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Sample records for manganese ferrite nanoparticles

  1. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy constant in manganese ferrite nanoparticles at low temperature

    E-print Network

    Krishnan, Kannan M.

    Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy constant in manganese ferrite nanoparticles at low temperature Sunghyun Yoon1,a) and Kannan M. Krishnan2 1 Department of Physics, Gunsan National University December 2010; published online 7 April 2011) The temperature dependence of the effective magnetic

  2. Hydrothermal synthesis of fine stabilized superparamagnetic nanoparticles of Zn2+ substituted manganese ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahraei, Maryam; Monshi, Ahmad; Morales, Maria del Puerto; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Amirnasr, Mehdi; Behdadfar, Behshid

    2015-11-01

    Superparamagnetic Zn2+ substituted manganese ferrite Mn1-xZnxFe2O4 (x=0.3, 0.35, 0.4 and 0.45) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via a direct, efficient and environmental friendly hydrothermal method. The synthesized NPs were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetry (TG) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The effects of various parameters such as the pH of reaction mixture, time and temperature of hydrothermal treatment and Zn substitution on the spinel phase formation, the magnetization, and the size of resulting NPs are discussed. The Zn2+ substituted manganese ferrite NPs obtained from hydrothermal process crystallized mainly in the spinel phase. Nevertheless, without citrate ions, the hematite phase appeared in the product. The monophase Zn2+ substituted manganese ferrite NPs hydrothermally prepared in the presence of citric acid had mean particle size of 7 nm and a narrow size distribution. Furthermore, the synthesized NPs can be used to prepare ferrofluids for biomedical applications due to their small size, good stability in aqueous medium (pH 7) and also high magnetization value.

  3. Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties of Gd substituted manganese ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, C.; Sathyamoorthy, B.; Chandrasekaran, G.

    2015-08-01

    Gd3+ ion-substituted manganese ferrite nanoparticles with the chemical formula MnGdxFe2-xO4 (x = 0.0, 0.05, and 0.1) were synthesized by sol-gel auto combustion method. Thermal stability of the as-prepared sample was analyzed using thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and the result reveals that the prepared sample is thermally stable above 300 °C. Structural and morphology studies were performed using powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Indexed PXRD patterns confirm the formation of pure cubic spinel structure. The average crystallite sizes calculated using Sherrer’s formula decreased from 47 nm to 32 nm and lattice constant was enhanced from 8.407 Å to 8.432 Å. The FTIR spectrum of manganese ferrite shows a high frequency vibrational band at 564 cm-1 assigned to tetrahedral site and a low frequency vibrational band at 450 cm-1 assigned to octahedral site which are shifted to 556 cm-1 and 439 cm-1 for Gd3+ substitution and confirm the incorporation of Gd3+ into manganese ferrite. SEM analysis shows the presence of agglomerated spherical shaped particles at the surface. Room temperature dielectric and magnetic properties were studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). Frequency dependent dielectric constant, ac conductivity and tan delta were found to increase with Gd3+ ion substitution. The measured values of saturation magnetization decrease from 46.6 emu g-1 to 41 emu g-1 with increase in Gd3+ concentration and coercivity decreases from 179.5 Oe to 143 Oe.

  4. Manganese ferrite-based nanoparticles induce ex vivo, but not in vivo, cardiovascular effects

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Allancer DC; Ramalho, Laylla S; Souza, Álvaro PS; Mendes, Elizabeth P; Colugnati, Diego B; Zufelato, Nícholas; Sousa, Marcelo H; Bakuzis, Andris F; Castro, Carlos H

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used for various biomedical applications. Importantly, manganese ferrite-based nanoparticles have useful magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and potential for hyperthermia treatment, but their effects in the cardiovascular system are poorly reported. Thus, the objectives of this study were to determine the cardiovascular effects of three different types of manganese ferrite-based magnetic nanoparticles: citrate-coated (CiMNPs); tripolyphosphate-coated (PhMNPs); and bare magnetic nanoparticles (BaMNPs). The samples were characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer, X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The direct effects of the MNPs on cardiac contractility were evaluated in isolated perfused rat hearts. The CiMNPs, but not PhMNPs and BaMNPs, induced a transient decrease in the left ventricular end-systolic pressure. The PhMNPs and BaMNPs, but not CiMNPs, induced an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, which resulted in a decrease in a left ventricular end developed pressure. Indeed, PhMNPs and BaMNPs also caused a decrease in the maximal rate of left ventricular pressure rise (+dP/dt) and maximal rate of left ventricular pressure decline (?dP/dt). The three MNPs studied induced an increase in the perfusion pressure of isolated hearts. BaMNPs, but not PhMNPs or CiMNPs, induced a slight vasorelaxant effect in the isolated aortic rings. None of the MNPs were able to change heart rate or arterial blood pressure in conscious rats. In summary, although the MNPs were able to induce effects ex vivo, no significant changes were observed in vivo. Thus, given the proper dosages, these MNPs should be considered for possible therapeutic applications. PMID:25031535

  5. Long-circulating PEGylated manganese ferrite nanoparticles for MRI-based molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernia Leal, Manuel; Rivera-Fernández, Sara; Franco, Jaime M.; Pozo, David; de La Fuente, Jesús M.; García-Martín, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance based molecular imaging has emerged as a very promising technique for early detection and treatment of a wide variety of diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and vascular diseases. The limited sensitivity and specificity of conventional MRI are being overcome by the development of a new generation of contrast agents, using nanotechnology approaches, with improved magnetic and biological properties. In particular, for molecular imaging, high specificity, high sensitivity, and long blood circulation times are required. Furthermore, the lack of toxicity and immunogenicity together with low-cost scalable production are also necessary to get them into the clinics. In this work, we describe a facile, robust and cost-effective ligand-exchange method to synthesize dual T1 and T2 MRI contrast agents with long circulation times. These contrast agents are based on manganese ferrite nanoparticles (MNPs) between 6 and 14 nm in size covered by a 3 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell that leads to a great stability in aqueous media with high crystallinity and magnetization values, thus retaining the magnetic properties of the uncovered MNPs. Moreover, the PEGylated MNPs have shown different relaxivities depending on their size and the magnetic field applied. Thus, the 6 nm PEGylated MNPs are characterized by a low r2/r1 ratio of 4.9 at 1.5 T, hence resulting in good dual T1 and T2 contrast agents under low magnetic fields, whereas the 14 nm MNPs behave as excellent T2 contrast agents under high magnetic fields (r2 = 335.6 mM-1 s-1). The polymer core shell of the PEGylated MNPs minimizes their cytotoxicity, and allows long blood circulation times. This combination of cellular compatibility and excellent T2 and r2/r1 values under low magnetic fields, together with long circulation times, make these nanomaterials very promising contrast agents for molecular imaging.Magnetic resonance based molecular imaging has emerged as a very promising technique for early detection and treatment of a wide variety of diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and vascular diseases. The limited sensitivity and specificity of conventional MRI are being overcome by the development of a new generation of contrast agents, using nanotechnology approaches, with improved magnetic and biological properties. In particular, for molecular imaging, high specificity, high sensitivity, and long blood circulation times are required. Furthermore, the lack of toxicity and immunogenicity together with low-cost scalable production are also necessary to get them into the clinics. In this work, we describe a facile, robust and cost-effective ligand-exchange method to synthesize dual T1 and T2 MRI contrast agents with long circulation times. These contrast agents are based on manganese ferrite nanoparticles (MNPs) between 6 and 14 nm in size covered by a 3 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell that leads to a great stability in aqueous media with high crystallinity and magnetization values, thus retaining the magnetic properties of the uncovered MNPs. Moreover, the PEGylated MNPs have shown different relaxivities depending on their size and the magnetic field applied. Thus, the 6 nm PEGylated MNPs are characterized by a low r2/r1 ratio of 4.9 at 1.5 T, hence resulting in good dual T1 and T2 contrast agents under low magnetic fields, whereas the 14 nm MNPs behave as excellent T2 contrast agents under high magnetic fields (r2 = 335.6 mM-1 s-1). The polymer core shell of the PEGylated MNPs minimizes their cytotoxicity, and allows long blood circulation times. This combination of cellular compatibility and excellent T2 and r2/r1 values under low magnetic fields, together with long circulation times, make these nanomaterials very promising contrast agents for molecular imaging. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental details including TEM images of MNPs, size distribution graphs, thermogravimetric curves, FTIR spectra, and XRD patterns of MNPs. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05781c

  6. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section...treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance...treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section...treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance...treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section...treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance...treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to...

  9. Relaxivities of hydrogen protons in aqueous solutions of PEG-coated rod-shaped manganese-nickel-ferrite (Mn0.4Ni0.6Fe2O4) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Yousaf; Bae, Hongsub; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook

    2014-11-01

    Spinel-structured manganese (Mn)-nickel (Ni)-ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method. Coating with PEG (polyethylene glycol) was simultaneously conducted along with the synthesis of Mn-Ni-ferrites. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) analyses revealed a cubic spinel ferrite structure of the synthesized nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the synthesized nanoparticles were rod-shaped with a uniform size distribution and that the average length and width were 15.13 ± 1.32 nm and 3.78 ± 0.71 nm, respectively. The bonding status of PEG on the nanoparticle surface was checked by using FTIR. The relaxivities of the hydrogen protons in the aqueous solutions of the coated particles were determined by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. The T1 and the T2 relaxivities were 0.34 ± 0.11 mM-1s-1 and 29.91 ± 0.98 mM-1s-1, respectively. This indicates that the synthesized PEG-coated Mn-Ni-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable for use as T2 contrast agents.

  10. Structure and magnetic properties of manganese-zinc-ferrites prepared by spray pyrolysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsikau, Dzmitry; Ivanovskaya, Maria; Pankov, Vladimir; Fedotova, Yulia

    2015-01-01

    A spray pyrolysis of a water solution of iron, manganese and iron nitrates is applied to prepare Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 single-phase ferrite with a spinel-type structure. The samples are characterized by means of differential scanning calorimetry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The mass magnetization ? and the magnetic susceptibility 1/? of the ferrites are measured as a function of temperature over the range of 78-728 K. The obtained sample contains nanoparticles with an average diameter d ?7 nm possessing MnxZnyFe3-(x+y)O4 spinel-type structure with a uniform distribution of manganese and zinc atoms over the ferrite lattice. The Curie temperature is determined to be 375 ÷ 380 K.

  11. Magnetic properties of manganese ferrite films grown at atomic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Xu; Yang, Aria; Yoon, Soack-Dae; Christodoulides, Joe A.; Harris, Vincent G.; Vittoria, Carmine

    2005-05-15

    Manganese ferrite is a partial inverse spinel which, when prepared by conventional growth techniques, has {approx}20% of the Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice. Here we describe a layer-by-layer growth scheme at atomic scale by which the percentage of Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice can be artificially controlled. Manganese ferrite films grown by this technique exhibits different degrees of cation inversion when grown on {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace} MgO substrates. It was observed that saturation magnetization varied in a wide range of values depending on chemical composition and oxygen pressure. Although bulk manganese ferrite was low anisotropy magnetic material, uniaxial anisotropy was observed at room temperature in the films deposited on {l_brace}100{r_brace} MgO substrates, and its magnitude and direction sensitively depended on chemical composition and oxygen pressure during deposition.

  12. Recovery of Manganese Ferrite in Nanoform from the Metallurgical Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semykina, Anna; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2011-02-01

    The present work investigates the formation of manganese ferrite of nanosize by oxidation of MnO- and FeO-containing slag. A horizontal resistance furnace was used as an experimental setup. The experiment was conducted in the temperature range of 1573 K to 1673 K (1300 °C to 1400 °C) in an oxidizing atmosphere. The samples were quenched to the cold end of the furnace and were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD patterns of the products showed the presence of two phases—manganese ferrite and calcium silicate. The particle size of the manganese ferrite was estimated by the Scherrer formula to be in the range of nanometers.

  13. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  17. Anisotropy of Manganese-Substituted Cobalt Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikhov, Yevgen; Paulsen, Jason

    2005-03-01

    Study of the anisotropy of magnetostrictive cobalt ferrite composites and its temperature dependence helps better understand the magnetomechanical properties, which will allow tuning the properties of the materials for magnetoelastic stress and torque sensors applications. We have investigated the temperature dependence of anisotropy of Mn-substituted cobalt ferrite CoMnxFe2-xO4 (0 <= x <= 0.8). Magnetization measurements of the hysteresis loops were made at temperatures over the range 200-300 K using a SQUID magnetometer. To determine the anisotropy constant K1, the high field regime of the loops was fitted using the law of approach approximation M(T) = Ms.(1-?K1^2/H^2), where ? = 8/105 ?0-2Ms-2 for the samples which have spinel structure and cubic anisotropy. It was found that anisotropy decreases with increasing Mn content and with increasing temperature for all compositions. However, at higher temperatures the anisotropy of the Mn-substituted specimens converges to approximately the same value K1=200 kJ/m^3. The pure cobalt ferrite sample appears to have considerably higher anisotropy K1 than the Mn-substituted samples over the whole temperature range.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, optical and sensing property of manganese oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Manigandan, R.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Narayanan, V.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.

    2014-01-28

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles were prepared by thermal decomposition of manganese oxalate. Manganese oxalate was synthesized by reacting 1:1 mole ratio of manganese acetate and ammonium oxalate along with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The structural characterization of manganese oxalate and manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by XRD. The XRD spectrum confirms the crystal structure of the manganese oxide and manganese oxalate. In addition, the average grain size, lattice parameter values were also calculated using XRD spectrum. Moreover, the diffraction peaks were broadened due to the smaller size of the particle. The band gap of manganese oxide was calculated from optical absorption, which was carried out by DRS UV-Visible spectroscopy. The morphology of manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by SEM images. The FT-IR analysis confirms the formation of the manganese oxide from manganese oxalate nanoparticles. The electrochemical sensing behavior of manganese oxide nanoparticles were investigated using hydrogen peroxide by cyclic voltammetry.

  19. Fe57 NMR and spin structure of manganese ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Št?pánková, H.; Sedlák, B.; Chlan, V.; Novák, P.; Šimša, Z.

    2008-03-01

    NMR of Fe57 in five MnFe2O4 single crystals with different degrees of inversion was measured in liquid He temperature. At the zero external field, two lines originating from Fe3+ ions on the octahedral sites are observed at 68.7 and 71.1MHz , while the line at 72.0MHz , the amplitude of which increases with increasing inversion, is ascribed to Fe3+ ions on the tetrahedral sites. Measurement in the external field shows that the spin structure is in accord with the Goodenough-Kanamori rules. This contradicts to an abnormal spin structure which Shim [Phys. Rev. B 75, 134406 (2007)] proposed recently on the basis of Fe57 NMR measured in polycrystalline manganese ferrite. Reinterpretation of the NMR in polycrystalline compounds is given.

  20. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Errandonea, D.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Agouram, S.

    2015-08-01

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20-27 GPa to 7.5-12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B0 = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe2O4 (B0 = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B0 = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  1. Transformation Characteristics of Ferrite/Carbide Aggregate in Continuously Cooled, Low Carbon-Manganese Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Martino, S. F.; Thewlis, G.

    2014-02-01

    Transformation characteristics and morphological features of ferrite/carbide aggregate (FCA) in low carbon-manganese steels have been investigated. Work shows that FCA has neither the lamellae structure of pearlite nor the lath structure of bainite and martensite. It consists of a fine dispersion of cementite particles in a smooth ferrite matrix. Carbide morphologies range from arrays of globular particles or short fibers to extended, branched, and densely interconnected fibers. Work demonstrates that FCA forms over similar cooling rate ranges to Widmanstätten ferrite. Rapid transformation of both phases occurs at temperatures between 798 K and 973 K (525 °C and 700 °C). FCA reaction is not simultaneous with Widmanstätten ferrite but occurs at temperatures intermediate between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainite. Austenite carbon content calculations verify that cementite precipitation is thermodynamically possible at FCA reaction temperatures without bainite formation. The pattern of precipitation is confirmed to be discontinuous. CCT diagrams have been constructed that incorporate FCA. At low steel manganese content, Widmanstätten ferrite and bainite bay sizes are significantly reduced so that large amounts of FCA are formed over a wide range of cooling rates.

  2. Optimizing hysteretic power loss of magnetic ferrite nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Chen, Ritchie

    2013-01-01

    This thesis seeks to correlate hysteretic power loss of tertiary ferrite nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields to trends predicted by physical models. By employing integration of hysteresis loops simulated from ...

  3. Thermodynamic modelling of the formation of zinc-manganese ferrite spinel in electric arc furnace dust.

    PubMed

    Pickles, C A

    2010-07-15

    Electric arc furnace dust is generated when automobile scrap, containing galvanized steel, is remelted in an electric arc furnace. This dust is considered as a hazardous waste in most countries. Zinc is a major component of the dust and can be of significant commercial value. Typically, the majority of the zinc exists as zinc oxide (ZnO) and as a zinc-manganese ferrite spinel ((Zn(x)Mn(y)Fe(1-x-y))Fe(2)O(4)). The recovery of the zinc from the dust in metal recycling and recovery processes, particularly in the hydrometallurgical extraction processes, is often hindered by the presence of the mixed ferrite spinel. However, there is a paucity of information available in the literature on the formation of this spinel. Therefore, in the present research, the equilibrium module of HSC Chemistry 6.1 was utilized to investigate the thermodynamics of the formation of the spinel and the effect of variables on the amount and the composition of the mixed ferrite spinel. It is proposed that the mixed ferrite spinel forms due to the reaction of iron-manganese particulates with both gaseous oxygen and zinc, at the high temperatures in the freeboard of the furnace above the steel melt. Based on the thermodynamic predictions, methods are proposed for minimizing the formation of the mixed ferrite spinel. PMID:20356673

  4. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science.

    PubMed

    Amiri, S; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. PMID:25428034

  5. Structural, dielectric and gas sensing behavior of Mn substituted spinel MFe2O4 (M=Zn, Cu, Ni, and Co) ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjith Kumar, E.; Siva Prasada Reddy, P.; Sarala Devi, G.; Sathiyaraj, S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinel ferrite (MnZnFe2O4, MnCuFe2O4, MnNiFe2O4 and MnCoFe2O4) nanoparticles have been prepared by evaporation method. The annealing temperature plays an important role on changing particle size of the spinel ferrite nanoparticles was found out by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The role of manganese substitution in the spinel ferrite nanoparticles were also analyzed for different annealing temperature. The substitution of Mn also creates a vital change in dielectric properties have been measured in the frequency range of 100 kHz to 5 MHz. These spinel ferrites are decomposed to ?-Fe2O3 after annealing above 550 °C in air. Through the characterization of the prepared powder, the effect of annealing temperature, chemical composition and preparation technique on the microstructure, particle size and dielectric properties of the Mn substituted spinel ferrite nanoparticles are discussed. Furthermore, Conductance response of Mn substituted MFe2O4 ferrite nanoparticles were measured by exposing the materials to reducing gas like liquefied petroleum gas (LPG).

  6. Magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles embedded in polystyrene resin

    E-print Network

    Boolchand, Punit

    Magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles embedded in polystyrene resin P. P. Vaishnava online 20 April 2006 Samples of maghemite and cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles sizes, 3­10 nm were prepared of cobalt-ferrite nano- particles by ion exchanging sulfonated polystyrene resin with iron and cobalt

  7. Magnetoabsorption and magnetic hysteresis in Ni ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Gómez, P.; Muñoz, J. M.; Valente, M. A.; Torres, C.; de Francisco, C.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by a modified sol-gel technique employing coconut oil, and then annealed at different temperatures in 400-1200 °C range. This route of preparation has revealed to be one efficient and cheap technique to obtain high quality nickel ferrite nanosized powder. Sample particles sizes obtained with XRD data and Scherrer's formula lie in 13 nm to 138 nm, with increased size with annealing temperature. Hysteresis loops have been obtained at room temperature with an inductive method. Magnetic field induced microwave absorption in nanoscale ferrites is a recent an active area of research, in order to characterize and explore potential novel applications. In the present work microwave magnetoabsorption data of the annealed nickel ferrite nanoparticles are presented. These data have been obtained with a system based on a network analyzer that operates in the frequency range 0 - 8.5 GHz. At fields up to 400 mT we can observe a peak according to ferromagnetic resonance theory. Sample annealed at higher temperature exhibits different absorption, coercivity and saturation magnetization figures, revealing its multidomain character.

  8. Bifunctional Manganese Ferrite/Polyaniline Hybrid as Electrode Material for Enhanced Energy Recovery in Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Khilari, Santimoy; Pandit, Soumya; Varanasi, Jhansi L; Das, Debabrata; Pradhan, Debabrata

    2015-09-23

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are emerging as a sustainable technology for waste to energy conversion where electrode materials play a vital role on its performance. Platinum (Pt) is the most common material used as cathode catalyst in the MFCs. However, the high cost and low earth abundance associated with Pt prompt the researcher to explore inexpensive catalysts. The present study demonstrates a noble metal-free MFC using a manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4)/polyaniline (PANI)-based electrode material. The MnFe2O4 nanoparticles (NPs) and MnFe2O4 NPs/PANI hybrid composite not only exhibited superior oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity for the air cathode but also enhanced anode half-cell potential upon modifying carbon cloth anode in the single-chambered MFC. This is attributed to the improved extracellular electron transfer of exoelectrogens due to Fe(3+) in MnFe2O4 and its capacitive nature. The present work demonstrates for the first time the dual property of MnFe2O4 NPs/PANI, i.e., as cathode catalyst and an anode modifier, thereby promising cost-effective MFCs for practical applications. PMID:26315619

  9. Site-specific local structure of Mn in artificial manganese ferrite films

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, E.; Haskel, D.; Cady, A.; Yang, A.; Vittoria, C.; Harris, V. G.; Zuo, X.

    2006-09-01

    Diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS) spectroscopy has been applied to resolve site-specific Mn local structure in manganese ferrite films grown under nonequilibrium conditions. The DAFS spectra were measured at a number of Bragg reflections in the vicinity of the Mn absorption K edge. The DAFS data analysis done with an iterative Kramers-Kroenig algorithm made it possible to solve separately the local structure around crystallographically inequivalent Mn sites in the unit cell with nominal octahedral and tetrahedral coordination. The strong preference for Mn to be tetrahedrally coordinated in this compound is not only manifested in the relative site occupancies but also in a strong reduction in coordination number for Mn ions at nominal octahedral sites.

  10. Microwave-assisted synthesis and characterization of nickel ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Gopal; Sen, Ravindra; Malviya, Nitin; Gupta, Nitish

    2015-08-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) were successfully prepared by microwave-assisted combustion method (MWAC) using citric Electron acid as a chelating agent. NiFe2O4 nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, Scanning Microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-Visible techniques. XRD analysis revealed that NiFe2O4 nanoparticles have spinel cubic structure with the average crystalline size of 26.38 nm. SEM analysis revealed random and porous structural morphology of particles and FTIR showed absorption bands related to octahedral and tetrahedral sites, in the range 400-600cm-1 which strongly favor the formation of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles. The optical band gap is determined by UV Visible method and found to be 5.4 eV.

  11. The role of annealing temperature and bio template (egg white) on the structural, morphological and magnetic properties of manganese substituted MFe2O4 (M=Zn, Cu, Ni, Co) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjith Kumar, E.; Jayaprakash, R.; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-02-01

    Manganese substituted ferrites (ZnFe2O4, CuFe2O4, NiFe2O4 and CoFe2O4) have been prepared in the bio template medium by using a simple evaporation method. The annealing temperature plays an important position on changing particle size and morphology of the mixed ferrite nanoparticles were found out by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy methods. The role of manganese substitution in the mixed ferrite nanoparticles were also analyzed for different annealing temperature. The substitution of Mn also creates a vital change in magnetic properties which is studied by using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). These spinel ferrites are decomposed to ?-Fe2O3 after annealing above 550 °C in air. However, ?-Fe2O3 phase was slowly vanished after ferrites annealing above 900 °C. The effect of this secondary phase on the structural change and magnetic properties of the mixed ferrite nanoparticles is discussed.

  12. Ultrafine grained high density manganese zinc ferrite produced using polyol process assisted by Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudisson, T.; Beji, Z.; Herbst, F.; Nowak, S.; Ammar, S.; Valenzuela, R.

    2015-08-01

    We report the synthesis of Mn-Zn ferrite (MZFO) nanoparticles (NPs) by the polyol process and their consolidation by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique at relatively low temperature and short time, namely 500 °C for 10 min. NPs were obtained as perfectly epitaxied aggregated nanoclusters forming a kind of spherical pseudo-single-crystals of about 40 nm in size. The results on NPs consolidation by SPS underlined the importance of this clustering on the grain growth mechanism. Grain growth proceeds by coalescing nanocrystalline aggregates into single grain of almost the same average size, thus leading to a high density ceramic. Due to magnetic exchange interactions between grains, the produced ceramic does not exhibit thermal relaxation whereas their precursor polyol-made NPs are superparamagnetic.

  13. Probing bismuth ferrite nanoparticles by hard x-ray photoemission: Anomalous occurrence of metallic bismuth

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, Smita; Rajendra, Ranguwar; Ballav, Nirmalya; Kulkarni, Sulabha; Sarkar, Indranil; Shirolkar, Mandar M.; Jeng, U-Ser; Yeh, Yi-Qi

    2014-09-08

    We have investigated bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (?75?nm and ?155?nm) synthesized by a chemical method, using soft X-ray (1253.6?eV) and hard X-ray (3500, 5500, and 7500?eV) photoelectron spectroscopy. This provided an evidence for the variation of chemical state of bismuth in crystalline, phase pure nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis using Mg K? (1253.6?eV) source showed that iron and bismuth were present in both Fe{sup 3+} and Bi{sup 3+} valence states as expected for bismuth ferrite. However, hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles using variable photon energies unexpectedly showed the presence of Bi{sup 0} valence state below the surface region, indicating that bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are chemically inhomogeneous in the radial direction. Consistently, small-angle X-ray scattering reveals a core-shell structure for these radial inhomogeneous nanoparticles.

  14. Photoacoustic and magnetoelastic property of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and its attenuation with barium titanate coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betal, Soutik; Dutta, Moumita; Khachatryan, Edward; Cotica, Luiz; Nash, Kelly; Bhalla, Amar; Guo, Ruyan

    2015-08-01

    We report an experimental study, where Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles exhibit Photoacoustic (PA) emission peak intensity of 235.2V/J when analyzed under the Opto-Acoustic measurement setup. PA emission peak intensity decreases to 210V/J when AC Magnetic field is applied and further when Barium Titanate coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were analyzed, the PA peak further reduces to 68.76667V/J and with application of AC magnetic field the peak completely disappears. The measurement depicts the Photoacoustic and magnetoelastic behavior of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  15. Cytotoxicity of nickel zinc ferrite nanoparticles on cancer cells of epithelial origin

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; Rasedee, Abdullah; Flaifel, Moayad Husein; Ahmad, Sahrim HJ; Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Eid, Eltayeb EM; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Saeed, Mohd; Ilowefah, Muna; Fakurazi, Sharida; Isa, Norhaszalina Mohd; Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat El

    2013-01-01

    In this study, in vitro cytotoxicity of nickel zinc (NiZn) ferrite nanoparticles against human colon cancer HT29, breast cancer MCF7, and liver cancer HepG2 cells was examined. The morphology, homogeneity, and elemental composition of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. The exposure of cancer cells to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles (15.6–1,000 ?g/mL; 72 hours) has resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The quantification of caspase-3 and -9 activities and DNA fragmentation to assess the cell death pathway of the treated cells showed that both were stimulated when exposed to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles. Light microscopy examination of the cells exposed to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles demonstrated significant changes in cellular morphology. The HepG2 cells were most prone to apoptosis among the three cells lines examined, as the result of treatment with NiZn nanoparticles. In conclusion, NiZn ferrite nanoparticles are suggested to have potential cytotoxicity against cancer cells. PMID:23885175

  16. Correlation between structural, magnetic, and dielectric properties of manganese substituted cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Ramana, C. V. Kolekar, Y. D.; Kamala Bharathi, K.; Sinha, B.; Ghosh, K.

    2013-11-14

    Manganese (Mn) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2?x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFMO) were synthesized and their structural, magnetic, and dielectric properties were evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements coupled with Rietveld refinement indicate that the CFMO materials crystallize in the inverse cubic spinel phase. Temperature (T?=?300?K and 10?K) dependent magnetization (M(H)) measurements indicate the long range ferromagnetic ordering in CoFe{sub 2?x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4} (x?=?0.00–0.15) ferrites. The cubic anisotropy constant (K{sub 1}(T)) and saturation magnetization (M{sub s}(T)) were derived by using the “law of approach” to saturation that describes the field dependence of M(H) for magnetic fields much higher than the coercive field (H{sub c}). Saturation magnetization (M{sub s}), obtained from the model, decreases with increasing temperature. For CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, M{sub s} decreases from 3.63??{sub B} per formula unit (f.u.) to 3.47??{sub B}/f.u. with increasing temperature from 10 to 300?K. CFMO (0.00–0.15) exhibit the similar trend while the magnitude of M{sub s} is dependent on Mn-concentration. M{sub s}-T functional relationship obeys the Bloch's law. The lattice parameter and magnetic moment calculated for CFMO reveals that Mn ions occupying the Fe and Co position at the octahedral site in the inverse cubic spinel phase. The structure and magnetism in CFMO are further corroborated by bond length and bond angle calculations. The dielectric constant dispersion of CFMO in the frequency range of 20?Hz–1?MHz fits to the modified Debye's function with more than one ion contributing to the relaxation. The relaxation time and spread factor derived from modeling the experimental data are ?10{sup ?4}?s and ?0.35(±0.05), respectively.

  17. Maximizing Hysteretic Losses in Magnetic Ferrite Nanoparticles via Model-Driven Synthesis and Materials Optimization

    E-print Network

    Chen, Ritchie

    This article develops a set of design guidelines for maximizing heat dissipation characteristics of magnetic ferrite MFe[subscript 2]O[subscript 4] (M = Mn, Fe, Co) nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields. Using ...

  18. Synthesis of Trimagnetic Multishell MnFe2 O4 @CoFe2 O4 @NiFe2 O4 Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov-Isaac, Véronica; Neveu, Sophie; Dupuis, Vincent; Taverna, Dario; Gloter, Alexandre; Cabuil, Valérie

    2015-06-10

    The synthesis and characterization of original ferrite multishell magnetic nanoparticles made of a soft core (manganese ferrite) covered with two successive shells, a hard one (cobalt ferrite) and then a soft one (nickel ferrite), are described. The results demonstrate the modulation of the coercivity when new magnetic shells are added. PMID:25684735

  19. Direct dyes removal using modified magnetic ferrite nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic adsorbent nanoparticle was modified using cationic surface active agent. Zinc ferrite nanoparticle and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide were used as an adsorbent and a surface active agent, respectively. Dye removal ability of the surface modified nanoparticle as an adsorbent was investigated. Direct Green 6 (DG6), Direct Red 31 (DR31) and Direct Red 23 (DR23) were used. The characteristics of the adsorbent were studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of adsorbent dosage, initial dye concentration and salt was evaluated. In ternary system, dye removal of the adsorbent at 90, 120, 150 and 200 mg/L dye concentration was 63, 45, 30 and 23% for DR23, 97, 90, 78 and 45% for DR31 and 51, 48, 42 and 37% for DG6, respectively. It was found that dye adsorption onto the adsorbent followed Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption kinetic of dyes was found to conform to pseudo-second order kinetics. PMID:24991427

  20. Chemical equilibria involved in the oxygen-releasing step of manganese ferrite water-splitting thermochemical cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Seralessandri, L.; Bellusci, M.; Alvani, C.; La Barbera, A.; Padella, F.; Varsano, F.

    2008-08-15

    Sodium ferrimanganite carbonatation reaction was investigated at different temperatures/carbon dioxide partial pressures to evaluate the feasibility of the thermochemical water-splitting cycle based on the MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Na(Mn{sub 1/3}Fe{sub 2/3})O{sub 2} system. After thermal treatments in selected experimental conditions, the obtained powder samples were investigated by using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and Rietveld analysis. Two different lamellar Na{sub 1-x}Mn{sub 1/3}Fe{sub 2/3}O{sub 2-{delta}} phases were observed together with the expected MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixture. Different equilibrium regions among sodium-depleted lamellar phases, manganese ferrite and sodium carbonate were found as a function of the different reaction conditions. A hypothesis concerning the regeneration mechanism of the initial compounds is proposed. Chemical equilibrium between stoichiometric and sub-stoichiometric forms of sodium ferrimanganite and sodium carbonate formation/dissociation appears to be essential factors governing the oxygen-releasing step of the manganese ferrite thermochemical cycle. - Graphical abstract: Na(Mn{sub 1/3}Fe{sub 2/3})O{sub 2} disproportion reaction in the presence of CO{sub 2} was studied. Chemical equilibria among Na{sub 1-x}(Mn{sub 1/3}Fe{sub 2/3})O{sub 2}, MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} compounds were evidenced and studied by means of Rietveld analysis performed on XRD patterns. Two different sodium-depleted lamellar structures were identified. The role of sodium carbonate formation/dissociation equilibrium in the oxygen-releasing step of the manganese ferrite thermochemical cycle has been highlighted.

  1. Dielectric relaxations and alternating current conductivity in manganese substituted cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kolekar, Y. D.; Sanchez, L. J.; Ramana, C. V.

    2014-04-14

    Manganese (Mn) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2-x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFMO) have been synthesized by the solid state reaction method and their dielectric properties and ac conductivity have been evaluated as a function of applied frequency and temperature. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that CFMO crystallize in the inverse cubic spinel phase with a lattice constant ?8.38?Å. Frequency dependent dielectric measurements at room temperature obey the modified Debye model with relaxation time of 10{sup ?4} s and spreading factor of 0.35(±0.05). The frequency (20?Hz–1?MHz) and temperature (T?=?300–900?K) dependent dielectric constant analyses indicate that CFMO exhibit two dielectric relaxations at lower frequencies (1–10?kHz), while completely single dielectric relaxation for higher frequencies (100?kHz–1?MHz). The dielectric constant of CFMO is T-independent up to ?400?K, at which point increasing trend prevails. The dielectric constant increase with T?>?400?K is explained through impedance spectroscopy assuming a two-layer model, where low-resistive grains separated from each other by high-resistive grain boundaries. Following this model, the two electrical responses in impedance formalism are attributed to the grain and grain-boundary effects, respectively, which also satisfactorily accounts for the two dielectric relaxations. The capacitance of the bulk of the grain determined from impedance analyses is ?10?pF, which remains constant with T, while the grain-boundary capacitance increases up to ?3.5 nF with increasing T. The tan ? (loss tangent)-T also reveals the typical behavior of relaxation losses in CFMO.

  2. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Bae, Hongsub; Iqbal, Yousaf; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun; Sohn, Derac

    2015-05-01

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T1 and T2 relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM-1 s-1, respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T1-weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T2-weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T1 and T2 contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles.

  3. Seeded growth of ferrite nanoparticles from Mn oxides: observation of anomalies in magnetic transitions.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyon-Min; Zink, Jeffrey I; Khashab, Niveen M

    2015-07-28

    A series of magnetically active ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared by using Mn oxide NPs as seeds. A Verwey transition is identified in Fe3O4 NPs with an average diameter of 14.5 nm at 96 K, where a sharp drop of magnetic susceptibility occurs. In MnFe2O4 NPs, a spin glass-like state is observed with the decrease in magnetization below the blocking temperature due to the disordered spins during the freezing process. From these MnFe2O4 NPs, MnFe2O4@Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O core-shell NPs are prepared by seeded growth. The structure of the core is cubic spinel (Fd3¯m), and the shell is composed of iron-manganese oxide (Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O) with a rock salt structure (Fm3¯m). Moiré fringes appear perpendicular to the ?110? directions on the cubic shape NPs through the plane-matched epitaxial growth. These fringes are due to the difference in the lattice spacings between MnFe2O4 and Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O. Exchange bias is observed in these MnFe2O4@Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O core-shell NPs with an enhanced coercivity, as well as the shift of hysteresis along the field direction. PMID:26123580

  4. Substitution of manganese and iron into hydroxyapatite: Core/shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Meejoo, Siwaporn; Tang, I.-Ming

    2008-08-04

    The bioceramics, hydroxyapatite (HAP), is a material which is biocompatible to the human body and is well suited to be used in hyperthermia applications for the treatment of bone cancer. We investigate the substitution of iron and manganese into the hydroxyapatite to yield ceramics having the empirical formula Ca{sub 9.4}Fe{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}. The samples were prepared by the co-precipitation method. The formation of the nanocrystallites in the HAP structure as the heating temperatures were raised to obtain a glass-ceramic system are confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED) and electron spin resonance (ESR). TEM images show the core/shell structure of the nanoparticles, with the core being formed by the ferrites and the shell by the hydroxyapatite. The ED patterns indicate the nanoparticles formed at 500 deg. C have an amorphous structure while the nanoparticles formed at 1000 deg. C are crystalline. ESR spectroscopy indicated that the Fe{sup 3+} ions have a g-factor of 4.23 and the Mn{sup 2+} ions have a g-factor of 2.01. The values of the parameters in the spin Hamiltonian which describes the interaction between the transition metal ions and the Ca{sup 2+} ions, indicate that the Mn{sup 2+} ion substitute into the Ca{sup 2+} sites which are ninefold coordinated, i.e., the Ca(1) sites.

  5. Manganese

    MedlinePLUS

    Manganese is a mineral that is found in several foods including nuts, legumes, seeds, tea, whole grains, and leafy green vegetables. It is ... manganese by mouth along with other vitamins and minerals can promote growth in children who have low ...

  6. Synthesis and characterization of Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) nanoparticles by solution evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoor, A.; Afzal, A. M.; Umair, M.; Ali, Adnan; Rizwan, M.; Yaqoob, M. Z.

    2015-11-01

    Single phase Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) with high magnetization and polarization was synthesized by solution evaporation method (SEM) at room temperature. The influence of temperature and size of nanoparticles on magnetic properties was studied. The prepared Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to investigate the structure and size of crystal. The average crystallite size of nanoparticles (NPs) as calculated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) falls in the range of 22-31 nm. The crystallite size of Bismuth ferrite increased as the temperature varied from 450 °C to 650 °C. Magnetic properties were studied by using physical properties measurement system (PPMS). It was also observed that the magnetic properties were directly related to the size and temperature of Bismuth ferrite nanoparticles. It has been investigated that the magnetization was decreased as the temperature and crystallite size increased.

  7. Magnetic liposomes based on nickel ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana Rita O; Gomes, I T; Almeida, Bernardo G; Araújo, J P; Castanheira, Elisabete M S; Coutinho, Paulo J G

    2015-07-21

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles with superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature were synthesized using a coprecipitation method. These magnetic nanoparticles were either covered with a lipid bilayer, forming dry magnetic liposomes (DMLs), or entrapped in liposomes, originating aqueous magnetoliposomes (AMLs). A new and promising method for the synthesis of DMLs is described. The presence of the lipid bilayer in DMLs was confirmed by FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer) measurements between the fluorescent-labeled lipids NBD-C12-HPC (NBD acting as a donor) included in the second lipid layer and rhodamine B-DOPE (acceptor) in the first lipid layer. An average donor-acceptor distance of 3 nm was estimated. Assays of the non-specific interactions of magnetoliposomes with biological membranes (modeled using giant unilamellar vesicles, GUVs) were performed. Membrane fusion between both aqueous and dry magnetoliposomes and GUVs was confirmed by FRET, which is an important result regarding applications of these systems both as hyperthermia agents and antitumor drug nanocarriers. PMID:26095537

  8. Structural And Magnetic Properties Of Ni-Zn Ferrite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahane, G. S.; Kumar, Ashok; Pant, R. P.; Lal, Krishan

    2010-10-01

    Nickel zinc ferrite nanoparticles of the composition NixZn1-xFe2O4 (x = 0.1, 0.3, 0.5) have been synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, TEM, EPR, DC magnetization and AC susceptibility measurements. The X-ray diffraction patterns confirm the synthesis of single crystalline phase of NixZn1-xFe2O4 (x = 0.1, 0.3, 0.5) nanoparticles. Lattice parameter decreases with the increase in nickel content. The magnetic measurements shows superparamagnetic nature of the samples for x = 0.1 and 0.3 whereas for x = 0.5 the material shows ferromagnetic nature. The saturation magnetization is low and increases with increase in nickel content. The superparamagnetic nature of the samples is supported by the EPR and ac susceptibility measurement studies. The blocking temperature increases with the nickel concentration. The changes in the magnetic properties have been explained by the redistribution of the cations on A and B sites.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of Ni-Zn ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahane, G. S.; Kumar, Ashok; Arora, Manju; Pant, R. P.; Lal, Krishan

    2010-04-01

    Nickel zinc ferrite nanoparticles Ni xZn 1- xFe 2O 4 ( x=0.1, 0.3, 0.5) have been synthesized by a chemical co-precipitation method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, dc magnetization and ac susceptibility measurements. The X-ray diffraction patterns confirm the synthesis of single crystalline Ni xZn 1- xFe 2O 4 nanoparticles. The lattice parameter decreases with increase in Ni content resulting in a reduction in lattice strain. Similarly crystallite size increases with the concentration of Ni. The magnetic measurements show the superparamagnetic nature of the samples for x=0.1 and 0.3 whereas for x=0.5 the material is ferromagnetic. The saturation magnetization is 23.95 emu/g and increases with increase in Ni content. The superparamagnetic nature of the samples is supported by the EPR and ac susceptibility measurement studies. The blocking temperature increases with Ni concentration. The increase in blocking temperature is explained by the redistribution of the cations on tetrahedral (A) and octahedral (B) sites.

  10. Exchange spring like magnetic behavior in cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chithra, M.; Anumol, C. N.; Sahu, Baidyanath; Sahoo, Subasa C.

    2016-03-01

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by sol-gel technique and were annealed at 900 °C in air for 2 h. Structural properties were studied by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies show presence of mostly two different sizes of grains in these samples. Magnetization value of 58.36 emu/g was observed at 300 K for the as prepared sample and an enhanced magnetization close to the bulk value of 80.59 emu/g was observed for the annealed sample. At 10 K a two stepped hysteresis loop showing exchange spring magnetic behavior was observed accompanied by very high values of coercivity and remanence. Two clear peaks were observed in the derivative of demagnetization curve in the as prepared sample where as two partially overlapped peaks were observed in the annealed sample. The observed magnetic properties can be understood on the basis of the grain size and their distribution leading to the different types of intergranular interactions in these nanoparticles.

  11. Manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Major-Sosias, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a hard, brittle, gray-white transition metal, with the most numerous oxidation states of the elements in the first series of the Periodic Table. Since the manganese atom can donate up to seven electrons from its outer two shells, manganese compounds exist with valences from -3 to +7, the most common being +2, +4, and +7. Due to its sulfur-fixing, deoxidizing, and alloying properties, as well as its low cost, the principal commercial application for manganese is in iron and steel production. Manganese is also employed in non-ferrous metallurgy, batteries and chemical processes. Although potentially harmful to the respiratory and nervous systems, manganese is an essential element for animals and humans, and a micronutrient for plants.

  12. Biodistribution and acute toxicity of a nanofluid containing manganese iron oxide nanoparticles produced by a mechanochemical process.

    PubMed

    Bellusci, Mariangela; La Barbera, Aurelio; Padella, Franco; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pasquo, Alessandra; Grollino, Maria Giuseppa; Leter, Giorgio; Nardi, Elisa; Cremisini, Carlo; Giardullo, Paola; Pacchierotti, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are candidate contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. Biodistribution and toxicity assessment are critical for the development of nanoparticle-based drugs, because of nanoparticle-enhanced biological reactivity. Here, we investigated the uptake, in vivo biodistribution, and in vitro and in vivo potential toxicity of manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanoparticles, synthesized by an original high-yield, low-cost mechanochemical process. Cultures of murine Balb/3T3 fibroblasts were exposed for 24, 48, or 72 hours to increasing ferrofluid concentrations. Nanoparticle cellular uptake was assessed by flow-cytometry scatter-light measurements and microscopy imaging after Prussian blue staining; cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and colony-forming assays. After a single intravenous injection, in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution and clearance were evaluated in mice by Mn spectrophotometric determination and Prussian blue staining in the liver, kidneys, spleen, and brain at different posttreatment times up to 21 days. The same organs were analyzed for any possible histopathological change. The in vitro study demonstrated dose-dependent nanoparticle uptake and statistically significant cytotoxic effects from a concentration of 50 ?g/mL for the MTT assay and 20 ?g/mL for the colony-forming assay. Significant increases in Mn concentrations were detected in all analyzed organs, peaking at 6 hours after injection and then gradually declining. Clearance appeared complete at 7 days in the kidneys, spleen, and brain, whereas in the liver Mn levels remained statistically higher than in vehicle-treated mice up to 3 weeks postinjection. No evidence of irreversible histopathological damage to any of the tested organs was observed. A comparison of the lowest in vitro toxic concentration with the intravenously injected dose and the administered dose of other ferrofluid drugs currently in clinical practice suggests that there might be sufficient safety margins for further development of our formulation. PMID:24790434

  13. Biodistribution and acute toxicity of a nanofluid containing manganese iron oxide nanoparticles produced by a mechanochemical process

    PubMed Central

    Bellusci, Mariangela; La Barbera, Aurelio; Padella, Franco; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pasquo, Alessandra; Grollino, Maria Giuseppa; Leter, Giorgio; Nardi, Elisa; Cremisini, Carlo; Giardullo, Paola; Pacchierotti, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are candidate contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. Biodistribution and toxicity assessment are critical for the development of nanoparticle-based drugs, because of nanoparticle-enhanced biological reactivity. Here, we investigated the uptake, in vivo biodistribution, and in vitro and in vivo potential toxicity of manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanoparticles, synthesized by an original high-yield, low-cost mechanochemical process. Cultures of murine Balb/3T3 fibroblasts were exposed for 24, 48, or 72 hours to increasing ferrofluid concentrations. Nanoparticle cellular uptake was assessed by flow-cytometry scatter-light measurements and microscopy imaging after Prussian blue staining; cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and colony-forming assays. After a single intravenous injection, in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution and clearance were evaluated in mice by Mn spectrophotometric determination and Prussian blue staining in the liver, kidneys, spleen, and brain at different posttreatment times up to 21 days. The same organs were analyzed for any possible histopathological change. The in vitro study demonstrated dose-dependent nanoparticle uptake and statistically significant cytotoxic effects from a concentration of 50 ?g/mL for the MTT assay and 20 ?g/mL for the colony-forming assay. Significant increases in Mn concentrations were detected in all analyzed organs, peaking at 6 hours after injection and then gradually declining. Clearance appeared complete at 7 days in the kidneys, spleen, and brain, whereas in the liver Mn levels remained statistically higher than in vehicle-treated mice up to 3 weeks postinjection. No evidence of irreversible histopathological damage to any of the tested organs was observed. A comparison of the lowest in vitro toxic concentration with the intravenously injected dose and the administered dose of other ferrofluid drugs currently in clinical practice suggests that there might be sufficient safety margins for further development of our formulation. PMID:24790434

  14. Abrasion and deformed layer formation of manganese-zinc ferrite in sliding contact with lapping tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Tanaka, K.

    1986-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and the deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite simulated heads during contact with lapping tapes. The crystaline state of the head is changed drastically during the abrasion process. Crystalline states ranging from nearly amorphous to highly textured polycrystalline can be produced on the wear surface of a single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite head. The total thickness of the deformed layer was approximately 0.8 microns. This thickness increased as the load and abrasive grit size increased. The anisotropic wear of the ferrite was found to be inversely proportional to the hardness of the wear surface. The wear was lower in the order 211 111 10 0110. The wear of the ferrite increased markedly with an increase in sliding velocity and abrasive grit size.

  15. Crystallite size induced crossover from paramagnetism to superparamagnetism in zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jitendra Pal; Gautam, Sanjeev; Srivastava, R. C.; Asokan, K.; Kanjilal, D.; Chae, Keun Hwa

    2015-10-01

    Present work investigates the crossover from paramagnetism to superparamagnetism as a function of crystallite size in zinc ferrite nanoparticles using near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Synthesized paramagnetic and superparamagnetic nanoparticles exhibit presence of Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions with dominant concentration of Fe3+ ions. Fe L- and O K-edges spectra of paramagnetic nanoparticles consist of more intense spectral features compared to that of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. This reflects enhanced t2g and eg symmetry states of Fe-O hybridized states in paramagnetic nanoparticles induced by increased degree of crystallization.

  16. Moessbauer studies in zinc-manganese ferrites for use in measuring small velocities and accelerations with great precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escue, W. T.; Gupta, R. G.; Mendiratta, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Mossbauer spectroscopy was used for a systematic study of the magnetic behavior of manganese and zinc in mixed ferrites. It was observed that Zn2+ has preference to substitute Mn2+ at interstitial sites where the metal ions are tetrahedrally coordinated with four oxygen neighbors. The internal magnetic hyperfine field at the tetrahedral iron site is larger than that at the octahedral site. The relaxation effects were observed to play an important role as the zinc contents were increased, while the spin-correlation time and the magnetic field were observed to decrease in strength. It is concluded that Mossbauer effect data on complex materials, when used in conjunction with other data, can provide useful insight into the origin of the microscopic properties of magnetic materials.

  17. Superparamagnetic calcium ferrite nanoparticles synthesized using a simple sol-gel method for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, N H; Ghazali, M J; Majlis, B Y; Yunas, J; Razali, M

    2015-08-17

    The calcium ferrite nano-particles (CaFe2O4 NPs) were synthesized using a sol-gel method for targeted drug delivery application. The proposed nano-particles were initially prepared by mixing calcium and iron nitrates that were added with citric acid in order to prevent agglomeration and subsequently calcined at a temperature of 550°C to obtain small particle size. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by using an XRD (X-ray diffraction), which revealed the configuration of orthorhombic structures of the CaFe2O4 nano-particles. A crystallite size of ~13.59 nm was obtained using a Scherer's formula. Magnetic analysis using a VSM (Vibrating Sample Magnetometer analysis), revealed that the synthesized particles exhibited super-paramagnetic behavior having magnetization saturation of approximately 88.3emu/g. Detailed observation via the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the calcium ferrite nano-particles were spherical in shape. PMID:26405858

  18. Manganese

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in many chemical processes in the body, including processing of cholesterol, carbohydrates, and protein. It might also ... iron, zincTaking calcium along with any of these minerals can decrease the amount of manganese that the ...

