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Sample records for management danish experience

  1. Danish experiences on EIA of livestock projects

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Per . E-mail: pc@plan.aau.dk

    2006-07-15

    Since its introduction into Danish planning in 1989, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) has been widely discussed. At the centre of the debate has been the question of whether EIA actually offered anything new and there has been a great deal of scepticism about the efficacy of the instrument, especially when it comes to livestock projects. In an evaluation of the Danish EIA experience, we have looked more closely at how the EIA instruments function regarding livestock projects. This article addresses both the EIA process as well as the EIA screening. It is demonstrated that the EIA screening in its own right is a kind of regulatory instrument. Examining the assessments made during screening more closely, we conclude that there is still some way to go in order to make the assessment broader and more holistic in accordance with the ambitions set out in the EIA directive to contribute to a more sustainable development. Although the provisions laid down are the same the praxis related to the field has developed at a considerable speed. In order to understand this development we have closely examined how the decisions made by the Nature Protection Board of Appeal (NPBA) have been changed and conclude that these changes definitely address some of the shortcomings found in the evaluation.

  2. Decentralization of management responsibility: the case of Danish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pallesen, T; Pedersen, L D

    1993-01-01

    This article examines a specific management reform at three hospitals in a Danish county. Management reform at the hospital level implies a decentralization of responsibility and power to the departmental level. Along with increased responsibility and power, departments get the message: keep your budgets and keep your output level. This preliminary analysis indicates that departmental budgets can be a way of containing costs in clinical departments. Non-staff expenditures especially are subjected to reductions. The system still seems to 'favour' doctors and nurses, but less than in a system with traditional budgetary institutions. The behaviour of the top-management teams shows that the output constraint is not seriously meant. Departments are allowed to reduce capacity, with declining output, with the knowledge of the top-management team. The declining output makes it easier to departments ceteris paribus to keep within their budgets. And that makes it easier for the top-management team to keep the overall hospital budget. The obligation to keep the overall hospital budget is thus an important criterion of success in the eyes of the political masters of hospitals. PMID:10134931

  3. Danish heathland manipulation experiment data in Model-Data-Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thum, Tea; Peylin, Philippe; Ibrom, Andreas; Van Der Linden, Leon; Beier, Claus; Bacour, Cédric; Santaren, Diego; Ciais, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    In ecosystem manipulation experiments (EMEs) the ecosystem is artificially exposed to different environmental conditions that aim to simulate circumstances in future climate. At Danish EME site Brandbjerg the responses of a heathland to drought, warming and increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are studied. The warming manipulation is realized by passive nighttime warming. The measurements include control plots as well as replicates for each three treatment separately and in combination. The Brandbjerg heathland ecosystem is dominated by heather and wavy hairgrass. These experiments provide excellent data for validation and development of ecosystem models. In this work we used a generic vegetation model ORCHIDEE with Model-Data-Fusion (MDF) approach. ORCHIDEE model is a process-based model that describes the exchanges of carbon, water and energy between the atmosphere and the vegetation. It can be run at different spatial scales from global to site level. Different vegetation types are described in ORCHIDEE as plant functional types. In MDF we are using observations from the site to optimize the model parameters. This enables us to assess the modelling errors and the performance of the model for different manipulation treatments. This insight will inform us whether the different processes are adequately modelled or if the model is missing some important processes. We used a genetic algorithm in the MDF. The data available from the site included measurements of aboveground biomass, heterotrophic soil respiration and total ecosystem respiration from years 2006-2008. The biomass was measured six times doing this period. The respiration measurements were done with manual chamber measurements. For the soil respiration we used results from an empirical model that has been developed for the site. This enabled us to have more data for the MDF. Before the MDF we performed a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters to different data streams. Fifteen most influential

  4. Shared experience in 13 local Danish EPR projects: the Danish EPR Observatory.

    PubMed

    Nøhr, C; Kristensen, M; Andersen, S K; Vingtoft, S; Lippert, S; Berstein, K; Bruun-Rasmussen, M

    2001-01-01

    In 1996 a national strategy for the development of electronic patient records (EPR) for the Danish hospitals and primary care was launched. An element in the strategy was to support a number of regional EPR development projects. The EPR-Observatory has in the two recent years collected data from the regional projects, dealing with the expectations in four areas: 1) Impact on organisational issues, 2) Benefits of EPR, 3) Integration of EPR with other information systems and 4) security aspects of EPR. Among the observations an increasing teamwork and im-proved knowledge about the patient was found. What was expected, but not found, was resistance to EPR, as a result of changes in skills and power. The most obvious benefits are increased data accessibility and improved decision ma-king. The most considerable disadvantage is an enormous growth in discontent with the systems performance and the fact, that all the projects are delayed. Many different types of integration solutions are chosen, because of a lack of a common model for integration. Generally the projects find, that EPJ yields increased security, but logistical problems arise in having the systems running 24 hours 7 days a week. Economical benefits cannot be documented. This relates to the fact, that the regional projects are stand-alone projects. The ongoing growth in discontent with the EPR-systems and the fact, that all the projects are delayed must be subject to further exploration. PMID:11604822

  5. Change Management at a Danish University: The Introduction of a Common Market for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundgaard, Helle

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the approach to the management of change taken by a Danish university when introducing a university-wide market for education and it explores the different positions taken by some of the central stakeholders in one of the faculties involved. I argue that neither the inadequacies of a popular management model nor insufficient…

  6. Educational Testing as an Accountability Measure: Drawing on Twentieth-Century Danish History of Education Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ydesen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This article reveals perspectives based on experiences from twentieth-century Danish educational history by outlining contemporary, test-based accountability regime characteristics and their implications for education policy. The article introduces one such characteristic, followed by an empirical analysis of the origins and impacts of test-based…

  7. Danish Health Professionals' Experiences of Being Coached: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne Irene; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze health professionals' experiences from…

  8. Ruxolitinib is manageable in patients with myelofibrosis and severe thrombocytopenia: a report on 12 Danish patients.

    PubMed

    Bjørn, Mads Emil; Holmström, Morten Orebo; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl

    2016-01-01

    We report 12 Danish myelofibrosis patients who have been treated successfully with ruxolitinib despite having low platelet counts (< 50 × 10(9)/L) during their treatment-course. The majority of the patients experienced marked clinical improvement. Serious side effects were only recorded in a single patient. It is concluded that JAK-inhibition with ruxolitinib is manageable in patients with low platelet counts and should be considered in symptomatic patients who otherwise might not be candidates for treatment. PMID:25936872

  9. Sensemaking, Sensegiving and Strategic Management in Danish Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degn, Lise

    2015-01-01

    Strategic management and leadership has been a vital catchphrase in most European higher education reforms over the past decade, and has in many countries resulted in a strengthening of the top level management tiers. Rectors and Deans are increasingly tasked with the responsibility of turning HEIs into more active, entrepreneurial actors in…

  10. Cryogenic fluid management experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.; Fester, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The cryogenic fluid management experiment (CFME), designed to characterize subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and expulsion in the low-q space environment, is discussed. The experiment utilizes a fine mesh screen fluid management device to accomplish gas-free liquid expulsion and a thermodynamic vent system to intercept heat leak and control tank pressure. The experiment design evolved from a single flight prototype to provision for a multimission (up to 7) capability. A detailed design of the CFME, a dynamic test article, and dedicated ground support equipment were generated. All materials and parts were identified, and components were selected and specifications prepared. Long lead titanium pressurant spheres and the flight tape recorder and ground reproduce unit were procured. Experiment integration with the shuttle orbiter, Spacelab, and KSC ground operations was coordinated with the appropriate NASA centers, and experiment interfaces were defined. Phase 1 ground and flight safety reviews were conducted. Costs were estimated for fabrication and assembly of the CFME, which will become the storage and supply tank for a cryogenic fluid management facility to investigate fluid management in space.

  11. Self managing experiment resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagni, F.; Ubeda, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Roiser, S.; Charpentier, P.; Graciani, R.

    2014-06-01

    Within this paper we present an autonomic Computing resources management system, used by LHCb for assessing the status of their Grid resources. Virtual Organizations Grids include heterogeneous resources. For example, LHC experiments very often use resources not provided by WLCG, and Cloud Computing resources will soon provide a non-negligible fraction of their computing power. The lack of standards and procedures across experiments and sites generated the appearance of multiple information systems, monitoring tools, ticket portals, etc... which nowadays coexist and represent a very precious source of information for running HEP experiments Computing systems as well as sites. These two facts lead to many particular solutions for a general problem: managing the experiment resources. In this paper we present how LHCb, via the DIRAC interware, addressed such issues. With a renewed Central Information Schema hosting all resources metadata and a Status System (Resource Status System) delivering real time information, the system controls the resources topology, independently of the resource types. The Resource Status System applies data mining techniques against all possible information sources available and assesses the status changes, that are then propagated to the topology description. Obviously, giving full control to such an automated system is not risk-free. Therefore, in order to minimise the probability of misbehavior, a battery of tests has been developed in order to certify the correctness of its assessments. We will demonstrate the performance and efficiency of such a system in terms of cost reduction and reliability.

  12. Comparison of the organic waste management systems in the Danish-German border region using life cycle assessment (LCA).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Morten Bang; Møller, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2016-03-01

    This study assessed the management of the organic household waste in the Danish-German border region and points out major differences between the systems and their potential effects on the environment using life cycle assessment (LCA). The treatment of organic waste from households in the Danish-German border region is very different on each side of the border; the Danish region only uses incineration for the treatment of organic household waste while the German region includes combined biogas production and composting, mechanical and biological treatment (MBT) and incineration. Data on all parts of the organic waste treatment was collected including waste composition data and data from treatment facilities and their respective energy systems. Based on that the organic waste management systems in the border region were modelled using the EASETECH waste management LCA-model. The main output is a life cycle assessment showing large differences in the environmental performance of the two different regions with the Danish region performing better in 10 out of 14 impact categories. Furthermore, the importance of the substituted district heating systems was investigated showing an impact up to 34% of the entire system for one impact category and showing large difference between each heating system substituted, e.g. in "Global Warming" the impact was from -16 to -1.1 milli person equivalent/tonne treated waste from substitution of centralised hard coal and decentralised natural gas, respectively. PMID:26856446

  13. Preoperative airway assessment - experience gained from a multicentre cluster randomised trial and the Danish Anaesthesia Database.

    PubMed

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet

    2016-05-01

    Difficulties with airway management in relation to general anaesthesia have been a challenge for the anaesthesiologist since the birth of anaesthesia. Massive landmark improvements have been made and general anaesthesia is now regarded as a safe procedure. However, rare, difficult airway management still occurs and it prompts increased risk of morbidity and mortality - especially when not anticipated. Several preoperative risk factors for airway difficulties have been identified, yet none have convincing diagnostic accuracy as stand alone tests. Combining several risk factors increase the predictive value of the test and multivariable risk models have been developed. The Simplified Airway Risk Index (SARI) is a predictive model developed for anticipation of a difficult direct laryngoscopy. However, neither the diagnostic accuracy of the SARI nor of any other model has been tested prospectively and compared with existing practice for airway assessment in a randomised trial setting. The first objective of this thesis was to quantify the proportion of unanticipated difficult intubation and difficult mask ventilation in Denmark. The second objective was to design a cluster randomised trial, using state of the art methodology, in order to test the clinical impact of using the SARI for preoperative airway assessment compared with a clinical judgement based on usual practice for airway assessment. Finally, to test if implementation of the SARI would reduce the proportion of unanticipated difficult intubation compared with usual care for airway assessment. This thesis is based on data from the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD). Paper 1 presents an observational cohort study on 188,064 patients who underwent tracheal intubation from 2008 to 2011. Data on the anaesthesiologists' preoperative anticipations of airway difficulties was compared with actual airway management conditions, thus enabling an estimation of the proportion of unanticipated difficulties with intubation

  14. TMI-2 waste management experience

    SciTech Connect

    Deltete, C.P.; Hahn, R.E. )

    1992-04-01

    The waste management experience following the TMI-2 March 1979 accident contributed invaluable information to the nuclear power industry. Unique to the TMI-2 cleanup were the columes, types, and special problems associated with the processing, handling, storage, packaging, transportation, and disposal of radioactive material. With its highlight of unusual situations encountered during cleanup, this report provides a comprehensive look at the TMI-2 waste management experience. Key sections identify the major technical and regulatory waste management challenges and their resolutions. Topics include solid waste generation, the abnormal waste shipment program, water processing systems, waste packaging, shipping containers/casks, equipment decontamination facilities, waste storage/staging and disposal, the nuclear fuel shipment program, and the makeup and purifaction resin removal program.

  15. Activity Theories and the Ontology of Psychology: Learning from Danish and Russian Experiences.

    PubMed

    Mammen, Jens; Mironenko, Irina

    2015-12-01

    Psychology has permanent problems of theoretical coherence and practical, analytic and critical efficiency. It is claimed that Activity Theory (AT) with roots in a long European philosophical tradition and continued in Russian AT is a first step to remedy this. A Danish version of AT may have a key to exceed some, mostly implicit, ontological restrictions in traditional AT and free it from an embracement of functionalism and mechanicism, rooted in Renaissance Physics. The analysis goes back to Aristotle's understanding of the freely moving animal in its ecology and introduces some dualities in the encounter between subject and object which replace the dualistic dichotomies traditionally splitting Psychology in Naturwissenschaft vs. Geisteswissenshaft. This also implies a "Copernican turn" of Cartesian dualism. The perspectives are to give place for a phenomenology of meaning without cutting human psyche out of Nature and to open Psychology to its domain. PMID:26001990

  16. WHO classification 2008 of myeloproliferative neoplasms: a workshop learning effect--the Danish experience.

    PubMed

    Madelung, Ann B; Bondo, Henrik; Stamp, Inger; Løvgreen, Preben; Nielsen, Signe L; Falensteen, Anne; Knudsen, Helle; Svendsen, Kira D; Lange, Theis; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Nielsen, Karsten; Hasselbalch, Hans; Thiele, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    We examined the learning effect of a workshop for Danish hematopathologists led by an international expert regarding histological subtyping of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Six hematopathologists evaluated 43 bone marrow (BM) biopsies according to the WHO description (2008), blinded to clinical data. All panelists then participated in the workshop. The case biopsies - mixed with 251 other MPN BM biopsies - were reviewed again. Consensus regarding the histological subtype was significantly improved; from 49% to 72% (Fleiss kappa value 0.302 pre-workshop, 0.474 post-workshop; p = 0.004). There was no significant effect on the isolated morphological characteristics. Agreement between cases with histological consensus and clinical diagnosis was 86% without significant change during workshop sessions. Our study demonstrates that experienced hematopathologists can significantly improve their diagnostic ability by a workshop led by an international expert; not by improving the evaluation of individual histological parameters but by weighting these in their conclusive diagnosis. PMID:26200697

  17. Two First-Person Accounts of Intercultural Experiences: But I Am Danish (?) and "A-doka." Occasional Papers in Intercultural Learning No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehl, Julie; Karl, Rebecca

    These nonfiction, first-hand accounts of the experiences of two young women sojourning in foreign countries offer insights into the cultural adjustments, problems, and rewards foreign exchange students may encounter. A Danish woman recounts her difficulty in readjusting to her home country following a year in Kenya, emphasizing the cultural and…

  18. Thermal energy management process experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, S.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal energy management processes experiment (TEMP) will demonstrate that through the use of two-phase flow technology, thermal systems can be significantly enhanced by increasing heat transport capabilities at reduced power consumption while operating within narrow temperature limits. It has been noted that such phenomena as excess fluid puddling, priming, stratification, and surface tension effects all tend to mask the performance of two-phase flow systems in a 1-g field. The flight experiment approach would be to attack the experiment to an appropriate mounting surface with a 15 to 20 meter effective length and provide a heat input and output station in the form of heaters and a radiator. Using environmental data, the size, location, and orientation of the experiment can be optimized. The approach would be to provide a self-contained panel and mount it to the STEP through a frame. A small electronics package would be developed to interface with the STEP avionics for command and data handling. During the flight, heaters on the evaporator will be exercised to determine performance. Flight data will be evaluated against the ground tests to determine any anomalous behavior.

  19. Prevalence, risk surfaces and inter-municipality variations in caries experience in Danish children and adolescents in 2012.

    PubMed

    Nørrisgaard, Pia Elisabeth; Qvist, Vibeke; Ekstrand, Kim

    2016-05-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the caries experience, prevalence and distribution related to tooth type and surfaces in the primary and permanent dentition in children and adolescents in Denmark in 2012. In addition, to examine if explanatory factors influence the inter-municipality variation in caries experience. Materials and methods Data was collected in the public Child Dental Health Service. In total, 5636 caries registrations on 3-, 9-, 15- and 18-year-olds were collected in 35 of the 98 Danish municipalities. Caries experience was expressed by mean def-s/DMF-S and caries prevalence by def-s = 0/DMF-S = 0. Inter-municipality variations were illustrated. Multivariate regression analyses were applied to assess the influence of fluoride concentration in drinking water, proportion of immigrants and personal income on the inter-municipality variation in mean def-s/DMF-S. Results Only 4.6% of 3-year-olds had def-s (mean = 0.25), compared to 44.9% of 9-year-olds (mean = 3.07), primarily located occlusally and interproximally on the primary molars. Mean DMF-S for the 9-, 15- and 18-year-olds were 0.27, 1.97 and 4.40, respectively. Caries were primarily located occlusally and in pits on the permanent molars, which also showed high frequencies of sealings. Mean def-s/DMF-S showed substantial inter-municipality variations, while the caries location in both dentitions was rather stable. The three background factors explained less than 25% of the variation in mean def-s/DMF. Conclusions The caries distribution within the primary and permanent dentition among 3-, 9-, 15- and 18-year-olds followed definite patterns concerning location on teeth and surfaces. Background factors only explained a minor part of the variation. PMID:26651538

  20. Experiences with Recruitment of Marginalized Groups in a Danish Health Promotion Program: A Document Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Tine Mechlenborg; Bak, Carsten Kronborg

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies have found that marginalized groups living in deprived neighborhoods are less likely to participate in health programs compared to the majority of society. This study evaluates recruitment approaches conducted during a national government-funded project in 12 deprived neighborhoods across Denmark between 2010 and 2014. The aim of this study was to understand how recruitment approaches could promote participation in health programs within deprived neighborhoods to reach marginalized groups. Method Documents from all 12 of the included municipalities were collected to conduct a document evaluation. The collected documents consisted of 1,500 pages of written material with 12 project descriptions, three midterm and 10 final evaluations. The collected data were analyzed through a qualitative content analysis. Results The results are based on the fact that only 10 municipalities have developed evaluations related to recruitment, and only three evaluations provided a description of which marginalized groups were recruited. Challenges related to recruitment consist of difficulties involving the target group, including general distrust, language barriers and a lack of ability to cope with new situations and strangers. Additional geographical challenges emerged, especially in rural areas. Positive experiences with recruitment approaches were mainly related to relationship building and trust building, especially through face-to-face contact and the project employees’ presence in the neighborhood. Additionally, adjusting some of the interventions and the recruitment strategy increased participation. Conclusion This study found that relation and trust between the residents and the project employees is an important factor in the recruitment of marginalized groups in deprived neighborhoods as well as adjusting the health interventions or recruitment strategy to the target groups. In future research, it is necessary to examine which recruitment approaches are

  1. Engineering data management: Experience and projections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferson, D. K.; Thomson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Experiences in developing a large engineering data management system are described. Problems which were encountered are presented and projected to future systems. Business applications involving similar types of data bases are described. A data base management system architecture proposed by the business community is described and its applicability to engineering data management is discussed. It is concluded that the most difficult problems faced in engineering and business data management can best be solved by cooperative efforts.

  2. Synthesis of the Danish Experience with Combating Nutrient Pollution of Surface Waters: The Old Regulatory Approach and a New Targeted Approach Utilising the Natural Attenuation Capacity in Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronvang, Brian; Windolf, Jørgen; Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte; Tornbjerg, Henrik; Højberg, Anker; Rieman, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Excess nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) emissions to surface waters are a high priority environmental problem worldwide for protection of water resources in times of population growth and climate change. As clean water is a scarce resource the struggle for reducing nutrient emissions are an ongoing issue for many countries and regions. Since the mid1980s a wide range of national regulatory general measures have been implemented to reduce land based nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loadings of the Danish aquatic environment. These measures have addressed both point source emissions and emissions from diffuse sources especially from agricultural production. Following nearly 4 decades of combating nutrient pollution our surface waters such as lakes and estuaries are only slowly responding on the 50% reduction in N and 56% reduction in P. Therefore, the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive in Danish surface waters still call for further reductions of N and P loadings. Introduction of a new paradigm of targeted implemented measures was the proposed outcome of a Commission on Nature and Agriculture established by the Danish Government in 2013. Their White Book points to the need of increased growth and better environment through more targeted and efficient regulation using advanced technological mitigation methods that are implemented intelligently according to the local natural attenuation capacity for nutrients in the landscape. As a follow up a national consensus model for N was established chaining existing leaching, 3D groundwater and surface water models. The new model concept enables a calculation of the N dynamics and attenuation capacity within a scale of 15 km2. Moreover, several research projects have been conducted to investigate the effect of a suite of targeted mitigation measures such as restored natural wetlands, constructed wetlands, controlled drainage and intelligent buffer zones. The outcome of six Danish management plans for nutrient load

  3. Managing Data From Signal-Propagation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses system for management of data from Pilot Field Experiment (PiFEx) program, which consists of series of experiments on propagation of signals from transmitter at one fixed location to transponder on tower at another fixed location and from transponder to mobile receiver in van. Purpose of experiments to simulate signal-propagation conditions of land-mobile/satellite communication system.

  4. Managing the Fruit Fly Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeszenszky, Arleen W.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a sophisticated version of the fruit fly experiment for teaching concepts about genetics to biology students. Provides students with the opportunity to work with live animals over an extended period. (JRH)

  5. The AMT data management experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Claudia; Moncoiffé, Gwenaëlle; Brown, Juan

    2009-07-01

    As the UK's national marine data centre, a key responsibility of the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) is to provide data management support for the scientific activities of complex multi-disciplinary long-term research programmes. Since the initial cruise in 1995, the NERC funded Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) project has undertaken 18 north-south transects of the Atlantic Ocean. As the project has evolved there has been a steady growth in the number of participants, the volume of data, its complexity and the demand for data. BODC became involved in AMT in 2002 at the beginning of phase II of this programme and since then has provided continuous support to the AMT and the wider scientific community through the rescue, quality control, processing and access to the data. The data management is carried out by a team of specialists using a sophisticated infrastructure and hardware to manage, integrate and serve physical, biological and chemical data. Here, we discuss the approach adopted, techniques applied and some guiding principles for management of large multi-disciplinary programmes.

  6. Managed care: the US experience.

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, N. K.

    2000-01-01

    This article provides an overview of managed health care in the USA--what has been achieved and what has not--and some lessons for policy-makers in other parts of the world. Although the backlash by consumers and providers makes the future of managed care in the USA uncertain, the evidence shows that it has had a positive effect on stemming the rate of growth of health care spending, without a negative effect on quality. More importantly, it has spawned innovative technologies that are not dependent on the US market environment, but can be applied in public and private systems globally. Active purchasing tools that incorporate disease management programmes, performance measurement report cards, and alignment of incentives between purchasers and providers respond to key issues facing health care reform in many countries. Selective adoption of these tools may be even more relevant in single payer systems than in the fragmented, voluntary US insurance market where they can be applied more systematically with lower transaction costs and where their effects can be measured more precisely. PMID:10916920

  7. Illness management and recovery (IMR) in Danish community mental health centres

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are severe mental illnesses that can have a significant disabling impact on the lives of people. Psychosocial interventions that stress hope and recovery as a part of a multi-dimensional approach are possibly indicated to support people with severe mental illness in facilitating recovery. Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) is a curriculum-based psychosocial intervention designed as structured program with a recovery-oriented approach. The aim of IMR is to rehabilitate people with severe mental illnesses by helping them acquire knowledge and skills in managing their illness and achieve personal recovery goals. Previous randomised clinical trials indicate that IMR can be implemented with a good effect and a high fidelity though further trials are crucial to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of IMR. Methods/Design The trial design is a randomised, assessor-blinded, multi-centre, clinical trial of the IMR program compared with treatment as usual for 200 participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder under the care of two community mental health centres in the Capital Region of Denmark. The primary outcome is level of functioning at the end of treatment. The secondary outcomes are disease symptoms; use of alcohol/drugs; individual meaning of recovery; hope; hospital admissions and out-patient psychiatric treatment at the end of treatment and the abovementioned and level of functioning at follow-up 21 months after baseline. Discussion If the results of this trial show IMR to be effective these positive results will strengthen the evidence of IMR as an effective comprehensive psychosocial intervention with a recovery-oriented approach for people with severe mental illness. This will have significant implications for the treatment and recovery of people with severe mental illness. Trial registration Registration number NCT01361698. PMID:21849024

  8. Experimenters' reference based upon Skylab experiment management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The methods and techniques for experiment development and integration that evolved during the Skylab Program are described to facilitate transferring this experience to experimenters in future manned space programs. Management responsibilities and the sequential process of experiment evolution from initial concept through definition, development, integration, operation and postflight analysis are outlined and amplified, as appropriate. Emphasis is placed on specific lessons learned on Skylab that are worthy of consideration by future programs.

