituted partly with peptide-bound Phe (phenylalanylphenylalanine, phenylalanyl threonine, threonyl-phenylalanyl-phenylalanine) in the experimental media. After incubation with experimental medium, cells were collected for gene expression analysis and medium was collected for milk protein or amino acid determination. The results showed that peptide-bound Phe at 10% (11.7 μg/ml) significantly enhanced αs1 casein gene expression and milk protein synthesis as compared with equivalent amount of free Phe. When 10% Phe was replaced by phenylalanylphenylalanine, the disappearance of most essential amino acids increased significantly, and gene expression of peptide transporter 2 and some amino acid transporters was significantly enhanced. These results indicate that the Phe and Thr oligopeptides are important for milk protein synthesis, and peptide-bound amino acids could be utilised more efficiently in milk protein synthesis than the equivalent amount of free amino acids. PMID:25199802

  4. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Fractions from Mammary Epithelial Tissue.

    PubMed

    Chanat, Eric; Le Parc, Annabelle; Lahouassa, Hichem; Badaoui, Bouabid

    2016-06-01

    In the mammary glands of lactating animals, the mammary epithelial cells that surround the lumen of the acini produce and secrete copious amounts of milk. Functional differentiation of these mammary epithelial cells depends on the development of high-efficiency secretory pathways, notably for protein and lipid secretion. Protein secretion is a fundamental process common to all animal cells that involves a subset of cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. In contrast, en masse secretion of triglycerides and cholesterol esters in the form of milk fat globules is a unique feature of the mammary epithelial cell. Cytoplasmic lipid droplets, the intracellular precursors of milk fat globules, originate from the endoplasmic reticulum, as do most milk-specific proteins. This organelle is therefore pivotal in the biogenesis of milk components. Fractionation of the cell into its subcellular parts is an approach that has proven very powerful for understanding organelle function and for studying the specific role of an organelle in a given cell activity. Here we describe a method for the purification of both smooth and rough microsomes, the membrane-bound endoplasmic reticulum fragments that form from endoplasmic reticulum domains when cells are broken up, from mammary gland tissue at lactation. PMID:27048289

  5. Classification and grading of canine malignant mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tavasoly, Abbas; Golshahi, Hannaneh; Rezaie, Annahita; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Histological grading is a good parameter to stratify tumors according to their biological aggressiveness. The Elston and Ellis grading method in humans, invasive ductal breast carcinomas and other invasive tumors are routinely used. The aims of this study were classification of mammary gland tumors and also application of a human grading method in canine mammary carcinoma. The samples included 37 tumors of mammary glands. Mammary tumors were carcinomas (n = 32) and sarcomas (n = 5). The carcinomas were classified as simple carcinoma 56.8% (n = 21), complex carcinoma 13.5% (n = 5), carcinoma arising from benign tumor 10.8% (n= 4) and special type of carcinoma 5.4% (n = 2). Out of 32 carcinomas studied, 37.5% (n = 12) grade I, 46.9% (n = 15) grade II and 15.6% (n = 5) grade III. This study demonstrated that the Elston and Ellis method of histological grading in canine mammary tumor is a reliable prognostic factor which is correlated with histopathological classification. PMID:25593682

  6. Environmental exposure to cooking oil fumes and cervical intraepithelial neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Tsang; Lee, Li-Hung; Ho, Chi-Kung; Wu, Su-Chu; Lin, Long-Yau; Cheng, Bi-Hua; Liu, Chia-Ling; Yang, Chun-Yuh; Tsai, Hsiu-Ting; Wu, Trong-Neng

    2004-01-01

    The fumes from cooking oil, similar to cigarette smoke, contain numerous carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, etc. In this study, we examined the association between exposure to cooking oil fumes and the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasm. The study population in this nested case-control study consisted of women above the age of 19 years living in Chia-Yi County, located in the southwestern Taiwan, who had received pap smear screening between October, 1999, and December, 2000 (n=32,466). The potential cases were women having lesions greater than cervical intraepithelium neoplasm II (> or =CIN2) reconfirmed by cervical biopsy (n=116). The potential controls (case: control=1:2) were age-matched (+/-2 years) and residence-matched women who had normal pap smears within 6 months of the cases. In total, 100 cases and 197 controls were completely interviewed by public health nurses about cooking methods, ventilation, and other potential risk factors. Women who cooked at home in a kitchen (n=269) without the presence of a fume extractor at least once a week between the ages of 20 and 40 had a 2.29 times higher risk [95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08-4.87] of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasm than those who did not cook once a week in such a kitchen during the same age span, after adjusting for other potential confounders. This finding was further strengthened by the finding that women who did not use the fume extractors had a 2.47 times higher risk (95% CI=1.15-5.32) of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasm than women who cooked in kitchens with fume extractors that were always switched on while cooking. We also found a joint protective effect of fume extractor use among women older than 40 years (n=202) if they used the extractors during both age spans of their lives, ages 20-40 and >40 years. Comparing our findings on women more than 40 years old who used fume extractors

  7. In vitro expansion of the mammary stem/progenitor cell population by xanthosinetreatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Mammary stem cells are critical for growth and maintenance of the mammary gland and therefore of considerable interest for improving productivity and efficiency of dairy animals. Xanthosine (Xs) treatment has been demonstrated to promote expansion of putative mammary stem cells in vivo ...

  8. p62: a hub of multiple signaling pathways in HER2-induced mammary tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cai-McRae, Xiaofeng; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that depletion of p62 in the background of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression sensitizes mammary tumor cells to amino acid deprivation, abolishes cellular transformation in vitro, and suppresses mammary tumorigenesis in vivo. Extensive investigation on the underlying molecular mechanisms has revealed a multifaceted role for p62 in HER2-associated mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:27308451

  9. Expression of novel, putative stem cell markers in prepubertal and lactating mammary glands of bovine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) are essential for growth and maintenance of the mammary epithelium. Two main phases of mammary growth include ductal elongation prior to puberty and lobulo-alveolar growth and development during pregnancy. Some studies have utilized morphological characteristics and retenti...

  10. Mammary carcinogenesis in rats: basic facts and recent results in Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, s.

    1982-01-01

    Some research results from experiments investigating neutron-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats are presented. The additive effects of neutrons and 3-methylcholanthrene on mammary adenocarcinoma were determined. Synergism between diethylstilbestrol and neutrons was likewise studied. Differences in mammary neoplastic response between strains of laboratory rats was also investigated. (ACR)

  11. Interaction of dimethylbenzanthracene and diethylstilbestrol on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; McKnight, B.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1980-06-01

    It has been reported that x-irradiation and diethylstilbestrol (DES) act synergistically on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats. The physical carcinogen, x-irradiation, was replaced by a chemical carcinogen, dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA), and their interaction was studied in this system. Thirty-three female ACI rats were given 13.3 mg of DMBA per 100 grams of body weight. A total of 10 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 8 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 2 in a single rat, over a 266-day study period. Twenty-nine rats were implanted with a cholesterol pellet containing 5 mg of DES, and a total of 47 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 5 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 42 in 5 rats with 2 or more mammary adenocarcinomas. Twenty-four rats were given a combined treatment of both compounds, DES 2 days before DMBA, and a total of 126 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 2 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 124 in 18 rats with 2 or more mammary adenocarcinomas. The interaction between DMBA and DES was interpreted to be synergistic in regard to the proportion of rats with one or more mammary adenocarcinomas, and the median times of appearance of both first and second mammary adenocarcinomas. These interactions between DMBA and DES resemble the previously reported synergistic interactions between radiation and DES on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats.

  12. Bovine mammary stem cells: Transcriptome profiling and the stem cell niche

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification and transcriptome analysis of mammary stem cells (MaSC) are important steps toward understanding the molecular basis of mammary epithelial growth, homeostasis and tissue repair. Our objective was to evaluate the molecular profiles of four categories of cells within the bovine mammary ...

  13. Enrichment of Mammary Basal and Luminal Cells for Cell-of-Origin Metastasis Studies.

    PubMed

    Kabeer, Farhia; Podsypanina, Katrina; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland is an important model system in metastasis research. Mammary epithelial stem cells are of particular interest because of their capacity for regeneration and their role in cancer initiation. This protocol describes how to enrich for mammary basal and luminal epithelial cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). PMID:26832681

  14. Trianthema portulacastrum Linn. exerts chemoprevention of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Bishayee, Anupam; Mandal, Animesh

    2014-10-01

    Due to limited treatment options for advanced-stage metastatic breast cancer, a high priority should be given to develop non-toxic chemopreventive drugs. The value of various natural and dietary agents to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer is well established. Trianthema portulacastrum Linn. (Aizoaceae), a dietary and medicinal plant, has been found to exert antihepatotoxic and antihepatocarcinogenic properties in rodents. This study was initiated to investigate mechanism-based chemopreventive potential of an ethanolic extract of T. portulacastrum (TPE) against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated rat mammary gland carcinogenesis, an experimental tumor model that closely resembles human breast cancer. Rats had access to a basal diet supplemented with TPE to yield three dietary doses of the extract, i.e., 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight. Following two weeks of TPE treatment, mammary tumorigenesis was initiated by oral administration of DMBA (50 mg/kg body weight). At the end of the study (16 weeks after DMBA exposure), TPE exhibited a striking reduction of DMBA-induced mammary tumor incidence, total tumor burden and average tumor weight and reversed intratumor histopathological alterations. TPE dose-dependently suppressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cyclin D1 expression, induced apoptosis, upregulated proapoptotic protein Bax, downregulated antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and diminished the expression of nuclear and cytosolic β-catenin in mammary tumors. Our results clearly provide the first experimental evidence that TPE exerts chemopreventive effect in the classical DMBA model of breast cancer by suppressing abnormal cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis mediated through alteration of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Mechanistically, TPE is capable of diminishing activated canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling to exhibit antiproliferative, proapoptotic and oncostatic effects during an early-stage breast cancer. These results may encourage further

  15. NMR-metabolomics profiling of mammary gland secretory tissue and milk serum in two goat breeds with different levels of tolerance to seasonal weight loss.

    PubMed

    Palma, Mariana; Hernández-Castellano, Lorenzo E; Castro, Noemí; Arguëllo, Anastasio; Capote, Juan; Matzapetakis, Manolis; de Almeida, André Martinho

    2016-06-21

    Goats are of special importance in the Mediterranean and tropical regions for producing a variety of dairy products. The scarcity of pastures during the dry season leads to seasonal weight loss (SWL), which affects milk production. In this work, we studied the effect of feed-restriction on two dairy goat breeds, with different tolerance levels to SWL: the Majorera breed (tolerant) and the Palmera breed (susceptible). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to compare the metabolome of an aqueous fraction of the mammary gland and milk serum from both breeds. Goats in mid-lactation were divided by breed, and each in two feed-regime groups: the control group and the restricted-fed group (to achieve 15-20% reduction of body weight at the end of the experiment). Milk and mammary gland samples were collected at the end of the experimental period (23rd day). (1)H NMR spectra were collected from the aqueous extract of the mammary gland biopsies and the milk serum. Profiling analysis has led to the identification of 46 metabolites in the aqueous extract of the mammary gland. Lactose, glutamate, glycine and lactate were found to be the most abundant. Analysis of milk serum allowed the identification of 50 metabolites, the most abundant being lactose, citrate and creatine. Significant differences were observed, in mammary gland biopsies and milk serum, between control and restricted-fed groups in both breeds, albeit with no differences between the breeds. Variations seem to be related to metabolism adaptation to the low-energy diet and are indicative of breed-specific microflora. Milk serum showed more metabolites varying between control and restricted groups, than the mammary gland. The Majorera breed also showed more variations than the Palmera breed in milk samples, which could be an indication of a prompt adaptation to SWL by the Majorera breed. PMID:27001028

  16. Melatonin potentiates the anti-tumour effect of pravastatin in rat mammary gland carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Orendáš, Peter; Kubatka, Peter; Bojková, Bianka; Kassayová, Monika; Kajo, Karol; Výbohová, Desanka; Kružliak, Peter; Péč, Martin; Adamkov, Marián; Kapinová, Andrea; Adamicová, Katarína; Sadloňová, Vladimíra; Chmelová, Martina; Stollárová, Nadežda

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in the field of cancer research have suggested a possible role for statins in the reduction of risk in certain malignancies. The purpose of these studies was to examine the chemopreventive effects of pravastatin alone and in combination with pineal hormone melatonin in the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary carcinogenesis model. Pravastatin was given orally (1 00 mg/kg) and melatonin was added to the water (20 μg/ml). Chemoprevention began seven days prior to carcinogen administration and subsequently continued for 15 weeks until autopsy. At autopsy, mammary tumours were removed and prepared for histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. Parameters of experimental carcinogenesis, mechanism of action (biomarkers of apoptosis, angiogenesis and proliferation) and side effects after long-term treatment in animals were assessed. Pravastatin alone suppressed tumour frequency by 20.5% and average tumour volume by 15% compared with controls. Combined administration of the drugs decreased tumour frequency by 69% and lengthened tumour latency by nine days compared with control animals. The ration between high and low grade carcinomas was apparently reduced in both treated groups. The analysis of carcinoma cells showed significant expression increase in caspase-3 and caspase-7 after pravastatin treatment; however, combined treatment even more pronounced increase in the expression of both caspases. Regarding VEGFR-2 expression, a small effect in carcinomas of both treated groups was found. In plasma metabolism evaluation, pravastatin alone significantly decreased levels of glucose and triacylglycerols. Our results suggest a mild anti-neoplastic effect of pravastatin in this rat mammary gland carcinoma model. Statins co-administered with other suitable drug (e.g. melatonin) should be further evaluated for tumour-preventive properties. PMID:25270735

  17. Progestogens and mammary tumours in the beagle bitch.

    PubMed

    Briggs, M H

    1980-03-01

    Progesterone administration induces specific cytosol receptors for progesterone in the mammary glands and uterus of adult beagle bitches but not in the mammary tissues or uterus of adult female rats. The specifiity of the progesterone receptor of dog myometrium is unlike that of human myometrium and is significantly different from progesterone receptors in tissues of th guinea pig. A spontaneous mammary benign mixed adenoma from an old beagle bitch was shown to contain specific progesterone receptors of similar affinity for progestogens as the dog uterine receptor. It is proposed that chronic toxicity tests of progestogens in the bitch cannot predict potential adverse human side effects because the regulatory mechanism for progesterone receptors is so different in the dog and major species differences exist in cytosol receptor affinity for particular progestational compounds. PMID:7414066

  18. Mammary blood flow regulation in the nursing rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, M.; Creasy, R.K.

    1984-11-01

    Cardiac output and mammary blood flow distribution prior to and after suckling were studied in 10 nursing rabbits by means of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Suckling was followed by a 5.8% rise in cardiac output and a 20.4% rise in mammary blood flow. Determinations of intraglandular blood flow distribution have shown that there was a 43% increase in blood flow to the glands suckled from as compared to a 22.7% rise to the contralateral untouched glands and a 4.9% rise in the remainder of untouched glands. The conclusion is that a local mechanism may be involved in the regulation of mammary blood flow in the nursing rabbit.

  19. Survivin and related proteins in canine mammary tumors: immunohistochemical expression.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, L; Romanucci, M; Malatesta, D; D'Andrea, A; Ciccarelli, A; Della Salda, L

    2015-03-01

    Survivin is reexpressed in most human breast cancers, where its expression has been associated with tumor aggressiveness, poor prognosis, and poor response to therapy. Survivin expression was evaluated in 41 malignant canine mammary tumors (CMTs) by immunohistochemistry, in relation to histological grade and stage, and correlated with that of some related molecules (β-catenin, caspase 3, heat shock proteins) to understand their possible role in canine mammary tumorigenesis. An increase in nuclear survivin expression, compared with healthy mammary glands, was observed in CMTs, where nuclear immunolabeling was related to the presence of necrosis. No statistically significant relation was found between the expression of the investigated molecules and the histological grade or stage. The present study may suggest an important involvement of survivin in CMT tumorigenesis. Its overexpression in most of the cases evaluated might suggest that targeting survivin in CMTs may be a valid anticancer therapy. PMID:24686389

  20. [Hormones and mammary tumors in the bitch: a review].

    PubMed

    Rutteman, G R

    1992-02-01

    Toxicity studies as well as epidemiological studies in veterinary medicine have shown that both ovarian steroids and a large number of synthetic derivatives may promote the formation of mammary tumours in dogs. Abnormalities in pituitary function, particularly in the secretion of growth hormones, have been assumed to be involved in this process. In the present paper the possible role of endogenous and exogenous hormones in the pathogenesis of mammary tumours in bitches is reviewed. The available evidence suggests that steroid hormones may act at an early stage in the development of tumours by stimulating the proliferation of normal epithelium. This results in an increase in the number of susceptible cells. In addition a growth-stimulating action may be exerted upon cells which have undergone partial malignant transformation, but possibly to a lesser extent upon fully malignant cells at a late stage of tumour development. In advanced mammary cancers steroid receptors are frequently absent, which may indicate a more autonomous pattern of growth. It seems justified to conclude that in clinical practice ovariectomy at an early age as a measure to prevent oestrus is to be preferred to progestin treatment with regard to the risk of mammary carcinoma. Still, there is no indication that in dogs, ovariectomy will reduce the risk of metastasis once the animal is presented with a mammary carcinoma. The earlier assumption that overproduction of growth hormone is an important factor in the pathogenesis of spontaneous mammary tumours in the dogs could not be proven. The role of prolactin and of thyroid hormones in this process continues to be uncertain. PMID:1736405

  1. Malignant mammary tumor in female dogs: environmental contaminants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mammary tumors of female dogs have greatly increased in recent years, thus demanding rapid diagnosis and effective treatment in order to determine the animal survival. There is considerable scientific interest in the possible role of environmental contaminants in the etiology of mammary tumors, specifically in relation to synthetic chemical substances released into the environment to which living beings are either directly or indirectly exposed. In this study, the presence of pyrethroid insecticide was observed in adjacent adipose tissue of canine mammary tumor. High Precision Liquid Chromatography - HPLC was adapted to detect and identify environmental contaminants in adipose tissue adjacent to malignant mammary tumor in nine female dogs, without predilection for breed or age. After surgery, masses were carefully examined for malignant neoplastic lesions. Five grams of adipose tissue adjacent to the tumor were collected to detect of environmental contaminants. The identified pyrethroids were allethrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and tetramethrin, with a contamination level of 33.3%. Histopathology demonstrated six female dogs (66.7%) as having complex carcinoma and three (33.3%) with simple carcinoma. From these tumors, seven (77.8%) presented aggressiveness degree III and two (22.2%) degree I. Five tumors were positive for estrogen receptors in immunohistochemical analysis. The contamination level was observed in more aggressive tumors. This was the first report in which the level of environmental contaminants could be detected in adipose tissue of female dogs with malignant mammary tumor, by HPLC. Results suggest the possible involvement of pyrethroid in the canine mammary tumor carcinogenesis. Hence, the dog may be used as a sentinel animal for human breast cancer, since human beings share the same environment and basically have the same eating habits. PMID:20587072

  2. The Epigenetic Landscape of Mammary Gland Development and Functional Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rijnkels, Monique; Kabotyanski, Elena; Montazer-Torbati, Mohamad B.; Beauvais, C. Hue; Vassetzky, Yegor; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Devinoy, Eve

    2010-01-01

    Most of the development and functional differentiation in the mammary gland occur after birth. Epigenetics is defined as the stable alterations in gene expression potential that arise during development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes are mediated at the biochemical level by the chromatin conformation initiated by DNA methylation, histone variants, post-translational modifications of histones, non-histone chromatin proteins, and non-coding RNAs. Epigenetics plays a key role in development. However, very little is known about its role in the developing mammary gland or how it might integrate the many signalling pathways involved in mammary gland development and function that have been discovered during the past few decades. An inverse relationship between marks of closed (DNA methylation) or open chromatin (DnaseI hypersensitivity, certain histone modifications) and milk protein gene expression has been documented. Recent studies have shown that during development and functional differentiation, both global and local chromatin changes occur. Locally, chromatin at distal regulatory elements and promoters of milk protein genes gains a more open conformation. Furthermore, changes occur both in looping between regulatory elements and attachment to nuclear matrix. These changes are induced by developmental signals and environmental conditions. Additionally, distinct epigenetic patterns have been identified in mammary gland stem and progenitor cell sub-populations. Together, these findings suggest that epigenetics plays a role in mammary development and function. With the new tools for epigenomics developed in recent years, we now can begin to establish a framework for the role of epigenetics in mammary gland development and disease. PMID:20157770

  3. Plasma free amino acid profiles of canine mammary gland tumors

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Kazuo; Tsuka, Takeshi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Minami, Saburo; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between plasma free amino acid (PFAA) levels and the clinical stages of mammary gland tumors (MGT) in dogs. PFAA levels in canines with malignant mammary tumors were decreased compared to those of healthy animals. The levels of aspartate and ornithine, in the dogs with tumor metastasis were significantly decreased when compared to those of dogs that did not have metastases. Results of this study indicate that PFAA levels could be a risk factor or biomarker for canine MGT metastasis. PMID:23271187

  4. Periductal mastitis and mammary duct ectasia in a male.

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, M. T.; Corcoran, G. D.; Haqqani, M. T.

