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Sample records for manganese iron copper

  1. Evolution of Microstructures During Austempering of Ductile Irons Alloyed with Manganese and Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Ranjan Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ajit Kumar

    2013-03-01

    The influences of relatively high manganese (0.45 through 1.0 wt pct) and copper (0.56 through 1.13 wt pct) contents on microstructure development and phase transformation in three austempered ductile irons have been studied. The experimental ductile irons alloyed with copper and manganese are found to be practically free from intercellular manganese segregation. This suggests that the positive segregation of manganese is largely neutralized by the negative segregation of copper when these alloying elements are added in appropriate proportions. The drop in unreacted austenite volume (UAV) with increasing austempering temperature and time is quite significant in irons alloyed with copper and manganese. The ausferrite morphology also undergoes a transition from lenticular to feathery appearance of increasing coarseness with the increasing austempering temperature and time. SEM micrographs of the austempered samples from the base alloy containing manganese only, as well as copper plus manganese-alloyed irons, clearly reveal the presence of some martensite along with retained austenite and ferrite. X-ray diffraction analysis also confirms the presence of these phases. SEM examination further reveals the presence of twinned martensite in the copper plus manganese-alloyed samples. The possibility of strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite during austempering heat treatment is suggested.

  2. Iron, Manganese and Copper Release from Synthetic Hydroxyapatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, Douglas W.

    1999-01-01

    Kinetic stir-flow dissolution experiments were performed on iron- (Fe-SHA), manganese- (Mn-SHA), and copper- (Cu-SHA) containing synthetic hydroxyapatites. Solution treatments consisted of de-ionized water, citric acid and DTPA. Initially, Mn concentrations were higher than Cu concentrations and Fe concentrations were the lowest in all treatments. At later times Mn and Cu concentrations dropped in the DTPA treatment while Fe rose to the concentration similar to Mn and Cu. At all times, metal release concentrations in the water and citric acid treatments followed the trend of Mn>Cu>Fe. Rietveld analysis of x-ray diffraction data and ^31P NMR indicated that the metals substituted for Ca in the SHA structure. However, EPR data suggested that a metal (hydr)oxide phase existed either on the SHA surface or between the SHA crystallites. The metal concentration trend of Mn>Cu>Fe suggested that the initial solution metal concentrations are dependent on the dissolution of (hydr)oxides from SHA surfaces or between SHA crystallites. Similar metal concentrations at later times in the DTPA experiments suggests that metal concentrations were controlled by the release of Mn, Cu, or Fe from the SHA structure.

  3. The effect of high dose oral manganese exposure on copper, iron and zinc levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Courtney J; Herrera, Carolina; Pettiglio, Michael A; Foster, Melanie L; Johnson, Laura C; Dorman, David C; Bartnikas, Thomas B

    2016-06-01

    Manganese is an essential dietary nutrient and trace element with important roles in mammalian development, metabolism, and antioxidant defense. In healthy individuals, gastrointestinal absorption and hepatobiliary excretion are tightly regulated to maintain systemic manganese concentrations at physiologic levels. Interactions of manganese with other essential metals following high dose ingestion are incompletely understood. We previously reported that gavage manganese exposure in rats resulted in higher tissue manganese concentrations when compared with equivalent dietary or drinking water manganese exposures. In this study, we performed follow-up evaluations to determine whether oral manganese exposure perturbs iron, copper, or zinc tissue concentrations. Rats were exposed to a control diet with 10 ppm manganese or dietary, drinking water, or gavage exposure to approximately 11.1 mg manganese/kg body weight/day for 7 or 61 exposure days. While manganese exposure affected levels of all metals, particularly in the frontal cortex and liver, copper levels were most prominently affected. This result suggests an under-appreciated effect of manganese exposure on copper homeostasis which may contribute to our understanding of the pathophysiology of manganese toxicity. PMID:26988220

  4. [Effect of iron-containing supplements on the level of iron, copper, and manganese in young sportsmen].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtseva, I P

    2010-01-01

    In was defined that 2-week intake by senior school pupils of iron-containing supplements combined with an ascorbic acid was followed by a significant increase of iron concentration in plasma and formal blood elements, hemoglobin and erythrocytes level, increase of vitamin C provision and physical performance efficiency at simultaneous decrease of copper and manganese content in blood plasma. PMID:20968011

  5. Content of total iron, copper and manganese in liver of animals during hypokinesia, muscle activity and process of recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapovich, G. M.; Taneyeva, G. V.; Uteshev, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the content of total iron, copper and manganese in the liver of animals is altered depending on the intensity and duration of their swimming. Hypodynamia for 7 days does not alter the concentration of iron, but sufficiently increases the content of copper and manganese. The barometric factor effectively influences the maintenance of constancy in the content of microelements accumulated in the liver after intensive muscle activity.

  6. The Proteome of Copper, Iron, Zinc, and Manganese Micronutrient Deficiency in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Scott I.; Castruita, Madeli; Malasarn, Davin; Urzica, Eugen; Erde, Jonathan; Page, M. Dudley; Yamasaki, Hiroaki; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Trace metals such as copper, iron, zinc, and manganese play important roles in several biochemical processes, including respiration and photosynthesis. Using a label-free, quantitative proteomics strategy (MSE), we examined the effect of deficiencies in these micronutrients on the soluble proteome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We quantified >103 proteins with abundances within a dynamic range of 3 to 4 orders of magnitude and demonstrated statistically significant changes in ∼200 proteins in each metal-deficient growth condition relative to nutrient-replete media. Through analysis of Pearson's coefficient, we also examined the correlation between protein abundance and transcript abundance (as determined via RNA-Seq analysis) and found moderate correlations under all nutritional states. Interestingly, in a subset of transcripts known to significantly change in abundance in metal-replete and metal-deficient conditions, the correlation to protein abundance is much stronger. Examples of new discoveries highlighted in this work include the accumulation of O2 labile, anaerobiosis-related enzymes (Hyd1, Pfr1, and Hcp2) in copper-deficient cells; co-variation of Cgl78/Ycf54 and coprogen oxidase; the loss of various stromal and lumenal photosynthesis-related proteins, including plastocyanin, in iron-limited cells; a large accumulation (from undetectable amounts to over 1,000 zmol/cell) of two COG0523 domain-containing proteins in zinc-deficient cells; and the preservation of photosynthesis proteins in manganese-deficient cells despite known losses in photosynthetic function in this condition. PMID:23065468

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of As-Cast Ductile Irons Alloyed with Manganese and Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Ranjan Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ajit Kumar; Ganguli, Ashis Chandra

    2012-08-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the effect of manganese and copper addition, singly as well as in combination, on the microstructure, micro-segregation, and mechanical properties of ductile irons. Alloy A (3.18C, 2.64Si, 0.45Mn), alloy B (3.35C, 2.51Si, 0.82Mn), alloy C (3.16C, 2.80Si, 1.08Mn, 0.56Cu), and alloy D (3.18C, 3.00Si, 1.04Mn, 1.13Cu) were melted and cast in the form of Y-block test pieces. The cast microstructures varied from ferrito-pearlitic in alloys A, B, and C to pearlitic in alloy D. However, on XRD analysis and SEM examination, the presence of martensite patches was also detected. There was a marginal decrease in nodule count in alloy B. In alloys C and D, nodule counts were higher, but the proportion of ferrite decreased drastically. Alloy D was found to be the strongest (UTS ≈ 800 MPa, El = 5%) with alloys A and C coming next in strength; while alloy B was weakest of the four. The presence of martensite patches in association with pearlite appears to be responsible for low toughness of these alloys. Microprobe analysis shows some silicon segregation near the graphite nodules and practically little segregation of manganese. Elemental mapping by FE-SEM does not indicate any manganese segregation.

  8. Zinc, iron, manganese, and magnesium accumulation in crayfish populations near copper-nickel smelters at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Bagatto, G.; Alikhan, M.A.

    1987-06-01

    The Sudbury basin has been subjected to extreme ecological disturbances from logging, mining and smelting activities. Elevated concentrations of copper, cadmium, and nickel have been reported in crayfish populations close to the Sudbury smelting works. The present study compares concentrations of zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and magnesium (Mg) in freshwater crayfish at selected distances of the habitat from the emission source. These metals were selected since they are known to be emitted in moderately high quantities into the Sudbury environment as byproduct of the smelting process. Various tissue concentrations in crayfish were also examined to determined specific tissue sites for these accumulations.

  9. Effects of sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron applications on sunflower yield and plant nutrient concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, B.R.; Zubriski, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron application did not affect the seed yield or oil percentage of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) on both dryland and irrigated soils in North Dakota in 1981. Field averages indicated significant Zn, Mn, and B uptake by sunflower at the 12-leaf stage as a result of fertilization with these elements. Increased Zn uptake was also observed in the uppermost mature leaf at anthesis from zinc fertilization. Although sunflower yield from boron fertilization was not significantly different from the check, a trend was observed in which boron fertilization seemed to decrease sunflower yield. Sunflower yields from the boron treatment were the lowest out of seven treatments in three out of four fields. Also, sunflower yield from the boron treatment was significantly lower than both iron and sulfur treatments when all fields were combined.

  10. Iron, copper, and manganese complexes with in vitro superoxide dismutase and/or catalase activities that keep Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells alive under severe oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Thales P; Fernandes, Christiane; Melo, Karen V; Ferreira, Sarah S; Lessa, Josane A; Franco, Roberto W A; Schenk, Gerhard; Pereira, Marcos D; Horn, Adolfo

    2015-03-01

    Due to their aerobic lifestyle, eukaryotic organisms have evolved different strategies to overcome oxidative stress. The recruitment of some specific metalloenzymes such as superoxide dismutases (SODs) and catalases (CATs) is of great importance for eliminating harmful reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion). Using the ligand HPClNOL {1-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]-3-chloropropan-2-ol}, we have synthesized three coordination compounds containing iron(III), copper(II), and manganese(II) ions, which are also present in the active site of the above-noted metalloenzymes. These compounds were evaluated as SOD and CAT mimetics. The manganese and iron compounds showed both SOD and CAT activities, while copper showed only SOD activity. The copper and manganese in vitro SOD activities are very similar (IC50~0.4 μmol dm(-3)) and about 70-fold higher than those of iron. The manganese compound showed CAT activity higher than that of the iron species. Analyzing their capacity to protect Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress (H2O2 and the O2(•-) radical), we observed that all compounds act as antioxidants, increasing the resistance of yeast cells mainly due to a reduction of lipid oxidation. Especially for the iron compound, the data indicate complete protection when wild-type cells were exposed to H2O2 or O2(•-) species. Interestingly, these compounds also compensate for both superoxide dismutase and catalase deficiencies; their antioxidant activity is metal ion dependent, in the order iron(III)>copper(II)>manganese(II). The protection mechanism employed by the complexes proved to be independent of the activation of transcription factors (such as Yap1, Hsf1, Msn2/Msn4) and protein synthesis. There is no direct relation between the in vitro and the in vivo antioxidant activities. PMID:25511255

  11. Calculation of binodals and spinodals in multicomponent alloys by different statistical methods with application to iron-copper-manganese alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vaks, V. G. Zhuravlev, I. A.; Khromov, K. Yu.

    2010-11-15

    A generalization of the pair-cluster (PC) approximation in the theory of disordered systems to multicomponent alloys is proposed. It is shown that phase equilibrium boundaries (binodals) calculated in the mean-field (MF) approximation, which is used in standard calculations of phase diagrams by the CALPHAD method, coincide with the results of rigorous calculations for dilute alloys; however, the application of these methods to calculating the boundaries of the stability region with respect to the decomposition of an alloy (spinodals) leads to large errors. At the same time, in the PC approximation, the description of all statistical properties, including binodals and spinodals, turns out to be exact for dilute alloys. The methods developed are illustrated by an example of iron-copper-manganese ternary alloys.

  12. Fast ultrasound-assisted extraction of copper, iron, manganese and zinc from human hair samples prior to flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Yebra-Biurrun, M C; Cespón-Romero, R M

    2007-06-01

    A dynamic ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure utilizing diluted nitric acid was developed for the determination of copper, iron, manganese and zinc in human hair taken from workers in permanent contact with a polluted environment. The extraction unit of the dynamic ultrasound-assisted extraction system contains a minicolumn into which a specified amount of hair (5-50 mg) is placed. Once inserted into the continuous manifold, trace metals were extracted at 3 mL min(-1) with 3 mol L(-1) nitric acid under the action of ultrasound for 2 min for zinc and 3 min for copper, iron and manganese determination, and using an ultrasonic water-bath temperature of 70 degrees C for zinc and 80 degrees C for copper, iron and manganese determination. The system permits the direct analysis of hair and yields concentrations with relative standard deviations of <3% (n = 11). The applicability of the procedure was verified by analysing human hair samples from workers exposed to welding fumes, and its accuracy was assessed through comparison with a conventional sample dissolution procedure and the use of a certified reference material (BCR 397, human hair). PMID:17404713

  13. Zinc, iron, manganese and copper uptake requirement in response to nitrogen supply and the increased grain yield of summer maize.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yanfang; Yue, Shanchao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Dunyi; Cui, Zhenling; Chen, Xinping; Ye, Youliang; Zou, Chunqin

    2014-01-01

    The relationships between grain yields and whole-plant accumulation of micronutrients such as zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and copper (Cu) in maize (Zea mays L.) were investigated by studying their reciprocal internal efficiencies (RIEs, g of micronutrient requirement in plant dry matter per Mg of grain). Field experiments were conducted from 2008 to 2011 in North China to evaluate RIEs and shoot micronutrient accumulation dynamics during different growth stages under different yield and nitrogen (N) levels. Fe, Mn and Cu RIEs (average 64.4, 18.1 and 5.3 g, respectively) were less affected by the yield and N levels. ZnRIE increased by 15% with an increased N supply but decreased from 36.3 to 18.0 g with increasing yield. The effect of cultivars on ZnRIE was similar to that of yield ranges. The substantial decrease in ZnRIE may be attributed to an increased Zn harvest index (from 41% to 60%) and decreased Zn concentrations in straw (a 56% decrease) and grain (decreased from 16.9 to 12.2 mg kg-1) rather than greater shoot Zn accumulation. Shoot Fe, Mn and Cu accumulation at maturity tended to increase but the proportions of pre-silking shoot Fe, Cu and Zn accumulation consistently decreased (from 95% to 59%, 90% to 71% and 91% to 66%, respectively). The decrease indicated the high reproductive-stage demands for Fe, Zn and Cu with the increasing yields. Optimized N supply achieved the highest yield and tended to increase grain concentrations of micronutrients compared to no or lower N supply. Excessive N supply did not result in any increases in yield or micronutrient nutrition for shoot or grain. These results indicate that optimized N management may be an economical method of improving micronutrient concentrations in maize grain with higher grain yield. PMID:24705926

  14. Effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on the metabolism of copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc in an animal model of alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bogden, J.D.; Al-Rabiai, S.; Gilani, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (AC) is one of the diseases caused by alcohol abuse, and there has been considerable debate about the possibility that nutritional factors may be important in the etiology of AC. In addition, there is evidence that ethanol may affect the metabolism of trace elements. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if chronic ethanol administration produces changes in the metabolism of the essential metals copper, iron, manganese, zinc, and selenium using an animal model of AC. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups; an ad libitum control group (AL), a pair-fed control group (PF), and an ethanol-dosed group (ETOH). The latter group received gradually increasing concentrations (5-25%) of ethanol in the drinking water for 15 wk. Food intake was monitored and urine and feces collected for a 4-d period during the study to determine ethanol effects on trace-element balance. Growth of both the PF and ETOH animals was inhibited. Ethanol produced substantial increases in liver manganese and decreases in liver copper and zinc. Metal concentrations in heart and concentrations in other tissues studied (spleen, testes, brain, bone, kidney, and muscle) did not differ significantly among the groups, except for testes selenium and kidney zinc. Reduced food intake and ethanol ingestion were associated with a reduced percentage of ingested selenium excreted in the urine. Deficiencies of copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc in myocardial tissue are not likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of AC in the rat. 38 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  15. Inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric method is described for the determination of six elements in a variety of geological materials. Sixteen reference materials are analysed by this technique to demonstrate its use in geochemical exploration. Samples are decomposed with nitric, hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids, and the residue dissolved in hydrochloric acid and diluted to volume. The elements are determined in two groups based on compatibility of instrument operating conditions and consideration of crustal abundance levels. Cadmium, Cu, Pb and Zn are determined as a group in the 50-ml sample solution under one set of instrument conditions with the use of scatter correction. Limitations of the scatter correction technique used with the fluorescence instrument are discussed. Iron and Mn are determined together using another set of instrumental conditions on a 1-50 dilution of the sample solution without the use of scatter correction. The ranges of concentration (??g g-1) of these elements in the sample that can be determined are: Cd, 0.3-500; Cu, 0.4-500; Fe, 85-250 000; Mn, 45-100 000; Pb, 5-10 000; and Zn, 0.4-300. The precision of the method is usually less than 5% relative standard deviation (RSD) over a wide concentration range and acceptable accuracy is shown by the agreement between values obtained and those recommended for the reference materials.

  16. Solid state 31phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance of iron-, manganese-, and copper-containing synthetic hydroxyapatites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Taylor, R. E.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    The incorporation of micronutrients into synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) is proposed for slow release of these nutrients to crops in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Advanced Life Support (ALS) program for Lunar or Martian outposts. Solid state 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was utilized to examine the paramagnetic effects of Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ to determine if they were incorporated into the SHA structure. Separate Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ containing SHA materials along with a transition metal free SHA (pure-SHA) were synthesized using a precipitation method. The proximity (<1 nm) of the transition metals to the 31P nuclei of SHA were apparent when comparing the integrated 31P signal intensities of the pure-SHA (87 arbitrary units g-1) with the Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials (37-71 arbitrary units g-1). The lower integrated 31P signal intensities of the Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials relative to the pure-SHA suggested that Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ were incorporated in the SHA structure. Further support for Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ incorporation was demonstrated by the reduced spin-lattice relaxation constants of the Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials (T'=0.075-0.434s) relative to pure-SHA (T1=58.4s). Inversion recovery spectra indicated that Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ were not homogeneously distributed about the 31P nuclei in the SHA structure. Extraction with diethylene-triamine-penta-acetic acid (DTPA) suggested that between 50 and 80% of the total starting metal concentrations were incorporated in the SHA structure. Iron-, Mn-, and Cu-containing SHA are potential slow release sources of Fe, Mn, and Cu in the ALS cropping system.

  17. Study on determination of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and manganese in drinking water by solid-phase extraction and RP-HPLC with 2-(2-quinolinylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol as precolumn derivatizing reagent.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiufen; Yang, Guanyu; Yang, Jihong; Yin, Jiayuan

    2002-12-01

    A new method for the determination of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and manganese in drinking water by the reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with 2-(2-quinolinylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (QADEAP) as precolumn derivatizing reagent was studied in this paper. The iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, and manganese ions react with QADEAP to form color chelates in the presence of cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) and acetic acid-sodium acetic buffer solution medium of pH 4.0. These chelates were enriched by solid-phase extraction with a Waters Nova-Pak C18 cartridge and eluted the retained chelates from the cartridge with tetrahydrofuran (THF). The enrichment factor of 100 was achieved. Then the chelates were separated on a Waters Nova-Pak C18 column (3.9 x 150 mm, 5 microm) by gradient elution with methanol (containing 0.2% of acetic acid and 0.1% of CTMAB) and 0.05 mol L(-1) acetic acid-sodium acetic buffer solution (containing 0.1% of CTMAB) (pH 4.0) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.5 ml min(-1), and monitored with a photodiode array detector from 450 approximately 700 nm. The detection limits (S/N = 3) of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and manganese are 0.8, 1.1, 0.9, 1.1, 1.5 and 2.0 ng L(-1), respectively, in the original sample. This method can be applied to determination at the microg L(-1) level of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and manganese in drinking water with good results. PMID:12509050

  18. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes. PMID:26830585

  19. Groundwater, iron and manganese an unwelcome trio

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, N. )

    1988-02-01

    Iron and manganese are natural constituents of the earth's crust and both elements create serious aesthetic problems in drinking water supplies. The occurrence of iron and manganese in groundwater, and problems arising from their presence, are reviewed. Four commonly used methods for iron and manganese removal are direct oxidation, addition of oxidation agents, ion exchange, and stabilization. These methods are discussed, as well as factors affecting iron and manganese removal, such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, and other ions present. The above factors affect the removal methods differently and for these reasons, laboratory testing and studies should be made to evaluate the treatability of a water supply for iron and manganese removal.

  20. Lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, calcium, iron, manganese and chromium (VI) levels in Nigeria and United States of America cement dust.

    PubMed

    Ogunbileje, J O; Sadagoparamanujam, V-M; Anetor, J I; Farombi, E O; Akinosun, O M; Okorodudu, A O

    2013-03-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the relative abundance of heavy metals in cement dust from different cement dust factories in order to predict their possible roles in the severity of cement dust toxicity. The concentrations of total mercury (Hg), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), iron (Fe) and chromium (VI) (Cr (VI)) levels in cement dust and clinker samples from Nigeria and cement dust sample from the United States of America (USA) were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAAS), while Zn and Ca were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS), and Cr (VI) by colorimetric method. Total Cu, Ni and Mn were significantly higher in cement dust sample from USA (p<0.05), also, both total Cr and Cr (VI) were 5.4-26 folds higher in USA cement dust compared with Nigeria cement dust or clinker (p<0.001). Total Cd was higher in both Nigeria cement dust and clinker (p<0.05 and p<0.001), respectively. Mercury was more in both Nigeria cement dust and clinker (p<0.05), while Pb was only significantly higher in clinker from Nigeria (p<0.001). These results show that cement dust contain mixture of metals that are known human carcinogens and also have been implicated in other debilitating health conditions. Additionally, it revealed that metal content concentrations are factory dependent. This study appears to indicate the need for additional human studies relating the toxicity of these metals and their health impacts on cement factory workers. PMID:23261125

  1. Interactive effects of manganese and/or iron supplementation in adult women

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.D.; Greger, J.L. )

    1991-03-15

    Evaluation of the practical significance of manganese-iron interactions has been hampered by the limited methodologies available to assess manganese status. Manganese status has not been monitored longitudinally in control studies with humans. Forty-eight women were recruited for a double blind 125-day supplementation study. After an initial 5-day baseline period, subjects were assigned to one of four treatments: placebo; 30 mg iron as ferrous fumarate daily; 15 mg manganese as an amino acid chelated manganese supplement daily or both the iron and manganese supplements daily. Dietary information, blood and 3-day urine samples were collected during the baseline period and after 20, 55, 85 and 120 days of consuming the supplements. Urinary manganese excretion ranged from 0.11 to 1.40 {mu}g/day. Serum manganese ranged from 0.16 to 1.92 {mu}g/l. Serum was also analyzed for iron, zinc, copper, ferritin and transferrin concentrations. Lymphocytes were isolated and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase activity was determined as a new method to assess manganese status. Plasma cholesterol ranged from 126 to 229 mg/dl and HDL cholesterol ranged from 31 to 84 mg/dl. Plasma triglycerides were determined and LDL cholesterol was calculated by difference.

  2. Iron, copper, zinc, and manganese transport and regulation in pathogenic Enterobacteria: correlations between strains, site of infection and the relative importance of the different metal transport systems for virulence

    PubMed Central

    Porcheron, Gaëlle; Garénaux, Amélie; Proulx, Julie; Sabri, Mourad; Dozois, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    For all microorganisms, acquisition of metal ions is essential for survival in the environment or in their infected host. Metal ions are required in many biological processes as components of metalloproteins and serve as cofactors or structural elements for enzymes. However, it is critical for bacteria to ensure that metal uptake and availability is in accordance with physiological needs, as an imbalance in bacterial metal homeostasis is deleterious. Indeed, host defense strategies against infection either consist of metal starvation by sequestration or toxicity by the highly concentrated release of metals. To overcome these host strategies, bacteria employ a variety of metal uptake and export systems and finely regulate metal homeostasis by numerous transcriptional regulators, allowing them to adapt to changing environmental conditions. As a consequence, iron, zinc, manganese, and copper uptake systems significantly contribute to the virulence of many pathogenic bacteria. However, during the course of our experiments on the role of iron and manganese transporters in extraintestinal Escherichia coli (ExPEC) virulence, we observed that depending on the strain tested, the importance of tested systems in virulence may be different. This could be due to the different set of systems present in these strains, but literature also suggests that as each pathogen must adapt to the particular microenvironment of its site of infection, the role of each acquisition system in virulence can differ from a particular strain to another. In this review, we present the systems involved in metal transport by Enterobacteria and the main regulators responsible for their controlled expression. We also discuss the relative role of these systems depending on the pathogen and the tissues they infect. PMID:24367764

  3. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecth, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  4. Molecular Mediators Governing Iron-Copper Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Sukru; Collins, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Given their similar physiochemical properties, it is a logical postulate that iron and copper metabolism are intertwined. Indeed, iron-copper interactions were first documented over a century ago, but the homeostatic effects of one on the other has not been elucidated at a molecular level to date. Recent experimental work has, however, begun to provide mechanistic insight into how copper influences iron metabolism. During iron deficiency, elevated copper levels are observed in the intestinal mucosa, liver, and blood. Copper accumulation and/or redistribution within enterocytes may influence iron transport, and high hepatic copper may enhance biosynthesis of a circulating ferroxidase, which potentiates iron release from stores. Moreover, emerging evidence has documented direct effects of copper on the expression and activity of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. This review summarizes current experimental work in this field, with a focus on molecular aspects of iron-copper interplay and how these interactions relate to various disease states. PMID:24995690

  5. AM1* parameters for manganese and iron.

    PubMed

    Kayi, Hakan; Clark, Timothy

    2010-06-01

    We report the parameterization of AM1* for the elements manganese and iron. The basis sets for both metals contain one set each of s-, p- and d-orbitals. AM1* parameters are now available for H, C, N, O and F (which use the original AM1 parameters), Al, Si, P, S, Cl, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Zr, Mo, I and Au. The performance and typical errors of AM1* are discussed for Mn and Fe, and are compared with available NDDO Hamiltonians. PMID:19937261

  6. Cu-Mn-Si (Copper-Manganese-Silicon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materials Science International Team MSIT

    This document is part of Subvolume C2 'Non-Ferrous Metal Systems. Part 2: Selected Copper Systems' of Volume 11 'Ternary Alloy Systems - Phase Diagrams, Crystallographic and Thermodynamic Data critically evaluated by MSIT®' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It provides data of the ternary system Copper-Manganese-Silicon.

  7. Determination of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, phosphorus, sodium, and zinc in fortified food products by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry: single-laboratory validation and ring trial.

    PubMed

    Poitevin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation (SLV) and a ring trial (RT) were undertaken to determine nine nutritional elements in food products by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry in order to modernize AOAC Official Method 984.27. The improvements involved extension of the scope to all food matrixes (including infant formula), optimized microwave digestion, selected analytical lines, internal standardization, and ion buffering. Simultaneous determination of nine elements (calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium, phosphorus, and zinc) was made in food products. Sample digestion was performed through wet digestion of food samples by microwave technology with either closed- or open-vessel systems. Validation was performed to characterize the method for selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, ruggedness, and uncertainty. The robustness and efficiency of this method was proven through a successful RT using experienced independent food industry laboratories. Performance characteristics are reported for 13 certified and in-house reference materials, populating the AOAC triangle food sectors, which fulfilled AOAC criteria and recommendations for accuracy (trueness, recovery, and z-scores) and precision (repeatability and reproducibility RSD, and HorRat values) regarding SLVs and RTs. This multielemental method is cost-efficient, time-saving, accurate, and fit-for-purpose according to ISO 17025 Norm and AOAC acceptability criteria, and is proposed as an extended updated version of AOAC Official Method 984.27 for fortified food products, including infant formula. PMID:22468357

  8. Thermochemistry of iron manganese oxide spinels

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemet-Fritsch, Sophie; Navrotsky, Alexandra . E-mail: anavrotsky@ucdavis.edu; Tailhades, Philippe; Coradin, Herve; Wang Miaojun

    2005-01-15

    Oxide melt solution calorimetry has been performed on iron manganese oxide spinels prepared at high temperature. The enthalpy of formation of (Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}){sub 3}O{sub 4} at 298K from the oxides, tetragonal Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} (hausmannite) and cubic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite), is negative from x=0 to x=0.67 and becomes slightly positive for 0.670.6) spinels of intermediate compositions. The enthalpies of formation are discussed in terms of three factors: oxidation-reduction relative to the end-members, cation distribution, and tetragonality. A combination of measured enthalpies and Gibbs free energies of formation in the literature provides entropies of mixing. {delta}S{sub mix}, consistent with a cation distribution in which all trivalent manganese is octahedral and all other ions are randomly distributed for x>0.5, but the entropy of mixing appears to be smaller than these predicted values for x<0.4.

  9. Structural and surface changes of copper modified manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gac, Wojciech; Słowik, Grzegorz; Zawadzki, Witold

    2016-05-01

    The structural and surface properties of manganese and copper-manganese oxides were investigated. The oxides were prepared by the redox-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy studies evidenced transformation of cryptomelane-type nanoparticles with 1-D channel structure into the large MnO crystallites with regular rippled-like surface patterns under reduction conditions. The development of Cu/CuO nanorods from strongly dispersed species was evidenced. Coper-modified manganese oxides showed good catalytic performance in methanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production. Low selectivity to CO was observed in the wide range of temperatures.

  10. Iron and manganese removal by using manganese ore constructed wetlands in the reclamation of steel wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing-Cheng; Chen, Gu; Huang, Xiang-Feng; Li, Guang-Ming; Liu, Jia; Yang, Na; Gao, Sai-Nan

    2009-09-30

    To reclaim treated steel wastewater as cooling water, manganese ore constructed wetland was proposed in this study for the removal of iron and manganese. In lab-scale wetlands, the performance of manganese ore wetland was found to be more stable and excellent than that of conventional gravel constructed wetland. The iron and manganese concentration in the former was below 0.05 mg/L at hydraulic retention time of 2-5 days when their influent concentrations were in the range of 0.16-2.24 mg/L and 0.11-2.23 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, its removals for COD, turbidity, ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus were 55%, 90%, 67% and 93%, respectively, superior to the corresponding removals in the gravel wetland (31%, 86%, 58% and 78%, respectively). The good performance of manganese ore was ascribed to the enhanced biological manganese removal with the aid of manganese oxide surface and the smaller size of the medium. The presence of biological manganese oxidation was proven by the facts of good manganese removal in wetlands at chemical unfavorable conditions (such as ORP and pH) and the isolation of manganese oxidizing strains from the wetlands. Similar iron and manganese removal was later observed in a pilot-scale gravel-manganese-ore constructed wetland, even though the manganese ore portion in total volume was reduced from 100% (in the lab-scale) to only 4% (in the pilot-scale) for the sake of cost-saving. The quality of the polished wastewater not only satisfied the requirement for cooling water but also suitable as make-up water for other purposes. PMID:19443107

  11. Manganese, Iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cyclin...

  12. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems.

    PubMed

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Grass, Gregor; Rensing, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron/manganese-uptake systems relevant for growth in defined medium. Based on these results an exit strategy enabling the cell to cope with iron depletion and use of manganese as an alternative for iron could be shown. Such a strategy would also explain why E. coli harbors some iron- or manganese-dependent iso-enzymes such as superoxide dismutases or ribonucleotide reductases. The benefits for gaining a means for survival would be bought with the cost of less efficient metabolism as indicated in our experiments by lower cell densities with manganese than with iron. In addition, this strain was extremely sensitive to the metalloid gallium but this gallium toxicity can be alleviated by low concentrations of manganese. PMID:27003826

  13. Copper/Manganese Cocatalyzed Oxidative Coupling of Vinylarenes with Ketones.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xing-Wang; Wang, Nai-Xing; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Jia-Long; Bai, Cui-Bing; Xing, Yalan; Li, Yi-He

    2015-09-18

    A novel copper/manganese cocatalyzed direct oxidative coupling of terminal vinylarenes with ketones via C(sp(3))-H bond functionalization following C-C bond formation has been developed using tert-butyl hydroperoxide as the radical initiator. Various ketones underwent a free-radical addition of terminal vinylarenes to give the corresponding 1,4-dicarbonyl products with excellent regioselectivity and efficiency through one step. A possible reaction mechanism has been proposed. PMID:26348870

  14. Simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, calcium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc in fertilizers by microwave acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry detection: single-laboratory validation of a modification and extension of AOAC 2006.03.

    PubMed

    Webb, Sharon; Bartos, James; Boles, Rhonda; Hasty, Elaine; Thuotte, Ethel; Thiex, Nancy J

    2014-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was conducted for the simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, chromium, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc in all major types of commercial fertilizer products by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy analysis. This validation study proposes an extension and modification of AOAC 2006.03. The extension is the inclusion of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, and zinc, and the modification is incorporation of hydrochloric acid in the digestion system. This dual acid digestion utilizes both hydrochloric and nitric acids in a 3 to 9 mL volume ratio/100 mL. In addition to 15 of the 30 original validation materials used in the 2006.03 collaborative study, National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 695 and Magruder 2009-06 were incorporated as accuracy materials. The main benefits of this proposed method are a significant increase in laboratory efficiency when compared to the use of both AOAC Methods 965.09 and 2006.03 to achieve the same objective and an enhanced recovery of several metals. PMID:25051614

  15. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  17. Elements of the iron and manganese cycles in Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granina, L.Z.; Callender, E.

    2007-01-01

    Using data obtained in recent years, we considered the external mass balance and characteristics of internal iron and manganese cycles in Lake Baikal (biological uptake, remineralization, sedimentary and diffusive fluxes, accumulation in sediments, time of renewal, etc.). Some previous results and common concepts were critically reevaluated. ?? Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2007.

