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Sample records for manganese non-magnetic steel

  1. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-05-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  2. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-06-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  3. Iron and manganese removal by using manganese ore constructed wetlands in the reclamation of steel wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing-Cheng; Chen, Gu; Huang, Xiang-Feng; Li, Guang-Ming; Liu, Jia; Yang, Na; Gao, Sai-Nan

    2009-09-30

    To reclaim treated steel wastewater as cooling water, manganese ore constructed wetland was proposed in this study for the removal of iron and manganese. In lab-scale wetlands, the performance of manganese ore wetland was found to be more stable and excellent than that of conventional gravel constructed wetland. The iron and manganese concentration in the former was below 0.05 mg/L at hydraulic retention time of 2-5 days when their influent concentrations were in the range of 0.16-2.24 mg/L and 0.11-2.23 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, its removals for COD, turbidity, ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus were 55%, 90%, 67% and 93%, respectively, superior to the corresponding removals in the gravel wetland (31%, 86%, 58% and 78%, respectively). The good performance of manganese ore was ascribed to the enhanced biological manganese removal with the aid of manganese oxide surface and the smaller size of the medium. The presence of biological manganese oxidation was proven by the facts of good manganese removal in wetlands at chemical unfavorable conditions (such as ORP and pH) and the isolation of manganese oxidizing strains from the wetlands. Similar iron and manganese removal was later observed in a pilot-scale gravel-manganese-ore constructed wetland, even though the manganese ore portion in total volume was reduced from 100% (in the lab-scale) to only 4% (in the pilot-scale) for the sake of cost-saving. The quality of the polished wastewater not only satisfied the requirement for cooling water but also suitable as make-up water for other purposes. PMID:19443107

  4. Critical Aspects of Alloying of Sintered Steels with Manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryha, Eduard; Dudrova, Eva; Nyborg, Lars

    2010-11-01

    This study examines the sintering behavior and properties of Fe-0.8Mn-0.5C manganese powder metallurgy steels. The study focuses on the influence of mode of alloying—admixing using either high-purity electrolytic manganese or medium carbon ferromanganese as well as the fully prealloying of water-atomized powder. Three main aspects were studied during the whole sintering process—microstructure development, interparticle necks evolution, and changes in the behavior of manganese carrier particles during both heating and sintering stages. The prealloyed powder shows considerable improvement in carbon homogenization and interparticle neck development in comparison with admixed materials. The first indication of pearlite for the fully prealloyed material was registered at ~1013 K (740 °C) in comparison with ~1098 K (825 °C) in the case of the admixed systems. The negative effect of the oxidized residuals of manganese carrier particles and high microstructure inhomogeneity, which is a characteristic feature of admixed systems, is reflected in the lower values of the mechanical properties. The worst results in this respect were obtained for the system admixed with electrolytic manganese because of more intensive manganese sublimation and resulting oxidation at lower temperatures. According to the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses, the observed high brittleness of admixed materials is connected with intergranular decohesion failure associated with manganese oxide formation on the grain boundaries.

  5. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  6. Corrosion of stainless steel piping in high manganese fresh water

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.E.; Lutey, R.W.; Musick, J.; Pinnow, K.E.; Tuthill, A.H.

    1996-09-01

    A potable water treatment plant, designed to reduce manganese and iron in well water, experienced leaks in the 16 in. (406 mm) raw water headers about nine months after startup. The material, type 304 (UNS 30403) stainless steel, was purchased to American Society of Testing Materials specification A 778, with additional stipulations governing internal finish, the use of filler metal, and pickling for scale removal. Laboratory screenings of deposits for bacteria revealed some potentially additive corrosive effects from microbial action. However, the correlation of corrosion with the presence or absence of heat tint in the heat-affected zone of the circumferential welds prevailed as a primary cause of the corrosion observed beneath an adherent manganese-iron deposit in a low chloride, high manganese, raw water.

  7. Microstructure Evolution of a Medium Manganese Steel During Thermomechanical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Binhan; Aydin, Huseyin; Fazeli, Fateh; Yue, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    An as-cast Fe-0.2C-10Mn-3Si-3Al medium manganese steel with a ferrite plus austenite duplex microstructure was subjected to hot compression tests at deformation temperatures within two-phase ( α + γ) range and various strain rates. The microstructure evolution of the experimental steel during hot deformation was investigated. The flow curves were characterized by a discontinuous yielding at the beginning of plastic deformation, followed by a weak work hardening to a peak and a subsequent mild softening stage. Two restoration processes took place during hot deformation, namely dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of austenite and continuous dynamic recrystallization of ferrite. The DRX of austenite was believed to dominate the softening stage of the flow curves. The discontinuous yielding stemmed from the existing Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) orientation relationship between ferrite and austenite in the initial undeformed microstructure, which gradually weakened during subsequent deformation.

  8. Effect of biomineralized manganese on the corrosion behavior of C1008 mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Olesen, B.H.; Nielsen, P.H.; Lewandowski, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The possibility that biomineralized manganese dioxide (MnO{sub 2}) might serve as an efficient cathodic reactant in mild steel corrosion was studied using stainless steel (SS) covered with microbially or electrochemically deposited MnO{sub 2} and galvanically coupled to mild steel and mild steel covered with microbially deposited MnO{sub 2}. Biofilms of the manganese-oxidizing bacteria, Leptothrix discophora SP-6, were used to deposit biomineralized MnO{sub 2}. When MnO{sub 2} was biologically deposited on the SS, the corrosion rate of the galvanically coupled mild steel was initially about eight times higher than that in a control experiment without depositing manganese. After a few minutes, the MnO{sub 2} discharged and the corrosion rate of the mild steel decreased to values comparable with biofouled cathodes without manganese. When MnO{sub 2} was electroplated on SS, a linear relation between the amount of MnO{sub 2} and the duration of the elevated corrosion rate of mild steel was observed. However, when MnO{sub 2} was biologically deposited directly onto the mild steel, the corrosion rate did not increase, possibly because the corrosion product buildup on the mild steel surface prevented electrical contact between the manganese oxide and the underlying metal.

  9. Thermodynamic Calculation Study on Effect of Manganese on Stability of Austenite in High Nitrogen Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingchuan; Zhang, Bingchun; Yang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    A series of high nitrogen steels were studied by using thermodynamic calculations to investigate the effect of manganese on the stability of austenite. Surprisingly, it was found that the austenite stabilizing ability of manganese was strongly weakened by chromium, but it was strengthened by molybdenum. In addition, with an increase of manganese content, the ferrite stabilizing ability of chromium significantly increased, but that of molybdenum decreased. Therefore, strong interactions exist between manganese and the other alloying elements, which should be the main reason for the difference among different constituent diagrams.

  10. Thermodynamic Calculation Study on Effect of Manganese on Stability of Austenite in High Nitrogen Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingchuan; Zhang, Bingchun; Yang, Ke

    2016-05-01

    A series of high nitrogen steels were studied by using thermodynamic calculations to investigate the effect of manganese on the stability of austenite. Surprisingly, it was found that the austenite stabilizing ability of manganese was strongly weakened by chromium, but it was strengthened by molybdenum. In addition, with an increase of manganese content, the ferrite stabilizing ability of chromium significantly increased, but that of molybdenum decreased. Therefore, strong interactions exist between manganese and the other alloying elements, which should be the main reason for the difference among different constituent diagrams.

  11. Manganese

    MedlinePlus

    Manganese is a mineral that is found in several foods including nuts, legumes, seeds, tea, whole grains, and leafy green vegetables. It is ... manganese by mouth along with other vitamins and minerals can promote growth in children who have low ...

  12. Low Frequency-SAFT Inspection Methodology for Coarse-Grained Steel Rail Components (Manganese Steel Frogs)

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.

    2004-11-01

    In the rail industry, sections of high strength Manganese steel are employed at critical locations in railroad networks. Ultrasonic inspections of Manganese steel microstructures are difficult to inspect with conventional means, as the propagation medium is highly attenuative, coarse-grained, anisotropic and nonhomogeneous in nature. Current in-service inspection methods are ineffective while pre-service X-ray methods (used for full-volumetric examinations of components prior to shipment) are time-consuming, costly, require special facilities and highly trained personnel for safe operations, and preclude manufacturers from inspecting statistically meaningful numbers of frogs for effective quality assurance. In-service examinations consist of visual inspections only and by the time a defect or flaw is visually detected, the structural integrity of the component may already be compromised, and immediate repair or replacement is required. A novel ultrasonic inspection technique utilizing low frequency ultrasound (100 to 500 kHz) combined with a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) for effective reduction of signal clutter and noise, and extraction of important features in the data, has proven to be effective for these coarse grained steel components. Results from proof-of-principal tests in the laboratory demonstrate an effective means to detect and localize reflectors introduced as a function of size and depth from the top of the frog rail. Using non-optimal, commercially available transducers coupled with the low-frequency/SAFT approach, preliminary evaluations were conducted to study the effects of the material microstructure on ultrasonic propagation, sensitivity and resolution in thick section frog components with machined side-drilled holes. Results from this study will be presented and discussed.

  13. Behavior of nitrogen in a nitrogen-containing chromium-manganese steel during electroslag remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linchevskii, B. V.; Rigina, L. G.; Takhirov, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    Electroslag remelting of a high-alloyed steel with high contents of nitrogen, chromium, and manganese in an electroslag furnace has been studied. CaF2-MgO-SiO2 slag developed at TsNIITMASh and allowing remelting process at a temperature of 1520-1560°C is used as a flux. It is found that electroslag remelting of high-alloyed steels with a high nitrogen concentration does not change the nitrogen content.

  14. Hot Ductility Behavior of Boron Containing Microalloyed Steels with Varying Manganese Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Tobias; Senk, Dieter; Walpot, Raphael; Steenken, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The hot ductility is measured for six different steel grades with different microalloying elements and with varying manganese contents using the hot tensile test machine with melting/solidification unit at the Department of Ferrous Metallurgy RWTH Aachen University. To identify the influence of manganese on hot ductility, tests are performed with varying the manganese content from 0.7 to 18.2 wt pct, a high manganese steel. Additionally, the effect of different cooling and strain rates is analyzed by changing the particular rate for selected samples in the minima. To investigate and detect the cause of cracking during testing, the fracture surfaces in the ductility minima are considered with scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thermodynamic modeling is conducted on basis of the commercial software ThermoCalc©. A sharp decrease of the hot ductility is recognizable at 1398 K (1125 °C), at only 0.7 wt pct manganese because of the low manganese to sulfur ratio. The grades with a Mn content up to 1.9 wt pct show a good ductility with minimal ductility loss. In comparison, the steel grade with 18.2 wt pct has a poor hot ductility. Because of the formation of complex precipitates, where several alloying elements are involved, the influence of boron on hot ductility is not fully clarified. By increasing the cooling rate, the reduction of area values are shifted to smaller values. For high test temperatures, these measured values are decreased for lower strain rates. Thereby, an early drop of the ductility is noticeable for the high temperatures around 1373 K (1100 °C).

  15. Corrosion of stainless steel piping in a high manganese fresh water

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.E.; Lutey, R.W.; Musick, J.; Pinnow, K.E.; Tuthill, A.H.

    1996-07-01

    In March of 1993, about two years after startup in early 1991, pinhole leaks were found in the 16 in. (406 mm) type 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403) raw water piping at the Brunswick-Topsham Water District (BTWD) Potable Water Treatment Plant (PWTP) in Brunswick, Maine. The low chloride manganese-containing well water is chlorinated in the pump house. After reaching the plant, the raw water is handled in type 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403) piping. It was initially felt that the corrosion might be the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) type corrosion described by Tverberg, Pinnow, and Redmerski. Investigation showed that the role of manganese and chlorine differed, in important respects, from that described by Tverberg et. al., and that heat tint scale may have played a significant role in the corrosion that occurred at the BTWD plant.

  16. Manganese

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Manganese ; CASRN 7439 - 96 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  17. Manganese

    MedlinePlus

    ... no RDAs for a nutrient, the Adequate Intake (AI) is used as a guide. The AI is the estimated amount of the nutrient that ... assumed to be adequate. The daily Adequate Intake (AI) levels for manganese are: infants birth to 6 ...

  18. Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    1990-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

  19. Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    1990-08-07

    An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

  20. Effect of Manganese Sulphide Size on the Precipitation of Tin Heterogeneous Nucleation in as-Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guilin; Song, Bo; Tao, Sufen; Cai, Zeyun

    2015-05-01

    Tramp elements in steels such as tin have been thought harmful because of the hot brittleness at grain boundaries and will be enriched in new steels because of difficulty of removal. It has been an important and difficult matter for metallurgist to use these elements. In the present paper, the as-cast steel containing high concentration of tin is prepared in laboratory and tin precipitates at the manganese sulphide inclusions have been found. A theoretical model is established to calculate the size of manganese sulphide inclusions acted as the heterogeneous nucleation site of tin precipitation. The results show that the inclusions with the smaller contact angle between tin precipitate is more advantageous to be the nucleus of tin heterogeneous nucleation. In this experiment, the manganese sulphide inclusions whose size is 2~4 μm in diameter can act as the nuclei of the nucleation of tin precipitation.

  1. Effects of Manganese Content on Solidification Structures, Thermal Properties, and Phase Transformation Characteristics in Fe-Mn-C Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Wang, Yu-Nan; Ruan, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Zhu, Kai; Fan, Zheng-Jie; Wang, Ying-Chun; Li, Cheng-Bin; Jiang, Xiao-Fang

    2015-02-01

    The solidification structures and the thermal properties of Fe-Mn-C steel ingots containing different manganese contents have been investigated and the phase transformation characteristics have been revealed by Thermo-Calc to assist development of the continuous casting technology of Fe-Mn-C steels. The results show that the thermal conductivity of the 0Mn steel is higher than that of the 3Mn steel. The thermal conductivity of the 6Mn steel is the lowest in the three kinds of steels below 1023 K (750 °C) and the highest above 1173 K (900 °C). The 0Mn steel has the highest value of the proportion of equiaxed grain zone area in the three kinds of steels, whereas the 3Mn steel has the lowest value of it in the steels. Manganese has the effect of promoting the coarsening of grains. The microstructure is martensite and a little retained austenite (3.8 mass pct) in the 6Mn steel, whereas the microstructure is bainite in the 3Mn steel. The 0Mn steel is characterized by ferrite and pearlite. The mean thermal expansion coefficients of the steels are in the range from 1.0 × 10-5 to 1.6 × 10-5 K-1, and the determinations of mold tapers of the 6Mn and 3Mn steels can refer to low-carbon steel. Using RA <60 pct as the criterion, the third brittle temperature region of the 6Mn steel is 873 K to 1073 K (600 °C to 800 °C), whereas those of the 3Mn steel and the 0Mn steel are 873 K to 1123 K (600 °C to 850 °C) and 873 K to 1173 K (600 °C to 900 °C), respectively. In the 6Mn and 3Mn steels, the deformation-induced ferrite (DIF) forms in sufficient quantities cause the recovery of the ductility at the low temperature end. However, since low strains are present when straightening, sufficient quantities of DIF cannot be formed. Thus, the ductility of the 6Mn and 3Mn steels cannot be improved during the continuous casting process. Manganese has the effect of enlarging the austenite phase region and reducing the δ-ferrite phase region and α-ferrite phase region.

  2. Transformation Characteristics of Ferrite/Carbide Aggregate in Continuously Cooled, Low Carbon-Manganese Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Martino, S. F.; Thewlis, G.

    2014-02-01

    Transformation characteristics and morphological features of ferrite/carbide aggregate (FCA) in low carbon-manganese steels have been investigated. Work shows that FCA has neither the lamellae structure of pearlite nor the lath structure of bainite and martensite. It consists of a fine dispersion of cementite particles in a smooth ferrite matrix. Carbide morphologies range from arrays of globular particles or short fibers to extended, branched, and densely interconnected fibers. Work demonstrates that FCA forms over similar cooling rate ranges to Widmanstätten ferrite. Rapid transformation of both phases occurs at temperatures between 798 K and 973 K (525 °C and 700 °C). FCA reaction is not simultaneous with Widmanstätten ferrite but occurs at temperatures intermediate between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainite. Austenite carbon content calculations verify that cementite precipitation is thermodynamically possible at FCA reaction temperatures without bainite formation. The pattern of precipitation is confirmed to be discontinuous. CCT diagrams have been constructed that incorporate FCA. At low steel manganese content, Widmanstätten ferrite and bainite bay sizes are significantly reduced so that large amounts of FCA are formed over a wide range of cooling rates.

  3. Ennoblement of Stainless Steel by the Manganese-Depositing Bacterium Leptothrix discophora.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, W H; Caccavo, F; Olesen, B; Lewandowski, Z

    1997-07-01

    The noble shift in open-circuit potential exhibited by microbially colonized stainless steel (ennoblement) was investigated by examining the relationship among surface colonization, manganese deposition, and open-circuit potential for stainless steel coupons exposed to batch cultures of the manganese-depositing bacterium Leptothrix discophora. Open-circuit potential shifted from -100 to +330 mV(infSCE) as a biofilm containing 75 nmol of MnO(infx) cm(sup-2) formed on the coupon surface but changed little further with continued MnO(infx) deposition up to 270 nmol cm(sup-2). Increased open-circuit potential corresponded to decreasing Mn(II) concentration in solution and to increased MnO(infx) accumulation and attached cell density on the coupon surfaces. MnO(infx) deposition was attributable to biological activity, and Mn(II) was observed to enhance cell attachment. The experimental results support a mechanism of ennoblement in which open-circuit potential is fixed near +350 mV(infSCE) by the cathodic activity of biomineralized MnO(infx). PMID:16535635

  4. Ennoblement of Stainless Steel by the Manganese-Depositing Bacterium Leptothrix discophora

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, W. H.; Caccavo, F.; Olesen, B.; Lewandowski, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The noble shift in open-circuit potential exhibited by microbially colonized stainless steel (ennoblement) was investigated by examining the relationship among surface colonization, manganese deposition, and open-circuit potential for stainless steel coupons exposed to batch cultures of the manganese-depositing bacterium Leptothrix discophora. Open-circuit potential shifted from -100 to +330 mV(infSCE) as a biofilm containing 75 nmol of MnO(infx) cm(sup-2) formed on the coupon surface but changed little further with continued MnO(infx) deposition up to 270 nmol cm(sup-2). Increased open-circuit potential corresponded to decreasing Mn(II) concentration in solution and to increased MnO(infx) accumulation and attached cell density on the coupon surfaces. MnO(infx) deposition was attributable to biological activity, and Mn(II) was observed to enhance cell attachment. The experimental results support a mechanism of ennoblement in which open-circuit potential is fixed near +350 mV(infSCE) by the cathodic activity of biomineralized MnO(infx). PMID:16535635

  5. Diffusion zone between high-chromium cast iron and high-manganese steel during electric-slag facing

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, V.P.; Shvartser, A.Y.; Stroganova, G.V.

    1986-05-01

    The authors investigate extending the service lives of components by the method of electric-slag facing of working surfaces. Steel 45 was used in the annealed state. Electric-slag remelting was the method used to determine the bending strength. Metallographic examinations were conducted under an MIM-8m microscope, while x-ray analysis of the built-up and base metals were performed on a DRON-2 diffractometer. BAsic alloying elements, chromium and manganese were studied on a ''Cameca MS-46'' microanalyzer. During the electri-slag facing of a high-chromium cast iron containing 8% of Mn on high-manganese steel 11OG13L diffusion equalization of the manganese content occurs in the fusion zone. Diffusion displacement of carbon, chromium, and manganese from high-chromium cast iron into the high-manganese steel during electric-slag facing gies rise to a smooth change in the structure of the metal in the fusion zone, and to increased strength of the joint between the unlike materials investigated.

  6. The critical analysis of austenitic manganese steel T130Mn135 used for castings in the mining industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josan, A.; Pinca Bretotean, C.; Putan, V.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the critical analysis of making technology of austenitic manganese steel T130Mn135, used for castings of the type Mills hammer at a Romanian foundry. Are analyzed 11 charges of steel for castings and is determined the diagram of the heat treatment. After the applying of the heat treatment results a single-phase structure, consisting of homogeneous austenite. For all the 11 charges is presented the variation of chemical composition.

  7. Static Strain Aging Behavior of a Manganese-Silicon Steel After Single and Multi-stage Straining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seraj, P.; Serajzadeh, S.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, static strain aging behavior of an alloy steel containing high amounts of silicon and manganese was examined while the influences of initial microstructure and pre-strain on the aging kinetics were evaluated as well. The rate of strain aging in a low carbon steel was also determined and compared with that occurred in the alloy steel. The rates of static strain aging in the steels were defined at room temperature and at 95 °C by means of double-hit tensile testing and hardness measurements. In addition, three-stage aging experiments at 80 °C were carried out to estimate aging behavior under multi-pass deformation processing. The results showed that in-solution manganese and silicon atoms could significantly affect the aging behavior of the steel and reduce the kinetics of static strain aging as compared to the low carbon steel. The initial microstructure also played an important role on the aging behavior. The rapidly cooled steel having mean ferrite grain size of 9.7 μm showed the least aging susceptibility index during the aging experiments. Accordingly, the activation energies for static strain aging were calculated as 93.2 and 85.7 kJ/mole for the alloy steel having fine and coarse ferrite-pearlite structures, respectively while it was computed as 79.1 kJ/mole for the low carbon steel with ferrite mean grain size of about 16.2 μm.

  8. Influence of explosive density on mechanical properties of high manganese steel explosion hardened

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoyan; Shen, Zhaowu; Liu, Yingbin; Liu, Tiansheng; Wang, Fengying

    2013-12-01

    The explosion hardening tests of high manganese steel were carried out by using two kinds of explosives of the same composition but different density, respectively. The detonation velocities were tested and the relevant mechanical properties were studied. The results show that the stronger single impulse acting on the specimen, the more hardness of surface increases and the more impact toughness decreases. Compared with the explosive of 1.48 g/cm3 density, the hardness, elongation rate, and impact toughness of the sample for triple explosion with explosive of 1.38 g/cm3 density are larger at the same hardening depth. In addition, the tensile strength of the sample for triple explosion with density of 1.38 g/cm3 is higher from the surface to 15 mm below the surface hardened.

  9. Microstructural characterization of high-manganese austenitic steels with different stacking fault energies

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shigeo; Kwon, Eui-Pyo; Imafuku, Muneyuki; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Shigeru

    2011-08-15

    Microstructures of tensile-deformed high-manganese austenitic steels exhibiting twinning-induced plasticity were analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction pattern observation and X-ray diffraction measurement to examine the influence of differences in their stacking fault energies on twinning activity during deformation. The steel specimen with the low stacking fault energy of 15 mJ/m{sup 2} had a microstructure with a high population of mechanical twins than the steel specimen with the high stacking fault energy (25 mJ/m{sup 2}). The <111> and <100> fibers developed along the tensile axis, and mechanical twinning occurred preferentially in the <111> fiber. The Schmid factors for slip and twinning deformations can explain the origin of higher twinning activity in the <111> fiber. However, the high stacking fault energy suppresses the twinning activity even in the <111> fiber. A line profile analysis based on the X-ray diffraction data revealed the relationship between the characteristics of the deformed microstructures and the stacking fault energies of the steel specimens. Although the variation in dislocation density with the tensile deformation is not affected by the stacking fault energies, the effect of the stacking fault energies on the crystallite size refinement becomes significant with a decrease in the stacking fault energies. Moreover, the stacking fault probability, which was estimated from a peak-shift analysis of the 111 and 200 diffractions, was high for the specimen with low stacking fault energy. Regardless of the difference in the stacking fault energies of the steel specimens, the refined crystallite size has a certain correlation with the stacking fault probability, indicating that whether the deformation-induced crystallite-size refinement occurs depends directly on the stacking fault probability rather than on the stacking fault energies in the present steel specimens. - Highlights: {yields} We studied effects of stacking fault energies on

  10. Structure analysis of aluminium silicon manganese nitride precipitates formed in grain-oriented electrical steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bernier, Nicolas; Xhoffer, Chris; Van De Putte, Tom; Galceran, Montserrat; Godet, Stéphane

    2013-12-15

    We report a detailed structural and chemical characterisation of aluminium silicon manganese nitrides that act as grain growth inhibitors in industrially processed grain-oriented (GO) electrical steels. The compounds are characterised using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), while their crystal structures are analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TEM in electron diffraction (ED), dark-field, high-resolution and automated crystallographic orientation mapping (ACOM) modes. The chemical bonding character is determined using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Despite the wide variation in composition, all the precipitates exhibit a hexagonal close-packed (h.c.p.) crystal structure and lattice parameters of aluminium nitride. The EDX measurement of ∼ 900 stoichiometrically different precipitates indicates intermediate structures between pure aluminium nitride and pure silicon manganese nitride, with a constant Si/Mn atomic ratio of ∼ 4. It is demonstrated that aluminium and silicon are interchangeably precipitated with the same local arrangement, while both Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+} are incorporated in the h.c.p. silicon nitride interstitial sites. The oxidation of the silicon manganese nitrides most likely originates from the incorporation of oxygen during the decarburisation annealing process, thus creating extended planar defects such as stacking faults and inversion domain boundaries. The chemical composition of the inhibitors may be written as (AlN){sub x}(SiMn{sub 0.25}N{sub y}O{sub z}){sub 1−x} with x ranging from 0 to 1. - Highlights: • We study the structure of (Al,Si,Mn)N inhibitors in grain oriented electrical steels. • Inhibitors have the hexagonal close-packed symmetry with lattice parameters of AlN. • Inhibitors are intermediate structures between pure AlN and (Si,Mn)N with Si/Mn ∼ 4. • Al and Si share the same local arrangement; Mn is incorporated in both Mn

  11. Structural studies with the use of XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy of new high Manganese steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonska, Magdalena Barbara

    2014-04-01

    New high-strength austenitic and austenitic-ferritic manganese steels represent a significant potential in applications for structural components in the automotive and railway industry due to the excellent combination of high mechanical properties and good plasticity. They belong to the group of steels called AHSS (Advanced High Strength Steels) and UHSS (Ultra High Strength Steels). Application of this combination of properties allows a reduction in the weight of vehicles by the use of reduced cross-section components, and thus to reduce fuel consumption. The development and implementation of industrial production of such interesting and promising steel and its use as construction material requires an improvement of their casting properties and susceptibility to deformation in plastic working conditions. In this work, XRD, Transmission Mössbauer Spectroscopy and Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy were employed in a study of the new high-manganese steels with a austenite and austenite-ferrite structure. The influence of the plastic deformation parameters on the changes in the structure, distribution of ferrite and disclosure of the presence of carbides was determined. The analysis of phase transformations in various times using CEMS method made possible to reveal their fine details.

  12. Local shear texture formation in adiabatic shear bands by high rate compression of high manganese TRIP steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Yang, P.; Mao, W. M.; Cui, F. E.

    2015-04-01

    Local shear textures in ASBs of high manganese TRIP steels under high rate straining are determined and the influences of initial microstructure is analyzed using EBSD technique. It is seen that even at the presence of majority of two types of martensite before deformation, ASB is preferred to evolve in austenite, rather than in martenite, due to reverse transformation. Ultrafine grains of thress phases due to dynamic recrystallization are formed and all show shear textures. The less ε-martensite in ASB is distributed as islands and its preferred orientation can be found to originate from the variants in matrix. The grain orientation rotation around ASB in multi-phase alloy reveals significant influence of α'- martensite on texture in ASB. The mechanism of local texture formation in ASB of high manganese TRIP steel is proposed in terms of the interaction of early TRIP and later reverse transformation.