    1985-01-01

    A case of periductal mastitis and mammary duct ectasia is presented in a 50 year old male, with presenting symptoms similar to those of females, namely subareolar breast lump and mastalgia. As far as can be ascertained only 4 cases of mammary duct ectasia and periductal mastitis in males have been reported previously. Since this entity is not well known in males it is possible that it may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed clinically and histologically. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:4040633

  5. Polyurethane-covered mammary implants: a 12-year experience.

    PubMed

    Gasperoni, C; Salgarello, M; Gargani, G

    1992-10-01

    Polyurethane-covered mammary implants are the implants of choice in aesthetic and reconstructive mammary surgery. These implants give very good results in regard to breast contour and consistency, and have a very low complication rate. We present our 12-year experience using polyurethane-covered prostheses. We place the implant mostly in the subglandular or subcutaneous site, and their capsular contracture rate is extremely low (3.3%). Based on our experience, we also review the other complications and side effects occurring with polyurethane prostheses and discuss them in detail. PMID:1466525

  6. Cadherin Cell Adhesion System in Canine Mammary Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Adelina; Schmitt, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Cadherin-catenin adhesion complexes play important roles by providing cell-cell adhesion and communication in different organ systems. Abnormal expression of cadherin adhesion molecules constitutes a common phenomenon in canine mammary cancer and has been frequently implicated in tumour progression. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on cadherin/catenin adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, β-catenin, and P-cadherin) in canine mammary cancer, focusing on the putative biological functions and clinical significance of these molecules in this disease. This paper highlights the need for further research studies in this setting in order to elucidate the role of these adhesion molecules during tumour progression and metastasis. PMID:22973534

  7. [Physiology of secretory cells in the mouse mammary gland].

    PubMed

    Tolkunov, Iu A; Markov, A G

    2000-08-01

    Secretory cells' membrane potential and transepithelial potential difference in the mouse mammary gland diminish within 2.5 hours following breast-feeding of the litter. The transepithelial resistance for up to 20 hours after the feeding did not drop below 40-70 k omega. The secret pressure in the mammary gland does not grow during this period. Therefore an increase of interval between litter feeding up to 20 hours does not entail any mechanical lesion of the secretory epithelium. The latter's cells seem to secrete organic and inorganic substances in concentrations which do not change significantly during their transfer along the outgoing ducts. PMID:11059022

  8. Coronary bypass using bilateral internal mammary arteries in an achondroplast.

    PubMed

    Alassal, Mohamed Abdulwahab; Youssef, Mostafa; Koudieh, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Coronary bypass grafting for ischemic heart disease in achondroplastic dwarfs is very rare. Shortage of veins and inadequate vein quality may cause difficulties during surgery. Only 2 cases of coronary bypass surgery in an achondroplastic dwarf, in which the left internal mammary artery and vein grafts were used, have been reported. We describe the case of a 55-year-old male achondroplastic dwarf who had triple-vessel coronary disease and underwent successful coronary bypass surgery using one saphenous vein graft and bilateral internal mammary artery grafts. The anatomic and surgical challenges in achondroplasia are highlighted. PMID:24887865

  9. Mammary-type myofibroblastoma with the nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vankawala, Preksha; Kuperman, Michael B.; Mennel, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a 23-year-old white man who presented with anasarca and a new periumbilical mass. He had preserved kidney function and laboratory findings consistent with nephrotic syndrome, including 9.7 g/day albuminuria. Serum serologies were positive for anti-SSa and anti-SSb and low complements but were negative for antinuclear antibody. Pathologic findings of the abdominal mass showed a mammary-type myofibroblastoma. A kidney biopsy revealed a diffuse proliferative and membranous immune-mediated glomerulonephritis with 10% interstitial fibrosis. This is a novel case of mammary-type myofibroblastoma associated with nephrotic syndrome mimicking a proliferative lupus pattern. PMID:27365885

  10. Modeling mammary gland morphogenesis as a reaction-diffusion process.

    PubMed

    Grant, Mark R; Hunt, C Anthony; Xia, Lan; Fata, Jimmie E; Bissell, Mina J

    2004-01-01

    Mammary ducts are formed through a process of branching morphogenesis. We present results of experiments using a simulation model of this process, and discuss their implications for understanding mammary duct extension and bifurcation. The model is a cellular automaton approximation of a reaction-diffusion process in which matrix metalloproteinases represent the activator, inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases represent the inhibitor, and growth factors serve as a substrate. We compare results from the simulation model with those from in-vivo experiments as part of an assessment of whether duct extension and bifurcation during morphogenesis may be a consequence of a reaction-diffusion mechanism mediated by MMPs and TIMPs. PMID:17271768

  11. Tumours and dysplasias of the mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, J. F.; Misdorp, W.

    1974-01-01

    As mammary tumours occur frequently in the dog and cat but rarely in other domestic animals, only the tumours of these two species are classified. The epithelial tumours are termed “complex” when they consist of cells resembling both secretory and myoepithelial cells: these tumours are biologically less malignant than tumours of the “simple” type in which only one of these kinds of cell is present. The carcinomas are subdivided into adenocarcinoma, solid carcinoma, spindle cell carcinoma, anaplastic carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and mucinous carcinoma. The term “carcinosarcoma or malignant mixed tumour” was used only when there were cells morphologically resembling not only one or both of the epithelial components but also connective tissue cells with their products of differentiation. The benign tumours are classed as adenoma, papilloma, fibroadenoma, or benign soft tissue tumour. The dysplasias are described under the following headings: cyst, adenosis, regular typical epithelial proliferation in ducts and lobules (epitheliosis), duct ectasia, fibrosclerosis, and lobular hyperplasia. ImagesFig. 41Fig. 42Fig. 43Fig. 44Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 45Fig. 46Fig. 47Fig. 48Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36 PMID:4371737

  12. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  13. Primary cilia distribution and orientation during involution of the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Biet, J; Poole, C A; Stelwagen, K; Margerison, J K; Singh, K

    2016-05-01

    The regulation of mammary gland involution occurs through multiple levels including environmental factors, hormones, and local intramammary signals. Primary cilia (PC) are signaling organelles that sense biochemical and biophysical extracellular stimuli and are vital for cellular and tissue function. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution, incidence, and orientation of PC. Furthermore, we determined changes in expression levels of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)6 at the onset of bovine mammary gland involution. Mammary tissue was collected from pasture-fed, primiparous, nonpregnant Friesian dairy cows at mid lactation (n=5 per group) killed 6-h after milking (lactating controls) and during involution after 7 and 28 d of nonmilking (NM). Fluorescent immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy of tissue sections showed that PC were present on luminal secretory epithelial cells (SEC), myoepithelial cells (MEC), and stromal fibroblast cells (SFC). Furthermore, in all 3 experimental groups, different PC positions or orientations relative to the cell surface were identified on SEC and MEC, which projected toward the lumen and were either straight, bent, or deflected against the apical cell surface, whereas PC in SFC were confined to the interalveolar space. However, by 28-d NM, fewer PC projected into the luminal space and most appeared deflected or projected toward the interalveolar space. Furthermore, by 28-d NM, with the increase in stromal connective tissue, more PC were detected within the interalveolar and interlobular stroma. At 28-d NM, we observed a decrease in luminal cilia relative to the total number of cilia. The number of ciliated cells in the total fraction (SEC, MEC, and SFC) was the same for all 3 groups, although in the luminal fraction (SEC and MEC), PC per nuclei increased by 28-d NM relative to lactation. At all 3 stages, we detected variations in shape and orientation of PC within the same alveolus, with

  14. The mammary glands of the Amazonian manatee, Trichechus inunguis (Mammalia: Sirenia): morphological characteristics and microscopic anatomy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernanda Rosa; da Silva, Vera Maria Ferreira; Barcellos, José Fernando Marques

    2014-08-01

    The mammaries from carcasses of two female Amazonian manatees were examined. Trichechus inunguis possesses two axillary mammaries beneath the pectoral fins, one on each side of the body. Each papilla mammae has a small hole on its apex--the ostium papillare. The mammaries are covered by a stratified squamous keratinized epithelium. The epithelium of the mammary ducts became thinner more deeply in the tissue and varied from stratified to simple cuboidal. There was no evidence of glandular activity or secretion into the ducts of the mammary glands. PMID:24920139

  15. Mammary analog secretory carcinoma of the parotid gland: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed Central

    Balanzá, Ricardo; Arrangoiz, Rodrigo; Cordera, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel; Luque-de-León, Enrique; Moreno, Eduardo; Toledo, Carlos; González, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Background Mammary analog secretory carcinoma (MASC) was first described in 2010 by Skálová et al. This entity shares morphologic and immunohistochemical features with the secretory carcinoma (SC) of the breast. MASC usually presents as an asymptomatic mass in the parotid gland and predominantly affects men. This tumor is considered a low-grade carcinoma but has the potential for high-grade transformation. We report one MASC case and a review of world literature. Case report A 66-year-old male patient presented because he noticed a mass of approximately 3 × 3 cm on the right pre-auricular region. Physical examination demonstrated a 3 × 3.5 cm, firm, fixed, non-tender mass in the right pre-auricular region. An MRI of the head and neck showed an ovoid heterogeneous lesion, dependent of the right parotid gland of 27 × 28 mm. We performed a superficial parotidectomy with identification and preservation of the facial nerve. The immunophenotype was positive for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), CK8/18, vimentin, S-100 protein, and mammoglobin. No further surgical interventions or adjuvant therapies were needed. The patient will have a close follow up. Conclusion The presence of t(12;15) (p13;q25) translocation which results in the ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion or positive immunochemical studies for STAT5, mammoglobin and S100 protein, are necessary to confirm the diagnosis of MASC. MASC treatment should mimic the management of other low-grade malignant salivary gland neoplasms. The inhibition of ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion could be used as treatment in the future. PMID:26496413

  16. Field cancerization in mammary carcinogenesis - Implications for prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rivenbark, Ashley G; Coleman, William B

    2012-12-01

    The natural history of breast cancer unfolds with the development of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in normal breast tissue, and evolution of this pre-invasive neoplasm into invasive cancer. The mechanisms that drive these processes are poorly understood, but evidence from the literature suggests that mammary carcinogenesis may occur through the process of field cancerization. Clinical observations are consistent with the idea that (i) DCIS may arise in a field of altered breast epithelium, (ii) narrow surgical margins do not remove the entire altered field (contributing to recurrence and/or disease progression), and (iii) whole-breast radiation therapy is effective in elimination of the residual field of altered cells adjacent to the resected DCIS. Molecular studies suggest that the field of altered breast epithelial cells may carry cancer-promoting genetic mutations (or other molecular alterations) or cancer promoting epimutations (oncogenic alterations in the epigenome). In fact, most breast cancers develop through a succession of molecular events involving both genetic mutations and epimutations. Hence, in hereditary forms of breast cancer, the altered field reflects the entire breast tissue which is composed of cells with a predisposing molecular lesion (such as a BRCA1 mutation). In the example of a BRCA1-mutant patient, it is evident that local resection of a DCIS lesion or localized but invasive cancer will not result in elimination of the altered field. In sporadic breast cancer patients, the mechanistic basis for the altered field may not be so easily recognized. Nonetheless, identification of the nature of field cancerization in a given patient may guide clinical intervention. Thus, patients with DCIS that develops in response to an epigenetic lesion (such as a hypermethylation defect affecting the expression of tumor suppressor genes) might be treated with epigenetic therapy to normalize the altered field and reduce the risk of secondary occurrence of

  17. Pancreatic cystic neoplasms: Review of current knowledge, diagnostic challenges, and management options

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Tanima; Shroff, Jennifer; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions are being detected with increasing frequency, largely due to advances in cross-sectional imaging. The most common neoplasms include serous cystadenomas, mucinous cystic neoplasms, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, solid pseudopapillary neoplasms, and cystic pancreatic endocrine neoplasms. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are currently used as imaging modalities. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration has proved to be a useful diagnostic tool, and enables an assessment of tumor markers, cytology, chemistries, and DNA analysis. Here, we review the current literature on pancreatic cystic neoplasms, including classification, diagnosis, treatment, and recommendations for surveillance. Data for this manuscript was acquired via searching the literature from inception to December 2014 on PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE. PMID:25821410

  18. Radiation-induced intracranial neoplasms. A report of three possible cases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.R.; Treip, C.S.

    1984-02-01

    The pathologic findings are described in three patients who developed second intracranial neoplasms after irradiation for central nervous system malignancy. The second neoplasms were an astrocytoma, an ependymoma, and multiple meningiomas. All were histologically different from the first neoplasms and appeared in the field of irradiation between 3 and 15 years later. It is suggested that therapeutic irradiation was a causative factor in the development of these tumors.

  19. Update on surgical treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    D’Haese, Jan G; Tosolini, Chiara; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Kong, Bo; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Kleeff, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) are rare and account for only 2%-4% of all pancreatic neoplasms. All PNENs are potential (neurendocrine tumors PNETs) or overt (neuroendocrine carcinomas PNECs) malignant, but a subset of PNETs is low-risk. Even in case of low-risk PNETs surgical resection is frequently required to treat hormone-related symptoms and to obtain an appropriate pathological diagnosis. Low-risk PNETs in the body and the tail are ideal for minimally-invasive approaches which should be tailored to the individual patient. Generally, surgeons must aim for parenchyma sparing in these cases. In high-risk and malignant PNENs, indications for tumor resection are much wider than for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, in many cases due to the relatively benign tumor biology. Thus, patients with locally advanced and metastatic PNETs may benefit from extensive resection. In experienced hands, even multi-organ resections are accomplished with acceptable perioperative morbidity and mortality rates and are associated with excellent long term survival. However, poorly differentiated neoplasms with high proliferation rates are associated with a dismal prognosis and may frequently only be treated with chemotherapy. The evidence on surgical treatment of PNENs stems from reviews of mostly single-center series and some analyses of nation-wide tumor registries. No randomized trial has been performed to compare surgical and non-surgical therapies in potentially resectable PNEN. Though such a trial would principally be desirable, ethical considerations and the heterogeneity of PNENs preclude realization of such a study. In the current review, we summarize recent advances in the surgical treatment of PNENs. PMID:25320524

  20. Retrospective analysis of the clinicopathological characteristics of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZHIQIANG; LI, WENLIANG; CHEN, TIANXING; YANG, JUN; LUO, LILIN; ZHANG, LIANYU; SUN, BAOCUN; LIANG, RUI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze and summarize the clinicopathological characteristics and factors affecting prognosis for patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GINENs). Retrospective analysis was conducted on the clinicopathological data of 74 patients who were diagnosed with GINEN, and immunohistochemical methods were used to detect the expression levels of relevant markers [synaptophysin (Syn), chromogranin A (CgA) and Ki-67]. Among the 74 cases with GINEN, there were 39 males and 35 females, with an average age of 56.9 years. There were 32 neoplasms in the rectum, 29 in the stomach, 6 in the colon, 2 in the small intestine and 5 in the appendix. All 74 cases underwent surgical resection. According to the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Digestive System (2010), the diagnosis of the 74 cases showed 41 cases (55.4%) of neuroendocrine tumor (NET; 25 cases of G1 and 16 cases of G2), 21 cases (28.4%) of neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) and 12 cases (16.2%) of mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Additionally, 19 cases had metastasis to lymph nodes. During 10–34 months of follow-up, 15 patients had distant metastasis and 24 patients succumbed, and the accumulative survival rate in 1 or 2 years was 87.8 and 74.3%, respectively. Six factors, namely neoplasm size, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, pathological type and the expression or lack of expression of CgA, significantly affected the survival time of patients. Definitive diagnosis of GINEN mainly relies on pathological diagnosis. GINENs with different histopathological types and grading have different clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis: NETs are mainly early lesions with a good prognosis, whereas NECs and MANECs have high malignancy and strong invasion with a worse prognosis. PMID:26622444

  1. An in vitro model of epithelial cell growth stimulation in the rodent mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Ehmann, U K; DeVries, J T; Chen, M S C; Adamos, A A; Guzman, R C; Omary, M B

    2003-08-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cell cultures previously described bring about extensive proliferation and a cell population with the appropriate markers for luminal ductal epithelial cells, and also the ability to form normal tissue after implantation into mice. This success may result from a culture environment that resembles certain aspects of the environment in the mammary gland. Mouse mammary epithelial cells, whose proliferation is limited when plated alone, can be stimulated to multiply by contact with lethally irradiated cells of the LA7 rat mammary tumour line. Most of the proliferative stimulus is imparted by direct cell contact between LA7 and mouse mammary cells. Junctions, including adherens junctions, form among all cells in the culture, much as junctions form in the mammary gland. LA7 cells secrete TGFalpha and bFGF, factors found in the mammary gland, and factors to which mouse mammary cells respond in culture. Mouse mammary cells express keratins 8 and 18, markers for luminal cells of the mammary duct. LA7 cells express keratin 14 and vimentin, markers for myoepithelial cells. These facts, taken together, fit a model of cell replacement in an epithelial tissue and also imitate the relationship between luminal ductal cells and myoepithelial cells in the mammary gland. This method of culturing cells is useful, not only for in vitro-in vivo carcinogenesis studies, but also for the study of mechanisms by which growth signals are imparted from one cell to another. PMID:12950387

  2. Effect of adjuvant perioperative desmopressin in locally advanced canine mammary carcinoma and its relation to histologic grade.

    PubMed

    Hermo, Guillermo A; Turic, Esteban; Angelico, Daniel; Scursoni, Alejandra M; Gomez, Daniel E; Gobello, Cristina; Alonso, Daniel F

    2011-01-01

    Desmopressin (DDAVP) is a vasopressin peptide analog with hemostatic properties that has been successfully used during surgery in patients with bleeding disorders. Recently published experimental and clinical data indicate that perioperative administration of DDAVP can minimize spread and survival of residual mammary cancer cells. The central aim of this study was to explore the effect of perioperative DDAVP and its relation to histologic grade in bitches with locally advanced mammary carcinoma. Of the 32 dogs initially recruited, 28 intact bitches with mammary carcinoma tumors stage III or IV were ultimately included. These dogs were randomized to receive DDAVP at intravenous doses of 1 μg/kg (n=18) or saline solution as placebo (n=10). En bloc mastectomy of the affected gland(s) was performed. Tumor malignancy was graded by the method of Elston and Ellis into well-differentiated (grade 1), moderately differentiated (grade 2), or poorly differentiated (grade 3). DDAVP therapy significantly prolonged the disease-free survival (P<0.001) and overall survival (P<0.01) in bitches with grade 2 or 3 carcinomas compared with bitches in the control group. No significant difference in disease-free period or overall survival was found between treatment groups in bitches with grade 1 tumors. The present data suggest that DDAVP may be an excellent candidate as a surgical adjuvant in the management of aggressive cancers in small animals. More research in this field is warranted. PMID:21164169

  3. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens. Final progress report, 1 January 1987--31 December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1998-07-10

    The induction of cancer by ionizing radiation is a matter of great practical importance to the nuclear industry, to national defense, to radiological medicine and to the general public. It is increasingly apparent that carcinogenesis is a leading dose-limiting effect of radiation exposure. The thyroid and mammary glands are among the most sensitive human tissues to radiogenic initiation of cancer, and there is a profoundly higher risk of neoplastic initiation in these glands among individuals irradiated before or during puberty than among those exposed in later life. The authors developed unique quantitative experimental models to investigate and characterize the cells of origin of thyroid and mammary cancers and the effects of radiation on them (C185). To study these progenitor cells in vivo it is necessary to have a system by which their concentrations, total numbers and responses to radiation and other factors can be measured. It is a truism that not all cells in a tissue are equally sensitive to neoplastic initiation. They reasoned that the progenitor cells are most likely members of that subpopulation that is necessary to maintenance of normal tissue cell numbers and to repair and replacement after tissue damage. They further reasoned that such cells would likely be responsive to specific mitogenic stimulation by hormones. On the basis of these considerations, they developed quantitative rat thyroid and mammary epithelial cell transplantation systems.