  19. Zinc ferrite nanoparticle as a magnetic catalyst: Synthesis and dye degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Red 198 and Reactive Red 120 by the synthesized zinc ferrite nanoparticle. - Highlights: • Magnetic zinc ferrite nanoparticle was synthesized and characterized. • Photocatalytic dye degradation by magnetic nanoparticle was studied. • Formate, acetate and oxalate were detected as dominant dye degradation aliphatic intermediates. • Nitrate and sulfate ions were detected as mineralization products of dyes. • Zinc ferrite nanoparticle was an effective magnetic photocatalyst to degrade dyes. - Abstract: In this paper, magnetic zinc ferrite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticle was synthesized and its photocatalytic dye degradation ability from colored wastewater was studied. Reactive Red 198 (RR198) and Reactive Red 120 (RR120) were used as model dyes. The characteristics of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Photocatalytic dye degradation by ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was studied by UV–vis spectrophotometer and ion chromatography (IC). The effects of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} dosage, initial dye concentration and salt on dye degradation were evaluated. Formate, acetate and oxalate anions were detected as dominant aliphatic intermediate. Inorganic anions (nitrate and sulfate anions) were detected as dye mineralization products. The results indicated that ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} could be used as a magnetic photocatalyst to degrade dyes from colored wastewater.

  20. Structure and magnetic properties of rf thermally plasma synthesized Mn and Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.; Swaminathan, R.; McHenry, M. E.

    2003-05-01

    Plasma synthesis has previously been shown to be a viable route to producing nanocrystalline magnetite and Ni ferrite nanoparticles. In this work nanocrystalline powders of Mn and Mn-Zn ferrites have been synthesized using a 50 kW-3 MHz rf (radio frequency) induction plasma torch. We investigate these materials for soft magnetic applications. High-energy ball milled Mn + Fe powders and (Mn+Zn) +Fe powders (<10 ?m) in the stoichiometric ratio of 1:2 were used as precursors for the ferrite synthesis. Compressed air was used in the oxygen source for oxidation of metal species in the plasma. X-ray diffraction patterns for the plasma-torched Mn ferrite and MnZn ferrite powders were indexed to the spinel ferrite crystal structure. An average grain size of ˜20 nm was determined from Scherrer analysis confirmed by transmission electron microscopy studies. The particles also exhibited faceted polygonal growth forms with the associated truncated cuboctahedral shapes. Room-temperature vibrating sample magnetometer measurements of the hysteretic response revealed saturation magnetization Ms and coercivity Hc of Mn ferrite are 23.65 emu/g and 20 Oe, respectively. The Néel temperatures of Mn ferrite powders before and after annealing (500 °C, 30 min) were determined to be 200 and 360 °C, respectively. Inductively coupled plasma chemical analysis and energy dispersive x-ray analysis data on the plasma-torched powders indicated deviations in the Mn or Zn contents than the ideal stoichiometry. MnZn ferrite was observed to have a Néel temperature increased by almost 400 °C as compared with as-synthesized Mn ferrite but with a larger coercivity of ˜35 Oe.

  1. Organ weight changes in mice after long-term inhalation exposure to manganese oxides nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, T.; Buchtová, M.; Do?ekal, B.; Míšek, I.; Navrátil, J.; Mikuška, P.; Šerý, O.; Ve?e?a, Z.

    2015-05-01

    Recently, it has been proven that manganese from inhaled particles of manganese compounds can accumulate in the internal organs of laboratory animals. Nevertheless, there were only a few researches dealing with changes in body morphology induced by inhalation of these particles, even though results of some studies indicate existence of such changes. The aim of our research was to assess the effect of inhaled manganese oxides nanoparticles on weight of internal organs. For this purpose a long-term inhalation experiment on laboratory mice was performed, during which the mice were exposed to MnO.Mn2O3 nanoparticles in concentration 2 × 106 particles/cm3 for 17 weeks, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Manganese oxides nanoparticles were synthesized continuously via aerosol route in a hot wall tube flow reactor using thermal decomposition of metal organic precursor manganese(II)acetylacetonate in the flow tube reactor at temperature 750 °C in the presence of 30 vol% of oxygen. It was proven that inhaled nanoparticles can influence the weight of internal organs of mice. Moreover, it was discovered that the resulting change in weight of selected organs is disproportional. The mice from the experimental group had statistically significantly lighter kidneys, liver and spleen and heavier pancreas compared to the mice from the control group.

  2. Hyperthermia HeLa cell treatment with silica coated manganese oxide nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Villanueva, A; Alonso, JM; Rueda, T; Martínez, A; Crespo, P; Morales, MP; Fernandez, MA Gonzalez; Valdes, J; Rivero, G

    2009-01-01

    HeLa tumour cells incubated with ferromagnetic nanoparticles of manganese oxide perovskite La0.56(SrCa)0.22MnO3 were treated with a high frequency alternating magnetic field. The particles were previously coated with silica to improve their biocompatibility. The control assays made with HeLa tumour cells showed that cell survival and growth rate were not affected by the particle internalization in cells, or by the electromagnetic field on cells without nanoparticles. The application of an alternating electromagnetic field to cells incubated with this silica coated manganese oxide induced a significant cellular damage that finally lead to cell death by an apoptotic mechanism.

  3. Manganese

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Manganese ; CASRN 7439 - 96 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  4. Manganese Nanoparticle Activates Mitochondrial Dependent Apoptotic Signaling and Autophagy in Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Hilary Afeseh; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2011-01-01

    The production of man-made nanoparticles for various modern applications has increased exponentially in recent years, but the potential health effects of most nanoparticles are not well characterized. Unfortunately, in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies are extremely limited by yet unresolved problems relating to dosimetry. In the present study, we systematically characterized manganese (Mn) nanoparticle sizes and examined the nanoparticle-induced oxidative signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that Mn nanoparticles range in size from single nanoparticles (~25 nM) to larger agglomerates when in treatment media. Manganese nanoparticles were effectively internalized in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells, and they induced a time-dependent upregulation of the transporter protein transferrin. Exposure to 25–400 µg/mL Mn nanoparticles induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mn nanoparticles also significantly increased ROS, accompanied by a caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of proapoptotic protein kinase C? (PKC?), as well as activation loop phosphorylation. Blocking Mn nanoparticle-induced ROS failed to protect against the neurotoxic effects, suggesting the involvement of other pathways. Further mechanistic studies revealed changes in Beclin1 and LC3, indicating that Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy. Primary mesencephalic neuron exposure to Mn nanoparticles induced loss of TH positive dopaminergic neurons and neuronal processes. Collectively, our results suggest that Mn nanoparticles effectively enter dopaminergic neuronal cells and exert neurotoxic effects by activating an apoptotic signaling pathway and autophagy, emphasizing the need for assessing possible health risks associated with an increased use of Mn nanoparticles in modern applications. PMID:21856324

  5. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    van Berkum, Susanne; Dee, Joris T.; Philipse, Albert P.; Erné, Ben H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid)-based hydrogels (PAA). To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network. PMID:23673482

  6. Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Ferrite Nanoparticles: Effect of Reaction Temperature on Particle Size and Magnetic Properties.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, S; Sangeetha, J; Philip, John

    2015-08-01

    The preparation of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles of different particle sizes by controlling the reaction temperature using microwave assisted synthesis is reported. The iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at two different temperatures viz., 45 and 85 °C were characterized using techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The average size of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C is found to be 10 and 13.8 nm, respectively, and the nanoparticles exhibited superparamagantic behavior at room temperature. The saturation magnetization values of nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C were found to be 67 and 72 emu/g, respectively. The increase in particle size and saturation magnetization values with increase in incubation temperature is attributed to a decrease in supersaturation at elevated temperature. The Curie temperature was found to be 561 and 566 0C for the iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C, respectively. The FTIR spectrum of the iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at different temperatures exhibited the characteristic peaks that corresponded to the stretching of bonds between octahedral and tetrahedral metal ions to oxide ions. Our results showed that the ferrite nanoparticle size can be varied by controlling the reaction temperature inside a microwave reactor. PMID:26369150

  7. Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr MA/ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Kimura, A

    2010-04-06

    Oxide nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr ODS ferritic steel fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) method have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. A partial crystallization of oxide nanoparticles was frequently observed in as-fabricated ODS steel. The crystal structure of crystalline oxide particles is identified to be mainly Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) with a monoclinic structure. Large nanoparticles with a diameter larger than 20 nm tend to be incoherent and have a nearly spherical shape, whereas small nanoparticles with a diameter smaller than 10 nm tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have faceted boundaries. The oxide nanoparticles become fully crystallized after prolonged annealing at 900 C. These results lead us to propose a three-stage formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels.

  8. Study of Zn-Cu Ferrite Nanoparticles for LPG Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Baranwal, Ravi Kant; Bharti, Ajaya; Vakil, Z.; Prajapati, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured zinc-copper mixed ferrite was synthesized using sol-gel method. XRD patterns of different compositions of zinc-copper ferrite, Zn(1?x)CuxFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75), revealed single phase inverse spinel ferrite in all the samples synthesized. With increasing copper concentration, the crystallite size was found to be increased from 28?nm to 47?nm. The surface morphology of all the samples studied by the Scanning Electron Microscopy there exhibits porous structure of particles throughout the samples. The pellets of the samples are prepared for LPG sensing characteristics. The sensing is carried out at different operating temperatures (200, 225, and 250°C) with the variation of LPG concentrations (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 vol%). The maximum sensitivity of 55.33% is observed at 250°C operating for the 0.6 vol% LPG. PMID:23864833

  9. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, A. Banerjee, M. Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-24

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  10. Nanostructural evolution from nanosheets to one-dimensional nanoparticles for manganese oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hongmei; Kong, Xingang; Wen, Puhong; Kitayama, Tomonori; Feng, Qi

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ? Nanosheets were transformed to other one-dimensional nanoparticles. ? Nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoribbons, and nanobelts were obtained. ? Nanoparticle morphology can be controlled with organic amines. ? Organic amines act as morphology directing agent. -- Abstract: This paper introduces a novel hydrothermal soft chemical synthesis process for manganese oxide nanostructured particles using two-dimensional manganese oxide nanosheets as precursor. In this process, a birnessite-type manganese oxide with a layered structure was exfoliated into its elementary layer nanosheets, and then the nanosheets were hydrothermally treated to transform the two-dimensional morphology of the nanosheets to one-dimensional nanoparticles. The manganese oxide nanofibers, nanotubes, nanobelts, nanoribbons, and fabric-ribbon-like particles constructed from nanofibers or nanobelts were obtained using this hydrothermal soft chemical process. The nanostructural evolution from the two-dimensional nanosheets to the one-dimensional nanoparticles was characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and TG-DTA analysis. The morphology and nanostructure of the products are strongly dependent on the molecular dimension of organic amine cations added in the reaction system. The organic amine cations act as a morphology directing agent in the nanostructural evolution process.

  11. Magnetic properties of bio-synthesized zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yeary, Lucas W; Moon, Ji Won; Rawn, Claudia J; Love, Lonnie J; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Thompson, James R; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic properties of zinc ferrite (Zn-substituted magnetite, Zn{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) formed by a microbial process compared favorably with chemically synthesized materials. A metal reducing bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter, strain TOR-39 was incubated with Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}OOH (x=0.01, 0.1, and 0.15) precursors and produced nanoparticulate zinc ferrites. Composition and crystalline structure of the resulting zinc ferrites were verified using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction. The average composition from triplicates gave a value for y of 0.02, 0.23, and 0.30 with the greatest standard deviation of 0.02. Average crystallite sizes were determined to be 67, 49, and 25 nm, respectively. While crystallite size decreased with more Zn substitution, the lattice parameter and the unit cell volume showed a gradual increase in agreement with previous literature values. The magnetic properties were characterized using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer and were compared with values for the saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) reported in the literature. The averaged M{sub s} values for the triplicates with the largest amount of zinc (y=0.30) gave values of 100.1, 96.5, and 69.7 emu/g at temperatures of 5, 80, and 300 K, respectively indicating increased magnetic properties of the bacterially synthesized zinc ferrites.

  12. Oleate Coated Magnetic Cores Based on Magnetite, Zn Ferrite and Co Ferrite Nanoparticles - Preparation, Physical Characterization and Biological Impact on Helianthus Annuus Photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ursache-Oprisan, Manuela; Foca-nici, Ecaterina; Cirlescu, Aurelian; Caltun, Ovidiu; Creanga, Dorina

    2010-12-02

    Sodium oleate was used as coating shell for magnetite, Zn ferrite and Co ferrite powders to stabilize them in the form of aqueous magnetic suspensions. The physical characterization was carried out by applying X-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Both crystallite size and magnetic core diameter ranged between 7 and 11 nm. The influence of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions (corresponding to magnetic nanoparticle levels of 10{sup -14}-10{sup -15}/cm{sup 3}) on sunflower seedlings was studied considering the changes in the photosynthesis pigment levels. Similar responses were obtained for magnetite and cobalt ferrite nanoparticle treatment consisting in the apparent inhibition of chlorophyll biosynthesis while for zinc ferrite nanoparticles some concentrations seemed to have stimulatory effects on the chlorophylls as well as on the carotene levels. But the chlorophyll ratio was diminished in the case of all three types of magnetic nanoparticles meaning their slight negative effect on the light harvesting complex II (LHC II) from the chloroplast membranes and consequently on the photosynthesis efficiency.

  13. Investigations on Laser Beam Welding Dissimilar Material Combinations of Austenitic High Manganese (FeMn) and Ferrite Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Velten; Höfemann, Matthias; Hatscher, Ansgar; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan; Hein, David; Otto, Manuel; Overmeyer, Ludger

    For the past few years the customer's demand for more fuel efficient and at the same time safer vehicles has steadily increased. Consequently, light weight design has become one of the main interests in engineering. With regard to sheet metal components, a new class of high manganese steels, based on the TWIP (twinning induced plasticity) effect, provides the opportunity of shaping light weight designedthin and complex sheet metal geometries with advanced crash performance. In terms of weldability, due to their thermo-physical properties (high content of C, Mn, Al, Si), FeMn steels have to be handled differently in comparison to conventional steel grades. Particularly dissimilar material combinations of FeMn and ferrite steels are in the center of interest for industrial applications. This study reveals that metallurgical properties of dissimilar welding seams can be influenced considerably by laser beam welding, resulting in a change of the mechanical properties of the seam which is practicable without using filler material as described in (Flügge et al., 2011).

  14. Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties of nickel substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Effect of nickel concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velhal, Ninad B.; Patil, Narayan D.; Shelke, Abhijeet R.; Deshpande, Nishad G.; Puri, Vijaya R.

    2015-09-01

    Nickel substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with composition Co1-xNixFe2O4 (0.0 ? x ? 1.0) was synthesized using simple, low temperature auto combustion method. The X-ray diffraction patterns reveal the formation of cubic phase spinel structure. The crystallite size varies from 30-44 nm with the nickel content. Porous and agglomerated morphology of the bulk sample was displayed in the scanning electron microscopy. Micro Raman spectroscopy reveals continuous shift of Eg and Eg(2) stokes line up to 0.8 Ni substitution. The dispersion behavior of the dielectric constant with frequency and the semicircle nature of the impedance spectra show the cobalt nickel ferrite to have high resistance. The ferromagnetic nature is observed in all the samples, however, the maximum saturation magnetization was achieved by the 0.4 Ni substituted cobalt ferrite, which is up to the 92.87 emu/gm at 30K.

  15. Investigation of structural, thermal and magnetic properties of cadmium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Reddy, Ch.; Byon, Chan; Narendra, B.; Baskar, D.; Srinivas, G.; Shim, Jaesool; Prabhakar Vattikuti, S. V.

    2015-06-01

    Cd substituted Cobalt ferrite nano particles are synthesis using co-precipitation method. The as prepared samples are calcinated at 300 and 600 °C respectively. The existence of single phase spinal cubic structure of the prepared ferrite material is confirmed by the powder XRD measurement. The surface morphology images, compositional features are studied by SEM with EDX, and TEM. From the FT-IR spectra the absorption bands observed at 595 and 402 cm-1 are attributed to vibrations of tetrahedral and octahedral complexes respectively. From the VSM data, parameters like magnetization, coercivity, remanent magnetization and remanent squareness are measured. The saturation magnetization value is increases with increasing calcination temperature. The DSC and TG-DTA curves reveal that the thermal stability of the prepared ferrite nanoparticles. The calcination temperature affects the crystallite size, morphology and magnetic properties of the samples.

  16. Manganese nanoparticle activates mitochondrial dependent apoptotic signaling and autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2011-11-15

    The production of man-made nanoparticles for various modern applications has increased exponentially in recent years, but the potential health effects of most nanoparticles are not well characterized. Unfortunately, in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies are extremely limited by yet unresolved problems relating to dosimetry. In the present study, we systematically characterized manganese (Mn) nanoparticle sizes and examined the nanoparticle-induced oxidative signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that Mn nanoparticles range in size from single nanoparticles ({approx} 25 nM) to larger agglomerates when in treatment media. Manganese nanoparticles were effectively internalized in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells, and they induced a time-dependent upregulation of the transporter protein transferrin. Exposure to 25-400 {mu}g/mL Mn nanoparticles induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mn nanoparticles also significantly increased ROS, accompanied by a caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of proapoptotic protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), as well as activation loop phosphorylation. Blocking Mn nanoparticle-induced ROS failed to protect against the neurotoxic effects, suggesting the involvement of other pathways. Further mechanistic studies revealed changes in Beclin 1 and LC3, indicating that Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy. Primary mesencephalic neuron exposure to Mn nanoparticles induced loss of TH positive dopaminergic neurons and neuronal processes. Collectively, our results suggest that Mn nanoparticles effectively enter dopaminergic neuronal cells and exert neurotoxic effects by activating an apoptotic signaling pathway and autophagy, emphasizing the need for assessing possible health risks associated with an increased use of Mn nanoparticles in modern applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles activate mitochondrial cell death signaling in dopaminergic neuron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles activate caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of PKC{delta} cascade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles induce loss of TH{sup +} neurons in primary mesencephalic cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study emphasizes neurotoxic risks of Mn nanoparticles to nigral dopaminergic system.

  17. Ferromagnetic resonance in Ni-Zn ferrite nanoparticles in different aggregation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Raúl; Herbst, Frédéric; Ammar, Souad

    2012-10-01

    Ferrite nanoparticles of composition Zn0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4 were synthesized by forced hydrolysis in polyol from the corresponding zinc, nickel and iron acetates. By varying the preparation conditions, different aggregation states were obtained, ranging from isolated nanoparticles with average diameter of 5 nm, to clusters of some 20 nm, formed as well by nanoparticles with average diameter in the 5 nm range, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements exhibited a ferrimagnetic behavior for both aggregation states at 77 K; at 300 K, however, isolated nanoparticles showed a superparamagnetic behavior while clustered ones remained ferrimagnetic with a broad linewidth. These results are interpreted on the basis of interactions between nanoparticles.

  18. Spherical barium ferrite nanoparticles and hexaferrite single crystals for information data storage and RF devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalli, Jeevan Prasad

    Since their discovery in the early 1950's hexagonal ferrites or hexaferrites have been studied for a long time because of their technological applications, such as microwave devices and high density magnetic recording media. In this dissertation efforts have been made to address these two applications by developing nanosized spherical barium ferrite particles for advanced magnetic recording media, and hexaferrite single crystals for low loss RF devices. Accordingly, this dissertation consists of two parts; part one spherical barium ferrite nanoparticles for information data storage media, and part two hexaferrite single crystals for RF devices. Part I. Spherical Barium Ferrite Nanoparticles Hexagonal barium ferrite (H-BaFe) nanoparticles are good candidates for particulate recording media due to their high uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy, excellent chemical stability, and narrow switching field distribution. One major disadvantage of using H-BaFe particles for particulate recording media is their poor dispersion and a high degree of stacking that deteriorate the recording capability by creating large media noise and surface roughness. One way to solve and improve the recording performance of H-BaFe media is employing substantially nanosized spherical barium ferrite (S­BaFe) particles. Spherical shaped particles have low aspect ratio and only form a point-to-point contact, unlike the H-BaFe particles. Therefore, using S-BaFe particles not only decrease the degree of magnetic interaction between the particles but also can substantially increases the recording performance by improving the dispersion and SNR of the particles in the magnetic media. In this dissertation, two different approaches were employed successfully to synthesize S-BaFe nanoparticles in the range of 20-45 nm. Part II. Hexaferrite Single Crystals As wireless communication systems are flourishing, and the operating frequencies are increasing, there is a great demand for RF devices such as circulators and isolators. Traditional RF devices using spinel or garnets are disadvantageous in the millimeter range frequencies, since they require a strong external bias field provided by external permanent magnets. A promising approach to circumvent this problem is to use the high crystalline anisotropy field in the hexaferrites. Single crystals of M and Y-type hexaferrites show promising results with their low microwave losses and excellent magnetic and physical properties. In this dissertation efforts to grow, high-quality bulk M and Y-type single crystals with the aim to study and improve their magnetic and microwave properties with respect to different cation dopant elements is reported. Also, a liquid phase epitaxial technique was developed to grow thick barium ferrite films onto semiconductor substrates. Finally, magnetic domain patterns on bulk M-type single crystals was studied by using a magnetic force microscopy technique.

  19. Development of Manganese-Based Nanoparticles as Contrast Probes for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Zipeng; Xie, Jin

    2012-01-01

    MRI is one of the most important imaging tools in clinics. It interrogates nuclei of atoms in a living subject, providing detailed delineation with high spatial and temporal resolutions. To compensate the innate low sensitivity, MRI contrast probes were developed and widely used. These are typically paramagnetic or superparamagnetic materials, functioning by reducing relaxation times of nearby protons. Previously, gadolinium(Gd)-based T1 contrast probes were dominantly used. However, it was found recently that their uses are occasionally associated with nephrogenic system fibrosis (NSF), which suggests a need of finding alternatives. Among the efforts, manganese-containing nanoparticles have attracted much attention. By careful engineering, manganese nanoparticles with comparable r1 relaxivities can be yielded. Moreover, other functionalities, be a targeting motif, a therapeutic agent or a second imaging component, can be loaded onto these nanoparticles, resulting in multifunctional nanoplatforms. PMID:22272218

  20. Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetic characteristics, and reflection loss analysis of nickel-strontium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, Ali; Paesano, Andrea; Cerqueira Machado, Carla Fabiana; Shirsath, Sagar E.; Liu, Xiaoxi; Morisako, Akimitsu

    2014-05-07

    In current research work, Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x/2}Sr{sub x/2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x?=?0–1 in a step of 0.2) ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a sol-gel method. According to the evolution in the subspectral areas obtained from Mössbauer spectroscopy, it was found that the relaxing iron belongs mostly to the site B, since the Mössbauer fraction of site A does not vary appreciably. With an increase in Ni-Sr substitution contents in cobalt ferrite, the coercivity and saturation of magnetization decrease. Variation of reflection loss versus frequency in microwave X-band demonstrates that the reflection peak shifts to lower frequency by adding substituted cations and the synthesized nanoparticles can be considered for application in electromagnetic wave absorber technology.

  1. Superparamagnetic magnesium ferrite nanoparticles fabricated by a simple, thermal-treatment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarz Naseri, Mahmoud; Ara, Mohammad Hossein Majles; Saion, Elias B.; Shaari, Abdul Halim

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the synthesis of magnesium ferrite (MgFe2O4) nanoparticles with cubic symmetry that were prepared by a thermal-treatment method by using a solution that contained poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as a capping agent and Mg and Fe nitrates as alternative sources of metal. Heat treatment was conducted using an electric cylinder furnace in an air atmosphere at temperatures between 673 and 973 K, and magnesium ferrite nanoparticles were produced that had different crystallite sizes ranging from5 to 8 nm. The products were well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray analysis (EDXA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). All the samples calcined from 673 to 973 K exhibited super paramagnetic behavior with unpaired electrons spins, which was confirmed by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy.

  2. In situ synthesis of magnetic MnZn-ferrite nanoparticles using reverse microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košak, A.; Makovec, D.; Drofenik, M.; Žnidarši?, A.

    2004-05-01

    Superparamagnetic MnZn-ferrite nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution were prepared at various pH values using precipitation in a reverse microemulsion consisting of hexanol, as an oil phase; surfactant CTAB; and an aqueous solution of metal sulfates. Tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide was used as the precipitating agent and hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing reagent. The synthesized materials were characterized using X-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, BET surface analysis and magnetometry.

  3. Manganese-enhanced MRI of rat brain based on slow cerebral delivery of manganese(II) with silica-encapsulated Mn x Fe(1-x) O nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Lu, Fang; Chen, Chiao-Chi V; Mo, Kuan-Chi; Hung, Yann; Guo, Zhi-Xuan; Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Ming-Huang; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Chen; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we report a monodisperse bifunctional nanoparticle system, MIO@SiO2 -RITC, as an MRI contrast agent [core, manganese iron oxide (MIO); shell, amorphous silica conjugated with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC)]. It was prepared by thermal decomposition and modified microemulsion methods. The nanoparticles with varying iron to manganese ratios displayed different saturated magnetizations and relaxivities. In vivo MRI of rats injected intravenously with MIO@SiO2-RITC nanoparticles exhibited enhancement of the T1 contrast in brain tissue, in particular a time-delayed enhancement in the hippocampus, pituitary gland, striatum and cerebellum. This is attributable to the gradual degradation of MIO@SiO2-RITC nanoparticles in the liver, resulting in the slow release of manganese(II) [Mn(II)] into the blood pool and, subsequently, accumulation in the brain tissue. Thus, T1-weighted contrast enhancement was clearly detected in the anatomic structure of the brain as time progressed. In addition, T2*-weighted images of the liver showed a gradual darkening effect. Here, we demonstrate the concept of the slow release of Mn(II) for neuroimaging. This new nanoparticle-based manganese contrast agent allows one simple intravenous injection (rather than multiple infusions) of Mn(II) precursor, and results in delineation of the detailed anatomic neuroarchitecture in MRI; hence, this provides the advantage of the long-term study of neural function. PMID:23526743

  4. Cytotoxicity and physicochemical characterization of iron-manganese-doped sulfated zirconia nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Al-Fahdawi, Mohamed Qasim; Rasedee, Abdullah; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; Alhassan, Fatah H; Rosli, Rozita; El Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat; Naadja, Seïf-Eddine; Webster, Thomas J; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    Iron-manganese-doped sulfated zirconia nanoparticles with both Lewis and Brønsted acidic sites were prepared by a hydrothermal impregnation method followed by calcination at 650°C for 5 hours, and their cytotoxicity properties against cancer cell lines were determined. The characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brauner-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta size potential, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The cytotoxicity of iron-manganese-doped sulfated zirconia nanoparticles was determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays against three human cancer cell lines (breast cancer MDA-MB231 cells, colon carcinoma HT29 cells, and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells) and two normal human cell lines (normal hepatocyte Chang cells and normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells [HUVECs]). The results suggest for the first time that iron-manganese-doped sulfated zirconia nanoparticles are cytotoxic to MDA-MB231 and HepG2 cancer cells but have less toxicity to HT29 and normal cells at concentrations from 7.8 ?g/mL to 500 ?g/mL. The morphology of the treated cells was also studied, and the results supported those from the cytotoxicity study in that the nanoparticle-treated HepG2 and MDA-MB231 cells had more dramatic changes in cell morphology than the HT29 cells. In this manner, this study provides the first evidence that iron-manganese-doped sulfated zirconia nanoparticles should be further studied for a wide range of cancer applications without detrimental effects on healthy cell functions. PMID:26425082

  5. Cytotoxicity and physicochemical characterization of iron–manganese-doped sulfated zirconia nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Al-Fahdawi, Mohamed Qasim; Rasedee, Abdullah; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; Alhassan, Fatah H; Rosli, Rozita; El Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat; Naadja, Seïf-Eddine; Webster, Thomas J; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    Iron–manganese-doped sulfated zirconia nanoparticles with both Lewis and Brønsted acidic sites were prepared by a hydrothermal impregnation method followed by calcination at 650°C for 5 hours, and their cytotoxicity properties against cancer cell lines were determined. The characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brauner–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area measurements, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta size potential, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The cytotoxicity of iron–manganese-doped sulfated zirconia nanoparticles was determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays against three human cancer cell lines (breast cancer MDA-MB231 cells, colon carcinoma HT29 cells, and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells) and two normal human cell lines (normal hepatocyte Chang cells and normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells [HUVECs]). The results suggest for the first time that iron–manganese-doped sulfated zirconia nanoparticles are cytotoxic to MDA-MB231 and HepG2 cancer cells but have less toxicity to HT29 and normal cells at concentrations from 7.8 ?g/mL to 500 ?g/mL. The morphology of the treated cells was also studied, and the results supported those from the cytotoxicity study in that the nanoparticle-treated HepG2 and MDA-MB231 cells had more dramatic changes in cell morphology than the HT29 cells. In this manner, this study provides the first evidence that iron–manganese-doped sulfated zirconia nanoparticles should be further studied for a wide range of cancer applications without detrimental effects on healthy cell functions. PMID:26425082

  6. Preparation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a novel solvothermal approach using divalent iron salt as precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jie; Green Bio- and Eco-Chem. Eng. Lab, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology ; Zhao, Jiantao; Li, Wenlie; Zhang, Shuping; Green Bio- and Eco-Chem. Eng. Lab, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology ; Tian, Zhenran; Basov, Sergey

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are obtained via solvothermal approach using Fe{sup 2+} salt as iron resource. The magnetic properties can be modified by some additives. Display Omitted Highlights: ? CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are synthesized by a facile one-step novel solvothermal method. ? The system is firstly performed in water–glycol mixture solvent with an ordinary air surrounding. ? The ferrous ions are used as iron source without adding oxidant. ? It is firstly found the low-coercivity CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles can be obtained with the help of some additives in the synthesis system. -- Abstract: Cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles are synthesized by a facile novel solvothermal method. The reactions are firstly performed in water–glycol system and Fe{sup 2+} salt is used as iron source without oxidant help. Some factors influenced the reactions, including temperature, reaction time, additives, are investigated. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The magnetic properties of some samples are detected by vibrating sample magnetometry techniques (VSM). It is firstly found that the magnetism of cobalt ferrites nanomaterials can be modified by some additives. The coercivity of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles evidently decreases from 600 to 50 Oe in the presence of PEG-4000 in the system.

  7. Comparison effects and electron spin resonance studies of ?-Fe2O4 spinel type ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakdar, H.; Yalç?n, O.; Cengiz, U.; Özüm, S.; Anigi, E.; Topel, O.

    2014-11-01

    ?-Fe2O4 spinel type ferrite nanoparticles have been synthesized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) assisted hydrothermal route by using NaOH solution. Electron spin resonance (ESR/EPR) measurements of ?-Fe2O4 nanoparticles have been performed by a conventional x-band spectrometer at room temperature. The comparison effect of nanoparticles prepared by using CTAB and EDTA in different ?-doping on the structural and morphological properties have been investigated in detail. The effect of EDTA-assisted synthesis for ?-Fe2O4 nanoparticles are refined, and thus the spectroscopic g-factor are detected by using ESR signals. These samples can be considered as great benefits for magnetic recording media, electromagnetic and drug delivery applications.

  8. Manganese-containing Prussian blue nanoparticles for imaging of pediatric brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Matthieu F; Yadavilli, Sridevi; Sze, Raymond W; Nazarian, Javad; Fernandes, Rohan

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric brain tumors (PBTs) are a leading cause of death in children. For an improved prognosis in patients with PBTs, there is a critical need to develop molecularly-specific imaging agents to monitor disease progression and response to treatment. In this paper, we describe manganese-containing Prussian blue nanoparticles as agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence-based imaging of PBTs. Our core-shell nanoparticles consist of a core lattice structure that incorporates and retains paramagnetic Mn2+ ions, and generates MRI contrast (both negative and positive). The biofunctionalized shell is comprised of fluorescent avidin, which serves the dual purpose of enabling fluorescence imaging and functioning as a platform for the attachment of biotinylated ligands that target PBTs. The surfaces of our nanoparticles are modified with biotinylated antibodies targeting neuron-glial antigen 2 or biotinylated transferrin. Both neuron-glial antigen 2 and the transferrin receptor are protein markers overexpressed in PBTs. We describe the synthesis, biofunctionalization, and characterization of these multimodal nanoparticles. Further, we demonstrate the MRI and fluorescence imaging capabilities of manganese-containing Prussian blue nanoparticles in vitro. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of these nanoparticles as PBT imaging agents by measuring their organ and brain biodistribution in an orthotopic mouse model of PBTs using ex vivo fluorescence imaging. PMID:24920896

  9. Influence of the morphology of ferrite nanoparticles on the directed assembly into magnetically anisotropic hierarchical structures.

    PubMed

    Lisjak, Darja; Jenuš, Petra; Mertelj, Alenka

    2014-06-10

    The effect of the morphology of ferrite nanoparticles on their assembly in a magnetic field was studied. Thin BaFe12O19 nanoplatelets were compared with isotropic, spherical or octahedral, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, all of which were synthesized hydrothermally. The nanoplatelets and nanoparticles assembled into a variety of hierarchical structures from stable suspensions during the "drop deposition" and drying in a magnetic field. The alignment of the nanoparticles in the magnetic field was observed in situ with an optical microscope. The morphologies of the nanoparticles and the subsequent assemblies were observed with transmission and scanning electron microscopes, respectively. The magnetic properties of the nanoparticles and the assemblies were measured with a vibrating-sample magnetometer. The BaFe12O19 nanoplatelets aligned in the plane of the substrate and formed several-micrometers-thick, ordered films with a magnetic alignment of approximately 90%. The CoFe2O4 nanoparticles assembled into thick, dense columns with a height of several hundreds of micrometers and showed a magnetic alignment of up to 60%. The differences in the morphologies and the magnetic alignments between the BaFe12O19 and CoFe2O4 hierarchical structures could be explained in terms of the differences in the shape and magnetocrystalline structure of the specific nanoparticles. PMID:24841592

  10. Effects of magnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles on biological and artificial lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Drašler, Barbara; Drobne, Damjana; Novak, Sara; Valant, Janez; Boljte, Sabina; Otrin, Lado; Rappolt, Michael; Sartori, Barbara; Igli?, Aleš; Kralj-Igli?, Veronika; Šuštar, Vid; Makovec, Darko; Gyergyek, Sašo; Ho?evar, Matej; Godec, Matjaž; Zupanc, Jernej

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this work is to provide experimental evidence on the interactions of suspended nanoparticles with artificial or biological membranes and to assess the possibility of suspended nanoparticles interacting with the lipid component of biological membranes. Methods 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid vesicles and human red blood cells were incubated in suspensions of magnetic bare cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) or citric acid (CA)-adsorbed CoFe2O4 nanoparticles dispersed in phosphate-buffered saline and glucose solution. The stability of POPC giant unilamellar vesicles after incubation in the tested nanoparticle suspensions was assessed by phase-contrast light microscopy and analyzed with computer-aided imaging. Structural changes in the POPC multilamellar vesicles were assessed by small angle X-ray scattering, and the shape transformation of red blood cells after incubation in tested suspensions of nanoparticles was observed using scanning electron microscopy and sedimentation, agglutination, and hemolysis assays. Results Artificial lipid membranes were disturbed more by CA-adsorbed CoFe2O4 nanoparticle suspensions than by bare CoFe2O4 nanoparticle suspensions. CA-adsorbed CoFe2O4-CA nanoparticles caused more significant shape transformation in red blood cells than bare CoFe2O4 nanoparticles. Conclusion Consistent with their smaller sized agglomerates, CA-adsorbed CoFe2O4 nanoparticles demonstrate more pronounced effects on artificial and biological membranes. Larger agglomerates of nanoparticles were confirmed to be reactive against lipid membranes and thus not acceptable for use with red blood cells. This finding is significant with respect to the efficient and safe application of nanoparticles as medicinal agents. PMID:24741305

  11. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-Stabilized and Manganese-Modified Rhodium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Highly Selective Synthesis of Ethanol and Acetaldehyde from Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yulin; Deng, Weihua; Guo, Enruo; Chung, Po-Wen; Chen, Senniang; Trewyn, Brian; Brown, Robert; Lin, Victor

    2012-03-30

    Well-defined and monodispersed rhodium nanoparticles as small as approximately 2?nm were encapsulated in?situ and stabilized in a mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) framework during the synthesis of the mesoporous material. Although both the activity and selectivity of MSN-encapsulated rhodium nanoparticles in CO hydrogenation could be improved by the addition of manganese oxide as expected, the carbon selectivity for C2 oxygenates (including ethanol and acetaldehyde) was unprecedentedly high at 74.5?% with a very small amount of methanol produced if rhodium nanoparticles were modified by manganese oxide with very close interaction.

  12. Comparative cytotoxic response of nickel ferrite nanoparticles in human liver HepG2 and breast MFC-7 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Khan, M A Majeed; Alrokayan, Salman A

    2015-09-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) have received much attention for their potential applications in biomedical fields such as magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery and cancer hyperthermia. However, little is known about the toxicity of nickel ferrite NPs at the cellular and molecular levels. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic responses of nickel ferrite NPs in two different types of human cells (i.e., liver HepG2 and breast MCF-7). Nickel ferrite NPs induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in both types of cells, which was demonstrated by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT), neutral red uptake (NRU) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Nickel ferrite NPs were also found to induce oxidative stress, which was evident by the depletion of glutathione and the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation. The mitochondrial membrane potential due to nickel ferrite NP exposure was also observed. The mRNA levels for the tumor suppressor gene p53 and the apoptotic genes bax, CASP3 and CASP9 were up-regulated, while the anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 was down-regulated following nickel ferrite NP exposure. Furthermore, the activities of apoptotic enzymes (caspase-3 and caspase-9) were also higher in both types of cells treated with nickel ferrite NPs. Cytotoxicity induced by nickel ferrite was efficiently prevented by N-acetyl cysteine (ROS scavenger) treatment, which suggested that oxidative stress might be one of the possible mechanisms of nickel ferrite NP toxicity. We also observed that MCF-7 cells were slightly more susceptible to nickel ferrite NP exposure than HepG2 cells. This study warrants further investigation to explore the potential mechanisms of different cytotoxic responses of nickel ferrite NPs in different cell lines. PMID:25966046

  13. Highly aluminium doped barium and strontium ferrite nanoparticles prepared by citrate auto-combustion synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J. . E-mail: neil.shirtcliffe@ntu.ac.uk; Thompson, Simon; O'Keefe, Eoin S.; Appleton, Steve; Perry, Carole C. . E-mail: carole.perry@ntu.ac.uk

    2007-02-15

    Aluminium doped barium and strontium hexaferrite nanoparticles BaAl {sub x}Fe{sub (12-x)}O{sub 19} and SrAl {sub x}Fe{sub (12-x)}O{sub 19} were synthesised via a sol-gel route using citric acid to complex the ions followed by an auto-combustion reaction. This method shows promise for the synthesis of complex ferrite powders with small particle size. It was found that around half of the iron could be substituted for aluminium in the barium ferrite with structure retention, whereas strontium aluminium ferrites could be produced with any aluminium content including total substitution of the iron. All synthesised materials consisted of particles smaller than 1 {mu}m, which is the size of a single magnetic domain, and various doping levels were achieved with the final elemental composition being within the bounds of experimental error. The materials show structural and morphological changes as they move from iron to aluminium ferrites. Such materials may be promising for imaging applications.

  14. Structural, IR, and Magnetic Studies of Annealed Li-Ferrite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agami, W. R.; Ashmawy, M. A.; Sattar, A. A.

    2013-10-01

    Nanoparticles of spinel Li-ferrite, Li0.5Fe2.5O4, were prepared by sol-gel autocombustion technique and annealed at different temperatures (T a = 673, 873, and 1073 K), i.e., at relatively low annealing temperatures to control the crystallite size. The saturation magnetization (M s) increased, and the surface area decreased by increasing the crystallite size, while Curie temperature (T C) remained almost constant. The critical crystallite size (D s), 74 nm, which corresponds to a maximum value of coercivity was determined. Samples with crystallite sizes ? D s had low initial permeability ?i, while the other samples lying in the multidomain region showed very high ?i values indicating a reversible domain wall displacement mechanism. Hence, the crystallite size plays an important role in changing the physical and magnetic properties of Li-ferrite.

  15. Synthesis of manganese spinel nanoparticles at room temperature by coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannelli, F.; Autret-Lambert, C.; Mathieu, C.; Chartier, T.; Delorme, F.; Seron, A

    2012-08-15

    This paper is focused on a new route to synthesize Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles by alkalisation by sodium hydroxide on a manganeous solution at room temperature. The precipitates obtained at different pH values have been characterized by XRD and TEM. Since the first addition of sodium hydroxide, a white Mn(OH){sub 2} precipitate appears. At pH=7, {gamma}-MnOOH phase is predominant with needle like shaped particles. At pH=10, hausmanite nanoparticles, which exhibits well defined cubic shape in the range 50-120 nm are obtained. This new precipitation route is a fast and easy environmentally friendly process to obtain well crystallized hausmanite nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: TEM image showing Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles after a precipitation at pH=10. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new route to synthesize Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles has been demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis has been performed by precipitation at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size of the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is between 50 and 120 nm.

  16. The superspin glass transition in zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaman, O.; Ko?ínková, T.; Jirák, Z.; Maryško, M.; Veverka, M.

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticles of the ZnxFe3-xO4 (x = 0.3-0.4) spinel phase having 5 and 15 nm size were synthesized by thermal decomposition of the respective acetylacetonates in a high boiling-point solvent employing surfactants. The collective behaviour of the nanoparticles was probed by dc and ac magnetic measurements of tightly compressed pellets of the particles and silica coated products which were prepared by reverse microemulsion technique. The assembly of bare 5 nm particles remains in the superparamagnetic state with Curie-Weiss characteristics down to 35 K when a rather sharp freezing of superspins is detected. The larger particles show a similar but more diffusive transition at 250 K. The cores encapsulated into the diamagnetic silica do not exhibit glassy freezing.

  17. [Superparamagnetic Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles "Blow up" Spatial Ordering of Double-stranded DNA Molecules].

    PubMed

    Yevdokimov, Yu M; Pershina, A G; Salyanov, V I; Magaeva, A A; Popenko, V I; Shtykova, E V; Dadinova, L A; Skuridin, S G

    2015-01-01

    The formation of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions formed by double-stranded DNA molecules, handled by positively charged superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, as well as action of these nanoparticles on DNA dispersion, are considered. The binding of magnetic nanoparticles to the linear double-stranded DNA in solution of high ionic strength (0.3 M NaCl) and subsequent phase exclusion of these complexes from polyethylene glycol-containing solutions lead to their inability to form dispersions, whose particles do possess the spatially twisted arrangement of neighboring double-stranded DNA molecules. The action of magnetic nanoparticles on DNA dispersion (one magnetic nanoparticle per one double-stranded DNA molecule) results in such "perturbation" of DNA structure at sites of magnetic nanoparticles binding that the regular spatial structure of DNA dispersion particles "blows up"; this process is accompanied by disappearance of both abnormal optical activity and characteristic Bragg maximum on the small-angle X-ray scattering curve. Allowing with the fact that the physicochemical properties of the DNA liquid-crystalline dispersion particles reflect features of spatial organization of these molecules in chromosomes of primitive organisms, it is possible, that the found effect can have the relevant biological consequences. PMID:26349206

  18. HRTEM Study of the Role of Nanoparticles in ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Tumey, S; Fluss, M; Serruys, Y; Willaime, F

    2011-08-30

    Structures of nanoparticles and their role in dual-ion irradiated Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (K3) ODS ferritic steel produced by mechanical alloying (MA) were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The observation of Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} complex-oxide nanoparticles in the ODS steel imply that decomposition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. HRTEM observations of crystalline and partially crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous cluster-domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of nanoparticles/clusters in MA/ODS steels, which we believe involves solid-state amorphization and re-crystallization. The role of nanoparticles/clusters in suppressing radiation-induced swelling is revealed through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in (Fe + He) dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS steel. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoparticle/clusters in dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS are presented.

  19. HRTEM Study of Oxide Nanoparticles in K3-ODS Ferritic Steel Developed for Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Tumey, S; Kuntz, J; El-Dasher, B; Wall, M; Choi, W; Kimura, A; Willaime, F; Serruys, Y

    2009-11-02

    Crystal and interfacial structures of oxide nanoparticles and radiation damage in 16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS ferritic steel have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Oxide nanoparticles with a complex-oxide core and an amorphous shell were frequently observed. The crystal structure of complex-oxide core is identified to be mainly monoclinic Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) oxide compound. Orientation relationships between the oxide and the matrix are found to be dependent on the particle size. Large particles (> 20 nm) tend to be incoherent and have a spherical shape, whereas small particles (< 10 nm) tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have a faceted interface. The observations of partially amorphous nanoparticles and multiple crystalline domains formed within a nanoparticle lead us to propose a three-stage mechanism to rationalize the formation of oxide nanoparticles containing core/shell structures in as-fabricated ODS steels. Effects of nanoparticle size and density on cavity formation induced by (Fe{sup 8+} + He{sup +}) dual-beam irradiation are briefly addressed.

  20. Microwave characterization of magnetically hard and soft ferrite nanoparticles in K-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Pina, C.; Falletta, E.; Ferretti, A. M.; Ponti, A.; Gentili, G. G.; Verri, V.; Nesti, R.

    2014-10-01

    Nano-sized magnetic particles show great promise in improving the performance of microwave absorbers with respect to the corresponding bulk materials. In this paper, magnetically hard and soft ferrite nanoparticles (CoFe2O4 and Fe3O4) having an average size of 14 and 11 nm were prepared by co-precipitation method and characterized in terms of morphology, structure, and magnetic properties. Their permeability and permittivity were measured by a waveguide technique, embedding each sample in a host medium. Their parameters at microwave frequencies were retrieved by comparing different effective medium equations.

  1. Manganese oxides supported on gold nanoparticles: new findings and current controversies for the role of gold.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Hosseini, Seyedeh Maedeh; Ho?y?ska, Ma?gorzata; Tomo, Tatsuya; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2015-12-01

    We synthesized manganese oxides supported on gold nanoparticles (diameter <100 nm) by the reaction of KMnO4 with gold nanoparticles under hydrothermal conditions. In this green method Mn oxide is deposited on the gold nanoparticles. The compounds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic absorption spectroscopy. In the next step, the water-oxidizing activities of these compounds in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate as a non-oxo transfer oxidant were studied. The results show that these compounds are good catalysts toward water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1.0 ± 0.1 (mmol O2/(mol Mn·s)). A comparison with other previously reported Mn oxides and important factors influencing the water-oxidizing activities of Mn oxides is also discussed. PMID:26076756

  2. Preparation of silica coated cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles for the purification of histidine-tagged proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygar, Gülfem; Kaya, Murat; Özkan, Necati; Kocab?y?k, Semra; Volkan, Mürvet

    2015-12-01

    Surface modified cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles containing Ni-NTA affinity group were synthesized and used for the separation of histidine tag proteins from the complex matrices through the use of imidazole side chains of histidine molecules. Firstly, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution were prepared in an aqueous solution using the controlled co-precipitation method. In order to obtain small CoFe2O4 agglomerates, oleic acid and sodium chloride were used as dispersants. The CoFe2O4 particles were coated with silica and subsequently the surface of these silica coated particles (SiO2-CoFe2O4) was modified by amine (NH2) groups in order to add further functional groups on the silica shell. Then, carboxyl (-COOH) functional groups were added to the SiO2-CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles through the NH2 groups. After that N?,N?-Bis(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine hydrate (NTA) was attached to carboxyl ends of the structure. Finally, the surface modified nanoparticles were labeled with nickel (Ni) (II) ions. Furthermore, the modified SiO2-CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles were utilized as a new system that allows purification of the N-terminal His-tagged recombinant small heat shock protein, Tpv-sHSP 14.3.

  3. Electromagnetic properties of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles and their polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, P.; Duncan, K.; Giri, A. K.; Xiao, J. Q.; Karna, S. P.

    2014-05-07

    The magnetic properties of polycrystalline NiZn ferrite nanoparticles synthesized using a polyol-reduction and coprecipitation reaction methods have been investigated. The effects on magnetization of synthesis approach, chemical composition, processing conditions, and on the size of nanoparticles on magnetization have been investigated. The measured room-temperature magnetization for the as-prepared magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) synthesized via polyol-reduction and coprecipitation is 69?Am{sup 2}?kg{sup ?1} and 14?Am{sup 2}?kg{sup ?1}, respectively. X-ray diffraction measurements confirm spinel structure of the particles with an estimated grain size of ?80?nm obtained from the polyol-reduction and 28?nm obtained from these coprecipitation techniques. Upon calcination under atmospheric conditions at different temperatures between 800?°C and 1000?°C, the magnetization, M, of the coprecipitated MNP increases to 76?Am{sup 2}?kg{sup ?1} with an estimated grain size of 90?nm. The MNP-polymer nanocomposites made from the synthesized MNP in various loading fraction and high density polyethylene exhibit interesting electromagnetic properties. The measured permeability and permittivity of the magnetic nanoparticle-polymer nanocomposites increases with the loading fractions of the magnetic nanoparticles, suggesting control for impedance matching for antenna applications.

  4. Effect of abrasive grit size on wear of manganese-zinc ferrite under three-body abrasion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1987-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites under three-body abrasion. The abrasion mechanism of Mn-Zn ferrite changes drastically with the size of abrasive grits. With 15-micron (1000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion of Mn-Zn ferrite is due principally to brittle fracture; while with 4- and 2-micron (4000- and 6000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion is due to plastic deformation and fracture. Both microcracking and plastic flow produce polycrystalline states on the wear surfaces of single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites. Coefficient of wear, total thickness of the deformed layers, and surface roughness of the wear surfaces increase markedly with an increase in abrasive grit size. The total thicknesses of the deformed layers are 3 microns for the ferrite abraded by 15-micron SiC, 0.9 microns for the ferrite abraded by 4-micron SiC, and 0.8 microns for the ferrite abraded by 1-micron SiC.

  5. Study of the thermal stability of nanoparticle distributions in an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, S. Y.; Ribis, J.; Klosek, V.; de Carlan, Y.; Lochet, N.; Ji, V.; Mathon, M. H.

    2012-09-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloys have a vast applicability due to their excellent mechanical resistance at high temperature. The precipitate dispersion of the nanoparticles in the matrix has a great effect on the creep properties of the material; in order to study the kinetics of precipitation of Y2Ti2O7 nanoparticles in Fe-14Cr1W ODS alloy, annealing experiments were taken at different temperatures (1050 °C-1400 °C) and for different times (0.5-10 h), then these samples were characterized by the small-angle neutron scattering technique (SANS) under magnetic field and TEM investigations and microhardness measurements were performed to gather nanoscopic information about the dispersed oxide particles size.

  6. Magnetocaloric effect in Ni-Zn ferrite nanoparticles prepared by using solution combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. D.; Kambale, R. C.; Hur, N.