  13. Grain refinement of a nickel and manganese free austenitic stainless steel produced by pressurized solution nitriding

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh Akbari, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    Prolonged exposure at high temperatures during solution nitriding induces grain coarsening which deteriorates the mechanical properties of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels. In this study, grain refinement of nickel and manganese free Fe–22.75Cr–2.42Mo–1.17N high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel plates was investigated via a two-stage heat treatment procedure. Initially, the coarse-grained austenitic stainless steel samples were subjected to an isothermal heating at 700 °C to be decomposed into the ferrite + Cr{sub 2}N eutectoid structure and then re-austenitized at 1200 °C followed by water quenching. Microstructure and hardness of samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and micro-hardness testing. The results showed that the as-solution-nitrided steel decomposes non-uniformly to the colonies of ferrite and Cr{sub 2}N nitrides with strip like morphology after isothermal heat treatment at 700 °C. Additionally, the complete dissolution of the Cr{sub 2}N precipitates located in the sample edges during re-austenitizing requires longer times than 1 h. In order to avoid this problem an intermediate nitrogen homogenizing heat treatment cycle at 1200 °C for 10 h was applied before grain refinement process. As a result, the initial austenite was uniformly decomposed during the first stage, and a fine grained austenitic structure with average grain size of about 20 μm was successfully obtained by re-austenitizing for 10 min. - Highlights: • Successful grain refinement of Fe–22.75Cr–2.42Mo–1.17N steel by heat treatment • Using the γ → α + Cr{sub 2}N reaction for grain refinement of a Ni and Mn free HNASS • Obtaining a single phase austenitic structure with average grain size of ∼ 20 μm • Incomplete dissolution of Cr{sub 2}N during re-austenitizing at 1200 °C for long times • Reducing re-austenitizing time by homogenizing treatment before grain refinement.

  14. Influence of Carbide Precipitation and Dissolution on the Microstructure of Ultra-Fine-Grained Intercritically Annealed Medium Manganese Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwon; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of cementite precipitation and dissolution on the formation of the carbide-free, ultra-fine-grained, ferrite + austenite microstructure of medium manganese steel was analyzed. During heating to the intercritical temperature, cementite nucleates at low-angle lath martensite boundaries, austenite subsequently nucleates at ferrite/cementite boundaries, and the cementite is gradually replaced by the growing austenite grains. The intercritical austenite carbon is therefore due to cementite dissolution, rather than carbon partitioning between ferrite and austenite.

  15. Influence of Carbide Precipitation and Dissolution on the Microstructure of Ultra-Fine-Grained Intercritically Annealed Medium Manganese Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwon; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of cementite precipitation and dissolution on the formation of the carbide-free, ultra-fine-grained, ferrite + austenite microstructure of medium manganese steel was analyzed. During heating to the intercritical temperature, cementite nucleates at low-angle lath martensite boundaries, austenite subsequently nucleates at ferrite/cementite boundaries, and the cementite is gradually replaced by the growing austenite grains. The intercritical austenite carbon is therefore due to cementite dissolution, rather than carbon partitioning between ferrite and austenite.

  16. Mechanical Properties of High Manganese Austenitic Stainless Steel JK2LB for ITER Central Solenoid Jacket Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Toru; Kawano, Katsumi; Yamazaki, Toru; Ozeki, Hidemasa; Isono, Takaaki; Hamada, Kazuya; Devred, Arnaud; Vostner, Alexander

    A suite of advanced austenitic stainless steels are used for the ITER TF, CS and PF coil systems.These materials will be exposed to cyclic-stress at cryogenic temperature. Therefore, high manganese austenitic stainless steel JK2LB, which has high tensile strength, high ductility and high resistance to fatigue at 4 K has been chosen for the CS conductor. The cryogenic temperature mechanical property data of this material are very important for the ITER magnet design. This study is focused on mechanical characteristics of JK2LB and its weld joint.

  17. Phase Transformation Behavior of Medium Manganese Steels with 3 Wt Pct Aluminum and 3 Wt Pct Silicon During Intercritical Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Binhan; Fazeli, Fateh; Scott, Colin; Yue, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Medium manganese steels alloyed with sufficient aluminum and silicon amounts contain high fractions of retained austenite adjustable to various transformation-induced plasticity/twinning-induced plasticity effects, in addition to a reduced density suitable for lightweight vehicle body-in-white assemblies. Two hot rolled medium manganese steels containing 3 wt pct aluminum and 3 wt pct silicon were subjected to different annealing treatments in the present study. The evolution of the microstructure in terms of austenite transformation upon reheating and the subsequent austenite decomposition during quenching was investigated. Manganese content of the steels prevailed the microstructural response. The microstructure of the leaner alloy with 7 wt pct Mn (7Mn) was substantially influenced by the annealing temperature, including the variation of phase constituents, the morphology and composition of intercritical austenite, the Ms temperature and the retained austenite fraction. In contrast, the richer variant 10 wt pct Mn steel (10Mn) exhibited a substantially stable ferrite-austenite duplex phase microstructure containing a fixed amount of retained austenite which was found to be independent of the variations of intercritical annealing temperature. Austenite formation from hot band ferrite-pearlite/bainite mixtures was very rapid during annealing at 1273 K (1000 °C), regardless of Mn contents. Austenite growth was believed to be controlled at early stages by carbon diffusion following pearlite/bainite dissolution. The redistribution of Mn in ferrite and particularly in austenite at later stages was too subtle to result in a measureable change in austenite fraction. Further, the hot band microstructure of both steels contained a large fraction of coarse-grained δ-ferrite, which remained almost unchanged during intercritical annealing. A recently developed thermodynamic database was evaluated using the experimental data. The new database achieved a better agreement

  18. Manganese-Cobalt Mixed Spinel Oxides as Surface Modifiers for Stainless Steel Interconnects of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Gordon; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2006-11-06

    Ferritic stainless steels are promising candidates for interconnect applications in low- and mid-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A couple of issues however remain for the particular application, including the chromium poisoning due to chromia evaporation, and long-term surface and electrical stability of the scale grown on these steels. Application of a manganese colbaltite spinel protection layer on the steels appears to be an effective approach to solve the issues. For an optimized performance, Mn{sub 1+x}Co{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} (-1 {le} x {le} 2) spinels were investigated against properties relative for protection coating applications on ferritic SOFC interconnects. Overall it appears that the spinels with x around 0.5 demonstrate a good CTE match to ceramic cell components, a relative high electrical conductivity, and a good thermal stability up to 1,250 C. This was confirmed by a long-term test on the Mn{sub 1.5}Co{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} protection layer that was thermally grown on Crofer22 APU, indicating the spinel protection layer not only significantly decreased the contact resistance between a LSF cathode and the stainless steel interconnects, but also inhibited the sub-scale growth on the stainless steels.

  19. Investigations on Laser Beam Welding Dissimilar Material Combinations of Austenitic High Manganese (FeMn) and Ferrite Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Velten; Höfemann, Matthias; Hatscher, Ansgar; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan; Hein, David; Otto, Manuel; Overmeyer, Ludger

    For the past few years the customer's demand for more fuel efficient and at the same time safer vehicles has steadily increased. Consequently, light weight design has become one of the main interests in engineering. With regard to sheet metal components, a new class of high manganese steels, based on the TWIP (twinning induced plasticity) effect, provides the opportunity of shaping light weight designedthin and complex sheet metal geometries with advanced crash performance. In terms of weldability, due to their thermo-physical properties (high content of C, Mn, Al, Si), FeMn steels have to be handled differently in comparison to conventional steel grades. Particularly dissimilar material combinations of FeMn and ferrite steels are in the center of interest for industrial applications. This study reveals that metallurgical properties of dissimilar welding seams can be influenced considerably by laser beam welding, resulting in a change of the mechanical properties of the seam which is practicable without using filler material as described in (Flügge et al., 2011).

  20. Effects of Non-metallic Inclusions on Hot Ductility of High Manganese TWIP Steels Containing Different Aluminum Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Nan; Yang, Jian; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Xin, Xiu-Ling; Xu, Long-Yun

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of inclusions in Fe-16Mn- xAl-0.6C ( x = 0.002, 0.033, 0.54, 2.10 mass pct) steels have been investigated and their effects on hot ductility of the high manganese TWIP steels have been discussed. Ductility is very poor in the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, which is lower than 20 pct in the temperature range of 873 K to 1473 K (600 °C to 1200 °C). For the steels containing 0.002 and 2.10 mass pct aluminum, ductility is higher than 40 pct in the same temperature range. The hot ductility of steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum is higher than 30 pct throughout the temperature range under examination. With increasing aluminum content, the main inclusions in the steels change along the route of MnO/(MnO + MnS) → MnS/(Al2O3 + MnS) → AlN/(Al2O3 + MnS)/(MgAl2O4 + MnS) → AlN. The thermodynamic results of inclusion types calculated with FactSage software are in agreement with the experimental observation results. The inclusions in the steels containing 0.002 mass pct aluminum do not deteriorate the hot ductility. MnS inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 1.12 μm, 15.62 mm-2, and 2.51 × 10-6 in the steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum reduce the ductility. In the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, AlN inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 0.878 μm, 16.28 mm-2 and 2.82 × 10-6 can precipitate at the austenite grain boundaries, prevent dynamic recrystallization and deteriorate the hot ductility. On the contrary, in the steel containing 2.10 mass pct aluminum, the average size, number density and volume ratio of AlN inclusions change to 2.418 μm, 35.95 mm-2, and 2.55 × 10-5. They precipitate in the matrix, which do not inhibit dynamic recrystallization and thereby do not lead to poor hot ductility.

  1. Study on the growth and corrosion resistance of manganese phosphate coatings on 30CrMnMoTi alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Liang; Xie, Liang-bo; Hu, Jia; Li, Yun; Zhang, Wen-ting

    Due to containing some alloy elements such as chromium, 30CrMnMoTi steel is usually difficult to be phosphated. In present paper, the growth process of the phosphate coating on 30CrMnMoTi alloy steel fabricated by a high temperature manganese phosphating was investigated. The microstructure, surface morphology, composition and corrosion resistance of the phosphate coatings were analyzed by XRD, SEM, EDS and electrochemical polarization method, respectively. The time dependence of open circuit potential (OCP) and the weight of the coating were also measured. It is found that the phosphate coating is mainly composed of (Mn,Fe)5H2(PO4)4·4H2O and consists of a lot of close packed lump crystallites. Based on the time dependence of morphology and the weight of phosphate films, it shows that the phosphating process mainly includes three stages: corrosion of the substrate, creation and growth of phosphate crystal nucleus and thickening of phosphate coating. For 30CrMnMoTi steel, it takes at least 30 seconds and 3 minutes for the first and second step, respectively: at the beginning stage of phospahting process, a lot of bubbles emit, then a complete film will form at the end of bubbling, and the nucleation of phosphate film is inhomogeneous, phosphate crystal nucleus usually forms preferentially at grain boundary. The coating weight-time curve is similar to that of the parabolic growth. The electrochemical polarization measurement shows that the corrosion potentials of the phosphated steel shifted positively about 480 mV than the bare steel and the results of neutral salt spray test (NSS) could reach 24 h, indicating the phosphating improved the corrosion resistance of the 30CrMnMoTi alloy steel.

  2. Welding fumes from stainless steel gas metal arc processes contain multiple manganese chemical species.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean

    2010-05-01

    Fumes from a group of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes used on stainless steel were generated using three different metal transfer modes and four different shield gases. The objective was to identify and measure manganese (Mn) species in the fumes, and identify processes that are minimal generators of Mn species. The robotic welding system was operated in short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO2 and He/Ar), axial spray (AXS) mode (Ar/O2 and Ar/CO2), and pulsed axial-spray (PAXS) mode (Ar/O2). The fumes were analyzed for Mn by a sequential extraction process followed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Total elemental Mn, iron (Fe), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) were separately measured after aqua regia digestion and ICP-AES analysis. Soluble Mn2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Ni2+ in a simple biological buffer (phosphate-buffered saline) were determined at pH 7.2 and 5.0 after 2 h incubation at 37 C by ion chromatography. Results indicate that Mn was present in soluble form, acid-soluble form, and acid-soluble form after reduction by hydroxylamine, which represents soluble Mn0 and Mn2+ compounds, other Mn2+ compounds, and (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds, respectively. The dominant fraction was the acid-soluble Mn2+ fraction, but results varied with the process and shield gas. Soluble Mn mass percent in the fume ranged from 0.2 to 0.9%, acid-soluble Mn2+ compounds ranged from 2.6 to 9.3%, and acid plus reducing agent-soluble (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds ranged from 0.6 to 5.1%. Total Mn composition ranged from 7 to 15%. XRD results showed fumes had a crystalline content of 90-99% Fe3O4, and showed evidence of multiple Mn oxides, but overlaps and weak signals limited identification. Small amounts of the Mn2+ in the fume (<0.01 to ≈ 1% or <0.1 to ≈ 10 microg ml(-1)) and Ni2+ (<0.01 to ≈ 0.2% or <0.1 to ≈ 2 mg ml(-1)) ions were found in biological buffer media, but amounts were highly dependent on pH and the

  3. Evolution of mechanical properties of boron/manganese 22MnB5 steel under magnetic pulse influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falaleev, A. P.; Meshkov, V. V.; Vetrogon, A. A.; Shymchenko, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    The boron/manganese 22MnB5 steel can be noted as the widely used material for creation of details, which must withstand high amount of load and impact influences. The complexity and high labor input of restoration of boron steel parts leads to growing interest in the new forming technologies such as magnetic pulse forming. There is the investigation of the evolution of mechanical properties of 22MnB5 steel during the restoration by means of magnetic pulse influence and induction heating. The heating of 22MnB5 blanks to the temperature above 9000C was examined. The forming processes at various temperatures (800, 900 and 9500C) were performed during the experiments. The test measurements allowed to obtain the relationships between the strain and the operation parameters such as induced current, pulse discharge time and the operation temperature. Based on these results the assumption about usage of these parameters for control of deformation process was made. Taking into account the load distribution and the plasticity evolution during the heating process, the computer simulation was performed in order to obtain more clear strain distribution through the processed area. The measurement of hardness and the comparison with the properties evolution during hot stamping processes confirmed the obtained results.

  4. Quenching and partitioning response of carbon-manganese-silicon sheet steels containing nickel, molybdenum, aluminum and copper additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahkonen, Joonas

    In order to produce passenger vehicles with improved fuel economy and increased passenger safety, car manufacturers are in need of steels with enhanced strength levels and good formability. Recently, promising combinations of strength and ductility have been reported for several, so-called third generation advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and quenching and partitioning (Q&P) steels are increasingly being recognized as a promising third generation AHSS candidate. Early Q research used conventional TRIP steel chemistries and richer alloying strategies have been explored in more recent studies. However, systematic investigations of the effects of alloying elements on tensile properties and retained austenite fractions of Q&P steels are sparse. The objective of the present research was to investigate the alloying effects of carbon, manganese, molybdenum, aluminum, copper and nickel on tensile properties and microstructural evolution of Q&P heat treated sheet steels. Seven alloys were investigated with 0.3C-1.5Mn-1.5Si (wt pct) and 0.4C-1.5Mn-1.5Si alloys used to study carbon effects, a 0.3C-5Mn-1.6Si alloy to study manganese effects, 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo and 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo-0.85Al alloys to study molybdenum and aluminum effects and 0.2C-1.5Mn-1.3Si-1.5Cu and 0.2C-1.5Mn-1.3Si-1.5Cu-1.5Ni alloys to study copper and nickel effects. Increasing alloy carbon content was observed to mainly increase the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) up to 1865 MPa without significantly affecting total elongation (TE) levels. Increasing alloy carbon content also increased the resulting retained austenite (RA) fractions up to 22 vol pct. Measured maximum RA fractions were significantly lower than the predicted maximum RA levels in the 0.3C-1.5Mn-1.5Si and 0.4C-1.5Mn-1.5Si alloys, likely resulting from transition carbide formation. Increasing alloy manganese content increased UTS, TE and RA levels, and decreased yield strength (YS) and austenite carbon content (Cgamma) levels

  5. Mild steels coated with 14% manganese covered electrodes (E7-UM-200-K and E1-UM-350): Phenomena at the steel-coating interface

    SciTech Connect

    Molleda, F. . E-mail: fmolleda@etsin.upm.es; Mora, J.; Molleda, F.J.; Carrillo, E.; Mora, E.; Mellor, B.G.

    2006-12-15

    In this work the authors have studied the phenomena in the interface of the coating made on soft carbon steel with electrodes with a high content of manganese. The study has been done with scanning electron microscope and X-rays mapping images. These images show how the alloy elements are distributed in each of the constituent elements presented in the interface, and the nature of these constituents. These results have allowed us to verify that many of the problems that arise in homogeneous joints, as such localised corrosion, low interface resistance, etc., happened, precisely in these regions. As a help to determine the nature of the constituent elements, microhardness measurements have also been made.

  6. The Effect of Cooling Conditions on the Evolution of Non-metallic Inclusions in High Manganese TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Nan; Yang, Jian; Xin, Xiu-Ling; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Xu, Long-Yun

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the effect of cooling conditions on the evolution of non-metallic inclusions in high manganese TWIP steels was investigated based on experiments and thermodynamic calculations. In addition, the formation and growth behavior of AlN inclusions during solidification under different cooling conditions were analyzed with the help of thermodynamics and dynamics. The inclusions formed in the high manganese TWIP steels are classified into nine types: (1) AlN; (2) MgO; (3) CaS; (4) MgAl2O4; (5) AlN + MgO; (6) MgO + MgS; (7) MgO + MgS + CaS; (8) MgO + CaS; (9) MgAl2O4 + MgS. With the increase in the cooling rate, the volume fraction and area ratio of inclusions are almost constant; the size of inclusions decreases and the number density of inclusions increases in the steels. The thermodynamic results of inclusion types calculated with FactSage are consistent with the observed results. With increasing cooling rate, the diameter of AlN decreases. When the cooling rate increases from 0.75 to 4.83 K s-1, the measured average diameter of AlN decreases from 4.49 to 2.42 μm. Under the high cooling rate of 4.83 K s-1, the calculated diameter of AlN reaches 3.59 μm at the end of solidification. However, the calculated diameter of AlN increases to approximately 5.93 μm at the end of solidification under the low cooling rate of 0.75 K s-1. The calculated diameter of AlN decreases with increasing cooling rate. The theoretical calculation results of the change in diameter of AlN under the different cooling rates have the same trend with the observed results. The existences of inclusions in the steels, especially AlN which average sizes are 2.42 and 4.49 μm, respectively, are not considered to have obvious influences on the hot ductility.

  7. Effect of manganese sulfide on the precipitation behavior of tin in steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gui-lin; Song, Bo; Yang, Ling-zhi; Tao, Su-fen; Yang, Yong

    2014-07-01

    Tramp elements such as tin are considered harmful to steel because of hot brittleness they induce at high temperatures. Because tramp elements retained in steel scrap will be enriched in new steel due to the difficultly of their removal, studies on the precipitation behavior of tin are essential. In this study, the effects of different inclusions on the precipitation behavior of tin in steel were studied. The results show that the tin-rich phase precipitates at austenite grain boundaries in an Fe-5%Sn alloy without MnS precipitates, whereas Sn precipitates at the boundaries of MnS inclusions in steel that contains MnS precipitates. MnS is more effective than silicon dioxide or aluminum oxide as a nucleation site for the precipitation of the tin phase, which is consistent with the disregistry between the lattice parameters of the tin phase and those of the inclusions.

  8. High Manganese and Aluminum Steels for the Military and Transportation Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Laura; Van Aken, David

    2014-09-01

    Lightweight advanced high strength steels (AHSS) with aluminum contents between 4 and 12 weight percent have been the subject of intense interest in the last decade because of an excellent combination of high strain rate toughness coupled with up to a 17% reduction in density. Fully austenitic cast steels with a nominal composition of Fe-30%Mn-9%Al-0.9%C are almost 15% less dense than quenched and tempered Cr-Mo steels (SAE 4130) with equivalent strengths and dynamic fracture toughness. This article serves as a review of the tensile and high-strain-rate fracture properties associated mainly with silicon additions to this base composition. In the solution-treated condition, cast steels have high work-hardening rates with elongations up to 64%, room-temperature Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact energies up to 200 J, and dynamic fracture toughness over 700 kJ/m2. Silicon additions in the range of 0.59-1.56% Si have no significant effect on the mechanical properties of solution-treated steels but increased the tensile strength and hardness during aging. For steels aged at 530°C to an average hardness of 310 Brinell hardness number, HBW, increasing the amount of silicon from 1.07% to 1.56% decreased the room temperature CVN breaking energy from 92 J to 68 J and the dynamic fracture toughness from 376 kJ/m2 to 265 kJ/m2. Notch toughness is a strong function of phosphorus content, decreasing the solution-treated CVN impact toughness from 200 J in a 0.006% P steel to 28 J in a 0.07% P steel. For age-hardened steels with 1% Si, increasing levels of phosphorus from 0.001% to 0.043% decreased the dynamic fracture toughness from 376 kJ/m2 to 100 kJ/m2.

  9. Effect of Grain Refinement on the Mechanical Properties of a Nickel- and Manganese-Free High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Alireza; Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh

    2015-04-01

    Grain coarsening due to the high temperature exposure deteriorates mechanical properties of the high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels (HNASSs) produced by solution nitriding. To improve mechanical properties, the grains of nickel and manganese-free Fe-23Cr-2.4Mo-1.2N HNASS plates fabricated by pressurized solution nitriding were refined using a two-stage heat treatment process. Structural and mechanical properties were investigated using X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, hardness and tensile testing and compared with that of the conventional AISI 316L steel. The results show that the as-produced HNASS exhibits uniform deformation up to failure without necking and brittle inter-granular fracture. By grain refinement, the yield and tensile strengths as well as the elongation to failure are increased by 17.8, 21.2, and 108.3 pct, respectively, as compared to the as-produced HNASS. However, despite more than a double increase in tensile toughness and elongation to failure, the brittle inter-granular fracture is not suppressed. The HNASSs plastically deform through formation of straight slip bands. TEM observations indicate development of planar arrays of dislocations in tensile-deformed HNASSs. The enhancement in tensile strength and toughness by grain refinement is discussed on the basis of straight slip bands formation, number of dislocations in pile-ups, and incompatibility strain developed between adjacent grains.

  10. Levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, manganese and zinc in biological samples of paralysed steel mill workers with related to controls.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Kazi, Atif G; Shah, Faheem; Wadhwa, Sham Kumar; Kolachi, Nida Fatima; Shah, Abdul Qadir; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Kazi, Naveed

    2011-12-01

    The determination of essential trace and toxic elements in the biological samples of human beings is an important clinical screening procedure. This study aimed to assess the possible effects of environmental exposure on paralysed male workers (n = 75) belonging to the production and quality control departments of a steel mill. In this investigation, the concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, lead, manganese and zinc were determined in biological samples (blood, urine and scalp hair samples) of exposed paralysis and non-paralysed steel mill workers. For comparative purposes, unexposed healthy subjects of same age group were selected as referents. The elements in the biological samples were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry prior to microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity of the methodology was checked by the biological certified reference materials. The results indicate that the level understudy elements in all three biological samples were significantly higher in paralysed workers of both groups (quality control and production) as compared to referents (p < 0.01). The possible connection of these elements with the aetiology of disease is discussed. The results also show the need for immediate improvements of workplace ventilation and industrial hygiene practices. PMID:21547399

  11. Characterization of Nonmetallic Inclusions in High-Manganese and Aluminum-Alloyed Austenitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jin; Min, Dong Joon

    2012-07-01

    The effects of Al and Mn contents on the size, composition, and three-dimensional morphologies of inclusions formed in Fe- xMn- yAl ( x = 10 and 20 mass pct, y = 1, 3, and 6 mass pct) steels were investigated to enhance our understanding of the inclusion formation behavior in high Mn-Al-alloyed steels. By assuming that the alumina is a dominant oxide compound, the volume fraction of inclusions estimated from the chemical analysis, i.e., insoluble Al, in the Fe-Mn-3Al steels was larger than the inclusion volume fractions in the Fe-Mn-1Al and Fe-Mn-6Al steels. A similar tendency was found in the analysis of inclusions from a potentiostatic electrolytic extraction method. This finding could be explained from the terminal velocities of the compounds, which was affected by the thermophysical properties of Fe-Mn-Al steels. The inclusions formed in the Fe-Mn-Al-alloyed steels are classified into seven types according to chemistry and morphology: (1) single Al2O3 particle, (2) single AlN or AlON particle, (3) MnAl2O4 single galaxite spinel particle, (4) Al2O3(-Al(O)N) agglomerate, (5) single Mn(S,Se) particle, (6) oxide core with Mn(S,Se) skin (wrap), and (7) Mn(S,Se) core with Al2O3(-Al(O)N) aggregate (or bump). The Mn(S,Se) compounds were formed by the contamination of the steels by Se from the electrolytic Mn. Therefore, the raw materials (Mn) should be used carefully in the melting and casting processes of Fe-Mn-Al-alloyed steels.

  12. State-of-the-Science of High Manganese TWIP Steels for Automotive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cooman, B. C.; Chen, L.; Kim, Han Soo; Estrin, Y.; Kim, S. K.; Voswinckel, H.

    Recent trends in automotive industry towards improved passenger safety and reduced weight have led to a great interest in AHSS (Advanced High Strength Steel), and DP, TRIP, CP, MA and high-Mn TWIP (TWinning Induced Plasticity) steels are particularly promising due to their superior toughness and ductility. The properties of low SFE (Stacking Fault Energy) austenitic high Mn FeMnC steel exhibiting twinning-induced plasticity have recently been analyzed in detail. It is argued that although the mechanical properties of TRIP and TWIP steels are often assumed to be solely due to effects related to straininduced transformation and deformation twinning, respectively, other mechanisms may also play an essential role such as point-defect cluster formation, planar glide, pseudo-twinning, short range ordering, and dynamic strain ageing, e.g. in the case of TWIP steel. At low strain rates, the plastic deformation of TWIP steels is often controlled by the movement of very few well-defined localized deformation bands. The formation and propagation of these Portevin-LeChatelier (PLC) bands lead to serrated stress-strain curves, exhibiting a small negative strain rate sensitivity.

  13. Unveiling the Origin of Work Hardening Behavior in an Ultrafine-Grained Manganese Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steel by Hydrogen Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xu; Li, Wei; Zhao, Hongshan; Han, Qihang; Wang, Li; Jiao, Huisheng; Jin, Xuejun

    2016-09-01

    To reveal the origin of work hardening behavior in an ultrafine-grained manganese transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel, specific experiments were designed with the assistance of hydrogen. Although the effect of hydrogen on the austenite transformation was negligible, the work hardening rate ( Θ) was apparently reduced for hydrogenated samples, indicating that TRIP effect cannot account for the high Θ alone. The collaborative effect of dislocation accumulation in ferrite and austenite transformation is proposed to explain the responsible mechanism.

