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Sample records for manganese oxide films

  1. Manganese oxide nanowires, films, and membranes and methods of making

    SciTech Connect

    Suib, Steven Lawrence; Yuan, Jikang

    2011-02-15

    Nanowires, films, and membranes comprising ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves and methods of making the same are disclosed. A method for forming nanowires includes hydrothermally treating a chemical precursor composition in a hydrothermal treating solvent to form the nanowires, wherein the chemical precursor composition comprises a source of manganese cations and a source of counter cations, and wherein the nanowires comprise ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves.

  2. Manganese oxide nanowires, films, and membranes and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Suib, Steven Lawrence; Yuan, Jikang

    2008-10-21

    Nanowires, films, and membranes comprising ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves, and methods of making, are disclosed. A single crystal ultra-long nanowire includes an ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieve, and has an average length greater than about 10 micrometers and an average diameter of about 5 nanometers to about 100 nanometers. A film comprises a microporous network comprising a plurality of single crystal nanowires in the form of a layer, wherein a plurality of layers is stacked on a surface of a substrate, wherein the nanowires of each layer are substantially axially aligned. A free standing membrane comprises a microporous network comprising a plurality of single crystal nanowires in the form of a layer, wherein a plurality of layers is aggregately stacked, and wherein the nanowires of each layer are substantially axially aligned.

  3. Growth and Dissolution of Iron and Manganese Oxide Films

    SciTech Connect

    Scot T. Martin

    2008-12-22

    Growth and dissolution of Fe and Mn oxide films are key regulators of the fate and transport of heavy metals in the environment, especially during changing seasonal conditions of pH and dissolved oxygen. The Fe and Mn are present at much higher concentrations than the heavy metals, and, when Fe and Mn precipitate as oxide films, heavy metals surface adsorb or co-precipitate and are thus essentially immobilized. Conversely, when the Fe and Mn oxide films dissolve, the heavy metals are released to aqueous solution and are thus mobilized for transport. Therefore, understanding the dynamics and properties of Fe and Mn oxide films and thus on the uptake and release of heavy metals is critically important to any attempt to develop mechanistic, quantitative models of the fate, transport, and bioavailablity of heavy metals. A primary capability developed in our earlier work was the ability to grow manganese oxide (MnO{sub x}) films on rhodochrosite (MnCO{sub 3}) substrate in presence of dissolved oxygen under mild alkaline conditions. The morphology of the films was characterized using contact-mode atomic force microscopy. The initial growth began by heteroepitaxial nucleation. The resulting films had maximum heights of 1.5 to 2 nm as a result of thermodynamic constraints. Over the three past years, we have investigated the effects of MnO{sub x} growth on the interactions of MnCO{sub 3} with charged ions and microorganisms, as regulated by the surface electrical properties of the mineral. In 2006, we demonstrated that MnO{sub x} growth could induce interfacial repulsion and surface adhesion on the otherwise neutral MnCO{sub 3} substrate under environmental conditions. Using force-volume microscopy (FVM), we measured the interfacial and adhesive forces on a MnO{sub x}/MnCO{sub 3} surface with a negatively charged silicon nitride tip in a 10-mM NaNO3 solution at pH 7.4. The interfacial force and surface adhesion of MnOx were approximately 40 pN and 600 pN, respectively

  4. Chemical and optical properties of thermally evaporated manganese oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Kuhaili, M. F.

    2006-09-15

    Manganese oxide thin films were deposited using thermal evaporation from a tungsten boat. Films were deposited under an oxygen atmosphere, and the effects of thickness, substrate temperature, and deposition rate on their properties were investigated. The chemical properties of the films were studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray fluorescence. The optical properties were determined from normal-incidence transmittance and reflectance. Based on the chemical and optical characterizations, the optimum conditions for the deposition of the films were investigated. Subsequently, the optical properties (refractive index, extinction coefficient, and band gap) of these films were determined.

  5. Manganese oxide helices, rings, strands, and films, and methods for their preparation

    DOEpatents

    Suib, Steven L.; Giraldo, Oscar; Marquez, Manuel; Brock, Stephanie

    2003-01-07

    Methods for the preparation of mixed-valence manganese oxide compositions with quaternary ammonium ions are described. The compositions self-assemble into helices, rings, and strands without any imposed concentration gradient. These helices, rings, and strands, as well as films having the same composition, undergo rapid ion exchange to replace the quaternary ammonium ions with various metal ions. And the metal-ion-containing manganese oxide compositions so formed can be heat treated to form semi-conducting materials with high surface areas.

  6. Electrochromic performance, wettability and optical study of copper manganese oxide thin films: Effect of annealing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falahatgar, S. S.; Ghodsi, F. E.; Tepehan, F. Z.; Tepehan, G. G.; Turhan, İ.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the nanostructured copper manganese oxide (CMO) thin films were prepared from acetate based sol-gel precursors and deposited on glass and indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates by dip-coating technique. The films were annealed at 300, 400 and 500 °C in ambient atmosphere. The effects of annealing temperature on structural, morphological, wettability, electrochromic and optical properties of CMO thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX), water contact angle measurement (WCA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometery. The presence of mixed oxide phases comprising of copper manganese oxide (CuMn2O4) and manganese oxide at different annealing temperature was confirmed by XRD patterns. The results showed that the Mn3O4 phase has been changed to Mn2O3 when the annealing temperature is increased from 300 to 500 °C. The FESEM images indicated that the granular surface morphology was sensitive to annealing temperature. EDX studies indicated that the thin films contained O, Mn and Cu species. Wettability studies showed that the water contact angle of the nanostructured CMO thin films coated on glass substrates was influenced by the variation of annealing temperature and the surface nature of thin films was changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. The results of CVs measurement indicated that the anodic and cathodic charge density and capacitance of all CMO samples decreased with increasing scan rate in potential range of -1-1 eV. Also, the annealed CMO thin film at 500 °C showed better electrochromic performance with respect to other samples at lower scan rate. The thickness, refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical band gap of thin films coated on glass substrates were calculated from reflectance and transmittance spectra using an iterative numerical method. The optical band gap of

  7. Sodium manganese oxide thin films as cathodes for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Baggetto, Loic; Carroll, Kyler J; Unocic, Raymond R; Bridges, Craig A; Meng, Ying Shirley; Veith, Gabriel M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of sodium manganese oxide cathode thin films for rechargeable Na-ion batteries. Layered oxide compounds of nominal compositions Na0.6MnO2 and Na1.0MnO2 have been prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering and post-annealing at high temperatures under various conditions. The Na0.6MnO2 thin films possess either a hexagonal or orthorhombic structure while the Na1.0MnO2 films crystallize in a monoclinic structure, as shown by X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. The potential profiles of the film cathodes are characterized by features similar to those measured for the powders and exhibit reversible storage capacities in the range of 50-60 Ah cm-2 m-1, which correspond to about 120-140 mAh g-1, and are maintained over 80 cycles.

  8. Solid-phase photocatalytic degradation of polyethylene film with manganese oxide OMS-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guanglong; Liao, Shuijiao; Zhu, Duanwei; Cui, Jingzhen; Zhou, Wenbing

    2011-01-01

    Solid-phase photocatalytic degradation of polyethylene (PE) film with cryptomelane-type manganese oxide (OMS-2) as photocatalyst was investigated in the ambient air under ultraviolet and visible light irradiation. The properties of the composite films were compared with those of the pure PE film through performing weight loss monitoring, IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photoinduced degradation of PE-OMS-2 composite films was higher than that of the pure films, while there has been little change under the visible light irradiation. The weight loss of PE-OMS-2 (1.0 wt%) composite films steadily decreased and reached 16.5% in 288 h under UV light irradiation. Through SEM observation there were some cavities on the surface of composite films, but few change except some surface chalking phenomenon occurred in pure PE film. The degradation rate with ultraviolet irradiation is controllable by adjusting the content of OMS-2 particles in PE plastic. Finally, the mechanism of photocatalytic degradation of the composite films was briefly discussed.

  9. Synthesis and pseudocapacitive studies of composite films of polyaniline and manganese oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Sun, Li-Jie; Luan, Feng; Liang, Ying; Li, Yat; Liu, Xiao-Xia

    We report the synthesis and pseudocapacitive studies of a composite film (PANI-ND-MnO 2) of polyaniline (PANI) and manganese oxide (MnO 2) nanoparticles. To enhance the interaction of MnO 2 and PANI, the surfaces of MnO 2 nanoparticles were modified by a silane coupling reagent, triethoxysilylmethyl N-substituted aniline (ND42). The composite film was obtained via controlled electro-co-polymerization of aniline and N-substituted aniline grafted on surfaces of MnO 2 nanoparticles (ND-MnO 2) on a carbon cloth in a electrolyte of 0.5 M H 2SO 4 and 0.6 M (NaPO 3) 6. In comparison to similarly prepared PANI film, the incorporation of MnO 2 nanoparticles substantially increases the effective surface area of the film by reducing the size of rod-like PANI aggregates and avoiding the entanglement of these PANI nanorods. Significantly, we observed significant enhancement of specific capacitance in PANI-ND-MnO 2 film compared to PANI-MnO 2 film prepared in a similar condition, indicating that the presence of the coupling reagent can improve the electrochemical performance of PANI composite film. A symmetric model capacitor has been fabricated by using two PANI-ND-MnO 2 nanocomposite films as electrodes. The PANI-ND-MnO 2 capacitor showed an average specific capacitance of ∼80 F g -1 and a stable coulombic efficiency of ∼98% over 1000 cycles. The results demonstrated that PANI-ND-MnO 2 nanocomposites are promising materials for supercapacitor electrode and the importance of designing and manipulating the interaction between PANI and MnO 2 for fundamentally improving capacitive properties.

  10. Growth of different phases of yttrium manganese oxide thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manish; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.

    2012-06-05

    Various phases of yttrium manganese oxide (YMO) thin films have been synthesized on different substrates from a single target of h-YMnO{sub 3}. It is observed that the phase stability and crystallinity of YMO thin films depend on the substrate used and oxygen partial pressure (OPP). (110) oriented and polycrystalline growth of h-YMnO{sub 3} are observed on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) and NGO (110) substrates respectively, when grown in OPP {approx_equal} 10{sup -6} Torr. While for similar OPP value, growth of mixed phases (h-YMnO{sub 3} and o-YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is observed on Si (001) substrate. Oriented growth of O-YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} phase film on Si (001) substrate is observed first time, when deposited at OPP value of 225 and 350 mTorr. +3 and mixed oxidation states (+3 and +4) of Mn were confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in pure YMnO{sub 3} phase and YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} phase respectively.

  11. Investigation of the influence of cadmium processing on zinc gallium oxide:manganese thin films for photoluminescent and thin film electroluminescent applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Michael John

    concentration left by the sublimed material, which aided the incorporation and activation of the manganese. The cadmium in the sputtering targets also impacted the crystal structure of the films. Films from cadmium free targets exhibited a strong (111) x-ray diffraction peak, while those from cadmium processed targets more closely resembled the powder structure. The optimum thin film electroluminescent performance was obtained for films sputtered from targets processed with between 5% and 15% cadmium substituted for zinc. This was the result of improved diffusion during the anneals, due to the sublimation of cadmium oxide and the resulting large vacancy concentration. The best performance was obtained for films annealed at between 875°C and 900°C for 6--12 hours. These films exhibited both the maximum luminance (55 cd/m2 at 60 Hz) and the lowest transferred charge (˜20 muC/cm2). This combined for a peak efficiency of 0.5 lm/W at 60 Hz). Beyond 12 hours at 900°C or temperatures higher than this, EL performance degraded due to the decomposition of the thin film. It was concluded that the luminescent performance of this material is strongly influenced by the loss of cadmium during processing. The enhanced diffusion afforded by the cadmium sublimation results in improved EL performance at annealing temperature lower that that of pure zinc gallate.

  12. Controlled Synthesis of Hollow Manganese Oxide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Min; Oh, Kyung Hee; Ham, Kyung-Sik

    2016-02-01

    Carbon spheres have been prepared from glucose under hydrothermal conditions to facilitate the synthesis of hollow manganese oxides. The phases of manganese oxide are controlled by changing annealing temperature of the manganese monoxide on a carbon sphere template. The particles on the carbon surface get an agglomeration and make dense oxide shell during the calcination step, which result in typical hollow structures. The electrochemical properties of hollow manganese oxides have been investigated to elucidate their relative catalytic activities. PMID:27433689

  13. Surface chemistry of coated lithium manganese nickel oxide thin film cathodes studied by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Baggetto, Loic; Dudney, Nancy J; Veith, Gabriel M

    2013-01-01

    The effect of coating high voltage LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 spinel cathode thin films with three metal oxide thin layers is discussed. The changes in surface chemistry of the electrodes are measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. ZnO is found to decompose during the first charge whereas Al2O3 and ZrO2 are stable for more than 100 cycles. ZrO2, however, importantly limits the available Li storage capacity of the electrochemical reaction due to poorer kinetics. Al2O3 offers the best results in term of capacity retention. Upon cycling, the evidence of a signal at 75.4 eV in the Al2p binding energy spectrum indicates the partial conversion of Al2O3 into Al2O2F2. Moreover, the continuous formation of PEO , esters and LixPOyFz compounds on the surface of the electrodes is found for all coating materials.

  14. AFM Nanolithography of Lanthanum Barium Manganese Oxide (LaBaMnO3)Thin Films: The Effect of Oxygen Pressure Variations During Film Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Christoper; Schaefer, David; Kolagani, Rajeswari; Yong, Grace; Warecki, Zoey

    2014-03-01

    In AFM nanolithography, a bias voltage applied between the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a sample is used to produce nanoscale modifications of material surfaces. AFM nanolithography has been studied extensively on a variety of materials, but limited studies have been performed on perovskite manganites such as Lanthanum Barium Manganese Oxide (LBMO). Studying such materials is important because of their potential applications for room-temperature nanoscale spintronic devices. Previous research on LBMO by our group has focused on how parameters such as applied tip voltage, temperature, and humidity affect the creation of nanopatterns. This paper reports on the influence of growth pressure of the LBMO films grown by pulsed laser deposition. Films grown on (100) SrTiO3 were studied for growth pressures ranging between 100 mTorr to 400 mTorr. Our studies indicate that the type of nanopatterns induced by AFM and the relaxation dynamics of these patterns are sensitive to the film growth pressure. The growth pressure is mainly known to affect the oxygen concentration and the surface roughness, but possible variations in cationic stoichiometry could also contribute to these results. RK and GY acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation Grant ECCS 1128586.

  15. Giant negative magnetoresistance in Manganese-substituted Zinc Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X. L.; Shao, Q.; Zhuravlyova, A.; He, M.; Yi, Y.; Lortz, R.; Wang, J. N.; Ruotolo, A.

    2015-01-01

    We report a large negative magnetoresistance in Manganese-substituted Zinc Oxide thin films. This anomalous effect was found to appear in oxygen-deficient films and to increase with the concentration of Manganese. By combining magnetoresistive measurements with magneto-photoluminescence, we demonstrate that the effect can be explained as the result of a magnetically induced transition from hopping to band conduction where the activation energy is caused by the sp-d exchange interaction. PMID:25783664

  16. Effects of Post-Deposition Annealing on the Properties of Calcium Manganese Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrone, Natalie; Chaudhry, Adeel; Hart, Cacie; Lawson, Bridget; Houston, David; Neubauer, Samuel; Johnson, Anthony; Schaefer, David; Kolagani, Rajeswari

    We will present our results on the effects of post-deposition annealing on the structural and electrical properties of CaMnO3-d thin films grown by Pulsed Laser deposition. The thin films are epitaxially grown on (100) LaAlO3 which has larger in-plane lattice parameters than that of bulk CaMnO3, which leads to bi-axial tensile strain in the thin films. Results from our laboratory show that bi-axial tensile strain leads to low resistivity in thinner films, the resistivity increasing with increasing thickness. These results are suggestive of a coupling between strain and oxygen stoichiometry in the thin films. We have investigated the effects of post-deposition annealing in various gas ambients towards the goal of understanding the effects of relaxation and oxygen stoichiometric changes. We will present a comparison of the structural and electrical properties of as-grown and post-annealed films over a range of thicknesses. Support from Towson University Office of Undergraduate Research, Fisher Endowment Grant & Undergraduate Research Grant from the Fisher College of Science & Mathematics, Seed Funding Grant from the School of Emerging technologies, & NSF Grant ECCS 112856.

  17. Thermal chemistry of Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10} during deposition of thin manganese films on silicon oxide and on copper surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Xiangdong; Sun Huaxing; Zaera, Francisco

    2012-01-15

    The surface chemistry of dimanganese decacarbonyl on the native oxide of Si(100) wafers was characterized with the aid of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Initial experiments in a small stainless-steel reactor identified a narrow range of temperatures, between approximately 445 and 465 K, in which the deposition of manganese could be achieved in a self-limiting fashion, as is desirable for atomic layer deposition. Deposition at higher temperatures leads to multilayer growth, but the extent of this Mn deposition reverses at even higher temperatures (about 625 K), and also ifhydrogen is added to the reaction mixture. Extensive decarbonylation takes place below room temperature, but limited C-O bond dissociation and carbon deposition are still seen after high exposures at 625 K. The films deposited at low ({approx}450 K) temperatures are mostly in the form of MnO, but at 625 K that converts to a manganese silicate, and upon higher doses a manganese silicide forms at the SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) interface as well. No metallic manganese could be deposited with this precursor on either silicon dioxide or copper surfaces.

  18. Manganese oxidation by Leptothrix discophora.

    PubMed

    Boogerd, F C; de Vrind, J P

    1987-02-01

    Cells of Leptothrix discophora SS1 released Mn2+-oxidizing factors into the medium during growth in batch culture. Manganese was optimally oxidized when the medium was buffered with HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid) at pH 7.5. Manganese-oxidizing activity in the culture medium in which this strain had been grown previously was sensitive to heat, phosphate, Tris, NaN3, HgCl2 NaCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and pronase; 0.5 mol of O2 was consumed per mol of MnO2 formed. During Mn2+ oxidation, protons were liberated. With sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, two protein-containing bands were detected in the spent culture medium. One band had an apparent molecular weight of 110,000 and was predominant in Mn2+-oxidizing activity. The second product (Mr 85,000) was only detected in some cases and probably represents a proteolytic breakdown moiety of the 110,000-Mr protein. The Mn2+-oxidizing factors were associated with the MnO2 aggregates that had been formed in spent culture medium. After solubilization of this MnO2 with ascorbate, Mn2+-oxidizing activity could be recovered. PMID:3804969

  19. Biomimetic Water-Oxidation Catalysts: Manganese Oxides.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen is a key process for the production of solar fuels. Inspired by the biological manganese-based active site for this reaction in the enzyme Photosystem II, researchers have made impressive progress in the last decades regarding the development of synthetic manganese catalysts for water oxidation. For this, it has been especially fruitful to explore the many different types of known manganese oxides MnOx. This chapter first offers an overview of the structural, thermodynamic, and mechanistic aspects of water-oxidation catalysis by MnOx. The different test systems used for catalytic studies are then presented together with general reactivity trends. As a result, it has been possible to identify layered, mixed Mn (III/IV)-oxides as an especially promising class of bio-inspired catalysts and an attempt is made to give structure-based reasons for the good performances of these materials. In the outlook, the challenges of catalyst screenings (and hence the identification of a "best MnOx catalyst") are discussed. There is a great variety of reaction conditions which might be relevant for the application of manganese oxide catalysts in technological solar fuel-producing devices, and thus catalyst improvements are currently still addressing a very large parameter space. Nonetheless, detailed knowledge about the biological catalyst and a solid experimental basis concerning the syntheses and water-oxidation reactivities of MnOx materials have been established in the last decade and thus this research field is well positioned to make important contributions to solar fuel research in the future. PMID:25980320

  20. Environmental Controls of Biological Manganese Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, A. P.; Ahn, C. C.; Nealson, K. H.

    2001-12-01

    Biological catalysis of manganese oxidation represents an important contribution to global manganese cycling; biological oxidation rates are several orders of magnitude higher than those of abiotic processes. Despite recent genetics advances, ongoing behavioral studies, and a large pool of knowledge regarding manganese chemistry, the links between biology and environmental chemistry remain unresolved. We have performed experiments on batch cultures of Leptothrix discophora SS-1 to explore the physiology of biological manganese oxidation. We have further conducted spectroscopic and microscopic studies of the mechanism as manganese proceeds from the soluble Mn2+ species to the insoluble Mn(III) and Mn(IV) phases. These investigations suggest roles for aqueous chemistry, mineralogy, and microbial physiology in controlling manganese fluxes in metal-rich environments.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, optical and sensing property of manganese oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Manigandan, R.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Narayanan, V.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.

    2014-01-28

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles were prepared by thermal decomposition of manganese oxalate. Manganese oxalate was synthesized by reacting 1:1 mole ratio of manganese acetate and ammonium oxalate along with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The structural characterization of manganese oxalate and manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by XRD. The XRD spectrum confirms the crystal structure of the manganese oxide and manganese oxalate. In addition, the average grain size, lattice parameter values were also calculated using XRD spectrum. Moreover, the diffraction peaks were broadened due to the smaller size of the particle. The band gap of manganese oxide was calculated from optical absorption, which was carried out by DRS UV-Visible spectroscopy. The morphology of manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by SEM images. The FT-IR analysis confirms the formation of the manganese oxide from manganese oxalate nanoparticles. The electrochemical sensing behavior of manganese oxide nanoparticles were investigated using hydrogen peroxide by cyclic voltammetry.

  2. Kinetic patterns in the formation of nanosized manganese-manganese oxide systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovoi, E. P.; Bugerko, L. N.; Surovaya, V. E.; Zaikonnikova, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Transformations in nanosized manganese films are studied by means of optical spectroscopy, microscopy, and gravimetry at different film thicknesses ( d = 4-108 nm) and temperatures of heat treatment ( T = 373-673 K). It is found that the kinetic curves of conversion are satisfactorily described in the terms of linear, inverse logarithmic, cubic, and logarithmic laws. The contact potential difference is measured for Mn and MnO films, and photo EMF is measured for Mn-MnO systems. An energy band diagram is constructed for Mn-MnO systems. A model for the thermal transformation of Mn films is proposed that includes stages of oxygen adsorption, the redistribution of charge carriers in the contact field of Mn-MnO, and manganese(II) oxide formation.

  3. Manganese oxidation model for rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Glen W.; Kim, Byung R.; Roberts, Philip J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of manganese in natural waters (>0.05 mg/L) degrades water-supply quality. A model was devised to predict the variation of manganese concentrations in river water released from an impoundment with the distance downstream. The model is one-dimensional and was calibrated using dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, pH, manganese, and hydraulic data collected in the Duck River, Tennessee. The results indicated that the model can predict manganese levels under various conditions. The model was then applied to the Chattahoochee River, Georgia. Discrepancies between observed and predicted may be due to inadequate pH data, precipitation of sediment particles, unsteady flow conditions in the Chattahoochee River, inaccurate rate expressions for the low pH conditions, or their combinations.

  4. The Products of Manganese (II) Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, A.

    2004-09-03

    Manganese, the second most abundant transition metal in the earth's crust, exists in a number of oxidation states, among which the II, III, and IV oxidation states are of greatest environmental importance. Produced through microbial activity, manganese oxides help to mediate redox reactions with organic and inorganic compounds and help to sequester a variety of metals. The mechanism by which Manganese (II) is oxidized to Manganese (IV) is a biologically catalyzed process. There are at least three different pathways by which Mn(II) can be bacterially oxidized to Mn(IV); the first in which states that Mn(II) can be oxidized to mixed Mn(III, IV), and Mn(IV) oxides and oxyhydroxides. The second of these pathways is that Mn(II) can be directly oxidized to Mn(IV) and the last of these pathways is that Mn(II) follows an enzymatic bond with a Mn(III) intermediate in which Mn(II) oxidizes to Mn(III) and then to Mn(IV). The pathways of focus for this research are the latter two pathways.

  5. Silver manganese oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2006-05-09

    This invention relates to electrodes for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries with silver manganese oxide positive electrodes, denoted AgxMnOy, in which x and y are such that the manganese ions in the charged or partially charged electrodes cells have an average oxidation state greater than 3.5. The silver manganese oxide electrodes optionally contain silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrodes and to improve the power capability of the cells or batteries. The invention relates also to a method for preparing AgxMnOy electrodes by decomposition of a permanganate salt, such as AgMnO4, or by the decomposition of KMnO4 or LiMnO4 in the presence of a silver salt.

  6. Widespread distribution of ability to oxidize manganese among freshwater bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gregory, E; Staley, J T

    1982-08-01

    Manganese-oxidizing heterotrophic bacteria were found to comprise a significant proportion of the bacterial community of Lake Washington (Seattle, Wash.) and Lake Virginia (Winter Park, Fla.). Identification of these freshwater bacteria showed that members of a variety of genera are capable of oxidizing manganese. Isolates maintained in the laboratory spontaneously lost the ability to oxidize manganese. A direct correlation was found between the presence of plasmid DNA and the ability of the organism to oxidize manganese. PMID:16346084

  7. Fabrication and characterization of lithium manganese nickel oxide sputtered thin film cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Baggetto, Loic; Unocic, Raymond R; Dudney, Nancy J; Veith, Gabriel M

    2012-01-01

    Li-rich and stoichiometric Li1Mn1.5Ni0.5O4 (LMNO) cathode films have been prepared by magnetron sputtering. Sputtering from a Li stoichiometric target yields Li-rich films composed of spinel, layered and monoclinic phases. Films obtained from a Li deficient target are mostly made of a spinel phase and little layered material. The resulting cathode thin films have good capacity retention and very high rate capability. The reaction mechanism has been investigated by XRD and HRTEM and evidences the reversible formation of a spinel phase, as is also found for the powder samples. The film geometry enables to understand the effect of coatings (ZnO or LiPON). Coating high voltage cathodes reduces the coulombic losses but at the price of rate performance. Nonetheless, these coated sputtered electrode thin films offer a higher rate capability than other LMNO thin films obtained by other physical vapor deposition techniques.

  8. Manganese oxide cathodes for rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Dongmin

    Manganese oxides are considered as promising cathodes for rechargeable batteries due to their low cost and low toxicity as well as the abundant natural resources. In this dissertation, manganese oxides have been investigated as cathodes for both rechargeable lithium and alkaline batteries. Nanostructured lithium manganese oxides designed for rechargeable lithium cells have been synthesized by reducing lithium permanganate with methanol or hydrogen in various solvents followed by firing at moderate temperatures. The samples have been characterized by wet-chemical analyses, thermal methods, spectroscopic methods, and electron microscopy. It has been found that chemical residues in the oxides such as carboxylates and hydroxyl groups, which could be controlled by varying the reaction medium, reducing agents, and additives, make a significant influence on the electrochemical properties. The Li/Mn ratio in the material has also been found to be a critical factor in determining the rechargeability of the cathodes. The optimized samples exhibit a high capacity of close to 300 mAh/g with good cyclability and charge efficiency. The high capacity with a lower discharge voltage may make these nanostructured oxides particularly attractive for lithium polymer batteries. The research on the manganese oxide cathodes for alkaline batteries is focused on an analysis of the reaction products generated during the charge/discharge processes or by some designed chemical reactions mimicking the electrochemical processes. The factors influencing the formation of Mn3O4 in the two-electron redox process of delta-MnO2 have been studied with linear sweep voltammetry combined with X-ray diffraction. The presence of bismuth, the discharge rate, and the microstructure of the electrodes are found to affect the formation of Mn3O4, which is known to be electrochemically inactive. A faster voltage sweep and a more intimate mixing of the manganese oxide and carbon in the cathode are found to suppress

  9. Electrochromic properties of manganese oxide (MnO{sub x}) thin films made by electron beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Erlandsson, O.; Lindvall, J.; Nguyen Ngoc Toan; Nguyen Van Hung; Vu Thi Bich; Nguyen Nang Dinh

    1993-12-31

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to both the theoretical and the experimental investigation of the physical and physico-chemical properties of the chromogenics materials due their favorable and promising applications such as electrochromic devices, energy-efficient smart windows, automobile mirrors and building glazings. Electrochromic MnO{sub x} thin films were prepared by using an electron beam technique followed by annealing post-treatment. Electrochromic properties of the films were studied in three different solutions: 1M LiClO{sub 4} in propylene carbonate, KOH (pH = 10.5) and natrium borate (pH = 9.2). The transmittance spectra of the colored films combined with their cyclic voltammograms have showed that the enhancement of the electrochromic behavior of these films can be attributed to the insertion (or extraction) of the OH{sup {minus}} anions into (or from) the MnO{sub x} films. The best electrochromic efficiency of the films was obtained in the borate electrolyte.

  10. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1oxidizing agent. Photocatalytic water oxidation in the presence of [Ru(bpy)3 ](2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) as a sensitizer and peroxodisulfate as an electron acceptor was carried out for all three manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. PMID:25044528

  11. Oxidation state of marine manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.; Basler, J.R.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Analyses of the bulk oxidation state of marine manganese nodules indicates that more than 98% of the Mn in deep ocean nodules is present as Mn(IV). The samples were collected from three quite different areas: the hemipelagic environment of the Guatemala Basin, the pelagic area of the North Pacific, and seamounts in the central Pacific. Results of the study suggest that todorokite in marine nodules is fully oxidized and has the following stoichiometry: (K, Na, Ca, Ba).33(Mg, Cu, Ni).76Mn5O22(H2O)3.2. ?? 1984.

