Science.gov

Sample records for management information feedback

  1. Feedback in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spink, Amanda; Losee, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    As Information Retrieval (IR) has evolved, it has become a highly interactive process, rooted in cognitive and situational contexts. Consequently the traditional cybernetic-based IR model does not suffice for interactive IR or the human approach to IR. Reviews different views of feedback in IR and their relationship to cybernetic and social…

  2. A Parallel Relational Database Management System Approach to Relevance Feedback in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundquist, Carol; Frieder, Ophir; Holmes, David O.; Grossman, David

    1999-01-01

    Describes a scalable, parallel, relational database-drive information retrieval engine. To support portability across a wide range of execution environments, all algorithms adhere to the SQL-92 standard. By incorporating relevance feedback algorithms, accuracy is enhanced over prior database-driven information retrieval efforts. Presents…

  3. Information avoidance tendencies, threat management resources, and interest in genetic sequencing feedback

    PubMed Central

    Taber, Jennifer M.; Klein, William M.P.; Ferrer, Rebecca A.; Lewis, Katie L.; Harris, Peter R.; Shepperd, James A.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Information avoidance is a defensive strategy that undermines receipt of potentially beneficial but threatening health information and may especially occur when threat management resources are unavailable. Purpose We examined whether individual differences in information avoidance predicted intentions to receive genetic sequencing results for preventable and unpreventable (i.e., more threatening) disease and, secondarily, whether threat management resources of self-affirmation or optimism mitigated any effects. Methods Participants (N=493) in an NIH study (ClinSeq®) piloting the use of genome sequencing reported intentions to receive (optional) sequencing results and completed individual difference measures of information avoidance, self-affirmation, and optimism. Results Information avoidance tendencies corresponded with lower intentions to learn results, particularly for unpreventable diseases. The association was weaker among individuals higher in self-affirmation or optimism, but only for results regarding preventable diseases. Conclusions Information avoidance tendencies may influence decisions to receive threatening health information; threat management resources hold promise for mitigating this association. PMID:25582989

  4. Soliciting Feedback from Resource Managers to Inform Response to Extreme Event Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedsworth, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    To date, extreme events have been defined by scientists through a top-down approach, relying on observations for current extremes and climate model projections based on future scenarios for their expected changes. These abstract definitions of extreme events are based on a corresponding characterization of what is "normal" and perhaps the choice of a threshold (e.g., a percentile of a historical distribution for a given climate variable), beyond which would represent an extreme event. However, there are not necessarily direct connections between these definitions and what is considered "extreme" in terms of impacts that challenge resource management. Several researchers have suggested that extreme event definitions would also be informed by input from on-the-ground resource managers who are familiar with the systems being impacted, the climate conditions that pose risks to those systems, and their resilience and adaptive capacity. This research will present preliminary survey work designed to solicit input from air and water quality managers in terms of what is considered an extreme event, how these events have been weathered in the past, and planned for in the future. The survey is based on literature review, interviews with air and water quality managers in California, and outreach to the scientific community. This work is the first step of a multistage research effort to link input from resource managers with scientific information to better inform air and water quality management and impacts of extreme events under a changing climate.

  5. Feedback on flood risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, K.; Roumagnac, A.

    2009-09-01

    For several years, as floods were increasing in South of France, local communities felt deprive to assume their mission of protection and information of citizens, and were looking for assistance in flood management. In term of flood disaster, the fact is that physical protection is necessary but inevitably limited. Tools and structures of assistance to anticipation remain slightly developed. To manage repeated crisis, local authorities need to be able to base their policy against flood on prevention, warnings, post-crisis analysis and feedback from former experience. In this objective, after 3 years of test and improvement since 2003, the initiative Predict-Services was developed in South of France: it aims at helping communities and companies to face repeated flood crisis. The principle is to prepare emergency plans, to organize crisis management and reduce risks; to help and assist communities and companies during crisis to activate and adapt their emergency plans with enough of anticipation; and to analyse floods effects and improve emergency plans afterwards. With the help of Meteo France datas and experts, Predict services helps local communities and companies in decision making for flood management. In order to reduce risks, and to keep the benefits of such an initiative, local communities and companies have to maintain the awareness of risk of the citizens and employees. They also have to maintain their safety plans to keep them constantly operational. This is a part of the message relayed. Companies, Local communities, local government authorities and basin stakeholders are the decision makers. Companies and local communities have to involve themselves in the elaboration of safety plans. They are also completely involved in their activation that is their own responsability. This applies to other local government authorities, like districts one's and basin stakeholders, which participle in the financing community safety plans and adminitrative district which

  6. Feedback on flood risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, K.; Roumagnac, A.

    2009-09-01

    For several years, as floods were increasing in South of France, local communities felt deprive to assume their mission of protection and information of citizens, and were looking for assistance in flood management. In term of flood disaster, the fact is that physical protection is necessary but inevitably limited. Tools and structures of assistance to anticipation remain slightly developed. To manage repeated crisis, local authorities need to be able to base their policy against flood on prevention, warnings, post-crisis analysis and feedback from former experience. In this objective, after 3 years of test and improvement since 2003, the initiative Predict-Services was developped in South of France: it aims at helping communities and companies to face repeated flood crisis. The principle is to prepare emergency plans, to organize crisis management and reduce risks; to help and assist communities and companies during crisis to activate and adapt their emergency plans with enough of anticipation; and to analyse floods effects and improve emergency plans afterwards. In order to reduce risks, and to keep the benefits of such an initiative, local communities and companies have to maintain the awareness of risk of the citizens and employees. They also have to maintain their safety plans to keep them constantly operational. This is a part of the message relayed. Companies, Local communities, local government authorities and basin stakeholders are the decision makers. Companies and local communities have to involve themselves in the elaboration of safety plans. They are also completely involved in their activation that is their own responsability. This applies to other local government authorities, like districts one's and basin stakeholders, which participle in the financing community safety plans and adminitrative district which are responsible of the transmission of meteorological alert and of rescue actions. In the crossing of the géo-information stemming from the

  7. Information management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Wendell; Corker, Kevin

    1990-01-01

    Primary Flight Display (PFD) information management and cockpit display of information management research is presented in viewgraph form. The information management problem in the cockpit, information management burdens, the key characteristics of an information manager, the interface management system handling the flow of information and the dialogs between the system and the pilot, and overall system architecture are covered.

  8. Advanced Feedback Methods in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salton, G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    In this study, automatic feedback techniques are applied to Boolean query statements in online information retrieval to generate improved query statements based on information contained in previously retrieved documents. Feedback operations are carried out using conventional Boolean logic and extended logic. Experimental output is included to…

  9. Measurement-feedback formalism meets information reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Naoto; Matsumoto, Takumi; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    There have been two distinct formalisms of thermodynamics of information: one is the measurement-feedback formalism, which concerns bipartite systems with measurement and feedback processes, and the other is the information reservoir formalism, which considers bit sequences as a thermodynamic fuel. In this paper, we derive a second-law-like inequality by applying the measurement-feedback formalism to information reservoirs, which provides a stronger bound of extractable work than any other known inequality in the same setup. In addition, we demonstrate that the Mandal-Jarzynski model, which is a prominent model of the information reservoir formalism, is equivalent to a model obtained by the contraction of a bipartite system with autonomous measurement and feedback. Our results provide a unified view on the measurement-feedback and the information-reservoir formalisms.

  10. Quality Management and Information Brokerage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Halm, Johan

    1995-01-01

    To compete effectively, information brokers need to adopt management and marketing tools; Total Quality Management can upgrade an organization's performance by using customer feedback of its services. SERVQUAL identifies gaps in service by assessing quality expectations versus quality experiences. (AEF)

  11. Effects of feedback of information on clinical practice: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Mugford, M; Banfield, P; O'Hanlon, M

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish what is known about the role of feedback of statistical information in changing clinical practice. DESIGN--Review of 36 studies of interventions entailing the use of statistical information for audit or practice review, which used a formal research design. SUBJECTS--Papers identified from computer searches of medical and health service management publications, of which 36 describing studies of interventions designed to influence clinical care and including information feedback from clinical or administrative data systems were reviewed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Evidence for effect of information feedback on change in clinical practice. RESULTS--Information feedback was most likely to influence clinical practice if it was part of strategy to target decision makers who had already agreed to review their practice. A more direct effect was discernable if the information was presented close to the time of decision making. The questions of the optimum layout and quantity of information were not addressed; the 36 papers were insufficient for defining good formats for information to be used for audit or quality assurance. CONCLUSIONS--Given the cost of information processing and the current emphasis on closing the audit loop in the health services, it is important that the use of information in the audit process should be critically evaluated. PMID:1912809

  12. Interactive Information Seeking and Retrieving: A Third Feedback Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spink, Amanda

    1996-01-01

    Presents an overview of feedback within the cybernetics and social frameworks. These feedback concepts are then compared with the interactive feedback concept evolving within the framework of information seeking and retrieving, based on their conceptualization of the feedback loop and notion of information. (Author/AEF)

  13. 75 FR 26345 - Agency Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) New Enrollee Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) New Enrollee Survey... collection of information abstracted below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review...

  14. 78 FR 24469 - Proposed Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) Activity; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) Activity; Comment... Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor....

  15. Orchestrated management of heterogeneous sensors incorporating feedback from intelligence assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkale, Yugandhar; Chong, Edwin K. P.

    2015-05-01

    We develop a method for autonomous management of multiple heterogeneous sensors mounted on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for multitarget tracking. The main contribution of the paper is incorporation of feedback received from intelligence assets (humans) on priorities assigned to specific targets. We formulate the problem as a partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDP) where information received from assets is captured as a penalty on the cost function. The resulting constrained optimization problem is solved using an augmented Lagrangian method. Information obtained from sensors and assets is fused centrally for guiding the UAVs to track these targets.

  16. 78 FR 13057 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism... to review and approve a previously approved information collection requirement regarding IT Dashboard... identified by Information Collection 3090- 0285, IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism, by any of the...

  17. Delayed excitatory and inhibitory feedback shape neural information transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacron, Maurice J.; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2005-11-01

    Feedback circuitry with conduction and synaptic delays is ubiquitous in the nervous system. Yet the effects of delayed feedback on sensory processing of natural signals are poorly understood. This study explores the consequences of delayed excitatory and inhibitory feedback inputs on the processing of sensory information. We show, through numerical simulations and theory, that excitatory and inhibitory feedback can alter the firing frequency response of stochastic neurons in opposite ways by creating dynamical resonances, which in turn lead to information resonances (i.e., increased information transfer for specific ranges of input frequencies). The resonances are created at the expense of decreased information transfer in other frequency ranges. Using linear response theory for stochastically firing neurons, we explain how feedback signals shape the neural transfer function for a single neuron as a function of network size. We also find that balanced excitatory and inhibitory feedback can further enhance information tuning while maintaining a constant mean firing rate. Finally, we apply this theory to in vivo experimental data from weakly electric fish in which the feedback loop can be opened. We show that it qualitatively predicts the observed effects of inhibitory feedback. Our study of feedback excitation and inhibition reveals a possible mechanism by which optimal processing may be achieved over selected frequency ranges.

  18. Information feedback strategy for beltways in intelligent transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Ting; Li, Jian-Qing; Chen, Bo-Kui; Huang, Xin; Wang, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    As an important part of the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS), the information feedback strategy has drawn more and more scholars' attention. A variety of feedback strategies are proposed to improve the traffic efficiency. These strategies are based on simple route scenarios, but most route scenarios are always complex in reality. In this letter, based on a complex beltway scenario, we propose a new traffic information feedback strategy called Beltway Feedback Strategy (BFS). The simulation results show that the BFS can effectively improve the transportation ability of beltways.

  19. Contextual Antecedents of Informal Feedback in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Rijt, Janine; van de Wiel, Margje W. J.; Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien S. R.; Gijselaers, Wim H.

    2012-01-01

    This study brings together findings from different research angles on informal feedback in the workplace. We explore the individual and joint influences of three contextual antecedents of seeking feedback: support for learning, psychological safety, and work pressure. Based on our survey of 138 employees from various organizations, hierarchical…

  20. Feedback Specificity, Information Processing, and Transfer of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Jodi S.; Wood, Robert E.; Chen, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effects of feedback specificity on transfer of training and the mechanisms through which feedback can enhance or inhibit transfer. We used concurrent verbal protocol methodology to elicit and operationalize the explicit information processing activities used by 48 trainees performing the Furniture Factory computer…

  1. Information Management Using Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Larry

    1985-01-01

    Commercially available software is described that can help manage information in speech and hearing clinics. Applications addressed include word processing, database management, columnar analysis, integrated programs, specialized information management programs, and networks. (CL)

  2. Ranking Refinement via Relevance Feedback in Geographic Information Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villatoro-Tello, Esaú; Villaseñor-Pineda, Luis; Montes-Y-Gómez, Manuel

    Recent evaluation results from Geographic Information Retrieval (GIR) indicate that current information retrieval methods are effective to retrieve relevant documents for geographic queries, but they have severe difficulties to generate a pertinent ranking of them. Motivated by these results in this paper we present a novel re-ranking method, which employs information obtained through a relevance feedback process to perform a ranking refinement. Performed experiments show that the proposed method allows to improve the generated ranking from a traditional IR machine, as well as results from traditional re-ranking strategies such as query expansion via relevance feedback.

  3. Fuzzy Information Retrieval Using Genetic Algorithms and Relevance Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Frederick E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes an approach that combines concepts from information retrieval, fuzzy set theory, and genetic programing to improve weighted Boolean query formulation via relevance feedback. Highlights include background on information retrieval systems; genetic algorithms; subproblem formulation; and preliminary results based on a testbed. (Contains 12…

  4. Managing Residential Electricity Demand Through Provision of Better Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Myles

    New and affordable technology for providing detailed feedback on household electricity usage presents a host of opportunities for utilities and policy-makers to manage demand. This dissertation examines ways to use these devices to reduce - and shift the timing of - energy use in the residential sector by influencing consumers' behavior. The first portion of the study analyzes the impact of programmable thermostats (PTs) on energy use, focusing on residents' knowledge of climate control settings in the dwelling. I found that of households with natural gas heating systems, young households with PTs used 17 percent less heating energy on average. In addition, residents who did not know their thermostat settings tended to use 10 percent more energy for heating. The main portion of the dissertation focuses specifically on the potential for better feedback on electricity usage to reduce household energy consumption. The existing literature suggests that feedback can reduce electricity consumption in homes by 5 to 20 percent, but that significant uncertainties remain in our knowledge of the effectiveness of feedback. These uncertainties include the variation in feedback effectiveness between demographic groups and consumers in different climate regions. This analysis uses these uncertainties to perform an exploratory analysis to determine the conditions under which the benefits of feedback outweigh the costs and to compare the cost-effectiveness of providing feedback against that of other DSM programs. I found that benefits would likely outweigh costs for enhanced monthly billing and real-time feedback and that cost-effectiveness was superior to that of other DSM programs for these types of feedback. For feedback that is disaggregated by appliance type, cost effectiveness was competitive with other DSM programs under a limited set of cases. This study also examines how energy consumption devices should display feedback on GHG emissions from electricity use under a real

  5. 78 FR 49335 - Agency Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) Activity Under OMB Review... abstracted below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and comment. The PRA...

  6. 75 FR 9490 - Proposed Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) Activity: Comment....S.C. 3501-3521), Federal agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget...

  7. Diverse Representations of Olfactory Information in Centrifugal Feedback Projections

    PubMed Central

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Tarabrina, Anna; Kizer, Erin; Callaway, Edward M.; Gage, Fred H.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2016-01-01

    Although feedback or centrifugal projections from higher processing centers of the brain to peripheral regions have long been known to play essential functional roles, the anatomical organization of these connections remains largely unknown. Using a virus-based retrograde labeling strategy and 3D whole-brain reconstruction methods, we mapped the spatial organization of centrifugal projections from two olfactory cortical areas, the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) and the piriform cortex, to the granule cell layer of the main olfactory bulb in the mouse. Both regions are major recipients of information from the bulb and are the largest sources of feedback to the bulb, collectively constituting circuits essential for olfactory coding and olfactory behavior. We found that, although ipsilateral inputs from the AON were uniformly distributed, feedback from the contralateral AON had a strong ventral bias. In addition, we observed that centrifugally projecting neurons were spatially clustered in the piriform cortex, in contrast to the distributed feedforward axonal inputs that these cells receive from the principal neurons of the bulb. Therefore, information carried from the bulb to higher processing structures by anatomically stereotypic projections is likely relayed back to the bulb by organizationally distinct feedback projections that may reflect different coding strategies and therefore different functional roles. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Principles of anatomical organization, sometimes instantiated as “maps” in the mammalian brain, have provided key insights into the structure and function of circuits in sensory systems. Generally, these characterizations focus on projections from early sensory processing areas to higher processing structures despite considerable evidence that feedback or centrifugal projections often constitute major conduits of information flow. Our results identify structure in the organization of centrifugal feedback projections to the

  8. Managing uncertainty in soil carbon feedbacks to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Mark A.; Wieder, William R.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Fierer, Noah; Raymond, Peter A.; Crowther, Thomas W.

    2016-08-01

    Planetary warming may be exacerbated if it accelerates loss of soil carbon to the atmosphere. This carbon-cycle-climate feedback is included in climate projections. Yet, despite ancillary data supporting a positive feedback, there is limited evidence for soil carbon loss under warming. The low confidence engendered in feedback projections is reduced further by the common representation in models of an outdated knowledge of soil carbon turnover. 'Model-knowledge integration' -- representing in models an advanced understanding of soil carbon stabilization -- is the first step to build confidence. This will inform experiments that further increase confidence by resolving competing mechanisms that most influence projected soil-carbon stocks. Improving feedback projections is an imperative for establishing greenhouse gas emission targets that limit climate change.

  9. Support Vector Machines: Relevance Feedback and Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Harris; Shahrary, Behzad; Gibbon, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Compares support vector machines (SVMs) to Rocchio, Ide regular and Ide dec-hi algorithms in information retrieval (IR) of text documents using relevancy feedback. If the preliminary search is so poor that one has to search through many documents to find at least one relevant document, then SVM is preferred. Includes nine tables. (Contains 24…

  10. Programming and Systems Design for a Classroom Information Feedback System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Frances R.

    The primary outcome of any information feedback system must be data for the classroom teacher. For this reason, a system's value has to be measured in terms of its usefulness to the teacher in making instructional decisions. A report should contain only data that the teacher needs and should be produced in an understandable format. User feedback…

  11. Conditions Fostering the Use of Informative Feedback by Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teager, Joyce; Stern, Carolyn

    In order to investigate the effect of reinforcement on learning, 21 disadvantaged black children, 4 to 5 years of age, were divided among three treatment groups. Group I children received only feedback (information) as to the correctness or incorrectness of their responses. Group II children received a raisin for each correct response, and group…

  12. Two improved coherent optical feedback systems for optical information processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. H.; Bartholomew, B.; Cederquist, J.

