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Sample records for manic depressive illness

  1. Linkage study between manic-depressive illness and chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Ewald, H.; Mors, O.; Flint, T.

    1996-04-09

    Chromosome 21, of interest as potentially containing a disease gene for manic-depressive illness as possible evidence for a gene predisposing to affective disorder, has recently been reported in a single large family as well as samples of families. The present study investigates for linkage between manic-depressive illness and markers covering the long arm of chromosome 21 in two manic-depressive families, using ten microsatellite polymorphisms as markers. No conclusive evidence for a disease gene on the long arm of chromosome 21 was found. Assuming either a dominant or recessive mode of inheritance, close linkage to the marker PFKL, which has been reported as possibly linked to affective disorder, seems unlikely in the families studied here. PFKL and more telomeric markers yielded small positive lod scores at higher recombination fractions in the largest family, and small positive lod scores at lower recombination fractions in the affecteds-only analyses in the smallest family. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Linkage analysis between manic-depressive illness and 35 classical markers

    SciTech Connect

    Ewald, H.; Mors, O.; Eiberg, H.

    1994-06-15

    The present study used carefully established phenotypes, several methods to reduce misclassification, and conservative genetic parameters. For the 35 markers investigated no evidence of linkage to manic-depressive illness was found, especially not to the markers on chromosomes 4q, 9q, and 19, which earlier has been suggested as possibly being linked to subtypes of manic-depressive illness. Close linkage to FY and SS(GYPB) was excluded for all chosen phenotypic models and to ACP1 and ADA for broader phenotypic models. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Flupenthixol decanoate in recurrent manic-depressive illness. A comparison with lithium.

    PubMed

    Ahlfors, U G; Baastrup, P C; Dencker, S J; Elgen, K; Lingjaerde, O; Pedersen, V; Schou, M; Aaskoven, O

    1981-09-01

    The hypothesis that flupenthixol decanoate may serve as an alternative to prophylactically administered lithium in recurrent manic-depressive illness, bipolar and unipolar type, was tested in two groups of patients. In Group I the patients were allocated randomly to maintenance treatment with either lithium or flupenthixol decanoate. The patients in Group II had previously been given lithium and were switched to flupenthixol decanoate because of unsatisfactory prophylactic effect of lithium, doubtful tablet compliance, troublesome side effects, or fear of later harmful effects. The flupenthixol decanoate dosage was 20 mg every 2-3 weeks. The study was not blind. In Group I neither lithium treatment (14 patients) nor treatment with flupenthixol decanoate (19 patients) led to a significant fall of mean episode frequency or mean per cent time ill. The reasons for this lack of response are not clear, but prognostically negative selection of the patients presumably took place before and possibly also during the hospitalization. Since absent effects cannot be compared, this part of the trial remains inconclusive. In Group II (93 patients) treatment with flupenthixol decanoate was associated with significant falls of the frequency of manic episodes and per cent time ill in mania and with significant rises of the frequency of depressive episodes and per cent time ill in depression. Increase of depressive morbidity was seen only in patients who had been given lithium during the pre-trial period and was presumably a result of the discontinuation of lithium. It is not known whether flupenthixol decanoate is of value in the prophylactic treatment of recurrent manic-depressive illness, but the drug may be worth trying in patients whose disease is dominated more by manic than by depressive recurrences and who do not respond to lithium or do not tolerate it or do not take it. PMID:7324992

  4. Systematic chromosome examination of two families with schizophrenia and two families with manic depressive illness

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, U.; Mors, O.; Ewald, H.

    1996-02-16

    Systematic and detailed chromosome analysis, combined with a semistructured interview, was performed in 2 families with schizophrenia and in 2 families with manic depressive illness. Prometaphase technique did not reveal any subtle structural chromosome abnormalities. However, in standard techniques, gain and loss of sex chromosomes were observed. This occurred in patients at a younger age than in unaffected persons. This gives rise to the suspicion that sex chromosome aneuploidy may somehow be related to the development of psychosis. But since the data set is small, especially with respect to schizophrenia, further studies are needed to elucidate this observation. In one family, cosegregation of the disease locus with a marker on chromosome 21 was seen. Therefore, further research should determine if chromosome 21 contains a gene for manic depressive illness. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. An association between Manic-depressive illness and a pseudoautosomal DNA marker

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Toshiaki; Ishida, Toru; Inayama, Yasuhiro; Nonomura, Yasuhiro; Kono, Yoshihiro; Asaba, Hiroyuki )

    1992-11-01

    This article reports on the association between manic-depressive illness and a polymorphic DNA marker in the pseudoautosomal region (Xp22.32; Yp11.3). The authors studied two markers in 49 biologically unrelated patients and 119 normal controls. Probe 362A (DXYS20) identified four alleles. Frequencies of the A4 allele were significantly higher in patients than in controls. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Manic depressive illness not linked to factor IX region in an independent series of pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Gejman, P V; Detera-Wadleigh, S; Martinez, M M; Berrettini, W H; Goldin, L R; Gelernter, J; Hsieh, W T; Gershon, E S

    1990-12-01

    We studied seven informative kindreds segregating for manic depressive illness (MDI), consistent with X-chromosome transmission of the trait (families do not show affective disease in both a father and a son), using markers mapped to the region of Xq27-Xq28. The lod scores were consistently below -2 in the region extending from about 10 cM centromeric from the Factor IX locus (F9) to the colorblindness region. This study does not replicate previous reports of linkage of MDI to Factor IX (Xq27) and colorblindness region (Xq28) chromosomal markers in other kindreds. PMID:1980485

  7. Linkage analysis between manic-depressive illness and markers on the long arm of chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Ewald, H.; Mors, O.; Eiberg, H.

    1995-10-09

    The long arm of chromosome 11 is one of the most interesting regions in the search for major genes involved in the etiology of manic-depressive illness. Several candidate genes have been identified, including the gene encoding the dopamine D2 receptor, the M1 muscarinic receptor, and porfobillinogen deaminase. Furthermore, different families with co-segregation of psychiatric illness and structural chromosome abnormalities involving regions 11q21, 11q22.3, and 11q25 have been reported. Using narrow as well as broad phenotypic models, conservative genetic parameters, models with dominant or recessive modes of inheritance, and various methods to reduce misclassification, the present study did not find evidence for a major gene causing manic-depressive illness on the long arm of chromosome 11. In the broader phenotypic models multi-point analyses excluded at least 11q14 to 11q23.3, approximately 60 cM, even in one large family. Assuming homogeneity, close linkage to DRD2 was excluded for all dominant models, and also in the affecteds-only analyses in the large family alone. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Lack of association between manic-depressive illness and a highly polymorphic marker from GABRA3 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Puertollano, R.; Piqueras, J.F.; Visedo, G.

    1995-10-09

    We have carried out an association study between a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in GABRA3 gene and manic-depressive illness in a Spanish population. This may be an important candidate gene for bipolar affective disorders since it is located in the Xq28 region, previously implicated in linkage studies. In addition, severe GABergic alterations have been reported in patients. We have not found significant differences between controls and patients in allele frequencies or genotypes. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Familial cosegregation of manic-depressive illness and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia

    SciTech Connect

    Piqueras, J.F.; Santos, J.; Puertollano, R.

    1995-06-19

    We report on a Spanish family with co-occurrence of manic-depression and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia. All affected individuals in the second generation showed cerebellar ataxia and manic-depression simultaneously. Since anticipation has been described in both disorders and the pattern of segregation may be autosomal as well as X-linked, we have searched for a possible involvement of two candidate genes which are located either on an autosome (SCA1) or on the X-chromosome (GABRA3). We concluded that expansion of trinucleotide repeats at SCA1 gene cannot be considered as a disease-causing mutation, and this gene should be initially discarded. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Cade's identification of lithium for manic-depressive illness--the prospector who found a gold nugget.

    PubMed

    Cole, Neil; Parker, Gordon

    2012-12-01

    John Cade's identification of lithium as a treatment of manic-depressive illness has been judged as a landmark biomedical advance and as an initiator of modern psychopharmacology. His personal background, interests, character, experiences, and key observational skills are sketched to provide the background and logic for his discovery and to argue against his simple self-description as a clinician administrator. The Cade story illustrates the potential strengths of clinical research whereby the clinician observes "signals," formulates hypotheses and explanations, and then pursues or encourages their validity and application. The suggestion that Cade simply "rediscovered lithium" is rejected. PMID:23197126

  11. A collaborative study of genetic linkage of bipolar manic-depressive illness and red/green colorblindness. A project of the biological psychiatry collaborative program of the world health organization.

    PubMed

    Gershon, E S; Mendlewicz, J; Gastpar, M; Bech, P; Goldin, L R; Kielholz, P; Refaelsen, O J; Vartanian, F; Bunney, W E

    1980-04-01

    A study of linkage of bipolar manic-depressive illness to the protan/deutan colorblindness region of the X-chromosome was performed on 16 informative families, in a WHO collaborative study (eight families from Brussels, Six from Bethesda, one each from Basel and Copenhagen). Overall, the series did not support close linkage, but is possibly suggestive of loose linkage. The possibility of genetic heterogeneity of bipolar manic-depressive illness, with one form linked to colorblindness, is considered. PMID:6969532

  12. Integrated theory to unify status among schizophrenia and manic depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, K

    2015-10-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase 1 is primarily expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, and has been associated with both schizophrenia and depression. Although decreased serotonin activity has been reported in both depression and mania, it is important to investigate the interaction between serotonin and other neurotransmitter systems. There are competitive relationships between branched-chain amino acids, and tryptophan and tyrosine that relate to physical activity, and between L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), both highly dependent on intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin concentrations. Here, I propose a chaos theory for schizophrenia, mania, and depression using the competitive interaction between tryptophan and tyrosine with regard to the blood-brain barrier and coenzyme tetrahydrobiopterin. Mania may be due to the initial conditions of physical hyperactivity and hypofunctional 5-HTP-producing cells inducing increased dopamine. Depression may be due to the initial conditions of physical hypoactivity and hypofunctional 5-HTP-producing cells inducing decreased serotonin. Psychomotor excitation may be due to the initial conditions of physical hyperactivity and hyperfunctional 5-HTP-producing cells inducing increased serotonin and substantially increased dopamine. The hallucinatory-paranoid state may be due to the initial conditions of physical hypoactivity and hyperfunctional 5-HTP-producing cells inducing increased serotonin and dopamine. PMID:26141636

  13. Modeling Manic-Depression with Symbolic Logic

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Charles; Banks, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    We characterize manic-depression in terms of symbolic logic and dynamical systems, and describe a computer simulation used to develop our theory. A formal theory of cognitive deficit has four parts. (1) For a normal representation we use the concept of sound and complete “self-axioms.” (2) Normal processing occurs when changes in our personal environment trigger a search for a new set of sound and complete self-axioms. (3) Deficits can lead to unsound judgement in mania and incomplete judgement in depression. (4) Adaptation may consist of attempts to suppress or use the changes in reasoning style. Since manic-depression involves changes in the temporal organization of mood and judgement, it can be classified as a dynamical disease. Nonlinear dynamical systems exhibit transitions between steady state, periodic, and chaotic behavior. We illustrate our approach with a computer simulation that searches through a small set of “self-axioms” while exhibiting periodic and chaotic behavior. In conclusion we conjecture that manic-depression may represent a bifurcation from the chaotic dynamics of normal emotional lability to the pathological periodicity of affective illness.

  14. In vivo assessment of dopamine D-2 and serotonin S-2 receptors measured by C-11 N-methylspiperone (NMSP) in manic-depressive illness

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.F.; Pearlson, G.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Dannals, R.F.; Suneja, S.; Bjorgvinsson, E.; Links, J.M.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Schaerf, F.

    1985-05-01

    The hypothesis has been suggested that either the dopaminergic or serotonergic neurotransmitter systems may be involved in manic-depressive illness (MD). The authors have studied 16 subjects with C-11 NMSP PET imaging. Two had never received neuroleptics; 4 were drug free for 1 month at the time of scanning; of these 3 were acutely manic; the rest were on stable lithium treatment. The dopamine and serotonin binding was estimated by the 43 min. caudate/cerebellum (Ca/Cb) and frontal/cerebellum (FC/Cb) ratios, respectively. No statistically significant difference was detected when compared to 44 age and sex matched controls. Based upon the variance in the normal data and the average age of the patient group studied, the probability of detecting a difference of >30% between patients and normals is >0.8. Hence, identification of receptor abnormalities if present will be improved with increased sample size of both normals and patients.

  15. Pseudoautosomal marker DXYS20 and manic depression

    SciTech Connect

    Noethen, M.M.; Cichon, S.; Erdmann, J.; Koerner, J.; Rietschel, M.; Propping, P. ); Rappold, G.A. ); Fritze, J. )

    1993-04-01

    Yoneda et al. (1992) observed a significant association between manic-depressive illness and a 13.5-kb band of the pseudoautosomal marker DXYS20 (probe 362A) in EcoRI digests of 49 Japanese patients compared with 119 controls. The 13.5-kb allele was designated [open quotes]A4 allele[close quotes] and was found on at least one chromosome in 46.9% of the patients, compared with 26.1% of the controls. The relative risk of the A4 allele for the disease was 2.51. The authors have genotyped the EcoRI RFLP in 73 patients (40 females and 33 males) who fulfill DSM-III-R criteria of manic-depressive illness (bipolar affective disorder) and in 79 controls (34 females and 45 males). All subjects included in the study were unrelated and were of German descent. They used the probe 3cos-PP, which, by sequence analysis, was shown to be directly homologous to the independently cloned probe 362A (Rappold et al. 1992). The pseudoautosomal locus DXYS20 represents a VNTR-like minisatellite, and many polymorphic bands are recognized by means of several restriction endonucleases (Page et al. 1987). In EcoRI digests, sizes of bands cluster, and the authors grouped their bands according to allele sizes used by Yoneda et al. In addition to the alleles reported by Yoneda et al., they observed a 10-kb band in five subjects. The results are shown in a table. The frequency of the A4 allele did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Thus, the data do not support a widespread or consistent association between DXYS20 and bipolar affective disorder. A large degree of ethnic variation is seen with DXYS20 (Rappold et al. 1992) and might explain the difference of allele frequencies in controls from Japan and Germany. Since VNTRs evolve rapidly, they may not always be the best markers to detect disease associations, where a positive effect requires linkage disequilibrium. In any case, it should be useful to study larger samples of Japanese patients and controls. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  16. The Clinical Picture of Mania in Manic-Depressive Black Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Billy E.; Robinson, Winvull M.; Parson, Elvin B.; Gray, Beverly A.

    1982-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that misdiagnosis of manic-depressive illness among blacks is a frequent occurrence. There are a number of historical and institutional dynamics involved in this process that have the roots of racism as their foundation. In light of this the authors decided to look at the clinical symptoms and behaviors of manic-depressive illness among black patients to see if their interpretation might be another contributing factor in misdiagnosis. The authors found the clinical symptoms of manic-depressive illness in black patients to be essentially what one would expect as determined by criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM III). However, there were cultural and socioeconomic determinants of behavior that affected the clinical manifestations. PMID:7120489

  17. Manic symptoms and impulsivity during bipolar depressive episodes

    PubMed Central

    Swann, Alan C; Moeller, F Gerard; Steinberg, Joel L; Schneider, Laurie; Barratt, Ernest S; Dougherty, Donald M

    2009-01-01

    Objectives In contrast to the extensive literature on the frequent occurrence of depressive symptoms in manic patients, there is little information about manic symptoms in bipolar depressions. Impulsivity is a prominent component of the manic syndrome, so manic features during depressive syndromes may be associated with impulsivity and its consequences, including increased risk of substance abuse and suicidal behavior. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of manic symptoms and their relationships to impulsivity and clinical characteristics in patients with bipolar depressive episodes. Methods In 56 bipolar I or II depressed subjects, we investigated the presence of manic symptoms, using Mania Rating Scale (MRS) scores from the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (SADS), and examined its association with other psychiatric symptoms (depression, anxiety, and psychosis), age of onset, history of alcohol and/or other substance abuse and of suicidal behavior, and measures of impulsivity. Results MRS ranged from 0 to 29 (25th–75th percentile, range 4–13), and correlated significantly with anxiety and psychosis, but not with depression, suggesting the superimposition of a separate psychopathological mechanism. Impulsivity and history of substance abuse, head trauma, or suicide attempt increased with increasing MRS. Receiver-operating curve analysis showed that MRS could divide patients into two groups based on history of alcohol abuse and suicide attempt, with an inflection point corresponding to an MRS score of 6. Discussion Even modest manic symptoms during bipolar depressive episodes were associated with greater impulsivity, and with histories of alcohol abuse and suicide attempts. Manic symptoms during depressive episodes suggest the presence of a potentially dangerous combination of depression and impulsivity. PMID:17430294

  18. Two manic-depressives, two tyrants, two world wars.

    PubMed

    Lieb, Julian

    2008-01-01

    Napoleon Bonaparte, Adolph Hitler and Joseph Stalin were tyrants who attained absolute power, and misused it in a gargantuan fashion, leaving in his wake a trail of hatred, devastation and death. All made war on their perceived enemies and on their own countrymen. In "A Brotherhood of Tyrants: Manic Depression and Absolute power" (1994) Amherst, Prometheus Books, D. Jablow Hershman and I expose manic-depressive disorder as the force that drove them to absolute power and the terrible abuse of it. We uncover manic-depressive disorder as a hidden cause of dictatorship, mass killing and war, and show how the psychopathology of the disorder can be a key factor in the political pathology of tyranny. In our earlier "The Key To Genius: Manic-Depression and the Creative Life" (1998) Amherst Prometheus Books we catalog the role of the disorder in the lives and careers of Isaac Newton, Ludwig von Beethoven, Charles Dickens, Vincent van Gogh and other creative geniuses. Thus manic-depressive disorder is variable to the extreme of paradox. Key to the destroyers is an indifference to the suffering of others, a need to control everyone and everything, a resistance to reason, and grandiose and paranoid delusions. The paranoid and grandiose delusions of manic-depressives are as infectious and as virulent as a deadly microbe, and can easily infect those in thrall to the host figure. It is a phenomenon known as "induced psychosis" and its imprint is often to be seen on the world stage. In this article I will add Kaiser Wilhelm to the list of manic-depressive warmongers, and passages from Robert Payne's "The Life and Death of Adolph Hitler" that are not only pathognomonic of manic-depressive disorder, but of the mixed variant. PMID:17881137

  19. Seasonal variation of manic and depressive symptoms in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Akhter, Ahmed; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Zhang, Tao; Potash, James B.; Cavanaugh, Joseph; Solomon, David A.; Coryell, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Analyses of seasonal variation of manic and depressive symptoms in bipolar disorder in retrospective studies examining admission data have yielded conflicting results. We examined seasonal variation of mood symptoms in a prospective cohort with long-term follow-up: The Collaborative Depression Study (CDS). Methods The CDS included participants from five academic centers with a prospective diagnosis of bipolar I or II disorder. The sample was limited to those who were followed for at least 10 years of annual or semi-annual assessments. Time series analyses and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models were used assess seasonal patterns of manic and depressive symptoms. Results A total of 314 individuals were analyzed [bipolar I disorder: (n = 202) and bipolar II disorder: (n = 112)] with both disorders exhibiting the lowest depressive symptoms in summer and highest around the winter solstice, though the winter peak in symptoms was statistically significant only with bipolar I disorder. Variation of manic symptoms was more pronounced in bipolar II disorder, with a significant peak in hypomanic symptomatology in the months surrounding the fall equinox. Conclusions Significant seasonal variation exists in bipolar disorder with manic/hypomanic symptoms peaking around the fall equinox and depressive symptoms peaking in months surrounding the winter solstice in bipolar I disorder. PMID:23621686

  20. Can personality traits predict increases in manic and depressive symptoms?

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Brian E.; Johnson, Sheri L.

    2010-01-01

    Background There has been limited research investigating personality traits as predictors of manic and depressive symptoms in bipolar individuals. The present study investigated the relation between personality traits and the course of bipolar disorder. The purpose of this study was to identify specific personality traits that predict the course of manic and depressive symptoms experienced by bipolar individuals. Methods The sample consisted of 39 participants with bipolar I disorder assessed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Personality was assessed using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. The Modified Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Bech–Rafaelsen Mania Rating Scale were used to assess symptom severity on a monthly basis. Results Consistent with previous research on unipolar depression, high Neuroticism predicted increases in depressive symptoms across time while controlling for baseline symptoms. Additionally, high Conscientiousness, particularly the Achievement Striving facet, predicted increases in manic symptoms across time. Limitations The current study was limited by the small number of participants, the reliance on a shortened version of a self-report personality measure, and the potential state-dependency of the personality measures. Conclusions Specific personality traits may assist in predicting bipolar symptoms across time. Further studies are needed to tease apart the state-dependency of personality. PMID:11246086

  1. Kraepelin's concept of manic-depressive insanity: one hundred years later.

    PubMed

    Zivanovic, Olga; Nedic, Aleksandra

    2012-03-01

    Kraepelin's work is frequently cited and repeatedly interpreted as groundwork for the categorical classification of mental disorders. The scope of this paper is to present a fragment of Kraepelin's contribution to the nosology of manic-depressive illness from another point of view. Studying conscientiously the original text written by Emil Kraepelin more than one hundred years ago, the reader could conclude that the author's attitudes were more in line with numerous contemporaries who promote the dimensional approach to the classification in psychiatry and spectrum concept of mood disorders. This text is an attempt to inspire the reader to examine the original textbook. PMID:21497402

  2. Search for a gene predisposing to manic-depression on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Byerley, W.; Holik, J.; Hoff, M.; Coon, H.

    1995-06-19

    Six kindreds containing multiple cases of manic-depressive illness (MDI) were genotyped with seven highly polymorphic microsatellite loci used in the construction of an index map for chromosome 21. The kindreds were also genotyped with a microsatellite polymorphism for PFKL, a chromosome 21 locus that has shown suggestive linkage to MDI in one pedigree. Evidence of linkage was not found assuming either autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. The nonparametric affected sib pair test did not yield significant evidence of linkage. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Virginia Woolf: manic-depressive psychosis and genius. An illustration of separation-individuation theory.

    PubMed

    Bond, A H

    1985-04-01

    Virginia Stephen was a member of one of England's great literary families, many of whom were also mentally ill. An exquisitely endowed infant, she was beautifully matched with her mother during the symbiotic state of development, and later called this period "the base upon which life stands." Difficulties presumably began as early as the differentiation subphase of separation. Mrs. Stephen appeared to be a narcissistic woman, who required constant affirmation, and thus was unable to respond to the needs of a developing child. Virginia probably was rescued from engulfment by a powerful biologically determined practicing period of separation-individuation. This great organismic surge, in all likelihood, is as characteristic of toddlers who are incipient manics as of children of future genius. Because of the strong regressive pull, it is probable that Virginia experienced a particularly high-powered glee in evading the field of her mother. This "economic condition," according to Freud, is a given that is felt by the manic as he overthrows the imprisoning restraints of the superego. Deflated by events beyond her control, such as the sadism of her siblings, Virginia probably attempted to return to her mother. But it appears that Mrs. Stephen was not available. Hence Virginia was forced to split off her anger and turn it against herself, keeping her aggression unavailable for neutralization. As a result she was unable to proceed to an age-adequate level of development. The raw rage lay smoldering within until many years later, when it burst forth to power her manic attacks. This failure of rapprochement presumably deflated Virginia, and resulted in a basic mood of depression already apparent in the nursery. Virginia also experienced a second basic mood, elation, which appears to have been characteristic of her even in well periods, and resembles the description of the typical manic victim given by Beck. PMID:3888936

  4. Early child-rearing practices in families with a manic-depressive parent.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Y B; Zahn-Waxler, C; Adland, M L; Mayfield, A

    1984-02-01

    Nurturing attitudes and behaviors among seven married couples, each of which contained one partner who had manic-depressive illness, and their young children were compared with those of normal control families. Mothers from index families, in contrast to control mothers, were less attentive to their children's health needs, emphasized performance in some achievement-related areas, were more overprotective, and reported more negative affect toward the child. They also were more disorganized, less active with their children, and more unhappy, tense, and ineffective. Index parents secured lower scores in the areas of family interaction and social adjustment, and they experienced situational problems of considerable severity, including clinical depression in the well parent. PMID:6691483

  5. Factorial structure of the manic-depressiveness scale in American college students.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed; Lester, David

    2005-06-01

    In a sample of 503 American college students, the correlational matrix (18 x 18) of the Thalbourne, et al. Manic-Depressiveness Scale (1994) was subjected to exploratory factor analysis with a varimax rotation, which showed 13 items had the correct assignment to one of the scales (six for depression and seven for mania). PMID:16050610

  6. The number of past manic episodes is the best predictor of antidepressant-emergent manic switch in a cohort of bipolar depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Gorwood, Philip; Richard-Devantoy, Stéphane; Sentissi, Othman; Le Strat, Yann; Olié, Jean Pierre

    2016-06-30

    The present study sought to identify factors associated with the onset of a manic or hypomanic episode during the month following a new antidepressant therapy in depressed bipolar patients. Patients receiving mood stabilizers for ≥3 months were screened from 400 French centers and were assessed for a 4-week period following prescription of a first or a new antidepressant. Of the 1242 included participants, 4.8% (n=60) experienced antidepressant-emergent manic switch (AEMS). AEMS was more frequently associated with lifetime manic, depressive, and total mood episodes, and with past AEMS. A higher score at two items of the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (pessimistic and suicidal thoughts) were significantly associated with AEMS. Logistic regression analysis showed that the number of lifetime manic episodes and past AEMS were the two most factors associated with an AEMS. Having more than four past manic episodes was associated with a 2.84 fold increased risk of AEMS. Cumulative number of past mood episodes seems to be the most important factor for switching to a manic episode following antidepressants in patients with bipolar disorder. Longer-term studies are required to further delineate antidepressant causality from natural disease course. PMID:27138820

  7. Revisiting Shimoda's “Shuuchaku-Kishitsu” (Statothymia): A Japanese View of Manic-Depressive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Although the empiric paradigm is now dominant in academic research, in Japan quite a few psychiatric clinicians still take phenomenological-anthropological approaches into consideration, especially when they address manic-depressive illness with typical endogenous features. This is because Shimoda's concept of “shuuchaku-kishitsu” (statothymia) has been widely accepted, together with other phenomenological views of continental origin. In the present paper the author first delineates Shimoda's concept which is based on observations of patients' personality features and the characteristics of their emotionality. He then attempts to refine this concept in spatiotemporal terms, presenting the view that in patients the past self tends to adhere to the present self (the term “shuuchaku” means “adhering to” or “preoccupied with”). He also considers that patients tend to incorporate “soto” (outer space) into “uchi” (inner space), where they believe that symbiotic relations are preserved. Finally, he argues the clinical significance of the presented views in the cultural milieu in which Japanese psychiatric practices are situated. PMID:21941642

  8. A genome-wide search for genes predisposing to manic-depression, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Jensen, S.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J.; Plaetke, R.; Reimherr, F.; Wender, P.; Leppert, M.; Byerley, W. )

    1993-06-01

    Manic-depressive illness (MDI), also known as [open quotes]bipolar affective disorder[close quotes], is a common and devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Although pivotal biochemical alterations underlying the disease are unknown, results of family, twin, and adoption studies consistently implicate genetic transmission in the pathogenesis of MDI. In order to carry out linkage analysis, the authors ascertained eight moderately sized pedigrees containing multiple cases of the disease. For a four-allele marker mapping at 5 cM from the disease gene, the pedigree sample has >97% power to detect a dominant allele under genetic homogeneity and has >73% power under 20% heterogeneity. To date, the eight pedigrees have been genotyped with 328 polymorphic DNA loci throughout the genome. When autosomal dominant inheritance was assumed, 273 DNA markers gave lod scores <[minus]2.0 at [theta] = .05, and 4 DNA marker loci yielded lod scores >1 (chromosome 5 -- D5S39, D5S43, and D5S62; chromosome 11 -- D11S85). Of the markers giving lod scores >1, only D5S62 continued to show evidence for linkage when the affected-pedigree-member method was used. The D5S62 locus maps to distal 5q, a region containing neurotransmitter-receptor genes for dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although additional work in this region may be warranted, the linkage results should be interpreted as preliminary data, as 68 unaffected individuals are not past the age of risk. 72 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. A genome-wide search for genes predisposing to manic-depression, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed Central

    Coon, H; Jensen, S; Hoff, M; Holik, J; Plaetke, R; Reimherr, F; Wender, P; Leppert, M; Byerley, W

    1993-01-01

    Manic-depressive illness (MDI), also known as "bipolar affective disorder," is a common and devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Although pivotal biochemical alterations underlying the disease are unknown, results of family, twin, and adoption studies consistently implicate genetic transmission in the pathogenesis of MDI. In order to carry out linkage analysis, we ascertained eight moderately sized pedigrees containing multiple cases of the disease. For a four-allele marker mapping 5 cM from the disease gene, the pedigree sample has > 97% power to detect a dominant allele under genetic homogeneity and has > 73% power under 20% heterogeneity. To date, the eight pedigrees have been genotyped with 328 polymorphic DNA loci throughout the genome. When autosomal dominant inheritance was assumed, 273 DNA markers gave lod scores < -2.0 at recombination fraction (theta) = .0, 174 DNA loci produced lod scores < -2.0 at theta = .05, and 4 DNA marker loci yielded lod scores > 1 (chromosome 5--D5S39, D5S43, and D5S62; chromosome 11--D11S85). Of the markers giving lod scores > 1, only D5S62 continued to show evidence for linkage when the affected-pedigree-member method was used. The D5S62 locus maps to distal 5q, a region containing neurotransmitter-receptor genes for dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although additional work in this region may be warranted, our linkage results should be interpreted as preliminary data, as 68 unaffected individuals are not past the age of risk. PMID:8503452

  10. Why some patients prefer to become manic-depressive rather than schizophrenic.

    PubMed Central

    Stierlin, H.; Weber, G.; Schmidt, G.; Simon, F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports the authors' observations on fifteen families in which a young adult member had been diagnosed as manic-depressive. All families were seen in systemic family therapy, with intervals of four to six weeks between sessions. The circular questioning method developed by Selvini-Palazzoli [1] and her team was widely employed. All families could be described as extremely rigid and bound-up systems characterized by a "restrictive parental complementarity," typical dynamics of reciprocal delegation, and certain cognitive features and shared assumptions. These "manic-depressive" families show similarities as well as differences when compared with families with schizophrenic members (i.e., "schizo-present" families). Finally, some therapeutic implications of this view and approach are developed. PMID:4049908