  9. Building a Propulsion Experiment Project Management Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keiser, Ken; Tanner, Steve; Hatcher, Danny; Graves, Sara

    2004-01-01

    What do you get when you cross rocket scientists with computer geeks? It is an interactive, distributed computing web of tools and services providing a more productive environment for propulsion research and development. The Rocket Engine Advancement Program 2 (REAP2) project involves researchers at several institutions collaborating on propulsion experiments and modeling. In an effort to facilitate these collaborations among researchers at different locations and with different specializations, researchers at the Information Technology and Systems Center,' University of Alabama in Huntsville, are creating a prototype web-based interactive information system in support of propulsion research. This system, to be based on experience gained in creating similar systems for NASA Earth science field experiment campaigns such as the Convection and Moisture Experiments (CAMEX), will assist in the planning and analysis of model and experiment results across REAP2 participants. The initial version of the Propulsion Experiment Project Management Environment (PExPM) consists of a controlled-access web portal facilitating the drafting and sharing of working documents and publications. Interactive tools for building and searching an annotated bibliography of publications related to REAP2 research topics have been created to help organize and maintain the results of literature searches. Also work is underway, with some initial prototypes in place, for interactive project management tools allowing project managers to schedule experiment activities, track status and report on results. This paper describes current successes, plans, and expected challenges for this project.

  10. Practice Experience with a Practice Management Company.

    PubMed

    Tankersley, Ron

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of a dentist using a contracted dental services organization to manage the business aspects of a multisite group oral and maxillofacial practice. The need for help with management functions first became apparent in medicine, and several models emerged there. The model used in this practice sought to take advantage of specialized expertise without reducing practitioners' control over dental decisions, including those going beyond narrow clinical decisions. Personal experiences and suggestions for best fit between practices on contracted services are presented. PMID:26562977

  11. Wildlife management: Managing the hunt versus the hunting experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammitt, William E.; McDonald, Cary D.; Noe, Francis P.

    1989-07-01

    Deer hunter satisfaction is investigated from two perspectives, (1) satisfaction with the hunt/harvest and (2) satisfaction with the overall hunting trip experience. Regression analysis is used to determine what variables best predict satisfaction with the hunt and the hunting experience. Results indicate that animal population variables (number of deer seen, shot at, bagged) are the best determinants of a quality deer hunt, while environmental (outdoors) and social (crowding and hunter behavior) are the best predictors of a quality hunting trip experience. Wildlife managers and researchers need to realize that deer hunters view the hunt/harvest as different from the hunting trip experience and need to manage for both aspects of hunter satisfaction.

  12. Labor-Management Cooperation: The American Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Irving H.; Weinberg, Edgar

    This book examines the wide range of opportunities, the attendant problems, and the potential benefits of labor-management cooperation. Cooperative arrangements are considered at different economic levels, and 65 cases are discussed. The first of 10 chapters sets up a conceptual framework for the review of American experience in cooperation.…

  13. TMI-2 waste management experience. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Deltete, C.P.; Hahn, R.E.

    1992-04-01

    The waste management experience following the TMI-2 March 1979 accident contributed invaluable information to the nuclear power industry. Unique to the TMI-2 cleanup were the columes, types, and special problems associated with the processing, handling, storage, packaging, transportation, and disposal of radioactive material. With its highlight of unusual situations encountered during cleanup, this report provides a comprehensive look at the TMI-2 waste management experience. Key sections identify the major technical and regulatory waste management challenges and their resolutions. Topics include solid waste generation, the abnormal waste shipment program, water processing systems, waste packaging, shipping containers/casks, equipment decontamination facilities, waste storage/staging and disposal, the nuclear fuel shipment program, and the makeup and purifaction resin removal program.

  14. The Leisure Experience. Leisure Management Module. Operational Management Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Anthony; And Others

    This module on the leisure experience is intended to give the supervisor or manager an understanding of the nature and scope of the leisure market and key trends and developments. The material is presented in a self-instructional format in three sections. At the beginning of each section is a statement of the objectives that will be achieved as a…

  15. Applying State-of-the-art, Unstructured mesh Models on Estuary Management in the Danish Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundgaard, K.; Lumborg, U.; Vested, H. J.; Edelvang, K.

    2006-12-01

    In the past years extensive research has been carried out on the effect of dredging in estuarine environments. The environmental impact is often assessed through measurements, dedicated numerical modelling studies and monitoring. However, given the extreme complexity of the dredged sediments, it is often difficult to predict the behaviour of the sediment. This depends on various chemical and physical properties, many of which are still unaccounted for. Several research projects have been carried out in the Danish Wadden Sea in recent years and the sedimentology and hydrodynamic conditions in the area are thus well documented. Many major projects have been carried out over the last decades: the first was in 1971 and the latest was in 2005. Characteristic for these projects was that they were based on extensive data sets and were, therefore able to demonstrate the complex hydrodynamics and sediment dynamics in the area. Further information can be found in the additional information. The area is dominated by the tidal barrier spit of Skallingen and the barrier island of Fanoe. The tidal inlet of Graadyb is responsible by far for most of the water exchange in the area. Only minor water masses are transported over the tidal divide behind Fanoe. The tidal lagoon is about 12 km long and 4 km wide. About 40% is comprised of intertidal flats. Esbjerg harbour, located at the centre of the estuary, carries out maintenance dredging of between 200.000 and 600.000 m3 of fine-grained sediment annually. Most of this sediment is dispersed on two sites located on the sides of the tidal channels, depending on the phase of the tide. The sedimentation of fine-grained sediment in the area is governed by estuarine processes such as settling lag, scour lag and tidal asymmetry. Research shows that slow but significant deposition occurs at the tidal flats consistent with measurements showing a net flux into the area. In this paper, the knowledge gained from various research projects and

  16. Cryogenic fluid management experiment trunnion fatigue verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, W. J.; Fester, D. A.; Toth, J. M., Jr.; Kasper, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    A subcritical liquid hydrogen orbital storage and transfer experiment was designed for flight in the Shuttle cargo bay. The Cryogenic Fluid Management Experiment (CFME) includes a liquid hydrogen tank supported in a vacuum jacket by two fiberglass epoxy trunnion mounts. This composite material was selected for the trunnions since it provides desirable strength, weight and thermal characteristics for supporting cryogenic tankage. An experimental program was conducted to provide material property and fatigue data for S-glass epoxy composite materials at ambient and liquid hydrogen temperatures and to verify structural integrity of the CFME trunnion supports.

  17. Flight experience with flight control redundancy management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalai, K. J.; Larson, R. R.; Glover, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Flight experience with both current and advanced redundancy management schemes was gained in recent flight research programs using the F-8 digital fly by wire aircraft. The flight performance of fault detection, isolation, and reconfiguration (FDIR) methods for sensors, computers, and actuators is reviewed. Results of induced failures as well as of actual random failures are discussed. Deficiencies in modeling and implementation techniques are also discussed. The paper also presents comparison off multisensor tracking in smooth air, in turbulence, during large maneuvers, and during maneuvers typical of those of large commercial transport aircraft. The results of flight tests of an advanced analytic redundancy management algorithm are compared with the performance of a contemporary algorithm in terms of time to detection, false alarms, and missed alarms. The performance of computer redundancy management in both iron bird and flight tests is also presented.

  18. Patients' experience of partial tooth loss and expectations to treatment: a qualitative study in Danish and Swedish patients.

    PubMed

    Øzhayat, E B; Åkerman, S; Lundegren, N; Öwall, B

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of impairments, wishes and expectations is essential to make correct decisions regarding oral rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate discomforts, wishes and expectations in patients' with partial edentulism before entering oral rehabilitation. In Copenhagen, Denmark, and Malmö, Sweden, respectively, 20 patients with partial edentulism seeking rehabilitation were interviewed in a semistructured qualitative manner. The interviews were transcribed and analysed yielding overall domains. Six themes appeared as overall domains: (i) experienced impairments, (ii) experienced social awareness, (iii) expectation to treatment, (iv) expectation to durability/survival, (v) coping strategies dealing with the tooth loss including explanations of the tooth loss and (vi) modifications to experienced impairment. The impairments were mostly experienced as problems in social settings. Most participants expressed a simple wish to function normally; a fixed solution was preferred. Many Danish participants accepted a removable solution whereas only few Swedish participants did so. The domains 'coping strategies' and 'modifications' were not part of the chosen topics of interest, indicating a high wish of the participants to explain their tooth loss and how they coped with it. In conclusion, a large degree of social impairment was found in the patient group along with several coping strategies. The impairments were modified by a number of factors indicating that highly individualised care and treatment is needed. A state of normality was described as the primary treatment wish with a higher acceptance of removable solutions in Denmark than in Sweden. For final decision-making, surrounding factors seemed to influence the patients' choices. PMID:26426127

  19. Conservative management of spontaneous abortions. Women's experiences.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, E.; Janssen, P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe women's experiences with expectant management of spontaneous abortions. DESIGN: Descriptive survey using questionnaires with fixed-choice and open-ended questions. The latter were analyzed for themes, using qualitative methods. SETTING: Urban and suburban private primary care family practices. PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of family practice patients (59 of 80 eligible) pregnant for less than 12 weeks who had spontaneous abortions without surgery. Response rate was 84.7%; 50 questionnaires were received from the 59 women. METHOD: Women were asked about their physical experiences, including amount of pain and bleeding; emotional effects; their satisfaction with medical care; and their suggestions for improving care. MAIN FINDINGS: The mean worst pain experienced during a spontaneous abortion on an 11-point scale was 5.9. Bleeding varied, but was often very heavy. Satisfaction rate was 92.9% with family physician care and 84.6% with hospital care. Women described the emotional effect of "natural" spontaneous abortions and made recommendations for improving care. CONCLUSIONS: A better understanding of the physical and emotional experiences of the women in this study might help physicians better prepare and support patients coping with expectant management of spontaneous abortions. PMID:10540695

  20. Does health technology assessment benefit health services and politics? The experiences of an established HTA institution: the Danish Centre for Evaluation and HTA.

    PubMed

    Sigmund, H; Kristensen, F B

    2002-01-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) was introduced in Denmark 20 years ago. However, it only came into fashion a few years ago. This happened when politicians and health service decision-makers realized that due to the increasing pressure on resources prioritization was an inescapable fact. HTA was supposed to support this effort by providing a broad spectrum of information designed for decision-making. Events speeded up from that point on: a national HTA strategy, a national HTA institution, satellite institutions, and many HTA projects were set up - at national, regional, and local levels. The diversity and decentralization of decision-making combined with a broad and interdisciplinary approach to methodology guided the development of Danish HTA. Experiences with HTA were gained from successful applications and disappointing encounters with uncontrollable political processes. Politicians seem in general to be content with the development. An evaluation of the impact of HTA has not yet been undertaken, and a good deal of work lies ahead. The implementation of HTA results will be one of the greatest challenges of the years ahead. PMID:15609118

  1. Experiences in managing the Prometheus Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, David H.; Clark, Karla B.; Cook, Beverly A.; Gavit, Sarah A.; Kayali, Sammy A.; McKinney, John C.; Milkovich, David C.; Reh, Kim R.; Taylor, Randall L.; Casani, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Congress authorized NASA?s Prometheus Project in February 2003, with the first Prometheus mission slated to explore the icy moons of Jupiter. The Project had two major objectives: (1) to develop a nuclear reactor that would provide unprecedented levels of power and show that it could be processed safely and operated reliably in space for long-duration, deep-space exploration and (2) to explore the three icy moons of Jupiter - Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa - and return science data that would meet the scientific goals as set forth in the Decadal Survey Report of the National Academy of Sciences. Early in Project planning, it was determined that the development of the Prometheus nuclear powered Spaceship would be complex and require the intellectual knowledge residing at numerous organizations across the country. In addition, because of the complex nature of the Project and the multiple partners, approaches beyond those successfully used to manage a typical JPL project would be needed. This paper1 will describe the key experiences in managing Prometheus that should prove useful for future projects of similar scope and magnitude

  2. NASA cryogenic fluid management space experiment efforts, 1960-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    A history of technological development for subcritical cryogenic fluid management (CFM) through space experiments is given for the period 1960 to 1990. Space experiments with liquid hydrogen were conducted in the early 1960's. Efforts since then have consisted of studies and designs of potential space experiments. A chronology of CFM space experiments and design efforts is included.

  3. Women in University Management: The Nigerian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiodun-Oyebanji, Olayemi; Olaleye, F.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined women in university management in Nigeria. It was a descriptive research of the survey type. The population of the study comprised all the public universities in southwest Nigeria, out of which three were selected through the stratified random sampling technique. Three hundred respondents who were in management positions were…

  4. Integrating Work Experience and Management for College Bound Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Leo V.; Coover, Thomas A.

    1975-01-01

    St. Viator High School, through a Business Management Seminar, converted job experiences into learning experiences by acknowledging the real value of the job as a laboratory for the study of principles of management and their application to the job. (Author/BP)

  5. Evaluating University Continuing Education: A Danish Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thune, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The Danish Evaluation Institute is conducting systematic assessments of three master's programs in public administration, public policy, and public management. They have found that explicit criteria have advantages and disadvantages. Development of criteria attempts to meet the following demands: uniformity, relevance of level, scope, precision,…

  6. Women's experiences of general practitioner management of miscarriage.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, T

    1989-01-01

    A study of 67 women one month after miscarriage identified significant levels of dissatisfaction with their medical care. There are particular problems in managing miscarriage which is very distressing for many women but a common clinical presentation for doctors. The reasons for women's dissatisfaction with their management are explained. Greater understanding of the experience of miscarriage should lead to better management and suggestions are made for better care for this common distressing experience. PMID:2560045

  7. The US JGOFS data management experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, David M.; Chandler, Cynthia L.; Doney, Scott C.; Buesseler, Ken O.; Heimerdinger, George; Bishop, J. K. B.; Flierl, Glenn R.

    2006-03-01

    The US Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) database management system is an online, oceanographic database assembled from the research activities of the US JGOFS field and Synthesis and Modeling Program (SMP). It is based on modern, object-oriented programming, with a web-based user interface ( http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/jg/dir/jgofs) that gives all users, regardless of the computer platform being used, equal access to the data and metadata. It is populated with an extensive set of biogeochemical data from the US JGOFS community along with the attendant metadata. This article summarizes the lessons learned that may serve as a primer for future oceanographic and earth science research programs. Good data management requires devoted resources, about 5-10% of the total cost of the program. A data management office should be established at the initiation of the program, conventions for standard methods, names, and units need to be established before the field program begins, and an agreed-to list of metadata must be collected systematically along with the data. Open and accessible data management depends upon investigators agreeing to share their data with each other, leading to more rapid scientific discovery. Data management should support data distribution and archival; interactions between the data managers and the principal investigators make the database a living database. Innovative use of commercial products in information technology can save time and money in scientific database management. Technology allows access to the database to be transparent in location and intuitive in use. Finally, the most important investments in data management are the people hired.

  8. Linking climate change mitigation and coastal eutrophication management through biogas technology: Evidence from a new Danish bioenergy concept.

    PubMed

    Kaspersen, Bjarke Stoltze; Christensen, Thomas Budde; Fredenslund, Anders Michael; Møller, Henrik Bjarne; Butts, Michael Brian; Jensen, Niels H; Kjaer, Tyge

    2016-01-15

    The interest in sustainable bioenergy solutions has gained great importance in Europe due to the need to reduce GHG emissions and to meet environmental policy targets, not least for the protection of groundwater and surface water quality. In the Municipality of Solrød in Denmark, a novel bioenergy concept for anaerobic co-digestion of food industry residues, manure and beach-cast seaweed has been developed and tested in order to quantify the potential for synergies between climate change mitigation and coastal eutrophication management in the Køge Bay catchment. The biogas plant, currently under construction, was designed to handle an annual input of up to 200,000 t of biomass based on four main fractions: pectin wastes, carrageenan wastes, manure and beach-cast seaweed. This paper describes how this bioenergy concept can contribute to strengthening the linkages between climate change mitigation strategies and Water Framework Directive (WFD) action planning. Our assessments of the projected biogas plant indicate an annual reduction of GHG emissions of approx. 40,000 t CO2 equivalents, corresponding to approx. 1/3 of current total GHG emissions in the Municipality of Solrød. In addition, nitrogen and phosphorous loads to Køge Bay are estimated to be reduced by approx. 63 t yr.(-1) and 9 tyr.(-1), respectively, contributing to the achievement of more than 70% of the nutrient reduction target set for Køge Bay in the first WFD river basin management plan. This study shows that anaerobic co-digestion of the specific food industry residues, pig manure and beach-cast seaweed is feasible and that there is a very significant, cost-effective GHG and nutrient loading mitigation potential for this bioenergy concept. Our research demonstrates how an integrated planning process where considerations about the total environment are integrated into the design and decision processes can support the development of this kind of holistic bioenergy solutions. PMID:26476058

  9. Polytrauma management - a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Frink, Michael; Zeckey, Christian; Mommsen, Philipp; Haasper, Carl; Krettek, Christian; Hildebrand, Frank

    2009-11-01

    The management of polytraumatised patients remains challenging in spite of advances and improvements in trauma care in recent decades. Trauma systems require enormous staff resources as well as technical equipment. Internal and external quality management processes are necessary to identify weak points and improve treatment quality. Continuous training of all professionals involved in trauma care is necessary to assure high quality, up-to-date therapy in patients with multiple injuries. Standard operating procedures such as prehospital trauma algorithms and clinical management protocols (ie, ATLS) can help to standardise and compare treatment of patients suffering from major trauma. In this overview, we describe the development and current state of our trauma department. Differences in our cohort of polytraumatised patients compared to other facilities and current strategies for initial treatment of these patients are also discussed. PMID:19895953

  10. Bridging the management-science partnership gap: Adaptive grazing management experiment in shortgrass steppe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Adaptive Grazing Management experiment (2013-2023) in shortgrass steppe of Colorado addresses a critical gap in grazing management: lack of management-science partnerships to more fully understand the effect of management decisions for multiple ecosystem goods and services at ranch-scales. A Sta...

  11. Clinicians’ experiences of becoming a clinical manager: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been an increased interest in recruiting health professionals with a clinical background to management positions in health care. We know little about the factors that influence individuals’ decisions to engage in management. The aim of this study is to explore clinicians’ journeys towards management positions in hospitals, in order to identify potential drivers and barriers to management recruitment and development. Methods We did a qualitative study which included in-depth interviews with 30 clinicians in middle and first-line management positions in Norwegian hospitals. In addition, participant observation was conducted with 20 of the participants. The informants were recruited from medical and surgical departments, and most had professional backgrounds as medical doctors or nurses. Interviews were analyzed by systemic text condensation. Results We found that there were three phases in clinicians’ journey into management; the development of leadership awareness, taking on the manager role and the experience of entering management. Participants’ experiences suggest that there are different journeys into management, in which both external and internal pressure emerged as a recurrent theme. They had not anticipated a career in clinical management, and experienced that they had been persuaded to take the position. Being thrown into the position, without being sufficiently prepared for the task, was a common experience among participants. Being left to themselves, they had to learn management “on the fly”. Some were frustrated in their role due to increasing administrative workloads, without being able to delegate work effectively. Conclusions Path dependency and social pressure seems to influence clinicians’ decisions to enter into management positions. Hospital organizations should formalize pathways into management, in order to identify, attract, and retain the most qualified talents. Top managers should make sure that necessary

  12. Subjective Experiences of Clients in a Voluntary Money Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Serowik, Kristin L.; Bellamy, Chyrell D.; Rowe, Michael; Rosen, Marc I.

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of people diagnosed with mental illnesses have difficulty managing their money, and therefore many psychiatric treatments involve providing money management assistance. However, little is known about the subjective experience of having a money manager, and extant literature is restricted to people forced to work with a representative payee or conservator. In this study, fifteen people were interviewed about their experience receiving a voluntary money management intervention designed to minimize substance use. Clients emphasized the importance of trusting the money manager, financial mindfulness (an enhanced awareness of the financial transactions in clients’ day-to-day lives), agency over their own affairs, and addiction. In contrast to evaluations of people assigned representative payees and/or conservators, there was little mention of feeling coerced. These findings suggest that money management programs can address client concerns by building trust, relating budgeting to clients’ day-to-day lives, and encouraging clients’ control over their own affairs. PMID:24605071

  13. Subjective Experiences of Clients in a Voluntary Money Management Program.

    PubMed

    Serowik, Kristin L; Bellamy, Chyrell D; Rowe, Michael; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of people diagnosed with mental illnesses have difficulty managing their money, and therefore many psychiatric treatments involve providing money management assistance. However, little is known about the subjective experience of having a money manager, and extant literature is restricted to people forced to work with a representative payee or conservator. In this study, fifteen people were interviewed about their experience receiving a voluntary money management intervention designed to minimize substance use. Clients emphasized the importance of trusting the money manager, financial mindfulness (an enhanced awareness of the financial transactions in clients' day-to-day lives), agency over their own affairs, and addiction. In contrast to evaluations of people assigned representative payees and/or conservators, there was little mention of feeling coerced. These findings suggest that money management programs can address client concerns by building trust, relating budgeting to clients' day-to-day lives, and encouraging clients' control over their own affairs. PMID:24605071

  14. A Small Business Management Entrepreneurship Curriculum: A Dual Progression Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuratko, Donald; LaFollette, William R.

    1986-01-01

    Describes Ball State University's "dual progression" curriculum for the small business management program. The program seeks to combine the best elements of entrepreneurial theory with the difficult facets of practical experience. The five major component courses (small business ventures, entrepreneurship, management information systems, a small…

  15. Culturally Relevant Management Education: Insights from Experience in Nunavut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wihak, Christine

    2005-01-01

    The author's experience with a Nunavut business management education program illustrates how to develop culturally relevant organizational behavior curriculum. The process initially involved interviews with Inuit Elders about culturally appropriate responses to scenarios of cultural conflicts in the workplace identified by Inuit managers. The…

  16. Managing Data From Signal-Propagation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1989-01-01

    Computer programs generate characteristic plots from amplitudes and phases. Software system enables minicomputer to process data on amplitudes and phases of signals received during experiments in ground-mobile/satellite radio propagation. Takes advantage of file-handling capabilities of UNIX operating system and C programming language. Interacts with user, under whose guidance programs in FORTRAN language generate plots of spectra or other curves of types commonly used to characterize signals. FORTRAN programs used to process file-handling outputs into any of several useful forms.

  17. Student Engagement and the College Experience in Hospitality Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Student perceptions of competency in Hospitality Management, (HM) and the level of engagement in the college experience were compared between two programs to verify engagement as a construct consisting of three domains; classroom, campus, and off-campus. Administrator and student descriptions of engagement in the college experience described the…

  18. Data management for interdisciplinary field experiments: OTTER project support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelici, Gary; Popovici, Lidia; Skiles, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of investigators of an interdisciplinary science project to properly manage the data that are collected during the experiment is critical to the effective conduct of science. When the project becomes large, possibly including several scenes of large-format remotely sensed imagery shared by many investigators requiring several services, the data management effort can involve extensive staff and computerized data inventories. The OTTER (Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research) project was supported by the PLDS (Pilot Land Data System) with several data management services, such as data inventory, certification, and publication. After a brief description of these services, experiences in providing them are compared with earlier data management efforts and some conclusions regarding data management in support of interdisciplinary science are discussed. In addition to providing these services, a major goal of this data management capability was to adopt characteristics of a pro-active attitude, such as flexibility and responsiveness, believed to be crucial for the effective conduct of active, interdisciplinary science. These are also itemized and compared with previous data management support activities. Identifying and improving these services and characteristics can lead to the design and implementation of optimal data management support capabilities, which can result in higher quality science and data products from future interdisciplinary field experiments.

  19. End-to-end experiment management in HPC

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, John M; Kroiss, Ryan R; Torrez, Alfred; Wingate, Meghan

    2010-01-01

    Experiment management in any domain is challenging. There is a perpetual feedback loop cycling through planning, execution, measurement, and analysis. The lifetime of a particular experiment can be limited to a single cycle although many require myriad more cycles before definite results can be obtained. Within each cycle, a large number of subexperiments may be executed in order to measure the effects of one or more independent variables. Experiment management in high performance computing (HPC) follows this general pattern but also has three unique characteristics. One, computational science applications running on large supercomputers must deal with frequent platform failures which can interrupt, perturb, or terminate running experiments. Two, these applications typically integrate in parallel using MPI as their communication medium. Three, there is typically a scheduling system (e.g. Condor, Moab, SGE, etc.) acting as a gate-keeper for the HPC resources. In this paper, we introduce LANL Experiment Management (LEM), an experimental management framework simplifying all four phases of experiment management. LEM simplifies experiment planning by allowing the user to describe their experimental goals without having to fully construct the individual parameters for each task. To simplify execution, LEM dispatches the subexperiments itself thereby freeing the user from remembering the often arcane methods for interacting with the various scheduling systems. LEM provides transducers for experiments that automatically measure and record important information about each subexperiment; these transducers can easily be extended to collect additional measurements specific to each experiment. Finally, experiment analysis is simplified by providing a general database visualization framework that allows users to quickly and easily interact with their measured data.

  20. Management of infective endocarditis: seventeen years' experience.

    PubMed

    Arbulu, A; Asfaw, I

    1987-02-01

    Infective endocarditis remains a serious illness with a high mortality. In more than 75% of 417 patients, the infection was due to gram-positive microorganisms. The non-drug-addicted patients (33%) were elderly and debilitated with advanced illness that preceded the endocarditis. The drug-addicted patients (67%) were young and were infected with multiple kinds of microorganisms. The blood cultures grew strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin sodium and nafcillin sodium in a majority of patients. Gram-negative microorganisms and fungi were cultured almost exclusively from samples from the drug-addicted patients. The high mortality among the non-drug-addicted patients (28%) was related to their advanced age and debilitating illness. The high mortality among the drug-addicted patients (21%) was related to the complex bacteriology of their infections and the severe anatomical disruption of the valvular complexes of the heart. When cured of their disease after treatment with intravenously administered antibiotics or a valve procedure or both, their long-term survival was related to whether or not they abstained from their habit. If the patient abstained from the use of drugs, the chances of survival were good; if not, death invariably ensued. This experience strongly supports our contention that if a patient returns to the use of drugs and reinfects the valve after initial cure, a second valve operation is contraindicated. PMID:3813702

  1. Lessons learned from experiments conducted on radar data management systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Mark W.