    1976-01-01

    Coherent optical feedback systems are Fabry-Perot interferometers modified to perform optical information processing. Two new systems based on plane parallel and confocal Fabry-Perot interferometers are introduced. The plane parallel system can be used for contrast control, intensity level selection, and image thresholding. The confocal system can be used for image restoration and solving partial differential equations. These devices are simpler and less expensive than previous systems. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate their potential for optical information processing.

  13. Representational dynamics of object recognition: Feedforward and feedback information flows.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Erin; Carlson, Thomas A; Dermody, Nadene; Woolgar, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    Object perception involves a range of visual and cognitive processes, and is known to include both a feedfoward flow of information from early visual cortical areas to higher cortical areas, along with feedback from areas such as prefrontal cortex. Previous studies have found that low and high spatial frequency information regarding object identity may be processed over different timescales. Here we used the high temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography (MEG) combined with multivariate pattern analysis to measure information specifically related to object identity in peri-frontal and peri-occipital areas. Using stimuli closely matched in their low-level visual content, we found that activity in peri-occipital cortex could be used to decode object identity from ~80ms post stimulus onset, and activity in peri-frontal cortex could also be used to decode object identity from a later time (~265ms post stimulus onset). Low spatial frequency information related to object identity was present in the MEG signal at an earlier time than high spatial frequency information for peri-occipital cortex, but not for peri-frontal cortex. We additionally used Granger causality analysis to compare feedforward and feedback influences on representational content, and found evidence of both an early feedfoward flow and later feedback flow of information related to object identity. We discuss our findings in relation to existing theories of object processing and propose how the methods we use here could be used to address further questions of the neural substrates underlying object perception. PMID:26806290

  14. Coherent versus Measurement Feedback: Linear Systems Theory for Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2014-10-01

    To control a quantum system via feedback, we generally have two options in choosing a control scheme. One is the coherent feedback, which feeds the output field of the system, through a fully quantum device, back to manipulate the system without involving any measurement process. The other one is measurement-based feedback, which measures the output field and performs a real-time manipulation on the system based on the measurement results. Both schemes have advantages and disadvantages, depending on the system and the control goal; hence, their comparison in several situations is important. This paper considers a general open linear quantum system with the following specific control goals: backaction evasion, generation of a quantum nondemolished variable, and generation of a decoherence-free subsystem, all of which have important roles in quantum information science. Some no-go theorems are proven, clarifying that those goals cannot be achieved by any measurement-based feedback control. On the other hand, it is shown that, for each control goal there exists a coherent feedback controller accomplishing the task. The key idea to obtain all the results is system theoretic characterizations of the above three notions in terms of controllability and observability properties or transfer functions of linear systems, which are consistent with their standard definitions.

  15. Medical Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  16. Management of Electronic Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breaks, Michael

    This paper discusses the management of library collections of electronic information resources within the classical theoretical framework of collection development and management. The first section provides an overview of electronic information resources, including bibliographic databases, electronic journals, journal aggregation services, and…

  17. An Extensible Information Grid for Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Bell, David G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes recent work on developing an extensible information grid for risk management at NASA - a RISK INFORMATION GRID. This grid is being developed by integrating information grid technology with risk management processes for a variety of risk related applications. To date, RISK GRID applications are being developed for three main NASA processes: risk management - a closed-loop iterative process for explicit risk management, program/project management - a proactive process that includes risk management, and mishap management - a feedback loop for learning from historical risks that escaped other processes. This is enabled through an architecture involving an extensible database, structuring information with XML, schemaless mapping of XML, and secure server-mediated communication using standard protocols.

  18. Universal Payload Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, Ralph B.

    2003-01-01

    As the overall manager and integrator of International Space Station (ISS) science payloads, the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at Marshall Space Flight Center has a critical need to provide an information management system for exchange and control of ISS payload files as well as to coordinate ISS payload related operational changes. The POIC's information management system has a fundamental requirement to provide secure operational access not only to users physically located at the POIC, but also to remote experimenters and International Partners physically located in different parts of the world. The Payload Information Management System (PIMS) is a ground-based electronic document configuration management and collaborative workflow system that was built to service the POIC's information management needs. This paper discusses the application components that comprise the PIMS system, the challenges that influenced its design and architecture, and the selected technologies it employs. This paper will also touch on the advantages of the architecture, details of the user interface, and lessons learned along the way to a successful deployment. With PIMS, a sophisticated software solution has been built that is not only universally accessible for POIC customer s information management needs, but also universally adaptable in implementation and application as a generalized information management system.

  19. Information Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossmeier, Joseph G.

    1981-01-01

    Explains the function of information resources, predicts the increased importance of computers, and emphasizes that computer information systems are a resource to support institutional operation and management. Enumerates the components in planning for the use of information technology. Presents the Virginia Community College System's information…

  20. Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

  1. Management Information System Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Walter J.; Harr, Gordon G.

    The Management Information System (MIS) described in this report represents a plan to utilize modern management techniques to facilitate the goal of a learner-responsive school system. The MIS component is being developed to meet the need for the coordination of the resources of staff, facilities, and time with the long range planning and…

  2. Management Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crump, Kelvin

    An Australian university architect studying management information systems programs at academic institutions in the United States visited 26 universities and colleges and nine educational and professional associations, including extended visits at the University of Wisconsin and the National Center of Higher Education Management Systems. During…

  3. At the Intersection of Health Information Technology and Decision Support: Measurement Feedback Systems... and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Chorpita, Bruce F; Daleiden, Eric L; Bernstein, Adam D

    2016-05-01

    We select and comment on concepts and examples from the target articles in this special issue on measurement feedback systems, placing them in the context of some of our own insights and ideas about measurement feedback systems, and where those systems lie at the intersection of technology and decision making. We contend that, connected to the many implementation challenges relevant to many new technologies, there are fundamental design challenges that await a more elaborate specification of the clinical information and decision models that underlie these systems. Candidate features of such models are discussed, which include referencing multiple evidence bases, facilitating observed and expected value comparisons, fostering collaboration, and allowing translation across multiple ontological systems. We call for a new metaphor for these technologies that goes beyond measurement feedback and encourages a deeper consideration of the increasingly complex clinical decision models needed to manage the uncertainty of delivering clinical care. PMID:26604202

  4. Distributed Information Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottenger, William M.; Callahan, Miranda R.; Padgett, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the scope and effects of distributed information management. Discusses cultural and social influences, including library and Internet culture, information and knowledge, electronic libraries, and social aspects of libraries; digital collections; indexing; permanent link systems; metadata; the Open Archives initiative; digital object…

  5. Air System Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  6. Materials management information systems.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The hospital materials management function--ensuring that goods and services get from a source to an end user--encompasses many areas of the hospital and can significantly affect hospital costs. Performing this function in a manner that will keep costs down and ensure adequate cash flow requires effective management of a large amount of information from a variety of sources. To effectively coordinate such information, most hospitals have implemented some form of materials management information system (MMIS). These systems can be used to automate or facilitate functions such as purchasing, accounting, inventory management, and patient supply charges. In this study, we evaluated seven MMISs from seven vendors, focusing on the functional capabilities of each system and the quality of the service and support provided by the vendor. This Evaluation is intended to (1) assist hospitals purchasing an MMIS by educating materials managers about the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs and (2) educate clinical engineers and information system managers about the scope of materials management within a healthcare facility. Because software products cannot be evaluated in the same manner as most devices typically included in Health Devices Evaluations, our standard Evaluation protocol was not applicable for this technology. Instead, we based our ratings on our observations (e.g., during site visits), interviews we conducted with current users of each system, and information provided by the vendor (e.g., in response to a request for information [RFI]). We divided the Evaluation into the following sections: Section 1. Responsibilities and Information Requirements of Materials Management: Provides an overview of typical materials management functions and describes the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs. Also includes the supplementary article, "Inventory Cost and Reimbursement Issues" and the glossary, "Materials Management Terminology." Section 2. The

  7. Role of inhibitory feedback for information processing in thalamocortical circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Joerg; Schuster, Heinz Georg; Claussen, Jens Christian

    2006-03-15

    The information transfer in the thalamus is blocked dynamically during sleep, in conjunction with the occurrence of spindle waves. In order to describe the dynamic mechanisms which control the sensory transfer of information, it is necessary to have a qualitative model for the response properties of thalamic neurons. As the theoretical understanding of the mechanism remains incomplete, we analyze two modeling approaches for a recent experiment by Le Masson et al. [Nature (London) 417, 854 (2002)] on the thalamocortical loop. We use a conductance based model in order to motivate an extension of the Hindmarsh-Rose model, which mimics experimental observations of Le Masson et al. Typically, thalamic neurons posses two different firing modes, depending on their membrane potential. At depolarized potentials, the cells fire in a single spike mode and relay synaptic inputs in a one-to-one manner to the cortex. If the cell gets hyperpolarized, T-type calcium currents generate burst-mode firing which leads to a decrease in the spike transfer. In thalamocortical circuits, the cell membrane gets hyperpolarized by recurrent inhibitory feedback loops. In the case of reciprocally coupled excitatory and inhibitory neurons, inhibitory feedback leads to metastable self-sustained oscillations, which mask the incoming input, and thereby reduce the information transfer significantly.

  8. Role of inhibitory feedback for information processing in thalamocortical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Jörg; Schuster, Heinz Georg; Claussen, Jens Christian

    2006-03-01

    The information transfer in the thalamus is blocked dynamically during sleep, in conjunction with the occurrence of spindle waves. In order to describe the dynamic mechanisms which control the sensory transfer of information, it is necessary to have a qualitative model for the response properties of thalamic neurons. As the theoretical understanding of the mechanism remains incomplete, we analyze two modeling approaches for a recent experiment by Le Masson [Nature (London) 417, 854 (2002)] on the thalamocortical loop. We use a conductance based model in order to motivate an extension of the Hindmarsh-Rose model, which mimics experimental observations of Le Masson Typically, thalamic neurons posses two different firing modes, depending on their membrane potential. At depolarized potentials, the cells fire in a single spike mode and relay synaptic inputs in a one-to-one manner to the cortex. If the cell gets hyperpolarized, T -type calcium currents generate burst-mode firing which leads to a decrease in the spike transfer. In thalamocortical circuits, the cell membrane gets hyperpolarized by recurrent inhibitory feedback loops. In the case of reciprocally coupled excitatory and inhibitory neurons, inhibitory feedback leads to metastable self-sustained oscillations, which mask the incoming input, and thereby reduce the information transfer significantly.

  9. Managing environmental information

    SciTech Connect

    Solyst, J.

    1998-12-31

    The public`s right to know about environmental policy has moved to the forefront with the technological advances in recent years. Congress has not kept pace with these developments having twice considered and twice rejected legislation that is necessary in this field. Congress should provide leadership to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for a broad strategy to improve information resources and management.

  10. Management Information Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication contains 19 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of management information specialist, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 19 units are as…

  11. Management Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Jean, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This collection of papers addresses key questions facing college managers and others choosing, introducing, and living with big, complex computer-based systems. "What Use the User Requirement?" (Tony Coles) stresses the importance of an information strategy driven by corporate objectives, not technology. "Process of Selecting a Computerised MIS in…

  12. The Effect of Information Feedback Upon Psychophysical Judgments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, Richard C.; Carterette, Edward C.; Kinchla, Ronald A.

    1964-01-01

    An analysis was made of the role of presentation schedules and information feedback on performance in a forced-choice signal detection task. The experimental results indicate that information feedback facilitates performance, but only for certain presentation schedules. The present study was designed to assess performance in a signal detection task under two conditions of information feedback. In the I-condition, S was told on each trial whether his detection response was correct or incorrect; in the !-condition S was given no feedback regarding the correctness of his response. The task involved a 2-response, forced-choice auditory detection problem. On each trial 2 temporal intervals were defined and S was required to report which interval he believed contained the signal; i. e., in one interval a tone burst in a background of white noise was presented, while the other interval contained only white noise. A trial will be denoted as s1 or s2, depending on whether the signal was embedded in the 1st or 2nd interval; the S's response will be denoted A1 or A2 to indicate which interval he reported contained the signal. The probability of an s1 trial will be denoted as y. In this study two values of y were used (.50 and.75) and, as indicated above, two conditions of information feedback. Thus there were 4 experimental conditions (501, · 50I, 751, 75I); each S was run under all 4 conditions. Method Gaussian noise was presented binaurally in S's headphones throughout a test session and the signal was a 1000-cps sinusoid tone; the tone was presented for 100 msec. including equal fall and rise times of 20 msec. The ratio of signal energy to noise power in a unit bandwidth was 2.9, and was constant throughout the study. The. S was seated before a stimulus display board. On each trial a red warning light was flashed for 100 msec. Two amber lights then came on successively each for 1 sec.; these lights defined the 2 observation intervals. The onset of the signal occurred 500

  13. Accident management information needs

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Nelson, W.R.; Meyer, O.R. )

    1990-04-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, a methodology has been developed for identifying the plant information needs necessary for personnel involved in the management of an accident to diagnose that an accident is in progress, select and implement strategies to prevent or mitigate the accident, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies. This report describes the methodology and presents an application of this methodology to a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with a large dry containment. A risk-important severe accident sequence for a PWR is used to examine the capability of the existing measurements to supply the necessary information. The method includes an assessment of the effects of the sequence on the measurement availability including the effects of environmental conditions. The information needs and capabilities identified using this approach are also intended to form the basis for more comprehensive information needs assessment performed during the analyses and development of specific strategies for use in accident management prevention and mitigation. 3 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Information Risk Management and Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dynes, Scott

    Are the levels of information risk management efforts within and between firms correlated with the resilience of the firms to information disruptions? This paper examines the question by considering the results of field studies of information risk management practices at organizations and in supply chains. The organizations investigated differ greatly in the degree of coupling from a general and information risk management standpoint, as well as in the levels of internal awareness and activity regarding information risk management. The comparison of the levels of information risk management in the firms and their actual or inferred resilience indicates that a formal information risk management approach is not necessary for resilience in certain sectors.

  15. Corporate information management guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Information Management (IM) Council, IM representatives from nearly all Headquarters (HQ) organizations have been meeting over the past year as the Corporate Guidance Group (CGG) to develop useful and sound corporate information management (IM) guidance. The ability of the Department`s IM community to develop such unified guidance continues to be critical to the success of future Departmental IM planning processes and the establishment of a well-coordinated IM environment between Headquarters and field organizations. This report, with 26 specific corporate IM guidance items documented and unanimously agreed to, as well as 12 items recommended for further development and 3 items deferred for future consideration, represents a highly successful effort by the IM community. The effort has proven that the diverse DOE organizations can put aside individual preferences and work together towards a common and mutually beneficial goal. In examining most areas and issues associated with information management in the Department, they have developed specific, far-reaching, and useful guidance. The IM representatives recommend that the documented guidance items provided in this report and approved by the DOE IM Council be followed by all IM organizations. The representatives also strongly recommend that the guidance process developed by the CGG be the single process for developing corporate IM guidance.

  16. Feedback informed treatment: evidence-based practice meets social construction.

    PubMed

    Tilsen, Julie; McNamee, Sheila

    2015-03-01

    This article explores the challenges presented by the mandate for evidence-based practice for family therapists who identify with the philosophical stance of social construction. The history of psychotherapy outcome research is reviewed, as are current findings that provide empirical evidence for an engaged, dialogic practice. The authors suggest that the binary between empiricism and social construction may be unhinged by understanding empiricism as a particular discursive frame (i.e., a particular way of talking, acting, and being in the world), one of many available as a way of understanding and talking about our work. Through a case vignette, the authors introduce the evidence-based practice of Feedback Informed Treatment as an elaboration of social construction, and as an example of bridging the gap between the discursive frames of empiricism and social construction. PMID:25394600

  17. 77 FR 59614 - Office of Citizen Services and Innovative Technologies; Information Collection; Data.gov Feedback...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Office of Citizen Services and Innovative Technologies; Information Collection; Data.gov Feedback... regarding Data.gov Feedback Mechanisms. Public comments are particularly invited on: Whether this collection... Collection 3090- 0284, Data.gov Feedback Mechanisms, by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  18. Attention Paid to Feedback Provided by a Computer-Based Assessment for Learning on Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmers, Caroline; Veldkamp, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Three studies are presented on attention paid to feedback provided by a computer-based assessment for learning on information literacy. Results show that the attention paid to feedback varies greatly. In general the attention focuses on feedback of incorrectly answered questions. In each study approximately fifty percent of the respondents paid…

  19. Training Management Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Rackley, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Training Management Information System (TMIS) is an integrated information system for all training related activities. TMIS is at the leading edge of training information systems used in the nuclear industry. The database contains all the necessary records to confirm the department's adherence to accreditation criteria and houses all test questions, student records and information needed to evaluate the training process. The key to the TMIS system is that the impact of any change (i.e., procedure change, new equipment, safety incident in the commercial nuclear industry, etc.) can be tracked throughout the training process. This ensures the best training can be performed that meets the needs of the employees. TMIS is comprised of six functional areas: Job and Task Analysis, Training Materials Design and Development, Exam Management, Student Records/Scheduling, Evaluation, and Commitment Tracking. The system consists of a VAX 6320 Cluster with IBM and MacIntosh computers tied into an ethernet with the VAX. Other peripherals are also tied into the system: Exam Generation Stations to include mark sense readers for test grading, Production PC's for Desk-Top Publishing of Training Material, and PC Image Workstations. 5 figs.

  20. Is this what you need? Direct feedback help climate change information exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, D. M.; Brown, M.; Gough, M.; Basin, D.

    2015-12-01

    The combination of projected climate change and land use adds uncertainty to the long-term effectiveness of current management strategies. Managers need reliable information to adjust their strategies as population density increases. However they are currently overwhelmed by the diversity of available information and the multiplicity of sources. CBI's goal is to centralize and package effectively the usable information for land managers and for the general public in order to increase awareness and promote preparation for the challenges ahead. We are designing conservation planning atlases in Data Basin for a number of landscape conservation cooperatives to address this need. We are adding some user-friendly tools to specifically serve the available climate projections and land use data in a meaningful way. By working closely with a group of managers, our goal is to understand how consideration of these projections figures into the decision-making process and refine the ways we can deliver relevant metrics. We have been holding interviews to gather information and critical feedback on existing climate-related web pages and tools, providing us with benchmarks for improvement. As it turned out, the student-manager dialogue added a component of climate change education and awareness of available tools to the project. Through an iterative process we plan to continue this exchange and address the variety of issues managers continually have to face to maintain healthy ecosystems.