  14. Unveiling the Origin of Work Hardening Behavior in an Ultrafine-Grained Manganese Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steel by Hydrogen Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xu; Li, Wei; Zhao, Hongshan; Han, Qihang; Wang, Li; Jiao, Huisheng; Jin, Xuejun

    2016-07-01

    To reveal the origin of work hardening behavior in an ultrafine-grained manganese transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel, specific experiments were designed with the assistance of hydrogen. Although the effect of hydrogen on the austenite transformation was negligible, the work hardening rate (Θ) was apparently reduced for hydrogenated samples, indicating that TRIP effect cannot account for the high Θ alone. The collaborative effect of dislocation accumulation in ferrite and austenite transformation is proposed to explain the responsible mechanism.

  15. Microstructural and Texture Development in Two Austenitic Steels with High-Manganese Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Basudev; Ray, Ranjit Kumar; Leffers, Torben

    2015-11-01

    Two austenitic steels, Fe-21.3Mn-3.44Si-3.74Al-0.5C and Fe-29.8Mn-2.96Si-2.73Al-0.52C, were subjected to cold rolling with 30 to 80 pct reduction with an increment of 10 pct and subsequently the development of their microstructures and textures were studied. The overall texture after 80 pct cold reduction was Brass type. A weak Copper component {112}<111> was present at the early stage of deformation, which disappeared completely after 60 pct cold reduction. Extensive shear banding took place in both the steels, right from rather low cold rolling levels, which became more prominent at higher amounts of cold rolling. Formation of twin bands, along with cellular dislocation network, was observed in Steel A after 30 pct cold rolling. In case of Steel B, denser twin bands and dislocation cellular network were observed in early stage of deformation. After 80 pct cold reduction, the development of a strong brass-type texture in both the steels could be attributed predominantly to the formation of shear banding, possibly with some partial contribution coming from micro twinning.

  16. Evolution of Nickel-Manganese-Silicon Dominated Phases in Highly Irradiated Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Peter B Wells; Yuan Wu; Tim Milot; G. Robert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto; Brandon Miller; James Cole

    2014-11-01

    Formation of a high density of Ni-Mn-Si nm-scale precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels, both with and without Cu, could lead to severe embrittlement. Models long ago predicted that these precipitates, which are not treated in current embrittlement regulations, would emerge only at high fluence. However, the mechanisms and variables that control Ni-Mn- Si precipitate formation, and their detailed characteristics, have not been well understood. High flux irradiations of six steels with systematic variations in Cu and Ni were carried out at ˜ 295±5°C to high and very high neutron fluences of ˜ 1.3x1020 and 1.1x1021 n/cm2. Atom probe tomography (APT) shows that significant mole fractions of these precipitates form in the Cu bearing steels at ˜ 1.3x1020 n/cm2, while they are only beginning to develop in Cu-free steels. However, large mole fractions, far in excess of those found in previous studies, are observed at 1.1x1021 n/cm2 at all Cu levels. The precipitates diffract, and in one case are compositionally and structurally consistent with the Mn6Ni16Si7 G-phase. At the highest fluence, the large precipitate mole fractions primarily depend on the steel Ni content, rather than Cu, and lead to enormous strength increases up to about 700 MPa. The implications of these results to light water reactor life extension are discussed briefly.

  17. Investigations of structural transformation within metal (austenite chromium-manganese steel) at the external surface of steam superheating tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, V. A.; Pshechenkova, T. P.; Shumovskaya, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    The elemental composition of an altered layer at the external surface of a steam superheating tube of grade DI59 steel is investigated after long-term operation. It is shown that the layer is located between a scale and a matrix and depleted by silicon, manganese, copper, and chromium with the maximum oxidizer affinity, enriched by iron and nickel to 90%, and mainly composed of the α-Fe phase (ferrite) with the ferromagnetic properties. The layer formed as a result of selective oxidation and diffusion from the matrix into the metal scale with the less standard free energy of the formation of sulfides and oxides. A magnetic ferrite meter is used in the experimental investigation of the layer evolution by testing grade DI59 steel for heat resistance in air environment at temperatures of 585, 650, and 700°C for 15 × 103 h; creep at a temperature of 750°C and a stress of 60 MPa; and long-term strength at temperatures of 700 and 750°C and stresses of from 30 to 80 MPa. Specimens for tests are made of tubes under as-received conditions. The relationship between the ferrite phase content in the surface metal layer and the temperature and time of test is determined. The dependence is developed to evaluate the equivalent temperature for operation of the external surface of steam superheating tubes using data of magnetic ferritometry. It is shown that operation temperatures that are determined by the ferrite phase content and the σ phase concentration in the metal structure of steam superheating tubes with the significant operating time are close. It is proposed to use magnetic ferritometry for revelation of thermal nonuniformity and worst tubes of steam superheaters of HPP boilers.

  18. Tensile, Fracture, and Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Behavior of High Manganese Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyilas, A.; Weiss, K.; Grikurov, G.; Zoidze, N.

    2006-03-01

    Mechanical low temperature investigations were carried out to determine the cryogenic mechanical properties of newly developed Fe-Cr-Mn alloys with contents of chromium between 5 % and 10 % and manganese between 30 % and 40 % under the Project G-811, Russia. The final products were forged, rolled, and solution heat treated to obtain appropriate plate sizes necessary for the mechanical measurements. The tensile properties of these alloys determined between 4 K and 7 K show for certain alloy combination high elongation values at fracture of greater than 50 % with considerable high yield strengths around 900 MPa. The measured fracture toughness values with small scale compact tension specimens using elastic plastic J-tests show KIC data between 100 MPa√m and 220 MPa√m according to the alloy combination. Fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) measurements of these alloys result also in some alloy combination case, high resistance against crack propagation with measured Paris coefficients of m ˜ 5 and C ˜ 8.5 E-13 mm/cycle. Thermal expansion of these alloys has been also determined resulting in values between 1600 μm/m and 1700 μm/m expansion from 5 K to 290 K.

  19. A structure created by intersecting ɛ martensite variant plates in a high-manganese steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Sawaguchi, T.; Ogawa, K.; Yin, F.; Zhao, X.

    2011-12-01

    Microstructural evidence for a new intersection structure, which has been observed in grains oriented to near ⟨101⟩ in a polycrystalline Fe-30Mn-4Si-2Al TRIP/TWIP steel, was obtained by combined use of electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, and the responsible intersection mechanisms are discussed from crystallographic and thermodynamic viewpoints. A γ phase with the orientation 90° rotated from the matrix with respect to the intersection axis is produced at the intersection of two dense ɛ plates, whereas the twinning of the obstacle ɛ plate occurs when the incident plate is a fine γ/ɛ lamella or a stacking fault bundle. The results are compared with various structures reported previously, and the wide variation of the intersection reactions is interpreted by their dependence on thermodynamic stability of the phases, grain orientation and shear amount.

  20. Mapping Phase Transformations in the Heat-Affected-Zone of Carbon Manganese Steel Welds using Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Ressler, T; Palmer, T A

    2001-12-04

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) was used to investigate phase transformations that occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in AISI 1005 carbon-manganese steel. In situ SRXRD experiments performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) probed the phases present in the HAZ during welding, and these real-time observations of the HAZ phases were used to construct a map of the phase transformations occurring in the HAZ. This map identified 5 principal phase regions between the liquid weld pool and the unaffected base metal for the carbon-manganese steel studied in this investigation. Regions of annealing, recrystallization, partial transformation and complete transformation to {alpha}-Fe, {gamma}-Fe, and {delta}-Fe phases were identified using SRXRD, and the experimental results were combined with a heat flow model of the weld to investigate transformation kinetics under both positive and negative temperature gradients in the HAZ. From the resulting phase transformation map, the kinetics of phase transformations that occur under the highly non-isothermal heating and cooling cycles produced during welding of steels can now be better understood and modeled.

  1. Small-angle neutron scattering analysis of Mn–C clusters in high-manganese 18Mn–0.6C steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Mihyun; Shin, Eunjoo; Woo, Wanchuck; Lee, Young-Kook

    2014-10-15

    Nanometer-scale particles (Mn–C clusters) were analyzed quantitatively using small-angle neutron scattering in 18Mn–0.6C (wt.%) austenite high-manganese steel. The size, number, and volume fraction of the particles were determined as a function of strain (0, 5, 15, 30, 45, 50%) at different temperatures (25 and 100 °C). The diameter of the cluster ranges from 2 to 14 nm in the matrix. The total volume fraction of the cluster significantly increases from 2.7 × 10{sup −6} to 8.7 × 10{sup −6} as the strain increases. Such clustering phenomenon is correlated to the serration behavior under loading in high-manganese steels. - Highlights: • Show Mn-C clustering as function of strain in 18Mn-0.6C TWIP steel. • Determine the size, number, and volume fraction of clusters quantitatively. • Compare the clustering behavior at 25 and 100 °C.

  2. Control of cryogenic intergranular fracture in high-manganese austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.

    1986-12-01

    The sources of cryogenic intergranular embrittlement in high-Mn austenitic steels and the conditions necessary for its control are examined. It is shown that the high-Mn alloys are inherently susceptible to intergranular embrittlement due to both their low grain boundary cohesion and heterogeneous deformation characteristics. Extrinsic sources of embrittlement which could account for the transition behavior are not observed. An Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) study shows no indication of impurity-segregation-induced embrittlement. No grain boundary precipitation is observed, and austenite stabilization does not ensure ductile fracture. The influence of chemistry modifications on the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior were also examined through additions of N, Cr, and C to binary Fe-31 Mn. Nitrogen additions increase the 77K yield strength at a rate of 2200 MPa per weight percent N, and increase the austenite stability, but also increase the susceptibility of ternary alloys to intergranular fracture. Quaternary Cr additions are effective in increasing the N solubility, and lower the transition temperature. Carbon additions result in complete suppression of intergranular fracture at 77K. Qualitatively significant changes in the deformation heterogeneity with chemistry modifications are not observed. The temper-toughening of Fe-Mn-Cr-N alloys is associated with the grain boundary segregation of boron and the redistribution of N. Both boron and carbon are expected to inhibit intergranular fracture through increases in grain boundary cohesion.

  3. Effect of initial grain size on inhomogeneous plastic deformation and twinning behavior in high manganese austenitic steel with a polycrystalline microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueji, R.; Tsuchida, N.; Harada, K.; Takaki, K.; Fujii, H.

    2015-08-01

    The grain size effect on the deformation twinning in a high manganese austenitic steel which is so-called TWIP (twining induced plastic deformation) steel was studied in order to understand how to control deformation twinning. The 31wt%Mn-3%Al-3% Si steel was cold rolled and annealed at various temperatures to obtain fully recrystallized structures with different mean grain sizes. These annealed sheets were examined by room temperature tensile tests at a strain rate of 10-4/s. The coarse grained sample (grain size: 49.6μm) showed many deformation twins and the deformation twinning was preferentially found in the grains in which the tensile axis is parallel near to [111]. On the other hand, the sample with finer grains (1.8 μm) had few grains with twinning even after the tensile deformation. The electron back scattering diffraction (EB SD) measurements clarified the relationship between the anisotropy of deformation twinning and that of inhomogeneous plastic deformation. Based on the EBSD analysis, the mechanism of the suppression of deformation twinning by grain refinement was discussed with the concept of the slip pattern competition between the slip system governed by a grain boundary and that activated by the macroscopic load.

  4. Investigation of the Effect of Tungsten Substitution on Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Performance of In Situ VC-Reinforced High-Manganese Austenitic Steel Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Emad Galin; Karimzadeh, Neda; Varahram, Naser; Davami, Parviz

    2013-08-01

    Particulate VC-reinforced high-manganese austenitic steel matrix composites with different vanadium and tungsten contents were synthesized by conventional alloying and casting route. Microstructural characterizations showed that the composites processed by in situ precipitation of the reinforcements were composed of V8C7 particulates distributed in an austenitic matrix. It was observed that addition of tungsten to austenite increases work-hardening rate of subsurface layer during pin-on disk wear test. The maximum abrasive wear resistance was achieved at tungsten content equal to 2 wt pct. However, excessive addition of tungsten promoted the formation of W3C phase and reduced the abrasive wear resistance because of decrease in distribution homogeneity and volume fraction of the reinforcing VC particles.

  5. Manganese recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the flow and processing of manganese within the U.S. economy in 1998 with emphasis on the extent to which manganese is recycled. Manganese was used mostly as an alloying agent in alloys in which it was a minor component. Manganese was recycled mostly within scrap of iron and steel. A small amount was recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Very little manganese was recycled from materials being recovered specifically for their manganese content. For the United States in 1998, 218,000 metric tons of manganese was estimated to have been recycled from old scrap, of which 96% was from iron and steel scrap. Efficiency of recycling was estimated as 53% and recycling rate as 37%. Metallurgical loss of manganese was estimated to be about 1.7 times that recycled. This loss was mostly into slags from iron and steel production, from which recovery of manganese has yet to be shown economically feasible.

  6. Mapping Phase Transformations in the Heat-Affected-Zone of Carbon Manganese Steel Welds using Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Ressler, T; Palmer, T A

    2002-02-12

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) was used to investigate phase transformations that occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in AISI 1005 carbon-manganese steel. In situ SRXRD experiments performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) probed the phases present in the HAZ during welding, and these real-time observations of the HAZ phases were used to construct a map of the phase transformations occurring in the HAZ. This map identified 5 principal phase regions between the liquid weld pool and the unaffected base metal. Regions of annealing, recrystallization, partial transformation and complete transformation to {alpha}-Fe, {gamma}-Fe, and {delta}-Fe phases were identified using SRXRD, and the experimental results were combined with a heat flow model of the weld and thermodynamic calculations to compare these results with the important phase transformation isotherms. From the resulting phase transformation map, the kinetics of phase transformations that occur under the highly non-isothermal heating and cooling cycles produced during welding of steels can be better understood and modeled.

  7. On the Effect of Manganese on Grain Size Stability and Hardenability in Ultrafine-Grained Ferrite/Martensite Dual-Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagnotto, Marion; Ponge, Dirk; Raabe, Dierk

    2012-01-01

    Two plain carbon steels with varying manganese content (0.87 wt pct and 1.63 wt pct) were refined to approximately 1 μm by large strain warm deformation and subsequently subjected to intercritical annealing to produce an ultrafine grained ferrite/martensite dual-phase steel. The influence of the Mn content on microstructure evolution is studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Mn distribution in ferrite and martensite is analyzed by high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The experimental findings are supported by the calculated phase diagrams, equilibrium phase compositions, and the estimated diffusion distances using Thermo-Calc (Thermo-Calc Software, McMurray, PA) and Dictra (Thermo-Calc Software). Mn substantially enhances the grain size stability during intercritical annealing and the ability of austenite to undergo martensitic phase transformation. The first observation is explained in terms of the alteration of the phase transformation temperatures and the grain boundary mobility, while the second is a result of the Mn enrichment in cementite during large strain warm deformation, which is inherited by the newly formed austenite and increases its hardenability. The latter is the main reason why the ultrafine-grained material exhibits a hardenability that is comparable with the hardenability of the coarse-grained reference material.

  8. Steel dust in the New York City subway system as a source of manganese, chromium, and iron exposures for transit workers.

    PubMed

    Chillrud, Steven N; Grass, David; Ross, James M; Coulibaly, Drissa; Slavkovich, Vesna; Epstein, David; Sax, Sonja N; Pederson, Dee; Johnson, David; Spengler, John D; Kinney, Patrick L; Simpson, H James; Brandt-Rauf, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The United States Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 reflected increasing concern about potential effects of low-level airborne metal exposure on a wide array of illnesses. Here we summarize results demonstrating that the New York City (NYC) subway system provides an important microenvironment for metal exposures for NYC commuters and subway workers and also describe an ongoing pilot study of NYC transit workers' exposure to steel dust. Results from the TEACH (Toxic Exposure Assessment, a Columbia and Harvard) study in 1999 of 41 high-school students strongly suggest that elevated levels of iron, manganese, and chromium in personal air samples were due to exposure to steel dust in the NYC subway. Airborne concentrations of these three metals associated with fine particulate matter were observed to be more than 100 times greater in the subway environment than in home indoor or outdoor settings in NYC. While there are currently no known health effects at the airborne levels observed in the subway system, the primary aim of the ongoing pilot study is to ascertain whether the levels of these metals in the subway air affect concentrations of these metals or related metabolites in the blood or urine of exposed transit workers, who due to their job activities could plausibly have appreciably higher exposures than typical commuters. The study design involves recruitment of 40 transit workers representing a large range in expected exposures to steel dust, the collection of personal air samples of fine particulate matter, and the collection of blood and urine samples from each monitored transit worker. PMID:15738337

  9. Mineral of the month: manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corathers, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most important ferrous metals and one of the few for which the United States is totally dependent on imports. It is a black, brittle element predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production, which together provide the largest market for manganese (about 83 percent). It is also used as an alloy with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Nonmetallurgical applications of manganese include battery cathodes, soft ferrite magnets used in electronics, micronutrients found in fertilizers and animal feed, water treatment chemicals, and a colorant for bricks and ceramics.

  10. The segregation behavior of manganese and silicon at the coherent interfaces of copper precipitates in ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yao-Ping; Zhao, Shi-Jin

    2014-02-01

    We have performed first-principles calculations to study the segregation behavior of Mn and Si at the interfaces of Cu precipitates in ferritic steels. We find that both the segregation energies of substitutional Mn and Si at the interfaces of the Cu precipitates are negligible. However, the energetics indicate that the self-interstitial dumbbells containing Mn or Si (Mn@SI or Si@SI)

  11. Toughness evaluation of a shielded metal arc carbon-manganese steel welded joint subjected to multiple post weld heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, I.S.; Teixeira, J.C.G.

    1999-12-01

    This study was part of a program to investigate the influence of multiple post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the fracture toughness and defect tolerance of a welded joint. The present work reports base metal data obtained for a quenched and tempered BS7191 Grade 450EM steel (0.10wt%C-1.08wt%Mn), weld metal data for a ferritic multipass weld obtained by shielded metal arc welding using an AWS E-9018M type electrode, and heat affected zone (HAZ) data obtained using a modified bead on groove technique for different PWHT conditions. The effect of the repeated heat treatment cycles on the mechanical properties was evaluated by hardness tests and toughness testing assessed by Charpy V-notch and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) techniques. The characterization of the microstructure was undertaken utilizing optical and electron microscopy. As fabrication codes for new equipment do not allow more than three PWHT cycles, the application of more cycles is only justifiable for old equipment when a fitness for purpose criterion is applied and these restrictions are not applicable. The results obtained are currently applied in repair work and revamps of pressure vessels and gas storage tanks.

  12. Influence of tungsten, carbon and nitrogen on toughness and weldability of low activation austenitic high manganese stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Y.; Shimoide, Y.; Abraham, M.; Kutsuna, M.; Miyahara, K.

    1992-09-01

    The effect of alloying elements of tungsten, carbon and nitrogen on high temperature strength, toughness and weldability of Fe12Cr15Mn alloy has been investigated. The high temperature stregth of Fe12Cr15Mn0.2C0.1N at 873 K increases with the addition of 2-300W without affecting ductility. The toughness as estimated by Charpy tests, is also not influenced by the addition of 2-3%W, while the increase of carbon content decreases the absorbed energy. The transition temperature shifts to higher temperature by aging at 873 K for 3600 ks, but it is still lower than room temperature. The degradation of tougheness after aging is considered to be related to the precipitation of M23C6 on grain boundaries. The weldability evaluated by hot cracking susceptibility is not affected by alloying of tungsten and carbon in this alloy system. It is noted that the alloys studied show less hot cracking susceptibility than commercial AISI 316L stainless steel.

  13. Dynamics of phase transformations and microstructure evolution in carbon-manganese steel arc welds using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Joe; Ressler, Thorsten; Elmer, John W

    2003-03-01

    Phase transformations that occur in both the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and the fusion zone (FZ) of a carbon-manganese steel spot weld have been investigated using time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TRXRD) with time resolutions down to 50 ms. It is found that in both zones the gamma(f.c.c.) --> alpha(b.c.c.) transformation on cooling is twice as fast as the forward transformation of alpha --> gamma on heating. Profile analysis of the major Bragg reflections recorded in the TRXRD patterns reveals similarities and differences in the microstructural evolution with time in the HAZ and in the FZ. The latter undergoes melting and solidification in addition to solid-state transformations. With increasing temperature, the (110) d-spacing of the alpha phase prior to and during the alpha --> gamma transformation and the (111) d-spacing of the gamma phase just after the same transformation exhibit a decrease. The observed (and unusual) lattice contraction with temperature rise may be attributed to chemical effects, such as carbide precipitation in the alpha matrix, and/or mechanical effects due to stress relief. In the FZ, the gamma-Fe that forms has a preferential (200) texture on solidification of the liquid, whereas, on cooling in the HAZ, the gamma-Fe retains largely a (111) texture that is induced in the alpha --> gamma transformation on heating. On cooling in the HAZ, the width of the gamma(111) reflection increases initially, which is indicative of microstrain developing in the f.c.c. lattice, but decreases as expected, with a reduction of thermal disorder, on further cooling until the completion of the gamma --> alpha transformation. In the FZ, however, the microstrain in the gamma phase increases steadily on solidification and more rapidly for the duration of the gamma --> alpha transformation on further cooling. The final microstructure of the FZ is likely to consist of a single alpha phase dispersed in two morphological entities, whereas in the HAZ the alpha phase

  14. Manganese consumption and recycling flow model. Information circular/1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gabler, R.C.

    1995-04-01

    The report follows the flow of manganese through its metallurgical and chemical applications and highlights areas where significant losses occur owing to downgrading, export, or disposal. The study indicates that materials containing 695,000 short tons (st) of manganese were consumed domestically in 1990. Scrap recovery specifically for manganese recycling was insignificant. However, considerable manganese was recycled through processing operations as a minor component of ferrous and nonferrous scrap and steel slag. The major loss category is manganese lost in steel processing, 323,156 st or 46 pct of the 1990 apparent consumption. Most of this loss reports to steelmaking slags. Recovery from slags is technically feasible, but is not economically feasible.

  15. Low Mn alloy steel for cryogenic service

    DOEpatents

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Niikura, M.

    A ferritic cryogenic steel which has a relatively low (about 4 to 6%) manganese content and which has been made suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures by a thermal cycling treatment followed by a final tempering. The steel includes 4 to 6% manganese, 0.02 to 0.06% carbon, 0.1 to 0.4% molybdenum and 0 to 3% nickel.

  16. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers

    SciTech Connect

    Barrington, W.W.; Angle, C.R.; Willcockson, N.K.; Padula, M.A.; Korn, T.

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a frog shop for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6--10 years before and 1.2--3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} in 29% and 0.2 mg/m{sup 3} in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR{prime} interval) and the rates of change at low frequency and high frequency. MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used.

  17. Globally sustainable manganese metal production and use.

    PubMed

    Hagelstein, Karen

    2009-09-01

    The "cradle to grave" concept of managing chemicals and wastes has been a descriptive analogy of proper environmental stewardship since the 1970s. The concept incorporates environmentally sustainable product choices-such as metal alloys utilized steel products which civilization is dependent upon. Manganese consumption is related to the increasing production of raw steel and upgrading ferroalloys. Nonferrous applications of manganese include production of dry-cell batteries, plant fertilizer components, animal feed and colorant for bricks. The manganese ore (high grade 35% manganese) production world wide is about 6 million ton/year and electrolytic manganese metal demand is about 0.7 million ton/year. The total manganese demand is consumed globally by industries including construction (23%), machinery (14%), and transportation (11%). Manganese is recycled within scrap of iron and steel, a small amount is recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Recycling rate is 37% and efficiency is estimated as 53% [Roskill Metals and Minerals Reports, January 13, 2005. Manganese Report: rapid rise in output caused by Chinese crude steel production. Available from: http://www.roskill.com/reports/manganese.]. Environmentally sustainable management choices include identifying raw material chemistry, utilizing clean production processes, minimizing waste generation, recycling materials, controlling occupational exposures, and collecting representative environmental data. This paper will discuss two electrolytically produced manganese metals, the metal production differences, and environmental impacts cited to date. The two electrolytic manganese processes differ due to the addition of sulfur dioxide or selenium dioxide. Adverse environmental impacts due to use of selenium dioxide methodology include increased water consumption and order of magnitude greater solid waste generation per ton of metal processed. The use of high grade manganese ores in the electrolytic process also

  18. On the corrosion resistance of AISI 316L-type stainless steel coated with manganese and annealed with flow of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaloni, Hadi; Agha-Taheri, Ensieh; Abdi, Fateme

    2016-06-01

    AISI 316L-type stainless steel was coated with 300-nm-thick Mn thin films and post-annealed at 673 K with a constant flow of oxygen (250 cm3/min). The films crystallographic and morphological structures were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) before corrosion test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after corrosion test. Corrosion behavior of the samples in 0.3, 0.5 and 0.6 M NaCl solutions was investigated by means of potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Results showed that the corrosion inhibition of annealed Mn/SS316L in all NaCl solutions with different concentrations is higher than that of bare SS316L. A correlation is achieved between the structural variation of the films with the potentiodynamic and EIS corrosion results.

  19. Manganese laser using manganese chloride as lasant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    A manganese vapor laser utilizing manganese chloride as a lasant has been observed and investigated. Lasing is attained by means of two consecutive electrical discharges. The maximum laser output is obtained at a vapor pressure of about 3 torr, a temperature of 680 C, and a time delay between electrical discharges of 150 microsec. The maximum energy density is 1.3 microjoule per cu cm.

  20. Manganese uptake of imprinted polymers

    DOE Data Explorer

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-09-30

    Batch tests of manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C . Data on manganese uptake for two consecutive cycles are included.

  1. Formation of Copper Sulfide Artifacts During Electrolytic Dissolution of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jia; Pistorius, P. Chris

    2013-06-01

    Based on equilibrium considerations, copper sulfide is not expected to form in manganese-containing steel, yet previous workers reported finding copper sulfide in transmission electron microscope samples which had been prepared by electropolishing. It is proposed that copper sulfide can form during electrolytic dissolution because of the much greater stability of copper sulfide relative to manganese sulfide in contact with an electrolyte containing copper and manganese cations. This mechanism has been demonstrated with aluminum-killed steel samples.

  2. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF MANGANESE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biological effects of manganese were studied in a town on the coast of Dalmatia in which a ferromanganese plant has been operating since before World War II. The study focused on the question of whether the exposure to manganese can cause a higher incidence of respiratory dis...

  3. Non-Magnetic, Tough, Corrosion- and Wear-Resistant Knives From Bulk Metallic Glasses and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Douglas C.; Potter, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Quality knives are typically fabricated from high-strength steel alloys. Depending on the application, there are different requirements for mechanical and physical properties that cause problems for steel alloys. For example, diver's knives are generally used in salt water, which causes rust in steel knives. Titanium diver's knives are a popular alternative due to their salt water corrosion resistance, but are too soft to maintain a sharp cutting edge. Steel knives are also magnetic, which is undesirable for military applications where the knives are used as a tactical tool for diffusing magnetic mines. Steel is also significantly denser than titanium (8 g/cu cm vs. 4.5 g/cu cm), which results in heavier knives for the same size. Steel is hard and wear-resistant, compared with titanium, and can keep a sharp edge during service. A major drawback of both steel and titanium knives is that they must be ground or machined into the final knife shape from a billet. Since most knives have a mirrored surface and a complex shape, manufacturing them is complex. It would be more desirable if the knife could be cast into a net or near-net shape in a single step. The solution to the deficiencies of titanium, steel, and ceramic knives is to fabricate them using bulk metallic glasses (or composites). These alloys can be cast into net or near-net shaped knives with a combination of properties that exceed both titanium and steel. A commercially viable BMG (bulk metallic glass) or composite knife is one that exhibits one or all of the following properties: It is based on titanium, has a self-sharpening edge, can retain an edge during service, is hard, is non-magnetic, is corrosion-resistant against a variety of corrosive environments, is tough (to allow for prying), can be cast into a net-shape with a mirror finish and a complex shape, has excellent wear resistance, and is low-density. These properties can be achieved in BMG and composites through alloy chemistry and processing. For

  4. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, D.; Hepworth, M.T.