  4. Influence of fatty acid-free diet on mammary tumor development and growth rate in HER-2/Neu transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Anna; Zanobbio, Laura; Sfondrini, Lucia; Cavalleri, Adalberto; Secreto, Giorgio; Morelli, Daniele; Palazzo, Marco; Sommariva, Michele; Tagliabue, Elda; Rumio, Cristiano; Balsari, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Numerous investigations have found a relationship between higher risk of cancer and increased intake of fats, while results of clinical studies of fat reduction and breast cancer recurrence have been mixed. A diet completely free of fats cannot be easily administered to humans, but experimental studies in mice can be done to determine whether this extreme condition influences tumor development. Here, we examined the effects of a FA-free diet on mammary tumor development and growth rate in female FVB-neu proto-oncogene transgenic mice that develop spontaneous multifocal mammary tumors after a long latency period. Mice were fed a fatty acid-free diet beginning at 112, 35, and 30 days of age. In all these experiments, tumor appearance was delayed, tumor incidence was reduced and the mean number of palpable mammary tumors per mouse was lower, as compared to standard diet-fed mice. By contrast, tumor growth rate was unaffected in mice fed the fatty acid-free diet. Plasma of mice fed the fatty acid-free diet revealed significantly higher contents of oleic, palmitoleic and 20:3ω9 acids and lower contents of linoleic and palmitic acids. In conclusion, these findings indicate that a FA-free diet reduces tumor incidence and latency but not tumor growth rate, suggesting that a reduction in dietary FAs in humans may have a protective effect on tumorigenesis but not on tumors once they appear. PMID:22689438

  5. Diet-induced obesity disrupts ductal development in the mammary glands of nonpregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Akihiro; Ichii, Osamu; Yamaji, Daisuke; Imao, Takeshi; Suzuki, Chiharu; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Terao, Akira; Kon, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Kazuhiro

    2009-05-01

    Mammary glands develop postnatally in response to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Obesity-induced changes in the local environment, however, retard mammary gland development during late pregnancy and lactation. To clarify the effects of obesity on fundamental duct development, we compared the mammary glands of nulliparous nonpregnant obese mice fed a high-fat diet with those of lean mice fed a normal diet. Obese mice had enlarged mammary glands, reflecting fat pad size, whereas the ducts in obese mice showed a less dense distribution with less frequent branching. Additionally, the ducts were surrounded by thick collagen layers, and were incompletely lined with myoepithelium. Because leptin receptors were localized in the epithelium region and leptin that was highly expressed in the obese glands suppressed mammary epithelial cell proliferation in vitro, the present results suggest that obesity disrupts mammary ductal development, possibly by remodeling the mammary microenvironment and promoting the expression of such paracrine factors as leptin. PMID:19384959

  6. Sweet syndrome and its association with hematopoietic neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Rodrigo; Levy, Yair

    2015-01-01

    The Sweet syndrome, or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is rare and has characteristic clinical, physical, and pathologic findings: abrupt onset of pyrexia, elevated neutrophil count, tender erythematous skin lesions, and a diffuse infiltrate of mature neutrophils in the reticular dermis with edema in the papillary dermis. The Sweet syndrome can be further classified based on the clinical setting: classical, malignancy-associated, and drug-induced. Diagnosis can alert the clinician to the presence of an underlying malignancy or the recurrence of a malignancy. The most commonly associated malignancy is acute myelogenous leukemia. We present three cases of Sweet syndrome associated with hematopoietic neoplasms. PMID:25552802

  7. Four primary malignant neoplasms in a single patient

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.M.; Triedman, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    A 60-year-old Caucasian male, with a previous history of a 10-year occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, chemical carcinogens, and a long history of tobacco and alcohol abuse, developed synchronous squamous cell carcinoma of the floor of the mouth and adenocarcinoma of the lung. Four years later, squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx followed by squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue were diagnosed. In this case report, we suggest that increased exposure to multiple carcinogenic factors may result in an increased incidence of both synchronous and metachronous primary malignant neoplasms.

  8. Spontaneous development of neoplasms in severe combined immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice lack functional T and B cells. This renders them useful for implantation of human cells. The absence of immune cells, however, makes severe combined immunodeficient mice highly susceptible to infections and spontaneous development of malignancies; 2 of 114 CB17/Icr-Prkdcscid/IcrIcoCrl severe combined immunodeficient mice aged 9 and 10 months developed spontaneous acute leukaemia and thymic lymphoma. The differential diagnosis of such an atypical lymphoid infiltrate includes ‘leaky’ severe combined immunodeficient mice, thymic lymphoma and acute leukaemia. Until this time, the link between the development of neoplasms in severe combined immunodeficient mice and the mutation remains unclear. PMID:27489678

  9. [History of treatment and classification of maxillary sinus neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Skorek, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    History of treatment of maxillary malignant neoplasms goes back to the middle of 19th century, when Gensoul and Lizzard performed their first maxillectomy. However the development of maxillar surgery is connected with achivements of Moure, who as the first one characterized and applied innovative skin cut on the face. Author presents the history of other surgical procedures in therapy of maxillary tumors and describes methods which are apply nowaday. Attention is paid to the Polish contributions and accomplishments in diagnostics and treatment of tumors localized in this area. The classification of maxillary tumors from Sebileau dissertation till the newest TNM classification from 2001 is described. PMID:16471201

  10. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Therapies in Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis; DiMaio, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from being primarily a diagnostic modality into an interventional endoscopic tool for the management of both benign and malignant gastrointestinal illnesses. EUS-guided therapy has garnered particular interest as a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a disease often complicated by its aggressive course and poor survival. The potential advantage of an EUS-guided approach revolves around real-time imaging for targeted therapy of a difficult to reach organ. In this review, we focus on EUS-guided therapies for pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:25802863

  11. Inflammation as a Driver of Clonal Evolution in Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Fleischman, Angela G.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of inflammation's role in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) is evolving. The impact of chronic inflammation, a characteristic feature of MPN, likely goes far beyond its role as a driver of constitutional symptoms. An inflammatory response to the neoplastic clone may be responsible for some pathologic aspects of MPN. Moreover, JAK2V617F mutated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are resistant to inflammation, and this gives the neoplastic clone a selective advantage allowing for its clonal expansion. Because inflammation plays a central role in MPN inflammation is a logical therapeutic target in MPN. PMID:26538830

  12. Quantification of mammary organoid toxicant response and mammary tissue motility using OCT fluctuation spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao; Blackmon, Richard L.; Carabas-Hernendez, Patricia; Fuller, Ashley; Troester, Melissa A.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-03-01

    Mammary epithelial cell (MEC) organoids in 3D culture recapitulate features of breast ducts in vivo. OCT has the ability to monitor the evolution of MEC organoids non-invasively and longitudinally. The anti-cancer drug Doxorubicin (Dox) is able to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells and has been widely used for chemotherapy of breast cancers; while environmental toxins implicated in breast cancer such as estrogen regulates mammary tumor growth and stimulates the proliferation and metastatic potential of breast cancers. Here we propose a quantitative method for measuring motility of breast cells in 3D cultures based upon OCT speckle fluctuation spectroscopy. The metrics of the inverse power-law exponent (α) and fractional modulation amplitude (M) were extracted from speckle fluctuation spectra. These were used to quantify the responses of MEC organoids to Dox, and estrogen. We investigated MEC organoids comprised of two different MEC lines: MCF10DCIS.com exposed to Dox, and MCF7 exposed to estrogen. We found an increase (p<0.001) in α of MEC along time (t=0, 1 hour, 24 hours, 48 hours and 6 days) at each dose of Dox (0, 1 μM and 10 μM), indicating lower fluctuation intensity at higher frequencies. We also observed a decrease (p<0.001) in M for increasing time. However, both α and M of MCF7 treated with estrogen (0, 1 nM and 10 nM) exhibited the opposite trend along time. This novel technology provides rapid and non-invasive measurements of the effects of toxicants on MEC motility for understanding breast cancer development and assessing anti-cancer drugs.

  13. Proteome analysis of functionally differentiated bovine (Bos indicus) mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk.

    PubMed

    Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Jamwal, Manu; Singh, Surender; Kumar, Saravanan; Panigrahi, Aswini K; Hariprasad, Gururao; Jena, Manoj K; Anand, Vijay; Kumar, Sudarshan; Kaushik, Jai K; Dang, Ajay K; Mukesh, Manishi; Mishra, Bishnu P; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Reddy, Vanga S; Mohanty, Ashok K

    2013-11-01

    Mammary gland is made up of a branching network of ducts that end in alveoli. Terminally differentiated mammary epithelial cells (MECs) constitute the innermost layer of aveoli. They are milk-secreting cuboidal cells that secrete milk proteins during lactation. Little is known about the expression profile of proteins in the metabolically active MECs during lactation or their functional role in the lactation process. In the present investigation, we have reported the proteome map of MECs in lactating cows using 2DE MALDI-TOF/TOF MS and 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS. MECs were isolated from milk using immunomagnetic beads and confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS and 2DE-MS/MS based approaches led to identification of 431 and 134 proteins, respectively, with a total of 497 unique proteins. Proteins identified in this study were clustered into functional groups using bioinformatics tools. Pathway analysis of the identified proteins revealed 28 pathways (p < 0.05) providing evidence for involvement of various proteins in lactation function. This study further provides experimental evidence for the presence of many proteins that have been predicted in annotated bovine genome. The data generated further provide a set of bovine MEC-specific proteins that will help the researchers to understand the molecular events taking place during lactation. PMID:24030930

  14. Canine mammary carcinoma cell line are resistant to chemosensitizers: verapamil and cyclosporin A.

    PubMed

    Król, M; Pawłowski, K M; Majchrzak, K; Mucha, J; Motyl, T

    2014-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy can fail in many ways. One of the most significant is the development of multiple drug resistance (MDR), which constitutes a serious clinical problem. The development of MDR relates to the expression of a major membrane pump, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Thus, currently one of the goals of experimental and clinical oncology is to decrease its activity. So far, many different P-gp inhibitors are available, but their efficacy is still questionable and requires further study. The aim of our study was to assess an impact of classical P-gp inhibitors (verapamil and cyclosporin A) in the reversion of multidrug resistance in canine mammary cancer cells. We used two cell lines isolated from mammary tumors and two cell lines isolated from their lung metastases. All of them showed P-gp over-expression confirmed using Real-time rt-PCR, Skan(R) screening station and confocal microscopy. The FACS analysis showed that in three of the examined cell lines, treatment with verpamil/cyclosporin A was ineffective to reverse cancer chemoresistance. However, more studies in this field are required. PMID:24724465

  15. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens. Progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.

    1993-07-30

    The induction of cancer by ionizing radiation is a matter of great practical importance to the nuclear industry, to national defense, to radiological medicine and to the general public. It is increasingly apparent that carcinogenesis is one of the leading dose-limiting effects of radiation exposure (Co90). Quantitative information at the cellular level is essential to an understanding of the mechanisms of radiogenic neoplastic initiation and the stages of promotion and progression to overt neoplasia. We have developed two experimental models, the rat thyroid and rat mammary clonogen transplant systems, for the quantitative study of radiation carcinogenesis at the cellular level in vivo (C185). The most important steps taken or completed during the current grant year include: (a) demonstration of the high age-dependent radiosensitivity of prepubertal rat mammary clonogens to radiogenic damage which may influence their susceptibility to neoplastic initiation, and (b) demonstration of the feasibility of using a molecular test for clonogenicity in which Simple Sequence Repeats in the DNA serve as identifying signals of the genotypic origin of the cells. We have also (c) set up a large carcinogenesis experiment to test the effect of close intercellular contact in thyroid glands in situ on promotion-progression of radiogenically initiated clonogens, (d) achieved considerable further concentration of thyroid clonogens, and (e) begun to explore whether thyroid cells can be induced to give rise to three dimensional multicellular structures in culture in reconstituted basement membrane. These are discussed in this report.

  16. Mammaglobin-A immunohistochemistry in primary central nervous system neoplasms and intracranial metastatic breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Patrick J; Perrin, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Metastases represent the most common type of intracranial neoplasm. In women, 30% of such tumors derive from breast carcinoma. In neurosurgical cases with ambiguous cellular morphology and/or limited biopsy material, immunohistochemistry (IHC) is often performed to distinguish metastases from primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms. IHC for mammaglobin-A (MGA), a protein expressed in a majority of breast carcinomas, is commonly applied in this setting, but its utility for distinguishing primary CNS neoplasms from metastatic breast carcinoma is unknown; the reactivity of MGA in primary and metastatic CNS neoplasms has never been described. Here, we describe the frequency and patterns of IHC reactivity for MGA in metastatic and primary CNS neoplasms from patients with well-documented histories of breast carcinoma. Following a published protocol previously applied to non-CNS neoplasms, MGA staining of moderate to strong intensity within 5% or more of a neoplasm was considered positive. On the basis of these criteria, 3 of 12 (25.0%) glioblastomas, 1 of 10 (10.0%) meningiomas, and 47 of 95 (49.5%) metastases were positive. Importantly, the cytoarchitectural staining characteristics among all 4 MGA-positive primary CNS neoplasms (cytoplasmic and nuclear) differed from those of the metastases (cytoplasmic and membranous). These findings suggest that MGA IHC staining intensity and distribution can distinguish metastases from primary CNS neoplasms (P=0.0086) in women with a history of breast carcinoma but also indicate that cytologic staining patterns must be interpreted for more accurate tumor classification. PMID:23958549

  17. Current perspectives on pancreatic serous cystic neoplasms: Diagnosis, management and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Yu, Zhong-Xun; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Dai, Meng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic neoplasms have been increasingly recognized recently. Comprising about 16% of all resected pancreatic cystic neoplasms, serous cystic neoplasms are uncommon benign lesions that are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. Despite overall low risk of malignancy, these pancreatic cysts still generate anxiety, leading to intensive medical investigations with considerable financial cost to health care systems. This review discusses the general background of serous cystic neoplasms, including epidemiology and clinical characteristics, and provides an updated overview of diagnostic approaches based on clinical features, relevant imaging studies and new findings that are being discovered pertaining to diagnostic evaluation. We also concisely discuss and propose management strategies for better quality of life. PMID:27022447

  18. MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT: EARLY LIFE EFFECTS FROM THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary Gland Development: Early Life Effects from the Environment

    S.E. Fenton. Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    As signs of precocious puberty in girls reach ...

  19. Selective transport of IgE into ovine mammary secretions.

    PubMed

    Hine, B C; Hunt, P W; Beasley, A M; Windon, R G; Glover, S A; Colditz, I G

    2010-10-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) E is actively transported into ovine colostrum. Here we examine the degree of selectivity and the mechanism by which this transfer occurs in sheep. Results indicate that during colostrogenesis in sheep, transfer of immunoglobulins was most selective for IgG1 and IgA followed by IgE, IgM and IgG2. In milk, selectivity was greatest for IgA, followed by IgM, IgE, IgG1 and IgG2. The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and poly immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) mediate the transport of IgG1 and IgA across the ovine mammary epithelium respectively. In primates and rodents, the low-affinity IgE receptor, Fc epsilonRII, functions to transport IgE across the intestinal epithelium. We therefore investigated the expression of the low-affinity IgE receptor (CD23), pIgR and FcRn transcripts in the ovine mammary gland. The expression profiles of FcRn, pIgR and CD23 mRNA reflected concentrations of their Ig ligands in mammary secretions. These findings suggest a role for CD23 in transport of IgE across the mammary epithelium of sheep. PMID:20226487

  20. The dynamics of murine mammary stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    DONG, Qiaoxiang; SUN, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The stem/progenitor cells in the murine mammary gland are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for ductal elongation in puberty, homeostasis maintenance in adult, and lobulo-alveolar genesis during pregnancy. In recent years understanding the epithelial cell hierarchy within the mammary gland is becoming particularly important as these different stem/progenitor cells were perceived to be the cells of origin for various subtypes of breast cancer. Although significant advances have been made in enrichment and isolation of stem/progenitor cells by combinations of antibodies against cell surface proteins together with flow cytometry, and in identification of stem/progenitor cells with multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal using mammary fat pad reconstitution assay and in vivo genetic labeling technique, a clear understanding of how these different stem/progenitors are orchestrated in the mammary gland is still lacking. Here we discuss the different in vivo and in vitro methods currently available for stem/progenitor identification, their associated caveats, and a possible new hierarchy model to reconcile various putative stem/progenitor cell populations identified by different research groups. PMID:25580105

  1. FEEDING GENISTEIN TO PREPUBERTAL GILTS STIMULATES THEIR MAMMARY DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possible role of dietary genistein on mammary development of prepubertal gilts was investigated. Forty-five gilts were fed one of three diets from 90 d of age until slaughter (day 183 ± 1). Diets were: without soya (CTL0, n=15); soya-based commercial (CTLS, n=15); and soya-based commercial with ...

  2. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  3. Pten in Stromal Fibroblasts Suppresses Mammary Epithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Trimboli, Anthony J.; Cantemir-Stone, Carmen Z.; Li, Fu; Wallace, Julie A.; Merchant, Anand; Creasap, Nicholas; Thompson, John C.; Caserta, Enrico; Wang, Hui; Chong, Jean-Leon; Naidu, Shan; Wei, Guo; Sharma, Sudarshana M.; Stephens, Julie A.; Fernandez, Soledad A.; Gurcan, Metin N.; Weinstein, Michael B.; Barsky, Sanford H.; Yee, Lisa; Rosol, Thomas J.; Stromberg, Paul C.; Robinson, Michael L.; Pepin, Francois; Hallett, Michael; Park, Morag; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Leone, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The tumor stroma is believed to contribute to some of the most malignant characteristics of epithelial tumors. However, signaling between stromal and tumor cells is complex and remains poorly understood. Here we show that the genetic inactivation of Pten in stromal fibroblasts of mouse mammary glands accelerated the initiation, progression and malignant transformation of mammary epithelial tumors. This was associated with the massive remodeling of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM), innate immune cell infiltration and increased angiogenesis. Loss of Pten in stromal fibroblasts led to increased expression, phosphorylation (T72) and recruitment of Ets2 to target promoters known to be involved in these processes. Remarkably, Ets2 inactivation in Pten stroma-deleted tumors ameliorated disruption of the tumor microenvironment and was sufficient to decrease tumor growth and progression. Global gene expression profiling of mammary stromal cells identified a Pten-specific signature that was highly represented in the tumor stroma of breast cancer patients. These findings identify the Pten-Ets2 axis as a critical stroma-specific signaling pathway that suppresses mammary epithelial tumors. PMID:19847259

  4. Mechanisms of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid inhibition of mammary cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Said, Thenaa K; Moraes, Ricardo CB; Sinha, Raghu; Medina, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in cell growth inhibition involved induction of pRb-2/p130 interaction and nuclear translocation with E2F-4, followed by significant repression in E2F-1 and PCNA nuclear levels, which led to inhibition in DNA synthesis in mammary epithelial cell lines. PMID:11250759

  5. Proliferation of human mammary cancer cells exposed to 27-hydroxycholesterol

    PubMed Central

    CRUZ, PAMELA; TORRES, CRISTIAN; RAMÍREZ, MARÍA EUGENIA; EPUÑÁN, MARÍA JOSÉ; VALLADARES, LUIS EMILIO; SIERRALTA, WALTER DANIEL

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the possible mechanisms by which certain estradiol receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumor cells remain resistant to treatment with anti-estrogens or inhibitors of local estradiol (E2) production. To this end, we compared the proliferative effects on mammary cancer cells of the novel selective ER modulator 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OHC) to those of E2, and evaluated their inhibition by ICI 182,780 (ICI). Analysis of the effects on the cell cycle of 27OHC and E2 in the absence or presence of ICI was conducted. In ER-positive mammary tumor cells, we detected the blocking of 27OHC proliferation-stimulatory activity by simvastatin, as well as the inhibition of E2-stimulated proliferation by an α-fetoprotein-derived cyclic nonapeptide. The effects reported herein may be extrapolated to infiltrating mammary cancer, where the activity of local macrophages may stimulate tumor growth. We suggest that increased breast cancer growth in obese patients may be related to increased 27OHC circulatory levels. PMID:22993572

  6. Precursors of hexoneogenesis within the human mammary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The human mammary gland is capable of de novo synthesis of glucose and galactose (hexoneogenesis); however, the carbon source is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the role of acetate, glutamine, lactate and glycerol as potential carbon sources for hexoneogenesis. Healthy breast...