  11. Prevalence and clinical significance of subsyndromal manic symptoms, including irritability and psychomotor agitation, during bipolar major depressive episodes

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Lewis L.; Schettler, Pamela J.; Akiskal, Hagop; Coryell, William; Fawcett, Jan; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Solomon, David A.; Keller, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that subsyndromal manic symptoms occur frequently during bipolar major depressive episodes (MDEs) and may be a subtle form of ‘depressive mixed state.’ This paper examines the prevalence and clinical characteristics of MDEs with subsyndromal manic symptoms. The specific effects of overt irritability and psychomotor agitation are examined. Methods Bipolar (type I or II) patients with an MDE at intake (N=142) were compared based on the presence or absence of concurrent subsyndromal manic symptoms. The groups were further subdivided by the presence of symptoms of overt irritability and/or psychomotor agitation. Results Subsyndromal manic symptoms during bipolar MDEs were highly prevalent (76.1%), and were associated with significantly increased severity of depression/dysphoria in the intake episode, longer episode duration, and more suicidal ideation and behavior (past, current, and during long-term follow-up). Overt irritability and psychomotor agitation were the most prevalent subsyndromal manic symptoms (co-occurring in 57% and 39% of MDEs, respectively), and accounted for most of the negative effects associated with subsyndromal manic symptoms. Limitations The findings need to be confirmed in larger samples, which also examine the relationship to adequate antidepressant and/or mood stabilizing treatment. Conclusions The presence of one or more subsyndromal manic symptoms appears to be the modal presentation of bipolar MDEs and a marker for a subtle form of bipolar mixed depressive state. In particular, patients with symptoms of overt irritability and/or psychomotor agitation should be monitored closely to avoid serious clinical outcomes such as longer affective episodes, exacerbation of manic symptoms syndromal mania, and heightened suicidality. PMID:22314261

  12. Development and validation of the Affective Self Rating Scale for manic, depressive, and mixed affective states.

    PubMed

    Adler, Mats; Liberg, Benny; Andersson, Stig; Isacsson, Göran; Hetta, Jerker

    2008-01-01

    Most rating scales for affective disorders measure either depressive or hypomanic/manic symptoms and there are few scales for hypomania/mania in a self-rating format. We wanted to develop and validate a self-rating scale for comprehensive assessment of depressive, manic/hypomanic and mixed affective states. We developed an 18-item self-rating scale starting with the DSM-IV criteria for depression and mania, with subscales for depression and mania. The scale was evaluated on 61 patients with a diagnosis of affective disorder, predominantly bipolar disorder type I, using Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Hypomania Interview Guide-Clinical version (HIGH-C) and Clinical Global Impression scale, modified for bipolar patients (CGI-BP) as reference scales. Internal consistency of the scale measured by Cronbach's alpha was 0.89 for the depression subscale and 0.91 for the mania subscale. Spearman's correlation coefficients (two-tailed) between the depression subscale and MADRS was 0.74 (P<0.01) and between mania subscale and HIGH-C 0.80 (P<0.01). A rotated factor analysis of the scale supported the separation of symptoms in the mania and depression subscale. We established that the self-rating scales sensitivity to identify mixed states, with combined cut-offs on the MADRS and HIGH-C as reference, was 0.90 with a specificity of 0.71. The study shows that the Affective Self Rating Scale is highly correlated with ratings of established interview scales for depression and mania and that it may aid the detection of mixed affective states. PMID:18569776

  13. Manic/hypomanic Symptom Burden Predicts Cardiovascular Mortality with Bipolar Disorder in the Collaborative Depression Study

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Solomon, David A.; Endicott, Jean; Leon, Andrew C.; Li, Chunshan; Rice, John P.; Coryell, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder conveys an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. We compared the risk for cardiovascular mortality between bipolar I and bipolar II subtypes and determined correlates of cardiovascular mortality. Methods Participants with major affective disorders were recruited for the National Institute of Mental Health Collaborative Depression Study and followed prospectively for up to twenty-five years. A total of 435 participants met diagnostic criteria for bipolar I (N=288) or bipolar II (N=147) disorder based on Research Diagnostic Criteria at intake and measures of psychiatric symptoms during follow-up. Diagnostic subtypes were contrasted by cardiovascular mortality risk using Cox proportional-hazards regression. Affective symptom burden (the proportion of time with clinically significant manic/hypomanic or depressive symptoms) and treatment exposure were additionally included in the models. Results Thirty-three participants died from cardiovascular causes. Participants with bipolar I disorder had more than double the cardiovascular mortality risk of those with bipolar II disorder, after controlling for age and gender (HR=2.35, 95% C.I. 1.04–5.33, p=0.04). The observed difference in cardiovascular mortality between these subtypes was at least partially confounded by the burden of clinically significant manic/hypomanic symptoms which predicted cardiovascular mortality independent of diagnosis, treatment exposure, age, gender, and cardiovascular risk factors at intake. Selective serotonin uptake inhibitors appeared protective though were introduced late in follow-up. Depressive symptom burden was not related to cardiovascular mortality. Conclusions Participants with bipolar I disorder may face greater risk of cardiovascular mortality than those with bipolar II disorder. This difference in cardiovascular mortality risk may reflect manic/hypomanic symptom burden. PMID:19561163

  14. Specific alterations in plasma proteins during depressed, manic, and euthymic states of bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Song, Y.R.; Wu, B.; Yang, Y.T.; Chen, J.; Zhang, L.J.; Zhang, Z.W.; Shi, H.Y.; Huang, C.L.; Pan, J.X.; Xie, P.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common psychiatric mood disorder affecting more than 1-2% of the general population of different European countries. Unfortunately, there is no objective laboratory-based test to aid BD diagnosis or monitor its progression, and little is known about the molecular basis of BD. Here, we performed a comparative proteomic study to identify differentially expressed plasma proteins in various BD mood states (depressed BD, manic BD, and euthymic BD) relative to healthy controls. A total of 10 euthymic BD, 20 depressed BD, 15 manic BD, and 20 demographically matched healthy control subjects were recruited. Seven high-abundance proteins were immunodepleted in plasma samples from the 4 experimental groups, which were then subjected to proteome-wide expression profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomic results were validated by immunoblotting and bioinformatically analyzed using MetaCore. From a total of 32 proteins identified with 1.5-fold changes in expression compared with healthy controls, 16 proteins were perturbed in BD independent of mood state, while 16 proteins were specifically associated with particular BD mood states. Two mood-independent differential proteins, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and Apo L1, suggest that BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism. Moreover, down-regulation of one mood-dependent protein, carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA-1), suggests it may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes in BD. Thus, BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism that are independent of mood state, while CA-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes. PMID:26375446

  15. Specific alterations in plasma proteins during depressed, manic, and euthymic states of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Song, Y R; Wu, B; Yang, Y T; Chen, J; Zhang, L J; Zhang, Z W; Shi, H Y; Huang, C L; Pan, J X; Xie, P

    2015-11-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common psychiatric mood disorder affecting more than 1-2% of the general population of different European countries. Unfortunately, there is no objective laboratory-based test to aid BD diagnosis or monitor its progression, and little is known about the molecular basis of BD. Here, we performed a comparative proteomic study to identify differentially expressed plasma proteins in various BD mood states (depressed BD, manic BD, and euthymic BD) relative to healthy controls. A total of 10 euthymic BD, 20 depressed BD, 15 manic BD, and 20 demographically matched healthy control subjects were recruited. Seven high-abundance proteins were immunodepleted in plasma samples from the 4 experimental groups, which were then subjected to proteome-wide expression profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomic results were validated by immunoblotting and bioinformatically analyzed using MetaCore. From a total of 32 proteins identified with 1.5-fold changes in expression compared with healthy controls, 16 proteins were perturbed in BD independent of mood state, while 16 proteins were specifically associated with particular BD mood states. Two mood-independent differential proteins, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and Apo L1, suggest that BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism. Moreover, down-regulation of one mood-dependent protein, carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA-1), suggests it may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes in BD. Thus, BD pathophysiology may be associated with early perturbations in lipid metabolism that are independent of mood state, while CA-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive episodes. PMID:26375446

  16. Differential Diagnosis of an Elderly Manic-Depressive Patient with Depersonalization and Other Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Shigehiro; Itohiya, Yu; Sakamoto, Yuri; Sato, Yuki; Suyama, Yudai; Atsuta, Hidenori; Iwata, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The case study of an elderly man having persecutory delusions and bizarre complaints at the first psychiatric interview is reported. The patient complained: "I have no sense of time" and "I have no sense of money." He refused nursing care. He had delusions centered on himself including that of his own death, which were difficult to diagnose but suggested the possibility of Cotard's syndrome. We assumed that the man was depressed and treated him for depression. However, as a result of this treatment he became temporarily manic but finally recovered completely. After his recovery, we learnt the patient's past history of hospitalization for psychiatric problems, and based on that history he was diagnosed as suffering from a bipolar I disorder. The lack of typical symptoms of depression and the remarkable depersonalization and derealization in this patient made it difficult to infer a depressive state. Nevertheless, being attentive to his strange feelings related to the flow of time would have helped us to make an accurate diagnosis earlier. PMID:27293942

  17. Differential Diagnosis of an Elderly Manic-Depressive Patient with Depersonalization and Other Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Shigehiro; Itohiya, Yu; Sakamoto, Yuri; Sato, Yuki; Suyama, Yudai; Atsuta, Hidenori; Iwata, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The case study of an elderly man having persecutory delusions and bizarre complaints at the first psychiatric interview is reported. The patient complained: “I have no sense of time” and “I have no sense of money.” He refused nursing care. He had delusions centered on himself including that of his own death, which were difficult to diagnose but suggested the possibility of Cotard's syndrome. We assumed that the man was depressed and treated him for depression. However, as a result of this treatment he became temporarily manic but finally recovered completely. After his recovery, we learnt the patient's past history of hospitalization for psychiatric problems, and based on that history he was diagnosed as suffering from a bipolar I disorder. The lack of typical symptoms of depression and the remarkable depersonalization and derealization in this patient made it difficult to infer a depressive state. Nevertheless, being attentive to his strange feelings related to the flow of time would have helped us to make an accurate diagnosis earlier. PMID:27293942

  18. Evidence for a susceptibility locus for manic-depressive disorder in Xq26

    SciTech Connect

    Pekkarinen, P.; Bredbacka, P.E.; Terwilliger, J.

    1994-09-01

    Manic-depression (MD) is a severe psychiatric disorder affecting 1% of the population. Several linkage studies have provided evidence for a susceptibility locus for MD in chromosome Xq27-28. However, validity of these findings have remained unclear for several reasons: linkage has been suggested to two distinct chromosomal regions (F9 and CB-G6PD) separated by 30 cM, linkage has been found in only few of the pedigrees analyzed and ascertainment bias have probably been introduced when using classical markers like CB. The aim of our study was to analyze several markers expanding both of these regions in one extended Finnish pedigree with 13 affected individuals (bipolar or schizoaffective disorder) and without male-to-male transmission. Together 27 polymorphic X chromosomal markers were studied, 22 of them in Xq25-q28. Linkage analyses were carried out using a dominant model, 0.005 disease gene frequency, age-dependent penetrance with a maximum penetrance of 0.80 and low phenocopy rate. Two-point linkage analyses resulted in clearly negative lod scores (<-2) to almost all markers outside the chromosomal region of Xq26. Three markers DXS458, GABRA3 and G6PD, gave uninformative lod scores but respective chromosomal areas could be excluded by other markers in the vicinity. Opposite to this, several markers on Xq26 resulted in positive lod scores. A maximum lod score of 3.4 was obtained with the marker AFM205wd2 at {theta}=0.0. This marker is located about 7 cM centromeric to F9. When all published linkage data on Xq26-q28 was reanalyzed no evidence for locus heterogeneity emerged suggesting a more general significance of this DNA region in the predisposition to manic-depressive disorder.

  19. Renal function in 153 manic-depressive patients treated with lithium for more than five years.

    PubMed

    Løkkegaard, H; Andersen, N F; Henriksen, E; Bartels, P D; Brahm, M; Baastrup, P C; Jørgensen, H E; Larsen, M; Munck, O; Rasmussen, K

    1985-04-01

    Renal function was examined in 153 manic-depressive patients treated with lithium for more than 5 years, mean 10 years. No significant change was detectable in plasma creatinine. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decreased slightly, but significantly, and not until after 17 years of treatment did the regression line reach the lower confidence limit in the reference material. GFR was generally only moderately decreased. Renal concentrating capacity was significantly reduced during the whole investigation period and did not change with time. GFR was independent of the dosage pattern. The diuresis did not differ markedly in patients given one or three daily doses. In a two-dose group predominantly treated with slow-release tablets, the diuresis was somewhat higher in 75% of the patients but much higher for the rest of the group. Since the prophylactic effect of lithium was the same in the one-dose group (mean dosage 21 mmol/day) as in the two-dose and three-dose groups (mean dosage 27-28 mmol/day), our data indicate that generally employed lithium doses may be reduced somewhat without loss of prophylactic efficacy. PMID:4003100

  20. Affective disorders in referred children and younger siblings of manic-depressives. Mode of onset and prospective course.

    PubMed

    Akiskal, H S; Downs, J; Jordan, P; Watson, S; Daugherty, D; Pruitt, D B

    1985-10-01

    We studied 68 referred juvenile offspring or siblings of adult bipolar patients. Mean age at onset of affective and related disturbances was 15.9 years (range, 6 to 24 years). Although four of the ten prepubertal children had hypomanic features, full-blown manic psychosis did not appear before puberty. In the sample at large, 12 were classified as dysthymic and ten as cyclothymic. Eleven additional subjects with polysubstance abuse, who at onset did not meet criteria for affective disorder, were reclassified as having either a dysthymic or a cyclothymic disorder during follow-up. Of the remaining patients--24 depressive, eight manic, and three mixed state--71% experienced recurrences; mood-incongruent features, present in four cases at onset, recurred in only one patient during subsequent episodes. Overall, half the sample evidenced signs of bipolarity during a mean prospective follow-up period of three years. PMID:4037989

  1. Ernst Rüdin’s Unpublished 1922-1925 Study “Inheritance of Manic-Depressive Insanity”: Genetic Research Findings Subordinated to Eugenic Ideology

    PubMed Central

    Kösters, Gundula; Steinberg, Holger; Kirkby, Kenneth Clifford; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2015-01-01

    In the early 20th century, there were few therapeutic options for mental illness and asylum numbers were rising. This pessimistic outlook favoured the rise of the eugenics movement. Heredity was assumed to be the principal cause of mental illness. Politicians, scientists and clinicians in North America and Europe called for compulsory sterilisation of the mentally ill. Psychiatric genetic research aimed to prove a Mendelian mode of inheritance as a scientific justification for these measures. Ernst Rüdin’s seminal 1916 epidemiological study on inheritance of dementia praecox featured large, systematically ascertained samples and statistical analyses. Rüdin’s 1922–1925 study on the inheritance of “manic-depressive insanity” was completed in manuscript form, but never published. It failed to prove a pattern of Mendelian inheritance, counter to the tenets of eugenics of which Rüdin was a prominent proponent. It appears he withheld the study from publication, unable to reconcile this contradiction, thus subordinating his carefully derived scientific findings to his ideological preoccupations. Instead, Rüdin continued to promote prevention of assumed hereditary mental illnesses by prohibition of marriage or sterilisation and was influential in the introduction by the National Socialist regime of the 1933 “Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring” (Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses). PMID:26544949

  2. Ernst Rüdin's Unpublished 1922-1925 Study "Inheritance of Manic-Depressive Insanity": Genetic Research Findings Subordinated to Eugenic Ideology.

    PubMed

    Kösters, Gundula; Steinberg, Holger; Kirkby, Kenneth Clifford; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2015-11-01

    In the early 20th century, there were few therapeutic options for mental illness and asylum numbers were rising. This pessimistic outlook favoured the rise of the eugenics movement. Heredity was assumed to be the principal cause of mental illness. Politicians, scientists and clinicians in North America and Europe called for compulsory sterilisation of the mentally ill. Psychiatric genetic research aimed to prove a Mendelian mode of inheritance as a scientific justification for these measures. Ernst Rüdin's seminal 1916 epidemiological study on inheritance of dementia praecox featured large, systematically ascertained samples and statistical analyses. Rüdin's 1922-1925 study on the inheritance of "manic-depressive insanity" was completed in manuscript form, but never published. It failed to prove a pattern of Mendelian inheritance, counter to the tenets of eugenics of which Rüdin was a prominent proponent. It appears he withheld the study from publication, unable to reconcile this contradiction, thus subordinating his carefully derived scientific findings to his ideological preoccupations. Instead, Rüdin continued to promote prevention of assumed hereditary mental illnesses by prohibition of marriage or sterilisation and was influential in the introduction by the National Socialist regime of the 1933 "Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring" (Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses). PMID:26544949

  3. Beating Depression …Help Is Available

    MedlinePlus

    ... functioning well or feeling good. Bipolar disorder (or manic depressive illness ) is characterized by cycling mood changes: severe highs (mania) and lows (depression), often with periods of normal mood in ... depressed or manic experiences every symptom. The severity of symptoms varies ...

  4. A Case Report of Isotretinoin-induced Manic Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucca, Jisha M; Varghese, Niphy Annie; Ramesh, Madhan; Ram, Dushad

    2016-01-01

    Isotretinoin, an oral vitamin A derivative, used to treat severe treatment-resistant acne. Psychiatric side effects of isotretinoin particularly depression and suicidal thoughts have been well documented. We report a case of isotretinoin-induced manic psychosis in a young female without a family history and history of mental illness. PMID:26955128

  5. Plain Talk about Depression. Plain Talk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargent, Marilyn

    Depression is defined as a "whole-body" illness, involving the body, mood, and thoughts. Three of the most prevalent types of depressive disorders are described: major depression, dysthymia, and bipolar disorders (formerly called manic-depressive illness). Eleven symptoms of depression and 10 symptoms of mania are listed. Causes of depression are…

  6. Depressive Illness: Pervasive Yet Mystifying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Doctors annually treat between approximately four and eight million Americans for depression. Behavioral changes in depressed individuals are characterized by sadness, loneliness, and apathy. Other symptoms include fatigue, early morning insomnia, loss of appetite, and suicide attempts. Underlying depression may mask itself in physical symptoms,…

  7. Depressive Illness and Aggression in Belfast

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, H. A.

    1972-01-01

    An inverse relation has been suggested between the incidence of depressive illness and the opportunity to externalize aggressive behaviour. The riot situation in Belfast in 1969-70 provided an opportunity to study this hypothesis. The incidences of depressive illness in the city and a neighbouring peaceful rural county were compared over a number of years. Data regarding age, sex, area of the city, and type of depression were obtained. The city was divided into areas and four of these were studied in detail. Similar data were obtained for persons showing aggressive behaviour. There was a significant decrease in depressive illness in Belfast in both sexes and all age groups. This was more pronounced in males but the decrease was confined to those in social groups IV and V. The decrease was more significant in riot areas. The suicide rate fell by almost 50% and there was a noticeable increase in the rates of homicide and crimes of violence. In contrast the rural county showed a sharp increase in male depressives. PMID:5008660

  8. Manic depressive psychosis and schizophrenia are neurological disorders at the extremes of CNS maturation and nutritional disorders associated with a deficit in marine fat.

    PubMed

    Saugstad, L F

    2001-12-01

    The maturational theory of brain development comprises manic depressive psychosis and schizophrenia. It holds that the disorders are part of human diversity in growth and maturation, which explains their ubiquity, shared susceptibility genes and multifactorial inheritance. Rate of maturation and age at puberty are the genotype; the disorders are localized at the extremes with normality in between. This is based on the association between onset of puberty and the final regressive event, with pruning of 40% of excitatory synapses leaving the inhibitory ones fairly unchanged. This makes excitability, a fundamental property of nervous tissue, a distinguishing factor: the earlier puberty, the greater excitability--the later puberty, the greater deficit. Biological treatment supports deviation from the norm: neuroleptics are convulsant; antidepressives are anti-epiletogenic. There is an association between onset of puberty and body-build: early maturers are pyknic broad-built, late ones linearly leptosomic. This discrepancy is similar to that in the two disorders, supporting the theory that body-build is the phenotype. Standard of living is the environmental factor, which affects pubertal age and shifts the panorama of mental illness accordingly. Unnatural death has increased with antipsychotics. Other treatment is needed. PUFA deficit has been observed in RBC in both disorders and striking improvements with addition of minor amounts of PUFA. This supports that dietary deficit might cause psychotic development and that prevention is possible. Other neurological disorders also profit from PUFA, underlining a general deficit in the diet. PMID:11918426

  9. THE COURSE OF DEPRESSIVE ILLNESS : A FOLLOW-UP INVESTIGATION OF 92 CASES

    PubMed Central

    Gada, Manilal

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY Ninety two out of one hundred cases of major depressive disorder were followed up for a period of 5 to 10 years after the index diagnosis. 36.6 per cent of the cases, had no recurrence. Out of the 63.4 per cent of the cases who had recurrences, 37.8 per cent cases turned out to be having bipolar affective disorder and remaining 25.6 per cent had major depressive disorder, recurrent type. The change of polarity from major depressive disorder to bipolar affective illness occurred within three years after the initial depressive episode in 77 per cent of the cases. The number of depressive episodes before I he onset of mania, was one in 63.0 per cent of the cases; two in 33.3 per cent and three in 3.7 per cent. 31 cases of bipolar affective disorder had a total of 152 recurrences, comprising 97 manic and 55 depressive episodes, the average being 4.9. The total number of episodes in 21 cases of major depressive disorder, recurrent type, were 73 yielding an average of 3.4, significantly less than those of bipolar affective illness cases. 2.2 per cent of the cases had successfully committed suicide. PMID:21927383

  10. Depression Strikes, Stays with Many Caregivers of Critically Ill

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158780.html Depression Strikes, Stays With Many Caregivers of Critically Ill ... News) -- Caregivers for the critically ill often suffer depression that lingers long after their loved one's hospital ...

  11. Suicidality and symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation in patients experiencing manic episodes with depressive symptoms: a naturalistic study

    PubMed Central

    Eberhard, Jonas; Weiller, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with a bipolar I disorder (BD-I) manic episode meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), criteria for “with mixed features” have a high incidence of suicide attempts and of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (AIA) symptoms. The aim of this analysis was to explore the relationship between suicidality and AIA symptoms in patients with BD-I experiencing mania with depressive symptoms, using data from a previous naturalistic study. Patients and methods Psychiatrists completed an online questionnaire about their adult patients who had a current BD-I manic episode. Questions covered the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier, the severity of AIA symptoms, the frequency and controllability of suicidal ideation, and the number of suicide attempts. Results Of 1,035 patients with BD-I mania who were included in the analyses, 348 (33.6%) met the criteria for the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier (three or more depressive symptoms). These patients were further stratified according to the severity of their AIA symptoms: “mild AIA” (zero or one AIA symptom above a severity threshold; 105 patients) or “severe AIA” (all three AIA symptoms above a severity threshold; 167 patients). A greater incidence of suicidal ideation was observed in the severe AIA group (71.9%) than in the mild AIA group (47.6%). Twice as many patients had easily controlled suicidal ideation than difficult-to-control suicidal ideation in both subgroups. The mean number of suicide attempts was higher in the severe AIA group than in the mild AIA group, during the current episode (0.84 vs 0.34 attempts, respectively; P<0.05) and over the patient’s lifetime (1.56 vs 1.04 attempts, respectively). Conclusion The high risk of suicide among BD-I mania patients with depressive symptoms is further increased when they experience severe AIA symptoms. Recognizing AIA symptoms in BD-I mania could provide a means of identifying

  12. The noradrenaline metabolite MHPG is a candidate biomarker between the depressive, remission, and manic states in bipolar disorder I: two long-term naturalistic case reports

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Masatake; Nishino, Satoshi; Numata, Yukio; Okubo, Yoshiro; Sato, Tadahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of the depressive and manic states in bipolar disorder I (BDI) is a challenge for psychiatrists. Despite the recognized importance of the switch phenomenon, the precise mechanisms underlying this process are yet to be shown. We conducted a naturalistic study in two BDI patients to determine whether biological markers (monoamine metabolites and brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF]) are associated with the switch between depressive and manic states. Case presentation and methods Blood sampling and mood assessments were performed at 2-week intervals over a period of 2 (Case 1, n=72) and 6 (Case 2, n=183) years. Plasma concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Plasma BDNF was assayed by sandwich ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Results MHPG had the highest standardized coefficient (β) in the multiple regression analysis. We found a significant positive correlation between Young Mania Rating Scale scores and plasma MHPG levels (Case 1: ρ=0.429; Case 2: ρ=0.488), and a significant negative correlation between Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores and MHPG levels (Case 1: ρ=−0.542; Case 2: ρ=−0.465). Conversely, no significant correlation was found between the level of BDNF and the presence of a manic or depressive state, and although HVA had a slightly stronger correlation than MHPG, the levels of neither of these were found to significantly correlate with the symptoms. Conclusion These data suggest that peripheral MHPG levels (which is related to noradrenaline levels in the brain) could be used as a biomarker of mood states in BDI. The noradrenaline level in the brain is likely to reflect the clinical characteristics of the switch process in BDI, and has prognostic significance for the treatment of both manic and depressive states. PMID:25709459

  13. Creativity in Manic-Depressives, Cyclothymes, Their Normal Relatives, and Control Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ruth L.; And Others

    Although previous studies support familial and individual relationships between creativity and affective illness, most have examined eminent creative individuals. This is the first study of creativity in subjects defined only by psychodiagnostic criteria. Creative accomplishment over the adult lifetime was assessed broadly using a new instrument,…

  14. Illness perceptions associated with perinatal depression treatment use.

    PubMed

    O'Mahen, Heather A; Flynn, Heather A; Chermack, Stephen; Marcus, Sheila

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between psychological beliefs about depression and depression treatment use was examined in depressed pregnant and postpartum women using the Common Sense Model as a framework (CSM; Leventhal H, Nerenz DR, Steele DF (1984) A handbook of psychology and health illness representations and coping with health threats. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.). Pregnant women who screened >/ 10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; Cox et al. Br J Psychiatry 150:782-786, 1987) completed measures of depression symptoms, perceptions and treatment at three time points through 6 weeks postpartum. Understanding modifiable beliefs may be useful in improving low rates of perinatal depression treatment use. PMID:19471852

  15. [Organic illness and depressions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bertagna, L

    1981-01-01

    There exist between depressions and organic disorders both structural and fortuitous relationships. Psychiatrists must know the former and non-psychiatrists must be suspicious of the latter. It is to be noticed that serious and mainly deadly diseases bring about the cure of current depressions and prevent, even in the case of patients showing a predisposition to them, the development of depressions that would still seem to be justified. Non-psychiatrists will often adopt, as regards depression, two opposite attitudes whose consequences may be serious: whether they unduly take the psychiatric approach to treat the organic ailments, or whether they ignore or deny the depressive fact and the therapeutic necessities. This communication will indicate precise cases when this double misunderstanding had had, or might have had tragic consequences. PMID:7318767

  16. The inflammasome: Pathways linking psychological stress, depression, and systemic illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Masaaki; Ota, Kristie T.; Duman, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Stress is a common occurrence in everyday life and repeated or traumatic stress can be a precipitating factor for illnesses of the central nervous system, as well as peripheral organ systems. For example, severe or long-term psychological stress can not only induce depression, a leading illness worldwide, but can also cause psychosomatic diseases such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Related key questions include how psychological stress influences both brain and peripheral systems, and what detection mechanisms underlie these effects? A clue is provided by the discovery of the pathways underlying the responses to host “danger” substances that cause systemic diseases, but can also contribute to depression. The inflammasome is a protein complex that can detect diverse danger signals and produce the accompanying immune-inflammatory reactions. Interestingly, the inflammasome can detect not only pathogen-associated molecules, but also cell damage-associated molecules such as ATP. Here, we propose a new inflammasome hypothesis of depression and related comorbid systemic illnesses. According to this hypothesis, the inflammasome is a central mediator by which psychological and physical stressors can contribute to the development of depression, and as well as a bridge to systemic diseases. This hypothesis includes an explanation for how psychological stress can influence systemic diseases, and conversely how systemic diseases can lead to psychiatric illnesses. The evidence suggests that the inflammasome may be a new target for the development of treatments for depression, as well as psychosomatic and somatopsycho diseases. PMID:23261775

  17. FOUR YEAR FOLLOW-UP OF FIRST EPISODE MANIC PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Khess, Christoday R.J.; Das, Jnanamay; Akhtar, Sayeed

    1997-01-01

    51 patients who were admitted for their first manic episode were followed up for 4 years after discharge from the hospital. 32 (62.7%) patients came for regular follow-ups whereas 19 (37.3%) patients did not come for any follow up. 19 (59.4%) patients out of the 32 patients had subsequent recurrences. 8 (25.0%) patients had a single recurrence only, whereas 11 (34.4%) patients had multiple recurrences. In total, 31 (74.19%) recurrences occurred in 4 years, out of which 23 (25.81%) recurrences were for mania and only 8 for depression. 46.88% patients had relapsed at the end of the first year and by the third year all 19 (59.4%) patients had relapsed. The chances of having a depressive episode was highest in the first six months after recovery from manic episode. Patients with a family history of bipolar illness had a more deleterious course. Poor drug compliance was a factor associated with greater relapse rates. Amongst the patients receiving regular medication, the patients who were on lithium had the best outcome. 48.8% patients had subsequent admissions in the four year follow up. Patients with late age of onset and substance abuse had required greater number of admissions. PMID:21584064

  18. Amphetamine sensitization in mice is sufficient to produce both manic- and depressive-related behaviors as well as changes in the functional connectivity of corticolimbic structures.