    1994-06-01

    The thesis provides lessons learned from experiments conducted by the 11th Air Force to verify the capabilities of two vendor-produced Radar Data Management Systems (RDMS). The first part of the thesis provides background information explaining the impetus for such experiments and why a lessons learned approach was taken. The experimental plan and the final report from the PACAF experiments are analyzed using evaluation tools taught in the C3 curriculum at the Naval Postgraduate School. The lessons learned from the mistakes made during these experiments are applied to produce a revised experimental plan. A lessons learned section follows the analysis. This section discusses specific lessons learned from the 11th Air Force experiments as well as more general lessons learned by the author. The thesis concludes with two chapters that provide overall conclusions and a summary, and recommendations for future work that can be accomplished in the area of radar data management.

  2. Automated support for experience-based software management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valett, Jon D.

    1992-01-01

    To effectively manage a software development project, the software manager must have access to key information concerning a project's status. This information includes not only data relating to the project of interest, but also, the experience of past development efforts within the environment. This paper describes the concepts and functionality of a software management tool designed to provide this information. This tool, called the Software Management Environment (SME), enables the software manager to compare an ongoing development effort with previous efforts and with models of the 'typical' project within the environment, to predict future project status, to analyze a project's strengths and weaknesses, and to assess the project's quality. In order to provide these functions the tool utilizes a vast corporate memory that includes a data base of software metrics, a set of models and relationships that describe the software development environment, and a set of rules that capture other knowledge and experience of software managers within the environment. Integrating these major concepts into one software management tool, the SME is a model of the type of management tool needed for all software development organizations.

  3. Appalachian residents’ experiences with and management of multiple morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Bardach, Shoshana H.; Manchikanti, Kavita N.; Goodenow, Anne C.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately three quarters of middle aged and older adults have at least two simultaneously occurring chronic conditions (“multiple morbidity” or MM), a trend expected to increase dramatically throughout the world. Rural residents, who tend to have fewer personal and health resources, are more likely to experience MM. To improve our understanding of the ways in which vulnerable, rural residents in the U.S. experience and manage MM, we interviewed twenty rural Appalachian residents with MM. We identified the following themes; (a) MM has multifaceted challenges and is viewed as more than the sum of its parts; (b) numerous challenges exist to optimal MM self-management, particularly in a rural, under-resourced context; however, (c) participants described strategic methods of managing multiple chronic conditions, including prioritizing certain conditions and management strategies and drawing heavily on assistance from informal and formal sources. PMID:21263063

  4. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hammersley, R.J.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation.

  5. Langley applications experiments data management system study. [for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanham, C. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A data management system study is presented that defines, in functional terms, the most cost effective ground data management system to support Advanced Technology Laboratory (ATL) flights of the space shuttle. Results from each subtask performed and the recommended system configuration for reformatting the experiment instrumentation tapes to computer compatible tape are examined. Included are cost factors for development of a mini control center for real-time support of the ATL flights.

  6. The virtuous manager. Renewing the experience of work.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, C E

    1997-01-01

    In healthcare, as in any other field, work can become dehumanizing, meaningless drudgery. But good managers can transform their organizations and renew the experience of work. Good management demands not only good business skills, but character, rooted in truthfulness and vision. Three virtues are particularly important: prudence, justice and fortitude. The moral skill of prudence enables healthcare managers to know what is to be done; justice creates honest relationships; and fortitude enables managers to seek a good that is difficult to achieve--to do the right thing. Businesses must also explore their potential for sacramentality and find ways in which employees--and employers--can become better, holier people through their work. Organizations should strive to achieve subsidiarity and keep employees well-informed of their missions. Establishing a sense of connectedness is important, as is open and honest communication. Finally, managers-and healthcare organizations-must always work for the common good. PMID:10168761

  7. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; DerSarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect of such strategies on a range of patient-reported experience measures. Materials and Methods We employed a cross-sectional, multi-level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey between May 2011 and January 2012. Each hospital contributed patient level data for four conditions/pathways: acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries. The outcome variables in this study were a set of patient-reported experience measures including a generic 6-item measure of patient experience (NORPEQ), a 3-item measure of patient-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure) and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management functions and patient-centered care strategies. We used directed acyclic graphs to detail and guide the modeling of the complex relationships between predictor variables and outcome variables, and fitted multivariable linear mixed models with random intercept by hospital, and adjusted for fixed effects at the country level, hospital level and patient level. Results Overall, 74 hospitals and 276 hospital departments contributed data on 6,536 patients to this study (acute

  8. Management Development in Health Care: Exploring the Experiences of Clinical Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Laura; Milner, Brigid

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dramatic reforms in the health service in recent years. Design/methodology/approach--Examines management development in health care, and explores the experiences of clinical nurse managers. Findings--Duplication of agencies and multiplication of roles have led to tensions in terms of both…

  9. Grazing management options in meeting objectives of grazing experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decisions on which grazing management option to use in grazing experiments can be critical in meeting research objectives and generating information for the scientific community or technologies that meets the needs of forage-based enterprises. It is necessary to have an understanding of animal per...

  10. German experience in managing stormwater with green infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper identifies and describes experience with ‘green’ stormwater management practices in Germany. It provides the context in which developments took place and extracts lessons learned to inform efforts of other countries in confronting urban stormwater challenges. Our findi...

  11. Electric power management for the International Space Station experiment racks

    SciTech Connect

    Burcham, M.; Darty, M.A.; Thibodeau, P.E.; Coe, R.; Dunn, M.

    1995-12-31

    An intelligent, all solid state, electric power management system for International Space Station experiment racks is described. This power system is implemented via redundant internal microcomputers, controlling hybridized solid state power controllers in response to 1553B data bus commands. The solid state power controllers are programmable for current trip level and for normally-open or normally-closed operation.

  12. Managing the Student Experience in a Shifting Higher Education Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Paul; Callender, Claire; Grove, Lyn; Kersh, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    This research report, prepared between January 2014 and July 2014, assesses how the management of the undergraduate student experience in English higher education (HE) is changing as a result of a more competitive environment, and in particular the impact of the new tuition fee regime introduced in 2012. Summary of respondent categories by…

  13. Developing International Managers: The Contribution of Cultural Experience to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Peter; Regan, Padraic; Li, Liang Liang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate cultural experience as a learning strategy for developing international managers. Design/methodology/approach: Using an integrated framework, two quantitative studies, based on empirical methodology, are conducted. Study 1, with an undergraduate sample situated in the Asia Pacific, aimed to examine…

  14. A Necessary Evil: The Experiences of Managers Implementing Downsizing Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noronha, Ernesto; D'Cruz, Premilla

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a phenomenological study, which describes the experiences of human resource (HR) managers implementing a downsizing program in a steel manufacturing organization in India. Data were collected through conversational interviews. Following van Manens sententious analytic approach, the core theme of a necessary…

  15. Demonstrating the Experimenting Society Model with Classwide Behavior Management Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Taya C.; Stoner, Gary; Green, Susan K.

    1996-01-01

    Demonstrates the experimenting society model using data-based decision making and collaborative consultation to evaluate behavior-management intervention strategies in 25 seventh graders. Each intervention results in improved behavior, but active teaching of classroom rules was determined to be most effective. (Author/JDM)

  16. Management of Foreign Language Anxiety: Insiders' Awareness and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Trang Thi Thu; Moni, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated EFL students' and teachers' perspectives and experiences of managing foreign language anxiety (FLA). Data were obtained from 49 student autobiographies, 18 student interviews, 8 teacher interviews and 351 student responses to an open-ended question. Content analysis was used to analyse the data with the use of NVivo. A…

  17. Danish auroral science history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, P.

    2011-01-01

    Danish auroral science history begins with the early auroral observations made by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe during the years from 1582 to 1601 preceding the Maunder minimum in solar activity. Included are also the brilliant observations made by another astronomer, Ole Rømer, from Copenhagen in 1707, as well as the early auroral observations made from Greenland by missionaries during the 18th and 19th centuries. The relations between auroras and geomagnetic variations were analysed by H. C. Ørsted, who also played a vital role in the development of Danish meteorology that came to include comprehensive auroral observations from Denmark, Iceland and Greenland as well as auroral and geomagnetic research. The very important auroral investigations made by Sophus Tromholt are outlined. His analysis from 1880 of auroral observations from Greenland prepared for the significant contributions from the Danish Meteorological Institute, DMI, (founded in 1872) to the first International Polar Year 1882/83, where an expedition headed by Adam Paulsen was sent to Greenland to conduct auroral and geomagnetic observations. Paulsen's analyses of the collected data gave many important results but also raised many new questions that gave rise to auroral expeditions to Iceland in 1899 to 1900 and to Finland in 1900 to 1901. Among the results from these expeditions were 26 unique paintings of the auroras made by the artist painter, Harald Moltke. The expedition to Finland was headed by Dan la Cour, who later as director of the DMI came to be in charge of the comprehensive international geomagnetic and auroral observations made during the Second International Polar Year in 1932/33. Finally, the article describes the important investigations made by Knud Lassen during, among others, the International Geophysical Year 1957/58 and during the International Quiet Sun Year (IQSY) in 1964/65. With his leadership the auroral and geomagnetic research at DMI reached a high international

  18. Nursing administrators' experiences in managing PDA use for inpatient units.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting-Ting

    2006-01-01

    The adoption of information technology in patient care has become a trend in healthcare organizations. The impact of this technology on end users has been widely studied, but little attention has been given to its influence from a management perspective. The purpose of this study was to explore nurse managers' perceived experiences in implementing a policy to adopt personal digital assistant technology. A descriptive, exploratory qualitative approach (one-on-one, in-depth interviews) was used to collect data from 16 nurse managers of inpatient units at a medical center in Taiwan. Interview data were analyzed according to Miles and Huberman's data reduction, data display, and conclusion verification process. The results revealed that nurse managers experienced the limitations of technology, training issues, doctors' obstructive influence, role conflict, and improvement of future personal digital assistant use. These results can be used to improve strategic organizational planning and in-service training programs to implement information systems. PMID:16980781

  19. Experiment module concepts study. Volume 1: Management summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The minimum number of standardized (common) module concepts that will satisfy the experiment program for manned space stations at least cost is investigated. The module interfaces with other elements such as the space shuttle, ground stations, and the experiments themselves are defined. The total experiment module program resource and test requirements are also considered. The minimum number of common module concepts that will satisfy the program at least cost is found to be three, plus a propulsion slice and certain experiment-peculiar integration hardware. The experiment modules rely on the space station for operational, maintenance, and logistic support. They are compatible with both expendable and shuttle launch vehicles, and with servicing by shuttle, tug, or directly from the space station. A total experiment module program cost of approximately $2319M under the study assumptions is indicated. This total is made up of $838M for experiment module development and production, $806M for experiment equipment, and $675M for interface hardware, experiment integration, launch and flight operations, and program management and support.

  20. The COLD-SAT Experiment for Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, J. R.; Wachter, J. P.; Vento, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    Future national space transportation missions will depend on the use of cryogenic fluid management technology development needs for these missions. In-space testing will be conducted in order to show low gravity cryogenic fluid management concepts and to acquire a technical data base. Liquid H2 is the preferred test fluid due to its propellant use. The design of COLD-SAT (Cryogenic On-orbit Liquid Depot Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer Satellite), an Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) launched orbital spacecraft that will perform subcritical liquid H2 storage and transfer experiments under low gravity conditions is studied. An Atlas launch vehicle will place COLD-SAT into a circular orbit, and the 3-axis controlled spacecraft bus will provide electric power, experiment control, and data management, attitude control, and propulsive accelerations for the experiments. Low levels of acceleration will provide data on the effects that low gravity might have on the heat and mass transfer processes used. The experiment module will contain 3 liquid H2 tanks; fluid transfer, pressurization and venting equipment; and instrumentation.

  1. Nevada Experiments and Operations Program (N Program) Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nattrass, L.; Anastasio, M.R.

    2000-02-01

    This plan briefly describes the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) institutional structure and how Nevada Experiments and Operations Program (N Program's) organization fits within this structure, roles and responsibilities, and management processes that govern N Program activities. This plan also serves as the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Implementation Plan for N Program work. This plan applies to all work performed by and for LLNL that falls under the oversight of DOE/NV except LLNL activities in support of the Yucca Mountain Project Office (YMPO).

  2. Governance Experiments in Water Management: From Interests to Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Doorn, Neelke

    2016-06-01

    The management of water is a topic of great concern. Inadequate management may lead to water scarcity and ecological destruction, but also to an increase of catastrophic floods. With climate change, both water scarcity and the risk of flooding are likely to increase even further in the coming decades. This makes water management currently a highly dynamic field, in which experiments are made with new forms of policy making. In the current paper, a case study is presented in which different interest groups were invited for developing new water policy. The case was innovative in that stakeholders were invited to identify and frame the most urgent water issues, rather than asking them to reflect on possible solutions developed by the water authority itself. The case suggests that stakeholders can participate more effectively if their contribution is focused on underlying competing values rather than conflicting interests. PMID:25652657

  3. Production Experiences with the Cray-Enabled TORQUE Resource Manager

    SciTech Connect

    Ezell, Matthew A; Maxwell, Don E; Beer, David

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing resources utilize batch systems to manage the user workload. Cray systems are uniquely different from typical clusters due to Cray s Application Level Placement Scheduler (ALPS). ALPS manages binary transfer, job launch and monitoring, and error handling. Batch systems require special support to integrate with ALPS using an XML protocol called BASIL. Previous versions of Adaptive Computing s TORQUE and Moab batch suite integrated with ALPS from within Moab, using PERL scripts to interface with BASIL. This would occasionally lead to problems when all the components would become unsynchronized. Version 4.1 of the TORQUE Resource Manager introduced new features that allow it to directly integrate with ALPS using BASIL. This paper describes production experiences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the new TORQUE software versions, as well as ongoing and future work to improve TORQUE.

  4. Large-scale flow experiments for managing river systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, C.P.; Olden, J.D.; Lytle, D.A.; Melis, T.S.; Schmidt, J.C.; Bray, E.N.; Freeman, Mary C.; Gido, K.B.; Hemphill, N.P.; Kennard, M.J.; McMullen, L.E.; Mims, M.C.; Pyron, M.; Robinson, C.T.; Williams, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental manipulations of streamflow have been used globally in recent decades to mitigate the impacts of dam operations on river systems. Rivers are challenging subjects for experimentation, because they are open systems that cannot be isolated from their social context. We identify principles to address the challenges of conducting effective large-scale flow experiments. Flow experiments have both scientific and social value when they help to resolve specific questions about the ecological action of flow with a clear nexus to water policies and decisions. Water managers must integrate new information into operating policies for large-scale experiments to be effective. Modeling and monitoring can be integrated with experiments to analyze long-term ecological responses. Experimental design should include spatially extensive observations and well-defined, repeated treatments. Large-scale flow manipulations are only a part of dam operations that affect river systems. Scientists can ensure that experimental manipulations continue to be a valuable approach for the scientifically based management of river systems. ?? 2011 by American Institute of Biological Sciences. All rights reserved.

  5. Large-scale flow experiments for managing river systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher P.; Olden, Julian D.; Lytle, David A.; Melis, Theodore S.; Schmidt, John C.; Bray, Erin N.; Freeman, Mary C.; Gido, Keith B.; Hemphill, Nina P.; Kennard, Mark J.; McMullen, Laura E.; Mims, Meryl C.; Pyron, Mark; Robinson, Christopher T.; Williams, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental manipulations of streamflow have been used globally in recent decades to mitigate the impacts of dam operations on river systems. Rivers are challenging subjects for experimentation, because they are open systems that cannot be isolated from their social context. We identify principles to address the challenges of conducting effective large-scale flow experiments. Flow experiments have both scientific and social value when they help to resolve specific questions about the ecological action of flow with a clear nexus to water policies and decisions. Water managers must integrate new information into operating policies for large-scale experiments to be effective. Modeling and monitoring can be integrated with experiments to analyze long-term ecological responses. Experimental design should include spatially extensive observations and well-defined, repeated treatments. Large-scale flow manipulations are only a part of dam operations that affect river systems. Scientists can ensure that experimental manipulations continue to be a valuable approach for the scientifically based management of river systems.

  6. The Management Academy for Public Health: the South Carolina experience.

    PubMed

    Cumbey, Dorothy A; Ellison, Lu Anne

    2006-01-01

    In the late 1990s, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) was faced with the challenges of a workforce that was not prepared in public health; the impending loss of significant agency expertise, leadership, and institutional knowledge through retirement; the lack of available and accessible training; and continuing state budget cuts. Preparedness for bioterrorism and other public health emergencies was also of concern, a need made more urgent after 2001. To respond to current and emerging public health challenges, the SCDHEC had to have a workforce with the knowledge and skills necessary for the delivery of essential public health services. To address these challenges, the department partnered with the University of North Carolina in the pilot of the Management Academy for Public Health. The Management Academy is now integrated into the South Carolina workforce development strategy, and 199 staff members and 22 community partners have graduated from the program. Along with increased knowledge, skills, and abilities of individual staff and increased organizational and community capacity, a significant result of South Carolina's experience with the Management Academy for Public Health is the development of a training program for emergency preparedness modeled on the Management Academy. This highly successful program illustrates the replicability of the Management Academy model. PMID:16912610

  7. Implementation Plan: Jasper Management Prestart Review (Surrogate Material Experiments)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.E.

    2000-09-29

    Able Site is located 24 km northwest of Mercury on the Nevada Test Site. The Nevada Test Site is approximately 105 km northwest of Las Vegas, NV. Major facilities at Able Site include Buildings 5100,5180, and 5191. Significant external interfaces for the JASPER site include the electrical system, wastewater system, communications systems, and water supply system, which provides both potable and fire-protection water. Support services, which are provided on the Nevada Test Site, include medical, emergency response (NTS Fire Department), radiation protection, industrial hygiene, and waste management. Although JASPER will ultimately be used for actinide research, the start-up process requires system demonstration using surrogates in place of the actinide targets. LLNL Nevada Experiments and Operations (N) Program has established a Management Prestart Review (MPR) team to determine the readiness of the JASPER personnel and facilities to initiate surrogate-material experiments. A second MPR will be conducted before actinide experiments are executed. This document addresses implementation requirements for only the first MPR. This first review coincides with the completion of authorization-basis documents and physical subsystems, which have undergone appropriate formal engineering design reviews. This MPR will affirm the quality of those reviews, their findings/resolutions, and will look most closely at systems integration requirements and demonstrations that will have undergone technical acceptance reviews before this formal MPR action. Closure of MPR findings will finalize requirements for a DOE/NV Real Estate/Operations Permit (REOP) for surrogate-material experiments. Upon completion of that experiment series and the establishment of capabilities for incorporating special nuclear material (SNM) into future experiments, the team will convene again as part of the process of authorizing those activities. A summary of the review schedule is provided.

  8. The COLD-SAT experiment for cryogenic fluid management technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, J. R.; Wachter, J. P.; Vento, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    The COLD-SAT spacecraft design experiments are described. COLD-SAT will be placed into an initial 1300 km circular orbit by an Atlas commercial launch vehicle. Electric power, experiment control and data management, attitude control, and propulsive accelarations for the experiments will be provided by the three-axis-controlled spacecraft bus. To provide data on the effects that low gravity levels might have on the heat and mass transfer processes involved, low levels of accelaration will be created. The COLD-SAT experiment will be configured into a module. The spacecraft experiment module will include three liquid hydrogen tanks; fluid transfer, pressurization and venting equipment; and instrumentation. Since the largest tank has helium-purged MLI to prevent ingress and freezing of air on the launchpad, it will contain all the liquid hydrogen at the point of launching. The hydrogen tanking system used for the Centaur upper stage of the Atlas will load and top off this tank. Atlas, with its liquid hydrogen upper stage, large payload fairing, and large launch margin, simplifies COLD-SAT design and integration.

  9. Experiences in managing arteriovenous malformations of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kevin; Dunphy, Louise; Nishikawa, Hiroshi; Monaghan, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Arteriovenous malformations of the head and neck are difficult to treat and require a multidisciplinary approach. Interventional radiology can now be used to downgrade previously inoperable lesions to enable ablation, and the use of Onyx® (Covidien, Irvine, CA, USA), which has revolutionised their management by allowing precise obliteration of the nidus, has enabled the aggressive management of lesions in compromised anatomical areas. We report a series of 31 patients with lesions on the head and neck. They all presented with serious symptoms (Schobinger grade 2-3) and had embolisation with Onyx®. Some had additional operations. We describe the outcome including complications, and offer some lessons learned from our experience. PMID:27066717

  10. Integrated management of childhood illness: a summary of first experiences.

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, T.; Bryce, J.; Orinda, V.

    1999-01-01

    The strategy of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) aims to reduce child mortality and morbidity in developing countries by combining improved management of common childhood illnesses with proper nutrition and immunization. The strategy includes interventions to improve the skills of health workers, the health system, and family and community practices. This article describes the experience of the first countries to adopt and implement the IMCI interventions, the clinical guidelines dealing with the major causes of morbidity and mortality in children, and the training package on these guidelines for health workers in first-level health facilities. The most relevant lessons learned and how these lessons have served as a basis for developing a broader IMCI strategy are described. PMID:10444882

  11. Managing coastal area resources by stated choice experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Wirtz, Kai W.

    2010-02-01

    In many coastal regions, oil spills can be considered as one of the most important and certainly the most noticeable forms of marine pollution. Efficient contingency management responding to oil spills on waters, which aims at minimizing pollution effects on coastal resources, turns out to be critically important. Such a decision making highly depends on the importance attributed to different coastal economic and ecological resources. Economic uses can, in principal, be addressed by standard measures such as value added. However, there is a missing of market in the real world for natural goods. Coastal resources such as waters and beach cannot be directly measured in money terms, which increases the risk of being neglected in a decision making process. This paper evaluates these natural goods of coastal environment in a hypothetical market by employing stated choice experiments. Oil spill management practice in German North Sea is used as an example. Results from a pilot survey show that during a combat process, beach and eider ducks are of key concerns for households. An environmental friendly combat option has to be a minor cost for households. Moreover, households with less children, higher monthly income and a membership of environmental organization are more likely to state that they are willing to pay for combat option to prevent coastal resources from an oil pollution. Despite that choice experiments require knowledge of designing questionnaire and statistical skills to deal with discrete choices and conducting a survey is time consumed, the results have important implications for oil spill contingency management. Overall, such a stated preference method can offer useful information for decision makers to consider coastal resources into a decision making process and can further contribute to finding a cost-effective oil preventive measure, also has a wide application potential in the field of Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM).

  12. Central airways stenoses management--a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Pereszlenyi, A; Majer, I; Janik, M; Demian, J; Igaz, M; Knappkova, S; Eftimova, P; Benej, R; Harustiak, S

    2004-01-01

    Tracheal stenosis is a serious, life-threatening disease with an increasing tendency. The number of complicated tracheal lesions, where resection and anastomosis can not be performed, still increases and the situation requires solution by endoprosthesis. Consequent the management of such complicated obstructive tracheal lesions is individual and time-consuming. The main objective of this study is to review the single institution experience with central airways stenosis treatment and to define the role of endotracheal stenting in tracheal reconstruction surgery. This study presents the retrospective analysis of tracheal stenosis reconstruction by means of our own modification of Montgomery T-tube. (Tab. 3, Fig. 3, Ref. 12.) PMID:15543848

  13. Duke Power experience with RCCA and guide card management

    SciTech Connect

    Boshers, A.

    1995-12-31

    The vibrational wear of rod control cluster assemblies (RCCAs) has been a concern for Westinghouse nuclear plants since the mid 1980s. In 1988, Duke Power Company (DPC) began an effort to understand and manage this phenomenon. While the early efforts dealt primarily with fretting wear, the issues of axial tip cracking and guide card wear were eventually included to develop what is now a comprehensive RCCA/guide tube assembly (GTA) wear program. This paper discusses the development of that program as well as DPC`s experience with fretting wear studies, wear resistant coatings, and axial tip cracks.