    2014-12-01

    Ni x Zn1- x Fe2O4 ( x = 0.2 and 0.3) ferrite nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 65 to 70 nm were synthesized employing the solution combustion route. The magnetocaloric behavior was investigated within the 50 K ? T ? 400 K range of temperatures ( T). The entropy change (? S) and the adiabatic temperature change (? T) were derived from magnetization ( M) and specific heat ( C P ) measurements. Both compositions exhibited broad peaks for the isothermal entropy change. The magnetic field ( H)-dependent ? T was analyzed within the mean-field approximation scheme, and the observed magnetocaloric properties of the nanoparticle samples were compared with those of a bulk sample. Our study suggests that the magnetocaloric properties of magnetic oxides strongly depend on the particle size; thus, particle size should be considered as a key tuning parameter in the optimization of magnetic refrigeration.

  7. Biological synthesis of manganese dioxide nanoparticles by Kalopanax pictus plant extract.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sun A; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Alkotaini, Bassam; Sathiyamoorthi, Ezhaveni; Kim, Beom Soo

    2015-08-01

    Manganese dioxide (MnO?) nanoparticles were synthesised by the reduction of potassium permanganate (KMnO?) using Kalopanax pictus leaf extract at room temperature. A transparent dark-brown colour appeared after the addition of K. pictus leaf extract to the solution of permanganate. The time course of the reduction of KMnO?and synthesis of MnO? nanoparticles was monitored by means of UV-Vis spectra. The reduction of KMnO?occurred after addition of plant extract with disappearance of KMnO?specific peaks and emergence of peak specific for MnO?nanoparticles. MnO?nanoparticles showed absorption maxima at 404 nm. The electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses confirmed the presence of Mn and O in the sample. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed characteristic binding energies for MnO?nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy micrographs revealed presence of uniformly dispersed spherical shaped particles with average size of 19.2 nm. The selected area electron diffraction patterns revealed the crystalline nature of MnO?nanoparticles. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy spectra of pure MnO?show the occurrence of O-Mn-O vibrational mode at around 518 cm?¹. The phyto-synthesised MnO?nanoparticles showed degradation ability of dyes (congo red and safranin O) similar to chemically synthesised MnO?nanoparticles. This study shows simple and eco-friendly synthesis of MnO?nanoparticles by plant extract and their utilisation for dye degradation for the first time. PMID:26224352

  8. Synthesis of nickel–zinc ferrite magnetic nanoparticle and dye degradation using photocatalytic ozonation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad; Bashiri, Marziyeh; Moeen, Shirin Jebeli

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Nickel–zinc ferrite magnetic nanoparticle (NZFMN) was synthesized and characterized. ? Dye degradation by photocatalytic ozonation using NZFMN was studied. ? Formate, acetate and oxalate were detected as dominant dye degradation aliphatic intermediates. ? Nitrate, sulfate and chloride ions were detected as mineralization products of dyes. ? NZFMN was an effective magnetic nanocatalyst to degrade dyes. -- Abstract: In this paper, nickel–zinc ferrite magnetic nanoparticle (NZFMN) was synthesized and its dye degradation ability using photocatalytic ozonation was investigated. The NZFMN was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopic (SEM), Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR) and alternative gradient force magnetometer (AGFM). Reactive Red 198 (RR198) and Direct Green 6 (DG6) were used as dye models. UV–vis and ion chromatography (IC) analyses were employed to study dye degradation. The effects of operational parameters on decolorization such as NZFMN dosage, dye concentration, salt and pH were studied. RR198 and DG6 were completely decolorized (100%) by photocatalytic ozonation using NZFMN. Formate, acetate and oxalate anions were detected as dominant aliphatic intermediates. Nitrate, sulfate and chloride ions were detected as mineralization products of dyes. Results showed that the photocatalytic ozonation using NZFMN was a very effective method for dye degradation.

  9. Ultrafast and continuous synthesis of crystalline ferrite nanoparticles in supercritical ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, Oana; Marre, Samuel; Aymonier, Cyril; Roig, Anna

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are of increasing interest in various industrially relevant products. For these, the development of greener and faster approaches facilitating scaling-up production is of paramount importance. Here, we report a novel, green and potentially scalable approach for the continuous and ultrafast (90 s) synthesis of superparamagnetic ferrite NPs (MnFe2O4, Fe3O4) in supercritical ethanol (scEtOH) at a fairly moderate temperature (260 °C). ScEtOH exhibits numerous advantages such as its production from bio-resources, its lack of toxicity and its relatively low supercritical coordinates (pc = 6.39 MPa and Tc = 243 °C), being therefore appropriate for the development of sustainable technologies. The present study is completed by the investigation of both in situ and ex situ NP surface functionalization. The as-obtained nanoparticles present good crystallinity, sizes below 8 nm, superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature and high saturation magnetization. Moreover, depending on the capping strategy, the ferrite NPs present extended (for in situ coated NPs) or short-term (for ex situ coated NPs) colloidal stability.

  10. Ultrafast and continuous synthesis of crystalline ferrite nanoparticles in supercritical ethanol.

    PubMed

    Pascu, Oana; Marre, Samuel; Aymonier, Cyril; Roig, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are of increasing interest in various industrially relevant products. For these, the development of greener and faster approaches facilitating scaling-up production is of paramount importance. Here, we report a novel, green and potentially scalable approach for the continuous and ultrafast (90 s) synthesis of superparamagnetic ferrite NPs (MnFe(2)O(4), Fe(3)O(4)) in supercritical ethanol (scEtOH) at a fairly moderate temperature (260 °C). ScEtOH exhibits numerous advantages such as its production from bio-resources, its lack of toxicity and its relatively low supercritical coordinates (p(c) = 6.39 MPa and T(c) = 243 °C), being therefore appropriate for the development of sustainable technologies. The present study is completed by the investigation of both in situ and ex situ NP surface functionalization. The as-obtained nanoparticles present good crystallinity, sizes below 8 nm, superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature and high saturation magnetization. Moreover, depending on the capping strategy, the ferrite NPs present extended (for in situ coated NPs) or short-term (for ex situ coated NPs) colloidal stability. PMID:23386040

  11. Microstructural and Mössbauer properties of low temperature synthesized Ni-Cd-Al ferrite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report the influence of Al3+ doping on the microstructural and Mössbauer properties of ferrite nanoparticles of basic composition Ni0.2Cd0.3Fe2.5 - xAlxO4 (0.0 ? x ? 0.5) prepared through simple sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR), and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques were used to investigate the structural, chemical, and Mössbauer properties of the grown nanoparticles. XRD results confirm that all the samples are single-phase cubic spinel in structure excluding the presence of any secondary phase corresponding to any structure. SEM micrographs show the synthesized nanoparticles are agglomerated but spherical in shape. The average crystallite size of the grown nanoparticles was calculated through Scherrer formula and confirmed by TEM and was found between 2 and 8 nm (± 1). FTIR results show the presence of two vibrational bands corresponding to tetrahedral and octahedral sites. Mössbauer spectroscopy shows that all the samples exhibit superparamagnetism, and the quadrupole interaction increases with the substitution of Al3+ ions. PMID:21851597

  12. Energy Migration Upconversion in Manganese(II)-Doped Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiyan; Liu, Xiaowang; Chevrier, Daniel M; Qin, Xian; Xie, Xiaoji; Song, Shuyan; Zhang, Hongjie; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-11-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of cubic NaGdF4 :Yb/Tm@NaGdF4 :Mn core-shell structures. By taking advantage of energy transfer through Yb?Tm?Gd?Mn in these core-shell nanoparticles, we have realized upconversion emission of Mn(2+) at room temperature in lanthanide tetrafluoride based host lattices. The upconverted Mn(2+) emission, enabled by trapping the excitation energy through a Gd(3+) lattice, was validated by the observation of a decreased lifetime from 941 to 532??s in the emission of Gd(3+) at 310?nm ((6) P7/2 ?(8) S7/2 ). This multiphoton upconversion process can be further enhanced under pulsed laser excitation at high power densities. Both experimental and theoretical studies provide evidence for Mn(2+) doping in the lanthanide-based host lattice arising from the formation of F(-) vacancies around Mn(2+) ions to maintain charge neutrality in the shell layer. PMID:26358961

  13. Investigating Negative Magnetization and Blocking Temperature in Aggregates of Ferrite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaidat, I. M.; Issa, B.; Albiss, B. A.; Haik, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Blocking temperatures of aggregates of Mn0.5Zn0.5GdxFe(2-x)O4 ferrite nanoparticles, with x = 0.02, 0.05, 0.11, 0.15, and 0.2, were obtained from the zero-field-cooled (ZFC) magnetization measurements. We found a nonmontonic behavior of the blocking temperature with increasing size of the particles. The effective magnetic anisotropy was calculated and found to have two distinct rates of increase with decreasing the size of the particles. These results were attributed to the strong inter-particle interactions in the aggregated nanoparticles and to the enhanced role of surface anisotropy with the decrease of the size of the particles. In three samples, the ZFC magnetization was found to exhibit a significant negative magnetization in a considerable part of the low temperature region. To our knowledge, this is the first time that negative magnetization is reported in such nanoparticles. These peculiar results are discussed and are currently under investigation.

  14. Synergetic effect of size and morphology of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles on proton relaxivity.

    PubMed

    N, Venkatesha; Srivastava, Chandan; Hegde, Veena

    2014-12-01

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with average sizes of 14, 9 and 6 nm were synthesised by the chemical co-precipitation technique. Average particle sizes were varied by changing the chitosan surfactant to precursor molar ratio in the reaction mixture. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed a faceted and irregular morphology for the as-synthesised nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements revealed a ferromagnetic nature for the 14 and 9 nm particles and a superparamagnetic nature for the 6 nm particles. An increase in saturation magnetisation with increasing particle size was noted. Relaxivity measurements were carried out to determine T2 value as a function of particle size using nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The relaxivity coefficient increased with decrease in particle size and decrease in the saturation magnetisation value. The observed trend in the change of relaxivity value with particle size was attributed to the faceted nature of as-synthesised nanoparticles. Faceted morphology results in the creation of high gradient of magnetic field in the regions adjacent to the facet edges increasing the relaxivity value. The effect of edges in increasing the relaxivity value increases with decrease in the particle size because of an increase in the total number of edges per particle dispersion. PMID:25429495

  15. Structural and magnetic properties correlated with cation distribution of Mo-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiba, Z. K.; Mostafa, Nasser Y.; Abd-Elkader, Omar H.

    2014-11-01

    Mo-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles; CoFe2-2xMoxO4 (0.0?x?0.3) were prepared by a one-step solution combustion synthesis technique. The reactants were metal nitrates and glycine as a fuel. The samples were characterized using an X-ray diffraction (XRD), a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). XRD analysis revealed a pure single phase of cubic spinel ferrites for all samples with x up to 0.3. The lattice parameter decreases with Mo6+ substitution linearly up to x=0.15, then nonlinearly for x?0.2. Rietveld analysis and saturation magnetization (Ms) revealed that Mo6+ replaced Fe3+ in the tetrahedral A-sites up to x=0.15, then it replaced Fe3+ in both A-sites and B-sites for x?0.2. The saturation magnetization (Ms) increases with increasing Mo6+ substitution up to x=0.15 then decreases. The crystallite size decreased while the microstrain increased with increasing Mo6+ substitution. Inserting Mo6+ produces large residents of defects and cation vacancies.

  16. Influence of Ce-Substitution on Structural, Magnetic and Electrical Properties of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashhash, A.; Kaiser, M.

    2015-10-01

    Nano-crystalline samples of cerium substituted cobalt ferrites with chemical formula CoCe x Fe2-x O4 (0.0 ? x ? 0.1) were prepared using the citrate auto-combustion method. The prepared ferrites were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD patterns and FTIR spectra confirm that the prepared samples reveal the formation of a single-phase spinel structure. TEM micrographs showed that the particles are made up of spherical and elongated nano-metric shapes. A limitation of the size of nanoparticles is observed as the Ce3+ concentration increases. VSM measurements showed that the coercivity H c and magnetization values M s are strongly dependent on Ce3+ content and particle size. The values of H c lie in the range of (411-1600 G), which suggest that these samples are convenient for different applications. The alternating current electrical conductivity (?), dielectric permittivities (?', ??), and dielectric loss tangent (tan ?) were studied at different ranges of frequency and temperature. The relation of conductivity with temperature revealed a semiconductor to semi-metallic behavior as cerium concentration increases. The variation in (tan ?) with frequency at different temperature shows abnormal behavior with more than one relaxation peak. The conduction mechanism used in the present study has been discussed in the light of cation-anion-cation interactions over the octahedral B-site.

  17. Polyethylene glycol coated CoFe2O4 nanoparticles: A potential spinel ferrite for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humbe, Ashok V.; Birajdar, Shankar D.; Bhandari, J. M.; Waghule, N. N.; Bhagwat, V. R.; Jadhav, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of the polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated cobalt spinel ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles have been reported in the present study. CoFe2O4 nanoparticles were prepared by sol-gel auto-combustion method using citric acid + ethylene glycol as a fuel. The prepared powder of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was annealed at 600°C for 6h and used for further study. The structural characterization of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles were carried out by X-ray diffraction technique. The X-ray analysis confirmed the formation of single phase cubic spinel structure. The crystallite size, Lattice constant and X-ray density of the PEG coated CoFe2O4 nanoparticles were calculated by using XRD data. The presence of PEG on CoFe2O4 nanoparticles and reduced agglomeration in the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles were revealed by SEM studies. The magnetic properties were studied by pulse field hysteresis loop tracer technique at a room temperature. The magnetic parameters such as saturation magnetization, remanence magnetization, coercivity etc have been obtained. These magnetic parameters were get decreased by PEG coating.

  18. Aqueous synthesis and transmission electron microscopy observation of seed-grown spherical ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Tada, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Abe, M.

    2012-03-01

    Uniform-sized spherical iron ferrite nanoparticles grew on seed crystals in an aqueous solution containing sucrose. Using the seed crystals which were highly dispersed in acidic or alkaline seed-crystal suspension without relation to pH of the suspension, we widely controlled the particle diameter in the range 20-200 nm by changing the additive amount of the seed crystals. By transmission electron microscopy observation and X-ray diffraction analysis, it indicated that the particles were highly crystalline but not amorphous. Selected area diffraction patterns of the particles by using transmission electron microscope revealed that the particles were composed of one to several crystals. Thus we provided the evidence that the particles grew on clusters composed of one to several seed crystals to which those of several dozen seed crystals were disintegrated.

  19. Preparation of magnesium ferrite nanoparticles by ultrasonic wave-assisted aqueous solution ball milling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding; Li, Dian-yi; Zhang, Ying-zhe; Kang, Zhi-tao

    2013-11-01

    Magnesium ferrite, MgFe2O4 nanoparticles with high saturation magnetization were successfully synthesized using ultrasonic wave-assisted ball milling. In this study, the raw materials were 4MgCO3·Mg(OH)2·5H2O and Fe2O3 powders and the grinding media was stainless steel ball. The average particle diameter of the product MgFe2O4 powders was 20 nm and the saturation magnetization of them reached 54.8 emu/g. The different results of aqueous solution ball milling with and without ultrasonic wave revealed that it was the coupling effect of ultrasonic wave and mechanical force that played an important role during the synthesis of MgFe2O4. In addition, the effect of the frequency of the ultrasonic wave on the ball milling process was investigated. PMID:23622867

  20. Experimental studies of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles doped silica matrix 3D magneto-photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Diwan, E.; Royer, F.; Kekesi, R.; Jamon, D.; Blanc-Mignon, M. F.; Neveu, S.; Rousseau, J. J.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and the optical properties of 3D magneto-photonic structures. The elaboration process consists in firstly preparing then infiltrating polystyrene direct opals with a homogeneous solution of sol-gel silica precursors doped by cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, and finally dissolving the polystyrene spheres. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of the prepared samples clearly evidence a periodic arrangement. Using a home-made polarimetric optical bench, the transmittance as a function of the wavelength, the Faraday rotation as a function of the applied magnetic field, and the Faraday ellipticity as a function of the wavelength and as a function of the applied magnetic field were measured. The existence of deep photonic band gaps (PBG), the unambiguous magnetic character of the samples and the qualitative modification of the Faraday ellipticity in the area of the PBG are evidenced.

  1. A.C. and D.C. conductivity of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles in wet and dry conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saafan, S. A.; Meaz, T. M.; El-Ghazzawy, E. H.; El Nimr, M. K.; Ayad, M. M.; Bakr, M.

    2010-08-01

    Promising future applications of ferrite nanoparticles in medicine, drug delivery, sensors and ferrofluids are expected to be in wet or humid environments. Therefore nanostructured powders of ferrites having the chemical compositions. Ni xZn (1- x) Fe 2O 4 with ( x=0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1) were pressed immediately after preparation - by the co-precipitation method - without any drying to simulate a humid environment. The nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) to be sure of the formation of the ferrite in nanoscale. The infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the samples ensures the existence of water as well as the characteristic absorption bands of ferrites. The ac and dc conductivity of the samples had been investigated immediately after preparation (the as-prepared samples). Then, the samples were dried at 200 °C for about 12 h and reinvestigated. The behavior of conductivity differs significantly in the two cases showing a noticeable effect due to humidity. Also, the magnetic induction of the as-prepared samples was investigated by using the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The samples show superparamagnetic behavior.

  2. Superior electro-optic response in multiferroic bismuth ferrite nanoparticle doped nematic liquid crystal device

    PubMed Central

    Nayek, Prasenjit; Li, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    A superior electro-optic (E-O) response has been achieved when multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3/BFO) nanoparticles (NPs) were doped in nematic liquid crystal (NLC) host E7 and the LC device was addressed in the large signal regime by an amplitude modulated square wave signal at the frequency of 100?Hz. The optimized concentration of BFO is 0.15?wt%, and the corresponding total optical response time (rise time?+?decay time) for a 5??m-thick cell is 2.5?ms for ~7?Vrms. This might be exploited for the construction of adaptive lenses, modulators, displays, and other E-O devices. The possible reason behind the fast response time could be the visco-elastic constant and restoring force imparted by the locally ordered LCs induced by the multiferroic nanoparticles (MNPs). Polarized optical microscopic textural observation shows that the macroscopic dislocation-free excellent contrast have significant impact on improving the image quality and performance of the devices. PMID:26041701

  3. Superior electro-optic response in multiferroic bismuth ferrite nanoparticle doped nematic liquid crystal device.

    PubMed

    Nayek, Prasenjit; Li, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    A superior electro-optic (E-O) response has been achieved when multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3/BFO) nanoparticles (NPs) were doped in nematic liquid crystal (NLC) host E7 and the LC device was addressed in the large signal regime by an amplitude modulated square wave signal at the frequency of 100 Hz. The optimized concentration of BFO is 0.15 wt%, and the corresponding total optical response time (rise time + decay time) for a 5 ?m-thick cell is 2.5 ms for ~7 V(rms). This might be exploited for the construction of adaptive lenses, modulators, displays, and other E-O devices. The possible reason behind the fast response time could be the visco-elastic constant and restoring force imparted by the locally ordered LCs induced by the multiferroic nanoparticles (MNPs). Polarized optical microscopic textural observation shows that the macroscopic dislocation-free excellent contrast have significant impact on improving the image quality and performance of the devices. PMID:26041701

  4. Nickel Ferrite Nanoparticles Anchored onto Silica Nanofibers for Designing Magnetic and Flexible Nanofibrous Membranes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feifei; Yan, Chengcheng; Si, Yang; He, Jianxin; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2015-09-16

    Many applications proposed for magnetic silica nanofibers require their assembly into a cellular membrane structure. The feature to keep structure stable upon large deformation is crucial for a macroscopic porous material which functions reliably. However, it remains a key issue to realize robust flexibility in two-dimensional (2D) magnetic silica nanofibrous networks. Here, we report that the combination of electrospun silica nanofibers with zein dip-coating can lead to the formation of flexible, magnetic, and hierarchical porous silica nanofibrous membranes (SNM). The 290 nm diameter silica nanofibers act as templates for the uniform anchoring of nickel ferrite nanoparticles (size of 50 nm). Benefiting from the homogeneous and stable nanofiber-nanoparticle composite structure, the resulting magnetic SNM can maintain their structure integrity under repeated bending as high as 180° and can facilely recover. The unique hierarchical structure also provides this new class of silica membrane with integrated properties of ultralow density, high porosity, large surface area, good magnetic responsiveness, robust dye adsorption capacity, and effective emulsion separation performance. Significantly, the synthesis of such fascinating membranes may provide new insight for further application of silica in a self-supporting, structurally adaptive, and 2D membrane form. PMID:26301575

  5. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer. PMID:26284144

  6. Radiation induced structural and magnetic transformations in nanoparticle MnxZn(1-x)Fe2O4 ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, P. P.; Tangsali, R. B.; Sonaye, B.; Sugur, S.

    2015-07-01

    Nanoparticle magnetic materials are suitable for multiple modern high end medical applications like targeted drug delivery, gene therapy, hyperthermia and MR thermometry imaging. Majority of these applications are confined to use of Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles. These nanoparticles are normally left in the body after their requisite application. Preparing these nanoparticles is usually a much involved job. However with the development of the simple technique MnxZn1-xFe2O4 nanoparticles could be prepared with much ease. The nanoparticles of MnxZn1-xFe2O4 with (x=1.0, 0.7, 0.5, 0.3, 0.0) were prepared and irradiated with gamma radiation of various intensities ranging between 500 R to 10,000 R, after appropriate structural and magnetic characterization. Irradiated samples were investigated for structural and magnetic properties, as well as for structural stability and cation distribution. The irradiated nanoparticles exhibited structural stability with varied cation distribution and magnetic properties, dependent on gamma radiation dose. Surprisingly samples also exhibited quenching of lattice parameter and particle size. The changes introduced in the cation distribution, lattice constant, particle size and magnetic properties were found to be irreversible with time lapse and were of permanent nature exhibiting good stability even after several months. Thus the useful properties of nanoparticles could be enhanced on modifying the cation distribution inside the nanoparticles by application of gamma radiation.

  7. Development of optically transparent water oxidation catalysts using manganese pyrophosphate compounds.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Toshihiro; Hotori, Yuki; Irie, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    One challenge in artificial photosynthetic systems is the development of active oxygen evolution catalysts composed of abundant elements. The oxygen evolution activities of manganese pyrophosphate compounds were examined in electrochemical and photochemical experiments. Electrocatalysis using calcium-manganese pyrophosphate exhibited good catalytic ability under neutral pH and an oxygen evolution reaction was driven with a small overpotential (?<100mV). UV-vis diffuse reflectance measurements revealed that manganese pyrophosphates exhibit weak absorption in the visible light region while commonly used oxygen evolution catalysts exhibit intense absorption. Therefore, the efficient light absorption of a photocatalyst was retained even after surface modification with a manganese pyrophosphate, and photochemical oxygen evolution was achieved by using magnesium ferrite modified with manganese pyrophosphate nanoparticles under the illumination of visible light at wavelength of over 420nm. PMID:25648929

  8. A fast route to obtain manganese spinel nanoparticles by reduction of K-birnessite

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannelli, F.; Chartier, T.; Autret-Lambert, C.; Delorme, F.; Zaghrioui, M.; Seron, A.

    2009-05-15

    The K-birnessite (K{sub x}MnO{sub 2}.yH{sub 2}O) reduction reaction has been tested in order to obtain manganese spinel nanoparticles. The addition of 0.25 weight percent of hydrazine hydrate, the reducing agent, during 24 hours is efficient to transform the birnessite powder in a hausmanite Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Well crystallised square shape nanoparticles are obtained. Different birnessite precursors have been tested and the reaction kinetics is strongly correlated to the crystallinity and granulometry of the precursor. The effects of aging time and hydrazine hydrate amount have been studied. Well crystallised Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} is obtained in one hour. The presence of feitknechtite (MnO(OH)) and amorphous nanorods has been detected as an intermediate phase during birnessite conversion into hausmanite. The conversion mechanism is discussed. - Graphical abstract: TEM image showing Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particle after treatment of birnessite with an addition of hydrazine during 24 hours.

  9. Manifestation of weak ferromagnetism and photocatalytic activity in bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sakar, M.; Balakumar, S.; Saravanan, P.; Jaisankar, S. N.

    2013-02-05

    Bismuth ferrite (BFO) nanoparticles were synthesized by auto-ignition technique with and without adding ignition fuel such as citric acid. The presence of citric acid in the reaction mixture yielded highly-magnetic BFO/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite. When this composite was annealed to 650 Degree-Sign C, a single phase BFO was formed with average crystallite size of 50 nm and showed weak ferromagnetic behavior. Conversely, the phase pure BFO prepared without adding citric acid exhibited antiferromagnetism because of its larger crystallite size of around 70 nm. The visible-light driven photocatalytic activity of both the pure BFO and BFO/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite were examined by degrading methyl orange dye. The pure BFO showed a moderate photocatalytic activity; while BFO/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite showed enhanced activity. This could be probably due to the optimal band gap ratio between BFO and {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases reduced the recombination of electron-hole pairs which aided in the enhancement of photocatalytic activity.

  10. Magnetic phase transitions in ferrite nanoparticles characterized by electron spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Arias, Yesica Vázquez-Victorio, Gabriela; Ortega-Zempoalteca, Raul; Acevedo-Salas, Ulises; Valenzuela, Raul; Ammar, Souad

    2015-05-07

    Ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in the composition Zn{sub 0.7}Ni{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were synthesized by the polyol method, with an average size of 8?nm. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were carried out at a frequency of 9.45 GHz in the 100–500?K temperature range. Obtained results exhibited a characteristic ESR signal in terms of resonance field, H{sub res}, linewidth, ?H, and peak ratio, R, for each magnetic phase. At low temperatures, the ferrimagnetic phase showed low H{sub res}, broad ?H, and asymmetric R. At high temperatures, these parameters exhibited opposite values: high H{sub res}, small ?H, and R???1. For intermediate temperatures, a different phase was observed, which was identified as a superparamagnetic phase by means of zero-field cooling-field cooling and hysteresis loops measurements. The observed differences were explained in terms of the internal fields and especially due to the cubic anisotropy in the ordered phase.

  11. High-Performance Flexible Organic Nano-Floating Gate Memory Devices Functionalized with Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Hyung; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Hyeonjung; Park, Jongnam; Oh, Joon Hak

    2015-10-01

    Nano-floating gate memory (NFGM) devices are transistor-type memory devices that use nanostructured materials as charge trap sites. They have recently attracted a great deal of attention due to their excellent performance, capability for multilevel programming, and suitability as platforms for integrated circuits. Herein, novel NFGM devices have been fabricated using semiconducting cobalt ferrite (CoFe2 O4 ) nanoparticles (NPs) as charge trap sites and pentacene as a p-type semiconductor. Monodisperse CoFe2 O4 NPs with different diameters have been synthesized by thermal decomposition and embedded in NFGM devices. The particle size effects on the memory performance have been investigated in terms of energy levels and particle-particle interactions. CoFe2 O4 NP-based memory devices exhibit a large memory window (?73.84 V), a high read current on/off ratio (read Ion /Ioff ) of ?2.98 × 10(3) , and excellent data retention. Fast switching behaviors are observed due to the exceptional charge trapping/release capability of CoFe2 O4 NPs surrounded by the oleate layer, which acts as an alternative tunneling dielectric layer and simplifies the device fabrication process. Furthermore, the NFGM devices show excellent thermal stability, and flexible memory devices fabricated on plastic substrates exhibit remarkable mechanical and electrical stability. This study demonstrates a viable means of fabricating highly flexible, high-performance organic memory devices. PMID:26153227

  12. Assessment of Immunotoxicity of Dextran Coated Ferrite Nanoparticles in Albino Mice

    PubMed Central

    Syama, Santhakumar; Gayathri, Viswanathan; Mohanan, Parayanthala Valappil

    2015-01-01

    In this study, dextran coated ferrite nanoparticles (DFNPs) of size <25?nm were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and oxidative stress by in vitro and in vivo methods. Cytotoxicity was performed in vitro using splenocytes with different concentrations of DFNPs. Gene expression of selected cytokines (IL-1, IL-10, and TNF ?) secretion by splenocytes was evaluated. Also, 100?mg of DFNPs was injected intraperitoneally to 18 albino mice for immunological stimulations. Six animals each were sacrificed at the end of 7, 14, and 21 days. Spleen was subjected to immunotoxic response and liver was analyzed for antioxidant parameters (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase). The results indicated that DFNPs failed to induce any immunological reactions and no significant alternation in antioxidant defense mechanism. Also, mRNA expression of the cytokines revealed an increase in IL-10 expression and subsequent decreased expression of IL-1 and TNF ?. Eventually, DNA sequencing of liver actin gene revealed base alteration in nonconserved regions (10–20 bases) of all the treated groups when compared to control samples. Hence, it can be concluded that the DFNPs were nontoxic at the cellular level and nonimmunotoxic when exposed intraperitoneally to mice. PMID:26576301

  13. Size tuned polyol-made Zn0.9M0.1Fe2O4 (M = Mn, Co, Ni) ferrite nanoparticles as potential heating agents for magnetic hyperthermia: from synthesis control to toxicity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basti, H.; Hanini, A.; Levy, M.; Ben Tahar, L.; Herbst, F.; Smiri, L. S.; Kacem, K.; Gavard, J.; Wilhelm, C.; Gazeau, F.; Chau, F.; Ammar, S.

    2014-12-01

    Zn-rich substituted Zn0.9M0.1Fe2O4 (M = Mn, Co, Ni) ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) of about 5 and 10 nm were produced by the so-called polyol method. They were engineered for hyperthermia therapy based on their magnetic and morphological properties. Indeed, because of their comparatively low Curie temperature and reasonable magnetization, these probes may turn into useful self-regulated heating agents under suitable conditions. For such a purpose, the structure, the microstructure, the magnetic and magnetocalorimetric properties of the produced NPs as well as their in vitro cytotoxicity were investigated. Our results demonstrate that the magnetic properties of these magnetically diluted spinel ferrite particles can be largely modified by just changing their size. They also show that the about 10 nm sized manganese-based ones exhibit the highest heating power under a 700 kHz ac magnetic field and the lowest cytotoxicity on Immortalized human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC).

  14. Chitosan-mediated formation of biomimetic silica nanoparticles: an effective method for manganese peroxidase immobilization and stabilization.

    PubMed

    Luan, Pan-Pan; Jiang, Yan-Jun; Zhang, Song-Ping; Gao, Jing; Su, Zhi-Guo; Ma, Guang-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Fei

    2014-11-01

    Our work here, for the first time, reported the use of chitosan-mediated biomimetic silica nanoparticles in enzyme immobilization. In order to make clear the relationship among silicification process, silica nanoparticle structure and immobilized enzyme activity, a mechanism of chitosan-mediated silicification using sodium silicate as the silica source was primarily evaluated. Chitosan was demonstrated effectively to promote the silicification not only in accelerating the aggregation rate of sodium silicate, but also in templating the formation of silica nanoparticles. Although the whole biomimetic silicification process contained polycondensation-aggregation-precipitation three stages, the elemental unit in precipitated silica was confirmed to be nanoparticles with 100 nm diameter regardless of the chitosan and silicate concentration used. Furthermore, the effect of enzyme on silicification process was also investigated. The introducing of manganese peroxidase (MnP) to silica precursor solution had no obvious effect on the silicification rate and nanoparticle morphology. The residual activity and embedding rate of immobilized MnP were 64.2% and 36.4% respectively under the optimum conditions. In addition, compared to native MnP, the MnP embedded in chitosan/silica nanoparticles exhibited improved stability against organic solvent and ultrasonic wave. After ultrasonic treatment for 20 min, 77% of the initial activity was remained due to the protective effect of chitosan/silica nanoparticles, while native MnP lost almost all of its original activity. PMID:24913823

  15. Zinc ferrite nanoparticles as MRI contrast agentsw Carlos Ba rcena,a

    E-print Network

    Gao, Jinming

    .e., Mn2+ occupies both A and B sites), whereas the other metal ferrites have an inverse spinel structure modification of a published procedure on metal ferrites.12 One of the major challenges in Zn-SPIO synthesis,2-hexadecanediol, oleic acid, octyl ether­diphenyl ether and hexadecylamine (HDA) were heated to 150

  16. Ferromagnetic resonance behavior of spark plasma sintered Ni-Zn ferrite nanoparticles produced by a chemical route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, R.; Beji, Z.; Herbst, F.; Ammar, S.

    2011-04-01

    Ferrite nanoparticles of composition Zn0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4 were prepared by forced hydrolysis in a polyol (polyol process) from the corresponding iron, nickel, and zinc acetates. Synthesis conditions allowed for obtaining polycrystalline epitaxial clusters of about 22 nm in size with an average crystal size of about 5 nm. These powders were subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique under a pressure of 80 MPa and temperatures in the 350 to 500 °C range for short periods (5 to 10 min). Densities reached 92% to 94% of the theoretical density. Particle size remained smaller than 61 nm, even for the highest temperature. Ferromagnetic resonance experiments at 77 K showed broadened resonance lines. In contrast with powdered nanoparticles, these high-density bodies can be used in many high-frequency applications.

  17. Low temperature-fired Ni-Cu-Zn ferrite nanoparticles through auto-combustion method for multilayer chip inductor applications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ferrite nanoparticles of basic composition Ni0.7-xZnxCu0.3Fe2O4 (0.0 ? x ? 0.2, x = 0.05) were synthesized through auto-combustion method and were characterized for structural properties using X-ray diffraction [XRD], scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy [FT-IR]. XRD analysis of the powder samples sintered at 600°C for 4 h showed the cubic spinel structure for ferrites with a narrow size distribution from 28 to 32 nm. FT-IR showed two absorption bands (v1 and v2) that are attributed to the stretching vibration of tetrahedral and octahedral sites. The effect of Zn doping on the electrical properties was studied using dielectric and impedance spectroscopy at room temperature. The dielectric parameters (?', ??, tan?, and ?ac) show their maximum value for 10% Zn doping. The dielectric constant and loss tangent decrease with increasing frequency of the applied field. The results are explained in the light of dielectric polarization which is similar to the conduction phenomenon. The complex impedance shows that the conduction process in grown nanoparticles takes place predominantly through grain boundary volume. PACS: 75.50.Gg; 78.20; 77.22.Gm. PMID:22316055

  18. Anhydride functionalised calcium ferrite nanoparticles: a new selective magnetic material for enrichment of lead ions from water and food samples.

    PubMed

    Pirouz, Mojgan Jafari; Beyki, Mostafa Hossein; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2015-03-01

    In this research a sonochemistry route for manufacture of uniform nanocrystalline CaFe2O4 and its anhydride functionalisation were reported. The potential of raw and modified material as a magnetically separable sorbent in selective enrichment of lead ions from water and food samples is outlined. This material was characterised using FT-IR, XRD, SEM and VSM techniques. The SEM and VSM results indicated that the calcium ferrite nanoparticles are sphere-like particles possessing superparamagnetic properties with an average diameter of 40 nm. Various analytical parameters, including pH, contact time, type and concentration of eluent, adsorption capacity, sample volume and interference of ions, were optimised. Following a modification by anhydride, calcium ferrite selectivity toward lead ions was raised more than twofold compared to the unmodified nanoparticles. Finally a pre-concentration procedure was applied for determination of trace Pb(II) in canned tuna fish, canned tomato paste, parsley, milk and well-water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:25306327

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and friction studies of nickel-zinc and manganese-zinc ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and sliding friction experiments were conducted with hot-pressed, polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in sliding contact with various transition metals at room temperature in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that the coefficients of friction for Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals are related to the relative chemical activity in these metals: the more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites correlate with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite surfaces increases the coefficients of friction for the Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrite-metal interfaces.

  20. Tunable T1 and T2 contrast abilities of manganese-engineered iron oxide nanoparticles through size control.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoming; Li, Hui; Chen, Jiahe; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Yang, Lijiao; Chi, Xiaoqin; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Xiaomin; Gao, Jinhao

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the tunable T1 and T2 contrast abilities of engineered iron oxide nanoparticles with high performance for liver contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mice. To enhance the diagnostic accuracy of MRI, large numbers of contrast agents with T1 or T2 contrast ability have been widely explored. The comprehensive investigation of high-performance MRI contrast agents with controllable T1 and T2 contrast abilities is of high importance in the field of molecular imaging. In this study, we synthesized uniform manganese-doped iron oxide (MnIO) nanoparticles with controllable size from 5 to 12 nm and comprehensively investigated their MRI contrast abilities. We revealed that the MRI contrast effects of MnIO nanoparticles are highly size-dependent. By controlling the size of MnIO nanoparticles, we can achieve T1-dominated, T2-dominated, and T1-T2 dual-mode MRI contrast agents with much higher contrast enhancement than the corresponding conventional iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:25079966

  1. Preparation of magnetic photocatalyst nanoparticles—TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Mn–Zn ferrite—and its photocatalytic activity influenced by silica interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Laohhasurayotin, Kritapas; Pookboonmee, Sudarat; Viboonratanasri, Duangkamon; Kangwansupamonkon, Wiyong

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ? TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Mn–Zn ferrite acts as magnetic photocatalyst nanoparticle. ? SiO{sub 2} interlayer is used to prevent electron migration between photocatalyst and magnetic core. ? TiO{sub 2}/Mn–Zn ferrite without SiO{sub 2} interlayer shows poor magnetic and photocatalytic property. -- Abstract: A magnetic photocatalyst, TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Mn–Zn ferrite, was prepared by stepwise synthesis involving the co-precipitation of Mn–Zn ferrite as a magnetic core, followed by a coating of silica as the interlayer, and titania as the top layer. The particle size and distribution of magnetic nanoparticles were found to depend on the addition rate of reagent and dispersing rate of reaction. The X-ray diffractometer and transmission electron microscope were used to examine the crystal structures and the morphologies of the prepared composites. Vibrating sample magnetometer was also used to reveal their superparamagnetic property. The UV–Vis spectrophotometer was employed to monitor the decomposition of methylene blue in the photocatalytic efficient study. It was found that at least a minimum thickness of the silica interlayer around 20 nm was necessary for the inhibition of electron transference initiated by TiO{sub 2} and Mn–Zn ferrite.

  2. Effect of zinc concentration on the structural and magnetic properties of mixed Co-Zn ferrites nanoparticles synthesized by sol/gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Ali, M.; El Maalam, K.; El Moussaoui, H.; Mounkachi, O.; Hamedoun, M.; Masrour, R.; Hlil, E. K.; Benyoussef, A.

    2016-01-01

    Synthesization of zinc-substituted cobalt ferrites nano-particles Co1-xZnxFe2O4 (x=0.0-0.3) has been achieved by the sol/gel method. The characterization of the synthesized nano-particles has been done by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FITR). The relation between the composition and magnetic properties has been investigated by Magnetic Properties Measurement System (MPMS). The results revealed that the nanoparticles size is in the range of 11-28 nm. It was found that the zinc substitution in cobalt ferrite increases saturation magnetization from 60.92 emu/g (x=0) to 74.67 emu/g (x=0.3). Nevertheless, zinc concentrations cause a significant decrease in coercivity.

  3. Effect of Ni2+ substitution on structural and magnetic properties of Ni-Zn ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Ch.; Tirupanyam, B. V.; Satish, A.; Seshubai, V.; Sastry, D. L.; Caltun, O. F.

    2015-05-01

    A series of co-precipitated NixZn1-xFe2O4 (x=0.5, 0.6, 0.7) ferrite nanoparticles heat treated at 200 °C were produced in order to understand the influence of substitution level on structural and magnetic properties including magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The XRD, FE-SEM, VSM and FC-ZFC techniques were used to characterize the samples. It is observed that as Ni2+ concentration increases crystallite size (D), saturation magnetization (Ms) and blocking temperature (TB) and decreases coercive field (Hc). All particles exhibit superparamagnetism at room temperature and hence lie in the single domain range. The magnetic anisotropy constant (K) is estimated to be maximum for Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 sample, whose particle size is the smallest. The results are interpreted presuming the presence of core shell interactions and/or cation redistribution that influence the magnetic properties of these ferrite nano particles.

  4. Structural and magnetic studies of the nickel doped CoFe2O4 ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Yadav, Nisha; Rana, Dinesh S.; Kumar, Parmod; Arora, Manju; Pant, R. P.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of nickel doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles NixCo1-xFe2O4 (x=0.5, 0.75, 0.9) derived by the chemical co-precipitation route are characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM, EPR, search coil and ac susceptibility techniques to develop stable kerosene based ferrofluid. XRD patterns and TEM images confirm the single phase formation of NixCo1-xFe2O4 nanoparticles whose crystallite size increases and lattice parameters decreases with the increase in Ni content. EPR resonance signal peak-to-peak line width and resonance field value decreases with the increase in Ni concentration in these samples. The broad nature of resonance signal is attributed to the ferromagnetic nature of the as-prepared nanoparticles and the increase in super exchange interaction among Ni2+-O-Co2+ facilitate the shifting of resonance value to lower field. The hysteresis loops of these nickel doped cobalt ferrite analogs exhibits highly magnetic nature of these nanoparticles at ambient temperature whose saturation magnetization, coerecivity and remanence magnetization decreases linearly with the increase in Ni-concentration in cobalt ferrite. The magnetic susceptibility with temperature curve shows increasing trend of blocking temperature with rise in nickel ion concentration.

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of magnesium ferrite nanoparticles prepared via EDTA-based sol-gel reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Shaban I.; Elkady, Ashraf S.; Rashad, M. M.; Mostafa, A. G.; Megahid, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium ferrite (MgFe2O4) nanoparticles have been prepared, for the first time, by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)-based sol-gel combustion method. The prepared ferrite system is calcined at 400, 500 and 600 °C. Thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA-DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) were applied for elucidating the structural and magnetic properties of the prepared system. XRD patterns revealed that the prepared system have two spinel MgFe2O4 structures, namely cubic and tetragonal phases that are dependent on calcination temperature (Tc). The crystallite sizes varied from 8.933 to 41.583 nm, and from 1.379 to 292.565 nm for the cubic and tetragonal phases respectively depending on Tc. The deduced lattice parameters for the cubic and (tetragonal) systems are a=8.368, 8.365 and 8.377 and (a=7.011, 5.922, 5.908 and c=6.622, 8.456, 8.364) Å at Tc=400, 500 and 600 °C respectively. While the cation distribution of the cubic phase is found to be mixed spinel and Tc-dependent, it is an inverse spinel in the tetragonal phase where the Fe3+ ions occupy both the tetrahedral A- and octahedral B-sites in almost equal amount; the Mg2+ ions are found to occupy only the B-sites. The HRTEM and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) revealed the detailed morphology of the nanoparticles, and confirmed their crystalline spinel structure. VSM indicated the existence of an appreciable fraction of superparamagnetic particles at room temperature, with pure superparamagnetic behavior observed for samples calcined at 400 °C. Besides, the magnetic properties are found to change by thermal treatment as a result of the varied phase concentration, cation distribution and lattice parameters. Thus, the new synthesis route used in this study by applying EDTA as an organic precursor for preparing MgFe2O4 nanoparticles at rather low temperatures proved to be efficient in obtaining nanoparticles with favorable structural and magnetic properties. Such properties would qualify them for several potential applications including e.g. in hyperthermia treatment, as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and in ferroelastomers technology.

  6. An integrated study of thermal treatment effects on the microstructure and magnetic properties of Zn-ferrite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Antic, Bratislav; Perovic, Marija; Kremenovic, Aleksandar; Blanusa, Jovan; Spasojevic, Vojislav; Vulic, Predrag; Bessais, Lotfi; Bozin, Emil S

    2013-02-27

    The evolution of the magnetic state, crystal structure and microstructure parameters of nanocrystalline zinc-ferrite, tuned by thermal annealing of ?4 nm nanoparticles, was systematically studied by complementary characterization methods. Structural analysis of neutron and synchrotron x-ray radiation data revealed a mixed cation distribution in the nanoparticle samples, with the degree of inversion systematically decreasing from 0.25 in an as-prepared nanocrystalline sample to a non-inverted spinel structure with a normal cation distribution in the bulk counterpart. The results of DC magnetization and Mössbauer spectroscopy experiments indicated a superparamagnetic relaxation in ?4 nm nanoparticles, albeit with different freezing temperatures T(f) of 27.5 K and 46 K, respectively. The quadrupole splitting parameter decreases with the annealing temperature due to cation redistribution between the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure and the associated defects. DC magnetization measurements indicated the existence of significant interparticle interactions among nanoparticles ('superspins'). Additional confirmation for the presence of interparticle interactions was found from the fit of the T(f)(H) dependence to the AT line, from which a value of the anisotropy constant of K(eff) = 5.6 × 10(5) erg cm(-3) was deduced. Further evidence for strong interparticle interactions was found from AC susceptibility measurements, where the frequency dependence of the freezing temperature T(f)(f) was satisfactory described by both Vogel-Fulcher and dynamic scaling theory, both applicable for interacting systems. The parameters obtained from these fits suggest collective freezing of magnetic moments at T(f). PMID:23343510

  7. An integrated study of thermal treatment effects on the microstructure and magnetic properties of Zn-ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Antic, Bratislav; Perovic, Marija; Kremenovic, Aleksandar; Blanusa, Jovan; Spasojevic, Vojislav; Vulic, Predrag; Bessais, Lotfi; Bozin, Emil S

    2015-09-30

    The evolution of the magnetic state, crystal structure and microstructure parameters of nanocrystalline zinc–ferrite, tuned by thermal annealing of ~4 nm nanoparticles, was systematically studied by complementary characterization methods. Structural analysis of neutron and synchrotron x-ray radiation data revealed a mixed cation distribution in the nanoparticle samples, with the degree of inversion systematically decreasing from 0.25 in an as-prepared nanocrystalline sample to a non-inverted spinel structure with a normal cation distribution in the bulk counterpart. The results of DC magnetization and Mossbauer spectroscopy experiments indicated a superparamagnetic relaxation in ~4 nm nanoparticles, albeit with different freezing temperatures Tf of 27.5 K and 46 K, respectively. The quadrupole splitting parameter decreases with the annealing temperature due to cation redistribution between the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure and the associated defects. DC magnetization measurements indicated the existence of significant interparticle interactions among nanoparticles (‘superspins’). Additional confirmation for the presence of interparticle interactions was found from the fit of the Tf(H) dependence to the AT line, from which a value of the anisotropy constant of Keff = 5.6 × 105 erg cm-3 was deduced. Further evidence for strong interparticle interactions was found from AC susceptibility measurements, where the frequency dependence of the freezing temperature Tf(ƒ) was satisfactory described by both Vogel–Fulcher and dynamic scaling theory, both applicable for interacting systems. The parameters obtained from these fits suggest collective freezing of magnetic moments at Tf .

  8. Heat treatment effects on structural and dielectric properties of Mn substituted CuFe2O4 and ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjith Kumar, E.; Arunkumar, T.; Prakash, T.

    2015-09-01

    Manganese substituted copper and zinc ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by an auto-combustion technique using metal nitrates and urea. The nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, and TEM techniques. The effect of annealing temperature on structural and dielectric properties of Mn substituted spinel ferrite nanoparticles was analyzed. The presenting elements in the prepared samples are recorded by EDX. TEM analysis clearly showed the particles are in the nanometer range. The dielectric loss and dielectric constant have been measured in the frequency range of 100 kHz-5 MHz. The variation in structural and dielectric properties of the prepared and annealed samples are discussed.

  9. Self-assembled organic–inorganic magnetic hybrid adsorbent ferrite based on cyclodextrin nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Denadai, Ângelo M L; De Sousa, Frederico B; Passos, Joel J; Guatimosim, Fernando C; Barbosa, Kirla D; Burgos, Ana E; de Oliveira, Fernando Castro; da Silva, Jeann C; Neves, Bernardo R A; Mohallem, Nelcy D S

    2012-01-01

    Summary Organic–inorganic magnetic hybrid materials (MHMs) combine a nonmagnetic and a magnetic component by means of electrostatic interactions or covalent bonds, and notable features can be achieved. Herein, we describe an application of a self-assembled material based on ferrite associated with ?-cyclodextrin (Fe-Ni/Zn/?CD) at the nanoscale level. This MHM and pure ferrite (Fe-Ni/Zn) were used as an adsorbent system for Cr3+ and Cr2O7 2? ions in aqueous solutions. Prior to the adsorption studies, both ferrites were characterized in order to determine the particle size distribution, morphology and available binding sites on the surface of the materials. Microscopy analysis demonstrated that both ferrites present two different size domains, at the micro- and nanoscale level, with the latter being able to self-assemble into larger particles. Fe-Ni/Zn/?CD presented smaller particles and a more homogeneous particle size distribution. Higher porosity for this MHM compared to Fe-Ni/Zn was observed by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller isotherms and positron-annihilation-lifetime spectroscopy. Based on the pKa values, potentiometric titrations demonstrated the presence of ?CD in the inorganic matrix, indicating that the lamellar structures verified by transmission electronic microscopy can be associated with ?CD assembled structures. Colloidal stability was inferred as a function of time at different pH values, indicating the sedimentation rate as a function of pH. Zeta potential measurements identified an amphoteric behavior for the Fe-Ni/Zn/?CD, suggesting its better capability to remove ions (cations and anions) from aqueous solutions compared to that of Fe-Ni/Zn. PMID:23209524

  10. Self-assembled organic-inorganic magnetic hybrid adsorbent ferrite based on cyclodextrin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Denadai, Angelo M L; De Sousa, Frederico B; Passos, Joel J; Guatimosim, Fernando C; Barbosa, Kirla D; Burgos, Ana E; de Oliveira, Fernando Castro; da Silva, Jeann C; Neves, Bernardo R A; Mohallem, Nelcy D S; Sinisterra, Rubén D

    2012-01-01

    Organic-inorganic magnetic hybrid materials (MHMs) combine a nonmagnetic and a magnetic component by means of electrostatic interactions or covalent bonds, and notable features can be achieved. Herein, we describe an application of a self-assembled material based on ferrite associated with ?-cyclodextrin (Fe-Ni/Zn/?CD) at the nanoscale level. This MHM and pure ferrite (Fe-Ni/Zn) were used as an adsorbent system for Cr(3+) and Cr(2)O(7) (2-) ions in aqueous solutions. Prior to the adsorption studies, both ferrites were characterized in order to determine the particle size distribution, morphology and available binding sites on the surface of the materials. Microscopy analysis demonstrated that both ferrites present two different size domains, at the micro- and nanoscale level, with the latter being able to self-assemble into larger particles. Fe-Ni/Zn/?CD presented smaller particles and a more homogeneous particle size distribution. Higher porosity for this MHM compared to Fe-Ni/Zn was observed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller isotherms and positron-annihilation-lifetime spectroscopy. Based on the pKa values, potentiometric titrations demonstrated the presence of ?CD in the inorganic matrix, indicating that the lamellar structures verified by transmission electronic microscopy can be associated with ?CD assembled structures. Colloidal stability was inferred as a function of time at different pH values, indicating the sedimentation rate as a function of pH. Zeta potential measurements identified an amphoteric behavior for the Fe-Ni/Zn/?CD, suggesting its better capability to remove ions (cations and anions) from aqueous solutions compared to that of Fe-Ni/Zn. PMID:23209524

  11. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; Han, Jinkyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiang; Shi, Chenyang; Abeykoon, A. M.Milinda; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Stach, Eric; Thomas, Justin; Guerrero, Kevin; Munayco, Pablo; Munayco, Jimmy; Scorzelli, Rosa B.; Burnham, Philip; Viescas, Arthur J; Tiano, Amanda L.