    PubMed

    Pathak, G; Ibrahim, B A; McCarthy, S A; Baker, K; Kelly, M P

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that amphetamine abuse and withdrawal mimics the diverse nature of bipolar disorder symptomatology in humans. Here, we determined if a single paradigm of amphetamine sensitization would be sufficient to produce both manic- and depressive-related behaviors in mice. CD-1 mice were subcutaneously dosed for 5 days with 1.8 mg/kg d-amphetamine or vehicle. On days 6-31 of withdrawal, amphetamine-sensitized (AS) mice were compared to vehicle-treated (VT) mice on a range of behavioral and biochemical endpoints. AS mice demonstrated reliable mania- and depression-related behaviors from day 7 to day 28 of withdrawal. Relative to VT mice, AS mice exhibited long-lasting mania-like hyperactivity following either an acute 30-min restraint stress or a low-dose 1 mg/kg d-amphetamine challenge, which was attenuated by the mood-stabilizers lithium and quetiapine. In absence of any challenge, AS mice showed anhedonia-like decreases in sucrose preference and depression-like impairments in the off-line consolidation of motor memory, as reflected by the lack of spontaneous improvement across days of training on the rotarod. AS mice also demonstrated a functional impairment in nest building, an ethologically-relevant activity of daily living. Western blot analyses revealed a significant increase in methylation of histone 3 at lysine 9 (H3K9), but not lysine 4 (H3K4), in hippocampus of AS mice relative to VT mice. In situ hybridization for the immediate-early gene activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) further revealed heightened activation of corticolimbic structures, decreased functional connectivity between frontal cortex and striatum, and increased functional connectivity between the amygdala and hippocampus of AS mice. The effects of amphetamine sensitization were blunted in C57BL/6J mice relative to CD-1 mice. These results show that a single amphetamine sensitization protocol is sufficient to produce behavioral, functional, and biochemical

  19. Altered hippocampal morphology in unmedicated patients with major depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Bearden, Carrie E; Thompson, Paul M; Avedissian, Christina; Klunder, Andrea D; Nicoletti, Mark; Dierschke, Nicole; Brambilla, Paolo; Soares, Jair C

    2009-01-01

    Despite converging evidence that major depressive illness is associated with both memory impairment and hippocampal pathology, findings vary widely across studies and it is not known whether these changes are regionally specific. In the present study we acquired brain MRIs (magnetic resonance images) from 31 unmedicated patients with MDD (major depressive disorder; mean age 39.2+/-11.9 years; 77% female) and 31 demographically comparable controls. Three-dimensional parametric mesh models were created to examine localized alterations of hippocampal morphology. Although global volumes did not differ between groups, statistical mapping results revealed that in MDD patients, more severe depressive symptoms were associated with greater left hippocampal atrophy, particularly in CA1 (cornu ammonis 1) subfields and the subiculum. However, previous treatment with atypical antipsychotics was associated with a trend towards larger left hippocampal volume. Our findings suggest effects of illness severity on hippocampal size, as well as a possible effect of past history of atypical antipsychotic treatment, which may reflect prolonged neuroprotective effects. This possibility awaits confirmation in longitudinal studies. PMID:19843010

  20. Selective responsiveness of chronically ill children to assessments of depression.

    PubMed

    Worchel, F F; Rae, W A; Olson, T K; Crowley, S L

    1992-12-01

    Many investigators have noted that depression is a common symptom among pediatric cancer patients. However, prevalence rates vary widely across studies. This variation in prevalence rates may be due, in part, to selective reporting of patients based on measures used and environmental cues. In this study, we evaluated 50 chronically ill pediatric patients (19 cancer and 31 diabetic patients) for their use of selective reporting of depression. Factors in the 2 x 2 design were Intervention (disclosure videotape and cartoon videotape) and Examiner (familiar examiner and unfamiliar examiner). In the Intervention manipulation, subjects were shown either a videotape prompting the child that self-disclosure was appropriate or a tape of a cartoon (control condition). In the Examiner manipulation, subjects were administered the experimental measures by either a familiar (parent) or unfamiliar (research assistant) examiner. Dependent variables were the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 1981), the Depression scale of the Roberts Apperception Test for Children (RATC; McArthur & Roberts, 1982), and a depression measure taken from the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL; Achenbach & Edelbrock, 1983). As hypothesized, the Examiner x Intervention interaction revealed that children who did not view the disclosure videotape and who were tested by an unfamiliar examiner gave significantly lower self-reports of depression on the CDI than children in the other conditions. However, parent and child projective reports of depression did not vary as a function of experimental condition. The results are interpreted as selective responding on the part of pediatric patients. Limitations of assessing internal psychological states in children are discussed. PMID:1487812

  1. Portrayal of Depression and Other Mental Illnesses in Australian Nonfiction Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Catherine; Pirkis, Jane; Blood, R. Warwick; Dunt, David; Burgess, Philip; Morley, Belinda; Stewart, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This study describes Australian media portrayal of mental illnesses, focusing on depression. A random sample of 1,123 items was selected for analysis from a pool of 13,389 nonfictional media items about mental illness collected between March 2000 and February 2001. Depression was portrayed more frequently than other mental illnesses. Items about…

  2. Multimorbidity in a Mexican Community: Secondary Analysis of Chronic Illness and Depression Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Kathleen; Vizcaino, Maricarmen; Ibarra, Jorge M.; Balcazar, Hector; Perez, Eduardo; Flores, Luis; Anders, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this article are: 1) to examine the associations between health provider-diagnosed depression and multimorbidity, the condition of suffering from more than two chronic illnesses; 2) to assess the unique contribution of chronic illness in the prediction of depression; and 3) to suggest practice changes that would address risk of depression among individuals with chronic illnesses. Data collected in a cross-sectional community health study among adult Mexicans (n= 274) living in a low income neighborhood (colonia) in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico, were examined. We tested the hypotheses that individuals who reported suffering chronic illnesses would also report higher rates of depression than healthy individuals; and having that two or more chronic illnesses further increased the risk of depression. PMID:26640817

  3. The Relationship Between Chronic Illness and Depression in a Community of Urban Black Elderly Persons

    PubMed Central

    Bazargan, Mohsen; Hamm-Baugh, Verneda P.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between depression and chronic illness among the elderly population has often been investigated. However, the impact of individual chronic illnesses while controlling for the impact of various psychosocial factors is still not well understood. This is particularly true among Black elderly persons. In a cross-sectional study, the impact of selected chronic illnesses and psychosocial variables on depression was investigated among 1,022 Black urban elderly persons who reside in New Orleans, Louisiana. Depression was greatest among those with more financial difficulties, more stressful life events, lower self-perceptions, less support from friends, and less instrumental support. Multiple regression analysis determined that depression was greatest among elderly persons who reported kidney, vision, and/or circulation problems. These findings suggest that elderly persons may perceive these three illnesses as more debilitating than other chronic illnesses. PMID:7757840

  4. Bipolar outcome in the course of depressive illness. Phenomenologic, familial, and pharmacologic predictors.

    PubMed

    Akiskal, H S; Walker, P; Puzantian, V R; King, D; Rosenthal, T L; Dranon, M

    1983-05-01

    Twenty percent of a cohort of 206 outpatient depressives with no past bipolar history switched during prospective observation. These 41 probands developed manic periods on the average of 6.4 years (median 4, range 1-25) after their first depressive episode. The change in polarity occurred throughout the life span, but was most common in adolescence and early adulthood. The following variables were found useful in predicting this outcome: onset less than or equal to 25 years, bipolar family history, loaded pedigrees, precipitation by childbirth, hypersomnic-retarded phenomenology, and pharmacologically-mobilized hypomania. Although the respective sensitivities of these findings were relatively low (32-71%), their specificities ranged from 69% to 100% for bipolar outcome; the diagnostic specificity of any 3 of these variables when combined was 98%. When compared with nonbipolar depression, bipolar disorder was seldom chronologically secondary to nonaffective psychiatric disorders. These findings suggest that many young depressives with lethargy and oversleeping are not manifesting a "neurotic" disorder, but rather a precursor of primary bipolar affective disorder. Finally, a psychotically depressed adolescent or young adult with positive bipolar family history should be observed for eventual bipolar outcome, especially when the clinical presentation is that of stupor. PMID:6222091

  5. Discriminating Risk and Resilience Endophenotypes From Lifetime Illness Effects in Familial Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Bradley S.; Wang, Zhishun; Horga, Guillermo; Warner, Virginia; Rutherford, Bret; Klahr, Kristin W.; Graniello, Barbara; Wickramaratne, Priya; Garcia, Felix; Yu, Shan; Hao, Xuejun; Adams, Phillip B.; Qian, Ming; Liu, Jun; Gerber, Andrew; Weissman, Myrna M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The neural systems that confer risk or vulnerability for developing familial depression, and those that protect against or confer resilience to becoming ill, can be disentangled from the effects of prior illness by comparing brain imaging measures in previously ill and never ill persons who have either a high or low familial risk for depression. OBJECTIVE To distinguish risk and resilience endophenotypes for major depression from the effects of prior lifetime illness. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure and compare brain function during performance of an attentional, self-regulatory task across a large sample of multigenerational families ascertained specifically to be at either high or low risk for developing major depression. Study procedures were performed in a university setting. A total of 143 community participants were followed up prospectively for more than 20 years in a university setting. The sample was enriched with persons who were at higher or lower familial risk for developing depression based on being biological offspring of either a clinical sample of persons with major depression or a community control sample of persons with no discernible lifetime illness. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Task-related change in blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. RESULTS A risk endophenotype included greater activation of cortical attention circuits. A resilience endophenotype included greater activation of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. The effects of prior lifetime illness were common to both risk groups and included greater deactivation of default-mode circuits. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These findings identify neural systems that increase risk for depression, those that protect from illness, and those that endure following illness onset, and they suggest circuits to target for developing novel preventive and therapeutic interventions. PMID:24369340

  6. Clinical Implications in the Treatment of Mania: Reducing Risk Behavior in Manic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    Bipolar individuals engage in risky behavior during manic phases that contributes to their vulnerability to regret during their depressive phases. A cognitive model of risk assessment is proposed in which manic risk assessment is based on exaggeration of current and future resources, high utility for gains, low demands for information to assess…

  7. Identifying the Links between Chronic Illness and Depression: Cognitive-Behavioral Mediators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Dennis C.; And Others

    All chronic illnesses represent assaults on multiple areas of functioning, not just the body. To examine the association between painful chronic illnesses and depression from a cognitive-behavioral perspective, 100 patients of the Pain Management Program at the West Haven, Connecticut Veterans Administration Hospital (78% males) completed a…

  8. [On Annotation on the Names and Syndromes of Ancient Diseases, with textual research on"dian (depressive psychosis)","kuang (manic psychosis)", and"xian (epilepsy)"].

    PubMed

    Li, Z H; Wang, Y L

    2016-01-28

    The book Gu dai ji bing ming hou shu yi (Annotation on the Names and Syndromes of Ancient Diseases) written by Yu Yunxiu holds that dian can be divided into two conditions, namely, epilepsy and manic psychosis. By analysis on related materials in ancient lexicographical works, ancient medical books and other ancient books, it reveals that dian and kuang are two very different diseases, but dian and xian refer to the same conditions. Dian was the special name of a disease, while xian was a stage of syndrome of that disease with typical symptoms. Dian and xian might also refer to two different types of that disease. Dian always refers to epilepsy from its very beginning besides cephalopathy, including both mental symptom and physical symptom. PMID:27049739

  9. Chronic Illness and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Older Adults: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Kee-Lee; Chi, Iris

    2002-01-01

    Depression is quite common among the elderly members of Hong Kong Chinese society. This study examined the impact of a series of chronic illnesses on change in depressive symptoms among the older people. The respondents were 260 people aged 70 years or older from a longitudinal study of a representative community sample of the elderly population…

  10. Anxiety and depression in mothers and fathers of a chronically ill child.

    PubMed

    van Oers, H A; Haverman, L; Limperg, P F; van Dijk-Lokkart, E M; Maurice-Stam, H; Grootenhuis, M A

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to determine the levels of anxiety and depression in mothers and fathers of a chronically ill child (0-18 years) and to study which parental and child variables are associated with anxiety and depression. In a cross-sectional design, anxiety and depression were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Scores were compared to a Dutch reference group by analysis of variance and logistic regression analysis. Linear regression analyses were performed to examine which variables were associated with anxiety and depression. Mothers of a chronically ill child (n = 566) scored significantly higher than the reference group (p < .001) on anxiety (Mean 5.9 vs 4.8) and depression (Mean 4.5 vs 3.1). Fathers (n = 123) had higher depression scores (Mean 4.5 vs 3.6; p < .05), but fathers' anxiety scores were comparable to the reference group. The percentages of mothers in the clinical range of anxiety (31.8 vs 20.7 %, OR 2.03, 95 % CI 1.46-2.83) and depression (23.0 vs 12.0 %, OR 2.76, 95 % CI 1.84-4.13) were higher (p < .001) than in the reference group. No differences were found for fathers in the clinical range for anxiety and depression. Practical problems in daily life (a: β = .33, d: β = .25) and parenting stress (a: β = .30, d: β = .32) showed the strongest association with anxiety and depression for parents as a group. Illness-related characteristics of the child were not related. Parents of a chronically ill child, especially mothers, reported high levels of anxiety and depression. Awareness about parental anxiety and depression in pediatrics is important as well as targeted interventions. PMID:24791971

  11. Illness beliefs of Chinese American immigrants with major depressive disorder in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Justin A; Hung, Galen Chin-Lun; Parkin, Susannah; Fava, Maurizio; Yeung, Albert S

    2015-02-01

    Underutilization of mental health services in the U.S. is compounded among racial/ethnic minorities, especially Chinese Americans. Culturally based illness beliefs influence help-seeking behavior and may provide insights into strategies for increasing utilization rates among vulnerable populations. This is the first large descriptive study of depressed Chinese American immigrant patients' illness beliefs using a standardized instrument. 190 depressed Chinese immigrants seeking primary care at South Cove Community Health Center completed the Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue, which probes different dimensions of illness beliefs: chief complaint, labeling of illness, stigma perception, causal attributions, and help-seeking patterns. Responses were sorted into categories by independent raters and results compared to an earlier study at the same site and using the same instrument. Contrary to prior findings that depressed Chinese individuals tend to present with primarily somatic symptoms, subjects were more likely to report chief complaints and illness labels related to depressed mood than physical symptoms. Nearly half reported they would conceal the name of their problem from others. Mean stigma levels were significantly higher than in the previous study. Most subjects identified psychological stress as the most likely cause of their problem. Chinese immigrants' illness beliefs were notable for psychological explanations regarding their symptoms, possibly reflecting increased acceptance of Western biomedical frameworks, in accordance with recent research. However, reported stigma regarding these symptoms also increased. As Asian American immigrant populations increasingly accept psychological models of depression, stigma may become an increasingly important target for addressing disparities in mental health service utilization. PMID:25563074

  12. Understanding Depression (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... daylight are shorter; for example, during winter months. Bipolar disorder (also called manic depression or bipolar depression) is ... to a Therapist Anxiety Disorders Cutting Word! Depression Bipolar Disorder Why Am I So Sad? Sadness and Depression ...

  13. Illness Attitudes Associated with Seasonal Depressive Symptoms: An Examination Using a Newly Developed Implicit Measure

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The Dual Vulnerability Model of seasonal depression posits that seasonal vegetative symptoms are due to a physiological vulnerability, but cognitive and mood symptoms are the result of negative appraisal of vegetative changes. In addition, rumination may be associated with stronger negative attitudes toward vegetative symptoms. This is the first study to examine implicit attitudes toward vegetative symptoms. We hypothesized that illness attitudes about fatigue moderate the relationship between the severity of vegetative symptoms and the severity of cognitive symptoms and that the illness attitudes are associated with rumination. This study also developed an implicit method to assess the appraisal of fatigue as indicating illness. Results supported both hypotheses. Illness attitudes toward fatigue moderated the relationship between vegetative symptoms and cognitive symptoms. Ruminative response style was positively associated with implicit illness attitudes towards fatigue. The study provides support for the role of negative appraisals of vegetative symptoms in the development of cognitive and mood seasonal depressive symptoms. PMID:26783456

  14. Illness perceptions among cardiac patients: Relation to depressive symptomatology and sex

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Sherry L.; Krepostman, Suzan; Brooks, Dina; Arthur, Heather; Scholely, Pat; Suskin, Neville; Jaglal, Susan; Abramson, Beth L.; Stewart, Donna E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examined cardiovascular disease (CVD) illness perceptions and how they relate to depressive symptomatology among women and men. Methods Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients at two hospitals were approached, and 661 consented to participate (504 men, 157 women; 75% response rate). Participants completed a survey including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ). Results Women perceived a significantly more chronic course (P<.001) and more cyclical episodes (P<.05)than men did, while men perceived greater personal control (P<.001) and treatability (P<.05)than women did. Participants perceived diet, heredity, and stress as the greatest CVD causes. For women (F=5.49, P<.001), greater depressive symptomatology was significantly related to younger age (P<.05), lower activity status (P<.001), and perceiving a chronic time course (P<.01). For men (F=7.68, P<.001), greater depressive symptomatology was significantly related to being non-white (P<.05), lower activity status (P<.001), less exercise behavior (P=.01), and three illness perceptions, namely, perceiving a chronic course (P<.05), greater consequences (P<.001), and lower treatability (P<.05). Conclusion Women, compared with men, are more likely to attribute CVD to causes beyond their control and to perceive CVD as a chronic, untreatable condition. Illness perceptions were related to depressive symptomatology, which suggests that interventions to reframe these perceptions may be warranted to improve emotional health in the context of CVD. PMID:16198188

  15. Depression and Cardiovascular Disease: An Update on How Course of Illness May Influence Risk

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.

    2014-01-01

    Depression constitutes a novel and independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which despite extensive support in the literature has been underappreciated. While much of the evidence for depression as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease is based on studies following myocardial infarction, the elevated vascular risk conveyed by depression is not confined to periods following acute coronary syndromes. For that matter, the risk appears across mood disorders with evidence for even greater risk in bipolar disorder. This review summarizes the literature linking depressive disorders to cardiovascular mortality with a focus on how the course of illness of mood disorders may influence this risk. Mood disorders may influence risk over decades of illness in a dose-response to symptom burden, or the persistence of affective symptomatology. This may be mediated through changes in the activity of the autonomic nervous system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and inflammatory cytokines. Whether treatment of depression can mitigate this risk is not established although there are suggestions to support this contention, which could be better studied with more effective treatments of depression and larger standardized samples. Directions for future study of mechanisms and treatment are discussed. Regardless of causal mechanisms, persons with depressive disorders and other risk factors for vascular disease represent a neglected, high-risk group for cardiovascular events. In addition to the appropriate treatment for depression, screening and optimized management of traditional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases is necessary. PMID:25163592

  16. Collaborative Care for Patients with Depression and Chronic Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Katon, Wayne J.; Lin, Elizabeth H.B.; Von Korff, Michael; Ciechanowski, Paul; Ludman, Evette J.; Young, Bessie; Peterson, Do; Rutter, Carolyn M.; McGregor, Mary; McCulloch, David

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with depression and poorly controlled diabetes, coronary heart disease, or both have an increased risk of adverse outcomes and high health care costs. We conducted a study to determine whether coordinated care management of multiple conditions improves disease control in these patients. METHODS We conducted a single-blind, randomized, controlled trial in 14 primary care clinics in an integrated health care system in Washington State, involving 214 participants with poorly controlled diabetes, coronary heart disease, or both and coexisting depression. Patients were randomly assigned to the usual-care group or to the intervention group, in which a medically supervised nurse, working with each patient’s primary care physician, provided guideline-based, collaborative care management, with the goal of controlling risk factors associated with multiple diseases. The primary outcome was based on simultaneous modeling of glycated hemoglobin, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and systolic blood-pressure levels and Symptom Checklist–20 (SCL-20) depression outcomes at 12 months; this modeling allowed estimation of a single overall treatment effect. RESULTS As compared with controls, patients in the intervention group had greater overall 12-month improvement across glycated hemoglobin levels (difference, 0.58%), LDL cholesterol levels (difference, 6.9 mg per deciliter [0.2 mmol per liter]), systolic blood pressure (difference, 5.1 mm Hg), and SCL-20 depression scores (difference, 0.40 points) (P<0.001). Patients in the intervention group also were more likely to have one or more adjustments of insulin (P = 0.006), antihypertensive medications (P<0.001), and antidepressant medications (P<0.001), and they had better quality of life (P<0.001) and greater satisfaction with care for diabetes, coronary heart disease, or both (P<0.001) and with care for depression (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS As compared with usual care, an intervention involving nurses who

  17. Influence of Intensity and Duration of Yoga on Anxiety and Depression Scores Associated with Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Telles, S; Pathak, S; Kumar, A; Mishra, P; Balkrishna, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic illness is commonly associated with anxiety and depression. Both anxiety and depression respond to yoga. However, there is no report on the association between the intensity and duration of yoga practice with the benefits seen. Aim: The present study was intended to determine whether the daily duration of yoga practice and the duration of experience in months would predict anxiety and depression, associated with chronic illness. Subjects and Methods: Seven hundred and sixty-three volunteers with ages between 14 and 86 years (group mean age standard deviation, 50.2 [14.2]) who attended a 7 day residential yoga camp in the north of India were included in this cross-sectional study. All participants had chronic illnesses, which were under control with treatment, and which were categorized and are detailed. Participants were assessed for state anxiety scores using State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and for anxiety with hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS-A), and depression was assessed using HADS-D scores of the HADS. Linear multiple regression analyses were performed using PASW SPSS version 18.0 (Armonk, New York, U.S.) to determine how the daily and monthly duration of yoga practice could influence state anxiety, hospital anxiety and depression of the participants. Results: Yoga practice in months and the time spent practicing yoga each day significantly predict the level of state anxiety (P < 0.001, P = 0.03) and HAD-A (P < 0.01, P < 0.01). The duration of yoga practice in months alone was a significant predictor of the HAD-D (P < 0.01). Conclusions: The results suggest that the duration of yoga practice in months and daily practice in minutes predict anxiety associated with chronic illness. In contrast the duration of yoga practice in months alone, predicted depression scores. PMID:26229714

  18. Internalized stigma of mental illness and depressive and psychotic symptoms in homeless veterans over 6 months.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Jennifer E; Hayward, H'Sien; Bassett, Elena D; Hoff, Rani

    2016-06-30

    We investigated the relationship between internalized stigma of mental illness at baseline and depressive and psychotic symptoms 3 and 6 months later, controlling for baseline symptoms. Data on homeless veterans with severe mental illness (SMI) were provided by the Northeast Program Evaluation Center (NEPEC) Special Needs-Chronic Mental Illness (SN-CMI) study (Kasprow and Rosenheck, 2008). The study used the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI) scale to measure internalized stigma at baseline and the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) to measure depressive and psychotic symptoms at baseline and 3 and 6 month follow-ups. Higher levels of internalized stigma were associated with greater levels of depressive and psychotic symptoms 3 and 6 months later, even controlling for symptoms at baseline. Alienation and Discrimination Experience were the subscales most strongly associated with symptoms. Exploratory analyses of individual items yielded further insight into characteristics of potentially successful interventions that could be studied. Overall, our findings show that homeless veterans with SMI experiencing higher levels of internalized stigma are likely to experience more depression and psychosis over time. This quasi-experimental study replicates and extends findings of other studies and has implications for future controlled research into the potential long-term effects of anti-stigma interventions on mental health recovery. PMID:27138814

  19. Psychosocial Outcomes of Children of Unipolar Depressed, Bipolar, Medically Ill, and Normal Women: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Carolyn A.; Hammen, Constance L.

    1993-01-01

    Studied behavior problems, social competence, internalizing/externalizing behaviors, academic performance, and school behavior of 96 children (ages 8-16) of unipolar depressed, bipolar, medically ill, and psychiatrically normal women over 2 years. Children of unipolar mothers showed significantly poorer functioning on all measures; greater…

  20. Illness Conceptualizations among Older Rural Mexican-Americans with Anxiety and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Letamendi, Andrea M.; Ayers, Catherine R.; Ruberg, Joshua L.; Singley, Daniel B.; Wilson, Jacqueline; Chavira, Denise; Palinkas, Lawrence; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2014-01-01

    Background Research on barriers and utilization of mental health services in older ethnic minorities has been productive. However, little is known about the characterization and beliefs about anxiety and depression symptoms among older Mexican-Americans. Exploration of these conceptualizations will lead to better detection and provision of care to this large, yet underserved group. Method The present study used a mixed methods approach to explore conceptualizations of anxiety and depression in a group of rural older Mexican-Americans. Twenty-five Spanish-speaking participants (mean age 71.2) responded to flyers that solicited individuals who felt “tense or depressed.” Participants completed a structured diagnostic interview as well as self-report questionnaires about medical health, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and cognitive functioning. Qualitative interviews included questions about how participants describe, conceptualize, and cope with anxiety and depression symptoms. Results Sixty-eight percent of the sample met criteria for at least one anxiety or mood disorder with high comorbidity rates. Self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatization were below clinical ranges for all participants. Medical illness, cognitive impairment, age, education, and acculturation were not associated with distress. Qualitative analyses revealed that nearly half of the terms used by the sample to describe distress phenomena deviated from Western labels traditionally used to indicate anxious and depressive symptomatology. Discussion Multiple methods of symptom endorsement demonstrated that older Mexican-Americans may report distress differently than detected by traditional self-report measures or common Western terminology. Understanding these additional illness conceptualizations may have implications for improving the detection of mental illness and increasing service use among this growing population. PMID:24077906

  1. Identifying illness perception schemata and their association with depression and quality of life in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Le Grande, Michael R; Elliott, Peter C; Worcester, Marian U C; Murphy, Barbara M; Goble, Alan J; Kugathasan, Vanessa; Sinha, Karan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify groups of cardiac patients who share similar perceptions about their illness and to examine the relationships between these schemata and psychosocial outcomes such as quality of life and depression. A total of 190 cardiac patients with diagnoses of myocardial infarction, stable angina pectoris or chronic heart failure, completed a battery of psychosocial questionnaires within four weeks of their admission to hospital. These included the Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire (BIPQ), Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI II) and The MacNew Health-related Quality of Life instrument (MacNew). BIPQ items were subjected to latent class analysis (LCA) and the resulting groups were compared according to their BDI II and MacNew scores. LCA identified a five-class model of illness perception which comprised the following: (1) Consequence focused and mild emotional impact, n = 55, 29%; (2) Low illness perceptions and low emotional impact, n = 45, 24%; (3) Control focused and mild emotional impact, n = 10, 5%; (4) Consequence focused and high emotional impact, n = 60, 32%; and (5) Consequence focused and severe emotional impact, n = 20, 10%. Gender and diagnosis did not appear to reflect class membership except that class 2 had a significantly higher proportion of AMI patients than did class 5. There were numerous significant differences between classes in regards to depression and health-related quality of life. Notably, classes 4 and 5 are distinguished by relatively high BDI II scores and low MacNew scores. Identifying classes of cardiac patients based on their illness perception schemata, in hospital or shortly afterwards, may identify those at risk of developing depressive symptoms and poor quality of life. PMID:22416847

  2. [Acedia or the depressed between sin and illness].