  14. Experience with integrated water quality management in the Wahnbach Watershed.

    PubMed

    Clasen, J; Krämer, R

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes how integrated water quality management has been developed for Wahnbach reservoir and the experience which has been gained with this multi-barrier system. Different measures in the catchment area, where co-operation with farmers was most important, are combined with the operation of a phophorus elimination plant, in which the main tributary is treated, and with aeration and biomanipulation in the reservoir. All measures together have led to the present oligotrophic state and the excellent hygienic condition of the reservoir. PMID:12381005

  15. UNIX-BASED DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR PROPAGATION EXPERIMENTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    This collection of programs comprises The UNIX Based Data Management System for the Pilot Field Experiment (PiFEx) which is an attempt to mimic the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) scenario. The major purposes of PiFEx are to define the mobile communications channels and test the workability of new concepts used to design various components of the receiver system. The results of the PiFex experiment are large amounts of raw data which must be accessed according to a researcher's needs. This package provides a system to manage the PiFEx data in an interactive way. The system not only provides the file handling necessary to retrieve the desired data, but also several FORTRAN programs to generate some standard results pertaining to propagation data. This package assumes that the data file initially generated from the experiment has been already converted from binary to ASCII format. The Data Management system described here consists of programs divided into two categories: those programs that handle the PiFEx generated files and those that are used for number-crunching of these files. Five FORTRAN programs and one UNIX shell script file are used for file manipulation purposes. These activities include: calibration of the acquired data; and parsing of the large data file into datasets concerned with different aspects of the experiment such as the specific calibrated propagation data, dynamic and static loop error data, statistical data, and temperature and spatial data on the hardware used in the experiment. The five remaining FORTRAN programs are used to generate usable information about the data. Signal level probability, probability density of the signal fitting the Rician density function, frequency of the data's fade duration, and the Fourier transform of the data can all be generated from these data manipulation programs. In addition, a program is provided which generates a downloadable file from the signal levels and signal phases files for use with the plotting routine

  16. Perceptions of Health Information Management Educational and Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Mari; Black, Clarence; Blair, Franchesica; Davis, Laquanda; Ingram, Steven; Lane, DaQuandra; McElderry, Alicia; Peagler, Bianca; Pickett, Jamie; Plettenberg, Cheryl; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Undergraduate students’ progress toward achievement of learning outcomes and entry-level competencies is an essential ingredient in efforts to meet the needs of the evolving national healthcare information infrastructure. Therefore, studies to evaluate variance in outcome assessment methods and perceived adequacy of educational curricula used by health information management (HIM) programs are vital. This study examined perceptions of HIM students, faculty, and individuals employed in healthcare regarding educational experiences and career preparation. Methods A convenience sample of attendees from the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) national conference in Atlanta, Georgia, was obtained. A survey was developed on the basis of a review of current literature related to the assessment of HIM educational programming. The authors used a prepared script to describe the study purpose and survey when approaching potential respondents. Completion of the survey was voluntary. Results Of the 100 surveys distributed, 58 were returned. Twenty-six respondents were employed in healthcare, 25 were students, and 7 were HIM faculty members; no respondents were HIM program directors. Ninety-six percent of the student respondents indicated that the programs’ HIM curriculum prepared them for an entry-level position, while 86 percent of the faculty respondents and 70 percent of the respondents employed in healthcare agreed with this statement. More than half (56 percent) of the respondents who were employed in healthcare indicated that they needed additional training when they entered their first entry-level position. The majority of the respondents indicated that they were not matched with a mentor during their educational experience. Conclusions This research supports the complementary roles that educational coursework and practical experiences provide individuals within the HIM field. However, additional research is needed to assess the

  17. Management of Post-traumatic Laryngotracheal Stenosis: Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Kandakure, Vinod T; Mishra, Swati; Lahane, Vaibhav J

    2015-09-01

    To describe our experience in management of post-traumatic laryngo-tracheal stenosis by study of various surgical methods. To compare our results with different studies. To find out best surgical procedure. Retrospective study. 13 patients of LTS were analyzed within the period of 2009-2013 highlighting the important causes of stenosis, management based on type and severity of stenosis and outcome following the treatment given. Cases were diagnosed in detail with help of flexible laryngoscopy. Finer details of stenosis like site, length, associated injuries were studied with help of CT scan. Various modalities of treatment were used and outcome was assessed. There were 13 patients 9 males and 4 females. Of these 54 % had iatrogenic stenosis and 46 % had traumatic stenosis. 46 % had true stenosis, remaining cases suffered from either soft stenosis or had associated injuries rendering the stenosis as a complex one. The patients underwent a combined surgical approach which included treatment modalities like T-tube insertion, endoscopic dilatation, laser, and open surgical intervention (tracheal resection and anastomosis). Of all the patient treated 69.2 % were successfully decannulated and recovered well with a satisfactory airway outcome, (23.07 %) cases remained T-tube dependent, 8 % case died due to septicemia. It was evident that prolonged intubation remained most common cause of tracheal stenosis and the management varied depending on the type of stenosis. Simple soft stenosis could be managed well by endoscopic dilatation and laser while complete, complex stenosis required surgical intervention in form of T-tube stenting or open surgical intervention. Tracheal stenosis is a life threatening complication and difficult to manage. It requires multiple approaches and the successful outcome is assessed by patent airway and voice quality. PMID:26405660

  18. UK contractors' experience of management of tritium during decommissioning projects

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Tommy; Stevens, Keith; Heaney, John; Murray, Alan; Warwick, Phil; Croudace, Ian

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: This paper provides an account of the tritium management experience of a UK decommissioning and remediation contracting organisation (NUKEM Limited), supported by a specialist radio-analysis organisation (GAU-Radioanalytical). This experience was gained during the execution of projects which involved the characterisation and remediation of facilities which had previously been used for tritium work and were contaminated with tritium. The emphasis of the paper is on the characterisation (sampling and analysis) of tritium. An account is given of the development of a methodology to improve the accuracy of tritium characterisation. The improved methodology evolved from recognition of the need to minimise tritium losses during sampling, storage, transport and preparation for analysis. These improvements were achieved in a variety of ways, including use of cold and dry sampling techniques in preference to hot or wet ones and freezing relevant samples during storage and transport. The major benefit was an improvement in the accuracy and reliability of the analyses results, essential for proper categorisation, sentencing and future management of tritiated waste. (authors)

  19. Recognising and Managing Refractory Coeliac Disease: A Tertiary Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Ikram; Nasr, Iman; Beyers, Carl; Chang, Fuju; Donnelly, Suzanne; Ciclitira, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is a rare complication of coeliac disease (CD) and involves malabsorption and villous atrophy despite adherence to a strict gluten-free diet (GFD) for at least 12 months in the absence of another cause. RCD is classified based on the T-cells in the intra-epithelial lymphocyte (IEL) morphology into type 1 with normal IEL and type 2 with aberrant IEL (clonal) by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) for T cell receptors (TCR) at the β/γ loci. RCD type 1 is managed with strict nutritional and pharmacological management. RCD type 2 can be complicated by ulcerative jejunitis or enteropathy associated lymphoma (EATL), the latter having a five-year mortality of 50%. Management options for RCD type 2 and response to treatment differs across centres and there have been debates over the best treatment option. Treatment options that have been used include azathioprine and steroids, methotrexate, cyclosporine, campath (an anti CD-52 monoclonal antibody), and cladribine or fluadribine with or without autologous stem cell transplantation. We present a tertiary centre’s experience in the treatment of RCD type 2 where treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine was used, and our results show good response with histological recovery in 56.6% of treated individuals. PMID:26633478

  20. European experience in chemicals management: integrating science into policy.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Frans M; Eisenreich, Steven J; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Sintes, Juan Riego; Sokull-Kluettgen, Birgit; Van de Plassche, Erik J

    2011-01-01

    The European Union (EU) adopted the first legislation on chemicals management in 1967 with the Dangerous Substances Directive (DSD). Over time the underlying concepts evolved: from hazard identification over risk assessment to safety assessment. In 1981 a premarketing notification scheme was introduced. Approximately 10 years later a risk assessment program started for existing substances following a data collection and prioritization exercise. Integration of science into EU chemicals legislation occurred via several technical committees managed by the European Chemicals Bureau (ECB) and resulted in the Technical Guidance Document on Risk Assessment (TGD), which harmonized the risk assessment methodology. The TGD was revised several times to adapt to scientific developments. The revision process, and the risk assessments for new and existing substances, led to scientific research on chemical risk assessment and thus increased in complexity. The new EU chemicals policy REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of CHemicals) builds on previous experiences and aims to further enhance health and safety. REACH places the burden of proof for chemical safety on industry focusing on managing risks. REACH formalizes the precautionary principle. Furthermore, it underlines a continued scientific underpinning in its implementation, also via stakeholder involvement, and a focus on aligning with international fora. PMID:20958022

  1. Early experiences in developing and managing the neuroscience gateway

    PubMed Central

    Sivagnanam, Subhashini; Majumdar, Amit; Yoshimoto, Kenneth; Astakhov, Vadim; Bandrowski, Anita; Martone, MaryAnn; Carnevale, Nicholas. T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The last few decades have seen the emergence of computational neuroscience as a mature field where researchers are interested in modeling complex and large neuronal systems and require access to high performance computing machines and associated cyber infrastructure to manage computational workflow and data. The neuronal simulation tools, used in this research field, are also implemented for parallel computers and suitable for high performance computing machines. But using these tools on complex high performance computing machines remains a challenge because of issues with acquiring computer time on these machines located at national supercomputer centers, dealing with complex user interface of these machines, dealing with data management and retrieval. The Neuroscience Gateway is being developed to alleviate and/or hide these barriers to entry for computational neuroscientists. It hides or eliminates, from the point of view of the users, all the administrative and technical barriers and makes parallel neuronal simulation tools easily available and accessible on complex high performance computing machines. It handles the running of jobs and data management and retrieval. This paper shares the early experiences in bringing up this gateway and describes the software architecture it is based on, how it is implemented, and how users can use this for computational neuroscience research using high performance computing at the back end. We also look at parallel scaling of some publicly available neuronal models and analyze the recent usage data of the neuroscience gateway. PMID:26523124

  2. The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program: An experiment in science-based resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kaplinski, m

    2001-12-01

    In 1996, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management (GCDAMP) program was established to provide input on Glen Canyon Dam operations and their affect on the Colorado Ecosystem in Grand Canyon. The GCDAMP is a bold experiment in federal resource management that features a governing partnership with all relevant stakeholders sitting at the same table. It is a complicated, difficult process where stakeholder-derived management actions must balance resource protection with water and power delivery compacts, the Endangered Species Act, the National Historical Preservation Act, the Grand Canyon Protection Act, National Park Service Policy, and other stakeholder concerns. The program consists of four entities: the Adaptive Management Workgroup (AMWG), the Technical Workgroup (TWG), the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC), and independent review panels. The AMWG and TWG are federal advisory committees that consists of federal and state resource managers, Native American tribes, power, environmental and recreation interests. The AMWG is develops, evaluates and recommends alternative dam operations to the Secretary. The TWG translates AMWG policy and goals into management objectives and information needs, provides questions that serve as the basis for long-term monitoring and research activities, interprets research results from the GCMRC, and prepares reports as required for the AMWG. The GCMRC is an independent science center that is responsible for all GCDAMP monitoring and research activities. The GCMRC utilizes proposal requests with external peer review and an in-house staff that directs and synthesizes monitoring and research results. The GCMRC meets regularly with the TWG and AMWG and provides scientific information on the consequences of GCDAMP actions. Independent review panels consist of external peer review panels that provide reviews of scientific activities and the program in general, technical advice to the GCMRC, TWG and AMWG, and play a critical

  3. Propulsion Integrated Vehicle Health Management Technology Experiment (PITEX) Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Chicatelli, Amy K.; Fulton, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    The Propulsion Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Technology Experiment (PITEX) is a continuing NASA effort being conducted cooperatively by the NASA Glenn Research Center, the NASA Ames Research Center, and the NASA Kennedy Space Center. It was a key element of a Space Launch Initiative risk-reduction task performed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation in El Segundo, California. PITEX's main objectives are the continued maturation of diagnostic technologies that are relevant to second generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV) subsystems and the assessment of the real-time performance of the PITEX diagnostic solution. The PITEX effort has considerable legacy in the NASA IVHM Technology Experiment for X-vehicles (NITEX) that was selected to fly on the X-34 subscale RLV that was being developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation. NITEX, funded through the Future-X Program Office, was to advance the technology-readiness level of selected IVHM technologies within a flight environment and to begin the transition of these technologies from experimental status into RLV baseline designs. The experiment was to perform realtime fault detection and isolation and suggest potential recovery actions for the X-34 main propulsion system (MPS) during all mission phases by using a combination of system-level analysis and detailed diagnostic algorithms.

  4. STATegra EMS: an Experiment Management System for complex next-generation omics experiments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing assays are now routinely used to study different aspects of genome organization. As decreasing costs and widespread availability of sequencing enable more laboratories to use sequencing assays in their research projects, the number of samples and replicates in these experiments can quickly grow to several dozens of samples and thus require standardized annotation, storage and management of preprocessing steps. As a part of the STATegra project, we have developed an Experiment Management System (EMS) for high throughput omics data that supports different types of sequencing-based assays such as RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, Methyl-seq, etc, as well as proteomics and metabolomics data. The STATegra EMS provides metadata annotation of experimental design, samples and processing pipelines, as well as storage of different types of data files, from raw data to ready-to-use measurements. The system has been developed to provide research laboratories with a freely-available, integrated system that offers a simple and effective way for experiment annotation and tracking of analysis procedures. PMID:25033091

  5. The Danish vaccination register.

    PubMed

    Grove Krause, T; Jakobsen, S; Haarh, M; Mølbak, K

    2012-01-01

    Immunisation information systems (IIS) are valuable tools for monitoring vaccination coverage and for estimating vaccine effectiveness and safety. Since 2009, an advanced IIS has been developed in Denmark and will be implemented during 2012–14. This IIS is based on a database existing since 2000. The reporting of all administered vaccinations including vaccinations outside the national programme will become mandatory. Citizens will get access to data about their own vaccinations and healthcare personnel will get access to information on the vaccinations of their patients. A national concept of identification, a national solution combining a personal code and a card with codes, ensures easy and secure access to the register. From the outset, the IIS will include data on childhood vaccinations administered from 1996 and onwards. All Danish citizens have a unique identifier, a so called civil registration number, which allows the linking of information on vaccinations coming from different electronic data sources. The main challenge will be to integrate the IIS with the different electronic patient record systems currently existing at general practitioner, vaccination clinic and hospital level thereby avoiding double-entry. A need has been identified for an updated international classification of vaccine products on the market. Such a classification would also be useful for the future exchange of data on immunisations from IIS between countries. PMID:22551494

  6. The Irreversible Process of University "Democratization": The Danish Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Mogens N.

    1988-01-01

    The Danish experience with university democratization suggests that the process is irreversible and that its progress is determined by how the initial change was begun two decades ago. It is also proposed that government attempts to intervene and revoke traditional institutional autonomy threaten to invalidate the progress made. (Author/MSE)

  7. Plan of Action: JASPER Management Prestart Review (Surrogate Material Experiments)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.E.

    2000-09-29

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility is being developed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to conduct shock physics experiments on special nuclear material and other actinide materials. JASPER will use a two-stage, light-gas gun to shoot projectiles at actinide targets. Projectile velocities will range from 1 to 8 km/s, inducing pressures in the target material up to 6 Mbar. The JASPER gas gun has been designed to match the critical dimensions of the two-stage, light-gas gun in Building 341 of LLNL. The goal in copying the LLNL gun design is to take advantage of the extensive ballistics database that exists and to minimize the effort spent on gun characterization in the initial facility start-up. A siting study conducted by an inter-Laboratory team identified Able Site in Area 27 of the NTS as the best location for the JASPER gas gun. Able Site consists of three major buildings that had previously been used to support the nuclear test program. In April 1999, Able Site was decommissioned as a Nuclear Explosive Assembly Facility and turned back to the DOE for other uses. Construction and facility modifications at Able Site to support the JASPER project started in April 1999 and were completed in September 1999. The gas gun and the secondary confinement chamber (SCC) were installed in early 2000. During the year, all facility and operational systems were brought on line. Initial system integration demonstrations were completed in September 2000. The facility is anticipated to be operational by August 2001, and the expected life cycle for the facility is 10 years. LLNL Nevada Experiments and Operations (N) Program has established a Management Prestart Review (MPR) team to determine the readiness of the JASPER personnel and facilities to initiate surrogate-material experiments. The review coincides with the completion of authorization-basis documents and physical subsystems, which have

  8. Plan of Action: JASPER Management Prestart Review (Surrogate Material Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W E

    2000-12-05

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility is being developed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to conduct shock physics experiments on special nuclear material and other actinide materials. JASPER will use a two-stage, light-gas gun to shoot projectiles at actinide targets. Projectile velocities will range from 1 to 8 km/s, inducing pressures in the target material up to 6 Mbar. The JASPER gas gun has been designed to match the critical dimensions of the two-stage, light-gas gun in Building 341 of LLNL. The goal in copying the LLNL gun design is to take advantage of the extensive ballistics database that exists and to minimize the effort spent on gun characterization in the initial facility start-up. A siting study conducted by an inter-Laboratory team identified Able Site in Area 27 of the NTS as the best location for the JASPER gas gun. Able Site consists of three major buildings that had previously been used to support the nuclear test program. In April 1999, Able Site was decommissioned as a Nuclear Explosive Assembly Facility and turned back to the DOE for other uses. Construction and facility modifications at Able Site to support the JASPER project started in April 1999 and were completed in September 1999. The gas gun and the secondary confinement chamber (SCC) were installed in early 2000. During the year, all facility and operational systems were brought on line. Initial system integration demonstrations were completed in September 2000. The facility is anticipated to be operational by August 2001, and the expected life cycle for the facility is 10 years. LLNL Nevada Experiments and Operations (N) Program has established a Management Prestart Review (MPR) team to determine the readiness of the JASPER personnel and facilities to initiate surrogate-material experiments. The review coincides with the completion of authorization-basis documents and physical subsystems, which have

  9. Drop Tower Experiments concerning Fluid Management under Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaulke, Diana; Dreyer, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Transport and positioning of liquid under microgravity is done utilizing capillary forces. Therefore, capillary transport processes have to be understood for a wide variety of space applications, ranging from propellant management in tanks of space transportation systems to eating and drinking devices for astronauts. There are two types of liquid transportation in microgravity using capillary forces. First, the driven liquid flow in open channels where the capillary forces at free surfaces ensure a gas and vapor free flow. Here it is important to know the limiting flow rate through such an open channel before the free surface collapses and gas is sucked into the channel. A number of different experiments at the drop tower Bremen, on sounding rockets and at the ISS have been conducted to analyse this phenomenon within different geometries. As result a geometry dependent theory for calculating the maximum flow rate has been found. On the other hand liquid positioning and transportation requires the capillary pressure of curved surfaces to achieve a liquid flow to a desired area. Especially for space applications the weight of structure has to be taken into account for development. For example liquid positioning in tanks can be achieved via a complicated set of structure filling the whole tank resulting in heavy devices not reasonable in space applications. Astrium developed in cooperation with ZARM a propellant management device much smaller than the tank volume and ensuring a gas and vapour free supply of propellant to the propulsion system. In the drop tower Bremen a model of this device was tested concerning different microgravity scenarios. To further decrease weight and ensure functionality within different scenarios structure elements are designed as perforated geometries. Capillary transport between perforated plates has been analyzed concerning the influence of geometrical pattern of perforations. The conducted experiments at the drop tower Bremen show the

  10. Dentists and eating disorders--knowledge, attitudes, management and experience.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ann-Katrin; Nohlert, Eva; Johansson, Anders; Norring, Claes; Tegelberg, Ake

    2009-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore the level of knowledge and attitudes among dentists in relation to patients with eating disorders (ED) and evaluate the extent to which patients with ED are identified and/or treated in the dental setting. A postal questionnaire was constructed and sent to all dentists (n = 367) in two Swedish counties during November 2005. The questionnaire comprised 29 questions or statements in the following categories: demographics, general knowledge of ED and its oral consequences, experience of and attitudes towards patients with ED and interaction within the health care system, for example, referrals and treatment options regarding this patient group. The response rate was 70% (n = 258). Perceived knowledge about ED was most commonly obtained from media sources, namely newspapers, television, etc. Few dentists knew that there existed specialized referral units for ED patients in their county. The majority of dentists stated that they had seen only a few such patients during their practice. Even though the perceived level of general knowledge about ED among female dentists appeared to be better than among male dentists, they also found it more difficult to inform the patient/relatives about their suspicion of the condition. Female dentists referred to specialists significantly more frequently than did males. Eighty-six percent of responders reported that they needed more training in dental management of patients with ED. Knowledge and clinical experience of dentists as regards patients with ED were found to be low. The level of education in this area needs to be improved, which would have the potential to encourage dentists to become more involved in secondary and tertiary prevention and management of ED. PMID:19522312

  11. Endoscopic Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: The Charing Cross Experience

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Jagdeep Singh; Elmiyeh, Behrad; Saleh, Hesham A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe our experience of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea management. Design Retrospective. Setting Charing Cross Hospital, London, a tertiary referral center. Participants Fifty-four patients with CSF rhinorrhea managed from 2003 to 2011. Main outcome measures Surgical technique; Recurrence. Results Etiologically, 36 were spontaneous and 18 traumatic. Eight patients with spontaneous and two with traumatic leaks had previous failed repairs in other units. Success rates after first and second surgery were 93% and 100%, respectively. Mean follow-up was 21 months. Four patients, all of spontaneous etiology, had recurrences; three of these underwent successful second repair with three layered technique, and the fourth had complete cessation of the leak after gastric bypass surgery and subsequent weight reduction. Adaptation of anatomic three-layered repair since then averted any further failure in the following 7 years. Mean body mass index was 34.0 kg/m2 in spontaneous and 27.8 kg/m2 in traumatic cases (p < 0.05). Fifty percent of spontaneous leaks were from the cribriform plate, 22% sphenoid, 14% ethmoid, and 14% frontal sinus. In the traumatic CSF leak group: 33.3% were from the cribriform plate, 33.3% sphenoid, 22.2% ethmoid, and 11.1% frontal. Conclusion Endoscopic CSF fistula closure is a safe and effective operation. All sites of leak can be accessed endoscopically. We recommend the use of an anatomic three-layered closure in difficult cases. PMID:24436890

  12. Management of laryngeal radionecrosis: Animal and clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, R.W.; Krespi, Y.P.; Einhorn, R.K.

    1989-05-01

    Radiation necrosis of the laryngeal cartilages is an uncommon complication of radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma. It is a devastating process for which there is no one acceptable treatment. Medical management offers only temporary, symptomatic relief, which further necessitates surgical treatment. Surgical management may start with a tracheotomy; however, it often ends with a total laryngectomy. Physiologically, the necrotic cartilages are the source of the problem. It is a general surgical principle that nonviable tissue must be excised to promote healing. Therefore, if the affected laryngeal cartilages were removed, the larynx should heal. Total or near total removal of the thyroid and cricoid cartilages with preservation of the endolaryngeal soft tissues has not been reported in the literature. Theoretically, if the entire cartilaginous framework is removed, there would be no structural support for the airway. We have found using animal models, that submucosal resection of the laryngeal cartilages, leaving the perichondrium and endolaryngeal soft tissues intact can result in a competent airway. Animal and clinical experience will be presented.

  13. Cryogenic Fluid Management Experiment (CFME) trunnion verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, W. J.; Fester, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Experiment (CFME) was designed to characterize subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and expulsion in the low-g space environment. The CFME has now become the storage and supply tank for the Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility, which includes transfer line and receiver tanks, as well. The liquid hydrogen storage and supply vessel is supported within a vacuum jacket to two fiberglass/epoxy composite trunnions which were analyzed and designed. Analysis using the limited available data indicated the trunnion was the most fatigue critical component in the storage vessel. Before committing the complete storage tank assembly to environmental testing, an experimental assessment was performed to verify the capability of the trunnion design to withstand expected vibration and loading conditions. Three tasks were conducted to evaluate trunnion integrity. The first determined the fatigue properties of the trunnion composite laminate materials. Tests at both ambient and liquid hydrogen temperatures showed composite material fatigue properties far in excess of those expected. Next, an assessment of the adequacy of the trunnion designs was performed (based on the tested material properties).

  14. Extending a Flight Management Computer for Simulation and Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael M.; Sugden, Paul C.

    2005-01-01

    In modern transport aircraft, the flight management computer (FMC) has evolved from a flight planning aid to an important hub for pilot information and origin-to-destination optimization of flight performance. Current trends indicate increasing roles of the FMC in aviation safety, aviation security, increasing airport capacity, and improving environmental impact from aircraft. Related research conducted at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) often requires functional extension of a modern, full-featured FMC. Ideally, transport simulations would include an FMC simulation that could be tailored and extended for experiments. However, due to the complexity of a modern FMC, a large investment (millions of dollars over several years) and scarce domain knowledge are needed to create such a simulation for transport aircraft. As an intermediate alternative, the Flight Research Services Directorate (FRSD) at LaRC created a set of reusable software products to extend flight management functionality upstream of a Boeing-757 FMC, transparently simulating or sharing its operator interfaces. The paper details the design of these products and highlights their use on NASA projects.

  15. Quality improvement and accountability in the Danish health care system.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Jan; Kristensen, Solvejg; Bartels, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Denmark has unique opportunities for quality measurement and benchmarking since Denmark has well-developed health registries and unique patient identifier that allow all registries to include patient-level data and combine data into sophisticated quality performance monitoring. Over decades, Denmark has developed and implemented national quality and patient safety initiatives in the healthcare system in terms of national clinical guidelines, performance and outcome measurement integrated in clinical databases for important diseases and clinical conditions, measurement of patient experiences, reporting of adverse events, national handling of patient complaints, national accreditation and public disclosure of all data on the quality of care. Over the years, Denmark has worked up a progressive and transparent just culture in quality management; the different actors at the different levels of the healthcare system are mutually attentive and responsive in a coordinated effort for quality of the healthcare services. At national, regional, local and hospital level, it is mandatory to participate in the quality initiatives and to use data and results for quality management, quality improvement, transparency in health care and accountability. To further develop the Danish governance model, it is important to expand the model to the primary care sector. Furthermore, a national quality health programme 2015-18 recently launched by the government supports a new development in health care focusing upon delivering high-quality health care-high quality is defined by results of value to the patients. PMID:26443814

  16. Understanding the Work-Life Experiences and Goals of Women Middle Managers in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankinson, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Middle managers in higher education hold diverse titles and perform a variety of roles. Women represent a large portion of this midlevel management, but there is limited research exploring their experiences. As a result, little is known about women middle managers' career trajectories and what effect their experiences have on their future career…

  17. Literary Analyses of the Danish, the Greenlandic, and the Turkish Stories Used in the "Folktale Project." Folktale: A Cross-Cultural, Interdisciplinary Study of the Experience of Literature. Paper 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollerup, Cay; And Others

    As part of the Folktale project, which explores similarities and dissimilarities in the response to literature from and in different cultures, advanced undergraduate students in classes on literary interpretation or literary history analyzed a Danish, a Greenlandic, and a Turkish folk tale. Two male and two female students in classes on literary…

  18. Management development. The MESOL (Management Education Scheme by Open Learning) experience.

    PubMed

    Wellman, N

    1994-01-01

    Explores and attempts to reconcile some of the differences between traditional professional and academic management qualifications and those based on the NVQ competence model. Based on the experience of Universities and Higher Education institutions delivering open learning MESOL materials to the UK health and social care sector, focuses on the different assessment methodologies used by each. Concludes that it is necessary to differentiate clearly between the traditional input/knowledge-based model and the competence-based approach of the NVQ. This will allow candidates to contextualize and consolidate learning in the workplace prior to revisiting their performance at a later date. PMID:10134589

  19. Experience in PWR and BWR mixed-oxide fuel management

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosser, G.J.; Krebs, W.; Urban, P. )

    1993-04-01

    Germany has adopted the strategy of a closed fuel cycle using reprocessing and recycling. The central issue today is plutonium recycling by the use of U-Pu mixed oxide (MOX) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs). The design of MOX fuel assemblies and fuel management in MOX-containing cores are strongly influenced by the nuclear properties of the plutonium isotopes. Optimized MOX fuel assembly designs for PWRs currently use up to three types of MOX fuel rods having different plutonium contents with natural uranium or uranium tailings as carrier material but without burnable absorbers. The MOX fuel assembly designs for BWRs use four to six rod types with different plutonium contents and Gd[sub 2]O[sub 3]/UO[sub 2] burnable absorber rods. Both the PWR and the BWR designs attain good burnup equivalence and compatibility with uranium fuel assemblies. High flexibility exists in the loading schemes relative to the position and number of MOX fuel assemblies in the reloads and in the core as a whole. The Siemens experience with MOX fuel assemblies is based on the insertion of 318 MOX fuel assemblies in eight PWRs and 168 in BWRs and pressurized heavy water reactors so far. The primary operating results include information on the cycle length, power distribution, reactivity coefficients, and control rod worth of cores containing MOX fuel assemblies.