  12. Thermochemistry of iron manganese oxide spinels

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemet-Fritsch, Sophie; Navrotsky, Alexandra . E-mail: anavrotsky@ucdavis.edu; Tailhades, Philippe; Coradin, Herve; Wang Miaojun

    2005-01-15

    Oxide melt solution calorimetry has been performed on iron manganese oxide spinels prepared at high temperature. The enthalpy of formation of (Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}){sub 3}O{sub 4} at 298K from the oxides, tetragonal Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} (hausmannite) and cubic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite), is negative from x=0 to x=0.67 and becomes slightly positive for 0.670.6) spinels of intermediate compositions. The enthalpies of formation are discussed in terms of three factors: oxidation-reduction relative to the end-members, cation distribution, and tetragonality. A combination of measured enthalpies and Gibbs free energies of formation in the literature provides entropies of mixing. {delta}S{sub mix}, consistent with a cation distribution in which all trivalent manganese is octahedral and all other ions are randomly distributed for x>0.5, but the entropy of mixing appears to be smaller than these predicted values for x<0.4.

  13. [Characterization of manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Na-Na; Bai, Yao-Hui; Liang, Jin-Song; Luo, Jin-Ming; Liu, Rui-Ping; Hu, Cheng-Zhi; Yuan, Lin-Jiang

    2014-02-01

    A manganese-oxidizing bacteria (QJX-1) was isolated from the soil of a manganese mine. It was identified as Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1 by 16S rDNA sequencing. Experimental results showed that the Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1 has a multi-copper oxidase gene CumA, which is an essential component for manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas sp. Under the condition of low initial inoculum level (D600, 0.020), 5.05 mg x L(-1 Mn2+ could be oxidized by QJX-1 within 48 h with a conversion rate of as high as 99.4%. In comparison with the eutrophic conditions, the oligotrophic condition dramatically increased the biological manganese oxidation rate. Biofilm formation by employing the quartz sand could further improve the oxidation rate of Mn2+. Based on these results, it is speculated that biological manganese oxidation in underground water treatment is comparatively high. PMID:24812972

  14. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium...

  17. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  18. Real-Time Manganese Phase Dynamics during Biological and Abiotic Manganese Oxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jena E; Savalia, Pratixa; Davis, Ryan; Kocar, Benjamin D; Webb, Samuel M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-04-19

    Manganese oxides are often highly reactive and easily reduced, both abiotically, by a variety of inorganic chemical species, and biologically during anaerobic respiration by microbes. To evaluate the reaction mechanisms of these different reduction routes and their potential lasting products, we measured the sequence progression of microbial manganese(IV) oxide reduction mediated by chemical species (sulfide and ferrous iron) and the common metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under several endmember conditions, using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopic measurements complemented by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy on precipitates collected throughout the reaction. Crystalline or potentially long-lived phases produced in these experiments included manganese(II)-phosphate, manganese(II)-carbonate, and manganese(III)-oxyhydroxides. Major controls on the formation of these discrete phases were alkalinity production and solution conditions such as inorganic carbon and phosphate availability. The formation of a long-lived Mn(III) oxide appears to depend on aqueous Mn(2+) production and the relative proportion of electron donors and electron acceptors in the system. These real-time measurements identify mineralogical products during Mn(IV) oxide reduction, contribute to understanding the mechanism of various Mn(IV) oxide reduction pathways, and assist in interpreting the processes occurring actively in manganese-rich environments and recorded in the geologic record of manganese-rich strata. PMID:27018915

  19. Bacterial manganese reduction and growth with manganese oxide as the sole electron acceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Charles R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Microbes that couple growth to the reduction of manganese could play an important role in the biogeochemistry of certain anaerobic environments. Such a bacterium, Alteromonas putrefaciens MR-1, couples its growth to the reduction of manganese oxides only under anaerobic conditions. The characteristics of this reduction are consistent with a biological, and not an indirect chemical, reduction of manganese, which suggest that this bacterium uses manganic oxide as a terminal electron acceptor. It can also utilize a large number of other compounds as terminal electron acceptors; this versatility could provide a distinct advantage in environments where electron-acceptor concentrations may vary.

  20. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  5. Structural and surface changes of copper modified manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gac, Wojciech; Słowik, Grzegorz; Zawadzki, Witold

    2016-05-01

    The structural and surface properties of manganese and copper-manganese oxides were investigated. The oxides were prepared by the redox-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy studies evidenced transformation of cryptomelane-type nanoparticles with 1-D channel structure into the large MnO crystallites with regular rippled-like surface patterns under reduction conditions. The development of Cu/CuO nanorods from strongly dispersed species was evidenced. Coper-modified manganese oxides showed good catalytic performance in methanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production. Low selectivity to CO was observed in the wide range of temperatures.

  6. Three manganese oxide-rich marine sediments harbor similar communities of acetate-oxidizing manganese-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vandieken, Verona; Pester, Michael; Finke, Niko; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Friedrich, Michael W; Loy, Alexander; Thamdrup, Bo

    2012-11-01

    Dissimilatory manganese reduction dominates anaerobic carbon oxidation in marine sediments with high manganese oxide concentrations, but the microorganisms responsible for this process are largely unknown. In this study, the acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing microbiota in geographically well-separated, manganese oxide-rich sediments from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden), Skagerrak (Norway) and Ulleung Basin (Korea) were analyzed by 16S rRNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Manganese reduction was the prevailing terminal electron-accepting process in anoxic incubations of surface sediments, and even the addition of acetate stimulated neither iron nor sulfate reduction. The three geographically distinct sediments harbored surprisingly similar communities of acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing bacteria: 16S rRNA of members of the genera Colwellia and Arcobacter and of novel genera within the Oceanospirillaceae and Alteromonadales were detected in heavy RNA-SIP fractions from these three sediments. Most probable number (MPN) analysis yielded up to 10(6) acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing cells cm(-3) in Gullmar Fjord sediment. A 16S rRNA gene clone library that was established from the highest MPN dilutions was dominated by sequences of Colwellia and Arcobacter species and members of the Oceanospirillaceae, supporting the obtained RNA-SIP results. In conclusion, these findings strongly suggest that (i) acetate-dependent manganese reduction in manganese oxide-rich sediments is catalyzed by members of taxa (Arcobacter, Colwellia and Oceanospirillaceae) previously not known to possess this physiological function, (ii) similar acetate-utilizing manganese reducers thrive in geographically distinct regions and (iii) the identified manganese reducers differ greatly from the extensively explored iron reducers in marine sediments. PMID:22572639

  7. Manganese oxide microswitch for electronic memory based on neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, R.; Daud, T.; Moopenn, A.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1989-01-01

    A solid-state, resistance tailorable, programmable-once, binary, nonvolatile memory switch based on manganese oxide thin films is reported. MnO(x) exhibits irreversible memory switching from conducting (on) to insulating (off) state, with the off and on resistance ratio of greater than 10,000. The switching mechanism is current-triggered chemical transformation of a conductive MnO(2-Delta) to an insulating Mn2O3 state. The energy required for switching is of the order of 4-20 nJ/sq micron. The low switching energy, stability of the on and off states, and tailorability of the on state resistance make these microswitches well suited as programmable binary synapses in electronic associative memories based on neural network models.

  8. Formation of methyl iodide on a natural manganese oxide.

    PubMed

    Allard, Sébastien; Gallard, Hervé; Fontaine, Claude; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2010-08-01

    This paper demonstrates that manganese oxides can initiate the formation of methyl iodide, a volatile compound that participates to the input of iodine into the atmosphere. The formation of methyl iodide was investigated using a natural manganese oxide in batch experiments for different conditions and concentrations of iodide, natural organic matter (NOM) and manganese oxide. Methyl iodide was formed at concentrations oxidation of NOM on manganese dioxide in the presence of iodide. However, the implication of elemental iodine cannot be excluded at acidic pH. Manganese oxides can then participate with ferric oxides to the formation of methyl iodide in soils and sediments. The formation of methyl iodide is unlikely in technical systems such as drinking water treatment i.e. for ppt levels of iodide and low contact times with manganese oxides. PMID:20580399

  9. Photochemical water oxidation by crystalline polymorphs of manganese oxides: structural requirements for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, David M; Go, Yong Bok; Mui, Michelle; Gardner, Graeme; Zhang, Zhijuan; Mastrogiovanni, Daniel; Garfunkel, Eric; Li, Jing; Greenblatt, Martha; Dismukes, G Charles

    2013-03-01

    Manganese oxides occur naturally as minerals in at least 30 different crystal structures, providing a rigorous test system to explore the significance of atomic positions on the catalytic efficiency of water oxidation. In this study, we chose to systematically compare eight synthetic oxide structures containing Mn(III) and Mn(IV) only, with particular emphasis on the five known structural polymorphs of MnO2. We have adapted literature synthesis methods to obtain pure polymorphs and validated their homogeneity and crystallinity by powder X-ray diffraction and both transmission and scanning electron microscopies. Measurement of water oxidation rate by oxygen evolution in aqueous solution was conducted with dispersed nanoparticulate manganese oxides and a standard ruthenium dye photo-oxidant system. No Ru was absorbed on the catalyst surface as observed by XPS and EDX. The post reaction atomic structure was completely preserved with no amorphization, as observed by HRTEM. Catalytic activities, normalized to surface area (BET), decrease in the series Mn2O3 > Mn3O4 ≫ λ-MnO2, where the latter is derived from spinel LiMn2O4 following partial Li(+) removal. No catalytic activity is observed from LiMn2O4 and four of the MnO2 polymorphs, in contrast to some literature reports with polydispersed manganese oxides and electro-deposited films. Catalytic activity within the eight examined Mn oxides was found exclusively for (distorted) cubic phases, Mn2O3 (bixbyite), Mn3O4 (hausmannite), and λ-MnO2 (spinel), all containing Mn(III) possessing longer Mn-O bonds between edge-sharing MnO6 octahedra. Electronically degenerate Mn(III) has antibonding electronic configuration e(g)(1) which imparts lattice distortions due to the Jahn-Teller effect that are hypothesized to contribute to structural flexibility important for catalytic turnover in water oxidation at the surface. PMID:23391134

  10. Amperometric Biosensors Based on Carbon Paste Electrodes Modified with Nanostructured Mixed-valence Manganese Oxides and Glucose Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaoli; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-06-01

    Nanostructured multivalent manganese oxides octahedral molecular sieve (OMS), including cryptomelane-type manganese oxides and todorokite-type manganese oxides, were synthesized and evaluated for chemical sensing and biosensing at low operating potential. Both cryptomelane-type manganese oxides and todorokite-type manganese oxides are nanofibrous crystals with sub-nanometer open tunnels that provide a unique property for sensing applications. The electrochemical and electrocatalytic performance of OMS for the oxidation of H2O2 have been compared. Both cryptomelane-type manganese oxides and todorokite-type manganese oxides can be used to fabricate sensitive H2O2 sensors. Amperometric glucose biosensors are constructed by bulk modification of carbon paste electrodes (CPEs) with glucose oxidase as a biocomponent and nanostructured OMS as a mediator. A Nafion thin film was applied as an immobilization/encapsulation and protective layer. The biosensors were evaluated as an amperometric glucose detector at phosphate buffer solution with a pH 7.4 at an operating potential of 0.3 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The biosensor is characterized by a well-reproducible amperometric response, linear signal-to-glucose concentration range up to 3.5 mM and 1.75 mM, and detection limits (S/N = 3) of 0.1 mM and 0.05 mM for todorokite-type manganese oxide and cryptomelane-type manganese oxide modified electrodes, respectively. The biosensors based on OMS exhibit considerable good reproducibility and stability, and the construction and renewal are simple and inexpensive.

  11. A manganese oxidation model for rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, G.W. ); Kim, Byung R. ); Roberts, P.J.W. )

    1989-04-01

    The presence of manganese in natural waters (>0.05 mg/L) degrades water-supply quality. A model was devised to predict the variation of manganese concentrations in river water released from an impoundment with the distance downstream. The model is one-dimensional and was calibrated using dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, pH, manganese, and hydraulic data collected in the Duck River, Tennessee. The results indicated that the model can predict manganese levels under various conditions. The model was then applied to the Chattahoochee River, Georgia. Discrepancies between observed and predicted may be due to inadequate pH data, precipitation of sediment particles, unsteady flow conditions in the Chattahoochee River, inaccurate rate expressions for the los pH conditions, or their combinations.

  12. Surfactant-mediated electrodeposition of a water-oxidizing manganese oxide.

    PubMed

    Osowiecki, Wojciech T; Sheehan, Stafford W; Young, Karin J; Durrell, Alec C; Mercado, Brandon Q; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-10-14

    Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen is one of the most promising ways of storing energy from intermittent, renewable sources in the future. Toward this goal, development of inexpensive, stable, and non-toxic catalysts for water oxidation is crucial. We report that the electrodeposition of manganese oxide in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) produces a material that is highly active for electrocatalytic water oxidation at pH near 7 and remains stable for over 24 hours of sustained electrolysis. Clark electrode measurements demonstrate more than 95% Faradaic efficiency for oxygen evolution after an initial charging period. We found that catalytic performance was optimized in films prepared by electrodeposition using a precursor solution containing moderate concentration of substrates, namely 25 mM Mn(2+) and 25 mM SDS. Microstructure and elemental analyses revealed that the deposited material, a mixed-phase manganese oxide, is structurally similar to materials used for electrochemical capacitors and batteries, drawing a parallel between highly studied cathode materials for rechargeable batteries and heterogeneous catalysts for water oxidation. PMID:26350519

  13. Microstructure and properties of manganese dioxide films prepared by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, G. Moses; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2008-08-01

    Nanostructured manganese dioxide films were obtained by galvanostatic, pulse and reverse pulse electrodeposition from 0.01 to 0.1 M KMnO 4 solutions. The deposition yield was investigated by in situ monitoring the deposit mass using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Obtained films were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. The QCM and electron microscopy data were utilized for the investigation of deposition kinetics and film formation mechanism. It was shown that the deposition rate and film microstructure could be changed by variation of deposition conditions. The method allowed the fabrication of dense or porous films. The thickness of dense films was limited to ˜0.1 μm due to the insulating properties of manganese dioxide and film cracking, attributed to drying shrinkage. Porous and crack-free 1-2 μm films were obtained using galvanostatic or reverse pulse deposition from 0.02 M KMnO 4 solutions. It was shown that film porosity is beneficial for the charge transfer during deposition and crack prevention in thick films. Moreover, porous nanostructured films showed good capacitive behavior for applications in electrochemical supercapacitors. The porous nanostructured films prepared in the reverse pulse regime showed higher specific capacitance (SC) compared to the SC of the galvanostatic films. The highest SC of 279 F/g in a voltage window of 1 V was obtained in 0.1 M Na 2SO 4 solutions at a scan rate of 2 mV/s.

  14. Synthesis of manganese oxide supported on mesoporous titanium oxide: Influence of the block copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, F.; Bois, L.; Chiriac, R.; Toche, F.; Chassagneux, F.; Besson, M.; Descorme, C.; Khrouz, L.

    2015-01-01

    Manganese oxides supported on mesoporous titanium oxides were synthesized via a sol-gel route using block copolymer self-assembly. The oxides were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analyses, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, electron microscopy and electronic paramagnetic resonance. A mesoporous anatase containing amorphous manganese oxide particles could be obtained with a 0.2 Mn:Ti molar ratio. At higher manganese loading (0.5 Mn:Ti molar ratio), segregation of crystalline manganese oxide occurred. The influence of block copolymer and manganese salt on the oxide structure was discussed. The evolution of the textural and structural characteristics of the materials upon hydrothermal treatment was also investigated.

  15. Energetic basis of catalytic activity of layered nanophase calcium manganese oxides for water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Birkner, Nancy; Nayeri, Sara; Pashaei, Babak; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Casey, William H.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Previous measurements show that calcium manganese oxide nanoparticles are better water oxidation catalysts than binary manganese oxides (Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnO2). The probable reasons for such enhancement involve a combination of factors: The calcium manganese oxide materials have a layered structure with considerable thermodynamic stability and a high surface area, their low surface energy suggests relatively loose binding of H2O on the internal and external surfaces, and they possess mixed-valent manganese with internal oxidation enthalpy independent of the Mn3+/Mn4+ ratio and much smaller in magnitude than the Mn2O3-MnO2 couple. These factors enhance catalytic ability by providing easy access for solutes and water to active sites and facile electron transfer between manganese in different oxidation states. PMID:23667149

  16. Water defluoridation by aluminium oxide-manganese oxide composite material.

    PubMed

    Alemu, Sheta; Mulugeta, Eyobel; Zewge, Feleke; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh

    2014-08-01

    In this study, aluminium oxide-manganese oxide (AOMO) composite material was synthesized, characterized, and tested for fluoride removal in batch experiments. AOMO was prepared from manganese(II) chloride and aluminium hydroxide. The surface area of AOMO was found to be 30.7m2/g and its specific density was determined as 2.78 g/cm3. Detailed investigation of the adsorbent by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and ion chromatography (for sulphate only) showed that it is composed of Al, Mn, SO4, and Na as major components and Fe, Si, Ca, and Mg as minor components. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to study the thermal behaviour of AOMO. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the adsorbent is poorly crystalline. The point of zero charge was determined as 9.54. Batch experiments (by varying the proportion of MnO, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial F concentration, and raw water pH) showed that fluoride removal efficiency ofAOMO varied significantly with percentage of MnO with an optimum value of about I11% of manganese oxide in the adsorbent. The optimum dose of the adsorbent was 4 g/L which corresponds to the equilibrium adsorption capacity of 4.8 mg F-/g. Both the removal efficiency and adsorption capacity showed an increasing trend with an increase in initial fluoride concentration of the water. The pH for optimum fluoride removal was found to be in the range between 5 and 7. The adsorption data were analysed using the Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinirn-Radushkevich models. The minimum adsorption capacity obtained from the non-linear Freundlich isotherm model was 4.94 mg F-/g and the maximum capacity from the Langmuir isotherm method was 19.2mg F-/g. The experimental data of fluoride adsorption on AOMO fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm model. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption is well described by a non-linear pseudo-second-order reaction model with an average rate constant of 3

  17. Electrodeposition of layered manganese oxide nanocomposites intercalated with strong and weak polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Masaharu; Tagashira, Hiroki

    2006-04-11

    Multilayered manganese oxide nanocomposites intercalated with strong (poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride, PDDA) and weak (poly(allylamine hydrochloride), PAH) polyelectrolytes can be produced on polycrystalline platinum electrode in a thin film form by a simple, one-step electrochemical route. The process involves a potentiostatic oxidation of aqueous Mn2+ ions at around +1.0 V (vs Ag/AgCl) in the presence of polyelectrolytes. Fully charged PDDA polycations are accommodated tightly in the interlayer space by electrostatic interaction with negative charges on the manganese oxide layers, leading to an interlayer distance of 0.97 nm. The layered film prepared with PAH has a larger polymer content (PAH/Mn molar ratio of 0.98) than that (PDDA/Mn molar ratio of 0.43) made with PDDA because of the smaller charging degree of PAH, exhibiting a larger interlayer distance (1.19 nm). The interlayer PAH contains neutral (-NH2) and positively charged (-NH3(+)) amine groups, and the -NH3(+) groups are associated with Cl- (to generate -NH3(+) Cl- ion pairs) as well as the negatively charged manganese oxide layers. Both polyelectrolytes once incorporated were not ion exchanged with small cations in solution. The layered structure of PDDA/MnO(x) was collapsed during the reduction process in a KCl electrolyte solution, accompanying an expansion of the interlayer as a result of incorporation of K+ ions for charge neutrality. On the contrary, the layered PAH/MnO(x) film showed a good electrochemical response due to the redox reaction of Mn3+/Mn4+ couple with no change in the structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that, in this case, excess negative charges generated on the manganese oxide layers upon reduction can be balanced by the protons being released from the -NH3(+) Cl- sites in the interlayer PAH; the Cl- anions becoming unnecessary are inevitably excluded from the interlayer, and vice versa upon oxidation. PMID:16584268

  18. The sorption of silver by poorly crystallized manganese oxides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, B.J.; Jenne, E.A.; Chao, T.T.

    1973-01-01

    The sorption of silver by poorly crystallized manganese oxides was studied using synthesized samples of three members of the manganous manganite (birnessite) group, of different chemical composition and crystallinity, and a poorly organized ??-MnO2. All four oxides sorbed significant quantities of silver. The manganous manganites showed the greatest sorption (up to 0.5 moles silver/mole MnOx at pH 7) while the ??-MnO2 showed the least (0.3 moles silver/ mole MnOx at pH 7). Sorption of silver was adequately described by the Langmuir equation over a considerable concentration range. The relationship failed at low pH values and high equilibrium silver concentrations. The sorption capacity showed a direct relationship with pH. However, the rate of increase of sorption capacity decreased at the higher pH values. Silver sorption maxima. were not directly related to surface area but appeared to vary with the amount of occluded sodium and potassium present in the manganese oxide. The important processes involved in the uptake of silver by the four poorly crystallized manganese oxides ara considered to be surface exchange for manganese, potassium and sodium as well as exchange for structural manganese, potassium and sodium. ?? 1973.

  19. Synthesis of manganese oxide supported on mesoporous titanium oxide: Influence of the block copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Schmit, F.; Bois, L.; Chiriac, R.; Toche, F.; Chassagneux, F.; Besson, M.; Descorme, C.; Khrouz, L.

    2015-01-15

    Manganese oxides supported on mesoporous titanium oxides were synthesized via a sol–gel route using block copolymer self-assembly. The oxides were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analyses, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, electron microscopy and electronic paramagnetic resonance. A mesoporous anatase containing amorphous manganese oxide particles could be obtained with a 0.2 Mn:Ti molar ratio. At higher manganese loading (0.5 Mn:Ti molar ratio), segregation of crystalline manganese oxide occurred. The influence of block copolymer and manganese salt on the oxide structure was discussed. The evolution of the textural and structural characteristics of the materials upon hydrothermal treatment was also investigated. - Graphical abstract: One-pot amorphous MnO{sub 2} supported on mesoporous anataseTiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Mesoporous manganese titanium oxides were synthesized using block copolymer. • Block copolymers form complexes with Mn{sup 2+} from MnCl{sub 2}. • With block copolymer, manganese oxide can be dispersed around the titania crystallites. • With Mn(acac){sub 2}, manganese is dispersed inside titania. • MnOOH crystallizes outside mesoporous titania during hydrothermal treatment.

  20. Coordination between manganese and nitrogen within the ligands in the manganese complexes facilitates the reconstitution of the water-oxidizing complex in manganese-depleted photosystem II preparations.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuqin; Chen, Guiying; Han, Guangye; Ling, Lin; Huang, Deguang; Khorobrykh, A A; Zharmukhamedov, S K; Liu, Qiutian; Klimov, V V; Kuang, Tingyun

    2006-09-01

    The water-oxidizing complex (WOC) within photosystem II (PSII) can be reconstituted with synthetic manganese complexes by a process called photoactivation; however, the key factors affecting the efficiency of synthetic manganese complexes in reconstitution of electron transport and oxygen evolution activity in manganese-depleted PSII remain unclear. In the present study, four complexes with different manganese coordination environments were used to reconstitute the WOC, and an interesting relationship was found between the coordination environment of the manganese atom in the complexes and their efficiency in restoring electron transport and oxygen evolution. If Mn(II) is coordinated to nitrogen atoms within the ligand, it can restore significant rates of electron transport and oxygen evolution; however, if the manganese atom is coordinated only to oxygen atoms instead of nitrogen atoms, it has no capability to restore electron transport and oxygen evolution. So, our results demonstrate that the capability of manganese complexes to reconstitute the WOC is mainly determined by the coordination between nitrogen atoms from ligands and the manganese atom. It is suggested from our results that the ligation between the nitrogen atom and the manganese atom within the manganese complex facilitates the photoligation of the manganese atom to histidyl residues on the apo-protein in manganese-depleted PSII during photoactivation. PMID:16791637

  1. Suppressing Manganese Dissolution from Lithium Manganese Oxide Spinel Cathodes with Single-Layer Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Puntambekar, Kanan P.; Kim, Soo; Aykol, Muratahan; Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Myers, Benjamin D.; Iddir, Hakim; Russell, John T.; Saldana, Spencer J.; Kumar, Rajan; Thackeray, Michael M.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-06-24

    Spinel-structured LiMn 2 O 4 (LMO) is a desirable cathode material for Li-ion batteries due to its low cost, abundance, and high power capability. However, LMO suffers from limited cycle life that is triggered by manganese dissolution into the electrolyte during electrochemical cycling. Here, it is shown that single-layer graphene coatings suppress manganese dissolution, thus enhancing the performance and lifetime of LMO cathodes. Relative to lithium cells with uncoated LMO cathodes, cells with graphene-coated LMO cathodes provide improved capacity retention with enhanced cycling stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that graphene coatings inhibit manganese depletion from the LMO surface. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that a stable solid electrolyte interphase is formed on graphene, which screens the LMO from direct contact with the electrolyte. Density functional theory calculations provide two mechanisms for the role of graphene in the suppression of manganese dissolution. First, common defects in single-layer graphene are found to allow the transport of lithium while concurrently acting as barriers for manganese diffusion. Second, graphene can chemically interact with Mn 3+ at the LMO electrode surface, promoting an oxidation state change to Mn 4+ , which suppresses dissolution.

  2. Np and Pu Sorption to Manganese Oxide Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, P; Johnson, M R; Roberts, S K; Zavarin, M

    2005-08-30

    Manganese oxide minerals are a significant component of the fracture lining mineralogy at Yucca Mountain (Carlos et al., 1993) and within the tuff-confining unit at Yucca Flat (Prothro, 1998), Pahute Mesa (Drellack et al., 1997), and other locations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Radionuclide sorption to manganese oxide minerals was not included in recent Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hydrologic source term (HST) models which attempt to predict the migration behavior of radionuclides away from underground nuclear tests. However, experiments performed for the Yucca Mountain Program suggest that these minerals may control much of the retardation of certain radionuclides, particularly Np and Pu (Triay et al., 1991; Duff et al., 1999). As a result, recent HST model results may significantly overpredict radionuclide transport away from underground nuclear tests. The sorption model used in HST calculations performed at LLNL includes sorption to iron oxide, calcite, zeolite, smectite, and mica minerals (Zavarin and Bruton 2004a; 2004b). For the majority of radiologic source term (RST) radionuclides, we believe that this accounts for the dominant sorption processes controlling transport. However, for the case of Np, sorption is rather weak to all but the iron and manganese oxides (Figure 1). Thus, we can expect to significantly reduce predicted Np transport by accounting for Np sorption to manganese oxides. Similarly, Pu has been shown to be predominantly associated with manganese oxides in Yucca Mountain fractured tuffs (Duff et al., 1999). Recent results on colloid-facilitated Pu transport (Kersting and Reimus, 2003) also suggest that manganese oxide coatings on fracture surfaces may compete with colloids for Pu, thus reducing the effects of colloid-facilitated Pu transport (Figure 1b). The available data suggest that it is important to incorporate Np and Pu sorption to manganese oxides in reactive transport models. However, few data are available for

  3. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Garwin, Edward L.; Nyaiesh, Ali R.

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  4. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

    1986-08-04

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  5. 40 CFR 721.4587 - Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4587 Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name). (a) Chemical... as lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (P-96-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4587 - Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4587 Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name). (a) Chemical... as lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (P-96-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4587 - Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4587 Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name). (a) Chemical... as lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (P-96-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4587 - Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4587 Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name). (a) Chemical... as lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (P-96-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4587 - Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4587 Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name). (a) Chemical... as lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (P-96-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  5. Manganese

    MedlinePlus

    Manganese is a mineral that is found in several foods including nuts, legumes, seeds, tea, whole grains, and leafy green vegetables. It is ... manganese by mouth along with other vitamins and minerals can promote growth in children who have low ...

  6. ChemCam Update ? Manganese Oxides on Mars

    ScienceCinema

    Lanza, Nina

    2016-07-14

    A recent discovery of manganese oxides in Martian rocks might tell us that the Red Planet was once more Earth-like than previously believed. So what exactly does that mean? Nina Lanza, Los Alamos scientist and lead author of the new paper about these findings in Geophysical Research Letters, breaks it down for us.

  7. Preparation and characterization of amorphous manganese sulfide thin films by SILAR method

    SciTech Connect

    Pathan, H.M.; Kale, S.S.; Lokhande, C.D.; Han, Sung-Hwan . E-mail: shhan@hanyang.ac.kr; Joo, Oh-Shim

    2007-08-07

    Manganese sulfide thin films were deposited by a simple and inexpensive successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method using manganese acetate as a manganese and sodium sulfide as sulfide ion sources, respectively. Manganese sulfide films were characterized for their structural, surface morphological and optical properties by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and optical absorption measurement techniques. The as-deposited film on glass substrate was amorphous. The optical band gap of the film was found to be thickness dependent. As thickness increases optical band gap was found to be increase. The water angle contact was found to be 34{sup o}, suggesting hydrophilic nature of manganese sulfide thin films. The presence of Mn and S in thin film was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

  8. Magnetotransport in Pulsed Laser Deposited Manganese Doped Lead Sulfide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimal, Gaurab; Sapkota, Keshab; Maksymov, Artur; Spinu, Leonard; Wang, Wenyong; Tang, Jinke

    Diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) have been proposed as promising candidates for spintronic applications. Most research in this field has been confined to III-V and II-VI semiconductor system. There are reports on IV-VI semiconductors, however reports on lead sulfide (PbS) based DMS is limited. We study the transport, magnetic and structural properties of manganese doped lead sulfide (Mn:PbS) films produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films are found to show hopping transport at low tempeature. Low temperature magnetoresistance (MR) studies show that the sign of MR can be changed by application of gate voltage. The magnetic properties of the films were also studied which showed ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature.