  18. Adsorption of selenium by amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and manganese dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Chao, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    This work compares and models the adsorption of selenium and other anions on a neutral to alkaline surface (amorphous iron oxyhydroxide) and an acidic surface (manganese dioxide). Selenium adsorption on these oxides is examined as a function of pH, particle concentration, oxidation state, and competing anion concentration in order to assess how these factors might influence the mobility of selenium in the environment. The data indicate that 1. 1) amorphous iron oxyhydroxide has a greater affinity for selenium than manganese dioxide, 2. 2) selenite [Se(IV)] adsorption increases with decreasing pH and increasing particle concentration and is stronger than selenate [Se(VI)] adsorption on both oxides, and 3. 3) selenate does not adsorb on manganese dioxide. The relative affinity of selenate and selenite for the oxides and the lack of adsorption of selenate on a strongly acidic surface suggests that selenate forms outer-sphere complexes while selenite forms inner-sphere complexes with the surfaces. The data also indicate that the competition sequence of other anions with respect to selenite adsorption at pH 7.0 is phosphate > silicate > molybdate > fluoride > sulfate on amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and molybdate ??? phosphate > silicate > fluoride > sulfate on manganese dioxide. The adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on these oxides as a function of pH indicates that the competition sequences reflect the relative affinities of these anions for the surfaces. The Triple Layer surface complexation model is used to provide a quantitative description of these observations and to assess the importance of surface site heterogeneity on anion adsorption. The modeling results suggest that selenite forms binuclear, innersphere complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and monodentate, inner-sphere complexes with manganese dioxide and that selenate forms outer-sphere, monodentate complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. The heterogeneity of the oxide surface sites

  19. Iron and manganese oxide mineralization in the Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Manheim, F. T.; Bau, M.; Kang, J.-K.; Lubick, N.

    1997-01-01

    Iron, manganese, and iron-manganese deposits occur in nearly all geomorphologic and tectonic environments in the ocean basins and form by one or more of four processes: (1) hydrogenetic precipitation from cold ambient seawater, (2) precipitation from hydrothermal fluids, (3) precipitation from sediment pore waters that have been modified from bottom water compositions by diagenetic reactions in the sediment column and (4) replacement of rocks and sediment. Iron and manganese deposits occur in five forms: nodules, crusts, cements, mounds and sediment-hosted stratabound layers. Seafloor oxides show a wide range of compositions from nearly pure iron to nearly pure manganese end members. Fe/Mn ratios vary from about 24 000 (up to 58% elemental Fe) for hydrothermal seamount ironstones to about 0.001 (up to 52% Mn) for hydrothermal stratabound manganese oxides from active volcanic arcs. Hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts that occur on most seamounts in the ocean basins have a mean Fe/Mn ratio of 0.7 for open-ocean seamount crusts and 1.2 for continental margin seamount crusts. Fe-Mn nodules of potential economic interest from the Clarion-Clipperton Zone have a mean Fe/Mn ratio of 0.3, whereas the mean ratio for nodules from elsewhere in the Pacific is about 0.7. Crusts are enriched in Co, Ni and Pt and nodules in Cu and Ni, and both have significant concentrations of Pb, Zn, Ba, Mo, V and other elements. In contrast, hydrothermal deposits commonly contain only minor trace metal contents, although there are many exceptions, for example, with Ni contents up to 0.66%, Cr to 1.2%, and Zn to 1.4%. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns generally show a positive Ce anomaly and abundant ??REEs for hydrogenetic and mixed hydrogenetic-diagenetic deposits, whereas the Ce anomaly is negative for hydrothermal deposits and ??REE contents are low. However, the Ce anomaly in crusts may vary from strongly positive in East Pacific crusts to slightly negative in West Pacific crusts, which may reflect

  20. [Influence of manganese on iron accumulation and flavinogenesis in yeast Debaryomyces hansenii].

    PubMed

    Sydorovych, I B; Fedorovych, D V

    2002-01-01

    In response to MnCl2 introduction the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii shows the increase of intracellular iron content and riboflavin biosynthesis level. Under iron deficiency the yeast cells sensitivity to manganese ions increases in spite of redundant synthesis of riboflavin. High concentration of iron in the culture results in the lower toxicity of Mn2+. Iron accumulation favours the cell resistance to manganese. Manganese causes the redundant synthesis of riboflavin as well as iron accumulation in streptonigrin-resistant mutants with a lowered iron content in cells. The Mn(2+)-resistant strains are phenotypically similar to the previously described Rib80(-)-mutants of D. hansenii with high iron content and riboflavin biosynthesis level. This suggests that riboflavin redundant synthesis and iron accumulation in the yeast cells are regulated by a common Mn(2+)-depending factor. A new method for isolation of the Rib80(-)-mutants is described. The method is based on the positive selection of manganese-resistant clones. PMID:12557493

  1. Manganese, iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devereux, Richard; Lehrter, John C.; Beddick, David L.; Yates, Diane F.; Jarvis, Brandon M.

    2015-05-01

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cycling in the region. Sedimentary manganese, iron, and sulfur cycling were investigated on the LCS using a combined chemical analysis and sediment diagenesis modeling approach. Three stations situated 320 km across the LCS along the 20 m isobath were sampled up to five times between the spring of 2006 and summer of 2007. Bottom water oxygen levels at the stations ranged from 203 mmol m-3 in spring to 2.5 mmol m-3 in summer. Porewater Mn and Fe2+ concentrations (up to 275 and 300 μmol L-1, respectively), sulfate reduction rates (1.0-8.4 mmol m-2 d-1), and the fraction of total oxalate extracted iron obtained as Fe(II) (0.25-0.52) differed between station and season. Sediments at station Z02 on the eastern LCS, south of Terrebonne Bay, had higher organic matter content and sulfate reduction rates than sediments at Z03, 160 km further west. Sulfate reduction rates were higher in summer than spring at station Z02 but not at Z03 where porewater Mn and Fe concentrations were highest in summer. Porewater Fe2+ concentrations, solid phase oxalate-extractable Fe concentrations, and sediment incubation experiments suggested iron reduction at Z03 may account for 20% or more of organic carbon remineralization. LCS Fe(III) concentrations decreased and sulfate reduction rates increased in model simulations by lowering interfacial dissolved oxygen levels and increasing the rates of organic matter deposited on the sediment surface. Results from this study demonstrate that LCS sedimentary metal oxide cycling may be more important in organic carbon mineralization pathways than previously recognized.

  2. Manganese and copper fluxes from continental margin sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Heggie, D.; Klinkhammer, G.; Cullen, D.

    1987-05-01

    Total dissolvable Cu and Mn have been measured in sea water collected from the continental shelf of the eastern Bering Sea. Copper concentrations of <3 nmole kg/sup -1/ were measured over the shelf break but concentrations increased to >4 nmole kg/sup -1/ inshore of a hydrographic front over the 100 m isobath. Manganese concentrations also were low over the shelf break, <10 nmole kg/sup -1/, and increased systematically to concentrations >10 nmole kg/sup -1/ inshore of the hydrographic front. Depth distributions of Mn at all continental shelf stations showed gradients into the sediments, with concentrations typically >20 nmole kg/sup -1/ in a bottom layer extending about 30 m off the bottom. Benthic Cu and Mn fluxes are indicated by cross-shelf pore water profiles that show interfacial concentrations more than an order of magnitude greater than in bottom water. These data and the results of a model of metal transport across the shelf suggest that Cu and Mn fluxes, estimated at 2 and 18 nmole cm/sup -2/y/sup -1/, respectively, from continental shelf sediments may be one source of these metals to the deep sea.

  3. Distributions of Manganese, Iron, and Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria In Lake Superior Sediments of Different Organic Carbon Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of oxygen, soluble and particulate manganese and iron, organic carbon and nitrogen were examined in Lake Superior sediment cores, along with the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic and manganese oxidizing bacteria. Analyses were performed using cores collected with the submersible Johnson Sea Link II. Three cores, exhibiting a range of organic carbon content, were collected from the deepest basin in Lake Superior and the north and south ends of the Caribou trough, and brought to the surface for immediate analysis. Minielectrode profiles of oxygen concentration of the three cores were carried out using a commercially available minielectrode apparatus. Oxygen depletion to less than 1% occurred within 4 cm of the surface for two of the cores, but not until approximately 15 cm for the core from the south basin of the Caribou trough. The three cores exhibited very different profiles of soluble, as well as leachable, manganese and iron, suggesting different degrees of remobilization of these metals in the sediments. Vertical profiles of viable bacteria and Mn oxidizing bacteria, determined by plating and counting, showed that aerobic (and facultatively aerobic) heterotrophic bacteria were present at the highest concentrations near the surface and decreased steadily with depth, while Mn oxidizing bacteria were concentrations primarily at and above the oxic/anoxic interface. Soluble manganese in the pore waters, along with abundant organic carbon, appeared to enhance the presence of manganese oxidizing bacteria, even below the oxic/anoxic interface. Profiles of solid-phase leachable manganese suggested a microbial role in manganese reprecipitation in these sediments.

  4. Distribution and chemistry of manganese, iron, and suspended particulates in Orca Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefry, John H.; Presley, Bob J.; Keeney-Kennicutt, Wendy L.; Trocine, Robert P.

    1984-06-01

    The intense halocline and redoxcline in the Orca Basin, northwest Gulf of Mexico, induce dramatic water column profiles for manganese, iron, and suspended particulates. Within a 17 m interval, the salinity of the basin water increases from 66 to ≈260 & permil and dissolved oxygen decreases to zero. Midway through this transition zone, concentrations of suspended matter peak at ≈900 μg/liter. Dissolved iron and manganese concentrations in the anoxic brine increase from oceanic values to maxima of 1.6 and 22 mg/liter, respectively. Upward migration of dissolved manganese from the brine leads to production of manganese-rich particles in the slightly oxygenated overlying water.

  5. Voltammetric determination of arsenic in high iron and manganese groundwaters.

    PubMed

    Gibbon-Walsh, Kristoff; Salaün, Pascal; Uroic, M Kalle; Feldmann, Joerg; McArthur, John M; van den Berg, Constant M G

    2011-09-15

    Determination of the speciation of arsenic in groundwaters, using cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV), is severely hampered by high levels of iron and manganese. Experiments showed that the interference is eliminated by addition of EDTA, making it possible to determine the arsenic speciation on-site by CSV. This work presents the CSV method to determine As(III) in high-iron or -manganese groundwaters in the field with only minor sample treatment. The method was field-tested in West-Bengal (India) on a series of groundwater samples. Total arsenic was subsequently determined after acidification to pH 1 by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Comparative measurements by ICP-MS as reference method for total As, and by HPLC for its speciation, were used to corroborate the field data in stored samples. Most of the arsenic (78±0.02%) was found to occur as inorganic As(III) in the freshly collected waters, in accordance with previous studies. The data shows that the modified on-site CSV method for As(III) is a good measure of water contamination with As. The EDTA was also found to be effective in stabilising the arsenic speciation for longterm sample storage at room temperature. Without sample preservation, in water exposed to air and sunlight, the As(III) was found to become oxidised to As(V), and Fe(II) oxidised to Fe(III), removing the As(V) by adsorption on precipitating Fe(III)-hydroxides within a few hours. PMID:21807202

  6. 40 CFR 721.10253 - Butanedioic acid, 2-methylene-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. 721...+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated (PMN P-09-388; CAS...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10253 - Butanedioic acid, 2-methylene-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. 721...+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated (PMN P-09-388; CAS...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10253 - Butanedioic acid, 2-methylene-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-, polymer with 2,5 furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. 721...+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... furanedione, copper(2+) manganese(2+) sodium zinc salt, hydrogen peroxide-initiated (PMN P-09-388; CAS...

  9. Iron versus Copper II. Principles and Applications in Bioinorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochiai, Ei-Ichiro

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the differences between iron and copper. Describes various aspects of the behaviors of these two elements, including those of biological and environmental significance. Addresses the evolution of the atmosphere and sedimentary ore formation, the phylogeny of iron and copper, and some anthropological notes regarding the use of the metals.…

  10. Morphological development of oxide-sulfide scales on iron and iron-manganese alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McAdam, G.; Young, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    Pure iron and alloys containing 2, 15, 25, and 50 wt.% manganese have been reacted at 1073 K in controlled gas atmospheres of SO/sub 2/-CO/sub 2/-CO-N/sub 2/. Equilibrium gas compositions were such that (1) FeS was stable but not FeO, or (2) both FeS and FeO were stable, or (3) FeO was stable but not FeS; in all cases, both MnS and MnO were stable. Under all reaction conditions, pure iron corroded to produce both sulfide and oxide. The resultant scale morphologies were consistent with local solid-gas equilibrium for the case in which both oxide and sulfide were stable but in the other cases indicated that equilibrium was not achieved and that direct reaction with SO/sub 2/(g) was responsible for corrosion. Additions of manganese did not greatly alter the scale morphologies. Under reaction conditions that were oxidizing and sulfidizing, very high levels of manganese were required to reduce the corrosion rate. On the other hand, relatively low levels had a beneficial effect both when FeO but not FeS was thermodynamically stable and similarly when FeS but not FeO was stable.

  11. Neutron activation analysis of fluid inclusions for copper, manganese, and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Roedder, E.; Burns, F.C.

    1963-01-01

    Microgram quantities of copper, manganese, and zinc, corresponding to concentrations greater than 100 parts per million, were found in milligram quantities of primary inclusion fluid extracted from samples of quartz and fluorite from two types of ore deposits. The results indicate that neutron activation is a useful analytical method for studying the content of heavy metal in fluid inclusions.

  12. [The complexes of copper, manganese and chromium with enzymatic hydrolysate of pig spleen: research in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zorin, S N; Sidorova, Yu S; Pleten, A P; Mazo, V K

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the preparation and the results of physical and chemical analysis of complexes of enzymatic hydrolysate of pig spleen (EHPS) with manganese, copper and chromium. The complexes were prepared using schemes including the reaction of complexation of inorganic cations with EHPS-peptides structures and application of membrane technology. The process of microfiltration of the resulting mixtures was carried out in tangential flow and low molecular weight fractions were collected. Solutions of copper and manganese complexes with EHPS were subjected to nanofiltration to remove inorganic ions from the reaction mixture. The obtained preparations were lyophilic dried and the molecular weight distribution of the protein fractions in Cu-EHPS, Mn-EHPS and Cr-EHPS complexes was analyzed by exclusion medium pressure liquid chromatography. The percentage relation of fractions with specific molecular weight range was calculated by applying the weighted integration of chromatograms. The determination of copper, manganese and chromium levels in the complexes was performed by atomic absorption method. The content of microelements in the preparations is for copper 16.5 ± 0.3 mg/g, for manganese--24.9 ± 0.5 mg/g and for chromium--2.5 ± 0.2 mg/g. PMID:27228705

  13. Daily Copper and Manganese Intakes and Their Relation to Blood Pressure in Normotensive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon-Kyung; Lyu, Eun-Soon; Oh, Se-Young; Park, Hae-Ryun; Ro, Hee-Kyong; Heo, Young-Ran; Hyun, Taisun

    2015-01-01

    Although it has been proposed that trace minerals have anti-oxidative functions and are related to the control of blood pressure, only a limited number of studies directly address the issue. Thus, the purpose of our study was to assess the intake of copper and manganese, which are trace minerals, and to clarify their relation to blood pressure. In a cross-sectional study, the blood pressure of 640 normotensive adults, from 19 to 69 year-old (320 males and 320 females), was measured, and its correlation with the intake of copper and manganese was assessed using a 24-hour dietary recall method. The average value of the blood pressure was 126.4/80.2 mmHg for the males and 117.8/75.8 mmHg for the females. The daily copper intake was 1.3 mg/day for the males and 1.2 mg/day for the females. For manganese, the daily intake was 4.2 mg/day for the males and 4.1 mg/day for the females. Although the copper intake of all subjects showed a positive correlation with the systolic and diastolic blood pressures, there was no significant correlation when the potential confounding factors were adjusted. The manganese intake of the male subjects had a significantly negative correlation with the systolic blood pressure after adjusting for gender, age, body mass index, and energy intake. In conclusion, the daily manganese intake of the normotensitve adults showed a significantly negative correlation with the systolic blood pressure indicating a possibility of a positive effect of manganese on blood pressure. PMID:26566521

  14. The influence of high iron diet on rat lung manganese absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Khristy; Molina, Ramon; Donaghey, Thomas; Brain, Joseph D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne . E-mail: wessling@hsph.harvard.edu

    2006-01-15

    Individuals chronically exposed to manganese are at high risk for neurotoxic effects of this metal. A primary route of exposure is through respiration, although little is known about pulmonary uptake of metals or factors that modify this process. High dietary iron levels inversely affect intestinal uptake of manganese, and a major goal of this study was to determine if dietary iron loading could increase lung non-heme iron levels and alter manganese absorption. Rats were fed a high iron (1% carbonyl iron) or control diet for 4 weeks. Lung non-heme iron levels increased {approx}2-fold in rats fed the high iron diet. To determine if iron-loading affected manganese uptake, {sup 54}Mn was administered by intratracheal (it) instillation or intravenous (iv) injection for pharmacokinetic studies. {sup 54}Mn absorption from the lungs to the blood was lower in it-instilled rats fed the 1% carbonyl iron diet. Pharmacokinetics of iv-injected {sup 54}Mn revealed that the isotope was cleared more rapidly from the blood of iron-loaded rats. In situ analysis of divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) expression in lung detected mRNA in airway epithelium and bronchus-associated lymphatic tissue (BALT). Staining of the latter was significantly reduced in rats fed the high iron diet. In situ analysis of transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA showed staining in BALT alone. These data demonstrate that manganese absorption from the lungs to the blood can be modified by iron status and the route of administration.

  15. Manganese

    MedlinePlus

    Manganese is a mineral that is found in several foods including nuts, legumes, seeds, tea, whole grains, and leafy green vegetables. It is ... manganese by mouth along with other vitamins and minerals can promote growth in children who have low ...

  16. Recent research progress on iron- and manganese-based positive electrode materials for rechargeable sodium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Komaba, Shinichi

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale high-energy batteries with electrode materials made from the Earth-abundant elements are needed to achieve sustainable energy development. On the basis of material abundance, rechargeable sodium batteries with iron- and manganese-based positive electrode materials are the ideal candidates for large-scale batteries. In this review, iron- and manganese-based electrode materials, oxides, phosphates, fluorides, etc, as positive electrodes for rechargeable sodium batteries are reviewed. Iron and manganese compounds with sodium ions provide high structural flexibility. Two layered polymorphs, O3- and P2-type layered structures, show different electrode performance in Na cells related to the different phase transition and sodium migration processes on sodium extraction/insertion. Similar to layered oxides, iron/manganese phosphates and pyrophosphates also provide the different framework structures, which are used as sodium insertion host materials. Electrode performance and reaction mechanisms of the iron- and manganese-based electrode materials in Na cells are described and the similarities and differences with lithium counterparts are also discussed. Together with these results, the possibility of the high-energy battery system with electrode materials made from only Earth-abundant elements is reviewed.

  17. Old iron, young copper: from Mars to Venus.

    PubMed

    Crichton, R R; Pierre, J L

    2001-06-01

    Iron and copper are metals which play an important role in the living world. From a brief consideration of their chemistry and biochemistry we conclude that the early chemistry of life used water soluble ferrous iron while copper was in the water-insoluble Cu(I) state as highly insoluble sulphides. The advent of oxygen was a catastrophic event for most living organisms, and can be considered to be the first general irreversible pollution of the earth. In contrast to the oxidation of iron and its loss of bioavailability as insoluble Fe(III), the oxidation of insoluble Cu(I) led to soluble Cu(II). A new iron biochemistry became possible after the advent of oxygen, with the development of chelators of Fe(III), which rendered iron once again accessible, and with the control of the potential toxicity of iron by its storage in a water soluble, non-toxic, bio-available storage protein (ferritin). Biology also discovered that whereas enzymes involved in anaerobic metabolism were designed to operate in the lower portion of the redox spectrum, the arrival of dioxygen created the need for a new redox active metal which could attain higher redox potentials. Copper, now bioavailable, was ideally suited to exploit the oxidizing power of dioxygen. The arrival of copper also coincided with the development of multicellular organisms which had extracellular cross-linked matrices capable of resisting attack by oxygen free radicals. After the initial 'iron age' subsequent evolution moved, not towards a 'copper age', but rather to an 'iron-copper' age. In the second part of the review, this symbiosis of iron and copper is examined in yeast. We then briefly consider iron and copper metabolism in mammals, before looking at iron-copper interactions in mammals, particularly man, and conclude with the reflection that, as in Greek and Roman mythology, a better understanding of the potentially positive interactions between Mars (iron) and Venus (copper) can only be to the advantage of our

  18. The scavenging of silver by manganese and iron oxides in stream sediments collected from two drainage areas of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Anderson, B.J.

    1974-01-01

    Stream sediments of two well-weathered and aerated drainage areas of Colorado containing anomalous amounts of silver were allowed to react by shaking with nitric acid of different concentrations (1-10M). Silver, manganese, and iron simultaneously dissolved were determined by atomic absorption. The relationship between silver dissolution and the dissolution of manganese and/or iron was evaluated by linear and multiple regression analyses. The highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.913) between silver and manganese dissolution suggests that manganese oxides are the major control on the scavenging of silver in these stream sediments, whereas iron oxides only play a secondary role in this regard. ?? 1974.

  19. Adsorption of iron cyanide complexes onto clay minerals, manganese oxide, and soil.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Hee; Schwab, A Paul; Johnston, C T; Banks, M Katherine

    2010-09-01

    The adsorption characteristics of an iron cyanide complex, soluble Prussian blue KFe(III)[Fe(II)(CN)(6)], were evaluated for representative soil minerals and soil at pH 3.7, 6.4 and 9.7. Three specimen clay minerals (kaolinite, montmorillonite, and illite), two synthesized manganese oxides (birnessite and cryptomelane), and a Drummer soil from Indiana were used as the adsorbents. Surface protonation of variable charge sites increased with decreasing pH yielding positively charged sites on crystal edges and enhancing the attractive force between minerals and iron cyanide complexes. Anion adsorption on clays often is correlated to the metal content of the adsorbent, and a positive relationship was observed between iron or aluminum content and Prussian blue adsorption. Illite had high extractable iron and adsorbed more ferro-ferricyande anion, while kaolinite and montmorillonite had lower extractable iron and adsorbed less. However, less pH effect was observed on the adsorption of iron cyanide to manganese oxides. This may due to the manganese oxide mediated oxidation of ferrocyanide [Fe(II)(CN)(6)(4-)], to ferricyanide [Fe(III)(CN)(6)(3-)], which has a low affinity for manganese oxides. PMID:20665323

  20. Effect of zinc on copper and iron bioavailability as influenced by dietary copper and fat source

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, A.C.; Jones, B.P.; Lin, F.; Sinthusek, G.; Frimpong, N.A.; Wu, S.

    1986-03-05

    In a number of experiments, they have observed that liver copper levels of young male rats fed low zinc diets were essentially the same as liver copper levels of rats fed adequate zinc. Liver iron levels of rats fed low zinc diets, however, tended to be markedly higher than liver iron levels of rats fed adequate zinc. Increases in dietary zinc (up to 200 ppm) were generally associated with decreases in liver iron deposition, but had little effect on liver copper deposition. Iron bioavailability appeared to be enhanced when fat sources high in saturated fatty acids were used, and there was evidence that the type of dietary fat influenced the effect of zinc on iron bioavailability. Liver copper deposition, however, did not appear to be markedly affected by the type of dietary fat suggesting that copper bioavailability is less affected by fat source. Increases in dietary copper were associated with increases in liver copper levels and decreases in liver iron levels of rats fed increasing levels of zinc. These data suggest that potential interrelationships between dietary factors not being considered as experimental variables could have significant effects on results and on the interrelationships between dietary variables which are being studied.

  1. Magnetic properties of iron minerals produced by natural iron- and manganese-reducing groundwater bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Kondratyeva, Lubov M.; Golubeva, Evgeniya M.; Kodama, Kazuto; Hori, Rie S.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the contribution of biogenic magnetic particles into sedimentary assemblages is a current challenge in palaeomagnetism. It has been demonstrated recently that magnetic particles produced through biologically controlled mineralization processes, such as magnetosomes from magnetotactic bacteria, contribute to the recording of natural remanent magnetization in marine and lacustrian sediments. Contributions from other, biologically induced, mineralization types, which are known from multiple laboratory experiments to include magnetic minerals, remain largely unknown. Here, we report magnetic properties of iron minerals formed by a community of iron- and manganese-reducing bacteria isolated from a natural groundwater deposit during a 2 yr long incubation experiment. The main iron phases of the biomineralized mass are lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite, each of which has environmental significance. Unlike the majority of the previous studies that reported superparamagnetic grain size, and thus no remanence carrying capacity of biologically induced magnetite, hysteresis and first-order reversal curves measurements in our study have not detected significant superparamagnetic contribution. The biomineralized mass, instead, contains a mixture of single-domain to pseudo-single-domain and multidomain magnetite particles that are capable of carrying a stable chemical remanent magnetization. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition parameters and first-order reversal curves signatures of the biomineralized samples deviate from previously proposed criteria for the distinction of extracellular (biologically induced) magnetic particles in mixtures. Given its potential significance as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization, environmental requirements, distribution in nature and the efficiency in the geomagnetic field recording by biologically induced mineralization need comprehensive investigation.

  2. Magnetic properties of iron minerals produced by natural iron- and manganese-reducing groundwater bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Kondratyeva, Lubov M.; Golubeva, Evgeniya M.; Kodama, Kazuto; Hori, Rie S.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the contribution of biogenic magnetic particles into sedimentary assemblages is a current challenge in paleomagnetism. It has been demonstrated recently that magnetic particles produced through biologically controlled mineralization processes, such as magnetosomes from magnetotactic bacteria, contribute to the recording of natural remanent magnetization in marine and lacustrian sediments. Contributions from other, biologically induced, mineralization types, which are known from multiple laboratory experiments to include magnetic minerals, remain largely unknown. Here, we report magnetic properties of iron minerals formed by a community of iron- and manganese-reducing bacteria isolated from a natural groundwater deposit during a two year long incubation experiment. The main iron phases of the biomineralized mass are lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite, each of which has environmental significance. Unlike the majority of the previous studies that reported superparamagnetic grain size, and thus no remanence carrying capacity of biologically induced magnetite, hysteresis and first order reversal curves measurements in our study have not detected significant superparamagnetic contribution. The biomineralized mass, instead, contains a mixture of single-domain to pseudo-single-domain and multi-domain magnetite particles that are capable of carrying a stable chemical remanent magnetization. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition parameters and first order reversal curves signatures of the biomineralized samples deviate from previously proposed criteria for the distinction of extracellular (biologically induced) magnetic particles in mixtures. Given its potential significance as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization, environmental requirements, distribution in nature and the efficiency in the geomagnetic field recording by biologically induced mineralization need comprehensive investigation.

  3. Liver metal levels and expression of genes related to iron homeostasis in rhesus monkeys after inhalational manganese exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pettiglio, Michael A.; Herrera, Carolina; Foster, Melanie L.; Dorman, David C.; Bartnikas, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present data on liver metal levels and expression of genes related to iron homeostasis in rhesus monkeys after inhalational manganese exposure. Archived liver samples from rhesus monkeys exposed to 0 (n=6), 0.06 (n=6), 0.3 (n=4) and 1.5 (n=4) mg/m3 manganese inhalation for 65 days were obtained from a published study (“Tissue manganese concentrations in young male rhesus monkeys following subchronic manganese sulfate inhalation” [1]). Samples were analyzed by spectroscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative PCR to assess metal levels and gene expression. Liver manganese and iron levels were linearly correlated although only the intermediate manganese exposure level (0.3 mg Mn/m3) led to a statistically significant increase in liver iron levels. PMID:26958631

  4. Liver metal levels and expression of genes related to iron homeostasis in rhesus monkeys after inhalational manganese exposure.

    PubMed

    Pettiglio, Michael A; Herrera, Carolina; Foster, Melanie L; Dorman, David C; Bartnikas, Thomas B

    2016-03-01

    Here we present data on liver metal levels and expression of genes related to iron homeostasis in rhesus monkeys after inhalational manganese exposure. Archived liver samples from rhesus monkeys exposed to 0 (n=6), 0.06 (n=6), 0.3 (n=4) and 1.5 (n=4) mg/m(3) manganese inhalation for 65 days were obtained from a published study ("Tissue manganese concentrations in young male rhesus monkeys following subchronic manganese sulfate inhalation" [1]). Samples were analyzed by spectroscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative PCR to assess metal levels and gene expression. Liver manganese and iron levels were linearly correlated although only the intermediate manganese exposure level (0.3 mg Mn/m(3)) led to a statistically significant increase in liver iron levels. PMID:26958631

  5. The effect of copper on iron reduction and its application to the determination of total iron content in iron and copper ores by potassium dichromate titration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hanjun; Tang, Yang; Ying, Haisong; Wang, Minghai; Wan, Pingyu; Jin Yang, X

    2014-07-01

    The International Standard Organization (ISO) specifies two titrimetric methods for the determination of total iron content in iron ores using potassium dichromate as titrant after reduction of the iron(III) by tin(II) chloride and/or titanium(III) chloride. These two ISO methods (ISO2597-1 and ISO2597-2) require nearly boiling-point temperature for iron(III) reduction and suffer from copper interference and/or mercury pollution. In this study, potassium borohydride was used for reduction of iron(III) catalyzed by copper ions at ambient temperatures. In the absence of copper, iron(III) reduction by potassium borohydride was sluggish while a trace amount of copper significantly accelerated the reduction and reduced potassium borohydride consumption. The catalytic mechanism of iron(III) reduction in sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid was investigated. Potassium borohydride in sodium hydroxide solution was stable without a significant degradation within 24h at ambient conditions and the use of potassium borohydride prepared in sodium hydroxide solution was safe and convenient in routine applications. The applicability of potassium borohydride reduction for the determination of total iron content by potassium dichromate titration was demonstrated by comparing with the ISO standard method using iron and copper ore reference materials and iron ore samples. PMID:24840467

  6. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium.

    PubMed

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  7. Magnetic particles extracted from manganese nodules: Suggested origin from stony and iron meteorites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkelman, R.B.

    1970-01-01

    On the basis of x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe data, spherical and ellipsoidal particles extracted from manganese nodules were divided into three groups. Group I particles are believed to be derived from iron meteorites, and Group II particles from stony meteorites. Group III particles are believed to be volcanic in origin.

  8. Oxidant Selection for the Treatment of Manganese (II), Iron (II), and Arsenic (III) in Groundwaters

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to comply with the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA’s) arsenic standard and the manganese and iron secondary maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) in water (10µg/L, 50µg/L, and 300µg/L, respectively), many Midwestern water utilities must add a strong...

  9. Effects of copper on the photosynthesis of intact chloroplasts: interaction with manganese.

    PubMed

    Pádua, Mário; Cavaco, Ana M; Aubert, Serge; Bligny, Richard; Casimiro, Adalcina

    2010-03-01

    Highly purified, intact chloroplasts were prepared from pea (Pisum sativum L.) and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) following an identical procedure, and were used to investigate the cupric cation inhibition on the photosynthetic activity. In both species, copper inhibition showed a similar inhibitor concentration that decreases the enzyme activity by 50% (IC(50) approximately 1.8 microM) and did not depend on the internal or external phosphate (Pi) concentration, indicating that copper did not interact with the Pi translocator. Fluorescence analysis suggested that the presence of copper did not facilitate photoinhibition, because there were no changes in maximal fluorescence (F(m)) nor in basal fluorescence (F(o)) of copper-treated samples. The electron transport through the photosystem II (PSII) was also not affected (operating efficiency of PSII-F'v/F'm similar in all conditions). Yet, under Cu(2+) stress, the proportion of open PSII reaction centers was dramatically decreased, and the first quinone acceptor (Q(A)) reoxidation was fully inhibited, as demonstrated by the constant photochemical quenching (q(P)) along experiment time. The quantum yield of PSII electron transport (Phi(PSII)) was also clearly affected by copper, and therefore reduced the photochemistry efficiency. Manganese, when added simultaneously with copper, delayed the inhibition, as measured by oxygen evolution and chlorophyll fluorescence, but neither reversed the copper effect when added to copper-inhibited plastids, nor prevented the inhibition of the Hill activity of isolated copper-treated thylakoids. Our results suggest that manganese competed with copper to penetrate the chloroplast envelope. This competition seems to be specific because other divalent cations e.g. magnesium and calcium, did not interfere with the copper action in intact chloroplasts. All results do suggest that, under these conditions, the stroma proteins, such as the Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes or others are the most

  10. Effect of oxygen, methyl mercaptan, and methyl chloride on friction behavior of copper-iron contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with an iron rider on a copper disk and a copper rider on an iron disk. The sputter cleaned iron and copper disk surfaces were saturated with oxygen, methyl mercaptan, and methyl chloride at atmospheric pressure. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor the surfaces. Lower friction was obtained in all experiments with the copper rider sliding on the iron disk than when the couple was reversed. For both iron and copper disks, methyl mercaptan gave the best surface coverage and was most effective in reducing friction. For both iron and copper disks, methyl chloride was the least effective in reducing friction. With sliding, copper transferred to iron and iron to copper.