  20. Retroperitoneal Laparoscopic Management of Paraganglioma: A Single Institute Experience

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weifeng; Li, Hanzhong; Ji, Zhigang; Yan, Weigang; Zhang, Yushi; Zhang, Xuebin; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the feasibility and safety of retroperitoneal laparoscopic resection of paraganglioma (RLPG) in a large study population. Methods In a six-year period, 49 patients with primary retroperitoneal paragangliomas (PG) underwent retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery in a single center. Medical records were reviewed, and collected the following data, which were clinical characteristics, perioperative data (operative time, estimated blood loss, intraoperative hemodynamic changes, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and open conversions), and follow-up data (recurrence or distant metastases). Results All PGs were removed with negative tumor margin confirmed by postoperative histopathology. The operative time of RLPG was 101.59±31.12 minutes, and the estimated blood loss was 169.78±176.70ml. Intraoperative hypertensive and hypotensive episodes occurred in 25 cases and 27 cases, respectively. Two open conversions occurred. Two intraoperative complications occurred but were successfully managed endoscopically. Postoperative complications were minor and unremarkable. No local recurrence or distant metastasis were observed during the follow-up period. Conclusions Our experience indicates the feasibility and safety of resection of PGs in a relatively large study population. PMID:26885838

  1. Prevention and management of obinutuzumab-associated toxicities: Australian experience.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Alicia; Hayden, Ingrid; Dixon, Joanna; Gregory, Gareth

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) are typically diagnosed at an advanced age and may have multiple co-existing conditions, augmenting the challenges of treating their CLL. Aggressive cytotoxic therapies are often poorly tolerated in this patient population. Obinutuzumab is a glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody indicated in combination with chlorambucil for previously untreated CLL. The approval of this drug was based on the pivotal CLL11 trial, which demonstrated longer progression-free survival vs. rituximab/chlorambucil and chlorambucil alone in patients with significant co-existing medical conditions and/or poor renal function. However, a higher risk of infusion-related reactions (IRRs) was demonstrated with obinutuzumab-based therapy. We highlight important nursing care considerations to help prevent and successfully manage IRRs and other important adverse events, to improve the treatment experience of patients receiving obinutuzumab infusions and to enable them to complete their treatment and receive optimal benefit. Premedication, drug handling, dosing, administration, monitoring and documentation are discussed. PMID:26681665

  2. Subjectless Sentences in Child Danish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamann, Cornelia; Plunkett, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Examined data for two Danish children to determine subject omission, verb usage, and sentence subjects. Found that children exhibit asymmetry in subject omission according to verb type as subjects are omitted from main verb utterances more frequently than from copula utterances. Concluded that treatment of child subject omission should involve…

  3. Nature and Nationhood: Danish Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnack, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I shall discuss Danish perspectives on nature, showing the interdependence of conceptions of "nature" and "nationhood" in the formations of a particular cultural community. Nature, thus construed, is never innocent of culture and cannot therefore simply be "restored" to some pristine, pre-lapsarian state. On the other hand,…

  4. Thyroid function in Danish greenhouse workers

    PubMed Central

    Toft, Gunnar; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2006-01-01

    Background From animal studies it is known that currently used pesticides can disturb thyroid function. Methods In the present study we investigated the thyroid function in 122 Danish greenhouse workers, to evaluate if greenhouse workers classified as highly exposed to pesticides experiences altered thyroid levels compared to greenhouse workers with lower exposure. Serum samples from the greenhouse workers were sampled both in the spring and the fall to evaluate if differences in pesticide use between seasons resulted in altered thyroid hormone levels. Results We found a moderate reduction of free thyroxine (FT4) (10–16%) among the persons working in greenhouses with a high spraying load both in samples collected in the spring and the fall, but none of the other measured thyroid hormones differed significantly between exposure groups in the cross-sectional comparisons. However, in longitudinal analysis of the individual thyroid hormone level between the spring and the fall, more pronounced differences where found with on average 32% higher thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level in the spring compared to the fall and at the same time a 5–9% lower total triiodthyroxin (TT3), free triiodthyroxine (FT3) and FT4. The difference between seasons was not consistently more pronounced in the group classified as high exposure compared to the low exposure groups. Conclusion The present study indicates that pesticide exposure among Danish greenhouse workers results in only minor disturbances of thyroid hormone levels. PMID:17147831

  5. The physician's civil liability under Danish law.

    PubMed

    Fenger, N; Broberg, M

    1991-01-01

    The physician's liability in Danish law is based on negligence, which is assessed by the courts largely on the basis of expert opinions. Such opinions are provided primarily by the Medico-Legal Council rather than by experts selected by the parties. The evaluation of negligence is based on a "reasonable man" standard and the performance expected of a competent colleague; a hospital will be responsible for the negligence of its employees. The burden of proof generally lies with the plaintiff; negligence will not be presumed and the assessment of the evidence of negligence will be adapted to the individual situation, e.g. factors such as the degree of specialization involved, the time which the physician had at his disposal to make his decision and the resources available to him will be taken into consideration. The courts have shown themselves willing to allow for the fact that doctors differ, i.e. recognizing that there must be scope for reasonable discretion. Because the culpa principle is central, the standard applied to medical knowledge will be that which pertained at the time of the treatment. Where a non-specialist is confronted with a problem which may go beyond the knowledge of his limits and experience, he is under an obligation to refer the patient. The principle of informed consent to treatment is accepted in Danish law, but such consent will readily be considered to have been given tacitly. PMID:23511859

  6. Adaptive harvest management for the Svalbard population of pink‐footed geese: 2016 progress summary: Technical Report from DCE – Danish Centre for Environment and Energy, No. 86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Fred A.; Madsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    This document describes progress to date on the development of an adaptive harvest management strategy for maintaining the Svalbard population of pink‐footed geese (Anser brachyrhynchus) near their agreed target level (60,000) by providing for sustainable harvests in Norway and Denmark. This report provides an assessment of the most recent monitoring information (1991-2015) and its implications for the harvest management strategy. By combining varying hypotheses about survival and reproduction, a suite of nine models have been developed that represent a wide range of possibilities concerning the extent to which demographic rates are density dependent or independent. These results suggest that the pink‐footed goose population may have recently experienced a release from density‐dependent mechanisms, corresponding to the period of most rapid growth in population size. Beginning with the 2016 hunting season, harvest quotas will be prescribed on an annual basis rather than every three years because of the potential to better meet population management objectives. Based on updated model weights, the recent observations of population size (74,800), the proportion of the population comprised of one-year-old birds (0.138), and temperature days in Svalbard (20), the optimal harvest quota for the 2016 hunting season is 25,000. The large increase in quota compared to that during first three years of AHM reflects stakeholders’ desire to reduce population size to the goal of 60,000, recognizing that population size remains relatively high and above-average production is expected in 2016 due to a warm spring.

  7. The MBA Experience: Participants' Entry Level Conceptions of Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viljoen, John; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Interviews with a sample of 18 first-year Master's of Business Administration students elicited their conceptions of management in terms of attributes, roles, and choices. Comparisons with major management theories showed that, although participants view management as an amalgam of highly personal choices, theories underplay the importance of…

  8. The Future of Management as Design: A Thought Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Veronique; del Forno, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Management practices and education are presently in a stage of reappraisal and a growing number of scholars and experts are suggesting that managers should be taught and adopt the approach and methodologies of designers. The purpose of this paper is to imagine the impact of this move and to try and foresee whether "management as design"…

  9. The Private Management of Public Schools: The Baltimore, Maryland, Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Sherri

    In 1992 the Baltimore City Public School District (Maryland) entered into a 5-year contract with Education Alternatives, Incorporated (EAI), to manage 9 of its schools. Baltimore's private-management model differed significantly from that of Dade County, Florida, in that EAI was given overall management responsibility. Data were gathered through a…

  10. Water quality management and sustainability: the experience of Lake Victoria Environmental Management Project (LVEMP)??Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machiwa, Praxeda K.

    Human health and development are threatened in many parts of the world either from lack of water or poor water quality. Human development has partially contributed to water quality deterioration. In Tanzania, for instance, rapid population growth that caused expansion of agricultural activities, livestock keeping, deforestation, biomass burning and human settlement have exerted pressures within the Lake Victoria Basin. These developments have led to land degradation and increased levels of pollution mainly from non-point sources. The Governments of Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda initiated the program of Lake Victoria Environmental Management Project, (LVEMP), in 1994 to rehabilitate the Lake Ecosystem through restoration and conservation of biodiversity in the lake as well as within the catchment. This paper presents the five years (1997-2002) experience of LVEMP in Tanzania on the issues of water quality; focusing on water pollution, water quality monitoring and LVEMP strategies to accomplish water quality management in the Lake Zone (Kagera, Mara and Mwanza regions). The findings show that non-point source pollution from agricultural practices; as well as unplanned urban settlements contribute more to siltation and eutrophication of the of Lake Victoria than that from point source pollution. Recommendations for water quality management and sustainability are presented.

  11. Lessons learned from past experience with intensive livestock management systems.

    PubMed

    Cronin, G M; Rault, J L; Glatz, P C

    2014-04-01

    The main impetus for 'modern' intensive animal production occurred after the Second World War, when Western governments developed policies to increase the availability of cheap, safe food for their populations. Livestock benefit under intensive husbandry by protection from environmental extremes and predators, and better nutritional and health management. Nevertheless, there are costs to the animal, such as impaired social behaviour, limited choice of living environment or pen mates, poor environmental stimulation and behavioural restrictions. The rapid progress in genetic selection of production traits has also, in some cases, adversely affected welfare by creating anatomical and metabolic problems. Above all, the intensively housed animal is heavily reliant on the stockperson and, therefore, inadequate care and husbandry practices by the stockperson may be the largest welfare risk. In a future in which the food supply may be limited as the world's population grows and land availability shrinks, intensive animal production is likely to expand. At the same time, ethical considerations surrounding intensive farming practices may also become more prominent. Novel technologies provide the opportunity to enhance both the productivity and welfare of intensively kept animals. Developing countries are also establishing more intensive commercial systems to meet their growing need for animal protein. Intensive livestock production in such countries has the potential for major expansion, particularly if such developments address the key constraints of poor welfare, inadequate nutrition, poor reproduction, poor housing, and high mortality often seen with traditional systems, and if farmer access to emerging market opportunities is improved. However, as shown by previous experience, inadequate regulation and staff who lack the appropriate training to care for the welfare of intensively housed livestock can be major challenges to overcome. PMID:25000786

  12. Vertebrate herbivory in managed coastal wetlands: A manipulative experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, L.A.; Foote, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    Structural marsh management and nutria herbivory are both believed to strongly influence plant production in the brackish, deltaic marshes of coastal Louisiana, USA. Previous studies have tested the effects of structural management on aboveground biomass after implementing management, but very few studies have collected data before and after management. Thus, to test the effects of structural marsh management on Spartina patens (Ait.) Muhl. and Scirpus americanus Pers., the aboveground biomass of both species was estimated before and after the construction of shallow, leveed impoundments. The water level in each impoundment was managed with a single flap-gated culvert fitted with a variable crest weir. Additionally, the influence of nutria grazing on aboveground biomass was measured by nondestructively sampling fenced (ungrazed) and unfenced (grazed) plots in both managed and unmanaged areas. While there was no significant difference in S. patens production between managed and unmanaged areas, marsh management negatively affected Sc. americanus production the two species also differed in their responses to grazing. Grazing dramatically reduced the sedge, Sc. americanus, while the grass, S. patens, remained at similar biomass levels in grazed and ungrazed plant stands. These findings support the belief that herbivory has a strong influence on plant production, but do not support the claim that management increases plant production in the deltaic marshes of Louisiana.

  13. Management of Spent and Disused Radiation Sources - The Zambian Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chabala, F.

    2002-02-26

    Zambia like all other countries in the world is faced with environmental problems brought about by a variety of human activities. In Zambia the major environmental issues as identified by Nation Environmental Action Plan (NEAP) of 1994 are water pollution, poor sanitation, land degradation, air pollution, poor waste management, misuse of chemicals, wildlife depletion and deforestation. Zambian has been using a lot of radioactive materials in its various industries. The country has taken several projects with help of external partners. These partners however left these projects in the hands of the Zambians without developing their capacities to manage these radioactive sources. The Government recognized the need to manage these sources and passed legislation governing the management of radioactive materials. The first act of Parliament on Radiation Protection work was passed in 1975 to legislate the use of ionizing radiation. However, because of financial constraints the Country is facing, these regulations have remained unimplemented. Fortunately the international Community has been working in partnership with the Zambian Government in the Management of Radioactive Material. Therefore this paper will present the following aspects of radioactive waste management in Zambia: review Existing Legislation in Zambia regarding management of spent/radioactive sources; capacity building in the field of management of radioactive waste; management of spent and disused radiation sources; existing disposal systems in Zambia regarding spent/orphaned sources; existing stocks of radioactive sources in the Zambian industries.

  14. Developing Higher Education Programs in Emergency Management: Ghana's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakubu, Mariama Bisongu

    2013-01-01

    Ghana is highly vulnerable and threatened by several hazards and has sought ways of minimizing impacts of hazards events over time including demonstrating an interest in developing an emergency management training and an higher education degree program. Yet, as of 2013, the country has not developed a disaster management training program or a…

  15. The Experience of Initial Management Training in ELT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Management training in ELT organizations is often inadequate. New managers are in severe need of training, especially for tasks which are non-pedagogical, yet they operate in a milieu where there are few opportunities for support compared with colleagues in mainstream education. The purpose of this case study, a rare evidence-based contribution to…

  16. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    The management concepts and operating procedures are documented as they apply to the planning of shuttle spacelab operations. Areas discussed include: airborne missions; formulation of missions; management procedures; experimenter involvement; experiment development and performance; data handling; safety procedures; and applications to shuttle spacelab planning. Characteristics of the airborne science experience are listed, and references and figures are included.

  17. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    Airborne research management and shuttle sortie planning at the Ames Research Center are reported. Topics discussed include: basic criteria and procedures for the formulation and approval of airborne missions; ASO management structure and procedures; experiment design, development, and testing aircraft characteristics and experiment interfaces; information handling for airborne science missions; mission documentation requirements; and airborne science methods and shuttle sortie planning.

  18. An Investigation into the Life Experiences and Beliefs of Teachers Exhibiting Highly Effective Classroom Management Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Chuck; Hargrove, Pauline; Harris, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the life experiences and beliefs of highly effective teachers exhibiting effective classroom management. This study explores the beliefs, background, and experiences of exemplary teachers in the area of classroom management. The goal of this study was to develop a deeper understanding of how individuals…

  19. Building a First-Class Faculty Based on the Management Experience of the University of Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Zhongshu

    2014-01-01

    The article analyzes the practice and experience of faculty management at the University of Pennsylvania and its implications for Chinese universities from the perspective of management systems and operation mechanisms. Recent reforms and innovation of faculty management at Sichuan University are described.

  20. Integrating Agronomic Principles with Management Experience in Introductory Agronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorst, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Explains the use of a cropping systems project to teach agronomic principles and crop management techniques, and to enhance communication skills. Provides a sample progress report instructions sheet which was used for the project. (Author/RT)

  1. Commercial solar/load management experiment: New mechanical engineering building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of load management heat recovery, thermal storage, and solar systems on energy usage and power demand profiles in the University of New Mexico's Mechanical Engineering Building are presented. Results were obtained from a year monitoring of the building's heating and cooling systems and recording of sensor signals by a computer based data acquisition system. A modified AXCESS Energy Analysis Program to simulate energy usage is detailed, and the development of perferred strategies for maximizing the building's load management capabilities is outlined.

  2. Does identity shape leadership and management practice? Experiences of PHC facility managers in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Daire, Judith; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-09-01

    In South Africa, as elsewhere, Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities are managed by professional nurses. Little is known about the dimensions and challenges of their job, or what influences their managerial practice. Drawing on leadership and organizational theory, this study explored what the job of being a PHC manager entails, and what factors influence their managerial practice. We specifically considered whether the appointment of professional nurses as facility managers leads to an identity transition, from nurse to manager. The overall intention was to generate ideas about how to support leadership development among PHC facility managers. Adopting case study methodology, the primary researcher facilitated in-depth discussions (about their personal history and managerial experiences) with eight participating facility managers from one geographical area. Other data were collected through in-depth interviews with key informants, document review and researcher field notes/journaling. Analysis involved data triangulation, respondent and peer review and cross-case analysis. The experiences show that the PHC facility manager's job is dominated by a range of tasks and procedures focused on clinical service management, but is expected to encompass action to address the population and public health needs of the surrounding community. Managing with and through others, and in a complex system, requiring self-management, are critical aspects of the job. A range of personal, professional and contextual factors influence managerial practice, including professional identity. The current largely facility-focused management practice reflects the strong nursing identity of managers and broader organizational influences. However, three of the eight managers appear to self-identify an emerging leadership identity and demonstrate related managerial practices. Nonetheless, there is currently limited support for an identity transition towards leadership in this context. Better

  3. Postgraduate Study and Managers' Subsequent Work Experience: An Exploratory Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Jane; Harris, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on an exploratory qualitative study, this article considers the link between business school teaching at graduate level and subsequent work behaviour and experiences of former students. It evaluates the student experience some time "after" graduation. The findings of the retrospective evaluation point to the value of classroom peer…

  4. Does identity shape leadership and management practice? Experiences of PHC facility managers in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Daire, Judith; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    In South Africa, as elsewhere, Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities are managed by professional nurses. Little is known about the dimensions and challenges of their job, or what influences their managerial practice. Drawing on leadership and organizational theory, this study explored what the job of being a PHC manager entails, and what factors influence their managerial practice. We specifically considered whether the appointment of professional nurses as facility managers leads to an identity transition, from nurse to manager. The overall intention was to generate ideas about how to support leadership development among PHC facility managers. Adopting case study methodology, the primary researcher facilitated in-depth discussions (about their personal history and managerial experiences) with eight participating facility managers from one geographical area. Other data were collected through in-depth interviews with key informants, document review and researcher field notes/journaling. Analysis involved data triangulation, respondent and peer review and cross-case analysis. The experiences show that the PHC facility manager’s job is dominated by a range of tasks and procedures focused on clinical service management, but is expected to encompass action to address the population and public health needs of the surrounding community. Managing with and through others, and in a complex system, requiring self-management, are critical aspects of the job. A range of personal, professional and contextual factors influence managerial practice, including professional identity. The current largely facility-focused management practice reflects the strong nursing identity of managers and broader organizational influences. However, three of the eight managers appear to self-identify an emerging leadership identity and demonstrate related managerial practices. Nonetheless, there is currently limited support for an identity transition towards leadership in this context. Better

  5. Management by Objectives: The Swedish Experience in Upper Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindberg, Erik; Wilson, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to explore how managing by objectives (MBO) has been adopted in Swedish schools and to reflect on some of the consequences in a longitudinal study. Results relate to whether introduction has increased student performance and whether it works as a tool for the principals to create more effective schools.…

  6. Organic weed management in vegetables: Research, experiences, and opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic farmers in a national survey ranked weed management as their greatest research need for organic crop production. Scientists from the Agriculture Research Service and Oklahoma State University have combined their efforts to conduct not only organic weed control research, but research involvi...

  7. Managing Information Technology in Academic Medical Centers: A "Multicultural" Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Charles P.; Corn, Milton; Krumrey, Arthur; Perry, David R.; Stevens, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Examines how beliefs and concerns of academic medicine's diverse professional cultures affect management of information technology. Two scenarios, one dealing with standardization of desktop personal computers and the other with publication of syllabi on an institutional intranet, form the basis for an exercise in which four prototypical members…

  8. Experiences in monitoring and assessment of sustainable land management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although sustainable land management (SLM) is widely promoted to prevent and mitigate land degradation and desertification, its monitoring and assessment has received much less attention. This paper compiles methodological approaches which to date have been little reported in literature. It draws le...

  9. Strategic Management Accounting in Universities: The Italian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agasisti, Tommaso; Arnaboldi, Michela; Azzone, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of management accounting in four major Italian universities, which have been struggling to build their strategy in a context of significant change. Following many OECD countries the Italian government has been changing its higher education system by giving more autonomy to universities. These changes pose a…

  10. Golden Parachutes: Changing the Experience of Unemployment for Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Anya M.; Jackson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effect of career transition support and three other situational variables--financial reserves, social inclusion, and a partner--on the psychological strain of unemployed managers. We extended the theories of unemployment by investigating the mechanisms by which these four situational variables affect psychological strain. After…

  11. Managing Sustainability Communication on Campus: Experiences from Luneburg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz-Balsen, Angela; Heinrichs, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability communication is evolving as a new interdisciplinary field of research and professional practice. The purpose of this paper is to point out the advantage of applying theoretical frameworks and related research instruments for an adequate sustainability communication management on campus. It also aims to highlight the…

  12. Managing Learning Experiences in an AACSB Environment: Beyond the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spruell, James; Hawkins, Al; Vicknair, David

    2009-01-01

    The study explores the development and management of a rich learning environment that extends the traditional classroom to include significant co-curricular programs. Learning enrichment is guided by the individual mission of the business school, accreditation agency (AACSB), and in our case, the Jesuit mission. That central framework provides a…

  13. Successful School Principalship in Danish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Lejf; Krejsler, John; Kofod, Klaus Kasper; Jensen, Bent Brandt

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Aims at conceptualizing and investigating the meaning of good school principalship within the space for manoeuvring that is available within the context of Danish comprehensive schools. The paper aims to present findings from case studies of two Danish schools within the frame of reference. Design/methodology/approach: Outlines the…

  14. Science in Support of Management, Management in Support of Science - the Long Island Sound Experience

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1987 Long Island Sound (LIS) has been part of EPA’s National Estuary Program, and since 1994 it has been governed by a Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan that provided for a strategic relationship between science and management. The Management Conference ...

  15. Experience as Knowledge in a New Product Development Team: Implications for Knowledge Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to better understand how New Product Development (NPD) team members apply their experiences to meet the task needs of their project. Although "experience" is highly valued in team members, little research has looked specifically at experiences as a type of knowledge, and how this knowledge is used in work settings. This research evaluated nearly 200 instances where team members referenced past experiences during team meetings. During these experience exchanges, team members structured the sharing of their experiences to include three common elements: the source of the experience, the nature of the experience, and the degree of relevance to the current work of the team. The experiences fell into four categories: people (relationships), process, product, and politics. This paper describes how team members structured, applied, and integrated their individual experiences and presents the resulting implications for knowledge management systems that wish to exploit experience knowledge.

  16. Helicopter winchmens' experiences with pain management in challenging environments.

    PubMed

    van der Velde, J; Linehan, L; Cusack, S

    2013-02-01

    We conducted a survey of Irish Coast Guard Search and Rescue Helicopter winchmen to establish if their pain management scope of practice was adequate for their working environment. We surveyed 17 SAR personnel. 88% of winchmen have experienced scenarios where they were unable to reduce pain scores below 6/10. In seeking solutions within current Irish Prehospital Clinical Practice Guidelines, repeated descriptions of operations in extreme weather and sea conditions were given which were entirely incompatible with the dexterity required to break a glass ampoule and draw up solution, let alone site an intravenous (IV) line or administer a drug via intramuscular (IM) injection. Irish Coast Guard Search and Rescue Helicopter winchmen encounter polytrauma patients in extreme pain in uniquely challenging environments. Novel solutions to pain management within this tightly governed system are urgently required. PMID:23472383

  17. Software engineering and data management for automated payload experiment tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddux, Gary A.; Provancha, Anna; Chattam, David

    1994-01-01

    The Microgravity Projects Office identified a need to develop a software package that will lead experiment developers through the development planning process, obtain necessary information, establish an electronic data exchange avenue, and allow easier manipulation/reformatting of the collected information. An MS-DOS compatible software package called the Automated Payload Experiment Tool (APET) has been developed and delivered. The objective of this task is to expand on the results of the APET work previously performed by UAH and provide versions of the software in a Macintosh and Windows compatible format.

  18. Software engineering and data management for automated payload experiment tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddux, Gary A.; Provancha, Anna; Chattam, David

    1994-01-01

    The Microgravity Projects Office identified a need to develop a software package that will lead experiment developers through the development planning process, obtain necessary information, establish an electronic data exchange avenue, and allow easier manipulation/reformatting of the collected information. An MS-DOS compatible software package called the Automated Payload Experiment Tool (APET) has been developed and delivered. The objective of this task is to expand on the results of the APET work previously performed by University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) and provide versions of the software in a Macintosh and Windows compatible format. Appendix 1 science requirements document (SRD) Users Manual is attached.

  19. Apollo experience report: Data management for postflight engineering evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, G. B., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The Apollo management of data for postflight engineering evaluation is described. The sources of Apollo telemetry data, the control of data processing by a single data team, the data techniques used to assist in evaluation of the large quantity of data, and the operation of the data team before the mission and during the evaluation phase are described. The techniques used to ensure the output of valid data and to determine areas in which data were of questionable quality are also included.