  9. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  14. Manganese oxidation state mediates toxicity in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reaney, S.H. . E-mail: stevereaney@hotmail.com; Smith, D.R.

    2005-06-15

    The role of the manganese (Mn) oxidation state on cellular Mn uptake and toxicity is not well understood. Therefore, undifferentiated PC12 cells were exposed to 0-200 {mu}M Mn(II)-chloride or Mn(III)-pyrophosphate for 24 h, after which cellular manganese levels were measured along with measures of cell viability, function, and cytotoxicity (trypan blue exclusion, medium lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), 8-isoprostanes, cellular ATP, dopamine, serotonin, H-ferritin, transferrin receptor (TfR), Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) protein levels). Exposures to Mn(III) >10 {mu}M produced 2- to 5-fold higher cellular manganese levels than equimolar exposures to Mn(II). Cell viability and ATP levels both decreased at the highest Mn(II) and Mn(III) exposures (150-200 {mu}M), while Mn(III) exposures produced increases in LDH activity at lower exposures ({>=}50 {mu}M) than did Mn(II) (200 {mu}M only). Mn(II) reduced cellular dopamine levels more than Mn(III), especially at the highest exposures (50% reduced at 200 {mu}M Mn(II)). In contrast, Mn(III) produced a >70% reduction in cellular serotonin at all exposures compared to Mn(II). Different cellular responses to Mn(II) exposures compared to Mn(III) were also observed for H-ferritin, TfR, and MnSOD protein levels. Notably, these differential effects of Mn(II) versus Mn(III) exposures on cellular toxicity could not simply be accounted for by the different cellular levels of manganese. These results suggest that the oxidation state of manganese exposures plays an important role in mediating manganese cytotoxicity.

  15. Transformation of bisphenol A by manganese oxide-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kunde; Peng, Yiwen; Huang, Xinwen; Ding, Jiafeng

    2013-03-01

    Oxidative transformation of organic contaminants by manganese oxides was commonly investigated with pure MnO(2) suspension, which deviates from the fact that natural manganese oxides are seldom present as a pure form in the natural environment. In this study, we prepared manganese oxide-coated sand (MOCS) and evaluated its oxidative capacity using bisphenol A (BPA) as the model compound. BPA was transformed by MOCS and the reaction followed an exponential decay model. The reaction was pH dependent and followed the order of pH 4.5>pH 5.5>pH 6.5>pH 7.5>pH 8.6>pH 9.6, indicating that acidic conditions facilitated BPA transformation while basic conditions disfavored the reaction. Coexisting metal ions exhibited inhibitory effects and followed the order of Fe(3+) > Zn(2+) > Cu(2+) > Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Na(+). Transformation of BPA by MOCS was much slower than that by pure MnO(2) suspension. However, similar transformation products were identified in both studies, suggesting the same reaction pathways. This work suggests that the reactivity of MnO(2) in the environment might be overestimated if extrapolating the result from the pure MnO(2) suspension because natural MnO(2) is mainly present as coating on the surface of soils and sediments. PMID:22752814

  16. Studies of Surface morphology and Atomic Force Microscope-induced Surface Modifications in Calcium Manganese Oxide (CaMnO) Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Anthony; Hart, Cacie; Chaudhry, Adeel; Lawson, Bridget; Ferrone, Natalie; Neubauer, Samuel; Houston, David; Kolagani, Rajeswari; Schaefer, David

    CaMnOis a material of interest for applications as a catalyst for renewable energy applications. Our recent work on epitaxial thin films of this material has shown that films with a tensile lattice mismatch strain exhibit structural and electrical properties that indicate oxygen deficiency. We are studying the influence of strain and oxygen stoichiometry variations on surface morphology as revealed by atomic force microscopy. Our previous work in epitaxial thin films of the hole doped manganite nanoscale has demonstrated surface modifications induced by a voltage-biased AFM tip. Such surface modifications have been shown to be associated with changes in cation and oxygen stoichiometry. We will report results of similar studies on strained CaMnOthin films; relevant for understanding the surface mobility of oxygen vacancies. We acknowledge support from the Towson Office of University Undergraduate Research, Fisher Endowment Grant and Undergraduate Research Grant from the Fisher College of Science and Mathematics, and Seed Funding Grant from the School of Emerging technologies.

  17. Tensile Strain Effects on the Magneto-transport in Calcium Manganese Oxide Thin Films: Comparison with its Hole-doped Counterpart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Bridget; Neubauer, Samuel; Chaudhry, Adeel; Hart, Cacie; Ferrone, Natalie; Houston, David; Yong, Grace; Kolagani, Rajeswari

    Magnetoresistance properties of the epitaxial thin films of doped rare earth manganites are known to be influenced by the effect of bi-axial strain induced by lattice mismatch with the substrate. In hole-doped manganites, the effect of both compressive and tensile strain is qualitatively consistent with the expected changes in unit cell symmetry from cubic to tetragonal, leading to Jahn-Teller strain fields that affect the energy levels of Mn3 + energy levels. Recent work in our laboratory on CaMnO3 thin films has pointed out that tetragonal distortions introduced by tensile lattice mismatch strain may also have the effect of modulating the oxygen content of the films in agreement with theoretical models that propose such coupling between strain and oxygen content. Our research focuses on comparing the magneto-transport properties of hole-doped manganite LaCaMnO3 thin films with that of its electron doped counter parts, in an effort to delineate the effects of oxygen stoichiometry changes on magneto-transport from the effects of Jahn-Teller type strain. Towson University Office of Undergraduate Research, Fisher Endowment Grant and Undergraduate Research Grant from the Fisher College of Science and Mathematics, Seed Funding Grant from the School of Emerging technologies and the NSF Grant ECCS 112856.

  18. Characterization of Synthetic and Natural Manganese Oxides as Martian Analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, V. K.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Carpenter, P. K.; Catalano, J. G.; Hinkle, M. A. G.; Morris, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries of highly concentrated manganese oxides in Gale Crater and on the rim of Endeavour Crater by the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity and Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, respectively, imply more highly oxidizing aqueous conditions than previously recognized. Manganese oxides are a significant environmental indicator about ancient aqueous conditions, provided the phases can be characterized reliably. Manganese oxides are typically fine-grained and poorly crystalline, making the mineral structures difficult to determine, and they generally have very low visible reflectance with few distinctive spectral features in the visible to near infrared, making them a challenge for interpretation from remote sensing data. Therefore, these recent discoveries motivate better characterization using methods available on Mars, particularly visible to near infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and compositional measurements. Both rovers have complementary instruments in this regard. Opportunity is equipped with its multispectral visible imager, Pancam, and an Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), and Curiosity has the multispectral Mastcam, ChemCam (laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and passive spectroscopy), and APXS for in situ characterization, and ChemMin (XRD) for collected samples.

  19. Distributions of Manganese, Iron, and Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria In Lake Superior Sediments of Different Organic Carbon Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of oxygen, soluble and particulate manganese and iron, organic carbon and nitrogen were examined in Lake Superior sediment cores, along with the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic and manganese oxidizing bacteria. Analyses were performed using cores collected with the submersible Johnson Sea Link II. Three cores, exhibiting a range of organic carbon content, were collected from the deepest basin in Lake Superior and the north and south ends of the Caribou trough, and brought to the surface for immediate analysis. Minielectrode profiles of oxygen concentration of the three cores were carried out using a commercially available minielectrode apparatus. Oxygen depletion to less than 1% occurred within 4 cm of the surface for two of the cores, but not until approximately 15 cm for the core from the south basin of the Caribou trough. The three cores exhibited very different profiles of soluble, as well as leachable, manganese and iron, suggesting different degrees of remobilization of these metals in the sediments. Vertical profiles of viable bacteria and Mn oxidizing bacteria, determined by plating and counting, showed that aerobic (and facultatively aerobic) heterotrophic bacteria were present at the highest concentrations near the surface and decreased steadily with depth, while Mn oxidizing bacteria were concentrations primarily at and above the oxic/anoxic interface. Soluble manganese in the pore waters, along with abundant organic carbon, appeared to enhance the presence of manganese oxidizing bacteria, even below the oxic/anoxic interface. Profiles of solid-phase leachable manganese suggested a microbial role in manganese reprecipitation in these sediments.

  20. Nano-sized manganese oxides as biomimetic catalysts for water oxidation in artificial photosynthesis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Rahimi, Fahimeh; Aro, Eva-Mari; Lee, Choon-Hwan; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I.

    2012-01-01

    There has been a tremendous surge in research on the synthesis of various metal compounds aimed at simulating the water-oxidizing complex (WOC) of photosystem II (PSII). This is crucial because the water oxidation half reaction is overwhelmingly rate-limiting and needs high over-voltage (approx. 1 V), which results in low conversion efficiencies when working at current densities required for hydrogen production via water splitting. Particular attention has been given to the manganese compounds not only because manganese has been used by nature to oxidize water but also because manganese is cheap and environmentally friendly. The manganese–calcium cluster in PSII has a dimension of about approximately 0.5 nm. Thus, nano-sized manganese compounds might be good structural and functional models for the cluster. As in the nanometre-size of the synthetic models, most of the active sites are at the surface, these compounds could be more efficient catalysts than micrometre (or bigger) particles. In this paper, we focus on nano-sized manganese oxides as functional and structural models of the WOC of PSII for hydrogen production via water splitting and review nano-sized manganese oxides used in water oxidation by some research groups. PMID:22809849

  1. Preliminary LIBS analysis of Yucca Mountain manganese oxide minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Blacic, J.; Pettit, D.; Cremers, D.

    1996-01-01

    The licensing and performance of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain will require the characterization of radionuclide sorptive capacity of the host rock, which in turn calls for hundreds of analyses based on extensive sampling or in situ measurements. A rapid method specifically for characterizing the manganese oxide minerals occurring heterogeneously throughout the Yucca Mountain block as fracture surface coatings is needed. Our unique solution is a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) surface-analysis technique that is usable in the field to produce high-resolution atomic emission spectra. In tests with manganese oxide minerals and fracture surface coatings from a few Yucca Mountain core samples, we used four spectral bands to show that qualitative measurement of all constituent elements except K and Na (in the presence of Mn) is possible with LIBS. Detailed calibration of final hardware will make the system quantitative.

  2. Copper/Manganese Cocatalyzed Oxidative Coupling of Vinylarenes with Ketones.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xing-Wang; Wang, Nai-Xing; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Jia-Long; Bai, Cui-Bing; Xing, Yalan; Li, Yi-He

    2015-09-18

    A novel copper/manganese cocatalyzed direct oxidative coupling of terminal vinylarenes with ketones via C(sp(3))-H bond functionalization following C-C bond formation has been developed using tert-butyl hydroperoxide as the radical initiator. Various ketones underwent a free-radical addition of terminal vinylarenes to give the corresponding 1,4-dicarbonyl products with excellent regioselectivity and efficiency through one step. A possible reaction mechanism has been proposed. PMID:26348870

  3. Oxidation kinetics of pentachlorophenol by manganese dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Yu, Zhiqiang; Peng, Pingán; Huang, Weilin; Feng, Shunqing; Zhou, Haiyan

    2006-11-01

    This study examined the abiotic transformation kinetics of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by manganese dioxide (MnO2) at different solution chemistry and initial concentrations of PCP and MnO2. The measured PCP transformation rates were found to be on the order of 1.07 with respect to [PCP] and 0.91 and 0.87 with respect to [MnO2] and [H+], respectively. Dissolved Mn2+ and Ca2+ as background electrolytes considerably decreased the reaction rate because of their adsorption and hence blocking of active sites on MnO2 surfaces. The dechlorination number, 0.59 chloride ions per transformed PCP after a 1-h reaction, suggests that a fraction of the transformed PCP was not dechlorinated and may be coupled directly to dimeric products. Gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry techniques were used to identify two isomeric nonachlorohydroxybiphenylethers as major products and 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-hydroquinone and tetrachlorocatechol as minor products. Product identification suggested that the reaction may include two parallel reactions to form either dimers or 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-hydroquinone and tetrachlorocatechol via simultaneous dehydrochlorination and hydroxylation. PMID:17089714

  4. A redox-assisted supramolecular assembly of manganese oxide nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Li; Sun Chenggao; Fan Meilian; Huang Caijuan; Wu Hailong; Chao Zisheng . E-mail: zschao@yahoo.com; Zhai Hesheng . E-mail: hszhai@xmu.edu.cn

    2006-11-09

    In this paper, we report the hydrothermal synthesis of manganese oxide nanotube from an aqueous medium of pH 7, using KMnO{sub 4} and MnCl{sub 2} as inorganic precursors, polyoxyethylene (10) nonyl phenyl ether (TX-10) a surfactant and acetaldehyde an additive. The characterization of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and N{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K (BET) reveals that the synthesized manganese oxide nanotube has a mesopore size of ca. 3.65 nm and a wall thickness of ca. 12 nm, with the wall being composed of microporous crystals of monoclinic manganite. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) result demonstrates a decrease of the binding energy of the Mn{sup 3+} in the manganese oxide nanotube, which may be related to both the nanotubular morphology and the crystalline pore wall. A mechanism of a redox-assisted supramolecular assembly, regulated by acetaldehyde, is postulated.

  5. Relations between magneto-optical properties and reactivity in cobalt-manganese ferrite thin films and powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouet, Laurence; Tailhades, Philippe; Rousset, Abel

    1996-02-01

    Co-Mn spinel ferrites were prepared as submicron powders and thin films. Because of their finely divided state, these spinels could be oxidized at low temperatures to give novel cation-deficient ferrites. For these two material forms, the magneto-optical properties were found to be strongly dependent on the ferrite oxidation state. The highest coercivities and Faraday rotations were obtained when the ferrites were partially oxidized. These phenomena are attributed to the mechanical stress effect developed during the oxidation of the manganese ions. The properties of these ferrites could be of interest for magneto-optical recording applications. The first static recording tests were performed at 780 nm wavelength.

  6. Manganese ion-assisted assembly of superparamagnetic graphene oxide microbowls

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Zhengshan; Xu, Chunxiang Li, Jitao; Zhu, Gangyi; Xu, Xiaoyong; Dai, Jun; Shi, Zengliang; Lin, Yi

    2014-03-24

    A facile manganese ion Mn(II)-assisted assembly has been designed to fabricate microbowls by using graphene oxide nanosheets as basic building blocks, which were exfoliated ultrasonically from the oxidized soot powders in deionized water. From the morphology evolution observations of transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope, a coordinating-tiling-collapsing manner is proposed to interpret the assembly mechanism based on attractive Van der Waals forces, π-π stacking, and capillary action. It is interesting to note that the as-prepared microbowls present a room temperature superparamagnetic behavior.

  7. Manganese oxide nanosheets and a 2D hybrid of graphene-manganese oxide nanosheets synthesized by liquid-phase exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, João; Mendoza-Sánchez, Beatriz; Pettersson, Henrik; Pokle, Anuj; McGuire, Eva K.; Long, Edmund; McKeon, Lorcan; Bell, Alan P.; Nicolosi, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Manganese oxide nanosheets were synthesized using liquid-phase exfoliation that achieved suspensions in isopropanol (IPA) with concentrations of up to 0.45 mg ml-1. A study of solubility parameters showed that the exfoliation was optimum in N,N-dimethylformamide followed by IPA and diethylene glycol. IPA was the solvent of choice due to its environmentally friendly nature and ease of use for further processing. For the first time, a hybrid of graphene and manganese oxide nanosheets was synthesized using a single-step co-exfoliation process. The two-dimensional (2D) hybrid was synthesized in IPA suspensions with concentrations of up to 0.5 mg ml-1 and demonstrated stability against re-aggregation for up to six months. The co-exfoliation was found to be a energetically favorable process in which both solutes, graphene and manganese oxide nanosheets, exfoliate with an improved yield as compared to the single-solute exfoliation procedure. This work demonstrates the remarkable versatility of liquid-phase exfoliation with respect to the synthesis of hybrids with tailored properties, and it provides proof-of-concept ground work for further future investigation and exploitation of hybrids made of two or more 2D nanomaterials that have key complementary properties for various technological applications.

  8. Isotopic evidence for organic matter oxidation by manganese reduction in the formation of stratiform manganese carbonate ore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okita, P.M.; Maynard, J.B.; Spiker, E. C.; Force, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    Unlike other marine-sedimentary manganese ore deposits, which are largely composed of manganese oxides, the primary ore at Molango (Hidalgo State, Mexico) is exclusively manganese carbonate (rhodochrosite, Mn-calcite, kutnahorite). Stable isotope studies of the carbonates from Molango provide critical new information relevant to the controversy over syngenetic and diagenetic models of stratiform manganese deposit formation. Negative ??13C values for carbonates from mineralized zones at Molango are strongly correlated with manganese content both on a whole rock scale and by mineral species. Whole rock ??13C data fall into three groups: high-grade ore = -16.4 to -11.5%.; manganese-rich, sub-ore-grade = -5.2 to 0%.; and unmineralized carbonates = 0 to +2.5%. (PDB). ??18O data show considerable overlap in values among the three groups: +4.8 to -2.8, -5.4 to -0.3%., and -7.4 to +6.2 (PDB), respectively. Isotopic data for individual co-existing minerals suggest a similar separation of ??13C values: ??13C values from calcite range from -1.1 to +0.7%. (PDB), whereas values from rhodochrosite are very negative, -12.9 to -5.5%., and values from kutnahorite or Mn-calcite are intermediate between calcite and rhodochrosite. 13C data are interpreted to indicate that calcite (i.e. unmineralized carbonate) formed from a normal marine carbon reservoir. However, 13C data for the manganese-bearing carbonates suggest a mixed seawater and organic source of carbon. The presence of only trace amounts of pyrite suggests sulfate reduction may have played a minor part in oxidizing organic matter. It is possible that manganese reduction was the predominant reaction that oxidized organic matter and that it released organic-derived CO2 to produce negative ??13C values and manganese carbonate mineralization. ?? 1988.

  9. Constraints on superoxide mediated formation of manganese oxides

    PubMed Central

    Learman, Deric R.; Voelker, Bettina M.; Madden, Andrew S.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive sorbents and oxidants within the environment, where they play a central role in the cycling of nutrients, metals, and carbon. Recent discoveries have identified superoxide (O2−) both of biogenic and abiogenic origin as an effective oxidant of Mn(II) leading to the formation of Mn oxides. Here we examined the conditions under which abiotically produced superoxide led to oxidative precipitation of Mn and the solid-phases produced. Oxidized Mn, as both aqueous Mn(III) and Mn(III/IV) oxides, was only observed in the presence of active catalase, indicating that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a product of the reaction of O2− with Mn(II), inhibits the oxidation process presumably through the reduction of Mn(III). Citrate and pyrophosphate increased the yield of oxidized Mn but decreased the amount of Mn oxide produced via formation of Mn(III)-ligand complexes. While complexing ligands played a role in stabilizing Mn(III), they did not eliminate the inhibition of net Mn(III) formation by H2O2. The Mn oxides precipitated were highly disordered colloidal hexagonal birnessite, similar to those produced by biotically generated superoxide. Yet, in contrast to the large particulate Mn oxides formed by biogenic superoxide, abiotic Mn oxides did not ripen to larger, more crystalline phases. This suggests that the deposition of crystalline Mn oxides within the environment requires a biological, or at least organic, influence. This work provides the first direct evidence that, under conditions relevant to natural waters, oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide can occur and lead to formation of Mn oxides. For organisms that oxidize Mn(II) by producing superoxide, these findings may also point to other microbially mediated processes, in particular enzymatic hydrogen peroxide degradation and/or production of organic ligand metabolites, that allow for Mn oxide formation. PMID:24027565

  10. Strontium and Actinides Removal from Savannah River Site Actual Waste Samples by Freshly Precipitated Manganese Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    2003-10-30

    The authors investigated the performance of freshly precipitated manganese oxide and monosodium titanate (MST) for the removal of strontium (Sr) and actinides from actual high-level waste. Manganese oxide precipitation occurs upon addition of a reductant such as formate (HCO2-) or peroxide (H2O2) to a waste solution containing permanganate (MnO4-). Tests described in this document address the capability of manganese oxide treatment to remove Rs, Pu, and Np from actual high-level waste containing elevated concentrations of Pu. Additionally, tests investigate MST (using two unique batches) performance with the same waste for direct comparison to the manganese oxide performance.

  11. First principles calculations for lithiated manganese oxides.

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R.

    1998-12-23

    First principles calculations within the local-spin-density-functional theory (LSDFF) framework are presented of densities of electronic states for MnO, LiMnO{sub 2} in the monoclinic and orthorhombic structures, cubic LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel and {lambda}-MnO{sub 2} (delithiated spinel), all in antiferromagnetic spin configurations. The changes in energy spectra as the Mn oxidation state varies between 2+ and 4+ are illustrated. Preliminary calculations for Co-doped LiMnO{sub 2} are presented, and the destabilization of a monoclinic relative to a rhombohedral structure is discussed.

  12. Iron and manganese oxide mineralization in the Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Manheim, F. T.; Bau, M.; Kang, J.-K.; Lubick, N.

    1997-01-01

    Iron, manganese, and iron-manganese deposits occur in nearly all geomorphologic and tectonic environments in the ocean basins and form by one or more of four processes: (1) hydrogenetic precipitation from cold ambient seawater, (2) precipitation from hydrothermal fluids, (3) precipitation from sediment pore waters that have been modified from bottom water compositions by diagenetic reactions in the sediment column and (4) replacement of rocks and sediment. Iron and manganese deposits occur in five forms: nodules, crusts, cements, mounds and sediment-hosted stratabound layers. Seafloor oxides show a wide range of compositions from nearly pure iron to nearly pure manganese end members. Fe/Mn ratios vary from about 24 000 (up to 58% elemental Fe) for hydrothermal seamount ironstones to about 0.001 (up to 52% Mn) for hydrothermal stratabound manganese oxides from active volcanic arcs. Hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts that occur on most seamounts in the ocean basins have a mean Fe/Mn ratio of 0.7 for open-ocean seamount crusts and 1.2 for continental margin seamount crusts. Fe-Mn nodules of potential economic interest from the Clarion-Clipperton Zone have a mean Fe/Mn ratio of 0.3, whereas the mean ratio for nodules from elsewhere in the Pacific is about 0.7. Crusts are enriched in Co, Ni and Pt and nodules in Cu and Ni, and both have significant concentrations of Pb, Zn, Ba, Mo, V and other elements. In contrast, hydrothermal deposits commonly contain only minor trace metal contents, although there are many exceptions, for example, with Ni contents up to 0.66%, Cr to 1.2%, and Zn to 1.4%. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns generally show a positive Ce anomaly and abundant ??REEs for hydrogenetic and mixed hydrogenetic-diagenetic deposits, whereas the Ce anomaly is negative for hydrothermal deposits and ??REE contents are low. However, the Ce anomaly in crusts may vary from strongly positive in East Pacific crusts to slightly negative in West Pacific crusts, which may reflect

  13. Manganese chlorins immobilized on silica as oxidation reaction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Castro, Kelly A D F; Pires, Sónia M G; Ribeiro, Marcos A; Simões, Mário M Q; Neves, M Graça P M S; Schreiner, Wido H; Wypych, Fernando; Cavaleiro, José A S; Nakagaki, Shirley

    2015-07-15

    Synthetic strategies that comply with the principles of green chemistry represent a challenge: they will enable chemists to conduct reactions that maximize the yield of products with commercial interest while minimizing by-products formation. The search for catalysts that promote the selective oxidation of organic compounds under mild and environmentally friendly conditions constitutes one of the most important quests of organic chemistry. In this context, metalloporphyrins and analogues are excellent catalysts for oxidative transformations under mild conditions. In fact, their reduced derivatives chlorins are also able to catalyze organic compounds oxidation effectively, although they have been still little explored. In this study, we synthesized two chlorins through porphyrin cycloaddition reactions with 1.3-dipoles and prepared the corresponding manganese chlorins (MnCHL) using adequate manganese(II) salts. These MnCHL were posteriorly immobilized on silica by following the sol-gel process and the resulting solids were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UVVIS spectroscopy, FTIR, XPS, and EDS. The catalytic activity of the immobilized MnCHL was investigated in the oxidation of cyclooctene, cyclohexene and cyclohexane and the results were compared with the ones obtained under homogeneous conditions. PMID:25841060

  14. Biological manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas putida in trickling filters.

    PubMed

    McKee, Kyle P; Vance, Cherish C; Karthikeyan, Raghupathy

    2016-06-01

    Biological oxidation has been researched as a viable alternative for treating waters with high manganese (Mn) concentrations, typically found in mine drainage or in some geological formations. In this study, laboratory-scale trickling filters were constructed to compare the Mn removal efficiency between filters inoculated with the Mn oxidizing bacteria, Pseudomonas putida, and filters without inoculation. Manganese oxidation and removal was found to be significantly greater in trickling filters with Pseudomonas putida after startup times of only 48 h. Mn oxidation in Pseudomonas putida inoculated trickling filters was up to 75% greater than non-inoculated filters. One-dimensional advective-dispersive models were formulated to describe the transport of Mn in trickling filter porous media. Based on the experimental transport parameters obtained, the model predicted that a filter depth of only 16 cm is needed to reduce influent concentration of 10 mg L(-1) to 0.05 mg L(-1). PMID:26943637

  15. Oxidation of manganese(II) during chlorination: role of bromide.

    PubMed

    Allard, S; Fouche, L; Dick, J; Heitz, A; von Gunten, U

    2013-08-01

    The oxidation of dissolved manganese(II) (Mn(II)) during chlorination is a relatively slow process which may lead to residual Mn(II) in treated drinking waters. Chemical Mn(II) oxidation is autocatalytic and consists of a homogeneous and a heterogeneous process; the oxidation of Mn(II) is mainly driven by the latter process. This study demonstrates that Mn(II) oxidation during chlorination is enhanced in bromide-containing waters by the formation of reactive bromine species (e.g., HOBr, BrCl, Br2O) from the oxidation of bromide by chlorine. During oxidation of Mn(II) by chlorine in bromide-containing waters, bromide is recycled and acts as a catalyst. For a chlorine dose of 1 mg/L and a bromide level as low as 10 μg/L, the oxidation of Mn(II) by reactive bromine species becomes the main pathway. It was demonstrated that the kinetics of the reaction are dominated by the adsorbed Mn(OH)2 species for both chlorine and bromine at circumneutral pH. Reactive bromine species such as Br2O and BrCl significantly influence the rate of manganese oxidation and may even outweigh the reactivity of HOBr. Reaction orders in [HOBr]tot were found to be 1.33 (±0.15) at pH 7.8 and increased to 1.97 (±0.17) at pH 8.2 consistent with an important contribution of Br2O which is second order in [HOBr]tot. These findings highlight the need to take bromide, and the subsequent reactive bromine species formed upon chlorination, into account to assess Mn(II) removal during water treatment with chlorine. PMID:23859083

  16. Electrodeposited Manganese Oxides on Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanotube Substrate: Supercapacitive Behaviour in Aqueous and Organic Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nam,K.W.; Yang,X.

    2009-03-01

    Thin amorphous manganese oxide layers with a thickness of 3-5nm are electrodeposited on a carbon nanotube (CNT) film substrate that has a three-dimensional nanoporous structure (denoted asMnO2/CNT electrode). For the purpose of comparison, manganese oxide films are also electrodeposited on a flat Pt-coated Si wafer substrate (denoted as MnO2 film electrode). The pseudocapacitive properties of the MnO2 film and MnO2/CNT electrodes are examined in both aqueous electrolyte (1.0M KCl) and nonaqueousorganic electrolyte (1.0M LiClO4 in propylene carbonate). While both types of electrode showpseudocapacitive behaviour in the aqueous electrolyte, only the MnO2/CNT electrode does so in the organic electrolyte, due to its high oxide/electrolyte interfacial area and improved electron conduction through the CNT substrate. Compared with the MnO2 film electrode, the MnO2/CNT electrode shows a much higher specific capacitance and better high-rate capability, regardless of the electrolyte used.Use of the organic electrolyte results in a ∼6 times higher specific energy compared with that obtained with the aqueous electrolyte, while maintaining a similar specific power. The construction of a threedimensional nanoporous network structure consisting of a thin oxide layer on a CNT film substrate at the nm scale and the use of an organic electrolyte are promising approaches to improving the specific energyof supercapacitors.

  17. Manganese oxide composite electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Li, Naichao

    2007-12-04

    An activated electrode for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell is disclosed with a precursor of a lithium metal oxide with the formula xLi.sub.2MnO.sub.3.(1-x)LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 for 0

  18. Manganese oxide composite electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Christopher S.; Kang, Sun-Ho; Thackeray, Michael M.

    2009-12-22

    An activated electrode for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell is disclosed with a precursor thereof a lithium metal oxide with the formula xLi.sub.2MnO.sub.3.(1-x)LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 for 0.5

  19. Solution synthesis and characterization of lithium manganese oxide cathode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, J.A.; Boyle, T.J.; Doughty, D.H.