    1993-09-01

    The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies at the US Steel Fundamental Research Laboratories in Monroeville, PA, by E.T. Turkdogan indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt % ore + 25 wt % Al{sub 2}/O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This presentation gives the thermodynamic background for consideration of manganese-based sorbents as an alternative to zinc ferrite. To date the work which has been in progress for nine months is limited at this stage to thermogravimetric testing of four formulations of manganese-alumina sorbents to determine the optimum conditions of pelletization and induration to produce reactive pellets.

  5. Insensitivity of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance to non-magnetic electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Y.; Song, C. Wang, G. Y.; Zeng, F.; Pan, F.

    2013-11-11

    Ferromagnetic electrodes play a crucial role in magnetoresistance effect and spin injection, whereas the essential features of non-magnetic metal electrodes in spintronics are commonly ignored except for their electrical conductivity. Here, we verify that the room-temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) behavior in antiferromagnet-based [Pt/Co]/IrMn/AlO{sub x}/metal (metal = Pt, Au, Cu, Al) junctions is insensitive to the top metal electrodes. Similar out-of-plane signals are detected for different electrodes, in contrast to the varied shapes of in-plane TAMR curves which are most likely attributed to the differences in the multidomain structure of the magnetic electrode. This would add a different dimension to spintronics.

  6. Magnetic Nanoparticles in Non-magnetic CNTs and Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayondo, Moses; Seifu, Dereje

    Magnetic nanoparticles were embedded in non-magnetic CNTs and graphene matrix to incorporate all the advantages and the unique properties of CNTs and graphene. Composites of CNTs and graphene with magnetic nanoparticles may offer new opportunities for a wide variety of potential applications such as magnetic data storage, magnetic force microscopy tip, electromagnetic interference shields, thermally conductive films, reinforced polymer composites, transparent electrodes for displays, solar cells, gas sensors, magnetic nanofluids, and magnetically guided drug delivery systems. Magnetic nanoparticles coated CNTs can also be used as an electrode in lithium ion battery to replace graphite because of the higher theoretical capacity. Graphene nanocomposites, coated with magnetic sensitive nanoparticles, have demonstrated enhanced magnetic property. We would like to acknowledge support by NSF-MRI-DMR-1337339.

  7. Size dependence of non-magnetic thickness in YIG nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyaifar, M.; Mohammadpour, H.; Dorafshani, M.; Hasanpour, A.

    2016-07-01

    This study is focused on particle size dependence of structural and magnetic properties in yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12) nanoparticles. A series of YIG samples with different particle size were produced by varying the annealing temperatures. The X-ray analysis revealed an inverse correlation between lattice parameter and the crystallite size. The normal distribution is used for fitting the particles size distribution which is extracted from scanning electron micrographs. Also, by using the results of vibrating sample magnetometer, the magnetic diameter was calculated based on Langevin model in order to investigate the variation of dead layer thickness. Furthermore, the observed line broadening in Mössbauer spectra confirmed the increase of non-magnetic thickness due to the reduction of particle size.

  8. The effect of manganese additions on the reactive evaporation of chromium in Ni–Cr alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-05-01

    Chromium is used as an alloy addition in stainless steels and nickel-chromium alloys to form protective chromium oxide scales. Chromium oxide undergoes reactive evaporation in high temperature exposures in the presence of oxygen and/or water vapor. The deposition of gaseous chromium species onto solid oxide fuel cell electrodes can reduce the efficiency of the fuel cell. Manganese additions to the alloy can reduce the activity of chromium in the oxide, either from solid solution replacement of chromium with manganese (at low levels of manganese) or from the formation of manganese-chromium spinels (at high levels of manganese). This reduction in chromium activity leads to a predicted reduction in chromium evaporation by as much as a factor of 35 at 800 °C and 55 at 700 °C. Quantifying the effects of manganese additions on chromium evaporation should aid alloy development of metallic interconnects and balance-of-plant alloys.

  9. [Function and disease in manganese].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    Manganese is a metal that has been known named a Greek word "Magnesia" meaning magnesia nigra from Roman Empire. Manganese provide the wide range of metablic function and the multiple abnomalities from its deficiency or toxicity. In 1931, the essentiality of manganese was demonstrated with the authoritative poor growth and declined reproduction in its deficiency. Manganese deficiency has been recognized in a number of species and its signs are impaired growth, impaired reproduction, ataxia, skeletal abnormalities and disorders in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Manganese toxicity is also acknowledged as health hazard for animals and humans. Here manganese nutrition, metabolism and metabolic function are summarized. PMID:27455810

  10. Detecting interfacial defects at magnetic/non-magnetic junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas; Flatté, Michael

    Recent three terminal (3T) measurements in Co/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 show that spin-dependent transport through an interfacial defect is occurring instead of Hanle dephasing. We propose extending 3T measurements into a coherent regime where single defects are detected by their local fields. The setup involves defects being situated between biased non-magnetic (NM) and ferromagnetic (FM) contacts. Spin torque on the FM drives an AC magnetization. Due to the large exchange interaction, the ability for charge to enter the FM depends on its spin and FM's relative orientation. As the FM precesses, the spin is dynamically filtered and a precessing spin accumulation remains at the defect. Local fields also precess the defect spin and interfere with the dynamic spin filtering. If the AC and local field are resonant, the spin accumulation is locked anti-parallel to the FM and leads to a dip in current. By adjusting the AC frequency, information on the local field is ascertained which, for hyperfine local fields, tells which nuclei are present at the defect and aids in identifying the defect. In the DC limit, defect spin accumulation leads to modifications in Hanle signals This material is based on work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-SC0014336.

  11. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  12. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  13. Manganese biomining: A review.

    PubMed

    Das, A P; Sukla, L B; Pradhan, N; Nayak, S

    2011-08-01

    Biomining comprises of processing and extraction of metal from their ores and concentrates using microbial techniques. Currently this is used by the mining industry to extract copper, uranium and gold from low grade ores but not for low grade manganese ore in industrial scale. The study of microbial genomes, metabolites and regulatory pathways provide novel insights to the metabolism of bioleaching microorganisms and their synergistic action during bioleaching operations. This will promote understanding of the universal regulatory responses that the biomining microbial community uses to adapt to their changing environment leading to high metal recovery. Possibility exists of findings ways to imitate the entire process during industrial manganese biomining endeavor. This paper reviews the current status of manganese biomining research operations around the world, identifies factors that drive the selection of biomining as a processing technology, describes challenges in exploiting these innovations, and concludes with a discussion of Mn biomining's future. PMID:21632238

  14. Low Mn alloy steel for cryogenic service and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Jr., John W.; Niikura, Masakazu

    1981-01-01

    A ferritic cryogenic steel which has a relatively low (about 4-6%) manganese content and which has been made suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures by a thermal cycling treatment followed by a final tempering. The steel includes 4-6% manganese, 0.02-0.06% carbon, 0.1-0.4% molybdenum and 0-3% nickel.

  15. Analysis on electromagnetic characteristics and military application of non-magnetized discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiachun; Miao, Lei; Li, Zhigang

    2015-11-01

    Firstly, the dispersion equation of a plane electromagnetic wave in homogeneous and non-magnetized discharge plasma was established. According to the different frequency of electromagnetic wave and plasma parameters, the characteristics were discussed when the plasma interacted with electromagnetic waves. Then the gas discharge approach was put forward according to characteristics of plasma generated by different methods and their advantages and disadvantages. The possibility of using non-magnetized discharge plasma for the military purpose was analyzed. In the end, the principle and characteristics of the application of the non-magnetized discharge plasma were studied in the fields of stealth and protection against strong electromagnetic pulse.

  16. Manganese, Metallogenium, and Martian Microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, L. Y.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese could easily be considered an abundant element in the Martian regolith, assuming that the composition of martian meteorites reflects the composition of the planet. Mineralogical analyses of 5 SNC meteorites have revealed an average manganese oxide concentration of 0.48%, relative to the 0.1% concentration of manganese found in the Earth's crust. On the Earth, the accumulation of manganese oxides in oceans, soils, rocks, sedimentary ores, fresh water systems, and hydrothermal vents can be largely attributed to microbial activity. Manganese is also a required trace nutrient for most life forms and participates in many critical enzymatic reactions such as photosynthesis. The wide-spread process of bacterial manganese cycling on Earth suggests that manganese is an important element to both geology and biology. Furthermore, there is evidence that bacteria can be fossilized within manganese ores, implying that manganese beds may be good repositories for preserved biomarkers. A particular genus of bacteria, known historically as Metallogenium, can form star-shaped manganese oxide minerals (called metallogenium) through the action of manganese oxide precipitation along its surface. Fossilized structures that resemble metallogenium have been found in Precambrian sedimentary formations and in Cretaceous-Paleogene cherts. The Cretaceous-Paleogene formations are highly enriched in manganese and have concentrations of trace elements (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Co) similar to modern-day manganese oxide deposits in marine environments. The appearance of metallogenium-like fossils associated with manganese deposits suggests that bacteria may be preserved within the minerals that they form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Comparison of non-magnetic and magnetic beads in bead-based assays.

    PubMed

    Hansenová Maňásková, Silvie; van Belkum, Alex; Endtz, Hubert P; Bikker, Floris J; Veerman, Enno C I; van Wamel, Willem J B

    2016-09-01

    Multiplex bead-based flow cytometry is an attractive way for simultaneous, rapid and cost-effective analysis of multiple analytes in a single sample. Previously, we developed various bead-based assays using non-magnetic beads coated with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens for the detection of antibodies. Here, we compared the performance of the assay using non-magnetic beads with one based on the newly developed magnetic beads. We optimized the magnetic beads' coupling procedure and antibody detection assays for S. aureus and S. pneumoniae antigens and we measured IgG in human pooled serum against a series of S. aureus and S. pneumoniae-derived antigens in a singleplex and in a multiplex assay, respectively. For the multiplex assay, the comparison between magnetic and non-magnetic beads showed: i) in the majority of the cases (13 of the 17 tested S. pneumoniae antigens) significantly higher Median Fluorescence Intensity (MFI) values, ii) lower detection limits, iii) lower coefficient of variation (CV: 12% vs. 7% for non-magnetic vs. magnetic beads), so lower inter-assay variation and hence higher reproducibility. Magnetic bead coupling is cost effective, as we used 25% of the normal amount of antigen and only 50% of the beads in comparison to the non-magnetic beads. This optimized magnetic-based assay, which combines ease of use with an improved assay performance, allows detection of antibodies with a low titer that are potentially missed with the non-magnetic-based assay. PMID:27296810

  18. Local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic impurities in mesoscopic iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Ji, Min; Schwarz, Tobias; Ke, Xiaoxing; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Yuan, Jie; Pereira, Paulo J.; Huang, Ya; Zhang, Gufei; Feng, Hai-Luke; Yuan, Ya-Hua; Hatano, Takeshi; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Yamaura, Kazunari; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wu, Pei-Heng; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    2015-07-01

    The determination of the pairing symmetry is one of the most crucial issues for the iron-based superconductors, for which various scenarios are discussed controversially. Non-magnetic impurity substitution is one of the most promising approaches to address the issue, because the pair-breaking mechanism from the non-magnetic impurities should be different for various models. Previous substitution experiments demonstrated that the non-magnetic zinc can suppress the superconductivity of various iron-based superconductors. Here we demonstrate the local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic zinc impurities in Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 by exploring phase-slip phenomena in a mesoscopic structure with 119 × 102 nm2 cross-section. The impurities suppress superconductivity in a three-dimensional `Swiss cheese'-like pattern with in-plane and out-of-plane characteristic lengths slightly below ~1.34 nm. This causes the superconducting order parameter to vary along abundant narrow channels with effective cross-section of a few square nanometres. The local destruction of superconductivity can be related to Cooper pair breaking by non-magnetic impurities.

  19. Local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic impurities in mesoscopic iron-based superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Ji, Min; Schwarz, Tobias; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Yuan, Jie; Pereira, Paulo J.; Huang, Ya; Zhang, Gufei; Feng, Hai-Luke; Yuan, Ya-Hua; Hatano, Takeshi; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Yamaura, Kazunari; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wu, Pei-Heng; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the pairing symmetry is one of the most crucial issues for the iron-based superconductors, for which various scenarios are discussed controversially. Non-magnetic impurity substitution is one of the most promising approaches to address the issue, because the pair-breaking mechanism from the non-magnetic impurities should be different for various models. Previous substitution experiments demonstrated that the non-magnetic zinc can suppress the superconductivity of various iron-based superconductors. Here we demonstrate the local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic zinc impurities in Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 by exploring phase-slip phenomena in a mesoscopic structure with 119 × 102 nm2 cross-section. The impurities suppress superconductivity in a three-dimensional ‘Swiss cheese'-like pattern with in-plane and out-of-plane characteristic lengths slightly below ∼1.34 nm. This causes the superconducting order parameter to vary along abundant narrow channels with effective cross-section of a few square nanometres. The local destruction of superconductivity can be related to Cooper pair breaking by non-magnetic impurities. PMID:26139568

  20. Molecular identification of indigenous manganese solubilising bacterial biodiversity from manganese mining deposits.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shreya; Mohanty, Sansuta; Nayak, Sanghamitra; Sukla, Lala B; Das, Alok P

    2016-03-01

    Manganese (Mn) ranks twelfth among the most exuberant metal present in the earth's crust and finds its imperative application in the manufacturing steel, chemical, tannery, glass, and battery industries. Solubilisation of Mn can be performed by several bacterial strains which are useful in developing environmental friendly solutions for mining activities. The present investigation aims to isolate and characterize Mn solubilising bacteria from low grade ores from Sanindipur Manganese mine of Sundargh district in Odisha state of India. Four morphologically distinct bacterial strains showing visible growth on Mn supplemented plates were isolated. Mn solubilising ability of the bacterial strains was assessed by visualizing the lightening of the medium appearing around the growing colonies. Three isolates were gram negative and rod shaped while the remaining one was gram positive, coccobacilli. Molecular identification of the isolates was carried out by 16S rRNA sequencing and the bacterial isolates were taxonomically classified as Bacillus anthrasis MSB 2, Acinetobacter sp. MSB 5, Lysinibacillus sp. MSB 11, and Bacillus sp. MMR-1 using BLAST algorithm. The sequences were deposited in NCBI GenBank with the accession number KP635223, KP635224, KP635225 and JQ936966, respectively. Manganese solubilisation efficiency of 40, 96, 97.5 and 48.5% were achieved by MMR-1, MSB 2, MSB 5 and MSB 11 respectively. The efficiency of Mn solubilisation is suggested with the help of a pH variation study. The results are discussed in relation to the possible mechanisms involved in Manganese solubilisation efficiency of bacterial isolates. PMID:26471873

  1. Magnetofluidic concentration and separation of non-magnetic particles using two magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-07-01

    The present paper reports the use of diluted ferrofluid and two arrays of permanent magnets for the size-selective concentration of non-magnetic particles. The micro magnetofluidic device consists of a straight channels sandwiched between two arrays of permanent magnets. The permanent magnets create multiple capture zones with minimum magnetic field strength along the channel. The complex interaction between magnetic forces and hydrodynamic force allows the device to operate in different regimes suitable for concentration of non-magnetic particles with small difference in size. Our experimental results show that non-magnetic particles with diameters of 3.1 μm and 4.8 μm can be discriminated and separated with this method. The results from this study could be used as a guide for the design of size-sensitive separation devices for particle and cell based on negative magnetophoresis. PMID:27478527

  2. The space density of magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables, and implications for CV evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretorius, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present estimates of the space densities of both non-magnetic and magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), based on X-ray flux-limited samples. The measurements can be used to address several questions relevant to the evolution of CVs and to the makeup of Galactic X-ray source populations. I will discuss the implications of these results for the high predicted space density of non-magnetic CVs, the evolutionary relationship between intermediate polars and polars, the fraction of CVs with strongly magnetic white dwarfs, and for the contribution of magnetic CVs to Galactic populations of hard X-ray sources.

  3. The Effect of Manganese Additions on the Reactive Evaporation of Chromium in Ni-Cr Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Alman, David E.

    2004-10-20

    Chromium is used as an alloy addition in stainless steels and nickel-chromium alloys to form protective chromium oxide scales. Chromium oxide undergoes reactive evaporation in high temperature exposures in the presence of oxygen and/or water vapor. The deposition of gaseous chromium species onto solid oxide fuel cell electrodes can reduce the efficiency of the fuel cell. Manganese additions to the alloy can reduce the activity of chromium in the oxide, either from solid solution replacement of chromium with manganese (at low levels of manganese) or from the formation of manganese-chromium spinels (at high levels of manganese). This reduction in chromium activity leads to a predicted reduction in chromium evaporation by as much as a factor of 35 at 800 C and 55 at 700 C. The results of evaporation loss measurements on nickel-chromium-manganese alloys are compared with the predicted reduction. Quantifying the effects of manganese additions on chromium evaporation should aid alloy development of metallic interconnects and balance-of-plant alloys.

  4. Pulsed remote field eddy current technique applied to non-magnetic flat conductive plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Binfeng; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhanbin

    2013-12-01

    Non-magnetic metal plates are widely used in aviation and industrial applications. The detection of cracks in thick plate structures, such as multilayered structures of aircraft fuselage, has been challenging in nondestructive evaluation societies. The remote field eddy current (RFEC) technique has shown advantages of deep penetration and high sensitivity to deeply buried anomalies. However, the RFEC technique is mainly used to evaluate ferromagnetic tubes. There are many problems that should be fixed before the expansion and application of this technique for the inspection of non-magnetic conductive plates. In this article, the pulsed remote field eddy current (PRFEC) technique for the detection of defects in non-magnetic conducting plates was investigated. First, the principle of the PRFEC technique was analysed, followed by the analysis of the differences between the detection of defects in ferromagnetic and non-magnetic plain structures. Three different models of the PRFEC probe were simulated using ANSYS. The location of the transition zone, defect detection sensitivity and the ability to detect defects in thick plates using three probes were analysed and compared. The simulation results showed that the probe with a ferrite core had the highest detecting ability. The conclusions derived from the simulation study were also validated by conducting experiments.

  5. Manganese oxidation model for rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Glen W.; Kim, Byung R.; Roberts, Philip J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of manganese in natural waters (>0.05 mg/L) degrades water-supply quality. A model was devised to predict the variation of manganese concentrations in river water released from an impoundment with the distance downstream. The model is one-dimensional and was calibrated using dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, pH, manganese, and hydraulic data collected in the Duck River, Tennessee. The results indicated that the model can predict manganese levels under various conditions. The model was then applied to the Chattahoochee River, Georgia. Discrepancies between observed and predicted may be due to inadequate pH data, precipitation of sediment particles, unsteady flow conditions in the Chattahoochee River, inaccurate rate expressions for the low pH conditions, or their combinations.

  6. Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization with manganese based sorbents. Quarterly report, August 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1993-10-01

    The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies at the US Steel Fundamental Research Laboratories in Monroeville, PA, by E. T. Turkdogan indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt % ore + 25 wt % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese at higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This report documents progress in pelletizing and testing via thermogravimetric analysis of individual pellet formulations of manganese ore/alumina combinations and also manganese carbonate/alumina with two binders, dextrin and bentonite. Preliminary results indicate that the manganese carbonate material, being of higher purity than the manganese ore, has a higher degree of sulfur capacity and more rapid absorption kinetics. A 2-inch fixed-bed reactor has been fabricated and is now ready for subjecting pellets to cyclic loading and regeneration.

  7. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Annual report, September 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1993-12-01

    The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies at the US Steel Fundamental Research Laboratories in Monroeville, PA, by E. T. Turkdogan indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt % ore + 25 wt % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese at higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This Annual Topical Report documents progress in pelletizing and testing via thermo-gravimetric analysis of individual pellet formulations of manganese ore/ alumina combinations and also manganese carbonate/alumina with two binders, dextrin and bentonite. It includes the prior Quarterly Technical Reports which indicate that the manganese carbonate material, being of higher purity than the manganese ore, has a higher degree of sulfur capacity and more rapid absorption kinetics. A 2-inch fixed-bed reactor has been fabricated and is now ready for subjecting pellets to cyclic loading and regeneration.

  8. Modeling Manganese Silicate Inclusion Composition Changes during Ladle Treatment Using FactSage Macros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piva, Stephano P. T.; Kumar, Deepoo; Pistorius, P. Chris

    2016-07-01

    This work investigated the use of FactSage macros to simulate steel-slag and steel-inclusion reaction kinetics in silicon-manganese killed steels, and predict oxide inclusion composition changes during ladle treatment. These changes were assessed experimentally using an induction furnace to simulate deoxidation and slag addition. The average steel mass transfer coefficient for the experimental setup was calculated from the analyzed aluminum pick-up by steel. Average oxide inclusion composition was measured using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess the physical state (solid or liquid) of oxide inclusions in selected samples. The changes in the chemical compositions of the oxide inclusions and the steel agreed with the FactSage macro simulations.

  9. Extraction of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by bioleaching.

    PubMed

    Xin, Baoping; Chen, Bing; Duan, Ning; Zhou, Changbo

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of manganese from electrolytic manganese residues using bioleaching was investigated in this paper. The maximum extraction efficiency of Mn was 93% by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria at 4.0 g/l sulfur after bioleaching of 9days, while the maximum extraction efficiency of Mn was 81% by pyrite-leaching bacteria at 4.0 g/l pyrite. The series bioleaching first by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and followed by pyrite-leaching bacteria evidently promoted the extraction of manganese, witnessing the maximum extraction efficiency of 98.1%. In the case of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, the strong dissolution of bio-generated sulfuric acid resulted in extraction of soluble Mn2+, while both the Fe2+ catalyzed reduction of Mn4+ and weak acidic dissolution of Mn2+ accounted for the extraction of manganese with pyrite-leaching bacteria. The chemical simulation of bioleaching process further confirmed that the acid dissolution of Mn2+ and Fe2+ catalyzed reduction of Mn4+ were the bioleaching mechanisms involved for Mn extraction from electrolytic manganese residues. PMID:21050747

  10. Iron and nitrogen self-diffusion in non-magnetic iron nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Mukul; Gupta, Ajay; Gupta, Rachana; Stahn, J.; Horisberger, M.; Wildes, A.; Tayal, Akhil

    2011-12-15

    The self-diffusion of iron and nitrogen is measured in nm range non-magnetic iron nitride thin films. Two non-magnetic iron nitrides, Fe{sub 2.23}N and FeN, were studied using neutron reflectivity. Neutron reflectivity with a depth resolution in the sub-nm range has a different scattering cross section for isotopes, providing a unique opportunity to measure very small diffusivities. The isotope heterostructure in thin film multilayers [Fe-N/{sup 57}Fe-N]{sub 10} and [Fe-N/Fe-{sup 15}N]{sub 10} were prepared using magnetron sputtering. It was observed that nitrogen diffuses slower than iron although the atomic size of iron is larger than that of nitrogen. It was found that a significantly larger group of N atoms participates in the diffusion process than of Fe, making N diffusion slower than that of Fe.

  11. Sensitivity of a 3D fully-gapped topological superconductor to non-magnetic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yukihiro; Nagai, Yuki; Machida, Masahiko

    2015-03-01

    Topological superconductors (TSC) are notable materials, owing to the mathematical curiosity and the application potential. The bulk TSC can emerge by copper intercalation into topological insulator Bi2Se3. In this paper, we theoretically study the non-magnetic impurity effects in the mean-field model of CuxBi2Se3, focusing on the odd-parity fully-gapped superconducting state. Calculating the density of states with a self-consistent T-matrix approach, we test the presence of mid-gap states, leading to pair-breaking effects. Remarkably, the sensitivity to non-magnetic impurities strongly depend on a normal-state dispersion character, i.e., either non-relativistic or relativistic dispersion relations. We show unification picture for understanding this intriguing result, deriving a low-energy effective superconducting theory.

  12. Apparatus and method for continuous separation of magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluids

    DOEpatents

    Oder, Robin R.; Jamison, Russell E.

    2010-02-09

    A magnetic separator vessel (1) for separating magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluid includes a separation chamber having an interior and exterior wall, a top and bottom portion; a magnet (3) having first and second poles (2) positioned adjacent to the exterior wall, wherein the first pole is substantially diametrically opposed to the second pole; a inlet port (5) is directed into the top portion of the separation chamber, wherein the inlet port (5) is positioned adjacent to one of the first and second poles (2), wherein the inlet port (5) is adapted to transfer a mixture into the separation chamber; an underflow port (6) in communication with the bottom portion, wherein the underflow port (6) is adapted to receive the magnetic particles; and an overflow port (9) in communication with the separation chamber, wherein the overflow port (9) is adapted to receive the non-magnetic fluid.

  13. Electric-field manipulation of spin states in confined non-magnetic/magnetic heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Borza, S; Peeters, F M; Vasilopoulos, P; Papp, G

    2007-04-30

    The energy spectrum and states of an electron in a non-magnetic/magnetic heterostructure placed between two materials (e.g. oxides) acting as barriers is studied in the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular or parallel to the well. A potential step is formed at the interface between the non-magnetic and magnetic material in the presence of a magnetic field since spin-up electrons see a barrier whereas the spin-down ones see a well. A rich band structure is obtained which can be tuned by a perpendicular electric field. Numerical results are presented for a ZnSe/Zn(1-x)Mn(x)Se heterostructure and their pertinence to spin-polarized transport is pointed out. PMID:21690966

  14. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  1. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. Spin transport in non-magnetic nano-structures induced by non-local spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idzuchi, Hiroshi; Fukuma, Yasuhiro; Otani, YoshiChika

    2015-04-01

    We review our recent achievements on optimization of spin injection from ferromagnetic into non-magnetic metals and characterization of spin transport properties in the non-magnetic nano-structures. We have realized the efficient spin injection by solving spin resistance mismatch problem in spin diffusion process across the interface between ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic metals. We analyzed temperature dependent spin relaxation length and time in Ag within the framework of the Elliot-Yafet mechanism based on spin-orbit interaction and momentum relaxation. The spin relaxation length in a light metal Mg is found comparable to that of Ag due to its peculiar electronic band structure in which so called spin-hotspots dramatically enhance spin relaxation. Spin relaxation properties in various metals are also quantitatively discussed. We employed commonly used Hanle effect measurements to characterize spin relaxation of spin current and reexamined both theoretically and experimentally the effect of spin absorption at the interface. The affected spatial profile of chemical potential due to the longitudinal and transverse spin absorption results in the broadened Hanle curve. All the Hanle curves both in metallic and semi-conductive materials including graphene fall into the universal scaling plot. Anatomy of spin injection properties of the junction and spin transport properties in non-magnetic metal is shown in tables.