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe?O? (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. As such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.

  12. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; Han, Jinkyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiang; Shi, Chenyang; Abeykoon, A. M.Milinda; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Stach, Eric; et al

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe?O? (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. Asmore »such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.« less

  13. Mineral of the month: manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corathers, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most important ferrous metals and one of the few for which the United States is totally dependent on imports. It is a black, brittle element predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production, which together provide the largest market for manganese (about 83 percent). It is also used as an alloy with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Nonmetallurgical applications of manganese include battery cathodes, soft ferrite magnets used in electronics, micronutrients found in fertilizers and animal feed, water treatment chemicals, and a colorant for bricks and ceramics.

  14. ?(3) Measurement and optical power limiting behavior of manganese doped lithium tetraborate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mohandoss, R; Dhanuskodi, S; Vinitha, G

    2015-02-01

    Manganese doped Li2B4O7 nano crystallites were prepared by chemical method and characterized by XRD, FTIR, UV and fluorescence spectra. FESEM reveals that the particles are coagulated and the particle size is in the range of 50-107 nm. Bands appear at 682-769 cm(-1) corresponds to the bending of B-O linkage in borate network. Nonradiative energy transfer process is observed from fluorescence spectrum. UV-Vis studies show the samples are completely transparent in the visible region and having absorption peaks (234 and 276 nm) in UV regime. The measured second harmonic generation values are 0.9 times KDP. The nonlinear optical parameters such as nonlinear refractive index, n2 (10(-8) cm(2)/W), nonlinear absorption, ? (10(-2) cm/W) and nonlinear optical susceptibility, ?(3) (10(-5) esu) are estimated using a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 50 mW). PMID:25459619

  15. ?(3) measurement and optical power limiting behavior of manganese doped lithium tetraborate nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohandoss, R.; Dhanuskodi, S.; Vinitha, G.

    2015-02-01

    Manganese doped Li2B4O7 nano crystallites were prepared by chemical method and characterized by XRD, FTIR, UV and fluorescence spectra. FESEM reveals that the particles are coagulated and the particle size is in the range of 50-107 nm. Bands appear at 682-769 cm-1corresponds to the bending of B-O linkage in borate network. Nonradiative energy transfer process is observed from fluorescence spectrum. UV-Vis studies show the samples are completely transparent in the visible region and having absorption peaks (234 and 276 nm) in UV regime. The measured second harmonic generation values are 0.9 times KDP. The nonlinear optical parameters such as nonlinear refractive index, n2 (10-8 cm2/W), nonlinear absorption, ? (10-2 cm/W) and nonlinear optical susceptibility, ?(3) (10-5 esu) are estimated using a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 50 mW).

  16. Biodiesel synthesis catalyzed by transition metal oxides: ferric-manganese doped tungstated/molybdena nanoparticle catalyst.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Fatah Hamid; Rashid, Umer; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    The solid acid Ferric-manganese doped tungstated/molybdena nananoparticle catalyst was prepared via impregnation reaction followed by calcination at 600°C for 3 h. The characterization was done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature programmed desorption of NH3 (TPD-NH3), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Brunner-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement (BET). Moreover, dependence of biodiesel yield on the reaction variables such as the reaction temperature, catalyst loading, as well as molar ratio of methanol/oil and reusability were also appraised. The catalyst was reused six times without any loss in activity with maximum yield of 92.3% ±1.12 achieved in the optimized conditions of reaction temperature of 200°C; stirring speed of 600 rpm, 1:25 molar ratio of oil to alcohol, 6 % w/w catalyst loading as well as 8 h as time of the reaction. The fuel properties of WCOME's were evaluated, including the density, kinematic viscosity, pour point, cloud point and flash point whereas all properties were compared with the limits in the ASTM D6751 standard. PMID:25492234

  17. Phase and composition controllable synthesis of cobalt manganese spinel nanoparticles towards efficient oxygen electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Han, Xiaopeng; Cheng, Fangyi; Hu, Yuxiang; Chen, Chengcheng; Chen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Spinel-type oxides are technologically important in many fields, including electronics, magnetism, catalysis and electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Typically, these materials are prepared by conventional ceramic routes that are energy consuming and offer limited control over shape and size. Moreover, for mixed-metal oxide spinels (for example, Co(x)Mn(3-x)O4), the crystallographic phase sensitively correlates with the metal ratio, posing great challenges to synthesize active product with simultaneously tuned phase and composition. Here we report a general synthesis of ultrasmall cobalt manganese spinels with tailored structural symmetry and composition through facile solution-based oxidation-precipitation and insertion-crystallization process at modest condition. As an example application, the nanocrystalline spinels catalyse the oxygen reduction/evolution reactions, showing phase and composition co-dependent performance. Furthermore, the mild synthetic strategy allows the formation of homogeneous and strongly coupled spinel/carbon nanocomposites, which exhibit comparable activity but superior durability to Pt/C and serve as efficient catalysts to build rechargeable Zn-air and Li-air batteries. PMID:26040417

  18. Phase and composition controllable synthesis of cobalt manganese spinel nanoparticles towards efficient oxygen electrocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun; Han, Xiaopeng; Cheng, Fangyi; Hu, Yuxiang; Chen, Chengcheng; Chen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Spinel-type oxides are technologically important in many fields, including electronics, magnetism, catalysis and electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Typically, these materials are prepared by conventional ceramic routes that are energy consuming and offer limited control over shape and size. Moreover, for mixed-metal oxide spinels (for example, CoxMn3?xO4), the crystallographic phase sensitively correlates with the metal ratio, posing great challenges to synthesize active product with simultaneously tuned phase and composition. Here we report a general synthesis of ultrasmall cobalt manganese spinels with tailored structural symmetry and composition through facile solution-based oxidation–precipitation and insertion–crystallization process at modest condition. As an example application, the nanocrystalline spinels catalyse the oxygen reduction/evolution reactions, showing phase and composition co-dependent performance. Furthermore, the mild synthetic strategy allows the formation of homogeneous and strongly coupled spinel/carbon nanocomposites, which exhibit comparable activity but superior durability to Pt/C and serve as efficient catalysts to build rechargeable Zn–air and Li–air batteries. PMID:26040417

  19. Phase and composition controllable synthesis of cobalt manganese spinel nanoparticles towards efficient oxygen electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun; Han, Xiaopeng; Cheng, Fangyi; Hu, Yuxiang; Chen, Chengcheng; Chen, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Spinel-type oxides are technologically important in many fields, including electronics, magnetism, catalysis and electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Typically, these materials are prepared by conventional ceramic routes that are energy consuming and offer limited control over shape and size. Moreover, for mixed-metal oxide spinels (for example, CoxMn3-xO4), the crystallographic phase sensitively correlates with the metal ratio, posing great challenges to synthesize active product with simultaneously tuned phase and composition. Here we report a general synthesis of ultrasmall cobalt manganese spinels with tailored structural symmetry and composition through facile solution-based oxidation-precipitation and insertion-crystallization process at modest condition. As an example application, the nanocrystalline spinels catalyse the oxygen reduction/evolution reactions, showing phase and composition co-dependent performance. Furthermore, the mild synthetic strategy allows the formation of homogeneous and strongly coupled spinel/carbon nanocomposites, which exhibit comparable activity but superior durability to Pt/C and serve as efficient catalysts to build rechargeable Zn-air and Li-air batteries.

  20. Ligand-induced evolution of intrinsic fluorescence and catalytic activity from cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pal, Monalisa; Kundu, Anirban; Rakshit, Rupali; Mandal, Kalyan

    2015-06-01

    To develop CoFe(2)O(4) as magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for biomedical applications, it would be advantageous to identify any intrinsic fluorescence of this important magnetic material by simply adjusting the surface chemistry of the NPs themselves. Herein, we demonstrate that intrinsic multicolor fluorescence, covering the whole visible region, can be induced by facile functionalization of CoFe(2)O(4) NPs with Na-tartrate. Moreover, the functionalized CoFe(2)O(4) NPs also show unprecedented catalytic efficiency in the degradation of both biologically and environmentally harmful dyes, pioneering the potential application of these NPs in therapeutics and wastewater treatment. Detailed investigation through various spectroscopic tools unveils the story behind the emergence of this unique optical property of CoFe(2)O(4) NPs upon functionalization with tartrate ligands. We believe our developed multifunctional CoFe(2)O(4) NPs hold great promise for advanced biomedical and technological applications. PMID:25867626

  1. Artificial Neural Network Modelling of Photodegradation in Suspension of Manganese Doped Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles under Visible-Light Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, Yadollah; Sairi, Nor Asrina; Amin Matori, Khamirul; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    The artificial neural network (ANN) modeling of m-cresol photodegradation was carried out for determination of the optimum and importance values of the effective variables to achieve the maximum efficiency. The photodegradation was carried out in the suspension of synthesized manganese doped ZnO nanoparticles under visible-light irradiation. The input considered effective variables of the photodegradation were irradiation time, pH, photocatalyst amount, and concentration of m-cresol while the efficiency was the only response as output. The performed experiments were designed into three data sets such as training, testing, and validation that were randomly splitted by the software's option. To obtain the optimum topologies, ANN was trained by quick propagation (QP), Incremental Back Propagation (IBP), Batch Back Propagation (BBP), and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithms for testing data set. The topologies were determined by the indicator of minimized root mean squared error (RMSE) for each algorithm. According to the indicator, the QP-4-8-1, IBP-4-15-1, BBP-4-6-1, and LM-4-10-1 were selected as the optimized topologies. Among the topologies, QP-4-8-1 has presented the minimum RMSE and absolute average deviation as well as maximum R-squared. Therefore, QP-4-8-1 was selected as final model for validation test and navigation of the process. The model was used for determination of the optimum values of the effective variables by a few three-dimensional plots. The optimum points of the variables were confirmed by further validated experiments. Moreover, the model predicted the relative importance of the variables which showed none of them was neglectable in this work. PMID:25538962

  2. pH-triggered release of manganese from MnAu nanoparticles that enables cellular neuronal differentiation without cellular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bhang, Suk Ho; Han, Jin; Jang, Hyeon-Ki; Noh, Myung-Kyung; La, Wan-Geun; Yi, Minyoung; Kim, Woo-Sik; Kwon, Yunhee Kim; Yu, Taekyung; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2015-07-01

    At high concentrations, manganese (Mn) promotes cellular neurodevelopment but causes toxicity. Here, we report that Mn ion at high concentrations can be delivered to pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to enhance cellular neurodevelopment without toxicity. Mn(2+) release from AuNPs was designed to be pH-responsive so that low pH condition of the cell endosomes can trigger in situ release of Mn(2+) from AuNPs after cellular uptake of Mn-incorporated AuNPs (MnAuNPs). Due to the differences in reduction potentials of Mn and Au, only Mn ionized and released while Au remained intact when MnAuNPs were uptaken by cells. Compared to PC12 cells treated with a high concentration of free Mn(2+), PC12 cells treated with an equal concentration of MnAuNPs resulted in significantly enhanced cellular neurodevelopment with decreased apoptosis and necrosis. Treatment with a high concentration of free Mn(2+) led to an abrupt consumption of a large amount of ATP for the intracellular transport of Mn(2+) through the ion channel of the cell membrane and to mitochondrial damage caused by the high intracellular concentration of Mn(2+), both of which resulted in cell necrosis and apoptosis. In contrast, MnAuNP-treated cells consumed much smaller amount of ATP for the intracellular transport of MnAuNPs by endocytosis and showed pH-triggered in situ release of Mn(2+) from the MnAuNPs in the endosomes of the cells, both of which prevented the cell death caused by ATP depletion and mitochondrial damage. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of AuNPs as a vehicle for pH-responsive, intracellular delivery of metal ion, which may open a new window for drug delivery and clinical therapy. PMID:25934450

  3. Synthesis of magnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with controlled morphology, monodispersity and composition: the influence of solvent, surfactant, reductant and synthetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Le T; Dung, Ngo T; Tung, Le D; Thanh, Cao T; Quy, Ong K; Chuc, Nguyen V; Maenosono, Shinya; Thanh, Nguyen T K

    2015-12-14

    In our present work, magnetic cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles have been successfully synthesised by thermal decomposition of Fe(iii) and Co(ii) acetylacetonate compounds in organic solvents in the presence of oleic acid (OA)/ oleylamine (OLA) as surfactants and 1,2-hexadecanediol (HDD) or octadecanol (OCD-ol) as an accelerating agent. As a result, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles of different shapes were tightly controlled in size (range of 4-30 nm) and monodispersity (standard deviation only at ca. 5%). Experimental parameters, such as reaction time, temperature, surfactant concentration, solvent, precursor ratio, and accelerating agent, in particular, the role of HDD, OCD-ol, and OA/OLA have been intensively investigated in detail to discover the best conditions for the synthesis of the above magnetic nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticles have been successfully applied for producing oriented carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and they have potential to be used in biomedical applications. PMID:26542630

  4. Ultrahigh relaxivity and safe probes of manganese oxide nanoparticles for in vivo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, J.; Tian, X. M.; Yang, C.; Liu, P.; Luo, N. Q.; Liang, Y.; Li, H. B.; Chen, D. H.; Wang, C. X.; Li, L.; Yang, G. W.

    2013-01-01

    Mn-based nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as new class of probes for magnetic resonance imaging due to the impressive contrast ability. However, the reported Mn-based NPs possess low relaxivity and there are no immunotoxicity data regarding Mn-based NPs as contrast agents. Here, we demonstrate the ultrahigh relaxivity of water protons of 8.26?mM?1s?1 from the Mn3O4 NPs synthesized by a simple and green technique, which is twice higher than that of commercial gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents (4.11?mM?1s?1) and the highest value reported to date for Mn-based NPs. We for the first time demonstrate these Mn3O4 NPs biocompatibilities both in vitro and in vivo are satisfactory based on systematical studies of the intrinsic toxicity including cell viability of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells, normal nasopharyngeal epithelium, apoptosis in cells and in vivo immunotoxicity. These findings pave the way for the practical clinical diagnosis of Mn based NPs as safe probes for in vivo imaging. PMID:24305731

  5. Magnetic properties of Co1-xZnxFe2O4 spinel ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by starch-assisted sol-gel autocombustion method and its ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Raghvendra Singh; Havlica, Jaromir; Hnatko, Miroslav; Šajgalík, Pavol; Alexander, Cigá?; Palou, Martin; Bartoní?ková, Eva; Bohá?, Martin; Frajkorová, Františka; Masilko, Jiri; Zmrzlý, Martin; Kalina, Lukas; Hajdúchová, Miroslava; Enev, Vojt?ch

    2015-03-01

    In this article, Co1-xZnxFe2O4 (x=0.0 and 0.5) spinel ferrite nanoparticles were achieved at 800 °C by starch-assisted sol-gel autocombustion method. To further reduce the particle size, these synthesized ferrite nanoparticles were ball-milled for 2 h. X-ray diffraction patterns demonstrated single phase formation of Co1-xZnxFe2O4 (x=0.0 and 0.5) spinel ferrite nanoparticles. FE-SEM analysis indicated the nanosized spherical particles formation with spherical morphology. The change in Raman modes and relative intensity were observed due to ball milling and consequently decrease of particle size and cationic redistribution. An X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) result indicated that Co2+, Zn2+ and Fe3+ exist in octahedral and tetrahedral sites. The cationic redistribution of Zn2+ and consequently Fe3+ occurred between octahedral and tetrahedral sites after ball-milling. The change in saturation magnetization (Ms) and coercivity (Hc) with decrease of nanocrystalline size and distribution of cations in spinel ferrite were observed.

  6. Control of Particle Size and Morphology of Cobalt-Ferrite Nanoparticles by Salt-Matrix during Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, A.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.; Mostafavi, M.

    Salt-matrix annealing of mechanically alloyed Co-ferrite nanopowder was used to modify its particle size and morphology. Efficiency improvement due to suppression of sintering and growth resulted in reduction of average particle size from 100nm for salt-less to 40nm for salt-full annealing procedure. Nanosized single-phase cobalt-ferrite particles were observed after 2h annealing at 750°C in the samples milled for 20 hours both with and without NaCl. NaCl:CoFe2O4 ratio of 10:1 resulted in cabbage-like clusters containing particles smaller than 50 nm.

  7. Study of structure and magnetic properties of Ni-Zn ferrite nano-particles synthesized via co-precipitation and reverse micro-emulsion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah Dar, M.; Shah, Jyoti; Siddiqui, W. A.; Kotnala, R. K.

    2014-08-01

    Nano-crystalline Ni-Zn ferrites were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation and reverse micro-emulsion technique with an average crystallite size of 11 and 6 nm, respectively. The reverse micro-emulsion method has been found to be more appropriate for nano-ferrite synthesis as the produced particles are monodisperse and highly crystalline. Zero-field cooled and field cooled magnetization study under different magnetic fields and magnetic hysteresis loops at different temperatures have been performed. The non-saturated M-H loops, absence of hysteresis, and coercivity at room temperature are indicative of the presence of super paramagnetic and single-domain nano-particles for both the materials. In sample `a', the blocking temperature ( T B) has been observed to decrease from 255 to 120 K on increasing the magnetic field from 50 to 1,000 Oe, which can be attributed to the reduction of magneto crystalline anisotropy constant. The M S and coercivity were found to be higher for sample `a' as compared with sample `b' since surface effects are neglected on increasing the crystallite size.

  8. Experimental demonstration of all-optical weak magnetic field detection using beam-deflection of single-mode fiber coated with cobalt-doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Somarpita; Chaudhuri, Partha Roy

    2015-07-10

    We experimentally demonstrate single-mode optical-fiber-beam-deflection configuration for weak magnetic-field-detection using an optimized (low coercive-field) composition of cobalt-doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles. Devising a fiber-double-slit type experiment, we measure the surrounding magnetic field through precisely measuring interference-fringe yielding a minimum detectable field ?100??mT and we procure magnetization data of the sample that fairly predicts SQUID measurement. To improve sensitivity, we incorporate etched single-mode fiber in double-slit arrangement and recorded a minimum detectable field, ?30??mT. To further improve, we redefine the experiment as modulating fiber-to-fiber light-transmission and demonstrate the minimum field as 2.0 mT. The device will be uniquely suited for electrical or otherwise hazardous environments. PMID:26193403

  9. Temperature Dependence of Saturation Magnetization and Coercivity in Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 Ferrite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaidat, I. M.; Issa, B.; Albiss, B. A.; Haik, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of temperature on coercivity, Hc and saturation magnetization, Ms were investigated experimentally in Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 ferrite nanoparticles (average size 35 nm). Isothermal magnetization curves M (H) were obtained in the field range from -5 kOe to +5 kOe at different temperatures after the zero field cooling (ZFC) process. The temperature dependence of the coercivity, Hc(T) deviated slightly from the classical Kneller's law. The temperature dependence of saturation magnetization, Ms(T) was found to have an excellent agreement with the Bloch's law. These results are discussed in terms of several factors such as the size and size distribution of the particles, inter-particle interactions and the surface spin.

  10. Controlled oxidation of FeCo magnetic nanoparticles to produce faceted FeCo/ferrite nanocomposites for rf heating applications

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, David E.

    and rates for plasma torch synthesized FeCo nanoparticles.1 FeCo nanoparticles are being studied for polydisperse FeCo magnetic nanoparticles MNPs synthesized using an induction plasma torch. X-ray diffraction of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.3054376 INTRODUCTION We report a systematic study of the oxidation products

  11. Synthesis of waste cooking oil based biodiesel via ferric-manganese promoted molybdenum oxide / zirconia nanoparticle solid acid catalyst: influence of ferric and manganese dopants.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Fatah H; Rashid, Umer; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferric-manganese promoted molybdenum oxide/zirconia (Fe-Mn- MoO3/ZrO2) (FMMZ) solid acid catalyst for production of biodiesel was demonstrated. FMMZ is produced through impregnation reaction followed by calcination at 600°C for 3 h. The characterization of FMMZ had been done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature programmed desorption of NH3 (TPD-NH3), transmission electron microscopy(TEM) and Brunner-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement. The effect of waste cooking oil methyl esters (WCOME's) yield on the reactions variables such as reaction temperature, catalyst loading, molar ratio of methanol/oil and reusability were also assessed. The catalyst was used to convert the waste cooking oil into corresponding methyl esters (95.6%±0.15) within 5 h at 200? reaction temperature, 600 rpm stirring speed, 1:25 molar ratio of oil to alcohol and 4% w/w catalyst loading. The reported catalyst was successfully recycled in six connective experiments without loss in activity. Moreover, the fuel properties of WCOME's were also reported using ASTM D 6751 methods. PMID:25843280

  12. A facile and practical biosensor for choline based on manganese dioxide nanoparticles synthesized in-situ at the surface of electrode by one-step electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guangxia; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Weixiang; Wei, Xiaoyun; Lu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a facile and sensitive biocompatible biosensor based on Nafion/choline oxidase/manganese dioxide composite film was developed for the determination of choline chloride. Manganese dioxide (MnO2) nanoparticles, possessing the advantages of large specific surface areas, good hydrophilicity, great permeability as well as excellent biocompatibility, were synthesized in-situ at the surface of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by one-step electrodeposition. And then, choline oxidase (ChOx) was immobilized on the MnO2 modified GCE with coating a Nafion film to hold the ChOx/MnO2 film on the electrode surface firmly. Upon optimized conditions, a linear range of 8.0-1.0mM was obtained for the sensor in a cyclic voltammetry method, with a detection limit as low as 5.0µM. Besides, the biosensor was successfully employed to detect choline in milk, milk powder and feedstuff samples, providing a promising alternative for the practical application. PMID:26695320

  13. Removing selected steroid hormones, biocides and pharmaceuticals from water by means of biogenic manganese oxide nanoparticles in situ at ppb levels.

    PubMed

    Furgal, Karolina M; Meyer, Rikke L; Bester, Kai

    2015-10-01

    The oxidation of organic micro-pollutants by biogenic manganese oxide nanoparticles (BioMnOx) has been studied with respect to possible implementation of BioMnOx in wastewater treatment. For this it would be prerequisite that microbial Mn(2+) oxidation and BioMnOx-driven pollutant removal can occur in situ, i.e. in the same reactor as the removal. Here we present the in situ reactivity of BioMnOx produced by Pseudomonas putida towards a range of micro-pollutants at environmentally relevant concentrations (10 ?g L(-1)). We found that in situ formed BioMnOx completely removed the steroid hormones estrone and 17-? ethinylestradiol, while only 26% removal of diclofenac was achieved. Ibuprofen, tebuconazole, carbamazepine, carbendazim, and terbutryn were not removed under in situ conditions. PMID:25532770

  14. Load partitioning between ferrite/martensite and dispersed nanoparticles of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-06-18

    In thisstudy,ahigh-energysynchrotronradiationX-raytechniquewasusedtoinvestigatethetensile deformation processesofa9Cr-ODSferritic/martensitic(F/M)steelatdifferenttemperatures.Twominor phases withinthe9Cr-ODSF/Msteelmatrixwereidentified asY2Ti2O7 and TiNbythehigh-energyX-ray diffraction, andconfirmed bytheanalysisusingenergydispersiveX-rayspectroscopy(EDS)ofscanning transmission electronmicroscope(STEM).Thelatticestrainsofthematrixandparticlesweremeasured through theentiretensiledeformationprocess.Duringthetensiletests,thelatticestrainsoftheferrite/ martensiteandtheparticles(TiNandY2Ti2O7) showedastrongtemperaturedependence,decreasing with increasingtemperature.Analysisoftheinternalstressatthreetemperaturesshowedthattheload partitioning betweentheferrite/martensiteandtheparticles(TiNandY2Ti2O7) wasinitiatedduring sample yieldingandreachedtoapeakduringsamplenecking.Atthreestudiedtemperatures,the internal stressofminorphases(Y2Ti2O7 and TiN)wasabout2timesthatofF/Mmatrixatyielding position, whiletheinternalstressofY2Ti2O7 and TiNreachedabout4.5–6 timesand3–3.5 timesthatof the F/Mmatrixatneckingposition,respectively.Itindicatesthatthestrengtheningofthematrixisdueto minor phases(Y2Ti2O7 and TiN),especiallyY2Ti2O7 particles. Althoughtheinternalstressesofallphases decreased withincreasingtemperaturefromRTto600 °C, theratioofinternalstressesofeachphaseat necking positionstayedinastablerange(internalstressesofY2Ti2O7 and TiNwereabout4.5–6 times and 3–3.5 timesofthatofF/Mmatrix,respectively).ThedifferencebetweeninternalstressoftheF/M matrix andtheappliedstressat600 °C isslightlylowerthanthoseatRTand300 °C, indicatingthatthe nanoparticles stillhavegoodstrengtheningeffectat600 °C.

  15. Attenuation of Combined Nickel(II) Oxide and Manganese(II, III) Oxide Nanoparticles' Adverse Effects with a Complex of Bioprotectors.

    PubMed

    Minigalieva, Ilzira A; Katsnelson, Boris A; Privalova, Larisa I; Sutunkova, Marina P; Gurvich, Vladimir B; Shur, Vladimir Y; Shishkina, Ekaterina V; Valamina, Irene E; Makeyev, Oleg H; Panov, Vladimir G; Varaksin, Anatoly N; Grigoryeva, Ekaterina V; Meshtcheryakova, Ekaterina Y

    2015-01-01

    Stable suspensions of NiO and Mn?O? nanoparticles (NPs) with a mean (±s.d.) diameter of 16.7 ± 8.2 and 18.4 ± 5.4 nm, respectively, purposefully prepared by laser ablation of 99.99% pure nickel or manganese in de-ionized water, were repeatedly injected intraperitoneally (IP) to rats at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg 3 times a week up to 18 injections, either alone or in combination. A group of rats was injected with this combination with the background oral administration of a "bio-protective complex" (BPC) comprising pectin, vitamins A, C, E, glutamate, glycine, N-acetylcysteine, selenium, iodide and omega-3 PUFA, this composition having been chosen based on mechanistic considerations and previous experience. After the termination of injections, many functional and biochemical indices and histopathological features (with morphometric assessment) of the liver, spleen, kidneys and brain were evaluated for signs of toxicity. The Ni and Mn content of these organs was measured with the help of the atomic emission and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies. We obtained blood leukocytes for performing the RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) test. Although both metallic NPs proved adversely bio-active in many respects considered in this study, Mn?O?-NPs were somewhat more noxious than NiO-NPs as concerns most of the non-specific toxicity manifestations and they induced more marked damage to neurons in the striatum and the hippocampus, which may be considered an experimental correlate of the manganese-induced Parkinsonism. The comparative solubility of the Mn?O?-NPs and NiO-NPs in a biological medium is discussed as one of the factors underlying the difference in their toxicokinetics and toxicities. The BPC has attenuated both the organ-systemic toxicity and the genotoxicity of Mn?O?-NPs in combination with NiO-NPs. PMID:26393577

  16. Attenuation of Combined Nickel(II) Oxide and Manganese(II, III) Oxide Nanoparticles’ Adverse Effects with a Complex of Bioprotectors

    PubMed Central

    Minigalieva, Ilzira A.; Katsnelson, Boris A.; Privalova, Larisa I.; Sutunkova, Marina P.; Gurvich, Vladimir B.; Shur, Vladimir Y.; Shishkina, Ekaterina V.; Valamina, Irene E.; Makeyev, Oleg H.; Panov, Vladimir G.; Varaksin, Anatoly N.; Grigoryeva, Ekaterina V.; Meshtcheryakova, Ekaterina Y.

    2015-01-01

    Stable suspensions of NiO and Mn3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) with a mean (±s.d.) diameter of 16.7 ± 8.2 and 18.4 ± 5.4 nm, respectively, purposefully prepared by laser ablation of 99.99% pure nickel or manganese in de-ionized water, were repeatedly injected intraperitoneally (IP) to rats at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg 3 times a week up to 18 injections, either alone or in combination. A group of rats was injected with this combination with the background oral administration of a “bio-protective complex” (BPC) comprising pectin, vitamins A, C, E, glutamate, glycine, N-acetylcysteine, selenium, iodide and omega-3 PUFA, this composition having been chosen based on mechanistic considerations and previous experience. After the termination of injections, many functional and biochemical indices and histopathological features (with morphometric assessment) of the liver, spleen, kidneys and brain were evaluated for signs of toxicity. The Ni and Mn content of these organs was measured with the help of the atomic emission and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies. We obtained blood leukocytes for performing the RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) test. Although both metallic NPs proved adversely bio-active in many respects considered in this study, Mn3O4-NPs were somewhat more noxious than NiO-NPs as concerns most of the non-specific toxicity manifestations and they induced more marked damage to neurons in the striatum and the hippocampus, which may be considered an experimental correlate of the manganese-induced Parkinsonism. The comparative solubility of the Mn3O4-NPs and NiO-NPs in a biological medium is discussed as one of the factors underlying the difference in their toxicokinetics and toxicities. The BPC has attenuated both the organ-systemic toxicity and the genotoxicity of Mn3O4-NPs in combination with NiO-NPs. PMID:26393577

  17. Barium carbonate nanoparticle to enhance oxygen reduction activity of strontium doped lanthanum ferrite for solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tao; Chen, Fanglin; Xia, Changrong

    2015-03-01

    BaCO3 nanoparticles are demonstrated as outstanding catalysts for high-temperature oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the La0.8Sr0.2FeO3-? (LSF) cathode for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) based on ytrria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes. Thermal gravitational and X-ray diffraction measurements show that BaCO3 is stable and chemically compatible with LSF under the fabrication and operation conditions of intermediate-temperature SOFCs. The BaCO3 nanoparticles can greatly reduce the interfacial polarization resistance; from 2.96 to 0.84 ? cm2 at 700 °C when 12.9wt% BaCO3 is infiltrated to the porous LSF electrode on the YSZ electrolyte. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows that there is about one order of magnitude decrease in the low-frequency resistance, indicating that BaCO3 nanoparticles can greatly enhance the surface steps for ORR. Electrical conductivity relaxation investigation indicates about one order of magnitude increase in the chemical oxygen surface exchange coefficient when BaCO3 is applied, directly demonstrating significant increase in the kinetics for ORR. In addition, LSF cathodes with infiltrated BaCO3 nanoparticles have shown excellent stability and substantially enhanced cell performance as demonstrated with single cells, suggesting BaCO3 nanoparticles are very effective in enhancing ORR on LSF.

  18. NMR-D study of the local spin dynamics and magnetic anisotropy in different nearly monodispersed ferrite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bordonali, L; Kalaivani, T; Sabareesh, K P V; Innocenti, C; Fantechi, E; Sangregorio, C; Casula, M F; Lartigue, L; Larionova, J; Guari, Y; Corti, M; Arosio, P; Lascialfari, A

    2013-02-13

    We present a systematic experimental comparison of the superparamagnetic relaxation time constants obtained by means of dynamic magnetic measurements and (1)H-NMR relaxometry, on ferrite-based nanosystems with different composition, various core sizes and dispersed in different solvents. The application of a heuristic model for the relaxivity allowed a comparison between the reversal time of magnetization as seen by NMR and the results from the AC susceptibility experiments, and an estimation of fundamental microscopic properties. A good agreement between the NMR and AC results was found when fitting the AC data to a Vogel-Fulcher law. Key parameters obtained from the model have been exploited to evaluate the impact of the contribution from magnetic anisotropy to the relaxivity curves and estimate the minimum approach distance of the bulk solvent. PMID:23315450

  19. Influence of zinc doping in nickel ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by using an oxalic-acid-based precursor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjaneyulu, T.; Raghavender, A. T.; Kumar, K. Vijaya; Murthy, P. Narayana; Narendra, K.

    2013-04-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni1- x Zn x Fe2O4 ( 0.0 ? x ? 0.8) ferrites have been synthesized by using an oxalic-acid-based precursor method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed the formation of a single-phase spinel structure at very low annealing temperature. The particle size was observed to decrease with increasing Zn content x. The lattice constants was observed to increase with increasing Zn content x due to large ionic radii of the zinc ion when compared to that of the nickel ion. Magnetic measurements at room temperature revealed that the magnetization did not change monotonically with increasing Zn content x. The coercivity and the remanence were observed to decrease with increasing non-magnetic Zn content x. The observed magnetic properties may be due to a reduction in the number of exchange interactions and the nanocrystalline size with increasing Zn content x.

  20. Dextrin-coated zinc substituted cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles as an MRI contrast agent: In vitro and in vivo imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Sattarahmady, N; Zare, T; Mehdizadeh, A R; Azarpira, N; Heidari, M; Lotfi, M; Heli, H

    2015-05-01

    Application of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) as a negative contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been of widespread interest. These particles can enhance contrast of images by altering the relaxation times of the water protons. In this study, dextrin-coated zinc substituted cobalt-ferrite (Zn0.5Co0.5Fe2O4) NPs were synthesized by a co-precipitation method, and the morphology, size, structure and magnetic properties of the NPs were investigated. These NPs had superparamagnetic behavior with an average size of 3.9 (±0.9, n=200)nm measured by transmission electron microscopy. Measurements on the relaxivities (r2 and r2(*)) of the NPs were performed in vitro by agarose phantom. In addition, after subcutaneous injection of the NPs into C540 cell line in C-57 inbred mice, the relaxivities were measured in vivo by a 1.5T MRI system. These NPs could effectively increase the image contrast in both T2-and T2(*)-weighted samples. PMID:25819361

  1. Structural, optical, and magnetic studies of manganese-doped zinc oxide hierarchical microspheres by self-assembly of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a series of manganese [Mn]-doped zinc oxide [ZnO] hierarchical microspheres [HMSs] are prepared by hydrothermal method only using zinc acetate and manganese acetate as precursors and ethylene glycol as solvent. X-ray diffraction indicates that all of the as-obtained samples including the highest Mn (7 mol%) in the crystal lattice of ZnO have a pure phase (hexagonal wurtzite structure). A broad Raman spectrum from as-synthesized doping samples ranges from 500 to 600 cm-1, revealing the successful doping of paramagnetic Mn2+ ions in the host ZnO. Optical absorption analysis of the samples exhibits a blueshift in the absorption band edge with increasing dopant concentration, and corresponding photoluminescence spectra show that Mn doping suppresses both near-band edge UV emission and defect-related blue emission. In particular, magnetic measurements confirm robust room-temperature ferromagnetic behavior with a high Curie temperature exceeding 400 K, signifying that the as-formed Mn-doped ZnO HMSs will have immense potential in spintronic devices and spin-based electronic technologies. PMID:22296968

  2. Cobalt ferrite based magnetostrictive materials for magnetic stress sensor and actuator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiles, David C. (Inventor); Paulsen, Jason A. (Inventor); Snyder, John E. (Inventor); Lo, Chester C. H. (Inventor); Ring, Andrew P. (Inventor); Bormann, Keith A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetostrictive material based on cobalt ferrite is described. The cobalt ferrite is substituted with transition metals (such manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) or mixtures thereof) by substituting the transition metals for iron or cobalt to form substituted cobalt ferrite that provides mechanical properties that make the substituted cobalt ferrite material effective for use as sensors and actuators. The substitution of transition metals lowers the Curie temperature of the material (as compared to cobalt ferrite) while maintaining a suitable magnetostriction for stress sensing applications.

  3. Effect of surfactant/water ratio and reagents' concentration on size distribution of manganese carbonate nanoparticles synthesized by microemulsion mediated route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, Giuseppe; Pagnanelli, Francesca; Nishio-Hamane, Daisuke; Sasaki, Takehiko

    2015-03-01

    In this work nanoparticles of manganese carbonate were produced by microemulsion-mediated route at room temperature, without any post-thermal treatment. All produced samples were characterized by XRD and by TEM and obtained images were analyzed in order to evaluate particle size distribution, mean size and polydispersity (variance). The influence of water-surfactant molar ratio and concentration of reagents were investigated in the range 5-7.5 and 0.25-1.0 M, respectively, according to factorial design. Significant effects on particle mean size and polydispersity were assessed by statistical analysis. Results showed that by increasing the water-surfactant molar ratio from 5 to 7.5, the average particle size increased from less than 10 nm to around 100 nm, and the standard deviation increased from less than 5 nm to 35 nm. Statistical analysis put in evidence that water-surfactant molar ratio has significant positive effect on both mean and variance of particle size. Concentration of reactants, in the investigated range, did not influence mean size of particles, while significant changes of variance were observed: passing from 0.25 to 1 M concentration, variances of particle size increased for w = 5 and for w = 6.25, while decreased for w = 7.5.

  4. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles decorated on exfoliated graphene oxide, application for amperometric determination of NADH and H2O2.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Alinajafi, Hossein A; Jafari-Asl, M; Rezaei, B; Ghazaei, F

    2016-03-01

    Here, cobalt ferrite nanohybrid decorated on exfoliated graphene oxide (CoFe2O4/EGO) was synthesized. The nanohybrid was characterized by different methods such as X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray diffraction microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical methods. The CoFe2O4/EGO nanohybrid was used to modify glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The voltammetric investigations showed that CoFe2O4/EGO nanohybrid has synergetic effect towards the electro-reduction of H2O2 and electro-oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used for their quantitative analysis. The calibration curves were observed in the range of 0.50 to 100.0?molL(-1) NADH and 0.9 to 900.0?molL(-1) H2O2 with detections limit of 0.38 and 0.54?molL(-1), respectively. The repeatability, reproducibility and selectivity of the electrochemical sensor for analysis of the analytes were studied. The new electrochemical sensor was successfully applied for the determination of NADH and H2O2 in real samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26706531

  5. Silver-doped manganese dioxide and trioxide nanoparticles inhibit both gram positive and gram negative pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kunkalekar, R K; Prabhu, M S; Naik, M M; Salker, A V

    2014-01-01

    Palladium, ruthenium and silver-doped MnO2 and silver doped Mn2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized by simple co-precipitation technique. SEM-TEM analysis revealed the nano-size of these synthesized samples. XPS data illustrates that Mn is present in 4+ and 3+ oxidation states in MnO2 and Mn2O3 respectively. Thermal analysis gave significant evidence for the phase changes with increasing temperature. Antibacterial activity of these synthesized nanoparticles on three Gram positive bacterial cultures (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Streptococcus epidermis ATCC 12228, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633) and three Gram negative cultures (Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Salmonella abony NCTC 6017 and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 1003) was investigated using a disc diffusion method and live/dead assay. Only Ag-doped MnO2 and Ag-doped Mn2O3 nanoparticles showed antibacterial property against all six-test bacteria but Ag-doped MnO2 was found to be more effective than Ag-doped Mn2O3. PMID:24140741

  6. Tuning the magnetic properties of Co-ferrite nanoparticles through the 1,2-hexadecanediol concentration in the reaction mixture.

    PubMed

    Moya, Carlos; Morales, María del Puerto; Batlle, Xavier; Labarta, Amílcar

    2015-05-21

    This work reports on the effect of the 1,2-hexadecanediol content on the structural and magnetic properties of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles synthesized by thermal decomposition of metal-organic precursors in 1-octadecene. Although pseudo-spherical particles having an average size of about 8 nm and similar stoichiometry have been observed in all studied samples, a high level of variability in the crystal quality and, in turn, in the magnetic properties has been found as a function of the amount of 1,2-hexadecanediol added to the reaction mixture. The magnetic study reveals that samples progress from glassy magnetic behavior to bulk-like, ferrimagnetic order as the crystal quality improves. The analysis of the reaction mixtures by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy at various stages of the reaction shows the key role of the 1,2-hexadecanediol in favoring the decomposition of the metal-organic precursor, formation of an intermediate Co(2+)Fe(3+)-oleate complex and, finally, the nucleation of nanoparticles at lower temperatures. PMID:25917308

  7. Magnetic properties of ultrafine cobalt ferrite particles L. D. Tung,a)

    E-print Network

    Spinu, Leonard

    Magnetic properties of ultrafine cobalt ferrite particles L. D. Tung,a) V. Kolesnichenko, D of a diluted system of ultrafine cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (d 3.3 nm). From the peak of the zero for cobalt ferrite, at 2 K, the reduced remanence Mr /Ms is equal to 0.46 which is close to the theoretical

  8. Sustainable synthesis of monodispersed spinel nano-ferrites

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sustainable approach for the synthesis of various monodispersed spinel ferrite nanoparticles has been developed that occurs at water-toluene interface under both conventional and microwave hydrothermal conditions. This general synthesis procedure utilizes readily available and ...

  9. Synthesis, characterization, in vitro and in vivo studies of dextrin-coated zinc-iron ferrite nanoparticles (Zn0.5Fe0.5Fe2O4) as contrast agent in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, T.; Lotfi, M.; Heli, H.; Azarpira, N.; Mehdizadeh, A. R.; Sattarahmady, N.; Abdollah-dizavandi, M. R.; Heidari, M.

    2015-09-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles, such as ferrites, offer some attractive possibilities in biomedicine, especially in MRI applications. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of dextrin-coated zinc-iron ferrite nanoparticles (IFNPs) as an MRI contrast agent in in vivo and in vitro media. IFNPs were synthesized by an aqueous precipitation method in the presence of dextrin. An agarose phantom with different concentrations of dextrin-coated IFNPs was performed on a 1.5-T MRI. For in vivo MRI studies, implanted melanoma tumors in mice were immediately scanned after intra-tumoral injection of dextrin-coated IFNPs. Microscopic studies showed that the average diameter of dextrin-coated IFNPs was 12 ± 2.4 nm and the saturation magnetization for IFNPs was 31.5 emu g-1; r 1 and r 2 relaxivities of these ultrasmall superparamagnetic IFNPs in agarose phantom were obtained as 0.99 and 17.4 mmol L-1 s-1, respectively. The relaxivity measurements revealed that the dextrin-coated IFNPs can serve as a negative contrast agent. In vivo MRI showed that the dextrin-coated IFNPs can be used for tumor detection. The dextrin-coated IFNPs were suggested to be applied for lymph node and targeted imaging.

  10. Comparative study of NiFe{sub 2?x}Al{sub x}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by chemical co-precipitation and sol–gel combustion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gul, I.H.; Pervaiz, Erum

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: AFM images of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles at room temperature synthesized by sol–gel technique. Highlights: ? Particle size reduces to less than 30 nm. ? DC electrical resistivity increases with substitution of Cr{sup 3+}. ? Dielectric constant decreases. -- Abstract: A series of aluminum substituted Ni-ferrite nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical co-precipitation and sol–gel techniques. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), DC electrical resistivity and dielectric properties. Analysis of the X-ray diffraction pattern of all the samples confirmed the formation of spinel structure. The crystallite sizes remain within the range 25–41 ± 3 nm. FTIR measurements show two fundamental absorption bands, assigned to the vibration of tetrahedral and octahedral sites. DC electrical resistivity increases from 6.60 × 10{sup 7} to 6.9 × 10{sup 10} ? cm as the Al{sup 3+} concentration increases from 0.00 to 0.50. The dielectric constant and loss tangent decreases with increasing Al{sup 3+} concentration from 22 to 14, 0.354 to 0.27 respectively at 5 MHz for all the samples. Impedance measurements as a function of frequency (1 kHz–5 MHz) at room temperature further helped in analyzing the electrical properties of the prepared samples.

  11. Preparation of single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods and nanodisks

    SciTech Connect

    Du Jimin; Liu Zhimin . E-mail: liuzm@iccas.ac.cn; Wu Weize; Li Zhonghao; Han Buxing . E-mail: hanbx@iccas.ac.cn; Huang Ying

    2005-06-15

    This article, for the first time, reports the preparation of single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods and nanodisks. Using amorphous copper ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by reverse micelle as reaction precursor, single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods were synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of surfactant polyethylene glycol (PEG), however, copper ferrite nanodisks were prepared through the same procedures except the surfactant PEG. The resulting nanomaterials have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected electron area diffraction (SEAD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The bulk composition of the samples was determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  12. Rapid magnetic solid-phase extraction based on monodisperse magnetic single-crystal ferrite nanoparticles for the determination of free fatty acid content in edible oils.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Zhao, Qin; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Feng, Yu-Qi; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a rapid magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) based on monodisperse magnetic single-crystal ferrite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles (NPs) for determining the quantities of eight free fatty acids (FFAs), including palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), linolenic acid (C18:3), arachidic acid (C20:0), eicosenoic acid (C20:1), and behenic acid (C22:0) in oil. The amine-functionalized mesoporous Fe(3)O(4) magnetic NPs were applied as a sorbent for MSPE of FFAs from oil samples in a process that is based on hydrophilic interaction. The extraction can be completed rapidly in a dispersive mode with the aid of vigorous vortex. Additional tedious processing steps such as centrifugation and evaporation of organic solvent were not necessary with this procedure. Furthermore, esterification of FFAs can be accomplished during the desorption procedure by using methanol/sulfuric acid (99:1, v/v) as the desorption solvent. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated, including the matrix solvent for extraction, the desorption solvent and desorption time, and the amount of sorbent and extraction time. The pretreatment process was rapid under optimal conditions, being accomplished within 15 min. When coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID), a rapid, simple, and convenient MSPE-GC-FID method for the determination of FFAs in oil samples was established with a total analysis time within 25 min. The limits of detection for the target FFAs were found to be 7.22-26.26 ng/mL. Recoveries in oil samples were in the range of 81.33-117.75%, with RSDs of <6.4% (intraday) and <6.9% (interday). This method was applied successfully to the analysis of dynamic FFA formation in four types of edible oils subjected to an accelerated storage test. The simple, rapid, and cost-effective method developed in the current study offers a potential application for the extraction and preconcentration of FFAs from hydrophobic sample matrices, including edible fats and oils, fatty foods, and biological samples with high amounts of lipid. PMID:23230865

  13. Zinc ferrite nanoparticles activate IL-1b, NFKB1, CCL21 and NOS2 signaling to induce mitochondrial dependent intrinsic apoptotic pathway in WISH cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Ahmad, Javed; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Khan, Shams T.; Musarrat, Javed

    2013-12-01

    The present study has demonstrated the translocation of zinc ferrite nanoparticles (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs) into the cytoplasm of human amnion epithelial (WISH) cells, and the ensuing cytotoxicity and genetic damage. The results suggested that in situ NPs induced oxidative stress, alterations in cellular membrane and DNA strand breaks. The [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] (MTT) and neutral red uptake (NRU) cytotoxicity assays indicated 64.48 ± 1.6% and 50.73 ± 2.1% reduction in cell viability with 100 ?g/ml of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs exposure. The treated WISH cells exhibited 1.2-fold higher ROS level with 0.9-fold decline in membrane potential (??m) and 7.4-fold higher DNA damage after 48 h of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs treatment. Real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis of p53, CASP 3 (caspase-3), and bax genes revealed 5.3, 1.6, and 14.9-fold upregulation, and 0.18-fold down regulation of bcl 2 gene vis-à-vis untreated control. RT{sup 2} Profiler™ PCR array data elucidated differential up-regulation of mRNA transcripts of IL-1b, NFKB1, NOS2 and CCL21 genes in the range of 1.5 to 3.7-folds. The flow cytometry based cell cycle analysis suggested the transfer of 15.2 ± 2.1% (p < 0.01) population of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs (100 ?g/ml) treated cells into apoptotic phase through intrinsic pathway. Over all, the data revealed the potential of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs to induce cellular and genetic toxicity in cells of placental origin. Thus, the significant ROS production, reduction in ??m, DNA damage, and activation of genes linked to inflammation, oxidative stress, proliferation, DNA damage and repair could serve as the predictive toxicity and stress markers for ecotoxicological assessment of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs induced cellular and genetic damage. - Highlights: • First report on the molecular toxicity of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs in cells of placental origin • WISH cells treated with ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs exhibited cytoplasmic localization of NPs. • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs induce DNA damage and mitochondrial dysfunction in WISH cells. • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs activate inflammatory and oxidative stress signaling in WISH cells. • Elevation of p53, CASP 3, bax and bcl 2 genes affirms intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  14. One-pot green synthesis of biocompatible arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongjun; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Xiaolei; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2009-11-18

    A green one-step approach has been developed for the synthesis of amino-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesis was accomplished by simply mixing FeCl2 with arginine under ambient conditions. It was found that the Fe2+/arginine molar ratio, reaction duration and temperature greatly influence the size, morphology and composition of magnetic nanoparticles. The arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The results show that the prepared nanoparticles are spherically shaped with a nearly uniform size distribution and pure magnetite phase. The presence of arginine on the magnetic nanoparticle surface has been confirmed and the amount of surface arginine varies with the Fe2+/arginine molar ratio. The surface amine densities are calculated to be 5.60 and 7.84 micromol mg(-1) for magnetic nanoparticles prepared at 1:1 and 1:2 Fe2+/arginine molar ratio, respectively. The as-synthesized nanoparticles show superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature and good solubility in water. In addition, using a similar synthesis procedure, we have been able to synthesize superparamagnetic manganese and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. PMID:19847022

  15. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Annual report, September 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1993-12-01

    The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies at the US Steel Fundamental Research Laboratories in Monroeville, PA, by E. T. Turkdogan indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt % ore + 25 wt % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese at higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This Annual Topical Report documents progress in pelletizing and testing via thermo-gravimetric analysis of individual pellet formulations of manganese ore/ alumina combinations and also manganese carbonate/alumina with two binders, dextrin and bentonite. It includes the prior Quarterly Technical Reports which indicate that the manganese carbonate material, being of higher purity than the manganese ore, has a higher degree of sulfur capacity and more rapid absorption kinetics. A 2-inch fixed-bed reactor has been fabricated and is now ready for subjecting pellets to cyclic loading and regeneration.

  16. Chronic manganese intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.C.; Chu, N.S.; Lu, C.S.; Wang, J.D.; Tsai, J.L.; Tzeng, J.L.; Wolters, E.C.; Calne, D.B. )

    1989-10-01

    We report six cases of chronic manganese intoxication in workers at a ferromanganese factory in Taiwan. Diagnosis was confirmed by assessing increased manganese concentrations in the blood, scalp, and pubic hair. In addition, increased manganese levels in the environmental air were established. The patients showed a bradykinetic-rigid syndrome indistinguishable from Parkinson's disease that responded to treatment with levodopa.