  1. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-12-14

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM.

  2. Managing Information On Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taulbee, Zoe A.

    1990-01-01

    Cost Management Model, CMM, software tool for planning, tracking, and reporting costs and information related to costs. Capable of estimating costs, comparing estimated to actual costs, performing "what-if" analyses on estimates of costs, and providing mechanism to maintain data on costs in format oriented to management. Number of supportive cost methods built in: escalation rates, production-learning curves, activity/event schedules, unit production schedules, set of spread distributions, tables of rates and factors defined by user, and full arithmetic capability. Import/export capability possible with 20/20 Spreadsheet available on Data General equipment. Program requires AOS/VS operating system available on Data General MV series computers. Written mainly in FORTRAN 77 but uses SGU (Screen Generation Utility).

  3. Immediate vs. Delayed Feedback in a Computer-Managed Test: Effects on Long-Term Retention. Technical Report, March 1976-August 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, Persis T.

    This experiment was designed to test the effect of immediate and delayed feedback on retention of learning in an educational situation. Four groups of college undergraduates took a multiple-choice computer-managed test. Three of these groups received informative feedback (the entire item with the correct answer identified) either: (1) immediately…

  4. Managing global change information

    SciTech Connect

    Stoss, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    Which human activities add to atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), the greenhouse gas that may promote warming of the earth`s climate? How could CO{sub 2} emission restrictions change the use of fossil fuels? How would increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} likely effect climate? Can one see any evidence that the world is getting warmer? What coastal-zone areas are more sensitive to potential sea-level rise from an accelerated melting of glaciers? What is El Nino and how does it affect the earth`s climate? These are among the thousands of questions to which ORNL data analysts respond every year. Recently, the topic of global environmental change, including climate change, has grown in importance. At ORNL researchers have improved their understanding of the science underlying this major environmental issue. At the same time the Laboratory is playing a pivotal role in directing the data and information management activities for what some researchers consider the most information-intensive science project ever undertaken. Long one of the world`s leading energy R&D facilities, ORNL has more recently emerged as one of the preeminent environmental research centers in the world. Within ORNL`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Environmental Information Analysis Program was established to serve as a focal point for the assimilation of data related to global environmental change. The three major components of the program are the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Archive, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Earth Observing System Data and Information System Distributed Active Archive Center, and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases is located in CDIAC.

  5. Information resource management concepts for records managers

    SciTech Connect

    Seesing, P.R.

    1992-10-01

    Information Resource Management (ERM) is the label given to the various approaches used to foster greater accountability for the use of computing resources. It is a corporate philosophy that treats information as it would its other resources. There is a reorientation from simply expenditures to considering the value of the data stored on that hardware. Accountability for computing resources is expanding beyond just the data processing (DP) or management information systems (MIS) manager to include senior organization management and user management. Management`s goal for office automation is being refocused from saving money to improving productivity. A model developed by Richard Nolan (1982) illustrates the basic evolution of computer use in organizations. Computer Era: (1) Initiation (computer acquisition), (2) Contagion (intense system development), (3) Control (proliferation of management controls). Data Resource Era: (4) Integration (user service orientation), (5) Data Administration (corporate value of information), (6) Maturity (strategic approach to information technology). The first three stages mark the growth of traditional data processing and management information systems departments. The development of the IRM philosophy in an organization involves the restructuring of the DP organization and new management techniques. The three stages of the Data Resource Era represent the evolution of IRM. This paper examines each of them in greater detail.

  6. Total Quality Management in Information Services. Information Services Management Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair, Guy

    Information services managers have a responsibility to provide the best information delivery possible. The basic principles of total quality management can be used by information professionals to help justify library funding through the creation of an environment where customer-patron satisfaction is paramount. This book reveals how to apply the…

  7. Information resource management concepts for records managers

    SciTech Connect

    Seesing, P.R.

    1992-10-01

    Information Resource Management (ERM) is the label given to the various approaches used to foster greater accountability for the use of computing resources. It is a corporate philosophy that treats information as it would its other resources. There is a reorientation from simply expenditures to considering the value of the data stored on that hardware. Accountability for computing resources is expanding beyond just the data processing (DP) or management information systems (MIS) manager to include senior organization management and user management. Management's goal for office automation is being refocused from saving money to improving productivity. A model developed by Richard Nolan (1982) illustrates the basic evolution of computer use in organizations. Computer Era: (1) Initiation (computer acquisition), (2) Contagion (intense system development), (3) Control (proliferation of management controls). Data Resource Era: (4) Integration (user service orientation), (5) Data Administration (corporate value of information), (6) Maturity (strategic approach to information technology). The first three stages mark the growth of traditional data processing and management information systems departments. The development of the IRM philosophy in an organization involves the restructuring of the DP organization and new management techniques. The three stages of the Data Resource Era represent the evolution of IRM. This paper examines each of them in greater detail.

  8. Developing Performance Management Competence: An Exercise Leveraging Video Technology and Multisource Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Troy V.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to competently manage employee performance is critical for students graduating with degrees in management. This article provides a competency development exercise (CDE) for use in graduate and undergraduate management courses to increase students' performance management competence. The CDE includes providing employee feedback,…

  9. On-line Technology Information System (OTIS): Solid Waste Management Technology Information Form (SWM TIF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levri, Julie A.; Boulanger, Richard; Hogan, John A.; Rodriguez, Luis

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: What is OTIS? OTIS use. Proposed implementation method. Development history of the Solid Waste Management (SWM) Technology Information Form (TIF) and OTIS. Current development state of the SWM TIF and OTIS. Data collection approach. Information categories. Critiques/questions/feedback.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EIMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Information Management System (EIMS) organizes descriptive information (metadata) for data sets, databases, documents, models, projects, and spatial data. The EIMS design provides a repository for scientific documentation that can be easily accessed with standar...

  11. A Social Learning Management System Supporting Feedback for Incorrect Answers Based on Social Network Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Jiseong; Kim, Jeong-Dong; Na, Hong-Seok; Baik, Doo-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we propose a Social Learning Management System (SLMS) enabling real-time and reliable feedback for incorrect answers by learners using a social network service (SNS). The proposed system increases the accuracy of learners' assessment results by using a confidence scale and a variety of social feedback that is created and shared…

  12. The Effects of Graphic Feedback, Goal-Setting, and Manager Praise on Customer Service Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewy, Shannon; Bailey, Jon

    2007-01-01

    The current study used a multiple baseline design to investigate the effects of graphic feedback, goal setting, and manager praise on customer service behaviors in a large retail setting. Direct observation of customer greeting, eye contact, and smiling was used to collect data. After baseline data were collected feedback graphs were posted twice…

  13. Information Resource Management for Industrial Information Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosa, Marta

    This paper argues that the function of educational programs is to convey a sense of reality and an understanding of the open-endedness of information needs and situations; only such a reality orientation can instill the necessary flexibility in information professionals for effectively managing change. There is a growing consensus among…

  14. 77 FR 28894 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Collection of Qualitative Feedback Through Focus Groups

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... Register on February 8, 2012, at 77 FR 6573, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS/did not... Qualitative Feedback Through Focus Groups ACTION: 30-Day Notice of Information Collection for Office of... sure to add ``1615-NEW, Collection of Qualitative Feedback through Focus Groups'' in the subject...

  15. Effects of different feedback types on information integration in repeated monetary gambles

    PubMed Central

    Haffke, Peter; Hübner, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Most models of risky decision making assume that all relevant information is taken into account (e.g., von Neumann and Morgenstern, 1944; Kahneman and Tversky, 1979). However, there are also some models supposing that only part of the information is considered (e.g., Brandstätter et al., 2006; Gigerenzer and Gaissmaier, 2011). To further investigate the amount of information that is usually used for decision making, and how the use depends on feedback, we conducted a series of three experiments in which participants choose between two lotteries and where no feedback, outcome feedback, and error feedback was provided, respectively. The results show that without feedback participants mostly chose the lottery with the higher winning probability, and largely ignored the potential gains. The same results occurred when the outcome of each decision was fed back. Only after presenting error feedback (i.e., signaling whether a choice was optimal or not), participants considered probabilities as well as gains, resulting in more optimal choices. We propose that outcome feedback was ineffective, because of its probabilistic and ambiguous nature. Participants improve information integration only if provided with a consistent and deterministic signal such as error feedback. PMID:25667576

  16. Information Management. Myths and Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    A number of misconceptions or "myths" about information management have arisen since the beginning of the Information Age. One misconception is that the problem of information overload stems from too much information. In reality, the greater problem may be an explosion of noninformation. Many people believe that they must try to stay on top of…

  17. Detecting concealed information using feedback related event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Sai, Liyang; Lin, Xiaohong; Hu, Xiaoqing; Fu, Genyue

    2014-10-01

    Employing an event-related potential (ERP)-based concealed information test (CIT), the present study investigated (1) the neurocognitive processes when people received feedbacks regarding their deceptive/truthful responses and (2) whether such feedback-related ERP activities can be used to detect concealed information above and beyond the recognition-related P300. During the CIT, participants were presented with rare, meaningful probes (their own names) embedded within a series of frequent yet meaningless irrelevants (others' names). Participants were instructed to deny their recognition of the probes. Critically, following participants' responses, they were provided with feedbacks regarding whether they succeeded or failed in the CIT. Replicating previous ERP-based CITs, we found a larger P300 elicited by probe compared to irrelevant. Regarding feedback-related ERPs, a temporospatial Principle Component Analyses found two ERP components that were not only sensitive to feedback manipulations but also can discriminate probe from irrelevant: an earlier, central-distributed positivity that was elicited by "success" feedbacks peaked around 219ms; and a later, right central-distributed positivity that was also elicited by "success" feedbacks, peaked around 400ms. Importantly, the feedback ERPs were not correlated with P300 that was elicited by probe/irrelevant, suggesting that these two ERPs reflect independent processes underlying memory concealment. These findings illustrate the feasibility and promise of using feedback-related ERPs to detect concealed memory and thus deception. PMID:25058495

  18. Rationalizing Management Information System Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parden, Robert J.

    This paper examines the proposition that management information systems (MIS) for colleges and universities are not achieving their original objectives of supporting better management decisions by providing more and better information in a more timely manner. As a consequence, the MIS activity should be reduced in scope, and standardized to…

  19. Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, R.J.; Sheely, K.B.; Brown, J.B.; Horton, R.D.; Strittmatter, R.; Manatt, D.R.

    1994-04-01

    The requirements for the management of information at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its Department of Safeguards are rapidly changing. Historically, the Department of Safeguards has had the requirement to process large volumes of conventional safeguards information. An information management system is currently in place that adequately handles the IAEA`s conventional safeguards data needs. In the post-Iraq environment, however, there is a growing need to expand the IAEA information management capability to include unconventional forms of information. These data include environmental sampling results, photographs, video film, lists of machine tools, and open-source materials such as unclassified publications. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responded to this information management need by implementing the Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS) initiative. SIMS was created by the DOE to anticipate and respond to IAEA information management needs through a multilaboratory initiative that will utilize an integrated approach to develop and deploy technology in a timely and cost-effective manner. The DOE will use the SIMS initiative to coordinate US information management activities that support the IAEA Department of Safeguards.

  20. Information Management for a Large Multidisciplinary Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Randall, Donald P.; Cronin, Catherine K.

    1992-01-01

    In 1989, NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) initiated the High-Speed Airframe Integration Research (HiSAIR) Program to develop and demonstrate an integrated environment for high-speed aircraft design using advanced multidisciplinary analysis and optimization procedures. The major goals of this program were to evolve the interactions among disciplines and promote sharing of information, to provide a timely exchange of information among aeronautical disciplines, and to increase the awareness of the effects each discipline has upon other disciplines. LaRC historically has emphasized the advancement of analysis techniques. HiSAIR was founded to synthesize these advanced methods into a multidisciplinary design process emphasizing information feedback among disciplines and optimization. Crucial to the development of such an environment are the definition of the required data exchanges and the methodology for both recording the information and providing the exchanges in a timely manner. These requirements demand extensive use of data management techniques, graphic visualization, and interactive computing. HiSAIR represents the first attempt at LaRC to promote interdisciplinary information exchange on a large scale using advanced data management methodologies combined with state-of-the-art, scientific visualization techniques on graphics workstations in a distributed computing environment. The subject of this paper is the development of the data management system for HiSAIR.

  1. Research review for information management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of RICIS research in information management is to apply currently available technology to existing problems in information management. Research projects include the following: the Space Business Research Center (SBRC), the Management Information and Decision Support Environment (MIDSE), and the investigation of visual interface technology. Several additional projects issued reports. New projects include the following: (1) the AdaNET project to develop a technology transfer network for software engineering and the Ada programming language; and (2) work on designing a communication system for the Space Station Project Office at JSC. The central aim of all projects is to use information technology to help people work more productively.

  2. Strategic Management of Geo-Referenced Soil and Crop Information

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For over a decade, farmers have been collecting site-specific yield data. Many have formed doubts about this investment because of their inability to directly apply this information as feedback for improving management. It seems evident that precision agriculture adoption has been hindered, in part,...

  3. Information management for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neil B; Martin, Stephen A; Maypole, Jack; Andrews, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    Clinicians are bombarded with information daily by social media, mainstream television news, e-mail, and print and online reports. They usually do not have much control over these information streams and thus are passive recipients, which means they get more noise than signal. Accessing, absorbing, organizing, storing, and retrieving useful medical information can improve patient care. The authors outline how to create a personalized stream of relevant information that can be scanned regularly and saved so that it is readily accessible. PMID:27505880

  4. Effectiveness and cost of different strategies for information feedback in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Szczepura, A; Wilmot, J; Davies, C; Fletcher, J

    1994-01-01

    AIM. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness and relative cost of three forms of information feedback to general practices--graphical, graphical plus a visit by a medical facilitator and tabular. METHOD. Routinely collected, centrally-held data were used where possible, analysed at practice level. Some non-routine practice data in the form of risk factor recording in medical notes, for example weight, smoking status, alcohol consumption and blood pressure, were also provided to those who requested it. The 52 participating practices were stratified and randomly allocated to one of the three feedback groups. The cost of providing each type of feedback was determined. The immediate response of practitioners to the form of feedback (acceptability), ease of understanding (intelligibility), and usefulness of regular feedback was recorded. Changes introduced as a result of feedback were assessed by questionnaire shortly after feedback, and 12 months later. Changes at the practice level in selected indicators were also assessed 12 and 24 months after initial feedback. RESULTS. The resulting cost per effect was calculated to be 46.10 pounds for both graphical and tabular feedback, 132.50 pounds for graphical feedback plus facilitator visit and 773.00 pounds for the manual audit of risk factors recorded in the practice notes. The three forms of feedback did not differ in intelligibility or usefulness, but feedback plus a medical facilitator visit was significantly less acceptable. There was a high level of self-reported organizational change following feedback, with 69% of practices reporting changes as a direct result; this was not significantly different for the three types of feedback. There were no significant changes in the selected indicators at 12 or 24 months following feedback. The practice characteristic most closely related to better indicators of preventive practice was practice size, smaller practices performing significantly better. Separate

  5. Improving Information Security Risk Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Anand

    2009-01-01

    manaOptimizing risk to information to protect the enterprise as well as to satisfy government and industry mandates is a core function of most information security departments. Risk management is the discipline that is focused on assessing, mitigating, monitoring and optimizing risks to information. Risk assessments and analyses are critical…

  6. Is feedback control effective for ecosystem-based fisheries management?

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Abrams, Peter A

    2013-12-21

    We investigate the effects of species interactions on the robustness of feedback control of the harvesting of prey species. We consider the consequences of feedback control of fishing effort. If a prey species is exploited, increasing fishing effort decreases predator abundance more than it does the prey abundance. Feedback control of fishing effort may cause the extinction of the predator, even if the prey population is well controlled. Even when fishing effort is controlled by predator density, it is difficult for the fishery and the predator to coexist, and, if they do so, the system exhibits complex dynamic behaviors. If the predator and fishery coexist, feedback control of fishing effort converges to a stable equilibrium, a synchronous cycle, or an asynchronous cycle. In the last case, the system undergoes more complex cycling with a longer period than that when the fishing effort is kept constant. These analyses suggest that there is no effective strategy that is robust against measurement errors, process errors and complex interactions in ecosystem dynamics. PMID:23792332

  7. Medical-Information-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  8. Monitoring informs management

    SciTech Connect

    West, Tristram O.

    2011-10-24

    Improved regional monitoring and reporting of greenhouse-gas emissions depends on accurate estimates of emissions from different land-use regimes. An analysis suggests that measuring emissions per crop yield may be an optimum metric for refining land-management decisions.

  9. Business, Economics, Management Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, Edward Zip

    This annotated bibliography includes reference sources pertaining to business, economics, and management that are located in the libraries of the Portland and Gorham campuses of the University of Southern Maine. Specific reference sources are listed under the categories of: (1) indexes and abstracts; (2) dictionaries and encyclopedias, including…

  10. Assessment of the Volunteered Geographic Information Feedback System for the Dutch Topographical Key Register

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grus, M.; te Winkel, D.

    2015-08-01

    Since Topographical Key Register has become an open data the amount of users increased enormously. The highest grow was in the private users group. The increasing number of users and their growing demand for high actuality of the topographic data sets motivates the Dutch Kadaster to innovate and improve the Topographical Key Register (BRT). One of the initiatives was to provide a voluntary geographical information project aiming at providing a user-friendly feedback system adjusted to all kinds of user groups. The feedback system is a compulsory element of the Topographical Key Register in the Netherlands. The Dutch Kadaster is obliged to deliver a feedback system and the key-users are obliged to use it. The aim of the feedback system is to improve the quality and stimulate the usage of the data. The results of the pilot shows that the user-friendly and open to everyone feedback system contributes enormously to improve the quality of the topographic dataset.

  11. Network Information Management Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatburn, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    The Deep Space Network is implementing a distributed data base management system in which the data are shared among several applications and the host machines are not totally dedicated to a particular application. Since the data and resources are to be shared, the equipment must be operated carefully so that the resources are shared equitably. The current status of the project is discussed and policies, roles, and guidelines are recommended for the organizations involved in the project.

  12. System Wide Information Management (SWIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hritz, Mike; McGowan, Shirley; Ramos, Cal

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation lists questions regarding the implementation of System Wide Information Management (SWIM). Some of the questions concern policy issues and strategies, technology issues and strategies, or transition issues and strategies.

  13. Management Framework for Information Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathezer, Gordon

    1985-01-01

    The development and implementation of an institutional framework to guide the management and use of information technologies (computing, office automation, and telecommunications) at Mount Royal College in Calgary, Alberta, are described. (Author/MLW)

  14. Minnesota Land Management Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordstrand, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A brief history of the Minnesota Land Management Information Center is given and the present operational status and plans for future development are described. The incorporation of LANDSAT data into the system, hardware and software capabilities, and funding are addressed.