  4. Controlled Synthesis of Hollow Manganese Oxide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Min; Oh, Kyung Hee; Ham, Kyung-Sik

    2016-02-01

    Carbon spheres have been prepared from glucose under hydrothermal conditions to facilitate the synthesis of hollow manganese oxides. The phases of manganese oxide are controlled by changing annealing temperature of the manganese monoxide on a carbon sphere template. The particles on the carbon surface get an agglomeration and make dense oxide shell during the calcination step, which result in typical hollow structures. The electrochemical properties of hollow manganese oxides have been investigated to elucidate their relative catalytic activities. PMID:27433689

  5. Manganese depresses rat heart muscle respiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has previously been reported that moderately high dietary manganese (Mn) in combination with marginal magnesium (Mg) resulted in ultrastructural damage to heart mitochondria. Manganese may replace Mg in biological functions, including the role of enzyme cofactor. Manganese may accumulate and subs...

  6. SEPARATING PROTOACTINIUM WITH MANGANESE DIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1958-04-22

    The preparation of U/sup 235/ and an improved method for isolating Pa/ sup 233/ from foreign products present in neutronirradiated thorium is described. The method comprises forming a solution of neutron-irradiated thorium together with a manganous salt, then adding potassium permanganate to precipitate the manganese as manganese dioxide whereby protoactinium is carried down with the nnanganese dioxide dissolving the precipitate, adding a soluble zirconium salt, and adding phosphate ion to precipitate zirconium phosphate whereby protoactinium is then carried down with the zirconium phosphate to effect a further concentration.

  7. Influence of essential elements on manganese intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Khandelwal, S.; Ashquin, M.; Tandon, S.K.

    1984-01-01

    With a view to explore the influence of essential metals in manganese intoxication, the effect of calcium, iron or zinc supplementation on the uptake of manganese and on the activity of manganese sensitive enzymes, succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase in brain and liver of rat was investigated. The choice of the two mitochondrial enzymes was based on the fact that the mitochondria are the chief site of manganese accumulation and their activity in brain, liver and blood of rats is significantly influenced by manganese.

  8. Nonlinear motion of coupled magnetic vortices in ferromagnetic/non-magnetic/ferromagnetic trilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Su-Hyeong; Shim, Je-Ho; Oh, Suhk-Kun; Yu, Seong-Cho; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Mesler, Brooke; Fischer, Peter

    2009-07-05

    We have investigated a coupled motion of two vortex cores in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic/ferromagnetic trilayer cynliders by means of micromagnetic simulation. Dynamic motion of two vortex with parallel and antiparallel relative chiralities of curling spins around the vortex cores have been examined after excitation by 1-ns pulsed external field. With systematic variation in non-magnetic spacer layer thickness from 0 to 20 nm, the coupling between two cores becomes significant as the spacer becomes thinner. Significant coupling leads to a nonlinear chaotic coupled motion of two vortex cores for the parallel chiralities and a faster coupled gyrotropic oscillation for the antiparallel chiralities.

  9. Development of a Non-Magnetic Inertial Sensor for Vibration Stabilization in a Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Seryi, Andrei; Chang, Allison; Partridge, Richard; /Brown U.

    2006-09-01

    One of the options for controlling vibration of the final focus magnets in a linear collider is to use active feedback based on accelerometers. While commercial geophysics sensors have noise performance that substantially exceeds the requirements for a linear collider, they are physically large, and cannot operate in the strong magnetic field of the detector. Conventional nonmagnetic sensors have excessive noise for this application. We report on the development of a non-magnetic inertial sensor, and on a novel commercial sensor both of which have demonstrated the required noise levels for this application.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, optical and sensing property of manganese oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Manigandan, R.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Narayanan, V.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.

    2014-01-28

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles were prepared by thermal decomposition of manganese oxalate. Manganese oxalate was synthesized by reacting 1:1 mole ratio of manganese acetate and ammonium oxalate along with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The structural characterization of manganese oxalate and manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by XRD. The XRD spectrum confirms the crystal structure of the manganese oxide and manganese oxalate. In addition, the average grain size, lattice parameter values were also calculated using XRD spectrum. Moreover, the diffraction peaks were broadened due to the smaller size of the particle. The band gap of manganese oxide was calculated from optical absorption, which was carried out by DRS UV-Visible spectroscopy. The morphology of manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by SEM images. The FT-IR analysis confirms the formation of the manganese oxide from manganese oxalate nanoparticles. The electrochemical sensing behavior of manganese oxide nanoparticles were investigated using hydrogen peroxide by cyclic voltammetry.

  11. Impact of dietary manganese concentration on status criteria to determine manganese requirement in piglets.

    PubMed

    Pallauf, J; Kauer, C; Most, E; Habicht, S D; Moch, J

    2012-12-01

    The Mn requirement for pigs is not well established. This study aimed to find criteria for assessing growing piglet supply status for Mn and to determine whether the current Mn recommendations meet the requirements for piglets. Thirty-six weaned male castrated 27-day-old piglets (7.24 ± 0.69 kg) were randomized into six groups of six piglets each and housed individually in stainless steel metabolic cages for 42 days. The piglets were fed a diet based on skimmed milk powder and corn starch with increasing Mn concentrations (0.24; 2; 4; 8; 16; or 32 mg Mn/kg diet as-fed). In week 6, Mn0.24 led to reduced feed intake (p < 0.05). Manganese concentrations in blood, liver, kidney, lung, heart, phalanx proximalis, pancreas and skeletal muscle were influenced by the dietary Mn supply (p < 0.05). The activity of the Mn-containing superoxide dismutase in the heart as well as relative arginase activity in the liver were lower in groups Mn0.24, Mn2 and Mn4 compared with the higher supplemented groups (p < 0.05). The relative arginase activity increased clearly with enhanced dietary Mn up to 16 mg/kg and correlated with Mn concentration in the liver. Manganese concentrations in the liver, kidney and phalanx proximalis seem to be suitable biomarkers for Mn status. A 4 mg/kg dietary Mn concentration recommended by NRC (1998, Nutrient Requirements of Swine. National Academy Press, Washington DC.) did not fulfil piglet requirements. Under the conditions investigated, 16 mg Mn/kg diet were necessary to reach a plateau in specific enzyme activity and Mn concentration in organs. PMID:21883497

  12. Corrosion Behavior of High Nitrogen Nickel-Free Fe-16Cr-Mn-Mo-N Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, K. L.; Liao, H. Y.; Shyue, J. J.; Lian, S. S.

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the current study is to develop austenitic nickel-free stainless steels with lower chromium content and higher manganese and nitrogen contents. In order to prevent nickel-induced skin allergy, cobalt, manganese, and nitrogen were used to substitute nickel in the designed steel. Our results demonstrated that manganese content greater than 14 wt pct results in a structure that is in full austenite phase. The manganese content appears to increase the solubility of nitrogen; however, a lower corrosion potential was found in steel with high manganese content. Molybdenum appears to be able to increase the pitting potential. The effects of Cr, Mn, Mo, and N on corrosion behavior of Fe-16Cr-2Co-Mn-Mo-N high nitrogen stainless steels were evaluated with potentiodynamic tests and XPS surface analysis. The results reveal that anodic current and pits formation of the Fe-16Cr-2Co-Mn-Mo-N high nitrogen stainless steels were smaller than those of lower manganese and nitrogen content stainless steel.

  13. Environmental Controls of Biological Manganese Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, A. P.; Ahn, C. C.; Nealson, K. H.

    2001-12-01

    Biological catalysis of manganese oxidation represents an important contribution to global manganese cycling; biological oxidation rates are several orders of magnitude higher than those of abiotic processes. Despite recent genetics advances, ongoing behavioral studies, and a large pool of knowledge regarding manganese chemistry, the links between biology and environmental chemistry remain unresolved. We have performed experiments on batch cultures of Leptothrix discophora SS-1 to explore the physiology of biological manganese oxidation. We have further conducted spectroscopic and microscopic studies of the mechanism as manganese proceeds from the soluble Mn2+ species to the insoluble Mn(III) and Mn(IV) phases. These investigations suggest roles for aqueous chemistry, mineralogy, and microbial physiology in controlling manganese fluxes in metal-rich environments.

  14. Substrate pH and butterfly bush response to dolomitic lime or steel slag amendment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steel slag is a fertilizer amendment with a high concentration of calcium oxide, and thus capable of raising substrate pH similar to dolomitic lime. Steel slag, however, contains higher concentrations of some nutrients, such as iron, manganese, and silicon, compared to dolomitic lime. The objectiv...

  15. [Analysis of alloy tool steel using X-ray fluorescence spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, S; Cai, Y; Huang, Z

    2001-08-01

    This report briefly introduces the analysis of Mn, Cr, V, W, Ti, Nb, Co, Zr, Ni, Mo, S, P, Si and Cu in alloy tool steel with X-ray florescence spectrometer. After being polished with grinding well and being cleaned with ethly alcohol, the test samples can be directly measured, and the results agree well with the standard values of the laboratory standards. The precision of the method (RSD) is in the range of 0.13%-9.56% (n = 8) for all elements except W, Ti, Nb and Zr. The method can be applied to many kinds of steel, such as chrome vanadium steel, manganese steel, die steel, middle-low alloy steel, tool steel. The measure instrument should be rectified with two or three standard samples which the quantity contained is suitable. The standard samples include 1Cr18Ni9Ti, C17Ni2, 25CrMo1V, 30CrMnSiA, 3CrW8V, Gx-8, Cr12MoV, chrome vanadium steel, manganese-boron steel, middle-low alloy steel and other kinds of steel. If there is not conditions to make work curves for all kinds steel separately, sometimes we don't know what kind of steel for one complex sample, the more real way will be to make an overall work curves which contains more kinds of steel as far as possible. PMID:12945299

  16. [Clinical cases of occupational chronic manganese intoxication].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, T N; Lakhman, O L; Katamanova, E V; Kartapol'tseva, N V; Meshcheriagin, V A; Rusanova, D V; Andreeva, O K

    2009-01-01

    Classic symptoms of manganese intoxication are very rarely seen nowadays. Clinic in Angarsk Research Institute for Occupational medicine and Human ecology registered two cases of stage I and II chronic manganese intoxication over 10 years among electric welders. The cases were diagnosed with consideration of long length of exposure to manganese with the ambient air level exceeding the MAC 1.5 times, the disease manifestation at middle age, high manganese level in serum and urine, characteristic neurologic symptoms in association with organic psychopathologic defects and polyneuropathy of limbs. PMID:19278189

  17. Negative impact of manganese on honeybee foraging

    PubMed Central

    Søvik, Eirik; Perry, Clint J.; LaMora, Angie; Barron, Andrew B.; Ben-Shahar, Yehuda

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic accumulation of metals such as manganese is a well-established health risk factor for vertebrates. By contrast, the long-term impact of these contaminants on invertebrates is mostly unknown. Here, we demonstrate that manganese ingestion alters brain biogenic amine levels in honeybees and fruit flies. Furthermore, we show that manganese exposure negatively affects foraging behaviour in the honeybee, an economically important pollinator. Our findings indicate that in addition to its direct impact on human health, the common industrial contaminant manganese might also have indirect environmental and economical impacts via the modulation of neuronal and behavioural functions in economically important insects. PMID:25808001

  18. Mechanical properties of low-nickel stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Demand for improved corrosion-resistant steels, coupled with increased emphasis on conserving strategic metals, has led to development of family of stainless steels in which manganese and nitrogen are substituted for portion of usual nickel content. Advantages are approximately-doubled yield strength in annealed condition, better resistance to stress-corrosion cracking, retention of low magnetic permeability even after severe cold working, excellent strength and ductility at cryogenic temperatures, superior resistance to wear and galling, and excellent high-temperature properties.

  19. The effect of magnetic and non-magnetic ion damage on the surface state in SmB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeham, N.; Wen, J.; Wang, Y. Q.; Fisk, Z.; Ronning, F.; Thompson, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    SmB6 is a Kondo insulator with a band structure that is topologically distinct from the vacuum. This is theoretically predicted to produce metallic topological surface states that are robust to perturbations that do not break time reversal symmetry, such as non-magnetic defects. However, the surface state may be destroyed by an impurity with a sufficiently large magnetic moment. In order to test this prediction we show measurements of the resistance of the surface state of single crystals of SmB6 with varying levels of damage induced by magnetic and non-magnetic ion irradiation. We find that at a sufficiently high concentration of damage the surface state reconstructs below an amorphous damaged layer, whether the damage was caused by a magnetic or non-magnetic ion.

  20. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  1. Regulation of cellular manganese and manganese transport rates in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Sunda, W.G.; Huntsman, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The cellular accumulation and uptake kinetics of manganese by Chlamydomonas sp. were studied in model chelate buffer systems. Cellular manganese concentrations and uptake rates were related to the computed free manganese ion concentration and were independent of the total or chelated manganese concentration. Cellular manganese was constant at about 1 mmol liter/sup -1/ of cellular volume at free manganese ion concentrations of 10/sup -7/ /sup 6/-10/sup -6/ /sup 3/ mol liter/sup -1/ and decreased below this range. Manganese uptake rates followed saturation kinetics and V/sub max/, but not K/sub s/, varied with the free manganese ion concentration in the growth medium. V/sub max/ appeared to be under negative feedback control and increased with decreasing manganese ion concentration. Variations of up to 30-fold in this parameter seemed to be instrumental in limiting the variation in cellular manganese to a sixfold range despite a 1000-fold variation in free manganese ion concentration in the growth medium.

  2. The influence of large non-magnetic gaps on the transversal end-effect in the linear induction pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfgat, Yu.; Mikelsons, A.; Krumins, J.; Pedchenko, A.

    2007-03-01

    It is usually accepted that in linear induction pumps and chute systems the transversal end-effect manifests itself as a deformation of the current induced in the working medium that results in decreasing the electromagnetic force, affecting the working medium. This is true at small non-magnetic gaps. With large gaps, dissipation fields should be accounted for. This phenomenon is very conspicuous in devices with a single-sided inductor. The paper reports the theoretical and experimental results on the definition of electromagnetic forces, affecting electrically conducting bodies subjected to the field induced by a one-sided inductor with different non-magnetic gaps. Figs 7, Refs 3.

  3. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-01

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide. PMID:17778807

  4. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese sulfate. 582.5461 Section 582.5461 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate....

  5. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 582.5452 Section 582.5452 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 582.5449 Section 582.5449 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate....

  8. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity. The color additive... less than 93 percent. (c) Uses and restrictions. Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good...

  9. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity. The color additive... less than 93 percent. (c) Uses and restrictions. Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good...

  10. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity. The color additive... less than 93 percent. (c) Uses and restrictions. Manganese violet is safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good...

  11. Carbide transformations in constructional steels

    SciTech Connect

    Vinokur, B.B.

    1986-01-01

    In connection with the type of carbides formed in general purpose constructional steels or on the mechanisms of carbide transformations and the influence of carbide formation on the properties, this work presents an investigation that was made of medium-carbon chrome-nickel and chrome-manganese steels with 1, 2, and 3% Cr, 1% Ni, and 1% Mn additionally alloyed with 0.25-2% Mo or W (every 0.25%). All of the steels were hardened from temperatures providing the fullest solution of carbides in austenite and were tempered at 400-650/sup 0/C every 25-50/sup 0/C. The composition of the carbides and their type were established by chemical, x-ray diffraction, and microdiffraction methods and the mechanism of the carbide transformations was determined on the basis of the changes in distortions of the second and third order of the matrix electrical resistance, and coercive force of the steel. All of the carbideforming elements present in steel participate in saturation of the carbides, as a result of which the formation of a special carbide is eased and the degree of alloying of the matrix increases. In the carbide transformation with a certain share of carbide phase an increase or retarding of the reduction in strength with an increase in tempering temperature with constant plasticity and impact strength is possible.

  12. Thermal conductivity of commercially available 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yuecel, A.; Maddocks, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Thermal conductivity values of 21-6-9 stainless steel over the temperature range of 5 K to 120 K are reported. Thermal conductivity integrals are measured using a steady-state heat flux method. The resulting data are fit with a polynomial and differentiated to obtain the conductivity. The derived conductivity is compared to published data for high-manganese stainless steels and to data for other stainless steels. A discussion of the methodology and its accuracy is included.

  13. Manganese peroxidase gene transcription in Phanerochaete chrysosporium: Activation by manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.; Alic, M. Gold, M.H. )

    1991-07-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on Mn, and initial work suggested that Mn regulates transcription of the mnp gene. In this study, using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of kinetic, dose-response, and inhibitor experiments, the authors demonstrate unequivocally that Mn regulates mnp gene transcription. The amount of mnp mRNA in cells of 4-day-old nitrogen-limited cultures is a direct function of the concentration of Mn in the culture medium up to a maximum of 180 {mu}M. Addition of Mn to nitrogen-limited Mn-deficient secondary metabolic (4-, 5-, and 6-day-old) cultures results in the appearance of mnp mRNA within 40 min. The appearance of this message is completely inhibited by the RNA synthesis inhibitor dactinomycin but not by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore, the amount of mnp mRNA produced is a direct function of the concentration of added Mn. In contrast, addition of Mn to low-nitrogen Mn-deficient 2- or 3-day-old cultures does not result in the appearance of mnp mRNA. Manganese peroxidase protein is detected by specific immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of poly(A) RNA isolated from Mn-supplemented (but nor from Mn-deficient) cells. All of these results demonstrate that Mn, the substrate for the enzyme, regulates mnp gene transcription via a growth-stage-specific and concentration-dependent mechanism.

  14. Groundwater, iron and manganese an unwelcome trio

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, N. )

    1988-02-01

    Iron and manganese are natural constituents of the earth's crust and both elements create serious aesthetic problems in drinking water supplies. The occurrence of iron and manganese in groundwater, and problems arising from their presence, are reviewed. Four commonly used methods for iron and manganese removal are direct oxidation, addition of oxidation agents, ion exchange, and stabilization. These methods are discussed, as well as factors affecting iron and manganese removal, such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, and other ions present. The above factors affect the removal methods differently and for these reasons, laboratory testing and studies should be made to evaluate the treatability of a water supply for iron and manganese removal.

  15. Ennoblement of stainless steel studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Olesen, B.H. |; Avci, R.; Lewandowski, Z.

    1998-12-31

    Manganese oxides deposited by biofilms of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 on 316L stainless steel corrosion coupons increased the open circuit potential of the steel to values of +375 mV{sub SCE}. XPS spectra of the deposits compared to spectra of different manganese containing minerals indicated that the deposits were composed of MnO{sub 2}. The redox reaction responsible for the potential change results in electron transfer from the metal substratum to the mineral deposit. To study the processes of manganese dioxide reduction, MnO{sub 2} which had been electroplated on stainless steel was reduced electrochemically. The surface chemistry before and after reduction was analyzed by XPS. The authors demonstrated that the manganese dioxide deposited on stainless steel coupons can be reduced to Mn{sup 2+} by accepting two electrons from the metal. MnOOH was identified as an unstable intermediate product in this reaction. Consequently they hypothesize, that manganese dioxide microbially deposited on stainless steel surfaces can provide an efficient cathodic reaction and accelerate microbially influenced corrosion processes.

  16. Manganese oxidation by Leptothrix discophora.

    PubMed

    Boogerd, F C; de Vrind, J P

    1987-02-01

    Cells of Leptothrix discophora SS1 released Mn2+-oxidizing factors into the medium during growth in batch culture. Manganese was optimally oxidized when the medium was buffered with HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid) at pH 7.5. Manganese-oxidizing activity in the culture medium in which this strain had been grown previously was sensitive to heat, phosphate, Tris, NaN3, HgCl2 NaCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and pronase; 0.5 mol of O2 was consumed per mol of MnO2 formed. During Mn2+ oxidation, protons were liberated. With sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, two protein-containing bands were detected in the spent culture medium. One band had an apparent molecular weight of 110,000 and was predominant in Mn2+-oxidizing activity. The second product (Mr 85,000) was only detected in some cases and probably represents a proteolytic breakdown moiety of the 110,000-Mr protein. The Mn2+-oxidizing factors were associated with the MnO2 aggregates that had been formed in spent culture medium. After solubilization of this MnO2 with ascorbate, Mn2+-oxidizing activity could be recovered. PMID:3804969

  17. Two new young, wide, magnetic + non-magnetic double-degenerate binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbie, P. D.; Baxter, R.; Külebi, B.; Parker, Q. A.; Koester, D.; Jordan, S.; Lodieu, N.; Euchner, F.

    2012-03-01

    We report the discovery of two, new, rare, wide, double-degenerate binaries that each contain a magnetic and a non-magnetic star. The components of SDSS J092646.88+132134.5 + J092647.00+132138.4 and of SDSS J150746.48+521002.1 + J150746.80+520958.0 have angular separations of only 4.6 arcsec (a˜ 650 au) and 5.1 arcsec (a˜ 750 au), respectively. They also appear to share common proper motions. Follow-up optical spectroscopy has revealed each system to consist of a DA and a H-rich high-field magnetic white dwarf (HFMWD). Our measurements of the effective temperatures and the surface gravities of the DA components reveal both to have larger masses than is typical of field white dwarfs. By assuming that these degenerates have evolved essentially as single stars, owing to their wide orbital separations, we can use them to place limits on the total ages of the stellar systems. These suggest that in each case the HFMWD is probably associated with an early-type progenitor (Minit > 2 M⊙). We find that the cooling time of SDSS J150746.80+520958.0 (DAH) is lower than might be expected had it followed the evolutionary path of a typical single star. This mild discord is in the same sense as that observed for two of the small number of other HFMWDs for which progenitor mass estimates have been made, RE J0317-853 and EG 59. The mass of the other DAH, SDSS J092646.88+132134.5, appears to be smaller than expected on the basis of single-star evolution. If this object was/is a member of a hierarchical triple system it may have experienced greater mass loss during an earlier phase of its life as a result of its having a close companion. The large uncertainties on our estimates of the parameters of the HFMWDs suggest that a larger sample of these objects is required to firmly identify any trends in their inferred cooling times and progenitor masses. This should shed further light on their formation and on the impact magnetic fields have on the late stages of stellar evolution. To

  18. Why stainless steel corrodes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mary P; Williams, David E; Chater, Richard J; Hutton, Bernie M; McPhail, David S

    2002-02-14

    Stainless steels are used in countless diverse applications for their corrosion resistance. Although they have extremely good general resistance, they are nevertheless susceptible to pitting corrosion. This localized dissolution of an oxide-covered metal in specific aggressive environments is one of the most common and catastrophic causes of failure of metallic structures. The pitting process has been described as random, sporadic and stochastic and the prediction of the time and location of events remains extremely difficult. Many contested models of pitting corrosion exist, but one undisputed aspect is that manganese sulphide inclusions play a critical role. Indeed, the vast majority of pitting events are found to occur at, or adjacent to, such second-phase particles. Chemical changes in and around sulphide inclusions have been postulated as a mechanism for pit initiation but such variations have never been measured. Here we use nanometre-scale secondary ion mass spectroscopy to demonstrate a significant reduction in the Cr:Fe ratio of the steel matrix around MnS particles. These chromium-depleted zones are susceptible to high-rate dissolution that 'triggers' pitting. The implications of these results are that materials processing conditions control the likelihood of corrosion failures, and these data provide a basis for optimizing such conditions. PMID:11845203

  19. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon-manganese steels are candidates for the structural materials in hydrogen gas pipelines, however it is well known that these steels are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Decades of research and industrial experience have established that hydrogen embrittlement compromises the structural integrity of steel components. This experience has also helped identify the failure modes that can operate in hydrogen containment structures. As a result, there are tangible ideas for managing hydrogen embrittement in steels and quantifying safety margins for steel hydrogen containment structures. For example, fatigue crack growth aided by hydrogen embrittlement is a key failure mode for steel hydrogen containment structures subjected to pressure cycling. Applying appropriate structural integrity models coupled with measurement of relevant material properties allows quantification of safety margins against fatigue crack growth in hydrogen containment structures. Furthermore, application of these structural integrity models is aided by the development of micromechanics models, which provide important insights such as the hydrogen distribution near defects in steel structures. The principal objective of this project is to enable application of structural integrity models to steel hydrogen pipelines. The new American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B31.12 design code for hydrogen pipelines includes a fracture mechanics-based design option, which requires material property inputs such as the threshold for rapid cracking and fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic loading. Thus, one focus of this project is to measure the rapid-cracking thresholds and fatigue crack growth rates of line pipe steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas. These properties must be measured for the base materials but more importantly for the welds, which are likely to be most vulnerable to hydrogen embrittlement. The measured properties can be evaluated by predicting the performance of the pipeline

  20. Chelating capture and magnetic removal of non-magnetic heavy metal substances from soil.

    PubMed

    Fan, Liren; Song, Jiqing; Bai, Wenbo; Wang, Shengping; Zeng, Ming; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yang; Li, Haifeng; Lu, Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    A soil remediation method based on magnetic beneficiation is reported. A new magnetic solid chelator powder, FS@IDA (core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles coated with iminodiacetic acid chelators), was used as a reactive magnetic carrier to selectively capture non-magnetic heavy metals in soil by chelation and removal by magnetic separation. FS@IDA was prepared via inorganic-organic and organic synthesis reactions that generated chelating groups on the surface of magnetic, multi-core, core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 (FS) nanoparticles. These reactions used a silane coupling agent and sodium chloroacetate. The results show that FS@IDA could chelate the heavy metal component of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu and Ni carbonates, lead sulfate and lead chloride in water-insoluble salt systems. The resulting FS@IDA-Cd and FS@IDA-Pb chelates could be magnetically separated, resulting in removal rates of approximately 84.9% and 72.2% for Cd and Pb, respectively. FS@IDA could not remove the residual heavy metals and those bound to organic matter in the soil. FS@IDA did not significantly alter the chemical composition of the soil, and it allowed for fast chelating capture, simple magnetic separation and facilitated heavy metal elution. FS@IDA could also be easily prepared and reprocessed. PMID:26878770

  1. Chelating capture and magnetic removal of non-magnetic heavy metal substances from soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liren; Song, Jiqing; Bai, Wenbo; Wang, Shengping; Zeng, Ming; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yang; Li, Haifeng; Lu, Haiwei

    2016-02-01

    A soil remediation method based on magnetic beneficiation is reported. A new magnetic solid chelator powder, FS@IDA (core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles coated with iminodiacetic acid chelators), was used as a reactive magnetic carrier to selectively capture non-magnetic heavy metals in soil by chelation and removal by magnetic separation. FS@IDA was prepared via inorganic-organic and organic synthesis reactions that generated chelating groups on the surface of magnetic, multi-core, core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 (FS) nanoparticles. These reactions used a silane coupling agent and sodium chloroacetate. The results show that FS@IDA could chelate the heavy metal component of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu and Ni carbonates, lead sulfate and lead chloride in water-insoluble salt systems. The resulting FS@IDA-Cd and FS@IDA-Pb chelates could be magnetically separated, resulting in removal rates of approximately 84.9% and 72.2% for Cd and Pb, respectively. FS@IDA could not remove the residual heavy metals and those bound to organic matter in the soil. FS@IDA did not significantly alter the chemical composition of the soil, and it allowed for fast chelating capture, simple magnetic separation and facilitated heavy metal elution. FS@IDA could also be easily prepared and reprocessed.