    1995-07-01

    A nonaqueous coprecipitation process has been developed to prepare controlled stoichiometry lithium manganese oxalate precipitates. The process involved mixing a methanolic Li-Mn nitrate solution with a methanolic solution containing tetramethylammonium oxalate as the precipitating agent. The resulting oxalates were readily converted to a variety of phase pure lithium manganese oxides at moderate temperatures ({le}600{degrees}C), where the phase formed was determined by the initial Li/Mn ratio in the starting solution. Metal cation dopants have been incorporated into the oxalate precipitate by dissolving the appropriate metal nitrate in the Li-Mn precursor solution The various starting solutions, oxalate precipitates, and calcined oxides have been extensively characterized using a variety of techniques, including {sup 7}Li NMR, TGA/DTA, SEM, and XRD. Results indicate that a strong interaction occurs between Li and Mn in the nitrate solution which carries over into the oxalate phase during precipitation. The morphology and the crystallite size of the oxide powders were shown to be controlled by the morphology of the oxalate precursor and the oxalate calcination temperature, respectively. The results of initial cathode performance tests with respect to dopant type (Al, Ni, Co) and concentration for LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} are also reported.

  20. Long Cyclic Life in Manganese Oxide-Based Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoming; Qin, Qingqing; Xu, Wei; Yan, Jian; Wu, Yucheng

    2016-07-20

    Long cyclic life is very important to the practical application of the pseudocapacitors. A systematic study has been carried out to reveal what key factors and how they affecting the cycling behaviors of manganese oxides. The specific capacitance degradation of MnOx is usually attributed to the so-called "dissolution" issue. Our results indicate that "dissoluted MnOx" is in the form of the "flotsam" derived from the detached active materials instead of Mn(2+) in the solution, which causes color change of electrolyte and the loss of specific capacitance. During the cycling, the morphology of manganese oxides transformed to flower-like flakes regardless of the starting structures. After that, it tends to form nanowires especially at elevated temperatures. According to the relative low electrochemical utility of nanowires, specific capacitance might decrease at this stage. These results put forward new questions on charge storage mechanism. Besides, electrochemical oxidation of MnOx leads to an increase in specific capacitance. The cycling behavior of MnOx is mainly determined by these three factors. Excitingly, a very stable cycling performance with no capacitance degradation over 40 000 cycles has been achieved in MnO2 hierarchical sphere-based electrodes. This study provides insightful understanding of the fundamental cycling behavior of MnOx-based electrodes and useful instructions for developing highly stable supercapacitors. PMID:27347779

  1. Calcium manganese(IV) oxides: biomimetic and efficient catalysts for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Pashaei, Babak; Nayeri, Sara

    2012-04-28

    CaMnO(3) and Ca(2)Mn(3)O(8) were synthesized and characterized by SEM, XRD, FTIR and BET. Both oxides showed oxygen evolution activity in the presence of oxone, cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate and H(2)O(2). Oxygen evolution from water during irradiation with visible light (λ > 400 nm) was also observed upon adding these manganese oxides to an aqueous solution containing tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(II), as photosensitizer, and chloro pentaammine cobalt(III) chloride, as electron acceptor, in an acetate buffer. The amounts of dissolved manganese and calcium from CaMnO(3) and Ca(2)Mn(3)O(8) in the oxygen evolving reactions were reported and compared with other (calcium) manganese oxides. Proposed mechanisms of oxygen evolution and proposed roles for the calcium ions are also considered. PMID:22382465

  2. Manganese

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Manganese ; CASRN 7439 - 96 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  3. Manganese

    MedlinePlus

    ... no RDAs for a nutrient, the Adequate Intake (AI) is used as a guide. The AI is the estimated amount of the nutrient that ... assumed to be adequate. The daily Adequate Intake (AI) levels for manganese are: infants birth to 6 ...

  4. Manganese oxide micro-supercapacitors with ultra-high areal capacitance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Myers, Benjamin D; Yan, Jian; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak; Lee, Pooi See

    2013-05-21

    A symmetric micro-supercapacitor is constructed by electrochemically depositing manganese oxide onto micro-patterned current collectors. High surface-to-volume ratio of manganese oxide and short diffusion distance between electrodes give an ultra-high areal capacitance of 56.3 mF cm(-2) at a current density of 27.2 μA cm(-2). PMID:23563785

  5. Manganese-Based Molecular Electrocatalysts for Oxidation of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hulley, Elliott; Kumar, Neeraj; Raugei, Simone; Bullock, R. Morris

    2015-10-05

    Oxidation of H2 (1 atm) is catalyzed by the manganese electrocatalysts [(P2N2)MnI(CO)(bppm)]+ and [(PNP)MnI(CO)(bppm)]+ (P2N2= 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane; PNP = (Ph2PCH2)2NMe); bppm = (PArF2)2CH2, and ArF = 3,5-(CF3)2C6H3). In fluorobenzene solvent using 2,6-lutidine as the exogeneous base, the turnover frequency for [(P2N2)MnI(CO)(bppm)]+ is 3.5 s-1 with an estimated overpotential of 590 mV. For [(PNP)MnI(CO)(bppm)], in fluorobenzene solvent using N-methylpyrrolidine as the exogeneous base, the turnover frequency is 1.4 s-1 with an estimated overpotential of 700 mV. Density functional theory calculations suggest that the slow step in the catalytic cycle is proton transfer from the oxidized 17-electron manganese hydride, e.g., [(P2N2)MnIIH(CO)(bppm)]+ to the pendant amine. The computed activation barrier for intramolecular proton transfer from the metal to the pendant amine is 20.4 kcal/mol in [(P2N2)MnIIH(CO)(bppm)]+ and 21.3 kcal/mol in [(PNP)MnI(CO)(bppm)]. The high barrier appears to result from both the unfavorability of metal-to-nitrogen proton transfer (thermodynamically uphill by 6.6 pKa units, 9 kcal/mol), as well as the relatively long manganese-nitrogen separation in the MnIIH complexes.

  6. Fully Converting Graphite into Graphene Oxide Hydrogels by Preoxidation with Impure Manganese Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaojiao; Yang, Ningxin; Sun, Zhe; Zeng, Mengqi; Fu, Lei; Hu, Chengguo; Hu, Shengshui

    2015-09-30

    Potassium permanganate (KMnO4) has been proved to be an efficient oxidant for converting graphite into graphite oxide, but its slow diffusion in the interlayer of graphite seriously restricts the production of graphene oxide (GO). Here, we demonstrate that the preoxidation of graphite by impure manganese dioxide (MnO2) in a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and phosphorus pentoxide (P2O5) can efficiently improve the synthesis of GO when KMnO4 is employed as the oxidant. The prepared honey-like GO hydrogels possess a high yield of single-layer sheets, large sizes (average lateral size up to 20 μm), wide ranges of stable dispersion concentrations (from dilute solutions, viscous hydrogels, to dry films), and good conductivity after reduction (~2.9 × 10(4) S/m). The mechanism for the improved synthesis of GO by impure MnO2 was explored. The enhanced exfoliation and oxidation of graphite by oxidative Mn ions (mainly Mn(3+)), which are synergistically produced by the reaction of impure MnO2 with H2SO4 and P2O5, are found to be responsible for the improved synthesis of such GO hydrogels. Particularly, preoxidized graphite (POG) can be partially dispersed in water with sonication, which allows the facile construction of flexible and highly conductive graphene nanosheet film electrodes with excellent electrochemical sensing properties. PMID:26352992

  7. Chromite oxidation by manganese oxides in subseafloor basalts and the presence of putative fossilized microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chromite is a mineral with low solubility and is thus resistant to dissolution. The exception is when manganese oxides are available, since they are the only known naturally occurring oxidants for chromite. In the presence of Mn(IV) oxides, Cr(III) will oxidise to Cr(VI), which is more soluble than Cr(III), and thus easier to be removed. Here we report of chromite phenocrysts that are replaced by rhodochrosite (Mn(II) carbonate) in subseafloor basalts from the Koko Seamount, Pacific Ocean, that were drilled and collected during the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 197. The mineral succession chromite-rhodochrosite-saponite in the phenocrysts is interpreted as the result of chromite oxidation by manganese oxides. Putative fossilized microorganisms are abundant in the rhodochrosite and we suggest that the oxidation of chromite has been mediated by microbial activity. It has previously been shown in soils and in laboratory experiments that chromium oxidation is indirectly mediated by microbial formation of manganese oxides. Here we suggest a similar process in subseafloor basalts. PMID:21639896

  8. Chromite oxidation by manganese oxides in subseafloor basalts and the presence of putative fossilized microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Holm, Nils G

    2011-01-01

    Chromite is a mineral with low solubility and is thus resistant to dissolution. The exception is when manganese oxides are available, since they are the only known naturally occurring oxidants for chromite. In the presence of Mn(IV) oxides, Cr(III) will oxidise to Cr(VI), which is more soluble than Cr(III), and thus easier to be removed. Here we report of chromite phenocrysts that are replaced by rhodochrosite (Mn(II) carbonate) in subseafloor basalts from the Koko Seamount, Pacific Ocean, that were drilled and collected during the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 197. The mineral succession chromite-rhodochrosite-saponite in the phenocrysts is interpreted as the result of chromite oxidation by manganese oxides. Putative fossilized microorganisms are abundant in the rhodochrosite and we suggest that the oxidation of chromite has been mediated by microbial activity. It has previously been shown in soils and in laboratory experiments that chromium oxidation is indirectly mediated by microbial formation of manganese oxides. Here we suggest a similar process in subseafloor basalts. PMID:21639896

  9. Exceptionally Active and Stable Spinel Nickel Manganese Oxide Electrocatalysts for Urea Oxidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, Sivakumar; Subramanian, Palaniappan; Levi, Elena; Aurbach, Doron; Gedanken, Aharon; Schechter, Alex

    2016-05-18

    Spinel nickel manganese oxides, widely used materials in the lithium ion battery high voltage cathode, were studied in urea oxidation catalysis. NiMn2O4, Ni1.5Mn1.5O4, and MnNi2O4 were synthesized by a simple template-free hydrothermal route followed by a thermal treatment in air at 800 °C. Rietveld analysis performed on nonstoichiometric nickel manganese oxide-Ni1.5Mn1.5O4 revealed the presence of three mixed phases: two spinel phases with different lattice parameters and NiO unlike the other two spinels NiMn2O4 and MnNi2O4. The electroactivity of nickel manganese oxide materials toward the oxidation of urea in alkaline solution is evaluated using cyclic voltammetric measurements. Ni1.5Mn1.5O4 exhibits excellent redox characteristics and lower charge transfer resistances in comparison with other compositions of nickel manganese oxides and nickel oxide prepared under similar conditions.The Ni1.5Mn1.5O4modified electrode oxidizes urea at 0.29 V versus Ag/AgCl with a corresponding current density of 6.9 mA cm(-2). At a low catalyst loading of 50 μg cm(-2), the urea oxidation current density of Ni1.5Mn1.5O4 in alkaline solution is 7 times higher than that of nickel oxide and 4 times higher than that of NiMn2O4 and MnNi2O4, respectively. PMID:27123873

  10. Manganese oxide minerals: Crystal structures and economic and environmental significance

    PubMed Central

    Post, Jeffrey E.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese oxide minerals have been used for thousands of years—by the ancients for pigments and to clarify glass, and today as ores of Mn metal, catalysts, and battery material. More than 30 Mn oxide minerals occur in a wide variety of geological settings. They are major components of Mn nodules that pave huge areas of the ocean floor and bottoms of many fresh-water lakes. Mn oxide minerals are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and participate in a variety of chemical reactions that affect groundwater and bulk soil composition. Their typical occurrence as fine-grained mixtures makes it difficult to study their atomic structures and crystal chemistries. In recent years, however, investigations using transmission electron microscopy and powder x-ray and neutron diffraction methods have provided important new insights into the structures and properties of these materials. The crystal structures for todorokite and birnessite, two of the more common Mn oxide minerals in terrestrial deposits and ocean nodules, were determined by using powder x-ray diffraction data and the Rietveld refinement method. Because of the large tunnels in todorokite and related structures there is considerable interest in the use of these materials and synthetic analogues as catalysts and cation exchange agents. Birnessite-group minerals have layer structures and readily undergo oxidation reduction and cation-exchange reactions and play a major role in controlling groundwater chemistry. PMID:10097056

  11. Direct growth of flower-like manganese oxide on reduced graphene oxide towards efficient oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jintao; Guo, Chunxian; Zhang, Lianying; Li, Chang Ming

    2013-07-18

    Three-dimensional manganese oxide is directly grown on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets, exhibiting comparable catalytic activity, higher selectivity and better stability towards oxygen reduction reaction than those of the commercial Pt/XC-72 catalyst. PMID:23745182

  12. Comparative evaluation of oxidative stress status and manganese availability in plants growing on manganese mine.

    PubMed

    Boojar, Massod Mashhadi Akbar; Goodarzi, Faranak

    2008-11-01

    This study pioneered an approach that determined the effects of excess manganese (Mn) on three species; Datura stramonium, Alhagi camelthorn and Chenopodium ambrosioides. We investigated their levels of Mn, antioxidative enzymes and oxidative damage biomarkers in plants (zone 1) in and outside (zone 2) the Mn mine. The results showed that total and available Mn were at toxic levels for plants growing on zone 1. The Mn levels in each plant species were higher in leaves, stems and roots. Mn was only accumulated significantly in leaf vacuoles of A. camelthorn. Antioxidative enzyme activities of C. ambrosioides and/or D. stramonium in zone 1 were higher in leaves, stems and then in their roots. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and dityrosine levels were insignificantly higher in tissues of the studied plants in zone 1 with respect to zone 2. The roots of studied plants showed significantly higher levels of these biomarkers in comparison with their leaves in zone 1. Accordingly, antioxidative enzymatic response to Mn-stress in D. stramonium and C. ambrosioides and possibly accumulation of Mn in leaf vacuoles of A. camelthorn, protected them from oxidative damages and involved in their tolerance in Mn mine. PMID:18068229

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Nanostructured Manganese Oxide for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jaeyong; Kim, Taewoo; Choi, Young Il; Park, Inyeong; Lim, Dongwook; Shim, Sang Eun; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured manganese oxides were synthesized by a sol-gel method using manganese acetate (MnAc2) and citric acid (C6H8O7,) as precursors, and characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The nano-rod structure of MnO2 developed gradually when the calcination temperature varied from 380 to 580 degrees C. As the pH increased, the pore size increased, while the specific surface area decreased. The effects of the pH and calcination temperature on the electrochemical properties of the nano-MnO2 electrode, including the supercapacitive behavior, were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) tests. The tests were performed between 0 and 0.8 V versus Ag/AgCl in 1 M Na2SO4 electrolyte at various scan rates (10-200 mVs(-1)). The specific capacitance of the SP-380 sample, prepared at pH 6, was equal to 269.3 Fg(-1). After 300 cycles, approximately a 3.4% increase of the specific capacitance was measured, confirming the excellent cyclability. PMID:27483899

  14. Manganese Oxide Nanoarray-Based Monolithic Catalysts: Tunable Morphology and High Efficiency for CO Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Yu; Song, Wenqiao; Lin, Hui-Jan; Wang, Sibo; Biswas, Sourav; Mollahosseini, Mehdi; Kuo, Chung-Hao; Gao, Pu-Xian; Suib, Steven L

    2016-03-30

    A generic one-pot hydrothermal synthesis route has been successfully designed and utilized to in situ grow uniform manganese oxide nanorods and nanowires onto the cordierite honeycomb monolithic substrates, forming a series of nanoarray-based monolithic catalysts. During the synthesis process, three types of potassium salt oxidants have been used with different reduction potentials, i.e., K2Cr2O7, KClO3, and K2S2O8, denoted as HM-DCM, HM-PCR, and HM-PSF, respectively. The different reduction potentials of the manganese source (Mn(2+)) and oxidants induced the formation of manganese oxide nanoarrays with different morphology, surface area, and reactivity of carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation. K2Cr2O7 and KClO3 can induce sharp and long nanowires with slow growth rates due to their low reduction potentials. In comparison, the nanoarrays of HM-PSF presented shorter nanorods but displayed an efficient 90% CO oxidation conversion at 200 °C (T90) without noble-metal loading. Reducibility tests for the three monolithic catalysts by hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction revealed an activation energy order of HM-PSF > HM-DCM > HM-PCR for CO oxidation. The characterizations of oxygen temperature-programmed desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated the abundant surface-adsorbed oxygen and lattice oxygen contributing to the superior reactivity of HM-PSF. The straightforward synthetic process showed a scalable, low-cost, and template-free method to fabricate manganese oxide nanoarray monolithic catalysts for exhaust treatment. PMID:26954301

  15. Thermodynamics of Manganese Oxides at Bulk and Nanoscale: Phase Formation, Transformation, Oxidation-Reduction, and Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkner, Nancy R.

    Natural manganese oxides are generally formed in surficial environments that are near ambient temperature and water-rich, and may be exposed to wet-dry cycles and a variety of adsorbate species that influence dramatically their level of hydration. Manganese oxide minerals are often poorly crystalline, nanophase, and hydrous. In the near-surface environment they are involved in processes that are important to life, such as water column oxygen cycling, biomineralization, and transport of minerals/nutrients through soils and water. These processes, often involving transformations among manganese oxide polymorphs, are governed by a complex interplay between thermodynamics and kinetics. Manganese oxides are also used in technology as catalysts, and for other applications. The major goal of this dissertation is to examine the energetics of bulk and nanophase manganese oxide phases as a function of particle size, composition, and surface hydration. Careful synthesis and characterization of manganese oxide phases with different surface areas provided samples for the study of enthalpies of formation by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry and of the energetics of water adsorption on their surfaces. These data provide a quantitative picture of phase stability and how it changes at the nanoscale. The surface energy of the hydrous surface of Mn3O4 is 0.96 +/- 0.08 J/m2, of Mn2O3 is 1.29 +/- 0.10 J/m2, and of MnO2 is 1.64 +/- 0.10 J/m2. The surface energy of the anhydrous surface of Mn3O4 is 1.62 +/- 0.08 J/m 2, of Mn2O3 is 1.77 +/- 0.10 J/m 2, and of MnO2 is 2.05 +/- 0.10 J/m2. Supporting preliminary findings (Navrotsky et al., 2010), the spinel phase (Mn3O4) has a lower surface energy (more stabilizing) than bixbyite, while the latter has a smaller surface energy than pyrolusite. These differences significantly change the positions in oxygen fugacity---temperature space of the redox couples Mn3O4-Mn2O 3 and Mn2O3-MnO2 favoring the lower surface enthalpy phase (the

  16. Manganese(III) binding to a pyoverdine siderophore produced by a manganese(II)-oxidizing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Sposito, Garrison; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2004-12-01

    The possible roles of siderophores (high affinity chelators of iron(III)) in the biogeochemistry of manganese remain unknown. Here we investigate the interaction of Mn(III) with a pyoverdine-type siderophore (PVD MnB1) produced by the model Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1. PVD MnB1 confirmed typical pyoverdine behavior with respect to: (a) its absorption spectrum at 350-600 nm, both in the absence and presence of Fe(III), (b) the quenching of its fluorescence by Fe(III), (c) the formation of a 1:1 complex with Fe(III), and (d) the thermodynamic stability constant of its Fe(III) complex. The Mn(III) complex of PVD MnB1 had a 1:1 Mn:pvd molar ratio, showed fluorescence quenching, and exhibited a light absorption spectrum (A max = 408-410 nm) different from that of either PVD MnB1-Fe(III) or uncomplexed PVD MnB1. Mn(III) competed strongly with Fe(III) for binding by PVD MnB1 in culture filtrates (pH 8, 4°C). Equilibration with citrate, a metal-binding ligand, did not detectably release Mn from its PVD MnB1 complex at a citrate/PVD MnB1 molar ratio of 830 (pH 8, 4°C), whereas pyrophosphate under the same conditions removed 55% of the Mn from its PVD MnB1 complex. Most of the PVD MnB1-complexed Mn was released by reaction with ascorbate, a reducing agent, or with EDTA, a ligand that is also oxidized by Mn(III). Data on the competition for binding to PVD MnB1 by Fe(III) vs. Mn(III) were used to determine a thermodynamic stability constant (nominally at 4°C) for the neutral species MnHPVD MnB1 (log K = 47.5 ± 0.5, infinite dilution reference state). This value was larger than that determined for FeHPVD MnB1 (log K = 44.6 ± 0.5). This result has important implications for the metabolism, solubility, speciation, and redox cycling of manganese, as well as for the biologic uptake of iron.

  17. Monte Carlo study of double exchange interaction in manganese oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Naa, Christian Fredy; Suprijadi, Viridi, Sparisoma Djamal, Mitra; Fasquelle, Didier

    2015-09-30

    In this paper we study the magnetoresistance properties attributed by double exchange (DE) interaction in manganese oxide by Monte Carlo simulation. We construct a model based on mixed-valence Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} on the general system of Re{sub 2/3}Ae{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} in two dimensional system. The conduction mechanism is based on probability of e{sub g} electrons hopping from Mn{sup 3+} to Mn{sup 4+}. The resistivity dependence on temperature and the external magnetic field are presented and the validity with related experimental results are discussed. We use the resistivity power law to fit our data on metallic region and basic activated behavior on insulator region. On metallic region, we found our result agree well with the quantum theory of DE interaction. From general arguments, we found our simulation agree qualitatively with experimental results.

  18. Sol-gel synthesis and characterization of mesoporous manganese oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Xinlin; Zhang Gaoyong; Zhu Yinyan; Yang Hengquan

    2003-10-30

    Mesoporous manganese oxide (MPMO) from reduction of KMnO{sub 4} with maleic acid, was obtained and characterized in detail. The characterization of the material was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD) and N{sub 2} sorptometry. The results showed that MPMO is a pseudo-crystalline material with complex network pore structure, of which BET specific surface area is 297 m{sup 2}/g and pore size distribution is approximately in the range of 0.7-6.0 nm. The MPMO material turns to cryptomelane when the calcinating temperature rises to 400 deg. C. The optimum sol-gel reaction conditions are KMnO{sub 4}/C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4} molar ratio=3, pH=7 and gelation time>6 h.

  19. Water exchange in manganese-based water-oxidizing catalysts in photosynthetic systems: from the water-oxidizing complex in photosystem II to nano-sized manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Tomo, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Satoh, Kimiyuki; Carpentier, Robert; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-09-01

    The water-oxidizing complex (WOC), also known as the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), of photosystem II in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms efficiently catalyzes water oxidation. It is, therefore, responsible for the presence of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The WOC is a manganese-calcium (Mn₄CaO₅(H₂O)₄) cluster housed in a protein complex. In this review, we focus on water exchange chemistry of metal hydrates and discuss the mechanisms and factors affecting this chemical process. Further, water exchange rates for both the biological cofactor and synthetic manganese water splitting are discussed. The importance of fully unveiling the water exchange mechanism to understand the chemistry of water oxidation is also emphasized here. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. PMID:24685431

  20. Insights into the solar light driven thermocatalytic oxidation of VOCs over tunnel structured manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yali; Wang, Wenzhong; Jiang, Dong; Zhang, Ling; Li, Xiaoman; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-21

    Different tunnel structured manganese oxides (1*1, 2*2, and 3*3) have been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal strategy. The three catalysts exhibit high photothermal performance, resulting in a considerable increase of temperature above the light-off temperature for VOC oxidation. On this point, aerobic oxidation reactions of propane and propylene under simulated sunlight and infrared light irradiation were selected as probe reactions to explore their light driven thermocatalytic activity. Furthermore, the light-off curves of the manganese oxides for propane and propylene were carefully investigated, which clearly explained the possibility of combining both the efficient photothermal effect and excellent thermocatalytic activity of the manganese oxides. Results show that the catalytic effects follow the order of 1*1 < 3*3 < 2*2. 2*2 exhibited the best catalytic properties due to better low-temperature reducibility, suitable tunnel structure and the presence of more Mn(4+). This work suggests new applications for traditional catalysts with intense photoabsorption and provides insights into the overall utilization of solar energy. PMID:27333408

  1. Towards a mechanistic understanding of carbon stabilization in manganese oxides

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Karen; Purvis, Graham; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Peacock, Caroline; Gray, Neil; Wagner, Thomas; März, Christian; Bowen, Leon; Ojeda, Jesus; Finlay, Nina; Robertson, Steve; Worrall, Fred; Greenwell, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Minerals stabilize organic carbon (OC) in sediments, thereby directly affecting global climate at multiple scales, but how they do it is far from understood. Here we show that manganese oxide (Mn oxide) in a water treatment works filter bed traps dissolved OC as coatings build up in layers around clean sand grains at 3%w/wC. Using spectroscopic and thermogravimetric methods, we identify two main OC fractions. One is thermally refractory (>550 °C) and the other is thermally more labile (<550 °C). We postulate that the thermal stability of the trapped OC is due to carboxylate groups within it bonding to Mn oxide surfaces coupled with physical entrapment within the layers. We identify a significant difference in the nature of the surface-bound OC and bulk OC . We speculate that polymerization reactions may be occurring at depth within the layers. We also propose that these processes must be considered in future studies of OC in natural systems. PMID:26194625

  2. Towards a mechanistic understanding of carbon stabilization in manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karen; Purvis, Graham; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Peacock, Caroline; Gray, Neil; Wagner, Thomas; März, Christian; Bowen, Leon; Ojeda, Jesus; Finlay, Nina; Robertson, Steve; Worrall, Fred; Greenwell, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Minerals stabilize organic carbon (OC) in sediments, thereby directly affecting global climate at multiple scales, but how they do it is far from understood. Here we show that manganese oxide (Mn oxide) in a water treatment works filter bed traps dissolved OC as coatings build up in layers around clean sand grains at 3%w/wC. Using spectroscopic and thermogravimetric methods, we identify two main OC fractions. One is thermally refractory (>550 °C) and the other is thermally more labile (<550 °C). We postulate that the thermal stability of the trapped OC is due to carboxylate groups within it bonding to Mn oxide surfaces coupled with physical entrapment within the layers. We identify a significant difference in the nature of the surface-bound OC and bulk OC . We speculate that polymerization reactions may be occurring at depth within the layers. We also propose that these processes must be considered in future studies of OC in natural systems. PMID:26194625

  3. Sulfur Dioxide Capture by Heterogeneous Oxidation on Hydroxylated Manganese Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haodong; Cai, Weimin; Long, Mingce; Wang, Hairui; Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Chen; Hu, Xiaofang; Yu, Xiaojuan

    2016-06-01

    Here we demonstrate that sulfur dioxide (SO2) is efficiently captured via heterogeneous oxidation into sulfate on the surface of hydroxylated manganese dioxide (MnO2). Lab-scale activity tests in a fluidized bed reactor showed that the removal efficiency for a simulated flue gas containing 5000 mg·Nm(-3) SO2 could reach nearly 100% with a GHSV (gas hourly space velocity) of 10000 h(-1). The mechanism was investigated using a combination of experimental characterizations and theoretical calculations. It was found that formation of surface bound sulfate proceeds via association of SO2 with terminal hydroxyls. Both H2O and O2 are essential for the generation of reactive terminal hydroxyls, and the indirect role of O2 in heterogeneous SO2 oxidation at low temperature was also revealed. We propose that the high reactivity of terminal hydroxyls is attributed to the proper surface configuration of MnO2 to adsorb water with degenerate energies for associative and dissociative states, and maintain rapid proton dynamics. Viability analyses suggest that the desulfurization method that is based on such a direct oxidation reaction at the gas/solid interface represents a promising approach for SO2 capture. PMID:27123922

  4. Metal oxide films on metal

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xin D.; Tiwari, Prabhat

    1995-01-01

    A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

  5. Understanding organic film behavior on alloy and metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Raman, Aparna; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Barriger, Lisa; Eastman, Rachel; Parsi, Arash; Gawalt, Ellen S

    2010-02-01

    Native oxide surfaces of stainless steel 316L and Nitinol alloys and their constituent metal oxides, namely nickel, chromium, molybdenum, manganese, iron, and titanium, were modified with long chain organic acids to better understand organic film formation. The adhesion and stability of films of octadecylphosphonic acid, octadecylhydroxamic acid, octadecylcarboxylic acid, and octadecylsulfonic acid on these substrates were examined in this study. The films formed on these surfaces were analyzed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. The effect of the acidity of the organic moiety and substrate composition on the film characteristics and stability is discussed. Interestingly, on the alloy surfaces, the presence of less reactive metal sites does not inhibit film formation. PMID:20039608

  6. Understanding Organic Film Behavior on Alloy and Metal Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Aparna; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Barriger, Lisa; Eastman, Rachel; Parsi, Arash

    2010-01-01

    Native oxide surfaces of stainless steel 316L and Nitinol alloys and their constituent metal oxides namely, nickel, chromium, molybdenum, manganese, iron and titanium were modified with long chain organic acids to better understand organic film formation. The adhesion and stability of films of octadecylphosphonic acid, octadecylhydroxamic acid, octadecylcarboxylic acid and octadecylsulfonic acid on these substrates was examined in this study. The films formed on these surfaces were analyzed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. The effect of the acidity of the organic moiety and substrate composition on the film characteristics and stability is discussed. Interestingly, on the alloy surfaces, the presence of less reactive metal sites does not inhibit film formation. PMID:20039608

  7. Electrochemical Deposition of Nanostructured Manganese Oxide on Carbon Cloth for Flexible High-Performance Supercapacitor Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zilong; Zhao, Xin; Ren, Jianli; Zhang, Junxian; Li, Yingzhi; Zhang, Qinghua

    2016-06-01

    Well-ordered manganese oxide (MnO2) arrays were directly grown on the treated carbon cloth (CC) though a simple electrochemical deposition method. The structures and the thickness of MnO2 film were controlled by tuning the deposition time. The morphologies and structures of MnO2 deposited on CC were examined by scanning electron microscopy, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. With appropriate reaction time, the MnO2/CC composite demonstrates a high specific capacitance of 291 mF/cm2 and a superior cycling stability at a current density of 0.2 mA/cm2. The specific capacitance shows a little improvement at the first 200 cycles and remains unchanged after continuous 2000 charge/discharge cycles. The MnO2 nanosheet arrays with high degree of ordering, combined with the flexible carbon cloth substrate can coffer great promise for supercapacitor applications. PMID:27427613

  8. Does manganese protect cultured human skin fibroblasts against oxidative injury by UVA, dithranol and hydrogen peroxide?