    PubMed

    Alliez, J; Huber, J P

    1987-05-01

    Acedia is a term of the classical greek vocabulary that a christian author of the IVth century, Evagre the Pontic, uses in a special sense, to describe a mental state characterized among other things, by disgust and dejection, and which, according to him, falls into what became the first list of deadly sins. The word was conveyed to us by another monk of the egyptian deserts, Jean Cassien, with a change of meaning which made it very difficult to distinguish from sadness: his audience being very different from his predecessor's, as he wrote for Latins, little inclined to anachoretic life but among which developed the first great coenobitic institutions of the Occident. One century later, Pope Gregory the great removes acedia from the list of deadly sins, either because he does not distinguish it from sadness (and laziness) or because he considers it a morbid state and, as such, depending on medical care. The word has nevertheless survived until Thomas Aquinas and later, and its study provides valuable data on the mental states prefiguring our modern depressions. PMID:3318616

  3. Examining Whether Offspring Psychopathology Influences Illness Course in Mothers With Recurrent Depression Using a High-Risk Longitudinal Sample

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Depression is known to be influenced by psychosocial stressors. For mothers with recurrent depressive illness, the presence of psychopathology in their children may have important effects on their own mental health. Although the impact of maternal depression on child mental health is well-established, no study to date, as far as we are aware, has examined the extent to which offspring psychopathology influences the course of depression in mothers with a history of recurrent depressive illness, what types of child psychopathology impact maternal mental health, or whether risks vary by child gender. Aims were to (a) Use a longitudinal design to examine whether adolescent psychopathology (depression, disruptive behavior disorder; DBD) predicts recurrence of a depressive episode and depression symptom course in women with a history of recurrent depression; and (b) To test if observed effects vary by child gender. 299 mothers with recurrent major depressive disorder and their adolescent offspring were assessed on 2 occasions, 29 months apart. Maternal depression and offspring psychopathology were assessed using semistructured interview measures. Cross-generational links across time were assessed using structural equation modeling. Analyses were adjusted for past severity of maternal depression. Offspring depression symptoms but not DBD symptoms at baseline predicted future episode recurrence in mothers. Depression symptoms in daughters (β = .16, p = .039) but not sons (β = −.07, p = .461), predicted an increase in maternal depression symptoms across time. Psychopathology in daughters is associated with long-term depressive symptoms in women (mothers) with a history of recurrent depression. Findings highlight the importance of careful assessment and management of mental health problems in adolescents for more effective management of maternal depression. This study suggests that offspring symptoms of depression may be important for the recurrence of maternal

  4. Examining whether offspring psychopathology influences illness course in mothers with recurrent depression using a high-risk longitudinal sample.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Ruth; Hammerton, Gemma; Harold, Gordon T; Mahedy, Liam; Potter, Robert; Langley, Kate; Thapar, Ajay; Rice, Frances; Thapar, Anita; Collishaw, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Depression is known to be influenced by psychosocial stressors. For mothers with recurrent depressive illness, the presence of psychopathology in their children may have important effects on their own mental health. Although the impact of maternal depression on child mental health is well-established, no study to date, as far as we are aware, has examined the extent to which offspring psychopathology influences the course of depression in mothers with a history of recurrent depressive illness, what types of child psychopathology impact maternal mental health, or whether risks vary by child gender. Aims were to (a) Use a longitudinal design to examine whether adolescent psychopathology (depression, disruptive behavior disorder; DBD) predicts recurrence of a depressive episode and depression symptom course in women with a history of recurrent depression; and (b) To test if observed effects vary by child gender. 299 mothers with recurrent major depressive disorder and their adolescent offspring were assessed on 2 occasions, 29 months apart. Maternal depression and offspring psychopathology were assessed using semistructured interview measures. Cross-generational links across time were assessed using structural equation modeling. Analyses were adjusted for past severity of maternal depression. Offspring depression symptoms but not DBD symptoms at baseline predicted future episode recurrence in mothers. Depression symptoms in daughters (β = .16, p = .039) but not sons (β = -.07, p = .461), predicted an increase in maternal depression symptoms across time. Psychopathology in daughters is associated with long-term depressive symptoms in women (mothers) with a history of recurrent depression. Findings highlight the importance of careful assessment and management of mental health problems in adolescents for more effective management of maternal depression. This study suggests that offspring symptoms of depression may be important for the recurrence of maternal depression

  5. Increases in Manic Symptoms After Life Events Involving Goal Attainment

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Sandrow, David; Meyer, Björn; Winters, Ray; Miller, Ivan; Solomon, David; Keitner, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar disorder has been conceptualized as an outcome of dysregulation in the behavioral activation system (BAS), a brain system that regulates goal-directed activity. On the basis of the BAS model, the authors hypothesized that life events involving goal attainment would promote manic symptoms in bipolar individuals. The authors followed 43 bipolar I individuals monthly with standardized symptom severity assessments (the Modified Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Rating Scale). Life events were assessed using the Goal Attainment and Positivity scales of the Life Events and Difficulties Schedule. As hypothesized, manic symptoms increased in the 2 months following goal-attainment events, but depressed symptoms were not changed following goal-attainment events. These results are congruent with a series of recent polarity-specific findings. PMID:11195996

  6. Manic defenses against loneliness in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    This essay focuses on the challenges adolescents face as they progress in the process of object removal. The loosening of primary libidinal object ties triggers object loss and a unique form of loneliness specific to adolescence, which may be misdiagnosed as depression. Rather than stemming from a fear of loss of love from the primary object, the loneliness results from the adolescent's need to transfer love from primary objects to new adult relationships not yet available to him. The resultant emptiness may be defended against by overuse of the Internet, alcohol, cigarettes, drugs, and food. These defenses are manic in quality in that they suggest an orally based regressive attempt to "take in" and "expel out, "preserving the felt "lost" object and converting the loneliness into elation. Clinical vignettes illustrate work with adolescents wherein the ability to tolerate lonely feelings is recognized as a developmental accomplishment leading to personality growth and maturity. PMID:19449791

  7. Models of Care for Late-Life Depression of the Medically Ill: Examples from COPD and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Avari, Jimmy N.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2014-01-01

    Depression worsens most treatment outcomes in medically ill older adults. Chronic medical illnesses weaken and demoralize patients and compromise their ability to adhere to treatments requiring consistency and effort. Acute medical illnesses create a psychosocial storm that finds patients and their ecosystem unprepared. We describe two intervention models that can be used to target and personalize treatment in depressed, chronically or acutely medically ill older adults. Personalized Adherence Intervention for Depression and COPD (PID-C) is a model intervention for depressed patients with chronic medical illnesses. It targets patient-specific barriers to treatment engagement and aims to shift the balance in favor of treatment participation. PID-C led to higher remission rates of depression, reduction in depressive symptoms, and reduction in dyspnea-related disability. Addition of problem solving training enables patients to utilize resources available to them and hopefully improve their outcomes. Ecosystem Focused Therapy (EFT) is a model intervention for depression developing in the context of an acute medical event. It was developed for patients with post-stroke depression (PSD) and targets five areas, part of the “psychosocial storm” originating from the patient’s sudden disability and the resulting change in the patient’s needs and family’s life. A preliminary study suggests that EFT is feasible and efficacious in reducing depressive symptoms and signs and disability in PSD. PMID:25028344

  8. Models of care for late-life depression of the medically ill: examples from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Avari, Jimmy N; Alexopoulos, George S

    2015-05-01

    Depression worsens most treatment outcomes in medically ill older adults. Chronic medical illnesses weaken and demoralize patients and compromise their ability to adhere to treatments requiring consistency and effort. Acute medical illnesses create a psychosocial storm that finds patients and their ecosystem unprepared. We describe two intervention models that can be used to target and personalize treatment in depressed, chronically, or acutely medically ill older adults. The Personalized Adherence Intervention for Depression and COPD (PID-C) is a model intervention for depressed patients with chronic medical illnesses. It targets patient-specific barriers to treatment engagement and aims to shift the balance in favor of treatment participation. PID-C led to higher remission rates of depression, reduction in depressive symptoms, and reduction in dyspnea-related disability. The addition of problem-solving training enables patients to use resources available to them and hopefully improve their outcomes. Ecosystem-focused therapy (EFT) is a model intervention for depression developing in the context of an acute medical event. It was developed for patients with poststroke depression (PSD) and targets five areas, part of the "psychosocial storm" originating from the patient's sudden disability and the resulting change in the patient's needs and family's life. A preliminary study suggests that EFT is feasible and efficacious in reducing depressive symptoms and signs and disability in PSD. PMID:25028344

  9. Illness narrative, depression, and sainthood: an analysis of the writings of Mother Teresa.

    PubMed

    Williams, S Taylor

    2014-02-01

    In 2007, the letters of The Blessed Mother Teresa to her confessors were published for the public in a book entitled Come Be My Light. What surprised many readers was that Mother Teresa felt very distant from God and described feeling great "darkness" for many years. This paper draws parallels between the writings of Mother Teresa and those of writers' illness narratives describing the psychiatric condition of Depression. The author provides this textual analysis to explore Mother Teresa's experience within a psychiatric paradigm (Major Depressive Disorder), in comparison with and contrast to the spiritual paradigm of a "Dark Night of the Soul." PMID:24046253

  10. The impact of chronic physical illness, maternal depressive symptoms, family functioning, and self-esteem on symptoms of anxiety and depression in children.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Mark A; Boyle, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    The present study extends earlier research identifying an increased risk of anxiety among children with chronic physical illness (CwCPI) by examining a more complete model that explains how physical illness leads to increased symptoms of anxiety and depression. We tested a stress-generation model linking chronic physical illness to symptoms of anxiety and depression in a population-based sample of children aged 10 to 15 years. We hypothesized that having a chronic physical illness would be associated with more symptoms of anxiety and depression, increased levels of maternal depressive symptoms, more family dysfunction, and lower self-esteem; and, that maternal depressive symptoms, family dysfunction, and child self-esteem would mediate the influence of chronic physical illness on symptoms of anxiety and depression. Data came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (N = 10,646). Mediating processes were analyzed using latent growth curve modeling. Childhood chronic physical illness was associated with increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression, β = 0.20, p < 0.001. Mediating effects were also observed such that chronic physical illness resulted in increases in symptoms of maternal depression and family dysfunction, leading to declines in child self-esteem, and in turn, increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression. CwCPI are at-risk for symptoms of anxiety and depression. Some of this elevated risk appears to work through family processes and child self-esteem. This study supports the use of family-centered care approaches among CwCPI to minimize burden on families and promote healthy psychological development for children. PMID:24938212

  11. Using mixed methods to examine the role of Veterans’ illness perceptions on depression treatment utilization and HEDIS concordance

    PubMed Central

    Glickman, Mark E.; Bokhour, Barbara G.; Dell, Natalie S.; Mueller, Nora M.; Zhao, Shibei; Osei-Bonsu, Princess E.; Rodrigues, Stephanie; Coldwell, Craig M.; Ngo, Tu A.; Schlosser, James; Vielhauer, Melanie J.; Pirraglia, Paul A.; Eisen, Susan V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although depression screening occurs annually in Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care, many Veterans may not be receiving guideline-concordant depression treatment. Objectives To determine whether Veterans’ illness perceptions of depression may be serving as barriers to guideline-concordant treatment. Research Design We used a prospective, observational design involving a mailed questionnaire and chart review data collection to assess depression treatment utilization and concordance with Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set guidelines adopted by the VA. The Self-Regulation Model of Illness Behavior guided the study. Subjects Veterans who screened positive for a new episode of depression at three VA primary care clinics in the U.S. Northeast. Measures The Illness Perceptions Questionnaire-Revised, measuring patients’ perceptions of their symptoms, cause, timeline, consequences, cure or controllability and coherence of depression and its symptoms, was our primary measure to calculate Veterans’ illness perceptions. Treatment utilization was assessed three months after the positive depression screen through chart review. HEDIS guideline-concordant treatment was determined according to a checklist created for the study. Results 839 Veterans screened positive for a new episode of depression from May 2009–June 2011; 275 (32.8%) completed the survey. 92 (33.9%) received HEDIS guideline-concordant depression treatment. Veterans’ illness perceptions of their symptoms, cause, timeline, and controllability of depression predicted receiving guideline-concordant treatment. Conclusions Many Veterans are not receiving guideline-concordant treatment for depression. HEDIS guideline measures may not be assessing all aspects of quality depression care. Conversations about Veterans’ illness perceptions and their specific needs are encouraged to ensure that appropriate treatment is achieved. PMID:24374425

  12. Measuring Latinos’ Perceptions of Depression: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Illness Perception Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Lagomasino, Isabel T.; Dwight-Johnson, Megan; Hansen, Marissa C.; Xie, Bin

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire adapted for a clinical sample of low-income Latinos suffering from depression. Participants (N = 339) were recruited from public primary care centers. Their average age was 49.73 years and the majority was foreign born females of either Mexican or Central American descent. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the factor structure of this measure. Construct and discriminant validity and internal consistency were evaluated. After the elimination of three items because of low factor loadings (< .40) and the specification of seven error covariances, a revised model composed of 24 items had adequate goodness-of-fit indices and factor loadings, supporting construct validity. Each of the subscales reported satisfactory internal consistency. Intercorrelations between the 5 illness perception factors provided initial support for the discriminant validity of these factors in the context of depression. The establishment of the psychometric properties of this adapted measure will pave the way for future studies examining the role illness perceptions play in the help seeking and management of depression among Latinos. PMID:18954174

  13. A regressional analysis of maladaptive rumination, illness perception and negative emotional outcomes in Asian patients suffering from depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanxia; Tang, Catherine; Liow, Chiew Shan; Ng, Winnie Wei Ni; Ho, Cyrus Su Hui; Ho, Roger Chun Mun

    2014-12-01

    Although illness perception has been shown to be associated with illness outcomes in various chronic physical diseases, the association of illness perception and rumination are not well elucidated in mental disorders. This study aims to investigate the mediational effects of adaptive and maladaptive rumination in the relationship between illness perception and negative emotions (depression, anxiety and stress) in male and female patients (N=110) suffering from depressive disorders. The results showed that maladaptive rumination mediated the relationship between illness perception and negative emotions in both male and female depressive patients. However, no mediating effects of adaptive rumination were found in the relationship between illness perception and negative emotion. Maladaptive rumination mediated the relationship between perceived identity, chronicity of illness, consequences of illness and emotional representation of illness and negative emotions in males. It also mediated the relationship between perceived identity and emotional representation of illness and negative emotions in females. The results, possible clinical implications and limitations of this study are also discussed. PMID:25440564

  14. Anhedonia, but not Irritability, Is Associated with Illness Severity Outcomes in Adolescent Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amy R.; Alonso, Carmen M.; Evans, Lori K.; Babb, James S.; Klein, Rachel G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Unlike adult major depressive disorder (MDD) which requires anhedonia or depressed mood for diagnosis, adolescent MDD can be sufficiently diagnosed with irritability in the absence of the former symptoms. In addition, the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) schema does not account for the interindividual variability of symptom severity among depressed adolescents. This practice has contributed to the high heterogeneity and diagnostic complexity of adolescent MDD. Here, we sought to examine relationships between two core symptoms of adolescent MDD – irritability and anhedonia, assessed both quantitatively and categorically – and other clinical correlates among depressed adolescents. Methods: Ninety adolescents with MDD (51 females), ages 12–20, were enrolled. Anhedonia and irritability scores were quantified by summing related items on the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised and the Beck Depression Inventory. Extremes of score distribution were defined as high or low irritability/anhedonia subgroups. A significance level of p=0.01 was set to adjust for the five comparisons. Results: Despite all subjects exhibiting moderate to severe MDD, both irritability and anhedonia scores manifested a full and normally distributed severity range including the lowest values possible. However, only anhedonia severity was associated with more severe clinical outcomes, including greater overall illness severity (p<0.001), suicidality scores (p<0.001), episode duration (p=0.006), and number of MDD episodes (p=0.01). Similarly, only the high-anhedonia subgroup manifested more severe outcomes; specifically, greater illness severity (p<0.0001), number of MDD episodes (p=0.01), episode duration (p=0.01), and suicidality scores (p=0.0001). Conclusions: Our findings suggest the significance of anhedonia as a hallmark of adolescent MDD and the need to incorporate dimensional analyses. These data are preliminary, and future

  15. Illness Appraisals and Depression in the First Year after HIV Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Judith Tedlie; Wrubel, Judith; Hult, Jen R.; Maurer, Stephanie; Acree, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Illness appraisals provide important context to help understand the way individuals cope with chronic illness. In the present study, a qualitative approach to the analysis of HIV diagnosis experience narratives in a sample of 100 people newly diagnosed with HIV revealed five groups that differed in their initial illness appraisals: HIV as Chronic Illness, Concern about Dying, Stigmatization, Threat to Identity, and Other Threats Overshadow HIV. When compared on quantitatively measured depressive mood, the groups differed on level and trajectory over the course of the first year post-diagnosis. Although the experience of living with HIV has changed significantly with the advent of effective Antiretroviral Therapies (ART), there were a number of similarities between the appraisals of this group of participants who were diagnosed post ART and groups who were diagnosed before ART became widely available. Posttest counselors and other HIV service providers should take individual differences in illness appraisals into account in order to help newly HIV-positive clients manage their healthcare and cope adaptively with their diagnosis. PMID:24205346

  16. Course of illness following prospectively observed mania or hypomania in individuals presenting with unipolar depression

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Endicott, Jean; Solomon, David A; Keller, Martin B.; Coryell, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In a well-defined sample, we sought to determine what clinical variables, some of potential nosological relevance, influence subsequent course following prospectively observed initial episodes of hypomania or mania (H/M). Methods We identified 108 individuals in the National Institute of Mental Health Collaborative Depression Study diagnosed with unipolar major depression at intake who subsequently developed H/M. We assessed time to repeat H/M based on whether one had been started on an antidepressant or electroconvulsive therapy within eight weeks of developing H/M, had longer episodes, or had a family history of bipolar disorder. Results Modeling age of onset, treatment-associated H/M, family history of bipolar disorder, duration of index H/M episode, and psychosis in Cox regression analysis, family history of bipolar disorder (n = 21) was strongly associated with repeat episodes of H/M [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.01, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06–3.83, p = 0.03]. Those with treatment-associated episodes (n = 12) were less likely to experience subsequent episodes of H/M, though this was not significant in the multivariate model (HR = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.06–1.05, p = 0.06). These individuals also had a later age of onset for affective illness and were more likely to be depressed. Duration of illness with a temporal resolution of one week, psychosis, and age of onset were not associated with time to repeat H/M episode. Conclusions Family history of bipolar disorder influences course of illness even after an initial H/M episode. In this select sample, treatment-associated H/M did not appear to convey the same risk for a course of illness characterized by recurrent H/M episodes. PMID:22816725

  17. Assessment of illness acceptance by patients with COPD and the prevalence of depression and anxiety in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Jankowska-Polanska, Beata; Motowidlo, Urszula; Uchmanowicz, Bartosz; Chabowski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is a civilization disease. It affects up to 8%–10% of population >30 years of age. Coexistence of depression occurs in 20%–40% of patients with COPD. Depression and anxiety reduce compliance and worsen prognosis. Objective The aims of this study were to determine the degree of illness acceptance among patients with COPD, to examine the relation between disease acceptance and perceived anxiety and depression, and to verify which of the sociodemographic and clinical factors are associated with illness acceptance, anxiety, and depression. Materials and methods The study included 102 patients with COPD (mean age 65.8 years), hospitalized due to exacerbations. Acceptance of Illness Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used. For statistical analysis, Student’s t-test and Pearson’s r correlation coefficient were carried out. Results The overall illness acceptance level was moderate with a tendency toward lack of acceptance (mean 20.6, standard deviation [SD] 7.62). The overall scores were 10.2 (SD 3.32) for anxiety and 10.8 (SD 4.14) for depression, which indicate borderline or high intensity of these symptoms. Acceptance of illness was negatively correlated with the intensity of depression symptoms (r=−0.46, P<0.05). Intensity of depression was significantly associated with intensity of smoking, duration of the disease, severity of dyspnea, and living in a rural area. Conclusion Early identification and assessment of depression and anxiety symptoms allow health care providers to offer patients at risk of depression a special medical supervision. Rapid start of antidepressant therapy may increase illness acceptance and improve prognosis among patients with COPD. PMID:27274217

  18. Depression in Working Adults: Comparing the Costs and Health Outcomes of Working When Ill

    PubMed Central

    Cocker, Fiona; Nicholson, Jan M.; Graves, Nicholas; Oldenburg, Brian; Palmer, Andrew J.; Martin, Angela; Scott, Jenn; Venn, Alison; Sanderson, Kristy

    2014-01-01

    Objective Working through a depressive illness can improve mental health but also carries risks and costs from reduced concentration, fatigue, and poor on-the-job performance. However, evidence-based recommendations for managing work attendance decisions, which benefit individuals and employers, are lacking. Therefore, this study has compared the costs and health outcomes of short-term absenteeism versus working while ill (“presenteeism”) amongst employed Australians reporting lifetime major depression. Methods Cohort simulation using state-transition Markov models simulated movement of a hypothetical cohort of workers, reporting lifetime major depression, between health states over one- and five-years according to probabilities derived from a quality epidemiological data source and existing clinical literature. Model outcomes were health service and employment-related costs, and quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs), captured for absenteeism relative to presenteeism, and stratified by occupation (blue versus white-collar). Results Per employee with depression, absenteeism produced higher mean costs than presenteeism over one- and five-years ($42,573/5-years for absenteeism, $37,791/5-years for presenteeism). However, overlapping confidence intervals rendered differences non-significant. Employment-related costs (lost productive time, job turnover), and antidepressant medication and service use costs of absenteeism and presenteeism were significantly higher for white-collar workers. Health outcomes differed for absenteeism versus presenteeism amongst white-collar workers only. Conclusions Costs and health outcomes for absenteeism and presenteeism were not significantly different; service use costs excepted. Significant variation by occupation type was identified. These findings provide the first occupation-specific cost evidence which can be used by clinicians, employees, and employers to review their management of depression-related work attendance, and may

  19. Two modalities of manic defences: their function in adolescent breakdown.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Catalina

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore two different modalities of manic defences and their specific underlying anxieties. I will describe the relation between these defences and the role of the superego and their specific function in adolescent breakdown. While one type of manic defence operates by the ego's identification with a sadistic superego the other one operates via evacuation of a guilt-inducing superego. I will illustrate the proposed ideas with clinical examples from the analysis of two adolescents. This paper stresses the specific differences between these two modalities and the clinical importance of both identifying and addressing the enactment in the transference of the unconscious phantasies and anxieties (paranoid and depressive) that give rise to these two types of defences. PMID:20590929

  20. Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  1. Altered Regional Homogeneity in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder during Manic State: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qian; Zhong, Yuan; Lu, Dali; Gao, Weijia; Jiao, Qing; Lu, Guangming; Su, Linyan

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) is a severely debilitating illness, which is characterized by episodes of mania and depression separated by periods of remission. Previous fMRI studies investigating PBD were mainly task-related. However, little is known about the abnormalities in PBD, especially during resting state. Resting state brain activity measured by fMRI might help to explore neurobiological biomarkers of the disorder. Methods: Regional homogeneity (ReHo) was examined with resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI) on 15 patients with PBD in manic state, with 15 age-and sex-matched healthy youth subjects as controls. Results: Compared with the healthy controls, the patients with PBD showed altered ReHo in the cortical and subcortical structures. The ReHo measurement of the PBD group was negatively correlated with the score of Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) in the superior frontal gyrus. Positive correlations between the ReHo measurement and the score of YMRS were found in the hippocampus and the anterior cingulate cortex in the PBD group. Conclusions: Altered regional brain activity is present in patients with PBD during manic state. This study presents new evidence for abnormal ventral-affective and dorsal-cognitive circuits in PBD during resting state and may add fresh insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying PBD. PMID:23526961

  2. Manic Depressive Disorder in Mental Handicap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, T. P.; Jones, P. M.

    1988-01-01

    Eight cases of early onset bipolar affective disorder in adolescents with mental impairment are described, focusing on age of onset; common characteristics such as rapid cycling, mixed affective states, and lithium resistance; and the likelihood that cerebral dysfunction might cause a secondary form of bipolar disorder. (JDD)

  3. Improving confidence for self care in patients with depression and chronic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Ludman, Evette J; Peterson, Do; Katon, Wayne J; Lin, Elizabeth H B; Von Korff, Michael; Ciechanowski, Paul; Young, Bessie; Gensichen, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether patients who received a multicondition collaborative care intervention for chronic illnesses and depression had greater improvement in self-care knowledge and efficacy, and whether greater knowledge and self-efficacy was positively associated with improved target outcomes. A randomized controlled trial with 214 patients with comorbid depression and poorly controlled diabetes and/or coronary heart disease tested a 12-month team-based intervention that combined self-management support and collaborative care management. At 6 and 12 month outcomes the intervention group showed significant improvements over the usual care group in confidence in ability to follow through with medical regimens important to managing their conditions and to maintain lifestyle changes even during times of stress. Improvements in self care-efficacy were significantly related to improvements in depression, and early improvements in confidence to maintain lifestyle changes even during times of stress explained part of the observed subsequent improvements in depression. PMID:23398269

  4. Older persons' experiences of depressive ill-health and family support.

    PubMed

    Lyberg, Anne; Holm, Anne Lise; Lassenius, Erna; Berggren, Ingela; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore experiences of the meaning of family support among older persons with depressive ill-health. Data were collected from twenty-nine participants through semistructured interviews and analysed using interpretative hermeneutic and reflective methodology. The findings revealed a main theme, hovering between feelings of belongingness and aloneness in relationships with family members, based on two themes: a sense of being worthy and a sense of being unworthy. Experiences of support and lack of support from family members were not opposites but connected in internal relationships and can be pictured as a movement on a continuum of ambiguity. Family support promotes the emotional needs of older persons with depressive ill-health to be confirmed. The family plays a vital role, not always by direct assistance, but indirectly by supporting the older person's own "guiding principles" for managing her/his situation. The feelings of aloneness as well as shame and guilt at poor or absent family responsiveness should be adequately addressed. Innovative nursing care can lead to improvement by focusing on acquiescence to the older person's life situation. PMID:24078871

  5. Older Persons' Experiences of Depressive Ill-Health and Family Support

    PubMed Central

    Lyberg, Anne; Holm, Anne Lise; Lassenius, Erna; Berggren, Ingela; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore experiences of the meaning of family support among older persons with depressive ill-health. Data were collected from twenty-nine participants through semistructured interviews and analysed using interpretative hermeneutic and reflective methodology. The findings revealed a main theme, hovering between feelings of belongingness and aloneness in relationships with family members, based on two themes: a sense of being worthy and a sense of being unworthy. Experiences of support and lack of support from family members were not opposites but connected in internal relationships and can be pictured as a movement on a continuum of ambiguity. Family support promotes the emotional needs of older persons with depressive ill-health to be confirmed. The family plays a vital role, not always by direct assistance, but indirectly by supporting the older person's own “guiding principles” for managing her/his situation. The feelings of aloneness as well as shame and guilt at poor or absent family responsiveness should be adequately addressed. Innovative nursing care can lead to improvement by focusing on acquiescence to the older person's life situation. PMID:24078871

  6. [Depression in older adults: the National Mental Care Project for People with Physical Illness].

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroto; Fukuda, Koji; Hattori, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Political attention is being increasingly directed to mental health in Japan. Mental disorders are now the fifth priority disease after cancer, stroke, acute myocardial infarction and diabetes for national medical services since April 2013. Each prefecture has to implement strategic mental healthcare plans at the regional level. With the increase in co-morbid mental and physical illnesses, patient information should be shared between psychiatric and non-psychiatric healthcare providers, and coordination is required in the healthcare systems. A better understanding of mental health between patients and medical staffs could contribute to improved access to psychiatric services in the integrated mental health care system. Collaborative care programs focusing on depression screening and management in the Mental Health Care Project for Patients with Physical Illness have been launched among six national specialized care and research centers (cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, child care, geriatric care and neurology and psychiatry) since 2012. These efforts to integrate mental health care into the general health care system would help to improve psychiatric care for elderly patients with physical illnesses. PMID:24622214

  7. Brief Report: Naturalistically Observed Swearing, Emotional Support and Depressive Symptoms in Women Coping with Illness

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Megan L.; Focella, Elizabeth S.; Kasle, Shelley; López, Ana María; Weihs, Karen L.; Mehl, Matthias R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to explore the intra- and interpersonal consequences of swearing. Specifically, it investigated what implications swearing has for coping with and adjustment to illness. Methods The present project combined data from two pilot studies of 13 women with rheumatoid arthritis and 21 women with breast cancer. Participants wore the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR), an unobtrusive observation sampling method that periodically records snippets of ambient sounds, on weekends to track spontaneous swearing in their daily interactions, and completed self-reported measures of depressive symptoms and emotional support. Results Naturalistically-observed swearing in the presence of others, but not alone, was related to decreases in reported emotional support and increases in depressive symptoms over the study period. Further, decreases in emotional support mediated the effect of swearing on disease-severity adjusted changes in depressive symptoms. Conclusion These exploratory results are consistent with the notion that swearing can sometimes repel emotional support at the expense of psychological adjustment. This is one of the first studies to examine the role of swearing, a ubiquitous but understudied psychological phenomenon, in a medical context. PMID:21574707

  8. Psycho-physical and neurophysiological effects of qigong on depressed elders with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Hector W H; Tsang, William W N; Jones, Alice Y M; Fung, Kelvin M T; Chan, Alan H L; Chan, Edward P; Au, Doreen W H

    2013-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial examined the psychological, physical, and neurophysiological effects of a qigong exercise program on depressed elders with chronic medical illness. The experimental group (n = 21, 80 ± 7 years) was given a 12-week qigong exercise program, while the comparison group (n = 17, 81 ± 8 years) participated in a newspaper reading program with the same duration and frequency. Measurement of depression symptoms, psychosocial functioning, muscle strengths, salivary cortisol, and serum serotonin was conducted. At 12 weeks, the qigong group had significant reduction in depressive symptoms (F = 11.68; p < 0.025). Improvement in self-efficacy (F = 4.30; p < 0.050), self-concept of physical well-being (F = 6.82; p < 0.025), and right-hand grip strength (F = 5.25; p = 0.034) was also found when compared with the comparison group. A change in salivary cortisol level was found marginally insignificant between groups (F = 3.16; p = 0.087). However, a decreasing trend of cortisol level was observed. The results provided preliminary evidence for the hypotheses that the antidepressive effect of qigong exercise could be explained by improvement in psychosocial functioning and possibly down-regulation of hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. PMID:23072658

  9. Treatment of bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Musetti, Laura; Del Grande, Claudia; Marazziti, Donatella; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2013-08-01

    Depressive symptoms and episodes dominate the long-term course of bipolar disorder and are associated with high levels of disability and an increased risk of suicide. However, the treatment of bipolar depression has been poorly investigated in comparison with that of manic episodes and unipolar major depressive disorder. The goal of treatment in bipolar depression is not only to achieve full remission of acute symptoms, but also to avoid long-term mood destabilization and to prevent relapses. A depressive presentation of bipolar disorder may often delay the appropriate management and, thus, worsen the long-term outcome. In these cases, an accurate screening for diagnostic indicators of a possible bipolar course of the illness should guide the therapeutic choices, and lead to prognostic improvement. Antidepressant use is still the most controversial issue in the treatment of bipolar depression. Despite inconclusive evidence of efficacy and tolerability, this class of agents is commonly prescribed in acute and long-term treatment, often in combination with mood stabilizers. In this article, we review available treatment options for bipolar depression, and we shall provide some suggestions for the management of the different presentations of depression in the course of bipolar disorder. PMID:23391164

  10. Web-based interventions for comorbid depression and chronic illness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Charova, Ekaterina; Dorstyn, Diana; Tully, Phillip; Mittag, Oskar

    2015-06-01

    Web-based interventions offer potential benefits for managing and treating depression in the context of chronic physical illness, however their use with this population has yet to be quantitatively assessed. The present systematic review examined the biopsychosocial data from 11 independent studies (N = 1348 participants), including randomised controlled and quasi-experimental designs most commonly performed with diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Study quality was evaluated using the Downs and Black (1998) index, with most studies being statistically underpowered although internal validity was demonstrated. Treatment outcomes were quantified using Cohen's d effect sizes. Results indicated significant short-term improvements in depression severity (d w = 0.36, CI = 0.20-0.52, p < 0.01), in addition to quality of life, problem-solving skills, functional ability, anxiety and pain-related cognitions (d range = 0.23 to 1.10). Longer-term outcomes could not be determined based on the limited data. Further robust studies are required before wider adoption of web techniques takes place. PMID:25712111

  11. Religiously integrated cognitive behavioral therapy: a new method of treatment for major depression in patients with chronic medical illness.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Michelle J; Koenig, Harold G; Robins, Clive J; Nelson, Bruce; Shaw, Sally F; Cohen, Harvey J; King, Michael B

    2015-03-01

    Intervention studies have found that psychotherapeutic interventions that explicitly integrate clients' spiritual and religious beliefs in therapy are as effective, if not more so, in reducing depression than those that do not for religious clients. However, few empirical studies have examined the effectiveness of religiously (vs. spiritually) integrated psychotherapy, and no manualized mental health intervention had been developed for the medically ill with religious beliefs. To address this gap, we developed and implemented a novel religiously integrated adaptation of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of depression in individuals with chronic medical illness. This article describes the development and implementation of the intervention. First, we provide a brief overview of CBT. Next, we describe how religious beliefs and behaviors can be integrated into a CBT framework. Finally, we describe Religiously Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (RCBT), a manualized therapeutic approach designed to assist depressed individuals to develop depression-reducing thoughts and behaviors informed by their own religious beliefs, practices, and resources. This treatment approach has been developed for 5 major world religions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism), increasing its potential to aid the depressed medically ill from a variety of religious backgrounds. PMID:25365155

  12. Religiously Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A New Method of Treatment for Major Depression in Patients With Chronic Medical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Michelle J.; Koenig, Harold G.; Robins, Clive J.; Nelson, Bruce; Shaw, Sally F.; Cohen, Harvey J.; King, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Intervention studies have found that psychotherapeutic interventions that explicitly integrate clients’ spiritual and religious beliefs in therapy are as effective, if not more so, in reducing depression than those that do not for religious clients. However, few empirical studies have examined the effectiveness of religiously (vs. spiritually) integrated psychotherapy, and no manualized mental health intervention had been developed for the medically ill with religious beliefs. To address this gap, we developed and implemented a novel religiously integrated adaptation of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of depression in individuals with chronic medical illness. This article describes the development and implementation of the intervention. First, we provide a brief overview of CBT. Next, we describe how religious beliefs and behaviors can be integrated into a CBT framework. Finally, we describe Religiously Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (RCBT), a manualized therapeutic approach designed to assist depressed individuals to develop depression-reducing thoughts and behaviors informed by their own religious beliefs, practices, and resources. This treatment approach has been developed for 5 major world religions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism), increasing its potential to aid the depressed medically ill from a variety of religious backgrounds. PMID:25365155

  13. The organization of the stress system and its dysregulation in depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Gold, P W

    2015-02-01

    brain and establish premonitory, proinflammatory and prothrombotic states in anticipation of either injury or hemorrhage during a threatening situation. Essential adaptive intracellular changes include increased neurogenesis, enhancement of neuroplasticity and deployment of a successful endoplasmic reticulum stress response. In melancholic depression, the activities of the central glutamate, norepinephrine and central cytokine systems are significantly and persistently increased. The subgenual prefrontal cortex is functionally impaired, and its size is reduced by as much as 40%. This leads to sustained anxiety and activations of the amygdala, CRH/HPA axis, the sympathomedullary system and their sequella, including early morning awakening and loss of appetite. The sustained activation of the amygdala, in turn, further activates stress system neuroendocrine and autonomic functions. The activity of the nucleus accumbens is further decreased and anhedonia emerges. Concomitantly, neurogenesis and neuroplasticity fall significantly. Antidepressants ameliorate many of these processes. The processes that lead to the behavioral and physiological manifestations of depressive illness produce a significant decrease in lifespan, and a doubling of the incidence of premature coronary artery disease. The incidences of premature diabetes and osteoporosis are also substantially increased. Six physiological processes that occur during stress and that are markedly increased in melancholia set into motion six different mechanisms to produce inflammation, as well as sustained insulin resistance and a prothrombotic state. Clinically, melancholic and atypical depression seem to be antithesis of one another. In melancholia, depressive systems are at their worst in the morning when arousal systems, such as the CRH/HPA axis and the noradrenergic systems, are at their maxima. In atypical depression, depressive symptoms are at their worst in the evening, when these arousal systems are at their

  14. Promotora assisted depression care among predominately Hispanic patients with concurrent chronic illness: Public care system clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Ell, Kathleen; Aranda, María P; Wu, Shinyi; Oh, Hyunsung; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Guterman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Depression frequently negatively affects patient overall self-care and social stress management within United States safety net care systems. Rates of major depression are significantly high among low-income predominantly Hispanic/Latino with chronic illness, such as diabetes and heart disease. The study design of the A Helping Hand to Activate Patient-Centered Depression Care among Low-income Patients (AHH) randomized clinical trial aims to enhance patient depression care receipt and overall bio-psychosocial self-care management. The AHH trial is conducted in collaboration with three Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (DHS) safety net clinics that provide Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) care. The study compares AHH intervention (AHH) in which community-based bilingual promotoras provide in-person or telephone patient engagement and intervention aimed to reduce the burden and strain on patients, families, and care providers by assessing, enhancing, and facilitating patient depression and co-morbid illness self-care management skill, and activating patient communication with clinic medical providers versus DHS PCMH team usual care (PCMHUC). AHH independent bilingual recruiters screened 1957 and enrolled 348 predominantly Hispanic/Latino patients, of whom 296 (85%) had diabetes, 14 (4%) with heart disease, and 38 (11%) with both diseases. Recruiters identified depressed patients by baseline Patient Health Questionnaire-9 scores of 10 or more, completed baseline assessments, and randomized patients to either AHH or PCMHUC study group. The comprehensive assessments will be repeated at 6 and 12months by an independent bilingual follow-up interviewer. Baseline and outcome data include mental health assessment and treatment receipt, co-morbid illness self-care, social relationships, and environmental stressor assessments. PMID:26600285

  15. Differential diagnosis of depression: relevance of positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.M.; Baxter, L.R. Jr.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Gerner, R.H.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-09-11

    The proper differential diagnosis of depression is important. A large body of research supports the division of depressive illness into bipolar and unipolar subtypes with respect to demographics, genetics, treatment response, and neurochemical mechanisms. Optimal treatment is different for unipolar and bipolar depressions. Treating a patient with bipolar depression as one would a unipolar patient may precipitate a serious manic episode or possibly even permanent rapid cycling disorder. The clinical distinction between these disorders, while sometimes difficult, can often be achieved through an increased diagnostic suspicion concerning a personal or family history of mania. Positron emission tomography and the FDG method, which allow in vivo study of the glucose metabolic rates for discrete cerebral structures, provide new evidence that bipolar and unipolar depression are two different disorders.