  17. Synthesis, magnetic and optical properties of core/shell Co1-xZnxFe2O4/SiO2 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The optical properties of multi-functionalized cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4), cobalt zinc ferrite (Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4), and zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles have been enhanced by coating them with silica shell using a modified Stöber method. The ferrites nanoparticles were prepared by a modified citrate gel technique. These core/shell ferrites nanoparticles have been fired at temperatures: 400°C, 600°C and 800°C, respectively, for 2 h. The composition, phase, and morphology of the prepared core/shell ferrites nanoparticles were determined by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The diffuse reflectance and magnetic properties of the core/shell ferrites nanoparticles at room temperature were investigated using UV/VIS double-beam spectrophotometer and vibrating sample magnetometer, respectively. It was found that, by increasing the firing temperature from 400°C to 800°C, the average crystallite size of the core/shell ferrites nanoparticles increases. The cobalt ferrite nanoparticles fired at temperature 800°C; show the highest saturation magnetization while the zinc ferrite nanoparticles coated with silica shell shows the highest diffuse reflectance. On the other hand, core/shell zinc ferrite/silica nanoparticles fired at 400°C show a ferromagnetic behavior and high diffuse reflectance when compared with all the uncoated or coated ferrites nanoparticles. These characteristics of core/shell zinc ferrite/silica nanostructures make them promising candidates for magneto-optical nanodevice applications. PMID:21774807

  18. The filler powders laser welding of ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shenyong; Lei, Yucheng; Zhu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Laser welding was performed on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with the self-designed filler powders. The filler powders were added to weld metal to produce nano-particles (Y-M-O and TiC), submicron particles (Y-M-O) and dislocation rings. The generated particles were evenly distributed in the weld metal and their forming mechanism and behavior were analyzed. The results of the tests showed that the nano-particles, submicron particles and dislocation rings were able to improve the micro-hardness and tensile strength of welded joint, and the filler powders laser welding was an effective welding method of ODS ferritic steel.

  19. Superparamagnetic state by linear and non-linear AC magnetic susceptibility in Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 ferrites nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Suneetha, T; Kundu, S; Kashyap, Subhash C; Gupta, H C; Nath, T K

    2013-01-01

    The Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles has been synthesized using citrate-gel-precursor method. The direct mixing of nitrates and acetates yields homogeneous nanoparticles. Phase formation and crystal structure of the synthesized powder were examined through the X-ray diffraction (XRD). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the sample confirm the spinel structure. The average particle size was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The average particle size is found to be about 13 nm. Superparamagnetic-like nature of the nanoparticles of Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 has been revealed through various dc and linear and non-linear ac magnetization measurements. However, the nanoparticles do not behave like ideal non-interacting superparamagnets. The magnetic particle size is found to be about 8 nm with saturation magnetization about 18.1 emu/g. The blocking temperature (T(B)) of the nanoparticle assembly is found to be about 150 K as observed from dc and ac magnetization measurements. The frequency dependence of the blocking temperature (T(B)) is found to follow Vogel-Fulcher law. The associated characteristic time tau0 is found to be 10(-5) s. This value is different from that generally found for non-interacting superparamagnetic (SPM) systems (tau0 = 10(-9)-10(-10) s). PMID:23646726

  20. Magnetic properties of barium ferrite nanoparticles: Quantitative test of the Stoner-Wohlfarth theory for uniaxial single-domain magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Hong-yan; Wang, Jun; Li, Le; Aguilar, Victor; Zhao, Guo-meng

    2013-11-01

    We have successfully synthesized single-domain barium ferrite particles with uniaxial anisotropy. We have coated them with amorphous silica to reduce interparticle interactions so that the assembly of these particles behaves like a noninteracting randomly oriented uniaxial single-domain particle system, a prototype for the Stoner-Wohlfarth model. From the magnetic hysteresis loops of the particle system in a wide temperature range (10-700 K), we simultaneously determine the magnetic anisotropic field HK, the reduced remanence Mr/Ms, and the coercive field HC in the whole temperature range below the Curie temperature. These complete sets of data allow us to quantitatively test the Stoner-Wohlfarth theory and the agreement between experiment and theory is good.

  1. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E. (Kennewick, WA); Straalsund, Jerry L. (Kennewick, WA); Chin, Bryan A. (Auburn, AL)

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  2. Structural analysis of emerging ferrite: Doped nickel zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajinder; Kumar, Hitanshu; Singh, Ragini Raj; Barman, P. B.

    2015-08-01

    Ni0.6-xZn0.4CoxFe2O4 (x = 0, 0.033, 0.264) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method and annealed at 900°C. Structural properties of all prepared samples were examined with X-ray diffraction (XRD). The partial formation of hematite (?-Fe2O3) secondary phase with spinel phase cubic structure of undoped and cobalt doped nickel zinc ferrite was found by XRD peaks. The variation in crystallite size and other structural parameters with cobalt doping has been calculated for most prominent peak (113) of XRD and has been explained on the basis of cations ionic radii difference.

  3. Manganese uptake of imprinted polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-09-30

    Batch tests of manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C . Data on manganese uptake for two consecutive cycles are included.

  4. Bulk Synthesis of Monodisperse Ferrite Nanoparticles at Water-Organic Interfaces under Conventional and Microwave Hydrothermal Treatment and Their Surface Functionalization

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synthesis of monodisperse MFe2O4 (M=, Ni, Co, Mn) and ?-Fe2O3 nanoparticles at a water-toluene interface under conventional as well as microwave hydrothermal conditions using readily available nitrate or chloride salts and oleic acid as the dispersing agent is described. The ens...

  5. Pharmacokinetics of intravenously injected Tc-99m labeled ferrite nanobeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chao-Ming; Wang, Yuh-Feng; Guo, Yu-Feng; Wang, Li-Shin; Chuang, May-Haw; Cham, Thau-Ming

    2009-04-01

    We study the time varying biodistribution of ferrite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles upon in vivo injection. For this purpose, a novel process of directly labeling radioactive Tc-99m with ferrite nanoparticles was developed. The radiobeads serve as a tracer to provide information on the uptake of injected particles by organs. In the course of our study, Tc-99m labeled ferrite beads were intravenously injected into the tail vein of rats. The time course of changes in the radio-intensity of heart, lung, and liver could be achieved by real-time scintigraphic images. It was observed that the particle uptake by organs is very fast and completed within the first few minutes after intravenous injection. The pharmacokinetic behavior of the radiobead uptake was quantitatively described by a two-compartment model.

  6. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF MANGANESE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biological effects of manganese were studied in a town on the coast of Dalmatia in which a ferromanganese plant has been operating since before World War II. The study focused on the question of whether the exposure to manganese can cause a higher incidence of respiratory dis...

  7. Magnetic properties and microwave absorption in Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by low-temperature solid-state reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Gh. R.; Yousefi, M. H.; Abolhassani, M. R.; Manouchehri, S.; Keshavarz, M. H.; Fatahian, S.

    2011-03-01

    In this work, Mn0.7Zn0.3Fe2O4 and Ni0.7Zn0.3Fe2O4 nanoparticles with super-paramagnetic properties and size distribution from 10 to 52 nm were investigated. These particles were produced by a low-temperature solid-state reaction method without the ball-milling process. The size and morphology of the nanocrystallites were determined by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy methods. Magnetic measurements such as alternating gradient field magnetometers were used to justify the super-paramagnetic properties of these nanoparticles. Their microwave absorption in the range of 8-18 GHz was studied by a vector network analyzer. Responses of the device under tests were studied. Also, the percentage of the resin, the size and thickness of the mount were determined. The band width of 2.3 GHz was obtained with reflection-loss/written-loss of -16 dB around 10.4 GHz.

  8. Evolution of Microstructures During Austempering of Ductile Irons Alloyed with Manganese and Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Ranjan Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ajit Kumar

    2013-03-01

    The influences of relatively high manganese (0.45 through 1.0 wt pct) and copper (0.56 through 1.13 wt pct) contents on microstructure development and phase transformation in three austempered ductile irons have been studied. The experimental ductile irons alloyed with copper and manganese are found to be practically free from intercellular manganese segregation. This suggests that the positive segregation of manganese is largely neutralized by the negative segregation of copper when these alloying elements are added in appropriate proportions. The drop in unreacted austenite volume (UAV) with increasing austempering temperature and time is quite significant in irons alloyed with copper and manganese. The ausferrite morphology also undergoes a transition from lenticular to feathery appearance of increasing coarseness with the increasing austempering temperature and time. SEM micrographs of the austempered samples from the base alloy containing manganese only, as well as copper plus manganese-alloyed irons, clearly reveal the presence of some martensite along with retained austenite and ferrite. X-ray diffraction analysis also confirms the presence of these phases. SEM examination further reveals the presence of twinned martensite in the copper plus manganese-alloyed samples. The possibility of strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite during austempering heat treatment is suggested.

  9. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  10. The Synthesis of Novel Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles with Applications Towards Catalysis

    E-print Network

    McMurdo, Meredith Joanne

    2010-01-01

    electrode (nanoparticle-modified nickel foam) was suspendednickel foam electrodes modified with the three ferrite nanoparticlenanoparticle modified anodes. Linear scan voltammograms were collected on nickel

  11. Manganese, the stress reliever.

    PubMed

    Latour, J-M

    2015-01-01

    Convergent evidence has emerged over the past decade to highlight the role of manganese as a key player in the defenses that many organisms are building to fight oxidative stress. For redox processes replacing iron by manganese requires adaptation at different levels. The aim of this perspective is to summarize recent important observations and to analyze the implications of the present knowledge for resolving future issues. PMID:25434324

  12. Ferrite logic reliability study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, J. A.; Clark, C. B.

    1973-01-01

    Development and use of digital circuits called all-magnetic logic are reported. In these circuits the magnetic elements and their windings comprise the active circuit devices in the logic portion of a system. The ferrite logic device belongs to the all-magnetic class of logic circuits. The FLO device is novel in that it makes use of a dual or bimaterial ferrite composition in one physical ceramic body. This bimaterial feature, coupled with its potential for relatively high speed operation, makes it attractive for high reliability applications. (Maximum speed of operation approximately 50 kHz.)

  13. An in vivo evaluation of acute toxicity of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles in larval-embryo Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farooq; Liu, Xiaoyi; Zhou, Ying; Yao, Hongzhou

    2015-09-01

    The broad spectrum applications of CoFe2O4 NPs have attracted much interest in medicine, environment and industry, resulting in exceedingly higher exposures to humans and environmental systems in succeeding days. Their health effects and potential biological impacts need to be determined for risk assessment. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to environmentally relevant doses of nano-CoFe2O4 (mean diameter of 40nm) with a concentration range of 10-500?M for 96h. Acute toxic end points were evaluated by survival rate, malformation, hatching delay, heart dysfunction and tail flexure of larvae. Dose and time dependent developmental toxicity with severe cardiac edema, down regulation of metabolism, hatching delay and tail/spinal cord flexure and apoptosis was observed. The biochemical changes were evaluated by ROS, Catalase (CAT), Lipid peroxidation (LPO), Acid phophatase (AP) and Glutatione s- transferase (GST). An Agglomeration of NPs and dissolution of ions induces severe mechanical damage to membranes and oxidative stress. Severe apoptosis of cells in the head, heart and tail region with inhibition of catalase confirms ROS induced acute toxicity with increasing concentration. Increased activity of GST and AP at lower concentrations of CoFe2O4 NPs demonstrates the severe oxidative stress. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated the weak interactions of NPs with BSA and slight changes in ?-helix structure. In addition, CoFe2O4 NPs at lower concentrations do not show any considerable interference with assay components and analytical instruments. The results are possible elucidation of pathways of toxicity induced by these particles, as well as contributing in defining the protocols for risk assessment of these nanoparticles. PMID:26197244

  14. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  15. Effect of filler loading of nickel zinc ferrite on the tensile properties of PLA nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahdan, Dalila; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj

    2013-05-01

    The mechanical strength of magnetic polymer nanocomposite (MPNC) of nickel zinc (NiZn) ferrite nanoparticles incorporated with polylactic acid (PLA) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as compatibilizer is reported. The matrix was prepared from PLA and LNR in the ratio of 90:10. The MPNC were prepared at constant mixing temperature at 180°C, mixing time of 15 min. and mixing speed of 100 rpm. In order to achieve a good dispersion of NiZn ferrite in the matrix, firstly an ultrasonic treatment had been employed to mix the LNR and NiZn ferrite for 1 hour. The MPNC of PLA/LNR/NiZn ferrite then were prepared via Thermo Haake internal mixer using melt-blending method from different filler loading from 1-5 wt% NiZn ferrite. The result of tensile tests showed that as the filler loading increases the tensile strength also increases until an optimum value of filler loading was reached. The Young's modulus, tensile strength and elongation at break have also increased. The study proves that NiZn ferrite is excellent reinforcement filler in PLA matrix. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were meant to show the homogeneity dispersion of nanoparticles within the matrix and to confirm the elemental composition of NiZn ferrites-PLA/LNR nanocomposites respectively.

  16. Influence of pH on the structural and magnetic behavior of cobalt ferrite synthesized by sol-gel auto-combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakade, S. G.; Kambale, R. C.; Kolekar, Y. D.

    2015-06-01

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) shown to be promising candidate for applications such as high-density magnetic recording, enhanced memory storage, magnetic fluids and catalysts. Utility of ferrite nanoparticles depends on its size, dispersibility in solutions, and magnetic properties. We have investigated the structural properties of synthesized cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by sol gel auto combustion for uncontrolled, acidic, neutral and basic pH values. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study confirms the cubic spinel phase formation with lattice constant 8.38 Å. In this study, we have optimized the pH value to synthesize homogenous cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic behavior. The surface morphology has been investigated by employing SEM images and the confirmation of spinel ferrite was also supported by using IR spectroscopy. Magnetic measurements for CoFe2O4 compositions (with pH <1, pH = 3, 7, 10) were investigated using VSM measurements.

  17. Size dependence of magnetorheological properties of cobalt ferrite ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhika, B.; Sahoo, Rasmita; Srinath, S.

    2015-06-01

    Cobalt Ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method at reaction temperatures of 40°C and 80°C. X-Ray diffraction studies confirm cubic phase formation. The average crystallite sizes were found to be ˜30nm and ˜48nm for 40°C sample and 80°C sample respectively. Magnetic properties measured using vibrating sample magnetometer show higher coercivety and magnetization for sample prepared at 80°C. Magnetorheological properties of CoFe2O4 ferrofluids were measured and studied.

  18. The Formation and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Mn-Ferrite from Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Okasha, N.; Nabeel, D.

    2013-03-01

    Nanocrystalline manganese ferrite of MnxFe3-xO4 with x = 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 was prepared by chemical co-precipitation method. The as prepared samples were characterized by XRD and magnetization. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the inverse spinel structure of ferrites particles with size ranged from 12 to 30 nm. The Magnetic properties such as typical saturation magnetization (Ms), remanence magnetization (Mr) and coercive field (Hc) measured at room temperature along with doped at different Mn contents show that the maximum Mn ions content doped into ferrite lattices is x = 0.4 which agree well with the magnetic susceptibility (?M) measurements and the high magnetic parameters.

  19. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  20. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S. (West Richland, WA); Ghoniem, Nasr M. (Granada Hills, CA); Powell, Roger W. (Pasco, WA)

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  1. Manganese, Metallogenium, and Martian Microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, L. Y.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese could easily be considered an abundant element in the Martian regolith, assuming that the composition of martian meteorites reflects the composition of the planet. Mineralogical analyses of 5 SNC meteorites have revealed an average manganese oxide concentration of 0.48%, relative to the 0.1% concentration of manganese found in the Earth's crust. On the Earth, the accumulation of manganese oxides in oceans, soils, rocks, sedimentary ores, fresh water systems, and hydrothermal vents can be largely attributed to microbial activity. Manganese is also a required trace nutrient for most life forms and participates in many critical enzymatic reactions such as photosynthesis. The wide-spread process of bacterial manganese cycling on Earth suggests that manganese is an important element to both geology and biology. Furthermore, there is evidence that bacteria can be fossilized within manganese ores, implying that manganese beds may be good repositories for preserved biomarkers. A particular genus of bacteria, known historically as Metallogenium, can form star-shaped manganese oxide minerals (called metallogenium) through the action of manganese oxide precipitation along its surface. Fossilized structures that resemble metallogenium have been found in Precambrian sedimentary formations and in Cretaceous-Paleogene cherts. The Cretaceous-Paleogene formations are highly enriched in manganese and have concentrations of trace elements (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Co) similar to modern-day manganese oxide deposits in marine environments. The appearance of metallogenium-like fossils associated with manganese deposits suggests that bacteria may be preserved within the minerals that they form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Energetic basis of catalytic activity of layered nanophase calcium manganese oxides for water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Birkner, Nancy; Nayeri, Sara; Pashaei, Babak; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Casey, William H.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Previous measurements show that calcium manganese oxide nanoparticles are better water oxidation catalysts than binary manganese oxides (Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnO2). The probable reasons for such enhancement involve a combination of factors: The calcium manganese oxide materials have a layered structure with considerable thermodynamic stability and a high surface area, their low surface energy suggests relatively loose binding of H2O on the internal and external surfaces, and they possess mixed-valent manganese with internal oxidation enthalpy independent of the Mn3+/Mn4+ ratio and much smaller in magnitude than the Mn2O3-MnO2 couple. These factors enhance catalytic ability by providing easy access for solutes and water to active sites and facile electron transfer between manganese in different oxidation states. PMID:23667149

  3. Effect of Ti-containing inclusions on the nucleation of acicular ferrite and mechanical properties of multipass weld metals.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Hosseini, M; Arabian, N; Rahimi, E

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, the influence of Ti-containing inclusions on the development of acicular ferrite microstructure and mechanical properties in the multipass weld metals has been studied. Shielded metal arc weld deposits were prepared by varying titanium content in the range of 0.003-0.021%. The variation in the titanium content was obtained by the addition of different amounts of titanium oxide nanoparticles to the electrode coating. The dispersion of titanium oxide nanoparticles, composition of inclusions, microstructural analysis, tensile properties and Charpy impact toughness were evaluated. As the amount of Ti-containing inclusions in the weld metal was increased, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed from the grain boundary allotriomorphic ferrite structure to acicular ferrite with the intragranular nucleation of ferrite on the Ti-containing inclusions, and the mechanical properties were improved. This improvement is attributable to the increased percentage of acicular ferrite due to the uniform dispersion of Ti-containing inclusions and the pinning force of oxide nanoparticles against the growth of allotriomorphic ferrite and Widmanstätten ferrite from the austenite grain boundaries. PMID:23238108

  4. CONVERSATION OF DISSOLVED MANGANESE TO PARTICULATE MANGANESE DURING DIATOM BLOOM: EFFECTS ON THE MANGANESE CYCLE IN THE MERL MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conversion of dissolved manganese to particulate manganese occurred during a minor diatom bloom during August and September 1978 in the MERL microcosms. Correlations between chlorophyll a and particulate manganese suggest that 29 moles Mn were transferred to the particulate phase...

  5. Wear-resistant and electromagnetic absorbing behaviors of oleic acid post-modified ferrite-filled epoxy resin composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zang, Chongguang; Jiao, Qingjie

    2015-03-01

    The post-modified Mn-Zn ferrite was prepared by grafting oleic acid on the surface of Mn-Zn ferrite to inhibit magnetic nanoparticle aggregation. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the particle surfaces. The friction and electromagnetic absorbing properties of a thin coating fabricated by dispersing ferrite into epoxy resin (EP) were investigated. The roughness of the coating and water contact angle were measured using the VEECO and water contact angle meter. Friction tests were conducted using a stainless-steel bearing ball and a Rockwell diamond tip, respectively. The complex permittivity and complex permeability of the composite coating were studied in the low frequency (10 MHz-1.5 GHz). Surface modified ferrites are found to improve magnetic particles dispersion in EP resulting in significant compatibility between inorganic and organic materials. Results also indicate that modified ferrite/EP coatings have a lower roughness average value and higher water contact angle than original ferrite/EP coatings. The enhanced tribological properties of the modified ferrite/EP coatings can be seen from the increased coefficient value. The composite coatings with modified ferrite are observed to exhibit better reflection loss compared with the coatings with original ferrite.

  6. Novel combustion route of synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline mixed ferrites of Ni-Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadharsini, P.; Pradeep, A.; Chandrasekaran, G.

    2009-06-01

    A novel combustion method of synthesis has been employed in this study for the preparation of nanoparticles of Ni-Zn ferrites. The preparation method is simple yet effective and its novelty lies in the direct mixing of reactants and the fuel. The structural and morphological studies on the nanoparticles of Ni-Zn ferrites have been carried out using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The values of grain size of the ferrites obtained using the Scherrer's formula are in the range between 10 and 20 nm. The mean value of X-ray density of the Ni-Zn ferrites is around 5343 Kg/m 3, which is more than the one experimentally observed for their bulk counterparts. The distribution of cations has been proposed theoretically for each concentration of Ni-Zn ferrite with reference to their respective experimental lattice constant values. Room-temperature magnetic measurements are carried out using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) with a view to understand the impact of the nano-regime on the magnetic parameters. The observed values of magnetization are in the range from 4 to 26 emu/g which is lower than that of bulk particles of Ni-Zn ferrite.

  7. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Identity. The color additive manganese violet is a violet pigment obtained by reacting phosphoric acid, ammonium dihydrogen...and manganese dioxide at temperatures above 450 °F. The pigment is a manganese ammonium pyrophosphate complex having the...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate. (b)...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate. (b)...

  15. Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz, Mohsen K.; Vasilevskiy, Dimitri; Masut, Remo A.; Turenne, Sylvain

    2014-06-01

    Nanostructured bulk materials are regarded as a means of enhancing the performance of thermoelectric (TE) materials and devices. Powder metallurgy has the distinct advantage over conventional synthesis that it can start directly from nanosized particles. However, further processing, for example extrusion, usually requires elevated temperatures, which lead to grain growth. We have found that introduction of semiconductor nanoparticles of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a well-known solid lubricant, suppresses grain growth in bismuth telluride-based alloys, thus improving the extrusion process. Scanning electron microscope images show that adding MoS2 particles at concentrations of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 wt% to p-type (Bi0.2Sb0.8)2Te3, under otherwise identical extrusion conditions, reduces average grain size by a factor of four. Scherer's formula applied to x-ray diffraction data indicates that average crystallite sizes (˜17 nm) of powders are not significantly different from those of alloys extruded with MoS2 (˜18 nm), which is in stark contrast with those for conventional alloy (Bi0.2Sb0.8)2Te3 extruded under the same conditions (˜80 nm). Harman measurements of TE properties reveal a decrease of the thermal conductivity accompanied by reduction of the room-temperature figure of merit ( ZT) from 0.9 to 0.7, because of a lower power factor. Above 370 K, however, the performance of alloys containing MoS2 surpasses that of (Bi0.2Sb0.8)2Te3, with reduction of the thermal conductivity which is more significant at temperatures above the cross point of the ZT values.

  16. Structural, morphological, dielectrical and magnetic properties of Mn substituted cobalt ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, S. P.; Shinde, S. S.; Kadam, A. A.; Rajpure, K. Y.

    2013-09-01

    The Co1-xMnxFe2O4 (0 <= x <= 0.5) ferrite system is synthesized by using an auto combustion technique using metal nitrates. The influence of Mn substitution on the structural, electrical, impedance and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite is reported. X-ray diffraction patterns of the prepared samples confirm that the Bragg's peak belongs to a spinel cubic crystal structure. The lattice constant of cobalt ferrite increases with the increase in Mn content. The microstructural study is carried out by using the SEM technique and the average grain size continues to increase with increasing manganese content. AC conductivity analysis suggests that the conduction is due to small polaron hopping. DC electrical resistivity decreases with increasing temperature for a Co1-xMnxFe2O4 system showing semiconducting behavior. The activation energy is found to be higher in the paramagnetic region than the ferromagnetic region. Curie temperature decreases with Mn substitution in the host ferrite system. Dielectric dispersion having Maxwell—Wagner-type interfacial polarization has been observed for cobalt ferrite samples. Magnetic properties have been studied by measuring M—H plots. The saturation and remanent magnetization increases with Mn substitution.

  17. Electrical and optical properties of nickel ferrite/polyaniline nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Khairy, M; Gouda, M E

    2015-07-01

    Polyaniline-NiFe2O4 nanocomposites (PANI-NiFe2O4) with different contents of NiFe2O4 (2.5, 5 and 50 wt%) were prepared via in situ chemical oxidation polymerization, while the nanoparticles nickel ferrite were synthesized by sol-gel method. The prepared samples were characterized using some techniques such as Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Moreover, the electrical conductivity and optical properties of the nanocomposites were investigated. Pure (PANI) and the composites containing 2.5 and 5 wt% NiFe2O4 showed amorphous structures, while the one with 50 wt% NiFe2O4 showed a spinel crystalline structure. The SEM images of the composites showed different aggregations for the different nickel ferrite contents. FTIR spectra revealed to the formation of some interactions between the PANI macromolecule and the NiFe2O4 nanoparticles, while the thermal analyses indicated an increase in the composites stability for samples with higher NiFe2O4 nanoparticles contents. The electrical conductivity of PANI-NiFe2O4 nanocomposite was found to increase with the rise in NiFe2O4 nanoparticle content, probably due to the polaron/bipolaron formation. The optical absorption experiments illustrate direct transition with an energy band gap of Eg  = 1.0 for PANI-NiFe2O4 nanocomposite. PMID:26199745

  18. Electrical and optical properties of nickel ferrite/polyaniline nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, M.; Gouda, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Polyaniline–NiFe2O4 nanocomposites (PANI–NiFe2O4) with different contents of NiFe2O4 (2.5, 5 and 50 wt%) were prepared via in situ chemical oxidation polymerization, while the nanoparticles nickel ferrite were synthesized by sol–gel method. The prepared samples were characterized using some techniques such as Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Moreover, the electrical conductivity and optical properties of the nanocomposites were investigated. Pure (PANI) and the composites containing 2.5 and 5 wt% NiFe2O4 showed amorphous structures, while the one with 50 wt% NiFe2O4 showed a spinel crystalline structure. The SEM images of the composites showed different aggregations for the different nickel ferrite contents. FTIR spectra revealed to the formation of some interactions between the PANI macromolecule and the NiFe2O4 nanoparticles, while the thermal analyses indicated an increase in the composites stability for samples with higher NiFe2O4 nanoparticles contents. The electrical conductivity of PANI–NiFe2O4 nanocomposite was found to increase with the rise in NiFe2O4 nanoparticle content, probably due to the polaron/bipolaron formation. The optical absorption experiments illustrate direct transition with an energy band gap of Eg = 1.0 for PANI–NiFe2O4 nanocomposite. PMID:26199745

  19. Magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of Cu substituted Co-ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Sekhar, B.; Rao, G. S. N.; Caltun, O. F.; Dhana Lakshmi, B.; Parvatheeswara Rao, B.; Subba Rao, P. S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Copper substituted cobalt ferrite, Co1-xCuxFe2O4 (x=0.00-0.25), nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel autocombustion method. X-ray diffraction analysis on the samples was done to confirm the cubic spinel structures and Scherrer equation was used to estimate the mean crystallite size as 40 nm. Using the obtained nanoparticles, fabrication of the sintered pellets was done by standard ceramic technique. Magnetic and magnetostrictive measurements on the samples were made by strain gauge and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques, respectively. Maximum magnetostriction and strain derivative values were deduced from the field dependent magnetostriction curves while the magnetic parameters such as saturation magnetization (51.7-61.9 emu/g) and coercivity (1045-1629 Oe) on the samples were estimated from the obtained magnetic hysteresis loops. Curie temperature values (457-315 °C) were measured by a built in laboratory set-up. Copper substituted cobalt ferrites have shown improved strain derivative values as compared to the pure cobalt ferrite and thus making them suitable for stress sensing applications. The results have been explained on the basis of cationic distributions, strength of exchange interactions and net decreased anisotropic contributions due to the increased presence of Co2+ ions in B-sites as a result of Cu substitutions.

  20. Effect of austempering time on mechanical properties of a low manganese austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putatunda, Susil K.; Gadicherla, Pavan K.

    2000-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of austempering time on the resultant microstructure and the room-temperature mechanical properties of an unalloyed and low manganese ductile cast iron with initially ferritic as-cast structure. The effect of austempering time on the plane strain fracture toughness of this material was also studied. Compact tension and round cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from unalloyed ductile cast iron with low manganese content and with a ferritic as-cast (solidified) structure. These specimens were then austempered in the upper (371 °C) and lower (260 °C) bainitic temperature ranges for different time periods, ranging from 30 min. to 4 h. Microstructural features such as type of bainite and the volume fraction of ferrite and austenite and its carbon content were evaluated by X-ray diffraction to examine the influence of microstructure on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of this material. The results of the present investigation indicate that for this low manganese austempered ductile iron (ADI), upper ausferritic microstructures exhibit higher fracture toughness than lower ausferritic microstructures. Yield and tensile strength of the material was found to increase with an increase in austempering time in a lower bainitic temperature range, whereas in the upper bainitic temperature range, time has no significant effect on the mechanical properties. A retained austenite content between 30 to 35% was found to provide optimum fracture toughness. Fracture toughness was found to increase with the parameter ( X?C?/d)1/2, where X? is the volume fraction of austenite, C? is the carbon content of the austenite, and d is the mean free path of dislocation motion in ferrite.

  1. Facile synthesis of cobalt ferrite nanotubes using bacterial nanocellulose as template.

    PubMed

    Menchaca-Nal, S; Londoño-Calderón, C L; Cerrutti, P; Foresti, M L; Pampillo, L; Bilovol, V; Candal, R; Martínez-García, R

    2016-02-10

    A facile method for the preparation of cobalt ferrite nanotubes by use of bacterial cellulose nanoribbons as a template is described. The proposed method relays on a simple coprecipitation operation, which is a technique extensively used for the synthesis of nanoparticles (either isolated or as aggregates) but not for the synthesis of nanotubes. The precursors employed in the synthesis are chlorides, and the procedure is carried out at low temperature (90°C). By the method proposed a homogeneous distribution of cobalt ferrite nanotubes with an average diameter of 217nm in the bacterial nanocellulose (BC) aerogel (3%) was obtained. The obtained nanotubes are formed by 26-102nm cobalt ferrite clusters of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with diameters in the 9-13nm interval. The nanoparticles that form the nanotubes showed to have a certain crystalline disorder, which could be attributed in a greater extent to the small crystallite size, and, in a lesser extent, to microstrains existing in the crystalline lattice. The BC-templated-CoFe2O4 nanotubes exhibited magnetic behavior at room temperature. The magnetic properties showed to be influenced by a fraction of nanoparticles in superparamagnetic state. PMID:26686185

  2. Probing the Chemical Stability of Mixed Ferrites: Implications for MR Contrast Agent Design

    PubMed Central

    Schultz-Sikma, Elise A.; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Ma, Qing; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Nanomaterials with mixed composition, in particular magnetic spinel ferrites, are emerging as efficient contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many factors, including size, composition, atomic structure, and surface properties are crucial in the design of such nanoparticle-based probes due to their influence on the magnetic properties. Silica-coated iron oxide (IO-SiO2) and cobalt ferrite (CoIO-SiO2) nanoparticles were synthesized using standard high temperature thermal decomposition and base-catalyzed water-in-oil microemulsion techniques. Under neutral aqueous conditions, it was found that 50–75% of the cobalt content in the CoIO-SiO2 nanoparticles leached out of the core structure. Leaching caused a 7.2-fold increase in longitudinal relaxivity and an increase in the saturation magnetization from ~48 emu/g core to ~65 emu/g core. X-ray absorption fine structure studies confirmed that the atomic structure of the ferrite core was altered following leaching, while TEM and DLS confirmed that the morphology and size of the nanoparticle remained unchanged. The CoIO-SiO2 nanoparticles converted from a partially inverted spinel cation arrangement (unleached state) to an inverse spinel arrangement (leached state). The control IO-SiO2 nanoparticles remained stable with no change in structure and negligible changes in magnetic behavior. This detailed analysis highlights how important understanding the properties of nanomaterials is in the development of reliable agents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:21603070

  3. Hayes, Michael by Diarmaid Ferriter

    E-print Network

    with the personality of de Valera, but firmly believed in Michael Collins's (qv) interpretation of the treaty; he alsoHayes, Michael by Diarmaid Ferriter Hayes, Michael (1889­1976), politician and academic, was born 1

  4. Rapidly reversible redox transformation in nanophase manganese oxides at room temperature triggered by changes in hydration

    PubMed Central

    Birkner, Nancy; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Chemisorption of water onto anhydrous nanophase manganese oxide surfaces promotes rapidly reversible redox phase changes as confirmed by calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and titration for manganese average oxidation state. Surface reduction of bixbyite (Mn2O3) to hausmannite (Mn3O4) occurs in nanoparticles under conditions where no such reactions are seen or expected on grounds of bulk thermodynamics in coarse-grained materials. Additionally, transformation does not occur on nanosurfaces passivated by at least 2% coverage of what is likely an amorphous manganese oxide layer. The transformation is due to thermodynamic control arising from differences in surface energies of the two phases (Mn2O3 and Mn3O4) under wet and dry conditions. Such reversible and rapid transformation near room temperature may affect the behavior of manganese oxides in technological applications and in geologic and environmental settings. PMID:24733903

  5. Structural studies with the use of XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy of new high Manganese steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonska, Magdalena Barbara

    2014-04-01

    New high-strength austenitic and austenitic-ferritic manganese steels represent a significant potential in applications for structural components in the automotive and railway industry due to the excellent combination of high mechanical properties and good plasticity. They belong to the group of steels called AHSS (Advanced High Strength Steels) and UHSS (Ultra High Strength Steels). Application of this combination of properties allows a reduction in the weight of vehicles by the use of reduced cross-section components, and thus to reduce fuel consumption. The development and implementation of industrial production of such interesting and promising steel and its use as construction material requires an improvement of their casting properties and susceptibility to deformation in plastic working conditions. In this work, XRD, Transmission Mössbauer Spectroscopy and Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy were employed in a study of the new high-manganese steels with a austenite and austenite-ferrite structure. The influence of the plastic deformation parameters on the changes in the structure, distribution of ferrite and disclosure of the presence of carbides was determined. The analysis of phase transformations in various times using CEMS method made possible to reveal their fine details.

  6. Structure and morphology of spinel MFe2O4 (M=Fe, Co, Ni) nanoparticles chemically synthesized from heterometallic complexes.

    PubMed

    Naidek, Karine Priscila; Bianconi, Flavia; da Rocha, Tulio Costa Rizuti; Zanchet, Daniela; Bonacin, Juliano Alves; Novak, Miguel Alexandre; Vaz, Maria das Graças Fialho; Winnischofer, Herbert

    2011-06-01

    We synthesized magnetic spinel ferrites from trimetallic single-source precursors. Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) ferrite nanoparticles in the range of 9-25 nm were synthesized by solvothermal decomposition of trimetallic acetate complex precursors in benzyl ether in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine, using 1,2-dodecanediol as the reducing agent. For comparison, spinel ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by stoichiometric mixtures of metal acetate or acetylacetonate salts. The nanoparticles (NP) were characterized by TEM, DLS, powder XRD, and Raman spectroscopy; and their magnetic properties were characterized by ZFC-FC and M(H) measurements. The ferrite-NP were more homogeneous and had a narrower size distribution when trimetallic complexes were used as precursors. As a consequence, the magnetic properties of these ferrite-NP are closer to the aimed room temperature superparamagnetic behavior, than are those of other ferrites obtained by a mixture of salts. PMID:21435649

  7. Tellurium content of marine manganese oxides and other manganese oxides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lakin, H.W.; Thompson, C.E.; Davidson, D.F.

    1963-01-01

    Tellurium in amounts ranging from 5 to 125 parts per million was present in all of 12 samples of manganese oxide nodules from the floor of the Pacific and Indian oceans. These samples represent the first recognized points of high tellurium concentration in a sedimentary cycle. The analyses may lend support to the theory that the minor-element content of seafloor manganese nodules is derived from volcanic emanations.

  8. Manganese oxidation model for rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Glen W.; Kim, Byung R.; Roberts, Philip J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of manganese in natural waters (>0.05 mg/L) degrades water-supply quality. A model was devised to predict the variation of manganese concentrations in river water released from an impoundment with the distance downstream. The model is one-dimensional and was calibrated using dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, pH, manganese, and hydraulic data collected in the Duck River, Tennessee. The results indicated that the model can predict manganese levels under various conditions. The model was then applied to the Chattahoochee River, Georgia. Discrepancies between observed and predicted may be due to inadequate pH data, precipitation of sediment particles, unsteady flow conditions in the Chattahoochee River, inaccurate rate expressions for the low pH conditions, or their combinations.

  9. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  10. Magnetic, dielectric and thermal stability of Ni-Zn ferrite-epoxy composite thin films for electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, M. S.; Serena Saw, W. P.; Mariatti, M.

    2012-03-01

    The fabrication of flexible epoxy thin film composites was investigated in this study. Neat epoxy with a resin-to-hardener ratio of 100:32 exhibits higher tensile properties and thermal stability than neat epoxy with a resin-to-hardener ratio of 100:45. In addition, the thermal stability of epoxy composites decreased as the NiZn ferrite content in the epoxy was increased. This result could be caused by the catalytic effect of ferrite. Vibration sample magnetometer results revealed the ferrimagnetic behavior of the ferrite-filled epoxy composites. The degree of saturation magnetization of the epoxy composites increased with the addition of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles. Dielectric tests were performed at room temperature and at frequencies ranging from 104 Hz to 106 Hz. These findings indicate that the dielectric constant and the dielectric loss are dependent on the filler concentration and test frequency.

  11. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...7773-01-5) is a pink, translucent, crystalline product. It is also known as manganese dichloride. It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2 ), or reduced manganese ore in hydrochloric acid. The resulting solution...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity...Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  9. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity...Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  10. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity...Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  11. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity...Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  12. Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese 

    E-print Network

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20

    . This is caused by colloidal iron?iron that does not form particles large enough to precipitate. Manganese usually is dissolved in water, although some shallow wells contain colloidal manganese that gives water a black tint. L-5451 2-04 Drinking Water Problems... mg/L combined concentrations of iron and manganese) Dissolved (colloidal) iron or Water is reddish or blackish Chemical oxidation and manganese (organic color from the tap and color filtration complexes of these minerals) remains longer than 24 hours...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2 ·4H2 O, CAS Reg. No....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O,...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O,...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT... GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7773-01-5) is a...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. Manganese depresses rat heart muscle respiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has previously been reported that moderately high dietary manganese (Mn) in combination with marginal magnesium (Mg) resulted in ultrastructural damage to heart mitochondria. Manganese may replace Mg in biological functions, including the role of enzyme cofactor. Manganese may accumulate and subs...

  5. Exsolution of Fe and SrO Nanorods and Nanoparticles from Lanthanum Strontium Ferrite La0.6Sr0.4FeO3?? Materials by Hydrogen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Formation of uniform Fe and SrO rods as well as nanoparticles following controlled reduction of La0.6Sr0.4FeO3?? (LSF) and Ni-LSF samples in dry and moist hydrogen is studied by aberration-corrected electron microscopy. Metallic Fe and SrO precipitate from the perovskite lattice as rods of several tenths of nm and thicknesses up to 20 nm. Based on a model of Fe whisker growth following reduction of pure iron oxides, Fe rod exsolution from LSF proceeds via rate-limiting lattice oxygen removal. This favors the formation of single iron metal nuclei at the perovskite surface, subsequently growing as isolated rods. The latter is only possible upon efficient removal of reduction-induced water and, subsequently, reduction of Fe +III/+IV to Fe(0). If water remains in the system, no reduction or rod formation occurs. In contrast, formation of SrO rods following reduction in dry hydrogen is a catalytic process aided by Ni particles. It bears significant resemblance to surface diffusion-controlled carbon whisker growth on Ni, leading to similar extrusion rods and filaments. In addition to SrO rod growth, the exsolution of Fe nanoparticles and, subsequently, Ni–Fe alloy particles is observed. The latter have also been observed under static hydrogen reduction. Under strict control of the experimental parameters, the presented data therefore open an attractive chemically driven pathway to metal nanoarchitectures beyond the formation of “simple” nanoparticles. PMID:26435764

  6. Development of a monolithic ferrite memory array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.; Bhiwandker, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the development and testing of ferrite monolithic memory arrays are presented. This development required the synthesis of ferrite materials having special magnetic and physical characteristics and the development of special processes; (1) for making flexible sheets (laminae) of the ferrite composition, (2) for embedding conductors in ferrite, and (3) bonding ferrite laminae together to form a monolithic structure. Major problems encountered in each of these areas and their solutions are discussed. Twenty-two full-size arrays were fabricated and fired during the development of these processes. The majority of these arrays were tested for their memory characteristics as well as for their physical characteristics and the results are presented. The arrays produced during this program meet the essential goals and demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating monolithic ferrite memory arrays by the processes developed.

  7. Effects of Manganese Content on Solidification Structures, Thermal Properties, and Phase Transformation Characteristics in Fe-Mn-Al-C Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Wang, Yu-Nan; Ruan, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Zhu, Kai; Fan, Zheng-Jie; Wang, Ying-Chun; Li, Cheng-Bin; Jiang, Xiao-Fang

    2015-04-01

    To assist developments of the continuous-casting technology of Fe-Mn-Al-C steels, the solidification structures and the thermal properties of Fe-Mn-Al-C steel ingots with different manganese contents have been investigated and the phase transformation characteristics have been revealed by FactSage (CRCT-ThermFact Inc., Montréal, Canada). The results show that the thermal conductivity of the 0Mn steel is the highest, whereas the thermal conductivity of the 8Mn steel is slightly higher than that of the 17Mn steel. Increasing the manganese content promotes a columnar solidification structure and coarse grains in steel. With the increase of manganese content, the mass fraction of austenite phase is increased. Finally, a single austenite phase is formed in the 17Mn steel. The mean thermal expansion coefficients of the steels are in the range from 1.3 × 10-5 to 2.3 × 10-5 K-1, and these values increase with the increase of manganese content. The ductility of the 17Mn steel and the 8Mn steel are higher than 40 pct in the temperature range from 873 K to 1473 K (600 °C to 1200 °C), and the cracking during the straightening operation should be avoided. However, the ductility of the 0Mn steel is lower than 40 pct at 973 K and 1123 K (700 °C and 850 °C), which indicates that the temperature of the straightening operation during the continuous-casting process should be above 1173 K (900 °C). Manganese has the effect of enlarging the austenite phase region and reducing the ?-ferrite phase region and ?-ferrite phase region. At the 2.1 mass pct aluminum level, the precipitate temperature of AlN is high. Thus, the formed AlN is too coarse to deteriorate the hot ductility of steel.

  8. Probing the Chemical Stability of Mixed Ferrites: Implications for Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agent Design

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz-Sikma, Elise A.; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Ma, Qing; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2011-09-16

    Nanomaterials with mixed composition, in particular magnetic spinel ferrites, are emerging as efficient contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Many factors, including size, composition, atomic structure, and surface properties, are crucial in the design of such nanoparticle-based probes because of their influence on the magnetic properties. Silica-coated iron oxide (IO-SiO{sub 2}) and cobalt ferrite (CoIO-SiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were synthesized using standard high-temperature thermal decomposition and base-catalyzed water-in-oil microemulsion techniques. Under neutral aqueous conditions, it was found that 50-75% of the cobalt content in the CoIO-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles leached out of the core structure. Leaching caused a 7.2-fold increase in the longitudinal relaxivity and an increase in the saturation magnetization from {approx}48 to {approx}65 emu/g of the core. X-ray absorption fine structure studies confirmed that the atomic structure of the ferrite core was altered following leaching, while transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering confirmed that the morphology and size of the nanoparticle remained unchanged. The CoIO-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles converted from a partially inverted spinel cation arrangement (unleached state) to an inverse spinel arrangement (leached state). The control IO-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles remained stable with no change in the structure and negligible changes in the magnetic behavior. This detailed analysis highlights how important understanding the properties of nanomaterials is in the development of reliable agents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  9. Ferrite-guided cyclotron-resonance maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerby, Eli; Kesar, A.; Aharony, A.; Breitmeier, G.

    2002-06-01

    The concept of a cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) with a ferrite loading incorporated in its waveguide is proposed. The CRM interaction occurs between the rotating electron beam and the em wave propagating along a longitudinally magnetized ferrite medium. The ferrite anisotropic permeability resembles the CRM susceptibility in many aspects, and particularly in their similar response to the axial magnetic field (the ferrite susceptibility can be regarded as a passive analog of the active CRM interaction). The ferrite loading slows down the phase velocity of the em wave and thus the axial (Weibel) mechanism of the CRM interaction dominates. The ferrite loading enables also a mechanism of spectral tunability for CRM's. The ferrite loading is proposed, therefore, as a useful ingredient for high-power CRM devices. A linear model of the combined ferrite-guided CRM interaction reveals its useful features. Future schemes may also incorporate ferrite sections functioning as isolators, gyrators, or phase shifters within the CRM device itself for selective suppression of backward waves and spurious oscillations, and for gain and efficiency enhancement.

  10. Ferrite-guided cyclotron-resonance maser.

    PubMed

    Jerby, Eli; Kesar, A; Aharony, A; Breitmeier, G

    2002-06-01

    The concept of a cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) with a ferrite loading incorporated in its waveguide is proposed. The CRM interaction occurs between the rotating electron beam and the em wave propagating along a longitudinally magnetized ferrite medium. The ferrite anisotropic permeability resembles the CRM susceptibility in many aspects, and particularly in their similar response to the axial magnetic field (the ferrite susceptibility can be regarded as a passive analog of the active CRM interaction). The ferrite loading slows down the phase velocity of the em wave and thus the axial (Weibel) mechanism of the CRM interaction dominates. The ferrite loading enables also a mechanism of spectral tunability for CRM's. The ferrite loading is proposed, therefore, as a useful ingredient for high-power CRM devices. A linear model of the combined ferrite-guided CRM interaction reveals its useful features. Future schemes may also incorporate ferrite sections functioning as isolators, gyrators, or phase shifters within the CRM device itself for selective suppression of backward waves and spurious oscillations, and for gain and efficiency enhancement. PMID:12188841

  11. High frequency AC response, DC resistivity and magnetic studies of holmium substituted Ni-ferrite: A novel electromagnetic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervaiz, Erum; Gul, I. H.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles of holmium substituted nickel ferrites (NiHoxFe2-xO4) with x ranging from 0.0 to 0.15 have been prepared by the sol-gel auto-combustion method. Structural and morphology studies have been performed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). XRD patterns revealed the formation of pure spinel phase ferrites without any impurity phase. Lattice parameter increases along with a decrease in crystallite size with increasing the concentration of Ho3+ in the parent nickel ferrite due to large ionic radius of Ho3+ (0.901 Å) as compared to Fe3+ (0.67 Å). SEM shows the spherical, uniformly distributed homogenous nanoparticles grown by controlled reaction parameters of the sol-gel method. Complex permittivity (?*) and complex electric modulus (M*) have been studied for the present nanoferrites in the frequency ranges of 1 MHz-1 GHz. Frequency dependent dielectric parameters (relative permittivity (?'), dielectric loss (??), dielectric loss tangent (tan ?)) decreases due to holmium substitution in nickel ferrites, showing the electrical conduction is decreasing in the nickel holmium ferrites with increase in the concentration of holmium. Complex modulus plots shows the poorly resolved semi circles and relaxation of nanoferrite is studied in the high frequency region. Also the relaxation time increases due to increase in x (0.0-0.15). DC electrical resistivity increases (107 ?-cm-1010 ?-cm) due to holmium ions substitution in nickel ferrites. Magnetic behavior was also characterized using a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) under an applied magnetic field of 10 kOe and shows that magnetization decreases with increase in composition of holmium in nickel ferrites. High frequency behavior, low losses and very high DC electrical resistivity made the material a novel one for electromagnetic devices.

  12. Observation of dimension dependent magnetic ordering in bismuth ferrite particulate and fiber nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakar, M.; Bharathkumar, S.; Saravanan, P.; Balakumar, S.

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles and nanofibers of bismuth ferrite were fabricated by sol-gel and electrospinning methods respectively. The structural and morphological analysis was carried out by XRD and FESEM techniques respectively. The magnetic measurements were carried out by SQUID magnetometer. The BFO nanofibers showed an enhanced magnetic property compared to nanoparticles. The observed magnetic properties were found to be associated with their magnetic ordering in the system where the antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic core/shell like nature and `canted' spin structure ordering was found to be the magnetic origin in the particulate and fiber nanostructures respectively.

  13. Manganese sulfide formation via concomitant microbial manganese oxide and thiosulfate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Moore, Dean A.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Reed, Samantha B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-13

    The dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced {gamma}-MnS (rambergite) nanoparticles during the concurrent reduction of MnO{sub 2} and thiosulfate coupled to H{sub 2} oxidation. To investigate effect of direct microbial reduction of MnO{sub 2} on MnS formation, two MR-1 mutants defective in outer membrane c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA and {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA/{Delta}mtrF) were also used and it was determined that direct reduction of MnO{sub 2} was dominant relative to chemical reduction by biogenic sulfide generated from thiosulfate reduction. Although bicarbonate was excluded from the medium, incubations of strain MR-1 with lactate as the electron donor produced MnCO{sub 3} (rhodochrosite) as well as MnS in nearly equivalent amounts as estimated by micro X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) analysis. It was concluded that carbonate released from lactate metabolism promoted MnCO{sub 3} formation and that Mn(II) mineralogy was strongly affected by carbonate ions even in the presence of abundant sulfide and weakly alkaline conditions expected to favor the precipitation of MnS. Formation of MnS, as determined by a combination of micro-XRD, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction analyses was consistent with equilibrium speciation modeling predictions. Biogenic manganese sulfide may be a manganese sink in the Mn biogeochemical cycle in select environments such as deep anoxic marine basins within the Baltic Sea.

  14. Electrokinetic properties of PMAA functionalized NiFe2O4 nanoparticles synthesized by thermal plasma route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhosale, Shivaji V.; Mhaske, Pravin; Kanhe, N.; Navale, A. B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Bhatt, S. K.

    2014-04-01

    The magnetic nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles with an average size of 30nm were synthesised by Transferred arc DC Thermal Plasma route. The synthesized nickel ferrite nanoparticles were characterized by TEM and FTIR techniques. The synthesized nickel ferrite nanoparticles were further functionalized with PMAA (polymethacrylic acid) by self emulsion polymerization method and subsequently were characterized by FTIR and Zeta Analyzer. The variation of zeta potential with pH was systematically studied for both PMAA functionalized (PNFO) and uncoated nickel ferrite nanoparticles (NFO). The IEP (isoelectric points) for PNFO and NFO was determined from the graph of zeta potential vs pH. It was observed that the IEP for NFO was at 7.20 and for PNFO it was 2.52. The decrease in IEP of PNFO was attributed to the COOH functional group of PMAA.