  15. RIMS: Resource Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symes, J.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities and functions of the resource management system (RIMS). It is a simple interactive DMS tool which allows users to build, modify, and maintain data management applications. The RIMS minimizes programmer support required to develop/maintain small data base applications. The RIMS also assists in bringing the United Information Services (UIS) budget system work inhouse. Information is also given on the relationship between the RIMS and the user community.

  16. Managing information technology security risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, David

    2003-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) Security Risk Management is a critical task for the organization to protect against the loss of confidentiality, integrity and availability of IT resources. As systems bgecome more complex and diverse and and attacks from intrusions and malicious content increase, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage IT security risk. This paper describes a two-pronged approach in addressing IT security risk and risk management in the organization: 1) an institutional enterprise appraoch, and 2) a project life cycle approach.

  17. The interaction of criterion and feedback information in learning a drawing task.

    PubMed

    Newell, K M; Carlton, M J; Antoniou, A

    1990-12-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the influence of criterion and feedback information in the learning of a two-dimensional drawing task. Experiment 1 showed that when the task criterion is well known to the subject, the combined presentation of criterion information and information feedback facilitates the rate of acquisition of the skill but not its overall performance level of achievement. Experiment 2 showed that when the task criterion information is not well known to the subject, presentation of criterion information facilitates both the rate of acquisition and the overall performance level and, furthermore, is essential if configuration information feedback is to be utilized effectively. Experiment 3 showed that it is the combined presentation of criterion and configuration information feedback rather than the isolate presentation of either type of information alone, that facilitates learning and performance. Collectively, the findings from the three experiments suggest an interactive effect of prior knowledge by the learner and type of augmented information in facilitating the acquisition of skill, according to the constraints imposed in the task. The data are consistent with the proposal that the degrees of freedom in the information available to support motor skill learning must match the degrees of freedom to be constraint in the perceptual-motor workspace. PMID:15117661

  18. Terminal weather information management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alfred T.

    1990-01-01

    Since the mid-1960's, microburst/windshear events have caused at least 30 aircraft accidents and incidents and have killed more than 600 people in the United States alone. This study evaluated alternative means of alerting an airline crew to the presence of microburst/windshear events in the terminal area. Of particular interest was the relative effectiveness of conventional and data link ground-to-air transmissions of ground-based radar and low-level windshear sensing information on microburst/windshear avoidance. The Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator located at Ames Research Center was employed in a line oriented simulation of a scheduled round-trip airline flight from Salt Lake City to Denver Stapleton Airport. Actual weather en route and in the terminal area was simulated using recorded data. The microburst/windshear incident of July 11, 1988 was re-created for the Denver area operations. Six experienced airline crews currently flying scheduled routes were employed as test subjects for each of three groups: (1) A baseline group which received alerts via conventional air traffic control (ATC) tower transmissions; (2) An experimental group which received alerts/events displayed visually and aurally in the cockpit six miles (approx. 2 min.) from the microburst event; and (3) An additional experimental group received displayed alerts/events 23 linear miles (approx. 7 min.) from the microburst event. Analyses of crew communications and decision times showed a marked improvement in both situation awareness and decision-making with visually displayed ground-based radar information. Substantial reductions in the variability of decision times among crews in the visual display groups were also found. These findings suggest that crew performance will be enhanced and individual differences among crews due to differences in training and prior experience are significantly reduced by providing real-time, graphic display of terminal weather hazards.

  19. Optimization and static output-feedback control for half-car active suspensions with constrained information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Changzheng; Yu, Shenbo

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the static output-feedback control problem of active suspension systems with information structure constraints is investigated. In order to simultaneously improve the ride comfort and stability, a half car model is used. Other constraints such as suspension deflection, actuator saturation, and controller constrained information are also considered. A novel static output-feedback design method based on the variable substitution is employed in the controller design. A single-step linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem is solved to derive the initial feasible solution with a sparsity constraint. The initial infeasibility issue of the static output-feedback is resolved by using state-feedback information. Specifically, an optimization algorithm is proposed to search for less conservative results based on the feasible controller gain matrix. Finally, the validity of the designed controller for different road profiles is illustrated through numerical examples. The simulation results indicate that the optimized static output-feedback controller can achieve better suspension performances when compared with the feasible static output-feedback controller.

  20. Bimanual Coordination Learning with Different Augmented Feedback Modalities and Information Types.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shiau-Chuen; Chang, Erik Chihhung

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that bimanual coordination learning is more resistant to the removal of augmented feedback when acquired with auditory than with visual channel. However, it is unclear whether this differential "guidance effect" between feedback modalities is due to enhanced sensorimotor integration via the non-dominant auditory channel or strengthened linkage to kinesthetic information under rhythmic input. The current study aimed to examine how modalities (visual vs. auditory) and information types (continuous visuospatial vs. discrete rhythmic) of concurrent augmented feedback influence bimanual coordination learning. Participants either learned a 90°-out-of-phase pattern for three consecutive days with Lissajous feedback indicating the integrated position of both arms, or with visual or auditory rhythmic feedback reflecting the relative timing of the movement. The results showed diverse performance change after practice when the feedback was removed between Lissajous and the other two rhythmic groups, indicating that the guidance effect may be modulated by the type of information provided during practice. Moreover, significant performance improvement in the dual-task condition where the irregular rhythm counting task was applied as a secondary task also suggested that lower involvement of conscious control may result in better performance in bimanual coordination. PMID:26895286

  1. Bimanual Coordination Learning with Different Augmented Feedback Modalities and Information Types

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Shiau-Chuen; Chang, Erik Chihhung

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that bimanual coordination learning is more resistant to the removal of augmented feedback when acquired with auditory than with visual channel. However, it is unclear whether this differential “guidance effect” between feedback modalities is due to enhanced sensorimotor integration via the non-dominant auditory channel or strengthened linkage to kinesthetic information under rhythmic input. The current study aimed to examine how modalities (visual vs. auditory) and information types (continuous visuospatial vs. discrete rhythmic) of concurrent augmented feedback influence bimanual coordination learning. Participants either learned a 90°-out-of-phase pattern for three consecutive days with Lissajous feedback indicating the integrated position of both arms, or with visual or auditory rhythmic feedback reflecting the relative timing of the movement. The results showed diverse performance change after practice when the feedback was removed between Lissajous and the other two rhythmic groups, indicating that the guidance effect may be modulated by the type of information provided during practice. Moreover, significant performance improvement in the dual-task condition where the irregular rhythm counting task was applied as a secondary task also suggested that lower involvement of conscious control may result in better performance in bimanual coordination. PMID:26895286

  2. Teacher Feedback and Student Academic Achievement: Teacher Use of Student Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    In an era of professional standards for educators and teacher evaluations linked to measures of student achievement, researchers use data from student information systems to address research questions linking teacher feedback to student achievement. A quantitative study of teacher use of the Skyward student information system (SIS) was conducted…

  3. 78 FR 36190 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... request to review and approve a previously approved information collection requirement regarding IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism. A notice was published in the Federal Register at 78 FR 13057, on February 26... ADMINISTRATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; IT Dashboard...

  4. The Role of Informative and Ambiguous Feedback in Avoidance Behavior: Empirical and Computational Findings

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Sheynin, Jony; Myers, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Avoidance behavior is a critical component of many psychiatric disorders, and as such, it is important to understand how avoidance behavior arises, and whether it can be modified. In this study, we used empirical and computational methods to assess the role of informational feedback and ambiguous outcome in avoidance behavior. We adapted a computer-based probabilistic classification learning task, which includes positive, negative and no-feedback outcomes; the latter outcome is ambiguous as it might signal either a successful outcome (missed punishment) or a failure (missed reward). Prior work with this task suggested that most healthy subjects viewed the no-feedback outcome as strongly positive. Interestingly, in a later version of the classification task, when healthy subjects were allowed to opt out of (i.e. avoid) responding, some subjects (“avoiders”) reliably avoided trials where there was a risk of punishment, but other subjects (“non-avoiders”) never made any avoidance responses at all. One possible interpretation is that the “non-avoiders” valued the no-feedback outcome so positively on punishment-based trials that they had little incentive to avoid. Another possible interpretation is that the outcome of an avoided trial is unspecified and that lack of information is aversive, decreasing subjects’ tendency to avoid. To examine these ideas, we here tested healthy young adults on versions of the task where avoidance responses either did or did not generate informational feedback about the optimal response. Results showed that provision of informational feedback decreased avoidance responses and also decreased categorization performance, without significantly affecting the percentage of subjects classified as “avoiders.” To better understand these results, we used a modified Q-learning model to fit individual subject data. Simulation results suggest that subjects in the feedback condition adjusted their behavior faster following better

  5. Studying citizen science through adaptive management and learning feedbacks as mechanisms for improving conservation.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Rebecca; Gray, Steven; Sorensen, Amanda; Newman, Greg; Mellor, David; Newman, Greg; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy; LaDeau, Shannon; Biehler, Dawn; Crall, Alycia

    2016-06-01

    Citizen science has generated a growing interest among scientists and community groups, and citizen science programs have been created specifically for conservation. We examined collaborative science, a highly interactive form of citizen science, which we developed within a theoretically informed framework. In this essay, we focused on 2 aspects of our framework: social learning and adaptive management. Social learning, in contrast to individual-based learning, stresses collaborative and generative insight making and is well-suited for adaptive management. Adaptive-management integrates feedback loops that are informed by what is learned and is guided by iterative decision making. Participants engaged in citizen science are able to add to what they are learning through primary data collection, which can result in the real-time information that is often necessary for conservation. Our work is particularly timely because research publications consistently report a lack of established frameworks and evaluation plans to address the extent of conservation outcomes in citizen science. To illustrate how our framework supports conservation through citizen science, we examined how 2 programs enacted our collaborative science framework. Further, we inspected preliminary conservation outcomes of our case-study programs. These programs, despite their recent implementation, are demonstrating promise with regard to positive conservation outcomes. To date, they are independently earning funds to support research, earning buy-in from local partners to engage in experimentation, and, in the absence of leading scientists, are collecting data to test ideas. We argue that this success is due to citizen scientists being organized around local issues and engaging in iterative, collaborative, and adaptive learning. PMID:26585836

  6. NASA information resources management handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Handbook (NHB) implements recent changes to Federal laws and regulations involving the acquisition, management, and use of Federal Information Processing (FIP) resources. This document defines NASA's Information Resources Management (IRM) practices and procedures and is applicable to all NASA personnel. The dynamic nature of the IRM environment requires that the controlling management practices and procedures for an Agency at the leading edge of technology, such as NASA, must be periodically updated to reflect the changes in this environment. This revision has been undertaken to accommodate changes in the technology and the impact of new laws and regulations dealing with IRM. The contents of this document will be subject to a complete review annually to determine its continued applicability to the acquisition, management, and use of FIP resources by NASA. Updates to this document will be accomplished by page changes. This revision cancels NHB 2410.1D, dated April 1985.

  7. Image and information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tina L. (Inventor); Raney, Michael C. (Inventor); Dougherty, Dennis M. (Inventor); Kent, Peter C. (Inventor); Brucker, Russell X. (Inventor); Lampert, Daryl A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A system and methods through which pictorial views of an object's configuration, arranged in a hierarchical fashion, are navigated by a person to establish a visual context within the configuration. The visual context is automatically translated by the system into a set of search parameters driving retrieval of structured data and content (images, documents, multimedia, etc.) associated with the specific context. The system places hot spots, or actionable regions, on various portions of the pictorials representing the object. When a user interacts with an actionable region, a more detailed pictorial from the hierarchy is presented representing that portion of the object, along with real-time feedback in the form of a popup pane containing information about that region, and counts-by-type reflecting the number of items that are available within the system associated with the specific context and search filters established at that point in time.

  8. Image and information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tina L. (Inventor); Raney, Michael C. (Inventor); Dougherty, Dennis M. (Inventor); Kent, Peter C. (Inventor); Brucker, Russell X. (Inventor); Lampert, Daryl A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A system and methods through which pictorial views of an object's configuration, arranged in a hierarchical fashion, are navigated by a person to establish a visual context within the configuration. The visual context is automatically translated by the system into a set of search parameters driving retrieval of structured data and content (images, documents, multimedia, etc.) associated with the specific context. The system places ''hot spots'', or actionable regions, on various portions of the pictorials representing the object. When a user interacts with an actionable region, a more detailed pictorial from the hierarchy is presented representing that portion of the object, along with real-time feedback in the form of a popup pane containing information about that region, and counts-by-type reflecting the number of items that are available within the system associated with the specific context and search filters established at that point in time.

  9. Technology Requirements for Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Sara; Knoblock, Craig A.; Lannom, Larry

    2002-01-01

    This report provides the results of a panel study conducted into the technology requirements for information management in support of application domains of particular government interest, including digital libraries, mission operations, and scientific research. The panel concluded that it was desirable to have a coordinated program of R&D that pursues a science of information management focused on an environment typified by applications of government interest - highly distributed with very large amounts of data and a high degree of heterogeneity of sources, data, and users.

  10. MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

  11. Management Information in Tertiary Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, A. W.

    1981-01-01

    A college or university's management information system corresponds roughly to the institution's structure, with these elements in descending order in the hierarchy: policy and planning, a planning system, control and coordination, and typical operating systems (payroll, exams, scheduling, library, facilities assignments, and accounting…

  12. Qos Management in Real-Time Spatial Big Data Using Feedback Control Scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, S.; Bouazizi, E.; Faiz, S.

    2015-08-01

    Geographic Information System (GIS) is a computer system designed to capture, store, manipulate, analyze, manage, and present all types of spatial data. Spatial data, whether captured through remote sensors or large scale simulations has always been big and heterogenous. The issue of real-time and heterogeneity have been extremely important for taking effective decision. Thus, heterogeneous real-time spatial data management has become a very active research domain. Existing research has principally focused on querying of real-time spatial data and their updates. But the unpredictability of access to data maintain the behavior of the real-time GIS unstable. In this paper, we propose the use of the real-time Spatial Big Data and we define a new architecture called FCSA-RTSBD (Feedback Control Scheduling Architecture for Real-Time Spatial Big Data). The main objectives of this architecture are the following: take in account the heterogeneity of data, guarantee the data freshness, enhance the deadline miss ratio even in the presence of conflicts and unpredictable workloads and finally satisfy the requirements of users by the improving of the quality of service (QoS).

  13. 78 FR 70066 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA Stakeholder Feedback for the New FHA Single...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA Stakeholder Feedback for the New.... Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: FHA Stakeholder Feedback for the...

  14. Training for Information Management in a Company.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karivalo, Merja

    1989-01-01

    Argues that information resource management is an established philosophy that needs to be linked to human resources management and strategic planning in industrial companies. A training program for information management is presented, including training objectives, participants, contents, and structure. (CLB)

  15. Debriefing Can Reduce Misperceptions of Feedback: The Case of Renewable Resource Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qudrat-Ullah, Hassan

    2007-01-01

    According to the hypothesis of misperception of feedback, people's poor performance in renewable resource management tasks can be attributed to their general tendency to systematically misperceive the dynamics of bioeconomic systems. The thesis of this article is that dynamic decision performance can be improved by helping individuals develop more…

  16. Learning to Swim Using Video Modelling and Video Feedback within a Self-Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lao, So-An; Furlonger, Brett E.; Moore, Dennis W.; Busacca, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Although many adults who cannot swim are primarily interested in learning by direct coaching there are options that have a focus on self-directed learning. As an alternative a self-management program combined with video modelling, video feedback and high quality and affordable video technology was used to assess its effectiveness to assisting an…

  17. Developing Business Management Students' Persuasive Writing through Blog-Based Peer-Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayed, Osama H.

    2010-01-01

    The present study attempted to investigate the effect of using blog-based peer feedback on the persuasive writing of EFL business management students at the community college in Bisha, King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia. The study used a pre-test/post-test experimental and control group design. An experimental group and a control group were…

  18. Infrastructure of electronic information management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twitchell, G.D.

    2004-01-01

    The information technology infrastructure of an organization, whether it is a private, non-profit, federal, or academic institution, is key to delivering timely and high-quality products and services to its customers and stakeholders. With the evolution of the Internet and the World Wide Web, resources that were once "centralized" in nature are now distributed across the organization in various locations and often remote regions of the country. This presents tremendous challenges to the information technology managers, users, and CEOs of large world-wide corporations who wish to exchange information or get access to resources in today's global marketplace. Several tools and technologies have been developed over recent years that play critical roles in ensuring that the proper information infrastructure exists within the organization to facilitate this global information marketplace Such tools and technologies as JAVA, Proxy Servers, Virtual Private Networks (VPN), multi-platform database management solutions, high-speed telecommunication technologies (ATM, ISDN, etc.), mass storage devices, and firewall technologies most often determine the organization's success through effective and efficient information infrastructure practices. This session will address several of these technologies and provide options related to those that may exist and can be readily applied within Eastern Europe. ?? 2004 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

  19. Asteroids Outreach Toolkit Development: Using Iterative Feedback In Informal Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Vivian; Berendsen, M.; Gurton, S.; Dusenbery, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    The Night Sky Network is a collaboration of close to 350 astronomy clubs across the US that actively engage in public outreach within their communities. Since 2004, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific has been creating outreach ToolKits filled with carefully crafted sets of physical materials designed to help these volunteer clubs explain the wonders of the night sky to the public. The effectiveness of the ToolKit activities and demonstrations is the direct result of a thorough testing and vetting process. Find out how this iterative assessment process can help other programs create useful tools for both formal and informal educators. The current Space Rocks Outreach ToolKit focuses on explaining asteroids, comets, and meteorites to the general public using quick, big-picture activities that get audiences involved. Eight previous ToolKits cover a wide range of topics from the Moon to black holes. In each case, amateur astronomers and the public helped direct the development the activities along the way through surveys, focus groups, and active field-testing. The resulting activities have been embraced by the larger informal learning community and are enthusiastically being delivered to millions of people across the US and around the world. Each ToolKit is delivered free of charge to active Night Sky Network astronomy clubs. All activity write-ups are available free to download at the website listed here. Amateur astronomers receive frequent questions from the public about Earth impacts, meteors, and comets so this set of activities will help them explain the dynamics of these phenomena to the public. The Space Rocks ToolKit resources complement the Great Balls of Fire museum exhibit produced by Space Science Institute's National Center for Interactive Learning and scheduled for release in 2011. NSF has funded this national traveling exhibition and outreach ToolKit under Grant DRL-0813528.

  20. Feedback versus Information concerning Carbon Monoxide as an Early Intervention Strategy in Adolescent Smoking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, William B.; Evans, Richard I.