  2. Instability of a magnetoelastic layer resting on a non-magnetic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danas, K.; Triantafyllidis, N.

    2014-09-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are ferromagnetic particle impregnated rubbers whose mechanical properties are altered by the application of external magnetic fields. Due to their coupled magneto-mechanical response, MREs are finding an increasing number of engineering applications. One such application is in haptics, where the goal is to actively control surface roughness. One way to achieve this is by exploiting the unstable regime of MRE substrate/layer assemblies subjected to transverse magnetic fields. In this work, we study the response of such an assembly subjected to a transverse magnetic field and in-plane stress. The layer is made up of a transversely isotropic MRE material, whose energy density has been obtained experimentally, while the substrate is a non-magnetic isotropic pure polymer/gel. An analytical solution to this problem based on a general, finite strain, 2D continuum modeling for both the MRE layer and the substrate shows that for adequately soft substrates there is a finite-wavelength buckling mode under a transverse magnetic field. Moreover, the critical magnetic field can be substantially reduced in the presence of a compressive stress of the assembly, thus opening the possibility for haptic applications operating under low magnetic fields.

  3. Revealing the Degree of Magnetic Frustration by Non-Magnetic Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-12

    Imaging the magnetic fields around a non-magnetic impurity can provide a clear benchmark for quantifying the degree of magnetic frustration. Focusing on the strongly frustrated J{sub 1}-J{sub 2} model and the spatially anisotropic J{sub 1a}-J{sub 1b}-J{sub 2} model, very distinct low energy behaviors reflect different levels of magnetic frustration. In the J{sub 1}-J{sub 2} model, bound magnons appear trapped near the impurity in the ground state and strongly reduce the ordered moments for sites proximal to the impurity. In contrast, local moments in the J{sub 1a}-J{sub 1b}-J{sub 2} model are enhanced on the impurity neighboring sites. These theoretical predictions can be probed by experiments such as nuclear magnetic resonance and scanning tunneling microscopy, and the results can elucidate the role of frustration in antiferromagnets and help narrow the possible models to understand magnetism in the iron pnictdies.

  4. Rotating field eddy current probe for characterization of cracking in non-magnetic tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Capobianco, T.E.

    1998-07-01

    A rotating field eddy current probe was built and tested for use in small diameter, non-magnetic tubing. The rotating field probe is a driver/pickup style with two orthogonally wound drive coils and a pancake pickup coil. The driver coils are excited by two sine waves 90{degree} out of phase with each other. The physical arrangement of the drive coils and the 90{degree} phase shift of the excitation waveforms creates a field which rotates in the test piece under the drive coils. Preliminary tests on electrical discharge machined (EDM) notches show that phased based estimates of notch depth are possible. Probes currently used for detection of cracks in tubing produce responses that have proven unreliable for estimating defect depths. This recently developed version of the rotating field eddy current probe produces a bipolar response in the presence of a crack or a notch. Typically, the phase angle of a bipolar eddy current response is easily identified and measured and is used extensively for estimating depths of volumetric defects. Data are shown relating the phase angle of the rotating field probe`s bipolar response to the depth of circumferential EDM notches.

  5. Design of a non-magnetic shielded and integrated electromagnetic tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Junqing; Li, Fanwei; Cui, Ziqiang; Xu, Chuanjin

    2011-10-01

    The detected signal of an electromagnetic tomography (EMT) system is weak and can be easily disturbed by the capacitance coupling and external magnetic field. In order to improve the performance of the EMT system, simulation of a non-magnetic shield design was done and an integrated EMT system based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) is presented in this paper. By the orthogonal experiments, the influence of the material, height and inner radius of the shield was investigated according to the uniformity criterion of sensitivity. Besides, the principle for the selection of the shield parameters was put forward. In the present EMT system, a direct digital synthesizer module, digital demodulation module, MCU control module, DA interface module, AD interface module and USB communication module were all integrated in a FPGA chip. The integration of the system is increased and the difficulty of debugging is decreased. The influence of the excitation signal frequency, the sample frequency and the accumulation number of the multiply accumulator intellectual property core on the demodulation was analysed and a general principle was proposed. The system was evaluated and an optimal excitation frequency was chosen. A back-projection algorithm based on a truncated singular value was selected to reconstruct the different distributions, and the speed of reconstruction was 27 frames s-1. The design scheme can be easily transplanted to other electrical tomography systems.

  6. Overcoming high-field RF problems with non-magnetic Cartesian feedback transceivers.

    PubMed

    Hoult, D I; Foreman, D; Kolansky, G; Kripiakevich, D

    2008-03-01

    In extending human MR to field strengths approaching 10 T, the wavelength of electromagnetic radiation at the proton Larmor frequency becomes less than human body size and conventional radio-frequency coil circumference. Consequently, radio-frequency magnetic fields are better generated by an array of small coils than by one large coil. In this article, the primary problem of array coil interactions during transmission is examined, and a standard proposed whereby secondary induced currents should be less than 1% of the primary coil current. The use of cancellation methods and of power amplifiers with high output impedance to reduce interactions is examined in the light of this standard and found wanting. Non-magnetic Cartesian feedback transceivers functioning at the magnet entrance are then proposed as a solution that both reduces instrumentation cost and increases the bandwidth over which the standard may be met. The compromises inherent in instrument design are detailed and examples given of the innovative circuitry used. It is shown experimentally that when connected to interacting coils, two Cartesian feedback instruments function stably in accord with theory and such that the proposed standard is typically attained over a bandwidth of 22 kHz during transmission (much greater during signal reception)-enough for all current MR protocols. PMID:18026763

  7. Ferromagnetic cluster glass state induced by non-magnetic ions in a paramagnetic host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takafumi D.; Okazaki, Ryuji; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Terasaki, Ichiro

    A paramagnetic metal CaRuO3 has been known to show unique impurity effects, where a magnetic ordering is induced by a partial substitution of transition metal ions for Ru. Since this phenomenon occurs regardless of the magnetism of the substituted ions, it must reflect a magnetic instability of this ruthenate. Understanding such physical properties is one of intriguing issues in condensed matter physics. In this talk, we report an unconventional magnetic state induced by substituting non-magnetic Sc3+ ions. We find that the static magnetic susceptibilities of all Sc-substituted samples show ferromagnetic-like features below 40 K, while the Curie-Weiss temperature dramatically changes with increasing x. This inconsistency is a sign of non-uniform magnetic system. We propose a phenomenological model and show that the static magnetic properties can be described as a volume average of a paramagnetic component originated from Ru4+ ions and a ferromagnetic one driven by Sc substitution [T. D. Yamamoto et al., JPSJ 84, 014708 (2015).]. Furthermore our dynamic magnetic measurements reveal a ferromagnetic cluster glass state embedded in the paramagnetic and metallic host of CaRuO3.

  8. Chelating capture and magnetic removal of non-magnetic heavy metal substances from soil

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Liren; Song, Jiqing; Bai, Wenbo; Wang, Shengping; Zeng, Ming; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yang; Li, Haifeng; Lu, Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    A soil remediation method based on magnetic beneficiation is reported. A new magnetic solid chelator powder, FS@IDA (core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles coated with iminodiacetic acid chelators), was used as a reactive magnetic carrier to selectively capture non-magnetic heavy metals in soil by chelation and removal by magnetic separation. FS@IDA was prepared via inorganic-organic and organic synthesis reactions that generated chelating groups on the surface of magnetic, multi-core, core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 (FS) nanoparticles. These reactions used a silane coupling agent and sodium chloroacetate. The results show that FS@IDA could chelate the heavy metal component of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu and Ni carbonates, lead sulfate and lead chloride in water-insoluble salt systems. The resulting FS@IDA-Cd and FS@IDA-Pb chelates could be magnetically separated, resulting in removal rates of approximately 84.9% and 72.2% for Cd and Pb, respectively. FS@IDA could not remove the residual heavy metals and those bound to organic matter in the soil. FS@IDA did not significantly alter the chemical composition of the soil, and it allowed for fast chelating capture, simple magnetic separation and facilitated heavy metal elution. FS@IDA could also be easily prepared and reprocessed. PMID:26878770

  9. Manganese concentrate usage in steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhihina, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    The results of the research process of producing metalized products by solid-phase reduction of iron using solid carbonaceous reducing agents. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out on the model of the unit the Fe-C-O and system with iron ore and coal. As a result of modeling the thermodynamic boundary reducing, oxidizing, and transition areas and the value of the ratio of carbon and oxygen in the system. Simulation of real systems carried out with the gas phase obtained in the pyrolys of coal. The simulation results allow to determine the optimal cost of coal required for complete reduction of iron ore from a given composition. The kinetics of the processes of solid-phase reduction of iron using coal of various technological brands. The paper describes experiments on effects of metal deoxidizer composition, component proportion, pelletizing mixture, particle size distribution of basic materials and flux on manganese recovering from oxides under direct melting.

  10. MANGANESE DIOXIDE METHOD FOR PREPARATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Katzin, L.I.

    1958-08-12

    A method of obtaining U/sup 233/ is described. An aqueous solution of neutriln irradiated thoriunn is treated by forming tberein a precipitate of manganese dioxide which carries and thus separates the Pa/sup 233/ from the solution. The carrier precipitate so formed is then dissolved in an acidic solution containing a reducing agent sufficiently electronegative to reduce the tetravalent manganese to the divalent state. Further purification of the Pa/sup 233/ may be obtained by forming another manganese dioxide carrier precipitate and subsequently dissolving it. Ater a sufficient number of such cycles have brought the Pa/sup 233/ to the desired purity, the solution is aged, allowing the formation ot U/sup 233/ by radioaetive decay. A manganese dioxide precipitate is then formed in the U/sup 233/ containing solution. This precipitate carries down any remaining Pa/sup 233/ thus leaving the separated U/sup 233/solution, from whieh it may be easily recovered.

  11. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... manganese compounds with sulfuric acid. It is also obtained as a byproduct in the manufacture of... dioxide in sulfuric acid, and the roasting of pyrolusite (MnO2) ore with solid ferrous sulfate and...

  12. A manganese oxidation model for rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, G.W. ); Kim, Byung R. ); Roberts, P.J.W. )

    1989-04-01

    The presence of manganese in natural waters (>0.05 mg/L) degrades water-supply quality. A model was devised to predict the variation of manganese concentrations in river water released from an impoundment with the distance downstream. The model is one-dimensional and was calibrated using dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, pH, manganese, and hydraulic data collected in the Duck River, Tennessee. The results indicated that the model can predict manganese levels under various conditions. The model was then applied to the Chattahoochee River, Georgia. Discrepancies between observed and predicted may be due to inadequate pH data, precipitation of sediment particles, unsteady flow conditions in the Chattahoochee River, inaccurate rate expressions for the los pH conditions, or their combinations.

  13. Cobaltites: Emergence of magnetism and metallicity from a non-magnetic, insulating state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Daniel Patrick

    In cobalt oxides, the energy splitting between different spin-states of Co3+ ions can be quite small, which means that more than one spin-state can simultaneously co-exist in the same compound and that transitions between different spin-state can occur. This makes understanding the magnetic coupling between cobalt sites rather complex. Such is the case for pure and hole-doped LaCoO3. In its ground state, LaCoO3 is a non-magnetic insulator. The lack of a magnetic moment, is due to the fact that the ground spin-state of Co3+ ions is a low-spin, S=0, state. However, since a spin-state that has a net spin is on the order of 100 K higher in energy than the ground spin-state, a magnetic moment appears as the temperature is increased, and the system behaves as a paramagnet above 100 K. The higher-energy spin-state is either an intermediate-spin (S=1) state of a high-spin (S=2) state - an issue that has been debated for quite some time. When holes are chemically doped into the system, as in La1- xSrxCoO3 (LSCO), the non-magnetic, insulating ground state evolves into a ferromagnetic, metallic state. This evolution is complicated because it occurs due to the convoluted effects of Co4+ ions being doped into the system and the fact that the ground spin-state of Co3+ ions changes as a function of the hole concentration. In this dissertation, the magnetic transitions in pure and hole-doped LaCoO3 are investigated by neutron scattering techniques. In the pure compound, it is shown that thermally excited spins have both fluctuating ferromagnetic and antiferro-magnetic spin-correlations, which is suggested to result from a dynamic orbital ordering of the occupied e. g orbitals of the intermediate-spin state. It is also shown that the thermally excited spin-state is split in energy by 0.6 meV. In the hole-doped compound, LSCO, it is shown that the evolution into a metallic ferromagnet occurs by the percolation of isotropic ferromagnetic droplets. It is also shown that incommensurate

  14. Design and testing of piezo motors for non-magnetic and/or fine positioning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six, M. F.; Le Letty, R.; Seiler, R.; Coste, P.

    2005-07-01

    Piezoelectric motors offer several outstanding characteristics that may be very interesting for new scientific instruments in space applications. Piezo motors use a combination of electro-mechanical and frictional forces for generating a progressive motion; they are well suited for positioning applications because they exhibit a large force at rest without any power supply, and they often do not require any reduction gear. They are increasingly used in optical applications. Using piezo motors in space applications may become more and more relevant because of the continuous trend towards adaptive optics in future scientific payloads. In general, piezoelectric actuators are more and more used in space. Piezoelectric motors exhibit a number of advantages compared to conventional electromagnetic (stepping) motors, e.g. superior force/mass ratio, improved direct drive capability, no power supply to maintain a position, feasibility of a fully non-magnetic motor design. In this context, two complementary concepts have been designed and evaluated in the frame of ESA funded research and development activities: a resonant concept, called Rotary Piezo Actuator (RPA), a quasi-static concept, called Rotary Piezo Motor for High Precision Pointing (RPMHPP). The developed Rotary Piezo Actuator (RPA) is based on a Ultrasonic Piezo Drive (UPD) unit that drives a friction ring on the rotor part supported by a ball bearing assembly. This new motorization principle offers excellent motion dynamics and positioning accuracy combined with a high un-powered torque at standstill, and it does not rely on any magnetic features. A rotary piezo motor compliant with the requirements of a reference space application has been designed and tested. The technology remains challenging to be mastered, since the interdisciplinary aspects of the concept include, among others, drive electronics and controller design, piezo-electricity, contact mechanics and tribology. The conceptual design has lead to a

  15. Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Second [quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1992--March 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1993-03-01

    At present, the focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however studies at the US Steel Fundamental Research Laboratories in Monroeville, PA, by E. T. Turkdogan indicate that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt % ore + 25 wt % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) may be a preferable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. A significant domestic source of manganese in Minnesota is being explored for an in situ leach process which has potential for producing large tonnages of solutions which may be ideal for precipitation and recovery of pure manganese as a carbonate in a reactive form. In the current program the following studies will be addressed: Preparation of manganese sorbent pellets and characterization tests on pellets for strength and surface area; analysis of the thermodynamics and kinetics of sulfur removal from hot fuel gases by individual sorbent pellets (loading tests) by thermogravimetric testing; regeneration tests via TGA on individual sorbent pellets by oxidation; and bench-scale testing on sorbent beds in a two-inch diameter reactor. The developed information will be of value to METC in its determination of whether or not a manganese-based regenerable sorbent holds real promise for sulfur cleanup of hot fuel gases. This information is necessary prior to pilot-scale testing leading to commercial development is undertaken.

  16. Non-magnetic Iron Rich Microspherules from Younger Dryas Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Nabelek, L.; Svitavska-Sokolova, H.; Kadlec, J.; Bunch, T. E.; West, A.; Firestone, R. B.

    2013-05-01

    We report the discovery of abundance peaks of high-temperature non-magnetic spherules at 3 sites that date at or close to the onset of the Younger Dryas (YD) cooling episode at 12.9 ± 0.1 kiloannum. Two sites (Gainey and Blackwater Draw) exhibit human cultural artifact sequences that rank them among the premier end-Pleistocene archeological locations. The third site has been discovered in southern part of Czech Republic within the sedimentary record of paleolake Svarcenberk. The spherules, sometimes associated with high temperature melt-glass, are found in the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) layer proposed to have resulted from a cosmic impact/airburst (Firestone et al., 2007). That event was posited to have triggered Younger Dryas cooling, contributed to megafaunal extinctions, and led to human cultural shifts and population decreases across the Northern Hemisphere. Reports of peak abundances in YDB impact-related spherules have been confirmed by several independent groups, but disputed by several others. We have performed geochemical analyses with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy on YDB spherules, supported by examination of surface ultrastructures by scanning electron microscope. These analyses demonstrate that the spherules were not formed through volcanic, cosmic, anthropogenic, biogenic, or authigenic processes. Instead, they are comprised of high-temperature mineral phases of terrestrial source rocks and sediments. They are also geochemically similar to spherules, melted glass tektites, and impact ejecta recovered from twelve known impact craters and strewnfields, including the Australasian tektite field (780 kiloannum) and the Cretaceous-Paleogene impact layer (65 million years), supporting the hypothesis that they formed by cosmic impact. Magnetic analyses performed on spherules allowed separation of microspherules into two groups. Group A with enhanced coercivity corresponds to microspheres composed of nanosphere agglomerates with high silica content

  17. Extraordinary Magnetoresistance At Room Temperature In Non-Magnetic Narrow-Gap Semiconductor/Metal Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solin, S. A.

    2001-03-01

    The magnetoresistance (MR) of a material object contains a physical contribution from the magnetic field dependence of the material parameters such as the mobility or carrier concentration and a geometric contribution from the dependence of the current path and output voltage on the sample shape and electrode configuration. To date, only two classes of magnetic materials, artificially layered metals which exhibit giant MR (GMR) and the manganite perovskites which exhibit colossal MR (CMR) have been considered serious candidates in the effort to improve the room temperature (RT) performance of MR sensors. For both of these classes, the physical MR dominates. In contrast, we have found that non-magnetic narrow-gap semiconductors containing patterned metallic inhomogeneities (shunts), exhibit RT geometric extraordinary MR (EMR) orders of magnitude larger than the physical MR of other materials. EMR in excess of 2000% at 0.05 Tesla and 3,000,000% at 5 T, respectively, has been observed in macroscopic ( ~ 1 mm) composite structures of InSb with patterned internal or external shunts.(S.A. Solin et al., Science 289), 1530 (2000).^,(T. Zhou, D.R. Hines and S.A. Solin, Appl. Phys. Lett., submitted.) We have been able to quantitatively account for the magnitude of the observed EMR as well as its dependence on the geometry (shape, size and placement of the shunt) using both analytic (Laplace equation with boundary conditions) and computational (Finite Element Analysis)(see the talk by L.R. Ram-Mohan et al., this conference) methods. The effect of scaling EMR structures to mesoscopic dimensions and the possible technological impact of EMR will be discussed.

  18. Toenail, Blood and Urine as Biomarkers of Manganese Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Laohaudomchok, Wisanti; Lin, Xihong; Herrick, Robert F.; Fang, Shona C.; Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Christiani, David C.; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examined the correlation between manganese exposure and manganese concentrations in different biomarkers. Methods Air measurement data and work histories were used to determine manganese exposure over a workshift and cumulative exposure. Toenail samples (n=49), as well as blood and urine before (n=27) and after (urine, n=26; blood, n=24) a workshift were collected. Results Toenail manganese, adjusted for age and dietary manganese, was significantly correlated with cumulative exposure in months 7-9, 10-12, and 7-12 before toenail clipping date, but not months 1-6. Manganese exposure over a work shift was not correlated with changes in blood nor urine manganese. Conclusions Toenails appeared to be a valid measure of cumulative manganese exposure 7 to 12 months earlier. Neither change in blood nor urine manganese appeared to be suitable indicators of exposure over a typical workshift. PMID:21494156

  19. Manganese mineralogy and diagenesis in the sedimentary rock record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jena E.; Webb, Samuel M.; Ma, Chi; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of manganese (II) to manganese (III,IV) demands oxidants with very high redox potentials; consequently, manganese oxides are both excellent proxies for molecular oxygen and highly favorable electron acceptors when oxygen is absent. The first of these features results in manganese-enriched sedimentary rocks (manganese deposits, commonly Mn ore deposits), which generally correspond to the availability of molecular oxygen in Earth surface environments. And yet because manganese reduction is promoted by a variety of chemical species, these ancient manganese deposits are often significantly more reduced than modern environmental manganese-rich sediments. We document the impacts of manganese reduction and the mineral phases that form stable manganese deposits from seven sedimentary examples spanning from modern surface environments to rocks over 2 billion years old. Integrating redox and coordination information from synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray microprobe imaging with scanning electron microscopy and energy and wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy, we find that unlike the Mn(IV)-dominated modern manganese deposits, three manganese minerals dominate these representative ancient deposits: kutnohorite (CaMn(CO3)2), rhodochrosite (MnCO3), and braunite (Mn(III)6Mn(II)O8SiO4). Pairing these mineral and textural observations with previous studies of manganese geochemistry, we develop a paragenetic model of post-depositional manganese mineralization with kutnohorite and calcian rhodochrosite as the earliest diagenetic mineral phases, rhodochrosite and braunite forming secondarily, and later alteration forming Mn-silicates.

  20. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  1. Pathophysiology of Manganese-Associated Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Racette, Brad A.; Aschner, Michael; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Dydak, Ulrike; Criswell, Susan R.; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Conference Summary Manganese (Mn) is a well established neurotoxin associated with specific damage to the basal ganglia in humans. The phenotype associated with Mn neurotoxicity was first described in two workers with occupational exposure to Mn oxide.(Couper, 1837) Although the description did not use modern clinical terminology, a parkinsonian illness characterized by slowness of movement (bradykinesia), masked facies, and gait impairment (postural instability) appears to have predominated. Nearly 100 years later an outbreak of an atypical parkinsonian illness in a Chilean Mn mine provided a phenotypic description of a fulminant neurologic disorder with parkinsonism, dystonia, and neuropsychiatric symptoms.(Rodier J, 1955) Exposures associated with this syndrome were massive and an order of magnitude greater than modern exposures.(Rodier J, 1955; Hobson et al., 2011) The clinical syndrome associated with Mn neurotoxicity has been called manganism. Modern exposures to Mn occur primarily through occupations in the steel industry and welding. These exposures are often chronic and varied, occurring over decades in the healthy workforce. Although the severe neurologic disorder described by Rodier and Couper are no longer seen, several reports have suggested a possible increased risk of neurotoxicity in these workers.(Racette et al., 2005b; Bowler et al., 2007; Harris et al., 2011) Based upon limited prior imaging and pathologic investigations into the pathophysiology of neurotoxicity in Mn exposed workers,(Huang et al., 2003) many investigators have concluded that the syndrome spares the dopamine system distinguishing manganism from Parkinson disease (PD), the most common cause of parkinsonism in the general population, and a disease with characteristic degenerative changes in the dopaminergic system.(Jankovic, 2005) The purpose of this symposium was to highlight recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of Mn associated neurotoxicity from C. elegans

  2. Coordination between manganese and nitrogen within the ligands in the manganese complexes facilitates the reconstitution of the water-oxidizing complex in manganese-depleted photosystem II preparations.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuqin; Chen, Guiying; Han, Guangye; Ling, Lin; Huang, Deguang; Khorobrykh, A A; Zharmukhamedov, S K; Liu, Qiutian; Klimov, V V; Kuang, Tingyun

    2006-09-01

    The water-oxidizing complex (WOC) within photosystem II (PSII) can be reconstituted with synthetic manganese complexes by a process called photoactivation; however, the key factors affecting the efficiency of synthetic manganese complexes in reconstitution of electron transport and oxygen evolution activity in manganese-depleted PSII remain unclear. In the present study, four complexes with different manganese coordination environments were used to reconstitute the WOC, and an interesting relationship was found between the coordination environment of the manganese atom in the complexes and their efficiency in restoring electron transport and oxygen evolution. If Mn(II) is coordinated to nitrogen atoms within the ligand, it can restore significant rates of electron transport and oxygen evolution; however, if the manganese atom is coordinated only to oxygen atoms instead of nitrogen atoms, it has no capability to restore electron transport and oxygen evolution. So, our results demonstrate that the capability of manganese complexes to reconstitute the WOC is mainly determined by the coordination between nitrogen atoms from ligands and the manganese atom. It is suggested from our results that the ligation between the nitrogen atom and the manganese atom within the manganese complex facilitates the photoligation of the manganese atom to histidyl residues on the apo-protein in manganese-depleted PSII during photoactivation. PMID:16791637

  3. A ferrofluid guided system for the rapid separation of the non-magnetic particles in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Asmatulu, R; Zhang, B; Nuraje, N

    2010-10-01

    A microfluidic device was fabricated via UV lithography technique to separate non-magnetic fluoresbrite carboxy microspheres (approximately 4.5 microm) in the pH 7 ferrofluids made of magnetite nanoparticles (approximately 10 nm). A mixture of microspheres and ferrofluid was injected to a lithographically developed Y shape microfluidic device, and then by applying the external magnet fields (0.45 T), the microspheres were clearly separated into different channels because of the magnetic force acting on those non-magnetic particles. During this study, various pumping speeds and particle concentrations associated with the various distances between the magnet and the microfluidic device were investigated for an efficient separation. This study may be useful for the separation of biological particles, which are very sensitive to pH value of the solutions. PMID:21137734

  4. Alternating current loss of second-generation high-temperature superconducting coils with magnetic and non-magnetic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Kvitkovic, J.; Kim, Jae-Ho.; Kim, C. H.; Pamidi, S. V.; Coombs, T. A.

    2012-09-01

    It is widely believed that the second-generation high-temperature superconducting (2G HTS) tapes with magnetic substrates suffer higher transport loss compared to those with non-magnetic substrates. To test this, we prepared two identical coils with magnetic and non-magnetic substrates, respectively. The experimental result was rather surprising that they generated roughly the same amount of transport loss. We used finite element method to understand this result. It is found that, unlike in the single tape where the magnetic field-dependent critical current characteristic can be neglected and the effect of magnetic substrate dominates, the magnetic field-dependent critical current characteristic of 2G tape plays as an equally important role as magnetic substrate in terms of HTS coils.

  5. Mössbauer and X-ray phase analysis of carburized steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemčík, T.; Suwalski, J.; Kucharski, Z.; Lukasiak, M.

    1994-12-01

    57Fe backscattering Mössbauer phase analysis of the ASTM A295-70 type chromium bearing steel gas was performed for samples with varying phase composition achieved by gas carburization up to 3 wt% C followed by standard hardening, i.e. austenitizing and quenching procedures. Variations of contents of principal metallographic phases (alloyed martensite, austenite, magnetic and non-magnetic carbides) were determined and compared with reported X-ray data. Results are discussed in connection with the composition and heat treatment. Good mutual agreement of results was found, the Mössbauer phase analysis being superior for distinguishing magnetic and non-magnetic carbides, for finding the dependence on composition and also for detecting alloying element segregation. On the other hand, the Mössbauer method of determination of a small content of alloyed retained austenite suffers from the small difference between its satellites and non-magnetic carbides.

  6. Enzymatic conversion of magnetic nanoparticles to a non-magnetic precipitate: a new approach to magnetic sensing.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Arati G; Jamison, Andrew C; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kourentzi, Katerina; Litvinov, Dmitri; Brazdeikis, Audrius; Willson, Richard C; Randall Lee, T

    2016-09-21

    Magnetic sensing utilizes the detection of biomolecule-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Our new strategy offers a novel approach to magnetic sensing where in situ conversion produces a "loss of signal" in the sensing device. This report demonstrates the enzymatic conversion of Fe3O4 MNPs to a non-magnetic precipitate via reduction by l-ascorbic acid generated by the action of alkaline phosphatase. PMID:27518879

  7. Superconductivity in HfCuGe2: A non-magnetic analog of the 1111 iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoop, Leslie; Hirai, Daigorou; Felser, Claudia; Cava, R. J.