  11. Copper-based electrochemical sensor with palladium electrode for cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wenjing; Pei, Xing; Bange, Adam; Haynes, Erin N; Heineman, William R; Papautsky, Ian

    2014-12-16

    In this work, we report on the development of a palladium-based, microfabricated point-of-care electrochemical sensor for the determination of manganese using square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry. Heavy metals require careful monitoring, yet current methods are too complex for a point-of-care system. Voltammetry offers an attractive approach to metal detection on the microscale, but traditional carbon, gold, or platinum electrodes are difficult or expensive to microfabricate, preventing widespread use. Our sensor uses palladium working and auxiliary electrodes and integrates them with a copper-based reference electrode for simple fabrication and compatibility with microfabrication and printed circuit board processing, while maintaining competitive performance in electrochemical detection. Copper electrodes were prepared on glass substrate using a combination of microfabrication procedures followed by electrodeposition of palladium. The disposable sensor system was formed by bonding a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) well to the glass substrate. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese using our new disposable palladium-based sensors exhibited 334 nM (18.3 ppb) limit of detection in borate buffer. The sensor was used to demonstrate manganese determination in natural water samples from a pond in Burnet Woods, located in Cincinnati, OH, and the Ohio River. PMID:25476591

  12. Copper-Based Electrochemical Sensor with Palladium Electrode for Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry of Manganese

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report on the development of a palladium-based, microfabricated point-of-care electrochemical sensor for the determination of manganese using square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry. Heavy metals require careful monitoring, yet current methods are too complex for a point-of-care system. Voltammetry offers an attractive approach to metal detection on the microscale, but traditional carbon, gold, or platinum electrodes are difficult or expensive to microfabricate, preventing widespread use. Our sensor uses palladium working and auxiliary electrodes and integrates them with a copper-based reference electrode for simple fabrication and compatibility with microfabrication and printed circuit board processing, while maintaining competitive performance in electrochemical detection. Copper electrodes were prepared on glass substrate using a combination of microfabrication procedures followed by electrodeposition of palladium. The disposable sensor system was formed by bonding a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) well to the glass substrate. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese using our new disposable palladium-based sensors exhibited 334 nM (18.3 ppb) limit of detection in borate buffer. The sensor was used to demonstrate manganese determination in natural water samples from a pond in Burnet Woods, located in Cincinnati, OH, and the Ohio River. PMID:25476591

  13. Zebrafish in the sea of mineral (iron, zinc, and copper) metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lu; Xia, Zhidan; Wang, Fudi

    2014-01-01

    Iron, copper, zinc, and eight other minerals are classified as essential trace elements because they present in minute in vivo quantities and are essential for life. Because either excess or insufficient levels of trace elements can be detrimental to life (causing human diseases such as iron-deficiency anemia, hemochromatosis, Menkes syndrome and Wilson's disease), the endogenous levels of trace minerals must be tightly regulated. Many studies have demonstrated the existence of systems that maintain trace element homeostasis, and these systems are highly conserved in multiple species ranging from yeast to mice. As a model for studying trace mineral metabolism, the zebrafish is indispensable to researchers. Several large-scale mutagenesis screens have been performed in zebrafish, and these screens led to the identification of a series of metal transporters and the generation of several mutagenesis lines, providing an in-depth functional analysis at the system level. Moreover, because of their developmental advantages, zebrafish have also been used in mineral metabolism-related chemical screens and toxicology studies. Here, we systematically review the major findings of trace element homeostasis studies using the zebrafish model, with a focus on iron, zinc, copper, selenium, manganese, and iodine. We also provide a homology analysis of trace mineral transporters in fish, mice and humans. Finally, we discuss the evidence that zebrafish is an ideal experimental tool for uncovering novel mechanisms of trace mineral metabolism and for improving approaches to treat mineral imbalance-related diseases. PMID:24639652

  14. The oxidation of iron-chromium-manganese alloys at 900C

    SciTech Connect

    Marasco, A.L.; Young, D.J. )

    1991-08-01

    The oxidation of nine ternary iron-chromium-manganese alloys was studied at 900C in an oxygen partial pressure of 26.7 kPa. The manganese concentration was set at 2, 6, and 10 wt.%, and chromium at 5, 12, and 20 wt.%. The scales formed on the low-chromium alloys consisted of (Mn,Fe){sub 2}O{sub 3}, {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. These alloys all exhibited internal oxidation and scale detachment upon cooling. The scales formed on the higher-chromium alloys were complicated by nodule formation. Initially, these scales had an outer layer of MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} underneath, adjacent to the alloy. With the passage of time, however, nodules formed, and the overall reaction rate increased. This tendency was more marked at higher manganese contents. Although these alloys contained a high chromium content, the product chromia scale usually contained manganese. It was concluded that the presence of manganese in iron-chromium alloys had an adverse effect on the oxidation resistance over a wide range of chromium levels.

  15. Evidence of a new structural phase of manganese-iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, B.; Albers, A.; Hearne, G. R.; Le Roux, H.

    1988-02-01

    Coprecipitation of manganese and iron followed by calcination at temperatures below 500°C results in a new structural phase for the Mn-Fe-O system: a non-stoichiometric spinel with, in every three unit cells, one metal atom missing. About 57% of the iron in this spinel has the composition γMnFeO3 which is paramagnetic at room temperature. The remaining 43% of the iron has the composition MnyFe2-yO3 with y˜0.16 which is magnetic at room temperature.

  16. Dysregulation of iron and copper homeostasis in nonalcoholic fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Aigner, Elmar; Weiss, Günter; Datz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Elevated iron stores as indicated by hyperferritinemia with normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturation and mostly mild hepatic iron deposition are a characteristic finding in subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Excess iron is observed in approximately one third of NAFLD patients and is commonly referred to as the “dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome”. Clinical evidence suggests that elevated body iron stores aggravate the clinical course of NAFLD with regard to liver-related and extrahepatic disease complications which relates to the fact that excess iron catalyses the formation of toxic hydroxyl-radicals subsequently resulting in cellular damage. Iron removal improves insulin sensitivity, delays the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus, improves pathologic liver function tests and likewise ameliorates NAFLD histology. Several mechanisms contribute to pathologic iron accumulation in NAFLD. These include impaired iron export from hepatocytes and mesenchymal Kupffer cells as a consequence of imbalances in the concentrations of iron regulatory factors, such as hepcidin, cytokines, copper or other dietary factors. This review summarizes the knowledge about iron homeostasis in NAFLD and the rationale for its therapeutic implications. PMID:25729473

  17. Dysregulation of iron and copper homeostasis in nonalcoholic fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Aigner, Elmar; Weiss, Günter; Datz, Christian

    2015-02-27

    Elevated iron stores as indicated by hyperferritinemia with normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturation and mostly mild hepatic iron deposition are a characteristic finding in subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Excess iron is observed in approximately one third of NAFLD patients and is commonly referred to as the "dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome". Clinical evidence suggests that elevated body iron stores aggravate the clinical course of NAFLD with regard to liver-related and extrahepatic disease complications which relates to the fact that excess iron catalyses the formation of toxic hydroxyl-radicals subsequently resulting in cellular damage. Iron removal improves insulin sensitivity, delays the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus, improves pathologic liver function tests and likewise ameliorates NAFLD histology. Several mechanisms contribute to pathologic iron accumulation in NAFLD. These include impaired iron export from hepatocytes and mesenchymal Kupffer cells as a consequence of imbalances in the concentrations of iron regulatory factors, such as hepcidin, cytokines, copper or other dietary factors. This review summarizes the knowledge about iron homeostasis in NAFLD and the rationale for its therapeutic implications. PMID:25729473

  18. Manganese oxide-supported iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts: physical and catalytic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitman, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, manganese oxide-supported iron (Fe/MnO) was prepared by impregnation of powdered manganese (II) oxide with aqueous iron(III) nitrate and subjected to various calcination and reduction treatments. It was then employed as a catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) and its steady-state activity and selectivity behavior was observed. The FTS reaction studies were run with nearly equimolal carbon monoxide/hydrogen feed at 515 and 540 K, 7.9 and 14.8 bar pressure. Feed conversion level was kept low in order to avoid transport limitations, and was varied by adjusting space velocity. The FTS reaction rate decreased strongly with increasing conversion. Compared to unpromoted iron catalysts, the Fe/MnO catalysts were more active for the water-gas shift reaction and less selective for methane and alcohols, especially at higher conversion, lower temperature and higher pressure. The olefin selectivity was high and secondary hydrogenation was not apparent. Catalysts calcined at higher temperature exhibited stronger effects of promotion, and yielded unusually high selectivity for C/sub 2/ to C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons at low temperature and high pressure. The general conclusion is that manganese promotion or iron can promote FTS selectivity towards low molecular weight olefins, but at the expense of high carbon dioxide formation. The Fe/MnO was also physically examined using Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Iron and manganese were found to interact strongly in the calcined catalyst, though extensive phase separation occurred during reduction. The promoting effects are apparently due to partial surface coverage of iron with MnO, the extent of which is enhanced by wetter reducing conditions.

  19. SERUM LEVELS OF COPPER AND IRON IN DENGUE FEVER.

    PubMed

    Soundravally, Rajendiran; Sherin, Jacob; Agieshkumar, Balakrishna Pillai; Daisy, Mariya Samadanam; Cleetus, Cherupanakkal; Narayanan, Parameswaran; Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu; Sujatha, Sistla; Harichandrakumar, Kottyen Thazhath

    2015-01-01

    The role of trace elements in dengue virulence is not yet known. The present study assessed the serum levels of two micronutrients, copper and iron, in cases of dengue fever. The study involved 96 patients of whom 48 had either severe or non-severe forms of dengue (with and without warning signs), and the remaining 48 were patients with other febrile illnesses (OFI), used as controls. Serum levels of copper and iron were evaluated at admission and by the time of defervescence using commercially available kits. At admission, no difference in the level of serum copper was observed between cases and controls. In the group of dengue cases, the copper level was found to be significantly decreased in severe and non-severe cases with warning signs, compared to non-severe cases without warning signs. In contrast, by the time of defervescence the copper level was found to be increased in all dengue cases compared to OFI controls, but no difference was observed among dengue cases. Unlike OFI controls, dengue cases showed an increasing pattern of copper levels from admission until defervescence. On the other hand, no such significant differences were observed in the serum level of iron in the clinical groups, except for a decreased iron level found in severe cases, compared to non-severe dengue without warning signs. The results show that copper is associated with dengue severity and this finding emphasizes the need to investigate the involvement of trace elements in disease severity so as to improve the prognosis of dengue. PMID:26422155

  20. Mechanism of Mineral Phase Reconstruction for Improving the Beneficiation of Copper and Iron from Copper Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhengqi; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jan; Zhang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    To maximize the recovery of iron and copper from copper slag, the modification process by adding a compound additive (a mixture of hematite, pyrite and manganous oxide) and optimizing the cooling of the slag was studied. The phase reconstruction mechanism of the slag modification process was revealed by thermodynamic calculations, x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the synergy between the burnt lime and the compound additive promotes the generation of target minerals, such as magnetite and copper matte. In addition, the multifunctional compound additive is able to improve the fluidity of the molten slag, which facilitates the coalescence and growth of fine particles of the target minerals. As a result, the percentage of iron distributed in the form of magnetite increased from 32.9% to 65.1%, and that of the copper exiting in the form of metallic copper and copper sulfide simultaneously increased from 80.0% to 90.3%. Meanwhile, the grains of the target minerals in the modified slag grew markedly to a mean size of over 50 μm after slow cooling. Ultimately, the beneficiation efficiency of copper and iron was improved because of the ease with which the target minerals could be liberated.

  1. Bioavailability of zinc, copper, and manganese from infant diets

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    A series of trace element absorption experiments were performed using the Sprague-Dawley suckling rat put and infant rhesis monkey (Macaca mulatta) with extrinsic radiolabeling to assess the bioavailability of Zn, Cu, and Mn from infant diets and to examine specific factors that affect absorption of these essential nutrients. Bioavailability of Cu as assessed by 6 h liver uptake (% of /sup 64/Cu dose) was highest from human milk and cow milk based formula and significantly lower from cow milk and soy based formula. Copper bioavailability from infant cereal products as assessed by whole body uptake (% of /sup 64/Cu dose) in d 20 rats, 9 h postintubation, was low compared to the bioavailability from cow milk or human milk alone. /sup 65/Zn uptake in d 20 rats, 9 h postintubation, was significantly lower from cereals fed alone or in combination with cow or human milk as compared to the uptake from the milks fed alone. Zn bioavailability varied among cereal diets, (lowest from cereals containing phytate and highest from cereal/fruit products). Mn bioavailability from infant diets was assessed using a modified suckling rat pup model. Bioavailability (24 h whole body retention of /sup 54/Mn) was high from all milks and commercial formulas tested.

  2. Iron may play a role in pancreatic atrophy in copper deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, M.; Lewis, C.G.; Lure, M.D. Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD Univ. of Maryland, College Park )

    1991-03-15

    The present study was undertaken to determine if pancreatic atrophy in copper deficient rats fed fructose is associated with excessive iron deposition. Weanling male and female rats were fed a copper deficient or copper adequate diet containing 62% carbohydrate as either fructose or starch. Another group of weanling rats consumed a copper deficient diet containing fructose that was low in iron. After consuming their respective diets for five weeks, the highest pancreatic iron concentration was seen in male rats consuming the copper deficient diet containing fructose. These animals also exhibited pancreatic atrophy. In contrast, neither copper deficient female rats fed fructose nor males fed starch exhibited pancreatic atrophy and their pancreata did not contain high levels of iron. In addition, reducing the availability of dietary iron in copper deficient rats fed fructose decreased pancreatic iron concentration and ameliorated the pathology. The data suggest that pancreatic atrophy in copper deficiency may be related to iron deposition in that tissue.

  3. Longitudinal Study on Trace Mineral Compositions (Selenium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese) in Korean Human Preterm Milk

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Yeon; Park, Jung Hwa; Lee-Kim, Yang Cha

    2012-01-01

    We measured selenium, zinc, copper and manganese concentrations in the human milk of Korean mothers who gave birth to preterm infants, and compared these measurements with the recommended daily intakes. The samples of human milk were collected postpartum at week-1, -2, -4, -6, -8, and -12, from 67 mothers who gave birth to preterm infants (< 34 weeks, or birth weight < 1.8 kg). All samples were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The concentrations of selenium were 11.8 ± 0.5, 11.4 ± 0.8, 12.7 ± 0.9, 11.4 ± 0.8, 10.8 ± 0.9, and 10.5 ± 1.3 µg/L, zinc were 7.8 ± 0.5, 9.1 ± 0.8, 7.2 ± 0.9, 8.0 ± 0.8, 7.4 ± 0.9, and 6.6 ± 1.2 mg/L, copper were 506 ± 23.6, 489 ± 29.4, 384 ± 33.6, 356 ± 32.9, 303 ± 35.0, and 301 ± 48.0 µg/L and manganese were 133 ± 4.0, 127 ± 6.0, 125 ± 6.0, 123 ± 6.0, 127 ± 6.0, and 108 ± 9.0 µg/L at week-1, -2, -4, -6, -8, and -12, respectively. The concentrations of selenium and zinc meet the daily requirements but that of copper is low and of manganese exceeds daily requirements recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Nutrition. PMID:22563219

  4. Retronasal smell and detection thresholds of iron and copper salts.

    PubMed

    Epke, Effie M; Lawless, Harry T

    2007-10-22

    Iron and copper salts, when placed in the mouth, may give rise to odorous compounds which complicate their functioning as chemical stimuli. The contribution of retronasal smell to perception of these metal salts at threshold has not been determined. Detection thresholds of the sulfate and chloride salts of ferrous iron and copper, and sodium chloride (as a control) were determined using a modified forced-choice ascending method of limits, with and without nasal occlusion. Threshold values were calculated from geometric means of individual estimates, and from interpolation on logistic regression and percent correct plots. Nasal occlusion raised thresholds for iron salts and copper but not sodium. The geometric mean detection thresholds with the nose open were 30, 64, 7.8, and 8.2 microM for FeSO(4), FeCl(2), CuSO(4), CuCl(2), respectively but rose to 160, 227, 24.6 and 15.6 with the nose closed. Metal salts of both iron and copper create a retronasally perceived olfactory stimulus at low concentration levels, probably arising from lipid oxidation products generated in the mouth. PMID:17532013

  5. Synthesis of phase pure praseodymium barium copper iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Konne, Joshua L; Davis, Sean A; Glatzel, Stefan; Hall, Simon R

    2013-06-18

    The control of crystallization of praseodymium barium copper iron oxide, an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell cathode material, has been demonstrated for the first time using a biotemplated sol-gel synthesis technique. The results obtained showed significant improvement in purity, synthesis time, surface area and simplicity over that previously reported. PMID:23660963

  6. Retronasal Smell and Detection Thresholds of Iron and Copper Salts

    PubMed Central

    Epke, Effie M.; Lawless, Harry T.

    2016-01-01

    Iron and copper salts, when placed in the mouth, may give rise to odorous compounds which complicate their functioning as chemical stimuli. The contribution of retronasal smell to perception of these metal salts at threshold has not been determined. Detection thresholds of the sulfate and chloride salts of ferrous iron and copper, and sodium chloride (as a control) were determined using a modified forced-choice ascending method of limits, with and without nasal occlusion. Threshold values were calculated from geometric means of individual estimates, and from interpolation on logistic regression and percent correct plots. Nasal occlusion raised thresholds for iron salts and copper but not sodium. The geometric mean detection thresholds with the nose open were 30, 64, 7.8, and 8.2 μM for FeSO4, FeCl2, CuSO4, CuCl2, respectively but rose to 160, 227, 24.6 and 15.6 with the nose closed. Metal salts of both iron and copper create a retronasally perceived olfactory stimulus at low concentration levels, probably arising from lipid oxidation products generated in the mouth. PMID:17532013

  7. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Huang, Yong-xian; Lü, Shi-xiong; Huang, Ti-fang; Lü, Zong-liang

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liquid-solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region appeared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  8. Removal of Arsenic, Iron, Manganese, and Ammonia in Drinking Water: Nagaoka International Corporation CHEMILES NCL Series Water Treatment System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nagaoka International Corporation CHEMILES NCL Series system was tested to verify its performance for the reduction of multiple contaminants including: arsenic, ammonia, iron, and manganese. The objectives of this verification, as operated under the conditions at the test si...

  9. Upgrading of Low-Grade Manganese Ore by Selective Reduction of Iron Oxide and Magnetic Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yubo; Olivas-Martinez, M.; Sohn, H. Y.; Kim, Hang Goo; Kim, Chan Wook

    2012-12-01

    The utilization of low-grade manganese ores has become necessary due to the intensive mining of high-grade ores for a long time. In this study, calcined ferruginous low-grade manganese ore was selectively reduced by CO, which converted hematite to magnetite, while manganese oxide was reduced to MnO. The iron-rich component was then separated by magnetic separation. The effects of the various reduction parameters such as particle size, reduction time, temperature, and CO content on the efficiency of magnetic separation were studied by single-factor experiments and by a comprehensive full factorial experiment. Under the best experimental conditions tested, the manganese content in the ore increased from around 36 wt pct to more than 44 wt pct, and almost 50 wt pct of iron was removed at a Mn loss of around 5 pct. The results of the full factorial experiments allowed the identification of the significant effects and yielded regression equations for pct Fe removed, Mn/Fe, and pct Mn loss that characterize the efficiency of the upgrading process.

  10. Regional Distribution of Copper, Zinc and Iron in Brain of Wistar Rat Model for Non-Wilsonian Brain Copper Toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Pal, Amit; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-03-01

    In previous studies, we have reported first in vivo evidence of copper deposition in the choroid plexus, cognitive impairments, astrocytes swelling (Alzheimer type II cells) and astrogliosis (increase in number of astrocytes), and degenerated neurons coupled with significant increase in the hippocampus copper and zinc content in copper-intoxicated Wistar rats. Nonetheless, hippocampus iron levels were not affected by chronic copper-intoxication. Notwithstanding information on distribution of copper, zinc and iron status in different regions of brain due to chronic copper exposure remains fragmentary. In continuation with our previous study, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intraperitoneally injected copper lactate (0.15 mg Cu/100 g body weight) daily for 90 days on copper, zinc and iron levels in different regions of the brain using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Copper-intoxicated group showed significantly increased cortex, cerebellum and striatum copper content (76, 46.8 and 80.7 % increase, respectively) compared to control group. However, non-significant changes were observed for the zinc and iron content in cortex, cerebellum and striatum due to chronic copper exposure. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that chronic copper toxicity causes differential copper buildup in cortex, cerebellum and striatum region of central nervous system of male Wistar rats; signifying the critical requirement to discretely evaluate the effect of copper neurotoxicity in different brain regions, and ensuing neuropathological and cognitive dysfunctions. PMID:26855494

  11. Associations of iron metabolism genes with blood manganese levels: a population-based study with validation data from animal models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Given mounting evidence for adverse effects from excess manganese exposure, it is critical to understand host factors, such as genetics, that affect manganese metabolism. Methods Archived blood samples, collected from 332 Mexican women at delivery, were analyzed for manganese. We evaluated associations of manganese with functional variants in three candidate iron metabolism genes: HFE [hemochromatosis], TF [transferrin], and ALAD [δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase]. We used a knockout mouse model to parallel our significant results as a novel method of validating the observed associations between genotype and blood manganese in our epidemiologic data. Results Percentage of participants carrying at least one copy of HFE C282Y, HFE H63D, TF P570S, and ALAD K59N variant alleles was 2.4%, 17.7%, 20.1%, and 6.4%, respectively. Percentage carrying at least one copy of either C282Y or H63D allele in HFE gene was 19.6%. Geometric mean (geometric standard deviation) manganese concentrations were 17.0 (1.5) μg/l. Women with any HFE variant allele had 12% lower blood manganese concentrations than women with no variant alleles (β = -0.12 [95% CI = -0.23 to -0.01]). TF and ALAD variants were not significant predictors of blood manganese. In animal models, Hfe-/- mice displayed a significant reduction in blood manganese compared with Hfe+/+ mice, replicating the altered manganese metabolism found in our human research. Conclusions Our study suggests that genetic variants in iron metabolism genes may contribute to variability in manganese exposure by affecting manganese absorption, distribution, or excretion. Genetic background may be critical to consider in studies that rely on environmental manganese measurements. PMID:22074419

  12. Modified clinoptilolite in the removal of iron and manganese from water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barloková, D.; Ilavský, J.

    2012-11-01

    It is necessary to treat water intended for drinking purposes in many cases to meet the requirements of the Regulation of the Government of the Slovak Republic No. 496/2010 on Drinking Water. There is a tendency to look for technology with new, more efficient and cost-effective materials and technologies. The goal of this study is to compare activated natural zeolite known as clinoptilolite (rich deposits of clinoptilolite were found in the region of East Slovakia Region in the 1980s) with the imported Greensand and Cullsorb materials in the removal of iron and manganese from water. The results obtained from experiments carried out at WTP Kúty prove that Klinopur-Mn is suitable for the removal of iron and manganese from water and is comparable with the imported materials.

  13. Manganese

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Manganese ; CASRN 7439 - 96 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  14. Manganese

    MedlinePlus

    ... no RDAs for a nutrient, the Adequate Intake (AI) is used as a guide. The AI is the estimated amount of the nutrient that ... assumed to be adequate. The daily Adequate Intake (AI) levels for manganese are: infants birth to 6 ...

  15. Synthesis and TL characterization of Li2B4O7 doped with copper and manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarneros-Aguilar, C.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Marcazzó, J.; Palomino-Merino, R.; Espinosa, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    Copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) doped tissue equivalent Li2B4O7 were prepared by solid state sintering. The glow curves shows a high temperature peak at 222 °C for Li2B4O7:Cu and for Li2B4O7:Mn at 218 °C. Linear dose response is observed up to 140 Gy. With a thermal treatment at 125 °C, the first peak of the phosphors doped with copper (95 °C) and manganese (90 °C) disappears and the main TL peaks remain isolated. The dose rate dependence was studied by exposing the samples at doses of 25 Gy and 250 Gy. At low dose it was observed that the Li2B4O7:Cu TL response has non-dependence on dose rate, and at higher dose was observed that there is a dependence of the TL response with the different dose rate until of 30%. For the case of Li2B4O7:Mn, the TL response has non-dependence on dose rate at low dose or high dose.

  16. Electrochromic performance, wettability and optical study of copper manganese oxide thin films: Effect of annealing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falahatgar, S. S.; Ghodsi, F. E.; Tepehan, F. Z.; Tepehan, G. G.; Turhan, İ.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the nanostructured copper manganese oxide (CMO) thin films were prepared from acetate based sol-gel precursors and deposited on glass and indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates by dip-coating technique. The films were annealed at 300, 400 and 500 °C in ambient atmosphere. The effects of annealing temperature on structural, morphological, wettability, electrochromic and optical properties of CMO thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX), water contact angle measurement (WCA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometery. The presence of mixed oxide phases comprising of copper manganese oxide (CuMn2O4) and manganese oxide at different annealing temperature was confirmed by XRD patterns. The results showed that the Mn3O4 phase has been changed to Mn2O3 when the annealing temperature is increased from 300 to 500 °C. The FESEM images indicated that the granular surface morphology was sensitive to annealing temperature. EDX studies indicated that the thin films contained O, Mn and Cu species. Wettability studies showed that the water contact angle of the nanostructured CMO thin films coated on glass substrates was influenced by the variation of annealing temperature and the surface nature of thin films was changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. The results of CVs measurement indicated that the anodic and cathodic charge density and capacitance of all CMO samples decreased with increasing scan rate in potential range of -1-1 eV. Also, the annealed CMO thin film at 500 °C showed better electrochromic performance with respect to other samples at lower scan rate. The thickness, refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical band gap of thin films coated on glass substrates were calculated from reflectance and transmittance spectra using an iterative numerical method. The optical band gap of

  17. Manganese-oxide-supported iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts: physical and catalytic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitman, K.M.; Baerns, M.; Butt, J.B.

    1987-06-01

    It has been claimed that catalysts containing iron and manganese are especially selective for production of low molecular weight olefins in the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. In this study a new system, manganese-oxide-supported iron, Fe/MnO, was prepared, subjected to various calcination and reduction treatments, and then employed as a FT catalyst. Reaction studies were run with approximately 1/1: CO/H/sub 2/ feed at 515 and 540 K and 7.8 and 14.8 bar pressure. Although low conversions were employed, the synthesis rate decreased strongly with increasing conversion. Compared to conventional Fe catalysts, the Fe/MnO was more active for water-gas shift and less selective for methane and alcohols, especially at higher conversions, lower temperature, and higher pressure. Olefin selectivity was high, hydrogen chemisorption was depressed, and secondary hydrogenation was not apparent. In general it is concluded that the manganese-supported iron does promote FT selectivity for low molecular weight olefins, but at the expense of high CO/sub 2/ formation.

  18. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  19. Abu Zenima synthetic zeolite for removing iron and manganese from Assiut governorate groundwater, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrag, Abd El Hay Ali; Abdel Moghny, Th.; Mohamed, Atef Mohamed Gad; Saleem, Saleem Sayed; Fathy, Mahmoud

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater in Upper Egypt especially in Assiut Governorate is considered the second source of fresh water and used for drinking, agriculture, domestic and industrial purposes. Unfortunately, it is characterized by high concentrations of iron and manganese ions. The study aimed at synthesizing zeolite-4A from kaolinite for removing the excess iron and manganese ions from Assiut Governorate groundwater wells. Therefor, the kaolinite was hydrothermally treated through the metakaolinization and zeolitization processes to produce crystalline zeolite-4A. The chemical composition of crystalline zeolite-4A and its morphology were then characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then the column experiments were conducted to study the performance of crystalline salt-4A as ion exchange and investigate their operating parameters and regeneration conditions. Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models were applied to predict adsorption capacity and the time required for 50 % breakthrough curves. The effects of initial concentrations of 600 and 1000 mg L-1 for Fe2+ and Mn2+, feed flow rate of 10-30 ml/min, and height range of 0.4-1.5 cm on the breakthrough behavior of the adsorption system were determined. The obtained results indicated that the synthesized zeolite-A4 can remove iron and manganese ions from groundwater to the permissible limit according to the standards drinking water law.

  20. Mineral of the month: manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corathers, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most important ferrous metals and one of the few for which the United States is totally dependent on imports. It is a black, brittle element predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production, which together provide the largest market for manganese (about 83 percent). It is also used as an alloy with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Nonmetallurgical applications of manganese include battery cathodes, soft ferrite magnets used in electronics, micronutrients found in fertilizers and animal feed, water treatment chemicals, and a colorant for bricks and ceramics.

  1. Ultrasound-enhanced copper removal by hydrous iron oxide adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, H.R.; Wheat, P.E.

    1996-12-31

    A model system to investigate ultrasound-enhanced removal of metallic ions from aqueous solution by hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) adsorption has been conducted. The experimental data indicate that ultrasonic treatment of pre-formed HFO flocs can lead to enhanced removal of metallic ions from aqueous solution and that the level of enhancement is strongly correlated with the solution pH. Ultrasonic treatment has been shown to be effective at lowering the final solution concentration of copper species in the pH range 7.5--9.5 at copper to iron molar concentration ratios of 10 and 30%.

  2. A novel zerovalent manganese for removal of copper ions: synthesis, characterization and adsorption studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dada, A. O.; Adekola, F. A.; Odebunmi, E. O.

    2015-11-01

    Synthesis of nanoscale zerovalent manganese (nZVMn) by chemical reduction was carried out in a single pot system under inert environment. nZVMn was characterized using a combination of analytical techniques: Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray, BET surface area and Point of Zero Charge. The adsorption physicochemical factors: pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, agitation speed, initial copper ion concentration and temperature were optimized. The kinetic data fitted better to Pseudo second-order, Elovich, fractional power and intraparticle diffusion models and their validity was tested by three statistical models: sum of square error, Chi-square (χ 2) and normalized standard deviation (Δq). Seven of the two-parameter isotherm models [Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin, Dubinin-Kaganer-Raduskevich (DKR), Halsey, Harkin-Jura and Flory-Huggins] were used to analyse the equilibrium adsorption data. The Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity (Q max = 181.818 mg/g) obtained is greater than other those of nano-adsorbents utilized in adsorption of copper ions. The equilibrium adsorption data were better described by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, DKR and Halsey isotherm models considering their coefficient of regression (R 2 > 0.90). The values of the thermodynamic parameters: standard enthalpy change ∆H° (+50.27848 kJ mol-1), standard entropy change ∆S° (203.5724 J mol-1 K-1) and the Gibbs free energy change ∆G° revealed that the adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic in nature. The performance of this novel nanoscale zerovalent manganese (nZVMn) suggested that it has a great potential for effective removal of copper ions from aqueous solution.

  3. Sorption of ferric iron from ferrioxamine B to synthetic and biogenic layer type manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Bargar, John R.; Sposito, Garrison

    2008-07-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments that increase the bioavailability of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but scant information appears to be available about the potential roles of layer type manganese oxides, which are relatively abundant in soils and the oligotrophic marine water column. To probe the effects of layer type manganese oxides on the stability of aqueous Fe-siderophore complexes, we studied the sorption of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB +, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] to two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III,IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida GB-1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB + at pH 8. Analysis of Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that a dominant fraction of Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to the mineral structure at multiple sites, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that layer type manganese oxides, including biogenic minerals, may sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes. We conclude that the sorption of iron-siderophore complexes may play a significant role in the bioavailability and biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  4. Methods for making a supported iron-copper catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1986-01-01

    A catalyst is described for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO+H.sub.2 utilizing a porous Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 support impregnated with iron and copper and optionally promoted with an alkali metal. The use of an Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 support results in the suppression of heavy waxes (C.sub.26 + hydrocarbons), particularly in slurry phase operation, when compared to unsupported or co-precipitated catalysts.

  5. Some interferences in atomic-absorption spectrometry and extraction of iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, M; Kihara, H; Suzuki, M; Takeuchi, T

    1970-09-01

    The effect of complexing agents on the atomic-absorption spectrometry of iron and copper extracts was investigated Thiocyanate complexes gave a marked depression of absorption by iron and copper, especially in fuel-rich flames. Chloride, diethyldithiocarbamate and hydroxyquinoline complexes of iron behaved alike, but differently from the thiocyanate complex. PMID:18960816

  6. Application of chromatography and mass spectrometry to the characterization of cobalt, copper, manganese and molybdenum in Morinda citrifolia.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Justyna; Ruzik, Lena

    2013-03-15

    An analytical procedure was proposed to determine the manganese species and to study the fractionation of microelements such as copper, cobalt and molybdenum in Noni juice. Morinda citrifolia is known as a noni fruit, Indian mulberry, nunaakai, dog dumpling, mengkudu, beach mulberry, vomit fruit and cheese fruit. It is a tropical plant with a long tradition of medicinal use in Polynesia and tropical parts of eastern Asia and Australia. This article covers the determination of manganese species in Noni juice and established by fractionation by size exclusion chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SEC ICP MS) and next characterization of species by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS). Also presented the fractionation analysis of copper, cobalt and molybdenum in Noni juice sample using SEC ICP MS - juice was treated with buffer and enzymatic extraction media and analyzed. For the evaluation of the amounts of the metal fractions distinguished, the ICP MS was used off-line prior to the determination of copper, cobalt, molybdenum and manganese concentrations in the juice. It was established that elements are present in the analyzed samples in different species and their concentration is μg mL(-1) and ng mL(-1) range in fruit. The accuracy of the entire fractionation scheme and sample preparation procedures involved was verified by the performance of the recovery test. For the information about the bioavailability of these elements, in vitro bioavailability investigation was used by SEC ICP MS technique. Two step digestion model simulating gastric (pepsin digestion) and intestinal (pancreatin digestion) juices. In Noni juice, manganese is complexed from flavonoids - rutin, from dye like anthraquinone (alizarin) and glycosides - asperulosidic acid (ESI MS - characterization). The study shows that copper and molybdenum contained in Noni juice are complexed by peptides, and cobalt by organic acids (which are 3.6% of juice). Molybdenum in

  7. Iron and copper catalysis of PCDD/F formation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Junhong; Buekens, Alfons; Olie, Kees; Yang, Jie; Chen, Tong; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    The formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) was explored during de novo tests designed to compare the catalytic activity of copper (II) chloride (CuCl2) with that of iron (III) oxide (Fe2O3) and to test some synergistic effect between these two catalytic compounds. Both copper chloride (CuCl2) and iron oxide (Fe2O3) were earlier proposed as catalysts to explain the PCDD/F emissions from, e.g. municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI). In addition, haematite (Fe2O3) is the main iron ore and could be responsible for the typical iron ore sintering plant fingerprint. A total of nine model fly ash (MFA) samples were prepared by mixing and grinding of sodium chloride (NaCl), activated carbon and a powder matrix of silica (SiO2) with the selected metal compound(s). The conditions of these de novo tests were 1 h in duration, 350 °C in a flow of synthetic combustion gas (10 vol.% oxygen in nitrogen). The effect of Fe-Cu catalyst concentration on yield and distribution pattern of PCDD/F was systematically explored; three strongly differing ratios of [Fe]:[Cu] were considered (1:1, 10:1 and 100:1) to study the potential interactions of Fe2O3 and CuCl2 suggested earlier. The results show some slight rise of PCDD/F formed with raising iron concentration from 0 to 10.1 wt% (no Cu added; 0.1 wt% Cu), as well as strong surging of both amount and average chlorination level of PCDD/F when rising amounts of copper (0 to 1.1 wt%) are introduced. The resulting fingerprints are compared with those from sintering and from MSWI. PMID:26416123

  8. Expanding the menu for carnivorous plants: uptake of potassium, iron and manganese by carnivorous pitcher plants.

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, Wolfram; Steinhauser, Georg; Peroutka, Marianne; Musilek, Andreas; Sterba, Johannes H; Lichtscheidl, Irene K; Bichler, Max

    2009-12-01

    Carnivorous plants use animals as fertiliser substitutes which allow them to survive on nutrient deficient soils. Most research concentrated on the uptake of the prey's nitrogen and phosphorus; only little is known on the utilisation of other elements. We studied the uptake of three essential nutrients, potassium, iron and manganese, in three species of carnivorous pitcher plants (Cephalotus follicularis LaBilladiere, Sarracenia purpureaL., Heliamphora nutans Bentham). Using relatively short-lived and gamma-emitting radiotracers, we significantly improved the sensitivity compared to conventional protocols and gained the following results. We demonstrated the uptake of trace elements like iron and manganese. In addition, we found direct evidence for the uptake of potassium into the pitcher tissue. Potassium and manganese were absorbed to virtually 100% if offered in physiological concentrations or below in Cephalotus. Analysis of pitcher fluid collected in the natural habitat showed that uptake was performed here as efficiently as in the laboratory. The absorption of nutrients is an active process depending on living glandular cells in the pitcher epidermis and can be inhibited by azide. Unphysiologically high amounts of nutrients were taken up for a short time, but after a few hours the absorbing cells were damaged, and uptake stopped. Absorption rates of pitcher leaves from plants under controlled conditions varied highly, indicating that each trap is functionally independent. The comparison of minerals in typical prey with the plants' tissues showed that a complete coverage of the plants' needs by prey capture is improbable. PMID:19428263

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance of iron and copper disease states

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, F.W.; Hutchison, J.; Mallard, J.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1983-11-01

    The tissue levels of paramagnetic ions are an important factor in the determination of T/sub 1/ values as observed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The increased levels of iron present in human disease states such as hemochromatosis lead to decreased T/sub 1/ values. The mean liver T/sub 1/ of three patients with iron storage disease was determined to be 130 msec, significantly different from the value of 154 msec, the mean for 14 normal controls. Whether NMR will be able to detect the increased copper levels in liver and brain in Wilson disease remains for further clinical trials to evaluate. NMR imaging, however, does serve as a noninvasive method for the diagnosis of states of iron overload and as a technique to follow progression of disease or response to medical therapy.