    1982-01-01

    Tested the efficacy of several programs using feedback about carbon monoxide as strategies for deterring experimentation with cigarettes in sixth-grade children (N=405). Compared to no-treatment controls, the only program to reduce experimentation with cigarettes was the information-only program. Several programs had increases in rates of…

  1. Conditions Fostering the Use of Information Feedback by Young Children. (Revised Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teager, Joyce

    Isolation of optimal instructional processes to provide information feedback and to motivate disadvantaged children was the goal of this comparative study of reinforcement contigencies. The subjects were 21 black children from 45 to 65 months of age. Children were ranked on the PPVT and a learning program pretest, then randomly assigned to three…

  2. The Informational Potential of the Nonverbal and Verbal Components of Feedback Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathers, Dale G.

    1979-01-01

    Identifies factors involved in nonverbal and verbal communicative behaviors which constitute feedback responses. Examines the informational potential of these behaviors in terms of the receivers' perceptions of themselves and the message sender and the effectiveness and efficiency with which receivers respond to a given message. (JMF)

  3. "Managing after the Merger": Feedback at BAS Case Analysis. Response to "Managing after the Merger" Case Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWine, Sue; Eicholtz, Mary M.; Walker, Juanie N.; Walker, Michael G.

    2000-01-01

    Offers two responses to the case study for management communication classes (presented in this same issue) examining issues of performance appraisals and employee feedback in a company after a recent merger. Outlines advice for coaching the supervisor on the performance appraisal process and in his understanding of cultural mergers. Examines…

  4. PROMIS (Procurement Management Information System)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The PROcurement Management Information System (PROMIS) provides both detailed and summary level information on all procurement actions performed within NASA's procurement offices at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It provides not only on-line access, but also schedules procurement actions, monitors their progress, and updates Forecast Award Dates. Except for a few computational routines coded in FORTRAN, the majority of the systems is coded in a high level language called NATURAL. A relational Data Base Management System called ADABAS is utilized. Certain fields, called descriptors, are set up on each file to allow the selection of records based on a specified value or range of values. The use of like descriptors on different files serves as the link between the falls, thus producing a relational data base. Twenty related files are currently being maintained on PROMIS.

  5. Firefighter feedback during active cooling: a useful tool for heat stress management?

    PubMed

    Savage, Robbie J; Lord, Cara; Larsen, Brianna L; Knight, Teagan L; Langridge, Peter D; Aisbett, Brad

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring an individual's thermic state in the workplace requires reliable feedback of their core temperature. However, core temperature measurement technology is expensive, invasive and often impractical in operational environments, warranting investigation of surrogate measures which could be used to predict core temperature. This study examines an alternative measure of an individual's thermic state, thermal sensation, which presents a more manageable and practical solution for Australian firefighters operating on the fireground. Across three environmental conditions (cold, warm, hot & humid), 49 Australian volunteer firefighters performed a 20-min fire suppression activity, immediately followed by 20 min of active cooling using hand and forearm immersion techniques. Core temperature (Tc) and thermal sensation (TS) were measured across the rehabilitation period at five minute intervals. Despite the decline in Tc and TS throughout the rehabilitation period, there was little similarity in the magnitude or rate of decline between each measure in any of the ambient conditions. Moderate to strong correlations existed between Tc and TS in the cool (0.41, p<0.05) and hot & humid (0.57, p<0.05) conditions, however this was resultant in strong correlation during the earlier stages of rehabilitation (first five minutes), which were not evident in the latter stages. Linear regression revealed TS to be a poor predictor of Tc in all conditions (SEE=0.45-0.54°C) with a strong trend for TS to over-predict Tc (77-80% of the time). There is minimal evidence to suggest that ratings of thermal sensation, which represent a psychophysical assessment of an individual's thermal comfort, are an accurate reflection of the response of an individual's core temperature. Ratings of thermal sensation can be highly variable amongst individuals, likely moderated by local skin temperature. In account of these findings, fire managers require a more reliable source of information to guide

  6. Information management systems for pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Thallinger, Gerhard G; Trajanoski, Slave; Stocker, Gernot; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2002-09-01

    The value of high-throughput genomic research is dramatically enhanced by association with key patient data. These data are generally available but of disparate quality and not typically directly associated. A system that could bring these disparate data sources into a common resource connected with functional genomic data would be tremendously advantageous. However, the integration of clinical and accurate interpretation of the generated functional genomic data requires the development of information management systems capable of effectively capturing the data as well as tools to make that data accessible to the laboratory scientist or to the clinician. In this review these challenges and current information technology solutions associated with the management, storage and analysis of high-throughput data are highlighted. It is suggested that the development of a pharmacogenomic data management system which integrates public and proprietary databases, clinical datasets, and data mining tools embedded in a high-performance computing environment should include the following components: parallel processing systems, storage technologies, network technologies, databases and database management systems (DBMS), and application services. PMID:12223050

  7. Information-reduced Carrier Synchronization of Iterative Decoded BPSK and QPSK using Soft Decision (Extrinsic) Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin; Valles, Esteban; Jones, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the carrier-phase estimation problem under low SNR conditions as are typical of turbo- and LDPC-coded applications. In previous publications by the first author, closed-loop carrier synchronization schemes for error-correction coded BPSK and QPSK modulation were proposed that were based on feeding back hard data decisions at the input of the loop, the purpose being to remove the modulation prior to attempting to track the carrier phase as opposed to the more conventional decision-feedback schemes that incorporate such feedback inside the loop. In this paper, we consider an alternative approach wherein the extrinsic soft information from the iterative decoder of turbo or LDPC codes is instead used as the feedback.

  8. Information management - Assessing the demand for information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, William H.

    1991-01-01

    Information demand is defined in terms of both information content (what information) and form (when, how, and where it is needed). Providing the information richness required for flight crews to be informed without overwhelming their information processing capabilities will require a great deal of automated intelligence. It is seen that the essence of this intelligence is comprehending and capturing the demand for information.

  9. Artificial Intelligence and Information Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Teruo

    After reviewing the recent popularization of the information transmission and processing technologies, which are supported by the progress of electronics, the authors describe that by the introduction of the opto-electronics into the information technology, the possibility of applying the artificial intelligence (AI) technique to the mechanization of the information management has emerged. It is pointed out that althuogh AI deals with problems in the mental world, its basic methodology relies upon the verification by evidence, so the experiment on computers become indispensable for the study of AI. The authors also describe that as computers operate by the program, the basic intelligence which is concerned in AI is that expressed by languages. This results in the fact that the main tool of AI is the logical proof and it involves an intrinsic limitation. To answer a question “Why do you employ AI in your problem solving”, one must have ill-structured problems and intend to conduct deep studies on the thinking and the inference, and the memory and the knowledge-representation. Finally the authors discuss the application of AI technique to the information management. The possibility of the expert-system, processing of the query, and the necessity of document knowledge-base are stated.

  10. The metamorphosis of information management

    SciTech Connect

    Gelernter, D.

    1989-08-01

    On the high plateau of modern computer hardware, software systems are arising that are more than fast data processors or glorified adding machines-they are information refineries that can transform mere facts into knowledge on a vast scale. For instance, information-refining programs might transform the low-level data that described a hospital patient, transportation network or factory into a high-level synopsis. They might convert electronic file cabinets full of data into authoritative discussions of the objects or events (patient histories, wildflowers or automobile accidents) contained in those files. The development of information refineries is intimately bound up with the growing role of parallelism in computer science. Parallel hardware consisting of multiple subcomputers in a single box has increased the computing power available to users. Parallel software makes it possible to tap this power, and frequently it offers elegant solutions to complex information-management problems. The author and investigators elsewhere have been exploring a number of approaches to building such information refineries. Two kinds of machine hold promise: the information filter, which transforms an incoming stream of data into higher-level knowledge, and the smart data base, which sorts out interesting patterns from records of many similar objects or event.

  11. Eco-Hydrological Feedback Dynamics: Application of Information Theory to multivariate timeseries data analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddell, B. L.; Kumar, P.

    2006-12-01

    Information-Theoretic approaches to the stochastic study of hydrology and other environmental sciences have become popular in recent years, owing to a greater availability of environmental data and the need to develop tools that can dissect the complex dynamics of environmental systems. Entropy-based metrics such at Transfer Entropy can go beyond correlation and uncover the cardinality of relationships between measured signals, and are therefore useful for the study of feedback-based complex environmental systems that are rich in data. Because information theoretic approaches to signal analysis are relatively immature, effort is needed to refine the technique in terms of algorithms, controls, and interpretation of results. A basic framework for environmental system analysis and interpretation is presented, and this framework is applied to simultaneous multivariate timeseries data. Eco-hydrological data from the Ameriflux network is examined, and the complex dynamics and feedbacks of the Eco-hydrological system are discussed.

  12. 75 FR 29572 - Information Collection; Grazing Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... published a 60-day notice (75 FR 3914) requesting comments on the proposed information collection. The... Bureau of Land Management Information Collection; Grazing Management AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: 30-day Notice and Request for Comments. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM)...

  13. Computer Aided Management for Information Processing Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akman, Ibrahim; Kocamustafaogullari, Kemal

    1995-01-01

    Outlines the nature of information processing projects and discusses some project management programming packages. Describes an in-house interface program developed to utilize a selected project management package (TIMELINE) by using Oracle Data Base Management System tools and Pascal programming language for the management of information system…

  14. School Management Information Systems in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Kamile

    2006-01-01

    Developments in information technologies have been impacting upon educational organizations. Principals have been using management information systems to improve the efficiency of administrative services. The aim of this research is to explore principals' perceptions about management information systems and how school management information…

  15. Using Feedback from Data Consumers to Capture Quality Information on Environmental Research Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaraju, A.; Klump, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Data quality information is essential to facilitate reuse of Earth science data. Recorded quality information must be sufficient for other researchers to select suitable data sets for their analysis and confirm the results and conclusions. In the research data ecosystem, several entities are responsible for data quality. Data producers (researchers and agencies) play a major role in this aspect as they often include validation checks or data cleaning as part of their work. It is possible that the quality information is not supplied with published data sets; if it is available, the descriptions might be incomplete, ambiguous or address specific quality aspects. Data repositories have built infrastructures to share data, but not all of them assess data quality. They normally provide guidelines of documenting quality information. Some suggests that scholarly and data journals should take a role in ensuring data quality by involving reviewers to assess data sets used in articles, and incorporating data quality criteria in the author guidelines. However, this mechanism primarily addresses data sets submitted to journals. We believe that data consumers will complement existing entities to assess and document the quality of published data sets. This has been adopted in crowd-source platforms such as Zooniverse, OpenStreetMap, Wikipedia, Mechanical Turk and Tomnod. This paper presents a framework designed based on open source tools to capture and share data users' feedback on the application and assessment of research data. The framework comprises a browser plug-in, a web service and a data model such that feedback can be easily reported, retrieved and searched. The feedback records are also made available as Linked Data to promote integration with other sources on the Web. Vocabularies from Dublin Core and PROV-O are used to clarify the source and attribution of feedback. The application of the framework is illustrated with the CSIRO's Data Access Portal.

  16. SU-E-J-196: Implementation of An In-House Visual Feedback System for Motion Management During Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, V; James, J; Wang, B; Ellerbusch, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To describe an in-house video goggle feedback system for motion management during simulation and treatment of radiation therapy patients. Methods: This video goggle system works by splitting and amplifying the video output signal directly from the Varian Real-Time Position Management (RPM) workstation or TrueBeam imaging workstation into two signals using a Distribution Amplifier. The first signal S[1] gets reconnected back to the monitor. The second signal S[2] gets connected to the input of a Video Scaler. The S[2] signal can be scaled, cropped and panned in real time to display only the relevant information to the patient. The output signal from the Video Scaler gets connected to an HDMI Extender Transmitter via a DVI-D to HDMI converter cable. The S[2] signal can be transported from the HDMI Extender Transmitter to the HDMI Extender Receiver located inside the treatment room via a Cat5e/6 cable. Inside the treatment room, the HDMI Extender Receiver is permanently mounted on the wall near the conduit where the Cat5e/6 cable is located. An HDMI cable is used to connect from the output of the HDMI Receiver to the video goggles. Results: This video goggle feedback system is currently being used at two institutions. At one institution, the system was just recently implemented for simulation and treatments on two breath-hold gated patients with 8+ total fractions over a two month period. At the other institution, the system was used to treat 100+ breath-hold gated patients on three Varian TrueBeam linacs and has been operational for twelve months. The average time to prepare the video goggle system for treatment is less than 1 minute. Conclusion: The video goggle system provides an efficient and reliable method to set up a video feedback signal for radiotherapy patients with motion management.

  17. Information Systems Coordinate Emergency Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The rescue crews have been searching for the woman for nearly a week. Hurricane Katrina devastated Hancock County, the southernmost point in Mississippi, and the woman had stayed through the storm in her beach house. There is little hope of finding her alive; the search teams know she is gone because the house is gone. Late at night in the art classroom of the school that is serving as the county s emergency operations center, Craig Harvey is discussing the search with the center s commander. Harvey is the Chief Operating Officer of a unique company called NVision Solutions Inc., based at NASA s Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, only a couple of miles away. He and his entire staff have set up a volunteer operation in the art room, supporting the emergency management efforts using technology and capabilities the company developed through its NASA partnerships. As he talks to the commander, Harvey feels an idea taking shape that might lead them to the woman s location. Working with surface elevation data and hydrological principles, Harvey creates a map showing how the floodwaters from the storm would have flowed along the topography of the region around the woman s former home. Using the map, search crews find the woman s body in 15 minutes. Recovering individuals who have been lost is a sad reality of emergency management in the wake of a disaster like Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But the sooner answers can be provided, the sooner a community s overall recovery can take place. When damage is extensive, resources are scattered, and people are in dire need of food, shelter, and medical assistance, the speed and efficiency of emergency operations can be the key to limiting the impact of a disaster and speeding the process of recovery. And a key to quick and effective emergency planning and response is geographic information. With a host of Earth-observing satellites orbiting the globe at all times, NASA generates an unmatched wealth of data about our ever

  18. The Eighth Stage of Information Management: Information Resources Management (IRM) vs. Knowledge Management (KM), and the Chief Information Officer (CIO) vs. the Chief Knowledge Officer (CKO).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Rui

    1998-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of the transfer point of information management to knowledge management (KM), what information resources management (IRM) does, and compares information and knowledge management and the roles of chief information officer (CIO) and chief knowledge officer (CKO). (PEN)

  19. Use of database management software in a management information system.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M

    1991-01-01

    If information is to play a useful role in the decision making process, an organization must design a system for capturing, organizing and presenting information from daily activities to its managers. Use of relational database management software to design a custom application as part of a management information system is both practical and cost effective. Designing a database management application is very challenging but well worth the effort, asserts the author of this case study. PMID:10119686

  20. Developing a Management Information Systems (MIS) Curriculum: Perspectives from MIS Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehie, Ike C.

    2002-01-01

    A management information systems (MIS) curriculum was developed through review of existing programs and feedback from 24 MIS practitioners. Key aspects of the role of the information systems professional were identified: knowledge of integrated business processes, programming skills, and technical skills in niche areas. (Contains 17 references.)…

  1. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  2. Government Services Information Infrastructure Management

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallini, J.S.; Aiken, R.J.

    1995-04-01

    The Government Services Information Infrastructure (GSII) is that portion of the NII used to link Government and its services, enables virtual agency concepts, protects privacy, and supports emergency preparedness needs. The GSII is comprised of the supporting telecommunications technologies, network and information services infrastructure and the applications that use these. The GSII is an enlightened attempt by the Clinton/Gore Administration to form a virtual government crossing agency boundaries to interoperate more closely with industry and with the public to greatly improve the delivery of government services. The GSII and other private sector efforts, will have a significant impact on the design, development, and deployment of the NII, even if only through the procurement of such services. The Federal Government must adopt new mechanisms and new paradigms for the management of the GSII, including improved acquisition and operation of GSII components in order to maximize benefits. Government requirements and applications will continue to evolv. The requirements from government services and users of form affinity groups that more accurately and effectively define these common requirements, that drive the adoption and use of industry standards, and that provide a significant technology marketplace.

  3. Towards Open Information Management in Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Yli-Hietanen, J; Niiranen, S

    2008-01-01

    The utilization of information technology as tool in health care is increasing. The main benefits stem from the fact that information in electronic form can be transferred to different locations rapidly and from the possibility to automate certain information management tasks. The current technological approach for this automation relies on structured, formally coded representation of information. We discuss the limitations of the current technological approach and present a viewpoint, grounded on previous research and the authors’ own experiences, on how to progress. We present that a bottleneck in the automation of the management of constantly evolving clinical information is caused by the fact that the current technological approach requires the formal coding of information to be static in nature. This inherently hinders the expandability of the information case space to be managed. We present a new paradigm entitled open information management targeting unlimited case spaces. We also present a conceptual example from clinical medicine demonstrating open information management principles and mechanisms. PMID:19415134

  4. Management Information Systems and the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    Britain's Further Education Unit (FEU) has continued to work in the areas of management information systems (MIS), particularly, computerized management information systems (CMIS), and their significance for curriculum management. Perceptions about the use of CMIS have been changed. Several reports have noted the limitations of existing systems in…

  5. Waste Information Management System-2012 - 12114

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, H.; Quintero, W.; Shoffner, P.; Lagos, L.; Roelant, D.