  16. Central Diabetes Insipidus presenting with manic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Jasmine Kaur; Chalana, Harsh

    2011-09-01

    Central Diabetes Insipidus mostly presents with polydipsia and polyuria but may also present with confusion, psychosis, seizure or coma. We present a case of Central Diabetes Insipidus presenting with manic symptoms. A 21 year old Indian male had Central Diabetes Insipidus, which was confirmed by water deprivation test. He presented to our hospital with full blown manic symptoms meeting the ICD 10 criteria. He was managed with intranasal Desmopressin, water restriction and Olanzapine. In contrary to routine psychiatric patients which may present with psychogenic polydipsia or Central Diabetes Insipidus patients presenting in delirium or psychosis, our case presents a unique example of Central Diabetes Insipidus presenting with manic symptoms. It hints about a relationship between a common pathway for Central Diabetes Insipidus and mood disorders which needs further research. Diencephalon has already been the focus of attention for several researchers but no concrete evidence is available yet. PMID:23051126

  17. Collaborative Depression Treatment in Older and Younger Adults with Physical Illness: Pooled Comparative Analysis of Three Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ell, Kathleen; Aranda, María P.; Xie, Bin; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Chou, Chih-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objective There have been few comparisons of the effectiveness of collaborative depression care between older versus younger adults with co-morbid illness, particularly among low-income populations. Design Intent-to-treat analyses are conducted on pooled data from three randomized controlled trials that tested collaborative care aimed at improving depression, quality of life and treatment receipt. Settings Trials were conducted in oncology and primary care safety net clinics and diverse home health care programs. Participants 1,081 patients with major depressive symptoms and cancer, diabetes or other co-morbid illness. Intervention Similar intervention protocols included patient, provider, socio-cultural and organizational adaptations. Measurements The PHQ-9 depression, SF-12/20 quality-of-life, self-reported hospitalization, ER, ICU utilization, and antidepressant, psychotherapy treatment receipt are assessed at baseline, 6, 12 months. Results There are no significant differences in reducing depression symptoms (P ranged 0.18-0.58), improving quality-of-life (t=1.86, df=669, P=0.07 for physical functioning at 12 months; and P ranged 0.23-0.99 for all others) between patients ≥60 versus 18-59. Both age group intervention patients have significantly higher rates of a 50% PHQ-9 reduction (older: Wald χ2[df=1]=4.82, p=0.03; younger: Wald χ2[df=1]=6.47, p=0.02), greater reduction in major depression rates (older: Wald χ2[df=1]=7.72, p=0.01; younger: Wald χ2[df=1]=4.0, p=0.05) than enhanced-usual-care patients at 6 months, and are no significant age group differences in treatment type or intensity. Conclusion Collaborative depression care in individuals with co-morbid illness is as effective in reducing depression in older patients as younger patients, including among low-income, minority patients. Patient, provider, and organizational adaptations of depression care management models may contribute to positive outcomes. PMID:20220588

  18. The neural correlates of emotional face-processing in adolescent depression: a dimensional approach focusing on anhedonia and illness severity.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Sarah E; Vallejo, Ana I; Ely, Benjamin A; Kang, Guoxin; Krain Roy, Amy; Pine, Daniel S; Stern, Emily R; Gabbay, Vilma

    2014-12-30

    Deficits in emotion processing, a known clinical feature of major depressive disorder (MDD), have been widely investigated using emotional face paradigms and neuroimaging. However, most studies have not accounted for the high inter-subject variability of symptom severity. Similarly, only sparse research has focused on MDD in adolescence, early in the course of the illness. Here we sought to investigate neural responses to emotional faces using both categorical and dimensional analyses with a focus on anhedonia, a core symptom of MDD associated with poor outcomes. Nineteen medication-free depressed adolescents and 18 healthy controls (HC) were scanned during presentation of happy, sad, fearful, and neutral faces. ANCOVAs and regressions assessed group differences and relationships with illness and anhedonia severity, respectively. Findings included a group by valence interaction with depressed adolescents exhibiting decreased activity in the superior temporal gyrus (STG), putamen and premotor cortex. Post-hoc analyses confirmed decreased STG activity in MDD adolescents. Dimensional analyses revealed associations between illness severity and altered responses to negative faces in prefrontal, cingulate, striatal, and limbic regions. However, anhedonia severity was uniquely correlated with responses to happy faces in the prefrontal, cingulate, and insular regions. Our work highlights the need for studying specific symptoms dimensionally in psychiatric research. PMID:25448398

  19. The neural correlates of emotional face-processing in adolescent depression: a dimensional approach focusing on anhedonia and illness severity

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Vallejo, Ana I.; Ely, Benjamin A.; Kang, Guoxin; Roy, Amy Krain; Pine, Daniel S.; Stern, Emily R.; Gabbay, Vilma

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in emotional processing, a known clinical feature of major depression (MDD), have been widely investigated using emotional face paradigms and neuroimaging. However, most studies have not accounted for the high inter-subject variability of symptom severity. Similarly, only sparse research has focused on MDD in adolescence, early in the course of the illness. Here we sought to investigate neural responses to emotional faces using both categorical and dimensional analyses with a focus on anhedonia, a core symptom of MDD associated with poor outcomes. Nineteen medication-free depressed adolescents and eighteen healthy controls were scanned during presentation of happy, sad, fearful, and neutral faces. ANCOVAs and regressions assessed group differences and relationships with illness and anhedonia severity, respectively. Findings included a group by valence interaction with depressed adolescents exhibiting decreased activity in the superior temporal gyrus (STG), putamen and premotor cortex. Post-hoc analyses confirmed decreased STG activity in MDD adolescents. Dimensional analyses revealed associations between illness severity and altered responses to negative faces in prefrontal, cingulate, striatal, and limbic regions. However, anhedonia severity was uniquely correlated with responses to happy faces in the prefrontal, cingulate, and insular regions. Our work highlights the need for studying specific symptoms dimensionally in psychiatric research. PMID:25448398

  20. The manic phase of Bipolar disorder significantly impairs theory of mind decoding.

    PubMed

    Hawken, Emily R; Harkness, Kate L; Lazowski, Lauren K; Summers, David; Khoja, Nida; Gregory, James Gardner; Milev, Roumen

    2016-05-30

    Bipolar disorder is associated with significant deficits in the decoding of others' mental states in comparison to healthy participants. However, differences in theory of mind decoding ability among patients in manic, depressed, and euthymic phases of bipolar disorder is currently unknown. Fifty-nine patients with bipolar I or II disorder (13 manic, 25 depressed, 20 euthymic) completed the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" Task (Eyes task) and the Animals Task developed to control for non-mentalistic response demands of the Eyes Task. Patients also completed self-report and clinician-rated measures of depression, mania, and anxiety symptoms. Patients in the manic phase were significantly less accurate than those in the depressed and euthymic phases at decoding mental states in the Eyes task, and this effect was strongest for eyes of a positive or neutral valence. Further Eyes task performance was negatively correlated with the symptoms of language/thought disorder, pressured speech, and disorganized thoughts and appearance. These effects held when controlling for accuracy on the Animals task, response times, and relevant demographic and clinical covariates. Results suggest that the state of mania, and particularly psychotic symptoms that may overlap with the schizophrenia spectrum, are most strongly related to social cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder. PMID:27039012

  1. Course of illness in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, A; Tonna, M; Odone, A; Stubbs, B; Ghaemi, S N

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We updated our recent systematic review searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to investigate course of illness in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 13 relevant papers which found that the majority of comorbid OCD cases appeared to be related to mood episodes. OC symptoms in comorbid patients appeared more often during depressive episodes, and comorbid BD and OCD cycled together, with OC symptoms often remitting during manic/hypomanic episodes. PMID:27025465

  2. Bcl-2 associated with severity of manic symptoms in bipolar patients in a manic phase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Huang, Tiao-Lai; Tsai, Meng-Chang

    2015-02-28

    B cell lymphoma protein-2 (Bcl-2) may contribute to the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, and may be involved in the therapeutic action of anti-manic drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate serum levels of Bcl-2 in bipolar patients in a manic phase, and evaluate the Bcl-2 changes after treatment. We consecutively enrolled 23 bipolar inpatients in a manic phase and 40 healthy subjects; 20 bipolar patients were followed up with treatment. Serum Bcl-2 levels were measured with assay kits. All 20 patients were evaluated by examining the correlation between Bcl-2 levels and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) scores, using Spearman׳s correlation coefficients. The serum Bcl-2 levels in bipolar patients in a manic phase were higher than in healthy subjects, but without a significant difference. The YMRS scores were significantly negatively associated with serum Bcl-2 levels (p=0.042). Bcl-2 levels of the 20 bipolar patients were measured at the end of treatment. Using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, we found no significant difference in the Bcl-2 levels of bipolar patients after treatment. Our results suggest that Bcl-2 levels might be an indicator of severity of manic symptoms in bipolar patients in a manic phase. PMID:25563670

  3. How mental health literacy and experience of mental illness relate to stigmatizing attitudes and social distance towards people with depression or psychosis: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Bengt; Hansson, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Background Evidence suggests that mental health literacy among the public is low, and stigmatizing attitudes are widespread. So far the effects of anti-stigma campaigns are small, and studies demonstrate that negative attitudes have been quite stable through recent decades. Aims To investigate the relationships between mental health literacy, experience of mental illness and stigmatizing attitudes/social distance towards people with depression or psychosis. Methods A cross-sectional study in which staff members from public services in Sweden (n = 1027) completed questionnaires covering demographic data, self-reported experience of mental illness, identification of a vignette for depression or psychosis, beliefs about helpful interventions for the illness presented in the vignette, and attitudes and social distance towards people with the illness. Results About 50% of participants could identify depression and less than 40% psychosis. A higher degree of mental health literacy was related to less stigma and social distance but mainly towards people with depression. A similar relationship was shown for having personal or family experience of mental illness and attitudes/social distance. Negative attitudes and social distance were significantly higher in all aspects measured towards a person with psychosis than a person with depression. Conclusions A higher degree of mental health literacy relates to more positive attitudes and less desire for social distance towards people with depression. The differences between depression and psychosis should be taken into account in anti-stigma interventions. PMID:26643359

  4. Burden of illness: A systematic review of depression in chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Schlosser, Rodney J.; Gage, Selby E.; Kohli, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Background: Depression has been reported in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), but its prevalence varies across studies, and uncertainty remains regarding the association with baseline disease severity and treatment outcomes. Objective: To systematically assess the prevalence of depression in CRS and to review its relationship to baseline disease severity and outcomes after treatment. Methods: A systematic review of the prevalence of possible depression was performed by using the available methods to diagnose depression, and the results were pooled. Studies that examined the relationship of depression on baseline disease severity and treatment outcomes were organized and reported individually. Results: Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria for prevalence analysis. The prevalence of possible or likely depression in patients with CRS ranged from 11.0 to 40.0%, depending on the method of diagnosis and sensitivity of various depression instruments. Positive depression screening was consistently associated with worse CRS-specific quality of life (QOL), medication usage, and health care utilization, but there were no reliable CRS-specific factors to predict the presence of depression. Patients with possible depression who underwent medical or surgical treatment for CRS tended to have improvements in CRS-specific QOL but did not achieve the same degree of QOL as patients who were not depressed. Depression-specific QOL seemed to improve after treatment for CRS. Conclusion: Positive depression screening was common in patients with CRS and had a negative association on the entire spectrum of QOL, health care utilization, and productivity. CRS-specific treatments were still beneficial in patients who seemed to be depressed and improved both depression-specific and CRS-specific QOL. PMID:27456594

  5. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression: The making of a “gold standard” and the unmaking of a chronic illness, 1960–1980

    PubMed Central

    Worboys, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To show why and how the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression became the ‘Gold Standard’ for assessing therapies from the mid-1960s and how it was used to frame depression as a short-term and curable illness rather than a chronic one. Methods: My approach is that of the social construction of knowledge, identifying the interests, institutional contexts and practices that produce knowledge claims and then mapping the social processes of their circulation, validation and acceptance. Results: The circulation and validation of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was relatively slow and it became a ‘Gold Standard’ ‘from below’, from an emerging consensus amongst psychiatrists undertaking clinical trials for depression, which from the 1960s were principally with psychopharmaceuticals for short-term illness. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, drug trials and the construction of depression as non-chronic were mutually constituted. Discussion: Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression framed depression and its sufferers in new ways, leading psychiatrists to understand illness as a treatable episode, rather than a life course condition. As such, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression served the interests of psychiatrists and psychiatry in its new era of drug therapy outside the mental hospital. However, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was a strange kind of ‘standard’, being quite non-standard in the widely varying ways it was used and the meanings given to its findings. PMID:23172888

  6. Psychotherapy based on identity problems of depressives.

    PubMed

    Kraus, A

    1995-01-01

    I present here what I call my identity-theoretical concept of depression, discussing both bipolar disorders and major depressive disorders. The method is phenomenological in that through interviews with depressives we become aware of their being-in-the-world, their social roles and the various identities they form through identification and under the pressure of their environment. In contrast to the normal individual, whose identity is autonomous, flexible, and continuously changes throughout the life cycle, depressives have what I call an "overidentifying" identity formation. That is to say, they cannot stand back and be autonomous, they must overidentify or throw themselves excessively into whatever particular social expectations they encounter. This leads to an "overadjustment" to the norms of society, a rigidity, and an excessive dependence on others. Patients in the manic phase may show the opposite extreme in their effort to avoid the overidentification tendency. Furthermore, depressives cannot tolerate ambiguity, they cannot deal with the positive and negative characteristics in one or the same object or person. Depressive or manic episodes are precipitated by situations where ambiguity cannot be avoided, or where conflicting identities are demanded at the same time, for example when a high quantity of high quality work is demanded in too short a time for this to be possible. Any sort of changes or role losses that demand flexibility of one's identity or the capacity to step back a bit and suspend one's characteristic habits or identity manifestations will precipitate manic or depressive episodes in such predisposed melancholics. On the basis of my identity-theoretical concept certain guidelines for psychotherapy suggest themselves, and these are presented. I call this "identity therapy," and I distinguish it from cognitive therapy because it is not the cognitive schemes that are disturbed in these patients but rather their identity structure. I discuss

  7. Predictors of Self-Reported Physical Symptoms in Low-Income, Inner-City African American Women: The Role of Optimism, Depressive Symptoms, and Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Deborah J.; O'Connell, Cara; Gound, Mary; Heller, Laurie; Forehand, Rex

    2004-01-01

    In this study we examined the association of optimism and depressive symptoms with self-reported physical symptoms in 241 low-income, inner-city African American women with or without a chronic illness (HIV). Although optimism was not a unique predictor of self-reported physical symptoms over and above depressive symptoms, optimism interacted with…

  8. Effects of qigong exercise on fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome-like illness: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jessie S M; Ho, Rainbow T H; Wang, Chong-Wen; Yuen, Lai Ping; Sham, Jonathan S T; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2013-01-01

    Background. Anxiety/depressive symptoms are common in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS-) like illness. Qigong as a modality of complementary and alternative therapy has been increasingly applied by patients with chronic illnesses, but little is known about the effect of Qigong on anxiety/depressive symptoms of the patients with CFS-like illness. Purpose. To investigate the effects of Qigong on fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in patients with CFS-illness. Methods. One hundred and thirty-seven participants who met the diagnostic criteria for CFS-like illness were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a waitlist control group. Participants in the intervention group received 10 sessions of Qigong training twice a week for 5 consecutive weeks, followed by home-based practice for 12 weeks. Fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and postintervention. Results. Total fatigue score [F(1,135) = 13.888, P < 0.001], physical fatigue score [F(1,135) = 20.852, P < 0.001] and depression score [F(1,135) = 9.918, P = 0.002] were significantly improved and mental fatigue score [F(1,135) = 3.902, P = 0.050] was marginally significantly improved in the Qigong group compared to controls. The anxiety score was not significantly improved in the Qigong group. Conclusion. Qigong may not only reduce the fatigue symptoms, but also has antidepressive effect for patients with CFS-like illness. Trial registration HKCTR-1200. PMID:23983785

  9. Manic Symptoms in Youth: Dimensions, Latent Classes, and Associations With Parental Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Pedro Mario; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Gadelha, Ary; Moriyama, Tais; Cogo-Moreira, Hugo; Graeff-Martins, Ana Soledade; Rosario, Maria Conceição; Polanczyk, Guilherme Vanoni; Brietzke, Elisa; Rohde, Luis Augusto; Stringaris, Argyris; Goodman, Robert; Leibenluft, Ellen; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the study was to define the latent structure of parent-reported manic symptoms and their association with functional impairment and familial risk in a community sample of Brazilian children. Method We screened for manic symptoms in a community sample of 2,512 children 6 to 12 years of age. Parents of children with “episodes of going abnormally high” completed a detailed mania section (n = 479; 19.1%). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) tested a solution with “Under-Control (UC)” and “Exuberant (EX)” dimensions, investigating the severity (threshold) and factor loading of each symptom. We also used latent class analysis (LCA) to evaluate the latent categorical structure of manic symptoms. Associations of these latent constructs with psychiatric comorbidity, psychosocial impairment, and family history of psychopathology were tested. Results The 2-dimensional model fit the data well. Only the UC dimension was associated with psychiatric morbidity, psychosocial impairment, and a family history of mania, depression, or suicide attempts. Both UC and EX items discriminated subjects with “episodes of going abnormally high,” but EX items lay at the mild end of the severity spectrum, whereas UC items lay at the severe end. The LCA yielded a small group of children with high levels of manic symptoms and a distinct profile of psychiatric comorbidity and impairment (“high-symptom group”). Conclusion In a large, community-based sample, we found a 2-dimensional latent structure for parent-reported manic symptoms in youth, and demonstrated familial associations between the UC dimension and affective disorders. Both UC and EX items are clinically useful, but their contributions vary with symptom severity. PMID:24839881

  10. A Tune in “A Minor” Can “B Major”: A Review of Epidemiology, Illness Course, and Public Health Implications of Subthreshold Depression in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Meeks, Thomas; Vahia, Ipsit; Lavretsky, Helen; Kulkarni, Ganesh; Jeste, Dilip

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND With emphasis on dimensional aspects of psychopathology in development of the upcoming DSM-V, we systematically review data on epidemiology, illness course, risk factors for, and consequences of late-life depressive syndromes not meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for major depression or dysthymia. We termed these syndromes subthreshold depression, including minor depression and subsyndromal depression. METHODS We searched PubMed (1980–Jan 2010) using the terms: subsyndromal depression, subthreshold depression, and minor depression in combination with elderly, geriatric, older adult, and late-life. Data were extracted from 181 studies of late-life subthreshold depression. RESULTS In older adults subthreshold depression was generally at least 2–3 times more prevalent (median community point prevalence 9.8%) than major depression. Prevalence of subthreshold depression was lower in community settings versus primary care and highest in long-term care settings. Approximately 8–10% of older persons with subthreshold depression developed major depression per year. The course of late-life subthreshold depression was more favorable than that of late-life major depression, but far from benign, with a median remission rate to non-depressed status of only 27% after ≥1 year. Prominent risk factors included female gender, medical burden, disability, and low social support; consequences included increased disability, greater healthcare utilization, and increased suicidal ideation. LIMITATIONS Heterogeneity of the data, especially related to definitions of subthreshold depression limit our ability to conduct meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS The high prevalence and associated adverse health outcomes of late-life subthreshold depression indicate the major public health significance of this condition and suggest a need for further research on its neurobiology and treatment. Such efforts could potentially lead to prevention of considerable morbidity for the growing number of

  11. An Illness of Power: Gender and the Social Causes of Depression.

    PubMed

    Neitzke, Alex B

    2016-03-01

    There is considerable discourse surrounding the disproportionate diagnosis of women with depression as compared to men, often times cited at a rate around 2:1. While this disparity clearly draws attention to gender, a focus on gender tends to fall away in the study and treatment of depression in neuroscience and psychiatry, which largely understand its workings in mechanistic terms of brain chemistry and neurological processes. I first consider how this brain-centered biological model for depression came about. I then argue that the authoritative scientific models for disorder have serious consequences for those diagnosed. Finally, I argue that mechanistic biological models of depression have the effect of silencing women and marginalizing or preventing the examination of social-structural causes of depression, like gender oppression, and therein contribute to the ideological reproduction of oppressive social relations. I argue that depression is best understood in terms of systems of power, including gender, and where a given individual is situated within such social relations. The result is a model of depression that accounts for the influence of biological, psychological, and social factors. PMID:26215590

  12. Religious vs. conventional cognitive behavioral therapy for major depression in persons with chronic medical illness: a pilot randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Harold G; Pearce, Michelle J; Nelson, Bruce; Shaw, Sally F; Robins, Clive J; Daher, Noha S; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Berk, Lee S; Bellinger, Denise L; Pargament, Kenneth I; Rosmarin, David H; Vasegh, Sasan; Kristeller, Jean; Juthani, Nalini; Nies, Douglas; King, Michael B

    2015-04-01

    We examine the efficacy of conventional cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT) versus religiously integrated CBT (RCBT) in persons with major depression and chronic medical illness. Participants were randomized to either CCBT (n = 67) or RCBT (n = 65). The intervention in both groups consisted of ten 50-minute sessions delivered remotely during 12 weeks (94% by telephone). Adherence to treatment was similar, except in more religious participants in whom adherence to RCBT was slightly greater (85.7% vs. 65.9%, p = 0.10). The intention-to-treat analysis at 12 weeks indicated no significant difference in outcome between the two groups (B = 0.33; SE, 1.80; p = 0.86). Response rates and remission rates were also similar. Overall religiosity interacted with treatment group (B = -0.10; SE, 0.05; p = 0.048), suggesting that RCBT was slightly more efficacious in the more religious participants. These preliminary findings suggest that CCBT and RCBT are equivalent treatments of major depression in persons with chronic medical illness. Efficacy, as well as adherence, may be affected by client religiosity. PMID:25816046

  13. Illness Perception and Depressive Symptoms among Persons with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Analytical Cross-Sectional Study in Clinical Settings in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Suira; Dhungana, Raja Ram; Subba, Usha Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assess the relationship between illness perception and depressive symptoms among persons with diabetes. Method. This was an analytical cross-sectional study conducted among 379 type 2 diabetic patients from three major clinical settings of Kathmandu, Nepal. Results. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 44.1% (95% CI: 39.1, 49.1). Females (p < 0.01), homemakers (p < 0.01), 61-70 age group (p = 0.01), those without formal education (p < 0.01), and people with lower social status (p < 0.01) had significantly higher proportion of depressive symptoms than the others. Multivariable analysis identified age (β = 0.036, p = 0.016), mode of treatment (β = 0.9, p = 0.047), no formal educational level (β = 1.959, p = 0.01), emotional representation (β = 0.214, p < 0.001), identity (β = 0.196, p < 0.001), illness coherence (β = -0.109, p = 0.007), and consequences (β = 0.093, p = 0.049) as significant predictors of depressive symptoms. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated a strong relationship between illness perception and depressive symptoms among diabetic patients. Study finding indicated that persons living with diabetes in Nepal need comprehensive diabetes education program for changing poor illness perception, which ultimately helps to prevent development of depressive symptoms. PMID:26236749

  14. Illness Perception and Depressive Symptoms among Persons with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Analytical Cross-Sectional Study in Clinical Settings in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Suira; Dhungana, Raja Ram; Subba, Usha Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assess the relationship between illness perception and depressive symptoms among persons with diabetes. Method. This was an analytical cross-sectional study conducted among 379 type 2 diabetic patients from three major clinical settings of Kathmandu, Nepal. Results. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 44.1% (95% CI: 39.1, 49.1). Females (p < 0.01), homemakers (p < 0.01), 61–70 age group (p = 0.01), those without formal education (p < 0.01), and people with lower social status (p < 0.01) had significantly higher proportion of depressive symptoms than the others. Multivariable analysis identified age (β = 0.036, p = 0.016), mode of treatment (β = 0.9, p = 0.047), no formal educational level (β = 1.959, p = 0.01), emotional representation (β = 0.214, p < 0.001), identity (β = 0.196, p < 0.001), illness coherence (β = −0.109, p = 0.007), and consequences (β = 0.093, p = 0.049) as significant predictors of depressive symptoms. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated a strong relationship between illness perception and depressive symptoms among diabetic patients. Study finding indicated that persons living with diabetes in Nepal need comprehensive diabetes education program for changing poor illness perception, which ultimately helps to prevent development of depressive symptoms. PMID:26236749

  15. Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms and Medical Illness Among Adults with Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Andrea N.; Dour, Halina J.; Stanton, Annette L.; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.; Stein, Murray B.; Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Rose, Raphael D.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Anxiety is linked to a number of medical conditions, yet few studies have examined how symptom severity relates to medical comorbidity. Purpose The current study assessed associations between severity of anxiety and depression and presence of medical conditions in adults diagnosed with anxiety disorders. Method Nine-hundred eighty-nine patients diagnosed with panic, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorders reported on the severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms and on diagnoses of 11 medical conditions. Results Severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms was strongly associated with having more medical conditions over and above control variables, and the association was as strong as that between BMI and disease. Odds of having asthma, heart disease, back problems, ulcer, migraine headache and eyesight difficulties also increased as anxiety and depressive symptom severity increased. Anxiety symptoms were independently associated with ulcer, whereas depressive symptoms were independently associated with heart disease, migraine, and eyesight difficulties. Conclusions These findings add to a growing body of research linking anxiety disorders with physical health problems and indicate that anxiety and depressive symptoms deserve greater attention in their association with disease. PMID:25510186

  16. How people evaluate others with social anxiety disorder: A comparison to depression and general mental illness stigma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kristin N; Jeon, Andrew B; Blenner, Jordan A; Wiener, Richard L; Hope, Debra A

    2015-03-01

    Despite the availability of effective interventions, most individuals with social anxiety disorder do not seek treatment. Given their fear of negative evaluation, socially anxious individuals might be especially susceptible to stigma concerns, a recognized barrier for mental health treatment. However, very little is known about the stigma specific to social anxiety disorder. In a design similar to Feldman and Crandall (2007), university undergraduate students read vignettes about target individuals with a generic mental illness label, major depressive disorder, and social anxiety disorder. Subjects rated each of 3 people in the vignettes on social distance and 17 dimensions including dangerousness, heritability and prevalence of the disorder, and gender ratio. Results indicated that being male and not having experience with mental health treatment was associated with somewhat greater preferred social distance. Multiple regression analyses revealed that being embarrassed by the disorder and dangerousness predicted social distance across all 3 vignettes. The vignette for social anxiety disorder had the most complex model and included work impairment, more common among women, and more avoidable. These results have implications for understanding the specific aspects of the stigma associated with social anxiety disorder. Public service messages to reduce stigma should focus on more accurate information about dangerousness and mental illness, given this is an established aspect of mental illness stigma. More nuanced messages about social anxiety might be best incorporated into the treatment referral process and as part of treatment. PMID:25822604