    2013-03-01

    Bulk superconductivity with a transition temperature Tc = 0.6 K is reported for the intermetallic compound HfCuGe2. HfCuGe2 is structurally related to the “1111” iron pnictide structure, which hosts a large number of Fe-based superconductors. It can therefore be viewed as a non-magnetic analog to the “1111”-type Fe-based superconductors.

  8. Biogeochemical cycling of manganese in Oneida Lake, New York: whole lake studies of manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, C.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    Oneida Lake, New York is a eutrophic freshwater lake known for its abundant manganese nodules and a dynamic manganese cycle. Temporal and spatial distribution of soluble and particulate manganese in the water column of the lake were analyzed over a 3-year period and correlated with other variables such as oxygen, pH, and temperature. Only data from 1988 are shown. Manganese is removed from the water column in the spring via conversion to particulate form and deposited in the bottom sediments. This removal is due to biological factors, as the lake Eh/pH conditions alone can not account for the oxidation of the soluble manganese Mn(II). During the summer months the manganese from microbial reduction moves from the sediments to the water column. In periods of stratification the soluble Mn(II) builds up to concentrations of 20 micromoles or more in the bottom waters. When mixing occurs, the soluble Mn(II) is rapidly removed via oxidation. This cycle occurs more than once during the summer, with each manganese atom probably being used several times for the oxidation of organic carbon. At the end of the fall, whole lake concentrations of manganese stabilize, and remain at about 1 micromole until the following summer, when the cycle begins again. Inputs and outflows from the lake indicate that the active Mn cycle is primarily internal, with a small accumulation each year into ferromanganese nodules located in the oxic zones of the lake.

  9. Electrokinetic remediation of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from electrolytic manganese residue.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Du, Jun; Tao, Changyuan

    2015-10-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) is a solid waste found in filters after sulphuric acid leaching of manganese carbonate ore, which mainly contains manganese and ammonia nitrogen and seriously damages the ecological environment. This work demonstrated the use of electrokinetic (EK) remediation to remove ammonia nitrogen and manganese from EMR. The transport behavior of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from EMR during electrokinetics, Mn fractionation before and after EK treatment, the relationship between Mn fractionation and transport behavior, as well as the effects of electrolyte and pretreatment solutions on removal efficiency and energy consumption were investigated. The results indicated that the use of H2SO4 and Na2SO4 as electrolytes and pretreatment of EMR with citric acid and KCl can reduce energy consumption, and the removal efficiencies of manganese and ammonia nitrogen were 27.5 and 94.1 %, respectively. In these systems, electromigration and electroosmosis were the main mechanisms of manganese and ammonia nitrogen transport. Moreover, ammonia nitrogen in EMR reached the regulated level, and the concentration of manganese in EMR could be reduced from 455 to 37 mg/L. In general, the electrokinetic remediation of EMR is a promising technology in the future. PMID:26062467

  10. Manganese-electrolysed slag treatment: bioleaching of manganese by Fusarium sp.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jian-Bing; Li, Xiao-Ming; Ouyang, Yu-Zhu; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Dong-Bo; Shen, Ting-Ting; Yue, Xiu; Yang, Qia

    2012-06-01

    A fungi strain named Fusarium sp. was isolated from manganese-electrolysed slag by using a gradient dilution spread plate method, identified by 26S RNA sequence analysis and phylogenetic tree analysis, and explored for the bioleaching capacity to manganese (II) from manganese-electrolysed slag in liquid mineral medium under different environmental conditions, including system temperature, incubator rotation speed and initial pH value. DNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis indicated the name of this fungi strain, that is, Fusarium sp., and higher bioleaching efficiencies (71.6%) of manganese by this fungi were observed when the bioleaching was carried out under the optimized conditions as follows: contact time: 72 h; system temperature: 28 degrees C; inoculums concentration: 2% (v/v); incubator rotation speed: 150 rpm; pH 4.0. Because of its low cost, environment friendliness and better efficiency, the bioleaching technique will have a significant impact on manganese-electrolysed slag pollution mitigation. PMID:22856303

  11. Study of high performance alloy electroforming. [nickel manganese and nickel cobalt manganese alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Nickel-manganese alloy electrodeposits from an electrolyte containing more manganese ion than previously used is being evaluated at two bath operating temperatures with a great variety of pulse plating conditions. Saccharine was added as a stress reducing agent for the electroforming of several of the samples with highest manganese content. All specimens for mechanical property testing have been produced but are not through the various heat treatments as yet. One of the heat treatment will be at 343 C (650 F), the temperature at which the MCC outer electroformed nickel shell is stress relieved. A number of retainer specimens from prior work have been tested for hardness before and after heat treatment. There appears to be a fairly good correlation between hardness and mechanical properties. Comparison of representative mechanical properties with hardnesses are made for nickel-manganese electrodeposits and nickel-cobalt-manganese deposits.

  12. The diagnosis of manganese-induced parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Cersosimo, Maria G; Koller, William C

    2006-05-01

    Parkinsonism is a clinical syndrome consisting of tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, gait, balance problems, in addition to various non-motor symptoms. There are many causes of parkinsonism such as neurodegenerative disease, drugs, vascular causes, structural lesions, infections, and toxicants. Parkinson's disease, or idiopathic parkinsonism, is the most common form of parkinsonism observed in the clinic. There is degeneration of the substantia nigra, pars compacta, which results in loss of striatal dopamine. Parkinson's disease is a slowly progressive condition in which there is a dramatic and sustained responsiveness to levodopa therapy. Manganese is an essential trace element that can be associated with neurotoxicity. Hypermanganism can occur in a variety of clinical settings. The clinical symptoms of manganese intoxication include non-specific complaints, neurobehavioral changes, parkinsonism, and dystonia. Although the globus pallidus is the main structure of damage, other basal ganglia areas can also be involved. MRI scans may show globus pallidus changes during (and for a short period after) exposure. Fluorodopa PET scans that assess the integrity of the substantia nigra dopaminergic system are abnormal in Parkinson's disease. However, these scans re-reported to be normal in a few cases studied with manganese-induced parkinsonism. The parkinsonism due to manganese may have some clinical features that occur less commonly in Parkinson's disease, such as kinetic tremor, dystonia, specific gait disturbances, and early mental, balance and speech changes. The clinical signs tend to be bilateral whereas Parkinson's disease begins on one side of the body. Patients with manganese-induced parkinsonism may be younger at the onset of the disease than with Parkinson's disease. Lastly, there appears to be a lack of response to levodopa therapy in manganese-induced parkinsonism. In summary it may be possible to differentiate manganese-induced parkinsonism from Parkinson

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: STEREO non-magnetic chemically peculiar stars (Paunzen+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Wraight, K. T.; Fossati, L.; Netopil, M.; White, G. J.; Bewsher, D.

    2014-03-01

    We have analysed the photometric data obtained with the STEREO spacecraft for 558 non-magnetic chemically peculiar (CP) stars to search for rotational and pulsational variability. Applying the Lomb-Scargle and the phase dispersion minimization methods, we have detected photometric variability for 44 objects from which 35 were previously unknown. The new objects are all bright stars on the ecliptic plane (magnitude range 4.7

  14. Wear evaluation of high interstitial stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Tylczak, J.H.

    2008-07-01

    A new series of high nitrogen-carbon manganese stainless steel alloys are studied for their wear resistance. High nitrogen and carbon concentrations were obtained by melting elemental iron-chromium-manganese (several with minor alloy additions of nickel, silicon, and molybdenum) in a nitrogen atmosphere and adding elemental graphite. The improvement in material properties (hardness and strength) with increasing nitrogen and carbon interstitial concentration was consistent with previously reported improvements in similar material properties alloyed with nitrogen only. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk, sand-rubber-wheel, impeller, and jet erosion. Additions of interstitial nitrogen and carbon as well as interstitial nitrogen and carbide precipitates were found to greatly improve material properties. In general, with increasing nitrogen and carbon concentrations, strength, hardness, and wear resistance increased.

  15. Cardiovascular Toxicities Upon Manganese Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yueming; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn)-induced Parkinsonism has been well documented; however, little attention has been devoted to Mn-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. This review summarizes literature data from both animal and human studies on Mn’s effect on cardiovascular function. Clinical and epidemiological evidence suggests that the incidence of abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG) is significantly higher in Mn-exposed workers than that in the control subjects. The main types of abnormal ECG include sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinister megacardia, and ST-T changes. The accelerated heartbeat and shortened P-R interval appear to be more prominent in female exposed workers than in their male counterparts. Mn-exposed workers display a mean diastolic blood pressure that is significantly lower than that of the control subjects, especially in the young and female exposed workers. Animal studies indicate that Mn is capable of quickly accumulating in heart tissue, resulting in acute or sub-acute cardiovascular disorders, such as acute cardiodepression and hypotension. These toxic outcomes appear to be associated with Mn-induced mitochondrial damage and interaction with the calcium channel in the cardiovascular system. PMID:16382172

  16. Widespread distribution of ability to oxidize manganese among freshwater bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gregory, E; Staley, J T

    1982-08-01

    Manganese-oxidizing heterotrophic bacteria were found to comprise a significant proportion of the bacterial community of Lake Washington (Seattle, Wash.) and Lake Virginia (Winter Park, Fla.). Identification of these freshwater bacteria showed that members of a variety of genera are capable of oxidizing manganese. Isolates maintained in the laboratory spontaneously lost the ability to oxidize manganese. A direct correlation was found between the presence of plasmid DNA and the ability of the organism to oxidize manganese. PMID:16346084

  17. Real-Time Manganese Phase Dynamics during Biological and Abiotic Manganese Oxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jena E; Savalia, Pratixa; Davis, Ryan; Kocar, Benjamin D; Webb, Samuel M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-04-19

    Manganese oxides are often highly reactive and easily reduced, both abiotically, by a variety of inorganic chemical species, and biologically during anaerobic respiration by microbes. To evaluate the reaction mechanisms of these different reduction routes and their potential lasting products, we measured the sequence progression of microbial manganese(IV) oxide reduction mediated by chemical species (sulfide and ferrous iron) and the common metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under several endmember conditions, using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopic measurements complemented by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy on precipitates collected throughout the reaction. Crystalline or potentially long-lived phases produced in these experiments included manganese(II)-phosphate, manganese(II)-carbonate, and manganese(III)-oxyhydroxides. Major controls on the formation of these discrete phases were alkalinity production and solution conditions such as inorganic carbon and phosphate availability. The formation of a long-lived Mn(III) oxide appears to depend on aqueous Mn(2+) production and the relative proportion of electron donors and electron acceptors in the system. These real-time measurements identify mineralogical products during Mn(IV) oxide reduction, contribute to understanding the mechanism of various Mn(IV) oxide reduction pathways, and assist in interpreting the processes occurring actively in manganese-rich environments and recorded in the geologic record of manganese-rich strata. PMID:27018915

  18. Development of an accelerator based system for in vivo neutron activation analysis measurements of manganese in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michelle Lynn

    2001-11-01

    Manganese is required by the human body, but as with many heavy elements, in large amounts it can be toxic, producing a neurological disorder similar to that of Parkinson's Disease. The primary industrial uses of the element are for the manufacturing of steel and alkali batteries. Environmental exposure may occur via drinking water or exhaust emissions from vehicles using gasoline with the manganese containing compound MMT as an antiknock agent (MMT has been approved for use in both Canada and the United States). Preclinical symptoms of toxicity have recently been detected in individuals occupationally exposed to airborne manganese at levels below the present threshold limit value set by the EPA. Evidence also suggests that early detection of manganese toxicity is crucial since once the symptoms have developed past a certain point, the syndrome will continue to progress even if manganese exposure ceases. The development of a system for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) measurement of manganese levels was investigated, with the goal being to have a means of monitoring both over exposed and manganese deficient populations. The McMaster KN-accelerator was used to provide low-energy neutrons, activation within an irradiation site occurred via the 55Mn(n,gamma) 56Mn capture reaction, and the 847 keV gamma-rays emitted when 56Mn decayed were measured using one or more Nal(TI) detectors. The present data regarding manganese metabolism and storage within the body are limited, and it is unclear what the optimal measurement site would be to provide a suitable biomarker of past exposure. Therefore the feasibility of IVNAA measurements in three sites was examined---the liver, brain and hand bones. Calibration curves were derived, minimum detectable limits determined and resulting doses calculated for each site (experimentally in the case of the liver and hand bones, and through computer simulations for the brain). Detailed analytical calculations of the 7Li(p,n) 7Be

  19. Essentiality, Toxicity and Uncertainty in the Risk Assessment of Manganese

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessments of manganese by inhalation or oral routes of exposure typically acknowledge the duality of manganese as an essential element at low doses and a toxic metal at high doses. Previously, however, risk assessors were unable to describe manganese pharmacokinetics quant...

  20. Silver manganese oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2006-05-09

    This invention relates to electrodes for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries with silver manganese oxide positive electrodes, denoted AgxMnOy, in which x and y are such that the manganese ions in the charged or partially charged electrodes cells have an average oxidation state greater than 3.5. The silver manganese oxide electrodes optionally contain silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrodes and to improve the power capability of the cells or batteries. The invention relates also to a method for preparing AgxMnOy electrodes by decomposition of a permanganate salt, such as AgMnO4, or by the decomposition of KMnO4 or LiMnO4 in the presence of a silver salt.

  1. Manganese transport in Brevibacterium ammoniagenes ATCC 6872.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, J; Auling, G

    1987-01-01

    Uptake of manganese by Brevibacterium ammoniagenes ATCC 6872 was energy dependent and obeyed saturation kinetics (Km = 0.65 microM; Vmax = 0.12 mumol/min per g [dry weight]). Uptake showed optima at 27 degrees C and pH 9.5. 54Mn2+ accumulated by the cells was released by treatment with toluene or by exchange for unlabeled manganese ions, via an energy-dependent process. Co2+, Fe2+, Cd2+, and Zn2+ inhibited manganese uptake. Inhibition by Cd2+ and Zn2+ was competitive (Ki = 0.15 microM Cd2+ and 1.2 microM Zn2+). Experiments with 65Zn2+ provided no evidence for Zn2+ uptake via the Mn2+ transport system. PMID:3597325

  2. Spin dependent transport studies in magnetic, non-magnetic, antiferromagnetic, and half metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Rakhi

    This thesis consists of three studies of Current-Perpendicular-to-the-Planes (CPP) Magnetoresistance (MR) of sputtered ferromagnetic/non-magnetic (F/N) multilayers. (a) The first study involves a double-blind comparison of our measurements of the interface specific resistance AR (area A through which the CPP current flows times the CPP resistance R) of Pd/Ir interfaces with no-free-parameter calculations. (b) The second study is of spin relaxation within the antiferromagnets (AF) IrMn and FeMn and at their interfaces with Cu. (c) The third study is of the MR of multilayers involving a nominal half-metal Heusler alloy, Co2Fe(Al0.5Si0.5) (CFAS). A true half-metal should give an especially large CPP-MR. This study involves a different sample geometry, combining optical lithography and ion-beam etching, with epitaxial sputtering at elevated temperatures. (a) For four pairs of lattice-matched metals (Ag/Au, Co/Cu, Fe/Cr, and Pt/Pd) having the same crystal structure and the same lattice parameter to within ˜1%, no-free-parameter calculations of 2AR, twice the interface specific resistance AR have agreed with measured values to within mutual uncertainties. For three pairs, the measured values were known when the calculations were made. For the fourth pair, Pt/Pd, they were not. In contrast, calculations for non-matched pairs, where the lattice parameters differed by 5% or more, disagreed with measured values. In this thesis we study a fifth pair, Pd and Ir, where the lattice parameter mismatch is intermediate, 1.3%. The project was done double-blind with theory collaborators Wang and Xia, with experiment and calculations shared only after both groups settled on their separate values. The values for Pd/Ir calculated with the same assumptions used previously were just outside of uncertainty of the measured ones. An improved calculation gave agreement between the two values. (b) Antiferromagnets (AFs) play important roles in CPP-MR devices as sources of pinning for F

  3. Investigation of Non-Magnetic Iron in LUTETIUM(2)IRON(3)SILICON(5) - Superconductors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Youwen

    1987-03-01

    A focussed study on the effect of transition metal substitution for Fe in the compounds {rm Lu_2(Fe_{1-x}T_{x}) _3Si}_5 (Where T = Cr, Mn, Co, Ni Cu, and Ru) is reported. The effect of these transition metals on the superconducting transition temperature shows that Cr, Co, Ni and Ru all act as non-magnetic impurities. By fitting the experimental data {rm T _{c}/T_{co}} to Kaiser's equation, a good agreement with Kaiser's theory is obtained. The rate of suppression due to Co substitution is similar to that of Ru. Superconductivity persists ({rm T_{c}} = 0.49K) even when 10 at.% Co is substituted for Fe. In contrast, Mn and Cu act as magnetic impurities and suppress {rm T_{c}} in a way described by the theory of Abrikosov and Gor'kov. The molar magnetic susceptibility of {rm Lu_2Fe_3Si}_5 does not follow a Curie-Weiss law, but rather increases slightly as temperature increases. The addition of Ru lowers the value of chi{rm (T) }, but the overall shape of chi {rm (T)} is unchanged. In contrast, the substitution of the nominally magnetic transition metals Cr, Mn, Co and Ni for Fe causes chi{ rm (T)} to become more Curie-Weiss like. The magnetic susceptibility of the compound { rm Lu_2Co_3Si}_5 follows the Curie-Weiss law, while that of the compound {rm Lu_2Ru_3Si}_5 is diamagnetic. The electrical resistivity rho{ rm (T)} of the compound { rm Lu_2Fe_3Si}_5 is approximately quadratic in T at temperatures below 50 K and proportional to lnT at temperature above 100 K. The low temperature heat capacity data of the Co- and Ru-containing samples are similar and both fit to equations gamma{_ {s}T+beta_{s}T}^3 below {rm T_{c} } and gamma{_ {n}T+beta_{n}T^3+ alpha_{n}T}^5 above {rm T_{c}} in agreement with the heat capacity measurement by C. B. Vining for the compound {rm Lu_2Fe_3Si}_5. Increasing the concentration of Co or Ru lowers the Debye temperature and the electronic density of states at the Fermi level of the compounds and enhances the linear term in the superconducting

  4. Bacterial manganese reduction and growth with manganese oxide as the sole electron acceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Charles R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Microbes that couple growth to the reduction of manganese could play an important role in the biogeochemistry of certain anaerobic environments. Such a bacterium, Alteromonas putrefaciens MR-1, couples its growth to the reduction of manganese oxides only under anaerobic conditions. The characteristics of this reduction are consistent with a biological, and not an indirect chemical, reduction of manganese, which suggest that this bacterium uses manganic oxide as a terminal electron acceptor. It can also utilize a large number of other compounds as terminal electron acceptors; this versatility could provide a distinct advantage in environments where electron-acceptor concentrations may vary.

  5. Non-magnetic impurity effect on domain growth kinetics in an isosceles triangular Ising antiferromagnet CoNb2O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuda, S.; Okano, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Prokes, K.

    2004-05-01

    By neutron diffraction and ac susceptibility measurements we have investigated non-magnetic impurity effect on domain-growth-kinetics specific to an isosceles-triangular geometry of frustrated spins, using the Co1-xMgxNb2O6 sample with x=0.005, where, preserving anomalously low growth exponent n~0.2, anisotropic pinning effect for domain-wall-motion by non-magnetic impurity was clearly observed.

  6. Instrumentation of the variable-angle magneto-optic ellipsometer and its application to M-O media and other non-magnetic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Andy F.; Erwin, J. Kevin; Mansuripur, M.

    1992-01-01

    A new and comprehensive dielectric tensor characterization instrument is presented for characterization of magneto-optical recording media and non-magnetic thin films. Random and systematic errors of the system are studied. A series of TbFe, TbFeCo, and Co/Pt samples with different composition and thicknesses are characterized for their optical and magneto-optical properties. The optical properties of several non-magnetic films are also measured.

  7. Metal Uptake by Manganese Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase is an important antioxidant defense metalloenzyme that protects cells from damage by the toxic oxygen metabolite, superoxide free radical, formed as an unavoidable by-product of aerobic metabolism. Many years of research have gone into understanding how the metal cofactor interacts with small molecules in its catalytic role. In contrast, very little is presently known about how the protein acquires its metal cofactor, an important step in the maturation of the protein and one that is absolutely required for its biological function. Recent work is beginning to provide insight into the mechanisms of metal delivery to manganese superoxide dismutase in vivo and in vitro. PMID:19699328

  8. Embrittlement of RPV steels; An atom probe tomography perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Russell, Kaye F

    2007-01-01

    Atom probe tomography has played a key role in the understanding of the embrittlement of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels through the atomic level characterization of the microstructure. Atom probe tomography has been used to demonstrate the importance of the post weld stress relief treatment in reducing the matrix copper content in high copper alloys, the formation of {approx}-nm-diameter copper-, nickel-, manganese- and silicon-enriched precipitates during neutron irradiation in copper containing RPV steels, and the coarsening of these precipitates during post irradiation heat treatments. Atom probe tomography has been used to detect {approx}2-nm-diameter nickel-, silicon- and manganese-enriched clusters in neutron irradiated low copper and copper free alloys. Atom probe tomography has also been used to quantify solute segregation to, and precipitation on, dislocations and grain boundaries.

  9. Tricritical wetting in the two-dimensional Ising magnet due to the presence of localized non-magnetic impurities.

    PubMed

    Trobo, Marta L; Albano, Ezequiel V

    2016-03-31

    Fixed vacancies (non-magnetic impurities) are placed along the centre of Ising strips in order to study the wetting behaviour in this confined system, by means of numerical simulations analysed with the aid of finite size scaling and thermodynamic integration methods. By considering strips of size L × M (L < M) where short-range competitive surface fields (H(s)) act along the M-direction, we observe localization-delocalization transitions of the interface between magnetic domains of different orientation (driven by the corresponding surface fields), which are the precursors of the wetting transitions that occur in the thermodynamic limit. By placing vacancies or equivalently non-magnetic impurities along the centre of the sample, we found that for low vacancy densities the wetting transitions are of second order, while by increasing the concentration of vacancies the transitions become of first order. Second- and first-order lines meet in tricritical wetting points (H(tric)(SW), T(tric)(W)), where H(tric)(SW) and T(Tric)(W) are the magnitude of the surface field and the temperature, respectively. In the phase diagram, tricritical points shift from the high temperature and weak surface field regime at large vacancy densities to the T --> 0, H(tric)(SW) --> 1 limit for low vacancy densities. By comparing the locations of the tricritical points with those corresponding to the case of mobile impurities, we conclude that in order to observe similar effects, in the latter the required density of impurities is much smaller (e.g. by a factor 3-5). Furthermore, a proper density of non magnetic impurities placed along the centre of a strip can effectively pin rather flat magnetic interfaces for suitable values of the competing surface fields and temperature. PMID:26910650

  10. Microstructural characterization of irradiated PWR steels using the atom probe field-ion microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Burke, M.G.

    1987-08-01

    Atom probe field-ion microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructure of a neutron-irradiated A533B pressure vessel steel weld. The atomic spatial resolution of this technique permits a complete structural and chemical description of the ultra-fine features that control the mechanical properties to be made. A variety of fine scale features including roughly spherical copper precipitates and clusters, spherical and rod-shaped molybdenum carbide and disc-shaped molybdenum nitride precipitates were observed to be inhomogeneously distributed in the ferrite. The copper content of the ferrite was substantially reduced from the nominal level. A thin film of molybdenum carbides and nitrides was observed on grain boundaries in addition to a coarse copper-manganese precipitate. Substantial enrichment of manganese and nickel were detected at the copper-manganese precipitate-ferrite interface and this enrichment extended into the ferrite. Enrichment of nickel, manganese and phosphorus were also measured at grain boundaries.

  11. Manganese regulation of manganese peroxidase expression and lignin degradation by the white rot fungus Dichomitus squalens

    SciTech Connect

    Perie, F.; Gold, M.H. )

    1991-08-01

    Extracellular manganese peroxidase and laccase activities were detected in cultures of Dichomitus squalens (Polyporus anceps) under conditions favoring lignin degradation. In contrast, neither extracellular lignin peroxidase nor aryl alcohol oxidase activity was detected in cultures grown under a wide variety of conditions. The mineralization of {sup 14}C-ring-, -side chain-, and -methoxy-labeled synthetic guaiacyl lignins by D. squalens and the expression of extracellular manganese peroxidase were dependent on the presence of Mn(II), suggesting that manganese peroxidase is an important component of this organism's lignin degradation system. The expression of laccase activity was independent of manganese. In contrast to previous findings with Phanero-chaete chrysosporium, lignin degradation by D. squalens proceeded in the cultures containing excess carbon and nitrogen.

  12. Competition for Manganese at the Host-Pathogen Interface.

    PubMed

    Kelliher, J L; Kehl-Fie, T E

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals such as manganese are essential nutrients for both pathogen and host. Vertebrates exploit this necessity to combat invading microbes by restricting access to these critical nutrients, a defense known as nutritional immunity. During infection, the host uses several mechanisms to impose manganese limitation. These include removal of manganese from the phagolysosome, sequestration of extracellular manganese, and utilization of other metals to prevent bacterial acquisition of manganese. In order to cause disease, pathogens employ a variety of mechanisms that enable them to adapt to and counter nutritional immunity. These adaptations include, but are likely not limited to, manganese-sensing regulators and high-affinity manganese transporters. Even though successful pathogens can overcome host-imposed manganese starvation, this defense inhibits manganese-dependent processes, reducing the ability of these microbes to cause disease. While the full impact of host-imposed manganese starvation on bacteria is unknown, critical bacterial virulence factors such as superoxide dismutases are inhibited. This chapter will review the factors involved in the competition for manganese at the host-pathogen interface and discuss the impact that limiting the availability of this metal has on invading bacteria. PMID:27571690

  13. Manganese ore tailing: optimization of acid leaching conditions and recovery of soluble manganese.

    PubMed

    Santos, Olívia de Souza Heleno; Carvalho, Cornélio de Freitas; Silva, Gilmare Antônia da; Santos, Cláudio Gouvêa Dos

    2015-01-01

    Manganese recovery from industrial ore processing waste by means of leaching with sulfuric acid was the objective of this study. Experimental conditions were optimized by multivariate experimental design approaches. In order to study the factors affecting leaching, a screening step was used involving a full factorial design with central point for three variables in two levels (2(3)). The three variables studied were leaching time, concentration of sulfuric acid and sample amount. The three factors screened were shown to be relevant and therefore a Doehlert design was applied to determine the best working conditions for leaching and to build the response surface. By applying the best leaching conditions, the concentrations of 12.80 and 13.64 %w/w of manganese for the global sample and for the fraction -44 + 37 μm, respectively, were found. Microbeads of chitosan were tested for removal of leachate acidity and recovering of soluble manganese. Manganese recovery from the leachate was 95.4%. Upon drying the leachate, a solid containing mostly manganese sulfate was obtained, showing that the proposed optimized method is efficient for manganese recovery from ore tailings. PMID:25284800

  14. ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS FROM ENVIRONMENTAL MANGANESE EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ubiquitous element, manganese (Mn), is an essential nutrient, but toxic at excessive exposure levels. Therefore, the US EPA set guideline levels for Mn exposure through inhalation (reference concentration-RfC=0.05 ?g/m3) and ingestion (reference dose-RfD=0.14 mg/kg/day (10 mg...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese hypophosphite. 582.5458 Section 582.5458 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458...