  15. Magnetic and ultrasonic studies on stable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Nabeel Rashin, M; Hemalatha, J

    2014-03-01

    Stable cobalt ferrite nanofluids of various concentrations have been prepared through co-precipitation method. Structural and morphological studies of nanoparticles are made with the help of X-ray diffraction technique and Transmission Electron Microscope respectively and it is found that the particles exhibit face centered cubic structure with an average size of 14 nm. The magnetic properties of the nanofluids have been analyzed at room temperature which revealed ferromagnetic behavior and also the very low value of coupling constant which ensures the negligible interparticle interaction in the absence of magnetic field. Ultrasonic investigations have been made for the nanofluids at different temperatures and magnetic fields. The temperature effects are explained with the help of open and close-packed water structure. The inter particle interactions of surface modified CoFe2O4 particles and the cluster formation at higher concentrations are realized through the variations in ultrasonic parameters. PMID:24188514

  16. Characterization of (Mg, La) Substituted Ni-Zn Spinel Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wei, S. C.; Wang, Y. J.; Tian, H. L.; Tong, H.; Xu, B. S.

    Spinel structure of (Mg, La) substituted spinel Ni-Zn ferrite has been synthesized by sol-gel auto combustion method. The ferrite exhibits a single-spinel structure. The ferrite is studied as a microwave absorbing material. The microwave measurements are carried out by a vector network analyzer. The reflection loss of the ferrite is calculated as a single-layer absorber. The results indicate that the ferrite annealed at 850°C has great potential for application in electromagnetic wave attenuation.

  17. Mechanical and thermomechanical properties of radiation modified poly(ethylene-octene)/Ni-Zn ferrite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinholds, I.; Kalkis, V.; Zicans, J.; Merijs Meri, R.; Bockovs, I.; Grigalovica, A.; Muizzemnieks, G.

    2013-12-01

    Poly(ethylene-1-octene) copolymer (POE) composites filled with nickel-zinc ferrite nanoparticles have been modified by exposure to an electron beam at doses up to 500 kGy. The influence of radiation dose and ferrite content on mechanical properties has been investigated. Thermomechanical properties - thermorelaxation stresses formed in thermal heating and thermo residual stresses resulting in the process of full setting and cooling of materials have been investigated for radiation cross-linked oriented (extended up to 100%) composite samples. Increase of concentration of ferrite particles and increase of radiation dose affects a notable increase of elastic modulus and reduces the deformability in comparison to entire elastomer. Improvement of thermomechanical properties especially at low irradiation doses (100-150 kGy) have been detected for composites with increase of ferrite filler content up to 5 wt. %. It was found that gel content of POE increased up to 85% for pristine POE material with increase of irradiation dose up to 500 kGy due to the formation of cross-linked structure, increase of filler concentration up to 5 wt. % affect reduction in gel fraction due to uniform dispersion in amorphous (ethylene and substituted with hexyl branches) POE phases.

  18. Structural, electrical and magnetic characteristics of nickel substituted cobalt ferrite nano particles, synthesized by self combustion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sontu, Uday Bhasker; Yelasani, Vijayakumar; Musugu, Venkata Ramana Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Nickel-substituted cobalt ferrite nano-particles are synthesized using a self-combustion method. Aqueous metal nitrates and citric acid form the precursors. No external oxidizing agents are used to change the pH of the precursors; this resulted in a more environment friendly synthesis. Structural, magnetic and electrical characteristics of the nano ferrites are verified using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), VSM and impedance analyzer respectively. Phase formation, particle size, lattice parameter, X-ray density, saturation magnetization, coercivity, dielectric constant and electrical activation energy as function of nickel substitution in cobalt ferrite are studied. It is shown here that the magnetic and electrical properties can be tuned by varying the nickel concentration.

  19. Tailoring the magnetic properties and magnetorheological behavior of spinel nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite by varying annealing temperature.

    PubMed

    Sedlacik, Michal; Pavlinek, Vladimir; Peer, Petra; Filip, Petr

    2014-05-14

    Magnetic nanoparticles of spinel nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite were synthesized via the sol-gel method and subsequent annealing. The influence of the annealing temperature on the structure, magnetic properties, and magnetorheological effect was investigated. The finite crystallite size of the particles, determined by X-ray diffraction and the particle size observed via transmission electron microscopy, increased with the annealing temperature. The magnetic properties observed via a vibrating sample magnetometer showed that an increase in the annealing temperature leads to the increase in the magnetization saturation and, in contrast, a decrease in the coercivity. The effect of annealing on the magnetic properties of ferrite particles has been explained by the recrystallization process at high temperatures. This resulted in grain size growth and a decrease in an imposed stress relating to defects in the crystal lattice structure of the nanoparticles. The magnetorheological characteristics of suspensions of ferrite particles in silicone oil were measured using a rotational rheometer equipped with a magnetic field generator in both steady shear and small-strain oscillatory regimes. The magnetorheological performance expressed as a relative increase in the magnetoviscosity appeared to be significantly higher for suspensions of particles annealed at 1000 °C. PMID:24668306

  20. Mesoporous bubble-like manganese silicate as a versatile platform for design and synthesis of nanostructured catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Guowu; Yec, Christopher C; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2015-01-26

    Manganese silicate in bubble-like morphology was used as a versatile platform to prepare a new class of yolk-shell hybrids. The mesoporosity of the shell was generated from the interbubble space and the bubble structure of manganese silica was used to hold and support nanoparticles (e.g., Au, Ag, Pt, Co, Ni, Au-Pd alloy, MoO2 , Fe3 O4 , carbon nanotubes and their combinations). We also used heterogeneous catalysis reactions to demonstrate the workability of these catalysts in both liquid and gas phases. PMID:25488060

  1. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pale pink, granular, odorless powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese compounds with sulfuric acid... include the action of sulfur dioxide on a slurry of manganese dioxide in sulfuric acid, and the roasting... chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this chapter; and poultry products as defined...

  2. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity. The color additive... less than 93 percent. (c) Uses and restrictions. Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity. The color additive... less than 93 percent. (c) Uses and restrictions. Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity. The color additive... less than 93 percent. (c) Uses and restrictions. Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity. The color additive... less than 93 percent. (c) Uses and restrictions. Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good...

  6. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-01

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide. PMID:17778807

  7. Thermal treatment of magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wykowska, Urszula; Satula, Dariusz; Nordblad, Per

    2015-01-01

    Summary This paper presents the results of a thermal treatment process for magnetite nanoparticles in the temperature range of 50–500 °C. The tested magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using three different methods that resulted in nanoparticles with different surface characteristics and crystallinity, which in turn, was reflected in their thermal durability. The particles were obtained by coprecipitation from Fe chlorides and decomposition of an Fe(acac)3 complex with and without a core–shell structure. Three types of ferrite nanoparticles were produced and their thermal stability properties were compared. In this study, two sets of unmodified magnetite nanoparticles were used where crystallinity was as determinant of the series. For the third type of particles, a Ag shell was added. By comparing the coated and uncoated particles, the influence of the metallic layer on the thermal stability of the nanoparticles was tested. Before and after heat treatment, the nanoparticles were examined using transmission electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, it was observed that the fabrication methods determine, to some extent, the sensitivity of the nanoparticles to external factors. PMID:26199842

  8. Magnetic and structural study of electric double-layered ferrofluid with MnFe(2)O(4)@?-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles of different mean diameters: Determination of the magnetic correlation distance.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, E S; Cornejo, D R; Oliveira, C L P; Figueiredo Neto, A M; Depeyrot, J; Tourinho, F A; Aquino, R

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic fluids based on manganese ferrite nanoparticles were studied from the structural point of view through small angle x-rays scattering (SAXS) and from the magnetic point of view through zero-field cooling and field cooling (ZFC-FC) and ac susceptibility measurements (MS). Three different colloids with particles mean diameters of 2.78,3.42, and 6.15 nm were investigated. The size distribution obtained from SAXS measurements follows a log-normal behavior. The ZFC-FC and MS results revealed the presence of an important magnetic interaction between the nanoparticles, characterized by a magnetic correlation distance ?. The colloidal medium can be pictures as composed by magnetic cluster constituted by N interacting particles. These magnetic clusters are not characterized by a physical aggregation of particles. The energy barrier energy obtained is consistent with the existence of this magnetic clusters. Besides the magnetic interaction between particles, confinement effects must be included to account for the experimental values of the magnetic energy barrier encountered. PMID:25974501

  9. Magnetic and structural study of electric double-layered ferrofluid with MnFe2O4@? -Fe2O3 nanoparticles of different mean diameters: Determination of the magnetic correlation distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, E. S.; Cornejo, D. R.; Oliveira, C. L. P.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.; Depeyrot, J.; Tourinho, F. A.; Aquino, R.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic fluids based on manganese ferrite nanoparticles were studied from the structural point of view through small angle x-rays scattering (SAXS) and from the magnetic point of view through zero-field cooling and field cooling (ZFC-FC) and ac susceptibility measurements (MS). Three different colloids with particles mean diameters of 2.78 ,3.42 , and 6.15 nm were investigated. The size distribution obtained from SAXS measurements follows a log-normal behavior. The ZFC-FC and MS results revealed the presence of an important magnetic interaction between the nanoparticles, characterized by a magnetic correlation distance ? . The colloidal medium can be pictures as composed by magnetic cluster constituted by N interacting particles. These magnetic clusters are not characterized by a physical aggregation of particles. The energy barrier energy obtained is consistent with the existence of this magnetic clusters. Besides the magnetic interaction between particles, confinement effects must be included to account for the experimental values of the magnetic energy barrier encountered.

  10. RNASeq in C. elegans following manganese exposure

    PubMed Central

    Parmalee, Nancy L.; Maqbool, Shahina B.; Ye, Bin; Calder, Brent; Bowman, Aaron B.; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Manganese is a metal that is required for optimal biological functioning of organisms. Absorption, cellular import and export, and excretion of manganese are all tightly regulated. While some genes involved in regulation, such as DMT-1 and ferroportin are known, it is presumed that many more are involved and as yet unknown. Excessive exposure to manganese, usually in industrial settings, such as mining or welding, can lead to neurotoxicity and a condition known as manganism that closely resembles Parkinson's disease. Elucidating transcriptional changes following manganese exposure could lead to the development of biomarkers for exposure. This unit presents a protocol for RNA sequencing in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans to assay for transcriptional changes following exposure to manganese. This protocol is adaptable to any environmental exposure in C. elegans. The protocol results in counts of gene transcripts in control versus exposed conditions, and a ranked list of differentially expressed genes for further study. PMID:26250396

  11. RNASeq in C. elegans Following Manganese Exposure.

    PubMed

    Parmalee, Nancy L; Maqbool, Shahina B; Ye, Bin; Calder, Brent; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Manganese is a metal that is required for optimal biological functioning of organisms. Absorption, cellular import and export, and excretion of manganese are all tightly regulated. While some genes involved in regulation, such as DMT-1 and ferroportin, are known, it is presumed that many more are involved and as yet unknown. Excessive exposure to manganese, usually in industrial settings such as mining or welding, can lead to neurotoxicity and a condition known as manganism that closely resembles Parkinson's disease. Elucidating transcriptional changes following manganese exposure could lead to the development of biomarkers for exposure. This unit presents a protocol for RNA sequencing in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans to assay for transcriptional changes following exposure to manganese. This protocol is adaptable to any environmental exposure in C. elegans. The protocol results in counts of gene transcripts in control versus exposed conditions and a ranked list of differentially expressed genes for further study. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26250396

  12. Manganese borohydride; synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Richter, Bo; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Tumanov, Nikolay; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Jensen, Torben R

    2015-03-01

    Solvent-based synthesis and characterization of ?-Mn(BH4)2 and a new nanoporous polymorph of manganese borohydride, ?-Mn(BH4)2, via a new solvate precursor, Mn(BH4)2·1/2S(CH3)2, is presented. Manganese chloride is reacted with lithium borohydride in a toluene/dimethylsulfide mixture at room temperature, which yields halide and solvent-free manganese borohydride after extraction with dimethylsulfide (DMS) and subsequent removal of residual solvent. This work constitutes the first example of establishing a successful, reproducible solvent-based synthesis route for a pure, crystalline, stable transition metal borohydride. The new polymorph, ?-Mn(BH4)2, is shown to be the manganese counterpart of the zeolite-like compound, ?-Mg(BH4)2 (cubic, a = 16.209(1) Å, space group Id3?a). It is verified that large pores (diameter > 6.0 Å) exist in this structure. The solvate, Mn(BH4)2·1/2S(CH3)2, is subsequently shown to be the analogue of Mg(BH4)2·1/2S(CH3)2. As the structural analogies between Mg(BH4)2 and Mn(BH4)2 became evident a new polymorph of Mg(BH4)2 was identified and termed ?-Mg(BH4)2. ?-Mg(BH4)2 is the structural counterpart of ?-Mn(BH4)2. All synthesis products are characterized employing synchrotron radiation-powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis in combination with mass spectroscopy. Thermal analysis reveals the decomposition of Mn(BH4)2 to occur at 160 °C, accompanied by a mass loss of 14.8 wt%. A small quantity of the desorbed gaseous species is identified as diborane (?(m)(Mn(BH4)2) = 9.5 wt% H2), while the remaining majority is found to be hydrogen. PMID:25611294

  13. Jingle-bell-shaped ferrite hollow sphere with a noble metal core: Simple synthesis and their magnetic and antibacterial properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li Siheng; Wang Enbo Tian Chungui; Mao Baodong; Kang Zhenhui; Li Qiuyu; Sun Guoying

    2008-07-15

    In this paper, a simple strategy is developed for rational fabrication of a class of jingle-bell-shaped hollow structured nanomaterials marked as Ag(MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) (M=Ni, Co, Mg, Zn), consisting of ferrite hollow shells and metal nanoparticle cores, using highly uniform colloidal Ag(C) microspheres as template. The final composites were obtained by direct adsorption of metal cations Fe{sup 3+} and M{sup 2+} on the surface of the Ag(C) spheres followed by calcination process to remove the middle carbon shell and transform the metal ions into pure phase ferrites. The as-prepared composites were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometer. The results showed that the composites possess the magnetic property of the ferrite shell and the optical together with antibacterial property of the Ag core. - Graphical abstract: MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M=Ni, Co, Mg, Zn) hollow spheres with a noble metal nanoparticle core were successfully prepared by using colloidal metal(C) core-shell spheres as templates with no need of surface modification. The shell thickness and magnetic properties of the ferrite hollow spheres could be controlled by varying the synthetic parameters.

  14. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  15. Characterization of nanodimensional Ni-Zn ferrite prepared by mechanochemical and thermal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manova, E.; Paneva, D.; Kunev, B.; Rivière, E.; Estournès, C.; Mitov, I.

    2010-03-01

    Nickel zinc ferrite nanoparticles, Ni1-xZnxFe2O4 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0), with dimensions below 10 nm have been prepared by combining chemical precipitation with high-energy ball milling. For comparison, their analogues obtained by thermal synthesis have also been studied. Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and magnetic measurements are used for the characterization of the obtained materials. X-ray diffraction shows that after 3h of mechanical treatment ferrites containing zinc are formed, while 6h of treatment is needed to obtain NiFe2O4. The magnetic properties of the samples exhibit a strong dependence on the phase composition, particle size and preparation method.

  16. Ferrite insertion at Recycler Flying Wire System

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-02-27

    Ferrite rods are installed inside the flying-wire cavity of the Recycler Ring and at entrance and exit beam pipes in order to absorb high-frequency electromagnetic waves excited by the beam. However, these rods may also deteriorate the vacuum pressure of the ring. An investigation is made to analyze the necessity of the ferrite rods at the entrance and exit beam pipes.

  17. Iron and manganese removal by using manganese ore constructed wetlands in the reclamation of steel wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing-Cheng; Chen, Gu; Huang, Xiang-Feng; Li, Guang-Ming; Liu, Jia; Yang, Na; Gao, Sai-Nan

    2009-09-30

    To reclaim treated steel wastewater as cooling water, manganese ore constructed wetland was proposed in this study for the removal of iron and manganese. In lab-scale wetlands, the performance of manganese ore wetland was found to be more stable and excellent than that of conventional gravel constructed wetland. The iron and manganese concentration in the former was below 0.05 mg/L at hydraulic retention time of 2-5 days when their influent concentrations were in the range of 0.16-2.24 mg/L and 0.11-2.23 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, its removals for COD, turbidity, ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus were 55%, 90%, 67% and 93%, respectively, superior to the corresponding removals in the gravel wetland (31%, 86%, 58% and 78%, respectively). The good performance of manganese ore was ascribed to the enhanced biological manganese removal with the aid of manganese oxide surface and the smaller size of the medium. The presence of biological manganese oxidation was proven by the facts of good manganese removal in wetlands at chemical unfavorable conditions (such as ORP and pH) and the isolation of manganese oxidizing strains from the wetlands. Similar iron and manganese removal was later observed in a pilot-scale gravel-manganese-ore constructed wetland, even though the manganese ore portion in total volume was reduced from 100% (in the lab-scale) to only 4% (in the pilot-scale) for the sake of cost-saving. The quality of the polished wastewater not only satisfied the requirement for cooling water but also suitable as make-up water for other purposes. PMID:19443107

  18. Manganese oxidation by Leptothrix discophora.

    PubMed Central

    Boogerd, F C; de Vrind, J P

    1987-01-01

    Cells of Leptothrix discophora SS1 released Mn2+-oxidizing factors into the medium during growth in batch culture. Manganese was optimally oxidized when the medium was buffered with HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid) at pH 7.5. Manganese-oxidizing activity in the culture medium in which this strain had been grown previously was sensitive to heat, phosphate, Tris, NaN3, HgCl2 NaCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and pronase; 0.5 mol of O2 was consumed per mol of MnO2 formed. During Mn2+ oxidation, protons were liberated. With sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, two protein-containing bands were detected in the spent culture medium. One band had an apparent molecular weight of 110,000 and was predominant in Mn2+-oxidizing activity. The second product (Mr 85,000) was only detected in some cases and probably represents a proteolytic breakdown moiety of the 110,000-Mr protein. The Mn2+-oxidizing factors were associated with the MnO2 aggregates that had been formed in spent culture medium. After solubilization of this MnO2 with ascorbate, Mn2+-oxidizing activity could be recovered. Images PMID:3804969

  19. Filling Narrow Trenches by Iodine-Catalyzed CVD of Copper and Manganese on Manganese Nitride Barrier/Adhesion Layers

    E-print Network

    Filling Narrow Trenches by Iodine-Catalyzed CVD of Copper and Manganese on Manganese Nitride-free filling of sub-100 nm trenches with copper or copper-manganese alloy by chemical vapor deposition (CVD copper or copper-manganese alloy is achieved in trenches narrower than 30 nm with aspect ratios up

  20. 40 CFR 721.10222 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...activities . Requirements as specified in § 721.80(j) (raw material intermediate used in the manufacture of polymerized pigments). (b) Specific requirements . The provisions of subpart A of this part apply to this section except as modified...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10222 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...activities . Requirements as specified in § 721.80(j) (raw material intermediate used in the manufacture of polymerized pigments). (b) Specific requirements . The provisions of subpart A of this part apply to this section except as modified...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10222 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...activities . Requirements as specified in § 721.80(j) (raw material intermediate used in the manufacture of polymerized pigments). (b) Specific requirements . The provisions of subpart A of this part apply to this section except as modified...

  3. Diclofenac and 2-anilinophenylacetate degradation by combined activity of biogenic manganese oxides and silver.

    PubMed

    Meerburg, Francis; Hennebel, Tom; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2012-05-01

    The occurrence of a range of recalcitrant organic micropollutants in our aquatic environment has led to the development of various tertiary wastewater treatment methods. In this study, biogenic manganese oxides (Bio-MnOx), biogenic silver nanoparticles (Bio-Ag(0)) and ionic silver were used for the oxidative removal of the frequently encountered drug diclofenac and its dechlorinated form, 2-anilinophenylacetate (APA). Diclofenac was rapidly degraded during ongoing manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas putida MnB6. Furthermore, whereas preoxidized Bio-MnOx, Bio-Ag(0) and Ag(+) separately did not show any removal capacity for diclofenac, an enhanced removal occurred when Bio-MnOx and silver species were combined. Similar results were obtained for APA. Finally, a slow removal of diclofenac but more rapid APA degradation was observed when silver was added to manganese-free P. putida biomass. Combining these results, three mechanisms of diclofenac and APA removal could be distinguished: (i) a co-metabolic removal during active Mn(2+) oxidation by P. putida; (ii) a synergistic interaction between preoxidized Bio-MnOx and silver species; and (iii) a (bio)chemical process by biomass enriched with silver catalysts. This paper demonstrates the use of P. putida for water treatment purposes and is the first report of the application of silver combined with biogenic manganese for the removal of organic water contaminants. PMID:22221449

  4. Preparation and magnetic properties of nano size nickel ferrite particles using hydrothermal method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nickel ferrite, a kind of soft magnetic materials is one of the most attracting class of materials due to its interesting and important properties and has many technical applications, such as in catalysis, sensors and so on. In this paper the synthesis of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles by the hydrothermal method is reported and the inhibition of surfactant (Glycerol or Sodium dodecyl sulfate) on the particles growth is investigated. Methods For investigation of the inhibition effect of surfactant on NiFe2O4 particles growth, the samples were prepared in presence of Glycerol and Sodium dodecyl sulfate. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) techniques were used to characterize the samples. Results The results of XRD and ICP-AES show that the products were pure NiFe2O4 and also nanoparticles grow with increasing the temperature, while surfactant prevents the particle growth under the same condition. The average particle size was determined from the Scherrer's equation and TEM micrographs and found to be in the range of 50-60 nm that decreased up to 10-15 nm in presence of surfactant. The FT-IR results show two absorption bands near to 603 and 490 cm-1 for the tetrahedral and octahedral sites respectively. Furthermore, the saturated magnetization and coercivity of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles were in the range of 39.60 emu/g and 15.67 Qe that decreased for samples prepared in presence of surfactant. As well as, the nanoparticles exhibited a superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. Conclusions Nanosized nickel ferrite particles were synthesized with and without surfactant assisted hydrothermal methods. The results show that with increasing of temperature, the crystallinity of nanoparticles is increased. In the presence of surfactants, the crystallinity of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles decreased in comparison with surfactant- free prepared samples. All of the nickel ferrite nanoparticles were superparamagnetic at room temperature. Graphical abstract PMID:22462726

  5. [Tongue play and manganese deficiency in dairy cattle].

    PubMed

    Karatzias, H; Roubies, N; Polizopoulou, Z; Papasteriades, A

    1995-09-01

    The present paper discusses "tongue rolling" observed in dairy cattle farms of a region in northern Greece associated with manganese deficiency. In these animals total body manganese status was evaluated by determining hair, as well as feed manganese content. Cows exhibiting tongue rolling had significantly lower hair manganese content, compared to non-tongue rolling control animals from other farms; in addition, feedstuff analysis demonstrated that manganese and inorganic phosphorus intake of affected cows was also significantly lower. PMID:8591770

  6. Reduction Mechanisms in Manganese Ore Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coetsee, Theresa; Reinke, Christian; Nell, Johannes; Pistorius, Petrus Christiaan

    2015-12-01

    Manganese ores are highly heterogeneous and contain various minerals with different levels of contained manganese and iron and therefore the ore reduction behavior is not uniform. Both phase chemistry and phase morphology at the reaction interface, at micron scale, must be investigated to understand the reaction mechanism effects in manganese ore reduction. This approach is applied here to reacted material mixture samples taken from the AlloyStream pilot plant furnace over a period of 4 months. The mineralogical features are reported and discussed. Deductions are made on the likely dominant reduction mechanism in this reaction system, given the phase morphology observations presented.

  7. Effects of Manganese Content on Solidification Structures, Thermal Properties, and Phase Transformation Characteristics in Fe-Mn-C Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Wang, Yu-Nan; Ruan, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Zhu, Kai; Fan, Zheng-Jie; Wang, Ying-Chun; Li, Cheng-Bin; Jiang, Xiao-Fang

    2015-02-01

    The solidification structures and the thermal properties of Fe-Mn-C steel ingots containing different manganese contents have been investigated and the phase transformation characteristics have been revealed by Thermo-Calc to assist development of the continuous casting technology of Fe-Mn-C steels. The results show that the thermal conductivity of the 0Mn steel is higher than that of the 3Mn steel. The thermal conductivity of the 6Mn steel is the lowest in the three kinds of steels below 1023 K (750 °C) and the highest above 1173 K (900 °C). The 0Mn steel has the highest value of the proportion of equiaxed grain zone area in the three kinds of steels, whereas the 3Mn steel has the lowest value of it in the steels. Manganese has the effect of promoting the coarsening of grains. The microstructure is martensite and a little retained austenite (3.8 mass pct) in the 6Mn steel, whereas the microstructure is bainite in the 3Mn steel. The 0Mn steel is characterized by ferrite and pearlite. The mean thermal expansion coefficients of the steels are in the range from 1.0 × 10-5 to 1.6 × 10-5 K-1, and the determinations of mold tapers of the 6Mn and 3Mn steels can refer to low-carbon steel. Using RA <60 pct as the criterion, the third brittle temperature region of the 6Mn steel is 873 K to 1073 K (600 °C to 800 °C), whereas those of the 3Mn steel and the 0Mn steel are 873 K to 1123 K (600 °C to 850 °C) and 873 K to 1173 K (600 °C to 900 °C), respectively. In the 6Mn and 3Mn steels, the deformation-induced ferrite (DIF) forms in sufficient quantities cause the recovery of the ductility at the low temperature end. However, since low strains are present when straightening, sufficient quantities of DIF cannot be formed. Thus, the ductility of the 6Mn and 3Mn steels cannot be improved during the continuous casting process. Manganese has the effect of enlarging the austenite phase region and reducing the ?-ferrite phase region and ?-ferrite phase region.

  8. Residual ferrite formation in 12CrODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Kudo, Y.; Wu, X.; Oono, N.; Hayashi, S.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing Cr content from 9 to 12 mass% leads to superior corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistances, and usually changes microstructure from martensite to a ferrite. To make transformable martensitic type of 12CrODS steels that have superior processing capability by using ?/? phase transformation, alloy design was conducted through varying nickel content. The structure of 12CrODS steels was successfully modified from full ferrite to a transformable martensite-base matrix containing ferrite. This ferrite consists of both equilibrium ferrite and a metastable residual ferrite. It was shown that the fraction of the equilibrium ferrite is predictable by computed phase diagram and formation of the residual ferrite was successfully evaluated through pinning of ?/? interfacial boundaries by oxide particles.

  9. Manganese concentrate usage in steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhihina, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    The results of the research process of producing metalized products by solid-phase reduction of iron using solid carbonaceous reducing agents. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out on the model of the unit the Fe-C-O and system with iron ore and coal. As a result of modeling the thermodynamic boundary reducing, oxidizing, and transition areas and the value of the ratio of carbon and oxygen in the system. Simulation of real systems carried out with the gas phase obtained in the pyrolys of coal. The simulation results allow to determine the optimal cost of coal required for complete reduction of iron ore from a given composition. The kinetics of the processes of solid-phase reduction of iron using coal of various technological brands. The paper describes experiments on effects of metal deoxidizer composition, component proportion, pelletizing mixture, particle size distribution of basic materials and flux on manganese recovering from oxides under direct melting.

  10. A manganese oxidation model for rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, G.W. ); Kim, Byung R. ); Roberts, P.J.W. )

    1989-04-01

    The presence of manganese in natural waters (>0.05 mg/L) degrades water-supply quality. A model was devised to predict the variation of manganese concentrations in river water released from an impoundment with the distance downstream. The model is one-dimensional and was calibrated using dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, pH, manganese, and hydraulic data collected in the Duck River, Tennessee. The results indicated that the model can predict manganese levels under various conditions. The model was then applied to the Chattahoochee River, Georgia. Discrepancies between observed and predicted may be due to inadequate pH data, precipitation of sediment particles, unsteady flow conditions in the Chattahoochee River, inaccurate rate expressions for the los pH conditions, or their combinations.

  11. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR MANGANESE. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document evaluates data on occurrence, sources, and transport of manganese in the environment and data on metabolism, pharmacokinetics, laboratory toxicological and epidemiologic studies to determine the nature and dose response relationship of potential health effects on hum...

  12. Improved magnetostrictive properties of Co-Mn ferrites for automobile torque sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, G. S. N.; Caltun, O. F.; Rao, K. H.; Subba Rao, P. S. V.; Parvatheeswara Rao, B.

    2013-09-01

    Strain derivative of local anisotropy, which depends on the magnetostriction, is the figure of merit for the magnetic materials used in automobile torque sensor applications. In order to improve the strain derivative, a series of samples with chemical formulae CoMnxFe2-xO4 (x=0.00-0.60) was prepared by a conventional ceramic technique. X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples confirm cubic spinel crystal structures. The magnetic properties, such as saturation magnetization and coercivity, were measured and the Curie temperature was estimated. Magnetostrictive properties were studied by the tensile strain gauge method. Manganese substituted cobalt ferrites have shown improved strain derivative values as compared to the pure cobalt ferrite. The strain derivative has been observed to increase for larger Mn substituent concentrations in CoMnxFe2-xO4. This behavior has been ascribed to the net decreased anisotropic contribution due to the increased presence of Mn3+ ions in B-sites and a corresponding migration of Co2+ ions to A-sites, and also to the microstructural grain size of the samples. The coercivity and magnetostriction measurements are in support of the strain derivative variations. The results are discussed on the basis of cationic site occupancies, variations in grain size and reduced anisotropy of the system.

  13. Biological investigation of a citrate-coated cobalt-ferrite-based magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kückelhaus, S.; Garcia, V. A. P.; Lacava, L. M.; Azevedo, R. B.; Lacava, Z. G. M.; Lima, E. C. D.; Figueiredo, F.; Tedesco, A. C.; Morais, P. C.

    2003-05-01

    The present study reports on several in vivo biological tests carried out with a cobalt-ferrite, citrate-coated, magnetic fluid sample developed for biomedical purposes. Systematic biological investigation was performed after endovenous injection in mice. Morphological analysis showed magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) infiltration in the parenchyma or vessels of all investigated organs. Nevertheless, at the investigated dose and period of treatment, no cell damage or inflammatory processes were observed. Cytometry alterations and genotoxic effects were not observed. Although precipitation of MNPs in tissues may be taken as undesirable, the absence of morphological alterations is very promising. The data show that the investigated sample is biocompatible and useful for biomedical applications.

  14. Manganese recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the flow and processing of manganese within the U.S. economy in 1998 with emphasis on the extent to which manganese is recycled. Manganese was used mostly as an alloying agent in alloys in which it was a minor component. Manganese was recycled mostly within scrap of iron and steel. A small amount was recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Very little manganese was recycled from materials being recovered specifically for their manganese content. For the United States in 1998, 218,000 metric tons of manganese was estimated to have been recycled from old scrap, of which 96% was from iron and steel scrap. Efficiency of recycling was estimated as 53% and recycling rate as 37%. Metallurgical loss of manganese was estimated to be about 1.7 times that recycled. This loss was mostly into slags from iron and steel production, from which recovery of manganese has yet to be shown economically feasible.

  15. Engineering of Ferrite-Graphite Composite Media for Microwave Shields

    E-print Network

    Koledintseva, Marina Y.

    Engineering of Ferrite-Graphite Composite Media for Microwave Shields Marina Koledintseva, PoornaAA@mpei.ru Abstract-- An electromagnetic shielding of objects using ferrite-graphite composites is considered- shielding; dielectric base material; ferrite- graphite composite, Maxwell Garnett formulation I

  16. Manganese mineralogy and diagenesis in the sedimentary rock record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jena E.; Webb, Samuel M.; Ma, Chi; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of manganese (II) to manganese (III,IV) demands oxidants with very high redox potentials; consequently, manganese oxides are both excellent proxies for molecular oxygen and highly favorable electron acceptors when oxygen is absent. The first of these features results in manganese-enriched sedimentary rocks (manganese deposits, commonly Mn ore deposits), which generally correspond to the availability of molecular oxygen in Earth surface environments. And yet because manganese reduction is promoted by a variety of chemical species, these ancient manganese deposits are often significantly more reduced than modern environmental manganese-rich sediments. We document the impacts of manganese reduction and the mineral phases that form stable manganese deposits from seven sedimentary examples spanning from modern surface environments to rocks over 2 billion years old. Integrating redox and coordination information from synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray microprobe imaging with scanning electron microscopy and energy and wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy, we find that unlike the Mn(IV)-dominated modern manganese deposits, three manganese minerals dominate these representative ancient deposits: kutnohorite (CaMn(CO3)2), rhodochrosite (MnCO3), and braunite (Mn(III)6Mn(II)O8SiO4). Pairing these mineral and textural observations with previous studies of manganese geochemistry, we develop a paragenetic model of post-depositional manganese mineralization with kutnohorite and calcian rhodochrosite as the earliest diagenetic mineral phases, rhodochrosite and braunite forming secondarily, and later alteration forming Mn-silicates.

  17. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers

    SciTech Connect

    Barrington, W.W.; Angle, C.R.; Willcockson, N.K.; Padula, M.A.; Korn, T.

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a frog shop for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6--10 years before and 1.2--3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} in 29% and 0.2 mg/m{sup 3} in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR{prime} interval) and the rates of change at low frequency and high frequency. MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used.

  18. Magnesium and Manganese Content of Halophilic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Médicis, Eveline De; Paquette, Jean; Gauthier, Jean-Jacques; Shapcott, Dennis

    1986-01-01

    Magnesium and manganese contents were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in bacteria of several halophilic levels, in Vibrio costicola, a moderately halophilic eubacterium growing in 1 M NaCl, Halobacterium volcanii, a halophilic archaebacterium growing in 2.5 M NaCl, Halobacterium cutirubrum, an extremely halophilic archaebacterium growing in 4 M NaCl, and Escherichia coli, a nonhalophilic eubacterium growing in 0.17 M NaCl. Magnesium and manganese contents varied with the growth phase, being maximal at the early log phase. Magnesium and manganese molalities in cell water were shown to increase with the halophilic character of the logarithmically growing bacteria, from 30 mmol of Mg per kg of cell water and 0.37 mmol of Mn per kg of cell water for E. coli to 102 mmol of Mg per kg of cell water and 1.6 mmol of Mn per kg of cell water for H. cutirubrum. The intracellular concentrations of manganese were determined independently by a radioactive tracer technique in V. costicola and H. volcanii. The values obtained by 54Mn loading represented about 70% of the values obtained by atomic absorption. The increase of magnesium and manganese contents associated with the halophilic character of the bacteria suggests that manganese and magnesium play a role in haloadaptation. Images PMID:16347151

  19. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugavel, T.; Raj, S. Gokul; Rajarajan, G.; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  20. Ferritic/martensitic steels: promises and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Ehrlich, K.; Abe, F.

    1992-09-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for fusion reactors because of their higher swelling resistance, higher thermal conductivity, lower thermal expansion, and better liquid-metal compatibility than austenitic steels. Irradiation effects will ultimately determine the applicability of these steels, and the effects of irradiation on microstructure and swelling, and on the tensile, fatigue, and impact properties of the ferritic/martensitic steels are discussed. Most irradiation studies have been carried out in fast reactors, where little transmutation helium forms. Helium has been shown to enhance swelling and affect tensile and fracture behavior, making helium a critical issue, since high helium concentrations will be generated in conjunction with displacement damage in a fusion reactor. These issues are reviewed to evaluate the status of ferritic/martensitic steels and to assess the research required to insure that such steels are viable candidates for fusion applications.

  1. Electrokinetic remediation of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from electrolytic manganese residue.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Du, Jun; Tao, Changyuan

    2015-10-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) is a solid waste found in filters after sulphuric acid leaching of manganese carbonate ore, which mainly contains manganese and ammonia nitrogen and seriously damages the ecological environment. This work demonstrated the use of electrokinetic (EK) remediation to remove ammonia nitrogen and manganese from EMR. The transport behavior of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from EMR during electrokinetics, Mn fractionation before and after EK treatment, the relationship between Mn fractionation and transport behavior, as well as the effects of electrolyte and pretreatment solutions on removal efficiency and energy consumption were investigated. The results indicated that the use of H2SO4 and Na2SO4 as electrolytes and pretreatment of EMR with citric acid and KCl can reduce energy consumption, and the removal efficiencies of manganese and ammonia nitrogen were 27.5 and 94.1 %, respectively. In these systems, electromigration and electroosmosis were the main mechanisms of manganese and ammonia nitrogen transport. Moreover, ammonia nitrogen in EMR reached the regulated level, and the concentration of manganese in EMR could be reduced from 455 to 37 mg/L. In general, the electrokinetic remediation of EMR is a promising technology in the future. PMID:26062467

  2. Biogeochemical cycling of manganese in Oneida Lake, New York: whole lake studies of manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, C.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    Oneida Lake, New York is a eutrophic freshwater lake known for its abundant manganese nodules and a dynamic manganese cycle. Temporal and spatial distribution of soluble and particulate manganese in the water column of the lake were analyzed over a 3-year period and correlated with other variables such as oxygen, pH, and temperature. Only data from 1988 are shown. Manganese is removed from the water column in the spring via conversion to particulate form and deposited in the bottom sediments. This removal is due to biological factors, as the lake Eh/pH conditions alone can not account for the oxidation of the soluble manganese Mn(II). During the summer months the manganese from microbial reduction moves from the sediments to the water column. In periods of stratification the soluble Mn(II) builds up to concentrations of 20 micromoles or more in the bottom waters. When mixing occurs, the soluble Mn(II) is rapidly removed via oxidation. This cycle occurs more than once during the summer, with each manganese atom probably being used several times for the oxidation of organic carbon. At the end of the fall, whole lake concentrations of manganese stabilize, and remain at about 1 micromole until the following summer, when the cycle begins again. Inputs and outflows from the lake indicate that the active Mn cycle is primarily internal, with a small accumulation each year into ferromanganese nodules located in the oxic zones of the lake.

  3. Magnetic properties of LiZnCu ferrite synthesized by the microwave sintering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khot, Sujata S.; Shinde, Neelam S.; Basavaiah, Nathani; Watawe, Shrikant C.; Vaidya, Milind M.

    2015-01-01

    Lithium ferrites have attracted considerable attention because they have been used as replacements for garnets due to their low cost. A series of polycrystalline ferrite samples were prepared with the composition of LiXZn(0.6-2X)Cu0.4Fe2O4(X=0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.25, 0.3) at chemical reaction temperature 150 °C by sintering with microwave assisted combustion method. The characterization shows the formation of single phase cubic structure when carried out by using the X-rays technique and I-R technique. Magnetization parameters such as saturation magnetization, coercivity, magnetic moment were calculated by using the Hysteresis graph. The Curie temperature obtained using the susceptibility data are found to be in the range 350-700 °C. Anhysteric remanent magnetization is used for estimating the grain size and domain structure of the composition. An attempt has been made to synthesis the nano-particles at lower reaction temperature by using non-conventional microwave sintering method. The advantage of this method is its lower sintering temperature and time compared to the conventional ceramic technique and direct formation of nano-ferrites without ball-milling.

  4. Study of high performance alloy electroforming. [nickel manganese and nickel cobalt manganese alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Nickel-manganese alloy electrodeposits from an electrolyte containing more manganese ion than previously used is being evaluated at two bath operating temperatures with a great variety of pulse plating conditions. Saccharine was added as a stress reducing agent for the electroforming of several of the samples with highest manganese content. All specimens for mechanical property testing have been produced but are not through the various heat treatments as yet. One of the heat treatment will be at 343 C (650 F), the temperature at which the MCC outer electroformed nickel shell is stress relieved. A number of retainer specimens from prior work have been tested for hardness before and after heat treatment. There appears to be a fairly good correlation between hardness and mechanical properties. Comparison of representative mechanical properties with hardnesses are made for nickel-manganese electrodeposits and nickel-cobalt-manganese deposits.

  5. Elimination of gases from sulfur dioxide using natural manganese ores with concurrent sulfatization of manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Malikov, F.L.; Mukhlenov, I.P.; Mirzarakhimov, M.S.

    1982-04-10

    This article investigates the feasibility of detoxifying gaseous wastes by the adsorption of SO/sub 2/ using natural porous manganese ores. The possibility of converting various gaseous mixtures with low sulfur dioxide content through a layer of manganese ore granules under specific conditions over a short time followed by regeneration of the adsorbing agent by washing with water was studied. The metal sulfates formed, predominately MnSO/sub 4/, are transferred into solution and then taken for subsequent electrolytic metallurgical treatment. The delineation of the mechanism for the trapping of sulfur dioxide by manganese chemisorbents was also studied. Results indicated that the use of natural manganese ores as chemisorbents is very attractive.The purification of gaseous wastes to eliminate sulfur dioxide by this method in a suitable process may be very effective. Manganese sulfate is formed concurrently and may be extracted by water for further hydrometallurgical treatment from unconcentrated ores.

  6. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  7. A preliminary ferritic-martensitic stainless steel constitution diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, M.C.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary research to develop a constitution diagram that will more accurately predict the microstructure of ferritic and martensitic stainless steel weld deposits. A button melting technique was used to produce a wide range of compositions using mixtures of conventional ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, including types 403, 409, 410, 430, 439 and 444. These samples were prepared metallographically, and the vol-% ferrite and martensite was determined quantitatively. In addition, the hardness and ferrite number (FN) were measured. Using this data, a preliminary constitution diagram is proposed that provides a more accurate method for predicting the microstructures of arc welds in ferritic and martensitic stainless steels.

  8. Effect of SiO 2 coating on the magnetic properties of Ni-Zn ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bo; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xianjie; Sui, Yu; Huang, Xiqiang; Lü, Zhe; Su, Wenhui

    2010-01-01

    The Ni-Zn ferrite/SiO 2 nanocomposites (ZNF/SiO 2 NCs) with core-shell structure were synthesized using Stöber method and a modified one. The core-shell structure was confirmed by transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM). The product obtained by modified Stöber method was more uniform than by Stöber method. The strength of dipole-dipole interaction between Ni-Zn nanoparticles decreases and the coordination of surface atoms increases due to surface modification. The decrease of blocking temperature and coercivity of the magnetic particles at low temperature can be attributed to the coating of SiO 2, which weakens the surface spin disorder of magnetic nanoparticles.

  9. Magnetization and Magnetocaloric Effect in Sol-Gel Derived Nanocrystalline Copper-Zinc Ferrite.

    PubMed

    Anwar, M S; Ahmed, Faheem; Koo, Bon Heun

    2015-02-01

    We report the sol-gel synthesis and magnetocaloric effect in nanocrystalline copper-zinc ferrite (Cu0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4). The synthesized powder was characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and magnetization measurements. The XRD results confirm the formation of single phase spinel structure. The average particle size was found to be ~58 nm. FE-SEM results suggested that the nanoparticles are agglomerated and spherical in shape. Magnetization measurement reveals that Cu0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles exhibit transition temperature (Tc) above room temperature. The maximum magnetic entropy change (?SM)max shows interesting behaviour and was found to vary with the applied magnetic field. This nanopowder can be considered as potential material for magnetic refrigeration above room temperature. PMID:26353670

  10. Globally sustainable manganese metal production and use.

    PubMed

    Hagelstein, Karen

    2009-09-01

    The "cradle to grave" concept of managing chemicals and wastes has been a descriptive analogy of proper environmental stewardship since the 1970s. The concept incorporates environmentally sustainable product choices-such as metal alloys utilized steel products which civilization is dependent upon. Manganese consumption is related to the increasing production of raw steel and upgrading ferroalloys. Nonferrous applications of manganese include production of dry-cell batteries, plant fertilizer components, animal feed and colorant for bricks. The manganese ore (high grade 35% manganese) production world wide is about 6 million ton/year and electrolytic manganese metal demand is about 0.7 million ton/year. The total manganese demand is consumed globally by industries including construction (23%), machinery (14%), and transportation (11%). Manganese is recycled within scrap of iron and steel, a small amount is recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Recycling rate is 37% and efficiency is estimated as 53% [Roskill Metals and Minerals Reports, January 13, 2005. Manganese Report: rapid rise in output caused by Chinese crude steel production. Available from: http://www.roskill.com/reports/manganese.]. Environmentally sustainable management choices include identifying raw material chemistry, utilizing clean production processes, minimizing waste generation, recycling materials, controlling occupational exposures, and collecting representative environmental data. This paper will discuss two electrolytically produced manganese metals, the metal production differences, and environmental impacts cited to date. The two electrolytic manganese processes differ due to the addition of sulfur dioxide or selenium dioxide. Adverse environmental impacts due to use of selenium dioxide methodology include increased water consumption and order of magnitude greater solid waste generation per ton of metal processed. The use of high grade manganese ores in the electrolytic process also reduces the quantity of solid wastes generated during processing. Secondary aluminum facilities have reported hazardous waste generation management issues due to baghouse dusts from rotary furnaces processing selenium contaminated manganese alloys. Environmental impacts resulting from industry are represented by emission inventories of chemical releases to the air, water, and soil. The U.S. metals industry releases reported to EPA Toxic Release Inventory indicate the primary metals industry is the major source of metal air toxic emissions, exceeding electric utility air toxic emissions. The nonferrous metals industry is reported to be the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) most intensive airborne and land pollution source of bioaccumulative metals. However, total waste emissions from industries in the OECD countries have declined due to improving energy consumption. Emission registers and access are improving around the world. However, environmental databases for metal particulates have low confidence ratings since the majority of air toxic emissions are not reported, not monitored, or are estimated based on worst-case emission factors. Environmental assessments including biological monitoring are necessary to validate mandated particulate metal emission reductions and control technologies during metal processing. PMID:19467569

  11. Flash microwave synthesis of trevorite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bousquet-Berthelin, C. Chaumont, D.; Stuerga, D.

    2008-03-15

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles have several possible applications as cathode materials for rechargeable batteries, named 'lithium-ion' batteries. In this study, NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was prepared by microwave induced thermohydrolysis. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET method, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). All the results show that the microwave one-step flash synthesis leads in a very short time to NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with elementary particles size close to 4-5 nm, and high specific surfaces (close to 240 m{sup 2}/g). Thus, microwave heating appears as an efficient source of energy to produce quickly nanoparticles with complex composition as ferrite. - Graphical abstract: At the end of the 20th century, a new concept of battery was introduced, named 'Li ion', where electrodes are both lithium-storage materials. Compounds with a spinel structure are so investigated and microwave heating appears as an efficient source of energy to produce nanoparticles in a very short time and at low temperature, with controlled size (4-5 nm) and high specific area (240 m{sup 2}/g). Legend: Pictogram represents our original microwave reactor, the RAMO (French acronym of Reacteur Autoclave Micro-Onde), containing the reactants and submitted to the microwave irradiation. Multicolor candy represents obtained material.

  12. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, T.; Schaltz, E.; Ahn, S.

    2015-05-01

    Power transfer capability of wireless power transfer systems is highly dependent on the magnetic design of the primary and secondary inductors and is measured quantitatively by the coupling factor. The inductors are designed by placing the coil over a ferrite base to increase the coupling factor and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance, and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending on the placement of ferrite. Also, the addition of ferrite increases the self-inductance of the coils, and there is a probability for an overall decrease in the coupling factor. Correct placement of ferrite, on the other hand, can increase the coupling factor relatively higher than the base ferrite as it is closer to the other inductor. Ferrite being a heavy compound of iron increases the inductor weight significantly and needs to be added judiciously. Four zones have been identified in the paper, which shows different sensitivity to addition of ferrite in terms of the two inductances and coupling factor. Simulation and measurement results are presented for different air gaps between the coils and at different gap distances between the ferrite base and added ferrite. This paper is beneficial in improving the coupling factor while adding minimum weight to wireless power transfer system.

  13. Vanadia supported on nickel manganese oxide nanocatalysts for the catalytic oxidation of aromatic alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adil, Syed F.; Alabbad, Saad; Kuniyil, Mufsir; Khan, Mujeeb; Alwarthan, Abdulrahman; Mohri, Nils; Tremel, Wolfgang; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq Hussain

    2015-02-01

    Vanadia nanoparticles supported on nickel manganese mixed oxides were synthesized by co-precipitation method. The catalytic properties of these materials were investigated for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol using molecular oxygen as oxidant. It was observed that the calcination temperature and the size of particles play an important role in the catalytic process. The catalyst was evaluated for its oxidation property against aliphatic and aromatic alcohols, which was found to display selectivity towards aromatic alcohols. The samples were characterized by employing scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  14. Adding calcium improves lithium ferrite core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessoff, H.

    1969-01-01

    Adding calcium increases uniformity of grain growth over a wide range of sintering temperatures and reduces porosity within the grain. Ferrite cores containing calcium have square hysteresis loops and high curie temperatures, making them useful in coincident current memories of digital electronic computers.

  15. Structural and magnetic properties of cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion method for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Kaliyamoorthy; Rajan Babu, Dhanakotti; Kavya Bai, Mane Prabhu; Supriya, Ravi; Vidya, Radhakrishnan; Madeswaran, Saminathan; Anandan, Pandurangan; Arivanandhan, Mukannan; Hayakawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by solution combustion technique. The structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were also investigated. The average crystallite size of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) magnetic nanoparticle was calculated using Scherrer equation, and it was found to be 16±5 nm. The particle size was measured by transmission electron microscope. This value was found to match with the crystallite size calculated by Scherrer equation corresponding to the prominent intensity peak (311) of X-ray diffraction. The high-resolution transmission electron microscope image shows clear lattice fringes and high crystallinity of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles exhibited the saturation magnetization value of 47 emu/g and coercivity of 947 Oe. The anti-microbial activity of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles showed better results as an anti-bacterial agent. The affinity constant was determined for the nanoparticles, and the cytotoxicity studies were conducted for the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles at different concentrations and the results are discussed. PMID:26491320

  16. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. 721.10011 Section 721...721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and...identified as barium calcium manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. 721.10011 Section 721...721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and...identified as barium calcium manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. 721.10011 Section 721...721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and...identified as barium calcium manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. 721.10011 Section 721...721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and...identified as barium calcium manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. 721.10011 Section 721...721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and...identified as barium calcium manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  6. Essentiality, Toxicity and Uncertainty in the Risk Assessment of Manganese

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessments of manganese by inhalation or oral routes of exposure typically acknowledge the duality of manganese as an essential element at low doses and a toxic metal at high doses. Previously, however, risk assessors were unable to describe manganese pharmacokinetics quant...