  10. Highly Efficient Elimination of Carbon Monoxide with Binary Copper-Manganese Oxide Contained Ordered Nanoporous Silicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jiho; Kim, Hwayoun; Lee, Hyesun; Jang, Seojun; Chang, Jeong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Ordered nanoporous silicas containing various binary copper-manganese oxides were prepared as catalytic systems for effective carbon monoxide elimination. The carbon monoxide elimination efficiency was demonstrated as a function of the [Mn]/[Cu] ratio and reaction time. The prepared catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method, small- and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) for structural analysis. Moreover, quantitative analysis of the binary metal oxides within the nanoporous silica was achieved by inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The binary metal oxide-loaded nanoporous silica showed high room temperature catalytic efficiency with over 98 % elimination of carbon monoxide at higher concentration ratio of [Mn]/[Cu].

  11. Highly Efficient Elimination of Carbon Monoxide with Binary Copper-Manganese Oxide Contained Ordered Nanoporous Silicas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiho; Kim, Hwayoun; Lee, Hyesun; Jang, Seojun; Chang, Jeong Ho

    2016-12-01

    Ordered nanoporous silicas containing various binary copper-manganese oxides were prepared as catalytic systems for effective carbon monoxide elimination. The carbon monoxide elimination efficiency was demonstrated as a function of the [Mn]/[Cu] ratio and reaction time. The prepared catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method, small- and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) for structural analysis. Moreover, quantitative analysis of the binary metal oxides within the nanoporous silica was achieved by inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The binary metal oxide-loaded nanoporous silica showed high room temperature catalytic efficiency with over 98 % elimination of carbon monoxide at higher concentration ratio of [Mn]/[Cu]. PMID:26744146

  12. Laser Surface Alloying of Copper, Manganese, and Magnesium with Pure Aluminum Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay G.; Sankar, M. Ravi; Dixit, Uday S.

    2016-03-01

    Laser surface alloying is one of the recent technologies used in the manufacturing sector for improving the surface properties of the metals. Light weight materials like aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, and magnesium alloys are used in the locomotive, aerospace, and structural applications. In the present work, an experimental study was conducted to improve the surface hardness of commercially pure aluminum plate. CO2 laser is used to melt pre-placed powders of pure copper, manganese, and magnesium. Microstructure of alloyed surface was analyzed using optical microscope. The best surface alloying was obtained at the optimum values of laser parameters, viz., laser power, scan speed, and laser beam diameter. In the alloyed region, microhardness increased from 30 HV0.5 to 430 HV0.5, while it was 60 HV0.5 in the heat-affected region. Tensile tests revealed some reduction in the strength and total elongation due to alloying. On the other hand, corrosion resistance improved.

  13. The photochemistry of manganese and the origin of banded iron formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Holland, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    The origin of the deposition of superior-type Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs) is investigated in experiments where the effect of UV radiation on dissolved manganese was studied to determine if the commonly accepted photochemical model for BIF formation is consistent with the distribution of Mn in BIFs. Solutions containing 0.56 M NaCl and about 180 microM MnCl2, with or without 3 to 200 microM FeCl2 were irradiated with filtered and unfiltered UV light for up to 8 hrs; the solutions were deaerated and buffered to a pH of 7, and the experiments were conducted under oxygen-free atmosphere. Data on the rate of manganese photooxidation confirmed that a photochemical model for the origin of oxide facies BIFs is consistent with field observations.

  14. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of biosorption of iron and manganese from aqueous medium using rice husk ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekola, F. A.; Hodonou, D. S. S.; Adegoke, H. I.

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption behavior of rice husk ash with respect to manganese and iron has been studied by batch methods to consider its application for water and waste water treatment. The optimum conditions of adsorption were determined by investigating the effect of initial metal ion concentration, contact time, adsorbent dose, pH value of aqueous solution and temperature. Adsorption equilibrium time was observed at 120 min. The adsorption efficiencies were found to be pH dependent. The equilibrium adsorption experimental data were found to fit the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms for iron, but fitted only Langmuir isotherm for manganese. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was found to describe the manganese and iron kinetics more effectively. The thermodynamic experiment revealed that the adsorption processes involving both metals were exothermic. The adsorbent was finally applied to typical raw water with initial manganese and iron concentrations of 3.38 mg/l for Fe and 6.28 mg/l, respectively, and the removal efficiency was 100 % for Mn and 70 % for Fe. The metal ions were desorbed from the adsorbent using 0.01 M HCl, it was found to quantitatively remove 67 and 86 % of Mn and Fe, respectively, within 2 h. The results revealed that manganese and iron are considerably adsorbed on the adsorbent and could be an economic method for the removal of these metals from aqueous solutions.

  15. The photochemistry of manganese and the origin of Banded Iron Formations.

    PubMed

    Anbar, A D; Holland, H D

    1992-07-01

    The photochemical oxidation of Fe(2+) -hydroxide complexes dissolved in anoxic Precambrian oceans has been suggested as a mechanism to explain the deposition of Banded Iron Formations (BIFs). Photochemical studies have not yet addressed the low levels of manganese in many of these deposits, which probably precipitated from solutions bearing similar concentrations of Fe2+ and Mn2+. Depositional models must also explain the stratigraphic separation of iron and manganese ores in manganiferous BIFs. In this study, solutions containing 0.56 M NaCl and approximately 180 micromoles MnCl2 with or without 3 to 200 micromoles FeCl2 were irradiated with filtered and unfiltered UV light from a medium-pressure mercury-vapor lamp for up to 8 hours. The solutions were deaerated and buffered to pH approximately 7, and all experiments were conducted under O2-free (< 1 ppm) atmospheres. In experiments with NaCl + MnCl2, approximately 20% of the Mn2+ was oxidized and precipitated as birnessite in 8 hours. Manganese precipitation was only observed when light with lambda < 240 nm was used. In experiments with NaCl + MnCl2 + FeCl2, little manganese was lost from solution, while Fe2+ was rapidly oxidized to Fe3+ and precipitated as gamma-FeOOH or as amorphous ferric hydroxide. The Mn:Fe ratio of these precipitates was approximately 1:50, similar to the ratios observed in BIFs. A strong upper limit on the rate of manganese photo-oxidation during the Precambrian is estimated to be 0.1 mg cm-2 yr-1, a factor of 10(3) slower than the rate of iron photo-oxidation considered reasonable in BIF depositional basins. Thus, a photochemical model for the origin of oxide facies BIFs is consistent with field observations, although models that invoke molecular O2 as the oxidant of Fe2+ and Mn2+ are not precluded. Apparently, oxide facies BIFs could have formed under anoxic, as well as under mildly oxygenated atmospheres. PMID:11537803

  16. Promotion of atherogenesis by copper or iron-Which is more likely?

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Reshmi; Ren, Minqin; Ning, Pan; Tan Kwong Huat, Benny; Halliwell, Barry . E-mail: bchbh@nus.edu.sg; Watt, Frank

    2007-02-02

    Iron levels increase in atherosclerotic lesions in cholesterol fed-rabbits and play a role in atherosclerosis. We investigated whether copper also rises. Male New Zealand White rabbits were fed high-cholesterol diets for 8 weeks. After sacrifice, lesion sizes were determined, and elemental analyses of the lesion and unaffected artery wall performed using nuclear microscopy. Unlike iron, lesion copper is decreased by about half compared with the unaffected artery wall, and much less copper than iron is present. Our data suggest that iron may be more likely to play a role in the promotion of atherosclerosis than copper.

  17. Effect of austempering time on mechanical properties of a low manganese austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Putatunda, S.K.; Gadicherla, P.K.

    2000-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of austempering time on the resultant microstructure and the room-temperature mechanical properties of an unalloyed and low manganese ductile cast iron with initially ferritic as-cast structure. The effect of austempering time on the plane strain fracture toughness of this material was also studied. Compact tension and round cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from unalloyed ductile cast iron with low manganese content and with a ferritic as-cast (solidified) structure. These specimens were then austempered in the upper (371 C) and lower (260 C) bainitic temperature ranges for different time periods, ranging from 30 min. to 3 h. Microstructural features such as type of bainite and the volume fraction of ferrite and austenite and its carbon content were evaluated by X-ray diffraction to examine the influence of microstructure on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of this material. The results of the present investigation indicate that for this low manganese austempered ductile iron (ADI), upper ausferritic microstructures exhibit higher fracture toughness than lower ausferritic microstructures. Yield and tensile strength of the material was found to increase with an increase in austempering time in a lower bainitic temperature range, whereas in the upper bainitic temperature range, time has no significant effect on the mechanical properties. A retained austenite content between 30 to 35% was found to provide optimum fracture toughness. Fracture toughness was found to increase with the parameter (X{gamma}C{gamma}/d){sup 1/2}, where X{gamma} is the volume fraction of austenite, C{gamma} is the carbon content of the austenite, and d is the mean free path of dislocation motion in ferrite.

  18. Growth and Dissolution of Iron and Manganese Oxide Films

    SciTech Connect

    Scot T. Martin

    2008-12-22

    Growth and dissolution of Fe and Mn oxide films are key regulators of the fate and transport of heavy metals in the environment, especially during changing seasonal conditions of pH and dissolved oxygen. The Fe and Mn are present at much higher concentrations than the heavy metals, and, when Fe and Mn precipitate as oxide films, heavy metals surface adsorb or co-precipitate and are thus essentially immobilized. Conversely, when the Fe and Mn oxide films dissolve, the heavy metals are released to aqueous solution and are thus mobilized for transport. Therefore, understanding the dynamics and properties of Fe and Mn oxide films and thus on the uptake and release of heavy metals is critically important to any attempt to develop mechanistic, quantitative models of the fate, transport, and bioavailablity of heavy metals. A primary capability developed in our earlier work was the ability to grow manganese oxide (MnO{sub x}) films on rhodochrosite (MnCO{sub 3}) substrate in presence of dissolved oxygen under mild alkaline conditions. The morphology of the films was characterized using contact-mode atomic force microscopy. The initial growth began by heteroepitaxial nucleation. The resulting films had maximum heights of 1.5 to 2 nm as a result of thermodynamic constraints. Over the three past years, we have investigated the effects of MnO{sub x} growth on the interactions of MnCO{sub 3} with charged ions and microorganisms, as regulated by the surface electrical properties of the mineral. In 2006, we demonstrated that MnO{sub x} growth could induce interfacial repulsion and surface adhesion on the otherwise neutral MnCO{sub 3} substrate under environmental conditions. Using force-volume microscopy (FVM), we measured the interfacial and adhesive forces on a MnO{sub x}/MnCO{sub 3} surface with a negatively charged silicon nitride tip in a 10-mM NaNO3 solution at pH 7.4. The interfacial force and surface adhesion of MnOx were approximately 40 pN and 600 pN, respectively

  19. Interplay between Manganese and Iron in Pneumococcal Pathogenesis: Role of the Orphan Response Regulator RitR

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y.; Potter, Adam J.; Trappetti, Claudia; Walker, Mark J.; Jennings, Michael P.; Paton, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a major human pathogen that is carried asymptomatically in the nasopharynx by up to 70% of the human population. Translocation of the bacteria into internal sites can cause a range of diseases, such as pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis, and bacteremia. This transition from nasopharynx to growth at systemic sites means that the pneumococcus needs to adjust to a variety of environmental conditions, including transition metal ion availability. Although it is an important nutrient, iron potentiates oxidative stress, and it is established that in S. pneumoniae, expression of iron transport systems and proteins that protect against oxidative stress are regulated by an orphan response regulator, RitR. In this study, we investigated the effect of iron and manganese ion availability on the growth of a ritR mutant. Deletion of ritR led to impaired growth of bacteria in high-iron medium, but this phenotype could be suppressed with the addition of manganese. Measurement of metal ion accumulation indicated that manganese prevents iron accumulation. Furthermore, the addition of manganese also led to a reduction in the amount of hydrogen peroxide produced by bacterial cells. Studies of virulence in a murine model of infection indicated that RitR was not essential for pneumococcal survival and suggested that derepression of iron uptake systems may enhance the survival of pneumococci in some niches. PMID:23184523

  20. Structural studies of iron and manganese in photosynthetic reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, A.E.

    1987-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used to characterize components involved in the light reactions of photosynthetic reaction centers from spinach and a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp.: center X, the low electron potential acceptor in Photosystem I (PS I) and the Mn complex involved in water oxidation and oxygen evolution. The dependence of its EPR amplitude on microwave power and temperature indicate an Orbach spin relaxation mechanism involving an excited state at 40 cm/sup -1/. This low energy contributes to its unusually anisotropic g-tensor. XAS of iron in PS I preparations containing ferredoxins A, B and X are consistent with a model with (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins, which are presumably centers A and B and (2Fe-2S) ferredoxins, which would be X. Illumination of dark-adapted Synechococcus PS II samples at 220 to 240 K results in the formation of the multiline EPR signal previously assigned as a Mn S/sub 2/ species, and g = 1.8 and 1.9 signals of Fe/sup 2 +/ Q/sub A//sup -/. In contrast to spinach, illumination at 110 to 160 K produces only a new EPR signal at g = 1.6 which we assign to another configuration of Fe/sup 2+ - Q/sup -/. Following illumination of a S/sub 1/ sample at 140 K or 215 K, the Mn x-ray absorption edge inflection energy changes from 6550 eV to 6551 eV, indicating an oxidation of Mn, and average valences greater than Mn(II). Concomitant changes in the shape of the pre-edge spectrum indicate oxidation of Mn(III) to Mn(IV). The Mn EXAFS spectrum of PS II from Synechococcus is similar in the S/sub 1/ and S/sub 2/ states, indicating O or N ligands at 1.75 +- 0.05 A, transition metal neighbor(s) at 2.75 +- 0.05 A, and N and O ligands at 2.2 A with heterogeneous bond lengths; these data demonstrate the presence of a di-..mu..-oxo bridged Mn structure. 202 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Isoflavones Reduce Copper with Minimal Impact on Iron In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Karlíčková, Jana; Macáková, Kateřina; Říha, Michal; Pinheiro, Liliane Maria Teixeira; Filipský, Tomáš; Horňasová, Veronika; Hrdina, Radomír; Mladěnka, Přemysl

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavones are commonly consumed in many Asian countries and have potentially positive effects on human being. Only a few and rather controversial data on their interactions with copper and iron are available to date. 13 structurally related isoflavones were tested in the competitive manner for their Cu/Fe-chelating/reducing properties. Notwithstanding the 5-hydroxy-4-keto chelation site was associated with ferric, ferrous, and cupric chelation, the chelation potential of isoflavones was low and no cuprous chelation was observed. None of isoflavones was able to substantially reduce ferric ions, but the vast majority reduced cupric ions. The most important feature for cupric reduction was the presence of an unsubstituted 4′-hydroxyl; contrarily the presence of a free 5-hydroxyl decreased or abolished the reduction due to chelation of cupric ions. The results from this study may enable additional experiments which might clarify the effects of isoflavones on human being and/or mechanisms of copper absorption. PMID:26273421

  2. Effects of Exogenous Gibberellic Acid3 on Iron and Manganese Plaque Amounts and Iron and Manganese Uptake in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yue; Zhu, Changhua; Gan, Lijun; Ng, Denny; Xia, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GA) regulate various components of plant development. Iron and Mn plaque result from oxiding and hydroxiding Fe and Mn, respectively, on the roots of aquatic plant species such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we found that exogenous gibberellic acid3 (GA3) spray decreased Fe plaque, but increased Mn plaque, with applications of Kimura B nutrient solution. Similar effects from GA3, leading to reduced Fe plaque and increased Mn plaque, were also found by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometric microanalysis. Reduced Fe plaque was observed after applying GA3 to the groups containing added Fe2+ (17 and 42 mg•L-1) and an increasing trend was detected in Mn plaques of the Mn2+ (34 and 84 mg•L-1) added treatments. In contrast, an inhibitor of GA3, uniconazole, reversed the effects of GA3. The uptake of Fe or Mn in rice plants was enhanced after GA3 application and Fe or Mn plaque production. Strong synergetic effects of GA3 application on Fe plaque production were detected. However, no synergetic effects on Mn plaque production were detected. PMID:25710173

  3. Effects of exogenous gibberellic acid3 on iron and manganese plaque amounts and iron and manganese uptake in rice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yue; Zhu, Changhua; Gan, Lijun; Ng, Denny; Xia, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GA) regulate various components of plant development. Iron and Mn plaque result from oxiding and hydroxiding Fe and Mn, respectively, on the roots of aquatic plant species such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we found that exogenous gibberellic acid3 (GA3) spray decreased Fe plaque, but increased Mn plaque, with applications of Kimura B nutrient solution. Similar effects from GA3, leading to reduced Fe plaque and increased Mn plaque, were also found by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometric microanalysis. Reduced Fe plaque was observed after applying GA3 to the groups containing added Fe2+ (17 and 42 mg•L(-1)) and an increasing trend was detected in Mn plaques of the Mn2+ (34 and 84 mg•L(-1)) added treatments. In contrast, an inhibitor of GA3, uniconazole, reversed the effects of GA3. The uptake of Fe or Mn in rice plants was enhanced after GA3 application and Fe or Mn plaque production. Strong synergetic effects of GA3 application on Fe plaque production were detected. However, no synergetic effects on Mn plaque production were detected. PMID:25710173

  4. Radiation induced chemical activity at iron and copper oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Sarah C.

    The radiolysis of three iron oxides, two copper oxides, and aluminum oxide with varying amounts of water were performed using gamma-rays and 5 MeV 4He ions. The adsorbed water on the surfaces was characterized using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy, which indicated that all of the oxides had chemisorbed water on the surface. Physisorbed water was observed on the Fe2O 3 and Al2O3 surfaces as well. Molecular hydrogen was produced from adsorbed water only on Fe2O3 and Al 2O3, while the other compounds did not show any hydrogen production due to the low amounts of water on the surfaces. Slurries of varying amounts of water were also examined for hydrogen production, and they showed yields that were greater than the yield for bulk water. However, the yields of hydrogen from the copper compounds were much lower than those of the iron suggesting that the copper oxides are relatively inert to radiation induced damage to nearby water. X-ray diffraction measurements did not show any indication of changes to the bulk crystal structure due to radiolysis for any of the oxides. The surfaces of the oxides were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the iron samples, FeO and Fe3O4, Raman spectroscopy revealed areas of Fe2O3 had formed following irradiation with He ions. XPS indicated the formation of a new oxygen species on the iron oxide surfaces. Raman spectroscopy of the copper oxides did not reveal any changes in the surface composition, however, XPS measurements showed a decrease in the amount of OH groups on the surface of Cu2O, while for the CuO samples the amount of OH groups were found to increase following radiolysis. Pristine Al2O3 showed the presence of a surface oxyhydroxide layer which was observed to decrease following radiolysis, consistent with the formation of molecular hydrogen.

  5. Mobilisation processes responsible for iron and manganese contamination of groundwater in Central Adriatic Italy.

    PubMed

    Palmucci, William; Rusi, Sergio; Di Curzio, Diego

    2016-06-01

    Iron and manganese are two of the most common contaminants that exceed the threshold imposed by international and national legislation. When these contamination occurs in groundwater, the use of the water resource is forbidden for any purposes. Several studies investigated these two metals in groundwater, but research focused in the Central Adriatic area are still lacking. Thus, the objective of this study is to identify the origin of Fe and Mn contamination in groundwater and the hydrogeochemical processes that can enrich aquifers with these metals. This work is based on hydrogeochemical and multivariate statistical analysis of analytical results undertaken on soils and groundwater. Fe and Mn contamination are widespread in the alluvial aquifers, and their distribution is regulated by local conditions (i.e. long residence time, presence of peat or organic-rich fine sediments or anthropic pollution) that control redox processes in the aquifers and favour the mobilisation of these two metals in groundwater. The concentration of iron and manganese identified within soil indicates that the latter are a concrete source of the two metals. Anthropic impact on Fe and Mn contamination of groundwater is not related to agricultural activities, but on the contrary, the contribution of hydrocarbons (e.g. spills) is evident. PMID:26948970

  6. Treponema denticola TroR is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Paul J; Burtnick, Mary N; Fenno, J Christopher; Gherardini, Frank C

    2008-01-01

    Treponema denticola harbours a genetic locus with significant homology to most of the previously characterized Treponema pallidum tro operon. Within this locus are five genes (troABCDR) encoding for the components of an ATP-binding cassette cation-transport system (troABCD) and a DtxR-like transcriptional regulator (troR). In addition, a σ70-like promoter and an 18 bp region of dyad symmetry were identified upstream of the troA start codon. This putative operator sequence demonstrated similarity to the T. pallidum TroR (TroRTp) binding sequence; however, the position of this motif with respect to the predicted tro promoters differed. Interestingly, unlike the T. pallidum orthologue, T. denticola TroR (TroRTd) possesses a C-terminal Src homology 3-like domain commonly associated with DtxR family members. In the present study, we show that TroRTd is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor using Escherichia coli reporter constructs and in T. denticola. In addition, we demonstrate that although TroRTd possessing various C-terminal deletions maintain metal-sensing capacities, these truncated proteins exhibit reduced repressor activities in comparison with full-length TroRTd. Based upon these findings, we propose that TroRTd represents a novel member of the DtxR family of transcriptional regulators and is likely to play an important role in regulating both manganese and iron homeostases in this spirochaete. PMID:18761626

  7. Iron depletion increases manganese uptake and potentiates apoptosis through ER stress

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young Ah; Li, Yuan; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a risk factor for manganese (Mn) accumulation. Excess Mn promotes neurotoxicity but the mechanisms involved and whether iron depletion might affect these pathways is unknown. To study Mn intoxication in vivo, iron deficient and control rats were intranasally instilled with 60 mg MnCl2/kg over 3 weeks. TUNEL staining of olfactory tissue revealed that Mn exposure induced apoptosis and that iron deficiency potentiated this effect. In vitro studies using the dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cell line confirmed that Mn-induced apoptosis was enhanced by iron depletion using the iron chelator desferrioxamine. Mn has been reported to induce apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum stress. In SH-SY5Y cells, Mn exposure induced the ER stress genes glucose regulated protein 94 (GRP94) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Increased phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (phospho-eIF2α) was also observed. These effects were accompanied by the activation of ER resident enzyme caspase-12, and the downstream apoptotic effector caspase-3 was also activated. All of the Mn-induced responses were enhanced by DFO treatment. Inhibitors of ER stress and caspases significantly blocked Mn-induced apoptosis and its potentiation by DFO, indicating that ER stress and subsequent caspase activation underlie cell death. Taken together, these data reveal that Mn induces neuronal cell death through ER stress and the UPR response pathway and that this apoptotic effect is potentiated by iron deficiency most likely through upregulation of DMT1. PMID:23764342

  8. Coprecipitation and redox reactions of manganese oxides with copper and nickel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.; Lind, Carol J.; Roberson, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    Open-system, continuous-titration experiments have been done in which a slow flux of ???0.02 molar solution of Mn2+ chloride, nitrate, or perchlorate with Cu2+ or Ni2+ in lesser concentrations was introduced into an aerated reactor solution held at constant temperature and at constant pH by a pH-stat titrator that added dilute NaOH. The resulting mixtures of metal oxyhydroxides and their native solutions were aged for periods as long as 2 1/2 years. Fresh and aged precipitates were characterized by chemical analysis, oxidation state determinations, X-ray and electron diffraction, and electron microscopy. The precipitates can be described as mixtures of oxide and oxyhydroxide species, using concepts of equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemical thermodynamics. The metal-ion content of the aged precipitates in systems that contained copper is distributed among three principal components. One of these is a mixed oxide Cu2Mn3O8 in which all Mn is in the 4+ oxidation state. A major component in all precipitates is feitknechtite, ??MnOOH. These forms are supplemented by CuO or by birnessite or ramsdellite forms of MnO2 where stoichiometry and thermodynamic calculations predict them. In systems that contained nickel and manganese, identifiable components included ??MnOOH, Ni(OH)2, and the same two forms of MnO2. The oxidation number of the precipitated manganese increased during aging, and the pH of the supernatant solution decreased. The maximum Mn oxidation number observed was 3.55 in an Mn + Cu precipitate aged for 18 months. Concentrations of Cu2+ and Ni2+ generally decreased to values substantially below those predicted by oxide or hydroxide equilibrium. Scavenging effects of this type are common in natural aqueous systems. ?? 1989.

  9. Ternary copper complexes and manganese (III) tetrakis(4-benzoic acid) porphyrin catalyze peroxynitrite-dependent nitration of aromatics.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Sueta, G; Ruiz-Ramírez, L; Radi, R

    1997-12-01

    Peroxynitrite is a powerful oxidant formed in biological systems from the reaction of nitrogen monoxide and superoxide and is capable of nitrating phenols at neutral pH and ambient temperature. This peroxynitrite-mediated nitration is catalyzed by a number of Lewis acids, including CO2 and transition-metal ion complexes. Here we studied the effect of ternary copper-(II) complexes constituted by a 1,10-phenanthroline and an amino acid as ligands. All the complexes studied accelerate both the decomposition of peroxynitrite and its nitration of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid at pH > 7. The rate of these reactions depends on the copper complex concentration in a hyperbolic plus linear manner. The yield of nitrated products increases up to 2.6-fold with respect to proton-catalyzed nitration and has a dependency on the concentration of copper complexes which follows the same function as observed for the rate constants. The manganese porphyrin complex, Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin [Mn(tbap)], also promoted peroxynitrite-mediated nitration with an even higher yield (4-fold increase) than the ternary copper complexes. At pH = 7.5 +/- 0.2 the catalytic behavior of the copper complexes can be linearly correlated with the pKa of the phenanthroline present as a ligand, implying that a peroxynitrite anion is coordinated to the copper ion prior to the nitration reaction. These observations may prove valuable to understand the biological effects of these transition-metal complexes (i.e., copper and manganese) that can mimic superoxide dismutase activity and, in the case of the ternary copper complexes, show antineoplastic activity. PMID:9437523

  10. Spinel coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects and crystal structure of copper manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ping

    Long-term stability and chromium (Cr) contamination are two major concerns for application of chromium-bearing metallic materials as interconnects of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) at intermediate temperature (˜800°C). Copper-manganese (Cu-Mn) and cobalt-manganese (Co-Mn) spinel can be promising coating materials for the metallic interconnects as they show high electrical conductivities. The first objective of this research is to develop an economical and convenient method through which the spinel coatings can be applied to the metallic substrates. The investigations on the crystal structure of Cu xMn3-xO4 spinel, e.g., structure symmetry and cation distributions, have always been controversial, which hinders the total understanding of the detailed structure of the material. In order to resolve the inconsistency, in-situ neutron and X-ray diffraction were employed to determine the structure of the spinel. A novel method was developed to obtain high quality manganese coating without any additives (sulphur or selenium compounds). Cu-Mn and Co-Mn spinel coatings were applied to metallic coupons by electrodeposition and subsequent annealing. The method is convenient and easy to control. The performance testing showed that the area specific resistances (ASRs) of the coated samples (0.003 O·cm 2) are much lower than that of the uncoated UNS 430 (0.189 O·cm 2) after oxidation at 750°C for 1500 hours. Moreover, both spinel coatings can effectively suppress the outward diffusion of Cr, which resulted in reduction of Cr contamination significantly. The oxidation studies of Cu-Mn coating revealed the transformation mechanisms of Cu-Mn coating to the spinel. In-situ neutron and X-ray diffraction analysis clarified the crystal symmetry of CuxMn3-xO4 spinel and CuMnO2 at high temperatures. Rietveld refinement revealed the cation distribution of Cu and Mn ions on tetrahedral and octrahedral sites of CuxMn 3-xO4 spinel, which was compared to values in the literatures.

  11. Iron supplementation does not affect copper and zinc absorption in breastfed infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron supplements are commonly recommended for infants but were suggested to inhibit zinc and copper absorption. The objective of this study was to investigate potential effects of iron supplementation, infant age, and mineral status on zinc and copper absorption in infants at 6 and 9 mo of age. Twen...

  12. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC-SULFIDE COATED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetra sulfide silane coated iron-copper nano-particle aggregates are found to be potentially very high capacity sorbents for vapor phase mercury capture. High equilibrium capacities were obtained for the silane coated iron copper nano-aggregate sorbent at 70 oC and 120 oC. Even a...

  13. Interface driven magnetic interactions in nanostructured thin films of iron nanocrystallites embedded in a copper matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Desautels, R. D. Lierop, J. van; Shueh, C.; Lin, K.-W.; Freeland, J. W.

    2015-05-07

    We have fabricated thin films of iron nanocrystallites embedded in a copper matrix using a dual ion beam assisted deposition technique. A secondary End-Hall ion beam bombarded the iron atoms during deposition altering significantly the morphology of the films and allowing for control of the intermixing between iron and copper components. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray reflectometry experiments indicated that the morphology of the films was that of iron nanocrystallites embedded in a copper matrix. Rietveld refinements of the diffraction pattern identified fcc-copper and amorphous iron. An increased amount of disorder was observed with a reduction in the amount of deposited iron from a 1:1 Fe:Cu ratio to 0.25:0.75 Fe:Cu ratio. Interfacial copper-iron alloys were identified by DC susceptibility experiments through their reduced T{sub C,Alloy} (370, 310, and 280 K) compared with that of bulk iron (∼1000 K). Element specific x-ray absorption and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments were performed to identify the contributions to the magnetism from the iron and the copper-iron alloy.

  14. Bacterial Disproportionation of Elemental Sulfur Coupled to Chemical Reduction of Iron or Manganese

    PubMed Central

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler; Bak, Friedhelm

    1993-01-01

    A new chemolithotrophic bacterial metabolism was discovered in anaerobic marine enrichment cultures. Cultures in defined medium with elemental sulfur (S0) and amorphous ferric hydroxide (FeOOH) as sole substrates showed intense formation of sulfate. Furthermore, precipitation of ferrous sulfide and pyrite was observed. The transformations were accompanied by growth of slightly curved, rod-shaped bacteria. The quantification of the products revealed that S0 was microbially disproportionated to sulfate and sulfide, as follows: 4S0 + 4H2O → SO42- + 3H2S + 2H+. Subsequent chemical reactions between the formed sulfide and the added FeOOH led to the observed precipitation of iron sulfides. Sulfate and iron sulfides were also produced when FeOOH was replaced by FeCO3. Further enrichment with manganese oxide, MnO2, instead of FeOOH yielded stable cultures which formed sulfate during concomitant reduction of MnO2 to Mn2+. Growth of small rod-shaped bacteria was observed. When incubated without MnO2, the culture did not grow but produced small amounts of SO42- and H2S at a ratio of 1:3, indicating again a disproportionation of S0. The observed microbial disproportionation of S0 only proceeds significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S0 disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO2 was high, > 104 cm-3 in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic sulfide oxidation to sulfate in anoxic sediments. PMID:16348835

  15. Arsenic, Iron, Lead, Manganese and Uranium Concentrations in Private Bedrock Wells in Southeastern New Hampshire, 2012-2013

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace metals, such as arsenic, iron, lead, manganese, and uranium, in groundwater used for drinking have long been a concern because of the potential adverse effects on human health and the aesthetic or nuisance problems that some present. Moderate to high concentrations of the t...

  16. Joint toxic action of binary metal mixtures of copper, manganese and nickel to Paronychiurus kimi (Collembola).

    PubMed

    Son, Jino; Lee, Yun-Sik; Kim, Yongeun; Shin, Key-Il; Hyun, Seunghun; Cho, Kijong

    2016-10-01

    The joint toxic effects of binary metal mixtures of copper (Cu), manganese (Mn) and nickel (Ni) on reproduction of Paronhchiurus kimi (Lee) was evaluated using a toxic unit (TU) approach by judging additivity across a range of effect levels (10-90%). For all metal mixtures, the joint toxic effects of metal mixtures on reproduction of P. kimi decreased in a TU-dependent manner. The joint toxic effects of metal mixtures also changed from less than additive to more than additive at an effect level lower than or equal to 50%, while a more than additive toxic effects were apparent at higher effect levels. These results indicate that the joint toxicity of metal mixtures is substantially different from that of individual metals based on additivity. Moreover, the close relationship of toxicity to effect level suggests that it is necessary to encompass a whole range of effect levels rather than a specific effect level when judging mixture toxicity. In conclusion, the less than additive toxicity at low effect levels suggests that the additivity assumption is sufficiently conservative to warrant predicting joint toxicity of metal mixtures, which may give an additional margin of safety when setting soil quality standards for ecological risk assessment. PMID:27318557

  17. Interaction of bivalent copper, nickel, manganese ions with native DNA and its monomers.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, V A; Valeev, V A; Gladchenko, G O; Sysa, I V; Blagoi, Y P; Volchok, I V

    1996-08-01

    UV differential spectroscopy is applied to study the interaction of Cu2+, Ni2+, Mn2+ ions with deoxyribonucleotides of canonic bases (dGMP, dAMP, dCMP, dTMP) and native DNA. Heteroatoms of the bases, coordinating ions, and binding constants which characterize the formation of metal complexes are found. The affinity of the ions is lower for the deoxyribonucleotide bases than for the ribonucleotide ones. This indicates that 02' of ribose participates in the stabilization of the metal complex even under conditions close to the neutral one (pH 6). Unlike the Cu2+ ions, Ni2+ and Mn2+ ions do not interact with N3C both in monomers and polymers. This seems to be the main factor explaining why copper makes DNA transform into a structure with a quasi-Hoogsteen pairing of GC pairs. No transformations of this kind of helix-coil transitions are caused by manganese and nickel up to concentrations 4 X 10(-2) M. PMID:8699177

  18. Validation of In-Situ Iron-Manganese Oxide Coated Stream Pebbles as Sensors for Arsenic Source Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, J.; Peters, S. C.; Casteel, A.