    PubMed

    Parat, M O; Richard, M J; Leccia, M T; Amblard, P; Favier, A; Beani, J C

    1995-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the mechanism of photoaging and carcinogenesis. Skin is endowed with antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutases (SOD): cytosolic copper zinc SOD and mitochondrial manganese SOD. The aim of our study was to estimate the protective effect of manganese against oxidative injury on cultured human skin fibroblasts. Dithranol, hydrogen peroxide and UV-A radiation (375 nm) were employed as oxidative stressors. The supply of manganese chloride produced an increase in cellular content of this element up to 24 fold without concomitant elevation of MnSOD activity. Nevertheless, manganese protects cells against two of the three ROS generating systems assessed, namely hydrogen peroxyde and UV-A. This protective effect depends on the concentration of manganese in the medium, 0.1 mM and 0.2 mM protect against UVA cytotoxicity, only 0.2 mM protects against H2O2 cytotoxicity. PMID:7493040

  9. Fabrication of MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide through an exfoliation/reassembling and oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiaqi; Liu, Zong-Huai; Qiao, Shanfeng; Ma, Xiangrong; Xu, Naicai

    MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide has been first fabricated by a delamination/reassembling process followed by oxidation reaction and then by heat treatment. The structural evolution of MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide has been characterized by XRD, SEM, DSC-GTA, IR and N 2 adsorption-desorption. MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide shows a relative high thermal stability and mesoporous characteristic. The layered structure with a basal spacing of 0.66 nm could be maintained up to 400 °C. The electrochemical properties of the synthesized MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide have been studied using cyclic voltammetry in a mild aqueous electrolyte. Sample MnO 2-BirMO (300 °C) shows good capacitive behavior and cycling stability, and the specific capacitance value is 206 F g -1.

  10. Sodium perxenate permits rapid oxidation of manganese for easy spectrophotometric determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bane, R. W.

    1967-01-01

    Sodium perxenate oxidizes manganese to permanganate almost instantaneously in dilute acid solution and without a catalyst. A solution is prepared by dissolving 200 mg of sodium perxenate in distilled water and diluting to 100 ml.

  11. Rapidly reversible redox transformation in nanophase manganese oxides at room temperature triggered by changes in hydration

    PubMed Central

    Birkner, Nancy; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Chemisorption of water onto anhydrous nanophase manganese oxide surfaces promotes rapidly reversible redox phase changes as confirmed by calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and titration for manganese average oxidation state. Surface reduction of bixbyite (Mn2O3) to hausmannite (Mn3O4) occurs in nanoparticles under conditions where no such reactions are seen or expected on grounds of bulk thermodynamics in coarse-grained materials. Additionally, transformation does not occur on nanosurfaces passivated by at least 2% coverage of what is likely an amorphous manganese oxide layer. The transformation is due to thermodynamic control arising from differences in surface energies of the two phases (Mn2O3 and Mn3O4) under wet and dry conditions. Such reversible and rapid transformation near room temperature may affect the behavior of manganese oxides in technological applications and in geologic and environmental settings. PMID:24733903

  12. Visible-Light-Driven Water Oxidation by a Molecular Manganese Vanadium Oxide Cluster.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Benjamin; Forster, Johannes; Goetz, McKenna K; Yücel, Duygu; Berger, Claudia; Jacob, Timo; Streb, Carsten

    2016-05-17

    Photosynthetic water oxidation in plants occurs at an inorganic calcium manganese oxo cluster, which is known as the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), in photosystem II. Herein, we report a synthetic OEC model based on a molecular manganese vanadium oxide cluster, [Mn4 V4 O17 (OAc)3 ](3-) . The compound is based on a [Mn4 O4 ](6+) cubane core, which catalyzes the homogeneous, visible-light-driven oxidation of water to molecular oxygen and is stabilized by a tripodal [V4 O13 ](6-) polyoxovanadate and three acetate ligands. When combined with the photosensitizer [Ru(bpy)3 ](2+) and the oxidant persulfate, visible-light-driven water oxidation with turnover numbers of approximately 1150 and turnover frequencies of about 1.75 s(-1) is observed. Electrochemical, mass-spectrometric, and spectroscopic studies provide insight into the cluster stability and reactivity. This compound could serve as a model for the molecular structure and reactivity of the OEC and for heterogeneous metal oxide water-oxidation catalysts. PMID:27062440

  13. Extracellular zinc competitively inhibits manganese uptake and compromises oxidative stress management in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Morey, Jacqueline R; Ween, Miranda P; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y; McEwan, Alastair G; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae requires manganese for colonization of the human host, but the underlying molecular basis for this requirement has not been elucidated. Recently, it was shown that zinc could compromise manganese uptake and that zinc levels increased during infection by S. pneumoniae in all the niches that it colonized. Here we show, by quantitative means, that extracellular zinc acts in a dose dependent manner to competitively inhibit manganese uptake by S. pneumoniae, with an EC50 of 30.2 µM for zinc in cation-defined media. By exploiting the ability to directly manipulate S. pneumoniae accumulation of manganese, we analyzed the connection between manganese and superoxide dismutase (SodA), a primary source of protection for S. pneumoniae against oxidative stress. We show that manganese starvation led to a decrease in sodA transcription indicating that expression of sodA was regulated through an unknown manganese responsive pathway. Intriguingly, examination of recombinant SodA revealed that the enzyme was potentially a cambialistic superoxide dismutase with an iron/manganese cofactor. SodA was also shown to provide the majority of protection against oxidative stress as a S. pneumoniae ΔsodA mutant strain was found to be hypersensitive to oxidative stress, despite having wild-type manganese levels, indicating that the metal ion alone was not sufficiently protective. Collectively, these results provide a quantitative assessment of the competitive effect of zinc upon manganese uptake and provide a molecular basis for how extracellular zinc exerts a 'toxic' effect on bacterial pathogens, such as S. pneumoniae. PMID:24558498

  14. Extracellular Zinc Competitively Inhibits Manganese Uptake and Compromises Oxidative Stress Management in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Morey, Jacqueline R.; Ween, Miranda P.; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Paton, James C.; McDevitt, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae requires manganese for colonization of the human host, but the underlying molecular basis for this requirement has not been elucidated. Recently, it was shown that zinc could compromise manganese uptake and that zinc levels increased during infection by S. pneumoniae in all the niches that it colonized. Here we show, by quantitative means, that extracellular zinc acts in a dose dependent manner to competitively inhibit manganese uptake by S. pneumoniae, with an EC50 of 30.2 µM for zinc in cation-defined media. By exploiting the ability to directly manipulate S. pneumoniae accumulation of manganese, we analyzed the connection between manganese and superoxide dismutase (SodA), a primary source of protection for S. pneumoniae against oxidative stress. We show that manganese starvation led to a decrease in sodA transcription indicating that expression of sodA was regulated through an unknown manganese responsive pathway. Intriguingly, examination of recombinant SodA revealed that the enzyme was potentially a cambialistic superoxide dismutase with an iron/manganese cofactor. SodA was also shown to provide the majority of protection against oxidative stress as a S. pneumoniae ΔsodA mutant strain was found to be hypersensitive to oxidative stress, despite having wild-type manganese levels, indicating that the metal ion alone was not sufficiently protective. Collectively, these results provide a quantitative assessment of the competitive effect of zinc upon manganese uptake and provide a molecular basis for how extracellular zinc exerts a ‘toxic’ effect on bacterial pathogens, such as S. pneumoniae. PMID:24558498

  15. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Yu, Yingchun

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 {mu}M Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs and PGE{sub 2} in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  16. Surface characteristics and in vitro biocompatibility of a manganese-containing titanium oxide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Youn-Jeong; Jang, Je-Hee

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the surface characteristics and in vitro biocompatibility of a titanium (Ti) oxide layer incorporating the manganese ions (Mn) obtained by hydrothermal treatment with the expectation of utilizing potent integrin-ligand binding enhancement effect of Mn for future applications as an endosseous implant surface. The surface characteristics were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, thin-film X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical profilometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The in vitro biocompatibility of the Mn-containing Ti oxide surface was evaluated in comparison with untreated bare Ti using a mouse calvaria-derived osteoblastic cell line (MC3T3-E1). The hydrothermal treatment produced a nanostructured Mn-incorporated Ti oxide layer approximately 0.6 μm thick. ICP-AES analysis demonstrated that the Mn ions were released from the hydrothermally treated surface into the solution. Mn incorporation notably decreased cellular attachment, spreading, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteoblast phenotype gene expression compared with the bare Ti surface (p < 0.05). The results indicate that the Mn-incorporation into the surface Ti oxide layer has no evident beneficial effects on osteoblastic cell function, but instead, actually impaired cell behavior.

  17. Visible and near-infrared spectra of manganese oxides: Detecting high manganese phases in Curiosity Mastcam multispectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C. J.; Lanza, N.; Bell, J. F., III; Wiens, R. C.; Johnson, J. R.; Morris, R. V.

    2014-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover's Chemcam instrument has identified manganese in relatively high abundance on several rock surfaces. The manganese abundances are several orders of magnitude greater than has been previously identified on Mars, indicating the presence of a manganese-rich phase. Although the specific phase has yet to be identified, these results suggest that the martian surface may have been much more highly oxidizing than has previously been recognized. The presence of a manganese-rich phase could provide an additional indicator of habitable aqueous environments. Given the importance of manganese for understanding past habitability, and the high abundances identified with Chemcam, we investigate the utility of using Mastcam multispectral imaging surveys to identify areas for subsequent detailed analysis with Chemcam. Vempati et al. showed that Mn3+ affect the reflectance spectra of Mn-bearing minerals. Specifically, relatively weak features due to electronic transitions and crystal field effects are observed in Mn-enriched hematites and geothites at 454, 554, 596 and 700 nm. The Mastcam-34 medium angle camera has filter band-passes at 550, 675 and 750nm, and we will explore the utility of using these bands (or combinations thereof) to determine if there is a contribution of Mn-bearing phases on spectra, specifically those that have been identified as having elevated Mn with Chemcam. The most common Mn-bearing mineral phase in terrestrial varnishes, Birnessite, has charge-transfer features that are similar to Fe-oxides but are centered at slightly longer wavelength band positions. Longer wavelength features are also common for other Mn-oxides, and this could be used to distinguish these phases from other Fe-oxide components. In this study we will present visible to near-infrared (0.4 - 3 µm) reflectance spectra on a suite of Mn-oxide laboratory standards. The set of standards includes Mn-oxide abundances that vary from less than 1 up to

  18. Photosynthetic water oxidation: insights from manganese model chemistry.

    PubMed

    Young, Karin J; Brennan, Bradley J; Tagore, Ranitendranath; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-03-17

    Catalysts for light-driven water oxidation are a critical component for development of solar fuels technology. The multielectron redox chemistry required for this process has been successfully deployed on a global scale in natural photosynthesis by green plants and cyanobacteria using photosystem II (PSII). PSII employs a conserved, cuboidal Mn4CaOX cluster called the O2-evolving complex (OEC) that offers inspiration for artificial O2-evolution catalysts. In this Account, we describe our work on manganese model chemistry relevant to PSII, particularly the functional model [Mn(III/IV)2(terpy)2(μ-O)2(OH2)2](NO3)3 complex (terpy = 2,2';6',2″-terpyridine), a mixed-valent di-μ-oxo Mn dimer with two terminal aqua ligands. In the presence of oxo-donor oxidants such as HSO5(-), this complex evolves O2 by two pathways, one of which incorporates solvent water in an O-O bond-forming reaction. Deactivation pathways of this catalyst include comproportionation to form an inactive Mn(IV)Mn(IV) dimer and also degradation to MnO2, a consequence of ligand loss when the oxidation state of the complex is reduced to labile Mn(II) upon release of O2. The catalyst's versatility has been shown by its continued catalytic activity after direct binding to the semiconductor titanium dioxide. In addition, after binding to the surface of TiO2 via a chromophoric linker, the catalyst can be oxidized by a photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism, mimicking the natural PSII process. Model oxomanganese complexes have also aided in interpreting biophysical and computational studies on PSII. In particular, the μ-oxo exchange rates of the Mn-terpy dimer have been instrumental in establishing that the time scale for μ-oxo exchange of high-valent oxomanganese complexes with terminal water ligands is slower than O2 evolution in the natural photosynthetic system. Furthermore, computational studies on the Mn-terpy dimer and the OEC point to similar Mn(IV)-oxyl intermediates in the O-O bond

  19. Mercury removal from waste gases by manganese oxide acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S.; Bertuccio, N.; Antonucci, P.; Giordano, N.

    1982-02-01

    Removal of mercury vapor from a waste gas has been investigated at atmospheric pressure and at ambient temperature using a series of manganese-based reagents supported on an inert medium. The effect of catalyst composition on activity and the influence of relative humidity of the air stream have been studied. Whereas ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has a very low mercury sorption capacity, sorption occurs copiously on impregnated silver- and copper-doped MnO/sub 2/ acceptors but the much higher activity is reduced by the presence of water vapour in the carrier gas. The morphological and microstructural characterization of the (MnO/sub 2/, AgNO/sub 3/) ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ reagents has shown selective deposition of AgNO/sub 3/ particles on ..beta..-MnO/sub 2/ crystallites which are dispersed on the ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ matrix. As the adsorption is associated with a sequence of specific colour changes a chemical oxidation mechanism is proposed. Acceptor deactivation is discussed. 9 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Effects of FeS on Chromium Oxidation Mediated by Manganese Oxidizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Youxian; Deng, Baolin

    2004-03-31

    Reductive immobilization of Cr(VI) has been widely explored as a cost-effective approach for Cr-contaminated site remediation. The long-term stability of the immobilized Cr(III), however, is a concern. Cr(III) is known to be oxidized by Mn oxides chemically and Mn-oxides could be produced through microbially mediated Mn(II) oxidation. This study examined the effect of FeS on Cr(III) oxidation mediated by Pseudomonas putida. The results showed that commercial granular FeS did not affect Cr(III) oxidation in the culture of P. putida with Mn(II), but freshly precipitated FeS slurry inhibited Cr(III) oxidation. A 10 mg/l of FeS did not inhibit the microbial growth, but delayed the production of Mn oxides, thus postponing potential Cr(III) oxidation. In the presence of excessive FeS slurry, both Cr(VI) and Mn oxides were reduced rapidly. The reduced Cr(III) could not be re-oxidized as long as freshly formed FeS was present, even in the presence of the manganese oxidizers.

  1. Study of a QCM dimethyl methylphosphonate sensor based on a ZnO-modified nanowire-structured manganese dioxide film.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhifu; Ma, Xingfa; Ding, Pengfei; Zhang, Wuming; Luo, Zhiyuan; Li, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive, selective and fast detection of chemical warfare agents is necessary for anti-terrorism purposes. In our search for functional materials sensitive to dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of sarin and other toxic organophosphorus compounds, we found that zinc oxide (ZnO) modification potentially enhances the absorption of DMMP on a manganese dioxide (MnO(2)) surface. The adsorption behavior of DMMP was evaluated through the detection of tiny organophosphonate compounds with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensors coated with ZnO-modified MnO(2) nanofibers and pure MnO(2) nanofibers. Experimental results indicated that the QCM sensor coated with ZnO-modified nanostructured MnO(2) film exhibited much higher sensitivity and better selectivity in comparison with the one coated with pure MnO(2) nanofiber film. Therefore, the DMMP sensor developed with this composite nanostructured material should possess excellent selectivity and reasonable sensitivity towards the tiny gaseous DMMP species. PMID:22163653

  2. Study of a QCM Dimethyl Methylphosphonate Sensor Based on a ZnO-Modified Nanowire-Structured Manganese Dioxide Film

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zhifu; Ma, Xingfa; Ding, Pengfei; Zhang, Wuming; Luo, Zhiyuan; Li, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive, selective and fast detection of chemical warfare agents is necessary for anti-terrorism purposes. In our search for functional materials sensitive to dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of sarin and other toxic organophosphorus compounds, we found that zinc oxide (ZnO) modification potentially enhances the absorption of DMMP on a manganese dioxide (MnO2) surface. The adsorption behavior of DMMP was evaluated through the detection of tiny organophosphonate compounds with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensors coated with ZnO-modified MnO2 nanofibers and pure MnO2 nanofibers. Experimental results indicated that the QCM sensor coated with ZnO-modified nanostructured MnO2 film exhibited much higher sensitivity and better selectivity in comparison with the one coated with pure MnO2 nanofiber film. Therefore, the DMMP sensor developed with this composite nanostructured material should possess excellent selectivity and reasonable sensitivity towards the tiny gaseous DMMP species. PMID:22163653

  3. Room-Temperature Oxidation of Formaldehyde by Layered Manganese Oxide: Effect of Water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Pengyi; Li, Jinge; Jiang, Chuanjia; Yunus, Rizwangul; Kim, Jeonghyun

    2015-10-20

    Layered manganese oxide, i.e., birnessite was prepared via the reaction of potassium permanganate with ammonium oxalate. The water content in the birnessite was adjusted by drying/calcining the samples at various temperatures (30 °C, 100 °C, 200 °C, 300 °C, and 500 °C). Thermogravimetry-mass spectroscopy showed three types of water released from birnessite, which can be ascribed to physically adsorbed H2O, interlayer H2O and hydroxyl, respectively. The activity of birnessite for formaldehyde oxidation was positively associated with its water content, i.e., the higher the water content, the better activity it has. In-situ DRIFTS and step scanning XRD analysis indicate that adsorbed formaldehyde, which is promoted by bonded water via hydrogen bonding, is transformed into formate and carbonate with the consumption of hydroxyl and bonded water. Both bonded water and water in air can compensate the consumed hydroxyl groups to sustain the mineralization of formaldehyde at room temperature. In addition, water in air stimulates the desorption of carbonate via water competitive adsorption, and accordingly the birnessite recovers its activity. This investigation elucidated the role of water in oxidizing formaldehyde by layered manganese oxides at room temperature, which may be helpful for the development of more efficient materials. PMID:26426569

  4. Effect of oxide formation mechanisms on lead adsorption by biogenic manganese (hydr)oxides, iron (hydr)oxides, and their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Yarrow M; Lion, Leonard W; Shuler, Michael L; Ghiorse, William C

    2002-02-01

    The effects of iron and manganese (hydr)oxide formation processes on the trace metal adsorption properties of these metal (hydr)oxides and their mixtures was investigated by measuring lead adsorption by iron and manganese (hydr)oxides prepared by a variety of methods. Amorphous iron (hydr)oxide formed by fast precipitation at pH 7.5 exhibited greater Pb adsorption (gamma(max) = 50 mmol of Pb/mol of Fe at pH 6.0) than iron (hydr)oxide formed by slow, diffusion-controlled oxidation of Fe(II) at pH 4.5-7.0 or goethite. Biogenic manganese(III/IV) (hydr)oxide prepared by enzymatic oxidation of Mn(II) by the bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS-1 adsorbed five times more Pb (per mole of Mn) than an abiotic manganese (hydr)oxide prepared by oxidation of Mn(II) with permanganate, and 500-5000 times more Pb than pyrolusite oxides (betaMnO2). X-ray crystallography indicated that biogenic manganese (hydr)oxide and iron (hydr)oxide were predominantly amorphous or poorly crystalline and their X-ray diffraction patterns were not significantly affected by the presence of the other (hydr)oxide during formation. When iron and manganese (hydr)oxides were mixed after formation, or for Mn biologically oxidized with iron(III) (hydr)oxide present, observed Pb adsorption was similar to that expected for the mixture based on Langmuir parameters for the individual (hydr)oxides. These results indicate that interactions in iron/manganese (hydr)oxide mixtures related to the formation process and sequence of formation such as site masking, alterations in specific surface area, or changes in crystalline structure either did not occur or had a negligible effect on Pb adsorption by the mixtures. PMID:11871557

  5. Manganese-oxidizing bacteria mediate the degradation of 17α-ethinylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Sabirova, Julia S; Cloetens, L F F; Vanhaecke, L; Forrez, I; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, N

    2008-11-01

    Manganese (II) and manganese-oxidizing bacteria were used as an efficient biological system for the degradation of the xenoestrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at trace concentrations. Mn(2+)-derived higher oxidation states of Mn (Mn(3+), Mn(4+)) by Mn(2+)-oxidizing bacteria mediate the oxidative cleavage of the polycyclic target compound EE2. The presence of manganese (II) was found to be essential for the degradation of EE2 by Leptothrix discophora, Pseudomonas putida MB1, P. putida MB6 and P. putida MB29. Mn(2+)-dependent degradation of EE2 was found to be a slow process, which requires multi-fold excess of Mn(2+) and occurs in the late stationary phase of growth, implying a chemical process taking place. EE2-derived degradation products were shown to no longer exhibit undesirable estrogenic activity. PMID:21261871

  6. Catalytic role of Manganese oxides in prebiotic Nucleobases synthesis from Formamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Brij

    2012-07-01

    The evolution of living cell from chemicals is more complicated reaction which could be studied in multistep. A study of prebiotic synthesis of naturally occurring purine and pyrimidine derivatives from formamide under catalytic condition with different oxides of manganese reveals a significant role. Manganese oxides are highly efficient in the conversion of formamide into different nucleobases. Neat formamide is converted to the purine, 9-(hydroxyacetyl) purine, cytosine, 4(3H)-pyrimidinone, thymine and adenine in good yield. Metal oxides have provided their surfaces and catalyzed the reactions from simple molecules to more complex bio-organic molecules. Our results show that probably prebiotic reactions might have occured on the sea floor where the existence of manganese oxide is second to iron transition metal minerals.

  7. Microbial oxidation and reduction of manganese: consequences in groundwater and applications.

    PubMed

    Gounot, A M

    1994-08-01

    In the natural environment, manganese is found as reduced soluble or adsorbed Mn(II) and insoluble Mn(III) and Mn(IV) oxides. Mn oxidation has been reported in various microorganisms. Several possible pathways, indirect or direct, have been proposed. A wider variety of Mn-reducing microorganisms, from highly aerobic to strictly anaerobic, has been described. The mechanisms of Mn reduction can be either an indirect process resulting from interactions with organic or inorganic compounds, or a direct enzymatic (electron-transfer) reaction. The role of microorganisms in Mn cycle is now well demonstrated by various methods in superficial natural environments, and research has been initiated on subsurface sediments. Observations in vivo (Rhône valley) and under in vitro suggested that bacterial activities are the main processes that promote manganese evolution and migration in shallow aquifers. After the building of hydroelectric dams, the stream of the Rhône was modified, giving rise to mud deposition on the bank. In the mud, bacteria are stimulated by the high organic content and consume oxygen. The redox potential drops. The manganese oxides previously formed under aerobic conditions are reduced and soluble manganese (Mn(II)) migrates into the aquifer. If the subsurface sediments are coarse-grained, the aquifer is well aerated, allowing the re-oxidation of Mn(II) by the oligotrophic attached bacteria in aquifer sediments. If the aquifer is confined, aeration is not sufficient for Mn-reoxidation. Mn(II) remains in a reduced state and migrates to the wells. Furthermore, the presence of organic matter in subsurface sediments results in the reduction of previously formed Mn oxides. Pseudo-amorphous manganese oxides, which were probably recently formed by bacteria, are more readily reduced than old crystalline manganese oxides. Although the concentrations of soluble manganese found in groundwaters are not toxic, it still is a problem since its oxidation results in

  8. Electrocatalytic oxidation of dopamine based on non-covalent functionalization of manganese tetraphenylporphyrin/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Sakthinathan, Subramanian; Lee, Hsin Fang; Chen, Shen-Ming; Tamizhdurai, P

    2016-04-15

    In the present work, a reduced graphene oxide (RGO) supported manganese tetraphenylporphyrin (Mn-TPP) nanocomposite was electrochemically synthesized and used for the highly selective and sensitive detection of dopamine (DA). The nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy and elemental analysis were confirmed the successful formation of RGO/Mn-TPP nanocomposite. The prepared RGO/Mn-TPP nanocomposite modified electrode exhibited an enhanced electrochemical response to DA with less oxidation potential and enhanced response current. The electrochemical studies revealed that the oxidation of the DA at the composite electrode is a surface controlled process. The cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and amperometry methods were enable to detect DA. The working linear range of the electrode was observed from 0.3 to 188.8 μM, limit of detection was 8 nM and the sensitivity was 2.606 μA μM(-1) cm(-2). Here, the positively charged DA and negatively charged porphyrin modified RGO can accelerate the electrocatalysis of DA via electrostatic attraction, while the negatively charged ascorbic acid (AA) repulsed by the negatively charged electrode surface which supported for good selectivity. The good recovery results obtained for the determination of DA present in DA injection samples and human pathological sample further revealed the good practicality of RGO/Mn-TPP nanocomposite film modified electrode. PMID:26835582

  9. In-situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) Investigation of a Bifunctional Manganese Oxide Catalyst with High Activity for Electrochemical Water Oxidation and Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Benck, Jesse D.; Gul, Sheraz; Webb, Samuel M.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    In-situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a powerful technique that can be applied to electrochemical systems, with the ability to elucidate the chemical nature of electrocatalysts under reaction conditions. In this study, we perform in-situ XAS measurements on a bifunctional manganese oxide (MnOx) catalyst with high electrochemical activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), we find that exposure to an ORR-relevant potential of 0.7 V vs. RHE produces a disordered Mn3II,III,IIIO4 phase with negligible contributions from other phases. After the potential is increased to a highly anodic value of 1.8 V vs. RHE, relevant to the OER, we observe an oxidation of approximately 80% of the catalytic thin film to form a mixed MnIII,IV oxide, while the remaining 20% of the film consists of a less oxidized phase, likely corresponding to unchanged Mn3II,III,IIIO4. XAS and electrochemical characterization of two thin film catalysts with different MnOx thicknesses reveals no significant influence of thickness on the measured oxidation states, at either ORR or OER potentials, but demonstrates that the OER activity scales with film thickness. This result suggests that the films have porous structure, which does not restrict electrocatalysis to the top geometric layer of the film. As the portion of the catalyst film that is most likely to be oxidized at the high potentials necessary for the OER is that which is closest to the electrolyte interface, we hypothesize that the MnIII,IV oxide, rather than Mn3II,III,IIIO4, is the phase pertinent to the observed OER activity. PMID:23758050

  10. Manganese Compounds as Water-Oxidizing Catalysts: From the Natural Water-Oxidizing Complex to Nanosized Manganese Oxide Structures.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Renger, Gernot; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Moghaddam, Atefeh Nemati; Aro, Eva-Mari; Carpentier, Robert; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2016-03-01

    All cyanobacteria, algae, and plants use a similar water-oxidizing catalyst for water oxidation. This catalyst is housed in Photosystem II, a membrane-protein complex that functions as a light-driven water oxidase in oxygenic photosynthesis. Water oxidation is also an important reaction in artificial photosynthesis because it has the potential to provide cheap electrons from water for hydrogen production or for the reduction of carbon dioxide on an industrial scale. The water-oxidizing complex of Photosystem II is a Mn-Ca cluster that oxidizes water with a low overpotential and high turnover frequency number of up to 25-90 molecules of O2 released per second. In this Review, we discuss the atomic structure of the Mn-Ca cluster of the Photosystem II water-oxidizing complex from the viewpoint that the underlying mechanism can be informative when designing artificial water-oxidizing catalysts. This is followed by consideration of functional Mn-based model complexes for water oxidation and the issue of Mn complexes decomposing to Mn oxide. We then provide a detailed assessment of the chemistry of Mn oxides by considering how their bulk and nanoscale properties contribute to their effectiveness as water-oxidizing catalysts. PMID:26812090

  11. Studies of layered and pillared manganese oxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying

    Synthetic Birnessite, an octahedral layered manganese oxide material called OL-1 was synthesized with Na+, K+, Na +/Mg2+, K+/Mg2+, Na +/K+ ions as interlayer cations by redox reactions between permanganate and alcohols in a strong basic media. Chromia pillared OL-1s were prepared under reflux conditions using trinuclear chromium hydroxyl acetate as a pillaring agent followed by calcination in a N2 atmosphere at 200°C. Vanadium oxide pillared OL-1s were obtained by intercalating neutral vanadyl acetylacetonate (VOacac) or vanadium acetylacetonate (Vacac) into the interlayer of OL-1 and subsequently calcining in air at 300°C. The synthesis procedures were monitored using X-ray diffraction studies. The resultant materials were characterized by XRD, X-ray absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectra, FTIR, UV-VIS, inductively coupled plasma, transmission electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, potentiometric titration, thermal analyses, TPD measurements, BET surface area and pore size distribution measurements. OL-1 materials prepared using this alcohol route showed enhanced thermal stabilities and increased Mg accommodation compared to OL-1s prepared with other methods. Based on the analysis methods developed here, Na-OL-1 exhibited recoverable and reversible structural and surface O2 oxygen species while K-OL-1 showed higher stability. Na-OL-1 had predominantly Bronsted acid sites resulting from OH groups bonded to Mn on Na-OL-1 surfaces, while the Na/Mg-OL-1 had mainly Lewis acid sites. Large porosity was obtained in chromia pillared OL-1 materials with a narrow pore size distribution centered around 18 A. Although these materials remained "amorphous" as determined by XRD after calcination, TEM morphology studies suggest that the materials were still layered. EXAFS studies indicated the formation of Cr-O-Mn bonds in the resultant materials via comer-shared linkages of CrO6 and MnO6 octahedra. Good crystallinity in

  12. Determination of uranyl incorporation into biogenic manganese oxides using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scattering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, S.M.; Fuller, C.C.; Tebo, B.M.; Bargar, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides are common and an important source of reactive mineral surfaces in the environment that may be potentially enhanced in bioremediation cases to improve natural attenuation. Experiments were performed in which the uranyl ion, UO22+ (U(VI)), at various concentrations was present during manganese oxide biogenesis. At all concentrations, there was strong uptake of U onto the oxides. Synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to determine the molecular-scale mechanism by which uranyl is incorporated into the oxide and how this incorporation affects the resulting manganese oxide structure and mineralogy. The EXAFS experiments show that at low concentrations (2 mol % U, >4 ??M U(VI) in solution), the presence of U(VI) affects the stability and structure of the Mn oxide to form poorly ordered Mn oxide tunnel structures, similar to todorokite. EXAFS modeling shows that uranyl is present in these oxides predominantly in the tunnels of the Mn oxide structure in a tridentate complex. Observations by XRD corroborate these results. Structural incorporation may lead to more stable U(VI) sequestration that may be suitable for remediation uses. These observations, combined with the very high uptake capacity of the Mn oxides, imply that Mn-oxidizing bacteria may significantly influence dissolved U(VI) concentrations in impacted waters via sorption and incorporation into Mn oxide biominerals. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  13. Ethanedithiol-treated manganese oxide nanoparticles for rapidly responsive and transparent supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Ilhwan; Kim, Green; Park, Dasom; Yim, Sanggyu

    2015-11-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) provide a large surface area and short diffusion pathways for ions in supercapacitor electrode materials. However, binders and conductive additives used for tight connections with current collectors and improved conductivity hamper these benefits. In this work, we successfully fix manganese oxide (Mn3O4) NPs onto ITO current collectors by a simple 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) treatment without using any binders or conductive additives. As compared to the electrode fabricated using binder-mixed Mn3O4 NPs, the EDT-treated electrode shows significantly improved specific capacitance of 403 F g-1 at a scan rate of 10 mV s-1. The EDT-treatment is more effective at higher scan rates. The specific capacitances, 278 F g-1 at 100 mV s-1 and 202 F g-1 at 200 mV s-1, are larger than those reported so far at scan rates ≥100 mV s-1. The deconvolution of capacitive elements indicates that these improved capacitive properties are attributed to large insertion elements of the binder-free NP electrodes. Furthermore, this additive-free electrode is highly transparent and can be easily fabricated by simple spray-coating on various substrates including polymer films, implying that this new method is promising for the fabrication of large-area, transparent and flexible electrodes for next-generation supercapacitors.