    2012-07-01

    The Waste Information Management System (WIMS) -2012 was updated to support the Department of Energy (DOE) accelerated cleanup program. The schedule compression required close coordination and a comprehensive review and prioritization of the barriers that impeded treatment and disposition of the waste streams at each site. Many issues related to waste treatment and disposal were potential critical path issues under the accelerated schedule. In order to facilitate accelerated cleanup initiatives, waste managers at DOE field sites and at DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., needed timely waste forecast and transportation information regarding the volumes and types of radioactive waste that would be generated by DOE sites over the next 40 years. Each local DOE site historically collected, organized, and displayed waste forecast information in separate and unique systems. In order for interested parties to understand and view the complete DOE complex-wide picture, the radioactive waste and shipment information of each DOE site needed to be entered into a common application. The WIMS application was therefore created to serve as a common application to improve stakeholder comprehension and improve DOE radioactive waste treatment and disposal planning and scheduling. WIMS allows identification of total forecasted waste volumes, material classes, disposition sites, choke points, technological or regulatory barriers to treatment and disposal, along with forecasted waste transportation information by rail, truck and inter-modal shipments. The Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida, developed and deployed the web-based forecast and transportation system and is responsible for updating the radioactive waste forecast and transportation data on a regular basis to ensure the long-term viability and value of this system. WIMS continues to successfully accomplish the goals and objectives set forth by DOE for this project. It has

  6. Opportunity for information search and the effect of false heart rate feedback.

    PubMed

    Barefoot, John C; Straub, Ronald B

    2005-01-01

    The role of information search in the attribution of physiological states was investigated by manipulating the subject's opportunity for information search following the presentation of false information about his heart-rate reactions to photographs of female nudes. Consistent with the self-persuasion hypothesis proposed by Valins, the rated attractiveness of the slides was not affected by the false heart-rate feedback for those subjects who were prevented from visually searching the slides. Those subjects who had ample opportunity to view the slides rated those slides accompanied by false information of a heart-rate change as more attractive than those slides which were not paired with a change in heart rate. PMID:17477208

  7. The Next-Generation Information Manager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varian, Hal R.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Master's program at the University of California at Berkeley's new School of Information Management and Systems, highlighting courses in information organization and retrieval, communication and networking, users and society, and management of information organization and systems; and the school's continuing education for information…

  8. Information Security Management - Part Of The Integrated Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Constantin Adrian

    2015-07-01

    The international management standards allow their integrated approach, thereby combining aspects of particular importance to the activity of any organization, from the quality management systems or the environmental management of the information security systems or the business continuity management systems. Although there is no national or international regulation, nor a defined standard for the Integrated Management System, the need to implement an integrated system occurs within the organization, which feels the opportunity to integrate the management components into a cohesive system, in agreement with the purpose and mission publicly stated. The issues relating to information security in the organization, from the perspective of the management system, raise serious questions to any organization in the current context of electronic information, reason for which we consider not only appropriate but necessary to promote and implement an Integrated Management System Quality - Environment - Health and Operational Security - Information Security

  9. Information management for entomology screening.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Jane; Huesing, Joseph; Simpson, Robert; Elands, Jack

    2004-02-01

    The successful introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops has created a revolutionary transformation of the agricultural industry with GM crops currently planted on some 130 million acres. Historically, agricultural companies were involved in the discovery of conventional insecticide chemistries in processes that were very similar to those in the pharmaceutical industry. With the introduction of GM technologies, the process has radically changed. The new process is best described as the pharmaceutical equivalent of a very large-scale limited clinical trial conducted at the discovery stage. For example, unlike pharmaceutical screens, GM crop discovery screens frequently involve live insects challenged with complex protein containing soups. Furthermore, the nature of the potential avenues for discovery mandates that assay models also support protein engineering, proteomics, and genomics efforts. The range in sample demand ranges from ultra-low to high throughput. Finally, regulatory and good business stewardship demands that data integrity and tractability is in place, from discovery through varietal introduction, to manage the information generated in support of a commercialized GM plant variety. The authors describe their discovery workflow and detail how they have customized a commercially available database software package to achieve an optimum configuration for entomology screening. PMID:15006147

  10. Manpower management information system /MIS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravette, M. C.; King, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    System of programs capable of building and maintaining data bank provides all levels of management with regular manpower evaluation reports and data source for special management exercises on manpower.

  11. A stage structure pest management model with impulsive state feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Guoping; Chen, Lansun; Xu, Weijian; Fu, Gang

    2015-06-01

    A stage structure pest management model with impulsive state feedback control is investigated. We get the sufficient condition for the existence of the order-1 periodic solution by differential equation geometry theory and successor function. Further, we obtain a new judgement method for the stability of the order-1 periodic solution of the semi-continuous systems by referencing the stability analysis for limit cycles of continuous systems, which is different from the previous method of analog of Poincarè criterion. Finally, we analyze numerically the theoretical results obtained.

  12. Stimulating Contributions to Public Goods through Information Feedback: Some Experimental Results

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Marco A.; Lee, Allen; Sundaram, Hari

    2016-01-01

    In traditional public good experiments participants receive an endowment from the experimenter that can be invested in a public good or kept in a private account. In this paper we present an experimental environment where participants can invest time during five days to contribute to a public good. Participants can make contributions to a linear public good by logging into a web application and performing virtual actions. We compared four treatments, with different group sizes and information of (relative) performance of other groups. We find that information feedback about performance of other groups has a small positive effect if we control for various attributes of the groups. Moreover, we find a significant effect of the contributions of others in the group in the previous day on the number of points earned in the current day. Our results confirm that people participate more when participants in their group participate more, and are influenced by information about the relative performance of other groups. PMID:27459070

  13. Toward information management in corporations (11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Yoshiaki

    PC/WS's proleferation on to the despk top of endusers result in high level of computer literacies to them, networking between host/departmental/personal equipments also prevails entire organizations. In these circumstance, information architecture and environments will rapidly change in 1990's. Information manager's roles would change in these informated organization. Their roles and responsibilities will shifts to similer ones as other managers roles like human/asset/purchase/financial resources management. Sprit responsibilities between Cief Information Officer and MIS manager also will be seen in 1990's.

  14. Creating a benefit management information database.

    PubMed

    Martin, R D

    1998-09-01

    In this case study, a real-life information technology conundrum is fictionalized to illustrate the potential benefits of retaining corporate knowledge through the creation of an information repository in a managed health care plan. PMID:10187587

  15. Electronic information sharing in air quality management

    SciTech Connect

    Handel, E.D.; Mitro, S.; Smith, E.C.; Tropea, L.C. Jr.; Koorse, S.J.; Cox, E.; Ahladas, J.

    1997-12-31

    The State Advisory Board on Air Pollution (SAB) was asked by the Virginia State Air Pollution Control Board to explore issues related to electronic information sharing in air quality management and to advise the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) on ways to set the scope, priority and long-term goals for electronic information sharing in air quality management.

  16. Management Information Gleaned from Automated Library Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawks, Carol Pitts

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of the need for automated library systems to provide management information to aid in decision making focuses on the automatic generation of reports. Examples of management information generated in collection development, acquisitions and serials, cataloging, online catalogs and circulation are described as well as possible uses of this…

  17. Information Literacy and the Introductory Management Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Jennifer S. A.; Gibbon, Cynthia A.

    2008-01-01

    This article proposes that the integration of information literacy standards into the management classroom can address underdeveloped student research strategies and promote effective use of print, digital, and free Web resources. Incorporating information literacy can support management educators in their need to balance disciplinary content,…

  18. Knowledge Management and Global Information Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umunadi, Ejiwoke Kennedy

    2014-01-01

    The paper looked at knowledge management and global information dissemination. Knowledge is a very powerful tool for survival, growth and development. It can be seen as the information, understanding and skills that you gain through education or experience. The paper was addressed under the following sub-headings: Knowledge management knowledge…

  19. Information and Knowledge Management: Dimensions and Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlögl, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Though literature on information and knowledge management is vast, there is much confusion concerning the meaning of these terms. Hence, this article should give some orientation and work out the main aspects of information and knowledge management. Method: An author co-citation analysis, which identified the main dimensions of…

  20. Public Management Information Systems: Theory and Prescription.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozeman, Barry; Bretschneider, Stuart

    1986-01-01

    The existing theoretical framework for research in management information systems (MIS) is criticized for its lack of attention to the external environment of organizations, and a new framework is developed which better accommodates MIS in public organizations: public management information systems. Four models of publicness that reflect external…

  1. TUBERCULOSIS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (TIMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TIMS is a Windows-based client/server application that assists health departments and other facilities to manage TB patients, to conduct TB surveillance activities, and to manage TB programs overall. TIMS provides for electronic transmission of TB surveillance data (OMB No. 0920-...

  2. Academic Information Management--A New Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Marshall Edward

    The design concept and initial development phases of academic information management (AIM) are discussed. The AIM concept is an attempt to serve three segments of academic management with data and models to support decision making. AIM is concerned with management and evaluation of instructional computing in areas other than direct computing (data…

  3. Challenges in Managing Information Extraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Warren H.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation studies information extraction (IE), the problem of extracting structured information from unstructured data. Example IE tasks include extracting person names from news articles, product information from e-commerce Web pages, street addresses from emails, and names of emerging music bands from blogs. IE is all increasingly…

  4. Disabilities Information Flow: A Disabilities Information Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Bin; Allison, Colin; Nicholl, J. Ross; Moodley, Luke; Roberts, Dave

    2006-01-01

    The Disabilities Information Flow (DIF) project at the University of St Andrews has sought to provide a means of efficiently managing all student disabilities information within the institution and provide appropriate role-based service interfaces for all staff who need to routinely interact with this information. This paper describes the software…

  5. Supporting Information Governance through Records and Information Management. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaczmarek, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The expanding scope of IT initiatives in higher education institutions now goes well beyond basic desktop and enterprise applications. IT is often asked to focus on efforts to establish good information-governance practices. The many aspects of information governance are often found in a records and information management (RIM) program, but not…

  6. Information management challenges of the EOS Data and Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Kenneth R.; Blake, Deborah J.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the current information management concepts that are embodied in the plans for the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is presented, and some of the technology development and application areas that are envisioned to be particularly challenging are introduced. The Information Management System (IMS) is the EOSDIS element that provides the primary interface between the science users and the data products and services of EOSDIS. The goals of IMS are to define a clear and complete set of functional requirements and to apply innovative methods and technologies to satisfy them. The information management functions are described in detail, and some applicable technolgies are discussed. Some of the general issues affecting the successful development and operation of the information management element are addressed.

  7. Waste Management Information System (WMIS) User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    R. E. Broz

    2008-12-22

    This document provides the user of the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) instructions on how to use the WMIS software. WMIS allows users to initiate, track, and close waste packages. The modular design supports integration and utilization of data throuh the various stages of waste management. The phases of the waste management work process include generation, designation, packaging, container management, procurement, storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal.

  8. An Exploration into Framing Effects and Information Preferences: Implications for the Design of Energy Feedback Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Brown, Peter

    A recent topic in the energy industry involves developing strategies to reduce the necessary peak production capacity of our future electricity infrastructure. One of these strategies is promoting behavioral change among individual energy consumers. An inherent problem with electricity consumption is that electricity is invisible, intangible, and abstract. Interfaces that provide people with useful feedback on their usage can help with understanding and reduction of consumption. These interfaces intend to empower individuals with ability to adopt less wasteful energy consumption behaviors. Skillful HCI design will include attention to informational preferences, and framing effects due to presentation choices. An online questionnaire was utilized to explore this domain, and the results identified design requirements for a home feedback interface. The final dataset contained responses from 36 male and 49 female United States residents. Cost () was perceived as the most useful metric and kW as the least useful. Respondent preference was expressed for lower levels of automation, which was not attributable to distrust of automation. Further, a test of framings effects showed a higher likelihood to change behavior to save 100 dollars per year than 2 per week (U=1248.5, p=0.001). A feedback interface design based on the questionnaire results was used in the second phase of the research. A 2x2x2 factorial design compared the effects of goal-type (specific vs. open-ended), metric-use ( vs. kWh), and visualization (graphical vs. text-only) on user experience, learning and behavior during a consumption reduction task. Results showed that goal-type affects the amount of diagnostic behavior conducted by participants (U=351.0, p=0.001). Goal-type and metric-use independently affect participant belief that they could reduce their consumption in their real home with the same feedback shown in the task, F(df=1,39)=24.77, p=0.001; F(df=1,39)=5.55, p=0.05. In addition, visualization

  9. Knowledge and information management for integrated water resource management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watershed information systems that integrate data and analytical tools are critical enabling technologies to support Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) by converting data into information, and information into knowledge. Many factors bring people to the table to participate in an IWRM fra...

  10. Managing Personal and Group Collections of Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Shawn R.; Wragg, Stephen D.; Chen, James R.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The internet revolution has dramatically increased the amount of information available to users. Various tools such as search engines have been developed to help users find the information they need from this vast repository. Users often also need tools to help manipulate the growing amount of useful information they have discovered. Current tools available for this purpose are typically local components of web browsers designed to manage URL bookmarks. They provide limited functionalities to handle high information complexities. To tackle this have created DIAMS, an agent-based tool to help users or groups manage their information collections and share their collections with other. the main features of DIAMS are described here.

  11. Toward information management in corporations (5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Masayuki

    Information storage media are basic elements in office automation systems toward information management in corporations. For information manages, it is important to know characteristics of them. But recently, it becomes more and more difficult to know how to utilize the media, because of complicated and fast-moving technical trend in them. So I classify information storage media into paper media, film media, magnetic media, optical media and semiconductor media, and briefly review characteristics, usage, history, technical trend and so on about the each classified one. Then the point of how to make good use of information storage media in corporations is shown.

  12. Information Management in Agricultural Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samaha, E. K.

    1985-01-01

    Main problems in dissemination of agricultural research results, provision of library and documentation services, development of person-to-person communication and communication of information to decision-makers, farmers, and other end-users are outlined and suggestions for improvements are offered. International information systems are described…

  13. Developing a Management Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Michael

    This paper is based on the assumption that in shaping academic strategies for long-range planning purposes, educational institutions must be able to gather adequate information on which to base administrative decisions. Information on how the institution has operated in the past as well as how it is currently operating are critical items for valid…

  14. Trust management of information vital.

    PubMed

    Rayfield, Jason

    2005-02-01

    The Freedom of Information (FOI) Act, which came into force on 1 January this year, requires all NHS bodies to disclose, when requested, any information they hold. Jason Rayfield reports on the work done by legal firm Morgan Cole to prepare NHS Trusts to deal with their responsibilities under the new legislation. PMID:15729999

  15. Core Competencies in Information Management Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, G. E.; Corbitt, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses core competencies in library and information science and in information systems to use as a background for an examination of core competencies in information management. Suggests a set of core competencies and educational outcomes that might be applied to curricula in both developed and developing countries. (Author/LRW)

  16. Insider Threat and Information Security Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles-Kemp, Lizzie; Theoharidou, Marianthi

    The notion of insider has multiple facets. An organization needs to identify which ones to respond to. The selection, implementetion and maintenance of information security countermeasures requires a complex combination of organisational policies, functions and processes, which form Information Security Management. This chapter examines the role of current information security management practices in addressing the insider threat. Most approaches focus on frameworks for regulating insider behaviour and do not allow for the various cultural responses to the regulatory and compliance framework. Such responses are not only determined by enforcement of policies and awareness programs, but also by various psychological and organisational factors at an individual or group level. Crime theories offer techniques that focus on such cultural responses and can be used to enhance the information security management design. The chapter examines the applicability of several crime theories and concludes that they can contribute in providing additional controls and redesign of information security management processes better suited to responding to the insider threat.

  17. Information requirements of self-managing teams

    SciTech Connect

    Van Aken, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    In response to the significant challenges organizations face today, many managers have put in place continuous improvement efforts to help the organization on enhance its competitive position. A key element of continuous improvement efforts is employee involvement, and one of the most complex, mature, and effective forms of employee involvement is self-managing teams. A self-managing team is a group of employees, usually eight to fifteen, which is responsible for planning, implementing, controlling, and improving work processes. There are many characteristics of self-managing teams which are discussed frequently in the literature and are common topics of seminars and workshops on SMTs, including the role of the first-line supervisor, the structure of teams, the training necessary, and the pay system for SMTs. However, one area which has not been as widely researched is the role of information - what types of information do self-managing teams need? This paper addresses this question. Results from a multiple case study research project focusing on the information requirements of SMTs are presented. Specifically, seven types of information SMTs need are identified, as well as general characteristics of the information system. By information system, I mean very broadly, the system (both formal and informal) which provides information of any kind to a self-managing team. The results of this research can be thought of as ``design features`` for an information system to support SMTs. Practicing managers can use these design features in two ways: they can design them into beginning SMT efforts; or, for SMTs already established, managers can compare them to the existing information system and adjust accordingly.

  18. Information requirements of self-managing teams

    SciTech Connect

    Van Aken, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    In response to the significant challenges organizations face today, many managers have put in place continuous improvement efforts to help the organization on enhance its competitive position. A key element of continuous improvement efforts is employee involvement, and one of the most complex, mature, and effective forms of employee involvement is self-managing teams. A self-managing team is a group of employees, usually eight to fifteen, which is responsible for planning, implementing, controlling, and improving work processes. There are many characteristics of self-managing teams which are discussed frequently in the literature and are common topics of seminars and workshops on SMTs, including the role of the first-line supervisor, the structure of teams, the training necessary, and the pay system for SMTs. However, one area which has not been as widely researched is the role of information - what types of information do self-managing teams need This paper addresses this question. Results from a multiple case study research project focusing on the information requirements of SMTs are presented. Specifically, seven types of information SMTs need are identified, as well as general characteristics of the information system. By information system, I mean very broadly, the system (both formal and informal) which provides information of any kind to a self-managing team. The results of this research can be thought of as design features'' for an information system to support SMTs. Practicing managers can use these design features in two ways: they can design them into beginning SMT efforts; or, for SMTs already established, managers can compare them to the existing information system and adjust accordingly.

  19. American Health Information Management Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stakeholders Code-Check™ ICD-10 Trainer Program Privacy & Security Overview HIM Role Education Certification P&S Month Informatics & ... Sponsorship Events Calendar Of Events HIP Week Privacy & Security Month CAREER & STUDENT CENTER Health Information 101 What ...

  20. Resource Information Management in Chinese Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Hua; Cui, Chen-Zhou; Li, Lian; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2008-06-01

    Information technology has been affecting on all fields of traditional scientific research deeply. Virtual Observatory is a typical example of combination of the latest information technologies with astronomy. Taking advantages of advanced information technologies, for example, Grid technology, it aims to achieve the seamless and global access to astronomical information and maximum scientific output of huge modern astronomic datasets. In the process of design and implementation of resource information system for Chinese Virtual Observatory, the authors adopt Open Grid Service Architecture (OGSA) as its infrastructure, and all resources are managed in the system as services. Resource management, especially resource registry and discovery is a key consideration for both Grid and Virtual Observatory, which affects directly on the performance of the whole system. Based on OGSA and one of its implementations, GT3, this paper describes the design and implementation of resource information management system in Chinese Virtual Observatory.

  1. Engineering Information Infrastructure for Product Lifecycle Managment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Fumihiko

    For proper management of total product life cycle, it is fundamentally important to systematize design and engineering information about product systems. For example, maintenance operation could be more efficiently performed, if appropriate parts design information is available at the maintenance site. Such information shall be available as an information infrastructure for various kinds of engineering operations, and it should be easily accessible during the whole product life cycle, such as transportation, marketing, usage, repair/upgrade, take-back and recycling/disposal. Different from the traditional engineering database, life cycle support information has several characteristic requirements, such as flexible extensibility, distributed architecture, multiple viewpoints, long-time archiving, and product usage information, etc. Basic approaches for managing engineering information infrastructure are investigated, and various information contents and associated life cycle applications are discussed.