  7. Internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy: abandon or persist?

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Peng-Fei; Liu, Yan-Bing; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Although the 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer incorporated the internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy (IM-SLNB) concept, there has been little change in surgical practice patterns due to the low visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes with the traditional injection technique. Meanwhile, as internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLN) metastases are mostly found concomitantly with axillary lymph nodes (ALN) metastases, previous IM-SLNB clinical trials fail to evaluate the status of IMLN in patients who are really in need (only in clinically ALN negative patients). Our modified injection technique (periareolar intraparenchymal, high volume, and ultrasonographic guidance) significantly improved the visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes, making the routine IM-SLNB possible in daily practice. IM-SLNB could provide individual minimally invasive staging, prognosis, and decision-making for breast cancer patients, especially for patients with clinically positive ALN. Moreover, IMLN radiotherapy should be tailored and balanced between the potential benefit and toxicity, and IM-SLNB-guided IMLN radiotherapy could achieve this goal. In the era of effective adjuvant therapy, within the changing treatment approach – more systemic therapy, less loco-regional therapy – clinicians should deliberate the application of regional IMLN therapy. PMID:27390528

  8. Internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy: abandon or persist?

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peng-Fei; Liu, Yan-Bing; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Although the 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer incorporated the internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy (IM-SLNB) concept, there has been little change in surgical practice patterns due to the low visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes with the traditional injection technique. Meanwhile, as internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLN) metastases are mostly found concomitantly with axillary lymph nodes (ALN) metastases, previous IM-SLNB clinical trials fail to evaluate the status of IMLN in patients who are really in need (only in clinically ALN negative patients). Our modified injection technique (periareolar intraparenchymal, high volume, and ultrasonographic guidance) significantly improved the visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes, making the routine IM-SLNB possible in daily practice. IM-SLNB could provide individual minimally invasive staging, prognosis, and decision-making for breast cancer patients, especially for patients with clinically positive ALN. Moreover, IMLN radiotherapy should be tailored and balanced between the potential benefit and toxicity, and IM-SLNB-guided IMLN radiotherapy could achieve this goal. In the era of effective adjuvant therapy, within the changing treatment approach - more systemic therapy, less loco-regional therapy - clinicians should deliberate the application of regional IMLN therapy. PMID:27390528

  9. The epigenetic landscape of mammary gland development and functional differentiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of the development and functional differentiation in the mammary gland occur after birth. Epigenetics is defined as the stable alterations in gene expression potential that arise during development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes are mediated at the biochemical level by the chromatin conf...

  10. Aflatoxins ingestion and canine mammary tumors: There is an association?

    PubMed

    Frehse, M S; Martins, M I M; Ono, E Y S; Bracarense, A P F R L; Bissoqui, L Y; Teixeira, E M K; Santos, N J R; Freire, R L

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of mycotoxins on dogs feed and to explore the potential association between mycotoxins exposure and the chance of mamary tumors in a case-control study. The study included 256 female dogs from a hospital population, 85 with mammary tumors (case group) and 171 without mammary tumors (control group). An epidemiological questionnaire was applied to both groups, and the data were analyzed by the EpiInfo statistical package. For the study, 168 samples of the feed offered to dogs were analyzed for the presence of aflatoxins, fumonisins and zearalenone by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mycotoxins were found in 79 samples (100%) in the case group and 87/89 (97.8%) in the control group. Mycotoxins were detected in all types of feed, regardless feed quality. Level of aflatoxin B1 (p = 0.0356, OR = 2.74, 95%, CI 1.13 to 6.60), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) (p = 0.00007, OR = 4.60, 95%, CI = 2.16 to 9.79), and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) (p = 0.0133, OR = 9.91, 95%, CI 1.21 to 81.15) were statistically higher in case of mammary cancer. In contrast, neutering was a protective factor for mammary cancer (p = 0.0004, OR = 0.32, 95%, CI = 0.17 to 0.60). PMID:26271706

  11. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management. PMID:25110429

  12. Study of Superficial Type Colorectal Neoplasms With Central Depression

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yoshihiro

    2000-01-01

    Superficial lesion with central depression obtained by endoscopic resection (23 carcinomas limited in the mucosa and 40 adenomas) were studied morphologically and histologically. These lesions were calculated concerning the height from the muscularis mucosa, depth of depressed central portions and the height of circumferential mucosa. Then, using the image analyzer, followings were determined with two-dimensional analysis: (1) the size of neoplasms and also (2) the size of whole mucosal lesions which was calculated by drawing a perpendicular from the border of the neoplasms; and thus, the ratio of each area was calculated. Little difference was found between the adenomas and carcinomas. The sizes of carcinomas were found to be of 8.8 ± 4.7 mm and the adenomas of 5.1 ± 2.3 mm (p < 0.01). As for the depth of depression, it was found to be of 352 ± 147 μm in the carcinomas and 277 ± 93 μm in the adenomas (p < 0.05). Concerning the ratio of carcinomatous area in the mucosa, it was found to be 78 ± 10% in the carcinomas, while in the adenomas, it was found to be 70 ± 10% (p < 0.05). Accordingly, it was found that compared with the adenomas, carcinomas showed significantly larger in size, deeper depression in configuration and the ratio of their size in the mucosa is rather high. PMID:18493535

  13. Frequent GNAS mutations in low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, G; Sekine, S; Ogawa, R; Matsubara, A; Mori, T; Taniguchi, H; Kushima, R; Hiraoka, N; Tsuta, K; Tsuda, H; Kanai, Y

    2013-01-01

    Background: The molecular basis for the development of appendiceal mucinous tumours, which can be a cause of pseudomyxoma peritonei, remains largely unknown. Methods: Thirty-five appendiceal mucinous neoplasms were analysed for GNAS and KRAS mutations. A functional analysis of mutant GNAS was performed using a colorectal cancer cell line. Results: A mutational analysis identified activating GNAS mutations in 16 of 32 low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms (LAMNs) but in none of three mucinous adenocarcinomas (MACs). KRAS mutations were found in 30 LAMNs and in all MACs. We additionally analysed a total of 186 extra-appendiceal mucinous tumours and found that GNAS mutations were highly prevalent in intraductal papillary mucinous tumours of the pancreas (88%) but were rare or absent in mucinous tumours of the colorectum, ovary, lung and breast (0–9%). The prevalence of KRAS mutations was quite variable among the tumours. The introduction of the mutant GNAS into a colorectal cancer cell line markedly induced MUC2 and MUC5AC expression, but did not promote cell growth either in vitro or in vivo. Conclusion: Activating GNAS mutations are a frequent and characteristic genetic abnormality of LAMN. Mutant GNAS might play a direct role in the prominent mucin production that is a hallmark of LAMN. PMID:23403822

  14. Circumscribed sebaceous neoplasms: a morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Nathan Tobias; Tabone, Tania; Erber, Wendy; Wood, Benjamin Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Sebaceous neoplasms encompass a range of lesions, including benign entities such as sebaceous adenoma and sebaceoma, as well as sebaceous carcinoma. The distinction of sebaceous carcinoma from benign lesions relies on histological identification of architectural or cytological features of malignancy. In this study we have assessed the diagnostic discriminatory ability of mitotic rate and immunohistochemical markers (p53, bcl-2 and p16) in a selected group of well circumscribed sebaceous neoplasms, incorporating examples of sebaceous adenoma, sebaceoma and sebaceous carcinoma. We found that mitotic rate was significantly higher in malignant lesions as compared to benign lesions, but none of the immunohistochemical markers showed a discriminatory expression pattern. In addition, we performed a mutational analysis on the same group of lesions using next generation sequencing (NGS) technology. The most commonly mutated gene was TP53, although there was no correlation between the p53 immunohistochemical results and number or type of TP53 mutation detected. CDKN2A, EGFR, CTNNB1 and KRAS were also commonly mutated across all lesions. No particular gene, mutation profile or individual mutation could be identified which directly correlated with the consensus histological diagnosis. In conclusion, within this diagnostically challenging group of lesions, mitotic activity, but not immunohistochemical labelling for p16 or bcl-2, correlates with diagnostic category. While a number of genes potentially involved in the genesis of sebaceous neoplasia were uncovered, any molecular differences between the histological diagnostic categories remain unclear. PMID:27311873

  15. Hepatic neoplasms from internally deposited 144CeCl3.

    PubMed

    Hahn, F F; Muggenburg, B A; Boecker, B B

    1996-01-01

    Fifty-five dogs were exposed by inhalation to graded activity levels of 144CeCl3, a relatively soluble form of the beta-emitting radionuclide. A large portion of the 144Ce translocated from lung to liver and skeleton. Significant radiation doses were delivered to the respiratory tract, liver, and skeleton; however, the liver received the greatest cumulative absorbed dose. Liver tumors were the most frequently observed neoplasms in these exposed dogs and included 7 primary hepatic hemangiosarcomas, 1 cholangiocarcinoma, 1 hepatocellular carcinoma, 1 fibrosarcoma, 4 biliary cystadenomas, and 1 fibroma. The dose to the liver in these dogs ranged from 11 to 250 Gy with a median of 57 Gy. Autoradiographs showed a relative uniform distribution of beta dose to the liver. All the malignant tumors and 1 cystadenoma were primary causes of death. The morphologic features of the hemangiosarcomas and associated hepatic lesions were similar to those described for hemangiosarcomas induced in people exposed to Thorotrast. Biliary cystadenomas were associated with degenerative lesions in the liver but not with other neoplasms in the liver. These results indicate that the liver is an important target organ for effects from internally deposited 144Ce. PMID:8736384

  16. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal neoplasms: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Taku; Mori, Genki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kinjo, Yuzuru; So, Eriko; Abe, Seiichiro; Otake, Yosuke; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has expanded the application of endoscopic treatment, which can be used for lesions with a low metastatic potential regardless of their size. ESD has the advantage of achieving en bloc resection with a lower local recurrence rate compared with that of piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection. Moreover, in the past, surgery was indicated in patients with large lesions spreading to almost the entire circumference of the rectum, regardless of the depth of invasion, as endoscopic resection of these lesions was technically difficult. Therefore, a prime benefit of ESD is significant improvement in the quality of life for patients who have large rectal lesions. On the other hand, ESD is not as widely applied in the treatment of colorectal neoplasms as it is in gastric cancers owing to the associated technical difficulty, longer procedural duration, and increased risk of perforation. To diversify the available endoscopic treatment strategies for superficial colorectal neoplasms, endoscopists performing ESD need to recognize its indications, the technical issues involved in its application, and the associated complications. This review outlines the methods and type of devices used for colorectal ESD, and the training required by endoscopists to perform this procedure. PMID:25473168

  17. MRI findings of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs).

    PubMed

    Lana, Silvia; Vallara, Manuela; Bono, Nicola Emanuele; Russo, Giuseppe; Artioli, Giulia; Capretti, Giovanni; Paladini, Ilaria; Pesce, Antonella; Ruggirello, Margherita; Barbalace, Sandro; Mostardi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are relatively frequent imaging findings due to the improvement of imaging technologies. They may be secondary to both benign and malignant disease processes and their prevalence increases with age. In most cases, these lesions are detected incidentally by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed for other reasons. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) represent 25% of the cystic neoplasms, morphologically classified into "main pancreatic duct IPMN" (MPD-IPMN), "side branches IPMN" (SB-IPMN) and mixed forms. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a multiparametricity not invasive radiological technique that doesn't use ionizing radiation or organ iodinized contrast agents; it allows an accurate characterization of the lesions (number and size of cystic lesions, internal features of a cyst, ducts dilation, communication with main pancreatic duct) that is important to guide the differential diagnosis and establish a correct follow-up. International guidelines consider IPMN of MPD and mixed forms to be an indication for surgery, while clinical and radiological follow-up is indicated in asymptomatic patients with SB-IPMN, especially when lesions are < 2,5-3 cm in diameter and there are no mural nodules or dilation of MPD. PMID:27467864

  18. Disease-specific mutations in mature lymphoid neoplasms: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Enami, Terukazu; Yokoyama, Yasuhisa; Chiba, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Mature lymphoid neoplasms (MLN) are clinically and pathologically more complex than precursor lymphoid neoplasms. Until recently, molecular characterization of MLN was mainly based on cytogenetics/fluorescence in situ hybridization, allele copy number, and mRNA expression, approaches that yielded scanty gene mutation information. Use of massive parallel sequencing technologies has changed this outcome, and now many gene mutations have been discovered. Some of these are considerably frequent in, and substantially specific to, distinct MLN subtypes, and occur at single or several hotspots. They include the V600E BRAF mutation in hairy cell leukemia, the L265P MYD88 mutation in Waldenström macroglobulinemia, the G17V RHOA mutation in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, and the Y640F//D661Y/V/H/I//N647I STAT3 mutations in T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Detecting these mutations is highly valuable in diagnosing MLN subtypes. Defining these mutations also sheds light on the molecular pathogenesis of MLN, furthering development of molecular targeting therapies. In this review, we focus on the disease-specific gene mutations in MLN discovered by recent massive sequencing technologies. PMID:24689848

  19. Pitfalls in staging uterine neoplasm with imaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Kinkel, K

    2006-01-01

    This review analyzes current pitfalls in pretreatment staging of endometrial and cervical carcinoma with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based on a critical review of the literature. Technical, patient, and tumor-related characteristics were analyzed to improve further staging of uterine neoplasm with MRI. For endometrial carcinoma staging, contrast-enhanced dynamic imaging appears essential to avoid false-positive findings for deep myometrial invasion by better delineating tumor from normal myometrium. However, leiomyomas, adenomyosis, and grade 3 tumors provide difficulties in staging for pathologists and radiologists. Slice orientation perpendicular to the long axis of the cervical channel might improve false-negative findings for deep stromal invasion on T2-weighted images in endometrial and cervical cancer. Contrast-enhanced sequences do not improve diagnosis of parametrial or vaginal invasion in cervical cancer. Assessment of lymph node invasion by any imaging modality has limited sensitivity in detecting lymph node metastasis smaller than 5 mm. Knowledge of diagnostic criteria is critical to avoid false-negative findings for bladder wall invasion. Higher spatial resolution with dedicated multichannel pelvic phase array coils, smaller fields of view and section thickness, and careful comparison of T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced sequences are strategies that might avoid misinterpretation of pelvic MRI in staging uterine neoplasm. PMID:16333697

  20. Identifying brain neoplasms using dye-enhanced multimodal confocal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Dennis; Snuderl, Matija; Sheth, Sameer; Kwon, Churl-Su; Frosch, Matthew P.; Curry, William; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2012-02-01

    Brain tumors cause significant morbidity and mortality even when benign. Completeness of resection of brain tumors improves quality of life and survival; however, that is often difficult to accomplish. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using multimodal confocal imaging for intraoperative detection of brain neoplasms. We have imaged different types of benign and malignant, primary and metastatic brain tumors. We correlated optical images with histopathology and evaluated the possibility of interpreting confocal images in a manner similar to pathology. Surgical specimens were briefly stained in 0.05 mg/ml aqueous solution of methylene blue (MB) and imaged using a multimodal confocal microscope. Reflectance and fluorescence signals of MB were excited at 642 nm. Fluorescence emission of MB was registered between 670 and 710 nm. After imaging, tissues were processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. The results of comparison demonstrate good correlation between fluorescence images and histopathology. Reflectance images provide information about morphology and vascularity of the specimens, complementary to that provided by fluorescence images. Multimodal confocal imaging has the potential to aid in the intraoperative detection of microscopic deposits of brain neoplasms. The application of this technique may improve completeness of resection and increase patient survival.

  1. Diverse and Targetable Kinase Alterations Drive Histiocytic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Eli L.; Durham, Benjamin H.; Haroche, Julien; Yao, Zhan; Ma, Jing; Parikh, Sameer A.; Wang, Zhaoming; Choi, John; Kim, Eunhee; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Gao, Yijun; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Campbell, Patrick; Walsh, Michael P.; Sylvester, Brooke; Dolgalev, Igor; Aminova, Olga; Heguy, Adriana; Zappile, Paul; Nakitandwe, Joy; Ganzel, Chezi; Dalton, James D.; Ellison, David W.; Estrada-Veras, Juvianee; Lacouture, Mario; Gahl, William A.; Stephens, Philip J.; Miller, Vincent A.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Ali, Siraj M.; Briggs, Samuel R.; Fasan, Omotayo; Block, Jared; Héritier, Sebastien; Donadieu, Jean; Solit, David B.; Hyman, David M.; Baselga, Jose; Janku, Filip; Taylor, Barry S.; Park, Christopher Y.; Amoura, Zahir; Dogan, Ahmet; Emile, Jean-Francois; Rosen, Neal; Gruber, Tanja A.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Histiocytic neoplasms are clonal, hematopoietic disorders characterized by an accumulation of abnormal, monocyte-derived dendritic cells or macrophages in Langerhans Cell (LCH) and non-Langerhans (non-LCH) histiocytoses, respectively. The discovery of BRAFV600E mutations in ~50% of these patients provided the first molecular therapeutisc target in histiocytosis. However, recurrent driving mutations in the majority of BRAFV600E-wildtype, non-LCH patients are unknown, and recurrent cooperating mutations in non-MAP kinase pathways are undefined for the histiocytic neoplasms. Through combined whole exome and transcriptome sequencing, we identified recurrent kinase fusions involving BRAF, ALK, and NTRK1, as well as recurrent, activating MAP2K1 and ARAF mutations in BRAFV600E-wildtype, non-LCH patients. In addition to MAP kinase pathway lesions, recurrently altered genes involving diverse cellular pathways were identified. Treatment of MAP2K1- and ARAF-mutated, non-LCH patients using MEK and RAF inhibitors, respectively, resulted in clinical efficacy demonstrating the importance of detecting and targeting diverse kinase alterations in these disorders. PMID:26566875

  2. Lack of a significant effect of arctiin on development of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumors in ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Hasumura, Mai; Ueda, Makoto; Onose, Jun-ichi; Imai, Toshio; Hirose, Masao

    2007-01-01

    Arctiin, a plant lignan, is metabolized to hormone-like compounds with weak estrogenic and antioxidative activity in experimental animals and man. To clarify its influence on mammary carcinogenesis, female rats were administrated 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) once, and when the incidence of palpable mammary tumors reached 50%, subjected to ovariectomy (OVX) and divided into tumor-bearing [DMBA-Tumor (+)] and no-tumor-bearing [DMBA-Tumor (-)] groups, subgroups of each then being fed soybean-free diet containing 0, 40, 200, and 1000 ppm of arctiin for 31 wk. The incidence and multiplicity of palpable tumors in the 200 ppm DMBA-Tumor (+) subgroup from week 12 of arctiin treatment tended to be decreased as compared to the 0 ppm subgroup and at terminal sacrifice, the volume of histopathologically defined mammary tumors was decreased in the 40 ppm DMBA-Tumor (-) subgroup, but again without statistical significance. In conclusion, weak inhibitory effects of arctiin on DMBA-induced mammary tumor development were suggested in OVX rats, but any further assessment is needed to obtain conclusive results. PMID:17571954

  3. Regulation of transgenes in three-dimensional cultures of primary mouse mammary cells demonstrates oncogene dependence and identifies cells that survive deinduction

    PubMed Central

    Jechlinger, Martin; Podsypanina, Katrina; Varmus, Harold

    2009-01-01

    The advent of targeted therapies for cancer has provoked interest in experimental models for the systematic study of oncogene dependence. To that end, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) culture system to analyze the responses of primary mouse mammary epithelial cells to the induction and deinduction of oncogenes. Mammary cells derived from normal virgin mice, or from tritransgenic mice (TetO-MYC;TetO-KrasG12D;MMTV-rtTA) in which MYC and mutant Kras can be regulated by doxycycline, develop from single cells into polarized acini. Lumen formation occurs without apparent apoptosis, and the hollow spheres of cells enlarge by division, with metaphase plates oriented perpendicularly to the apical surface. When MYC and KrasG12D are induced, the acini enlarge and form solid, depolarized spheres. Upon deinduction of MYC and KrasG12D the solid structures regress, leaving a repolarized monolayer of viable cells. These cells display a phenotype consistent with progenitors of mammary epithelium: They exclude Hoechst dye 33342, and reform acini in 3D cultures and repopulate mammary fat pads more efficiently than cells harvested from uninduced acini. Moreover, cells in the surviving spheres retain the ability to respond to reinduction and thus may represent the type of cells that give rise to recurrent tumors. PMID:19605689

  4. Dermoscopy of Skin Adnexal Neoplasms:A Continuous Challenge.

    PubMed

    di Meo, Nicola; Stinco, Giuseppe; Gatti, Alessandro; Fadel, Mattia; Vichi, Silvia; Trevisan, Giusto

    2016-06-01

    Dear Editor, Apocrine hidradenoma is a rare benign adnexal tumor related to the more common poroma, as they both originate from sweat glands. Hidradenoma usually has an eccrine differentiation, but an apocrine differentiation is possible. Due to its rarity and non-specific clinical appearance it is difficult to differentiate it from other malignant cutaneous lesions. In this challenging task, dermatoscopy could be particularly helpful to better describe, recognize, and differentiate these lesions. Unfortunately, the literature offers only few dermatoscopic descriptions of this rare cutaneous neoplasm. A 70-year-old woman in fair general condition was referred to our Department for an asymptomatic 10×8 mm single nodule on her left scapula. This nodule was red, dome shaped, well circumscribed, firm, and mildly tender (Figure 1). The patient reported that it had been present since approximately 7 months. The lesion was neither painful nor itchy and there was no bleeding. A skin examination did not show any other lesions with the same features or other suspicious lesions. Dermatoscopy revealed milky-pinkish areas with dotted vessels, linear-irregular vessels, and hairpin vessels: some of these aspects can also be found in amelanotic melanoma (1). There were also homogeneous blue areas similar to lacunae, characteristic but not exclusive to vascular or sarcomatous neoplasms and basal cell carcinoma (1,2). Furthermore, small ulcerations covered by an amber crust were identified, which can usually be found in basal cell carcinoma. Regarding the background of the lesion, we noticed peculiar, translucent, pinkish, soft, large lobular areas (Figure 2). On the basis of this analysis, we suspected an atypical presentation of a basal cell carcinoma, an amelanotic melanoma, or a sarcomatous skin neoplasm. A metastasis of an unknown solid tumor was also taken into consideration. The histological examination revealed an adnexal neoplasm and specifically an apocrine hidradenoma