  14. Effect of additives on electrochemical performance of lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyoung Seok; Choi, Suneui; Song, JunHo; Woo, Sang-Gil; Jo, Yong Nam; Choi, Jungkyu; Yim, Taeeun; Yu, Ji-Sang; Kim, Young-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Lithium-nickel-cobalt-manganese oxide, Li[NixCoyMnz]O2 (NCM) is a low-cost cathode material with a high capacity and a moderately high rate capability, however, it still suffers from poor electrochemical performance. In this study, several types of additives are attempted to enhance the surface stability of high-Ni-content (Ni ≥ 60%) cathodes and the most effective additive turns out to be PS. The cycle performance in the presence of 2% PS is much improved at a high temperature of 60 °C: (1) 98.9% of its initial capacity is preserved, (2) the increase in thickness is only 17.9%, preventing undesired swellings, and (3) gases are not generated in large amounts with the internal pressure being 56.4 kPa. The FT-IR spectroscopy results suggest that the surface of the cathode in the presence of 2% PS is covered with a film of alkyl sulfone components (RSOSR and RSO2SR), which is possibly formed by the electrochemical oxidation of PS. The current results confirm that the electrochemical performance of Ni-rich cathodes can be improved via the appropriate use of additives. They also indicate that among the tested additive candidates in this study, PS is highly desirable for enhancing the electrochemical performance of Ni-rich cathodes.

  15. Sol-gel synthesis and adsorption properties of mesoporous manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanets, A. I.; Kuznetsova, T. F.; Prozorovich, V. G.

    2015-03-01

    Sol-gel synthesis of mesoporous xerogels of manganese oxide with different phase compositions has been performed. The manganese oxide sols were obtained by redox reactions of potassium permanganate with hydrogen peroxide or manganese(II) chloride in aqueous solutions. The isotherms of the low-temperature adsorption-desorption of nitrogen with manganese oxide xerogels treated at 80, 200, 400, and 600°C were measured. The samples were studied by electron microscopy and thermal and XRD analysis. The phase transformation and the changes in the adsorption and capillary-condensation properties of manganese oxide were shown to depend on the sol synthesis conditions and the temperature of the thermal treatment of the gel. The X-ray amorphous samples heated at 80°C were shown to have low values of the specific surface; at higher temperatures, the xerogel crystallized into mixed phases with various compositions and its surface area increased at 200-400°C and decreased at 600°C.

  16. Catalytic ozonation of sulfosalicylic acid over manganese oxide supported on mesoporous ceria.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shengtao; Lu, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Lin; Ma, Zichuan; Wu, Yinsu

    2016-02-01

    Manganese oxide supported on mesoporous ceria was prepared and used as catalyst for catalytic ozonation of sulfosalicylic acid (SA). Characterization results indicated that the manganese oxide was mostly incorporated into the pores of ceria. The synthesized catalyst exhibited high activity and stability for the mineralization of SA in aqueous solution by ozone, and more than 95% of total organic carbon was removed in 30 min under various conditions. Mechanism studies indicated that SA was mainly degraded by ozone molecules, and hydroxyl radical reaction played an important role for the degradation of its ozonation products (small molecular organic acids). The manganese oxide in the pores of CeO2 improved the adsorption of small molecular organic acids and the generation of hydroxyl radicals from ozone decomposition, resulting in high TOC removal efficiency. PMID:26344143

  17. Sorption of lead ions on diatomite and manganese oxides modified diatomite.

    PubMed

    Al-Degs, Y; Khraisheh, M A; Tutunji, M F

    2001-10-01

    Naturally occurring diatomaceous earth (diatomite) has been tested as a potential sorbent for Pb(II) ions. The intrinsic exchange properties were further improved by modification with manganese oxides. Modified adsorbent (referred to as Mn-diatomite) showed a higher tendency for adsorbing lead ions from solution at pH 4. The high performance exhibited by Mn-diatomite was attributed to increased surface area and higher negative surface charge after modification. Scanning electron microscope pictures revealed a birnessite structure of manganese oxides, which was featured by a plate-like-crystal structure. Diatomite filtration quality was improved after modification by manganese oxides. Good filtration qualities combined with high exchange capacity emphasised the potential use of Mn-diatomite in filtration systems. PMID:11561635

  18. Electrochemically formed 3D hierarchical thin films of cobalt-manganese (Co-Mn) hexacyanoferrate hybrids for electrochemical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam Venugopal, Narendra Kumar; Joseph, James

    2016-02-01

    Here we report the feasibility of forming 3D nanostructured hexacyanoferates of Cobalt and Manganese (Co-MnHCF) on GC surface by a facile electrochemical method. This 3D architecture on glassy carbon electrode characterised systematically by voltammetry and other physical characterisation techniques like Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) etc,. Electrochemical Quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) studies helped out to calculate the total mass change during Co-MnHCF formation. Electrochemical studies reveal that the formal redox potentials of both Co and MnHCF films remained close to that of newly formed Co-MnHCF hybrid films. These 3D modified films were successfully applied for two different electrochemical applications i) For pseudocapacitor studies in KNO3 medium ii) Investigated the electrocatalytic behaviour of redox film towards water oxidation reaction in alkaline medium. Electrochemical performances of newly formed Co-MnHCF are compared with their individual transition metal (Co, Mn) hexacyanoferrates. The resulting material shows a specific capacitance of 350 F g-1 through its fast reversible redox reaction of electrochemically formed Co-MnHCF modified film. Interestingly we showed the overpotential of 450 mV (from its thermodynamic voltage 1.2 V) to attain its optimum current density of 10 mA cm-2 for O2 evolution in alkaline medium.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of a Layered Manganese Oxide: Materials Chemistry for the Inorganic or Instrumental Methods Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Stanton; Neupane, Ram P.; Gray, Timothy P.

    2006-01-01

    A three-week laboratory project involving synthesis and characterization of a layered manganese oxide provides an excellent vehicle for teaching important concepts of inorganic chemistry and instrumental methods related to non-molecular systems. Na-birnessite is an easily prepared manganese oxide with a 7 A interlayer spacing and Na[superscript +]…

  20. Microcolumn studies of dye adsorption onto manganese oxides modified diatomite.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghouti, M A; Khraisheh, M A M; Ahmad, M N; Allen, S J

    2007-07-19

    The method described here cannot fully replace the analysis of large columns by small test columns (microcolumns). The procedure, however, is suitable for speeding up the determination of adsorption parameters of dye onto the adsorbent and for speeding up the initial screening of a large adsorbent collection that can be tedious if a several adsorbents and adsorption conditions must be tested. The performance of methylene blue (MB), a basic dye, Cibacron reactive black (RB) and Cibacron reactive yellow (RY) was predicted in this way and the influence of initial dye concentration and other adsorption conditions on the adsorption behaviour were demonstrated. On the basis of the experimental results, it can be concluded that the adsorption of RY onto manganese oxides modified diatomite (MOMD) exhibited a characteristic "S" shape and can be simulated effectively by the Thomas model. It is shown that the adsorption capacity increased as the initial dye concentration increased. The increase in the dye uptake capacity with the increase of the adsorbent mass in the column was due to the increase in the surface area of adsorbent, which provided more binding sites for the adsorption. It is shown that the use of high flow rates reduced the time that RY in the solution is in contact with the MOMD, thus allowing less time for adsorption to occur, leading to an early breakthrough of RY. A rapid decrease in the column adsorption capacity with an increase in particle size with an average 56% reduction in capacity resulting from an increase in the particle size from 106-250 microm to 250-500 microm. The experimental data correlated well with calculated data using the Thomas equation and the bed depth-service time (BDST) equation. Therefore, it might be concluded that the Thomas equation and the BDST equations can produce accurate predication for variation of dye concentration, mass of the adsorbent, flow rate and particle size. In general, the values of adsorption isotherm capacity

  1. The oxidation of iron-chromium-manganese alloys at 900C

    SciTech Connect

    Marasco, A.L.; Young, D.J. )

    1991-08-01

    The oxidation of nine ternary iron-chromium-manganese alloys was studied at 900C in an oxygen partial pressure of 26.7 kPa. The manganese concentration was set at 2, 6, and 10 wt.%, and chromium at 5, 12, and 20 wt.%. The scales formed on the low-chromium alloys consisted of (Mn,Fe){sub 2}O{sub 3}, {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. These alloys all exhibited internal oxidation and scale detachment upon cooling. The scales formed on the higher-chromium alloys were complicated by nodule formation. Initially, these scales had an outer layer of MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} underneath, adjacent to the alloy. With the passage of time, however, nodules formed, and the overall reaction rate increased. This tendency was more marked at higher manganese contents. Although these alloys contained a high chromium content, the product chromia scale usually contained manganese. It was concluded that the presence of manganese in iron-chromium alloys had an adverse effect on the oxidation resistance over a wide range of chromium levels.

  2. Oxidation and dechlorination of chlorophenols in dilute aqueous suspensions of manganese oxides: Reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Ukrainczyk, L.; McBride, M.B. . Dept.of Soil, Crop, and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-11-01

    Some monomeric and dimeric oxidation products of para- and/or ortho-chlorinated phenols in dilute (1 mmol/L phenol), acidified, aqueous suspensions of manganese oxide (Na-buserite) were identified by MS, Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy and UV/visible spectroscopy. The para-chlorinated phenols (4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 4-chloro-2-methylphenol) gave corresponding p-benzoquionones (benzoquinone, 2-chlorobenzoquinone, 2,6-dichlorobenzoquinone, 2-methylbenzoquinone) as the detectable water-soluble oxidation products. Dimeric products were present in the extracts obtained by washing the oxide with methylene chloride. Michael addition of phenolate to quinone seems to be the predominant mode of coupling. Chlorinated phenols without chlorine in the para-position (2-chlorophenol, 2,6-dichlorophenol) were more difficult to oxidize and afforded diphenoquinones as the only detectable water-soluble products. For all studied phenols, with the exception of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, the amount of water-soluble products accounts only for a small fraction of oxidized phenol. The quinone and diphenoquinone products readily couple with phenols into humus like materials.

  3. Processes of nickel and cobalt uptake by a manganese oxide forming sediment in Pinal Creek, Globe mining district, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, J.T.; Conklin, M.H.; Fuller, C.C.; O'Day, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of column experiments was conducted using manganese oxide coated sediments collected from the hyporheic zone in Pinal Creek (AZ), a metal-contaminated stream, to study the uptake and retention of Mn, Ni, and Co. Experimental variables included the absence (abiotic) and presence (biotic) of active Mn-oxidizing bacteria, the absence and presence of dissolved Mn, and sediment manganese oxide content. Uptake of Mn under biotic conditions was between 8 and 39% higher than under abiotic conditions. Continuous uptake of Mn due to biotic oxidation was evident from extraction of column sediments. Manganese uptake is hypothesized to initially occur as adsorption, which led to subsequent surface and/or microbial oxidation. Complete breakthrough of Ni within 100 pore volumes indicated no process of continuous uptake and was modeled as an equilibrium adsorption process. Nickel uptake in the presence of dissolved Mn was 67-100% reversible. Sediment extractions suggest that Ni uptake occurred through weak and strong adsorption. Continuous uptake of cobalt increased with sediment manganese oxide content, and Co uptake was up to 75% greater under biotic than abiotic conditions. Cobalt uptake was controlled by both existing and newly formed manganese oxides. Only a small amount of Co uptake was reversible (10-25%). XANES spectral analysis indicated that most Co(II) was oxidized to Co(III) and probably incorporated structurally into manganese oxides. Although manganese oxides were the primary phase controlling uptake and retention of Mn, Ni, and Co, the mechanisms varied among the metals.

  4. The scavenging of silver by manganese and iron oxides in stream sediments collected from two drainage areas of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Anderson, B.J.

    1974-01-01

    Stream sediments of two well-weathered and aerated drainage areas of Colorado containing anomalous amounts of silver were allowed to react by shaking with nitric acid of different concentrations (1-10M). Silver, manganese, and iron simultaneously dissolved were determined by atomic absorption. The relationship between silver dissolution and the dissolution of manganese and/or iron was evaluated by linear and multiple regression analyses. The highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.913) between silver and manganese dissolution suggests that manganese oxides are the major control on the scavenging of silver in these stream sediments, whereas iron oxides only play a secondary role in this regard. ?? 1974.

  5. Reactivity of biogenic manganese oxide for metal sequestration and photochemistry: Computational solid state physics study

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.D.; Sposito, G.

    2010-02-01

    Many microbes, including both bacteria and fungi, produce manganese (Mn) oxides by oxidizing soluble Mn(II) to form insoluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, a kinetically much faster process than abiotic oxidation. These biogenic Mn oxides drive the Mn cycle, coupling it with diverse biogeochemical cycles and determining the bioavailability of environmental contaminants, mainly through strong adsorption and redox reactions. This mini review introduces recent findings based on quantum mechanical density functional theory that reveal the detailed mechanisms of toxic metal adsorption at Mn oxide surfaces and the remarkable role of Mn vacancies in the photochemistry of these minerals.

  6. Adsorption of iron cyanide complexes onto clay minerals, manganese oxide, and soil.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Hee; Schwab, A Paul; Johnston, C T; Banks, M Katherine

    2010-09-01

    The adsorption characteristics of an iron cyanide complex, soluble Prussian blue KFe(III)[Fe(II)(CN)(6)], were evaluated for representative soil minerals and soil at pH 3.7, 6.4 and 9.7. Three specimen clay minerals (kaolinite, montmorillonite, and illite), two synthesized manganese oxides (birnessite and cryptomelane), and a Drummer soil from Indiana were used as the adsorbents. Surface protonation of variable charge sites increased with decreasing pH yielding positively charged sites on crystal edges and enhancing the attractive force between minerals and iron cyanide complexes. Anion adsorption on clays often is correlated to the metal content of the adsorbent, and a positive relationship was observed between iron or aluminum content and Prussian blue adsorption. Illite had high extractable iron and adsorbed more ferro-ferricyande anion, while kaolinite and montmorillonite had lower extractable iron and adsorbed less. However, less pH effect was observed on the adsorption of iron cyanide to manganese oxides. This may due to the manganese oxide mediated oxidation of ferrocyanide [Fe(II)(CN)(6)(4-)], to ferricyanide [Fe(III)(CN)(6)(3-)], which has a low affinity for manganese oxides. PMID:20665323

  7. Preparation of anionic clay-birnessite manganese oxide composites by interlayer oxidation of oxalate ions by permanganate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arulraj, James; Rajamathi, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Oxalate intercalated anionic clay-like nickel zinc hydroxysalt was obtained starting from nickel zinc hydroxyacetate, Ni3Zn2(OH)8(OAc)2·2H2O, by anion exchange. The intercalated oxalate species was reacted with potassium permanganate in such a way that the layered manganese oxide formed was within the interlayer region of the anionic clay resulting in a layered composite in which the negative charges on the birnessite type manganese oxide layers compensate the positive charges on the anionic clay layers. Birnessite to anionic clay ratio could be varied by varying the reaction time or the amount of potassium permanganate used.

  8. The kinetics of iodide oxidation by the manganese oxide mineral birnessite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, P.M.; Davis, J.A.; Luther, G. W., III

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of iodide (I-) and molecular iodine (I2) oxidation by the manganese oxide mineral birnessite (??-MnO2) was investigated over the pH range 4.5-6.25. I- oxidation to iodate (IO3-) proceeded as a two-step reaction through an I2 intermediate. The rate of the reaction varied with both pH and birnessite concentration, with faster oxidation occurring at lower pH and higher birnessite concentration. The disappearance of I- from solution was first order with respect to I- concentration, pH, and birnessite concentration, such that -d[I-]/dt = k[I-][H+][MnO2], where k, the third order rate constant, is equal to 1.08 ?? 0.06 ?? 107 M-2 h-1. The data are consistent with the formation of an inner sphere I- surface complex as the first step of the reaction, and the adsorption of I- exhibited significant pH dependence. Both I2, and to a lesser extent, IO3- sorbed to birnessite. The results indicate that iodine transport in mildly acidic groundwater systems may not be conservative. Because of the higher adsorption of the oxidized I species I2 and IO3-, as well as the biophilic nature of I2, redox transformations of iodine must be taken into account when predicting I transport in aquifers and watersheds.

  9. Manganese Homeostasis in Group A Streptococcus Is Critical for Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Andrew G.; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y.; Gillen, Christine M.; Davies, Mark R.; West, Nicholas P.; McEwan, Alastair G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) is an obligate human pathogen responsible for a spectrum of human disease states. Metallobiology of human pathogens is revealing the fundamental role of metals in both nutritional immunity leading to pathogen starvation and metal poisoning of pathogens by innate immune cells. Spy0980 (MntE) is a paralog of the GAS zinc efflux pump CzcD. Through use of an isogenic mntE deletion mutant in the GAS serotype M1T1 strain 5448, we have elucidated that MntE is a manganese-specific efflux pump required for GAS virulence. The 5448ΔmntE mutant had significantly lower survival following infection of human neutrophils than did the 5448 wild type and the complemented mutant (5448ΔmntE::mntE). Manganese homeostasis may provide protection against oxidative stress, explaining the observed ex vivo reduction in virulence. In the presence of manganese and hydrogen peroxide, 5448ΔmntE mutant exhibits significantly lower survival than wild-type 5448 and the complemented mutant. We hypothesize that MntE, by maintaining homeostatic control of cytoplasmic manganese, ensures that the peroxide response repressor PerR is optimally poised to respond to hydrogen peroxide stress. Creation of a 5448ΔmntE-ΔperR double mutant rescued the oxidative stress resistance of the double mutant to wild-type levels in the presence of manganese and hydrogen peroxide. This work elucidates the mechanism for manganese toxicity within GAS and the crucial role of manganese homeostasis in maintaining GAS virulence. PMID:25805729

  10. Organ weight changes in mice after long-term inhalation exposure to manganese oxides nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, T.; Buchtová, M.; Dočekal, B.; Míšek, I.; Navrátil, J.; Mikuška, P.; Šerý, O.; Večeřa, Z.

    2015-05-01

    Recently, it has been proven that manganese from inhaled particles of manganese compounds can accumulate in the internal organs of laboratory animals. Nevertheless, there were only a few researches dealing with changes in body morphology induced by inhalation of these particles, even though results of some studies indicate existence of such changes. The aim of our research was to assess the effect of inhaled manganese oxides nanoparticles on weight of internal organs. For this purpose a long-term inhalation experiment on laboratory mice was performed, during which the mice were exposed to MnO.Mn2O3 nanoparticles in concentration 2 × 106 particles/cm3 for 17 weeks, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Manganese oxides nanoparticles were synthesized continuously via aerosol route in a hot wall tube flow reactor using thermal decomposition of metal organic precursor manganese(II)acetylacetonate in the flow tube reactor at temperature 750 °C in the presence of 30 vol% of oxygen. It was proven that inhaled nanoparticles can influence the weight of internal organs of mice. Moreover, it was discovered that the resulting change in weight of selected organs is disproportional. The mice from the experimental group had statistically significantly lighter kidneys, liver and spleen and heavier pancreas compared to the mice from the control group.

  11. Electrochromism in nickel oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Wruck, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Optical absorption in a thin-film nickel oxide electrode depends on the state of charge of the electrode; the effect has been called electrochromism, and it may have practical applications in low-speed light modulation devices. In this dissertation, the physical and chemical processes which lead to the change in optical properties are investigated. Preparation of NiO film electrodes by reactive sputtering of a Ni target in an Ar + O[sub 2] gas mixture is described, and the electrochromic response is correlated to film growth conditions. Structural, electronic, and electrochemical properties of the NiO films are characterized by x-ray diffraction, infrared absorption, x-ray photoemission, optical absorption, electrical conductivity, and electrochemical measurements. It is proposed that the electrochromism results from the adsorption and desorption of protons at the oxygen-rich surface of a granular and porous NiO film. The surface electronic levels are then modified by the presence or absence of the O-H bonds, and the effect on the film electronic properties is discussed. A general discussion is also given of the current-limiting processes at the NiO film electrodes.

  12. Process for fabrication of metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.; Svensson, S.

    1990-07-17

    This invention is comprised of a method of fabricating metal oxide films from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of metal oxides, e.g. electro-optically active transition metal oxides, at a high deposition rate. The presence of hydrogen during the plasma reaction enhances the deposition rate of the metal oxide. Various types of metal oxide films can be produced.

  13. Spinel coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects and crystal structure of copper manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ping

    Long-term stability and chromium (Cr) contamination are two major concerns for application of chromium-bearing metallic materials as interconnects of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) at intermediate temperature (˜800°C). Copper-manganese (Cu-Mn) and cobalt-manganese (Co-Mn) spinel can be promising coating materials for the metallic interconnects as they show high electrical conductivities. The first objective of this research is to develop an economical and convenient method through which the spinel coatings can be applied to the metallic substrates. The investigations on the crystal structure of Cu xMn3-xO4 spinel, e.g., structure symmetry and cation distributions, have always been controversial, which hinders the total understanding of the detailed structure of the material. In order to resolve the inconsistency, in-situ neutron and X-ray diffraction were employed to determine the structure of the spinel. A novel method was developed to obtain high quality manganese coating without any additives (sulphur or selenium compounds). Cu-Mn and Co-Mn spinel coatings were applied to metallic coupons by electrodeposition and subsequent annealing. The method is convenient and easy to control. The performance testing showed that the area specific resistances (ASRs) of the coated samples (0.003 O·cm 2) are much lower than that of the uncoated UNS 430 (0.189 O·cm 2) after oxidation at 750°C for 1500 hours. Moreover, both spinel coatings can effectively suppress the outward diffusion of Cr, which resulted in reduction of Cr contamination significantly. The oxidation studies of Cu-Mn coating revealed the transformation mechanisms of Cu-Mn coating to the spinel. In-situ neutron and X-ray diffraction analysis clarified the crystal symmetry of CuxMn3-xO4 spinel and CuMnO2 at high temperatures. Rietveld refinement revealed the cation distribution of Cu and Mn ions on tetrahedral and octrahedral sites of CuxMn 3-xO4 spinel, which was compared to values in the literatures.

  14. IMPACT OF WATER CHEMISTRY ON MANGANESE REMOVAL DURING OXIDATION/FILTRATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a poster showing the purpose and setup of our pilot plant experiments with manganese filtration. The focus is on the differences, effectiveness, and problems with using chlorine and potassium permanganate in oxidation/filtration. The poster will show the results and findi...

  15. Synthesis and characterisation of manganese oxides from potassium permanganate and citric acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burhanuddin, Syazwani; Yarmo, Ambar; Yamin, Bohari M.

    2013-11-01

    Reaction of KMnO4 and citric acid at different stoichiometric ratio found to give black precipitate after calcined at 500 %C. The black precipitate are classified as two type of manganese oxides mineral namely as bixbyite and hollandite. IR and XRD data were in agreement with the literature report.

  16. Hybrid ternary rice paper-manganese oxide-carbon nanotube nanocomposites for flexible supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenchao; Zhang, Kaixi; Wei, Li; Yu, Dingshan; Wei, Jun; Chen, Yuan

    2013-11-21

    Modern portable electronic devices create a strong demand for flexible energy storage devices. Paper based nanocomposites are attractive as sustainable materials for such applications. Here, we directly explored the hydroxyl chemistry of cellulose fibers to synthesize hybrid ternary nanocomposites, comprised of rice paper, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and manganese oxide nanoparticles. The functional groups on cellulose fibers can react with adsorbed permanganate ions, resulting in uniform deposition of manganese oxide nanoparticles. SWCNTs coated on top of manganese oxide nanoparticles form a highly conductive network connecting individual manganese oxide particles. By using the hybrid ternary composites as electrodes, the assembled two-electrode supercapacitors demonstrated high capacitance (260.2 F g(-1)), energy (9.0 W h kg(-1)), power (59.7 kW kg(-1)), and cycle stability (12% drop after 3000 cycles). In addition, the nanocomposites show good strength and excellent mechanical flexibility, and their capacitance shows negligible changes after bending more than 100 times. These findings suggest that opportunities exist to further explore the rich chemistry of cellulose fibers for innovative energy applications. PMID:24077360

  17. Diclofenac and 2-anilinophenylacetate degradation by combined activity of biogenic manganese oxides and silver.

    PubMed

    Meerburg, Francis; Hennebel, Tom; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2012-05-01

    The occurrence of a range of recalcitrant organic micropollutants in our aquatic environment has led to the development of various tertiary wastewater treatment methods. In this study, biogenic manganese oxides (Bio-MnOx), biogenic silver nanoparticles (Bio-Ag(0)) and ionic silver were used for the oxidative removal of the frequently encountered drug diclofenac and its dechlorinated form, 2-anilinophenylacetate (APA). Diclofenac was rapidly degraded during ongoing manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas putida MnB6. Furthermore, whereas preoxidized Bio-MnOx, Bio-Ag(0) and Ag(+) separately did not show any removal capacity for diclofenac, an enhanced removal occurred when Bio-MnOx and silver species were combined. Similar results were obtained for APA. Finally, a slow removal of diclofenac but more rapid APA degradation was observed when silver was added to manganese-free P. putida biomass. Combining these results, three mechanisms of diclofenac and APA removal could be distinguished: (i) a co-metabolic removal during active Mn(2+) oxidation by P. putida; (ii) a synergistic interaction between preoxidized Bio-MnOx and silver species; and (iii) a (bio)chemical process by biomass enriched with silver catalysts. This paper demonstrates the use of P. putida for water treatment purposes and is the first report of the application of silver combined with biogenic manganese for the removal of organic water contaminants. PMID:22221449

  18. Nanostructural evolution from nanosheets to one-dimensional nanoparticles for manganese oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hongmei; Kong, Xingang; Wen, Puhong; Kitayama, Tomonori; Feng, Qi

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► Nanosheets were transformed to other one-dimensional nanoparticles. ► Nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoribbons, and nanobelts were obtained. ► Nanoparticle morphology can be controlled with organic amines. ► Organic amines act as morphology directing agent. -- Abstract: This paper introduces a novel hydrothermal soft chemical synthesis process for manganese oxide nanostructured particles using two-dimensional manganese oxide nanosheets as precursor. In this process, a birnessite-type manganese oxide with a layered structure was exfoliated into its elementary layer nanosheets, and then the nanosheets were hydrothermally treated to transform the two-dimensional morphology of the nanosheets to one-dimensional nanoparticles. The manganese oxide nanofibers, nanotubes, nanobelts, nanoribbons, and fabric-ribbon-like particles constructed from nanofibers or nanobelts were obtained using this hydrothermal soft chemical process. The nanostructural evolution from the two-dimensional nanosheets to the one-dimensional nanoparticles was characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and TG-DTA analysis. The morphology and nanostructure of the products are strongly dependent on the molecular dimension of organic amine cations added in the reaction system. The organic amine cations act as a morphology directing agent in the nanostructural evolution process.