  2. Managing geometric information with a data base management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dube, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    The strategies for managing computer based geometry are described. The computer model of geometry is the basis for communication, manipulation, and analysis of shape information. The research on integrated programs for aerospace-vehicle design (IPAD) focuses on the use of data base management system (DBMS) technology to manage engineering/manufacturing data. The objectives of IPAD is to develop a computer based engineering complex which automates the storage, management, protection, and retrieval of engineering data. In particular, this facility must manage geometry information as well as associated data. The approach taken on the IPAD project to achieve this objective is discussed. Geometry management in current systems and the approach taken in the early IPAD prototypes are examined.

  3. Information needs for natural fire management planning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, David; Bancroft, Larry; Nichols, Thomas; Stohlgren, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    The development and implementation of an effective natural fire management program require a clear definition of goals and objectives, an ever-expanding information base, and effective program evaluation. Examples are given from Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

  4. Information Management Strategic Plan. Information: The fuel for success

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    Reliable information is key to the ultimate success of the Departmental Strategic Plan. To help ensure that success, this Information Management Strategic Plan has been developed, which evolved from and directly supports the Departmental Strategic Plan and the Human Resources and Administration Strategic Plan.

  5. The Information Support System: Management Information for Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Nancy A.

    The Information Support System (ISS) is a management information system developed for the National Drug Education Program (NDEP). The major components of the ISS are: (1) the Project Growth Record which provides a tool for project self-evaluation and for communication between NDEP project officers and project directors; (2) the Quarterly Project…

  6. Developing a theory of the societal lifecycle of cigarette smoking : explaining and anticipating trends using information feedback.

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Nancy S.; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Richardson, George P.

    2010-12-01

    Cigarette smoking presented the most significant public health challenge in the United States in the 20th Century and remains the single most preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in this country. A number of System Dynamics models exist that inform tobacco control policies. We reviewed them and discuss their contributions. We developed a theory of the societal lifecycle of smoking, using a parsimonious set of feedback loops to capture historical trends and explore future scenarios. Previous work did not explain the long-term historical patterns of smoking behaviors. Much of it used stock-and-flow to represent the decline in prevalence in the recent past. With noted exceptions, information feedbacks were not embedded in these models. We present and discuss our feedback-rich conceptual model and illustrate the results of a series of simulations. A formal analysis shows phenomena composed of different phases of behavior with specific dominant feedbacks associated with each phase. We discuss the implications of our society's current phase, and conclude with simulations of what-if scenarios. Because System Dynamics models must contain information feedback to be able to anticipate tipping points and to help identify policies that exploit leverage in a complex system, we expanded this body of work to provide an endogenous representation of the century-long societal lifecycle of smoking.

  7. Laboratory Information Systems Management and Operations.

    PubMed

    Cucoranu, Ioan C

    2015-06-01

    The main mission of a laboratory information system (LIS) is to manage workflow and deliver accurate results for clinical management. Successful selection and implementation of an anatomic pathology LIS is not complete unless it is complemented by specialized information technology support and maintenance. LIS is required to remain continuously operational with minimal or no downtime and the LIS team has to ensure that all operations are compliant with the mandated rules and regulations. PMID:26065790

  8. Laboratory Information Systems Management and Operations.

    PubMed

    Cucoranu, Ioan C

    2016-03-01

    The main mission of a laboratory information system (LIS) is to manage workflow and deliver accurate results for clinical management. Successful selection and implementation of an anatomic pathology LIS is not complete unless it is complemented by specialized information technology support and maintenance. LIS is required to remain continuously operational with minimal or no downtime and the LIS team has to ensure that all operations are compliant with the mandated rules and regulations. PMID:26851664

  9. Incentive Issues in Information Security Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chul Ho

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation studies three incentive issues in information security management. The first essay studies contract issues between a firm that outsources security functions and a managed security service provider (MSSP) that provides security functions to the firm. Since MSSP and firms cannot observe each other's actions, both can suffer…

  10. Turning information into knowledge for rangeland management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The kind of knowledge system that will be capable of meeting the needs of rangeland managers will evolve as scientists, technology specialists, managers, and biologists find ways to integrate the ever expanding array of information systems and tools to meet their needs. The tools and techniques high...

  11. The Role of Feedback in the Assimilation of Information in Prediction Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolly, Richard Donald

    2011-01-01

    Leveraging the knowledge of an organization is an ongoing challenge that has given rise to the field of knowledge management. Yet, despite spending enormous sums of organizational resources on Information Technology (IT) systems, executives recognize there is much more knowledge to harvest. Prediction markets are emerging as one tool to help…

  12. Detection of the dominant direction of information flow and feedback links in densely interconnected regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Maslov, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    Background Finding the dominant direction of flow of information in densely interconnected regulatory or signaling networks is required in many applications in computational biology and neuroscience. This is achieved by first identifying and removing links which close up feedback loops in the original network and hierarchically arranging nodes in the remaining network. In mathematical language this corresponds to a problem of making a graph acyclic by removing as few links as possible and thus altering the original graph in the least possible way. The exact solution of this problem requires enumeration of all cycles and combinations of removed links, which, as an NP-hard problem, is computationally prohibitive even for modest-size networks. Results We introduce and compare two approximate numerical algorithms for solving this problem: the probabilistic one based on a simulated annealing of the hierarchical layout of the network which minimizes the number of "backward" links going from lower to higher hierarchical levels, and the deterministic, "greedy" algorithm that sequentially cuts the links that participate in the largest number of feedback cycles. We find that the annealing algorithm outperforms the deterministic one in terms of speed, memory requirement, and the actual number of removed links. To further improve a visual perception of the layout produced by the annealing algorithm, we perform an additional minimization of the length of hierarchical links while keeping the number of anti-hierarchical links at their minimum. The annealing algorithm is then tested on several examples of regulatory and signaling networks/pathways operating in human cells. Conclusion The proposed annealing algorithm is powerful enough to performs often optimal layouts of protein networks in whole organisms, consisting of around ~104 nodes and ~105 links, while the applicability of the greedy algorithm is limited to individual pathways with ~100 vertices. The considered examples

  13. Development of an Interval Management Algorithm Using Ground Speed Feedback for Delayed Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Swieringa, Kurt A.; Underwood, Matthew C.; Abbott, Terence; Leonard, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    One of the goals of NextGen is to enable frequent use of Optimized Profile Descents (OPD) for aircraft, even during periods of peak traffic demand. NASA is currently testing three new technologies that enable air traffic controllers to use speed adjustments to space aircraft during arrival and approach operations. This will allow an aircraft to remain close to their OPD. During the integration of these technologies, it was discovered that, due to a lack of accurate trajectory information for the leading aircraft, Interval Management aircraft were exhibiting poor behavior. NASA's Interval Management algorithm was modified to address the impact of inaccurate trajectory information and a series of studies were performed to assess the impact of this modification. These studies show that the modification provided some improvement when the Interval Management system lacked accurate trajectory information for the leading aircraft.

  14. Information Management Software: Guidelines for Decision-Making and Information Management Software--A Selected Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazlauskas, Edward John; Ingebretsen, Dorothy L.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the categories of available information management software, and provides guidelines for needs assessment, software selection, testing, and evaluation. The annotated bibliography cites general discussions and program reviews for the following types of software: file management, general database management, bibliographic management,…

  15. Office of Legacy Management. Information and Records Management. Transition Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    2004-03-01

    The Office of Legacy Management (LM) is an integral part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) strategy to ensure that legacy liabilities of former nuclear weapons production sites are properly managed following the completion of environmental cleanup activities. LM will work with each site using an integrated team approach to ensure a successful transition. Part of this process will include transition of Government records and information. The Office of Legacy Management Information and Records Management Transition Guidance focuses on LM’s goal to preserve and protect legacy records and information. This guidance document establishes a framework for the transfer of records management responsibilities for sites transferring to LM. It describes the requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for the efficient and cost-effective transfer of custody, ownership, and management of records and other information products from the transfer site to LM. Records management practices are critical to the functions of Federal agencies because records provide information about, or evidence of, the organization, functions, policies, decisions, procedures, operations, or other activities. Therefore, the information generated by an agency is created, maintained, and dispositioned through records management processes that ensure the appropriate preservation and retrieval of essential information. Because of their intrinsic value, best practices to preserve information and records should be utilized when records are transferred from one organization to another. As the transfer program completes cleanup activities at closure sites, a transitional process will facilitate the transparent shift in the management of site records activities to LM. The roles and responsibilities of the transfer site and/or program and LM described in this document are a necessary foundation for cooperation and coordination and are essential to the successful transition of records and

  16. Managing Information On Technical Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, Lemuel E., III; Hammond, Dana P.

    1993-01-01

    Technical Requirements Analysis and Control Systems/Initial Operating Capability (TRACS/IOC) computer program provides supplemental software tools for analysis, control, and interchange of project requirements so qualified project members have access to pertinent project information, even if in different locations. Enables users to analyze and control requirements, serves as focal point for project requirements, and integrates system supporting efficient and consistent operations. TRACS/IOC is HyperCard stack for use on Macintosh computers running HyperCard 1.2 or later and Oracle 1.2 or later.

  17. The Humanity in Management Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausner, David

    More emphasis should be placed on "human factors" in the management information systems (MIS). They should be tailored to their users--the administrators, faculty, and students. Easy communication with an information system is a basic necessity, just as is the ability to get simpler answers to the most complex questions. All levels of the…

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EIMS) FACT SHEET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the fact sheet is to provide information about the US EPA Office of Research and Developments Environmental Information Management System. The fact sheet indicates the type of records that are in EIMS, systems that are integrated with EIMS as well as some highligh...

  19. Improving Ohio's Education Management Information System (EMIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    Due to legislative mandate, the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) was required to develop a system (the Education Management Information System) that would increase the amount of information available to state-level policy makers and the public. Some recommendations for improving the function of EMIS are offered in this report. The text provides…

  20. Nuclear Power: Problems in Information Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, William

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the problems encountered at the Duquesne Light Company of Pittsburgh's nuclear power plant as the result of an inability to process information effectively and keep pace with technological change. The creation of a separate division trained and directed to manage the plant's information flows is described and evaluated. (CLB)

  1. Intranets: Considerations for the Information Services Manager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Paul

    1997-01-01

    This article identifies benefits of using Internet technologies in an organization's intranet or internal information system: ease-of-use, one interface, implementation cost, access, information services (flat content and interactive intranets), support desks (via Web services and e-mail), document management. Discusses the impact of intranets on…

  2. Managing Records as Evidence and Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Richard J.

    For the past three decades, policies regarding a variety of information issues have emanated from federal agencies, legislative chambers, and corporate boardrooms. Records policies are critically important for records professionals to develop and use as a means of strategically managing the information and evidence found in the millions of records…

  3. Computerized management information systems and organizational structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zannetos, Z. S.; Sertel, M. R.

    1970-01-01

    The computerized management of information systems and organizational structures is discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) critical factors favoring centralization and decentralization of organizations, (2) classification of organizations by relative structure, (3) attempts to measure change in organization structure, and (4) impact of information technology developments on organizational structure changes.

  4. Cooperative Data Management for Information Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Martha E.

    The Association of Information Dissemination Centers (ASIDIC) formed the Cooperative Data Management Committee to address the problems of information center operators and data base suppliers. The number of operating centers in the U.S. is limited and their future expansion in numbers and in type of services, will depend on the education of users.…

  5. Management Information Systems: Applications to Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkin, Belle Ruth

    An orientation to management information systems (MIS) is offered which presents information about MIS in the context of public education and suggests some considerations that should be taken into account in designing and operating such systems. MIS is defined as a set of operating procedures that act as a control system to automatically provide…

  6. Incorporating Video Feedback into Self-Management Training to Promote Generalization of Social Initiations by Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deitchman, Carole; Reeve, Sharon A.; Reeve, Kenneth F.; Progar, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    Self-monitoring is a well-studied and widely used self-management skill in which a person observes and records his or her own behavior. Video feedback (VFB) occurs when an instructor videotapes a child's performances and reviews the footage with the child and potentially allows the child to score or evaluate their own behavior. A multiple-probe…

  7. Information management, today and tomorrow. [acquisition, manipulation, transfer, and display of information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Current problems and future trends in information management are briefly summarized in relation to scientific and technical information management systems and management of management information (planning, marketing, and operations).

  8. Experience feedback committee in emergency medicine: a tool for security management

    PubMed Central

    Lecoanet, André; Sellier, Elodie; Carpentier, Françoise; Maignan, Maxime; Seigneurin, Arnaud; François, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Objective Emergency departments are high-risk structures. The objective was to analyse the functioning of an experience feedback committee (EFC), a security management tool for the analysis of incidents in a medical department. Methods We conducted a descriptive study based on the analysis of the written documents produced by the EFC between November 2009 and May 2012. We performed a double analysis of all incident reports, meeting minutes and analysis reports. Results During the study period, there were 22 meetings attended by 15 professionals. 471 reported incidents were transmitted to the EFC. Most of them (95%) had no consequence for the patients. Only one reported incident led to the patient's death. 12 incidents were analysed thoroughly and the committee decided to set up 14 corrective actions, including eight guideline writing actions, two staff trainings, two resource materials provisions and two organisational changes. Conclusions The staff took part actively in the EFC. Following the analysis of incidents, the EFC was able to set up actions at the departmental level. Thus, an EFC seems to be an appropriate security management tool for an emergency department. PMID:23964063

  9. Integrated image information management: research issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrotra, Rajiv; Pierson, William E., Jr.

    1995-06-01

    A vast number of applications including defense, medical, manufacturing, law enforcement, digital library, education, space exploration, weather forecasting, and entertainment require efficient management of huge collections of nonalphanumeric data. The most common and important nonalphanumeric data in most of these applications is image data. Owing to the availability of a variety of visual sensors, several large collections of images and related anciliary data exists and are rapidly growing. Examples of such collections include LANDSAT, weather, medical, and DoD target signature images. Unfortunately, in most cases only a fraction of the collected data is ever utilized to its full potential. The primary reason for this under-utilization is the lack of pictorial data management techniques/systems. Conventional data management systems are not designed to handle pictorial data in an integrated fashion, i.e., images and alphanumeric data are not treated equally. In such systems, an image is stored as a tag field in the description of some entity. Images are not entities and they cannot be key fields. Furthermore, content-based retrieval of images and related data is not possible. Therefore, new data management technologies need to be developed for an integrated management of textual and imagery data. This requires a clear understanding of the requirements and desireable characteristics of a pictorial data management system. In almost all image information management (or integrated image database) applications, image information modeling, content-based image information retrieval, and memeory management are the most important issues to be resolved. In this paper, the requirements of an integrated image information management system and the challenges posed by image data from the data modeling, the content-based retrieval, and the memory management viewpoints are discussed.

  10. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  11. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well-being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Education Division/FE, Office of Human Resources and Education.

  12. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA' objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  13. Effectiveness of In-Home Feedback Devices in Conjunction with Energy Use Information on Residential Energy Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rungta, Shaily

    Residential energy consumption accounts for 22% of the total energy use in the United States. The consumer's perception of energy usage and conservation are very inaccurate which is leading to growing number of individuals who try to seek out ways to use energy more wisely. Hence behavioral change in consumers with respect to energy use, by providing energy use feedback may be important in reducing home energy consumption. Real-time energy information feedback delivered via technology along with feedback interventions has been reported to produce up to 20 percent declines in residential energy consumption through past research and pilot studies. There are, however, large differences in the estimates of the effect of these different types of feedback on energy use. As part of the Energize Phoenix Program, (a U.S. Department of Energy funded program), a Dashboard Study was conducted by the Arizona State University to estimate the impact of real-time, home-energy displays in conjunction with other feedback interventions on the residential rate of energy consumption in Phoenix, while also creating awareness and encouragement to households to reduce energy consumption. The research evaluates the effectiveness of these feedback initiatives. In the following six months of field experiment, a selected number of low-income multi-family apartments in Phoenix, were divided in three groups of feedback interventions, where one group received residential energy use related education and information, the second group received the same education as well as was equipped with the in-home feedback device and the third was given the same education, the feedback device and added budgeting information. Results of the experiment at the end of the six months did not lend a consistent support to the results from literature and past pilot studies. The data revealed a statistically insignificant reduction in energy consumption for the experiment group overall and inconsistent results for

  14. 75 FR 23218 - Information Collection; Inventory Property Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... Farm Service Agency Information Collection; Inventory Property Management AGENCY: Farm Service Agency... Management. The information is used to evaluate applicant requests to purchase inventory property, determine... Desk Officer for Agriculture, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management...

  15. 78 FR 47273 - Information Collection; Inventory Property Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Farm Service Agency Information Collection; Inventory Property Management AGENCY: Farm Service Agency... Inventory Property Management. The information is used to evaluate applicant requests to purchase inventory... Desk Officer for Agriculture, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management...

  16. 75 FR 56501 - Information Collection; Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Information Collection; Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys... organizations on the new information collection, the Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys. DATES: Comments... Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys. OMB Number:...

  17. Modeling for Policy Change: A Feedback Perspective on Improving the Effectiveness of Coastal and Marine Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robadue, Donald D., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Those advocating for effective management of the use of coastal areas and ecosystems have long aspired for an approach to governance that includes information systems with the capability to predict the end results of various courses of action, monitor the impacts of decisions and compare results with those predicted by computer models in order to…

  18. An Integrated Information System for Supporting Quality Management Tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, N.; Helmreich, W.