  20. Learning the Collection: A New Librarian's Experience in Collection Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Heather

    2010-01-01

    The author is a reference and instruction librarian at Iowa State University with collection development and liaison responsibilities for chemistry, biochemistry, entomology, and natural resource ecology. She recently came to librarianship with an education and three years' experience in biochemistry and biotechnology. During the last four years…

  1. Data management in a fusion energy research experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Glad, A.; Drobnis, D.; McHarg, B.

    1981-07-01

    Present-day fusion research requires extensive support for the large amount of scientific data generated, bringing about three distinct problems computer systems must solve: (1) the processing of large amounts of data in very small time frames; (2) the archiving, analyzing and managing of the entire data output for the project's lifetime; (3) the standardization of data for the exchange of information between laboratories. The computer system supporting General Atomic's Doublet III tokamak, a project funded by the United States Department of Energy, is the first to encounter and address these problems through a system-wide data base structure.

  2. Void Management in MEPHISTO and Other Space Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Johnston, J. Christopher; Wei, Bingbo

    1998-01-01

    The second flight of NASA's Shuttle Flight experiment program known as MEPHISTO suffered from a void in the liquid portion of the sample, even though a piston arrangement was in place to keep the ampoule filled. In preparations for the next flight of the MEPHISTO furnace an animated computer program, called MEPHISTO Volume Visualizer (MVV), was written to help avoid the formation of unwanted voids. A piston system on MEPHISTO has the ability to move approximately 5 mm in compression, to accommodate expansion of the solid during heating; then from the completely compressed position, the piston can move up to 25 mm in towards the sample, effectively making the ampoule smaller and hopefully eliminating any voids. Due to the nature of the piston design and ampoule and sample arrangement, the piston has gotten stuck during normal directional solidification; this creates the risk of a void. To eliminate such a void, the liquid in the hot zones of the furnace can be heated, thereby expanding the liquid and consuming any void. The problem with this approach is that if the liquid is heated too much an overpressure could result, breaking the ampoule and ending the experiment catastrophically. The MVV has been found to be a useful tool in the assessment of the risks associated with the formation of a void and the additional heating of the liquid in the hot zone of this Bridgman type furnace. The MVV software will be discussed and copies available; it is written in the Delphi 2 programming language and runs under Windows 95 and NT. The strategies used in other flight experiments, such as the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment, will also be presented.

  3. Experiences managing radioactive material at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Rick L

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the world's largest and most energetic laser system for inertial confinement fusion and experiments studying high energy density science. Many experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility involve radioactive materials; these may take the form of tritium and small quantities of depleted uranium used in targets, activation products created by neutron-producing fusion experiments, and fission products produced by the fast fissioning of the depleted uranium. While planning for the introduction of radioactive material, it was recognized that some of the standard institutional processes would need to be customized to accommodate aspects of NIF operations, such as surface contamination limits, radiological postings, airborne tritium monitoring protocols, and personnel protective equipment. These customizations were overlaid onto existing work practices to accommodate the new hazard of radioactive materials. This paper will discuss preparations that were made prior to the introduction of radioactive material, the types of radiological work activities performed, and the hazards and controls encountered. Updates to processes based on actual monitoring results are also discussed. PMID:23629067

  4. Toward Full Participation in Management Consulting Practice: Experiences of Recent College Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Chia-an

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - This study seeks to understand the college-to-work transition process from the perspectives of a group of new management consultants. Design/methodology/approach - This study focuses on the experience of a group of management consultants, how they construct meaning in their work, and the workplace itself. Participants in this study…

  5. Career-Self Management and Entrepreneurship: An Experience with PhD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Joana Carneiro; do Ceu Taveira, Maria; Sa, Elisabete

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study presents an experience developed with PhD students aimed to analyze the extent to which career self-management should be approached along with entrepreneurship issues to promote students' career development. Method: An intervention group who attended a Career Self-Management Seminar (EG1), a comparison group who attended…

  6. Ethics and Retail Management Professionals: An Examination of Age, Education, and Experience Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mujtaba, Bahaudin G.; Cavico, Frank J.; McCartney, Timothy O.; DiPaolo, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Ethical maturity and behavior are of great concern to all educators, firms, and investors, and even more so in a recession. This research surveyed managers and employees in the retail environment to measure their Personal Business Ethics Scores (PBES) to see if age, education, and management experience makes a difference in making more ethical…

  7. Stages of Learning during a Self-Directed Stress Management Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Karl L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to document the stages of learning reflected through student journaling during a self-directed experience in stress management, and the relationship of those stages to a historical model. Methods: College students participating in a full-semester course in stress management theory were required to select a…

  8. Conceptual framework for a Danish human biomonitoring program

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Marianne; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Vorkamp, Katrin; Frederiksen, Marie; Bach, Hanne; Bonefeld-Jorgensen, Eva Cecilie; Rastogi, Suresch; Fauser, Patrik; Krongaard, Teddy; Sorensen, Peter Borgen

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the conceptual framework for a Danish human biomonitoring (HBM) program. The EU and national science-policy interface, that is fundamental for a realization of the national and European environment and human health strategies, is discussed, including the need for a structured and integrated environmental and human health surveillance program at national level. In Denmark, the initiative to implement such activities has been taken. The proposed framework of the Danish monitoring program constitutes four scientific expert groups, i.e. i. Prioritization of the strategy for the monitoring program, ii. Collection of human samples, iii. Analysis and data management and iv. Dissemination of results produced within the program. This paper presents the overall framework for data requirements and information flow in the integrated environment and health surveillance program. The added value of an HBM program, and in this respect the objectives of national and European HBM programs supporting environmental health integrated policy-decisions and human health targeted policies, are discussed. In Denmark environmental monitoring has been prioritized by extensive surveillance systems of pollution in oceans, lakes and soil as well as ground and drinking water. Human biomonitoring has only taken place in research programs and few incidences of e.g. lead contamination. However an arctic program for HBM has been in force for decades and from the preparations of the EU-pilot project on HBM increasing political interest in a Danish program has developed. PMID:18541069

  9. Managing state energy conservation programs - The Minnesota experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, E.; Armstrong, J. R.

    1980-11-01

    The development and operation of energy conservation programs in the Minnesota Energy Agency (MEA) are discussed. The MEA has responsibility for voluntary conservation efforts, regulating energy efficient devices, and grant programs to audit and retrofit public buildings. The MEA has developed the plan under which the Minnesota utilities will provide conservation services to residential customers, including an on-site home energy audit. The relation between the Department of Energy (DOE) and state energy offices in implementing programs is considered. The DOE has provided technical assistance to the states through the development of a model audit. Steps are discussed to reduce the burdens imposed on the states by program planning, funding, and management responsibilities, including the consolidation of several existing state conservation programs. Improved policy analysis is suggested to correct inefficiencies in government programs.

  10. The Apollo Experience Lessons Learned for Constellation Lunar Dust Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    Lunar dust will present significant challenges to NASA's Lunar Exploration Missions. The challenges can be overcome by using best practices in system engineering design. For successful lunar surface missions, all systems that come into contact with lunar dust must consider the effects throughout the entire design process. Interfaces between all these systems with other systems also must be considered. Incorporating dust management into Concept of Operations and Requirements development are the best place to begin to mitigate the risks presented by lunar dust. However, that is only the beginning. To be successful, every person who works on NASA's Constellation lunar missions must be mindful of this problem. Success will also require fiscal responsibility. NASA must learn from Apollo the root cause of problems caused by dust, and then find the most cost-effective solutions to address each challenge. This will require a combination of common sense existing technologies and promising, innovative technical solutions

  11. Experience of disused source management in Latin America

    SciTech Connect

    Pimenta Mourao, R.

    2008-07-01

    The Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology) - CDTN - has been actively engaged in cooperation programs for disused source management throughout the Latin American and the Caribbean region since 1996. The CDTN source conditioning team participated in the preparation of the technical procedures established for the different tasks involved in the radium sources conditioning operations, like preparation of the packaging for conditioning; sources conditioning; capsule welding; leak test in radium-containing capsule; and radiation protection planning for the conditioning of disused radium sources. The team also carried out twelve radium sources conditioning operation in the region, besides in-house operations, which resulted in a total conditioned activity of approximately 525 GBq, or 14,200 mg of radium. Additionally, one operation was carried out in Nicaragua to safely condition three Cobalt teletherapy heads stored under very precarious conditions in the premises of an old hospital. More recently, the team started its participation in an IAEA- and US State Department-sponsored program for the repatriation of disused or excess transuranic sources presently stored at users' premises or under regulatory control in different countries in the region. In September 2007 the team attended a theoretical and practical training in transuranic sources management, including the participation in the conditioning of different neutron sources in certified packages. It is expected that the trained team will carry out similar operations in other Latin American countries. Finally, the team is expected be involved in the near future in the repatriation of US-origin teletherapy heads and industrial gauges. (authors)

  12. Clinical profile, etiology, and management of hydropneumothorax: An Indian experience

    PubMed Central

    Kasargod, Vasunethra; Awad, Nilkanth Tukaram

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hydropneumothorax is an abnormal presence of air and fluid in the pleural space. Even though the knowledge of hydro-pneumothorax dates back to the days of ancient Greece, not many national or international literatures are documented. Aim: To study clinical presentation, etiological diagnosis, and management of the patients of hydropneumothorax. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted in a tertiary care hospital with diagnosis of hydropneumothorax between 2012 and 2014 were prospectively studied. Detailed history and clinical examination were recorded. Blood, pleural fluid, sputum investigations, and computed tomography (CT) thorax (if necessary) were done. Intercostal drainage (ICD) tube was inserted and patients were followed up till 3 months. Results: Fifty-seven patients were studied. Breathlessness, anorexia, weight loss, and cough were the most common symptoms. Tachypnea was present in 68.4% patients. Mean PaO2 was 71.7 mm of Hg (standard deviation ±12.4). Hypoxemia was present in 35 patients (61.4%). All patients had exudative effusion. Etiological diagnosis was possible in 35 patients by initial work-up and 22 required CT thorax for arriving at a diagnosis. Tuberculosis (TB) was etiology in 80.7% patients, acute bacterial infection in 14%, malignancy in 3.5%, and obstructive airway disease in 1.8%. All patients required ICD tube insertion. ICD was required for 24.8 days (±13.1). Conclusion: Most patients presented with symptoms and signs of cardiorespiratory distress along with cough, anorexia, and weight loss. Extensive pleural fluid analysis is essential in establishing etiological diagnosis. TB is the most common etiology. ICD for long duration with antimicrobial chemotherapy is the management. PMID:27185991

  13. Experiences of Uav Surveys Applied to Environmental Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprioli, M.; Trizzino, R.; Mazzone, F.; Scarano, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the results of some surveys carried out in an area of Apulian territory affected by serious environmental hazard are presented. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are emerging as a key engineering tool for future environmental survey tasks. UAVs are increasingly seen as an attractive low-cost alternative or supplement to aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry due to their low cost, flexibility, availability and readiness for duty. In addition, UAVs can be operated in hazardous or temporarily inaccessible locations, that makes them very suitable for the assessment and management of environmental risk conditions. In order to verify the reliability of these technologies an UAV survey and A LIDAR survey have been carried outalong about 1 km of coast in the Salento peninsula, near the towns of San Foca, Torre dellOrso and SantAndrea( Lecce, Southern Italy). This area is affected by serious environmental risks due to the presence of dangerous rocky cliffs named falesie. The UAV platform was equipped with a photogrammetric measurement system that allowed us to obtain a mobile mapping of the fractured fronts of dangerous rocky cliffs. UAV-images data have been processed using dedicated software (AgisoftPhotoscan). The point clouds obtained from both the UAV and LIDAR surveys have been processed using Cloud Compare software, with the aim of testing the UAV results with respect to the LIDAR ones. The total error obtained was of centimeter-order that is a very satisfactory result. The environmental information has been arranged in an ArcGIS platform in order to assess the risk levels. The possibility to repeat the survey at time intervals more or less close together depending on the measured levels of risk and to compare the output allows following the trend of the dangerous phenomena. In conclusion, for inaccessible locations of dangerous rocky bodies the UAV survey coupled with GIS methodology proved to be a key engineering tool for the management of environmental

  14. EXCON: a graphics-based experiment-control manager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mumit; Anderson, Paul D.; Cerrina, Franco

    1991-08-01

    EXCON is a software package developed to control and define the modeling of experiments. In this case, EXCON is used to integrate various individual modeling systems, in a user- definable manner, to simulate the semiconductor manufacturing process. These numerous systems model specific aspects of the integrated circuit fabrication process. Each can be a large complex software program requiring many system resources to reliably emulate the physical processes, in many cases at the atomic level, in an analytical manner. There are many different program data formats and user interfaces within the modeling systems used. EXCON addresses the automatic insertion of configuration and process data, the conversion of data formats between modeling systems, and the sequence of model execution. EXCON also has a mechanism to re-run the sequence of models with variations in one or several configuration or data parameters, thereby creating an environment to do controlled experiments. EXCON assists in the visualization of the data in the experimental data sequence. EXCON allows for coarse-grained parallelism by connecting processes with an interprocess and inter-machine communication mechanism, thereby allowing for concurrent execution of processes on multiple machines. System performance enhancement is done with a incremental directed graph analysis technique. EXCON will, when appropriate, transparently convert file formats between modeling systems.

  15. The Field Experience in Education for Management in Social Welfare. National Project on Education for Management in Social Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Sue, Ed.; And Others

    The document presents 10 papers which offer a framework for improving educational field experience in master's level social welfare management programs. The guide is arranged in three parts. The two papers in part I, the orienting framework, present a set of value assumptions which govern the nature and effectiveness of social service delivery and…

  16. The Experiences of Mothers of Children with Autism: Managing Multiple Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safe, Anneleise; Joosten, Annette; Molineux, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mothers of children with autism experience poorer health and wellbeing compared to mothers of children with other disabilities or typically-developing children. This qualitative phenomenological study aimed to explore the daily life experiences of mothers of children with autism, and the strategies they use to manage their roles, their…

  17. An Experiment on Enforcement Strategies for Managing a Local Environment Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James J.; Cardenas, Juan-Camilo

    2004-01-01

    Managing local environmental resources with moderately enforced government regulations can often be counterproductive, whereas nonbinding communications can be remarkably effective. The authors describe a classroom experiment that illustrates these points. The experiment is rich in its institutional settings and highlights the challenges that…

  18. Supervised Occupational Experience Record Book for Agricultural Resource Conservation, Environmental Management and Forestry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickles, Tom

    The record book was designed to meet the occupational experience recordkeeping requirements of vocational agriculture students enrolled in forestry, environmental management, or agriculture resource conservation programs in Ohio. It provides guidelines and forms for recording on-the-job, in-the-school lab, and occupational experience project data.…

  19. [Management of children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus: personal experience].

    PubMed

    Dorchy, H

    2005-09-01

    The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the USA has closely paralleled the increase in childhood obesity noted there, but now across the Western world and therefore in Belgium. (Pre)type 2 diabetes is preceded by insulin resistance which must be diagnosed and treated. In Belgium, type 1 diabetes is the predominant (97%) form of diabetes in young people (< 2,000 cases under the age of 18 years). Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease which is more aggressive in younger children. At onset, the key-symptoms are : polyuria, polydipsia, weight loss, asthenia. Diagnosis is confirmed with 2 strips measuring glycaemia and glycosuria. Treatment and diabetes education for self-management should be initiated immediately in paediatric clinics of diabetology with a specialised multidisciplinary team. Thanks to the Belgian Social medicine, medical consultations and material necessary for treatment are nearly without cost. The principal aims of therapeutic management of the child, adolescent and adult with type 1 diabetes are to allow good quality of life and to avoid long-term complications by maintaining blood glucose concentrations close to the normal range and an HbA1c level under 7%. The number of daily insulin injections, 2 or > or = 4, by itself does not necessarily give better results, but the 4-injection regimen allows greater freedom, taking into account that the proper insulin adjustment is difficult before adolescence. Successful glycaemic control in young patients depends mainly on the quality and intensity of diabetes education. Any dogmatism must be avoided. Dietary recommendations issued over the last few years are the same for diabetic and non-diabetic individuals in order to avoid degenerative diseases. In the twice-daily injection regimen, the allocation of carbohydrates throughout the day is essential. Due to their pharmakokinetic characteristics, rapid-acting and long-acting insulin analogues have specific indications in both the twice

  20. German experience in the management of ELGAN infants.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Of 680 000 infants born in Germany a year roughly 10% are preterm and 1% are very preterm. They are treated in around 150 level 1 perinatal centers and there are various credos how to best treat the ELGAN infant. However, many centers include the use of a sustained inflation for lung aeration in the standard protocol of delivery room care in Germany. As a result of the large studies on delivery room care, a trend for earlier or prophylactic surfactant in the most immature infants can be observed, however, surfactant is increasingly given in a new less invasive way called LISA. German randomized controlled trials on LISA , on permissive hypercapnia in the premature infants and a German initiated European trial on inhaled steroids have been completed and preliminary results are available. NIRS so far mostly is used for research reasons; however, the number of centers that monitor brain oxygenation for clinical reasons to guide hemodynamic management is increasing. A recent initiative was able to tremendously reduce the rate of IVH by prospective multidisciplinary surveillance. PMID:26135950

  1. House dust in seven Danish offices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølhave, L.; Schneider, T.; Kjærgaard, S. K.; Larsen, L.; Norn, S.; Jørgensen, O.

    Floor dust from Danish offices was collected and analyzed. The dust was to be used in an exposure experiment. The dust was analyzed to show the composition of the dust which can be a source of airborne dust indoors. About 11 kg of dust from vacuum cleaner bags from seven Danish office buildings with about 1047 occupants (12 751 m 2) was processed according to a standardized procedure yielding 5.5 kg of processed bulk dust. The bulk dust contained 130.000-160.000 CFU g -1 microorganisms and 71.000-90.000 CFU g -1 microfungi. The content of culturable microfungi was 65-123 CFU 30 g -1 dust. The content of endotoxins ranged from 5.06-7.24 EU g -1 (1.45 ng g -1 to 1.01 ng g -1). Allergens (ng g -1) were from 147-159 (Mite), 395-746 (dog) and 103-330 (cat). The macro molecular organic compounds (the MOD-content) varied from 7.8-9.8 mg g -1. The threshold of release of histamine from basophil leukocytes provoked by the bulk dust was between 0.3 and 1.0 mg ml -1. The water content was 2% (WGT) and the organic fraction 33%. 6.5-5.9% (dry) was water soluble. The fiber content was less than 0.2-1.5% (WGT) and the desorbable VOCs was 176-319 μg g -1. Most of the VOC were aldehydes. However, softeners for plastic (DBP and DEHP) were present. The chemical composition includes human and animal skin fragments, paper fibers, glass wool, wood and textilefibers and inorganic and metal particles. The sizes ranged from 0.001-1 mm and the average specific density was 1.0 g m -3. The bulk dust was resuspended and injected into an exposure chamber. The airborne dust was sampled and analyzed to illustrate the exposures that can result from sedimented dirt and dust. The airborne dust resulting from the bulk dust reached concentrations ranging from 0.26-0.75 mg m -3 in average contained 300-170 CFU m -3. The organic fraction was from 55-70% and the water content about 2.5% (WGT). The content of the dust was compared to the similar results reported in the literature and its toxic potency is

  2. Electrically Driven Single Phase Thermal Management: STP-H5 EHD Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    The Electrically Driven Single Phase Thermal Management: STP-H5 iEHDS Experiment is a technology demonstration of prototype proof of concept hardware to establish the feasilibilty and long term operation of this hardware. This is a structural thermal plate that will operate continuous as part of the STP-H5 ISEM experiment for up to 18 months. This presentation discusses the design, fabrication and environmental operational paramertes of the experiment hardware.

  3. [Early achievements of the Danish pharmaceutical industry-6 Pharmacia].

    PubMed

    Grevsen, Jørgen V; Kruse, Edith; Kruse, Poul R

    2014-01-01

    The article series provides a written and pictorial account of the Danish pharmaceutical industry's products from their introduction until about 1950. Part 6 deals with products from A/S Pharmacia. A/S Pharmacia was established in Copenhagen in 1922 as a Danish limited company by the enterprising pharmacist Edward Jacobsen. Pharmacia was not Jacobsen's first pharmaceutical company as previously he had established a pharmaceutical agency already in 1913 which in 1919 was reorganized to a limited company by the name of A/S Edward Jacobsen. This agency was later extended to include a production of generics. Jacobsen remained the co-owner and manager of Pharmacia until 1934 where he resigned and established another company, A/S Ejco, for the manufacture of generics. It is worth mentioning that already in 1911 a Swedish pharmaceutical company was established named AB Pharmacia. Today we do not know whether Edward Jacobsen knew about this Swedish company. Later on in 1936 AB Pharmacia and A/S Pharmacia made a contract concerning mutual market sharing, and a research cooperation was brought about between the two companies which resulted in an increase of turnover for A/S Pharmacia. In 1955 the cooperation between the two companies was increased as the Swedish company joined as principal shareholder with the purpose of continuing and developing the Danish company as an independent pharmaceutical company with its own research and development as well as manufacture, control and marketing. Therefore Pharmacia in Denmark was able to establish a synthesis factory in Koge and move the domicile to new premises in Hillered. In 1993 Pharmacia was presented in a printed matter as "The largest Nordic pharmaceutical company" as a result of the merger between the Swedish Kabi Pharmacia, formerly established by a merger between Kabi Vitrum and AB Pharmacia, and the Italian Farmitalia Carlo Erba. Only two years later in 1995 Pharmacia merged with the American pharmaceutical company The

  4. Occupational Health Management in the Lead Industry: The Korean Experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In 1967, the problem of occupational lead exposure came to public attention in Korea. Since then, regular progress has been made in lowering workplace lead exposures, instituting new workplace controls, and implementing health examinations of exposed workers. Past serious lead poisoning episodes made it possible to introduce biological monitoring programs on a voluntary basis in high-lead-exposure facilities in Korea. Industry-specific occupational health services for lead workers in Korea during the last 22 years can be categorized into three phases. During the first phase (1988-1993), efforts were directed at increasing awareness among workers about the hazards of lead exposure, biological monitoring of blood zinc protoporphyrin began, and a respiratory protection program was introduced. During the second phase (1994-1997), a computerized health management system for lead workers was developed, blood-lead measurement was added to biologic monitoring, and engineering controls were introduced in the workplace to lower air-lead levels to comply with air-lead regulations. Finally, during the third phase (1998-present), a new biomarker, bone-lead measurement by X-ray fluorescence, was introduced. Bone-lead measurement proved to be useful for assessing body burden and to demonstrate past lead exposure in retired workers. Occupational health service practice for lead workers, including the industry-specific group occupational health system, has brought considerable success in the prevention of lead poisoning and in reducing the lead burden in Korean lead workers during the last several decades. The successful achievement of prevention of lead poisoning in Korea was a result of the combined efforts of lead workers, employers, relevant government agencies, and academic institutes. PMID:22953192

  5. Implications of pollution prevention experience for environmental management

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, W.

    1993-06-01

    Conventional wisdom in the US is that firms face a trade-off between environmental efforts and profit because of the belief that environmental protection invariably involves costs that reduce profits. Firms, therefore, generally perceive environmental protection as an impediment to their goal of profit maximization. Environmental efforts are viewed as an added hurdle in producing a product, rather than an as intrinsic part of well-designed operations. From this perspective, firms have no incentive to engage in environmental protection efforts, and will do so only if they are forced (or are given incentives) by government or if they perceive in advance potential profits from their efforts (e.g., a market for environmental products). The concept of a trade-off between the environment and profit, however, has been challenged recently. A common argument raised for questioning this trade-off is that efforts directed at environmental protection will lead to the development of new technologies and will give US firms a competitive advantage in the emerging environmental industry. It is argued that opportunities available within this growth field outweigh costs of entry and research. Recent publications (World Wildlife Fund, 1992; Resources for the Future, 1993) have proposed that government actions, may encourage the development of the environmental industry and, thus, improve both economic and environmental performance. Suggested governmental actions include using market incentives rather than command and control regulation to achieve environmental goals, integrating environmental values into governmental policy analysis, and supporting investments in environmental technologies. This paper details the economics and benefits of various waste management efforts.