  19. SERUM CHEMISTRIES OF COTURNIX JAPONICA GIVEN DIETARY MANGANESE OXIDE (MN3O4)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma creatinine and inorganic phosphorus were increased in manganese oxide (Mn3O4)-treated adult male Coturnix quail, but BUN, BUN/creatinine ratio, uric acid, and total calcium were decreased. 2. Serum enzymes (alkaline phosphatase glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic p...

  20. Influence of sequential lithium insertions on the physical properties of spinel manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Liancai; Wu, Jinping; Zhou, Chenggang; Yao, Shujuan; Pi, Zhenbang; Cheng, Hansong

    We present first principles studies based on density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the lithium intercalation process in spinel manganese oxide compound. The lattice volume change, energetics, and insertion voltage were systematically examined upon sequential lithium insertions into the lattice. The charge transfer mechanism upon lithium intercalation was studied by analyzing the calculated spectra of density of states.

  1. Synthesis of nanostructured manganese oxides based materials and application for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dung Dang, Trung; Le, Thi Thu Hang; Bich Thuy Hoang, Thi; Mai, Thanh Tung

    2015-01-01

    Manganese oxides are important materials with a variety of applications in different fields such as chemical sensing devices, magnetic devices, field-emission devices, catalysis, ion-sieves, rechargeable batteries, hydrogen storage media and microelectronics. To open up new applications of manganese oxides, novel morphologies or nanostructures are required to be developed. Via sol—gel and anodic electrodeposition methods, M (Co, Fe) doped manganese oxides were prepared. On the other hand, nanostructured (nanoparticles, nanorods and hollow nanotubes) manganese oxides were synthesized via a process including a chemical reaction with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) templates followed by heat treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used for characterization of the prepared materials. The influence of chemical reaction conditions, heat treatment and template present on the morphology, structure, chemical and electrochemical properties of the prepared materials were investigated. Chronopotentiometry (CP) and CV results show high specific capacitance of 186.2 to 298.4 F g-1 and the charge/discharge stability of the prepared materials and the ideal pseudocapacitive behaviors were observed. These results give an opening and promising application of these materials in advanced energy storage applications.

  2. Facile synthesis of birnessite-type manganese oxide nanoparticles as supercapacitor electrode materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihu; Luo, Yao; Tan, Wenfeng; Zhang, Yashan; Liu, Fan; Qiu, Guohong

    2016-11-15

    Manganese oxides are environmentally benign supercapacitor electrode materials and, in particular, birnessite-type structure shows very promising electrochemical performance. In this work, nanostructured birnessite was facilely prepared by adding dropwise NH2OH·HCl to KMnO4 solution under ambient temperature and pressure. In order to fully exploit the potential of birnessite-type manganese oxide electrode materials, the effects of specific surface area, pore size, content of K(+), and manganese average oxidation state (Mn AOS) on their electrochemical performance were studied. The results showed that with the increase of NH2OH·HCl, the Mn AOS decreased and the corresponding pore sizes and specific surface area of birnessite increased. The synthesized nanostructured birnessite showed the highest specific capacitance of 245Fg(-1) at a current density of 0.1Ag(-1) within a potential range of 0-0.9V, and excellent cycle stability with a capacitance retention rate of 92% after 3000 cycles at a current density of 1.0Ag(-1). The present work implies that specific capacitance is mainly affected by specific surface area and pore volume, and provides a new method for the facile preparation of birnessite-type manganese oxide with excellent capacitive performance. PMID:27501042

  3. Manganese oxide micro-supercapacitors with ultra-high areal capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Myers, Benjamin D.; Yan, Jian; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak; Lee, Pooi See

    2013-05-01

    A symmetric micro-supercapacitor is constructed by electrochemically depositing manganese oxide onto micro-patterned current collectors. High surface-to-volume ratio of manganese oxide and short diffusion distance between electrodes give an ultra-high areal capacitance of 56.3 mF cm-2 at a current density of 27.2 μA cm-2.A symmetric micro-supercapacitor is constructed by electrochemically depositing manganese oxide onto micro-patterned current collectors. High surface-to-volume ratio of manganese oxide and short diffusion distance between electrodes give an ultra-high areal capacitance of 56.3 mF cm-2 at a current density of 27.2 μA cm-2. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures; optical images of micro-supercapacitors; areal capacitances of samples M-0.3C, M-0.6C and M-0.9C; illustration of interdigital finger electrodes; Nyquist plot of Co(OH)2 deposited on micro-electrodes. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00210a

  4. The effect of lanthanum(III) and cerium(III) ions between layers of manganese oxide on water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman

    2015-12-01

    Manganese oxide structure with lanthanum(III) or cerium(III) ions between the layers was synthesized by a simple method. The ratio of Mn to Ce or La in samples was 0.00, 0.04, 0.08, 0.16, 0.32, 0.5, 0.82, or 1.62. The compounds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction studies, and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The compounds show efficient catalytic activity of water oxidation in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate with a turnover frequency of 1.6 mmol O2/mol Mn.s. In contrast to the water-oxidizing complex in Photosystem II, calcium(II) has no specific role to enhance the water-oxidizing activity of the layered manganese oxides and other cations can be replaced without any significant decrease in water-oxidizing activities of these layered Mn oxides. Based on this and previously reported results from oxygen evolution in the presence of H 2 (18) O, we discuss the mechanism and the important factors influencing the water-oxidizing activities of the manganese oxides. PMID:25701552

  5. Endowing manganese oxide with fast adsorption ability through controlling the manganese carbonate precursor assembled in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Ge, X; Gu, C D; Wang, X L; Tu, J P

    2015-01-15

    Manganese oxides with desired structure are controllably obtained through annealing MnCO3 precursors with required structures. The structures of MnCO3 precursors are determined by a "mesocrystal formation" process in an ionic liquid system of a choline chloride/urea (CU) mixture. Without addition of surfactants, only CU solvent and manganese chloride are needed in the reaction system, in which the CU acts as reaction medium as well as control agent for particle growth. A shape transformation of MnCO3 particles from well-defined rhombohedral mesocrystals to ellipsoidal polycrystal ensembles, and to nanoparticulate aggregates is observed when heating the reaction system for 4 h at 120, 150, and 180 °C, respectively. With a longer aging time at 120 °C, etching and disassembly of MnCO3 mesocrystals happened. The correlation between the microstructure and the underlying formation mechanism is highlighted. Porous and nanowire-like MnO(x) nanostructures are obtained through a facile thermal conversion process from the diverse MnCO3 precursors, which are demonstrated as effective and efficient adsorbents to remove organic waste (e.g. Congo red) from water. Significantly, the nanowire-like MnO(x) nanostructures obtained by annealing the MnCO3 mesocrystals at 300 °C for 4 h can remove about 95% Congo red in waste water at room temperature in only one minute, which is superior to the reported hierarchical hollow nanostructured MnO2. PMID:25454437

  6. Cobalt(II) Oxidation by the Marine Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Bacillus sp. Strain SG-1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon; Tebo, Bradley M.

    1994-01-01

    The geochemical cycling of cobalt (Co) has often been considered to be controlled by the scavenging and oxidation of Co(II) on the surface of manganese [Mn(III,IV)] oxides or manganates. Because Mn(II) oxidation in the environment is often catalyzed by bacteria, we have investigated the ability of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria to bind and oxidize Co(II) in the absence of Mn(II) to determine whether some Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria also oxidize Co(II) independently of Mn oxidation. We used the marine Bacillus sp. strain SG-1, which produces mature spores that oxidize Mn(II), apparently due to a protein in their spore coats (R.A. Rosson and K. H. Nealson, J. Bacteriol. 151:1027-1034, 1982; J. P. M. de Vrind et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 52:1096-1100, 1986). A method to measure Co(II) oxidation using radioactive 57Co as a tracer and treatments with nonradioactive (cold) Co(II) and ascorbate to discriminate bound Co from oxidized Co was developed. SG-1 spores were found to oxidize Co(II) over a wide range of pH, temperature, and Co(II) concentration. Leucoberbelin blue, a reagent that reacts with Mn(III,IV) oxides forming a blue color, was found to also react with Co(III) oxides and was used to verify the presence of oxidized Co in the absence of added Mn(II). Co(II) oxidation occurred optimally around pH 8 and between 55 and 65°C. SG-1 spores oxidized Co(II) at all Co(II) concentrations tested from the trace levels found in seawater to 100 mM. Co(II) oxidation was found to follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics. An Eadie-Hofstee plot of the data suggests that SG-1 spores have two oxidation systems, a high-affinity-low-rate system (Km, 3.3 × 10-8 M; Vmax, 1.7 × 10-15 M · spore-1 · h-1) and a low-affinity-high-rate system (Km, 5.2 × 10-6 M; Vmax, 8.9 × 10-15 M · spore-1 · h-1). SG-1 spores did not oxidize Co(II) in the absence of oxygen, also indicating that oxidation was not due to abiological Co(II) oxidation on the surface of preformed Mn(III,IV) oxides. These

  7. Determining the Oxidation States of Manganese in NT2 Cells and Cultured Astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter,K.; Aschner, M.; Miller, L.; Eliseev, R.; Salter, J.; Andersen, K.; Gunter, T.

    2006-01-01

    Excessive brain manganese (Mn) can produce a syndrome called 'manganism', which correlates with loss of striatal dopamine and cell death in the striatum and globus pallidus. The prevalent hypothesis for the cause of this syndrome has been oxidation of cell components by the strong oxidizing agent, Mn{sup 3+}, either formed by oxidation of intracellular Mn{sup 2+} or transported into the cell as Mn{sup 3+}. We have recently used X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) to determine the oxidation states of manganese complexes in brain and liver mitochondria and in nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced and non-induced PC12 cells. No evidence was found for stabilization or accumulation of Mn{sup 3+} complexes because of oxidation of Mn{sup 2+} by reactive oxygen species in these tissues. Here we extend these studies of manganese oxidation state to cells of brain origin, human neuroteratocarcinoma (NT2) cells and primary cultures of rat astrocytes. Again we find no evidence for stabilization or accumulation of any Mn{sup 3+} complex derived from oxidation of Mn{sup 2+} under a range of conditions.

  8. Oxidation of manganese and iron by Leptothrix discophora: Use of N,N,N prime ,N prime -tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine as an indicator of metal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    de Vrind-de Jong, E.W.; Corstjens, P.L.A.M.; Kempers, E.S.; Westbroek, P.; de Vrind, J.P.M. )

    1990-11-01

    A new method for the quantification and characterization of manganese-oxidizing activity by spent culture medium of Leptothrix discophora SS-1 was developed. It is based on the formation of the dye Wurster blue from N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by oxidized manganese generated in the spent medium. The kinetic parameters thus obtained agreed well with data obtained with other methods. It was also possible to demonstrate iron oxidation by spent culture medium. The kinetics of the process and inhibition by enzyme poisons suggest that iron oxidation is enzymatically catalyzed. Probably two different factors are involved in manganese and iron oxidation.

  9. Oxidation of Manganese and Iron by Leptothrix discophora: Use of N,N,N',N'-Tetramethyl-p-Phenylenediamine as an Indicator of Metal Oxidation.

    PubMed

    de Vrind-de Jong, E W; Corstjens, P L; Kempers, E S; Westbroek, P; de Vrind, J P

    1990-11-01

    A new method for the quantification and characterization of manganese-oxidizing activity by spent culture medium of Leptothrix discophora SS-1 was developed. It is based on the formation of the dye Wurster blue from N,N,N',N'-Tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by oxidized manganese generated in the spent medium. The kinetic parameters thus obtained agreed well with data obtained with other methods. It was also possible to demonstrate iron oxidation by spent culture medium. The kinetics of the process and inhibition by enzyme poisons suggest that iron oxidation is enzymatically catalyzed. Probably two different factors are involved in manganese and iron oxidation. PMID:16348351

  10. Study and optimisation of manganese oxide-based electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staiti, P.; Lufrano, F.

    A manganese oxide material was synthesised by an easy precipitation method based on reduction of potassium permanganate(VII) with a manganese(II) salt. The material was treated at different temperatures to study the effect of thermal treatment on capacitive property. The best capacitive performance was obtained with the material treated at 200 °C. This material was used to prepare electrodes with different amounts of polymer binder, carbon black and graphite fibres to individuate the optimal composition that gave the best electrochemical performances. It was found that graphite fibres improve the electrochemical performance of electrodes. The highest specific capacitance (267 F g -1 MnO x) was obtained with an electrode containing 70% of MnO x, 15% of carbon black, 10% of graphite fibres and 5% of PVDF. This electrode, with CB/GF ratio of 1.5, showed a higher utilization of manganese oxide. The results reported in the present paper further confirmed that manganese oxide is a very interesting material for supercapacitor application.

  11. Oxidation of manganese(II) with ferrate: Stoichiometry, kinetics, products and impact of organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Joseph E; Mai, Xuyen; Jiang, Yanjun; Reckhow, David A; Tobiason, John E

    2016-09-01

    Manganese is a contaminant of concern for many drinking water utilities, and future regulation may be pending. An analysis of soluble manganese (Mn(II)) oxidation by ferrate (Fe(VI)) was executed at the bench-scale, in a laboratory matrix, both with and without the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and at two different pH values, 6.2 and 7.5. In the matrix without NOM, the oxidation of Mn(II) by Fe(VI) followed a stoichiometry of 2 mol Fe(VI) to 3 mol Mn(II). The presence of NOM did not significantly affect the stoichiometry of the oxidation reaction, indicating relative selectivity of Fe(VI) for Mn(II). The size distribution of resulting particles included significant amounts of nanoparticles. Resulting manganese oxide particles were confirmed to be MnO2 via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The rate of the Mn(II) oxidation reaction was fast relative to typical time scales in drinking water treatment, with an estimated second order rate constant of approximately 1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 9.2 and > 9 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 6.2. In general, ferrate is a potential option for Mn(II) oxidation in water treatment. PMID:27341149

  12. Population Structure of Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria in Stratified Soils and Properties of Manganese Oxide Aggregates under Manganese–Complex Medium Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongming; Chen, Hong; Liu, Jin; Ali, Muhammad; Liu, Fan; Li, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Manganese-oxidizing bacteria in the aquatic environment have been comprehensively investigated. However, little information is available about the distribution and biogeochemical significance of these bacteria in terrestrial soil environments. In this study, stratified soils were initially examined to investigate the community structure and diversity of manganese-oxidizing bacteria. Total 344 culturable bacterial isolates from all substrata exhibited Mn(II)-oxidizing activities at the range of 1 µM to 240 µM of the equivalent MnO2. The high Mn(II)-oxidizing isolates (>50 mM MnO2) were identified as the species of phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Seven novel Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterial genera (species), namely, Escherichia, Agromyces, Cellulomonas, Cupriavidus, Microbacterium, Ralstonia, and Variovorax, were revealed via comparative phylogenetic analysis. Moreover, an increase in the diversity of soil bacterial community was observed after the combined enrichment of Mn(II) and carbon-rich complex. The phylogenetic classification of the enriched bacteria represented by predominant denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis bands, was apparently similar to culturable Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The experiments were further undertaken to investigate the properties of the Mn oxide aggregates formed by the bacterial isolates with high Mn(II)-oxidizing activity. Results showed that these bacteria were closely encrusted with their Mn oxides and formed regular microspherical aggregates under prolonged Mn(II) and carbon-rich medium enrichment for three weeks. The biotic oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) by these isolates was confirmed by kinetic examinations. X-ray diffraction assays showed the characteristic peaks of several Mn oxides and rhodochrosite from these aggregates. Leucoberbelin blue tests also verified the Mn(II)-oxidizing activity of these aggregates. These results demonstrated that Mn oxides were formed at certain amounts under the enrichment

  13. Significantly improved cyclability of lithium manganese oxide under elevated temperature by an easily oxidized electrolyte additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunmin; Rong, Haibo; Mai, Shaowei; Luo, Xueyi; Li, Xiaoping; Li, Weishan

    2015-12-01

    Spinel lithium manganese oxide, LiMn2O4, is a promising cathode for lithium ion battery in large-scale applications, because it possesses many advantages compared with currently used layered lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) and olivine phosphate (LiFePO4), including naturally abundant resource, environmental friendliness and high and long work potential plateau. Its poor cyclability under high temperature, however, limits its application. In this work, we report a significant cyclability improvement of LiMn2O4 under elevated temperature by using dimethyl phenylphonite (DMPP) as an electrolyte additive. Charge/discharge tests demonstrate that the application of 0.5 wt.% DMPP yields a capacity retention improvement from 16% to 82% for LiMn2O4 after 200 cycles under 55 °C at 1 C (1C = 148 mAh g-1) between 3 and 4.5 V. Electrochemical and physical characterizations indicate that DMPP is electrochemically oxidized at the potential lower than that for lithium extraction, forming a protective cathode interphase on LiMn2O4, which suppresses the electrolyte decomposition and prevents LiMn2O4 from crystal destruction.

  14. Influence of film thickness and air exposure on the transport gap of manganese phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Haidu, F.; Fechner, A.; Salvan, G.; Gordan, O. D.; Fronk, M.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Lehmann, D.; Mahns, B.; Knupfer, M.

    2013-06-15

    The interface formation between manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) and cobalt was investigated combining ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy. The transport band gap of the MnPc increases with the film thickness up to a value of (1.2 {+-} 0.3) eV while the optical band gap as determined from spectroscopic ellipsometry amounts to 0.5 eV. The gap values are smaller compared to other phthalocyanines due to metallic Mn 3d states close to the Fermi level. The transport band gap was found to open upon air exposure as a result of the disappearance of the occupied 3d electronic states.

  15. Thin-film zinc/manganese dioxide electrodes based on microporous polymer foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbic, P. A.; Binder, L.; Voss, S.; Hofer, F.; Grogger, W.

    Thin-film electrodes allow manufacturing of flat batteries of variable design which can be used for the development of smaller electric appliances. Substituting the metal carrier by conductive plastics leads to a considerable reduction of battery weight. Usually the electroactive materials are deposited onto the surface of the carrier. A significant improvement of the originally poor adherence between polymer foil and electroactive layers can be achieved by mechanical (surface roughening) or chemical (etching) pretreatment. Another way to form extremely thin electrodes having a thickness in the range of some ten micrometers is reported here. First, a metallic layer is deposited onto one surface of a 25 μm thin porous polypropylene foil. Subsequently, the electroactive materials are electrolytically deposited into the pores of the metallized foil providing the required conductive connection through the plastic matrix by themselves. In this case the flexibility of the polymer has a positive influence on the problem of volume change of manganese dioxide during charging and discharging, respectively, because the plastic provides flexible `mechanical struts' which act as a `binder' and therefore prevent increasing internal resistance due to contact problems. Assembling a zinc filled polymer and a manganese dioxide filled one in such a way that both metallic back-layers are in contact, a thin bipolar zinc/manganese dioxide electrode can be obtained.

  16. Decreased methane formation from the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide using zeolite/cobalt-manganese oxide composite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Johns, M; Landon, P; Alderson, T; Hutchings, G J

    2001-12-01

    A composite catalyst comprising a physical mixture of a zeolite and a cobalt/manganese oxide Fischer-Tropsch catalyst decreases the formation of methane in the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide without significantly affecting conversion. PMID:12240011

  17. Effects of a manganese oxide-modified biochar composite on adsorption of arsenic in red soil.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhihong; Zhou, Li; Huang, Yifan; Song, Zhengguo; Qiu, Weiwen

    2015-11-01

    The arsenic adsorption capacity of a manganese oxide-modified biochar composite (MBC), prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of potassium permanganate and biochar, was investigated in red soil. Adsorption experiments using batch procedures were used to estimate the arsenic adsorption capacities of the absorbent materials. Adsorption and desorption isotherms, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterise the prepared adsorbent materials, and a plausible mechanism for arsenic removal by MBC was proposed. Arsenic in red soil-MBC mixtures exhibited lower mobility than that in soils amended with pristine biochar. The improved removal performance of soil-MBC mixtures was attributed to a lower H/C ratio, higher O/C ratio, higher surface hydrophilicity, and higher surface sorption capacity, even though the impregnation of manganese oxide decreased the specific surface area of the biochar. Arsenic retention increased as the biochar content increased, mainly owing to an increase in soil pH. Several oxygenated functional groups, especially O-H, CO, Mn-O, and Si-O, participated in the adsorption process, and manganese oxides played a significant role in the oxidation of arsenic. This study highlights the potential of MBC as an absorbent to immobilise arsenic for use in contaminated land remediation in the red soils region. PMID:26320008

  18. Diclofenac and 2‐anilinophenylacetate degradation by combined activity of biogenic manganese oxides and silver

    PubMed Central

    Meerburg, Francis; Hennebel, Tom; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2012-01-01

    Summary The occurrence of a range of recalcitrant organic micropollutants in our aquatic environment has led to the development of various tertiary wastewater treatment methods. In this study, biogenic manganese oxides (Bio‐MnOx), biogenic silver nanoparticles (Bio‐Ag0) and ionic silver were used for the oxidative removal of the frequently encountered drug diclofenac and its dechlorinated form, 2‐anilinophenylacetate (APA). Diclofenac was rapidly degraded during ongoing manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas putida MnB6. Furthermore, whereas preoxidized Bio‐MnOx, Bio‐Ag0 and Ag+ separately did not show any removal capacity for diclofenac, an enhanced removal occurred when Bio‐MnOx and silver species were combined. Similar results were obtained for APA. Finally, a slow removal of diclofenac but more rapid APA degradation was observed when silver was added to manganese‐free P. putida biomass. Combining these results, three mechanisms of diclofenac and APA removal could be distinguished: (i) a co‐metabolic removal during active Mn2+ oxidation by P. putida; (ii) a synergistic interaction between preoxidized Bio‐MnOx and silver species; and (iii) a (bio)chemical process by biomass enriched with silver catalysts. This paper demonstrates the use of P. putida for water treatment purposes and is the first report of the application of silver combined with biogenic manganese for the removal of organic water contaminants. PMID:22221449

  19. Interactions between manganese oxides and multiple-ringed aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, G. ); Sims, R.C. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    Objective is to determine whether Mn reductive dissolution can oxidize multiple-ringed aromatics, such as PAHs, in an oxic environment Research indicated that certain PAHs (eg, dihydrodiols and diones that form free-radical intermediates) are susceptible to oxidation and polymerization. Over 14 days, 83, 76, 54, 70, and 20% of the Mn was reduced by 2,3-, 1,3-, and 1,4-naphthalenediol, quinizarin, and 1,4-naphthoquinone, respectively. 100, 100, and 65% of the first three PAHs were oxidized, respectively. Aromatics with diol functional groups were more easily oxidized than those with only dione groups. Relatively insoluble compounds like quinizarin can be oxidized; insoluble ''humic-like'' material precipitated, indicating a polymerization-humification process. Results suggest that electron transfer/organic release from the oxide surface is the rate-limiting step.

  20. Interactions between manganese oxides and multiple-ringed aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, G.; Sims, R.C.

    1992-08-01

    Objective is to determine whether Mn reductive dissolution can oxidize multiple-ringed aromatics, such as PAHs, in an oxic environment? Research indicated that certain PAHs (eg, dihydrodiols and diones that form free-radical intermediates) are susceptible to oxidation and polymerization. Over 14 days, 83, 76, 54, 70, and 20% of the Mn was reduced by 2,3-, 1,3-, and 1,4-naphthalenediol, quinizarin, and 1,4-naphthoquinone, respectively. 100, 100, and 65% of the first three PAHs were oxidized, respectively. Aromatics with diol functional groups were more easily oxidized than those with only dione groups. Relatively insoluble compounds like quinizarin can be oxidized; insoluble ``humic-like`` material precipitated, indicating a polymerization-humification process. Results suggest that electron transfer/organic release from the oxide surface is the rate-limiting step.

  1. Regulating proton-coupled electron transfer for efficient water splitting by manganese oxides at neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Inuzuka, Riko; Takashima, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Toru; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese oxides have been extensively investigated as model systems for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. However, most bioinspired catalysts are inefficient at neutral pH and functional similarity to the oxygen-evolving complex has been rarely achieved with manganese. Here we report the regulation of proton-coupled electron transfer involved in water oxidation by manganese oxides. Pyridine and its derivatives, which have pKa values intermediate to the water ligand bound to manganese(II) and manganese(III), are used as proton-coupled electron transfer induction reagents. The induction of concerted proton-coupled electron transfer is demonstrated by the detection of deuterium kinetic isotope effects and compliance of the reactions with the libido rule. Although proton-coupled electron transfer regulation is essential for the facial redox change of manganese in photosystem II, most manganese oxides impair these regulatory mechanisms. Thus, the present findings may provide a new design rationale for functional analogues of the oxygen-evolving complex for efficient water splitting at neutral pH. PMID:24977746

  2. Coordination compounds of manganese(II) with polyamines - catalysts of the oxidation of organic dyes by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Batyr, D.G.; Isak, V.G.; Kirienko, A.A.; Kharitonov, Yu.Ya.

    1987-02-01

    The peroxidase activity of complexes of manganese(II) with polyamines has been characterized. A comparison of the original and literature data has led to the conclusion that the oxidation of organic substrates having some complexing ability with respect to Manganese(II) in Mn(II)-ligand-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-S systems takes place according to an inner-sphere ion-molecule mechanism. In cases in which the substrate does not have any complexing ability with respect to Manganese(II), the oxidation process takes place according to an outer-sphere mechanism.

  3. Phenolic mediators enhance the manganese peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of recalcitrant lignin model compounds and synthetic lignin.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Paula; Kontro, Jussi; Manner, Helmiina; Hatakka, Annele; Sipilä, Jussi

    2014-11-01

    Fungal oxidative enzymes, such as peroxidases and laccases, are the key catalysts in lignin biodegradation in vivo, and consequently provide an important source for industrial ligninolytic biocatalysts. Recently, it has been shown that some syringyl-type phenolics have potential as industrial co-oxidants or mediators, in laccase-catalyzed modification of lignocellulosic material. We have now studied the effect of such mediators with ligninolytic peroxidases on oxidation of the most recalcitrant lignin model compounds. We found that they are able to enhance the manganese peroxidase (MnP) catalyzed oxidation reactions of small non-phenolic compounds, veratryl alcohol and veratrylglycerol β-guaiacyl ether (adlerol), which are not usually oxidized by manganese peroxidases alone. In these experiments we compared two peroxidases from white-rot fungi, MnP from Phlebia sp. Nf b19 and versatile peroxidase (VP) from Bjerkandera adusta under two oxidation conditions: (i) the Mn(III) initiated mediated oxidation by syringyl compounds and (ii) the system involving MnP-dependent lipid peroxidation, both with production of (hydrogen) peroxides in situ to maintain the peroxidase catalytic cycle. It was found that both peroxidases produced α-carbonyl oxidation product of veratryl alcohol in clearly higher yields in reactions mediated by phenoxy radicals than in lipid-peroxyl radical system. The oxidation of adlerol, on the other hand, was more efficient in lipid-peroxidation-system. VP was more efficient than MnP in the oxidation of veratryl alcohol and showed its lignin peroxidase type activity in the reaction conditions indicated by some cleavage of Cα-Cβ-bond of adlerol. Finally, the mediator assisted oxidation conditions were applied in the oxidation of synthetic lignin (DHP) and the structural analysis of the oxidized polymers showed clear modifications in the polymer outcome, e.g. the oxidation resulted in reduced amount of aliphatic hydroxyls indicated by (31)P NMR. PMID

  4. Phase stability and properties of manganese oxide polymorphs: Assessment and insights from diffusion Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Joshua A.; Wagner, Lucas K.; Ertekin, Elif

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the polymorphic energy ordering and properties of the rocksalt and zinc-blende structures of manganese oxide using fixed node diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC). Manganese oxide is a correlated, antiferromagnetic material that has proven to be challenging to model from first principles across a variety of approaches. Unlike conventional density functional theory and some hybrid functionals, fixed node diffusion Monte Carlo finds the rocksalt structure to be more stable than the zinc-blende structure, and thus recovers the correct energy ordering. Analysis of the site-resolved charge fluctuations of the wave functions according to DMC and other electronic structure descriptions gives insights into elements that are missing in other theories. While the calculated band gaps within DMC are in agreement with predictions that the zinc-blende polymorph has a lower band gap, the gaps themselves overestimate reported experimental values.

  5. Enhanced mercury removal from fix-bed reactor by lamella manganese oxide sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H. W.; Yu, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is an extremely hazardous metal and attracted more concern because of its high toxicity and bioaccumulation. Several manganese-oxide-containing sorbents prepared by co-precipitation method could exhibit the mercury removal activities toward Hg0. The mercury removal test at the temperature of 300°C has the highest removal efficiency. Under this temperature, the maximum absorption equivalent of Mg-Al-Mn and Mn-Al were up to 90.9 and 247 μg/g, then gradually decreased at 400°C. The mercury removal efficiency declined in the following sequence: Mn-Al > Mg-Al-Mn > Mg-Al-Mn/ACA = Mn/AC(p)> Mn/AC(g), due to the manganese-oxide content formed on the sorbents.