  17. Goal Setting and Treatment Adherence among Patients with Chronic Illness and Depressive Symptoms: Applying a Patient-Centered Approach

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Eric; Tatum, Alexander K.; Guy, Arryn; Mikrut, Cassandra; Yoder, Wren

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Poor treatment adherence is a major problem among individuals with chronic illness. Research indicates that adherence is worsened when accompanied by depressive symptoms. In this preliminary study, we aimed to describe how a patient-centered approach could be employed to aid patients with depressive symptoms in following their treatment regimens. Methods: The sample consisted of 14 patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV who reported clinically-significant depressive symptoms. Participant ratings of 23 treatment-related statements were examined using two assessment and analytic techniques. Interviews were conducted with participants to determine their views of information based on the technique. Results: Results indicate that while participants with optimal adherence focused on views of treatment associated with side effects to a greater extent than participants with poor adherence, they tended to relate these side effects to sources of intrinsic motivation. Conclusion: The study provides examples of how practitioners could employ the assessment techniques outlined to better understand how patients think about treatment and aid them in effectively framing their health-related goals. PMID:26755463

  18. A Preliminary Study of White Matter in Adolescent Depression: Relationships with Illness Severity, Anhedonia, and Irritability

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Johnson, Amy R.; Vallejo, Ana I.; Katz, Lev; Wong, Edmund; Gabbay, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) during adolescence is a common and disabling psychiatric condition; yet, little is known about its neurobiological underpinning. Evidence indicates that MDD in adults involves alterations in white and gray matter; however, sparse research has focused on adolescent MDD. Similarly, little research has accounted for the wide variability of symptom severity among depressed teens. Here, we aimed to investigate white matter (WM) microstructure between 17 adolescents with MDD and 16 matched healthy controls (HC) using diffusion tensor imaging. We further assessed within the MDD group relationships between WM integrity and depression severity, as well as anhedonia and irritability – two core symptoms of adolescent MDD. As expected, adolescents with MDD manifested decreased WM integrity compared to HC in the anterior cingulum and anterior corona radiata. Within the MDD group, greater depression severity was correlated with reduced WM integrity in the genu of corpus callosum, anterior thalamic radiation, anterior cingulum, and sagittal stratum. However, anhedonia and irritability were associated with alterations in distinct WM tracts. Specifically, anhedonia was associated with disturbances in tracts related to reward processing, including the anterior limb of the internal capsule and projection fibers to the orbitofrontal cortex. Irritability was associated with decreased integrity in the sagittal stratum, anterior corona radiata, and tracts leading to prefrontal and temporal cortices. Overall, these preliminary findings provide further support for the hypotheses that there is a disconnect between prefrontal and limbic emotional regions in depression, and that specific clinical symptoms involve distinct alterations in WM tracts. PMID:24324445

  19. A preliminary study of white matter in adolescent depression: relationships with illness severity, anhedonia, and irritability.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Sarah E; Johnson, Amy R; Vallejo, Ana I; Katz, Lev; Wong, Edmund; Gabbay, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) during adolescence is a common and disabling psychiatric condition; yet, little is known about its neurobiological underpinning. Evidence indicates that MDD in adults involves alterations in white and gray matter; however, sparse research has focused on adolescent MDD. Similarly, little research has accounted for the wide variability of symptom severity among depressed teens. Here, we aimed to investigate white matter (WM) microstructure between 17 adolescents with MDD and 16 matched healthy controls (HC) using diffusion tensor imaging. We further assessed within the MDD group relationships between WM integrity and depression severity, as well as anhedonia and irritability - two core symptoms of adolescent MDD. As expected, adolescents with MDD manifested decreased WM integrity compared to HC in the anterior cingulum and anterior corona radiata. Within the MDD group, greater depression severity was correlated with reduced WM integrity in the genu of corpus callosum, anterior thalamic radiation, anterior cingulum, and sagittal stratum. However, anhedonia and irritability were associated with alterations in distinct WM tracts. Specifically, anhedonia was associated with disturbances in tracts related to reward processing, including the anterior limb of the internal capsule and projection fibers to the orbitofrontal cortex. Irritability was associated with decreased integrity in the sagittal stratum, anterior corona radiata, and tracts leading to prefrontal and temporal cortices. Overall, these preliminary findings provide further support for the hypotheses that there is a disconnect between prefrontal and limbic emotional regions in depression, and that specific clinical symptoms involve distinct alterations in WM tracts. PMID:24324445

  20. Cabergoline-induced manic episode: case report.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Rabia Nazik; Elyas Kaya, Zeynep; Dilbaz, Nesrin; Cingi Yirün, Merve

    2016-06-01

    Cabergoline is an orally administered synthetic dopamine agonist that is used for the treatment of hyperprolactinemia, Parkinson's disease and antipsychotic-induced prolactin elevation. One of the main characteristics of cabergoline is its long duration of effect. It is highly effective in suppressing prolactin levels up to 21 days after a single 1 mg oral dose. The prolonged elimination half-life offers an advantage of once-daily dosing, but it might be a handicap in terms of washout of adverse effects such as psychosis. Cabergoline has been associated with adverse reactions consistent with other dopaminergic agonists including cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and neuropsychiatric effects. It is known that dopaminergic treatment is a remarkable risk factor for psychosis. A number of reports implicate dopamine agonists in the development of psychosis, but there is no knowledge in the literature of dopamine agonist-induced mania. In this case, we report the first manic episode occurring after cabergoline use for hyperprolactinemia treatment. In susceptible individuals, cabergoline can cause manic episodes and cabergoline should be used more carefully considering the risk-benefit ratio. PMID:27354910

  1. Cabergoline-induced manic episode: case report

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Rabia Nazik; Elyas Kaya, Zeynep; Dilbaz, Nesrin; Cingi Yirün, Merve

    2016-01-01

    Cabergoline is an orally administered synthetic dopamine agonist that is used for the treatment of hyperprolactinemia, Parkinson’s disease and antipsychotic-induced prolactin elevation. One of the main characteristics of cabergoline is its long duration of effect. It is highly effective in suppressing prolactin levels up to 21 days after a single 1 mg oral dose. The prolonged elimination half-life offers an advantage of once-daily dosing, but it might be a handicap in terms of washout of adverse effects such as psychosis. Cabergoline has been associated with adverse reactions consistent with other dopaminergic agonists including cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and neuropsychiatric effects. It is known that dopaminergic treatment is a remarkable risk factor for psychosis. A number of reports implicate dopamine agonists in the development of psychosis, but there is no knowledge in the literature of dopamine agonist-induced mania. In this case, we report the first manic episode occurring after cabergoline use for hyperprolactinemia treatment. In susceptible individuals, cabergoline can cause manic episodes and cabergoline should be used more carefully considering the risk–benefit ratio. PMID:27354910

  2. Endocannabinoid signaling in the etiology and treatment of major depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Hillard, Cecilia J; Liu, Qing-song

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine human and preclinical data that are relevant to the following hypotheses. The first hypothesis is that deficient CB1R-mediated signaling results in symptoms that mimic those seen in depression. The second hypothesis is that activation of CB1R-mediated signaling results in behavioral, endocrine and other effects that are similar to those produced by currently used antidepressants. The third hypothesis is that conventional antidepressant therapies act through enhanced CB1R mediated signaling. Together the available data indicate that activators of CB1R signaling, particularly inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase, should be considered for clinical trials for the treatment of depression. PMID:24180398

  3. Endocannabinoid Signaling in the Etiology and Treatment of Major Depressive Illness

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Cecilia J.; Liu, Qing-song

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine human and preclinical data that are relevant to the following hypotheses. The first hypothesis is that deficient CB1R-mediated signaling results in symptoms that mimic those seen in depression. The second hypothesis is that activation of CB1R-mediated signaling results in behavioral, endocrine and other effects that are similar to those produced by currently used antidepressants. The third hypothesis is that conventional antidepressant therapies act through enhanced CB1R mediated signaling. Together the available data indicate that activators of CB1R signaling, particularly inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase, should be considered for clinical trials for the treatment of depression. PMID:24180398

  4. Spirituality and religious coping in African American youth with depressive illness

    PubMed Central

    Breland-Noble, Alfiee M.; Wong, Michele J; Childers, Trenita; Hankerson, Sidney; Sotomayor, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The research team completed a secondary data analysis of primary data from a 2 phase depression treatment engagement behavioral trial to assess African American adolescents reported experiences of spiritual and religious coping when dealing with depression. The team utilized data collected from twenty-eight youth who participated in focus groups or individual interviews. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic techniques for transcript-based analysis to identify the key patterns and elements of the study participants’ accounts and to extract 6 primary themes. The main themes are reported in this manuscript and include; “Religion as Treatment Incentive”, “Prayer & Agency”, “Mixed Emotions”, “Doesn't Hurt, Might Help”, “Finding Support in the Church”, and “Prayer and Church: Barriers to Treatment?” Overall, the data suggested that religion and spirituality play a key role in African American adolescents’ experiences of depression. As well, it is surmised that these factors may be important for improving treatment seeking behaviors and reducing racial mental health disparities in this population of youth. PMID:26500425

  5. Stories to be told: Korean doctors between hwa-byung (fire-illness) and depression, 1970-2011.

    PubMed

    Suh, Soyoung

    2013-03-01

    This article analyzes the process of the making of hwa-byung (fire illness) an internationally recognized term for a Korean emotion-related disorder. To index hwa-byung as a valid condition within professional medical circles, Koreans draw on both the traditional idea of "constrained fire" and the DSM's modern identification of "depressive disorders." Examining the research on hwa-byung since the 1970s, conducted by both Korean psychiatrists and doctors of traditional medicine, this article demonstrates how inextricably conceptions of Korean-ness in medicine have been tied to the right positioning of Korea in a global context. The project of defining a uniquely Korean malady reflects the desire of medical professionals to make the indigenous meaningful, thereby guaranteeing a tool for gaining circulation and foreign recognition. Studies of hwa-byung since the 2000s have in many ways been a reflection of the endeavor to interpret patients' narratives as a therapeutic resource. Some hwa-byung specialists have dealt with patients' stories of illness over time and argue for establishing better techniques of clinical communication. Whereas the label of hwa-byung initiated the indigenous turn during the 1980s, now the term succinctly responds to the recent trend of exploring the colloquial dimension of medicine. This also demonstrates the way in which hwa-byung has been (dis)assembled at the junction of global and domestic flows. PMID:23229388

  6. Molecular genetics in affective illness

    SciTech Connect

    Mendlewicz, J.; Sevy, S.; Mendelbaum, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Genetic transmission in manic depressive illness (MDI) has been explored in twins, adoption, association, and linkage studies. The X-linked transmission hypothesis has been tested by using several markers on chromosome X: Xg blood group, color blindness, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), factor IX (hemophilia B), and DNA probes such as DXS15, DXS52, F8C, ST14. The hypothesis of autosomal transmission has been tested by association studies with the O blood group located on chromosome 9, as well as linkage studies on chromosome 6 with the Human Leucocyte Antigens (HLA) haplotypes and on Chromosome 11 with DNA markers for the following genes: D2 dopamine receptor, tyrosinase, C-Harvey-Ras-A (HRAS) oncogene, insuline (ins), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Although linkage studies support the hypothesis of a major locus for the transmission of MDI in the Xq27-28 region, several factors are limiting the results, and are discussed in the present review. 105 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Bipolar depression: Managing patients with second generation antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Avery, Lindsay M; Drayton, Shannon J

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar affective disorder is a debilitating illness that manifests as cyclical episodes of mood elevation and depression, but the treatment of the depressive episodes (i.e., bipolar depression) differs considerably from the treatment of major depressive disorder. In bipolar affective disorder, it is well known that patients spend a significantly greater amount of time in depressive episodes than manic or hypomanic episodes, yet there are currently just three Food and Drug Administration-approved agents for the treatment of bipolar depression: (1) olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (2) quetiapine, both immediate- and extended-release, and (3) lurasidone. The literature review presented here focuses on the clinical trials that led to the Food and Drug Administration-approval of these second generation antipsychotics in the treatment of bipolar depression. The discussion highlights key considerations regarding overall treatment strategies to aid clinicians in the selection of pharmacologic agents. Recommended monitoring parameters, potential adverse effects, and pertinent counseling points for second generation antipsychotics used in bipolar depression are included. PMID:27079776

  8. Qigong exercise alleviates fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms, improves sleep quality, and shortens sleep latency in persons with chronic fatigue syndrome-like illness.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jessie S M; Ho, Rainbow T H; Chung, Ka-Fai; Wang, Chong-Wen; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Ng, Siu-Man; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of Baduanjin Qigong exercise on sleep, fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS-) like illness and to determine the dose-response relationship. Methods. One hundred fifty participants with CFS-like illness (mean age = 39.0, SD = 7.9) were randomly assigned to Qigong and waitlist. Sixteen 1.5-hour Qigong lessons were arranged over 9 consecutive weeks. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Chalder Fatigue Scale (ChFS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were assessed at baseline, immediate posttreatment, and 3-month posttreatment. The amount of Qigong self-practice was assessed by self-report. Results. Repeated measures analyses of covariance showed a marginally nonsignificant (P = 0.064) group by time interaction in the PSQI total score, but it was significant for the "subjective sleep quality" and "sleep latency" items, favoring Qigong exercise. Improvement in "subjective sleep quality" was maintained at 3-month posttreatment. Significant group by time interaction was also detected for the ChFS and HADS anxiety and depression scores. The number of Qigong lessons attended and the amount of Qigong self-practice were significantly associated with sleep, fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptom improvement. Conclusion. Baduanjin Qigong was an efficacious and acceptable treatment for sleep disturbance in CFS-like illness. This trial is registered with Hong Kong Clinical Trial Register: HKCTR-1380. PMID:25610473

  9. Qigong Exercise Alleviates Fatigue, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms, Improves Sleep Quality, and Shortens Sleep Latency in Persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jessie S. M.; Ho, Rainbow T. H.; Chung, Ka-fai; Wang, Chong-wen; Yao, Tzy-jyun; Ng, Siu-man; Chan, Cecilia L. W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of Baduanjin Qigong exercise on sleep, fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS-) like illness and to determine the dose-response relationship. Methods. One hundred fifty participants with CFS-like illness (mean age = 39.0, SD = 7.9) were randomly assigned to Qigong and waitlist. Sixteen 1.5-hour Qigong lessons were arranged over 9 consecutive weeks. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Chalder Fatigue Scale (ChFS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were assessed at baseline, immediate posttreatment, and 3-month posttreatment. The amount of Qigong self-practice was assessed by self-report. Results. Repeated measures analyses of covariance showed a marginally nonsignificant (P = 0.064) group by time interaction in the PSQI total score, but it was significant for the “subjective sleep quality” and “sleep latency” items, favoring Qigong exercise. Improvement in “subjective sleep quality” was maintained at 3-month posttreatment. Significant group by time interaction was also detected for the ChFS and HADS anxiety and depression scores. The number of Qigong lessons attended and the amount of Qigong self-practice were significantly associated with sleep, fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptom improvement. Conclusion. Baduanjin Qigong was an efficacious and acceptable treatment for sleep disturbance in CFS-like illness. This trial is registered with Hong Kong Clinical Trial Register: HKCTR-1380. PMID:25610473

  10. A Pill for the Ill? Patients’ Reports of Their Experience of the Medical Encounter in the Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Vilhelmsson, Andreas; Svensson, Tommy; Meeuwisse, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Background Starting in the 1960s, a broad-based patients’ rights movement began to question doctors’ paternalism and to demand disclosure of medical information, informed consent, and active participation by the individual in personal health care. According to scholars, these changes contributed to downplay the biomedical approach in favor of a more patient-oriented perspective. The Swedish non-profit organization Consumer Association for Medicines and Health (KILEN) has offered the possibility for consumers to report their perceptions and experiences from their use of medicines in order to strengthen consumer rights within the health care sector. Methodology In this paper, qualitative content analysis was used to analyze 181 KILEN consumer reports of adverse events from antidepressant medications in order to explore patients’ views of mental ill health symptoms and the doctor-patient interaction. Principal Findings Overall, the KILEN stories contained negative experiences of the patients’ medical encounters. Some reports indicated intense emotional outrage and strong feelings of abuse by the health care system. Many reports suggested that doctors and patients had very different accounts of the nature of the problems for which the patient was seeking help. Although patients sought help for problems like tiredness and sleeplessness (often with a personal crisis of some sort as a described cause), the treating doctor in most cases was exceptionally quick in both diagnosing depression and prescribing antidepressant treatment. When patients felt they were not being listened to, trust in the doctor was compromised. This was evident in the cases when the doctor tried to convince them to take part in medical treatment, sometimes by threatening to withdraw their sick-listing. Conclusions Overall, this study suggests that the dynamics happening in the medical encounter may still be highly affected by a medical dominance, instead of a patient-oriented perspective

  11. Surviving depressive ill-health: a qualitative systematic review of older persons' narratives.

    PubMed

    Holm, Anne Lise; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this qualitative systematic review was to report a comprehensive literature synthesis of older persons' narratives about what they need in order to survive when suffering from depression. Their survival strategies seem to be a state rarely outlined in the literature. A systematic search of EBSCOhost/Academic Search Premier, ProQuest and PubMed was conducted for the period January 2000 to April 2012. Data were analyzed by means of thematic analysis. Thirteen studies were selected and three themes emerged from synthesis: the need for courage, strength, and self-reliance; the meaning of responsibility; and wearing a mask of normalcy to hide the shame. The first comprised two subthemes: the value of faith and distraction and activity; the second had no subtheme; and the third had one subtheme: reaching out of loneliness towards aloneness and connectivity. Further research should be focused on how community projects can improve health services such as enhancing the safety of health care and disseminating health information. PMID:23692267

  12. Tryptophan: the key to boosting brain serotonin synthesis in depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Abdulla A-B

    2013-10-01

    It has been proposed that focusing on brain serotonin synthesis can advance antidepressant drug development. Biochemical aspects of the serotonin deficiency in major depressive disorder (MDD) are discussed here in detail. The deficiency is caused by a decreased availability of the serotonin precursor tryptophan (Trp) to the brain. This decrease is caused by accelerated Trp degradation, most likely induced by enhancement of the hepatic enzyme tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) by glucocorticoids and/or catecholamines. Induction of the extrahepatic Trp-degrading enzyme indolylamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by the modest immune activation in MDD has not been demonstrated and, if it occurs, is unlikely to make a significant contribution. Liver TDO appears to be a target of many antidepressants, the mood stabilisers Li(+) and carbamazepine and possibly other adjuncts to antidepressant therapy. The poor, variable and modest antidepressant efficacy of Trp is due to accelerated hepatic Trp degradation, and efficacy can be restored or enhanced by combination with antidepressants or other existing or new TDO inhibitors. Enhancing Trp availability to the brain is thus the key to normalisation of serotonin synthesis and could form the basis for future antidepressant drug development. PMID:23904410

  13. Lifetime History of Depression and Anxiety Disorders Predicts Low Quality-of-Life in Midlife Women in the Absence of Current Illness Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Hadine; Chang, Yuefang; Dhaliwal, Sammy; Hess, Rachel; Thurston, Rebecca; Gold, Ellen; Matthews, Karen A; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2013-01-01

    Context It is unknown whether a previous history of depression, anxiety disorders, or comorbid depression and anxiety influences subsequent health-related quality-of-life (HRQL) during midlife in women when vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and sleep disturbance commonly disrupt quality-of-life. Objective We evaluated whether prior affective illness is associated with low HRQL during midlife in the absence of current illness episodes, and whether low HRQL is explained by VMS or sleep disruption. Design Longitudinal, community-based. Setting Western Pennsylvania. Participants 425 midlife women in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation who completed the SCID and SF-36 annually during 6-years of follow-up. Outcome Measures SF-36 scales of social functioning (SF), role-emotional (RE), role-physical (RP), body pain (BP), and vitality. Results 97 (22.8%) women had comorbid affective illness histories, 162 (38.1%) had prior depression only, and 21 (4.9%) had prior anxiety only. Those with comorbid illness histories and depression alone were more likely to report low HRQL on SF, RE, RP, and BP domains (ORs=2.31–3.54 and 1.59–2.28, respectively) than women with neither disorder. After adjustment for VMS and sleep disturbance, the comorbid group continued to have low HRQL on these domains (ORs=2.13–3.07), whereas the association was significant on SF and BP only for the depression-alone group (ORs= 2.08, 1.95, respectively). Compared to women with neither disorder, the anxiety-only group had low HRQL on the RP domain (OR 2.60). Sleep disturbance, but not VMS, was independently associated with low HRQL on all domains except for RE. Conclusions A prior history of both depression and anxiety has the most robust negative effect on HRQL in women during midlife, an association not explained by VMS or sleep disturbance. For the depression-alone group, sleep disturbance may partially explain the negative impact of prior affective illness on HRQL. Sleep disturbance remains an

  14. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... make negative thinking worse. previous continue Depression Can Go Unrecognized People with depression may not realize they ... themselves or who have eating disorders or who go through extreme mood changes may have unrecognized depression. ...

  15. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... The depression generally lifts during spring and summer. Bipolar disorder is different from depression but is included in this list is because someone with bipolar disorder experiences episodes of extreme low moods (depression). But ...

  16. [First manic episode in the elderly--consider a subdural haematoma due to head trauma as cause].

    PubMed

    Marijnissen, Radboud M; Bakker, Miranda; Stek, Max L

    2010-01-01

    A manic episode in old age presents a diagnostic challenge to the clinician due to the different symptomatology often difficult to distinguish from delirium, dementia, agitated depression and psychosis. To complicate matters further, a first episode of mania in later life is very often based on underlying physical and cerebral pathology ('secondary mania'). Many causes of 'secondary mania', including neurological, systemic or endocrine diseases, infections, intoxications, apnoea, post-thoracic surgery and vitamin B12 deficiency have been described to date, but there have been no reports on subdural haematomas in this context. However, the elderly are more prone to subdural haematomas following head trauma than younger patients. We present two case reports of older patients with a first manic episode in later life probably caused by subdural haematomas. A first episode of mania in later life always requires thorough assessment of the patient to determine physical and cerebral pathology. PMID:20456795

  17. A comparative study on psycho-socio-demographic and clinical profile of patients with bipolar versus unipolar depression

    PubMed Central

    Nisha, A.; Sathesh, V.; Punnoose, Varghese P.; Varghese, P. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have revealed significant differences between bipolar (BP) and unipolar depression (UP). Misdiagnosing BP depression results in suboptimal symptom resolution, induction of manic switch, mixed state, or accelerated cycling. This study compares various psycho-socio-demographic, longitudinal course, and phenomenological factors associated with BP and UP depression. Materials and Methods: We compared 30 UP and 30 BP depression patients using a specially designed intake proforma, International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnostic criteria for research, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-21 (HAMD-21), Hypomania Checklist-32 Questionnaire (HCL-32), Brief psychiatric rating scale (BPRS), and Kuppuswami's socioeconomic status scale. Results: BP depression group consisted of mostly males, with earlier age of onset of illness, longer illness duration, frequent episodes, hospitalizations and psychotic symptoms. The total HAM-D score and 4 HAM-D item scores–psychomotor retardation, insight, diurnal variation of symptoms and its severity, and paranoid symptoms were significantly higher in this group. Binary logistic regression identified the age of onset, the total duration of illness, frequency of affective episodes, and presence of delusions as predictors of bipolarity (odds ratio = 1.327; 1.517; 0.062; 0.137). Conclusions: Identification of clinical markers of bipolarity from large scale prospective studies is needed. PMID:26813699

  18. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... it might motivate the person to go for treatment. Treating Depression Your doctor or mental health expert can often treat your depression successfully. Different therapies seem to work for different people. For instance, ...

  19. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    Drug Fact Sheet Depressants Overview Includes barbiturates (barbs), benzodiazepines (benzos) and sedative-hypnotics. Depressants will put you ... unsafe, increasing the likelihood of coma or death. Benzodiazepines were developed to replace barbiturates, though they still ...

  20. Epidemiology and Heritability of Major Depressive Disorder, Stratified by Age of Onset, Sex, and Illness Course in Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS)

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Pippa; McKechanie, Andrew G.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Smith, Blair H.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Andrew D.; Matthews, Keith; Campbell, Archie; Linksted, Pamela; Haley, Chris S.; Deary, Ian J.; Porteous, David J.; McIntosh, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The heritability of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has been estimated at 37% based largely on twin studies that rely on contested assumptions. More recently, the heritability of MDD has been estimated on large populations from registries such as the Swedish, Finnish, and Chinese cohorts. Family-based designs utilise a number of different relationships and provide an alternative means of estimating heritability. Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) is a large (n = 20,198), family-based population study designed to identify the genetic determinants of common diseases, including Major Depressive Disorder. Two thousand seven hundred and six individuals were SCID diagnosed with MDD, 13.5% of the cohort, from which we inferred a population prevalence of 12.2% (95% credible interval: 11.4% to 13.1%). Increased risk of MDD was associated with being female, unemployed due to a disability, current smokers, former drinkers, and living in areas of greater social deprivation. The heritability of MDD in GS:SFHS was between 28% and 44%, estimated from a pedigree model. The genetic correlation of MDD between sexes, age of onset, and illness course were examined and showed strong genetic correlations. The genetic correlation between males and females with MDD was 0.75 (0.43 to 0.99); between earlier (≤ age 40) and later (> age 40) onset was 0.85 (0.66 to 0.98); and between single and recurrent episodic illness course was 0.87 (0.72 to 0.98). We found that the heritability of recurrent MDD illness course was significantly greater than the heritability of single MDD illness course. The study confirms a moderate genetic contribution to depression, with a small contribution of the common family environment (variance proportion = 0.07, CI: 0.01 to 0.15), and supports the relationship of MDD with previously identified risk factors. This study did not find robust support for genetic differences in MDD due to sex, age of onset, or illness course. However, we found

  1. [Manic episode in a patient with Beçhet's disease].

    PubMed

    Bozikas, V; Ramnalis, A; Dittopoulos, J; Iakovou, J; Garyfallos, G; Fokas, K

    2015-01-01

    Beçhet's disease (BD) is a chronic, heterogeneous, multisystem disease that affects young males and females around the Mediterranean region, as well as from Far and Middle East. Its etiology is vague with vasculitis being its main pathological feature. International diagnostic criteria have been established and they require the presence of recurrent oral ulcerations plus two of the following: Recurrent genital ulceration, eye lesions, skin lesions and positive pathergy test. A significant number of patients with Beçhet's disease suffers from symptoms from the central nervous system (CNS), while the most common clinical symptoms are pyramidal signs, mental-behavioral changes, hemiparesis and brain stem syndrome. The existence of mental-behavioral changes seems to be one of the most common findings in patients with Neuro-Beçhet (N-BD). These changes seem to be related with memory and attention deficits, and the process of deterioration continues even in attack-free periods, suggesting a continuously active disease process in the CNS. The prevalence of anxiety, depression and general psychiatric symptoms is higher among patients with BD compared to healthy individuals. However, the association between psychiatric symptoms and BD is not clearly understood. On the other hand, syndromes like psychosis or bipolar disorder appear to be less frequent, especially in attack-free periods. We describe the case of a 52-year old woman with Beçhet's disease who developed a single manic episode 13 years after the onset of Beçhet's disease. A 52-year old woman, suffering from Beçhet's disease since the age of 39, developed manic symptoms, namely elevated mood, pressured speech, flight of ideas, distractibility and decreased need for sleep. The above symptoms developed during a period that no other symptoms of Beçhet's disease were present. Moreover there was no other manifestation from the nervous system. A brain MRI was unremarkable, while a brain SPECT study revealed severe

  2. Chronic treatment with mood stabilizer lithium inhibits amphetamine-induced risk-taking manic-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhu; Wang, Ying; Tan, Hua; Bharti, Veni; Che, Yi; Wang, Jun-Feng

    2015-08-31

    A lack of behavioral tests and animal models for manic-depressive bipolar disorder is recognized as an important factor limiting development of novel pharmaceutical treatments for the disorder. Repeated amphetamine-induced hyperactivity is a commonly used animal model for mania. However, hyperactivity represents only one facet of mania and is also seen in other disorders. Increased engagement in risk taking behavior is frequently observed in the manic phase of bipolar disorder. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of the most commonly used mood stabilizer lithium on repeated amphetamine treatment-induced risk-taking behaviors in rats using elevated plus maze and wire-beam bridge tests. We found that repeated amphetamine treatment not only increased locomotor activity, but also increased risk taking behaviors in rats, and further that chronic lithium treatment inhibited the amphetamine-increased risk taking behavior. Our studies suggest that these tests may be useful tools to analyze the pharmacological validity of new and improved anti-manic drugs in animals. PMID:26219985

  3. Effects of illness representation, perceived quality of information provided by the health-care professional, and perceived social support on depressive symptoms of the caregivers of children with leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bozo, Ozlem; Anahar, Selin; Ateş, Gizem; Etel, Evren

    2010-03-01

    The present study examined the effects of illness representation, perceived quality of information provided by the health-care professional, and perceived social support on the depressive symptoms of the caregivers of children with leukemia. The sample was composed of 71 caregivers of children with leukemia living in Turkey. The obtained data were analyzed by path analysis. The results show that caregivers of children with leukemia experience higher levels of depressive symptoms when they have negative illness representation and lower levels of depressive symptoms when they perceive higher levels of social support. Moreover, they perceive higher social support when they perceive high quality of information provided by health-care professionals. It can be suggested that intervention programs which aim to increase caregivers' social support and change their illness representation in a positive way would be helpful for the caregivers showing depressive symptoms. PMID:19898925

  4. Personality Predispositions to Depression in Children of Affectively-Ill Parents: The Buffering Role of Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abela, John R. Z.; Fishman, Michael B.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Young, Jami F.