  6. The management of sinonasal inverted papilloma: our experience.

    PubMed

    Terzakis, Georgios; Vlachou, Stamatia; Kyrmizakis, Dionysios; Helidonis, Emmanuel

    2002-03-01

    The inverted papilloma of the nose and paranasal sinuses is a controversial disease. It invades surrounded structures, shows a high recurrence rate after surgical excision and may coexist with squamous cell carcinoma. The use of the optimal surgical approach and technique is of the utmost importance, as it is related to the possibility of recurrence. In cases of tumors of limited size a conservative local excision is sufficient, while, in larger tumors filling the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses a more aggressive strategy is needed, such as a medial maxillectomy after lateral rhinotomy. In this paper we present our experience from treating 42 sinonasal inverted papillomas, using a surgical technique which is based on the conservation of as much part of the healthy lateral nasal wall as possible. This modified medial maxillectomy allows us to create a limited in size and normally functioning nasal cavity, thus minimizing the disadvantages of the classical medial maxillectomy without jeopardizing the safety of the operation. PMID:12012951

  7. Charging systems and PAYT experiences for waste management in Spain.

    PubMed

    Puig-Ventosa, I

    2008-12-01

    Municipal waste charges in Spain are very widespread, although their application varies significantly among different municipalities. Most commonly, waste charges are implemented as a flat rate, but some of them depend on indicators such as household water consumption, the land area of the property or the value of the real estate. Only one residential pay-as-you-throw scheme has been applied so far. It was a pay-per-bag scheme implemented in Torrelles de Llobregat, Barcelona. A number of other systems focussing only on commercial waste have been implemented in Spain. Several factors suggest that new pay-as-you-throw schemes will be adopted in the near future. In 2000 no municipalities had door-to-door collection schemes; since then over 70 municipalities have implemented them. In addition to this, some regions encourage the separate collection of commercial waste, by means of doorstep schemes. In all of these areas, variable charging systems could be easily adopted. Additionally, regarding waste charges, the National Waste Plan (2000-2006) advocated for the implementation of "pilot experiences for the quantitative application of the polluter-pays-principle". The tendency towards these variable charging systems in Europe will also favour their introduction in Spain. PMID:18783932

  8. Public or private water management: Experience from different European Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wackerbauer, Johann

    2008-11-01

    Faced with liberalisation proposals and an increasing internationalisation of water resource management, the question arises as to how a change of the regulatory framework would affect the market structure and the supply conditions in this area. While the term "privatisation" relates to the ownership structure of the providers, the term "liberalisation" implies extensive free market ideas. Privatisation involves the outsourcing of public services from the public authorities to a privately organised organisation. Through this, however, nothing needs to change in terms of the market or the intensity of competition for the commodity in question. Within the framework of privatisation it can also occur that the public monopoly is only transferred to a private monopoly. The term "liberalisation" in addition refers to the basic regulatory constraints: liberalisation signifies the cessation of limitations to competition and supply monopolies, and open competition between several suppliers for the consumers. In the EU-15, the only country where the provision of operational services in the water supply has been totally passed to the private sector is the UK, but this is only true for UK and Wales. Another singular case is France, where there is a mix of mainly private operating companies and municipalities which have divided the regional supply areas among themselves. In six other EU-15 countries where some privatisation took place, either the municipalities or (majority) publicly owned companies are controlling water supply. In the remaining seven countries, the water supply is organised by municipality companies only. In an international comparison, there are three basic models for the regulation of natural monopolies in the public water supply: the Anglo-Saxon, the French and the German model. The delimitation between supervisory bodies and operations in the water supply is strongest in the first model and weakest in the last. This has led to three basic types of

  9. Treatment Experiences and Management Outcomes for Skipped Multisegmental Spinal Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mei, Gang; Luo, Fei; Zhang, Zehua; Dai, Fei; Zhou, Qiang; He, Qingyi; Hou, Tianyong; Xu, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    China ranks second among the 22 countries with the highest burden of tuberculosis. The goals of this study were to evaluate the clinical outcomes of treatment of skipped multisegmental spinal tuberculosis and to investigate the selection strategy for the optimal procedure based on focal characteristics. From March 1999 to December 2013, 24 patients with skipped multisegmental spinal tuberculosis were enrolled in this study. Ten patients underwent an anterior procedure (anterior group). Four patients underwent a combined anterior and posterior procedure (combined anterior and posterior group). Ten patients underwent a posterior procedure (posterior group). All patients were evaluated according to clinical presentation and radiographic, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings. The focal tissues of all patients underwent drug susceptibility testing. The patients underwent clinical and radiologic follow-up an average of 18.6 months post-operatively. The cohort included 13 male and 11 female patients (age range, 15-69 years). The patients showed significant improvement in deformity and neurologic deficits. All patients had graft union 6 to 12 months postoperatively. No patient had surgical complications. Postoperative recurrence occurred in 1 patient in the combined anterior and posterior group. Two patients had strains that were resistant to at least 1 anti-tuberculosis drug. One patient had multidrug-resistant strains. All 24 patients had achieved cure at final follow-up. This study showed that the 3 procedures can safely and effectively achieve nerve decompression, graft fusion, and kyphosis correction. The procedure should be chosen according to the patient's general condition, focal characteristics, and type of complication, and the surgeon's experience. PMID:26709565

  10. Managing medical images and clinical information: InCor's experience.

    PubMed

    Furuie, Sergio S; Rebelo, Marina S; Moreno, Ramon A; Santos, Marcelo; Bertozzo, Nivaldo; Motta, Gustavo H M B; Pires, Fabio A; Gutierrez, Marco A

    2007-01-01

    Patients usually get medical assistance in several clinics and hospitals during their lifetime, archiving vital information in a dispersed way. Clearly, a proper patient care should take into account that information in order to check for incompatibilities, avoid unnecessary exams, and get relevant clinical history. The Heart Institute (InCor) of São Paulo, Brazil, has been committed to the goal of integrating all exams and clinical information within the institution and other hospitals. Since InCor is one of the six institutes of the University of São Paulo Medical School and each institute has its own information system, exchanging information among the institutes is also a very important aspect that has been considered. In the last few years, a system for transmission, archiving, retrieval, processing, and visualization of medical images integrated with a hospital information system has been successfully created and constitutes the InCor's electronic patient record (EPR). This work describes the experience in the effort to develop a functional and comprehensive EPR, which includes laboratory exams, images (static, dynamic, and three dimensional), clinical reports, documents, and even real-time vital signals. A security policy based on a contextual role-based access control model was implemented to regulate user's access to EPR. Currently, more than 10 TB of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) images have been stored using the proposed architecture and the EPR stores daily more than 11 GB of integrated data. The proposed storage subsystem allows 6 months of visibility for rapid retrieval and more than two years for automatic retrieval using a jukebox. This paper addresses also a prototype for the integration of distributed and heterogeneous EPR. PMID:17249400

  11. The experiences of risk managers in providing emotional support for health care workers after adverse events.

    PubMed

    Edrees, Hanan; Brock, Douglas M; Wu, Albert W; McCotter, Patricia I; Hofeldt, Ron; Shannon, Sarah E; Gallagher, Thomas H; White, Andrew A

    2016-04-01

    Risk managers often meet with health care workers who are emotionally traumatized following adverse events. We surveyed members of the American Society for Health care Risk Management (ASHRM) about their training, experience, competence, and comfort with providing emotional support to health care workers. Although risk managers reported feeling comfortable and competent in providing support, nearly all respondents prefer to receive additional training. Risk managers who were comfortable listening to and supporting health care workers were more likely to report prior training. Health care organizations implementing second victim support programs should not rely solely on risk managers to provide support, rather engage and train interested risk managers and provide them with opportunities to practice. PMID:27088771

  12. The Lived Experience of Lupus Flares: Features, Triggers, and Management in an Australian Female Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Squance, Marline L.; Reeves, Glenn E. M.; Bridgman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Individuals living with lupus commonly experience daily backgrounds of symptoms managed to acceptable tolerance levels to prevent organ damage. Despite management, exacerbation periods (flares) still occur. Varied clinical presentations and unpredictable symptom exacerbation patterns provide management and assessment challenges. Patient perceptions of symptoms vary with perceived impact, lifestyles, available support, and self-management capacity. Therefore, to increase our understanding of lupus' health impacts and management, it was important to explore lupus flare characteristics from the patient viewpoint. Lupus flares in 101 Australian female patients were retrospectively explored with the use of a novel flare definition. Qualitative methods were used to explore patient-perceived flare symptoms, triggers, and management strategies adopted to alleviate symptom exacerbations. A mean of 29.9 flare days, with 6.8 discrete flares, was experienced. The study confirmed that patients perceive stress, infection, and UV light as flare triggers and identified new potential triggers of temperature and weather changes, work, and chemical exposure from home cleaning. The majority of flares were self-managed with patients making considered management choices without medical input. Barriers to seeking medical support included appointment timings and past negative experiences reflecting incongruence between clinician and patient views of symptom impact, assessment, and ultimately flare occurrence. PMID:26464865

  13. UNIX-based data management system for the Mobile Satellite Propagation Experiment (PiFEx)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1987-01-01

    A new method is presented for handling data resulting from Mobile Satellite propagation experiments such as the Pilot Field Experiment (PiFEx) conducted by JPL. This method uses the UNIX operating system and C programming language. The data management system is implemented on a VAX minicomputer. The system automatically divides the large data file housing data from various experiments under a predetermined format into various individual files containing data from each experiment. The system also has a number of programs written in C and FORTRAN languages to allow the researcher to obtain meaningful quantities from the data at hand.

  14. The personal computer and GP-B management. [Gravity Probe experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neighbors, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The Gravity Probe-B (GP-B) experiment is one of the most sophisticated and challenging developments to be undertaken by NASA. Its objective is to measure the relativistic drift of gyroscopes in orbit about the earth. In this paper, the experiment is described, and the strategy of phased procurements for accomplishing the engineering development of the hardware is discussed. The microcomputer is a very convenient and powerful tool in the management of GP-B. It is used in creating and monitoring such project data as schedules, budgets, hardware procurements and technical and interface requirements. Commercially available software in word processing, database management, communications, spreadsheet, graphics and program management are used. Examples are described of the efficacy of the application of the computer by the management team.

  15. Nurse managers' perceptions and experiences regarding staff nurse empowerment: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Peremans, Lieve; de Wit, Marlinde; Van heusden, Danny; Franck, Erik; Timmermans, Olaf; Havens, Donna S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study nurse managers' perceptions and experiences of staff nurse structural empowerment and its impact on the nurse manager leadership role and style. Background: Nurse managers' leadership roles may be viewed as challenging given the complex needs of patients and staff nurses' involvement in both clinical and organizational decision-making processes in interdisciplinary care settings. Design: Qualitative phenomenological study. Methods: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 8 medical or surgical nurse managers in a 600-bed Belgian university hospital between December 2013 and June 2014. This hospital was undergoing conversion from a classical hierarchical, departmental structure to a flat, interdisciplinary model. Results: Nurse managers were found to be familiar with the structural empowerment of clinical nurses in the hospital and to hold positive attitudes toward it. They confirmed the positive impact of empowerment on their staff nurses, as evidenced by increased responsibility, autonomy, critical reflection and enhanced communication skills that in turn improved the quality and safety of patient care. Structural empowerment was being supported by several change initiatives at both the unit and hospital levels. Nurse managers' experiences with these initiatives were mixed, however, because of the changing demands with regard to their manager role and leadership style. In addition, pressure was being experienced by both staff nurses and nurse managers as a result of direct patient care priorities, tightly scheduled projects and miscommunication. Conclusion: Nurse managers reported that structural empowerment was having a favorable impact on staff nurses' professional attitudes and the safety and quality of care in their units. However, they also reported that the empowerment process had led to changes in the managers' roles as well as daily practice dilemmas related to the leadership styles needed. Clear organizational goals and

  16. Aiding the environment: the Australian Development Agency's experience of implementing an environmental management system

    SciTech Connect

    Keen, Meg . E-mail: meg.keen@anu.edu.au; Sullivan, Marjorie

    2005-08-15

    Aid agencies, like commercial businesses, are increasingly concerned with incorporating sound environmental management into their operations. Different approaches are being used to integrate sustainability into development assistance to ensure that environmental impacts are assessed and managed. One approach being used by AusAID, the Australian aid agency, is to implement an environmental management system (EMS) across program and project areas. This paper examines how AusAID has adapted the EMS approach to suit aid agency operations, and some of the lessons from the Australian experience.

  17. Summary of Results from the Risk Management Program for the Mars Microrover Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert; Matijevic, Jacob R.

    2000-01-01

    On 4 July 1997, the Mars Pathfinder landed on the surface of Mars carrying the first planetary rover, known as the Sojourner. Formally known as the Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX), the Sojourner was a low cost, high-risk technology demonstration, in which new risk management techniques were tried. This paper summarizes the activities and results of the effort to conduct a low-cost, yet meaningful risk management program for the MFEX. The specific activities focused on cost, performance, schedule, and operations risks. Just as the systems engineering process was iterative and produced successive refinements of requirements, designs, etc., so was the risk management process. Qualitative risk assessments were performed first to gain some insights for refining the microrover design and operations concept. These then evolved into more quantitative analyses. Risk management lessons from the manager's perspective is presented for other low-cost, high-risk space missions.

  18. Partnering With a Patient and Family Advisory Council to Improve Patient Care Experiences With Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Bookout, Michelle L; Staffileno, Beth A; Budzinsky, Christine M

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered care is a key driver for the nation's health system, yet patient experience surveys indicate that hospitals are far from achieving favorable outcomes. Partnering with patients and families through a patient and family advisory council (PFAC) advances the practice of patient-centered care to improve outcomes and experiences. This article describes the process of implementing a PFAC and presents outcomes related to patients' perception of pain management in the acute care hospital setting. PMID:26963442

  19. The Influence of Literacy on Patient-Reported Experiences of Diabetes Self-Management Support

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Andrea S.; Carlson, John R.; Malone, Robb M.; Joyner, James; DeWalt, Darren A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Variability in disease-related outcomes may relate to how patients experience self-management support in clinical settings. Objectives To identify factors associated with experiences of self-management support during primary care encounters. Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted of 208 patients seen in a multidisciplinary diabetes program in an academic medicine clinic. Multiple regression analysis was used to test associations between patient-rated experiences of self-management support (Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care [PACIC]) and race, gender, insurance status, literacy, duration of diabetes, and intensity of care management. Results The PACIC ratings decreased with age (r = −0.235, p = .001), were higher for women than for men (3.95 vs. 3.65, t = 2.612, p = .010), and were greater for those with more education (F = 3.927, p = .009) and greater literacy skills (t = 3.839, p < .001). The ratings did not vary between racial (t = −1.108, p = .269) or insurance (F = 1.045, p = .374) groups and were unaffected by duration of diabetes (r = 0.052, p = .466) and the intensity of care management (F = 1.028, p = .360). In multivariate models, literacy was the only variable contributing significantly to variation in self-management support ratings. Discussion Even when considering the objective intensity of health services delivered, literacy was the sole variable contributing to differences in patient ratings of self-management support. Although conclusions are limited by the cross-sectional nature of this study, the results emphasize the need to consider literacy when developing and communicating treatment plans requiring self-management skills. PMID:20808193

  20. Waiting Time: The De-Subjectification of Children in Danish Asylum Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitus, Kathrine

    2010-01-01

    This article analyses the relationship between time and subjectification, focusing on the temporal structures created within Danish asylum centres and politics, and on children's experiences of and reactions to open-ended waiting. Such waiting leads to existential boredom which manifests in the children as restlessness, fatigue and despair. The…

  1. Sport or School? Dreams and Dilemmas for Talented Young Danish Football Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; Sorensen, Jan Kahr

    2009-01-01

    Today's young semi-professional football players are expected to continue their education while honing their talents as footballers. This means they must balance the contradictory demands that come from their education establishments and their football clubs. The present study explores how young Danish male football talents experience and describe…

  2. The Danish large wind turbine program. [feasibility of wind power in a utility grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pederson, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the Danish wind energy program and its present status is given. Results and experiences from tests on the Gedser windmill (200 kW) are presented. The key results are presented from the preliminary design study and detailed design of two new WECS (630 kW each) is described.

  3. Quality Circles in the Classroom: An Experiment in the Pedagogical Uses of Japanese Management Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirshfield, Claire

    An on-going experiment in the classroom use of the Japanese quality circle concept of consensus and group management has been conducted for the past 2 years at the Ogontz Campus of Pennsylvania State University. Quality circles composed of the teacher and eight student volunteers meet weekly for 45 minutes, with each member informing three other…

  4. Managing Disaster Recovery Centers on Campus: The Experience of Southeastern Louisiana University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Heather; Shafer, Duane

    2007-01-01

    When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in August 2005, Southeastern Louisiana University was spared the brunt of the storm and was fortunate that most structures on campus remained intact. However, the storm still affected the campus for weeks. This article reflects on the experiences of university leaders and facility managers as they provided…

  5. Perceptions and Lived Experiences of Illinois Parents as Teachers Program Leaders While Managing a Multigenerational Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhe Marsh, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative narrative inquiry was to explore the perceptions and lived experiences of Illinois Parents as Teachers (PAT) program leaders managing a multigenerational workforce. Supervisors state that leading a multigenerational staff possesses challenges that affect overall productivity (Bell, 2008). PAT stakeholders including…

  6. Practice and Experience of Task Management of University Students: Case of University of Tsukuba, Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuzawa, Ryoko; Joho, Hideo; Maeshiro, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey that investigated the practice and experience of task management of university students. A total of 202 tasks identified by 24 university students were analyzed. The results suggest that participants had a reasonable sense of priority of tasks, that they tend to perceive a task as a big chunk, not a…

  7. Effect of Leadership Experience on Agricultural Education Student Teacher Self-Efficacy in Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kattlyn J.; Foster, Daniel D.; Birkenholz, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning agriculture teachers often cite classroom management as the most important problem they face in their careers. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of leadership experience on self-perceived teacher efficacy among agricultural education student teachers. The three dimensions of teacher efficacy addressed in this study…

  8. Using the Experience Sampling Method in the Context of Contingency Management for Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husky, Mathilde M.; Mazure, Carolyn M.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Barry, Danielle; Petry, Nancy M.

    2008-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) treatments have been shown to be effective in reducing substance use. This manuscript illustrates how the experience sampling method (ESM) can depict behavior and behavior change and can be used to explore CM treatment mechanisms. ESM characterizes idiosyncratic patterns of behavior and offers the potential to determine…

  9. Voices of Experience: Understanding and Enhancing Successful Conflict Management by Community College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanjani, Mellissia M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to enhance understanding of successful conflict management by community college Presidents through highlighting and describing conflict experiences with the faculty union or the board of trustees in a community college context. The following questions guided the research: (a) How do community college…

  10. Work Experiences, Occupational Commitment, and Intent to Enter the Sport Management Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, George B.; Sagas, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Building from Mever, Allen, & Smith's (1993) work in organizational psychology, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among work experiences, affective occupational commitment, and intent to enter the sport management profession among college seniors completing their internship requirements. Results indicate that intent to…

  11. A Guide for Student Change Agents: Incorporating Social Impact Management into the MBA Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scully, Maureen A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide students with tools for incorporating social impact management into their business school environments. Providing ideas, resources, and "how to" steps for shaping the business school experience, this guide helps students collaborate with faculty and administrators to meet particular objectives. The body of…

  12. An Academic Medical Center's Experience with Mandatory Managed Care for Medicaid Recipients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Alan L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on experiences and concerns of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania as a participating primary care site in a Medicaid managed care program (HealthPASS). Discussed are the modification of existing activities to meet increased care demands and administrative demands, and characteristics of HealthPASS that have impeded…

  13. Budgetary Expertise and Experience: A Significant Link to Effective Management and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogges, Ralph

    The importance of expertise and experience in university budgetary management is discussed. A short survey of higher education institutions indicated that program administrations were not knowledgeable about budgetary processes and procedures and were not interested in developing such expertise. It is suggested that there is a need for…

  14. Structured storage in ATLAS Distributed Data Management: use cases and experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassnig, Mario; Garonne, Vincent; Molfetas, Angelos; Beermann, Thomas; Dimitrov, Gancho; Canali, Luca; Zang, Donal; Azzurra Chinzer, Lisa

    2012-12-01

    The distributed data management system of the high-energy physics experiment ATLAS has a critical dependency on the Oracle Relational Database Management System. Recently however, the increased appearance of data warehouselike workload in the experiment has put considerable and increasing strain on the Oracle database. In particular, the analysis of archived data, and the aggregation of data for summary purposes has been especially demanding. For this reason, structured storage systems were evaluated to offload the Oracle database, and to handle processing of data in a non-transactional way. This includes distributed file systems like HDFS that support parallel execution of computational tasks on distributed data, as well as non-relational databases like HBase, Cassandra, or MongoDB. In this paper, the most important analysis and aggregation use cases of the data management system are presented, and how structured storage systems were established to process them.

  15. Genitourinary Medicine trainees' experience and training needs in the management of patients disclosing sexual violence.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Rachel; Emerson, Carol

    2014-04-01

    The British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) Sexual Violence group assessed the level of confidence of Genitourinary Medicine (GUM) trainees in managing patients disclosing sexual violence using an online survey. Twenty-eight percent of current UK GUM trainees responded. The results demonstrated wide variation in trainees' experience and confidence in managing these patients, which was dependent on the patient type, as well as the gender of the trainee and the number of years' experience the trainee had in the specialty. There were also differences in the reported availability of training in this specialist area. Regular accessible training in identification and management of patients disclosing sexual violence is recommended for GUM trainees. PMID:24100285

  16. Inspiring change: humanities and social science insights into the experience and management of breathlessness

    PubMed Central

    Oxley, Rebecca; Macnaughton, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Breathlessness can be debilitating for those with chronic conditions, requiring continual management. Yet, the meaning of breathlessness for those who live with it is poorly understood in respect of its subjective, cultural, and experiential significance. This article discusses a number of current issues in understanding the experience of breathlessness. Recent findings Effective communication concerning the experience of breathlessness is crucial for diagnosis, to identify appropriate treatment, and to provide patients with the capacity to self-manage their condition. However, there is an evident disconnect between the way breathlessness is understood between clinical and lay perspectives, in terms of awareness of breathlessness, the way symptoms are expressed, and acknowledgement of how it affects the daily lives of patients. Summary The review highlights the need for integrated multidisciplinary work on breathlessness, and suggests that effective understanding and management of breathlessness considers its wider subjective and social significance. PMID:27490147

  17. Mogens Jansen: An Interview with a Danish Reading Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engberg, Eva

    1985-01-01

    The president of the Danish Association of Reading Teachers discusses the positive effects of international cooperation on reading education, the influence of society's demands on curriculum, and the instinctive features and benefits of Danish Reading instruction. (FL)

  18. The Danish Collaborative Bacteraemia Network (DACOBAN) database

    PubMed Central

    Gradel, Kim Oren; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Arpi, Magnus; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Østergaard, Christian; Søgaard, Mette

    2014-01-01

    The Danish Collaborative Bacteraemia Network (DACOBAN) research database includes microbiological data obtained from positive blood cultures from a geographically and demographically well-defined population serviced by three clinical microbiology departments (1.7 million residents, 32% of the Danish population). The database also includes data on comorbidity from the Danish National Patient Registry, vital status from the Danish Civil Registration System, and clinical data on 31% of nonselected records in the database. Use of the unique civil registration number given to all Danish residents enables linkage to additional registries for specific research projects. The DACOBAN database is continuously updated, and it currently comprises 39,292 patients with 49,951 bacteremic episodes from 2000 through 2011. The database is part of an international network of population-based bacteremia registries from five developed countries on three continents. The main purpose of the DACOBAN database is to study surveillance, risk, and prognosis. Sex- and age-specific data on background populations enables the computation of incidence rates. In addition, the high number of patients facilitates studies of rare microorganisms. Thus far, studies on Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, computer algorithms for the classification of bacteremic episodes, and prognosis and risk in relation to socioeconomic factors have been published. PMID:25258557

  19. Women's experiences of three early miscarriage management options a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lindsay F; Frost, Julia; Levitas, Ruth; Bradley, Harriet; Garcia, Jo

    2006-01-01

    Background Miscarriage affects around one in six pregnancies. Much research has taken place identifying the consequences of this for parents but is mainly quantitative. Of the limited qualitative studies, none have explored women's experiences of the methods of miscarriage management received. Aim To assess the social and personal impact of different management methods (expectant, medical and surgical) on women's experience of first trimester miscarriage. Design of study Qualitative interviews using a topic guide with a purposive cohort of four categories of women (each management method plus non-participants) 6 months to 1 year after first trimester miscarriage. Focus groups with both research participants and health workers. Setting Women from three hospitals in the South West of England that participated in the Miscarriage Treatment (MIST) trial. Method Seventy-two interviews were undertaken between September 1999 and June 2000. There were also five focus groups (47 participants) and two feedback sessions (8 participants) with written feedback from 12 women. Interviews lasted 0.5–2.5 hours generating over 2000 A4 pages of transcripts. The transcripts were analysed for common themes, using standard proformas, which were filled in by individual team members and then discussed by the whole research team. Iterative readings in the light of new emerging issues ensured that new themes could be identified throughout the analytical process. All transcripts were then encoded for the identified themes using NUDIST. Results Common themes emerged across all management options although some were specific to just one or two management options. The five major themes arising out of the data analysis were: intervention; experiences of care; finality; the ‘baby’; and pain and bleeding. Conclusions Women's experiences and beliefs vary widely and their preferences need to be considered in their early miscarriage management. The three methods have different benefits and

  20. The R3/R5 impoundment study: a large-scale management experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, J.E.; Laskowski, H.P.; Runge, M.C.; Lor, S.; Kendall, W.L.; Talbott, S.

    2005-01-01

    Managed wetlands provide a broad spectrum of resources to migratory waterbirds (shorebirds, wading birds, and waterfowl) throughout the annual cycle. Successful conservation and management of waterbirds depends on integrated approaches that (1) incorporate larger spatial and temporal scales than traditional approaches to wetland management, and (2) use experimental designs to reduce uncertainty about the response of the systems to management. In a previous experiment on USFWS National Wildlife Refuges in the Northeast, we explored the effects of water-level management on migratory shorebirds in spring. We documented regional patterns of shorebird use of Refuge wetlands and showed that across the region, a slow drawdown was superior to 2 alternatives. USGS and USFWS have now cooperatively undertaken an expanded study focusing on 3 waterbird guilds in the context of the complete annual cycle and over a larger spatial extent. For this 3-yr study, now in its first year, 2 impoundments were selected at each of 23 NWRs across the Northeast and Upper Midwest Regions. Two experimental treatments (annual water regimes focused on early-season or late-season drawdowns) are being applied each year in a cross-over design. This experimental design will increase our understanding of cross-seasonal interactions which result from specific hydrologic regimes aimed at a particular waterbird guild. Monitoring will allow waterbird responses to be linked with direct effects of water management on plant and invertebrate populations. Results of this large-scale experiment will be used to motivate formal adaptive management of wetlands and waterbirds at refuges following completion of this experiment.

  1. Community energy auditing: experience with the comprehensive community energy management program

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.L.; Berger, D.A.; Rubin, C.B.; Hutchinson, P.A. Sr.; Griggs, H.M.