  5. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Paolo; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Watters, James; Loboda, Andrey; Kulkarni, Amit; Castle, John; Palombo, Fabio; Viti, Valentina; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Zappulli, Valentina; Marconato, Laura; Abramo, Francesca; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Lahm, Armin; La Monica, Nicola; de Rinaldis, Emanuele

    2009-01-01

    Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies. PMID:19327144

  6. ATG proteins mediate efferocytosis and suppress inflammation in mammary involution

    PubMed Central

    Teplova, Irina; Lozy, Fred; Price, Sandy; Singh, Sukhwinder; Barnard, Nicola; Cardiff, Robert D.; Birge, Raymond B.; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2013-01-01

    Involution is the process of post-lactational mammary gland regression to quiescence and it involves secretory epithelial cell death, stroma remodeling and gland repopulation by adipocytes. Though reportedly accompanying apoptosis, the role of autophagy in involution has not yet been determined. We now report that autophagy-related (ATG) proteins mediate dead cell clearance and suppress inflammation during mammary involution. In vivo, Becn1+/− and Atg7-deficient mammary epithelial cells (MECs) produced ‘competent’ apoptotic bodies, but were defective phagocytes in association with reduced expression of the MERTK and ITGB5 receptors, thus pointing to defective apoptotic body engulfment. Atg-deficient tissues exhibited higher levels of involution-associated inflammation, which could be indicative of a tumor-modulating microenvironment, and developed ductal ectasia, a manifestation of deregulated post-involution gland remodeling. In vitro, ATG (BECN1 or ATG7) knockdown compromised MEC-mediated apoptotic body clearance in association with decreased RAC1 activation, thus confirming that, in addition to the defective phagocytic processing reported by other studies, ATG protein defects also impair dead cell engulfment.   Using two different mouse models with mammary gland-associated Atg deficiencies, our studies shed light on the essential role of ATG proteins in MEC-mediated efferocytosis during mammary involution and provide novel insights into this important developmental process. This work also raises the possibility that a regulatory feedback loop exists, by which the efficacy of phagocytic cargo processing in turn regulates the rate of engulfment and ultimately determines the kinetics of phagocytosis and dead cell clearance. PMID:23380905

  7. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  8. Inositol hexaphosphate and inositol inhibit DMBA-induced rat mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Vucenik, I; Yang, G Y; Shamsuddin, A M

    1995-05-01

    Because inositol hexaphosphate (InsP6) and inositol (Ins), contained in plants and most mammalian cells, have been demonstrated to have anti-cancer and anti-cell proliferative action in several experimental models of carcinogenesis we have examined the effect of InsP6 +/- Ins on DMBA-induced rat mammary tumor model. Starting two weeks prior to induction with DMBA, the drinking water of female Sprague-Dawley rats was supplemented with either: 15 mM InsP6, 15 mM Ins, or 15 mM InsP6 + 15 mM Ins; a control group received no inositol compounds. Animals (49-day-old) were given a single intragastric dose of DMBA (5 mg/rat) in 1 ml of corn oil administered by oral intubation. After 45 weeks of treatment, the animals in all the three treatment regimens showed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in tumor incidence. Tumor number, multiplicity and tumor burden were also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced by InsP6 +/- Ins. When all the parameters were taken into consideration, the best results were obtained by the combination treatment of InsP6 + Ins. Four additional groups not receiving DMBA, but drinking tap water, InsP6, Ins, or InsP6 + Ins of the same molarity as experimental groups were observed for the duration of the study to monitor for any toxicity following this long-term treatment; no significant toxicity as evaluated by body weight gain, serum and bone mineral levels was detected. We demonstrate that InsP6 +/- Ins reproducibly inhibits experimental mammary carcinoma, therefore having great potential as a chemopreventive and adjuvant therapeutic agent for this disease as well. PMID:7767964

  9. Functional characterization of Mammary Gland Protein-40, a chitinase-like glycoprotein expressed during mammary gland apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Anand, Vijay; Jaswal, Shalini; Singh, Surender; Kumar, Sudarshan; Jena, Manoj Kumar; Verma, Arvind Kumar; Yadav, Munna Lal; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Lotfan, Masoud; Malakar, Dhruba; Dang, Ajay Kumar; Mohanty, Tushar Kumar; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar

    2016-02-01

    MGP-40 is a chitinase-like protein which is over expressed during mammary gland involution. However, its physiological function in the mammary gland is poorly understood. In the present investigation, we have reported the functional significance of buffalo specific MGP-40 in the mammary gland by using an in vitro model of the buffalo mammary epithelial cell (BuMEC) line. MGP-40 was highly up regulated in BuMECs in serum starved condition as well as after treatment with prolactin suggesting its role in the stress response. Subsequently, to study the effect of MGP-40 on BuMECs, the cells were transfected with a mammalian expression construct of pCI neo harboring MGP-40 gene. It was observed that over expression of MGP-40 enhanced proliferation of BuMECs and protected the cells from apoptosis under serum free condition. In contrast, MGP-40 attenuated the mitogenic effect of insulin in BuMECs. Besides, over expression of the MGP-40 reduced dome formation, acinar polarization and casein synthesis in BuMECs in the presence of lactogenic hormones, it also induced Stat3 phosphorylation and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) -like features. Together, our data suggest that MGP-40 is involved in protection of BuMECs under stress conditions, inhibits cellular differentiation and induces EMT-like features. A schematic diagram depicting possible association of MGP-40 in various molecular pathways has been presented. PMID:26659075

  10. Enhanced mammary progesterone receptor-A isoform activity in the promotion of mammary tumor progression by dietary soy in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary contribution to breast cancer risk, recurrence, and progression remains incompletely understood. Increased consumption of soy and soy isoflavones is associated with reduced mammary cancer susceptibility in women and in rodent models of carcinogenesis. In rats treated with N-Methyl-N-Nitrosou...

  11. Regulation of adipocyte lipid homeostasis by genistein alters mammary epithelial cell differentiation: a paracrine mechanism for mammary tumor protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological and animal studies have shown a negative correlation between breast cancer incidence and intake of soy rich foods. Our laboratory has studied soy protein isolate (SPI), the primary component of soy infant formula, as a paradigm to evaluate diet as a risk factor in mammary cancer. We ...

  12. Enhancement of maternal lactation performance during prolonged lactation in the mouse by mouse GH and long-R3-IGF-I is linked to changes in mammary signaling and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hadsell, Darryl L; Parlow, Albert F; Torres, Daniel; George, Jessy; Olea, Walter

    2008-07-01

    GH, prolactin (PRL), and IGF-I stimulate lactation-related metabolic processes in mammary epithelial cells. However, the ability of these factors to stimulate milk production in animals varies depending on species and experimental variables. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that transgenic overexpression of des(1-3)IGF-I within the mammary glands of lactating mouse dams increased lactation capacity during prolonged lactation. This work also suggested that some of the effects of the overexpressed IGF-I may have been mediated through elevated concentrations of IGF-I or PRL in the systemic circulation. In the present study, murine GH and PRL, and a human IGF-I analog, long-R3-IGF-I (LR3), were administered as s.c. injections to compare their ability to enhance milk production, and alter mammary gland signaling and gene expression. Lactation capacity, as measured by litter gain, was increased (P<0.05) by GH, but not by PRL. LR3 increased (P<0.05) mammary phospho-Akt and suppressors of cytokines signaling 3 (SOCS3) gene expression, and had a modest ability to increase (P<0.05) lactation capacity. GH both increased (P<0.05) mammary SOCS1 expression and decreased (P<0.05) mammary expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of serotonin and a potential feedback inhibitor of lactation. These results suggest that while both GH and IGF-I stimulate milk production in the lactating mouse, the effect of GH may be additionally mediated through IGF-I-independent effects associated with repression of mammary serotonin synthesis. PMID:18577570

  13. Ectodysplasin/NF-κB Promotes Mammary Cell Fate via Wnt/β-catenin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Voutilainen, Maria; Lindfors, Päivi H; Trela, Ewelina; Lönnblad, Darielle; Shirokova, Vera; Elo, Teresa; Rysti, Elisa; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Schneider, Pascal; Mikkola, Marja L

    2015-11-01

    Mammary gland development commences during embryogenesis with the establishment of a species typical number of mammary primordia on each flank of the embryo. It is thought that mammary cell fate can only be induced along the mammary line, a narrow region of the ventro-lateral skin running from the axilla to the groin. Ectodysplasin (Eda) is a tumor necrosis factor family ligand that regulates morphogenesis of several ectodermal appendages. We have previously shown that transgenic overexpression of Eda (K14-Eda mice) induces formation of supernumerary mammary placodes along the mammary line. Here, we investigate in more detail the role of Eda and its downstream mediator transcription factor NF-κB in mammary cell fate specification. We report that K14-Eda mice harbor accessory mammary glands also in the neck region indicating wider epidermal cell plasticity that previously appreciated. We show that even though NF-κB is not required for formation of endogenous mammary placodes, it is indispensable for the ability of Eda to induce supernumerary placodes. A genome-wide profiling of Eda-induced genes in mammary buds identified several Wnt pathway components as potential transcriptional targets of Eda. Using an ex vivo culture system, we show that suppression of canonical Wnt signalling leads to a dose-dependent inhibition of supernumerary placodes in K14-Eda tissue explants. PMID:26581094

  14. Ectodysplasin/NF-κB Promotes Mammary Cell Fate via Wnt/β-catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Voutilainen, Maria; Lönnblad, Darielle; Shirokova, Vera; Elo, Teresa; Rysti, Elisa; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Schneider, Pascal; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2015-01-01

    Mammary gland development commences during embryogenesis with the establishment of a species typical number of mammary primordia on each flank of the embryo. It is thought that mammary cell fate can only be induced along the mammary line, a narrow region of the ventro-lateral skin running from the axilla to the groin. Ectodysplasin (Eda) is a tumor necrosis factor family ligand that regulates morphogenesis of several ectodermal appendages. We have previously shown that transgenic overexpression of Eda (K14-Eda mice) induces formation of supernumerary mammary placodes along the mammary line. Here, we investigate in more detail the role of Eda and its downstream mediator transcription factor NF-κB in mammary cell fate specification. We report that K14-Eda mice harbor accessory mammary glands also in the neck region indicating wider epidermal cell plasticity that previously appreciated. We show that even though NF-κB is not required for formation of endogenous mammary placodes, it is indispensable for the ability of Eda to induce supernumerary placodes. A genome-wide profiling of Eda-induced genes in mammary buds identified several Wnt pathway components as potential transcriptional targets of Eda. Using an ex vivo culture system, we show that suppression of canonical Wnt signalling leads to a dose-dependent inhibition of supernumerary placodes in K14-Eda tissue explants. PMID:26581094

  15. Characterization of intraductal papillary neoplasm of bile duct with respect to histopathologic similarities to pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Nakanuma, Yasuni; Kakuda, Yuko; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Miyata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Fukumura, Yuki; Sato, Yasunori; Sasaki, Motoko; Harada, Kenichi; Takase, Masaru

    2016-05-01

    Intraductal papillary neoplasm of bile duct (IPNB) is a papillary tumor covered by well-differentiated neoplastic epithelium with fine fibrovascular cores in the dilated bile ducts. It reportedly shows similarities to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of pancreas (IPMN), to various degrees. Herein, IPNB was pathologically analyzed by classifying 52 cases into 4 groups based on the histopathologic similarities to IPMN: group A (identical to IPMN, 19 cases), group B (similar to but slightly different from IPMN, 18 cases), group C (vaguely similar to IPMN, 5 cases), and group D (different from IPMN, 10 cases). In group A, intrahepatic and perihilar regions were mainly affected, most cases were of low/intermediate or high grade without invasion, and gastric type was the most common phenotype, followed by oncocytic and intestinal types. In groups C and D, perihilar and distal bile ducts were affected, almost all cases were of high grade with invasion, and most of them were of intestinal and pancreatobiliary phenotypes. Most group B cases were of intestinal phenotype, and all were of high grade with or without invasion. In conclusion, these 4 groups of IPNB showed unique pathologic features and behaviors. Group A cases were less aggressive and shared many features with IPMN, whereas group C and D cases were more aggressive and mainly found in perihilar and distal bile ducts. Group B resembling IPMN was intermediate between them. This classification may be useful in clinical practice and holds promise for a novel approach to analyze IPNB tumorigenesis. PMID:27067788

  16. Application of laser-induced fluorescence to neoplasm diagnosis using bis-1[alanylo-N]ethylodeuteroporphyrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasny, Miroslaw; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Graczyk, Alfreda; Chwirot, S.; Chwirot, B. W.; Pirozynska, E.; Zuchewicz, K.

    1996-03-01

    This study presents possibilities of neoplasm localization applying the laser-induced fluorescence method using new porphyrin derivatives -- complexes of protoporphyrin and amino acids. These compounds show a strong retention in diseased tissues. Their spectral characteristics and photosensitizing properties are similar to hematoporphyrin derivatives, so they can be used both in the photodynamic therapy method and neoplasm diagnosis.

  17. CT findings associated with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung W; Jeong, Katherine; Sokol, Lubomir

    2016-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematologic malignancy that is frequently misdiagnosed. We present a case of a 53-year-old man diagnosed with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with extensive computed tomography (CT) findings and provide an imaging focused review of this uncommon malignancy. PMID:27504192

  18. EXOCRINE PANCREATIC NEOPLASMS IN THE MUMMICHOG (FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS) FROM A CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high prevalence of exocrine pancreatic neoplasms occurred in mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, from a creosote-contaminated site in the Elizabeth River, Virginia. otal of 20 neoplasms occurred in a group of about 1 100 fish evaluated histologically. f 240 adult fish collected d...

  19. Regulation of mammary stem cell population with dietary intake of soy protein isolate reveals novel mechanisms for diet-mediated control of mammary tumorigenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breast cancer risk is highly modified by environmental factors including diet. Previously, we showed that dietary intake of soy protein isolate (SPI) decreased mammary tumor incidence and increased mammary tumor latency in rats relative to those fed a control casein (CAS) diet, when exposed to the c...

  20. Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With HIV and Relapsed, Refractory, or Disseminated Malignant Neoplasms

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Locally Advanced Malignant Neoplasm; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Kaposi Sarcoma; Recurrent Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Malignant Neoplasm; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  1. Optimization and characterization of an in vitro bovine mammary cell culture system to study regulation of milk protein synthesis and mammary differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Talhouk, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    A long term bovine mammary cell culture system that maintains normal mammary cell function was established and optimized to study milk protein synthesis and secretion and mammary differentiation. This culture system used bovine mammary acini isolated from developing or lactating mammary gland by enzymatic dissociation, and cryopreserved until thawed and plated for growth in vitro for these studies. Cells in M199 with lactogenic hormones {plus minus} fetal calf serum (FCS) were cultured on plastic, 100ul and 500ul type I collagen, and Matrigel, or embedded within type I collagen. Cell morphology, cell number, and total TCA-precipitable {sup 35}S-labelled proteins were monitored. Milk protein ({alpha}{sub s,1}-casein, lactoferrin (LF), {alpha}-lactalbumin, and {beta}-lactoglobulin) secretion and intracellular levels were determined by an ELISA assay.

  2. Examination of weekly mammary parenchymal area by ultrasound, mammary mass, and composition in Holstein heifers reared on 1 of 3 diets from birth to 2 months of age.

    PubMed

    Esselburn, K M; Hill, T M; Bateman, H G; Fluharty, F L; Moeller, S J; O'Diam, K M; Daniels, K M

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring in vivo growth of mammary parenchyma (PAR) has historically been difficult, necessitating slaughter studies to measure PAR quantity. Advances in ultrasound (US) technology warrant revisiting its use as a noninvasive tool to monitor PAR growth in vivo. The level of nutrient intake during the first 2mo of life may affect measures of mammary growth and composition. Objectives were to examine the utility of US as an in vivo tool to quantify PAR cross-sectional area in Holstein heifers reared on 1 of 3 diets from birth to 2mo of age, assessing potential dietary effects; assess the relationships between weekly US measurements, teat length, manual palpation of PAR scores, and PAR mass at 2mo of age; and examine mammary composition in experimental animals. Holstein heifers (n=24; 41±1kg of initial body weight) from a single farm were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 milk replacers that differed in source and amount of fat. Milk replacer was fed at 660g of dry matter/d until weaning at 42 d. Heifers had ad libitum access to a common calf starter (20% crude protein) and water for the duration of the 56-d trial. Teat length and palpation scores were obtained weekly. A real-time B-mode US with a 7.5-MHz convex probe was used to examine 2-dimensional PAR area in all 4 glands of heifers once weekly from 2 to 3 d of age to harvest at 56 d. The left front and left rear glands were also examined by US 24h postharvest to validate final US measurements, and then bisected to produce a sagittal plane view of PAR for comparison with US images. Mass and composition of mammary gland tissue were determined at 8 wk using standard methodology. Over the course of this 8-wk trial, average teat length increased from 11 to 17mm. The PAR area started small (6.6±3.2mm(2) per gland) and increased to 42.1±2.5mm(2) per gland by the end of the trial. As anticipated, based on measurements obtained at slaughter, US measurements were more related to amount of PAR (r=0.74) than either teat length

  3. Autocrine-paracrine regulation of the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Weaver, S R; Hernandez, L L

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland has a remarkable capacity for regulation at a local level, particularly with respect to its main function: milk secretion. Regulation of milk synthesis has significant effects on animal and human health, at the level of both the mother and the neonate. Control by the mammary gland of its essential function, milk synthesis, is an evolutionary necessity and is therefore tightly regulated at a local level. For at least the last 60 yr, researchers have been interested in elucidating the mechanisms underpinning the mammary gland's ability to self-regulate, largely without the influence from systemic hormones or signals. By the 1960s, scientists realized the importance of milk removal in the capacity of the gland to produce milk and that the dynamics of this removal, including emptying of the alveolar spaces and frequency of milking, were controlled locally as opposed to traditional systemic hormonal regulation. Using both in vitro systems and various mammalian species, including goats, marsupials, humans, and dairy cows, it has been demonstrated that the mammary gland is largely self-regulating in its capacity to support the young, which is the evolutionary basis for milk production. Local control occurs at the level of the mammary epithelial cell through pressure and stretching negative-feedback mechanisms, and also in an autocrine fashion through bioactive factors within the milk which act as inhibitors, regulating milk secretion within the alveoli themselves. It is only within the last 20 to 30 yr that potential candidates for these bioactive factors have been examined at a molecular level. Several, including parathyroid hormone-related protein, growth factors (transforming growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, epidermal growth factor), and serotonin, are synthesized within and act upon the gland and possess dynamic receptor activity resulting in diverse effects on growth, calcium homeostasis, and milk composition. This review will focus on the

  4. Application of FT IR microspectroscopy in diagnosing thyroid neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Christian P.; Liu, Kan-Zhi; Salamon, Elizabeth A.; Riese, Karl T.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    1999-05-01

    Tissue biopsies and fine-needle aspirates (FNA) of patients with suspected benign or malignant thyroid neoplasms were investigated by infrared microspectroscopy and multivariate statistical methods. Unsupervised cluster analysis revealed four different spectral patterns for the aspirates analyzed, corresponding to colloid goiter, adenoma, carcinomas and negative diagnoses. Infrared microspectroscopic measurements of neoplastic cells on infrared transparent slides provide a potentially new tool for diagnostic screening of these FNA. Biopsy material obtained during surgical removal of gland tissue, was successfully used to generate statistically significant criteria for the distinction of neoplastic from normal tissue. Bivariate histogram plots demonstrate that two selected parameters, DNA and protein, are sufficient to separate control tissue from adenoma and carcinomas

  5. Occupations of fathers of children dying from neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, B M; White, G C; Draper, G J

    1981-01-01

    It has been suggested in a number of recent reports that there is a possible relationship between parental occupation and malignant disease in children. A proportional mortality analysis relating deaths among children in England and Wales in 1959-63 and 1970-72 to occupation of father as stated on the child's death certificate has not shown any convincing evidence for such associations. Earlier papers published on the subject are reviewed. Although there is some slight evidence for associations between childhood tumours and certain parental occupations there is little consistency between the results reported by different authors. A previously reported association between higher social class and deaths from neoplasms was found also in this study. The explanation for this finding is unknown, and it remains possible that it is an artefact. PMID:7338698

  6. Dermoscopy of benign and malignant neoplasms in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Haliasos, Helen C; Zalaudek, Iris; Malvehy, Josep; Lanschuetzer, Christoph; Hinter, Helmut; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Braun, Ralph; Marghoob, Ashfaq A