    2013-12-01

    Locating nonpoint source contaminant fluxes can be challenging due to the inherent heterogeneity of source and of the subsurface. Contaminants such as arsenic are a concern for drinking water quality and ecosystem health. Arsenic contamination can be the result of several natural and anthropogenic sources, and therefore it can be difficult to trace and identify major areas of arsenic in natural systems. Identifying a useful source indicator for arsenic is a crucial step for environmental remediation efforts. Previous studies have found iron-manganese oxide coated streambed pebbles as useful source indicators due to their high attraction for heavy metals in water. In this study, pebbles, surface water at baseflow and nearby rocks were sampled from the Pennypack Creek and its tributaries, in southwestern Pennsylvania, to test the ability of coated streambed pebbles as environmental source indicators for arsenic. Quartz pebbles, 5-7 cm in diameter, were sampled to minimize elemental contamination from rock chemistry. In addition, quartz provides an excellent substrate for iron and manganese coatings to form. These coatings were leached from pebbles using 4M nitric acid with 0.1% concentrated hydrochloric acid. Following sample processing, analyses were performed using an ICP-MS and the resulting data were spatially organized using ArcGIS software. Arsenic, iron and manganese concentrations in the leachate are normalized to pebble surface area and each location is reported as a ratio of arsenic to iron and manganese. Results suggest that iron-manganese coated stream pebbles are useful indicators of arsenic location within a watershed.

  19. Manganese Doping of Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Tailoring Surface Reactivity for a Regenerable Heavy Metal Sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Cynthia L.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Mackie, Katherine E.; Neiner, Doinita; Saraf, Laxmikant; Droubay, Timothy C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2012-02-28

    A method for tuning the analyte affinity of magnetic, inorganic nanostructured sorbents for heavy metal contaminants is described. The manganese-doped iron oxide nanoparticle sorbents have a remarkably high affinity compared to the precursor material. Sorbent affinity can be tuned toward an analyte of interest simply by adjustment of the dopant quantity. The results show that following the Mn doping process there is a large increase in affinity and capacity for heavy metals (i.e., Co, Ni, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, Hg, and Tl). Capacity measurements were carried out for the removal of cadmium from river water and showed significantly higher loading than the relevant commercial sorbents tested for comparison. The reduction in Cd concentration from 100 ppb spiked river water to 1 ppb (less than the EPA drinking water limit of 5 ppb for Cd) was achieved following treatment with the Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles. The Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were able to load 1 ppm of Cd followed by complete stripping and recovery of the Cd with a mild acid wash. The Cd loading and stripping is shown to be consistent through multiple cycles with no loss of sorbent performance.

  20. The possible crucial role of iron accumulation combined with low tryptophan, zinc and manganese in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S

    2001-11-01

    Iron can react with citric acid, interfering with the Krebs cycle, hence with oxidative phosphorylation. Free iron (Fe) can cause considerable oxidative damage both through Fenton reactions and by activating xanthine oxidase, which produces both superoxide (O(2-)) and uric acid (abundant in many cancers). It can also react with lactic acid, reducing its elimination and increasing the acidity of the cytoplasm. Fe can also wreak havoc by reacting with tryptophan, the least abundant and most delicate essential amino acid, which is necessary for the production of serotonin and other substances required by the immune system to fight cancer. On the other hand, in the presence of iron, the tryptophan metabolite quinolinate causes intense lipid peroxidation. Similarly, several other carcinogenic metabolites of tryptophan are particularly dangerous in the presence of Fe. Excess Fe may also interfere with manganese superoxide dismutase and impair the initiation of apoptosis by the mitochondrion, rendering the cells impervious to all the signals to undergo apoptosis from without and from within the cell. Moreover, Fe may also play a crucial role on telomere repair, by activating telomerase. Therefore, by inhibiting apoptosis and enhancing chromosome repair, Fe may bestow immortality upon the cancer cell. Furthermore, Fe is one of the triggers for mitosis. Therefore, increased Fe levels may be essential for the rapid growth characteristic of many malignancies. In turn, the rapid growth further depletes resources from the healthy tissues, exacerbating the deficiencies of the other elements and reducing the ability to fight the malignancy. PMID:11735307

  1. Manganese exposure among smelting workers: relationship between blood manganese-iron ratio and early onset neurobehavioral alterations.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Dallas M; Zheng, Wei; Zou, Yan; Shi, Xiujuan; Chen, Jian; Rosenthal, Frank S; Fan, Qiyuan

    2009-11-01

    A biomarker for detection of early onset neurobehavioral alterations in manganism remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to use a neurobehavioral test battery to identify subtle changes in Mn-induced motor and memory dysfunction and to relate the quantifiable neurological dysfunction to an established Mn-exposure index such as blood manganese-iron ratio (MIR). A total of 323 subjects were recruited to control (n=106), low-exposure (122), and high-exposure (95) groups. The test battery consisted of standard testing procedures including the nine-hole and groove-type steadiness tester, Benton visual retention test, and Purdue pegboard coordination test. No significant health problems or clinically diagnosed neurological dysfunctions were observed. Benton test did not reveal any abnormal memory deficits among Mn-exposed smelters, nor did the groove and nine-hole tests detect any abnormality in dynamic and static steadiness in tested subjects. Purdue pegboard test showed a remarkable age-related decline in fine movement coordination among all study participants regardless of the Mn-exposure condition. Mn exposure significantly exacerbated this age-related deterioration. Statistical modeling revealed that the plasma and erythrocyte MIR (i.e., pMIR and eMIR, respectively) were associated with Purdue pegboard scores. Among all subjects whose MIR were above the cut-off value (COV), pMIR was significantly correlated with pegboard scores (r=-0.261, p=0.002), whereas for those subjects over the age of 40, the eMIR, but not pMIR, was associated with declined pegboard performance (r=-0.219, p=0.069). When both factors were taken into account (i.e., age>40 and MIR>the COV), only pMIR was inversely associated with pegboard scores. Combining their usefulness in Mn-exposure assessment, we recommend that the blood Mn-Fe ratio may serve as a reasonable biomarker not only for assessment of Mn exposure but also for health risk assessment. PMID:19963104

  2. Diffusion zone between high-chromium cast iron and high-manganese steel during electric-slag facing

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, V.P.; Shvartser, A.Y.; Stroganova, G.V.

    1986-05-01

    The authors investigate extending the service lives of components by the method of electric-slag facing of working surfaces. Steel 45 was used in the annealed state. Electric-slag remelting was the method used to determine the bending strength. Metallographic examinations were conducted under an MIM-8m microscope, while x-ray analysis of the built-up and base metals were performed on a DRON-2 diffractometer. BAsic alloying elements, chromium and manganese were studied on a ''Cameca MS-46'' microanalyzer. During the electri-slag facing of a high-chromium cast iron containing 8% of Mn on high-manganese steel 11OG13L diffusion equalization of the manganese content occurs in the fusion zone. Diffusion displacement of carbon, chromium, and manganese from high-chromium cast iron into the high-manganese steel during electric-slag facing gies rise to a smooth change in the structure of the metal in the fusion zone, and to increased strength of the joint between the unlike materials investigated.

  3. Oxidation of manganese and iron by Leptothrix discophora: Use of N,N,N prime ,N prime -tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine as an indicator of metal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    de Vrind-de Jong, E.W.; Corstjens, P.L.A.M.; Kempers, E.S.; Westbroek, P.; de Vrind, J.P.M. )

    1990-11-01

    A new method for the quantification and characterization of manganese-oxidizing activity by spent culture medium of Leptothrix discophora SS-1 was developed. It is based on the formation of the dye Wurster blue from N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by oxidized manganese generated in the spent medium. The kinetic parameters thus obtained agreed well with data obtained with other methods. It was also possible to demonstrate iron oxidation by spent culture medium. The kinetics of the process and inhibition by enzyme poisons suggest that iron oxidation is enzymatically catalyzed. Probably two different factors are involved in manganese and iron oxidation.

  4. Oxidation of Manganese and Iron by Leptothrix discophora: Use of N,N,N',N'-Tetramethyl-p-Phenylenediamine as an Indicator of Metal Oxidation.

    PubMed

    de Vrind-de Jong, E W; Corstjens, P L; Kempers, E S; Westbroek, P; de Vrind, J P

    1990-11-01

    A new method for the quantification and characterization of manganese-oxidizing activity by spent culture medium of Leptothrix discophora SS-1 was developed. It is based on the formation of the dye Wurster blue from N,N,N',N'-Tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by oxidized manganese generated in the spent medium. The kinetic parameters thus obtained agreed well with data obtained with other methods. It was also possible to demonstrate iron oxidation by spent culture medium. The kinetics of the process and inhibition by enzyme poisons suggest that iron oxidation is enzymatically catalyzed. Probably two different factors are involved in manganese and iron oxidation. PMID:16348351

  5. Role of nickel and manganese in recovery of resistivity in iron-based alloys after low-temperature proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, K.; Iwai, T.; Abe, H.; Sekimura, N.; Katano, Y.; Iwata, T.; Onitsuka, T.

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the recovery of electric resistivity in pure iron, Fe-0.6Ni and Fe-1.5Mn as related to isochronal annealing following 1 MeV proton irradiation at lower temperature than 70 K, focusing on the relationship between solute atoms and irradiation defects. Both nickel and manganese prevent stage ID recovery, which corresponds to correlated recombination. Stage II recovery is also changed by the addition of a solute, which corresponds to the migration of small interstitial clusters. In both pure iron and Fe-0.6Ni, no evident difference was observed in the stage III region, which corresponds to the migration of vacancies. In contrast, two substages appeared in the Fe-1.5Mn at a higher temperature than stage IIIB appeared in pure iron. These substages are considered to represent the release of irradiation-induced defects, which was trapped by manganese.

  6. Low iron stores are related to higher blood concentrations of manganese, cobalt and cadmium in non-smoking, Norwegian women in the HUNT 2 study

    SciTech Connect

    Margrete Meltzer, Helle; Lise Brantsaeter, Anne; Borch-Iohnsen, Berit; Ellingsen, Dag G.; Alexander, Jan; Thomassen, Yngvar; Stigum, Hein; Ydersbond, Trond A.

    2010-07-15

    Low iron (Fe) stores may influence absorption or transport of divalent metals in blood. To obtain more knowledge about such associations, the divalent metal ions cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) and parameters of Fe metabolism (serum ferritin, haemoglobin (Hb) and transferrin) were investigated in 448 healthy, menstruating non-smoking women, age 20-55 years (mean 38 years), participating in the Norwegian HUNT 2 study. The study population was stratified for serum ferritin: 257 were iron-depleted (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L) and 84 had iron deficiency anaemia (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L and Hb<120 g/L). The low ferritin group had increased blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd but normal concentrations of Cu, Zn and Pb. In multiple regression models, ferritin emerged as the main determinant of Mn, Co and Cd (p<0.001), while no significant associations with Cu, Zn and Pb were found. Adjusted r{sup 2} for the models were 0.28, 0.48 and 0.34, respectively. Strong positive associations between blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd were observed, also when controlled for their common association with ferritin. Apart from these associations, the models showed no significant interactions between the six divalent metals studied. Very mild anaemia (110{<=}Hb<120 g/L) did not seem to have any effect independent of low ferritin. Approximately 26% of the women with iron deficiency anaemia had high concentrations of all of Mn, Co and Cd as opposed to 2.3% of iron-replete subjects. The results confirm that low serum ferritin may have an impact on body kinetics of certain divalent metal ions, but not all. Only a fraction of women with low iron status exhibited an increased blood concentration of divalent metals, providing indication of complexities in the body's handling of these metals.

  7. The commercialization of the FENIX iron control system for purifying copper electrowinning electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, D. R.; Dreisinger, D. B.; Lancaster, T.; Richmond, G. D.; Tomlinson, M.

    2004-07-01

    The FENIX Hydromet Iron Control System was installed at Western Metals Copper Ltd.’s Mt. Gordon Operations in Queensland, Australia. The system uses a novel and patented ion-exchange resin to selectively remove iron from copper electrolyte at the solvent extraction/electrowinning plant. At Mt. Gordon, the system delivered significant savings in reagent consumption (acid and cobalt sulfate for electrowinning and lime for neutralization of the raffinate bleed) and has the potential to deliver higher current efficiencies in copper electrowinning, leading to increased copper production.

  8. Sorption of Ferric Iron from Ferrioxamine B to Synthetic and Biogenic Layer Type Manganese Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O.; John, B.; Sposito, G.

    2006-12-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments to increase the bioavailablity of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but no information appears to be available about the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV). To probe the effects of predominantly Mn(IV) oxides, we studied the sorption reaction of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB+, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] with two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III, IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida MnB1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB+ over at pH 8. After 72 hours equilibration time, the sorption behavior for the synthetic birnessites could be accurately described by a Langmuir isotherm; for the biogenic oxide, a Freundlich isotherm was best utilized to model the sorption data. To study the molecular nature of the interaction between the Fe(III)HDFOB+ complex and the oxide surface, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra indicated that Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to into the mineral structure at multiple sites with no evidence of DFOB complexation, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that manganese oxides, including biominerals, may strongly sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes and thus may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  9. Baseline Blood Levels of Manganese, Lead, Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc in Residents of Beijing Suburb

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long-Lian; Lu, Ling; Pan, Ya-Juan; Ding, Chun-Guang; Xu, Da-Yong; Huang, Chuan-Feng; Pan, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Baseline blood concentrations of metals are important references for monitoring metal exposure in environmental and occupational settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood levels of manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) among the residents (aged 12–60 years old) living in the suburb southwest of Beijing in China and to compare the outcomes with reported values in various developed countries. Blood samples were collected from 648 subjects from March 2009 to February 2010. Metal concentrations in the whole blood were determined by ICP-MS. The geometric means of blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 11.4, 802.4, 4665, 42.6, and 0.68 μg/L, respectively. Male subjects had higher blood Pb than the females, while the females had higher blood Mn and Cu than the males. There was no gender difference for blood Cd and Zn. Smokers had higher blood Cu, Zn, and Cd than nonsmokers. There were significant age-related differences in blood levels of all metals studied; subjects in the 17–30 age group had higher blood levels of Mn, Pb, Cu, and Zn, while those in the 46–60 age group had higher Cd than the other age groups. A remarkably lower blood level of Cu and Zn in this population as compared with residents of other developed countries was noticed. Based on the current study, the normal reference ranges for the blood Mn were estimated to be 5.80–25.2 μ/L; for blood Cu, 541–1475 μ/L; for blood Zn, 2349–9492 μ/L; for blood Pb, <100 μ/L; and for blood Cd, <5.30 μ/L in the general population living in Beijing suburbs. PMID:25836720

  10. Spectroscopic Studies of the Iron and Manganese Reconstituted Tyrosyl Radical in Bacillus Cereus Ribonucleotide Reductase R2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tomter, Ane B.; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Bell, Caleb B.; Barra, Anne-Laure; Andersen, Niels H.; Solomon, Edward I.; Andersson, K. Kristoffer

    2012-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the rate limiting step in DNA synthesis where ribonucleotides are reduced to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides. Class Ib RNRs consist of two homodimeric subunits: R1E, which houses the active site; and R2F, which contains a metallo cofactor and a tyrosyl radical that initiates the ribonucleotide reduction reaction. We studied the R2F subunit of B. cereus reconstituted with iron or alternatively with manganese ions, then subsequently reacted with molecular oxygen to generate two tyrosyl-radicals. The two similar X-band EPR spectra did not change significantly over 4 to 50 K. From the 285 GHz EPR spectrum of the iron form, a g1-value of 2.0090 for the tyrosyl radical was extracted. This g1-value is similar to that observed in class Ia E. coli R2 and class Ib R2Fs with iron-oxygen cluster, suggesting the absence of hydrogen bond to the phenoxyl group. This was confirmed by resonance Raman spectroscopy, where the stretching vibration associated to the radical (C-O, ν7a = 1500 cm−1) was found to be insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange. Additionally, the 18O-sensitive Fe-O-Fe symmetric stretching (483 cm−1) of the metallo-cofactor was also insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange indicating no hydrogen bonding to the di-iron-oxygen cluster, and thus, different from mouse R2 with a hydrogen bonded cluster. The HF-EPR spectrum of the manganese reconstituted RNR R2F gave a g1-value of ∼2.0094. The tyrosyl radical microwave power saturation behavior of the iron-oxygen cluster form was as observed in class Ia R2, with diamagnetic di-ferric cluster ground state, while the properties of the manganese reconstituted form indicated a magnetic ground state of the manganese-cluster. The recent activity measurements (Crona et al., (2011) J Biol Chem 286: 33053–33060) indicates that both the manganese and iron reconstituted RNR R2F could be functional. The manganese form might be very important, as it has 8 times higher

  11. High-Iron Consumption Impairs Growth and Causes Copper-Deficiency Anemia in Weanling Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung-Heun; Doguer, Caglar; Wang, Xiaoyu; Flores, Shireen R.; Collins, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-copper interactions were described decades ago; however, molecular mechanisms linking the two essential minerals remain largely undefined. Investigations in humans and other mammals noted that copper levels increase in the intestinal mucosa, liver and blood during iron deficiency, tissues all important for iron homeostasis. The current study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that dietary copper influences iron homeostasis during iron deficiency and iron overload. We thus fed weanling, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-11/group) AIN-93G-based diets containing high (~8800 ppm), adequate (~80) or low (~11) iron in combination with high (~183), adequate (~8) or low (~0.9) copper for 5 weeks. Subsequently, the iron- and copper-related phenotype of the rats was assessed. Rats fed the low-iron diets grew slower than controls, with changes in dietary copper not further influencing growth. Unexpectedly, however, high-iron (HFe) feeding also impaired growth. Furthermore, consumption of the HFe diet caused cardiac hypertrophy, anemia, low serum and tissue copper levels and decreased circulating ceruloplasmin activity. Intriguingly, these physiologic perturbations were prevented by adding extra copper to the HFe diet. Furthermore, higher copper levels in the HFe diet increased serum nonheme iron concentration and transferrin saturation, exacerbated hepatic nonheme iron loading and attenuated splenic nonheme iron accumulation. Moreover, serum erythropoietin levels, and splenic erythroferrone and hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels were altered by the dietary treatments in unanticipated ways, providing insight into how iron and copper influence expression of these hormones. We conclude that high-iron feeding of weanling rats causes systemic copper deficiency, and further, that copper influences the iron-overload phenotype. PMID:27537180

  12. High-Iron Consumption Impairs Growth and Causes Copper-Deficiency Anemia in Weanling Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung-Heun; Doguer, Caglar; Wang, Xiaoyu; Flores, Shireen R; Collins, James F

    2016-01-01

    Iron-copper interactions were described decades ago; however, molecular mechanisms linking the two essential minerals remain largely undefined. Investigations in humans and other mammals noted that copper levels increase in the intestinal mucosa, liver and blood during iron deficiency, tissues all important for iron homeostasis. The current study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that dietary copper influences iron homeostasis during iron deficiency and iron overload. We thus fed weanling, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-11/group) AIN-93G-based diets containing high (~8800 ppm), adequate (~80) or low (~11) iron in combination with high (~183), adequate (~8) or low (~0.9) copper for 5 weeks. Subsequently, the iron- and copper-related phenotype of the rats was assessed. Rats fed the low-iron diets grew slower than controls, with changes in dietary copper not further influencing growth. Unexpectedly, however, high-iron (HFe) feeding also impaired growth. Furthermore, consumption of the HFe diet caused cardiac hypertrophy, anemia, low serum and tissue copper levels and decreased circulating ceruloplasmin activity. Intriguingly, these physiologic perturbations were prevented by adding extra copper to the HFe diet. Furthermore, higher copper levels in the HFe diet increased serum nonheme iron concentration and transferrin saturation, exacerbated hepatic nonheme iron loading and attenuated splenic nonheme iron accumulation. Moreover, serum erythropoietin levels, and splenic erythroferrone and hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels were altered by the dietary treatments in unanticipated ways, providing insight into how iron and copper influence expression of these hormones. We conclude that high-iron feeding of weanling rats causes systemic copper deficiency, and further, that copper influences the iron-overload phenotype. PMID:27537180

  13. Fluorescence quenching and bonding properties of some hydroxamic acid derivatives by iron(III) and manganese(II).

    PubMed

    Senthilnithy, R; De Costa, M D P; Gunawardhana, H D

    2009-01-01

    Spectrophotometric investigations of highly fluorescent metal chelating molecules are of relevance due to their potential application in novel, selective fluorescence-based sensors. Benzene and naphthalene chromophores are highly fluorescent while hydroxamic acids are widely used as ligands for complexation of transition metals. In order to develop fluorescence probes, several phenyl derivatives of N-phenylbenzohydroxamic acid and an aminodihydroxamic acid linked with a naphthalene chromophore were synthesized and their selective ionophoric properties towards iron(III) and manganese(II) ions were investigated using fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. Both methods confirm the formation of 1:1 and 1:2 complexes for iron(III) and a 1:1 complex for manganese(II). The complex that is formed depends on the concentration of the ligand and pH of the medium. The amino dihydroxamic acid exhibits a prominent selectivity towards iron(III) with a two-step 1:1 and 1:2 quenching mechanism at pH 3 and towards manganese(II) with a 1:1 quenching mechanism at a probe concentration of 1 x 10(-5) mol dm(-3) at pH 9.5 The logarithm of overall formation constants of 1:1 and 1:2 complexes of iron(III) were estimated as 3.30 and 9.05, respectively. PMID:18800360

  14. Metals, Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration: A focus on Iron, Manganese and Mercury

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Marcelo; Avila, Daiana Silva; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Essential metals are crucial for the maintenance of cell homeostasis. Among the 23 elements that have known physiological functions in humans, 12 are metals, including iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn). Nevertheless, excessive exposure to these metals may lead to pathological conditions, including neurodegeneration. Similarly, exposure to metals that do not have known biological functions, such as mercury (Hg), also present great health concerns. This reviews focuses on the neurodegenerative mechanisms and effects of Fe, Mn and Hg. Oxidative stress (OS), particularly in mitochondria, is a common feature of Fe, Mn and Hg toxicity. However, the primary molecular targets triggering OS are distinct. Free cationic iron is a potent pro-oxidant and can initiate a set of reactions that form extremely reactive products, such as OH•. Mn can oxidize dopamine (DA), generating reactive species and also affect mitochondrial function, leading to accumulation of metabolites and culminating with OS. Cationic Hg forms have strong affinity for nucleophiles, such as –SH and –SeH. Therefore, they target critical thiol- and selenol-molecules with antioxidant properties. Finally, we address the main sources of exposure to these metals, their transport mechanisms into the brain, and therapeutic modalities to mitigate their neurotoxic effects. PMID:23266600

  15. Overlap of copper and iron uptake systems in mitochondria in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Gammon, Micah G.; Maynard, Margaret K.; White, Olivia L.; Cobine, Jai A.; Mahone, Wilkerson K.

    2016-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mitochondrial carrier family protein Pic2 imports copper into the matrix. Deletion of PIC2 causes defects in mitochondrial copper uptake and copper-dependent growth phenotypes owing to decreased cytochrome c oxidase activity. However, copper import is not completely eliminated in this mutant, so alternative transport systems must exist. Deletion of MRS3, a component of the iron import machinery, also causes a copper-dependent growth defect on non-fermentable carbon. Deletion of both PIC2 and MRS3 led to a more severe respiratory growth defect than either individual mutant. In addition, MRS3 expressed from a high copy number vector was able to suppress the oxygen consumption and copper uptake defects of a strain lacking PIC2. When expressed in Lactococcus lactis, Mrs3 mediated copper and iron import. Finally, a PIC2 and MRS3 double mutant prevented the copper-dependent activation of a heterologously expressed copper sensor in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Taken together, these data support a role for the iron transporter Mrs3 in copper import into the mitochondrial matrix. PMID:26763345

  16. Role of copper promotion in precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, R.J.; Xu, L.; Davis, B.H.

    1996-10-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was conducted on precipitated iron-silicon catalysts. The affect of copper promotion on the activity and selectivity of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and syngas activated catalysts is presented. High activity and stability have been obtained for potassium promoted catalysts when operating at 270{degrees}C; however, it has been found that promotion with potassium and copper is essential to obtaining good activity in a wax producing mode at 230{degrees}C. Promotion with copper is critical to achieving good activity when pretreating catalysts with hydrogen or with syngas at high pressure. XRD and Mossbauer data indicate that copper facilitates the reduction of iron oxide to metallic iron and iron carbides during hydrogen and syngas pretreatments.

  17. [The serum copper/serum iron ratio in malignant tumors of the female genitalia].

    PubMed

    Maas, D H; Hinckers, H J

    1975-08-01

    Copper and iron in blood of 83 women with maligne tumors of the genitalia were regulary controled before, during and till 69 weeks after therapy. The relation between the copper/iron-ratio and the expansion and histology of the tumors, the success of the therapy and the incidence of a recurrence was checked for any significancy. Our results show the improtance of the ratio in the diagnosis and differentialdiagnosis of the ovarian-cancer and the corpus-uteri-cancer, and in the success-controll during tumor-therapy. In the group of the patients with collum-uteri-cancer we found a significant difference in the copper/iron-ratio of the patients with and without a recurrence during the controllperiod after therapy, which emphasizes the importance of this copper/iron-ratio. PMID:1175904

  18. Levels and predictors of airborne and internal exposure to manganese and iron among welders.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Beate; Weiss, Tobias; Kendzia, Benjamin; Henry, Jana; Lehnert, Martin; Lotz, Anne; Heinze, Evelyn; Käfferlein, Heiko Udo; Van Gelder, Rainer; Berges, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Mattenklott, Markus; Punkenburg, Ewald; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We investigated airborne and internal exposure to manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) among welders. Personal sampling of welding fumes was carried out in 241 welders during a shift. Metals were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Mn in blood (MnB) was analyzed by graphite furnace atom absorption spectrometry. Determinants of exposure levels were estimated with multiple regression models. Respirable Mn was measured with a median of 62 (inter-quartile range (IQR) 8.4-320) μg/m(3) and correlated with Fe (r=0.92, 95% CI 0.90-0.94). Inhalable Mn was measured with similar concentrations (IQR 10-340 μg/m(3)). About 70% of the variance of Mn and Fe could be explained, mainly by the welding process. Ventilation decreased exposure to Fe and Mn significantly. Median concentrations of MnB and serum ferritin (SF) were 10.30 μg/l (IQR 8.33-13.15 μg/l) and 131 μg/l (IQR 76-240 μg/l), respectively. Few welders were presented with low iron stores, and MnB and SF were not correlated (r=0.07, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.20). Regression models revealed a significant association of the parent metal with MnB and SF, but a low fraction of variance was explained by exposure-related factors. Mn is mainly respirable in welding fumes. Airborne Mn and Fe influenced MnB and SF, respectively, in welders. This indicates an effect on the biological regulation of both metals. Mn and Fe were strongly correlated, whereas MnB and SF were not, likely due to higher iron stores among welders. PMID:22377681

  19. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer. PMID:26284144

  20. Copper binding in IscA inhibits iron-sulfur cluster assembly in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Guoqiang; Cheng, Zishuo; Pang, Yilin; Landry, Aaron P.; Li, Jianghui; Lu, Jianxin; Ding, Huangen

    2014-01-01

    Among the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins encoded by gene cluster iscSUA-hscBA-fdx in Escherichia coli, IscA has a unique and strong iron binding activity and can provide iron for iron-sulfur cluster assembly in proteins in vitro. Deletion of IscA and its paralogue SufA results in an E. coli mutant that fails to assemble [4Fe-4S] clusters in proteins under aerobic conditions, suggesting that IscA has a crucial role for iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis. Here we report that among the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins, IscA also has a strong and specific binding activity for Cu(I) in vivo and in vitro. The Cu(I) center in IscA is stable and resistant to oxidation under aerobic conditions. Mutation of the conserved cysteine residues that are essential for the iron binding in IscA abolishes the copper binding activity, indicating that copper and iron may share the same binding site in the protein. Additional studies reveal that copper can compete with iron for the metal binding site in IscA and effectively inhibits the IscA-mediated [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly in E. coli cells. The results suggest that copper may not only attack the [4Fe-4S] clusters in dehydratases, but also block the [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly in proteins by targeting IscA in cells. PMID:24946160

  1. Activation and promotion studies in a mixed slurry reactor with an iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline, H.W.; Zarochak, M.F.; Stencel, J.M.; Diehl, J.R.

    1987-03-01

    Synthesis gas was reacted over a coprecipitated iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalyst in a slurry reactor. The effect of various activation parameters - temperature, pressure, and gas composition - on subsequent catalyst activity and product selectivity was investigated. The gas composition had the most dramatic effect on the catalyst activation and the ensuing synthesis gas conversion. The effect of potassium promotion on catalyst activity and product selectivity was also studied in slurry reactor tests.

  2. Evaluation of iron and manganese-coated pumice application for the removal of as(v) from aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of water has been recognized as a serious environmental issue and there are reports on its epidemiological problems to human health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performances of iron-coated pumice and manganese-coated pumice as the adsorbents for removing arsenate from aqueous solutions. The effect of various parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH and initial concentration on removal efficiency of arsenate were evaluated in batch mode. The data obtained from the kinetic studies were analyzed using kinetic models of pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order. In addition, two isotherm models of Freundlich and Langmuir were used to fit the experimental data. The results showed that the optimum dosage of iron-coated pumice and manganese-coated pumice for arsenate removal were 40 and 80 g/L whereas the adsorption process reached equilibrium after 80 and 100 min, respectively. The maximum removal efficiency of arsenate using the two adsorbents were both recorded in pH=3 as the removal efficiency gradually declined following every increase in pH values of the solution. Iron-coated pumice also showed to have high removal efficiency when the initial concentration of arsenate was high while the low concentration of arsenate was efficiently removed by manganese-coated pumice. Moreover, it was depicted that the adsorption kinetics by both adsorbents followed pseudo-second order equation and the uptake data of arsenate were well fitted with Langmuir isotherm model. Therefore, it could be concluded that iron and manganese-coated pumice could be considered as suitable adsorbents for arsenate removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:23369510

  3. Evaluation of iron and manganese-coated pumice application for the removal of as(v) from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Far, Leila Babaie; Souri, Bubak; Heidari, Masoumeh; Khoshnavazi, Roshan

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of water has been recognized as a serious environmental issue and there are reports on its epidemiological problems to human health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performances of iron-coated pumice and manganese-coated pumice as the adsorbents for removing arsenate from aqueous solutions. The effect of various parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH and initial concentration on removal efficiency of arsenate were evaluated in batch mode. The data obtained from the kinetic studies were analyzed using kinetic models of pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order. In addition, two isotherm models of Freundlich and Langmuir were used to fit the experimental data. The results showed that the optimum dosage of iron-coated pumice and manganese-coated pumice for arsenate removal were 40 and 80 g/L whereas the adsorption process reached equilibrium after 80 and 100 min, respectively. The maximum removal efficiency of arsenate using the two adsorbents were both recorded in pH=3 as the removal efficiency gradually declined following every increase in pH values of the solution. Iron-coated pumice also showed to have high removal efficiency when the initial concentration of arsenate was high while the low concentration of arsenate was efficiently removed by manganese-coated pumice. Moreover, it was depicted that the adsorption kinetics by both adsorbents followed pseudo-second order equation and the uptake data of arsenate were well fitted with Langmuir isotherm model. Therefore, it could be concluded that iron and manganese-coated pumice could be considered as suitable adsorbents for arsenate removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:23369510

  4. Baseline blood levels of manganese, lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in residents of Beijing suburb

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long-Lian; Lu, Ling; Pan, Ya-Juan; Ding, Chun-Guang; Xu, Da-Yong; Huang, Chuan-Feng; Pan, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Wei

    2015-07-15

    Baseline blood concentrations of metals are important references for monitoring metal exposure in environmental and occupational settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood levels of manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) among the residents (aged 12–60 years old) living in the suburb southwest of Beijing in China and to compare the outcomes with reported values in various developed countries. Blood samples were collected from 648 subjects from March 2009 to February 2010. Metal concentrations in the whole blood were determined by ICP-MS. The geometric means of blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 11.4, 802.4, 4665, 42.6, and 0.68 µg/L, respectively. Male subjects had higher blood Pb than the females, while the females had higher blood Mn and Cu than the males. There was no gender difference for blood Cd and Zn. Smokers had higher blood Cu, Zn, and Cd than nonsmokers. There were significant age-related differences in blood levels of all metals studied; subjects in the 17–30 age group had higher blood levels of Mn, Pb, Cu, and Zn, while those in the 46–60 age group had higher Cd than the other age groups. A remarkably lower blood level of Cu and Zn in this population as compared with residents of other developed countries was noticed. Based on the current study, the normal reference ranges for the blood Mn were estimated to be 5.80–25.2 μg/L; for blood Cu, 541–1475 μg/L; for blood Zn, 2349–9492 μg/L; for blood Pb, <100 μg/L; and for blood Cd, <5.30 μg/L in the general population living in Beijing suburbs. - Highlights: • Baseline blood levels of metals in residents of Beijing suburb are investigated. • BMn and BPb in this cohort are higher than those in other developed countries. • Remarkably lower blood levels of Cu and Zn in this Chinese cohort are noticed. • The reference values for blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd are established.