    2012-01-01

    A major theory of personality predispositions to depression posits that individuals who possess high levels of self-criticism and/or dependency are vulnerable to developing depression following negative life events. The goal of the current study was to test this theory of personality predispositions and the self-esteem buffering hypothesis in a…

  5. Self-help interventions for symptoms of depression, anxiety and psychological distress in patients with physical illnesses: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Matcham, F; Rayner, L; Hutton, J; Monk, A; Steel, C; Hotopf, M

    2014-03-01

    Psychological distress, depression and anxiety are common in most physical diseases, and self-help interventions, if effective, might be an important approach to improve outcomes as they are inexpensive to provide to large numbers of patients. The primary aim of this review was to assess randomised controlled trials examining the impact of self-help interventions on symptoms of depression, anxiety and psychological distress in patients with physical illness. Systematic searches of electronic databases resulted in twenty-five eligible studies for meta-analysis (n=4211). The results of the primary meta-analyses revealed a significant improvement in depression symptoms, in favour of the intervention group (SMD=-0.13, 95% CI: -0.25, -0.02, p=0.02, I(2)=50%). There were no significant differences in symptoms of anxiety (SMD=-0.10, 95% CI: -0.24, 0.05, p=0.20, I(2)=63%) or psychological distress (SMD=-0.14, 95% CI: -0.40, 0.12, p=0.30, I(2)=72%) between intervention and control conditions. Several subgroup and sensitivity analyses improved effect sizes, suggesting that optimal mental health outcomes may be obtained in patients without neurological conditions, and with interventions based on a therapeutic model (such as cognitive behavioural therapy), and with stress management components. This review demonstrates that with appropriate design and implementation, self-help interventions may potentially improve symptoms of depression in patients with physical conditions. PMID:24508685

  6. Circadian Rhythm Hypotheses of Mixed Features, Antidepressant Treatment Resistance, and Manic Switching in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Son, Gi-Hoon; Geum, Dongho

    2013-01-01

    Numerous hypotheses have been put forth over the years to explain the development of bipolar disorder. Of these, circadian rhythm hypotheses have gained much importance of late. While the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivation hypothesis and the monoamine hypothesis somewhat explain the pathogenic mechanism of depression, they do not provide an explanation for the development of mania/hypomania. Interestingly, all patients with bipolar disorder display significant disruption of circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycles throughout their mood cycles. Indeed, mice carrying the Clock gene mutation exhibit an overall behavioral profile that is similar to human mania, including hyperactivity, decreased sleep, lowered depression-like behavior, and lower anxiety. It was recently reported that monoamine signaling is in fact regulated by the circadian system. Thus, circadian rhythm instability, imposed on the dysregulation of HPA axis and monoamine system, may in turn increase individual susceptibility for switching from depression to mania/hypomania. In addition to addressing the pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the manic switch, circadian rhythm hypotheses can explain other bipolar disorder-related phenomena such as treatment resistant depression and mixed features. PMID:24302944

  7. Stress, Illness, and the Social Environment: Depression among First Generation Mandarin Speaking Chinese in Greater Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yueling; Hofstetter, C. Richard; Irving, Veronica; Chhay, Doug; Hovell, Melbourne F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study documents the indirect effects of social and environmental variables as mediated by immigrant stress and physical health. Methods Using data from a large dual frame sample of first generation mandarin speaking Chinese immigrants in metropolitan Los Angeles counties with the largest groups of Chinese immigrants, this study uses a path analytic approach to trace how predictors are related to depressive symptoms and to measure direct and indirect influences of variables. Results Although bivariate analyses suggested that many predictors were associated with depressive symptoms, multivariate path analysis revealed a more complex structure of mediated associations. In the multivariate path analysis only reports of physical health and immigrant stress were directly related to depressive symptoms (P<.05), while acculturation, time in the U.S., income, U.S. citizenship, and distance of persons on whom one could rely were related to stress (but not to physical health status) and only to depressive symptoms as mediated by stress. Age and educational attainment were related to health status (and to stress as mediated by physical health) and to depressive symptoms as mediated by both health and stress. These variables were also unrelated directly to health status and to depressive symptoms. Associations were evaluated using statistical significance, P<.05. Conclusions This study demonstrates the significance of stress and health as mediators of variables in the larger context of the physical environment and suggests that the mechanisms linking ecological characteristics of immigrants to depressive symptoms may be stress and physical health among immigrants. PMID:24306282

  8. Stress, illness, and the social environment: depressive symptoms among first generation mandarin speaking Chinese in greater Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueling; Hofstetter, C Richard; Irving, Veronica; Chhay, Doug; Hovell, Melbourne F

    2014-12-01

    This study documents the indirect effects of social and environmental variables as mediated by immigrant stress and physical health. Using data from a large dual frame sample of first generation mandarin speaking Chinese immigrants in metropolitan Los Angeles counties with the largest groups of Chinese immigrants, this study uses a path analytic approach to trace how predictors are related to depressive symptoms and to measure direct and indirect influences of variables. Although bivariate analyses suggested that many predictors were associated with depressive symptoms, multivariate path analysis revealed a more complex structure of mediated associations. In the multivariate path analysis only reports of physical health and immigrant stress were directly related to depressive symptoms (P < 0.05), while acculturation, time in the US, income, US citizenship, and distance of persons on whom one could rely were related to stress (but not to physical health status) and only to depressive symptoms as mediated by stress. Age and educational attainment were related to health status (and to stress as mediated by physical health) and to depressive symptoms as mediated by both health and stress. These variables were also unrelated directly to health status and to depressive symptoms. Associations were evaluated using statistical significance, P < 0.05. This study demonstrates the significance of stress and health as mediators of variables in the larger context of the physical environment and suggests that the mechanisms linking ecological characteristics of immigrants to depressive symptoms may be stress and physical health among immigrants. PMID:24306282

  9. Maternal inheritance and chromosome 18 allele sharing in unilineal bipolar illness pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Gershon, E.S.; Badner, J.A.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.

    1996-04-09

    We have replicated the observation that there is excess maternal transmission of illness in a series of previously described unilineal Bipolar manic-depressive illness extended pedigrees. ({open_quotes}Transmission{close_quotes} is defined for any ill person in a pedigree when father or mother has a personal or immediate family history of major affective disorder.) We divided our pedigrees into exclusively maternal transmission (Mat) and mixed maternal-paternal transmission (in different pedigree branches) (Pat). Using affected sib-pair-analysis, linkage to a series of markers on chromosome 18p-cen was observed in the Pat but not the Mat pedigrees, with significantly greater identity by descent (IBD) at these markers in the Pat pedigrees. As compared with the pedigree series as a whole, the proportion of alleles IBD in the linkage region is much increased in the Pat pedigrees. As the sharing proportion of alleles in affected relative pairs increases, the number of such pairs needed to resolve the linkage region to a 1 cM interval becomes smaller. Genetic subdivision of an illness by clinical or pedigree configuration criteria may thus play an important role in discovery of disease susceptibility mutations. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Marker genotyping errors in old data on X-linkage in bipolar illness.

    PubMed

    Gershon, E S

    1991-04-01

    Investigations of linkage markers of the X-chromosome colorblindness region in bipolar manic-depressive illness (BP) have yielded inconsistent results, with linkage accepted in some and rejected in other studies. Although genetic heterogeneity has been proposed as the reason for differences, other possibilities exist, including systematic procedural errors. Statistical evidence for linkage between the markers, Xg and colorblindness, is present in a series of papers on bipolar illness reported in 1972-1975. The linkage implied by this reanalysis is spurious, since the two markers are at opposite ends of the X chromosome. The presumptive reason for this spurious linkage is that it is a result of systematic genotyping errors. The support provided by these data to the X-linkage hypothesis in BP illness is thus diminished. That is, the linkage to illness may depend on systematic errors in marker genotyping. In general, the possible causes of inconsistency between linkage reports may be divided into statistical and systematic causes. Statistical causes would generally consist of chance differences in sampling, such as might occur under genetic heterogeneity. If this occurs, the reports rejecting linkage may be false negatives, or the reports detecting linkage may be false-positive results. Systematic causes of differences among reports could include systematic errors (or variations) in procedures, including ascertainment, diagnosis, genotyping, or analysis. Consistency of the marker map in a particular study with the known marker map is one test for systematic errors in genotyping. PMID:1888383

  11. Serious Mental Illness and Acute Hospital Readmission in Diabetic Patientsa

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jennifer S.; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R.; Morgan, Daniel J.; Comer, Angela C.; Harris, Anthony D.; Furuno, Jon P.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. We hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary-care facility from 2005–2009. SMI was defined by ICD-9 discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizo-affective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26,878 eligible admissions, prevalence of SMI was 6% and incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (OR 0.39, 95% CI: 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR 1.11, 95%CI: 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population. PMID:22539798

  12. Dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal gray matter density changes associated with bipolar depression

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, John O.; Bonner, Julie C.; Rosen, Allyson C.; Wang, Po W.; Hoblyn, Jennifer C.; Hill, Shelley J.; Ketter, Terence A.

    2009-01-01

    Mood states are associated with alterations in cerebral blood flow and metabolism, yet changes in cerebral structure are typically viewed in the context of enduring traits, genetic predispositions, or the outcome of chronic psychiatric illness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained from two groups of patients with bipolar disorder. In one group, patients met criteria for a current major depressive episode whereas in the other no patient did. No patient in either group met criteria for a current manic, hypomanic, or mixed episode. Groups were matched with respect to age and illness severity. Analyses of gray matter density were performed with Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM5). Compared with non-depressed bipolar subjects, depressed bipolar subjects exhibited lower gray matter density in the right dorsolateral and bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortices and portions of the left parietal lobe. In addition, gray matter density was greater in the left temporal lobe and right posterior cingulate cortex/parahippocampal gyrus in depressed than in non-depressed subjects. Our findings highlight the importance of mood state in structural studies of the brain—an issue that has received insufficient attention to date. Moreover, our observed differences in gray matter density overlap metabolic areas of change and thus have implications for the conceptualization and treatment of affective disorders. PMID:19351579

  13. Causes, Detection and Treatment of Childhood Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahraes, Herbert

    Three types of depressive illness of childhood (masked depression, acute depressive illness, and chronic depressive illness) are described; contributing factors (heredity and parental behavior) are discussed; and indications of depression are considered. Briefly reviewed are various methods of treating depressed children, including the use of…

  14. [The difference between depression and melancholia: two distinct conditions that were combined into a single category in DSM-III].

    PubMed

    Ohmae, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    In DSM-III (1980), depressive states of neurosis and those of manic-depressive illness (melancholia or endogenous depression) were combined into the single category "major depression," which is the progenitor of "major depressive disorder" in DSM-IV-TR (2000). According to Hamilton, the word "depression" is used in three different ways. In common speech, it is used to describe the state of sadness that all persons experience when they lose something of importance to them. In psychiatry, the word is used to signify an abnormal mood, analogous to the sadness, unhappiness, and misery of everyday experiences. Moreover, the depression discussed in psychiatry often has another quality that makes it distinctive, and this quality appears to be related to an inability to experience any pleasure (anhedonia) regardless of experience. Accordingly, we classify these three uses of the term "depression" into sadness, depression, and melancholia in order of appearance within this paper. According to DSM-IV-TR criteria for major depressive disorder, depression corresponds closely to A1 "depressed mood", while melancholia is roughly compatible with A2 "markedly diminished interest or pleasure." Depression and melancholia differ in terms of origin, psychopathology, and therapy. Before DSM-III, depression had not been considered as a diagnosis, but was a ubiquitous symptom that was seen in such conditions as neurasthenia, psychasthenia, nervousness, and neurosis. Melancholia has a history that reaches back to Hippocratic times. Its modern meaning was established based on Kraepelin's manic-depressive illness. Depression is a deepened or prolonged sadness in everyday life, but melancholia has a distinct quality of mood that cannot be interpreted as severe depression. In modern times, depression has been treated with a diverse range of methods, including rest, talk therapy, amphetamines (1930s), meprobamate (1950s), and benzodiazepines (1970s). Melancholia has primarily been treated with

  15. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Bipolar Depression in Adults: An Evidence Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the majority of cases of bipolar disorder, manic episodes are usually brief and typically responsive to currently available psychopharmacological agents. In contrast, depressive manifestations are more prevalent and persistent, and can present as major depressive/mixed episodes or residual interepisode symptoms. The depressive phase is often associated with other neuropsychiatric conditions, such as anxiety spectrum disorders, substance use disorders, stressor-related disorders, and eating disorders. It is viewed as a systemic disease with associated ailments such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. There is an increased rate of mortality not only from suicide, but also from concomitant physical illness. This scenario is made worse by the fact that depressive symptoms, which represent the main disease burden, are often refractory to existing psychotropic drugs. As such, there is a pressing need for novel agents that are efficacious in acute depressive exacerbations, and also have applicable value in preventing recurrent episodes. The rationale of the present review is to delineate the pharmacotherapy of the depressive phase of bipolar disorder with medications for which there is evidence in the form of observational, open-label, or double-blind randomized controlled studies. In the treatment of acute bipolar depression in adults, a comprehensive appraisal of the extant literature reveals that among mood stabilizers, the most robust proof of efficacy exists for divalproex sodium; while atypical antipsychotics, which include olanzapine, quetiapine, lurasidone, and cariprazine, are also effective, as demonstrated in controlled trials. PMID:27274384

  16. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Bipolar Depression in Adults: An Evidence Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Ather

    2016-05-01

    In the majority of cases of bipolar disorder, manic episodes are usually brief and typically responsive to currently available psychopharmacological agents. In contrast, depressive manifestations are more prevalent and persistent, and can present as major depressive/mixed episodes or residual interepisode symptoms. The depressive phase is often associated with other neuropsychiatric conditions, such as anxiety spectrum disorders, substance use disorders, stressor-related disorders, and eating disorders. It is viewed as a systemic disease with associated ailments such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. There is an increased rate of mortality not only from suicide, but also from concomitant physical illness. This scenario is made worse by the fact that depressive symptoms, which represent the main disease burden, are often refractory to existing psychotropic drugs. As such, there is a pressing need for novel agents that are efficacious in acute depressive exacerbations, and also have applicable value in preventing recurrent episodes. The rationale of the present review is to delineate the pharmacotherapy of the depressive phase of bipolar disorder with medications for which there is evidence in the form of observational, open-label, or double-blind randomized controlled studies. In the treatment of acute bipolar depression in adults, a comprehensive appraisal of the extant literature reveals that among mood stabilizers, the most robust proof of efficacy exists for divalproex sodium; while atypical antipsychotics, which include olanzapine, quetiapine, lurasidone, and cariprazine, are also effective, as demonstrated in controlled trials. PMID:27274384

  17. Patterns of depressive symptoms in caregivers of mechanically ventilated critically ill adults from ICU admission to two months post-ICU discharge: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiYeon; Sherwood, Paula R.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara; Hoffman, Leslie A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine trajectories of depressive symptoms in caregivers of critically ill adults from ICU admission to 2 months post-ICU discharge and explore patient and caregiver characteristics associated with differing trajectories. Design Longitudinal descriptive Setting Medical ICU in a tertiary university hospital Subjects 50 caregivers and 47 patients on mechanical ventilation for ≥ 4 days Intervention None Measurements and Main Results Caregivers completed measures assessing depressive symptoms (Short version Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale 10-items [shortened CES-D]), burden (Brief Zarit Burden Interview [Zarit-12]) and health risk behaviors (caregiver health behaviors) during ICU admission, at ICU discharge and 2 months post-ICU discharge. Group-based trajectory analysis was used to identify patterns of change in shortened CES-D scores over time. Two trajectory groups emerged: 1) caregivers who had clinically significant depressive symptoms (21.0 ± 4.1) during ICU admission that remained high (13.6 ± 5) at 2 months post-ICU discharge (high trajectory group, 56%) and 2) caregivers who reported scores that were lower (10.6 ± 5.7) during ICU admission and decreased further (5.7 ± 3.6) at 2 months post-ICU discharge (low trajectory group, 44%). Caregivers in the high trajectory group tended to be younger, female, adult child living with financial difficulty and less likely to report a religious background or preference. More caregivers in the high trajectory group reported greater burden and more health risk behaviors at all time points; patients tended to be male with poorer functional ability at ICU discharge. Caregivers’ responses during ICU admission did not differ in regard to number of days patients being on mechanical ventilation prior to enrollment. Conclusion Findings suggest two patterns of depressive symptom response in caregivers of critically ill adults on mechanical ventilation from ICU admission to two months post

  18. Distinct relationships between social aptitude and dimensions of manic-like symptoms in youth.

    PubMed

    Benarous, Xavier; Mikita, Nina; Goodman, Robert; Stringaris, Argyris

    2016-08-01

    Difficulties with interpersonal relationships have been reported in children and adolescents with manic symptoms, even if they do not fulfil criteria for a manic episode. The role of social aptitude (SA) in youths with manic symptoms has never been examined in the general population. Moreover, no study has examined whether SA is differentially associated with dimensions of manic symptoms. We hypothesised that youth with predominantly undercontrol manic symptoms (characterised by irritability) would show lower levels of SA; conversely, youth with predominantly exuberant symptoms would show better than average social skills. Our sample comprised 5325 participants from the 2004 British Child and Adolescent Mental Health Survey (B-CAMHS04), mean age 10.3 years, SD = 3.3, 48 % girls. Manic symptoms were assessed with the Development and Wellbeing Assessment by interviewing parents and young people. Children and adolescents with manic symptoms had a lower SA score, compared to the general population by parent report, but not by self-report. SA score was higher in youths with predominantly exuberant manic symptoms compared to the general population; whereas the youths with predominantly undercontrol manic symptoms had lower SA scores by parent and self-report. Our results provide further evidence for the distinction between exuberant and undercontrol manic symptoms and highlight the need to focus on SA in future research. PMID:26650482

  19. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... newborns, as well as jitteriness, difficulty feeding, and low blood sugar after delivery. However, moms who stop medications can ... a kind of antidepressant for treating depression and anxiety disorders. However, a number of research studies show ...

  20. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... system. Doctors use them to treat things like insomnia or anxiety . But if depressant drugs (like sedatives, ... Other long-term effects include: impaired sexual function insomnia and other sleep problems breathing problems convulsions (similar ...

  1. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... marketed in the United States. Common places of origin Generally, legitimate pharmaceutical products are diverted to the illicit market. Teens can obtain depressants from the family medicine cabinet, friends, family members, the Internet, doctors, ...

  2. Rehabilitating and upgrading Hydro-Quebec's Manic 5 station

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, L.B. ); Mahe, B. ); Giguere, J.G. )

    1993-08-01

    Although modernizing the Manic 5 turbine-generator units would mean more capacity for Hydro-Quebec's electrical grid, the utility was concerned about extended downtime of the plant. Consequently, several innovative concepts were developed to make the rehabilitation feasible. This article describes some of those innovations, such as designing a portable machine for precision machining of the discharge ring to reduce the discharge ring tolerance, and increasing the stroke of servomotors to increase output by 20 MW.

  3. Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Medicinal Property of Sage (Salvia) to Prevent and Cure Illnesses such as Obesity, Diabetes, Depression, Dementia, Lupus, Autism, Heart Disease, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamidpour, Mohsen; Hamidpour, Rafie; Hamidpour, Soheila; Shahlari, Mina

    2014-01-01

    For a long time, sage (Salvia) species have been used in traditional medicine for the relief of pain, protecting the body against oxidative stress, free radical damages, angiogenesis, inflammation, bacterial and virus infection, etc., Several studies suggest that sage species can be considered for drug development because of their reported pharmacology and therapeutic activities in many countries of Asia and Middle East, especially China and India. These studies suggest that Salvia species, in addition to treating minor common illnesses, might potentially provide novel natural treatments for the relief or cure of many serious and life-threatening diseases such as depression, dementia, obesity, diabetes, lupus, heart disease, and cancer. This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the botanical, chemical, and pharmacological aspects of sage (Saliva). PMID:24860730

  4. Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Medicinal Property of Sage (Salvia) to Prevent and Cure Illnesses such as Obesity, Diabetes, Depression, Dementia, Lupus, Autism, Heart Disease, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hamidpour, Mohsen; Hamidpour, Rafie; Hamidpour, Soheila; Shahlari, Mina

    2014-04-01

    For a long time, sage (Salvia) species have been used in traditional medicine for the relief of pain, protecting the body against oxidative stress, free radical damages, angiogenesis, inflammation, bacterial and virus infection, etc., Several studies suggest that sage species can be considered for drug development because of their reported pharmacology and therapeutic activities in many countries of Asia and Middle East, especially China and India. These studies suggest that Salvia species, in addition to treating minor common illnesses, might potentially provide novel natural treatments for the relief or cure of many serious and life-threatening diseases such as depression, dementia, obesity, diabetes, lupus, heart disease, and cancer. This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the botanical, chemical, and pharmacological aspects of sage (Saliva). PMID:24860730

  5. Manic Symptoms during a Switch from Paliperidone ER to Paliperidone Palmitate in a Patient with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Kadir; Keleş, Süleyman; Demirdaş, Arif; Korucu, Cafer Çağrı

    2015-01-01

    Some antipsychotic drugs have treatment efficacy for mania and bipolar disorder. However, these drugs may rarely cause manic symptoms in some schizophrenic patients. We hereby report a 22-year-old female patient with schizophrenia who experienced a manic episode during a switch from paliperidone ER to paliperidone palmitate. This case is an important reminder that an abrupt switch from oral paliperidone to paliperidone palmitate may predispose certain patients to hypomanic or manic symptoms. PMID:26539300

  6. Repeated low-dose organophosphate DFP exposure leads to the development of depression and cognitive impairment in a rat model of Gulf War Illness.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kristin F; Deshpande, Laxmikant S

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 175,000-250,000 of the returning veterans from the 1991 Persian Gulf War exhibit chronic multi-symptom illnesses that includes neurologic co-morbidities such as depression, anxiety and cognitive impairments. Amongst a host of causative factors, exposure to low levels of the nerve agent Sarin has been strongly implicated for expression of Gulf War Illness (GWI). Nerve agents similar to pesticides are organophosphate (OP) compounds. There is evidence from civilian population that exposure to OPs such as in agricultural workers and nerve agents such as the survivors and first-responders of the Tokyo subway Sarin gas attack suffer from chronic neurological problems similar to GWI symptoms. Given this unique chemical profile, OPs are ideal to study the effects of nerve agents and develop models of GWI in civilian laboratories. In this study, we used repeated low-dose exposure to OP agent diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) over a 5-day period to approximate the duration and level of Sarin exposure during the Persian Gulf War. We tested the rats at 3-months post DFP exposure. Using a battery of behavioral assays, we observed the presence of symptoms of chronic depression, anxiety and memory problems as characterized by increased immobility time in the Forced Swim Test, anhedonia in the Sucrose Preference Test, anxiety in the Elevated Plus Maze, and spatial memory impairments in the Object Location Test, respectively. Chronic low dose DFP exposure was also associated with hippocampal neuronal damage as characterized by the presence of Fluoro-Jade staining. Given that OP exposure is considered a leading cause of GWI related morbidities, this animal model will be ideally suited to study underlying molecular mechanisms for the expression of GWI neurological symptoms and identify drugs for the effective treatment of GWIs. PMID:26619911

  7. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... to eat at all Not being able to sleep, or sleeping too much Feeling very tired Feeling hopeless, irritable, anxious, or guilty Aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems Thoughts of death or suicide Depression is a disorder of the brain. There are a variety of ...

  8. Predictors of switch from depression to mania in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Niitsu, Tomihisa; Fabbri, Chiara; Serretti, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Manic switch is a relevant issue when treating bipolar depression. Some risk factors have been suggested, but unequivocal findings are lacking. We therefore investigated predictors of switch from depression to mania in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) sample. Manic switch was defined as a depressive episode followed by a (hypo)manic or mixed episode within the following 12 weeks. We assessed possible predictors of switch using generalized linear mixed models (GLMM). 8403 episodes without switch and 512 episodes with switch (1720 subjects) were included in the analysis. Several baseline variables were associated with a higher risk of switch. They were younger age, previous history of: rapid cycling, severe manic symptoms, suicide attempts, amphetamine use and some pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments. During the current depressive episode, the identified risk factors were: any possible mood elevation, multiple mania-associated symptoms with at least moderate severity, and comorbid panic attacks. In conclusion, our study suggests that both characteristics of the disease history and clinical features of the current depressive episode may be risk factors for manic switch. PMID:25937504

  9. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome and the onset of a manic episode.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, Phillip; Tau, Michael; Robertson, David

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is a rare, recently described, clinically diagnosed condition that is characterised by a chronic history of cannabis use, cyclic nausea and vomiting, symptomatic relief with hot water bathing, and resolution with cessation of use. We present a case of this syndrome concurrent in a patient with bipolar mania. We suggest that a 3-week period of vomiting in the context of this syndrome contributed to the precipitation of a manic episode by lowering mood stabiliser serum levels, and that this syndrome will have significant consequences for the patient's mental health. PMID:27122104

  10. The Relationship between Manic Symptoms on the Dash II and YMRS and Feeding/Mealtime Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laud, Rinita B.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2006-01-01

    This study represents the first to assess whether a relationship between manic symptoms and feeding/mealtime behavior problems exists in individuals with ID. Participants were compared across three groups (manic, non-manic psychiatrically impaired, and controls) on the diagnostic assessment for the severely handicapped-revised (DASH-II) and young…

  11. Importance of Depression in Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustman, Patrick J.; Clouse, Ray E.; Anderson, Ryan J.

    Depression doubles the likelihood of comorbid depression, which presents as major depression in 11% and subsyndromal depression in 31% of patients with the medical illness. The course of depression is chronic, and afflicted patients suffer an average of one episode annually. Depression has unique importance in diabetes because of its association…

  12. Screening for Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... events Visit the podcast archive Mood Disorders Depression Bipolar Disorder Anxiety Screening Center Co-occurring Illnesses/Disorders Related ... for Your Patients Information about Depression Information about Bipolar Disorder Wellness Tools DBSA Support Groups Active Research Studies ...

  13. Schizophrenia: the illness that made us human.

    PubMed

    Horrobin, D F

    1998-04-01

    Any hypotheses concerning the origins of humans must explain many things. Among these are: 1, the growth in brain size around two million years ago; 2, the presence of subcutaneous fat; 3, the near absence of change or cultural progress for around 2 million years after the brain grew in size; 4, the cultural explosion which began somewhere between fifty thousand and one hundred thousand years ago with the emergence of art, music, religion and warfare; 5, the further cultural explosion around ten thousand to fifteen thousand years ago which developed with the emergence of agriculture and which has continued since. Since the brain, like subcutaneous fat, is particularly rich in lipids, and since the microconnections of the brain are substantially lipid in nature, it is suggested that changes in lipid metabolism are what differentiated humans from the great apes. The growth in brain size and in the quality of subcutaneous adipose tissue may have occurred because of changes in the proteins which regulate the rate of delivery of fatty acids to tissues, notably lipoprotein lipases and fatty acid binding proteins. The creativity which occurred one hundred thousand years ago may have resulted from changes in phospholipid-synthesizing, -remodelling and -degrading enzymes which largely determine the microconnectivity of neurons. Family studies and adoption studies indicate that schizophrenia in a family member is associated with an increased risk of the illness in other family members. It is also associated with an increased risk of schizotypy, manic-depression, dyslexia, sociopathy and psychopathy. On the other hand it is also an indication of an increased likelihood of high creativity, leadership qualities, achievements in many fields, high musical skills and an intense interest in religion. I propose that the characteristics which entered the human race about one hundred thousand years ago and which ended around two million years of cultural near-stagnation are precisely

  14. Illness Progression as a Function of Independent and Accumulating Poor Prognosis Factors in Outpatients With Bipolar Disorder in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, Lori L.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Nolen, Willem A.; Kupka, Ralph; Grunze, Heinz; Frye, Mark A.; Suppes, Trisha; McElroy, Susan L.; Keck, Paul E.; Rowe, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Many patients with bipolar disorder in the United States experience a deteriorating course of illness despite naturalistic treatment in the community. We examined a variety of factors associated with this pattern of illness progression. Method: From 1995 to 2002, we studied 634 adult outpatients with bipolar disorder (mean age of 40 years) emanating from 4 sites in the United States. Patients gave informed consent and completed a detailed questionnaire about demographic, vulnerability, and course-of-illness factors and indicated whether their illness had shown a pattern of increasing frequency or severity of manic or depressive episodes. Fifteen factors previously linked in the literature to a poor outcome were examined for their relationship to illness progression using Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by a 2-sample Wilcoxon rank sum (Mann-Whitney) test, χ2, and logistical regression. Results: All of the putative poor prognosis factors occurred with a high incidence, and, with the exception of obesity, were significantly (P < .05) associated with illness progression. These factors included indicators of genetic and psychosocial risk and loss of social support, early onset, long delay to first treatment, anxiety and substance abuse comorbidity, rapid cycling in any year, and the occurrence of more than 20 prior episodes prior to entering the network. A greater number of factors were linearly associated with the likelihood of a progressively worsening course. Conclusions: Multiple genetic, psychosocial, and illness factors were associated with a deteriorating course of bipolar disorder from onset to study entry in adulthood. The identification of these factors provides important targets for earlier and more effective therapeutic intervention in the hope of achieving a more benign course of bipolar disorder. PMID:25834764

  15. Pattern of healthcare resource utilization and direct costs associated with manic episodes in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although some studies indicate that bipolar disorder causes high health care resources consumption, no study is available addressing a cost estimation of bipolar disorder in Spain. The aim of this observational study was to evaluate healthcare resource utilization and the associated direct cost in patients with manic episodes in the Spanish setting. Methods Retrospective descriptive study was carried out in a consecutive sample of patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of bipolar type I disorder with or without psychotic symptoms, aged 18 years or older, and who were having an active manic episode at the time of inclusion. Information regarding the current manic episode was collected retrospectively from the medical record and patient interview. Results Seven hundred and eighty-four evaluable patients, recruited by 182 psychiatrists, were included in the study. The direct cost associated with healthcare resource utilization during the manic episode was high, with a mean cost of nearly €4,500 per patient, of which approximately 55% corresponded to the cost of hospitalization, 30% to the cost of psychopharmacological treatment and 10% to the cost of specialized care. Conclusions Our results show the high cost of management of the patient with a manic episode, which is mainly due to hospitalizations. In this regard, any intervention on the management of the manic patient that could reduce the need for hospitalization would have a significant impact on the costs of the disease. PMID:20426814

  16. Psychotic Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Engagement in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy within an Outpatient Sample of Adults with Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Jennifer D.; Mueser, Kim T.; Rosenberg, Stanley D.; Xie, Haiyi; Wolfe, Rosemarie S.