    2010-12-01

    Dermoscopy is a noninvasive technique that enables visualization of subsurface colors and structures within the skin that are imperceptible to the naked eye. The dermatoscope allows the physician to examine both the macroscopic and microscopic primary morphology of skin lesions, identify subtle clinical clues, confirm naked-eye clinical diagnoses, and monitor treatment progress while posing little threat to the young patient. Dermoscopic findings have been formulated into diagnostic criteria that assist experienced clinicians in differentiating benign and malignant neoplasms. In this review, clinical morphology of melanocytic nevi and melanoma in the pediatric population is examined and the relevant dermoscopic findings and histopathologic correlates that aid in the diagnosis and management of these lesions are described. PMID:21277535

  7. [Research Progress on CALR Mutation in the Myeloproliterative Neoplasm -Review].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Hao, Hong-Ling; Li, Yan; Wang, Rui-Cang; Zhang, Xiao-Xia

    2016-08-01

    There is no gold diagnostic standard for BCR-ABL fusion gene negative chronic myeloproliterative neoplasm(cMPN). The following detection methods such as comprehensive bone marrow cell morphology, bone marrow pathology, genetic mutation, flow cytometry and immunohistochemical are needed to diagnose the BCR-ABL fusion gene positive cMPN. The JAK2 mutation can be used as a specific diagnostic criteria for polycythemia vera (PV), but there is no specific and sensitive indication for the JAK2 mutation-negative MPN. CALR mutation would be an indication in a certain extent. In this review, the CALR mutation detection, detection mean and its correlation with disease diagnosis and prognosis etc were summarized. PMID:27531810

  8. WHO classification of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN): A critical update.

    PubMed

    Kvasnicka, Hans Michael

    2013-12-01

    Although the revised World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for the diagnosis and classification of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) were defined by a panel of expert hematopathologists and clinicians, controversy has been repeatedly expressed questioning the clinical usefulness and reproducibility of these diagnostic guidelines. In particular, the distinction between essential thrombocythemia (ET), early/prefibrotic primary myelofibrosis (PMF) and initial stages of polycythemia vera (PV) is still a matter of debate. In this context, it has been argued that clinical correlations with histological features were not firmly substantiated. On the other hand, recently published data from independently performed studies have repeatedly validated the reproducibility of the WHO criteria and provided persuasive evidence that discrimination of early/prefibrotic PMF has a significant impact on the risk of myelofibrotic and leukemic transformation. However, as has been explicitly required, the WHO concept is based on the recognition of characteristic bone marrow patterns and a consensus of clinical and molecular data. PMID:24146204

  9. Molecular insights into regulation of JAK2 in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Stevan R.

    2015-01-01

    The critical role of Janus kinase-2 (JAK2) in regulation of myelopoiesis was established 2 decades ago, but identification of mutations in the pseudokinase domain of JAK2 in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and in other hematologic malignancies highlighted the role of JAK2 in human disease. These findings have revolutionized the diagnostics of MPNs and led to development of novel JAK2 therapeutics. However, the molecular mechanisms by which mutations in the pseudokinase domain lead to hyperactivation of JAK2 and clinical disease have been unclear. Here, we describe recent advances in the molecular characterization of the JAK2 pseudokinase domain and how pathogenic mutations lead to constitutive activation of JAK2. PMID:25824690

  10. Appendiceal mucinous neoplasms: a clinicopathologic analysis of 107 cases.

    PubMed

    Misdraji, Joseph; Yantiss, Rhonda K; Graeme-Cook, Fiona M; Balis, Ulysses J; Young, Robert H

    2003-08-01

    The classification of appendiceal mucinous tumors is controversial and terminology used for them inconsistent, particularly when they lack overtly malignant features but are associated with extra-appendiceal spread. We reviewed 107 appendiceal mucinous neoplasms and classified them as low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm (LAMN) (n = 88), mucinous adenocarcinomas (MACAs) (n = 16), or discordant (n = 3) based on architectural and cytologic features. LAMNs were characterized by a villous or flat proliferation of mucinous epithelium with low-grade atypia. Thirty-nine tumors were confined to the appendix, but 49 had extra-appendiceal tumor spread, including 39 with peritoneal tumor characterized by mucin pools harboring low-grade mucinous epithelium, usually dissecting in a hyalinized stroma. Eight of the 16 MACAs lacked destructive invasion of the appendiceal wall and eight showed an infiltrative pattern of invasion. Extra-appendiceal tumor spread was present in 12 MACAs (four peritoneum, seven peritoneum and ovaries; one ovaries only). In MACAs with an infiltrative pattern, peritoneal tumor consisted of glands and single cells in a desmoplastic stroma. The peritoneal tumor in the remaining cases consisted of mucin pools that contained mucinous epithelium with high-grade atypia and, in some cases, increased cellularity compared with that seen in peritoneal spread in cases of LAMN. Three cases were classified as discordant because the appendiceal tumors were LAMNs but the peritoneal tumors were high-grade. Follow-up was available for 49 LAMNs, 15 MACAs, and 2 discordant cases. None of the patients with LAMNs confined to the appendix experienced recurrence (median follow-up 6 years). LAMNs with extra-appendiceal spread were associated with 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates of 100%, 86%, and 45%, respectively. Patients with MACA had 3- and 5-year survival rates of 90% and 44%, respectively (p = 0.04). The bulk of peritoneal disease correlated with prognosis among

  11. Enhancement of maternal lactation performance during prolonged lactation in the mouse by mouse GH and long-R3-IGF-I is linked to changes in mammary signaling and gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GH, prolactin (PRL), and IGF-I stimulate lactation-related metabolic processes in mammary epithelial cells. However, the ability of these factors to stimulate milk production in animals varies depending on species and experimental variables. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that transgen...

  12. Computed tomographic characteristics of odontogenic neoplasms in dogs.

    PubMed

    Amory, Joseph T; Reetz, Jennifer A; Sánchez, Melissa D; Bradley, Charles W; Lewis, John R; Reiter, Alexander M; Mai, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic neoplasms are locally invasive oral tumors in dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe CT characteristics for varying histopathologic types of canine odontogenic neoplasms. A board-certified veterinary radiologist who was unaware of histologic findings reviewed and scored imaging studies. A total of 29 dogs were included in the study. Twenty-three of these dogs had concurrent dental radiographs. The most common CT characteristics for all tumor types were a direct association with or in the region of multiple teeth in 96.4% (27/28), contrast enhancement in 96.3% (26/27), alveolar bone lysis in 93.1% (27/29), and mass-associated tooth displacement in 85.2% (23/27). Mass-associated cyst-like structures were identified in 53.6% (15/28) and were only present in tumors containing odontogenic epithelium. Canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas (n = 15) appeared as extra-osseous (10/15) or intra-osseous (5/15) masses. Intra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas were more likely to have mass-associated cyst-like structures and were subjectively more aggressive when compared with extra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumors (n = 3) had subjectively uniform CT imaging characteristics and consisted of round soft tissue and mineral attenuating masses with multiple associated cyst-like structures. Fibromatous epulides of periodontal ligament origin (n = 4) were contrast enhancing extra-osseous masses that were rarely referred for CT examinations and 25% (1/4) were not visible with CT. Other odontogenic tumors were less represented or had more variable CT imaging characteristics. Mass-associated tooth destruction was appreciated more often with dental radiographs and extra-oral tumor extension was identified more often with CT. PMID:24102949

  13. Key stages in mammary gland development: the mammary end bud as a motile organ.

    PubMed

    Hinck, Lindsay; Silberstein, Gary B

    2005-01-01

    In the rodent, epithelial end buds define the tips of elongating mammary ducts. These highly motile structures undergo repeated dichotomous branching as they aggressively advance through fatty stroma and, turning to avoid other ducts, they finally cease growth leaving behind the open, tree-like framework on which secretory alveoli develop during pregnancy. This review identifies the motility of end buds as a unique developmental marker that represents the successful integration of systemic and local mammotrophic influences, and covers relevant advances in ductal growth regulation, extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, and cell adhesion in the inner end bud. An unexpected growth-promoting synergy between insulin-like growth factor-1 and progesterone, in which ducts elongate without forming new end buds, is described as well as evidence strongly supporting self-inhibition of ductal elongation by end-bud-secreted transforming growth factor-beta acting on stromal targets. The influence of the matrix metalloproteinase ECM-remodeling enzymes, notably matrix metalloproteinase-2, on end bud growth is discussed in the broader context of enzymes that regulate the polysaccharide-rich glycosaminoglycan elements of the ECM. Finally, a critical, motility-enabling role for the cellular architecture of the end bud is identified and the contribution of cadherins, the netrin/neogenin system, and ErbB2 to the structure and motility of end buds is discussed. PMID:16280048

  14. Tenascin is a Stromal Marker for Epithelial Malignancy in the Mammary Gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Eleanor J.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Adams Pearson, Carolyn; Inaguma, Yutaka; Taya, Koji; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Sakakura, Teruyo

    1987-07-01

    Tenascin is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that is not present in the normal mature rat mammary gland. The distribution of tenascin was examined by immunohistochemistry in mammary tumors from carcinogen-treated and untreated rats, in virus-induced mammary tumors from mice, and in a variety of mammary gland lesions from humans. Tenascin was detectable in the stroma of the malignant but not of the benign tumors from all species. An inhibition ELISA, testing homogenates of rat tumors, confirmed that tenascin was present in malignant but not in benign tumors. Thus, tenascin was consistently found to be a stromal marker for epithelial malignancy in the mammary gland. It is concluded that tenascin may be involved in the interactions between the epithelial and mesenchyme-derived (stromal) components of the mammary gland, which are known to influence epithelial carcinogenesis in this organ.

  15. Tumour-Associated Transplantation Antigens of Neoplasms Induced by a Naturally Occurring Murine Sarcoma Virus (FBJ-MSV)

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David B.; Moore, Michael

    1973-01-01

    FBJ osteosarcoma virus (FBJ-MSV) isolated originally from a spontaneously arising osteosarcoma in a CF1 mouse is the only known naturally occurring murine sarcoma virus (MSV). It is unique among strains of MSV in producing primarily sarcomata in mice. The capacity of tumour cells transformed in vivo by this agent to elicit specific transplantation immunity in syngeneic hosts was investigated. A low level of resistance (104-105 cells) was consistently induced by implantation of x-irradiated (15,000 rad) tumours or surgical excision of developing subcutaneous grafts. By contrast intraperitoneal inoculation of virus containing cellfree extracts of FBJ-MSV sarcomata was a far less effective immunization procedure. Confirmatory evidence for the antigenicity of these neoplasms was obtained in tests in which preincubation of tumour cells with lymphoid cells from specifically immune donors inhibited in vivo outgrowth of the FBJ-MSV cells in untreated syngeneic recipients. The induction of host resistance to FBJ-MSV cells by immunization with identical and independently-induced FBJ-MSV tumours established that FBJ-MSV cells possess common cell surface antigenic specificities in a manner analogous to those of experimental neoplasms induced by other oncogenic DNA and RNA viruses. Since FBJ-MSV cells release infectious virus it was not possible in this system to establish whether the tumour-rejection antigen was cellular or virion in nature. The antigenic weakness of FBJ-MSV cells in syngeneic hosts is comparable with that of virus-induced murine leukaemias of the Gross (G) or “wild” type subgroup to which category FBJ-MSV also belongs. These features suggest that FBJ-MSV exemplifies naturally occurring sarcomagenic viruses more closely than those of the Friend-Moloney-Rauscher-Graffi (FMRGr) subgroup which in general induce highly antigenic neoplasms. PMID:4516007

  16. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mammary gland in a dog.

    PubMed

    Nakahira, R; Michishita, M; Yoshimura, H; Hatakeyama, H; Takahashi, K

    2015-01-01

    A 10-year-old female border collie was presented with a mass (2 cm diameter) in the fifth mammary gland. The mass was located in the subcutis and the cut surface was grey-white in colour. Microscopically, the mass was composed of tumour cells arranged in nests of various sizes separated by delicate fibrovascular stroma. The tumour cells had small, round hypochromatic nuclei and abundant cytoplasm. Metastases were observed in the inguinal lymph node. Immunohistochemically, most tumour cells expressed cytokeratin (CK) 20, chromogranin A, neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin and oestrogen receptor-β, but not low molecular weight CK (CAM5.2), p63 and insulin. Ultrastructurally, the tumour cells contained a large number of electron-dense granules corresponding to neuroendocrine granules. Based on these findings, this case was diagnosed as a neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mammary gland. PMID:25670668

  17. Chromatin Remodeling in Mammary Gland Differentiation and Breast Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tim H.-M.; Esteller, Manel

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone modifications have essential roles in remodeling chromatin structure of genes necessary for multi-lineage differentiation of mammary stem/progenitor cells. The role of this well-defined epigenetic programming is to heritably maintain transcriptional plasticity of these loci over multiple cell divisions in the differentiated progeny. Epigenetic events can be deregulated in progenitor cells chronically exposed to xenoestrogen or inflammatory microenvironment. In addition, epigenetically mediated silencing of genes associated with tumor suppression can take place, resulting in clonal proliferation of undifferentiated or semidifferentiated cells. Alternatively, microRNAs that negatively regulate the expression of their protein-coding targets may become epigenetically repressed, leading to oncogenic expression of these genes. Here we further discuss interactions between DNA methylation and histone modifications that have significant contributions to the differentiation of mammary stem/progenitor cells and to tumor initiation and progression. PMID:20610549

  18. Mammary gland tumor formation in transgenic mice overexpressing stromelysin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1995-06-01

    An intact basement membrane (BM) is essential for the proper function, differentiation and morphology of many epithelial cells. The disruption or loss of this BM occurs during normal development as well as in the disease state. To examine the importance of BM during mammary gland development in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that inappropriately express autoactivating isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. The mammary glands from these mice are both functionally and morphologically altered throughout development. We have now documented a dramatic incidence of breast tumors in several independent lines of these mice. These data suggest that overexpression of stromelysin-1 and disruption of the BM may be a key step in the multi-step process of breast cancer.

  19. Serotoninergic and Circadian Systems: Driving Mammary Gland Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Trujillo, Aridany; Casey, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Since lactation is one of the most metabolically demanding states in adult female mammals, beautifully complex regulatory mechanisms are in place to time lactation to begin after birth and cease when the neonate is weaned. Lactation is regulated by numerous different homeorhetic factors, all of them tightly coordinated with the demands of milk production. Emerging evidence support that among these factors are the serotonergic and circadian clock systems. Here we review the serotoninergic and circadian clock systems and their roles in the regulation of mammary gland development and lactation physiology. We conclude by presenting our hypothesis that these two systems interact to accommodate the metabolic demands of lactation and thus adaptive changes in these systems occur to maintain mammary and systemic homeostasis through the reproductive cycles of female mammals. PMID:27471474

  20. Mammary gland tumors in irradiated and untreated guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch-Ligeti, C.; Liebelt, A.G.; Congdon, C.C.; Stewart, H.L.

    1986-01-01

    This is a report of mammary gland tumors from 62 guinea pigs. The tumors arose in the terminal ductal-lobular units as either lobular acinar carcinoma or cystadenocarcinoma or as papillary carcinomas within large ducts near the mammilla. About half the number of the males had terminal ductal-lobular carcinomas and all but 2 of the papillary duct carcinomas also arose in males. Large tumors frequently exhibited squamous, chondromatous, osseous, fatty and myoepitheliomatous types of tissues. In 2 irradiated males and 1 female the tumors metastasized. Whole-body irradiation did not produce significant changes in the number or sex distribution or in the morphology of mammary gland tumors in inbred or outbred guinea pigs. All females had cystic ovaries without increase in granulosa cells, 24 (66.6%) had uterine tumors and 13 (34.2%) had adrenal gland tumors; all males had atrophic testes, 5 (16.5%) had testicular and 6 (22.2%) had adrenal gland tumors.

  1. Quantification of regenerative potential in primary human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Jelena R.; Miura, Haruko; Meixner, Lisa K.; Irmler, Martin; Kloos, Uwe J.; Hirschi, Benjamin; Bartsch, Harald S.; Sass, Steffen; Beckers, Johannes; Theis, Fabian J.; Gabka, Christian; Sotlar, Karl; Scheel, Christina H.

    2015-01-01

    We present an organoid regeneration assay in which freshly isolated human mammary epithelial cells are cultured in adherent or floating collagen gels, corresponding to a rigid or compliant matrix environment. In both conditions, luminal progenitors form spheres, whereas basal cells generate branched ductal structures. In compliant but not rigid collagen gels, branching ducts form alveoli at their tips, express basal and luminal markers at correct positions, and display contractility, which is required for alveologenesis. Thereby, branched structures generated in compliant collagen gels resemble terminal ductal-lobular units (TDLUs), the functional units of the mammary gland. Using the membrane metallo-endopeptidase CD10 as a surface marker enriches for TDLU formation and reveals the presence of stromal cells within the CD49fhi/EpCAM− population. In summary, we describe a defined in vitro assay system to quantify cells with regenerative potential and systematically investigate their interaction with the physical environment at distinct steps of morphogenesis. PMID:26071498

  2. Myofibroblastoma arising in mammary hamartoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Uchôa, Diego M; Cruz, Dênnis Baroni; Schaefer, Pedro Guilherme; Pêgas, Karla Laís; Cambruzzi, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Myofibroblastoma (MFB) is a rare mesenchymal tumor arising in breast's soft tissue with a great variety of microscopic features that can be mistaken with a wide variety of biphasic lesions. The authors report a rare case of myofibroblastoma of the breast arising in a mammary hamartoma (MH), present a review of the clinicopathological features of these lesions, and make some diagnostic considerations. The tumour consisted of a well-circumscribed nodule. MFB component comprised about fifty percent of the lesion and was made up of bipolar spindle cells arranged in fascicular clusters separated by bands of hyalinized collagen. There were fat cells and several residual hamartoma glands intermingled and distorted in MFB area. MFB component was positive for Desmin, CD34, bcl-2, and Calponin. To the best of our knowledge, MFB has not been reported in MH, neither has any of the reports described mammary glands joined within MFB. PMID:21151720

  3. Control of Differentiation of a Mammary Cell Line by Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulbecco, Renato; Bologna, Mauro; Unger, Michael

    1980-03-01

    A rat mammary cell line (LA7) undergoes spontaneous differentiation into domes due to production of specific inducers by the cells. Some of these inducers may be lipids, and we show that lipids regulate this differentiation as both inducers and inhibitors. One inhibitor is the tumor promoter tetradecanoyl-13 phorbol 12-acetate. The inducers are saturated fatty acids of two groups: butyric acid and acids with chain lengths from C13 to C16, especially myristic acid (C14). Other inducers are myristoyl and palmitoyl lysolecithins, myristic acid methyl ester, and two cationic detergents with a tetradecenyl chain. We propose that the lipids with a C14-C16 alkyl chain affect differentiation by recognizing specific receptors through their alkyl chains and that the effects obtained depend on the head groups. These lipids may be physiological regulators in the mammary gland.