  5. Methane monooxygenase: functionalizing methane at iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Sazinsky, Matthew H; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) catalyze the conversion of methane to methanol as the first committed step in the assimilation of this hydrocarbon into biomass and energy by methanotrophs, thus playing a significant role in the biogeochemistry of this potent greenhouse gas. Two distinct enzymes, a copper-dependent membrane protein, particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), and an iron-dependent cytosolic protein, soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), carry out this transformation using large protein scaffolds that help to facilitate the timely transport of hydrocarbon, O₂, proton, and electron substrates to buried dimetallic active sites. For both enzymes, reaction of the reduced metal centers with O₂leads to intermediates that activate the relatively inert C-H bonds of hydrocarbons to yield oxidized products. Among synthetic and biological catalysts, MMOs are unique because they are the only ones known to hydroxylate methane at ambient temperatures. As a need for new industrial catalysts and green chemical transformations increases, understanding how the different MMO metal centers efficiently accomplish this challenging chemistry has become the focus of intense study. This chapter examines current understanding of the sMMO and pMMO protein structures, their methods for substrate channeling, and mechanisms for the dimetallic activation of O₂and C-H bonds. PMID:25707469

  6. Biochemical Evolution of Iron and Copper Proteins, Substances Vital to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frieden, Earl

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes studies in the area of biochemical evolution of iron, copper, and heme proteins to provide an historical outline. Included are lists of major kinds of proteins and enzymes and charts illustrating electron flow in a cytochrome electron transport system and interconversion of jerrous to ferric ion in iron metabolism. (CC)

  7. Effect of oxide formation mechanisms on lead adsorption by biogenic manganese (hydr)oxides, iron (hydr)oxides, and their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Yarrow M; Lion, Leonard W; Shuler, Michael L; Ghiorse, William C

    2002-02-01

    The effects of iron and manganese (hydr)oxide formation processes on the trace metal adsorption properties of these metal (hydr)oxides and their mixtures was investigated by measuring lead adsorption by iron and manganese (hydr)oxides prepared by a variety of methods. Amorphous iron (hydr)oxide formed by fast precipitation at pH 7.5 exhibited greater Pb adsorption (gamma(max) = 50 mmol of Pb/mol of Fe at pH 6.0) than iron (hydr)oxide formed by slow, diffusion-controlled oxidation of Fe(II) at pH 4.5-7.0 or goethite. Biogenic manganese(III/IV) (hydr)oxide prepared by enzymatic oxidation of Mn(II) by the bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS-1 adsorbed five times more Pb (per mole of Mn) than an abiotic manganese (hydr)oxide prepared by oxidation of Mn(II) with permanganate, and 500-5000 times more Pb than pyrolusite oxides (betaMnO2). X-ray crystallography indicated that biogenic manganese (hydr)oxide and iron (hydr)oxide were predominantly amorphous or poorly crystalline and their X-ray diffraction patterns were not significantly affected by the presence of the other (hydr)oxide during formation. When iron and manganese (hydr)oxides were mixed after formation, or for Mn biologically oxidized with iron(III) (hydr)oxide present, observed Pb adsorption was similar to that expected for the mixture based on Langmuir parameters for the individual (hydr)oxides. These results indicate that interactions in iron/manganese (hydr)oxide mixtures related to the formation process and sequence of formation such as site masking, alterations in specific surface area, or changes in crystalline structure either did not occur or had a negligible effect on Pb adsorption by the mixtures. PMID:11871557

  8. Geochemistry and Microbial Communities in Iron- and Manganese-Enriched Cold Groundwater Biofiltration Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W.; Dangeti, S.; Roshani, B.; McBeth, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Exploring how to enhance the microbially mediated oxidization of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) in natural and engineered environments in cold climates requires an understanding of the interactive relationships between the geochemistry of cold groundwater and Fe- and Mn-oxidizing bacteria. This study precisely measured geochemical and microbial communities in a scaled-up biofiltration system using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) analyses coupled with next-generation sequencing (Illumina Miseq). Two pilot-scale biofiltration columns for Fe (Filter 1) and Mn (Filter 2) were connected in series and installed at the Langham Water Treatment Plant in Saskatoon, Canada. The groundwater temperature ranged from 4 to 8 °C. The pilot-scale study showed that successful treatment (99% removal) of both Fe and Mn was achieved in the biofilters. However, the Mn removal was significantly retarded for four months, likely due to the slow growth of Mn-oxidizing bacteria (MnOB) in Filter 2. The removal of Mn was accelerated once the redox potential in Filter 2 exceeded +300 mV. At that point, the XANES analyses showed that the oxidization states of Mn in Filter 2 were mainly +3 and +4, confirming that Mn oxidization had occurred. Geochemical analyses (PHREEQCi) also indicated changed geochemical conditions that favoured the formation of Mn-oxides during biofiltration. Next-generation sequencing analyses indicated the enrichment of iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), including Gallionella sp. and Sideroxydans sp., in Filter 1. There were high read numbers for MnOB relatives, including Pseudomonas sp., Hydrogenophaga sp., Bdellovibrio sp., and Leptothrix sp., in Filter 2. Furthermore, the addition of anthracite (coal-based filter media) positively affected the growth MnOB and enhanced Mn oxidization. The evidence obtained in this study provides insight into how Mn oxidization can be accelerated in cold groundwater treatment systems.

  9. Theoretical technique for predicting the cumulative impact of iron and manganese oxidation in streams receiving discharge from coal mines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bobay, Keith E.

    1986-01-01

    Two U.S. Geological Survey computer programs are modified and linked to predict the cumulative impact of iron and manganese oxidation in coal-mine discharge water on the dissolved chemical quality of a receiving stream. The coupled programs calculate the changes in dissolved iron, dissolved manganese, and dissolved oxygen concentrations; alkalinity; and, pH of surface water downstream from the point of discharge. First, the one-dimensional, stead-state stream, water quality program uses a dissolved oxygen model to calculate the changes in concentration of elements as a function of the chemical reaction rates and time-of-travel. Second, a program (PHREEQE) combining pH, reduction-oxidation potential, and equilibrium equations uses an aqueous-ion association model to determine the saturation indices and to calculate pH; it then mixes the discharge with a receiving stream. The kinetic processes of the first program dominate the system, whereas the equilibrium thermodynamics of the second define the limits of the reactions. A comprehensive test of the technique was not possible because a complete set of data was unavailable. However, the cumulative impact of representative discharges from several coal mines on stream quality in a small watershed in southwestern Indiana was simulated to illustrate the operation of the technique and to determine its sensitivity to changes in physical, chemical, and kinetic parameters. Mine discharges averaged 2 cu ft/sec, with a pH of 6.0, and concentrations of 7.0 mg/L dissolved iron, 4.0 mg/L dissolved manganese, and 8.08 mg/L dissolved oxygen. The receiving stream discharge was 2 cu ft/sec, with a pH of 7.0, and concentrations of 0.1 mg/L dissolved iron, 0.1 mg/L dissolved manganese, and 8.70 mg/L dissolved oxygen. Results of the simulations indicated the following cumulative impact on the receiving stream from five discharges as compared with the effect from one discharge: 0.30 unit decrease in pH, 1.82 mg/L increase in dissolved

  10. Variations in structure and electrochemistry of iron- and titanium-doped lithium nickel manganese oxyfluoride spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höweling, Andres; Stenzel, David; Gesswein, Holger; Kaus, Maximilian; Indris, Sylvio; Bergfeldt, Thomas; Binder, Joachim R.

    2016-05-01

    Doping of cathode materials can considerably improve electrochemical performance and stability. Here, the high-voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel is used as a candidate material. It is high-voltage cycling at a potential of approximately 4.7 V and the ability to host 2 eq. Li, thus leading to a theoretical capacity of 294 mAh g-1, that makes this material interesting. In order to improve stability and electronic conductivity, the spinel is doped with titanium and iron. Cycling in a voltage range of 2.0-5.0 V leads to a cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion accompanied by a phase transformation from cubic to tetragonal symmetry. This causes a severe capacity fade. To improve capacity retention, the as-prepared spinel is post-doped with fluorine. Influence of different fluorine amounts in LiNi0.5Mn1.4Fe0.1Ti0.027O4-xFx (x = 0-0.3) on the capacity and stability is analyzed. The initial capacities decrease with increasing fluorine content but the low voltage capacity is stabilized. Best electrochemical results are obtained with a fluorine content of x = 0.15. Furthermore, an additional redox couple is found. The intensity of this depends on the fluorine content. It is assumed that manganese, either in the tetrahedral sites or in octahedral sites, bound to fluorine lead to a higher voltage.

  11. Role of cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, platinum, selenium, and titanium in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kazantzis, G

    1981-01-01

    The possible carcinogenicity of cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, platinum, selenium, and titanium is reviewed, taking into account epidemiological data, the results of animal experimental studies, data on mutagenic effects and on other in vitro test systems. Of the great variety of occupations where exposure to one of these metals may occur, only haematite mining has been clearly shown to involve an increased human cancer risk. While the possibility that haematite might in some way act as a carcinogen has to be taken into consideration it is more likely that other carcinogens are responsible. Certain platinum coordination complexes are used in cancer chemotherapy, are mutagenic, and likely to be carcinogenic. Cobalt, its oxide and sulfide, certain lead salts, one organomanganese, and one organotitanium compound have been shown to have a limited carcinogenic effect in experimental animal studies, and except for titanium appear to be mutagenic. Certain mercury compounds are mutagenic but none have been shown to be carcinogenic. The presently available data are inadequate to assess the possible carcinogenicity of selenium compounds, but a few observations suggest that selenium may suppress the effect of other carcinogens administered to experimental animals and may even be associated with lower cancer mortality rates in man. Epidemiological observations are essential for the assessment of a human cancer risk, but the difficulty in collecting past exposure data in occupational groups and the complexity of multiple occupational exposures with changes over time, limits the usefulness of retrospective epidemiological studies. PMID:7023929

  12. Tritium purification via zirconium-manganese-iron alloy getter st 909 in flow processes

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.D.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Pawelko, R. J.; Anderl, R.A. |; Tuggle, D.G.

    1995-03-01

    A zirconium-manganese-iron alloy, St 909, was evaluated as a purifier in tritium handling, transport, and storage applications. High efficiency removal of CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and O{sub 2} was observed at concentrations of 0.1 to 1% in helium. Gas streams at 100 to 5000 sccm were passed through getters operated at 500-800{degree}C. On-getter residence times of two seconds were required to achieve > 99% removal of these reactive impurities. At this removal efficiency level, the individual impurity capacity of 100 g of St 909 purifier at 800{degree}C was 0.59, 0.28, 0.19, 0.14 and 0.12 moles of CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}, respectively. Hydrogen containing gases, CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}, were cracked on the purifier and the resultant elemental hydrogen was released. Only 8{+-}2 scc of H{sub 2} were retained on 100 g of St 909 at 800{degree}C. These features suggest that this alloy can be employed as an efficient purifier for hydrogen isotopes in inert gas, nitrogen, or perhaps even H, D, or T streams. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Manganese doped iron oxide theranostic nanoparticles for combined T1 magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengxin; Cao, Yuhua; Wang, Lina; Ma, Yufei; Tu, Xiaolong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2015-03-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a noninvasive and convenient way to ablate tumor tissues. Integrating PTT with imaging technique could precisely identify the location and the size of tumor regions, thereby significantly improving the therapeutic efficacy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in clinical diagnosis due to its superb spatial resolution and real-time monitoring feature. In our work, we developed a theranostic nanoplatform based on manganese doped iron oxide (MnIO) nanoparticles modified with denatured bovine serum albumin (MnIO-dBSA). The in vitro experiment revealed that the MnIO nanoparticles exhibited T1-weighted MRI capability (r1 = 8.24 mM(-1) s(-1), r2/r1 = 2.18) and good photothermal effect under near-infrared laser irradiation (808 nm). Using 4T1 tumor-bearing mice as an animal model, we further demonstrated that the MnIO-dBSA composites could significantly increase T1 MRI signal intensity at the tumor site (about two times) and effectively ablate tumor tissues with photoirradiation. Taken together, this work demonstrates the great potential of the MnIO nanoparticles as an ideal theranostic platform for efficient tumor MR imaging and photothermal therapy. PMID:25672225

  14. Molecular-Level Processes Governing the Interaction of Contaminants with Iron and Manganese Oxides - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown Jr., G. E.; Chambers, S. A.

    1999-10-31

    Many of the inorganic and organic contaminants present in sediments at DOE sites can be altered or destroyed by reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions occurring at mineral surfaces. A fundamental understanding of such redox processes provided by molecular-level studies on structurally and compositionally well-defined mineral surfaces will lead to: (i) improved models of contaminant fate and transport in geochemical systems, and (ii) optimized manipulation of these processes for remediation purposes. To contribute to this understanding, we will study, both experimentally and theoretically, redox processes involving three important contaminants - chromate ion, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethene TCE, on the following iron and manganese oxides - hematite, magnetite, maghemite, and pyrolusite. These oxides and their hydroxylated analogs commonly occur as coatings on minerals or as interfaces in the subsurface environment. Single-crystal surfaces of these oxides will be synthesized in carefully controlled fashion by molecular beam epitaxy. These surfaces, as well as high surface are powdered samples of these oxides, will be used in spectroscopic and kinetic experiments in both aqueous and gas phases. Our goal is to identify products and to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of surface-catalyzed redox reaction of Cr(VI) and CR(III), and the reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride and TCE. The combination of theory and experiment will provide the base information needed to scale from the molecular level to the microscopic grain level minerals.

  15. Chromium Mobilization by Microbially-Driven Iron and Manganese Redox Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Arredondo, M.; Hausladen, D.; Ying, S.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Chromium, a naturally occurring contaminant, poses a significant threat to California groundwater quality when ultramafic rocks weather leaving Cr-enriched serpentine soils. Benign and of limited solubility, Cr(III) can oxidize into soluble and carcinogenic Cr(VI). Under most environmental conditions, Mn-oxides are the principal oxidant of Cr(III). Here we investigate Cr(III) oxidation by both abiotically synthesized birnessite and biogenically produced Mn-oxides. Further, we explore chromium dynamics within artificial soil aggregates composed of Cr(OH)3- and Cr0.25Fe0.75(OH)3-coated quartz grains surrounded by aerated solute flow. Abiotic aggregates contained synthetic birnessite, while biotic aggregates were inoculated with Leptothrix cholodnii, a manganese-oxidizing bacterium, and Shewanella putrefaciens, an iron-reducing bacterium. Results show aqueous Cr(VI) concentrations scaling with Cr-mineral solubility. When Leptothrix sp.-inoculated Cr(III),Fe(III)-aggregates are supplied with aqueous Mn(II), Mn-oxides precipitate in the aerobic aggregate. Cr(VI) production occurs similar to that via synthetic birnessite. With the addition of Shewanella sp., coupled biotic and abiotic processes occur causing the reduction, and subsequent immobilization, of chromium by microbial metabolites (e.g., Fe(II)). This study shows the importance of microbial community composition on chromium dynamics within diffusion-limited zones, and suggests the potential for biological immobilization of Cr even in the presence of Mn-oxidizing bacteria.

  16. Bovine hemoglobin as the sole source of dietary iron does not support adequate iron status in copper-adequate or copper-deficient rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was designed to determine whether hemoglobin as the sole source of dietary iron (Fe) could sustain normal Fe status in growing rats. Because adequate copper (Cu) status is required for efficient Fe absorption in the rat, we also determined the effects of Cu deficiency on Fe status of...

  17. IN-HOUSE CORROSION RESEARCH EMPHASIZING LEAD, COPPER AND IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead and copper are directly regulated via the "Lead and Copper Rule;" however, water suppliers must balance all water treatment processes in order to simultaneously comply with all regulations. Specific research needs for copper and lead chemistry still exist, as applications o...

  18. A thermodynamic study of silica-saturated iron silicate slags in equilibrium with liquid copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Toshio; Kamuo, Morinori; Ono, Katsutoshi; Moriyama, Joichiro

    1983-03-01

    The thermodynamic properties of silica-saturated iron silicate slags in equilibrium with liquid copper have been studied from oxygen partial pressure measurements in the temperature range from 1490 to 1580 K by means of a solid electrolyte galvanic cell. The following cells were used: Pt, Ni-NiO/O=/slag-Cu(l), Cr2O3, Pt; Pt, Fe-FeO/O=/slag-Cu(Fe sat.), Fe. A strong correlation was found between oxygen pressure and the copper content of the slag; the copper content increased from less than 1 pct near iron saturation to about 4 pct at an oxygen partial pressure of 7.2 x 10-3 Pa. A similar correlation was found between the ferric iron/total iron ratio and the oxygen pressure. The oxygen content in liquid copper decreased with increasing iron content in liquid copper and increased slightly near iron saturation. This behavior could be explained qualitatively by using the standard free energy of formation of FeO and the activities of components.

  19. Iron, copper and zinc isotopic fractionation up mammal trophic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Pons, Marie-Laure; Balter, Vincent

    2013-07-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that some non-traditional elements exhibit stable isotope compositions that are distinct in botanical and animal products, providing potential new tracers for diet reconstructions. Here, we present data for iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) stable isotope compositions in plants and bones of herbivores and carnivores. The samples come from trophic chains located in the Western Cape area and in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The Fe, Cu and Zn isotope systematics are similar in both parks. However, local Cu, and possibly Zn, isotopic values of soils influence that of plants and of higher trophic levels. Between plants and bones of herbivores, the Zn isotope compositions are 66Zn-enriched by about 0.8‰ whereas no significant trophic enrichment is observed for Fe and Cu. Between bones of herbivores and bones of carnivores, the Fe isotope compositions are 56Fe-depleted by about 0.6‰, the Cu isotope compositions are 65Cu-enriched by about 1.0‰, and the Zn isotope compositions are slightly 66Zn-depleted by about 0.2‰. The isotopic distributions of the metals in the body partly explain the observed trophic isotopic systematics. However, it is also necessary to invoke differential intestinal metal absorption between herbivores and carnivores to account for the observed results. Further studies are necessary to fully understand how the Fe, Cu and Zn isotope values are regulated within the ecosystem's trophic levels, but the data already suggests significant potential as new paleodietary and paleoecological proxies.

  20. The iron-sulfur clusters of dehydratases are primary intracellular targets of copper toxicity.

    PubMed

    Macomber, Lee; Imlay, James A

    2009-05-19

    Excess copper is poisonous to all forms of life, and copper overloading is responsible for several human pathologic processes. The primary mechanisms of toxicity are unknown. In this study, mutants of Escherichia coli that lack copper homeostatic systems (copA cueO cus) were used to identify intracellular targets and to test the hypothesis that toxicity involves the action of reactive oxygen species. Low micromolar levels of copper were sufficient to inhibit the growth of both WT and mutant strains. The addition of branched-chain amino acids restored growth, indicating that copper blocks their biosynthesis. Indeed, copper treatment rapidly inactivated isopropylmalate dehydratase, an iron-sulfur cluster enzyme in this pathway. Other enzymes in this iron-sulfur dehydratase family were similarly affected. Inactivation did not require oxygen, in vivo or with purified enzyme. Damage occurred concomitant with the displacement of iron atoms from the solvent-exposed cluster, suggesting that Cu(I) damages these proteins by liganding to the coordinating sulfur atoms. Copper efflux by dedicated export systems, chelation by glutathione, and cluster repair by assembly systems all enhance the resistance of cells to this metal. PMID:19416816

  1. Iron and manganese speciation and cycling in glacially influenced high-latitude fjord sediments (West Spitsbergen, Svalbard): Evidence for a benthic recycling-transport mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrmann, Laura M.; Formolo, Michael J.; Owens, Jeremy D.; Raiswell, Robert; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Riedinger, Natascha; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2014-09-01

    Glacial environments may provide an important but poorly constrained source of potentially bioavailable iron and manganese phases to the coastal ocean in high-latitude regions. Little is known about the fate and biogeochemical cycling of glacially derived iron and manganese in the coastal marine realm. Sediment and porewater samples were collected along transects from the fjord mouths to the tidewater glaciers at the fjord heads in Smeerenburgfjorden, Kongsfjorden, and Van Keulenfjorden along Western Svalbard. Solid-phase iron and manganese speciation, determined by sequential chemical extraction, could be linked to the compositions of the local bedrock and hydrological/weathering conditions below the local glaciers. The concentration and sulfur isotope composition of chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) in Kongs- and Van Keulenfjorden sediments largely reflect the delivery rate and isotope composition of detrital pyrite originating from adjacent glaciers. The varying input of reducible iron and manganese oxide phases and the input of organic matter of varying reactivity control the pathways of organic carbon mineralization in the sediments of the three fjords. High reducible iron and manganese oxide concentrations and elevated metal accumulation rates coupled to low input of “fresh” organic matter lead to a strong expression of dissimilatory metal oxide reduction evidenced in very high porewater iron (up to 800 μM) and manganese (up to 210 μM) concentrations in Kongsfjorden and Van Keulenfjorden. Sediment reworking by the benthic macrofauna and physical sediment resuspension via iceberg calving may be additional factors that promote extensive benthic iron and manganese cycling in these fjords. On-going benthic recycling of glacially derived dissolved iron into overlying seawater, where partial re-oxidation and deposition occurs, facilitates the transport of iron across the fjords and potentially into adjacent continental shelf waters. Such iron-dominated fjord

  2. Calcium carbonate-based permeable reactive barriers for iron and manganese groundwater remediation at landfills.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Pleasant, Saraya; Jain, Pradeep; Powell, Jon; Townsend, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    High concentrations of iron (Fe(II)) and manganese (Mn(II)) reductively dissolved from soil minerals have been detected in groundwater monitoring wells near many municipal solid waste landfills. Two in situ permeable reactive barriers (PRBs), comprised of limestone and crushed concrete, were installed downgradient of a closed, unlined landfill in Florida, USA, to remediate groundwater containing high concentrations of these metals. Influent groundwater to the PRBs contained mean Fe and Mn concentrations of approximately 30mg/L and 1.62mg/L, respectively. PRBs were constructed in the shallow aquifer (maximum depth 4.6m below land surface) and groundwater was sampled from a network of nearby monitoring wells to evaluate barrier performance in removing these metals. PRBs significantly (p<0.05) removed dissolved Fe and Mn from influent groundwater; Fe was removed from influent water at average rates of 91% and 95% (by mass) for the limestone and crushed concrete PRBs, respectively, during the first year of the study. The performance of the PRBs declined after 3years of operation, with Fe removal efficiency decreasing to 64% and 61% for limestone and concrete PRBs, respectively. A comparison of water quality in shallow and deep monitoring wells showed a more dramatic performance reduction in the deeper section of the concrete PRB, which was attributed to an influx of sediment into the barrier and settling of particulates from the upper portions of the PRBs. Although removal of Fe and Mn from redox impacts was achieved with the PRBs, the short time frame of effectiveness relative to the duration of a full-scale remediation effort may limit the applicability of these systems at some landfills because of the construction costs required. PMID:26992666

  3. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Seckin; Meier, Bastian; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Peiter, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism. PMID:26668333

  4. Changes in Dietary Iron Exacerbate Regional Brain Manganese Accumulation as Determined by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A.; Zhang, Na; Avison, Malcolm J.; Erikson, Keith M.; Gore, John C.; Aschner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal required for normal homeostasis. Humans chronically exposed to high Mn levels, however, may exhibit psychomotor signs secondary to increased brain Mn. As Mn and iron (Fe) share several cellular membrane transporters, decreased Fe levels resulting from Fe deficiency or anemia lead to increased brain Mn deposition. Conversely, decreased Mn levels are associated with abnormal brain Fe accumulation. To reduce potential Mn toxicity resulting from brain Mn accumulation, we proposed that increased dietary Fe would attenuate brain Mn deposition. To test this hypothesis, three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were injected weekly (14 weeks) with Mn (3 mg/kg) and fed normal Fe (TX), Fe-supplemented (FeS), or Fe-deficient (FeD) chow. Control (CN) rats received normal dietary Fe and saline injections. Using magnetic resonance imaging, rats were imaged biweekly for 14 weeks to qualitatively monitor brain Mn and Fe accumulation. Both FeS and FeD had greater brain Mn deposition than TX rats. By week 3, R1 values, which correlate with Mn deposition, were statistically significantly increased (p < 0.05) in brain stem, cerebellum, cortex, midbrain, and striatum compared with CN or TX animals. By week 14, R1 values for all brain regions in FeS and FeD animals were statistically significantly increased (p < 0.05). By the end of the study, similar results were obtained for R2 values, a marker of Fe accumulation. These data suggest that Fe supplementation does not effectively protect and may even exacerbate brain Mn accumulation in mammals subchronically exposed to Mn. PMID:21177776

  5. Phytoavailability and fractions of iron and manganese in calcareous soil amended with composted urban wastes.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Lara, Francisco; Azcón, Mariano; Polo, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of applying composted urban wastes on the phytoavailability and distribution of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) among chemical fractions in soil. In order to study this concern several experiments in pots containing calcareous soil were carried out. The received treatments by adding separately two rates (20 and 80 Mg ha-1) of municipal solid waste (MSW) compost and/or municipal solid waste and sewage sludge (MSW-SS) co-compost. The cropping sequence was a lettuce crop followed by a barley crop. It was observed that treatments amended with composted urban wastes tended to promote slight increases in lettuce yield compared to the control. The highest Fe levels in lettuce were found when higher rates of MSW-SS co-compost were applied; these values were significant compared to those obtained in the other treatments. In all cases, the application of organic materials increased the concentration and uptake of Mn in lettuce compared to the control; however, these increases were significant only when higher rates of MSW compost were applied. The organic amendments had beneficial delayed effects on barley yields, showing, in most cases, significant increases compared to the control. In this context, treatments with MSW compost were found to be more effective than the equivalent treatments amended with MSW-SS co-compost. Compared to the control, composted urban wastes increased Fe concentration in straw and rachis, and decreased Fe concentration in barley grain. Similarly, a decreased concentration of Mn in the dry matter of barley crop grown in soils treated with composted urban wastes was observed. PMID:16923600

  6. Stability Behavior and Thermodynamic States of Iron and Manganese in Sandy Soil Aquifer, Manukan Island, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chin Yik; Abdullah, Mohd. Harun; Musta, Baba; Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2011-03-15

    A total of 20 soil samples were collected from 10 boreholes constructed in the low lying area, which included ancillary samples taken from the high elevation area. Redox processes were investigated in the soil as well as groundwater in the shallow groundwater aquifer of Manukan Island, Sabah, Malaysia. Groundwater samples (n = 10) from each boreholes were also collected in the low lying area to understand the concentrations and behaviors of Fe and Mn in the dissolved state. This study strives to obtain a general understanding of the stability behaviors on Fe and Mn at the upper unsaturated and the lower-saturated soil horizons in the low lying area of Manukan Island as these elements usually play a major role in the redox chemistry of the shallow groundwater. Thermodynamic calculations using PHREEQC showed that the groundwater samples in the study area are oversaturated with respect to goethite, hematite, Fe(OH){sub 3} and undersaturated with respect to manganite and pyrochroite. Low concentrations of Fe and Mn in the groundwater might be probably due to the lack of minerals of iron and manganese oxides, which exist in the sandy aquifer. In fact, high organic matters that present in the unsaturated horizon are believed to be responsible for the high Mn content in the soil. It was observed that the soil samples collected from high elevation area (BK) comprises considerable amount of Fe in both unsaturated (6675.87 mg/kg) and saturated horizons (31440.49 mg/kg) compared to the low Fe content in the low lying area. Based on the stability diagram, the groundwater composition lies within the stability field for Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+} under suboxic condition and very close to the FeS/Fe{sup 2+} stability boundary. This study also shows that both pH and Eh values comprise a strong negative value thus suggesting that the redox potential is inversely dependent on the changes of pH.

  7. Developmental manganese exposure in combination with developmental stress and iron deficiency: Effects on behavior and monoamines.

    PubMed

    Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M; Davenport, Laurie L; Gutierrez, Arnold; Hufgard, Jillian R; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element but neurotoxic at higher exposures, however, Mn exposure seldom occurs in isolation. It often co-occurs in populations with inadequate dietary iron (Fe) and limited resources that result in stress. Subclinical FeD affects up to 15% of U.S. children and exacerbates Mn toxicity by increasing Mn bioavailability. Therefore, we investigated Mn overexposure (MnOE) in rats in combination with Fe deficiency (FeD) and developmental stress, for which we used barren cage rearing. For barren cage rearing (BAR), rats were housed in cages with a wire grid floor or standard bedding material (STD) from embryonic day (E)7 through postnatal day (P)28. For FeD, dams were fed a 90% Fe-deficient NIH-07 diet from E15 through P28. Within each litter, different offspring were treated with 100mg/kg Mn (MnOE) or vehicle (VEH) by gavage every other day from P4-28. Behavior was assessed at two ages and consisted of: open-field, anxiety tests, acoustic startle response (ASR) with prepulse inhibition (PPI), sociability, sucrose preference, tapered beam crossing, and the Porsolt's forced swim test. MnOE had main effects of decreasing activity, ASR, social preference, and social novelty. BAR and FeD transiently modified MnOE effects. BAR groups weighed less and showed decreased anxiety in the elevated zero maze, had increased ASR and decreased PPI, and exhibited reduced sucrose preference compared with the STD groups. FeD animals also weighed less and had increased slips on the tapered beam. Most of the monoamine effects were dopaminergic and occurred in the MnOE groups. The results showed that Mn is a pervasive developmental neurotoxin, the effects of which are modulated by FeD and/or BAR cage rearing. PMID:27302314

  8. Time-of-flight study of photoinduced dynamics of copper and manganese phthalocyanine thin films on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramonova, A. G.; Butkhuzi, T. G.; Abaeva, V. V.; Tvauri, I. V.; Khubezhov, S. A.; Turiev, A. M.; Tsidaeva, N. I.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2013-11-01

    Photoinduced fragmentation and desorption of species from copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and manganese phthalocyanine 80 nm thick films deposited on Si(111) have been studied by means of atomic force microscopy and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy in an ultra-high vacuum chamber. The main fragments formed under the effect of low-fluence (1-3 mJ cm-2) nanosecond laser light with photon energies of 2.34 and 1.17 eV are the entire phthalocyanine molecule, molecular fragments, atomic Cu and Mn and a Si-substituted CuPc. The latter is presumably due to migration of the Si atom of the underlying support to the vacancy formed after photoejection of the metallic atom out of the phthalocyanine molecule. The mechanism of photofragmentation and desorption is essentially non-thermal involving the metal atom as a key factor.

  9. Iron and copper in progressive demyelination--New lessons from Skogholt's disease.

    PubMed

    Aspli, Klaus Thanke; Flaten, Trond Peder; Roos, Per M; Holmøy, Trygve; Skogholt, Jon H; Aaseth, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of progressive demyelinating disorders including multiple sclerosis are incompletely understood. Increasing evidence indicates a role for trace metals in the progression of several neurodegenerative disorders. The study of Skogholt disease, a recently discovered demyelinating disease affecting both the central and peripheral nervous system, might shed some light on the mechanisms underlying demyelination. Cerebrospinal fluid iron and copper concentrations are about four times higher in Skogholt patients than in controls. The transit into cerebrospinal fluid of these elements from blood probably occurs in protein bound form. We hypothesize that exchangeable fractions of iron and copper are further transferred from cerebrospinal fluid into myelin, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of demyelination. Free or weakly bound iron and copper ions may exert their toxic action on myelin by catalyzing production of oxygen radicals. Similarities to demyelinating processes in multiple sclerosis and other myelinopathies are discussed. PMID:25563774

  10. Removal of copper from carbon-saturated iron with an aluminum sulfide ferrous sulfide flux.

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.; Blander, M.; Energy Technology

    1998-04-01

    Scrap iron and steel have long been considered as resources in the steelmaking industry, and their value is largely determined by the impurity content. Copper is a particularly troublesome impurity because of its role in causing hot shortness and should be kept below ==0.1 wt pct. A method for reducing copper content in steel to <0.1 wt pct could lead to increased use of lower-quality scrap.

  11. Some new chromogens for iron, cobalt, and copper Substituted hydrazidines and 1,2,4-triazines containing the ferroin group.

    PubMed

    Schilt, A A

    1966-07-01

    The spectral characteristics and solution conditions requisite for formation of the iron(II), cobalt(II), and copper(I) complexes of some newly synthesised compounds containing the ferroin functional grouping have been determined. These properties are useful for evaluation of the possible analytical effectiveness of the compounds as spectrophotometric reagents for the determination of iron, cobalt, and copper. PMID:18959951

  12. Phormidium autumnale growth and anatoxin-a production under iron and copper stress.

    PubMed

    Harland, Francine M J; Wood, Susanna A; Moltchanova, Elena; Williamson, Wendy M; Gaw, Sally

    2013-12-01

    Studies on planktonic cyanobacteria have shown variability in cyanotoxin production, in response to changes in growth phase and environmental factors. Few studies have investigated cyanotoxin regulation in benthic mat-forming species, despite increasing reports on poisoning events caused by ingestion of these organisms. In this study, a method was developed to investigate changes in cyanotoxin quota in liquid cultures of benthic mat-forming cyanobacteria. Iron and copper are important in cellular processes and are well known to affect growth and selected metabolite production in cyanobacteria and algae. The effect of iron (40-4000 μg L(-1)) and copper (2.5-250 μg L(-1)) on growth and anatoxin-a quota in Phormidium autumnale was investigated in batch culture. These concentrations were chosen to span those found in freshwater, as well as those previously reported to be toxic to cyanobacteria. Anatoxin-a concentrations varied throughout the growth curve, with a maximum quota of between 0.49 and 0.55 pg cell(-1) measured within the first two weeks of growth. Growth rates were significantly affected by copper and iron concentrations (P < 0.0001); however, no statistically significant difference between anatoxin-a quota maxima was observed. When the iron concentrations were 800 and 4000 μg L(-1), the P. autumnale cultures did not firmly attach to the substratum. At 250 μg L(-1) copper or either 40 or 4000 μg L(-1) iron, growth was suppressed. PMID:24351714

  13. Ferromagnets based on diamond-like semiconductors GaSb, InSb, Ge, and Si supersaturated with manganese or iron impurities during laser-plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, E. S. Podol'skii, V. V.; Lesnikov, V. P.; Sapozhnikov, M. V.; Druzhnov, D. M.; Gusev, S. N.; Gribkov, B. A.; Filatov, D. O.; Stepanova, Yu. S.; Levchuk, S. A.

    2008-01-15

    Properties of thin (30-100 nm) layers of diluted magnetic semiconductors based on diamond-like compounds III-V (InSb and GaSb) and elemental semiconductors Ge and Si doped with 3d impurities of manganese and iron up to 15% were measured and discussed. The layers were grown by laser-plasma deposition onto heated single-crystal gallium arsenide or sapphire substrates. The ferromagnetism of layers with the Curie temperature up to 500 K appeared in observations of the ferromagnetic resonance, anomalous Hall effect, and magneto-optic Kerr effect. The carrier mobility of diluted magnetic semiconductors is a hundred times larger than that of the previously known highest temperature magnetic semiconductors, i.e., copper and chromium chalcogenides. The difference between changes in the magnetization with temperature in diluted semiconductors based on III-V, Ge, and Si was discussed. A complex structure of the ferromagnetic resonance spectrum in Si:Mn/GaAs was observed. The results of magnetic-force microscopy showed a weak correlation between the surface relief and magnetic inhomogeneity, which suggests that the ferromagnetism is caused by the 3d-impurity solid solution, rather than ferromagnetic phase inclusions.