    1980-09-01

    The report provides local officials and staff with information on lessons from the audit, projection, and general planning experiences of the Comprehensive Community Energy Management Program (CCEMP) communities and provides ANL and US DOE with information useful to the further development of local energy management planning methods. In keeping with the objectives, the report is organized into the following sections: Section II presents the evaluation issues and key findings based on the communities' experiences from Spring of 1979 to approximately March of 1980; Section III gives an organized review of experience of communities in applying the detailed audit methodology for estimating current community energy consumption and projecting future consumption and supply; Section IV provides a preliminary assessment of how audit information is being used in other CCEMP tasks; Section V presents an organized review of preliminary lessons from development of the community planning processes; and Section VI provides preliminary conclusions on the audit and planning methodology. (MCW)

  2. Development of an online nursing management course: successful experience between Brazil and Portugal.

    PubMed

    Tronchin, Daisy Maria Rizatto; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Lima, Antônio Fernandes Costa; Alavarce, Débora Cristina; Prata, Ana Paula; Santos, Margarida Reis; Aroldi, Juscilynne Barros da Costa

    2015-12-01

    Objective To describe the experience of planning and developing online refresher courses in nursing management for nurses in the contexts of Brazil and Portugal. Method The instructional design was based on meaningful learning theory, andragogy, and dialectical methodology, so it valued interaction between the actors, emphasizing the scenarios of practice and applying the concepts covered. The course structure is divided into nine theoretical units, four case studies, and an essay exam. Results The course was positively evaluated by the participants, who reported opportunities for acquisition of new knowledge, interaction and exchange of experiences, motivation to study the topics, and self-learning. Conclusion It is expected that description of this experience will stimulate proposals for new courses and programs in distance education modalities, improving the processes of teaching and learning so as to give support to future analyses of their impact on the development and enhancement of management skills in nursing. PMID:26959169

  3. AMPS data management concepts. [Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasma in Space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzelaar, P. N.

    1975-01-01

    Five typical AMPS experiments were formulated to allow simulation studies to verify data management concepts. Design studies were conducted to analyze these experiments in terms of the applicable procedures, data processing and displaying functions. Design concepts for AMPS data management system are presented which permit both automatic repetitive measurement sequences and experimenter-controlled step-by-step procedures. Extensive use is made of a cathode ray tube display, the experimenters' alphanumeric keyboard, and the computer. The types of computer software required by the system and the possible choices of control and display procedures available to the experimenter are described for several examples. An electromagnetic wave transmission experiment illustrates the methods used to analyze data processing requirements.

  4. Relational experiences of power and gender for nurse-managers of private hospitals.

    PubMed

    Brito, Maria José Menezes; Montenegro, Lívia Cozer; Alves, Marília

    2010-01-01

    Influenced by increased technology and globalization, Brazilian hospitals are undergoing significant changes. The managerial models focused on the male model are being slowly and gradually replaced, with an expressive participation of female nurses in management positions. Thus, we aimed to uncover some aspects of the relational experiences of power and gender of nine female nurse-managers working in four large and medium-sized private hospitals in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, through a qualitative case study. The results show that management discourses value a managerial style focused on the organizations' humanized aspects, where authoritative styles have no space. In this scenario, the work of female nurse-managers strengthens teamwork, which improves their image and contributes to forming their identity. PMID:21120415

  5. The Danish Communicative Developmental Inventories: Validity and Main Developmental Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleses, Dorthe; Vach, Werner; Slott, Malene; Wehberg, Sonja; Thomsen, Pia; Madsen, Thomas O.; Basboll, Hans

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a large-scale cross-sectional study of Danish children's early language acquisition based on the Danish adaptation of the "MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories" (CDI). Measures of validity and reliability imply that the Danish adaptation of the American CDI has been adjusted linguistically and culturally in…

  6. Managing for Desired Experiences and Site Preferences: The Case of Fee-Fishing Anglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuett, Michael A.; Pierskalla, Chad D.

    2007-02-01

    Fee-fishing involves paying a fee for the privilege of fishing a body of water where fish populations are enhanced by stocking fish. Past literature on this activity has focused more on the operation of the enterprise and management of the fish than the people and site characteristics. The objectives of the study were to profile anglers and describe their site/management preferences. This study utilized an on-site interview and mail-back questionnaire at fee-fishing establishments in West Virginia ( n = 212). Factor analysis of desired recreation experiences yielded five factors: Experience nature & adventure, Stress release & relaxation, Trophy fishing, Escape, and Family time. Cluster analysis showed that these anglers can be segmented into two distinct clusters, differing by sociodemographic characteristics, fishing behavior, and site/management preferences. The findings from this study provide baseline data to aid public resource managers and fee-fishing business owners in determining how to provide satisfying outdoor experiences and deliver desired services on-site. Future research will be needed from additional fee-fishing sites to obtain more detail about this outdoor recreation cohort and be able to generalize to a larger population of participants.

  7. Using choice experiments to understand household tradeoffs regarding pineapple production and environmental management in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Robert B; Kellon, Delanie; Leon, Ramon G; Arvai, Joseph

    2013-09-30

    Choices among environmental management alternatives involve tradeoffs where, for example, the benefits of environmental protection may be offset by economic costs or welfare losses to individual agents. Understanding individual or household-level preferences regarding these tradeoffs is not always straightforward, and it often requires an analysis of choices under alternative scenarios. A household survey was used to gather data for a choice experiment, where respondents were asked to choose among pairs of alternative management scenarios about pineapple production in Costa Rica. The experimental design consisted of six attributes that varied on between two and five attribute levels, and the experiment and accompanying survey were administered orally in Spanish. The results show that respondents are willing to make tradeoffs with respect to the management attributes in order to see an overall improvement in environmental quality. Respondents were willing to accept a moderate level of pesticide application, presumably in exchange for paying a lower cost or seeing a gain in another area, such as monitoring or soil conservation. Buffer zones were significant only in the case of large farms. The results have implications for policy decisions that aim to reflect public attitudes, particularly the aspects of pineapple production that matter most to people living near pineapple plantations. The study also highlights the effectiveness of the choice experiment approach in examining household preferences about environmental management in a rural development context. PMID:23807434

  8. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    SciTech Connect

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies.

  9. MicroGen: a MIAME compliant web system for microarray experiment information and workflow management

    PubMed Central

    Burgarella, Sarah; Cattaneo, Dario; Pinciroli, Francesco; Masseroli, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Background Improvements of bio-nano-technologies and biomolecular techniques have led to increasing production of high-throughput experimental data. Spotted cDNA microarray is one of the most diffuse technologies, used in single research laboratories and in biotechnology service facilities. Although they are routinely performed, spotted microarray experiments are complex procedures entailing several experimental steps and actors with different technical skills and roles. During an experiment, involved actors, who can also be located in a distance, need to access and share specific experiment information according to their roles. Furthermore, complete information describing all experimental steps must be orderly collected to allow subsequent correct interpretation of experimental results. Results We developed MicroGen, a web system for managing information and workflow in the production pipeline of spotted microarray experiments. It is constituted of a core multi-database system able to store all data completely characterizing different spotted microarray experiments according to the Minimum Information About Microarray Experiments (MIAME) standard, and of an intuitive and user-friendly web interface able to support the collaborative work required among multidisciplinary actors and roles involved in spotted microarray experiment production. MicroGen supports six types of user roles: the researcher who designs and requests the experiment, the spotting operator, the hybridisation operator, the image processing operator, the system administrator, and the generic public user who can access the unrestricted part of the system to get information about MicroGen services. Conclusion MicroGen represents a MIAME compliant information system that enables managing workflow and supporting collaborative work in spotted microarray experiment production. PMID:16351755

  10. Women’s Management of Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis and Experiences of Clinical Care: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bilardi, Jade; Walker, Sandra; McNair, Ruth; Mooney-Somers, Julie; Temple-Smith, Meredith; Bellhouse, Clare; Fairley, Christopher; Chen, Marcus; Bradshaw, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    Background Few data are available on how women manage recurring bacterial vaginosis (BV) and their experiences of the clinical care of this condition. This study aimed to explore women’s recurrent BV management approaches and clinical care experiences, with a view to informing and improving the clinical management of BV. Methods A descriptive, social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study. Thirty-five women of varying sexual orientation who had experienced recurrent BV in the past 5 years took part in semi-structured interviews. Results The majority of women reported frustration and dissatisfaction with current treatment regimens and low levels of satisfaction with the clinical management of BV. Overall, women disliked taking antibiotics regularly, commonly experienced adverse side effects from treatment and felt frustrated at having symptoms recur quite quickly after treatment. Issues in clinical care included inconsistency in advice, misdiagnosis and inappropriate diagnostic approaches and insensitive or dismissive attitudes. Women were more inclined to report positive clinical experiences with sexual health physicians than primary care providers. Women’s frustrations led most to try their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications in an attempt to treat symptoms and prevent recurrences, including well-known risk practices such as douching. Conclusion In the face of considerable uncertainty about the cause of BV, high rates of recurrence, unacceptable treatment options and often insensitive and inconsistent clinical management, women are trying their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications to prevent recurrences, often with little effect. Clinical management of BV could be improved through the use of standardised diagnostic approaches, increased sensitivity and understanding of the impact of BV, and the provision of evidence based advice about known BV related risk factors. PMID:27010725

  11. The Real Time Mission Monitor: A Situational Awareness Tool For Managing Experiment Assets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard; Hall, John; Goodman, Michael; Parker, Philip; Freudinger, Larry; He, Matt

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Real Time Mission Monitor (RTMM) is a situational awareness tool that integrates satellite, airborne and surface data sets; weather information; model and forecast outputs; and vehicle state data (e.g., aircraft navigation, satellite tracks and instrument field-of-views) for field experiment management RTMM optimizes science and logistic decision-making during field experiments by presenting timely data and graphics to the users to improve real time situational awareness of the experiment's assets. The RTMM is proven in the field as it supported program managers, scientists, and aircraft personnel during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses experiment during summer 2006 in Cape Verde, Africa. The integration and delivery of this information is made possible through data acquisition systems, network communication links and network server resources built and managed by collaborators at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). RTMM is evolving towards a more flexible and dynamic combination of sensor ingest, network computing, and decision-making activities through the use of a service oriented architecture based on community standards and protocols.

  12. An expert system to advise astronauts during experiments: The protocol manager module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymann-Haber, Guido; Colombano, Silvano P.; Groleau, Nicolas; Rosenthal, Don; Szolovits, Peter; Young, Laurence R.

    1990-01-01

    Perhaps the scarcest resource for manned flight experiments - on Spacelab or on the Space Station Freedom - will continue to be crew time. To maximize the efficiency of the crew and to make use of their abilities to work as scientist collaborators as well as equipment operators, normally requires more training in a wide variety of disciplines than is practical. The successful application of on-board expert systems, as envisioned by the Principal Investigator in a Box program, should alleviate the training bottleneck and provide the astronaut with the guidance and coaching needed to permit him or her to operate an experiment according to the desires and knowledge of the PI, despite changes in conditions. The Protocol Manager module of the system is discussed. The Protocol Manager receives experiment data that has been summarized and categorized by the other modules. The Protocol Manager acts on the data in real-time, by employing expert system techniques. Its recommendations are based on heuristics provided by the Principal Investigator in charge of the experiment. This prototype was developed on a Macintosh II by employing CLIPS, a forward-chaining rule-based system, and HyperCard as an object-oriented user interface builder.

  13. Integrating theory into disturbance interaction experiments to better inform ecosystem management.

    PubMed

    Foster, Claire N; Sato, Chloe F; Lindenmayer, David B; Barton, Philip S

    2016-04-01

    Managing multiple, interacting disturbances is a key challenge to biodiversity conservation, and one that will only increase as global change drivers continue to alter disturbance regimes. Theoretical studies have highlighted the importance of a mechanistic understanding of stressor interactions for improving the prediction and management of interactive effects. However, many conservation studies are not designed or interpreted in the context of theory and instead focus on case-specific management questions. This is a problem as it means that few studies test the relationships highlighted in theoretical models as being important for ecological management. We explore the extent of this problem among studies of interacting disturbances by reviewing recent experimental studies of the interaction between fire and grazing in terrestrial ecosystems. Interactions between fire and grazing can occur via a number of pathways; one disturbance can modify the other's likelihood, intensity or spatial distribution, or one disturbance can alter the other's impacts on individual organisms. The strength of such interactions will vary depending on disturbance attributes (e.g. size or intensity), and this variation is likely to be nonlinear. We show that few experiments testing fire-grazing interactions are able to identify the mechanistic pathway driving an observed interaction, and most are unable to detect nonlinear effects. We demonstrate how these limitations compromise the ability of experimental studies to effectively inform ecological management. We propose a series of adjustments to the design of disturbance interaction experiments that would enable tests of key theoretical pathways and provide the deeper ecological understanding necessary for effective management. Such considerations are relevant to studies of a broad range of ecological interactions and are critical to informing the management of disturbance regimes in the context of accelerating global change. PMID

  14. Self-management experiences among men and women with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to better understand differences in diabetes self-management, specifically needs, barriers and challenges among men and women living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods 35 participants were recruited from a diabetes education center (DEC) in Toronto, Canada. Five focus groups and nine individual interviews were conducted to explore men and women's diabetes self-management experiences. Results The average age of participants was 57 years and just over half (51.4%) were female. Analyses revealed five themes: disclosure and identity as a person living with diabetes; self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG); diet struggles across varying contexts; utilization of diabetes resources; and social support. Women disclosed their diabetes more readily and integrated management into their daily lives, whereas men were more reluctant to tell friends and family about their diabetes and were less observant of self-management practices in social settings. Men focused on practical aspects of SMBG and experimented with various aspects of management to reduce reliance on medications whereas women focused on affective components of SMBG. Women restricted foods from their diets perceived as prohibited whereas many men moderated their intake of perceived unhealthy foods, except in social situations. Women used socially interactive resources, like education classes and support groups whereas men relied more on self-directed learning but also described wanting more guidance to help navigate the healthcare system. Finally, men and women reported wanting physician support for both affective and practical aspects of self-management. Conclusions Our findings highlight the differences in needs and challenges of diabetes self-management among men and women, which may inform gender-sensitive diabetes, care, counseling and support. PMID:23249410

  15. Engineering and management experience at Texas A&M Transportation Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Arif Tahjibul

    This manuscript presents the author's engineering and management experience during his internship in the Materials and Pavements (M&P) Division at the Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI), and is a record of study for the Doctor of Engineering at Texas A&M University. Through this internship, he met his established internship objectives of gaining technical knowledge as well as knowledge and skills in project management, organizational communication, and quality management of pavement condition data, and of attaining professional development. In meeting these objectives, the author describes the history, mission, and organizational structure of his workplace. He also presents his experience of developing and delivering a two-week training course on pavement design and construction in Kosovo. Participating in a number of professional development training courses and other activities prepared him for working as an engineering manager. These activities include Delta-T leadership training, an instructor development course, a time management and organizational skills course, and the M&P Division lecture series. Leadership and skills learned through the Delta-T program were beneficial for the employee as well as the employer. For the class project, the author and his teammates performed a study dealing with improving TTI's deliverables. The Delta-T team composed a report summarizing their efforts of examining the current state of TTI's project deliverables, the deliverables' shortcomings, and potential enhancements to expand the deliverables' appeal to additional types of potential users outside the traditional research community. The team also developed a prototype web-based model of deliverables and presented some implementation recommendations. Participating in the Texas Department of Transportation's (TxDOT's) pavement surface distress data collection program enabled the author to become familiar with pavement distress data quality management and thus attain the

  16. Management of Overweight during Childhood: A Focus Group Study on Health Professionals' Experiences in General Practice

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Lone Marie; Ledderer, Loni; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2015-01-01

    Background. Because of the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity in childhood in the Western world, focus on the management in general practice has also increased. Objective. To explore the experiences of general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing two management programmes in general practice for children who are overweight or obese. Methods. Three focus groups with GPs and nurses participating in the RCT. Transcribed data were analysed using systematic text condensation followed by thematic analysis. Results. Health professionals considered it their responsibility to offer a management programme to overweight children. They recognised that management of overweight during childhood was a complex task that required an evidence-based strategy with the possibility of supervision. Health professionals experienced a barrier to addressing overweight in children. However, increasing awareness of obesity in childhood and its consequences in society was considered helpful to reach an understanding of the articulations concerning how best to address the issue. Conclusions. Health professionals in general practice recognised that they have a special obligation, capacity, and role in the management of obesity in childhood. Implementation of future management programmes must address existing barriers beyond an evidence-based standardised strategy. PMID:26236505

  17. The Zero Boil-Off Tank Experiment Contributions to the Development of Cryogenic Fluid Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The Zero Boil-Off Technology (ZBOT) Experiment involves performing a small scale ISS experiment to study tank pressurization and pressure control in microgravity. The ZBOT experiment consists of a vacuum jacketed test tank filled with an inert fluorocarbon simulant liquid. Heaters and thermo-electric coolers are used in conjunction with an axial jet mixer flow loop to study a range of thermal conditions within the tank. The objective is to provide a high quality database of low gravity fluid motions and thermal transients which will be used to validate Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) modeling. This CFD can then be used in turn to predict behavior in larger systems with cryogens. This paper will discuss the current status of the ZBOT experiment as it approaches its flight to installation on the International Space Station, how its findings can be scaled to larger and more ambitious cryogenic fluid management experiments, as well as ideas for follow-on investigations using ZBOT like hardware to study other aspects of cryogenic fluid management.

  18. The NASA Integrated Vehicle Health Management Technology Experiment for X-37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabacher, Mark; Samuels, Jeff; Brownston, Lee; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Technology Experiment for X-37 was intended to run IVHM software on-board the X-37 spacecraft. The X-37 is intended to be an unpiloted vehicle that would orbit the Earth for up to 21 days before landing on a runway. The objectives of the experiment were to demonstrate the benefits of in-flight IVHM to the operation of a Reusable Launch Vehicle, to advance the Technology Readiness Level of this IVHM technology within a flight environment, and to demonstrate that the IVHM software could operate on the Vehicle Management Computer. The scope of the experiment was to perform real-time fault detection and isolation for X-37's electrical power system and electro-mechanical actuators. The experiment used Livingstone, a software system that performs diagnosis using a qualitative, model-based reasoning approach that searches system-wide interactions to detect and isolate failures. Two of the challenges we faced were to make this research software more efficient so that it would fit within the limited computational resources that were available to us on the X-37 spacecraft, and to modify it so that it satisfied the X-37's software safety requirements. Although the experiment is currently unfunded, the development effort had value in that it resulted in major improvements in Livingstone's efficiency and safety. This paper reviews some of the details of the modeling and integration efforts, and some of the lessons that were learned.

  19. Environmental agreements, EIA follow-up and aboriginal participation in environmental management: The Canadian experience

    SciTech Connect

    O'Faircheallaigh, Ciaran . E-mail: Ciaran.Ofaircheallaigh@griffith.edu.au

    2007-05-15

    During the last decade a number of environmental agreements (EAs) have been negotiated in Canada involving industry, government and Aboriginal peoples. This article draws on the Canadian experience to consider the potential of such negotiated agreements to address two issues widely recognised in academic and policy debates on environmental impact assessment (EIA) and environmental management. The first relates to the need to secure indigenous participation in environmental management of major projects that affect indigenous peoples. The second and broader issue involves the necessity for specific initiatives to ensure effective follow-up of EIA. The Canadian experience indicates that negotiated environmental agreements have considerable potential to address both issues. However, if this potential is to be realized, greater effort must be made to develop structures and processes specifically designed to encourage Aboriginal participation; and EAs must themselves provide the financial and other resource required to support EIA follow-up and Aboriginal participation.

  20. Are large-scale flow experiments informing the science and management of freshwater ecosystems?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olden, Julian D.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Melis, Theodore S.; Kennard, Mark J.; Freeman, Mary C.; Mims, Meryl C.; Bray, Erin N.; Gido, Keith B.; Hemphill, Nina P.; Lytle, David A.; McMullen, Laura E.; Pyron, Mark; Robinson, Christopher T.; Schmidt, John C.; Williams, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Greater scientific knowledge, changing societal values, and legislative mandates have emphasized the importance of implementing large-scale flow experiments (FEs) downstream of dams. We provide the first global assessment of FEs to evaluate their success in advancing science and informing management decisions. Systematic review of 113 FEs across 20 countries revealed that clear articulation of experimental objectives, while not universally practiced, was crucial for achieving management outcomes and changing dam-operating policies. Furthermore, changes to dam operations were three times less likely when FEs were conducted primarily for scientific purposes. Despite the recognized importance of riverine flow regimes, four-fifths of FEs involved only discrete flow events. Over three-quarters of FEs documented both abiotic and biotic outcomes, but only one-third examined multiple taxonomic responses, thus limiting how FE results can inform holistic dam management. Future FEs will present new opportunities to advance scientifically credible water policies.

  1. Managing Hardware Configurations and Data Products for the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincks, A. D.; Shaw, J. R.; Chime Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is an ambitious new radio telescope project for measuring cosmic expansion and investigating dark energy. Keeping good records of both physical configuration of its 1280 antennas and their analogue signal chains as well as the ˜100 TB of data produced daily from its correlator will be essential to the success of CHIME. In these proceedings we describe the database-driven software we have developed to manage this complexity.

  2. Conceptual requirements for large fusion experiment control, data, robotics, and management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Sullivan, J.D.

    1987-08-01

    The conceptual system requirements for the control, data, robotics, and project management (CDRM) system for the next generation of fusion experiments are developed by drawing on the success of the Tara control and data system. The requirements are described in terms of an integrated but separable matrix of well-defined interfaces among the various systems and subsystems. The study stresses modularity, performance, cost effectiveness, and exportability.

  3. Conceptual requirements for large fusion experiment control, data, robotics, and management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Sullivan, J.D.

    1987-05-01

    The conceptual system requirements for the control, data, robotics, and project management (CDRM) system for the next generation of fusion experiments are developed by drawing on the success of the Tara control and data system. The requirements are described in terms of an integrated but separable matrix of well-defined interfaces among the various systems and subsystems. The study stresses modularity, performance, cost effectiveness, and exportability.

  4. A modeling and experiment framework for the emergency management in AHC transmission.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Ge, Yuanzheng; Zhang, Laobing; Zhang, Yongzheng; Zhong, Ziming; Liu, Xiaocheng

    2014-01-01

    Emergency management is crucial to finding effective ways to minimize or even eliminate the damage of emergent events, but there still exists no quantified method to study the events by computation. Statistical algorithms, such as susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) models on epidemic transmission, ignore many details, thus always influencing the spread of emergent events. In this paper, we first propose an agent-based modeling and experiment framework to model the real world with the emergent events. The model of the real world is called artificial society, which is composed of agent model, agent activity model, and environment model, and it employs finite state automata (FSA) as its modeling paradigm. An artificial campus, on which a series of experiments are done to analyze the key factors of the acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) transmission, is then constructed to illustrate how our method works on the emergency management. Intervention measures and optional configurations (such as the isolation period) of them for the emergency management are also given through the evaluations in these experiments. PMID:24693330

  5. The Danish Free School Tradition under Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Tore Vincents

    2015-01-01

    The Danish free school tradition has entailed a large degree of associational freedom for non-governmental schools, religious as well as non-religious. Until the late 1990s, the non-governmental schools were under no strict ideological or pedagogical limitations; they could recruit teachers and students according to their own value base, and were…

  6. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, T.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark. Are the Danish groundwater monitoring strategy obtimal for detection of nitrate trends? Will the nitrate concentrations in Danish groundwater continue to decrease or are the Danish nitrate concentration levels now appropriate according to the Water Framework Directive?

  7. Escherichia vulneris in a Danish soccer wound.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, C F; Klebe, T M; Prag, J

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia vulneris was isolated from an infected soccer wound, a finding which has not apparently been described in Europe before, but by questioning Danish clinical microbiological laboratories a further 12 cases were discovered. Treatment with simple debridement and cefuroxime quickly eradicated the bacteria in our case. PMID:9255899

  8. Care and Education in the Danish Creche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brostrom, Stig; Hansen, Ole Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This article seeks to identify the relation between policy and lived life, for the small child in the Danish creche. To accomplish this, the article integrates demography, traditions, national curriculum and psychological, educational, and recent developments in research. It is an attempt to reveal knowledge and consequences, by conducting the…

  9. What Is the Essence of Spiritual Care? A Danish Hospice Perspective.

    PubMed

    Steenfeldt, Vibeke Ostergaard

    2016-01-01

    This study explored patients', relatives', and healthcare professionals' experience of life and caring practice in two Danish hospice settings. Using a phenomenological approach, four caring themes emerged from data analysis: recognized as an individual human being; caring as doing and being; caring for the whole body; and spaces of caring. Spiritual care was understood as providing whole-body experiences, respecting the patient, and involving the other person. PMID:27299946

  10. Propellant Management in Microgravity- Further Analysis of an Experiment Flown on REXUS-14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobino, D.; Zumbrunen, E.; Putzu, R.; Pontelandolfo, P.

    2015-09-01

    This paper is about the further analysis of an experiment named CAESAR (stands for Capillarity-based Experiment for Spatial Advanced Research): a sounding rocket experiment carried out by students of hepia within the REXUS program. The authors have launched on REXUS-14 a propellant management experiment based on capillarity to reliably confirm other ground-based cxperiments. In the framework of the present work, the authors present the comparison of CAESAR experimental data with theoretical profiles provided in literature. The objective of this flight was to place several Propellant Management Devices (PMD) in a microgravity environment and acquire images of the fluid distribution around them. The main element of the experiment, called a sponge, is a PMD for space vehicles, often used in satellites. This radial panel shaped device can be used at the bottom of a satellite tank to keep the propellant near the outlet. It is designed to work even if the vehicle undergoes small accelerations, for example during station-keeping maneuvers. The fluid is eccentric but stays on the sponge and near the outlet, so the injection system of the motor is continuously supplied with the propellant. As previously published, the authors have created a buoyancy test bench and have designed another system by magnetic levitation to perform the same experiment on earth. These systems are easier to use and less expensive than a sounding rocket, a parabolic flight or a drop tower (i.e. other system to obtain microgravity on earth), so they will be very useful to make progress in this particular domain of science. They will also allow universities with small funds to work within this spatial field. A previous publication showed, from a qualitative point of view, a good agreement between experiments and theory; however in this paper quantitative comparisons are given. With this demonstrated, hepia can validate its buoyancy test facility with real flight tests.