  4. Anti-tumor effect of SLPI on mammary but not colon tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Amiano, Nicolás O; Costa, María J; Reiteri, R Macarena; Payés, Cristian; Guerrieri, Diego; Tateosian, Nancy L; Sánchez, Mercedes L; Maffia, Paulo C; Diament, Miriam; Karas, Romina; Orqueda, Andrés; Rizzo, Miguel; Alaniz, Laura; Mazzolini, Guillermo; Klein, Slobodanka; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Chuluyan, H Eduardo

    2013-02-01

    Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is a serine protease inhibitor that was related to cancer development and metastasis dissemination on several types of tumors. However, it is not known the effect of SLPI on mammary and colon tumors. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of SLPI on mammary and colon tumor growth. The effect of SLPI was tested on in vitro cell apoptosis and in vivo tumor growth experiments. SLPI over-expressing human and murine mammary and colon tumor cells were generated by gene transfection. The administration of murine mammary tumor cells over-expressing high levels of SLPI did not develop tumors in mice. On the contrary, the administration of murine colon tumor cells over-expressing SLPI, developed faster tumors than control cells. Intratumoral, but not intraperitoneal administration of SLPI, delayed the growth of tumors and increased the survival of mammary but not colon tumor bearing mice. In vitro culture of mammary tumor cell lines treated with SLPI, and SLPI producer clones were more prone to apoptosis than control cells, mainly under serum deprivation culture conditions. Herein we demonstrated that SLPI induces the apoptosis of mammary tumor cells in vitro and decreases the mammary but not colon tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, SLPI may be a new potential therapeutic tool for certain tumors, such as mammary tumors. PMID:22767220

  5. Comparison of mouse mammary gland imaging techniques and applications: Reflectance confocal microscopy, GFP Imaging, and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tilli, Maddalena T; Parrish, Angela R; Cotarla, Ion; Jones, Laundette P; Johnson, Michael D; Furth, Priscilla A

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetically engineered mouse models of mammary gland cancer enable the in vivo study of molecular mechanisms and signaling during development and cancer pathophysiology. However, traditional whole mount and histological imaging modalities are only applicable to non-viable tissue. Methods We evaluated three techniques that can be quickly applied to living tissue for imaging normal and cancerous mammary gland: reflectance confocal microscopy, green fluorescent protein imaging, and ultrasound imaging. Results In the current study, reflectance confocal imaging offered the highest resolution and was used to optically section mammary ductal structures in the whole mammary gland. Glands remained viable in mammary gland whole organ culture when 1% acetic acid was used as a contrast agent. Our application of using green fluorescent protein expressing transgenic mice in our study allowed for whole mammary gland ductal structures imaging and enabled straightforward serial imaging of mammary gland ducts in whole organ culture to visualize the growth and differentiation process. Ultrasound imaging showed the lowest resolution. However, ultrasound was able to detect mammary preneoplastic lesions 0.2 mm in size and was used to follow cancer growth with serial imaging in living mice. Conclusion In conclusion, each technique enabled serial imaging of living mammary tissue and visualization of growth and development, quickly and with minimal tissue preparation. The use of the higher resolution reflectance confocal and green fluorescent protein imaging techniques and lower resolution ultrasound were complementary. PMID:18215290

  6. Canine mammary tumours: protective effect of late ovariectomy and stimulating effect of progestins.

    PubMed

    Misdorp, W

    1988-01-01

    Ovariectomy, even when performed at an advanced age, was found to be to some extent protective against mammary tumour development in dogs. Bitches treated with progestins had a slightly higher risk for mammary tumours (all types, benign and malignant) than controls. Progestin treatment did not increase the risk of mammary cancer. Benign tumours in (treated and untreated) dogs appeared earlier than malignant ones. Progestin treatment resulted in earlier appearance of both benign and malignant tumours than in controls. The ratio solitary/multiple mammary tumours was not significantly different between treated and untreated dogs. PMID:3376408

  7. Studies on canine mammary tumours. I. Age, seasonal and breed distribution.

    PubMed

    Boldizsár, H; Szenci, O; Muray, T; Csenki, J

    1992-01-01

    The incidence as well as age, seasonal and breed distribution of canine mammary tumours (n = 521) were studied at the Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the University of Veterinary Science, Budapest, between 1985 and 1989. In 39 cases of mammary tumour, blood plasma oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P) concentrations were also determined. Of all dogs referred to the clinics of the University in 1985, 0.7% had mammary tumour. On the average, 104 +/- 9.3 cases of mammary tumour were recorded at the Clinic of Obstetrics per year. This number did not increase after the Chernobyl atomic reactor catastrophe of 1986. The age distribution of canine mammary tumour found in this study shows good agreement with earlier data of the literature: mammary tumour showed the highest incidence in 10 years old dogs. The incidence of mammary tumour kept increasing with age until the 14th year of life (as expressed in per cent of animals of identical age). The number of mammary tumours was markedly higher in the spring (April-May) and autumn (September). This seasonality was demonstrable in 11 to 16 years old bitches, too. On the basis of the blood plasma E2 and P profiles, 61.5% of the clinically anoestrous animals were found to be cycling. The strikingly high ratio of pulis among dogs with mammary cancer was suggestive of a breed disposition. PMID:1476093

  8. A mystery wrapped in an enigma: Matrigel enhancement of mammary cell growth and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael T; Landua, John D; Adams, Homer C; Medina, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    The analysis of normal mammary morphogenesis is facilitated by the use of mammary fat pad transplantation. The recent experiments on analysis of normal mammary epithelial stem cell activity rely heavily on this technique. In this review, we discuss the known and unknown attributes of using Matrigel in the injection of the mammary epithelial cell suspension. Matrigel greatly increases the "take" frequency of the injected cell suspension; however, there is some uncertainty regarding the interpretation of some of the results. After consideration of these issues, our conclusion is that Matrigel is important in order to obtain rigorous and reproducible results. PMID:22581302

  9. A novel mechanism of resistance to mouse mammary tumor virus infection.

    PubMed

    Golovkina, T V

    2000-03-01

    Exogenous mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is carried from the gut of suckling pups to the mammary glands by lymphocytes and induces mammary gland tumors. MMTV-induced tumor incidence in inbred mice of different strains ranges from 0 to as high as 100%. For example, mice of the C3H/HeN strain are highly susceptible, whereas mice of the I/LnJ strain are highly resistant. Of the different factors that together determine the susceptibility of mice to development of MMTV-induced mammary tumors, genetic elements play a major role, although very few genes that determine a susceptibility-resistance phenotype have been identified so far. Our data indicate that MMTV fails to infect mammary glands in I/LnJ mice foster nursed on viremic C3H/HeN females, even though the I/LnJ mammary tissue is not refractory to MMTV infection. Lymphocytes from fostered I/LnJ mice contained integrated MMTV proviruses and shed virus but failed to establish infection in the mammary glands of susceptible syngeneic (I x C3H.JK)F(1) females. Based on the susceptible-resistant phenotype distribution in N(2) females, both MMTV mammary gland infection and mammary gland tumor development in I/LnJ mice are controlled by a single locus. PMID:10684291

  10. Amphiregulin mediates self-renewal in an immortal mammary epithelial cell line with stem cell characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Brian W.; Boulanger, Corinne A.; Anderson, Lisa H.; Jimenez-Rojo, Lucia; Brisken, Cathrin; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2010-02-01

    Amphiregulin (AREG), a ligand for epidermal growth factor receptor, is required for mammary gland ductal morphogenesis and mediates estrogen actions in vivo, emerging as an essential growth factor during mammary gland growth and differentiation. The COMMA-D {beta}-geo (CD{beta}geo) mouse mammary cell line displays characteristics of normal mammary progenitor cells including the ability to regenerate a mammary gland when transplanted into the cleared fat pad of a juvenile mouse, nuclear label retention, and the capacity to form anchorage-independent mammospheres. We demonstrate that AREG is essential for formation of floating mammospheres by CD{beta}geo cells and that the mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in AREG-mediated mammosphere formation. Addition of exogenous AREG promotes mammosphere formation in cells where AREG expression is knocked down by siRNA and mammosphere formation by AREG{sup -/-} mammary epithelial cells. AREG knockdown inhibits mammosphere formation by duct-limited mammary progenitor cells but not lobule-limited mammary progenitor cells. These data demonstrate AREG mediates the function of a subset of mammary progenitor cells in vitro.

  11. [Mammary implant selection or chest implants fabrication with computer help].

    PubMed

    Chavoin, J-P; André, A; Bozonnet, E; Teisseyre, A; Arrue, J; Moreno, B; Gangloff, D; Grolleau, J-L; Garrido, I

    2010-10-01

    Authors present their personal and original experience in the use of computer to enhance the precision in the good choice of volumes and shapes in the field of mammary reconstruction and aesthetic augmentation (800 cases). Concerning funnel chest (163 cases) and Poland syndrome (12 cases), they use computer-assisted conception and custom-made implants, much more precise than traditional plaster cast. PMID:20864242

  12. Migrastatin Analogues Inhibit Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Majchrzak, Kinga; Lo Re, Daniele; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Bulkowska, Małgorzata; Homa, Agata; Pawłowski, Karol; Motyl, Tomasz; Murphy, Paul V.; Król, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer spread to other organs is the main cause of death of oncological patients. Migration of cancer cells from a primary tumour is the crucial step in the complex process of metastasis, therefore blocking this process is currently the main treatment strategy. Metastasis inhibitors derived from natural products, such as, migrastatin, are very promising anticancer agents. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of six migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-1 to 6) on migration and invasion of canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines isolated from primary tumours and their metastases to the lungs. Canine mammary tumours constitute a valuable tool for studying multiple aspect of human cancer. Results Our results showed that two of six fully synthetic analogues of migrastatin: MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were potent inhibitors of canine mammary cancer cells migration and invasion. These data were obtained using the wound healing test, as well as trans-well migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, the treatment of cancer cells with the most effective compound (MGSTA-6) disturbed binding between filamentous F-actin and fascin1. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that treatment with MGSTA-6 increased the presence of unbound fascin1 and reduced co-localization of F-actin and fascin1 in canine cancer cells. Most likely, actin filaments were not cross-linked by fascin1 and did not generate the typical filopodial architecture of actin filaments in response to the activity of MGSTA-6. Thus, administration of MGSTA-6 results in decreased formation of filopodia protrusions and stress fibres in canine mammary cancer cells, causing inhibition of cancer migration and invasion. Conclusion Two synthetic migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6) were shown to be promising compounds for inhibition of cancer metastasis. They may have beneficial therapeutic effects in cancer therapy in dogs, especially in combination with other anticancer drugs. However, further in

  13. Glucocorticoid modulation of casein gene transcription in mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, R; Mehta, N M; Ganguly, N; Banerjee, M R

    1979-01-01

    The influence of cortisol and prolactin on casein gene expression in the mammary gland of lactating BALB/c mice was measured by using a specific cDNA probe to 15S casein mRNA (cDNAcsn). Casein mRNA (mRNAcsn) level in the mammary gland was decreased by 85% 5 days after adrenal ablation, but then was increased 4.4-fold 12 hr after a single injection of hydrocortisone-21-acetate. An 80% decrease in serum prolactin level, induced by the prolactin inhibitor 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptin (CB-154), did not alter the level of mRNAcsn in the gland. Specific transcription of the casein gene in nuclei isolated from lactating mammary glands was measured by cDNAcsn hybridization to the in vitro synthesized Hg-CTP-containing RNA (Hg-RNA), which was purified by SH-agarose chromatography. The level of the mRNAcsn in Hg-RNA synthesized in the isolated nuclei was 0.09% and this was decreased 85% by alpha-amanitin, indicating that the mRNAcsn sequences in the Hg-RNA were the products of RNA polymerase II-directed DNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Transcription of the mRNAcsn in isolated nuclei was decreased by 70% 5 days after adrenalectomy and a single injection of the glucocorticoid then increased the transcription level 2-fold at 6 hr. Essentially no alteration of the level of transcription was detectable in mammary nuclei isolated from lactating mice with 80% decreased serum prolactin level, induced by CB-154 treatment. The results thus demonstrate a glucocorticoid involvement on the modulation of casein gene expression at the transcriptional level of control. PMID:293734

  14. Isolation of Cancer Epithelial Cells from Mouse Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sara; Chen, Hexin; Lo, Pang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of cancer epithelial cells from mouse mammary tumor is accomplished by digestion of the solid tumor. Red blood cells and other contaminates are removed using several washing techniques such that primary epithelial cells can further enriched. This procedure yields primary tumor cells that can be used for in vitro tissue culture, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and a wide variety of other experiments (Lo et al., 2012).

  15. Comparative Epigenomics of Human and Mouse Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Demircan, Berna; Dyer, Lisa M.; Gerace, Mallory; Lobenhofer, Edward K.; Robertson, Keith D.; Brown, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Gene silencing by aberrant epigenetic chromatin alteration is a well-recognized event contributing to tumorigenesis. While genetically engineered tumor-prone mouse models have proven a powerful tool in understanding many aspects of carcinogenesis, to date few studies have focused on epigenetic alterations in mouse tumors. To uncover epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) in mouse mammary tumor cells, we conducted initial genome-wide screening by combining the treatment of cultured cells with the DNA demethylating drug 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-azadC) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) with expression microarray. By conducting this initial screen on EMT6 cells and applying protein function and genomic structure criteria to genes identified as upregulated in response to 5-azadC/TSA, we were able to identify 2 characterized breast cancer TSGs (Timp3 and Rprm) and 4 putative TSGs (Atp1B2, Dusp2, FoxJ1 and Smpd3) silenced in this line. By testing a panel of ten mouse mammary tumor lines, we determined that each of these genes is commonly hypermethylated, albeit with varying frequency. Furthermore, by examining a panel of human breast tumor lines and primary tumors we observed that the human orthologs of ATP1B2, FOXJ1 and SMPD3 are aberrantly hypermethylated in the human disease while DUSP2 was not hypermethylated in primary breast tumors. Finally, we examined hypermethylation of several genes targeted for epigenetic silencing in human breast tumors in our panel of ten mouse mammary tumor lines. We observed that the orthologs of Cdh1, RarB, Gstp1, RassF1 genes were hypermethylated, while neither Dapk1 nor Wif1 were aberrantly methylated in this panel of mouse tumor lines. From this study, we conclude that there is significant, but not absolute, overlap in the epigenome of human and mouse mammary tumors. PMID:18836996

  16. Incidence and patient survival of myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms in the United States, 2001-12.

    PubMed

    Srour, Samer A; Devesa, Susan S; Morton, Lindsay M; Check, David P; Curtis, Rochelle E; Linet, Martha S; Dores, Graça M

    2016-08-01

    Descriptive epidemiological information on myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and myelodysplastic (MDS)/MPNs is largely derived from single institution and European population-based studies. Data obtained following adoption of the World Health Organization classification of haematopoietic neoplasms and JAK2 V617F mutation testing are sparse. Using population-based data, we comprehensively assessed subtype-specific MPN and MDS/MPN incidence rates (IRs), IR ratios (IRRs) and relative survival (RS) in the United States (2001-12). IRs were highest for polycythaemia vera (PV) (IR = 10·9) and essential thrombocythaemia (ET) (IR = 9·6). Except for ET and mastocytosis, overall IRs were significantly higher among males (IRRs = 1·4-2·3). All evaluable MPNs were associated with lower IRs among Hispanic whites than non-Hispanic whites (NHWs), with the exception of BCR-ABL1-positive chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), chronic eosinophilic leukaemia (CEL) and juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia. Except for CEL, Asians/Pacific Islanders had significantly lower MPN IRs than NHWs. ET, MPN-unclassifiable and CEL IRs were 18%, 19% and 60% higher, respectively, among blacks than NHWs. Five-year RS was more favourable for younger (<60 years) than older individuals and for women compared with men, except for PV at older ages. RS was highest (>90%) for younger PV and ET patients and lowest (<20%) for older chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia and atypical BCR-ABL1-negative CML patients. Varying MPN and MDS/MPN incidence patterns by subtype support distinct aetiologies and/or susceptible populations. Decreased survival rates as compared to that expected in the general population were associated with every MPN subtype, highlighting the need for new treatments, particularly among older individuals. PMID:27061824

  17. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line. PMID:20400167

  18. Primary Cilia Regulate Branching Morphogenesis During Mammary Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Kimberly M.; Liu, Bob Y.; Tlsty, Thea D.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary During mammary gland development an epithelial bud undergoes branching morphogenesis to expand into a continuous tree-like network of branched ducts [1]. The process involves multiple cell types that are coordinated by hormones and growth factors coupled with signaling events including Wnt and Hedgehog [2-5]. Primary cilia play key roles in the development of many organs by coordinating extracellular signaling (Wnt, Hedgehog) with cellular physiology [6-8]. During mammary development, we find cilia on luminal epithelial, myoepithelial and stromal cells during early branching morphogenesis when epithelial ducts extend into the fat pad and undergo branching morphogenesis. When branching is complete, cilia disappear from luminal epithelial cells but remain on myoepithelial and stromal cells. Ciliary dysfunction caused by intraflagellar transport (IFT) defects results in branching defects. These include decreased ductal extension and decreased secondary and tertiary branching along with reduced lobular-alveolar development during pregnancy and lactation. We find increased canonical Wnt and decreased Hedgehog signaling in the mutant glands, which is consistent with the role of cilia in regulating these pathways [6-11]. In mammary gland and other organs, increased canonical Wnt [12-14] and decreased Hedgehog [15, 16] signaling decreases branching morphogenesis suggesting that Wnt and Hedgehog signaling connect ciliary dysfunction to branching defects. PMID:20381354

  19. Constitutive telomerase expression promotes mammary carcinomas in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Artandi, Steven E.; Alson, Scott; Tietze, Maja K.; Sharpless, Norman E.; Ye, Siqin; Greenberg, Roger A.; Castrillon, Diego H.; Horner, James W.; Weiler, Sarah R.; Carrasco, Ruben D.; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase is up-regulated in the vast majority of human cancers and serves to halt the progressive telomere shortening that ultimately blocks would-be cancer cells from achieving a full malignant phenotype. In contrast to humans, the laboratory mouse possesses long telomeres and, even in early generation telomerase-deficient mice, the level of telomere reserve is sufficient to avert telomere-based checkpoint responses and to permit full malignant progression. These features in the mouse provide an opportunity to determine whether enforced high-level telomerase activity can serve functions that extend beyond its ability to sustain telomere length and function. Here, we report the generation and characterization of transgenic mice that express the catalytic subunit of telomerase (mTERT) at high levels in a broad variety of tissues. Expression of mTERT conferred increased telomerase enzymatic activity in several tissues, including mammary gland, splenocytes, and cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts, mTERT overexpression extended telomere lengths but did not prevent culture-induced replicative arrest, thus reinforcing the view that this phenomenon is not related to occult telomere shortening. Robust telomerase activity, however, was associated with the spontaneous development of mammary intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive mammary carcinomas in a significant proportion of aged females. These data indicate that enforced mTERT expression can promote the development of spontaneous cancers even in the setting of ample telomere reserve. PMID:12034875

  20. Automatic segmentation of histological structures in mammary gland tissue sections

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravikanth; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2004-02-17

    Real-time three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of epithelial structures in human mammary gland tissue blocks mapped with selected markers would be an extremely helpful tool for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment planning. Besides its clear clinical application, this tool could also shed a great deal of light on the molecular basis of breast cancer initiation and progression. In this paper we present a framework for real-time segmentation of epithelial structures in two-dimensional (2D) images of sections of normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue blocks. Complete 3D rendering of the tissue can then be done by surface rendering of the structures detected in consecutive sections of the blocks. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are first sliced, and sections are stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy and their background is corrected using a phantom image. We then use the Fast-Marching algorithm to roughly extract the contours of the different morphological structures in the images. The result is then refined with the Level-Set method which converges to an accurate (sub-pixel) solution for the segmentation problem. Finally, our system stacks together the 2D results obtained in order to reconstruct a 3D representation of the entire tissue block under study. Our method is illustrated with results from the segmentation of human and mouse mammary gland tissue samples.

  1. Oxidative stress parameters in bitches with mammary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Szczubiał, M; Kankofer, M; Łopuszyński, W; Dabrowski, R; Lipko, J

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe some of the oxidative stress parameters in bitches suffering from spontaneously occurring mammary gland tumours. The experiment involved 28 bitches which had mammary gland tumours removed surgically (15 bitches with malignant tumour and 13 with benign tumour) as well as 10 clinically healthy bitches. The activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were determined in haemolysates of erythrocytes derived from the animals. The concentrations of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as well as -SH groups, were determined in blood plasma. GSH-Px activity was significantly higher in the malignant tumour group than in healthy animals. SOD activity was significantly higher in animals with tumours compared with the control group. Activities of both enzymes were higher in animals with malignant tumours than in benign groups, but the differences were not statistically significant. The concentrations of TBARS and -SH groups were similar in all examined groups. The increase of antioxidative enzyme activities in these animals may suggest the activation of antioxidative defence mechanisms in mammary gland carcinogenesis. Moreover, it might indicate the participation of oxidative stress in malignancies. Further experiments involving more animals, with more frequent sample collection and the use of other oxidative stress markers are necessary. PMID:15533114

  2. Murine mammary stem/progenitor cell isolation: Different method matters?

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Dong, Qiaoxiang; Chen, Yuanhong; Zhang, Fuchuang; Wu, Anqi; Shi, Yuanshuo; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Daniel, Benjamin J; Huang, Changjiang; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Murine mammary stem/progenitor cell isolation has been routinely used in many laboratories, yet direct comparison among different methods is lacking. In this study, we compared two frequently used digestion methods and three sets of frequently used surface markers for their efficiency in enriching mammary stem and progenitor cells in two commonly used mouse strains, C57BL/6J and FVB. Our findings revealed that the slow overnight digestion method using gentle collagenase/hyaluronidase could be easily adopted and yielded reliable and consistent results in different batches of animals. In contrast, the different fast digestion protocols, as described in published studies, yielded high percent of non-epithelial cells with very few basal epithelial cells liberated in our hands. The three sets of markers tested in our hands reveal rather equally efficiency in separating luminal and basal cells if same fluorochrome conjugations were used. However, the tendency of non-epithelial cell inclusion in the basal cell gate was highest in samples profiled by CD24/CD29 and lowest in samples profiled by CD49f/EpCAM, this is especially true in mammary cells isolated from C57BL/6J mice. This finding will have significant implication when sorted basal cells are used for subsequent gene expression analysis. PMID:26933638

  3. The effects of spaceflight on mammary metabolism in pregnant rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, K.; Maple, R.; Vyas, C.; Munaim, S.; Darling, A.; Casey, T.; Alberts, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight on mammary metabolism of 10 pregnant rats was measured on Day 20 of pregnancy and after parturition. Rats were flown on the space shuttle from Day 11 through Day 20 of pregnancy. After their return to earth, glucose oxidation to carbon dioxide increased 43% (P < 0.05), and incorporation into fatty acids increased 300% (P < 0.005) compared to controls. It is unclear whether the enhanced glucose use is due to spaceflight or a response to landing. Casein mRNA and gross histology were not altered at Day 20 of pregnancy. Six rats gave birth (on Day 22 to 23 of pregnancy) and mammary metabolic activity was measured immediately postpartum. The earlier effects of spaceflight were no longer apparent. There was also no difference in expression of beta-casein mRNA. It is clear from these studies that spaceflight does not impair the normal development of the mammary gland, its ability to use glucose, nor the ability to express mRNA for a major milk protein.