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis of layered sodium manganese oxide nanowires and their electrochemical performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Ming; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Oh, Sei-Woon; Ma, Peng-Cheng; Ma, Jun; Li, Bao-Hua; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2010-11-01

    A new method for preparing black birnessite nanowires is introduced. Layer-structured manganese oxide nanowires were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method, and using both NaMnO4 and CH3CH2OH as the precursors in a concentrated NaOH solution. The structure, composition, appearance and electrochemical performance of the product were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy diffraction (ED), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and constant current charge/discharge. The XRD patterns showed a single phase corresponding to a crystalline birnessite-based manganese oxide. TEM studies suggested their wire-like structures. The TGA measurement demonstrated that they possessed an excellent thermal stability up to 400 degrees C. In the potential window of 2.0-4.3 V, the product exhibited excellent cyclic stability and rapid charge-discharge performance. PMID:21137939

  7. Hybrid ternary rice paper-manganese oxide-carbon nanotube nanocomposites for flexible supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenchao; Zhang, Kaixi; Wei, Li; Yu, Dingshan; Wei, Jun; Chen, Yuan

    2013-10-01

    Modern portable electronic devices create a strong demand for flexible energy storage devices. Paper based nanocomposites are attractive as sustainable materials for such applications. Here, we directly explored the hydroxyl chemistry of cellulose fibers to synthesize hybrid ternary nanocomposites, comprised of rice paper, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and manganese oxide nanoparticles. The functional groups on cellulose fibers can react with adsorbed permanganate ions, resulting in uniform deposition of manganese oxide nanoparticles. SWCNTs coated on top of manganese oxide nanoparticles form a highly conductive network connecting individual manganese oxide particles. By using the hybrid ternary composites as electrodes, the assembled two-electrode supercapacitors demonstrated high capacitance (260.2 F g-1), energy (9.0 W h kg-1), power (59.7 kW kg-1), and cycle stability (12% drop after 3000 cycles). In addition, the nanocomposites show good strength and excellent mechanical flexibility, and their capacitance shows negligible changes after bending more than 100 times. These findings suggest that opportunities exist to further explore the rich chemistry of cellulose fibers for innovative energy applications.Modern portable electronic devices create a strong demand for flexible energy storage devices. Paper based nanocomposites are attractive as sustainable materials for such applications. Here, we directly explored the hydroxyl chemistry of cellulose fibers to synthesize hybrid ternary nanocomposites, comprised of rice paper, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and manganese oxide nanoparticles. The functional groups on cellulose fibers can react with adsorbed permanganate ions, resulting in uniform deposition of manganese oxide nanoparticles. SWCNTs coated on top of manganese oxide nanoparticles form a highly conductive network connecting individual manganese oxide particles. By using the hybrid ternary composites as electrodes, the assembled two

  8. Bare and Polymer-Coated Indium Tin Oxide as Working Electrodes for Manganese Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Rusinek, Cory A; Bange, Adam; Warren, Mercedes; Kang, Wenjing; Nahan, Keaton; Papautsky, Ian; Heineman, William R

    2016-04-19

    Though an essential metal in the body, manganese (Mn) has a number of health implications when found in excess that are magnified by chronic exposure. These health complications include neurotoxicity, memory loss, infertility in males, and development of a neurologic psychiatric disorder, manganism. Thus, trace detection in environmental samples is increasingly important. Few electrode materials are able to reach the negative reductive potential of Mn required for anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV), so cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) has been shown to be a viable alternative. We demonstrate Mn CSV using an indium tin oxide (ITO) working electrode both bare and coated with a sulfonated charge selective polymer film, polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene-sulfonate (SSEBS). ITO itself proved to be an excellent electrode material for Mn CSV, achieving a calculated detection limit of 5 nM (0.3 ppb) with a deposition time of 3 min. Coating the ITO with the SSEBS polymer was found to increase the sensitivity and lower the detection limit to 1 nM (0.06 ppb). This polymer modified electrode offers excellent selectivity for Mn as no interferences were observed from other metal ions tested (Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), In(3+), Sb(3+), Al(3+), Ba(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(3+), Bi(3+), and Sn(2+)) except Fe(2+), which was found to interfere with the analytical signal for Mn(2+) at a ratio 20:1 (Fe(2+)/Mn(2+)). The applicability of this procedure to the analysis of tap, river, and pond water samples was demonstrated. This simple, sensitive analytical method using ITO and SSEBS-ITO could be applied to a number of electroactive transition metals detectable by CSV. PMID:26980322

  9. Diphenyl Diselenide Protects Against Mortality, Locomotor Deficits and Oxidative Stress in Drosophila melanogaster Model of Manganese-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Adedara, Isaac A; Abolaji, Amos O; Rocha, Joao B T; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2016-06-01

    Several experimental and epidemiological reports have associated manganese exposure with induction of oxidative stress and locomotor dysfunctions. Diphenyl diselenide (DPDS) is widely reported to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in in vitro and in vivo studies via multiple biochemical mechanisms. The present study investigated the protective effect of DPDS on manganese-induced toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster. The flies were exposed, in a dietary regimen, to manganese alone (30 mmol per kg) or in combination with DPDS (10 and 20 µmol per kg) for 7 consecutive days. Exposure to manganese significantly (p < 0.05) increased flies mortality, whereas the survivors exhibited significant locomotor deficits with increased acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. However, dietary supplementation with DPDS caused a significant decrease in mortality, improvement in locomotor activity and restoration of AChE activity in manganese-exposed flies. Additionally, the significant decreases in the total thiol level, activities of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were accompanied with significant increases in the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in flies exposed to manganese alone. Dietary supplementation with DPDS significantly augmented the antioxidant status and prevented manganese-induced oxidative stress in the treated flies. Collectively, the present data highlight that DPDS may be a promising chemopreventive drug candidate against neurotoxicity resulting from acute manganese exposure. PMID:26875733

  10. Effect of enhanced manganese oxidation in the hyporheic zone on basin-scale geochemical mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Fuller, Christopher C.

    1998-04-01

    We determined the role of the hyporheic zone (the subsurface zone where stream water and shallow groundwater mix) in enhancing microbially mediated oxidation of dissolved manganese (to form manganese precipitates) in a drainage basin contaminated by copper mining. The fate of manganese is of overall importance to water quality in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona, because manganese reactions affect the transport of trace metals. The basin-scale role of the hyporheic zone is difficult to quantify because stream-tracer studies do not always reliably characterize the cumulative effects of the hyporheic zone. This study determined cumulative effects of hyporheic reactions in Pinal Creek basin by characterizing manganese uptake at several spatial scales (stream-reach scale, hyporheic-flow-path scale, and sediment-grain scale). At the stream-reach scale a one-dimensional stream-transport model (including storage zones to represent hyporheic flow paths) was used to determine a reach-averaged time constant for manganese uptake in hyporheic zones, 1/λs, of 1.3 hours, which was somewhat faster but still similar to manganese uptake time constants that were measured directly in centimeter-scale hyporheic flow paths (1/λh = 2.6 hours), and in laboratory batch experiments using streambed sediment (1/λ = 2.7 hours). The modeled depths of subsurface storage zones (ds = 4-17 cm) and modeled residence times of water in storage zones (ts = 3-12 min) were both consistent with direct measurements in hyporheic flow paths (dh = 0-15 cm, th = 1-25 min). There was also good agreement between reach-scale modeling and direct measurements of the percentage removal of dissolved manganese in hyporheic flow paths (fs = 8.9%, andfh = 9.3%rpar;. Manganese uptake experiments in the laboratory using sediment from Pinal Creek demonstrated (through comparison of poisoned and unpoisoned treatments) that the manganese removal process was enhanced by microbially mediated oxidation. The cumulative effect of

  11. Effect of enhanced manganese oxidation in the hyporheic zone on basin-scale geochemical mass balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Fuller, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    We determined the role of the hyporheic zone (the subsurface zone where stream water and shallow groundwater mix) in enhancing microbially mediated oxidation of dissolved manganese (to form manganese precipitates) in a drainage basin contaminated by copper mining. The fate of manganese is of overall importance to water quality in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona, because manganese reactions affect the transport of trace metals. The basin-scale role of the hyporheic zone is difficult to quantify because stream-tracer studies do not always reliably characterize the cumulative effects of the hyporheic zone. This study determined cumulative effects of hyporheic reactions in Pinal Creek basin by characterizing manganese uptake at several spatial scales (stream-reach scale, hyporheicflow-path scale, and sediment-grain scale). At the stream-reach scale a one-dimensional stream-transport model (including storage zones to represent hyporheic flow paths) was used to determine a reach-averaged time constant for manganese uptake in hyporheic zones, 1/??(s), of 1.3 hours, which was somewhat faster but still similar to manganese uptake time constants that were measured directly in centimeter-scale hyporheic flow paths (1/??(h) = 2.6 hours), and in laboratory batch experiments using streambed sediment (1/?? = 2.7 hours). The modeled depths of subsurface storage zones (d(s) = 4-17 cm) and modeled residence times of water in storage zones (t(s) = 3-12 min) were both consistent with direct measurements in hyporheic flow paths (d(h) = 0-15 cm, and t(h) = 1-25 min). There was also good agreement between reach-scale modeling and direct measurements of the percentage removal of dissolved manganese in hyporheic flow paths (f(s) = 8.9%, and f(h) = 9.3%). Manganese uptake experiments in the laboratory using sediment from Pinal Creek demonstrated (through comparison of poisoned and unpoisoned treatments) that the manganese removal process was enhanced by microbially mediated oxidation. The

  12. CHROMIUM TRANSPORT, OXIDATION, AND ADSORPTION IN MANGANESE-COATED SAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examine how the processes of advection, dispersion, oxidation-reduction, and adsorption combine to affect the transport of chromium through columns packed with pyrolusite (P-MnO$-coated sand. We find that P-Mn02 effectively oxidizes Cr@I) to Cr(VI) and that the extent of oxida...

  13. Manganese bismuth films with narrow transfer characteristics for Curie-point switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Guisinger, J. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Manganese bismuth films having improved characteristics for recording information in analogue form, can be produced by a vacuum deposition of Bi and Mn with an atomic ratio of Mn to Bi between 2 and 3.5 or 1.4 and 1.6, followed by a specialized heat treatment which includes very brief exposure to a temperature between about 275 deg and 300 C. Similar MnBi films can be produced more reliably and reproducibly if the initial Bi layer is annealed prior to deposition of the Mn layer. Such an annealing step renders most other factors of the processing relatively non-critical. Deposition of both initial layers is preferably carried out in a vacuum approaching 10 to the -8th power Torr.

  14. Manganese phosphide thin films and nanorods grown on gallium phosphide and on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nateghi, N.; Lambert-Milot, S.; Ménard, D.; Masut, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    We report a simple and fast route to grow ferromagnetic manganese phosphide polycrystalline films and nanorods on GaP and on glass substrates using metalorganic vapor phase deposition. Increasing the growth temperature (≥600 °C) and growth time (≥30 min) results in nucleation of secondary MnP crystals on the primary grains. The secondary crystals grow faster along a specific direction of orthorhombic MnP (c-axis) and form long rods (up to ~10 μm) whose diameters are in the nanoscale (20-100 nm). The nanorods can be easily detached from the glass substrate. The films exhibit ferromagnetic behavior with a range of transition temperatures, depending on the growth conditions.

  15. Upgrading of Low-Grade Manganese Ore by Selective Reduction of Iron Oxide and Magnetic Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yubo; Olivas-Martinez, M.; Sohn, H. Y.; Kim, Hang Goo; Kim, Chan Wook

    2012-12-01

    The utilization of low-grade manganese ores has become necessary due to the intensive mining of high-grade ores for a long time. In this study, calcined ferruginous low-grade manganese ore was selectively reduced by CO, which converted hematite to magnetite, while manganese oxide was reduced to MnO. The iron-rich component was then separated by magnetic separation. The effects of the various reduction parameters such as particle size, reduction time, temperature, and CO content on the efficiency of magnetic separation were studied by single-factor experiments and by a comprehensive full factorial experiment. Under the best experimental conditions tested, the manganese content in the ore increased from around 36 wt pct to more than 44 wt pct, and almost 50 wt pct of iron was removed at a Mn loss of around 5 pct. The results of the full factorial experiments allowed the identification of the significant effects and yielded regression equations for pct Fe removed, Mn/Fe, and pct Mn loss that characterize the efficiency of the upgrading process.

  16. Growth and magnetic property of antiperovskite manganese nitride films doped with Cu by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Fengmei; Ren, Lizhu; Meng, Meng; Wang, Yunjia; Yang, Mei; Wu, Shuxiang; Li, Shuwei

    2014-04-07

    Manganese nitrides thin films on MgO (100) substrates with and without Cu-doping have been fabricated by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Antiperovskite compounds Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N have been grown in the case of Cu-doping, and the pure Mn{sub 3}N{sub 2} single crystal has been obtained without Cu-doping. The Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N exhibits ferrimagnetism, and the magnetization of Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N increases upon the temperature decreasing from 300 K to 5 K, similar to Mn{sub 4}N. The exchange bias (EB) effects emerge in the Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N films. The EB behavior is originated from the interfaces between ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N and antiferromagnetic metal Mn, which is verified to be formed by the data of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The present results not only provide a strategy for producing functional antiperovskite manganese nitrides, but also shed promising light on fabricating the exchange bias part of spintronic devices.

  17. Fischer-Tropsch kinetic studies with cobalt-manganese oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, M.J.; Everson, R.C.; Espinoza, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to establish the reaction mechanism for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, in the presence of the water-gas shift reaction, over a cobalt-manganese oxide catalyst under conditions favoring the formation of gaseous, liquid, and solid (waxes) hydrocarbons (210--250 C and 6--26 bar). A micro-fixed-bed reactor was used with a cobalt-manganese oxide catalyst prepared by a coprecipitation method. An integral reactor model involving both Fischer-Tropsch and water-gas shift reaction kinetics was used to describe the overall performance. Reaction rate equations based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson models for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction (hydrocarbon forming) and empirical reaction rate equations for the water-gas shift reaction from the literature were tested. Different combinations of the reaction rate equation were evaluated with the aid of a nonlinear regression procedure. It was found that a reaction rate equation for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction based on the enolic theory performed slightly better than a reaction rate equation based on the carbide theory. Reaction rate constants for the cobalt-manganese oxide catalyst are reported, and it is concluded that this catalyst also behaves very much like iron-based catalysts.

  18. Catalytic Role of Manganese Oxides in Prebiotic Nucleobases Synthesis from Formamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Brij; Nayak, Arunima; Kamaluddin

    2016-06-01

    Origin of life processes might have begun with the formation of important biomonomers, such as amino acids and nucleotides, from simple molecules present in the prebiotic environment and their subsequent condensation to biopolymers. While studying the prebiotic synthesis of naturally occurring purine and pyrimidine derivatives from formamide, the manganese oxides demonstrated not only good binding for formamide but demonstrated novel catalytic activity. A novel one pot manganese oxide catalyzed synthesis of pyrimidine nucleobases like thymine is reported along with the formation of other nucleobases like purine, 9-(hydroxyacetyl) purine, cytosine, 4(3 H)-pyrimidinone and adenine in acceptable amounts. The work reported is significant in the sense that the synthesis of thymine has exhibited difficulties especially under one pot conditions and also such has been reported only under the catalytic activity of TiO2. The lower oxides of manganese were reported to show higher potential as catalysts and their existence were favored by the reducing atmospheric conditions prevalent on early Earth; thereby confirming the hypothesis that mineral having metals in reduced form might have been more active during the course of chemical evolution. Our results further confirm the role of formamide as a probable precursor for the formation of purine and pyrimidine bases during the course of chemical evolution and origin of life.

  19. Synthesis and Electrochemical Analyses of Manganese Oxides for Super-Capacitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taewoo; Hwang, Hyein; Jang, Jaeyong; Park, Inyeong; Shim, Sang Eun; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon

    2015-11-01

    δ-Phase and α-phase manganese oxides were prepared using a hydrothermal method and their electrochemical properties were characterized. The influence of calcination temperature on the properties of manganese oxides was studied. Crystallinities were studied by X-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy were utilized to examine morphologies. Average pore sizes and specific surface areas of samples were analyzed using the Barret-Joyner-Halenda and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller methods, respectively. After calcination in the range 300 degrees C to 600 degrees C, changes in morphology and crystallinity were observed. The flower-like shape of as synthesized samples became nanorod-like and the δ-phase changed to the α-phase. These changes may have been due to the removal of water during calcination. Furthermore, a transition stage in which the two phases coexisted was observed. Synthesized manganese oxides were mixed with carbon by sonification, to increase electric conductivity and to induce a synergistic effect between pseudo-capacitor and electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). Specific capacitances and rate durability of each composite were investigated by cyclic voltammetry in 1 M Na2SO4 electrolyte at different scan rates. MnO2 calcined at 400 degrees C exhibited the highest capacitance, probably due to its high surface area and more porous structure. PMID:26726613

  20. Catalytic Role of Manganese Oxides in Prebiotic Nucleobases Synthesis from Formamide.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Brij; Nayak, Arunima; Kamaluddin

    2016-06-01

    Origin of life processes might have begun with the formation of important biomonomers, such as amino acids and nucleotides, from simple molecules present in the prebiotic environment and their subsequent condensation to biopolymers. While studying the prebiotic synthesis of naturally occurring purine and pyrimidine derivatives from formamide, the manganese oxides demonstrated not only good binding for formamide but demonstrated novel catalytic activity. A novel one pot manganese oxide catalyzed synthesis of pyrimidine nucleobases like thymine is reported along with the formation of other nucleobases like purine, 9-(hydroxyacetyl) purine, cytosine, 4(3 H)-pyrimidinone and adenine in acceptable amounts. The work reported is significant in the sense that the synthesis of thymine has exhibited difficulties especially under one pot conditions and also such has been reported only under the catalytic activity of TiO2. The lower oxides of manganese were reported to show higher potential as catalysts and their existence were favored by the reducing atmospheric conditions prevalent on early Earth; thereby confirming the hypothesis that mineral having metals in reduced form might have been more active during the course of chemical evolution. Our results further confirm the role of formamide as a probable precursor for the formation of purine and pyrimidine bases during the course of chemical evolution and origin of life. PMID:26758444

  1. Morphological development of oxide-sulfide scales on iron and iron-manganese alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McAdam, G.; Young, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    Pure iron and alloys containing 2, 15, 25, and 50 wt.% manganese have been reacted at 1073 K in controlled gas atmospheres of SO/sub 2/-CO/sub 2/-CO-N/sub 2/. Equilibrium gas compositions were such that (1) FeS was stable but not FeO, or (2) both FeS and FeO were stable, or (3) FeO was stable but not FeS; in all cases, both MnS and MnO were stable. Under all reaction conditions, pure iron corroded to produce both sulfide and oxide. The resultant scale morphologies were consistent with local solid-gas equilibrium for the case in which both oxide and sulfide were stable but in the other cases indicated that equilibrium was not achieved and that direct reaction with SO/sub 2/(g) was responsible for corrosion. Additions of manganese did not greatly alter the scale morphologies. Under reaction conditions that were oxidizing and sulfidizing, very high levels of manganese were required to reduce the corrosion rate. On the other hand, relatively low levels had a beneficial effect both when FeO but not FeS was thermodynamically stable and similarly when FeS but not FeO was stable.

  2. Reversible aqueous zinc/manganese oxide energy storage from conversion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Huilin; Shao, Yuyan; Yan, Pengfei; Cheng, Yingwen; Han, Kee Sung; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Chongmin; Yang, Jihui; Li, Xiaolin; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Mueller, Karl T.; Liu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Rechargeable aqueous batteries such as alkaline zinc/manganese oxide batteries are highly desirable for large-scale energy storage owing to their low cost and high safety; however, cycling stability is a major issue for their applications. Here we demonstrate a highly reversible zinc/manganese oxide system in which optimal mild aqueous ZnSO4-based solution is used as the electrolyte, and nanofibres of a manganese oxide phase, α-MnO2, are used as the cathode. We show that a chemical conversion reaction mechanism between α-MnO2 and H+ is mainly responsible for the good performance of the system. This includes an operating voltage of 1.44 V, a capacity of 285 mAh g‑1 (MnO2), and capacity retention of 92% over 5,000 cycles. The Zn metal anode also shows high stability. This finding opens new opportunities for the development of low-cost, high-performance rechargeable aqueous batteries.

  3. Raman microscopy of lithium-manganese-rich transition metal oxide cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruther, Rose E.; Callender, Andrew F.; Zhou, Hui; Martha, Surendra K.; Nanda, Jagjit

    2014-11-15

    Lithium-rich and manganese-rich (LMR) layered transition metal (TM) oxide composites with general formula xLi2MnO3·(1-x)LiMO2 (M = Ni, Co, Mn) are promising cathode candidates for high energy density lithium ion batteries. Lithium-manganese-rich TM oxides crystallize as a nanocomposite layered phase whose structure further evolves with electrochemical cycling. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to monitor the crystal chemistry and correlate phase changes with electrochemical behavior. While several groups have reported Raman spectra of lithium rich TM oxides, the data show considerable variability in terms of both the vibrational features observed and their interpretation. In this paper, Raman microscopy is used to investigate lithium-rich and manganese-rich TM cathodes as a function of voltage and electrochemical cycling at various temperatures. No growth of a spinel phase is observed within the cycling conditions. However, analysis of the Raman spectra does indicate the structure of LMR-NMC deviates significantly from an ideal layered phase. Finally, the results also highlight the importance of using low laser power and large sample sizes to obtain consistent data sets.

  4. Raman microscopy of lithium-manganese-rich transition metal oxide cathodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ruther, Rose E.; Callender, Andrew F.; Zhou, Hui; Martha, Surendra K.; Nanda, Jagjit

    2014-11-15

    Lithium-rich and manganese-rich (LMR) layered transition metal (TM) oxide composites with general formula xLi2MnO3·(1-x)LiMO2 (M = Ni, Co, Mn) are promising cathode candidates for high energy density lithium ion batteries. Lithium-manganese-rich TM oxides crystallize as a nanocomposite layered phase whose structure further evolves with electrochemical cycling. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to monitor the crystal chemistry and correlate phase changes with electrochemical behavior. While several groups have reported Raman spectra of lithium rich TM oxides, the data show considerable variability in terms of both the vibrational features observed and their interpretation. In this paper, Raman microscopy is used tomore » investigate lithium-rich and manganese-rich TM cathodes as a function of voltage and electrochemical cycling at various temperatures. No growth of a spinel phase is observed within the cycling conditions. However, analysis of the Raman spectra does indicate the structure of LMR-NMC deviates significantly from an ideal layered phase. Finally, the results also highlight the importance of using low laser power and large sample sizes to obtain consistent data sets.« less

  5. Oxidative Transformation of Controlled Substances by Manganese Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lai, Webber Wei-Po; Lin, Angela Yu-Chen; Yang, Sheng-Yao; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the oxidative transformation of four controlled substances (ketamine, methamphetamine, morphine, and codeine) by synthesized MnO2 (δ-MnO2) in aqueous environments. The results indicated that ketamine and methamphetamine were negligibly oxidized by MnO2 and, thus, may be persistent in the aqueous environment. However, morphine and codeine were able to be oxidized by MnO2, which indicated that they are likely naturally attenuated in aqueous environments. Overall, lower solution pH values, lower initial compound concentrations, and higher MnO2 loading resulted in a faster reaction rate. The oxidation of morphine was inhibited in the presence of metal ions (Mn(2+), Fe(3+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+)) and fulvic acid. However, the addition of Fe(3+) and fulvic acid enhanced codeine oxidation. A second-order kinetics model described the oxidation of morphine and codeine by MnO2; it suggested that the formation of a surface precursor complex between the target compound and the MnO2 surface was the rate-limiting step. Although the target compounds were degraded, the slow TOC removal indicated that several byproducts were formed and persist against further MnO2 oxidation. PMID:26078991

  6. Sorption of ferric iron from ferrioxamine B to synthetic and biogenic layer type manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Bargar, John R.; Sposito, Garrison

    2008-07-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments that increase the bioavailability of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but scant information appears to be available about the potential roles of layer type manganese oxides, which are relatively abundant in soils and the oligotrophic marine water column. To probe the effects of layer type manganese oxides on the stability of aqueous Fe-siderophore complexes, we studied the sorption of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB +, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] to two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III,IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida GB-1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB + at pH 8. Analysis of Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that a dominant fraction of Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to the mineral structure at multiple sites, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that layer type manganese oxides, including biogenic minerals, may sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes. We conclude that the sorption of iron-siderophore complexes may play a significant role in the bioavailability and biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  7. Kinetics and spectroscopic observations of atrazine dealkylation on manganese oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Malengreau, N.; Sposito, G.; Cheney, M.A.; Crowley, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    Abiotic transformations of organic pollutants are often neglected in remediation scenarios but nonetheless can contribute significantly to detoxification. Mn oxide minerals are capable of degrading organic pollutants adsorbed to their surfaces by both redox and proton-promoted mechanisms. Concurrently with calorimetric, gas-pressure, chromatographic, and ESR methods, we used ICP, DRS, DRIFT, and FTIR spectroscopies to investigate atrazine degradation on three Mn oxides. We found that N-dealkylation can occur abiotically, leading to the formation of deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine. The Mn extractability after degradation of atrazine was highly dependent on the Mn oxide. Extractable Mn increased with time for cryptomelane, was constant for pyrolusite, and remained very low for birnessite. The extractable Mn is Mn(II). UV signatures of atrazine by-products were different from one another and were used to trace degradation products at the Mn oxide surface. Mechanistic interpretation of the in situ reaction kinetics and thermodynamics will be discussed.

  8. Simultaneous stripping recovery of ammonia-nitrogen and precipitation of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by air under calcium oxide assist.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongliang; Liu, Renlong; Shu, Jiancheng; Li, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Leaching tests of electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) indicated that high contents of soluble manganese and ammonia-nitrogen posed a high environmental risk. This work reports the results of simultaneous stripping recovery of ammonia-nitrogen and precipitation of manganese by air under calcium oxide assist. The ammonia-nitrogen stripping rate increased with the dosage of CaO, the air flow rate and the temperature of EMR slurry. Stripped ammonia-nitrogen was absorbed by a solution of sulfuric acid and formed soluble (NH4)2SO4 and (NH4)3H(SO4)3. The major parameters that effected soluble manganese precipitation were the dosage of added CaO and the slurry temperature. Considering these two aspects, the efficient operation conditions should be conducted with 8 wt.% added CaO, 60°C, 800 mL min(-1) air flow rate and 60-min reaction time. Under these conditions 99.99% of the soluble manganese was precipitated as Mn3O4, which was confirmed by XRD and SEM-EDS analyses. In addition, the stripping rate of ammonia-nitrogen was 99.73%. Leaching tests showed the leached toxic substances concentrations of the treated EMR met the integrated wastewater discharge standard of China (GB8978-1996). PMID:26301855

  9. Manganese-oxidizing photosynthesis before the rise of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jena E; Webb, Samuel M; Thomas, Katherine; Ono, Shuhei; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Fischer, Woodward W

    2013-07-01

    The emergence of oxygen-producing (oxygenic) photosynthesis fundamentally transformed our planet; however, the processes that led to the evolution of biological water splitting have remained largely unknown. To illuminate this history, we examined the behavior of the ancient Mn cycle using newly obtained scientific drill cores through an early Paleoproterozoic succession (2.415 Ga) preserved in South Africa. These strata contain substantial Mn enrichments (up to ∼17 wt %) well before those associated with the rise of oxygen such as the ∼2.2 Ga Kalahari Mn deposit. Using microscale X-ray spectroscopic techniques coupled to optical and electron microscopy and carbon isotope ratios, we demonstrate that the Mn is hosted exclusively in carbonate mineral phases derived from reduction of Mn oxides during diagenesis of primary sediments. Additional observations of independent proxies for O2--multiple S isotopes (measured by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry) and redox-sensitive detrital grains--reveal that the original Mn-oxide phases were not produced by reactions with O2, which points to a different high-potential oxidant. These results show that the oxidative branch of the Mn cycle predates the rise of oxygen, and provide strong support for the hypothesis that the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II evolved from a former transitional photosystem capable of single-electron oxidation reactions of Mn. PMID:23798417

  10. Manganese-oxidizing photosynthesis before the rise of cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jena E.; Webb, Samuel M.; Thomas, Katherine; Ono, Shuhei; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of oxygen-producing (oxygenic) photosynthesis fundamentally transformed our planet; however, the processes that led to the evolution of biological water splitting have remained largely unknown. To illuminate this history, we examined the behavior of the ancient Mn cycle using newly obtained scientific drill cores through an early Paleoproterozoic succession (2.415 Ga) preserved in South Africa. These strata contain substantial Mn enrichments (up to ∼17 wt %) well before those associated with the rise of oxygen such as the ∼2.2 Ga Kalahari Mn deposit. Using microscale X-ray spectroscopic techniques coupled to optical and electron microscopy and carbon isotope ratios, we demonstrate that the Mn is hosted exclusively in carbonate mineral phases derived from reduction of Mn oxides during diagenesis of primary sediments. Additional observations of independent proxies for O2—multiple S isotopes (measured by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry) and redox-sensitive detrital grains—reveal that the original Mn-oxide phases were not produced by reactions with O2, which points to a different high-potential oxidant. These results show that the oxidative branch of the Mn cycle predates the rise of oxygen, and provide strong support for the hypothesis that the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II evolved from a former transitional photosystem capable of single-electron oxidation reactions of Mn. PMID:23798417