    2004-08-01

    In a competitive environment, well defined processes become the strategic advantage of a company. Hence, targeted Quality Management ensures efficiency, trans- parency and, ultimately, customer satisfaction. In the particular context of a Space Test Centre, a num- ber of specific Quality Management standards have to be applied. According to the revision of ISO 9001 dur- ing 2000, and due to the adaptation of ECSS-Q20-07, process orientation and data analysis are key tasks for ensuring and evaluating the efficiency of a company's processes. In line with these requirements, an integrated management system for accessing the necessary infor- mation to support Quality Management and other proc- esses has been established. Some of its test-related fea- tures are presented here. Easy access to the integrated management system from any work place at IABG's Space Test Centre is ensured by means of an intranet portal. It comprises a full set of quality-related process descriptions, information on test facilities, emergency procedures, and other relevant in- formation. The portal's web interface provides direct access to a couple of external applications. Moreover, easy updating of all information and low cost mainte- nance are features of this integrated information system. The timely and transparent management of non- conformances is covered by a dedicated NCR database which incorporates full documentation capability, elec- tronic signature and e-mail notification of concerned staff. A search interface allows for queries across all documented non-conformances. Furthermore, print ver- sions can be generated at any stage in the process, e.g. for distribution to customers. Feedback on customer satisfaction is sought through a web-based questionnaire. The process is initiated by the responsible test manager through submission of an e- mail that contains a hyperlink to a secure website, ask- ing the customer to complete the brief online form, which is directly fed to a database

  19. A Virtual Emergency Telemedicine Serious Game in Medical Training: A Quantitative, Professional Feedback-Informed Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Riana; Marangos, Charis; Kyriacou, Efthyvoulos; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Dafli, Eleni; Pattichis, Constantinos S

    2015-01-01

    Background Serious games involving virtual patients in medical education can provide a controlled setting within which players can learn in an engaging way, while avoiding the risks associated with real patients. Moreover, serious games align with medical students’ preferred learning styles. The Virtual Emergency TeleMedicine (VETM) game is a simulation-based game that was developed in collaboration with the mEducator Best Practice network in response to calls to integrate serious games in medical education and training. The VETM game makes use of data from an electrocardiogram to train practicing doctors, nurses, or medical students for problem-solving in real-life clinical scenarios through a telemedicine system and virtual patients. The study responds to two gaps: the limited number of games in emergency cardiology and the lack of evaluations by professionals. Objective The objective of this study is a quantitative, professional feedback-informed evaluation of one scenario of VETM, involving cardiovascular complications. The study has the following research question: “What are professionals’ perceptions of the potential of the Virtual Emergency Telemedicine game for training people involved in the assessment and management of emergency cases?” Methods The evaluation of the VETM game was conducted with 90 professional ambulance crew nursing personnel specializing in the assessment and management of emergency cases. After collaboratively trying out one VETM scenario, participants individually completed an evaluation of the game (36 questions on a 5-point Likert scale) and provided written and verbal comments. The instrument assessed six dimensions of the game: (1) user interface, (2) difficulty level, (3) feedback, (4) educational value, (5) user engagement, and (6) terminology. Data sources of the study were 90 questionnaires, including written comments from 51 participants, 24 interviews with 55 participants, and 379 log files of their interaction with

  20. User Feedback Procedures; Part III of Scientific Report No. ISR-18, Information Storage and Retrieval...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Dept. of Computer Science.

    Part Three of this five part report on Salton's Magical Automatic Retriever of Texts (SMART) project contains four papers. The first: "Variations on the Query Splitting Technique with Relevance Feedback" by T. P. Baker discusses some experiments in relevance feedback performed with variations on the technique of query splitting. The results…

  1. Understanding Informal Feedback Seeking in the Workplace: The Impact of the Position in the Organizational Hierarchy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Rijt, Janine; Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the position of employees in the organizational hierarchy is important in explaining their feedback seeking behaviour. Design/methodology/approach: This study takes a social network perspective by using an ego-centric network survey to investigate employees' feedback seeking behaviour…

  2. 75 FR 1081 - Justice Management Division; Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management; Agency Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Justice Management Division; Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management; Agency Information Collection... Attorney Recruitment and Management (OARM), will be submitting the following information collection request...: Form Number: none. Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management, Justice Management Division,...

  3. 75 FR 11910 - Justice Management Division; Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management; Agency Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... Justice Management Division; Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management; Agency Information Collection... Attorney Recruitment and Management (OARM), will be submitting the following information collection request... collection: Form Number: none. Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management, Justice Management Division,...

  4. Information Management System for Site Remediation Efforts.

    PubMed

    Laha; Mukherjee; Nebhrajani

    2000-05-01

    / Environmental regulatory agencies are responsible for protecting human health and the environment in their constituencies. Their responsibilities include the identification, evaluation, and cleanup of contaminated sites. Leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) constitute a major source of subsurface and groundwater contamination. A significant portion of a regulatory body's efforts may be directed toward the management of UST-contaminated sites. In order to manage remedial sites effectively, vast quantities of information must be maintained, including analytical dataon chemical contaminants, remedial design features, and performance details. Currently, most regulatory agencies maintain such information manually. This makes it difficult to manage the data effectively. Some agencies have introduced automated record-keeping systems. However, the ad hoc approach in these endeavors makes it difficult to efficiently analyze, disseminate, and utilize the data. This paper identifies the information requirements for UST-contaminated site management at the Waste Cleanup Section of the Department of Environmental Resources Management in Dade County, Florida. It presents a viable design for an information management system to meet these requirements. The proposed solution is based on a back-end relational database management system with relevant tools for sophisticated data analysis and data mining. The database is designed with all tables in the third normal form to ensure data integrity, flexible access, and efficient query processing. In addition to all standard reports required by the agency, the system provides answers to ad hoc queries that are typically difficult to answer under the existing system. The database also serves as a repository of information for a decision support system to aid engineering design and risk analysis. The system may be integrated with a geographic information system for effective presentation and dissemination of spatial data. PMID:10742478

  5. Toward information management in corporations (3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Yoshiaki

    Managing the widely spreading computing power onto disk-top of end-user sites is becoming one of biggest issues not only information department but also entire organization. In the past, computing in the organization is centralized into one department (information processing) which is positioned as a staff organization in head office. They had been managing, developing and processing of data processing functions centrallaly. "Management Information System" once they dream-ed and also expected by organization's top-management was failed due to technological immaturity. Hence after increasing "Back-log" of developing application systems and system's "Maintenance" has been the department's biggest issue to solve. Evolutions of micro electronics and information network in 1980's are rapidly changing these situations. PC proliferation, end-user computing thru "Host-Micro Link" resuts in wide spread of computing literacy through entire organization. Downsizing/decentraliging of computer power is coming trend. However, more strongly managed centralization of computing operation will be promoted in the area of "Strategic Information System" conducted by CIO. These two mainstream will evolve hybrid fashion to solve current key issues.

  6. A Workshop Series Using Peer-grading to Build Drug Information, Writing, Critical-thinking, and Constructive Feedback Skills

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To utilize a skills-based workshop series to develop pharmacy students’ drug information, writing, critical-thinking, and evaluation skills during the final didactic year of training. Design. A workshop series was implemented to focus on written (researched) responses to drug information questions. These workshops used blinded peer-grading to facilitate timely feedback and strengthen assessment skills. Each workshop was aligned to the didactic coursework content to complement and extend learning, while bridging and advancing research, writing, and critical thinking skills. Assessment. Attainment of knowledge and skills was assessed by rubric-facilitated peer grades, faculty member grading, peer critique, and faculty member-guided discussion of drug information responses. Annual instructor and course evaluations consistently revealed favorable student feedback regarding workshop value. Conclusion. A drug information workshop series using peer-grading as the primary assessment tool was successfully implemented and was well received by pharmacy students. PMID:25657378

  7. Business Management in the advanced information society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, Akio

    This is a record of the commemorative lecture at the fifth anniversary of the establishment of the JICST Tohoku Branch Office. Lecturer explains about business management in the information age. "Management" originally means sensing and coping with changes. Thus, the business has to get information as quickly as possible and take the best possible measure for the new issues. As it is definitely important for the business to make an appropriate prediction, information including unknown facts is very valuable. Technological prediction is particulary indispensable for the business. It is available, to some extent, by looking back the steps of technological development in the past. As the characteristics of information age, lecturer explains that there will be less information gap in the world, due to the development of telecommunication technology.

  8. Using climate information for fuels management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolden, Crystal A.; Brown, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Climate has come to the forefront of wildfire discussions in recent years as research contributes to the general understanding of how climate influences fuels availability to burn, the occurrence of severe fire weather conditions and other wildfire parameters. This understanding has crossed over into wildfire management applications through the creation of tools like climate forecasts for wildfire and drought indices, which are now widely used in wildfire suppression and mitigation planning. The overall question is how can climate information help fire managers meet management objectives? Climate underlies weather. For example, a number of days could be generally wet, but that may occur in the context of a two-year overall drought. Knowing the baseline climate is not only critical to preventing escaped prescribed fires, but also how it may affect fire behavior, fire effects and whether or not fire managers will meet their fuels management objectives. Thus, for fire managers to use prescribed and WFU fire safely and effectively, and to minimize the number of escaped fires and conversions to suppression, they need to understand how current climate conditions will impact the use of fire. One example is the need to use prescribed fire under set “burn windows”. Since meteorological conditions vary considerably from year to year for a given day, fire managers will be more successful in utilizing burn windows effectively if they understand those climate thresholds conducive to an increased number of safe burn windows, and are able to predict and take advantage of those burn windows. While climate and wildfire has been studied extensively, climate and fire use has not. The initial goal of this project was to assess how climate impacts prescribed fire use in a more general sense. After a preliminary informal survey in the spring of 2003, we determined that 1) there is insufficient data (less than 10 years) to conduct empirical correlative studies similar to those of

  9. Transforming health information management through technology.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Mary Ellen

    2002-08-01

    No one would deny the need to transform health care. Information technology is capable of transforming health care organizations and delivering measurable value. However, these organizations will have to deploy effective, proactive strategies for managing information and adapting to the opportunities the technology offers. If, for example, an organization wants to become paperless, its information strategy must include appropriate tools to store and access unstructured data components of the medical record as well as structured data. An Electronic Document Management System (EDMS) is a critical element of this strategy. Also, a plan for managing change must be developed to mitigate technology risks. This can be realized through the development of a clear vision of the future and strong leadership, among other key items. PMID:12402636

  10. Strategic information management plans: the basis for systematic information management in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Winter, A F; Ammenwerth, E; Bott, O J; Brigl, B; Buchauer, A; Gräber, S; Grant, A; Häber, A; Hasselbring, W; Haux, R; Heinrich, A; Janssen, H; Kock, I; Penger, O S; Prokosch, H U; Terstappen, A; Winter, A

    2001-12-01

    Information management in hospitals is a complex task. In order to reduce complexity, we distinguish strategic, tactical, and operational information management. This is essential, because each of these information management levels views hospital information systems from different perspectives, and therefore uses other methods and tools. Since all these management activities deal only in part with computers, but mainly with human beings and their social behavior, we define a hospital information system as a sociotechnical subsystem of a hospital. Without proper strategic planning it would be a matter of chance, if a hospital information system would fulfil the information strategies goals. In order to support strategic planning and to reduce efforts for creating strategic plans, we propose a practicable structure. PMID:11734379

  11. Improvements to information management systems simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilek, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of personnel in the augmentation and improvement of the interactive IMSIM information management simulation model is summarized. With this augmented model, NASA now has even greater capabilities for the simulation of computer system configurations, data processing loads imposed on these configurations, and executive software to control system operations. Through these simulations, NASA has an extremely cost effective capability for the design and analysis of computer-based data management systems.

  12. Strategic plan for Hanford site information management

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The Hanford Site missions are to clean up the Site, to provide scientific knowledge and technology to meet global needs, and to partner in the economic diversification of the region. To achieve these long-term missions and increase confidence in the quality of the Site`s decision making process, a dramatically different information management culture is required, consistent with US Department of Energy (DOE) mandates on increased safety, productivity, and openness at its sites. This plan presents a vision and six strategies that will move the Site toward an information management culture that will support the Site missions and address the mandates of DOE.

  13. [A medical consumable material management information system].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Hu, Liang

    2014-05-01

    Medical consumables material is essential supplies to carry out medical work, which has a wide range of varieties and a large amount of usage. How to manage it feasibly and efficiently that has been a topic of concern to everyone. This article discussed about how to design a medical consumable material management information system that has a set of standardized processes, bring together medical supplies administrator, suppliers and clinical departments. Advanced management mode, enterprise resource planning (ERP) applied to the whole system design process. PMID:25241525

  14. Risk management information for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Edwards, A J

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses HIV infection in terms of the risk manager's information needs in the health care environment. The malpractice problem, increasing workman's compensation suits, the greater role of the ombudsman, implementation of the National Practitioner Data Bank, and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations' (JCAHO) emphasis on clinical excellence are conditions which have given greater importance to the risk manager's position. Included in this article are hedges to retrieve various components of risk management and a select bibliography from AIDSLINE. PMID:10110456

  15. 75 FR 45665 - Justice Management Division; Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management; Agency Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... Justice Management Division; Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management; Agency Information Collection...), Justice Management Division, Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management (OARM), will be submitting the... collection: Form Number: none. Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management, Justice Management Division,...

  16. 75 FR 30857 - Justice Management Division; Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management; Agency Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Justice Management Division; Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management; Agency Information Collection...), Justice Management Division, Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management (OARM), will be submitting the...: none. Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management, Justice Management Division, U.S. Department...

  17. 75 FR 13573 - Justice Management Division, Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management; Agency Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Justice Management Division, Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management; Agency Information Collection... Management Division, Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management (OARM), will be submitting the following...: Form Number: none. Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management, Justice Management Division,...

  18. STI: Managing a Universe of Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This video highlights the NASA STI Program, its mission and key elements and how the program manages the ever growing universe of scientific and technical information. The mission of the program is to provide world-wide access to aerospace-related scientific and technical information. A key element of the program is a massive online database of more than three million citations to technical reports and journal literature, acquired, processed and disseminated by the NASA STI Program.

  19. Managing Written and Oral Negative Feedback in a Synchronous Online Teaching Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guichon, Nicolas; Betrancourt, Mireille; Prie, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    This case study focuses on the feedback that is provided by tutors to learners in the course of synchronous online teaching. More specifically, we study how trainee tutors used the affordances of Visu, an experimental web videoconferencing system, to provide negative feedback. Visu features classical functionalities such as video and chat, and it…

  20. Technology Enhanced Feedback Tools as a Knowledge Management Mechanism for Supporting Professional Growth and School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Alan; Swan, Gerry

    2011-01-01

    Attempts at school reform and improvement have experienced difficulty creating and implementing feedback systems that energize and sustain change efforts. If the call for reform at all levels of education is to be met, attention must be given to establishing effective feedback mechanisms in educational institutions as they embark on improvement…

  1. [Informed consent for genetic information management in Colombian law].

    PubMed

    Gómez Córdoba, Ana Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Deciphering the human genome has allowed the development of new health care ways which have been generically referred to as genomic medicine. However, this new knowledge is not devoid of risks related to the access and use of genetic information, involving not only the individual, but also the biological family, ethnic group and community to which he/she belong to. This affects both individual and collective rights, which must be protected by law. This manuscript reviews the Colombian law, specifically in terms of the access and use of genetic information for diagnostic and treatment purposes, focusing on the informed consent process. The concept of genetic information, the risks and benefits associated with genetic data management and the description and critical analysis of the present Colombian regulations were thus reviewed. As a conclusion, the juridical framework of Colombia shows deficiencies regarding the protection of both individual and collective rights linked to the access and use of genetic information. PMID:22984754

  2. Environmental remediation and waste management information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, M.W.; Harlan, C.P.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to document a few of the many environmental information systems that currently exist worldwide. The paper is not meant to be a comprehensive list; merely a discussion of a few of the more technical environmental database systems that are available. Regulatory databases such as US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) RODS (Records of Decision System) database [EPA, 1993] and cost databases such as EPA`s CORA (Cost of Remedial Action) database [EPA, 1993] are not included in this paper. Section 2 describes several US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) information systems and databases. Section 3 discusses several US EPA information systems on waste sites and technologies. Section 4 summarizes a few of the European Community environmental information systems, networks, and clearinghouses. And finally, Section 5 provides a brief overview of Geographical Information Systems. Section 6 contains the references, and the Appendices contain supporting information.

  3. Visual information transfer. 1: Assessment of specific information needs. 2: The effects of degraded motion feedback. 3: Parameters of appropriate instrument scanning behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, J. R., Jr.; Kirby, R. H.; Coates, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Pilot and flight crew assessment of visually displayed information is examined as well as the effects of degraded and uncorrected motion feedback, and instrument scanning efficiency by the pilot. Computerized flight simulation and appropriate physiological measurements are used to collect data for standardization.

  4. Technical and Management Information System (TMIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rau, Timothy R.

    1987-01-01

    The TMIS goals developed to support the Space Station Program (SSP) mission requirements are outlined. The TMIS will provide common capabilities to all SSP centers and facilitate the flow of technical and management information throughout the program as well as SSP decision-making processes. A summary is presented of the various TMIS phases.

  5. The Changing Environment of Management Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tagawa, Ken

    1982-01-01

    The promise of mainframe computers in the 1970s for management information systems (MIS) is largely unfulfilled, and newer office automation systems and data communication systems are designed to be responsive to MIS needs. The status of these innovations is briefly outlined. (MSE)

  6. Distributed Administrative Management Information System (DAMIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juckiewicz, Robert; Kroculick, Joseph

    Columbia University's major program to distribute its central administrative data processing to its various schools and departments is described. The Distributed Administrative Management Information System (DAMIS) will link every department and school within the university via micrcomputers, terminals, and/or minicomputers to the central…

  7. NIST: Information Management in the AMRF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, George (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The information management strategies developed for the NIST Automated Manufacturing Research Facility (AMRF) - a prototype small batch manufacturing facility used for integration and measurement related standards research are outlined in this video. The five major manufacturing functions - design, process planning, off-line programming, shop floor control, and materials processing are explained and their applications demonstrated.

  8. Object-Oriented Systems for Information Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffcoate, Judith

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of object technology for the development of information management systems. Notes the benefits of modelling complex real-world systems and the increases in productivity leading to flexible, reusable, and maintainable software. Discusses problems, support for multimedia data types, and storage capabilities. (AEF)

  9. Designing Executive Information Systems for Enrollment Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krotseng, Marsha V.

    1993-01-01

    Priority given to enrollment management at the University of Hartford (Connecticut) has created demands for better information about prospective student markets, admissions selectivity, enrollments, student adjustment, retention, and graduation rates. The planning and institutional research office used fourth-generation software, microcomputers,…

  10. PIMS-Universal Payload Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, Ralph; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As the overall manager and integrator of International Space Station (ISS) science payloads and experiments, the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at Marshall Space Flight Center had a critical need to provide an information management system for exchange and management of ISS payload files as well as to coordinate ISS payload related operational changes. The POIC's information management system has a fundamental requirement to provide secure operational access not only to users physically located at the POIC, but also to provide collaborative access to remote experimenters and International Partners. The Payload Information Management System (PIMS) is a ground based electronic document configuration management and workflow system that was built to service that need. Functionally, PIMS provides the following document management related capabilities: 1. File access control, storage and retrieval from a central repository vault. 2. Collect supplemental data about files in the vault. 3. File exchange with a PMS GUI client, or any FTP connection. 4. Files placement into an FTP accessible dropbox for pickup by interfacing facilities, included files transmitted for spacecraft uplink. 5. Transmission of email messages to users notifying them of new version availability. 6. Polling of intermediate facility dropboxes for files that will automatically be processed by PIMS. 7. Provide an API that allows other POIC applications to access PIMS information. Functionally, PIMS provides the following Change Request processing capabilities: 1. Ability to create, view, manipulate, and query information about Operations Change Requests (OCRs). 2. Provides an adaptable workflow approval of OCRs with routing through developers, facility leads, POIC leads, reviewers, and implementers. Email messages can be sent to users either involving them in the workflow process or simply notifying them of OCR approval progress. All PIMS document management and OCR workflow controls are