  4. Characterization of an epithelial cell line from bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    German, Tania; Barash, Itamar

    2002-05-01

    Elucidation of the bovine mammary gland's unique characteristics depends on obtaining an authentic cell line that will reproduce its function in vitro. Representative clones from bovine mammary cell populations, differing in their attachment capabilities, were cultured. L-1 cells showed strong attachment to the plate, whereas H-7 cells detached easily. Cultures established from these clones were nontumorigenic upon transplantation to an immunodeficient host; they exhibited the epithelial cell characteristics of positive cytokeratin but not smooth muscle actin staining. Both cell lines depended on fetal calf serum for proliferation. They exhibited distinct levels of differentiation on Matrigel in serum-free, insulin-supplemented medium on the basis of their organization and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) secretion. H-7 cells organized into mammospheres, whereas L-1 cells arrested in a duct-like morphology. In both cell lines, prolactin activated phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription, Stat5-a regulator of milk protein gene transcription, and of PHAS-I-an inhibitor of translation initiation in its nonphosphorylated form. De novo synthesis and secretion of BLG were detected in differentiated cultures: in L-1 cells, BLG was dependent on lactogenic hormones for maximal induction but was less stringently controlled than was beta-casein in the mouse CID-9 cell line. L-1 cells also encompassed a near-diploid chromosomal karyotype and may serve as a tool for studying functional characteristics of the bovine mammary gland. PMID:12418925

  5. Pathological characteristics of intraductal polypoid neoplasms of bile ducts in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Takeo; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Sato, Yasunori; Hirano, Satoshi; Pairojkul, Chawalit

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary or tubular neoplasms of the bile duct have recently been proposed as one of the pre-invasive lesions of cholangiocarcinoma. Herein, a total of 50 cases of intraluminal polypoid neoplasms of the bile ducts experienced in Khon Kaen University Hospital in Thailand were pathologically examined. These cases presumably had a history of infection of Opisthorchis viverrini. These neoplasms were histologically composed of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasm showing a tubular and/papillary pattern without invasion (20 cases), and with minimal and considerable invasion (15 and 15 cases, respectively). They were histologically classifiable into papillary type (10 cases), tubular type (20 cases) and papillotubular type (20 cases), and were phenotypically classifiable into gastric (17 cases), intestinal (17 cases) and pancreatobiliary types (16 cases). It was found that cases of papillary type and gastric or intestinal phenotype were less invasive, while those of tubular or papillotubular type and pancreatobiliary phenotype were more invasive. In conclusion, intraductal polypoid neoplasms in Thailand were well-differentiated papillary and/or tubular neoplasms including those with no or minimal invasion, and histological and phenotypic subclassifications seem to be useful for evaluation of the aggressive pathological behaviors of these neoplasms. PMID:26339398

  6. [Utility of bone marrow biopsy in the diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasm].

    PubMed

    Tovar-Bobadilla, José Leonard; Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    A diagnostic approach of myeloproliferative neoplasms, according to the 2008 WHO classification system for hematological malignancies, has to consider clinical, molecular, and cytogenetic information as well as bone marrow histology. A diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia requires the presence of BCR-ABL-1, and the Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph-1-negative) myeloproliferative neoplasms constitute three main subtypes, including primary myelofibrosis, polycythemia rubra vera, and essential thrombocythemia. These three Ph-1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms share many pathogenic characteristic such as JAK2 mutations; however, they differ in prognosis, progression to myelofibrosis, and risk of leukemic transformation. There are currently various major points of interest in bone marrow examination in myeloproliferative neoplasms. One is the morphology of megakaryocytes, which are the hallmark of Ph-1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms and play a crucial role in separating the different subtypes of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Another is reticulin fibrosis or collagen fibrosis, which may only be detected on a bone marrow biopsy specimen by reticulin and trichrome stains, respectively, and immunohistochemistry and certain molecular techniques may be applied in bone marrow biopsies as supporting evidence of certain features of myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:27335198

  7. Mammary Gland Specific Knockdown of the Physiological Surge in Cx26 during Lactation Retains Normal Mammary Gland Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael K. G.; Plante, Isabelle; Bechberger, John F.; Naus, Christian C.; Laird, Dale W.

    2014-01-01

    Connexin26 (Cx26) is the major Cx protein expressed in the human mammary gland and is up-regulated during pregnancy while remaining elevated throughout lactation. It is currently unknown if patients with loss-of-function Cx26 mutations that result in hearing loss and skin diseases have a greater susceptibility to impaired breast development. To investigate if Cx26 plays a critical role in mammary gland development and differentiation, a novel Cx26 conditional knockout mouse model was generated by crossing Cx26fl/fl mice with mice expressing Cre under the β-Lactoglobulin promoter. Conditional knockdown of Cx26 from the mammary gland resulted in a dramatic reduction in detectable gap junction plaques confirmed by a significant ∼65-70% reduction in Cx26 mRNA and protein throughout parturition and lactation. Interestingly, this reduction was accompanied by a decrease in mammary gland Cx30 gap junction plaques at parturition, while no change was observed for Cx32 or Cx43. Whole mount, histological and immunofluorescent assessment of breast tissue revealed comparatively normal lobuloalveolar development following pregnancy in the conditionally knockdown mice compared to control mice. In addition, glands from genetically-modified mice were capable of producing milk proteins that were evident in the lumen of alveoli and ducts at similar levels as controls, suggesting normal gland function. Together, our results suggest that low levels of Cx26 expression throughout pregnancy and lactation, and not the physiological surge in Cx26, is sufficient for normal gland development and function. PMID:24988191

  8. Histopathological studies on neoplasms in the genital tract of female donkeys in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Sokkar, S M; Hamouda, M A; Abdel-Rahman, S M

    2001-01-01

    The genital tracts of 165 female donkeys were collected and examined with special concern to neoplasms. Ovarian Neoplasms were found in 12 cases (7.72%). A granulosa cell tumor was found in one case (0.61%). A cavernous haemangioma was found in 11 cases (6.67%). Uterine neoplasms were found in 14 cases (8.84%). Endometrial polyps and fibroleiomyoma were found in one case (0.61%) each. Leiomyoma was found in 2 cases (1.21%). Cavernous haemangioma was found in 10 cases (6.06%), and cervical polyps in 5 cases (3.03%). PMID:11413706

  9. Magnetic Resonance (MR) rectography in diagnostics of small-size rectal neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usova, AV; Frolova, IG; Trukhacheva, NG; Cheremisina, OV; Afanas'ev, SG

    2016-02-01

    Purpose was the assessment of diagnostic efficiency of MR-rectography in diagnostics of small-size rectal neoplasms. 12 patients with polyps and small tumors of a rectum are examined, the size of detected neoplasms varied in the range 3-18 mm. Native MRI and MRI with retrograde contrasting by ultrasonic gel was carried out. Results of MRI are compared with results of videocolonoscopy. Sensitivity of native MRT was 24%, MR- rectography was 88%. MR-rectography can be used in diagnostics of small-size rectal neoplasms.

  10. Binding of transcobalamin II by human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Y; Lönnerdal, B

    2001-01-01

    The presence of nutrient binders in milk may have an important role during milk production and may influence the nutrient's bioavailability to the infant. Human milk and plasma contain at least two types of vitamin B12 binders: transcobalamin II (TCII) and haptocorrin (Hc). Vitamin B12 in milk is exclusively bound to Hc (Hc-B12). In plasma, the major vitamin B12 binding protein that is responsible for delivering absorbed vitamin B12 to most tissues and cells is TCII (TCII-B12). Currently, little is known about the route of secretion of vitamin B12 into human milk. It is possible that a receptor-mediated pathway is involved, since maternal vitamin B12 supplementation increases the amount of the vitamin secreted into human milk if the mother's vitamin B12 consumption is low, but remains unchanged if her intake is adequate. In this study, we investigated the process by which the mammary gland acquires vitamin B12 from maternal circulation, whether as a free vitamin or as a Hc-B12 or TCII-B12 complex. TCII was purified from plasma incubated with [57Co]vit B12 (B12*), while Hc was purified from whey incubated with B12*. Both proteins were separated by fast protein liquid chromatography using gel filtration and anion-exchange columns. Purity of the separated proteins was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Binding studies were carried out on a monolayer of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) at 4 degrees C using free B12* and TCII-B12* and Hc-B12* complexes. Minimal binding of free B12* and Hc-B12* to HMEC was observed; however, HMEC exhibited a high affinity for the TCII-B12* complex. This study suggests that a specific cell surface receptor for the TCII-B12 complex exists in the mammary gland. It is possible that once vitamin B12 is in the mammary gland it is transferred to Hc (which may be synthesized by the mammary gland) and then secreted into milk as a Hc-B12 complex. PMID:11787717

  11. Internal Mammary Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy With Modified Injection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Peng-Fei; Cong, Bin-Bin; Zhao, Rong-Rong; Yang, Guo-Ren; Liu, Yan-Bing; Chen, Peng; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer incorporated the internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy (IM-SLNB) concept, there has been little change in surgical practice patterns because of the low visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes (IMSLN) with the traditional radiotracer injection technique. In this study, various injection techniques were evaluated in term of the IMSLN visualization rate, and the impact of IM-SLNB on the diagnostic and prognostic value were analyzed. Clinically, axillary lymph nodes (ALN) negative patients (n = 407) were divided into group A (traditional peritumoral intraparenchymal injection) and group B (modified periareolar intraparenchymal injection). Group B was then separated into group B1 (low volume) and group B2 (high volume) according to the injection volume. Clinically, ALN-positive patients (n = 63) were managed as group B2. Internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed for patients with IMSLN visualized. The IMSLN visualization rate was significantly higher in group B than that in group A (71.1% versus 15.5%, P < 0.001), whereas the axillary sentinel lymph nodes were reliably identified in both groups (98.9% versus 98.3%, P = 0.712). With high injection volume, group B2 was found to have higher IMSLN visualization rate than group B1 (75.1% versus 45.8%, P < 0.001). The IMSLN metastasis rate was only 8.1% (12/149) in clinically ALN-negative patients with successful IM-SLNB, and adjuvant treatment was altered in a small proportion. The IMSLN visualization rate was 69.8% (44/63) in clinically ALN-positive patients with the IMSLN metastasis rate up to 20.5% (9/44), and individual radiotherapy strategy could be guided with the IM-SLNB results. The modified injection technique (periareolar intraparenchymal, high volume, and ultrasound guidance) significantly improved the IMSLN visualization rate, making the routine IM-SLNB possible in daily practice. Internal

  12. Tamoxifen induces pleiotrophic changes in mammary stroma resulting in extracellular matrix that suppresses transformed phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hattar, Rhonda; Maller, Ori; McDaniel, Shauntae; Hansen, Kirk C; Hedman, Karla J; Lyons, Traci R; Lucia, Scott; Wilson, R Storey; Schedin, Pepper

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The functional unit of the mammary gland has been defined as the epithelial cell plus its microenvironment, a hypothesis that predicts changes in epithelial cell function will be accompanied by concurrent changes in mammary stroma. To test this hypothesis, the question was addressed of whether mammary stroma is functionally altered by the anti-oestrogen drug tamoxifen. Methods Forty female rats at 70 days of age were randomised to two groups of 20 and treated with 1.0 mg/kg tamoxifen or vehicle subcutaneously daily for 30 days, followed by a three-day wash out period. Mammary tissue was harvested and effects of tamoxifen on mammary epithelium and stroma determined. Results As expected, tamoxifen suppressed mammary alveolar development and mammary epithelial cell proliferation. Primary mammary fibroblasts isolated from tamoxifen-treated rats displayed a three-fold decrease in motility and incorporated less fibronectin in their substratum in comparison to control fibroblasts; attributes indicative of fibroblast quiescence. Immunohistochemistry analysis of CD68, a macrophage lysosomal marker, demonstrated a reduction in macrophage infiltration in mammary glands of tamoxifen-treated rats. Proteomic analyses by mass spectrometry identified several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins with expression levels with tamoxifen treatment that were validated by Western blot. Mammary tissue from tamoxifen-treated rats had decreased fibronectin and increased collagen 1 levels. Further, ECM proteolysis was reduced in tamoxifen-treated rats as detected by reductions in fibronectin, laminin 1, laminin 5 and collagen 1 cleavage fragments. Consistent with suppression in ECM proteolysis with tamoxifen treatment, matrix metalloproteinase-2 levels and activity were decreased. Biochemically extracted mammary ECM from tamoxifen-treated rats suppressed in vitro macrophage motility, which was rescued by the addition of proteolysed collagen or fibronectin. Mammary ECM from

  13. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium--Effects of Prochloraz.

    PubMed

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  14. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium - Effects of Prochloraz

    PubMed Central

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H.; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  15. Primate mammary development. Effects of hypophysectomy, prolactin inhibition, and growth hormone administration.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberg, D L; Niemann, W; Flamm, E; Cooper, P; Babitsky, G; Valensi, Q

    1985-01-01

    The pituitary gland has been found to be an important factor in mammary development in primates. Hypophysectomy in 12 sexually immature monkeys caused significant inhibition of estradiol (E2)-induced mammary growth and development. A histological index of mammary development in sexually immature hypophysectomized animals was lower (0.82) than in intact E2-treated controls (3.4; P less than 0.008). Hypophysectomy also inhibited growth of the mammary gland as judged by a size index. Despite the hypophysectomy, E2 stimulated some, albeit blunted, mammary growth and development, which may have been due to incomplete hypophysectomy. Selective inhibition of prolactin by ergot drugs in intact animals did not prevent full mammary development, suggesting that there may be pituitary mammogens other than prolactin, or that very low or unmeasurable concentrations of prolactin were sufficient to synergize with E2 to cause full acinar development. The mean histological index was 3.08 in E2-treated animals and 3.16 in animals treated with E2 plus pergolide. There was also no difference in the size of the glands. We evaluated the effect of growth hormone on mammary development by treating three hypophysectomized animals with pure 22,000 mol wt human growth hormone (hGH) (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA). We found that physiological or slightly supraphysiological concentrations of hGH in animals with unmeasurable prolactin were incapable of restoring the capacity of E2 to induce full mammary growth. These findings suggest that, if growth hormone is a mammary mitogen, that physiological concentrations are insufficient to synergize with E2 to induce full mammary growth or that other forms of hGH are mammogenic. Our studies suggest that the role of the pituitary gland in mammary mitogenesis in primates is more complicated than previously thought. They also raise the possibility that heretofore unidentified pituitary substances may be mammogenic. Images PMID:4008646

  16. Prolactin Suppression of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Initiation of Mammary Gland Involution in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Rieanrakwong, Duangjai; Laoharatchatathanin, Titaree; Terashima, Ryota; Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Kurusu, Shiro; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa; Kawaminami, Mitsumori

    2016-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that mammary gland involution after lactation is initiated by accumulation of milk in alveoli after weaning. Here, we report that involution is also dependent on mammary GnRH expression that is suppressed by PRL during lactation. Reduction of plasma prolactin (PRL) by the withdrawal of suckling stimuli increased GnRH and annexin A5 (ANXA5) expression in the mammary tissues after lactation with augmentation of epithelial apoptosis. Intramammary injection of a GnRH antagonist suppressed ANXA5 expression and apoptosis of epithelial cells after forcible weaning at midlactation, whereas local administration of GnRH agonist (GnRHa) caused apoptosis of epithelial cells with ANXA5 augmentation in lactating rats. The latter treatment also decreased mammary weight, milk production, and casein accumulation. Mammary mast cells were strongly immunopositive for GnRH and the number increased in the mammary tissues after weaning. GnRHa was shown to be a chemoattractant for mast cells by mammary local administration of GnRHa and Boyden chamber assay. PRL suppressed the mammary expression of both ANXA5 and GnRH mRNA. It also decreased mast cell numbers in the gland after lactation. These results are the first to demonstrate that GnRH, synthesized locally in the mammary tissues, is required for mammary involution after lactation. GnRH is also suggested to introduce mast cells into the regressing mammary gland and would be in favor of tissue remodeling. The suppression of these processes by PRL is a novel physiological function of PRL. PMID:27175971

  17. Netrin-1 Can Affect Morphogenesis and Differentiation of the Mouse Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Strizzi, Luigi; Mancino, Mario; Bianco, Caterina; Raafat, Ahmed; Gonzales, Monica; Booth, Brian W.; Watanabe, Kazuhide; Nagaoka, Tadahiro; Mack, David L.; Howard, Beatrice; Callahan, Robert; Smith, Gilbert H.; Salomon, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Netrin-1 has been shown to regulate the function of the EGF-like protein Cripto-1 (Cr-1) and affect mammary gland development. Since Cr-1 is a target gene of Nanog and Oct4, we investigated the relationship between Netrin-1 and Cr-1, Nanog and Oct4 during different stages of development in the mouse mammary gland. Results from histological analysis show that exogenous Netrin-1 was able to induce formation of alveolar-like structures within the mammary gland terminal end buds of virgin transgenic Cripto-1 mice and enhance mammary gland alveologenesis in early pregnant FVB/N mice. Results from immunostaining and Western blot analysis show that Netrin-1, Nanog and Oct4 are expressed in the mouse embryonic mammary anlage epithelium while Cripto-1 is predominantly expressed outside this structure in the surrounding mesenchyme. We find that in lactating mammary glands of postnatal FVB/N mice, Netrin-1 expression is highest while Cripto-1 and Nanog levels are lowest indicating that Netrin-1 may perform a role in the mammary gland during lactation. HC-11 mouse mammary epithelial cells stimulated with lactogenic hormones and exogenous soluble Netrin-1 showed increased beta-casein expression as compared to control thus supporting the potential role for Netrin-1 during functional differentiation of mouse mammary epithelial cells. Finally, mouse ES cells treated with exogenous soluble Netrin-1 showed reduced levels of Nanog and Cripto-1 and higher levels of beta-III tubulin during differentiation. These results suggest that Netrin-1 may facilitate functional differentiation of mammary epithelial cells and possibly affect the expression of Nanog and/or Cripto-1 in multipotent cells that may reside in the mammary gland. PMID:18425773

  18. Perendoscopic Nd:YAG laser therapy of colorectal neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberto, Lorenzo; Ranzato, R.; Marino, S.; Erroi, F.; Angriman, I.; Donadi, M.; Paratore, S.; Scuderi, G.; D'Amico, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    The range of application of Nd:YAG laser is now wide and of particular interest in the treatment of neoplastic lesions of the large bowel, both benign and malignant, which, besides the debilitating of vegetative lesions, may also provide a good hemostasis of the bleeding ones. Yag laser treatment of malignancies is indicated in patients not suitable for surgery due to the extent of the disease or to the high anesthesiologic/surgical risk. The treatment of choice for benign neoplasms is represented by endoscopic polypectomy, being Yag laser therapy reserved to patients with very large polyps and with a high anesthesiologic risk. Yag laser therapy is also recommended in teleangiectasies with active or previous bleeding, since it allows the complete ablation of such lesions with subsequent outstanding hemostasis. Furthermore this treatment may be advantageously associated to other operative endoscopic procedures, such as diatermotherapy, dilatation and injection therapy. It is also to be outlined that Yag laser therapy is currently used to cure benign diseases and for the palliation of advanced cancer in inoperable patients. Our laser instrument is an Nd:Yag laser MBB Medilas 2 with maximum power of 100 watts at the tip, with 'non-contact' laser fibers. We use flexible optic fiberendoscopes of several sizes, according to the type of lesion to be treated. Moreover we have employed both Savary dilators of progressive caliber from 5 to 15 mm and Rigiflex pneumatic balloons. Adequate bowel preparation by means of isosmotic solution was achieved in patients with non stenotic neoplasm, or evacuative enemas and fluid diet in patients with bowel neoplastic stenoses. The patients were premedicated with benzodiazepines. Stenotic malignant lesions have been treated with endoscopic dilatation before laser treatment. At each session 4,000 - 8,000 joules of energy were administered; all patients received an average of 5 - 6 laser sessions. Followup laser sessions have then been

  19. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Lessi, Francesca; Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-07-30

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095

  20. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus

    PubMed Central

    Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-01-01

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095