  7. Silver manganese oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2006-05-09

    This invention relates to electrodes for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries with silver manganese oxide positive electrodes, denoted AgxMnOy, in which x and y are such that the manganese ions in the charged or partially charged electrodes cells have an average oxidation state greater than 3.5. The silver manganese oxide electrodes optionally contain silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrodes and to improve the power capability of the cells or batteries. The invention relates also to a method for preparing AgxMnOy electrodes by decomposition of a permanganate salt, such as AgMnO4, or by the decomposition of KMnO4 or LiMnO4 in the presence of a silver salt.

  8. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng Tong, Hui; Tian, Haoliang; Liu, Ming; Xu, Binshi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.

  9. Chondrodystrophy in calves associated with manganese deficiency.

    PubMed

    Valero, G; Alley, M R; Badcoe, L M; Manktelow, B W; Merrall, M; Lawes, G S

    1990-12-01

    A severe congenital chondrodystrophy in Charolais calves is described. Thirty-two calves were born on the same farm with shortened limbs and enlarged joints. Histologically, there was poor cartilage maturation with excessive amounts of rarefied cartilage matrix. There were degenerative changes in the chondrocytes and a severe reduction in the mucopolysaccharide content of all body hyaline cartilage. The cartilage matrix, when examined ultrastructurally, showed loose, disorganised fibres in a rarefied matrix, and extensive vacuolation of the chondrocytes. A low level of manganese was found in the liver of an affected calf. The pregnant cows were fed on apple pulp and corn silage, both of which are low in manganese. PMID:16031605

  10. Covalent hybrid of spinel manganese-cobalt oxide and graphene as advanced oxygen reduction electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yongye; Wang, Hailiang; Zhou, Jigang; Li, Yanguang; Wang, Jian; Regier, Tom; Dai, Hongjie

    2012-02-22

    Through direct nanoparticle nucleation and growth on nitrogen doped, reduced graphene oxide sheets and cation substitution of spinel Co(3)O(4) nanoparticles, a manganese-cobalt spinel MnCo(2)O(4)/graphene hybrid was developed as a highly efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline conditions. Electrochemical and X-ray near-edge structure (XANES) investigations revealed that the nucleation and growth method for forming inorganic-nanocarbon hybrids results in covalent coupling between spinel oxide nanoparticles and N-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-rmGO) sheets. Carbon K-edge and nitrogen K-edge XANES showed strongly perturbed C-O and C-N bonding in the N-rmGO sheet, suggesting the formation of C-O-metal and C-N-metal bonds between N-doped graphene oxide and spinel oxide nanoparticles. Co L-edge and Mn L-edge XANES suggested substitution of Co(3+) sites by Mn(3+), which increased the activity of the catalytic sites in the hybrid materials, further boosting the ORR activity compared with the pure cobalt oxide hybrid. The covalently bonded hybrid afforded much greater activity and durability than the physical mixture of nanoparticles and carbon materials including N-rmGO. At the same mass loading, the MnCo(2)O(4)/N-graphene hybrid can outperform Pt/C in ORR current density at medium overpotentials with stability superior to Pt/C in alkaline solutions. PMID:22280461

  11. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission...Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that...ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates the guide to...

  12. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ...Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission...Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide (Revision 4) describes...ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. It updates the guide to remove...

  13. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite. Despite these limitations, magnetotactic bacteria have bee

  14. Preparation of high-permeability NiCuZn ferrite*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Yan, Mi

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate addition of CuO/V2O5 and the reduction of the granularity of the raw materials particle decrease the sintering temperature of NiZn ferrite from 1200 °C to 930 °C. Furthermore, the magnetic properties of the NiZn ferrite prepared at low temperature of 930 °C is superior to that of the NiZn ferrite prepared by sintering at high temperature of 1200 °C because the microstructure of the NiZn ferrite sintered at 930 °C is more uniform and compact than that of the NiZn ferrite sintered at 1200 °C. The high permeability of 1700 and relative loss coefficient tan?/?i of 9.0×10?6 at 100 kHz was achieved in the (Ni0.17Zn0.63Cu0.20)Fe1.915O4 ferrite. PMID:15909348

  15. Manganese ore tailing: optimization of acid leaching conditions and recovery of soluble manganese.

    PubMed

    Santos, Olívia de Souza Heleno; Carvalho, Cornélio de Freitas; Silva, Gilmare Antônia da; Santos, Cláudio Gouvêa Dos

    2015-01-01

    Manganese recovery from industrial ore processing waste by means of leaching with sulfuric acid was the objective of this study. Experimental conditions were optimized by multivariate experimental design approaches. In order to study the factors affecting leaching, a screening step was used involving a full factorial design with central point for three variables in two levels (2(3)). The three variables studied were leaching time, concentration of sulfuric acid and sample amount. The three factors screened were shown to be relevant and therefore a Doehlert design was applied to determine the best working conditions for leaching and to build the response surface. By applying the best leaching conditions, the concentrations of 12.80 and 13.64 %w/w of manganese for the global sample and for the fraction -44 + 37 ?m, respectively, were found. Microbeads of chitosan were tested for removal of leachate acidity and recovering of soluble manganese. Manganese recovery from the leachate was 95.4%. Upon drying the leachate, a solid containing mostly manganese sulfate was obtained, showing that the proposed optimized method is efficient for manganese recovery from ore tailings. PMID:25284800

  16. Manganese homeostasis in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Lee, Eunsook; Paoliello, Monica M B; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential heavy metal that is naturally found in the environment. Daily intake through dietary sources provides the necessary amount required for several key physiological processes, including antioxidant defense, energy metabolism, immune function and others. However, overexposure from environmental sources can result in a condition known as manganism that features symptomatology similar to Parkinson's disease (PD). This disorder presents with debilitating motor and cognitive deficits that arise from a neurodegenerative process. In order to maintain a balance between its essentiality and neurotoxicity, several mechanisms exist to properly buffer cellular Mn levels. These include transporters involved in Mn uptake, and newly discovered Mn efflux mechanisms. This review will focus on current studies related to mechanisms underlying Mn import and export, primarily the Mn transporters, and their function and roles in Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Though and essential metal, overexposure to manganese may result in neurodegenerative disease analogous to Parkinson's disease. Manganese homeostasis is tightly regulated by transporters, including transmembrane importers (divalent metal transporter 1, transferrin and its receptor, zinc transporters ZIP8 and Zip14, dopamine transporter, calcium channels, choline transporters and citrate transporters) and exporters (ferroportin and SLC30A10), as well as the intracellular trafficking proteins (SPCA1 and ATP12A2). A manganese-specific sensor, GPP130, has been identified, which affords means for monitoring intracellular levels of this metal. PMID:25982296

  17. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  18. Manganese partitioning during hydrous melting of peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. Brian; Asimow, Paul D.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.

    2011-10-01

    Manganese contents and the iron/manganese ratio of igneous rocks have been used as a method of probing the heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle during melting of peridotite and pyroxenite lithologies. Most previous work has assumed that changes in these parameters require differences in either source lithology or composition based on experiments indicating that manganese is slightly incompatible during melting and that the iron/manganese ratio is fixed by the presence of olivine. However, the presence of volatiles in the mantle drives melting at lower temperatures and with different compositions than in volatile-free systems, and thus the partitioning of Fe and Mn may in fact vary. We have produced silicate liquids in equilibrium with a peridotite assemblage under hydrous conditions at 3 GPa that show that Mn can also be unexpectedly compatible in garnet at 1375 °C and that Mn partitioning between solids and liquids can be strongly affected by temperature and liquid composition. The compatibility of Mn in garnet provides a mechanism for large variations of Mn contents and the Fe/Mn ratio in silicate melts that solely involves melting of mantle peridotite with only small compositional changes. Correlations between Mn variations and other indices indicative of melting in the presence of garnet may provide a means of more completely understanding the role of garnet at high pressures in peridotite melting.

  19. STRAIN AGING OF AUSTENITIC HADFIELD MANGANESE STEEL

    E-print Network

    Grujicic, Mica

    ®nitive study in 1981 [2], showed that the primary cause is dynamic strain aging involving the diusion of carbonSTRAIN AGING OF AUSTENITIC HADFIELD MANGANESE STEEL W. S. OWEN1 { and M. GRUJICIC2 1 Department 29634, U.S.A. (Received 14 August 1998; accepted 18 September 1998) AbstractÐStrain aging of Had

  20. ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS FROM ENVIRONMENTAL MANGANESE EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ubiquitous element, manganese (Mn), is an essential nutrient, but toxic at excessive exposure levels. Therefore, the US EPA set guideline levels for Mn exposure through inhalation (reference concentration-RfC=0.05 ?g/m3) and ingestion (reference dose-RfD=0.14 mg/kg/day (10 mg...

  1. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity. The color additive... extent that such other impurities may be avoided by good manufacturing practice: Ash (at 600 °C), not... substances, not more than 6 percent. pH of filtrate of 10 grams color additive (shaken occasionally for...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...No. 7785-0987-097) is a pale pink, granular, odorless powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese compounds with sulfuric...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Reg. No. 1002-46-65) is a pale orange or pinkish white powder. It is obtained by precipitating manganese carbonate from...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Reg. No. 10024-66-5) is a pale orange or pinkish white powder. It is obtained by precipitating manganese carbonate from...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Reg. No. 1002-46-65) is a pale orange or pinkish white powder. It is obtained by precipitating manganese carbonate from...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...No. 7785-0987-097) is a pale pink, granular, odorless powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese compounds with sulfuric...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...No. 7785-0987-097) is a pale pink, granular, odorless powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese compounds with sulfuric...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...CAS Reg. No. 648-0953-0998) is a slightly pink colored powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese carbonate with gluconic...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...CAS Reg. No. 648-0953-0998) is a slightly pink colored powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese carbonate with gluconic...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...CAS Reg. No. 648-0953-0998) is a slightly pink colored powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese carbonate with gluconic...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...No. 7785-0987-097) is a pale pink, granular, odorless powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese compounds with sulfuric...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...CAS Reg. No. 648-0953-0998) is a slightly pink colored powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese carbonate with gluconic...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Reg. No. 10024-66-5) is a pale orange or pinkish white powder. It is obtained by precipitating manganese carbonate from...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...No. 7785-0987-097) is a pale pink, granular, odorless powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese compounds with sulfuric...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Reg. No. 10024-66-5) is a pale orange or pinkish white powder. It is obtained by precipitating manganese carbonate from...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...CAS Reg. No. 648-0953-0998) is a slightly pink colored powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese carbonate with gluconic...products as defined in § 170.3(n)(29) of this chapter; milk products as defined in § 170.3(n)(31) of this...

  17. Friction and wear of single-crystal and polycrystalline maganese-zinc ferrite in contact with various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal (SCF) and hot-pressed polycrystalline (HPF) manganese-zinc ferrite in contact with various metals. Results indicate that the coefficients of friction for SCF and HPF are related to the relative chemical activity of those metals in high vacuum. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for both SCF and HPF were the same and much higher in vacuum than in argon at atmospheric pressure. All the metals tested transferred to the surface of both SCF and HPF in sliding. Both SCF and HPF exhibited cracking and fracture with sliding. Cracking in SCF is dependent on crystallographic characteristics. In HPF, cracking depends on the orientation of the individual crystallites.

  18. Compact magnetooptical isolator with cobalt ferrite on silicon photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanaga, Megumi; Shoji, Yuya; Takamura, Yota; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Mizumoto, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    In the telecom wavelength range, the magnetooptical effect of cobalt ferrites is approximately 10 times larger than that of conventional magnetooptical materials such as yttrium iron garnets. In this study, we focus on an application of cobalt ferrite to a magnetooptical isolator that is to be miniaturized and made suitable for integration. First, we prepare polycrystalline cobalt ferrite films deposited on a silicon substrate using a MgO buffer layer. Next, we fabricate a waveguide optical isolator of silicon waveguides by the partial deposition of the cobalt ferrite films. An optical isolation ratio of 5.5 dB is demonstrated.

  19. Tunable Dielectric Properties of Ferrite-Dielectric Based Metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Bi, K.; Huang, K.; Zeng, L. Y.; Zhou, M. H.; Wang, Q. M.; Wang, Y. G.; Lei, M.

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices. PMID:25993433

  20. Properties of ferrites important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental, chemical and crystallographical effects on the fundamental nature on friction and wear of the ferrites in contact with metals, magnetic tapes and themselves are reviewed. The removal of adsorbed films from the surfaces of ferrites results in very strong interfacial adhesion and high friction in ferrite to metal and ferrite to magnetic tape contacts. The metal ferrite bond at the interface is primarily a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the large oxygen anions in the ferrite surface, and the strength of these bonds is related to the oxygen to metal bond strength in the metal oxide. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. Not only under adhesive conditions, but also under abrasive conditions the friction and wear properties of ferrites are related to the crystallographic orientation. With ferrite to ferrite contact the mating of highest atomic density (most closely packed) direction on matched crystallographic planes, that is, 110 directions on /110/planes, results in the lowest coefficient of friction.

  1. Ferrite microwave electronics Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-07-01

    Research reports on single crystals, thin films, dielectrics, semiconductor devices, integrated circuits, phase shifters, and waveguide components are cited. Studies on the microwave properties of ferrites are included.

  2. Morphological, magnetic and electronic structural studies of nanostructured spinel ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardim, Marcos; Moura Prata, Daniela

    The scope of this thesis includes study of structural, magnetic and electronic properties of nanostructured ferrites with different morphology/geometries (e.g. core/shell and hollow nanoparticles), and non-stroichiomteric thin-films. In the case of core/shell, shell composition is varied and spin glass (SG) features due to the thick amorphous shells are explored. Exchange Bias (EB) for core/shell (ferromagnetic/SG) nanoparticles namely X33Fe 67/XFe67O4 (X = Co, Ni, Fe) is presented. Limitations in the synthesis of various other alloys by inert gas condensation (IGC) due to the difference in the melting points are discussed. The existence of SG phase in these nanoparticles with CoFe2O4 shell results in the enhancement in EB. This is attributed to the large bulk anisotropy constant of the shell compared to other spinel cubic ferrites. Both dc magnetization and ac susceptibility measurements revealed a SG like transition which occurs at unusually large spin freezing temperature (TF ˜ 175K). The SG nature of the transition is also confirmed by the field dependence of the freezing temperature (TF(H)) following the well-known Almeida-Thouless (AT) line, deltaT F ˜ H2/3. Particles exhibit a large exchange bias (HEB ˜ 1357Oe) arising from the core-shell (ferromagnetic-SG) coupling. The unusually high SG transition temperature and large exchange bias effects are attributed to a combination of several factors including the thickness of the amorphous oxide shell and large values of the exchange and anisotropy constants associated with the CoFe2O 4 shell. In another extreme case of disordered spin systems, we synthesized NPs with hollow morphology with intentional choice of material namely NiFe 2O4 (CoFe2O4) which has lowest (highest) bulk anisotropy constant among the spinel ferrites. The hollow NPs are synthesized by self-templating process utilizing coupled interfacial chemical reactions and Kirkendall effect between the core (X33Fe67) and the shell (XFe2O4) of the core/shell structure is described. Reaction temperature and time dependent structural and morphological transformations are presented in detail. NiFe2O4 hollow particles show lack of saturation, enhancement in EB and inverse trend in the blocking temperature as a function of particles size. These are explained as being due to stabilized spin disorder and surface anisotropy. Unlike solid NPs, hollow NPs are polycrystalline. Electronic structure studies are performed by photoemission which reveals that CoFe2O4 particles with hollow morphology have higher degree of inversion compared to solid NPs. Electronic structure in comparison with magnetic studies reveal that particles exhibit uncompensated spins unlike bulk where Neel's collinear spin alignment is expected. For CoFe2O 4, both morphologies show lack of saturation up to 7T of applied field and magnetic irreversibility exists up to 7T of cooling fields for the entire temperature range (10 to 300K). These effects are explained in terms of temperature dependent large bulk anisotropy constant of CoFe2O4. Strong influence of uncompensated spins for particles with hollow morphology is characterized by cooling the sample in large fields, up to (˜9T). Magnitude of horizontal shift is more than three times larger compared to that of particles with solid morphology. 11% vertical shift for particles with hollow morphology is observed, whereas solid particles do not show corresponding shift. Finally, off-stoichiometric NiFe2O4 films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at low pressures and relatively high substrate temperatures were studied. Details of electronic structure of the films are presented and compared with stoichiometric bulk counterpart. Significant amount of oxygen vacancies and enhanced cationic inversion for non-stoichiometric thin films is observed. Films show spin glass features which are contrary to the usual ferrimagnetic response of the bulk nickel ferrite and spin freezing temperature which lies above room temperature in low fields (cooling field ˜ 0.1T). Interestingly, an exceptionally large exchange bi

  3. Manganese oxide phases and morphologies: A study on calcination temperature and atmospheric dependence

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, Daniela; Bardenhagen, Ingo; Westphal, Anne; Knipper, Martin; Plaggenborg, Thorsten; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna; Parisi, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Summary Manganese oxides are one of the most important groups of materials in energy storage science. In order to fully leverage their application potential, precise control of their properties such as particle size, surface area and Mnx + oxidation state is required. Here, Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 nanoparticles as well as mesoporous ?-Mn2O3 particles were synthesized by calcination of Mn(II) glycolate nanoparticles obtained through an economical route based on a polyol synthesis. The preparation of the different manganese oxides via one route facilitates assigning actual structure–property relationships. The oxidation process related to the different MnOx species was observed by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showing time- and temperature-dependent phase transformations occurring during oxidation of the Mn(II) glycolate precursor to ?-Mn2O3 via Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 in O2 atmosphere. Detailed structural and morphological investigations using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder XRD revealed the dependence of the lattice constants and particle sizes of the MnOx species on the calcination temperature and the presence of an oxidizing or neutral atmosphere. Furthermore, to demonstrate the application potential of the synthesized MnOx species, we studied their catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction in aprotic media. Linear sweep voltammetry revealed the best performance for the mesoporous ?-Mn2O3 species. PMID:25671151

  4. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA)

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  5. Atomically Flat Ultrathin Cobalt Ferrite Islands.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Laura; Quesada, Adrián; Munuera, Carmen; Fernández, Jose F; García-Hernández, Mar; Foerster, Michael; Aballe, Lucía; de la Figuera, Juan

    2015-10-01

    A route for fabricating structurally perfect cobalt ferrite magnetic nanostructures is demonstrated. Ultrathin islands of up to 100 ?m(2) with atomically flat surfaces and free from antiphase boundaries are developed. The extremely low defect concentration leads to a robust magnetic order, even for thicknesses below 1 nm, and exceptionally large magnetic domains. This approach allows the evaluation of the influence of specific extrinsic effects on domain wall pinning. PMID:26306027

  6. Ferritic steel melt and FLiBe/steel experiment : melting ferritic steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Smith, Brandon M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan

    2004-11-01

    In preparation for developing a Z-pinch IFE power plant, the interaction of ferritic steel with the coolant, FLiBe, must be explored. Sandia National Laboratories Fusion Technology Department was asked to drop molten ferritic steel and FLiBe in a vacuum system and determine the gas byproducts and ability to recycle the steel. We tried various methods of resistive heating of ferritic steel using available power supplies and easily obtained heaters. Although we could melt the steel, we could not cause a drop to fall. This report describes the various experiments that were performed and includes some suggestions and materials needed to be successful. Although the steel was easily melted, it was not possible to drip the molten steel into a FLiBe pool Levitation melting of the drop is likely to be more successful.

  7. The Structure and Properties of Plasma Sprayed Iron Oxide Doped Manganese Cobalt Oxide Spinel Coatings for SOFC Metallic Interconnectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranen, Jouni; Lagerbom, Juha; Hyvärinen, Leo; Kylmälahti, Mikko; Himanen, Olli; Pihlatie, Mikko; Kiviaho, Jari; Vuoristo, Petri

    2011-01-01

    Manganese cobalt oxide spinel doped with Fe2O3 was studied as a protective coating on ferritic stainless steel interconnects. Chromium alloying causes problems at high operation temperatures in such oxidizing conditions where chromium compounds evaporate and poison the cathode active area, causing the degradation of the solid oxide fuel cell. In order to prevent chromium evaporation, these interconnectors need a protective coating to block the chromium evaporation and to maintain an adequate electrical conductivity. Thermal spraying is regarded as a promising way to produce dense and protective layers. In the present work, the ceramic Mn-Co-Fe oxide spinel coatings were produced by using the atmospheric plasma spray process. Coatings with low thickness and low amount of porosity were produced by optimizing deposition conditions. The original spinel structure decomposed because of the fast transformation of solid-liquid-solid states but was partially restored by using post-annealing treatment.

  8. Thermodynamics of Manganese Oxides at Bulk and Nanoscale: Phase Formation, Transformation, Oxidation-Reduction, and Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkner, Nancy R.

    Natural manganese oxides are generally formed in surficial environments that are near ambient temperature and water-rich, and may be exposed to wet-dry cycles and a variety of adsorbate species that influence dramatically their level of hydration. Manganese oxide minerals are often poorly crystalline, nanophase, and hydrous. In the near-surface environment they are involved in processes that are important to life, such as water column oxygen cycling, biomineralization, and transport of minerals/nutrients through soils and water. These processes, often involving transformations among manganese oxide polymorphs, are governed by a complex interplay between thermodynamics and kinetics. Manganese oxides are also used in technology as catalysts, and for other applications. The major goal of this dissertation is to examine the energetics of bulk and nanophase manganese oxide phases as a function of particle size, composition, and surface hydration. Careful synthesis and characterization of manganese oxide phases with different surface areas provided samples for the study of enthalpies of formation by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry and of the energetics of water adsorption on their surfaces. These data provide a quantitative picture of phase stability and how it changes at the nanoscale. The surface energy of the hydrous surface of Mn3O4 is 0.96 +/- 0.08 J/m2, of Mn2O3 is 1.29 +/- 0.10 J/m2, and of MnO2 is 1.64 +/- 0.10 J/m2. The surface energy of the anhydrous surface of Mn3O4 is 1.62 +/- 0.08 J/m 2, of Mn2O3 is 1.77 +/- 0.10 J/m 2, and of MnO2 is 2.05 +/- 0.10 J/m2. Supporting preliminary findings (Navrotsky et al., 2010), the spinel phase (Mn3O4) has a lower surface energy (more stabilizing) than bixbyite, while the latter has a smaller surface energy than pyrolusite. These differences significantly change the positions in oxygen fugacity---temperature space of the redox couples Mn3O4-Mn2O 3 and Mn2O3-MnO2 favoring the lower surface enthalpy phase (the spinel Mn3O4) for smaller particle size and in the presence of surface hydration. Chemisorption of water onto anhydrous nanophase Mn2O 3 surfaces promotes rapidly reversible redox phase changes at room temperature as confirmed by calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and titration for manganese average oxidation state. Water adsorption microcalorimetry (in situ) at room temperature measured the strongly exothermic integral enthalpy of water adsorption (-103.5 kJ/mol) and monitored the energetics of the redox phase transformation. Hydration-driven redox transformation of anhydrous nanophase Mn(III) 2O3, (high surface enthalpy of anhydrous surfaces 1.77 +/- 0.10 J/m2) to Mn(II,III)3O4 (lower surface enthalpy 0.96 +/- 0.08 J/m2) occurred during the first few doses of water vapor. Surface reduction of nanoparticle bixbyite (Mn 2O3) to hausmannite (Mn3O4) occurs under conditions where no such reactions are seen or expected on grounds of bulk thermodynamics in coarse-grained materials. Layered structure manganese oxides contain alkali or alkaline earth cations and water, are generally fine-grained, and have considerable thermodynamic stability. The surface enthalpies (SE) of layered and tunnel structure complex manganese oxides are significantly lower than those of the binary manganese oxide phases. The SE for hydrous surfaces and overall manganese average oxidation state (AOS) (value in parentheses) are: cryptomelane 0.77 +/- 0.10 J/m 2 (3.78), sodium birnessite 0.69 +/- 0.13 J/m2 (3.56), potassium birnessite 0.55 +/- 0.11 J/m2 (3.52), and calcium birnessite 0.41 +/- 0.11 J/m2 (3.50). Surface enthalpies of hydrous surfaces of the calcium manganese oxide nanosheets are: deltaCa 0.39MnO2.3nH2O 0.75 +/- 0.10 J/m2 (3.89) and deltaCa0.43MnO2.3nH2O 0.57 +/- 0.12 J/m2 (3.68). The surface enthalpy of the complex manganese oxides appears to decrease with decreasing manganese average oxidation state, that is, with greater mixed valence manganese (Mn 3+/4+). Low surface energy suggests loose binding of H2O on the internal and external surfaces and may be critical to catalysis in bo

  9. Magneto-resistive coefficient enhancement observed around Verwey-like transition on spinel ferrites XFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (X?=?Mn, Zn)

    SciTech Connect

    López Maldonado, K. L. Vazquez Zubiate, L.; Elizalde Galindo, J. T.; Presa, P. de la; Matutes Aquino, J. A.

    2014-05-07

    Manganese and Zinc ferrites were prepared by solid state reaction. The resulting powders were pressed into pellets and heat treated at 1100?°C. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, pure phases of zinc ferrite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and manganese ferrite (MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were obtained. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a good contact between particles. A drop of electrical resistance was found in both samples, MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, with values going from 2750 to 130?? and from 1100 to 55??, respectively. Transition temperatures were determined to be T{sub V}?=?225?K for MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and T{sub V}?=?130?K for ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Magnetoresistance measurements were carried out in the temperature range where R showed the transition, defined as the Verwey-like transition temperature range, ?T{sub V}. No magnetoresistive effect was observed out of it. The magnetoresistive coefficient (MRC) observed at ?T{sub V} reached its maximum values of 1.1% for MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and 6.68% for ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The differences between MRC values are related to the divalent metal element used. Finally, the magnetoresistive response indicates that the electrical transition observed is strongly influencing the magnetoresistance; where the underlying responsible for this behavior could be a charge reordering occurring at the Verwey-like transition temperature.

  10. Effect of Zn-substitution on the structural and magnetic properties of Mn-Zn ferrites synthesized from spent Zn-C batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabal, M. A.; Al-Luhaibi, R. S.; Al Angari, Y. M.

    2013-12-01

    The present study aimed at the production of manganese-zinc ferrites through the recycling process of spent Zn-C batteries. Firstly, the spent Zn-C batteries were dismantled, crushed and leached in nitric acid and the composition of the acid solution was analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Secondly, stoichimetric amounts of metal nitrates were used to adjust the metallic concentration and prepare respective Mn1-xZnxFe2O4 ferrites (x=0.2-0.8) through the urea auto-combustion method. The obtained ferrites were examined by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared for crystalline phase identification, transmission electron microscopy for particle size and morphology and vibrating sample magnetometer for magnetic properties. The obtained structural and magnetic properties such as lattice parameter, infrared band positions saturation magnetization and coercivity were used to estimate the proper cation distribution of the system. The magnetic measurements showed that the change in the values of saturation magnetization with increasing Zn-content can be described according to the cation distribution while, that in the coercivity values can be explained on the basis of the magneto-crystalline anisotropy.

  11. Synthesis and size dependent magnetic behaviour of nanocrystalline Cu0.2Ni0.8Fe2O4 ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolia, S. N.; Sharma, P. K.; Dhawan, M. S.; Samariya, A.; Pareek, S. P.; Prasad, Arun S.; Singhal, R. K.; Kumar, Sudhish

    2011-10-01

    Particle size has significant effect on the magnetic properties of nano-particles. Nano-particles of Cu-Ni ferrite have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method. Different particle sizes (3nm-9 nm) were obtained by annealing the prepared samples at various temperatures. The specimens characterized using XRD confirmed the formation of cubic spinel structure. The samples show typical superparamagnetic behaviour above blocking temperature. The particle size increases with increasing the annealing temperature. The saturation magnetization & blocking temperature increases with particle size which is characteristic of superparamagnetism. The hysteresis curves show reduction in saturation magnetization in the case of nanoparticles as compared to their bulk counterpart, which have been explained on the basis that the magnetic moments in the surface layers of a nanoparticle are in a state of frozen disorder. However the saturation magnetization increases with particle size, which is the characteristic property of single domain superparamagnetic particles.

  12. The effect of tempering temperature on the features of phase transformations in the ferritic-martensitic steel EK-181

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polekhina, N. A.; Litovchenko, I. Yu.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Astafurova, ?. G.; Chernov, V. M.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-12-01

    Using the methods of dilatometry and differential scanning calorimetry, critical points of phase transformations in the low-activation ferritic-martensitic steel EK-181 (RUSFER-EK-181) are identified. The characteristic temperature intervals of precipitation of carbide phases are revealed. It is shown that particles of the metastable carbide M3C are formed within the temperature range (500-600) °C. Formation of the stable phases ?23?6 and V(CN) begins at the temperatures higher than ? = 650 °?. An important feature of microstructure after tempering at ? = 720 °? is high density of nanoparticles (?10 nm) of vanadium carbonitride V(CN).

  13. Grain refinement of a nickel and manganese free austenitic stainless steel produced by pressurized solution nitriding

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh Akbari, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    Prolonged exposure at high temperatures during solution nitriding induces grain coarsening which deteriorates the mechanical properties of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels. In this study, grain refinement of nickel and manganese free Fe–22.75Cr–2.42Mo–1.17N high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel plates was investigated via a two-stage heat treatment procedure. Initially, the coarse-grained austenitic stainless steel samples were subjected to an isothermal heating at 700 °C to be decomposed into the ferrite + Cr{sub 2}N eutectoid structure and then re-austenitized at 1200 °C followed by water quenching. Microstructure and hardness of samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and micro-hardness testing. The results showed that the as-solution-nitrided steel decomposes non-uniformly to the colonies of ferrite and Cr{sub 2}N nitrides with strip like morphology after isothermal heat treatment at 700 °C. Additionally, the complete dissolution of the Cr{sub 2}N precipitates located in the sample edges during re-austenitizing requires longer times than 1 h. In order to avoid this problem an intermediate nitrogen homogenizing heat treatment cycle at 1200 °C for 10 h was applied before grain refinement process. As a result, the initial austenite was uniformly decomposed during the first stage, and a fine grained austenitic structure with average grain size of about 20 ?m was successfully obtained by re-austenitizing for 10 min. - Highlights: • Successful grain refinement of Fe–22.75Cr–2.42Mo–1.17N steel by heat treatment • Using the ? ? ? + Cr{sub 2}N reaction for grain refinement of a Ni and Mn free HNASS • Obtaining a single phase austenitic structure with average grain size of ? 20 ?m • Incomplete dissolution of Cr{sub 2}N during re-austenitizing at 1200 °C for long times • Reducing re-austenitizing time by homogenizing treatment before grain refinement.

  14. Manganese-Cobalt Mixed Spinel Oxides as Surface Modifiers for Stainless Steel Interconnects of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Gordon; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2006-11-06

    Ferritic stainless steels are promising candidates for interconnect applications in low- and mid-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A couple of issues however remain for the particular application, including the chromium poisoning due to chromia evaporation, and long-term surface and electrical stability of the scale grown on these steels. Application of a manganese colbaltite spinel protection layer on the steels appears to be an effective approach to solve the issues. For an optimized performance, Mn{sub 1+x}Co{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} (-1 {le} x {le} 2) spinels were investigated against properties relative for protection coating applications on ferritic SOFC interconnects. Overall it appears that the spinels with x around 0.5 demonstrate a good CTE match to ceramic cell components, a relative high electrical conductivity, and a good thermal stability up to 1,250 C. This was confirmed by a long-term test on the Mn{sub 1.5}Co{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} protection layer that was thermally grown on Crofer22 APU, indicating the spinel protection layer not only significantly decreased the contact resistance between a LSF cathode and the stainless steel interconnects, but also inhibited the sub-scale growth on the stainless steels.

  15. Conventional and microwave hydrothermal synthesis of monodispersed metal oxide nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monodispersed nanoparticles of metal oxide including ferrites MFe2O4 (M=, Ni, Co, Mn) and ?-Fe2O3, Ta2O5 etc. have been synthesized using a water-toluene interface under both conventional and microwave hydrothermal conditions. This general synthesis procedure uses readily availab...

  16. Sol-gel synthesis of manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, S.; Henry, M.; Baffier, N.; Livage, J.

    1990-10-01

    Transparent and stable manganese dioxide gels are obtained upon reduction of permanganate aqueous solutions AMnO 4 [ A = Li, Na, K, NH 4, N(CH 3) 4] by fumaric acid. All xerogels are amorphous when dried at room temperature. Their thermal behavior however depends on the nature of the counter cation A+. Ammonium permanganates lead to the formation of ?- or ?-Mn 2O 3 while AMnO 2 mixed oxides are obtained at high temperature when A = Li, Na, K. Other crystalline phases such as LiMn 2O 4 or Na 0.7MnO 2 are also formed at lower temperature around 500°C. Oxidation of these mixed oxides into sulfuric acid lead to the formation of ?- or ?-MnO 2 while A+ and Mn 2+ ions are released into the solution. Such manganese dioxides could be good candidates for making reversible cathodes in nonaqueous lithium batteries.

  17. Dietary manganese requirement of P. Vannamei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fa-Yi; Lawrence, A. L.

    1997-06-01

    Graded levels of manganese were supplemented to a semi-purified diet containing 45% crude protein, to provide six levels of manganese (i. e. containing 5, 25, 50, 70, 140 and 210×10-6, respectively) for two experiments with these experimental diets. The initial weight of shrimp used in the 35 day experiment I was 0.30±0.04 g, and that in the 70 day Experiment II was more than one gram. The results showed that optimum content in the semi-purified diet for the more than 1 gram shrimp ranged from 70 ×10-6, to 140×10-6, but supplementation of Mn was not necessary for the small shrimp.

  18. Impact of speciation on removal of manganese and organic matter by nanofiltration 

    E-print Network

    De Munari, Annalisa; Schäfer, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The removal of manganese and humic acid (HA) by two nanofiltration membranes, TFC-SR2 and TFC-SR3, was investigated in order to highlight the influence of speciation on manganese and HA retention. Manganese speciation ...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified...Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified...substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified...Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified...substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic...

  1. Characteristics of internal inductively coupled plasma with a ferrite module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeuk Lim, Jong; Kim, Kyong Nam; Gwon, Gwang Ho; Hong, Seng Pyo; Kim, Seok Hwan; Yeom, Geun Young

    2010-03-01

    The electrical and plasma properties of an internal inductively coupled plasma system with and without a Ni-Zn ferrite module operated at 13.56 and 2 MHz were investigated. Installing a ferrite module covering the top half of the ICP antenna increased the inductive coupling of the antenna to the plasma by the magnetic field reinforced by the ferrite. However, because of the high impedance of the Ni-Zn ferrite operated at 13.56 MHz, a more effective coupling was achieved at the operational frequency of 2 MHz. By using the ferrite module at 2 MHz, a plasma density of ~6 × 1011 cm-3 and a plasma potential of ~13 V were obtained at 500 W and 5 mTorr Ar. The plasma density was higher and the plasma potential lower than those obtained at 13.56 MHz.

  2. Properties of Organic Coatings with Nonisometric Ferrite Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, Miroslav; Kalendová, Andrea

    Ferrite pigments were synthesized through a high-temperature process during a solid phase. Zinc ferrites were prepared from hematite, goethite, magnetite and specularite entering into reaction with zinc oxide at temperatures ranging from 650 °C up to 1,150 °C. The nature of the initial raw material, primarily the shape of its particles, affects the shape of the particles of the synthesized zinc ferrite. The formulated zinc ferrites had a rod-shape, lamellar, and/or isometric shape. The shape of the particles of synthesized zinc ferrites was studied with regard to its effects on the mechanical and corrosion resistance of organic coatings. The obtained pigments were characterized by means of X- ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The synthesized anticorrosion pigments were used to prepare epoxy-ester coatings and water-borne styrene-acrylate coatings that were subjected to post-application tests for physical-mechanical properties and anticorrosion properties.

  3. Electrical transport behavior of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, S.; Sinha, M.; Meikap, A.K.; Pradhan, S.K.

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents the direct current conductivity, alternate current conductivity and dielectric properties of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite below room temperature. The frequency exponent (s) of conductivity shows an anomalous temperature dependency. The magnitude of the temperature exponent (n) of dielectric permittivity strongly depends on frequency and its value decreases with increasing frequency. The grain boundary contribution is dominating over the grain contribution in conduction process and the temperature dependence of resistance due to grain and grain boundary contribution exhibits two activation regions. The ferrite shows positive alternating current magnetoconductivity. The solid state processing technique was used for the preparation of nanocrystalline ferrite powder from oxides of magnesium, zinc and iron. The X-ray diffraction methods were used in determining the structure and composition of obtained ferrite, while multimeter, impedance analyzer, liquid nitrogen cryostat and electromagnet were used in the study of conducting and dielectric properties of ferrite.

  4. Ferrites and Different Winding Types in Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekerák, Peter; Hrabovcová, Valéria; Pyrhönen, Juha; Kalamen, Lukáš; Rafajdus, Pavol; Onufer, Matúš

    2012-05-01

    This paper deals with design of permanent magnet synchronous machines with ferrites. The ferrites became popular due to their low cost and cost increasing of NdFeB. The progress in ferrite properties in the last decade allows the use of ferrites in high power applications. Three models of ferrite motors are presented. It is shown that also the type of stator winding and the shape of the slot opening have an important effect on the PMSM properties. The first motor has a distributed winding, the second motor has concentrated, non-overlapping winding and open stator slots. The third motor has a concentrated non-overlapping winding and semi - open slots. All models are designed for the same output power and they do not have the same dimensions. The paper shows how important the design of an electric machine is for excellent motor properties or better to say how the motor properties can be improved by an appropriate design.

  5. Zn,Ni ferrite/NiO nanocomposite powder obtained from acetylacetonato complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucinic-Vasic, M.; Antic, B.; Kremenovic, A.; Nikolic, A. S.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Bibic, N.; Spasojevic, V.; Colomban, Ph

    2006-10-01

    The results on the synthesis, microstructure, structure and DC magnetization studies of nanocomposite Zn,Ni ferrite/NiO powder obtained by thermal decomposition of acetylacetonato complexes are reported in this paper. According to the results obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) element analysis and multiphase Rietveld refinement, the three samples made are composed of spinel-ferrite (86.7% 96.7%) and NiO (3.3% 13.3%) phases. The compositions of the spinel-ferrite (SP) phase in the investigated samples, S1 S3, are Zn0.72Ni0.24Fe1.98O4, Zn0.56Ni0.29Fe2.07O4 and Zn0.40Ni0.40Fe2.10O4, respectively. Due to the cation deficiency in spinels, created vacancies induce a partial change in the cation valence, \\mathrm {Ni^{2+}} \\to \\mathrm {Ni^{3+}} . The vacancy distribution is found to be random at 8a and 16d cation sites, except in sample S3, where all vacancies are over octahedral sites. The x-ray line broadening due to crystallite size effect is found to be isotropic for all spinels, while the x-ray line broadening due to the strain effect is anisotropic. A correlation between the Zn2+ occupancy of the tetrahedral site and the 650 cm-1 Raman peak intensities is shown. The observed coercivity decrease and shift in hysteresis loop in the samples are caused by the interaction between spinel and NiO phase. The results of M(H) measurements point to the properties of an ensemble of interacting nanoparticles. High saturation magnetization values and superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature point to the technological significance of the title compounds.

  6. Nanogold supported on manganese oxide doped alumina microspheres as a highly active and selective catalyst for CO oxidation in a H2-rich stream.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yu-Xin; Li, Wen-Cui; Sun, Qiang; Shi, Lei; He, Lei; Wang, Jing; Deng, Gao-Ming; Lu, An-Hui

    2015-12-28

    Manganese oxide-doped Al2O3 microspheres were synthesized via a redox method, and were then deposited with Au nanoparticles using a deposition-precipitation method. The obtained catalyst is not only highly active and selective for the preferential oxidation of CO in a H2-rich stream, but also shows excellent stability in the co-presence of H2O and CO2 at 80 °C. PMID:26489890

  7. Biomimetic Water-Oxidation Catalysts: Manganese Oxides.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen is a key process for the production of solar fuels. Inspired by the biological manganese-based active site for this reaction in the enzyme Photosystem II, researchers have made impressive progress in the last decades regarding the development of synthetic manganese catalysts for water oxidation. For this, it has been especially fruitful to explore the many different types of known manganese oxides MnO x .This chapter first offers an overview of the structural, thermodynamic, and mechanistic aspects of water-oxidation catalysis by MnO x . The different test systems used for catalytic studies are then presented together with general reactivity trends. As a result, it has been possible to identify layered, mixed Mn (III/IV) -oxides as an especially promising class of bio-inspired catalysts and an attempt is made to give structure-based reasons for the good performances of these materials.In the outlook, the challenges of catalyst screenings (and hence the identification of a "best MnO x catalyst") are discussed. There is a great variety of reaction conditions which might be relevant for the application of manganese oxide catalysts in technological solar fuel-producing devices, and thus catalyst improvements are currently still addressing a very large parameter space. Nonetheless, detailed knowledge about the biological catalyst and a solid experimental basis concerning the syntheses and water-oxidation reactivities of MnO x materials have been established in the last decade and thus this research field is well positioned to make important contributions to solar fuel research in the future. PMID:25980320

  8. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    E-print Network

    Barbuy, B; Zoccali, M; Minniti, D; Renzini, A; Ortolani, S; Gomez, A; Trevisan, M; Dutra, N

    2013-01-01

    Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut beween the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Gala...

  9. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400?m. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality. PMID:26409148

  10. Characterization of High-Velocity Solution Precursor Flame-Sprayed Manganese Cobalt Oxide Spinel Coatings for Metallic SOFC Interconnectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranen, Jouni; Laakso, Jarmo; Kylmälahti, Mikko; Vuoristo, Petri

    2013-06-01

    A modified high-velocity oxy-fuel spray (HVOF) thermal spray torch equipped with liquid feeding hardware was used to spray manganese-cobalt solutions on ferritic stainless steel grade Crofer 22 APU substrates. The HVOF torch was modified in such a way that the solution could be fed axially into the combustion chamber through 250- and 300-?m-diameter liquid injector nozzles. The solution used in this study was prepared by diluting nitrates of manganese and cobalt, i.e., Mn(NO3)2·4H2O and Co(NO3)2·6H2O, respectively, in deionized water. The as-sprayed coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy operating in secondary electron mode. Chemical analyses were performed on an energy dispersive spectrometer. Coatings with remarkable density could be prepared by the novel high-velocity solution precursor flame spray (HVSPFS) process. Due to finely sized droplet formation in the HVSPFS process and the use of as delivered Crofer 22 APU substrate material having very low substrate roughness ( R a < 0.5 ?m), thin and homogeneous coatings, with thicknesses lower than 10 ?m could be prepared. The coatings were found to have a crystalline structure equivalent to MnCo2O4 spinel with addition of Co-oxide phases. Crystallographic structure was restored back to single-phase spinel structure by heat treatment.

  11. Effect of d-ferrite on impact properties of supermartensitic stainless steel

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Effect of d-ferrite on impact properties of supermartensitic stainless steel heat affected zones D of the presence of non-equilibrium d-ferrite on the impact properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel-ferrite. STWJ/410 Keywords: supermartensitic stainless steels, weld heat affected zone, delta-ferrite toughness

  12. Manganese-Based Magnets: Manganese-Based Permanent Magnet with 40 MGOe at 200°C

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: PNNL is working to reduce the cost of wind turbines and EVs by developing a manganese-based nano-composite magnet that could serve as an inexpensive alternative to rare-earth-based magnets. The manganese composite, made from low-cost and abundant materials, could exceed the performance of today’s most powerful commercial magnets at temperature higher than 200°C. Members of PNNL’s research team will leverage comprehensive computer high-performance supercomputer modeling and materials testing to meet this objective. Manganese-based magnets could withstand higher temperatures than their rare earth predecessors and potentially reduce the need for any expensive, bulky engine cooling systems for the motor and generator. This would further contribute to cost savings for both EVs and wind turbines.

  13. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy of mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chesnick, I.E.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; Newbury, D.E.; Small, J.A.; Potter, K.

    2007-01-01

    Paramagnetic manganese (II) can be employed as a calcium surrogate to sensitize magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) to the processing of calcium during bone formation. At high doses, osteoblasts can take up sufficient quantities of manganese, resulting in marked changes in water proton T1, T2 and magnetization transfer ratio values compared to those for untreated cells. Accordingly, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results confirm that the manganese content of treated cell pellets was 10-fold higher than that for untreated cell pellets. To establish that manganese is processed like calcium and deposited as bone, calvaria from the skull of embryonic chicks were grown in culture medium supplemented with 1 mM MnCl2 and 3 mM CaCl2. A banding pattern of high and low T2 values, consistent with mineral deposits with high and low levels of manganese, was observed radiating from the calvarial ridge. The results of ICP-MS studies confirm that manganese-treated calvaria take up increasing amounts of manganese with time in culture. Finally, elemental mapping studies with electron probe microanalysis confirmed local variations in the manganese content of bone newly deposited on the calvarial surface. This is the first reported use of manganese-enhanced MRM to study the process whereby calcium is taken up by osteoblasts cells and deposited as bone. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Oriented nanometric aggregates of partially inverted zinc ferrite: One-step processing and tunable high-frequency magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Ranajit; Endo, Yasushi; Shimada, Yutaka; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, it is demonstrated that the in situ growth of oriented nanometric aggregates of partially inverted zinc ferrite can potentially pave a way to alter and tune magnetocrystalline anisotropy that, in turn, dictates ferromagnetic resonance frequency (fFMR) by inducing strain due to aggregation. Furthermore, the influence of interparticle interaction on magnetic properties of the aggregates is investigated. Mono-dispersed zinc ferrite nanoparticles (<5 nm) with various degrees of aggregation were prepared through decomposition of metal-organic compounds of zinc (II) and iron (III) in an alcoholic solution under controlled microwave irradiation, below 200 °C. The nanocrystallites were found to possess high degree of inversion (>0.5). With increasing order of aggregation in the samples, saturation magnetization (at 5 K) is found to decrease from 38 emu/g to 24 emu/g, while coercivity is found to increase gradually by up to 100% (525 Oe to 1040 Oe). Anisotropy-mediated shift of fFMR has also been measured and discussed. In essence, the result exhibits an easy way to control the magnetic characteristics of nanocrystalline zinc ferrite, boosted with significant degree of inversion, at GHz frequencies.

  15. Oriented nanometric aggregates of partially inverted zinc ferrite: One-step processing and tunable high-frequency magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sai, Ranajit; Endo, Yasushi; Shimada, Yutaka; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2015-05-07

    In this work, it is demonstrated that the in situ growth of oriented nanometric aggregates of partially inverted zinc ferrite can potentially pave a way to alter and tune magnetocrystalline anisotropy that, in turn, dictates ferromagnetic resonance frequency (f{sub FMR}) by inducing strain due to aggregation. Furthermore, the influence of interparticle interaction on magnetic properties of the aggregates is investigated. Mono-dispersed zinc ferrite nanoparticles (<5?nm) with various degrees of aggregation were prepared through decomposition of metal-organic compounds of zinc (II) and iron (III) in an alcoholic solution under controlled microwave irradiation, below 200?°C. The nanocrystallites were found to possess high degree of inversion (>0.5). With increasing order of aggregation in the samples, saturation magnetization (at 5?K) is found to decrease from 38?emu/g to 24?emu/g, while coercivity is found to increase gradually by up to 100% (525?Oe to 1040?Oe). Anisotropy-mediated shift of f{sub FMR} has also been measured and discussed. In essence, the result exhibits an easy way to control the magnetic characteristics of nanocrystalline zinc ferrite, boosted with significant degree of inversion, at GHz frequencies.

  16. Helium entrapment in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D; Parish, Chad M; Zhang, Yanwen; Hallen, Dr Anders; Miller, Michael K

    2011-01-01

    The nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT has been irradiated with He ions to simulate accumulation of He during the service life of a nuclear reactor to test the hypothesis that the large surface area for nanoclusters is a preferential nucleation site for bubbles. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography showed that high number densities of He bubbles were formed on the surface of nanoclusters and Ti(C,N) precipitates, and along grain boundaries and dislocations. At higher fluences, facetted bubbles are formed and it is postulated that the lowest energy state configuration is the truncated rhombic dodecahedron.

  17. Microstructural origin of the skeletal ferrite morphology of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-04-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy was conducted on welds exhibiting a variety of skeletal, or vermicular ferrite morphologies in addition to one lathy ferrite morphology. These ferrite morphologies result from primary ferrite solidification followed by a solid state transformation upon cooling. During cooling, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite leaving a variety of ferrite morphologies. Comparison of composition profiles and alloy partitioning showed both the skeletal and lathy ferrite structures result from a diffusion controlled solid state transformation. However, the overall measured composition profiles of the weld structure are a result of partitioning during both solidification and the subsequent solid state transformation.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of MnS and MnSe nanoparticles: Morphology, optical and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloto, N.; Moloto, M. J.; Kalenga, M.; Govindraju, S.; Airo, M.

    2013-11-01

    Herein, we report on the synthesis of manganese chalcogenide nanoparticles using mild synthetic methods. The MnS nanoparticles were synthesised using a single-source precursor method with tetramethylthiuram disulfide as a ligand, whilst the MnSe nanoparticles were synthesised by reacting reduced elemental selenium with manganese. These synthetic methods resulted in crystalline MnS nanoparticles with wire-like morphology with high aspect ratio and MnSe nanorods that were nearly mono-dispersed. The absorption band-edges of both MnS and MnSe were blue-shifted from the reported bulk band-edges indicative of quantum confinement effects seen in nanoparticles. Furthermore, both MnS and MnSe showed paramagnetic characteristics with the ESR spectra showing broad single resonance peaks with g-values of 2.0064 and 2.0068 respectively.

  19. SIMS depth profiling of working environment nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konarski, P.; Iwanejko, I.; Mierzejewska, A.

    2003-01-01

    Morphology of working environment nanoparticles was analyzed using sample rotation technique in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The particles were collected with nine-stage vacuum impactor during gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process of stainless steel and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of mild steel. Ion erosion of 300-400 nm diameter nanoparticles attached to indium substrate was performed with 2 keV, 100 ?m diameter, Ar + ion beam at 45° ion incidence and 1 rpm sample rotation. The results show that both types of particles have core-shell morphology. A layer of fluorine, chlorine and carbon containing compounds covers stainless steel welding fume particles. The cores of these particles are enriched in iron, manganese and chromium. Outer shell of mild steel welding fume particles is enriched in carbon, potassium, chlorine and fluorine, while the deeper layers of these nanoparticles are richer in main steel components.