  17. Geology of the manganese deposits of Cuba

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simons, Frank S.; Straczek, John A.

    1958-01-01

    Deposits of manganese ore have been found in five of the six provinces of Cuba and have been reported from the sixth.  Only Oriente and Pinar del Rio provinces have more than a few known deposits and only the deposits of Oriente have yielded any appreciable amount of ore.

  18. Health assessment document for manganese. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bilinski, H.; Bruins, R.J.F.; Erdreich, L.; Fugas, M.; Kello, D.

    1984-08-01

    The document evaluates data on occurrence, sources, and transport of manganese in the environment and data on metabolism, pharmacokinetics, laboratory toxicological and epidemiologic studies to determine the nature and dose response relationship of potential health effects on humans. Nationwide air sampling data indicate that mean manganese concentrations have declined from 0.11 micrograms per cu. m. in 1953-1957 to 0.033 micrograms per cu. m. in 1982. The effects of major concern to humans exposed to manganese are on neurological and on pulmonary function. The CNS effects have been observed in humans at exposure levels above 5 mg/cu. m. and are incapacitating and generally irreversible. Data are equivocal between 1 and 5 mg/cu. m. but suggest decreased prevalence. There are no reports of these effects below 0.3 mg/cu. m. exposure. Pneumonia and chronic bronchitis occur at levels which are associated with neurological effects. Reduced lung function has been reported in children exposed to an estimated 3-11 micrograms per cu. m. from emission of a ferromanganese plant. However, studies of workers exposed to 40 micrograms per cu. m. did not show respiratory symptoms. Animal studies qualitatively support pulmonary effects of manganese exposure. Respiratory symptoms occur at lower levels than neurological symptoms and are therefore considered to be the critical effect based on available data.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  1. The Products of Manganese (II) Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, A.

    2004-09-03

    Manganese, the second most abundant transition metal in the earth's crust, exists in a number of oxidation states, among which the II, III, and IV oxidation states are of greatest environmental importance. Produced through microbial activity, manganese oxides help to mediate redox reactions with organic and inorganic compounds and help to sequester a variety of metals. The mechanism by which Manganese (II) is oxidized to Manganese (IV) is a biologically catalyzed process. There are at least three different pathways by which Mn(II) can be bacterially oxidized to Mn(IV); the first in which states that Mn(II) can be oxidized to mixed Mn(III, IV), and Mn(IV) oxides and oxyhydroxides. The second of these pathways is that Mn(II) can be directly oxidized to Mn(IV) and the last of these pathways is that Mn(II) follows an enzymatic bond with a Mn(III) intermediate in which Mn(II) oxidizes to Mn(III) and then to Mn(IV). The pathways of focus for this research are the latter two pathways.

  2. Lithium Manganese Silicate Positive Electrode Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiong

    As the fast development of the electronic portable devices and drastic fading of fossil energy sources. The need for portable secondary energy sources is increasingly urgent. As a result, lithium ion batteries are being investigated intensely to meet the performance requirements. Among various electrode materials, the most expensive and capacity limiting component is the positive materials. Based on this, researches have been mostly focused on the development of novel cathode materials with high capacity and energy density and the lithium transition metal orthosilicates have been identified as possible high performance cathodes. Here in, we report the synthesis of a kind of lithium transition metal orthosilicates electrode lithium manganese silicate. Lithium manganese silicate has the advantage of high theoretical capacity, low cost raw material and safety. In this thesis, lithium manganese silicate are prepared using different silicon sources. The structure of silicon sources preferred are examined. Nonionic block copolymers surfactant, P123, is tried as carbon source and mophology directing agent. Lithium manganese silicate's performances are improved by adding P123.

  3. Manganese homeostasis in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Lee, Eunsook; Paoliello, Monica M B; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential heavy metal that is naturally found in the environment. Daily intake through dietary sources provides the necessary amount required for several key physiological processes, including antioxidant defense, energy metabolism, immune function and others. However, overexposure from environmental sources can result in a condition known as manganism that features symptomatology similar to Parkinson's disease (PD). This disorder presents with debilitating motor and cognitive deficits that arise from a neurodegenerative process. In order to maintain a balance between its essentiality and neurotoxicity, several mechanisms exist to properly buffer cellular Mn levels. These include transporters involved in Mn uptake, and newly discovered Mn efflux mechanisms. This review will focus on current studies related to mechanisms underlying Mn import and export, primarily the Mn transporters, and their function and roles in Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Though and essential metal, overexposure to manganese may result in neurodegenerative disease analogous to Parkinson's disease. Manganese homeostasis is tightly regulated by transporters, including transmembrane importers (divalent metal transporter 1, transferrin and its receptor, zinc transporters ZIP8 and Zip14, dopamine transporter, calcium channels, choline transporters and citrate transporters) and exporters (ferroportin and SLC30A10), as well as the intracellular trafficking proteins (SPCA1 and ATP12A2). A manganese-specific sensor, GPP130, has been identified, which affords means for monitoring intracellular levels of this metal. PMID:25982296

  4. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., and crystallized. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  5. Thermodynamic modelling of the formation of zinc-manganese ferrite spinel in electric arc furnace dust.

    PubMed

    Pickles, C A

    2010-07-15

    Electric arc furnace dust is generated when automobile scrap, containing galvanized steel, is remelted in an electric arc furnace. This dust is considered as a hazardous waste in most countries. Zinc is a major component of the dust and can be of significant commercial value. Typically, the majority of the zinc exists as zinc oxide (ZnO) and as a zinc-manganese ferrite spinel ((Zn(x)Mn(y)Fe(1-x-y))Fe(2)O(4)). The recovery of the zinc from the dust in metal recycling and recovery processes, particularly in the hydrometallurgical extraction processes, is often hindered by the presence of the mixed ferrite spinel. However, there is a paucity of information available in the literature on the formation of this spinel. Therefore, in the present research, the equilibrium module of HSC Chemistry 6.1 was utilized to investigate the thermodynamics of the formation of the spinel and the effect of variables on the amount and the composition of the mixed ferrite spinel. It is proposed that the mixed ferrite spinel forms due to the reaction of iron-manganese particulates with both gaseous oxygen and zinc, at the high temperatures in the freeboard of the furnace above the steel melt. Based on the thermodynamic predictions, methods are proposed for minimizing the formation of the mixed ferrite spinel. PMID:20356673

  6. Linear Stability Analysis Of A Magnetic/Non-Magnetic Fluid Coflow In The Presence Of A Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Anindya; Puri, Ishwar

    2007-11-01

    Ferrofluids are colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles in carrier liquids. Being both magnetic and a liquid, they are readily maneuvered from a distance using magnetic fields. When functionalized with different antibodies or medicinal compounds, the ferrofluid can be used for various purposes, e.g., to detect bacteria or for targeted drug delivery. We have considered a coflow where two fluids are separated by a vertical surface parallel to the direction of gravity. For simplicity the flow is assumed to be inviscid and incompressible. We have investigated two configurations depending on the position of the magnet relative to the channel. When the magnet is placed adjacent to the vertical wall along which the magnetic fluid is flowing, the magnetic fluid stays close to the wall unless perturbed by the shear due to a velocity difference. It results in a very stable system. In the second case, the magnet is placed close to the wall along which the non-magnetic fluid flows. The magnetic fluid gets attracted towards the magnet and tries to flow toward it when it gets resisted by the non-magnetic fluid. This configuration is inherently unstable and responds to small perturbations. The surface tension force resists the perturbation of smaller wavelengths. The relative effects of different forces are characterized by magnetic pressure number, Weber number and magnetic Weber number.

  7. Method of making high strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel, particularly suitable for the mining industry, is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other subsitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  8. Soil Manganese Enrichment from Industrial Inputs: A Gastropod Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bordean, Despina-Maria; Nica, Dragos V.; Harmanescu, Monica; Banatean-Dunea, Ionut; Gergen, Iosif I.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems. PMID:24454856

  9. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems.

    PubMed

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Grass, Gregor; Rensing, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron/manganese-uptake systems relevant for growth in defined medium. Based on these results an exit strategy enabling the cell to cope with iron depletion and use of manganese as an alternative for iron could be shown. Such a strategy would also explain why E. coli harbors some iron- or manganese-dependent iso-enzymes such as superoxide dismutases or ribonucleotide reductases. The benefits for gaining a means for survival would be bought with the cost of less efficient metabolism as indicated in our experiments by lower cell densities with manganese than with iron. In addition, this strain was extremely sensitive to the metalloid gallium but this gallium toxicity can be alleviated by low concentrations of manganese. PMID:27003826

  10. A simple route to synthesize manganese germanate nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.Z. Yang, Y.; Yuan, C.Z.; Duan Taike; Zhang Qianfeng

    2011-06-15

    Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple route using germanium dioxide and manganese acetate as the source materials. X-ray diffraction observation shows that the nanorods are composed of orthorhombic and monoclinic manganese germanate phases. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations display that the manganese germanate nanorods have flat tips with the length of longer than 10 micrometers and diameter of 60-350 nm, respectively. The role of the growth conditions on the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods shows that the proper selection and combination of the growth conditions are the key factor for controlling the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods. The photoluminescence spectrum of the manganese germanate nanorods exhibits four fluorescence emission peaks centered at 422 nm, 472 nm, 487 nm and 530 nm showing the application potential for the optical devices. - Research Highlights: {yields} Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. {yields} The formation of manganese germanate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. {yields} Manganese germanate nanorods exhibit good PL emission ability for optical device.

  11. Nonmetallic inclusions in a chromium steel intended for the power engineering industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpishon, E. Yu.; Mal'Ginov, A. N.; Romashkin, A. N.; Durynin, V. A.; Afanas'ev, S. Yu.; Shitov, E. V.; Afanas'eva, L. T.; Batov, Yu. M.

    2010-06-01

    The behavior of oxygen in the course of manufacturing large steel ingots containing 1.5-20% Cr, the formation of oxides depending on the contents of deoxidizing agents and oxygen, and the composition of the oxide phase in ingots and forgings made of the steel are considered. The steel is manufactured using an arc steel-melting furnace and unit for complex treatment of steel (ASF-ACSPU technology) and the ASF-ACSPU technology and electroslag remelting (ESR). It is shown that the oxide phase composition depends on the contents of strong deoxidizing agents and oxygen and the development of secondary oxidation. Chromium- and manganese-containing spinels are characteristic species of the secondary and tertiary oxides in the chromium steel in the case of deficient aluminum and silicon.

  12. Manganese oxide cathodes for rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Dongmin

    Manganese oxides are considered as promising cathodes for rechargeable batteries due to their low cost and low toxicity as well as the abundant natural resources. In this dissertation, manganese oxides have been investigated as cathodes for both rechargeable lithium and alkaline batteries. Nanostructured lithium manganese oxides designed for rechargeable lithium cells have been synthesized by reducing lithium permanganate with methanol or hydrogen in various solvents followed by firing at moderate temperatures. The samples have been characterized by wet-chemical analyses, thermal methods, spectroscopic methods, and electron microscopy. It has been found that chemical residues in the oxides such as carboxylates and hydroxyl groups, which could be controlled by varying the reaction medium, reducing agents, and additives, make a significant influence on the electrochemical properties. The Li/Mn ratio in the material has also been found to be a critical factor in determining the rechargeability of the cathodes. The optimized samples exhibit a high capacity of close to 300 mAh/g with good cyclability and charge efficiency. The high capacity with a lower discharge voltage may make these nanostructured oxides particularly attractive for lithium polymer batteries. The research on the manganese oxide cathodes for alkaline batteries is focused on an analysis of the reaction products generated during the charge/discharge processes or by some designed chemical reactions mimicking the electrochemical processes. The factors influencing the formation of Mn3O4 in the two-electron redox process of delta-MnO2 have been studied with linear sweep voltammetry combined with X-ray diffraction. The presence of bismuth, the discharge rate, and the microstructure of the electrodes are found to affect the formation of Mn3O4, which is known to be electrochemically inactive. A faster voltage sweep and a more intimate mixing of the manganese oxide and carbon in the cathode are found to suppress

  13. Preparation of manganese sulfate from low-grade manganese carbonate ores by sulfuric acid leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qing-quan; Gu, Guo-hua; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Ren-feng; Liu, You-cai; Fu, Jian-gang

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a method for preparing pure manganese sulfate from low-grade ores with a granule mean size of 0.47 mm by direct acid leaching was developed. The effects of the types of leaching agents, sulfuric acid concentration, reaction temperature, and agitation rate on the leaching efficiency of manganese were investigated. We observed that sulfuric acid used as a leaching agent provides a similar leaching efficiency of manganese and superior selectivity against calcium compared to hydrochloric acid. The optimal leaching conditions in sulfuric acid media were determined; under the optimal conditions, the leaching efficiencies of Mn and Ca were 92.42% and 9.61%, respectively. Moreover, the kinetics of manganese leaching indicated that the leaching follows the diffusion-controlled model with an apparent activation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol-1. The purification conditions of the leaching solution were also discussed. The results show that manganese dioxide is a suitable oxidant of ferrous ions and sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate is an effective precipitant of heavy metals. Finally, through chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis, the obtained product was determined to contain 98% of MnSO4·H2O.

  14. Suppressing Manganese Dissolution from Lithium Manganese Oxide Spinel Cathodes with Single-Layer Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Puntambekar, Kanan P.; Kim, Soo; Aykol, Muratahan; Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Myers, Benjamin D.; Iddir, Hakim; Russell, John T.; Saldana, Spencer J.; Kumar, Rajan; Thackeray, Michael M.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-06-24

    Spinel-structured LiMn 2 O 4 (LMO) is a desirable cathode material for Li-ion batteries due to its low cost, abundance, and high power capability. However, LMO suffers from limited cycle life that is triggered by manganese dissolution into the electrolyte during electrochemical cycling. Here, it is shown that single-layer graphene coatings suppress manganese dissolution, thus enhancing the performance and lifetime of LMO cathodes. Relative to lithium cells with uncoated LMO cathodes, cells with graphene-coated LMO cathodes provide improved capacity retention with enhanced cycling stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that graphene coatings inhibit manganese depletion from the LMO surface. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that a stable solid electrolyte interphase is formed on graphene, which screens the LMO from direct contact with the electrolyte. Density functional theory calculations provide two mechanisms for the role of graphene in the suppression of manganese dissolution. First, common defects in single-layer graphene are found to allow the transport of lithium while concurrently acting as barriers for manganese diffusion. Second, graphene can chemically interact with Mn 3+ at the LMO electrode surface, promoting an oxidation state change to Mn 4+ , which suppresses dissolution.

  15. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ~40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides.

  16. High Jc YBCO coated conductors on non-magnetic metallic substrate using YSZ-based buffer layer architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celentano, G.; Boffa, V.; Ciontea, L.; Fabbri, F.; Galluzzi, V.; Gambardella, U.; Mancini, A.; Petrisor, T.; Rogai, R.; Rufoloni, A.; Varesi, E.

    2002-08-01

    Biaxially aligned YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (YBCO) thick films were deposited by pulsed laser ablation technique on cube textured non-magnetic Ni 89V 11 (Ni-V) substrate, using CeO 2/YSZ/CeO 2/NiO buffer layer architecture. The first NiO seed layer was formed by epitaxial oxidation of the Ni-V substrate. Structural analyses show typical full width at half maximum values of φ- and ω-scans less than 10° and 8°, respectively. The highest value obtained for the critical current density at 77 K and zero magnetic field was 6×10 5 A cm -2, which is close to that obtained for YBCO films grown on CeO 2/NiO buffer layer architecture.

  17. Thermoelectric Signal Enhancement by Reconciling the Spin Seebeck and Anomalous Nernst Effects in Ferromagnet/Non-magnet Multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeong-Dong; Kim, Dong-Jun; Yeon Lee, Hae; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Ki-Suk; Song, Hyon-Seok; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Sung-Chul; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferromagnetic (FM) materials in thermoelectric devices allows one to have a simpler structure and/or independent control of electric and thermal conductivities, which may further remove obstacles for this technology to be realized. The thermoelectricity in FM/non-magnet (NM) heterostructures using an optical heating source is studied as a function of NM materials and a number of multilayers. It is observed that the overall thermoelectric signal in those structures which is contributed by spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) is enhanced by a proper selection of NM materials with a spin Hall angle that matches to the sign of the ANE. Moreover, by an increase of the number of multilayer, the thermoelectric voltage is enlarged further and the device resistance is reduced, simultaneously. The experimental observation of the improvement of thermoelectric properties may pave the way for the realization of magnetic-(or spin-) based thermoelectric devices. PMID:26020492

  18. The non-magnetic collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 and superconductivity in the iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, J. H.; Tucker, G. S.; Pratt, D. K.; Abernathy, D. L.; Stone, M. B.; Ran, S.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; McQueeney, R. J.; Goldman, A. I.

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations and superconductivity has become a central topic of research in studies of superconductivity in the iron pnictides. We present unambiguous evidence of the absence of magnetic fluctuations in the non-superconducting collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 via inelastic neutron scattering time-of-flight data, which is consistent with the view that spin fluctuations are a necessary ingredient for unconventional superconductivity in the iron pnictides. We demonstrate that the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 is non-magnetic, and discuss this result in light of recent reports of high-temperature superconductivity in the collapsed tetragonal phase of closely related compounds. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Work at ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source was sponsored by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  19. Thermoelectric Signal Enhancement by Reconciling the Spin Seebeck and Anomalous Nernst Effects in Ferromagnet/Non-magnet Multilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Dong; Kim, Dong-Jun; Yeon Lee, Hae; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Ki-Suk; Song, Hyon-Seok; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Sung-Chul; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferromagnetic (FM) materials in thermoelectric devices allows one to have a simpler structure and/or independent control of electric and thermal conductivities, which may further remove obstacles for this technology to be realized. The thermoelectricity in FM/non-magnet (NM) heterostructures using an optical heating source is studied as a function of NM materials and a number of multilayers. It is observed that the overall thermoelectric signal in those structures which is contributed by spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) is enhanced by a proper selection of NM materials with a spin Hall angle that matches to the sign of the ANE. Moreover, by an increase of the number of multilayer, the thermoelectric voltage is enlarged further and the device resistance is reduced, simultaneously. The experimental observation of the improvement of thermoelectric properties may pave the way for the realization of magnetic-(or spin-) based thermoelectric devices. PMID:26020492

  20. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of neutron irradiated ultrafine grained ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad Alsabbagh; Apu Sarkar; Brandon Miller; Jatuporn Burns; Leah Squires; Douglas Porter; James I. Cole; K. L. Murty

    2014-10-01

    Neutron irradiation effects on ultra-fine grain (UFG) low carbon steel prepared by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) has been examined. Counterpart samples with conventional grain (CG) sizes have been irradiated alongside with the UFG ones for comparison. Samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to 1.24 dpa. Atom probe tomography revealed manganese, silicon-enriched clusters in both ECAP and CG steel after neutron irradiation. X-ray quantitative analysis showed that dislocation density in CG increased after irradiation. However, no significant change was observed in UFG steel revealing better radiation tolerance.

  1. Dietary manganese requirement of P. Vannamei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fa-Yi; Lawrence, A. L.

    1997-06-01

    Graded levels of manganese were supplemented to a semi-purified diet containing 45% crude protein, to provide six levels of manganese (i. e. containing 5, 25, 50, 70, 140 and 210×10-6, respectively) for two experiments with these experimental diets. The initial weight of shrimp used in the 35 day experiment I was 0.30±0.04 g, and that in the 70 day Experiment II was more than one gram. The results showed that optimum content in the semi-purified diet for the more than 1 gram shrimp ranged from 70 ×10-6, to 140×10-6, but supplementation of Mn was not necessary for the small shrimp.

  2. Importance of effective dimensionality in manganese pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingl, Manuel; Assmann, Elias; Seth, Priyanka; Krivenko, Igor; Aichhorn, Markus

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we investigate the two manganese pnictides BaMn2As2 and LaMnAsO, using fully charge self-consistent density functional plus dynamical mean-field theory calculations. These systems have a nominally half-filled d shell, and as a consequence, electronic correlations are strong, placing these compounds at the verge of a metal-insulator transition. Although their crystal structure is composed of similar building blocks, our analysis shows that the two materials exhibit a very different effective dimensionality, LaMnAsO being a quasi-two-dimensional material in contrast to the much more three-dimensional BaMn2As2 . We demonstrate that the experimentally observed differences in the Néel temperature, the band gap, and the optical properties of the manganese compounds under consideration can be traced back to exactly this effective dimensionality. Our calculations show excellent agreement with measured optical spectra.

  3. Biomimetic Water-Oxidation Catalysts: Manganese Oxides.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen is a key process for the production of solar fuels. Inspired by the biological manganese-based active site for this reaction in the enzyme Photosystem II, researchers have made impressive progress in the last decades regarding the development of synthetic manganese catalysts for water oxidation. For this, it has been especially fruitful to explore the many different types of known manganese oxides MnOx. This chapter first offers an overview of the structural, thermodynamic, and mechanistic aspects of water-oxidation catalysis by MnOx. The different test systems used for catalytic studies are then presented together with general reactivity trends. As a result, it has been possible to identify layered, mixed Mn (III/IV)-oxides as an especially promising class of bio-inspired catalysts and an attempt is made to give structure-based reasons for the good performances of these materials. In the outlook, the challenges of catalyst screenings (and hence the identification of a "best MnOx catalyst") are discussed. There is a great variety of reaction conditions which might be relevant for the application of manganese oxide catalysts in technological solar fuel-producing devices, and thus catalyst improvements are currently still addressing a very large parameter space. Nonetheless, detailed knowledge about the biological catalyst and a solid experimental basis concerning the syntheses and water-oxidation reactivities of MnOx materials have been established in the last decade and thus this research field is well positioned to make important contributions to solar fuel research in the future. PMID:25980320

  4. Manganese oxide nanowires, films, and membranes and methods of making

    SciTech Connect

    Suib, Steven Lawrence; Yuan, Jikang

    2011-02-15

    Nanowires, films, and membranes comprising ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves and methods of making the same are disclosed. A method for forming nanowires includes hydrothermally treating a chemical precursor composition in a hydrothermal treating solvent to form the nanowires, wherein the chemical precursor composition comprises a source of manganese cations and a source of counter cations, and wherein the nanowires comprise ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves.

  5. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality. PMID:26409148

  6. Cathodic current enhancement via manganese and oxygen related reactions in marine biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Matthew James

    Corrosion is a threat that has economic, and environmental impacts worldwide. Many types of corrosive attack are the subject of ongoing research. One of these areas of research is microbiologically influenced corrosion, which is the enhancement and/or initiation of corrosion events caused by microorganisms. It is well known that colonies of microorganisms can enhance cathodic currents through biofilm formation. The aim of the present work was to elucidate the role of manganese in enhancing cathodic currents in the presence of biofilms. Repeated polarizations conducted in Delaware Bay waters, on biofilm coated Cr identified potentially sustainable reduction reactions. The reduction of MnO2 and the enhancement of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were proven to be factors that influence cathodic current enhancement. The removal of ambient oxygen during polarizations resulted in a shutdown of cathodic current enhancement. These field data led to an exploration of the synergistic relationship between MnO2 and the ORR. Laboratory studies of the catalysis of peroxide disproportionation by MnO2 were monitored using a hanging mercury drop electrode. Experiments were run at an ambient sweater pH of 8 and pH 9, which simulated the near-surface conditions typical of cathodes immersed in seawater. Rapid reoxidation at the more basic pH was shown to allow manganese to behave as a persistent catalyst under the typical electrochemical surface conditions of a cathode. As a result a mechanism for ORR enhancement by manganese was proposed as a unique mechanism for cathodic current enhancement in biofilms. A separate field study of Delaware biofilms on stainless steel coupled to a sacrificial Al anode was carried out to identify the ORR enhancement mechanism and sustainable redox reactions at the cathode. Chemical treatments of glutaraldehyde and formaldoxime were applied to cathodes with biofilms to distinguish between enzymatic and MnO2 related ORR enhancement. The results ruled

  7. A biokinetic model for manganese for use in radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The ICRP is updating its recommendations regarding occupational exposure to radionuclides including the biokinetic models used to derive dose coefficients and assess bioassay data for internally deposited radionuclides. This report reviews biokinetic data for manganese and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic manganese consistent with the current database. The model provides a more detailed and biologically realistic description of the movement of absorbed manganese in the body than the model currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The proposed model and current ICRP model yield broadly similar estimates of dose per unit activity of inhaled or ingested radio-manganese but differ substantially with regard to interpretation of bioassay data.

  8. Deposition of manganese in a drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed Central

    Sly, L I; Hodgkinson, M C; Arunpairojana, V

    1990-01-01

    The deposition of manganese in a water distribution system with manganese-related "dirty water" problems was studied over a 1-year period. Four monitoring laboratories with Robbins biofilm sampling devices fitted to the water mains were used to correlate the relationship among manganese deposition, the level of manganese in the water, and the chlorination conditions. Manganese deposition occurred by both chemical and microbial processes. Chemical deposition occurred when Mn(II) not removed during water treatment penetrated the filters and entered the distribution system, where it was oxidized by chlorine and chlorine dioxide used for disinfection. Microbial deposition occurred in areas with insufficient chlorination to control the growth of manganese-depositing biofilm. At 0.05 mg of Mn(II) per liter, the chemical deposition rate was much greater than microbial deposition. Significant deposition occurred at 0.03 mg of manganese per liter, and dirty water complaints were not eliminated until manganese levels were continuously less than 0.02 mg/liter and chlorination levels were greater than 0.2 mg/liter. A guideline level of 0.01 mg of manganese per liter is recommended. Images PMID:2317040

  9. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy of mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chesnick, I.E.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; Newbury, D.E.; Small, J.A.; Potter, K.

    2007-01-01

    Paramagnetic manganese (II) can be employed as a calcium surrogate to sensitize magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) to the processing of calcium during bone formation. At high doses, osteoblasts can take up sufficient quantities of manganese, resulting in marked changes in water proton T1, T2 and magnetization transfer ratio values compared to those for untreated cells. Accordingly, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results confirm that the manganese content of treated cell pellets was 10-fold higher than that for untreated cell pellets. To establish that manganese is processed like calcium and deposited as bone, calvaria from the skull of embryonic chicks were grown in culture medium supplemented with 1 mM MnCl2 and 3 mM CaCl2. A banding pattern of high and low T2 values, consistent with mineral deposits with high and low levels of manganese, was observed radiating from the calvarial ridge. The results of ICP-MS studies confirm that manganese-treated calvaria take up increasing amounts of manganese with time in culture. Finally, elemental mapping studies with electron probe microanalysis confirmed local variations in the manganese content of bone newly deposited on the calvarial surface. This is the first reported use of manganese-enhanced MRM to study the process whereby calcium is taken up by osteoblasts cells and deposited as bone. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. PMID:25044528