  14. Impact of wine production on the fractionation of copper and iron in Chardonnay wine: Implications for oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Rousseva, Michaela; Kontoudakis, Nikolaos; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Scollary, Geoffrey R; Clark, Andrew C

    2016-07-15

    Copper and iron in wine can influence oxidative, reductive and colloidal stability. The current study utilises a solid phase extraction technique to fractionate these metals into hydrophobic, cationic and residual forms, with quantification by ICP-OES. The impact of aspects of wine production on the metal fractions was examined, along with the relationship between metal fractions and oxygen decay rates. Addition of copper and iron to juice, followed by fermentation, favoured an increase in all of their respective metal fractions in the wine, with the largest increase observed for the cationic form of iron. Bentonite fining of the protein-containing wines led to a significant reduction in the cationic fraction of copper and an increase in the cationic form of iron. Total copper correlated more closely with oxygen consumption in the wine compared to total iron, and the residual and cationic forms of copper provided the largest contribution to this impact. PMID:26948636

  15. Manganese-tuned chemical etching of a platinum-copper nanocatalyst with platinum-rich surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. Y.; Zhao, T. S.; Zhao, G.; Yan, X. H.; Xu, K.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents a modified chemical etching strategy to fabricate binary metal nanocatalysts with large active areas. The strategy employs PtCu alloy particles with Pt-rich outer layers as the precursor and manganese species to manipulate the acid leaching processes. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques are used to analyze the catalyst structures and the tuning mechanism of manganese species during etching. It is found that the introduction of manganese species allows more Pt active sites to be formed onto the catalyst surface after etching, possibly due to reduction in the number of Pt atoms enclosed inside particles. The electrochemically active surface area of the synthetic MnA-PtCu/C catalyst increases by 90% relative to commercial Pt/C catalyst. As a result of the increase in active areas and the additional promotion effects by Cu, the MnA-PtCu/C catalyst reveals a methanol oxidation activity 1.7 and 4.0 times higher than that of the synthetic PtCu/C and commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively.

  16. Microwave digestion techniques in the sequential extraction of calcium, iron, chromium, manganese, lead, and zinc in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, K.I.; Foderaro, T.A.; Garza, T.L.; Martinez, R.M.; Maroney, G.A.; Trivisonno, M.R.; Willging, E.M.

    1987-04-01

    The sequential extraction scheme of Tessier partitions metals in sediments into exchangeable, carbonate bound iron-manganese oxide bound, organic bound, and residual binding fractions. Extraction rate experiments using conventional and microwave heating showed that microwave heating produces results comparable to the conventional procedure. Sequential microwave extraction procedures were established from the results of the extraction rate experiments. Recoveries of total metals from NBS SRM 1645 ranged from 76% to 120% for the conventional procedure and 62% to 120% for the microwave procedure. Recoveries of total metals using the microwave and conventional techniques were reasonably comparable except for iron (62% by microwave vs. 76% by conventional). Substitution of an aqua regia/HF extraction for total/residual metals results in essentially complete recovery of metals. Precision obtained from 31 replicate samples of the California Gulch, Colorado, sediment yielded about an average 11% relative standard deviation excluding the exchangeable fraction which was more variable.

  17. Quenching and partitioning response of carbon-manganese-silicon sheet steels containing nickel, molybdenum, aluminum and copper additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahkonen, Joonas

    In order to produce passenger vehicles with improved fuel economy and increased passenger safety, car manufacturers are in need of steels with enhanced strength levels and good formability. Recently, promising combinations of strength and ductility have been reported for several, so-called third generation advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and quenching and partitioning (Q&P) steels are increasingly being recognized as a promising third generation AHSS candidate. Early Q research used conventional TRIP steel chemistries and richer alloying strategies have been explored in more recent studies. However, systematic investigations of the effects of alloying elements on tensile properties and retained austenite fractions of Q&P steels are sparse. The objective of the present research was to investigate the alloying effects of carbon, manganese, molybdenum, aluminum, copper and nickel on tensile properties and microstructural evolution of Q&P heat treated sheet steels. Seven alloys were investigated with 0.3C-1.5Mn-1.5Si (wt pct) and 0.4C-1.5Mn-1.5Si alloys used to study carbon effects, a 0.3C-5Mn-1.6Si alloy to study manganese effects, 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo and 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo-0.85Al alloys to study molybdenum and aluminum effects and 0.2C-1.5Mn-1.3Si-1.5Cu and 0.2C-1.5Mn-1.3Si-1.5Cu-1.5Ni alloys to study copper and nickel effects. Increasing alloy carbon content was observed to mainly increase the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) up to 1865 MPa without significantly affecting total elongation (TE) levels. Increasing alloy carbon content also increased the resulting retained austenite (RA) fractions up to 22 vol pct. Measured maximum RA fractions were significantly lower than the predicted maximum RA levels in the 0.3C-1.5Mn-1.5Si and 0.4C-1.5Mn-1.5Si alloys, likely resulting from transition carbide formation. Increasing alloy manganese content increased UTS, TE and RA levels, and decreased yield strength (YS) and austenite carbon content (Cgamma) levels

  18. Response of zinc, iron and copper status parameters to supplementation with zinc or zinc and iron in women

    SciTech Connect

    Yadrick, K.; Kenney, M.A.; Winterfeldt, E.

    1986-03-05

    Supplementation with zinc at levels available over-the-counter may compromise iron or copper status. This study examined the effects of zinc(50mg/day) or zinc and iron(50 mg each/day) on 18 women aged 25-40. Subjects were matched on initial levels of serum ferritin(SF) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase(ESOD) and randomly assigned to Group Z (zinc) or F-Z (iron and zinc). The following were measured pretreatment and after 6 and 10 weeks treatment: serum zinc (BZ), salivary sediment zinc (SSZ), hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrit (Hct), SF, serum ceruloplasmin (Cp) and ESOD. Effects of treatment and weeks of treatment on changes from initial blood and saliva levels were analyzed using AOV. BZ increased (P=0.0144) and ESOD decreased (P=0.0001) with weeks of treatment. Differences due to treatment are presented. No effects were noted on Hgb, Hct or Cp. Intakes of zinc supplements at about 4X RDA appear to decrease copper(ESOD) and iron(SF) status. Use of iron w/zinc may be protective for FE but not Cu, and may compromise zinc (SSZ) status.

  19. Chemical and structural investigations of the incorporation of metal manganese into ruthenium thin films for use as copper diffusion barrier layers

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, A. P.; Casey, P.; Bogan, J.; Hughes, G.; Lozano, J. G.; Nellist, P. D.

    2012-12-03

    The incorporation of manganese into a 3 nm ruthenium thin-film is presented as a potential mechanism to improve its performance as a copper diffusion barrier. Manganese ({approx}1 nm) was deposited on an atomic layer deposited Ru film, and the Mn/Ru/SiO{sub 2} structure was subsequently thermally annealed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal the chemical interaction of Mn with the SiO{sub 2} substrate to form manganese-silicate (MnSiO{sub 3}), implying the migration of the metal through the Ru film. Electron energy loss spectroscopy line profile measurements of the intensity of the Mn signal across the Ru film confirm the presence of Mn at the Ru/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  20. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC SULFIDE MODIFIED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel organic sulfide modified bimetallic iron-copper nanoparticle aggregate sorbent materials have been synthesized for removing elemental mercury from vapor streams at elevated temperatures (120-140 °C). Silane based (disulfide silane and tetrasulfide silane) and alkyl sulfide ...

  1. Microelectrodes Based investigation of the Impacts of Water Chemistry on Copper and Iron Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of bulk drinking water quality on copper and iron pipe corrosion has been extensively studied. Despite past research, many have argued that bulk water quality does not necessarily reflect water quality near the water-metal interface and that such knowledge is necessary...

  2. The Structure and Properties of Cast Iron Alloyed with Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razumakov, A. A.; Stepanova, N. V.; Bataev, I. A.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Riapolova, Iu Iu; Emurlaev, K. I.

    2016-04-01

    Cast iron with 3 wt. % Cu was prepared by induction melting and casting in sand molds. The structure of the samples was studied using light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The addition of Cu promoted formation of pearlite and slightiy decreased the volume fraction of graphite. No Cu inclusions were found by LM and SEM. The nanoprecipitations of ε-Cu in lamellar pearlite were observed by TEM. The properties of the Cu-alloyed cast iron were compared with the properties of cast iron not alloyed with Cu. The hardness of cast iron after alloying with Cu increased and the friction coefficient decreased in comparison with the reference sample.

  3. Repletion of copper-deficient rats with dietary copper restores duodenal hephaestin protein and iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Philip G; Demars, Lana C S

    2005-05-01

    Copper (Cu) deficiency in rats reduces the relative concentration of duodenal hephaestin (Hp), reduces iron (Fe) absorption, and causes anemia. An experiment was conducted to determine whether these effects could be reversed by dietary Cu repletion. Five groups of eight weanling male rats each were used. Group 1 was fed a Cu-adequate diet (5.0 mg Cu/kg; CuA) and Group 2 was fed a Cu-deficient diet (0.25 mg Cu/kg; CuD) for 28 days. The rats were fed 1.0 g each of their respective diets labeled with 59Fe (37 kBq/g), and the amount of label retained was measured one week later by whole-body-counting (WBC). Group 3 was fed a CuA diet and Groups 4 and 5 were fed a CuD diet for 28 days. Group 5 was then fed the CuA diet for another week while Groups 3 and 4 continued on their previous regimens. Rats in Groups 3, 4, and 5 were fed 1.0 g of diet labeled with 59Fe, and the amount of label retained was measured by WBC one week later. Rats were killed and duodenal enterocytes isolated for Hp protein analysis, whole blood was analyzed for hematological parameters, and various organs for 59Fe content. CuD rats absorbed less (P<0.05) Fe than CuA rats, the relative amount of duodenal Hp was less (P<0.05) in CuD rats, and the CuD rats developed anemia. After the CuD rats had been repleted with Cu for one week, Fe retention rose to values even higher (P<0.05) than those in CuA rats. After two weeks, the relative amount of duodenal Hp was higher (P<0.05) than normal, and most signs of anemia were reversed. Liver 59Fe was elevated in CuD rats, but was restored to normal upon Cu repletion. These findings suggest a strong association between duodenal Hp abundance and Fe absorption in the CuD rat, and that reduced Fe absorption is an important factor in the cause of anemia. PMID:15855298

  4. Replacement of a cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase by a novel cytosolic manganese superoxide dismutase in crustaceans that use copper (haemocyanin) for oxygen transport.

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Marius; Hoexum Brouwer, Thea; Grater, Walter; Brown-Peterson, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, which uses the copper-dependent protein haemocyanin for oxygen transport, lacks the ubiquitous cytosolic copper-dependent enzyme copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD) as evidenced by undetectable levels of Cu,ZnSOD activity, protein and mRNA in the hepatopancreas (the site of haemocyanin synthesis) and gills. Instead, the crab has an unusual cytosolic manganese SOD (cytMnSOD), which is retained in the cytosol, because it lacks a mitochondrial transit peptide. A second familiar MnSOD is present in the mitochondria (mtMnSOD). This unique phenomenon occurs in all Crustacea that use haemocyanin for oxygen transport. Molecular phylogeny analysis suggests the MnSOD gene duplication is as old as the origin of the arthropod phylum. cytMnSOD activity in the hepatopancreas changes during the moulting cycle of the crab. Activity is high in intermoult crabs and non-detectable in postmoult papershell crabs. mtMnSOD is present in all stages of the moulting cycle. Despite the lack of cytCu,ZnSOD, crabs have an extracellular Cu,ZnSOD (ecCu,ZnSOD) that is produced by haemocytes, and is part of a large, approx. 160 kDa, covalently-linked protein complex. ecCu,ZnSOD is absent from the hepatopancreas of intermoult crabs, but appears in this tissue at premoult. However, no ecCu,ZnSOD mRNA can be detected, suggesting that the protein is recruited from the haemolymph. Screening of different taxa of the arthropod phylum for Cu,ZnSOD activity shows that those crustaceans that use haemoglobin for oxygen transport have retained cytCu,ZnSOD. It appears, therefore, that the replacement of cytCu,ZnSOD with cytMnSOD is part of an adaptive response to the dynamic, haemocyanin-linked, fluctuations in copper metabolism that occur during the moulting cycle of the crab. PMID:12769817

  5. MD description of damage production in displacement cascades in copper and α-iron.

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, David J; Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E; Voskoboinikov, Roman E

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulation was applied for an extensive study of primary damage creation in displacement cascades in copper and {alpha}-iron. Primary knock-on atom energy, E{sub p}, of up to 25 keV in copper and 100 keV in iron was considered for irradiation temperatures in the range 100-900 K. Special attention was paid to comprehensive statistical treatment of the number and type of defects created in cascades by conducting multiple simulations for each value of energy and temperature. The total number of point defects per cascade is significantly lower than that predicted by the NRT model and rather similar in the two metals. The fraction of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and vacancies that agglomerate in clusters in the cascade process was analysed in detail. The clustered fraction of SIAs increases with temperature increase and is larger in copper than iron. SIA clusters have a variety of forms in both metals and, although most are glissile clusters of parallel crowdions, a significant fraction are sessile. The latter include Frank dislocation loops in copper. Tightly packed arrangements of vacancies do not form in iron, and so the fraction of clustered vacancies depends strongly on the range within which point defects are defined to be near-neighbours. Arrangements of vacancies in first-neighbour sites are common in copper. Most are irregular stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs). In 53 simulations of cascades with E{sub p} = 25 keV at 100 K, the largest cluster formed contained 89 vacancies. The size spectrum of SFT-like clusters is similar to that found experimentally in neutron-irradiated copper, suggesting that the SFTs observed in experiment are formed directly in the cascade process.

  6. Tunable T1 and T2 contrast abilities of manganese-engineered iron oxide nanoparticles through size control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoming; Li, Hui; Chen, Jiahe; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Yang, Lijiao; Chi, Xiaoqin; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Xiaomin; Gao, Jinhao

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the tunable T1 and T2 contrast abilities of engineered iron oxide nanoparticles with high performance for liver contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mice. To enhance the diagnostic accuracy of MRI, large numbers of contrast agents with T1 or T2 contrast ability have been widely explored. The comprehensive investigation of high-performance MRI contrast agents with controllable T1 and T2 contrast abilities is of high importance in the field of molecular imaging. In this study, we synthesized uniform manganese-doped iron oxide (MnIO) nanoparticles with controllable size from 5 to 12 nm and comprehensively investigated their MRI contrast abilities. We revealed that the MRI contrast effects of MnIO nanoparticles are highly size-dependent. By controlling the size of MnIO nanoparticles, we can achieve T1-dominated, T2-dominated, and T1-T2 dual-mode MRI contrast agents with much higher contrast enhancement than the corresponding conventional iron oxide nanoparticles.In this paper, we demonstrate the tunable T1 and T2 contrast abilities of engineered iron oxide nanoparticles with high performance for liver contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mice. To enhance the diagnostic accuracy of MRI, large numbers of contrast agents with T1 or T2 contrast ability have been widely explored. The comprehensive investigation of high-performance MRI contrast agents with controllable T1 and T2 contrast abilities is of high importance in the field of molecular imaging. In this study, we synthesized uniform manganese-doped iron oxide (MnIO) nanoparticles with controllable size from 5 to 12 nm and comprehensively investigated their MRI contrast abilities. We revealed that the MRI contrast effects of MnIO nanoparticles are highly size-dependent. By controlling the size of MnIO nanoparticles, we can achieve T1-dominated, T2-dominated, and T1-T2 dual-mode MRI contrast agents with much higher contrast enhancement than the

  7. Zinc pyrithione inhibits yeast growth through copper influx and inactivation of iron-sulfur proteins.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Nancy L; Kaplan, Jerry; Xu, Jun; Youngquist, R Scott; Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ping; Juhlin, Kenton D; Schwartz, James R; Grant, Raymond A; Fieno, Angela; Nemeth, Suzanne; Reichling, Tim; Tiesman, Jay P; Mills, Tim; Steinke, Mark; Wang, Shuo L; Saunders, Charles W

    2011-12-01

    Zinc pyrithione (ZPT) is an antimicrobial material with widespread use in antidandruff shampoos and antifouling paints. Despite decades of commercial use, there is little understanding of its antimicrobial mechanism of action. We used a combination of genome-wide approaches (yeast deletion mutants and microarrays) and traditional methods (gene constructs and atomic emission) to characterize the activity of ZPT against a model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ZPT acts through an increase in cellular copper levels that leads to loss of activity of iron-sulfur cluster-containing proteins. ZPT was also found to mediate growth inhibition through an increase in copper in the scalp fungus Malassezia globosa. A model is presented in which pyrithione acts as a copper ionophore, enabling copper to enter cells and distribute across intracellular membranes. This is the first report of a metal-ligand complex that inhibits fungal growth by increasing the cellular level of a different metal. PMID:21947398

  8. Iron mitigates DMT1-mediated manganese cytotoxicity via the ASK1-JNK signaling axis: Implications of iron supplementation for manganese toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Yee Kit; Chew, Katherine C. M.; Tan, Bryce W. Q.; Lim, Kah-Leong; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn2+) neurotoxicity from occupational exposure is well documented to result in a Parkinson-like syndrome. Although the understanding of Mn2+ cytotoxicity is still incomplete, both Mn2+ and Fe2+ can be transported via the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), suggesting that competitive uptake might disrupt Fe2+ homeostasis. Here, we found that DMT1 overexpression significantly enhanced Mn2+ cytoplasmic accumulation and JNK phosphorylation, leading to a reduction in cell viability. Although a robust activation of autophagy was observed alongside these changes, it did not trigger autophagic cell death, but was instead shown to be essential for the degradation of ferritin, which normally sequesters labile Fe2+. Inhibition of ferritin degradation through the neutralization of lysosomal pH resulted in increased ferritin and enhanced cytoplasmic Fe2+ depletion. Similarly, direct Fe2+ chelation also resulted in aggravated Mn2+-mediated JNK phosphorylation, while Fe2+ repletion protected cells, and this occurs via the ASK1-thioredoxin pathway. Taken together, our study presents the novel findings that Mn2+ cytotoxicity involves the depletion of the cytoplasmic Fe2+ pool, and the increase in autophagy-lysosome activity is important to maintain Fe2+ homeostasis. Thus, Fe2+ supplementation could have potential applications in the prevention and treatment of Mn2+-mediated toxicity. PMID:26878799

  9. Iron mitigates DMT1-mediated manganese cytotoxicity via the ASK1-JNK signaling axis: Implications of iron supplementation for manganese toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yee Kit; Chew, Katherine C M; Tan, Bryce W Q; Lim, Kah-Leong; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn(2+)) neurotoxicity from occupational exposure is well documented to result in a Parkinson-like syndrome. Although the understanding of Mn(2+) cytotoxicity is still incomplete, both Mn(2+) and Fe(2+) can be transported via the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), suggesting that competitive uptake might disrupt Fe(2+) homeostasis. Here, we found that DMT1 overexpression significantly enhanced Mn(2+) cytoplasmic accumulation and JNK phosphorylation, leading to a reduction in cell viability. Although a robust activation of autophagy was observed alongside these changes, it did not trigger autophagic cell death, but was instead shown to be essential for the degradation of ferritin, which normally sequesters labile Fe(2+). Inhibition of ferritin degradation through the neutralization of lysosomal pH resulted in increased ferritin and enhanced cytoplasmic Fe(2+) depletion. Similarly, direct Fe(2+) chelation also resulted in aggravated Mn(2+)-mediated JNK phosphorylation, while Fe(2+) repletion protected cells, and this occurs via the ASK1-thioredoxin pathway. Taken together, our study presents the novel findings that Mn(2+) cytotoxicity involves the depletion of the cytoplasmic Fe(2+) pool, and the increase in autophagy-lysosome activity is important to maintain Fe(2+) homeostasis. Thus, Fe(2+) supplementation could have potential applications in the prevention and treatment of Mn(2+)-mediated toxicity. PMID:26878799

  10. Effects of dietary carbohydrate on iron metabolism and cytochrome oxidase activity in copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.A.; Henderson, J.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of dietary carbohydrate on the metabolism of iron and the activity of cytochrome oxidase were examined in Cu-deficient and Cu-adequate rats. Male rats (n = 36) were fed one of six diets which varied in copper level (Cu-: < 0.6 ppm or Cu+: 8.2 ppm) and carbohydrate type (cornstarch, sucrose or fructose). After 31 days, Cu- rats had 50% more iron in the liver and 38, 30 and 18% less iron in the tibia, spleen and kidneys, respectively, than Cu+ rats. The activity of cytochrome oxidase in the bone marrow, heart, and liver were 59%, 51%, and 43%, respectively, of the levels in Cu/sup +/ rats. The type of dietary carbohydrate significantly affected the development of anemia during copper deficiency. Cu-rats fed cornstarch, sucrose or fructose had hematocrit levels which were 92, 83 or 73%, respectively, of Cu+ rats. Similarly, the levels of iron in the tibias of Cu- rats fed cornstarch, sucrose or fructose were 69, 66 or 54%, respectively, of Cu+ rats. The hematocrit levels of Cu- rats were positively correlated to both tibia iron levels (r = 0.64, p < 0.005) and liver cytochrome oxidase activities (r = 0.50, p < 0.05). Thus, it appears that changes in the metabolism of iron may be involved with the development of anemia in Cu- rats fed fructose or sucrose.

  11. Effect of space flight on sodium, copper, manganese and magnesium content in the skeletal bones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokhonchukov, A. A.; Taitsev, V. P.; Shakhunov, B. A.; Zhizhina, V. A.; Kolesnik, A. G.; Komissarova, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium content decreased in the human skeletal bones and rose in the rat bones following space flight. In man copper content rose in the femoral bone and decreased in the vertebral body and the sternum, but was unchanged in the rest of the bones. Magnesium content was decreased in the femoral bone and the sternum, and in the vertebrae, but remained unchanged in the rest of the bones. Possible mechanisms of the changes detected are discussed.

  12. Regulation of copper and iron homeostasis by metal chelators: a possible chemotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Robert, Anne; Liu, Yan; Nguyen, Michel; Meunier, Bernard

    2015-05-19

    With the increase of life expectancy of humans in more than two-thirds of the countries in the World, aging diseases are becoming the frontline health problems. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is now one of the major challenges in drug discovery, since, with the exception of memantine in 2003, all clinical trials with drug candidates failed over the past decade. If we consider that the loss of neurons is due to a high level of oxidative stress produced by nonregulated redox active metal ions like copper linked to amyloids of different sizes, regulation of metal homeostasis is a key target. The difficulty for large copper-carrier proteins to directly extract copper ions from metalated amyloids might be considered as being at the origin of the rupture of the copper homeostasis regulation in AD brains. So, there is an urgent need for new specific metal chelators that should be able to regulate the homeostasis of metal ions, specially copper and iron, in AD brains. As a consequence of that concept, chelators promoting metal excretion from brain are not desired. One should favor ligands able to extract copper ions from sinks (amyloids being the major one) and to transfer these redox-active metal ions to copper-carrier proteins or copper-containing enzymes. Obviously, the affinity of these chelators for the metal ion should not be a sufficient criterion, but the metal specificity and the ability of the chelators to release the metal under specific biological conditions should be considered. Such an approach is still largely unexplored. The requirements for the chelators are very high (ability to cross the brain-blood barrier, lack of toxicity, etc.), few chemical series were proposed, and, among them, biochemical or biological data are scarce. As a matter of fact, the bioinorganic pharmacology of AD represents less than 1% of all articles dedicated to AD drug research. The major part of these articles deals with an old and rather toxic drug, clioquinol and related analogs, that

  13. Analytical use of the selective extraction of copper as its phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    Adam, J; Pribil, R

    1972-10-01

    Chloroform solution of phenylacetic add has been found very suitable for extraction and colorimetric determination of copper. Iron and uranium are the main interferences, which can be overcome by masking with ammonium fluoridc. Under these conditions, only gold(III), platinum(IV) and palladium(II) are co-extracted, but their colour does not interfere with measurement of the green copper extract at 700 nm. The method has been applied to the determination of copper in iron, steels, uranium, lead concentrates and alloys containing nickel, cobalt, etc. The extraction procedure can also be used to remove interference of iron, copper and uranium in the determination of manganese with formaldoxime. PMID:18961161

  14. Nanoparticles of zinc sulfide doped with manganese, nickel and copper as nanophotocatalyst in the degradation of organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Pouretedal, Hamid Reza; Norozi, Abbas; Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Semnani, Abolfazl

    2009-03-15

    Nanoparticles of zinc sulfide as undoped and doped with manganese, nickel and copper were used as photocatalyst in the photodegradation of methylene blue and safranin as color pollutants. Photoreactivity of doped zinc sulfide was varied with dopant, mole fraction of dopant to zinc ion, pH of solution, dosage of photocatalyst and concentration of dye. The characterization of nanoparticles was studied using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns and UV-vis spectra. The maximum degradation efficiency was obtained in the presence of Zn(0.98)Mn(0.02)S, Zn(0.94)Ni(0.06)S and Zn(0.90)Cu(0.10)S as nanophotocatalyst. The effect of dosage of photocatalyst was studied in the range of 20-250 mg/L. It was seen that 150.0 mg/L of photocatacyst is an optimum value for the dosage of photocatalyst. The most degradation efficiency was obtained in alkaline pH of 11.0 with study of photodegradation in pH amplitude of 2-12. The degradation efficiency was decreased in dye concentrations above of 5.0 mg/L for methylene blue and safranin dyes. In the best conditions, the degradation efficiency was obtained 87.3-95.6 and 85.4-93.2 for methylene blue and safranin, respectively. PMID:18603365

  15. Effect of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy on Brain Iron, Copper, and Zinc in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schrag, Matthew; Crofton, Andrew; Zabel, Matthew; Jiffry, Arshad; Kirsch, David; Dickson, April; Mao, Xiao Wen; Vinters, Harry V.; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Kirsch, Wolff

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a vascular lesion associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) present in up to 95% of AD patients and produces MRI-detectable microbleeds in many of these patients. It is possible that CAA-related microbleeding is a source of pathological iron in the AD brain. Because the homeostasis of copper, iron, and zinc are so intimately linked, we determined whether CAA contributes to changes in the brain levels of these metals. We obtained brain tissue from AD patients with severe CAA to compare to AD patients without evidence of vascular amyloid-β. Patients with severe CAA had significantly higher non-heme iron levels. Histologically, iron was deposited in the walls of large CAA-affected vessels. Zinc levels were significantly elevated in grey matter in both the CAA and non-CAA AD tissue, but no vascular staining was noted in CAA cases. Copper levels were decreased in both CAA and non-CAA AD tissues and copper was found to be prominently deposited on the vasculature in CAA. Together, these findings demonstrate that CAA is a significant variable affecting transition metals in AD. PMID:21187585

  16. Effects of iron and copper overload on the human liver: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Fanni, D; Fanos, V; Gerosa, C; Piras, M; Dessi, A; Atzei, A; Van, Eyken P; Gibo, Y; Faa, G

    2014-01-01

    Iron and copper ions play important roles in many physiological functions of our body, even though the exact mechanisms regulating their absorption, distribution and excretion are not fully understood. Metal-related human pathology may be observed in two different clinical settings: deficiency or overload. The overload in liver cells of both trace elements leads to multiple cellular lesions. Here we report the main pathological changes observed at transmission electron microscopy in the liver of subjects affected by Beta-thalassemia and by Wilson's disease. The hepatic iron overload in beta-thalassemia patients is associated with haemosiderin storage both in Kupffer cells and in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes. Haemosiderin granules are grouped inside voluminous lysosomes, also called siderosomes. Other ultrastructural changes are fat droplets, proliferation of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and fibrosis. Apoptosis of hepatocytes and infiltration of sinusoids by polymorphonucleates is also detected in beta-thalassemia. Ultrastructural changes in liver biopsies from Wilson's disease patients are characterized by severe mitochondrial changes, associated with an increased number of perossisomes, cytoplasmic lipid droplets and the presence of lipolysosomes, characteristic cytoplasmic bodies formed by lipid vacuoles surrounded by electron-dense lysosomes. In patients affected by Wilson's disease, nuclei are frequently involved, with disorganization of the nucleoplasm and with glycogen inclusions. On the contrary, no significant changes are detected in Kupffer cells. Our data show that iron and copper, even though are both transition metals, are responsible of different pathological changes at ultrastructural level. In particular, copper overload is associated with mitochondrial damage, whereas iron overload only rarely may cause severe mitochondrial changes. These differences underlay the need for further studies in which biochemical analyses should be associated with

  17. Fabrication of a nanocomposite from in situ iron nanoparticle reinforced copper alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zidong; Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Qiangsong; Shih, I; Xu, J J

    2009-02-18

    In situ iron nanoparticle reinforced Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy has been fabricated by centrifugal casting in a vacuum chamber with a medium frequency electrical furnace. The microstructure of this alloy was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the results show that the grains of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy without iron have a typical dendrite structure with dimensions from 500 to 1500 microm, and the grains of the alloy with the addition of 1% iron are small and equiaxed, with dimensions from 20 to 60 microm. Then, the relatively uniform dispersed particles in the copper matrix were identified with the HRTEM to be pure iron with dimensions in the order of 2-20 nm. The mechanical properties of the alloys were measured and the results show a significant increase in the tensile strength of the alloy with iron nanoparticles and a slight increase of the elongation compared to that without iron. The mechanism of formation of the iron nanoparticles was analyzed by thermodynamic and dynamic theories, and the results indicate that the in situ iron nanoparticles of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy can reasonably form during solidification in the centrifugal casting technique. PMID:19417426

  18. Fabrication of a nanocomposite from in situ iron nanoparticle reinforced copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zidong; Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Qiangsong; Shih, I.; Xu, J. J.

    2009-02-01

    In situ iron nanoparticle reinforced Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy has been fabricated by centrifugal casting in a vacuum chamber with a medium frequency electrical furnace. The microstructure of this alloy was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the results show that the grains of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy without iron have a typical dendrite structure with dimensions from 500 to 1500 µm, and the grains of the alloy with the addition of 1% iron are small and equiaxed, with dimensions from 20 to 60 µm. Then, the relatively uniform dispersed particles in the copper matrix were identified with the HRTEM to be pure iron with dimensions in the order of 2-20 nm. The mechanical properties of the alloys were measured and the results show a significant increase in the tensile strength of the alloy with iron nanoparticles and a slight increase of the elongation compared to that without iron. The mechanism of formation of the iron nanoparticles was analyzed by thermodynamic and dynamic theories, and the results indicate that the in situ iron nanoparticles of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy can reasonably form during solidification in the centrifugal casting technique.

  19. Copper, nickel, and iron in plumage of three upland gamebird species from non-contaminated environments

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.H.

    1985-12-01

    High levels of atmospheric contamination and particulate fallout characterizing the Industrial Basin of the copper-nickel smelting operations at Sudbury, Ontario, were shown to be reflected in the feather chemistry of resident ruffed grouse populations. Of considerable concern, however, is the paucity of information on background concentrations of elemental metals that could be considered normal for non-contaminated environments. The present report examines concentrations of copper, nickel and iron in the plumage of three tetraonid species collected from remote and undisturbed areas in Northern Ontario and Quebec.

  20. Nanostructures design by plasma afterglow-assisted oxidation of iron-copper thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, A.; Boileau, A.; Gries, T.; Ghanbaja, J.; Mangin, D.; Hussein, K.; Sezen, H.; Amati, M.; Belmonte, T.

    2016-05-01

    Oxidizing thin films made of Fe-Cu alloy with an Ar-O2 micro-afterglow operated at atmospheric pressure shows remarkable growth processes. The presence of iron in copper up to about 50% leads to the synthesis of CuO nanostructures (nanowalls, nanotowers and nanowires). Nanotowers show the presence of an amorphous phase trapped between crystalline domains. Beyond 50%, Fe2O3 iron nanoblades are also found. CuO nanowires as small as 5 nm in diameter can be synthesized. Thanks to the presence of patterned domains induced by buckling, it was possible to show that the stress level decreases when the iron content in the alloy increases. Iron blades grow from the inner Fe2O3 layer through the overlying CuO if it is thin enough.

  1. Relation between anemia and blood levels of lead, copper, zinc and iron among children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anemia is a health problem among infants and children. It is often associated with a decrease in some trace elements (iron, zinc, copper) and an increase in heavy metals as lead. This study was done to determine the association of blood lead level > 10 μg/dl, with the increased risk to anemia, also, to investigate the relationship between anemia and changes in blood iron, zinc and copper levels, and measure lead level in drinking water. The study is a cross-sectional performed on 60 children. Venous blood samples were taken from the studied population for estimating hematological parameters as well as iron and ferritin levels. The concentrations of zinc, copper, and lead were measured. The studied population was divided into anemic and non-anemic (control) groups. The anemic group was further classified into mild, moderate and severe anemia. The study subjects were also categorized into low and high blood lead level groups. Findings Approximately 63.33% of children had blood lead levels ≥ 10 μg/dl. At the blood lead level range of 10-20 μg/dl, a significant association was found for mild and severe anemia. The blood level of iron and ferritin was found to be significantly lower in high blood lead level and anemic groups than those of the low blood lead level and control groups. Lead level in drinking water was higher than the permissible limit. Conclusion Lead level ≥ 10 μg/dl was significantly associated with anemia, decreased iron absorption and hematological parameters affection. High blood lead levels were associated with low serum iron and ferritin. Lead level in drinking water was found to be higher than the permissible limits. PMID:20459857

  2. Deoxidation Equilibria of Manganese, Silicon, and Aluminum in Iron-Nickel-Chromium Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashevskii, Viktor; Aleksandrov, Aleksandr; Kanevskii, Akim; Leont'ev, Leopold

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen solution in Fe-Ni-Cr melts containing manganese, silicon, and aluminum has been thermodynamically analyzed and experimentally studied at 1873 K (1600 °C). The Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr and Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr compositions were studied as examples of the most frequently used alloys. Manganese is not a deoxidizer in these alloys, since manganese and chromium have similar affinities for oxygen. At low contents, silicon is also not a deoxidizer. However, above 0.358 pct for the Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr alloy and 0.261 pct for the Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr alloy, silicon decreases the oxygen concentration in the melts. Aluminum is an effective deoxidizer in the Fe-Ni-Cr melts. It decreases the oxygen concentration when its content is higher than 2.914 × 10-4 pct in the Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr alloy and 2.109 × 10-3 pct in the Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr alloy. Minimum oxygen concentrations are observed at aluminum contents of about 0.24 pct in the Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr alloy and at about 0.23 pct in the Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr alloy. The combined deoxidation of Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr and Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr alloys with silicon and manganese and also with aluminum and silicon was studied. The lower oxygen concentrations were reached as a result of complex deoxidation in comparison with the cases when deoxidized separately by each element at the same concentration levels.