  20. The effect of annealing on the structural and magnetic properties of Ni-ferrite nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Chaturbhuj; Verma, A. K.; Chauhan, S. S.; Shrivastava, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles NiFe2O4 were prepared by chemical co-precipitation technique using the chlorides of Ni, Fe (III) and oleic acid. The precursors were annealed at different temperature 500, 700, and 900 °C. The XRD of samples show the presence of inverse cubic spinel structure. Grain size was determined using Scherrer formula and SEM technique. The Particle size, Lattice parameter and X-ray density were also estimated from X-ray diffraction data. The particles size was found to vary from 17nm to 37 nm and largely depends on the annealing temperature. Magnetization measurements have also carried out using VSM and it was found that saturation magnetization (Ms), Remanance (Mr) and coercivity (Hc) of nano ferrite materials are lower compared to bulk materials.

  1. Effect of ultrasonic treatment on tensile properties of PLA/LNR/NiZn ferrite nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Shahdan, Dalila; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj.; Flaifel, Moayad Husein

    2013-11-27

    The influence of sonication treatment time on the morphological and mechanical properties of LNR/PLA composite impregnated with different filler loadings of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles was investigated. The nanocomposite was prepared using melt blending method with assistance of ultrasonic treatment of 0, 1 and 2 hrs. Structural characterization of the nanocomposites was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with their elemental composition being confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The tensile properties of LNR/PLA composite treated with different ultrasonication times have improved with increasing magnetic nanofiller signature in the nanocomposite. Further, the optimum sonication time of 1 hr was found to produce nanocomposite with maximum tensile properties.

  2. Preparation of medical magnetic nanobeads with ferrite particles encapsulated in a polyglycidyl methacrylate (GMA) for bioscreening

    SciTech Connect

    Nishibiraki, H.; Kuroda, C.S.; Maeda, M.; Matsushita, N.; Abe, M.; Handa, H.

    2005-05-15

    Ferrite nanoparticles (an intermediate between Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), {approx}7 nm in diameter, were embedded in beads of a mixed polymer of styrene (St) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) by emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization method. The beads were coated with GMA by a seeded polymerization method in order to suppress nonspecific protein binding on the surfaces; GMA exhibits very low nonspecific protein binding, which is required for carriers used for bioscreening. The beads have diameters of 180{+-}50 nm and saturation magnetizations of 28 emu/g, exceeding commercially available polymer-coated beads of micron size having a weaker saturation magnetization ({approx}12 emu/g)

  3. Surface driven effects on magnetic properties of antiferromagnetic LaFeO{sub 3} nanocrystalline ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sendil Kumar, A. E-mail: anilb42@gmail.com; Manivel Raja, M.; Bhatnagar, Anil K. E-mail: anilb42@gmail.com

    2014-09-21

    LaFeO{sub 3} nanocrystalline ferrites were synthesized through sol-gel method in different size distributions and the effect of finite size on magnetic properties is investigated. Results of magnetization and Mössbauer measurements show that superparamagnetism and weak ferromagnetic behavior in some of the size distributions. The origin of the superparamagnetism is from fine particles similar to ferromagnetic single domains and the weak ferromagnetism comes from surface spin disorder caused by Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. The magnetic ground state of LaFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles differs from that of bulk, and the ground state is dictated by the finite size effect because density of states depends on the dimensionality of the sample.

  4. Facile and economical synthesis of large hollow ferrites and their applications in adsorption for As(V) and Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Dui, Jingna; Zhu, Gongyu; Zhou, Shaomin

    2013-10-23

    Unlike the previous ferrites (MFe2O4; M=Fe, Co, Zn, and Mn) solid nanospheres/nanoparticles, which were prepared by polluted solvothermal (glycol) approaches, here controllable monodisperse porous ferrites hollow nanospheres are promptly synthesized by a nontemplate hydrothermal method which has introduced an addition agent, polyacrylamide. The hollow nanospheres with different size can be prepared by varying the synthetic compositions. Scanning/transmission micros-graphs show the outside diameters of ferrite nanospheres are 180-380 nm and the shell thicknesses of that are only 20-45 nm, which could be adjusted by controlling CH3COONa concentration. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy, scanning electron (SEM) and transmission electron (TEM) microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), the measurement of N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, and superconducting quantum interference device (SQID) magnetometer were adopted to analyze their phase composition, morphology, porosity, and magnetic properties, respectively. The results of controlled experiments show that citrate and polyacrylamide are vital for the phase purities and morphology of ferrites. In particular, the as-obtained samples exhibit a large adsorption capacity for the toxic solution containing As(V) and Cr(VI) ions, and the calculated result of the maximum adsorption capacity is 340 mg/g based on Langmuir model, which shows excellent As(V) and Cr(VI) ions uptake capacity in contrast to other solid nanosphere materials. PMID:24066850

  5. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  6. Phase transformation of strontium hexagonal ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilovol, V.; Martínez-García, R.

    2015-11-01

    The phase transformation of strontium hexagonal ferrite (SrFe12O19) to magnetite (Fe3O4) as main phase and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) as secondary phase is reported here. SrFe12O19 powder was obtained by a heat treatment at 250 °C under controlled oxygen flow. It was observed that the phase transformation occurred when the SrFe12O19 ferrite was heated up to 625 °C in confinement conditions. This transformation took place by a combination of three factors: the presence of stresses in the crystal lattice of SrFe12O19 due to a low synthesis temperature, the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ during the heating up to 625 °C, and the similarity of the coordination spheres of the iron atoms present in the S-block of SrFe12O19 and Fe3O4. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the existence of strain and crystal deformation in SrFe12O19 and the absence of them in the material after the phase transformation. Dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Fe57 Mössbauer spectroscopy provided evidences of the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ in the SrFe12O19 crystal.

  7. Influence of calcination temperature on Cd0.3Co0.7Fe2O4 nanoparticles: Structural, thermal and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Ch. Venkata; PrabhakarVattikuti, S. V.; Ravikumar, R. V. S. S. N.; Moon, Sang Jun; Shim, Jaesool

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are synthesis using the chemical method. The as-prepared ferrite nanoparticles are calcinated at 300 °C and 600 °C respectively. The samples are studied using; Powder XRD, SEM with EDX, TEM, FT-IR, TG-DTA and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) in order to study the calcination temperature effect on structural, morphological and magnetic properties. The magnetic properties, like saturation magnetization and coercivity increases with increasing the calcination temperature. This enhancement is attributed to the transition from amulti-domain to a single-domain nature. The absorption bands observed at 588 cm-1 (?1) and 440 cm-1 (?2) are attributed to the vibrations of tetrahedral and octahedral complexes. The TG-DTA curves reveal the thermal stability of the prepared ferrite nanoparticles. The calcination temperature influences the magnetic properties, surface morphology and crystalline size.

  8. Electrical and thermal behavior of PS/ferrite composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashour, A. H.; Hemeda, O. M.; Heiba, Z. K.; Al-Zahrani, S. M.

    2014-11-01

    This work aims to study the effect of gamma radiation on the structure, thermal and electrical properties of PS/ferrite composite. The Ni0.6Cd0.4Fe2-xSmxO4 was prepared using a conventional sintering ceramic process. Ferrite powder and Styrene was mixed and achieve polymerization process by gamma irradiation at 50 kGy. The composite samples have single spinel phase structure. Stability of the crystalline structure and no phase transition due to irradiation are found. The bulk density decreases whereas X-ray density increases with increasing Sm contents for both ferrite and PS/ferrite. The tetrahedral radii rA remains constant with Sm content but octahedral radii rB increases for both ferrite and PS/ferrite composite. The grain size shows increasing trend for PS/ferrite composite. The PS nearly coat the grains and so their boundaries become faint and not sharp. The gamma radiation transfer Fe3+ to Fe2+ due to its ionizing effect.The Fe2+ occupy octahedral site and the stretching vibration of its bond with oxygen (Fe2+-O2-) gives absorption at about 392 cm-1, near octahedral absorption at 462 cm-1.The PS/Ni0.6Cd0.4SmxFe2-xO4 composite becomes thermally more stable than pure polystyrene. The activation energy of conduction E? has a small values and in the range of hopping conduction mechanism.

  9. Preparation and investigation of dc conductivity and relative permeability of epoxy/Li-Ni-Zn ferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, M. A.; Saafan, S. A.; El-Kony, D.; Salahuddin, N. A.

    2015-07-01

    Ferrite nanoparticles - having the compositions Li(x/2)(Ni0.5Zn0.5)(1-x)Fe(2+x/2)O4 (x=0, 0.2, 0.3) - have been prepared by the co-precipitation method. The prepared powders have been divided into groups and sintered at different temperatures (373 K, 1074 K and 1473 K). X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD) for all samples has confirmed the formation of the desired ferrites with crystallite sizes within the nanoscale (<100 nm). The dc conductivity, the relative permeability and the magnetization of the ferrite samples have been investigated and according to the results, the sample Li0.15(Ni0.5Zn0.5)0.7 Fe2.15O4 sintered at 1473 K has been chosen to prepare the composites. The particle size of this sample has been recalculated by using JEOL JEM-100SX transmission electron microscope and it has been found about 64.7 nm. Then, a pure epoxy sample and four pristine epoxy resin /Li0.15(Ni0.5Zn0.5)0.7 Fe2.15O4 composites have been prepared using different ferrite contents (20%, 30%, 40%, and 50%) wt.%. These samples have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and their dc conductivity, relative permeability and magnetization have also been investigated. The obtained results indicate that the investigated composites may be promising candidates for practical applications such as EMI suppressor and high frequency applications.

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 37, NO. 4, JULY 2001 2589 Barium and Strontium Ferrite Perpendicular Thin

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, David E.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 37, NO. 4, JULY 2001 2589 Barium and Strontium FerriteAlSi) as the soft magnetic underlayer for hexagonal barium ferrite (BaM) and strontium ferrite (SrM) was studied--Barium ferrite, multi-layer, sendust, soft under- layer, strontium ferrite, textured growth. I. INTRODUCTION M

  11. Magnetically tunable wideband microwave filter using ferrite-based metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Ke; Zhu, Wenting; Lei, Ming; Zhou, Ji

    2015-04-01

    Magnetically tunable wideband microwave filters have been designed and prepared by using ferrite-based metamaterial structures. The microwave properties of the filters have been investigated by experiments and simulations. The negative permeability appears around the ferromagnetic resonance frequency, which leads to a remarkable stopband for the bandstop filter. The bandpass filter is composed of two kinds of ferrite rods with different saturation magnetization. The bandwidth of the passband can be tuned by adjusting the saturation magnetization of the ferrite rods. Both the experimental and the simulated results show that those filters possess magnetically tunable property. This approach opens a way for designing tunable wideband microwave filters.

  12. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  15. Manganese binding and oxidation by spores of a marine bacillus.

    PubMed Central

    Rosson, R A; Nealson, K H

    1982-01-01

    Mature, dormant spores of a marine bacillus, SG-1, bound and oxidized (precipitated) manganese on their surfaces. The binding and oxidation occurred under dormant conditions, with mature spores suspended in natural seawater. These heat-stable spores were formed in the absence of added manganese in the growth medium. The rate and amount of manganese bound by SG-1 spores was a function of spore concentration. Temperatures greater than 45 degrees C, pH values below 6.5, or the addition of EDTA or the metabolic inhibitors sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and mercuric chloride inhibited manganese binding and oxidation. However, SG-1 spores bound and oxidized manganese after treatment with glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide gas, or UV light, all of which killed the spores. Manganese oxidation never occurred in the absence of manganese binding to spores. The data suggest that Mn2+ was complexed by a spore component, perhaps an exosporium or a spore coat protein: once bound, the manganese was rapidly oxidized. Images PMID:6212577

  16. Non-heme manganese catalase – the ‘other’ catalase

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Non-heme manganese catalases are widely distributed over microbial life and represent an environmentally important alternative to heme-containing catalases in antioxidant defense. Manganese catalases contain a binuclear manganese complex as their catalytic active site rather than a heme, and cycle between Mn2(II,II) and Mn2(III,III) states during turnover. X-ray crystallography has revealed the key structural elements of the binuclear manganese active site complex that can serve as the starting point for computational studies on the protein. Four manganese catalase enzymes have been isolated and characterized, and the enzyme appears to have a broad phylogenetic distribution including both bacteria and archae. More than 100 manganese catalase genes have been annotated in genomic databases, although the assignment of many of these putative manganese catalases needs to be experimentally verified. Iron limitation, exposure to low levels of peroxide stress, thermostability and cyanide resistance may provide the biological and environmental context for the occurrence of manganese catalases. PMID:22198285

  17. Nanometer-size hard magnetic ferrite exhibiting high optical-transparency and nonlinear optical-magnetoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi; Namai, Asuka; Imoto, Kenta; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Tarora, Waka; Nakagawa, Kosuke; Komine, Masaya; Miyamoto, Yasuto; Nasu, Tomomichi; Oka, Syunsuke; Tokoro, Hiroko

    2015-10-01

    Development of nanometer-sized magnetic particles exhibiting a large coercive field (Hc) is in high demand for densification of magnetic recording. Herein, we report a single-nanosize (i.e., less than ten nanometers across) hard magnetic ferrite. This magnetic ferrite is composed of ?-Fe2O3, with a sufficiently high Hc value for magnetic recording systems and a remarkably high magnetic anisotropy constant of 7.7?×?106?erg cm-3. For example, 8.2-nm nanoparticles have an Hc value of 5.2?kOe at room temperature. A colloidal solution of these nanoparticles possesses a light orange color due to a wide band gap of 2.9?eV (430?nm), indicating a possibility of transparent magnetic pigments. Additionally, we have observed magnetization-induced second harmonic generation (MSHG). The nonlinear optical-magnetoelectric effect of the present polar magnetic nanocrystal was quite strong. These findings have been demonstrated in a simple iron oxide, which is highly significant from the viewpoints of economic cost and mass production.

  18. Nanometer-size hard magnetic ferrite exhibiting high optical-transparency and nonlinear optical-magnetoelectric effect.

    PubMed

    Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi; Namai, Asuka; Imoto, Kenta; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Tarora, Waka; Nakagawa, Kosuke; Komine, Masaya; Miyamoto, Yasuto; Nasu, Tomomichi; Oka, Syunsuke; Tokoro, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Development of nanometer-sized magnetic particles exhibiting a large coercive field (Hc) is in high demand for densification of magnetic recording. Herein, we report a single-nanosize (i.e., less than ten nanometers across) hard magnetic ferrite. This magnetic ferrite is composed of ?-Fe2O3, with a sufficiently high Hc value for magnetic recording systems and a remarkably high magnetic anisotropy constant of 7.7?×?10(6)?erg cm(-3). For example, 8.2-nm nanoparticles have an Hc value of 5.2?kOe at room temperature. A colloidal solution of these nanoparticles possesses a light orange color due to a wide band gap of 2.9?eV (430?nm), indicating a possibility of transparent magnetic pigments. Additionally, we have observed magnetization-induced second harmonic generation (MSHG). The nonlinear optical-magnetoelectric effect of the present polar magnetic nanocrystal was quite strong. These findings have been demonstrated in a simple iron oxide, which is highly significant from the viewpoints of economic cost and mass production. PMID:26439914

  19. Nanometer-size hard magnetic ferrite exhibiting high optical-transparency and nonlinear optical-magnetoelectric effect

    PubMed Central

    Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi; Namai, Asuka; Imoto, Kenta; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Tarora, Waka; Nakagawa, Kosuke; Komine, Masaya; Miyamoto, Yasuto; Nasu, Tomomichi; Oka, Syunsuke; Tokoro, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Development of nanometer-sized magnetic particles exhibiting a large coercive field (Hc) is in high demand for densification of magnetic recording. Herein, we report a single-nanosize (i.e., less than ten nanometers across) hard magnetic ferrite. This magnetic ferrite is composed of ?-Fe2O3, with a sufficiently high Hc value for magnetic recording systems and a remarkably high magnetic anisotropy constant of 7.7?×?106?erg cm?3. For example, 8.2-nm nanoparticles have an Hc value of 5.2?kOe at room temperature. A colloidal solution of these nanoparticles possesses a light orange color due to a wide band gap of 2.9?eV (430?nm), indicating a possibility of transparent magnetic pigments. Additionally, we have observed magnetization-induced second harmonic generation (MSHG). The nonlinear optical-magnetoelectric effect of the present polar magnetic nanocrystal was quite strong. These findings have been demonstrated in a simple iron oxide, which is highly significant from the viewpoints of economic cost and mass production. PMID:26439914

  20. Effect of cation trapping on thermal stability of magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pati, S S; Philip, John

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the effect of sodium trapping on thermal stability of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The pure magnetite nanoparticles incubated in sodium hydroxide solutions and subsequently washed with water to remove the excess sodium. The amount of sodium in magnetite is measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The size distribution obtained from Small angle X-ray scattering measurements show that particles are fairly monodisperse. The FTIR spectra of nanoparticles show transmission bands at 441 and 611 cm(-1) are due to the symmetric stretching vibrations (v) of Fe-O in octahedral and tetrahedral sites respectively. With 500 ppm of sodium ions (Na+) in magnetite, the cubic ferrite structure of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) to hexagonal hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) phase transition is enhanced by -150 degrees C in air. The Rietveld analysis of sodium doped magnetite nanoparticles show that above 99% of metastable gamma-Fe2O3 is converted to a thermodynamically stable alpha-Fe2O3 after air annealing at 700 degrees C. A decrease in enthalpy observed in doped magnetite unambiguously confirms that the activation energy for maghemite to hematite transition is increased due to the presence of trapped sodium ions. These results suggest that the trapped cations in ferrite nanoparticles can stabilize them by increasing the activation energy. PMID:24738360

  1. Some factors influencing cadmium-manganese interaction in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gruden, N.; Matausic, S. )

    1989-07-01

    Recent data show that even a low dose of cadmium (20 {mu}g/day/rat) significantly suppresses manganese transduodenal transport when administered during a three-day period. The inhibitory effect of cadmium upon manganese absorption is enhanced by concurrently administered iron-fortified milk diet. This suggests that the (synergistic) action of cadmium and iron upon manganese and the competition between these (three) ions in the intestine depend on their relative concentrations and affinity for the binding sites within the intestinal mucosa. For this reason the authors considered it worthwhile examining whether this inhibitory effect of cadmium would be affected by simultaneously administered manganese-fortified milk. Since the absorption of heavy metals and, at the same time, the demand for manganese is higher in the young than in the old animals, they also studied how this interaction depends upon the animals' age and sex and whether it is the same in the whole small intestine.

  2. Oxidation state of marine manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.; Basler, J.R.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Analyses of the bulk oxidation state of marine manganese nodules indicates that more than 98% of the Mn in deep ocean nodules is present as Mn(IV). The samples were collected from three quite different areas: the hemipelagic environment of the Guatemala Basin, the pelagic area of the North Pacific, and seamounts in the central Pacific. Results of the study suggest that todorokite in marine nodules is fully oxidized and has the following stoichiometry: (K, Na, Ca, Ba).33(Mg, Cu, Ni).76Mn5O22(H2O)3.2. ?? 1984.

  3. Manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves: Synthesis, self-assembly, control over morphologies and tunnel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jikang

    Direct architecture of complex nanostructures is desirable and still remains a challenge in areas of materials science. Due to their size-, shape-dependent electronic and optical properties, much effort has been made to control morphologies of transition metal oxide nanoparticles and to organize them into complicated 3D structures using templates. In particular, manganese oxides have attracted much attention because they have extensive applications in many chemical processes due to their porous structures, acidity, ionexchange, separation, catalysis, and energy storage in secondary batteries. Using organic templates such as trimethylamine (TMA), manganese oxides have been successfully organized into macroscopic rings and helices via sol-gel processes. However, the methods mentioned above all need further purification, so impurities will be avoided. Subsequent procedures are needed to obtain pure products. Thus facile and template-free methods are highly desired for synthesis of manganese oxide nanaoparticles with complex 3D structures. Manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (OMS) are a class of microporous transition metallic oxides with various kinds of tunnel structures that can be synthesized via controlling synthetic conditions such as temperature, concentration, pH, and cations. Manganese oxide molecular sieves are semiconducting mixed-valence catalysts that utilize electron transport to catalyze reactions such as selective oxidation of alcohols. OMS has distinct advantages over aluminosilicate molecular sieve materials for applications in catalysis due to the mixed valence character. The synthesis of manganese oxide OMS materials will be much more complicated than those of main group metallic oxides because of different coordination numbers and oxidation states. OMS-type materials with desirable morphologies formed under mild synthetic conditions are highly desirable. Herein, we report a template-free, low temperature preparation of porous cryptomelane-type manganese oxide (OMS-2) 3D nanostructures. The objectives of this research include exploration of new methods to oxidize Mn2+ in aqueous solution either under low-temperature reflux or hydrothermal conditions. Various oxidants were used with precisely controlled synthetic parameters such as temperature, concentrations of starting materials, pH, and kinds of templates. A variety of techniques including powder X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) scanning electron microscopy are used to investigate the structures of synthesized materials. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy are utilized to studying the morphology and topography. The surface areas of the materials is measured by the BET method. Inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) are utilized to investigate the chemical composition of the materials. Thermal-stability of the materials is investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The objectives of this research includes exploring new synthetic approach such as oxidation of Mn2+ in aqueous solution by selecting suitable oxidants so as to control redox potential, varying pH of reaction systems, and controlling tunnel structures using hard templates (cations) under hydrothermal conditions.

  4. Development of Lymantria dispar affected by manganese in food.

    PubMed

    Kula, Emanuel; Martinek, Petr; Chromcová, Lucie; Hedbávný, Josef

    2014-10-01

    We studied the response of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae)) to the content of manganese in food in the laboratory breeding of caterpillars. The food of the caterpillars {Betula pendula Roth (Fagales: Betulaceae) leaves} was contaminated by dipping in the solution of MnCl2 · 4H2O with manganese concentrations of 0, 0.5, 5 and 10 mg ml(-1), by which differentiated manganese contents (307; 632; 4,087 and 8,124 mg kg(-1)) were reached. Parameters recorded during the rearing were as follows: effect of manganese on food consumption, mortality and length of the development of caterpillars, pupation and hatching of imagoes. At the same time, manganese concentrations were determined in the offered and unconsumed food, excrements, and exuviae of the caterpillars, pupal cases and imagoes by using the AAS method. As compared with the control, high manganese contents in the food of gypsy moth caterpillars affected the process of development particularly by increased mortality of the first instar caterpillars (8 % mortality for caterpillars with no Mn contamination (T0) and 62 % mortality for subjects with the highest contamination by manganese (T3)), by prolonged development of the first-third instar (18.7 days (T0) and 27.8 days (T3)) and by increased food consumption of the first-third instar {0.185 g of leaf dry matter (T0) and 0.483 g of leaf dry matter (T3)}. The main defence strategy of the caterpillars to prevent contamination by the increased manganese content in food is the translocation of manganese into frass and exuviae castoff in the process of ecdysis. In the process of development, the content of manganese was reduced by excretion in imagoes to 0.5 % of the intake level even at its maximum inputs in food. PMID:25028315

  5. Effect of quantity and route of administration of manganese monoxide on feed intake and serum manganese in ruminants

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.R.; Ammerman, C.B.; Henry, P.R.

    1985-02-01

    The experiment investigated effects of high quantities of manganese and route of administration (diet versus capsule-dosed) on feed intake and blood characteristics in sheep. Twenty-four Florida native or Florida native by St. Croix crossbred wethers, 47 kg initially, were assigned randomly to eight treatments including basal diet supplemented with 0, 3000, 6000, or 9000 ppm manganese as a reagent grade manganese monoxide or basal diet plus gelatin capsules containing the equivalent of 0, 3000, 6000, or 9000 ppm manganese based on intake of the previous day. Three sheep per treatment were provided feed and tap water for ad libitum intake. Sheep were fed basal diet for 7 days followed by a 21-day experimental period, then placed back on the basal diet for 7 days. Average daily feed intake was reduced by increasing supplemental manganese, regardless of route. Animals dosed by capsule consumed less feed than those administered manganese in the diet. Serum manganese increased as manganese supplementation increased, but route of administration had no effect.

  6. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Boberg, Ralph E. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Weingart, Richard C. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto.

  7. Ferritic-martensitic steel subjected to equal channel angular extrusion 

    E-print Network

    Foley, David Christopher

    2009-05-15

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel (T91) has been extensively investigated as a structural material for GenIV nuclear reactors and Accelerator Driven Transmutation systems. One attractive characteristic of this steel in these applications...

  8. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Boberg, R.E.; Lee, R.S.; Weingart, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto. 10 figs.

  9. Controlled ferrite content improves weldability of corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant steel that adds restrictions on chemical composition to ensure sufficient ferrite content decreases the tendency of CRES to develop cracks during welding. The equations restricting composition are based on the Schaeffler constitution diagram.

  10. Study of the preparation of NI-Mn-Zn ferrite using spent NI-MH and alkaline Zn-Mn batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Guoxi; Xi, Yuebin; Xu, Huidao; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles of Ni-Mn-Zn ferrite have been prepared by a sol-gel method making use of spent Ni-MH and Zn-Mn batteries as source materials. Characterization by X-ray diffraction was carried out to study the particle size. The presence of functional groups was identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. From studies by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, crystallization occurred at temperatures above 560 °C. The magnetic properties of the final products were found to be directly influenced by the average particle size of the product. The Ms values increase and the Hc values decrease as the size of the Ni-Mn-Zn ferrite particles increases.

  11. Polymorphism and Formation Mechanism of Nanobipods in Manganese Sulfide Nanocrystals Induced by Temperature or Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xinyi; Wang, Yingnan; Wang, Kai; Sui, Yongming; Zhang, Meiguang; Li, Bing; Ma, Yanming; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2012-03-15

    Manganese sulfide (MnS) nanocrystals (NCs) with three different phases were synthesized by one-pot solvent thermal approach. The crystal structures and morphologies were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. We found that the crystal structure and morphology of MnS NCs could be controlled by simply varying the reaction temperature. The detailed growth process of MnS nanobipods, including the zinc blende (ZB)-core formation and wurtzite (WZ)-arms growth, provides direct experimental evidence for the polymorphism model. Furthermore, we have studied the stability of metastable ZB- and WZ-MnS NCs under high pressure and found that ZB-nanoparticles and ZB/WZ-nanobipods are stable below their critical pressure, 5.3 and 2.9 GPa, respectively. When pressures exceed the critical point, all these metastable MnS NCs directly convert to the stable rock salt MnS.

  12. Determination of growth of Sphaerotilus discophorus in the presence of manganese.

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, H; Makemson, J

    1976-01-01

    Manganese interferes strongly with most chemical methods of biomass determination. However, the biomass of manganese-encrusted Sphaerotilus discophorus can be determined after removal of the MnO2 with trichloroacetic acid and oxalic acid. Evidence which indicates that manganese inhibits the heterotrophic growth of S. discophorus and that the cells only oxidize manganese late in the growth curve is presented. PMID:791129

  13. Joining Techniques for Ferritic ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    V.G. Krishnardula; V.G. Krishnardula; D.E. Clark; T.C. Totemeier

    2005-06-01

    This report presents results of research on advanced joining techniques for ferritic oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys MA956 and PM2000. The joining techniques studied were resistance pressure welding (also known as pressure forge welding), transient liquid phase bonding, and diffusion bonding. All techniques were shown to produce sound joints in fine-grained, unrecrystallized alloys. Post-bond heat treatment to produce a coarse-grained, recrystallized microstructure resulted in grain growth across the bondline for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonds, giving microstructures essentially identical to that of the parent alloy in the recrystallized condition. The effects of bond orientation, boron interlayer thickness, and bonding parameters are discussed for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonding. The report concludes with a brief discussion of ODS joining techniques and their applicability to GEN IV reactor systems.

  14. Characterization of Irradiated Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, James; Hoelzer, David T; Tanigawa, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, George R.

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of a new class of mechanically alloyed (MA) ferritic steels with outstanding mechanical properties that come, at least in part, from the presence of high concentrations (>10{sup 23} m{sup -3}) of Ti-, Y-, and O-enriched nanoclusters (NC). From the outset, there has been much interest in their potential use for applications to fission and proposed fusion reactors, not only because of their attractive high-temperature strength, but also because the presence of NC may result in a highly radiation-resistant material by efficiently trapping point defects to enhance recombination. Of special interest for fusion applications is the potential of NC to trap transmutation-produced He in high concentrations of small cavities, rather than in fewer but larger cavities that lead to greater radiation-induced swelling and other degraded properties.

  15. DARHT-II Injector Transients and the Ferrite Damper

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Will; Reginato, Lou; Chow, Ken; Houck, Tim; Henestroza, Enrique; Yu, Simon; Kang, Michael; Briggs, Richard

    2006-08-04

    This report summarizes the transient response of the DARHT-II Injector and the design of the ferrite damper. Initial commissioning of the injector revealed a rise time excited 7.8 MHz oscillation on the diode voltage and stalk current leading to a 7.8 MHz modulation of the beam current, position, and energy. Commissioning also revealed that the use of the crowbar to decrease the voltage fall time excited a spectrum of radio frequency modes which caused concern that there might be significant transient RF electric field stresses imposed on the high voltage column insulators. Based on the experience of damping the induction cell RF modes with ferrite, the concept of a ferrite damper was developed to address the crowbar-excited oscillations as well as the rise-time-excited 7.8 MHz oscillations. After the Project decided to discontinue the use of the crowbar, further development of the concept focused exclusively on damping the oscillations excited by the rise time. The design was completed and the ferrite damper was installed in the DARHT-II Injector in February 2006. The organization of this report is as follows. The suite of injector diagnostics are described in Section 2. The data and modeling of the injector transients excited on the rise-time and also by the crowbar are discussed in Section 3; the objective is a concise summary of the present state of understanding. The design of the ferrite damper, and the small scale circuit simulations used to evaluate the ferrite material options and select the key design parameters like the cross sectional area and the optimum gap width, are presented in Section 4. The details of the mechanical design and the installation of the ferrite damper are covered in Section 5. A brief summary of the performance of the ferrite damper following its installation in the injector is presented in Section 6.

  16. Sol-gel synthesis of manganese oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, S.; Henry, M.; Baffier, N.; Livage, J. )

    1990-10-01

    Transparent and stable manganese dioxide gels are obtained upon reduction of permanganate aqueous solutions AMnO{sub 4} (A = Li, Na, K, NH{sub 4}, N(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}) by fumaric acid. All xerogels are amorphous when dried at room temperature. Their thermal behavior however depends on the nature of the counter cation A{sup +}. Ammonium permanganates lead to the formation of {alpha}- or {gamma}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} while AMnO{sub 2} mixed oxides are obtained at high temperature when A = Li, Na, K. Other crystalline phases such as LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} or Na{sub 0.7}MnO{sub 2} are also formed at lower temperature around 500{degree}C. Oxidation of these mixed oxides into sulfuric acid lead to the formation of {lambda}- or {delta}-MnO{sub 2} while A{sup +} and Mn{sup 2+} ions are released into the solution. Such manganese dioxides could be good candidates for making reversible cathodes in nonaqueous lithium batteries.

  17. Initial Ferritic Wall Mode studies on HBT-EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Paul; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Navratil, G. A.

    2014-10-01

    Low-activation ferritic steels are leading material candidates for use in next-generation fusion development experiments such as a prospective US component test facility and DEMO. Understanding the interaction of plasmas with a ferromagnetic wall will provide crucial physics for these experiments. Although the ferritic wall mode (FWM) was seen in a linear machine, the ferritic steel was observed to be compatible with high-performance operation in JFT-2M. Using its high-resolution magnetic diagnostics and adjustable wall segments, HBT-EP now operates successfully with a high-permeability (? ~ 8) tiled ferritic first wall and is exploring the dynamics and stability of kink modes interacting with the ferritic tiles. In this poster, we report the first studies of the evolution of naturally rotating modes, increased plasma response to phase-flip resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), and enhanced plasma disruptivity as wall configuration is adjusted from stainless wall to ferritic wall configuration. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  18. Exchange-spring mechanism of soft and hard ferrite nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Manjura Hoque, S.; Srivastava, C.; Kumar, V.; Venkatesh, N.; Das, H.N.; Saha, D.K.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Exchange-spring behaviour of soft and hard ferrites was studied. • XRD patterns indicated soft and hard ferrites as fcc and hcp structure. • Hysteresis loops indicate wide difference in coercivity of soft and hard phases. • Nanocomposites produced convex hysteresis loop characteristic of single-phase. - Abstract: The paper reports exchange-spring soft and hard ferrite nanocomposites synthesized by chemical co-precipitation with or without the application of ultrasonic vibration. The composites contained BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} as the hard phase and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the soft phase. X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples in the optimum calcined condition indicated the presence of soft ferrites as face-centred cubic (fcc) and hard ferrites as hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure respectively. Temperature dependence of magnetization in the range of 20–700 °C demonstrated distinct presence of soft and hard ferrites as magnetic phases which are characterized by wide difference in magnetic anisotropy and coercivity. Exchange-spring mechanism led these nanocomposite systems to exchange-coupled, which ultimately produced convex hysteresis loops characteristic of a single-phase permanent magnet. Fairly high value of coercivity and maximum energy product were observed for the samples in the optimum calcined conditions with a maximum applied field of 1600 kA/m (2 T)

  19. Controlled release of manganese into water from coated experimental fertilizers: laboratory characterization.

    PubMed

    Novillo, J; Rico, M I; Alvarez, J M

    2001-03-01

    The release of manganese into water from controlled-release formulations containing manganese EDTA or manganese lignosulfonate was studied. These fertilizers were obtained in the laboratory by adhering the source of manganese over urea pellets and by adding a coating. The materials used as adhesives and coatings were mixtures of rosins plus tricalcium phosphate. With regard to the chemical composition, these formulations conformed to national and international standards for commercial fertilizers. The rate of release of manganese was a function of both the source of manganese used and the coating thickness. Under the same conditions the release of manganese was greater for formulations with manganese EDTA than with manganese lignosulfonate. To predict the kinetic behaviors of the two series of formulations, mathematical equations were established. The manganese source plus rosin coatings improved the handling and storage characteristics of the commercial urea pellets. The study of the rosin coatings using scanning electron microscopy showed that they were compact and homogeneous. PMID:11312854

  20. Methanogenesis from wastewater stimulated by addition of elemental manganese

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Sen; Tian, Tian; Qi, Benyu; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a novel procedure for accelerating methanogenesis from wastewater by adding elemental manganese into the anaerobic digestion system. The results indicated that elemental manganese effectively enhanced both the methane yield and the production rate. Compared to the control test without elemental manganese, the total methane yield and production rate with 4?g/L manganese addition increased 3.4-fold (from 0.89?±?0.03 to 2.99?±?0.37?M/gVSS within 120?h) and 4.4-fold (from 6.2?±?0.1 to 27.2?±?2.2?mM/gVSS/h), respectively. Besides, more acetate consumption and less propionate generation were observed during the methanogenesis with manganese. Further studies demonstrated that the elemental manganese served as electron donors for the methanogenesis from carbon dioxide, and the final proportion of methane in the total generated gas with 4?g/L manganese addition reached 96.9%, which was 2.1-fold than that of the control (46.6%). PMID:26244609

  1. Metal Doped Manganese Oxide Thin Films for Supercapacitor Application.

    PubMed

    Tung, Mai Thanh; Thuy, Hoang Thi Bich; Hang, Le Thi Thu

    2015-09-01

    Co and Fe doped manganese oxide thin films were prepared by anodic deposition at current density of 50 mA cm(-2) using the electrolyte containing manganese sulfate and either cobalt sulfate or ferrous sulfate. Surface morphology and crystal structure of oxides were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Chemical composition of materials was analyzed by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS), iodometric titration method and complexometric titration method, respectively. Supercapacitive behavior of Co and Fe doped manganese oxide films were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that the doped manganese oxides are composed of nano fiber-like structure with radius of 5-20 nm and remain amorphous structure after heat treatment at 100 degrees C for 2 hours. The average valence of manganese increases from +3.808 to +3.867 after doping Co and from +3.808 to +3.846 after doping Fe. The doped manganese oxide film electrodes exhibited preferably ideal pseudo-capacitive behavior. The specific capacitance value of deposited manganese oxide reaches a maximum of 175.3 F/g for doping Co and 244.6 F/g for doping Fe. The thin films retained about 84% of the initial capacity even after 500 cycles of charge-discharge test. Doping Co and Fe decreases diffusion and charge transfer resistance of the films. The electric double layer capacitance and capacitor response frequency are increased after doping. PMID:26716267

  2. Silica encapsulation of ferrimagnetic zinc ferrite nanocubes enabled by layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Jooneon; Porter, Marc D; Granger, Michael C

    2015-03-24

    Stable suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with large magnetic moment, m, per particle have tremendous utility in a wide range of biological applications. However, because of the strong magnetic coupling interactions often present in these systems, it is challenging to stabilize individual, high-moment, ferro- and ferrimagnetic nanoparticles. A novel approach to encapsulate large, that is, >100 nm, ferrimagnetic zinc ferrite nanocubes (ZFNCs) with silica after an intermediary layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition step is described in this paper. The seed ZFNCs are uniform in shape and size and have high saturation mass magnetic moment (?(s) ?100 emu/g, m ? 4 × 10(-13) emu/particle at 150 Oe). For the MNP system described within, successful silica encapsulation and creation of discrete ZFNCs were realized only after depositing polyelectrolyte multilayers composed of alternating polyallylamine and polystyrenesulfonate. Without the intermediary polyelectrolyte layers, magnetic dipole-dipole interactions led to the formation of linearly chained ZFNCs embedded in a silica matrix. Characterization of particle samples was performed by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering (hydrodynamic size and ?-potential), and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results of these characterizations, which were performed after each of the synthetic steps, and synthetic details are presented. PMID:25756216

  3. Spin glasslike behavior and magnetic enhancement in nanosized Ni-Zn ferrite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, B.; Kumar, S.; Poddar, A.; Mazumdar, C.; Banerjee, S.; Reddy, V. R.; Gupta, A.

    2010-08-01

    The effects of particle size, structure, microstrain, and cation distribution on magnetic property of nanosized Ni0.35Zn0.65Fe2O4 prepared through high-energy ball milling have been explored by a wide variety of experimental technique namely, x-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, dc magnetization measurement, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The sample exhibits mixed magnetic behavior with a collective magnetic state between 300 and 60 K while spin glasslike freezing of magnetic moments has taken place below 60 K. The sample has displayed enhancement in magnetization, magnetic hyperfine field, coercivity, and anisotropy energy. The inherent superparamagnetic relaxation of ferrite nanoparticles has significantly reduced and it shows evidence of magnetic hysterisis at room temperature. These properties could be profitably used to overcome the inherent instability of magnetic nanoparticles. The intersublattice interaction (JAB) in the sample has strengthened due to migration of Fe3+ ions from octahedral (B) site to tetrahedral (A) site and this accounts for the genesis of counterintuitive magnetic enhancement in the sample.

  4. Manganese cycles and the origin of manganese nodules, Oneida Lake, New York, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.; Moore, W.S.; Nealson, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    Oneida Lake is a large shallow lake in central New York that is characterized by high algal productivity and concentrated deposits of freshwater manganese nodules. Budgets for Mn in the lake and its tributaries show a net loss of 23 metric tons of manganese within the lake per year with ???95% deposited in manganese nodules and the rest incorporated in the sediments. Erosion of nodules in the shallow well-oxygenated central part of the lake produces fragments of nodules as well as Mn-coated sand grains that are transported to adjacent deeper, more reducing parts of the lake where they sink into the anoxic sediments and MnO2 is reduced to Mn2+. This produces a high concentration of Mn2+ in the pore waters of these sediments and Mn2+ diffuses back into the water column. Growth of manganese nodules in Oneida Lake is characterized by periods of rapid accretion (> 1 mm 100 yr.) alternating with periods of no-growth or erosion. Rapid growth of nodules may be aided by the stripping of Mn from the water column by algae and bacteria. In addition, the high algal productivity of Oneida Lake produces a high-pH high-oxygen environment during the summer months that is maintained throughout the water column in the central part of the lake by almost continuous wind mixing. Thus, the cycle of Mn within the lake involves an interaction of the weather, the biota, the sediments, the nodules, and Mn dissolved in the lake and interstitial waters. ?? 1981.

  5. Distributions of Manganese, Iron, and Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria In Lake Superior Sediments of Different Organic Carbon Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of oxygen, soluble and particulate manganese and iron, organic carbon and nitrogen were examined in Lake Superior sediment cores, along with the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic and manganese oxidizing bacteria. Analyses were performed using cores collected with the submersible Johnson Sea Link II. Three cores, exhibiting a range of organic carbon content, were collected from the deepest basin in Lake Superior and the north and south ends of the Caribou trough, and brought to the surface for immediate analysis. Minielectrode profiles of oxygen concentration of the three cores were carried out using a commercially available minielectrode apparatus. Oxygen depletion to less than 1% occurred within 4 cm of the surface for two of the cores, but not until approximately 15 cm for the core from the south basin of the Caribou trough. The three cores exhibited very different profiles of soluble, as well as leachable, manganese and iron, suggesting different degrees of remobilization of these metals in the sediments. Vertical profiles of viable bacteria and Mn oxidizing bacteria, determined by plating and counting, showed that aerobic (and facultatively aerobic) heterotrophic bacteria were present at the highest concentrations near the surface and decreased steadily with depth, while Mn oxidizing bacteria were concentrations primarily at and above the oxic/anoxic interface. Soluble manganese in the pore waters, along with abundant organic carbon, appeared to enhance the presence of manganese oxidizing bacteria, even below the oxic/anoxic interface. Profiles of solid-phase leachable manganese suggested a microbial role in manganese reprecipitation in these sediments.

  6. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.; Trevisan, M.; Dutra, N.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut between the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. Results: We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. We find [Mn/Fe] ~ -0.7 at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3, increasing to a solar value at metallicities close to solar, and showing a spread around - 0.7 ? [Fe/H] ? -0.2, in good agreement with other work on Mn in bulge stars. There is also good agreement with chemical evolution models. We find no clear difference in the behaviour of the four bulge fields. Whereas [Mn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] could be identified with the behaviour of the thick disc stars, [Mn/O] vs. [O/H] has a behaviour running parallel, at higher metallicities, compared to thick disc stars, indicating that the bulge enrichment might have proceeded differently from that of the thick disc. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196).Tables 1-6 and Figs. 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Isotopic evidence for organic matter oxidation by manganese reduction in the formation of stratiform manganese carbonate ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Patrick M.; Maynard, J. Barry; Spiker, Elliott C.; Force, Eric R.

    1988-11-01

    Unlike other marine-sedimentary manganese ore deposits, which are largely composed of manganese oxides, the primary ore at Molango (Hidalgo State, Mexico) is exclusively manganese carbonate (rhodochrosite, Mn-calcite, kutnahorite). Stable isotope studies of the carbonates from Molango provide critical new information relevant to the controversy over syngenetic and diagenetic models of stratiform manganese deposit formation. Negative ? 13C values for carbonates from mineralized zones at Molango are strongly correlated with manganese content both on a whole rock scale and by mineral species. Whole rock ? 13C data fall into three groups: high-grade ore = -16.4 to -11.5%.; manganese-rich, sub-ore-grade = -5.2 to 0%.; and unmineralized carbonates = 0 to +2.5%. (PDB). ? 18O data show considerable overlap in values among the three groups: +4.8 to -2.8, -5.4 to -0.3%., and -7.4 to +6.2 (PDB), respectively. Isotopic data for individual co-existing minerals suggest a similar separation of ? 13C values: ? 13C values from calcite range from -1.1 to +0.7%. (PDB), whereas values from rhodochrosite are very negative, -12.9 to -5.5%., and values from kutnahorite or Mn-calcite are intermediate between calcite and rhodochrosite. 13C data are interpreted to indicate that calcite ( i.e. unmineralized carbonate) formed from a normal marine carbon reservoir. However, 13C data for the manganese-bearing carbonates suggest a mixed seawater and organic source of carbon. The presence of only trace amounts of pyrite suggests sulfate reduction may have played a minor part in oxidizing organic matter. It is possible that manganese reduction was the predominant reaction that oxidized organic matter and that it released organic-derived CO 2 to produce negative ? 13C values and manganese carbonate mineralization.

  8. Manganese recovery from secondary resources: a green process for carbothermal reduction and leaching of manganese bearing hazardous waste.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Navin; Amritphale, S S; Pal, Deepti

    2011-02-15

    During the hydrometallurgical extraction of zinc by electrowinning process, a hazardous solid waste called anode mud is generated. It contains large quantity of manganese oxides (55-80%) and lead dioxide (6-16%). Due to the presence of a large quantity of lead, the anode mud waste is considered hazardous and has to be disposed of in secure landfills, which is costly, wastes available manganese and valuable land resources. For recovery of manganese content of anode mud, a process comprising of carbothermal treatment using low density oil (LDO) followed by sulphuric acid leaching is developed. PMID:21115220

  9. Role of astrocytes in manganese mediated neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are responsible for numerous aspects of metabolic support, nutrition, control of the ion and neurotransmitter environment in central nervous system (CNS). Failure by astrocytes to support essential neuronal metabolic requirements plays a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of brain injury and the ensuing neuronal death. Astrocyte-neuron interactions play a central role in brain homeostasis, in particular via neurotransmitter recycling functions. Disruption of the glutamine (Gln)/glutamate (Glu) -?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) cycle (GGC) between astrocytes and neurons contributes to changes in Glu-ergic and/or GABA-ergic transmission, and is associated with several neuropathological conditions, including manganese (Mn) toxicity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in support of the important roles for astrocytes in normal as well as neuropathological conditions primarily those caused by exposure to Mn. PMID:23594835

  10. Synthesis of Novel Ferrite Based Recyclable Catalyst Used to Clean Dye and Emerging Contaminates from Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we describe synthesis of novel palladium, copper, cobalt and vanadium ferrites. The ferrites were synthesized by combustion method using polyvinyl alcohol. The particles phases were confirmed using X-ray diffraction and sizes were determined using particle size analyzer. ...

  11. Scattering from the Quasi-Optical Ferrite Circulator Using a Coupled Integral Equation/FEM Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, L. W.; Hoppe, D. J.; Chinn, G. C.; Lee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Ferrite materials are used in microwave devices that exploit the property of Faraday rotation to give non-reciprocal behavior. Examples of common waveguide components that use ferrite materials include circulators, isolators and gyrators.

  12. Millimeter wave phase shifter based on ferromagnetic resonance in a hexagonal barium ferrite thin film

    E-print Network

    Millimeter wave phase shifter based on ferromagnetic resonance in a hexagonal barium ferrite thin of an M-type barium ferrite BaM thin film prepared by pulsed laser deposition and a coplanar waveguide

  13. Competition between nucleation and early growth of ferrite from austenite -- Studies using cellular automaton simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Sasikumar, R.; Nair, P.K.

    1998-11-02

    A model for the nucleation of ferrite on austenite grain boundaries and the growth of these nuclei along the grain boundary and into the grain, is developed. A cellular automaton algorithm, with transformation rules based on this model, is used to simulate the decomposition of austenite into ferrite. When performed under continuous cooling conditions, the simulations give an insight into the competition between nucleation and early growth, which determines the variation of ferrite grain size with the cooling rate and with austenite grain size. The number of ferrite grains per austenite grain, ferrite grain size and the kinetics of ferrite formation are obtained as a function of the cooling rate and austenite grain size. Contour plots of the volume fraction of ferrite in the cells at different times, enables visualization of the ferrite growth process.

  14. Silver Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaydarov, R. R.; Khaydarov, R. A.; Estrin, Y.; Evgrafova, S.; Scheper, T.; Endres, C.; Cho, S. Y.

    The bactericidal effect of silver nanoparticles obtained by a novel electrochemical method on Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium phoeniceum cultures has been studied. The tests conducted have demonstrated that synthesized silver nanoparticles — when added to water paints or cotton fabrics — show a pronounced antibacterial/antifungal effect. It was shown that smaller silver nanoparticles have a greater antibacterial/antifungal efficacy. The paper also provides a review of scientific literature with regard to recent developments in the field of toxicity of silver nanoparticles and its effect on environment and human health.

  15. Manganese Oxidation In A Natural Marine Environment- San Antonio Bay 

    E-print Network

    Neyin, Rosemary Ogheneochuko

    2013-04-12

    the San Antonio Bay. In this study area, the formaldoxime assay was utilized to determine that manganese oxidation is catalyzed via multiple pathways utilizing various catalysts and proximal oxidants. The contribution of catalysts such as colloidal matter...

  16. Manganese resources of the Cuyuna range, east-central Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Beltrame, R.J.; Holtzman, R.C.; Wahl, T.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Cuyuna range, located in east-central Minnesota, consists of a sequence of argillite, siltstone, iron-formation, graywacke, slate, and quartzite of early Proterozoic age. Manganese-bearing materials occur within the iron-rich strata of the Trommald Formation and the Rabbit Lake Formation. Computer-assisted resource estimates, based on exploration drill hole information, indicate that the Cuyuna range contains a minimum of 176 million metric tons (MMT) of marginally economic manganiferous rock with an average grade of 10.46 weight percent manganese. The calculated 18.5 MMT of manganese on the Cuyuna range could supply this country's needs for this important and strategic metal for nearly 14 years. An additional resource of 6.9 MMT of manganese metal is available in the lower grade deposits The vast majority of these calculated resources are extractable by current surface mining techniques.

  17. Neuropsychological Motor Outcomes in Adults from Airborne Manganese Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The literature on manganese (Mn) is dominated by occupational exposures of adults exposed often to high levels without protection. Neuropsychological adverse health effects are similar to Parkinson’s Disease with psychomotor slowing, tremor, cognitive and mood ...

  18. Manganese Based Oxidative Technologies For Water/Wastewater Treatment 

    E-print Network

    Desai, Ishan

    2013-08-27

    Manganese is a commonly occurring mineral found in soil and sediments that takes part in chemical reactions in groundwater and soil systems. It plays a significant role in controlling the environmental fate and transport ...

  19. Manganese, Iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cyclin...

  20. Giant negative magnetoresistance in Manganese-substituted Zinc Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X. L.; Shao, Q.; Zhuravlyova, A.; He, M.; Yi, Y.; Lortz, R.; Wang, J. N.; Ruotolo, A.

    2015-01-01

    We report a large negative magnetoresistance in Manganese-substituted Zinc Oxide thin films. This anomalous effect was found to appear in oxygen-deficient films and to increase with the concentration of Manganese. By combining magnetoresistive measurements with magneto-photoluminescence, we demonstrate that the effect can be explained as the result of a magnetically induced transition from hopping to band conduction where the activation energy is caused by the sp-d exchange interaction. PMID:25783664