  3. The influence of selected antihypertensive drugs on zinc, copper, and iron status in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Suliburska, Joanna; Bogdanski, Paweł; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2014-09-01

    Mineral homeostasis in hypertensive patients may be affected by hypotensive drugs. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of selected antihypertensive drugs on mineral homeostasis in a rat model of hypertension. Eight-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were treated with perindopril, metoprolol, indapamide, amlodipine, or no drug for 45 days. In another experiment, the SHRs were treated with indapamide or amlodipine in the presence of zinc and copper gluconate supplement. Lipids, glucose, and insulin levels along with superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were assayed in serum. Iron, zinc, and copper concentrations in serum, erythrocytes, and tissues were determined using the flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Blood pressure was measured using a tail-cuff plethysmograph. Treatment with indapamide and amlodipine was found to significantly lower zinc levels in serum, erythrocytes, livers, and spleens of the SHRs, as well as copper levels in the kidneys, compared with the control no-drug group. A markedly higher concentration of glucose was found in the indapamide-treated rats. Supplementing the indapamide-treated SHRs with zinc and copper gluconate resulted in a significant decrease in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and also lowered serum glucose and triglyceride concentrations and HOMA (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance) values. The results show that indapamide and amlodipine disturb zinc and copper homeostasis in SHRs. Supplementation with zinc and copper restores mineral homeostasis in SHRs treated with indapamide and amlodipine, and also corrects metabolic imbalances while improving the antihypertensive efficiency of indapamide. PMID:24927993

  4. Direct Functionalization of (Un)protected Tetrahydroisoquinoline and Isochroman under Iron and Copper Catalysis: Two Metals, Two Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A highly facile, straightforward synthesis of 1-(3-indolyl)-tetrahydroisoquinolines was developed using either simple copper or iron catalysts. N-protected and unprotected tetrahydroisoquinolines (THIQ) could be used as starting materials. Extension of the substrate scope of the pronucleophile from indoles to pyrroles and electron-rich arenes was realized. Additionally, methoxyphenylation is not limited to THIQ but can be carried out on isochroman as well, again employing iron and copper catalysis. PMID:21902275

  5. Thermal chemistry of Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10} during deposition of thin manganese films on silicon oxide and on copper surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Xiangdong; Sun Huaxing; Zaera, Francisco

    2012-01-15

    The surface chemistry of dimanganese decacarbonyl on the native oxide of Si(100) wafers was characterized with the aid of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Initial experiments in a small stainless-steel reactor identified a narrow range of temperatures, between approximately 445 and 465 K, in which the deposition of manganese could be achieved in a self-limiting fashion, as is desirable for atomic layer deposition. Deposition at higher temperatures leads to multilayer growth, but the extent of this Mn deposition reverses at even higher temperatures (about 625 K), and also ifhydrogen is added to the reaction mixture. Extensive decarbonylation takes place below room temperature, but limited C-O bond dissociation and carbon deposition are still seen after high exposures at 625 K. The films deposited at low ({approx}450 K) temperatures are mostly in the form of MnO, but at 625 K that converts to a manganese silicate, and upon higher doses a manganese silicide forms at the SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) interface as well. No metallic manganese could be deposited with this precursor on either silicon dioxide or copper surfaces.

  6. Serum ceruloplasmin protein expression and activity increases in iron-deficient rats and is further enhanced by higher dietary copper intake

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Perungavur N.; Lu, Yan; Jiang, Lingli; Kim, Changae

    2011-01-01

    Increases in serum and liver copper content are noted during iron deficiency in mammals, suggesting that copper-dependent processes participate during iron deprivation. One point of intersection between the 2 metals is the liver-derived, multicopper ferroxidase ceruloplasmin (Cp) that is important for iron release from certain tissues. The current study sought to explore Cp expression and activity during physiologic states in which hepatic copper loading occurs (eg, iron deficiency). Weanling rats were fed control or low iron diets containing low, normal, or high copper for ∼ 5 weeks, and parameters of iron homeostasis were measured. Liver copper increased in control and iron-deficient rats fed extra copper. Hepatic Cp mRNA levels did not change; however, serum Cp protein was higher during iron deprivation and with higher copper consumption. In-gel and spectrophotometric ferroxidase and amine oxidase assays demonstrated that Cp activity was enhanced when hepatic copper loading occurred. Interestingly, liver copper levels strongly correlated with Cp protein expression and activity. These observations support the possibility that liver copper loading increases metallation of the Cp protein, leading to increased production of the holo enzyme. Moreover, this phenomenon may play an important role in the compensatory response to maintain iron homeostasis during iron deficiency. PMID:21768302

  7. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics of trivalent oxides of iron and manganese

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    2002-01-01

    A new method for combining elemental iron and other metals to form an inexpensive ceramic to stabilize arsenic, alkaline red mud wastes, swarfs, and other iron or metal-based additives, to create products and waste forms which can be poured or dye cast.

  8. Ion-exchanger colorimetry-I Micro determination of chromium, iron, copper and cobalt in water.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, K; Waki, H; Ohashi, S

    1976-06-01

    A new sensitive, colorimetric method based on the direct measurement of light-absorption by an ion-exchange resin phase, which has sorbed the sample complex species, has been developed. Determinations ofchromium(VI) with diphenylearbazide, iron(II) with 1,10-phenanthroline, copper with Zincon and cobalt with thiocyanate have more than ten times the sensitivity obtainable with conventional solution colorimetry. The present method can be applied to natural water samples containing very low levels of these metals. PMID:18961894

  9. Spin-density-wave magnetism in dilute copper-manganese alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lamelas, F.J.; Werner, S.A.; Shapiro, S.M.; Mydosh, J.A.

    1995-02-01

    Elastic neutron-scattering measurements on two samples of Cu alloyed with 1.3% Mn and 0.55% Mn show that the spin-density-wave (SDW) features found in more concentrated alloys persist in the limit of very dilute alloys. These features consist of temperature-dependent incommensurate peaks in magnetic neutron scattering, with positions and strengths which are fully consistent with those in the concentrated alloys. The implications of these measurements are twofold. First, it is clear from this data that SDW magnetic ordering occurs across the entire range of CuMn alloys which have typically been interpreted as spin glasses. Second, the more fundamental significance of this work is the suggestion via extrapolation that a peak in the magnetic susceptibility x(q) occurs in pure copper, at a value of q given by the Fermi-surface diameter 2k{sub F}.

  10. Toxicological characterization of bio-active drugs on basis of Iron Fe, Co, and Copper Cu nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishuk, S.; Nazarova, A.; Stepanova, I.

    2015-11-01

    The article presents investigations of toxicological parameters (acute and chronic toxicity, cumulative coefficient) of iron, cobalt, copper and copper oxide nanoparticles with white rats in labs. We have estimated the optimal concentrations of the above mentioned substances with rabbits. We have also studied morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters of the animals when adding the optimal doses to the diet for a long term.

  11. Protein-folding location can regulate manganese-binding versus copper- or zinc-binding.

    PubMed

    Tottey, Steve; Waldron, Kevin J; Firbank, Susan J; Reale, Brian; Bessant, Conrad; Sato, Katsuko; Cheek, Timothy R; Gray, Joe; Banfield, Mark J; Dennison, Christopher; Robinson, Nigel J

    2008-10-23

    Metals are needed by at least one-quarter of all proteins. Although metallochaperones insert the correct metal into some proteins, they have not been found for the vast majority, and the view is that most metalloproteins acquire their metals directly from cellular pools. However, some metals form more stable complexes with proteins than do others. For instance, as described in the Irving-Williams series, Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) typically form more stable complexes than Mn(2+). Thus it is unclear what cellular mechanisms manage metal acquisition by most nascent proteins. To investigate this question, we identified the most abundant Cu(2+)-protein, CucA (Cu(2+)-cupin A), and the most abundant Mn(2+)-protein, MncA (Mn(2+)-cupin A), in the periplasm of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Each of these newly identified proteins binds its respective metal via identical ligands within a cupin fold. Consistent with the Irving-Williams series, MncA only binds Mn(2+) after folding in solutions containing at least a 10(4) times molar excess of Mn(2+) over Cu(2+) or Zn(2+). However once MncA has bound Mn(2+), the metal does not exchange with Cu(2+). MncA and CucA have signal peptides for different export pathways into the periplasm, Tat and Sec respectively. Export by the Tat pathway allows MncA to fold in the cytoplasm, which contains only tightly bound copper or Zn(2+) (refs 10-12) but micromolar Mn(2+) (ref. 13). In contrast, CucA folds in the periplasm to acquire Cu(2+). These results reveal a mechanism whereby the compartment in which a protein folds overrides its binding preference to control its metal content. They explain why the cytoplasm must contain only tightly bound and buffered copper and Zn(2+). PMID:18948958

  12. Effects of Copper and Malleablizing Time on Mechanical Properties of Austempered Malleable Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsun; Lu, Jung-Kai; Chen, Fan-Shiong

    2007-10-01

    In this study, both the unalloyed and 1 wt pct copper alloyed white irons were successively treated with a duplex heating process consisting of malleablizing and austempering, and then the effects of copper and processing variables on microstructure and mechanical properties of the austempered malleable iron (AMI) were investigated. The results showed that AMI could effectively shorten malleablizing time to obtain the constituents of irregular graphite, acicular ferrite, and retained austenite in the microstructure. Moreover, 1 pct Cu-AMI had a higher retained austenite content than unalloyed AMI. This is because copper is an austenite stabilizer and acts to delay the start of the transformation into ausferrite. In the case of mechanical properties, AMI increased tensile strength (1083 to 1190 MPa) and impact toughness (16 to 22 J) by 2 to 3 times after 930 °C 20 hours malleablizing treatment as compared to as-cast (572 to 580 MPa and 5 to 6 J). In particular, 1 pct Cu-AMI had better performance than unalloyed AMI except for hardness. In comparison with conventional malleable irons, AMI was found to possess better tensile and impact properties.

  13. Influence of orange juice in the levels and in the genotoxicity of iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Franke, Silvia Isabel Rech; Prá, Daniel; Giulian, Raquel; Dias, Johnny Ferraz; Yoneama, Maria Lúcia; da Silva, Juliana; Erdtmann, Bernardo; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2006-03-01

    World consumption of natural juices is increasing as a consequence of the human search for a healthier life. The juice production industry, especially for orange juice, is expanding in several countries and particularly in Brazil. Despite scientific data reporting beneficial properties derived from juice consumption, some components of juices have been identified as mutagenic or carcinogenic. Carcinogenic or genotoxic effects may be mediated by the interaction of juice components with transition metals or by sub-products of juice auto-oxidation. In this study, the mutagenic potential of orange juice and two metallic agents used in dietary supplementation, FeSO(4) and CuSO(4), were investigated using the comet assay in mouse blood cells (in vivo). Both metal compounds were genotoxic for eukaryotic cells after 24h treatment at the doses used. Significant damage repair was observed after 48h of treatment with the same compounds. Orange juice had a modulating effect on the action of metallic sulfates. In the case of iron treatment, the presence of the orange juice had a preventive, but not restorative, effect. On the other hand, in the case of copper treatment, the effects were both preventive and restorative. PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) analysis indicated a positive correlation between DNA damage and the hepatic levels of iron and a negative correlation between whole blood copper and DNA damage. A negative correlation between hepatic iron and whole blood copper content was also seen in the treatment with both ferrous and cupric sulfates. PMID:16263202

  14. Nickel, manganese and copper removal by a mixed consortium of sulfate reducing bacteria at a high COD/sulfate ratio.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, L P; Costa, P F; Bertolino, S M; Silva, J C C; Guerra-Sá, R; Leão, V A; Teixeira, M C

    2014-08-01

    The use of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in passive treatments of acidic effluents containing heavy metals has become an attractive alternative biotechnology. Treatment efficiency may be linked with the effluent conditions (pH and metal concentration) and also to the amount and nature of the organic substrate. Variations on organic substrate and sulfate ratios clearly interfere with the biological removal of this ion by mixed cultures of SRB. This study aimed to cultivate a mixed culture of SRB using different lactate concentrations at pH 7.0 in the presence of Ni, Mn and Cu. The highest sulfate removal efficiency obtained was 98 %, at a COD/sulfate ratio of 2.0. The organic acid analyses indicated an acetate accumulation as a consequence of lactate degradation. Different concentrations of metals were added to the system at neutral pH conditions. Cell proliferation and sulfate consumption in the presence of nickel (4, 20 and 50 mg l(-1)), manganese (1.5, 10 and 25 mg l(-1)) and copper (1.5, 10 and 25 mg l(-1)) were measured. The presence of metals interfered in the sulfate biological removal however the concentration of sulfide produced was high enough to remove over 90 % of the metals in the environment. The molecular characterization of the bacterial consortium based on dsrB gene sequencing indicated the presence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfomonas pigra and Desulfobulbus sp. The results here presented indicate that this SRB culture may be employed for mine effluent bioremediation due to its potential for removing sulfate and metals, simultaneously. PMID:24710619

  15. Concentrations of strontium, barium, cadmium, copper, zinc, manganese, chromium, antimony, selenium and lead in the equine liver and kidneys.

    PubMed

    Paßlack, Nadine; Mainzer, Barbara; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, Monika; Schafft, Helmut; Palavinskas, Richard; Breithaupt, Angele; Neumann, Konrad; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of specific elements in the equine liver and kidneys are of practical relevance since horses are not only food-producing animals, but also partially serve as an indicator for the environmental pollution, as the basic feed includes plants like grass, grain and fruits. In this study, the concentrations of strontium (Sr), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb), selenium (Se) and lead (Pb) were measured in the liver, renal cortex and renal medulla of 21 horses (8 male; 13 female; aged between 5 months-28 years), using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Comparable Cu and Zn concentrations were detected in the liver and renal cortex, while approximately 50% lower concentrations were measured in the renal medulla. The lowest Sr, Cd and Se, but the highest Mn, Sb and Pb concentrations were measured in the liver. The Ba concentrations were comparable in the renal cortex and medulla, but lower in the liver of the horses. Gender-related differences were observed for Cd, Mn and Cr, with higher Cd concentrations in the liver, but lower Mn concentrations in the renal cortex and lower Cr concentrations in the renal medulla of female horses. Age-related differences were detected for most measured elements, however, the animal number per age-group was only low. In conclusion, the present study provides important reference data for the storage of Sr, Ba, Cd, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr, Sb, Se and Pb in the liver and kidneys of horses, which are of practical relevance for an evaluation of the exposure of horses to these elements, either via feed or the environment. PMID:25061551

  16. Liver and kidney concentrations of strontium, barium, cadmium, copper, zinc, manganese, chromium, antimony, selenium and lead in cats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to provide new knowledge on the storage of strontium (Sr), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb), selenium (Se) and lead (Pb) in the feline organism, we measured the concentrations of these elements in the liver, renal cortex and renal medulla, evaluating also the impact of age, sex or the occurrence of a chronic kidney disease (CKD). The element concentrations in the tissues of 47 cats (22 male; 25 female; aged between 2 months and 18 years) were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results Cu, Zn and Mn were the highest in the liver, followed by the renal cortex and the renal medulla. The Cd concentrations were lower in the renal medulla compared to the renal cortex and the liver, and Sr was higher in the renal medulla compared to the liver. The Se concentrations in the cortex of the kidneys were higher than in the medulla of the kidneys and in the liver. Higher Cd concentrations were measured in the renal cortex of female cats, while no further gender-related differences were observed. Except for Cr, Sb and Se, age-dependencies were detected for the storage of all elements. The occurrence of a CKD also affected the storage of the elements, with lower concentrations of Ba (renal medulla), Zn (renal cortex; renal medulla) and Mn (liver; renal medulla), but higher Cd concentrations (liver; renal cortex) in diseased cats. Conclusions In conclusion, the present results provide new information on the accumulation of specific elements in the feline liver and kidneys, demonstrating a dependency on age and an impaired kidney function, but not on the sex of the animals. PMID:25030305

  17. Characterization of vanadium, manganese and iron model clusters by vibrational and optical spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wenbin

    1999-12-01

    The active ferryl intermediates in the catalytic cycles of heme proteins are subject to interactions from the proximal and distal amino acid residues which control their activities and affect the ν(FeIVO) frequency. The effects of sixth axial ligation, hydrogen bonding, and solvent induced polarization on the resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferryl porphyrin analogs, vanadyl (VIVO) porphyrins and their π-cation radicals, are characterized. ν(VIVO) stretching bands for (VO)TMPyP and (VO)PPIX are observed to be sensitive to the pH value of the aqueous solutions, and reveal a number of coexisting 5-coordinate (c) and 6- c vanadyl porphyrins in solution. Moreover, the ν(VIVO) bands for (VO)TMP and (VO)TPP porphyrins upshift to higher frequencies with the formation of their π-cation radicals, in agreement with that of the (VO)OEP radical. For both a1u (OEP) and a2u (TPP, TMP) type radicals, an increased positive charge on the porphyrin reduces the porphyrin --> vanadium electron donation, but enhances the oxo --> V donation. The UV-Vis absorption and RR spectroscopic studies on a series of oxo-bridged vanadium(III) and manganese (III, IV) complexes established spectrostructural correlations that are useful as monitors of the structure of vanadium(III) and manganese(III, IV) centers in biological systems. The linear and bent V-O-V dimers display distinctive RR and absorption spectra. The linear V-O-V bridge displays an intense μ-O --> V charge transfer (CT) absorption band and a strongly enhanced symmetric (νs) or antisymmetric (νas) V-O-V stretching band in RR spectra, depending upon terminal ligands. In contrast, the bent bridge shows two μ-O --> V CT bands and both νs and νas V- O-V stretches are observed in RR spectra. These νs and νas vibrations are used to indicate that the vanadium(III) oxo-bridged dimer intercalates with DNA. The Mn-O-Mn vibrational frequencies in the 400-700 cm -1 region of the oxo-bridged manganese(III, IV) dimers, trimers, and

  18. In situ laser Raman spectra of iron phthalocyanine adsorbed on copper and gold electrodes. [Electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Melendres, C.A.; Rios, C.B.; Feng, X.; McMasters, R.

    1983-01-01

    Raman spectra of iron phthalocyanine (FePc) and its tetrasulfonated derivative (FeTSPc) adsorbed on copper and gold electrodes have been observed in situ in 0.05 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solution. Results confirm the authors previous finding on the coordination of FePc to water molecules to solution. Evidence suggests that the iron phthalocyanines are probably oriented with their planes parallel to the electrode surface even in immersed electrodes. A decrease in intensity and broadening of some vibrational bands are observed on increasing cathodic polarization; these are attributed to a lifting of the degeneracy of the vibrational modes due to a change in symmetry of the adsorbed molecules brought about by polarization induced by the double-layer field. The effect of carbon on the Raman spectra is discussed. The iron phthalocyanines appear to be stable at potentials close to hydrogen evolution in the absence of oxygen. 18 references, 8 figures.

  19. In situ laser Raman spectra of iron phthalocyanine adsorbed on copper and gold electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Melendres, C.A.; Rios, C.B.; Feng, X.; McMasters, R.

    1983-09-01

    Raman spectra of iron phthalocyanine (FePc) and its tetrasulfonated derivative (FeTSPc) adsorbed on copper and gold electrodes have been observed in situ in 0.05 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solution. Results confirm our previous finding on the coordination of FePc to water molecules to solution. Evidence suggests that the iron phthalocyanines are probably oriented with their planes parallel to the electrode surface even in immersed electrodes. A decrease in intensity and broadening of some vibrational bands are observed on increasing cathodic polarization; these are attributed to a lifting of the degeneracy of the vibrational modes due to a change in symmetry of the adsorbed molecules brought about by polarization induced by the double-layer field. The effect of carbon on the Raman spectra is discussed. The iron phthalocyanines appear to be stable at potentials close to hydrogen evolution in the absence of oxygen. 8 figures.

  20. Effect of acute administration of cadmium on the disposition of copper, zinc, and iron in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.L.; King, L.J.; Parke, D.V.W.

    1980-02-01

    Acute administration of subcutaneous doses of cadmium (0.1 to 1.5 mg/kg) to male rats results in high plasma concentrations of copper 24 hr after treatment. In contrast, plasma zinc and iron levels were markedly reduced. The magnitude and significance of the changes in plasma metal ion concentrations were dependent upon the dose of cadmium administered. Liver copper levels were slightly but not significantly increased, but circulating ceruloplasmin levels increased as the total plasma copper increased. Biliary excretion of copper was markedly inhibited after cadmium administration (subcutaneous and oral) and the degree of inhibition was directly related to the dose. Simultaneous parenteral administration of zinc did not counteract this effect. These results suggest that cadmium blocks the excretion of copper into the bile leading to an accumulation of copper in the liver, which in turn, stimulates the synthesis of ceruloplasmin. The mechanisms by which cadmium may inhibit biliary copper excretion are discussed.

  1. Influence of diet on iron, copper, and zinc status in children under 24 months of age.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew; Redworth, Edward Wallis; Morgan, Jane B

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether iron and micronutrient status is improved with an increased amount of meat in the diet. To this end, a longitudinal prospective study with infants recruited at 4 mo and followed until 24 mo of age was undertaken. One hundred ninety-eight infants formed the original study cohort; 48 withdrew before the end of the study. Subjects were classified as nonmeat eaters or as mixed (red and white)-meat eaters subgrouped into tertiles depending on the meat content reported in diet diaries. Seven-day weighed food records were recorded at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 mo. Blood samples taken at 4, 12, and 24 mo were analyzed for parameters of iron and micronutrient status. Iron intake increased during the first year, thereafter remaining constant. The percentages of subjects with hemoglobin values below 110 g/L were 34.1, 23.1, and 13.4 at 4, 12, and 24 mo, respectively. For parameters of iron status, the number of results below the reference range was determined for each diet group and a significant negative relationship between serum iron and meat intake at 12 mo of age was seen (p<0.023). There was a trend for hemoglobin concentrations to be inversely related to the meat intake, at the same age (p<0.068). No effects on zinc or copper status were seen. We conclude that a weak association between dietary meat and iron/Hb suggests a positive role for red meat. There was no disadvantage to the nonmeat-eating infants with respect to zinc or copper. PMID:14997021

  2. Dissolution kinetics of iron-, manganese-, and copper-containing synthetic hydroxyapatites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    Micronutrient-substituted synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) is being evaluated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program for crop production on long-duration human missions to the International Space Station or for future Lunar or Martian outposts. The stirred-flow technique was utilized to characterize Ca, P, Fe, Mn, and Cu release characteristics from Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-containing SHA in deionized (DI) water, citric acid, and diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA). Initially, Ca and P release rates decreased rapidly with time and were controlled by a non-SHA calcium phosphate phase(s) with low Ca/P solution molar ratios (0.91-1.51) relative to solid SHA ratios (1.56-1.64). At later times, Ca/P solution molar ratios (1.47-1.79) were near solid SHA ratios and release rates decreased slowly indicating that SHA controlled Ca and P release. Substituted SHA materials had faster dissolution rates relative to unsubstituted SHA. The initial metal release rate order was Mn >> Cu > Fe which followed metal-oxide/phosphate solubility suggesting that poorly crystalline metal-oxides/phosphates were dominating metal release. Similar metal release rates for all substituted SHA (approximately 0.01 cmol kg-1 min-1) at the end of the DTPA experiment indicated that SHA dissolution was supplying the metals into solution and that poorly crystalline metal-oxide/phosphates were not controlling metal release. Results indicate that non-SHA Ca-phosphate phases and poorly crystalline metal-oxide/phosphates will contribute Ca, P, and metals. After these phases have dissolved, substituted SHA will be the source of Ca, P, and metals for plants.

  3. Characterization of iron, manganese, and copper synthetic hydroxyapatites by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Wasowicz, T.; Howard, T.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    The incorporation of micronutrients (e.g., Fe, Mn, Cu) into synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) is proposed for slow release of these nutrients to crops in NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) program for long-duration space missions. Separate Fe3+ (Fe-SHA), Mn2+ (Mn-SHA), and Cu2+ (Cu-SHA) containing SHA materials were synthesized by a precipitation method. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to determine the location of Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ ions in the SHA structure and to identify other Fe(3+)-, Mn(2+)-, and Cu(2+)-containing phases that formed during precipitation. The EPR parameters for Fe3+ (g=4.20 and 8.93) and for Mn2+ (g=2.01, A=9.4 mT, D=39.0 mT and E=10.5 mT) indicated that Fe3+ and Mn2+ possessed rhombic ion crystal fields within the SHA structure. The Cu2+ EPR parameters (g(z)=2.488, A(z)=5.2 mT) indicated that Cu2+ was coordinated to more than six oxygens. The rhombic environments of Fe3+ and Mn2+ along with the unique Cu2+ environment suggested that these metals substituted for the 7 or 9 coordinate Ca2+ in SHA. The EPR analyses also detected poorly crystalline metal oxyhydroxides or metal-phosphates associated with SHA. The Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials are potential slow release sources of Fe, Mn, and Cu for ALS and terrestrial cropping systems.

  4. Mineralogical and chemical characterization of iron-, manganese-, and copper-containing synthetic hydroxyapatites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Clearfield, A.; Hossner, L. R.

    2003-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program is evaluating the use of Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-containing synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) as a slow release fertilizer for crops that might be grown on the International Space Station or at Lunar and Martian outposts. Separate Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-containing SHA materials along with a transition-metal free SHA (pure-SHA) were synthesized using a precipitation method. Chemical and mineralogical analyses determined if and how Fe, Mn, and Cu were incorporated into the SHA structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rietveld refinement, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that SHA materials with the apatite structure were produced. Chemical analyses indicated that the metal containing SHA materials were deficient in Ca relative to pure-SHA. The shift in the infrared PO4-mu 3 vibrations, smaller unit cell parameters, smaller particle size, and greater structural strain for Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-containing SHA compared with pure-SHA suggested that Fe, Mn, and Cu were incorporated into SHA structure. Rietveld analyses revealed that Fe, Mn, and Cu substituted into the Ca2 site of SHA. An Fe-rich phase was detected by TEM analyses and backscattered electron microscopy in the Fe-containing SHA material with the greatest Fe content. The substitution of metals into SHA suggests that metal-SHA materials are potential slow-release sources of micronutrients for plant uptake in addition to Ca and P.

  5. Effects of iron, manganese, copper, and zinc enrichments on productivity and biomass in the subarctic Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Coale, K.H. )

    1991-12-01

    Natural plankton populations from subarctic Pacific surface waters were incubated in 7-d experiments with added concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn. Small additions of metals were used to simulate natural perturbations in metal concentrations potentially experienced by marine plankton. Trace metal concentrations, phytoplankton productivity, Chl a, and the species composition of phytoplankton and microzooplankton were measured over the course of the experiment. Although the controls indicated little growth, increases in phytoplankton productivity, Chl a, and cell densities were dramatic after the addition of 0.89 nM Fe, indicating that it may limit the rates of algal production in these waters. Similar increases were observed in experiments with 3.9 nM Cu added. The Cu effect is attributed to a decrease in the grazing activities of the microzooplankton and increases in the rates of production. Mn enrichment had its greatest effect on diatom biomass, whereas Zn enrichment had its greatest effect on other autofluorescent organisms. The extent of trace metal adsorption onto carboy walls was also evaluated. These results imply that natural systems may be affected as follows: natural levels of Fe and Cu may influence phytoplankton productivity and trophic structure in open-ocean, high-nutrient, low-biomass systems; rates of net production are not limited by one micronutrient alone.

  6. Assessing of plasma levels of iron, zinc and copper in Iranian Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Meamar, Rokhsareh; Nikyar, Hamidreza; Dehghani, Leila; Basiri, Keivan; Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza Aghaye

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trace elements have long been suspected to be involved in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis, but their exact roles have been remained controversial. In this study, we assessed the levels of copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) in different stage of PD patients. Materials and Methods: Serum concentrations of iron, copper and zinc were measured in 109 patients with PD by colorimetric methods. Staging of the disease was evaluated according to Hoehn and Yahr (H and Y) and Unified PD Rating Scale III (UPDRS). Results: Severity values of PD measured by UPRDSIII and HY stages with mean ± SD were 22.9 ± 1.81 and 1.8 ± 1.1, respectively. Mean ± SD values of iron, zinc and copper are 100.7 ± 289.2, 68.3 ± 5.32, and 196.8 ± 162.1 μg/dl, respectively. Serum iron level in most of the patients was normal (76.6%). Whereas zinc concentration in most participants was below the normal range (64.5%) and serum Cu in the majority of patients had a high normal concentration (42.7%) and did not significantly differ among various PD stages. Conclusion: The result of this study does not confirm strong correlation between PD stages and serum levels of tested trace elements. The actual correlations between these elements and PD and whether modulating of these agents levels could be an effective approach in the treatment of this disease remain to be elucidated. PMID:27099844

  7. Influence of the substitution of the manganese for iron in the Fe sub 4 N lattice on particle formation and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Siberchicot, B.; Matar, S.F.; Fournes, L.; Demazeau, G.; Hagenmuller, P. )

    1990-01-01

    Moessbauer resonance studies on Mn-substituted Fe{sub 4}N show that manganese occupies statistically both iron sites in the lattice. Replacement of Fe by Mn modifies the crystal growth process of Fe{sub 4}N magnetic particles and leads to improvement of the extrinsic magnetic properties, i.e., H{sub c} and {sigma}{sub r}/{sigma}{sub s}, required for magnetic recording applications.

  8. An on-site colorimetric technique for routine determination of chromium, iron and copper in bath solutions for chromium(III) conversion coating.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Susumu; Shimada, Katsuhisa; Suzuki, Yasutada; Hattori, Kazuya

    2011-01-01

    An on-site colorimetric technique was developed for the routine determination of chromium, iron and copper in bath solutions for the chromium(III) conversion coating. A portable colorimeter with a red-green-blue light emitting diode was used for the absorbance measurements. Iron and copper were determined as Fe(III)-thiocyanate and Cu(I)-bathocuproindisulfonate, respectively. Chromium(III) was determined simultaneously with iron or copper using green and blue light. A correction method of the matrix effect was proposed and its applicability was demonstrated. Analytical errors were within 500, 5 and 0.3 mg L(-1) for chromium(III), iron and copper, respectively. PMID:21415522

  9. Iron and manganese in oxide minerals and in glasses: preliminary consideration of Eh buffering potential at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Caporuscio, F.A.; Vaniman, D.T.

    1985-04-01

    The tuffs of Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation as a possible deep burial site for high-level radioactive waste disposal. One of the main concerns is the effect of oxidizing groundwater on the transport of radionuclides. Rock components that may affect the oxygen content of groundwater include Fe-Ti oxides, Mn oxides, and glasses that contain ferrous iron. Some phenocryst Fe-Ti oxides at Yucca Mountain are in reduced states, whereas groundmass Fe-Ti oxides have been oxidized to hematite, rutile, and pseudobrookite (Fe{sup 3+}-bearing phases) exclusively. Estimates of Fe{sup 2+}-bearing oxides indicate that less than 0.33 vol% phenocrysts is available to act as solid buffering agents of Eh. Of this percentage, significant amounts of Fe-Ti oxides are isolated from effective interaction with groundwater because they occur in densely welded, devitrified tuffs that have low interstitial permeability. Manganese oxides occur primarily along fractures in the ash-flow tuffs. Because the Mn oxides are concentrated along the same pathways (fractures) where transport has occurred in the past, these small volume percentages could act as buffers. However, the oxidation states of actual Mn-oxide phases are high (Mn{sup 4+}), and these minerals have virtually no potential for reducing groundwater Eh. Manganese oxides may even act as oxidizing agents. However, regardless of their poor capabilities as reducing agents, the Mn oxides could be important as sorbents of heavy metals at Yucca Mountain. The lack of accessible, pristine Fe-Ti oxides and the generally high oxidation states of Mn oxides seem to rule out these oxides as Eh buffers of the Yucca Mountain groundwater system. Reduction of ferrous iron within glassy tuffs may have some effect on Eh, but further study is needed. At present it is prudent to assume that minerals and glasses have little or no capacity for reducing oxygen-rich groundwater at Yucca Mountain. 25 refs., 3 figs., 12

  10. Impact of orchard and tillage management practices on soil leaching of atrazine, potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, ammonium, nitrates and phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajdak, L.; Lipiec, J.; Siczek, A.; Kotowska, U.; Nosalewicz, A.

    2009-04-01

    The experiments were carried out on an Orthic Luvisol developed from loess, over limestone, at the experimental field of Lublin Agricultural University in Felin (51o15'N, 22o35'E), Poland. The investigation deals with the problems of leaching's rate of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,2,3-triazine), potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, ammonium, nitrates and phosphates from two management systems of soil: (i) conventionally tilled field with main tillage operations including stubble cultivator (10 cm) + harrowing followed by mouldboard ploughing to 20 cm depth, and crop rotation including selected cereals, root crops and papillionaceous crops, (ii) 35-year-old apple orchard field (100x200m) with a permanent sward that was mown in the inter-rows during the growing season. The conventionally tilled plot was under the current management practice for approximately 30 years. Field sites were close to each other (about 150 m). Core samples of 100 cm3 volume and 5 cm diameter were taken from two depths 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm, and were used to determine the soil water characteristic curve. It was observed that management practices impacted on the physic-chemical properties of soils. pH (in H2O) in tilled soil ranged from 5.80 to 5.91. However soil of orchard soil revealed higher values of pH than tilled soil and ranged from 6.36 to 6.40. The content of organic carbon for tilled soil ranged from 1.13 to 1.17%, but in orchard soil from 1.59 to 1.77%. Tillled soil showed broader range of bulk density 1.38-1.62 mg m-3, than orchard soil 1.33-134 mg m-3. The first-order kinetic reaction model was fitted to the experimental atrazine, potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, nitrates, ammonium and phosphates leaching vs. time data. The concentrations of leached chemical compounds revealed linear curves. The correlation coefficients ranged from -0.873 to -0.993. The first-order reaction constants measured for the orchard soils were from 3.8 to 19 times higher than