    2010-01-01

    Depression with psychotic features afflicts a substantial number of people, and has been characterized by significantly greater impairment, higher levels of dysfunctional beliefs, and poorer response to psychopharmacological and psychosocial interventions than non-psychotic depression. Those with psychotic depression also experience a host of co-occurring disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which is not surprising, given the established relationships between trauma exposure and increased rates of psychosis, and between PTSD and major depression. To date, there has been very limited research on the psychosocial treatment of psychotic depression, and even less is known about those who also suffer from PTSD. The purpose of this study was to better understand the rates and clinical correlates of psychotic depression in those with PTSD. Clinical and symptom characteristics of 20 individuals with psychotic depression and 46 with non-psychotic depression, all with PTSD, were compared prior to receiving CBT for PTSD treatment or TAU. Patients with psychotic depression exhibited significantly higher levels of depression and anxiety, a weaker perceived therapeutic alliance with their case managers, more exposure to traumatic events and more negative beliefs related to their traumatic experiences, as well as increased levels of maladaptive cognitions about themselves and the world, compared to participants without psychosis. Implications for CBT treatment aimed at dysfunctional thinking for this population are discussed. PMID:21220064

  17. Rapid response to methylphenidate as an add-on therapy to mirtazapine in the treatment of major depressive disorder in terminally ill cancer patients: a four-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chong Guan; Boks, Marco P M; Roes, Kit C B; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Tan, Seng Beng; de Wit, Niek J

    2014-04-01

    This is a 4 week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to examine the effects of methylphenidate as add-on therapy to mirtazapine compared to placebo for treatment of depression in terminally ill cancer patients. It involved 88 terminally ill cancer patients from University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. They were randomized and treated with either methylphenidate or placebo as add on to mirtazapine. The change in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score from baseline to day 3 was analyzed by linear regression. Changes of MADRS and Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) over 28 days were analyzed using mixed model repeated measures (MMRM). Secondary analysis of MADRS response rates, defined as 50% or more reduction from baseline score. A significantly larger reduction of Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score in the methylphenidate group was observed from day 3 (B=4.14; 95% CI=1.83-6.45). Response rate (defined as 50% or more reduction from baseline MADRS score) in the methylphenidate treated group was superior from day 14. Improvement in Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) was greater in the methylphenidate treated group from day 3 until day 28. The drop-out rates were 52.3% in the methylphenidate group and 59.1% in the placebo group (relative risk=0.86, 95%CI=0.54-1.37) due to cancer progression. Nervous system adverse events were more common in methylphenidate treated subjects (20.5% vs 9.1%, p=0.13). In conclusions, methylphenidate as add on therapy to mirtazapine demonstrated an earlier antidepressant response in terminally ill cancer patients, although at an increased risk of the nervous system side effects. PMID:24503279

  18. Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... events Visit the podcast archive Mood Disorders Depression Bipolar Disorder Anxiety Screening Center Co-occurring Illnesses/Disorders Related ... for Your Patients Information about Depression Information about Bipolar Disorder Wellness Tools DBSA Support Groups Active Research Studies ...

  19. Depression Plagues Many with COPD

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159436.html Depression Plagues Many With COPD Studies found 1 in ... pulmonary disorder (COPD) may raise the risk of depression among patients with the incurable respiratory illness, two ...

  20. Depression Plagues Many with COPD

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159436.html Depression Plagues Many With COPD Studies found 1 in ... pulmonary disorder (COPD) may raise the risk of depression among patients with the incurable respiratory illness, two ...

  1. Do You Have Major Depression?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression Do You Have Major Depression? Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Simple ... member may have major depression. —NIMH Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  2. Evaluating depressive symptoms in mania: a naturalistic study of patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Young, Allan H; Eberhard, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) who have mania with depressive symptoms and who meet the new “with mixed features” specifier of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5). Method This prospective, multinational, naturalistic study surveyed psychiatrists and their patients with BD-I from October 2013 to March 2014. Eligible patients had BD-I, had a (current) manic episode, and had experienced onset of a manic episode within the previous 3 months. Psychiatrists provided patient information on depressive symptoms (DSM-5 criteria); symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation; suicide attempts; and physician satisfaction with treatment response. Data were stratified according to whether patients met the criteria for the BD-I “with mixed features” specifier of DSM-5 (≥3 depressive symptoms) or not, and characteristics were compared between the two subgroups. Patients also self-reported on depressive symptoms using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview module questionnaire. Results Overall, 34% of 1,035 patients met the criteria for BD-I “with mixed features,” exhibiting ≥3 depressive symptoms during their current manic episode. This correlated with the matched patient self-reports of depressive symptoms. During their current manic episode, BD-I patients “with mixed features” had more severe symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (average composite severity score of 4.1 vs 3.4), a higher incidence of suicide attempts (38% vs 9%), and more physician dissatisfaction with treatment response (22% vs 14%), compared to patients with 0–2 depressive symptoms (all P<0.05). Conclusion This study found that patients with BD-I “with mixed features” (ie, ≥3 depressive symptoms during a manic episode), suffered, on average, from a greater burden of disease than patients with pure mania. Improved identification of these patients may help to optimize

  3. Pros and cons of approved therapies for bipolar depression and ongoing unmet needs.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Susan L

    2014-10-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder spend more time depressed than manic, but fewer clinical trials have been conducted investigating treatments for bipolar depression than for bipolar mania. Olanzapine-fluoxetine combination, quetiapine, and lurasidone are the only FDA-approved treatments for bipolar depression. Clinical trials of these drugs show similar efficacy but different side effect profiles. Clinicians, therefore, should consider possible adverse events and individual patient characteristics when selecting treatments. PMID:25373131

  4. Onset polarity and illness course in bipolar I and II disorders: The predictive role of broadly defined mixed states.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Antonio; Musetti, Laura; Benedetti, Alessandra; Berti, Benedetta; Massimetti, Gabriele; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2015-11-01

    Several studies investigating bipolar disorders have shown that polarity of onset can predict differences in symptomatology, course, and prognosis. Frequently, however, research on the topic has examined only bipolar I inpatients and has not included patients with mixed onset. The aim of the present naturalistic study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and illness course of a consecutive sample (407 outpatients, 58.7% with bipolar I (BD-I) and 41.3% with bipolar II (BD-II) disorder) according to polarity of onset: depressive (DP-o); manic/hypomanic (HM-o); or mixed--broadly defined to include agitated depression for BD-II--onset (MX-o). As compared with patients in the other two groups: a) DP-o patients (67.3%) were more frequently affected by BD-II and had lower ratings for psychotic symptoms; b) HM-o patients (17%) had a higher rate of family history for psychosis and a lower rate of suicide attempts; and c) patients in the MX-o group (15.7%) more frequently showed substance abuse and had a higher number of mixed recurrences per year. In the BD-II group, MX-o patients more frequently attempted suicide. The present study's main limitations are those of retrospective assessment of onset polarity and lack of treatment-impact evaluations over illness course. In conclusion, we confirm clinical expression differences in bipolar disorder in function of polarity of onset and underscore the importance of carefully considering broadly defined mixed state when examining polarity of onset. Further investigations are required to confirm the present study's results. PMID:26555487

  5. Mania and Intellectual Disability: The Course of Manic Symptoms in Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Melissa; Matson, Johnny L.

    2006-01-01

    Our aim was to extend the literature by examining the presence of manic symptoms in persons with intellectual deficits with and without bipolar disorder for 3 years. Three groups (bipolar, psychopathology other than bipolar disorder, and no Axis I diagnosis) were formed with 14 participants in each group. Initially, the presence of mania symptoms…

  6. Dimensions of Manic Symptoms in Youth: Psychosocial Impairment and Cognitive Performance in the IMAGEN Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringaris, Argyris; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Juergen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Itterman, Bernd; Lawrence, Claire; Nees, Frauke; Paillere-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Smolka, Michael N.; Schumann, Gunter; Goodman, Robert; Conrod, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background: It has been reported that mania may be associated with superior cognitive performance. In this study, we test the hypothesis that manic symptoms in youth separate along two correlated dimensions and that a symptom constellation of high energy and cheerfulness is associated with superior cognitive performance. Method: We studied 1755…

  7. Dimensions of manic symptoms in youth: psychosocial impairment and cognitive performance in the IMAGEN sample

    PubMed Central

    Stringaris, Argyris; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Juergen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Itterman, Bernd; Lawrence, Claire; Nees, Frauke; Paillere-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Smolka, Michael N; Schumann, Gunter; Goodman, Robert; Conrod, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been reported that mania may be associated with superior cognitive performance. In this study, we test the hypothesis that manic symptoms in youth separate along two correlated dimensions and that a symptom constellation of high energy and cheerfulness is associated with superior cognitive performance. Method We studied 1755 participants of the IMAGEN study, of average age 14.4 years (SD = 0.43), 50.7% girls. Manic symptoms were assessed using the Development and Wellbeing Assessment by interviewing parents and young people. Cognition was assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale For Children (WISC-IV) and a response inhibition task. Results Manic symptoms in youth formed two correlated dimensions: one termed exuberance, characterized by high energy and cheerfulness and one of undercontrol with distractibility, irritability and risk-taking behavior. Only the undercontrol, but not the exuberant dimension, was independently associated with measures of psychosocial impairment. In multivariate regression models, the exuberant, but not the undercontrolled, dimension was positively and significantly associated with verbal IQ by both parent- and self-report; conversely, the undercontrolled, but not the exuberant, dimension was associated with poor performance in a response inhibition task. Conclusions Our findings suggest that manic symptoms in youth may form dimensions with distinct correlates. The results are in keeping with previous findings about superior performance associated with mania. Further research is required to study etiological differences between these symptom dimensions and their implications for clinical practice. PMID:24865127

  8. The Structure of Cognitive Abilities in Youths with Manic Symptoms: A Factorial Invariance Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaujean, A. Alexander; Freeman, Megan Joseph; Youngstrom, Eric; Carlson, Gabrielle

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the structure of cognitive ability (specifically, verbal/crystallized ["Gc"] and visual-spatial ability ["Gv"]), as measured in the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, in youth with manic symptoms with a nationally representative group of similarly aged youth. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis found the majority of…

  9. Alcohol withdrawal delirium manifested by manic symptoms in an elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hung-Yu; Lee, Kuan-I

    2015-03-01

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is a commonly seen problem in psychiatric practice. Alcohol withdrawal delirium is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Withdrawal symptoms usually include tremulousness, psychotic and perceptual symptoms, seizures, and consciousness disturbance. Herein, we report a case involving a 63-year-old man who had alcohol withdrawal delirium that was manifested mainly by manic symptoms. PMID:25515164

  10. Effective treatment of bipolar depression: monotherapy and combination strategies.

    PubMed

    Manning, J Sloan

    2015-11-01

    Managing patients with bipolar disorder remains a challenge due to its chronic nature. In addition, bipolar depression remains understudied even though patients spend more time in depressive episodes than in manic ones. Effective treatment requires an accurate and timely diagnosis, psychoeducation, psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and implementation of elements of the chronic care model. Pharmacologic strategies for treating bipolar depression differ from those for bipolar mania as well as those for unipolar depression and require knowledge of the efficacy and safety of agents including mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, and antidepressants both as monotherapy and in combination. PMID:26646048

  11. Metabolic depression in hibernation and major depression: an explanatory theory and an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Tsiouris, John A

    2005-01-01

    therapeutic effects by normalizing the fluctuation of activities in the different signaling systems, which are down-regulated during hibernation and depression and up-regulated during exodus from hibernation and the hypomanic or manic phase of mood disorders. The ways individuals cognitively perceive, understand, communicate, and react to the vegetative symptoms of depression, from downregulation in energy production, and in the absence of known medical causes, produce the other characteristics of depression including guilt, helplessness, hopelessness, suicidal phenomena, agitation, panic attacks, psychotic symptoms, and sudden switch to hypomanic or manic episodes. The presence of one or more of these characteristics depends on the person's neuropsychological function, its social status between the others, and the other's response to the person. Neurobiological changes associated with metabolic depression during entrance, maintenance, and exodus from hibernation in bears is suggested as a natural animal model of human depression and mood disorders. PMID:16061329

  12. Recognizing teen depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... are twice as likely as boys to have depression. Your teen has trouble being social Your teen has learning disabilities Your teen has a chronic illness There are family problems or problems with their parents

  13. Bipolar polygenic loading and bipolar spectrum features in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wiste, Anna; Robinson, Elise B; Milaneschi, Yuri; Meier, Sandra; Ripke, Stephan; Clements, Caitlin C; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Rietschel, Marcella; Penninx, Brenda W; Smoller, Jordan W; Perlis, Roy H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Family and genetic studies indicate overlapping liability for major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this shared genetic liability influences clinical presentation. Methods A polygenic risk score for bipolar disorder, derived from a large genome-wide association meta-analysis, was generated for each subject of European–American ancestry (n = 1,274) in the Sequential Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression study (STAR*D) outpatient major depressive disorder cohort. A hypothesis-driven approach was used to test for association between bipolar disorder risk score and features of depression associated with bipolar disorder in the literature. Follow-up analyses were performed in two additional cohorts. Results A generalized linear mixed model including seven features hypothesized to be associated with bipolar spectrum illness was significantly associated with bipolar polygenic risk score [F = 2.07, degrees of freedom (df) = 7, p = 0.04). Features included early onset, suicide attempt, recurrent depression, atypical depression, subclinical mania, subclinical psychosis, and severity. Post-hoc univariate analyses demonstrated that the major contributors to this omnibus association were onset of illness at age ≤ 18 years [odds ratio (OR) = 1.2, p = 0.003], history of suicide attempt (OR = 1.21, p = 0.03), and presence of at least one manic symptom (OR = 1.16, p = 0.02). The maximal variance in these traits explained by polygenic score ranged from 0.8–1.1%. However, analyses in two replication cohorts testing a five feature model did not support this association. Conclusions Bipolar genetic loading appeared to be associated with bipolar-like presentation in major depressive disorder in the primary analysis. However, results are at most inconclusive because of lack of replication. Replication efforts are challenged by different ascertainment and assessment strategies in the different cohorts

  14. Dual Diagnosis: Substance Abuse and Mental Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... because of binge drinking, to someone’s symptoms of bipolar disorder becoming more severe when that person abuses heroin ... your story Mental Illness ADHD Anxiety Disorders Autism Bipolar Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Depression Dissociative Disorders Eating Disorders ...

  15. Major depression

    MedlinePlus

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... Doctors do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  16. Foodborne Illnesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some parasites and chemicals also cause foodborne illnesses. Bacteria Bacteria are tiny organisms that can cause infections of the GI tract. Not all bacteria are harmful to humans. Some harmful bacteria may ...

  17. Heat Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... humidity, sweating just isn't enough. Your body temperature can rise to dangerous levels and you can ... Heatstroke - a life-threatening illness in which body temperature may rise above 106° F in minutes; symptoms ...

  18. Foodborne Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... people in the U.S. get sick from contaminated food. Common culprits include bacteria, parasites and viruses. Symptoms ... are the most common cause of foodborne illness. Foods may have some bacteria on them when you ...

  19. Heat Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... high humidity, sweating just isn't enough. Your body temperature can rise to dangerous levels and you can ... include Heatstroke - a life-threatening illness in which body temperature may rise above 106° F in minutes; symptoms ...

  20. Precursor manic behavior in the assessment and treatment of episodic problem behavior for a woman with a dual diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Marissa B; Baker, Jonathan C; Nuernberger, Jodi E; Vargo, Kristina K

    2013-01-01

    A functional analysis examined the relation between consequences that maintained episodic problem behavior (aggression, property destruction, and elopement) in the presence and absence of manic behaviors (MB). Results suggested that the presence of MB was correlated with the sensitivity of problem behavior to attention as a reinforcer during a functional analysis and that problem behaviors were maintained by attention. Noncontingent reinforcement was subsequently implemented and demonstrated to be effective in reducing problem behavior during the presence of manic behaviors. PMID:24114233

  1. The manic syndrome: factors which may predict a patient's response to lithium, carbamazepine and valproate.

    PubMed Central

    Dilsaver, S C; Swann, A C; Shoaib, A M; Bowers, T C

    1993-01-01

    Studies suggest that 80% to 90% of all patients in the manic state respond to lithium provided that they are relatively free of dysphoria ("pure mania"). In contrast, less than 40% of individuals in the manic state who cycle rapidly or are substantially dysphoric ("dysphoric mania") respond to lithium. These patients appear to be more responsive to carbamazepine and valproate. The authors conclude that carbamazepine and valproate are the drugs of choice if one desires to treat a rapidly cycling individual or patient with dysphoric mania with just one agent. However, they emphasize that a prospective study designed to identify the predictors of response of primary mania to lithium, carbamazepine and valproate is required. Studies assessing the relative value of lithium, carbamazepine or valproate as prophylactic agents in the care of patients with specific subtypes of mania are also needed. These studies would address the most important issues confronting researchers interested in the drug treatment of mania. PMID:8461283

  2. Eukaryotic expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of murine Manic Fringe

    SciTech Connect

    Jinek, Martin; Conti, Elena

    2006-08-01

    The catalytic domain of the murine glycosyltransferase Manic Fringe was expressed in insect cells. Removal by site-directed mutagenesis of two N-glycosylation sites present in the protein was essential to obtain crystals that diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. Fringe proteins are Golgi-resident β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that regulate development in metazoa through glycosylation of the Notch receptor and its ligands. The catalytic domain of murine Manic Fringe was expressed in the baculovirus/insect-cell system as a secreted protein. Mass-spectrometric analysis of the purified protein indicated the presence of two N-linked glycans. Abolishing the glycosylation sites by site-directed mutagenesis was necessary in order to obtain orthorhombic crystals that diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. For phasing, a highly redundant data set was collected using a crystal soaked with halide salts.

  3. Adult Neurogenesis and Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Timothy J; Cameron, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that adult neurogenesis, the production of new neurons in adulthood, may play a role in psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Medications and other treatments for mental disorders often promote the proliferation of new neurons; the time course for maturation and integration of new neurons in circuitry parallels the delayed efficacy of psychiatric therapies; adverse and beneficial experiences similarly affect development of mental illness and neurogenesis; and ablation of new neurons in adulthood alters the behavioral impact of drugs in animal models. At present, the links between adult neurogenesis and depression seem stronger than those suggesting a relationship between new neurons and anxiety or schizophrenia. Yet, even in the case of depression there is currently no direct evidence for a causative role. This article reviews the data relating adult neurogenesis to mental illness and discusses where research needs to head in the future. PMID:25178407

  4. Beating Depression …Help Is Available

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Beating Depression …Help Is Available Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table ... treatments are available from your physician. Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  5. Subthreshold Hypomanic Symptoms in Progression From Unipolar Major Depression to Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Endicott, Jean; Leon, Andrew C.; Solomon, David A.; Keller, Martin B.; Coryell, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We determined if subthreshold hypomanic symptoms predicted new onset mania or hypomania. Method We identified 550 individuals followed for at least one year in the National Institute of Mental Health Collaborative Depression Study with a diagnosis of major depression at intake. All participants were screened at baseline for a total of five manic symptoms: elevated mood, decreased need for sleep, high energy, increased goal-directed activity, and grandiosity. Participants were followed prospectively for a mean of 17.5 and up to 31 years. Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Examinations monitored course of illness and identified any hypomania or mania. The association of subthreshold hypomanic symptoms at baseline with subsequent hypomania or mania was determined in survival analyses using Cox Proportional-Hazards Regression. Results With a cumulative probability of one-in-four on survival analysis, 19.6% (N=108) of the sample experienced hypomania or mania, resulting in revision of diagnoses for 12.2% to bipolar II and 7.5% to bipolar I disorder. The number of subthreshold hypomanic symptoms, psychosis, and age of onset predicted progression to bipolar disorder. Less need for sleep, unusual energy, and increased goal-directed activities were specifically implicated. Conclusions Symptoms of hypomania, even when of low intensity, were very frequently associated with subsequent progression to bipolar disorder, although the majority of patients who converted did not have any symptoms of hypomania at baseline. Therefore, continued monitoring for the possibility of progression to bipolar disorder over the long-term course of major depressive disorder is necessary. PMID:21078709

  6. Manic episodes are related to changes in frontal cortex: a longitudinal neuroimaging study of bipolar disorder 1.

    PubMed

    Abé, Christoph; Ekman, Carl-Johan; Sellgren, Carl; Petrovic, Predrag; Ingvar, Martin; Landén, Mikael

    2015-11-01

    Higher numbers of manic episodes in bipolar patients has, in cross-sectional studies, been associated with less grey matter volume in prefrontal brain areas. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if manic episodes set off progressive cortical changes, or if the association is better explained by premorbid brain conditions that increase risk for mania. We followed patients with bipolar disorder type 1 for 6 years. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed at baseline and follow-up. We compared patients who had at least one manic episode between baseline and follow-up (Mania group, n = 13) with those who had no manic episodes (No-Mania group, n = 18). We used measures of cortical volume, thickness, and area to assess grey matter changes between baseline and follow-up. We found significantly decreased frontal cortical volume (dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex) in the Mania group, but no volume changes in the No-Mania group. Our results indicate that volume decrease in frontal brain regions can be attributed to the incidence of manic episodes. PMID:26373602

  7. Feeling and Time: The Phenomenology of Mood Disorders, Depressive Realism, and Existential Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghaemi, S. Nassir

    2007-01-01

    Phenomenological research suggests that pure manic and depressive states are less common than mixtures of the two and that the two poles of mood are characterized by opposite ways of experiencing time. In mania, the subjective experience of time is sped up and in depression it is slowed down, perhaps reflecting differences in circadian pathophysiology. The two classic mood states are also quite different in their effect on subjective awareness: manic patients lack insight into their excitation, while depressed patients are quite insightful into their unhappiness. Consequently, insight plays a major role in overdiagnosis of unipolar depression and misdiagnosis of bipolar disorder. The phenomenology of depression also is relevant to types of psychotherapies used to treat it. The depressive realism (DR) model, in contrast to the cognitive distortion model, appears to better apply to many persons with mild to moderate depressive syndromes. I suggest that existential psychotherapy is the necessary corollary of the DR model in those cases. Further, some depressive morbidities may in fact prove, after phenomenological study, to involve other mental states instead of depression. The chronic subsyndromal depression that is often the long-term consequence of treated bipolar disorder may in fact represent existential despair, rather than depression proper, again suggesting intervention with existential psychotherapeutic methods. PMID:17122410

  8. [Attempted suicide and depression].

    PubMed

    Stenager, E N; Christensen, L L; Jepsen, I M; Krarup, G; Petersen, P; Rasmussen, G T; Benjaminsen, S

    1991-03-18

    The frequency of depressive illness was investigated in 195 patients who had been referred consecutively after attempted suicide during the period 15. February 1989-15, October 1989. A total of 130 of these patients were admitted to hospital while the remainder were treated in the psychiatric emergency room or admission department. Registration of depressive symptoms on admission revealed that 85% had depressed mood and other depressive symptoms. According to the criteria established by Feighner et al. 51% suffered from definite depressive disease on admission. According to Zung's Depression Scale, 60% were depressed. On the basis of observations during hospitalization, 25% suffered from depressive disease according to the criteria established by Feighner et al. 19% of these patients suffered from endogenic depression according to the Newcastle I scale which corresponds to 5% of all the hospitalized patients with attempted suicide. Approximately 10% were treated with antidepressives. Only 8% were discharged with the diagnoses of endogenic or reactive psychoses (ICD-8). It is concluded that depressive symptoms occur in the majority of patients with attempted suicide but that slight non-endogenic depressive states are most commonly concerned and that many of these improve rapidly during hospitalization without medicinal treatment. Restraint should be observed in prescription of antidepressive medicine to patients with attempted suicide until the diagnosis of depressive disease is verified. PMID:2014567

  9. Decompression illness.

    PubMed

    Vann, Richard D; Butler, Frank K; Mitchell, Simon J; Moon, Richard E

    2011-01-01

    Decompression illness is caused by intravascular or extravascular bubbles that are formed as a result of reduction in environmental pressure (decompression). The term covers both arterial gas embolism, in which alveolar gas or venous gas emboli (via cardiac shunts or via pulmonary vessels) are introduced into the arterial circulation, and decompression sickness, which is caused by in-situ bubble formation from dissolved inert gas. Both syndromes can occur in divers, compressed air workers, aviators, and astronauts, but arterial gas embolism also arises from iatrogenic causes unrelated to decompression. Risk of decompression illness is affected by immersion, exercise, and heat or cold. Manifestations range from itching and minor pain to neurological symptoms, cardiac collapse, and death. First-aid treatment is 100% oxygen and definitive treatment is recompression to increased pressure, breathing 100% oxygen. Adjunctive treatment, including fluid administration and prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in paralysed patients, is also recommended. Treatment is, in most cases, effective although residual deficits can remain in serious cases, even after several recompressions. PMID:21215883

  10. Cyclothymic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is a mild form of bipolar disorder (manic depressive illness), in which a person has mood swings over ... causes of cyclothymic disorder are unknown. Major depression, bipolar disorder, and cyclothymia often occur together in families. This ...

  11. Women and Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... to other mental disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder , research has not found differences in rates that ... Featured Health Topics Anxiety Disorders Depression Eating Disorders Bipolar Disorder (Manic-Depressive Illness) Schizophrenia Borderline Personality Disorder Suicide ...

  12. Coping with Mood Changes Later in Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of mood disorders. Could my illness be bipolar disorder (also known as manic-depression)? Have you had ... a relative or friend who has depression or bipolar disorder? Encourage your loved one to get help. Talk ...

  13. Cyclothymic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... mental disorder. It is a mild form of bipolar disorder (manic depressive illness), in which a person has ... causes of cyclothymic disorder are unknown. Major depression, bipolar disorder, and cyclothymia often occur together in families. This ...

  14. Antidepressant discontinuation manic states: a critical review of the literature and suggested diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Vinesh; Haddad, Peter M

    2011-03-01

    We critically appraised all published reports of hypomania and mania following antidepressant termination. To increase reliability and validity we devised diagnostic criteria for an antidepressant discontinuation or withdrawal 'manic state' based primarily on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition substance withdrawal criteria. A systematic literature review identified 24 reports meeting our criteria. Mean age was 39 years (range 18-74), men and women were approximately equally represented, and more cases involved people with unipolar (n = 19) than bipolar disorder (n = 4). The median duration of preceding antidepressant treatment was 12 weeks (range 4 weeks-12 years). All major antidepressant classes were involved (tricyclic antidepressants = 13; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors = 5; monoamine oxidase inhibitors = 3; selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors = 2; miscellaneous = 1). More cases followed abrupt antidepressant withdrawal (n = 11) than a tapered withdrawal (n = 6). Six cases appeared to meet the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition for a manic episode, with two cases requiring inpatient admission. Of the 24 cases, nine resolved spontaneously without treatment (median duration = 25.5 days), six responded to antimanic drugs, four resolved following antidepressant reinstatement, and treatment was unclear in five cases. We conclude that antidepressant discontinuation hypomania/mania is a valid syndrome. It should be added to the differential diagnosis of hypomania/mania. The clinical implications and possible mechanisms are discussed. PMID:20156925

  15. Effect of HIV infection on time to recovery from an acute manic episode

    PubMed Central

    Nakimuli-Mpungu, E; Mutamba, B; Nshemerirwe, S; Kiwuwa, MS; Musisi, S

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Understanding factors affecting the time to recovery from acute mania is critical in the management of manic syndromes. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of HIV infection on time to recovery from acute mania. Methods We performed a retrospective study in which medical charts of individuals who were treated for acute mania were reviewed. Survival analysis with Cox regression models were used to compare time to recovery from an acute manic episode between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals and HIV-negative individuals. Results Median survival time was one week for HIV-positive individuals and more than four weeks for HIV-negative individuals (χ2 = 18.4, P value = 0.000). HIV infection was the only marginally significant independent predictor of survival probability on the acute admission ward (hazards ratio 2.87, P = 0.06). Conclusion Acute mania in HIV-infected persons responds faster to psychotropic drugs compared with that in HIV-negative persons. PMID:22096397

  16. Neuroinflammation and psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in psychiatric illness. While systemic autoimmune diseases are well-documented causes of neuropsychiatric disorders, synaptic autoimmune encephalitides with psychotic symptoms often go under-recognized. Parallel to the link between psychiatric symptoms and autoimmunity in autoimmune diseases, neuroimmunological abnormalities occur in classical psychiatric disorders (for example, major depressive, bipolar, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorders). Investigations into the pathophysiology of these conditions traditionally stressed dysregulation of the glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems, but the mechanisms causing these neurotransmitter abnormalities remained elusive. We review the link between autoimmunity and neuropsychiatric disorders, and the human and experimental evidence supporting the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in selected classical psychiatric disorders. Understanding how psychosocial, genetic, immunological and neurotransmitter systems interact can reveal pathogenic clues and help target new preventive and symptomatic therapies. PMID:23547920

  17. [Melancholia and neurotic depression].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, S

    1999-11-01

    The author considers the psychopathological distinction between endogenous and neurotic depression as one of differing psychodynamics. In so doing he embeds both illnesses within psychoanalytic theory while at the same time allowing a sharp differentiation. Even the premorbid personalities of patients with endogenous and neurotic depression are different. The personalities of those with endogenous depression bear a similarity to those with obsessional character and betray a pathological super-ego monopolized by defence mechanisms. The personalities of patients with neurotic depression show an oral-dependent structure characterised by a structural deficit of the ego functions and of an autonomous super-ego. These factors are responsible for the greatly differing pathodynamics found in these illnesses and point to different etiological factors in socialization. PMID:10593139

  18. Genes, environments and depressions in young people.

    PubMed

    Goodyer, Ian M

    2015-11-01

    Among the common mental illnesses in childhood and adolescence, the unipolar depressions are the most concerning. These mental illnesses are aetiologically and clinically heterogeneous and little is known about their pathophysiology. This selected review considers the contribution of genetic and environmental factors in the emergence of these illnesses in the second decade of life. PMID:25877156

  19. Genetic linkage mapping for a susceptibility locus to bipolar illness: Chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10p, 11p, 22, and Xpter

    SciTech Connect

    Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Hseih, W.T.; Goldin, L.R.

    1994-09-15

    We are conducting a genome search for a predisposing locus to bipolar (manic-depressive) illness by genotyping 21 moderate-sized pedigrees. We report linkage data derived from screening marker loci on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10p, 11p, 22, and the pseudoautosomal region at Xpter. To analyze for linkage, two-point marker to illness lod scores were calculated under a dominant model with either 85% or 50% maximum penetrance and a recessive model with 85% maximum penetrance, and two affection status models. Under the dominant high penetrance model the cumulative lod scores in the pedigree series were less than -2 at {theta} = 0.01 in 134 of 142 loci examined, indicating that if the disease is genetically homogeneous, linkage could be excluded in these marker regions. Similar results were obtained using the other genetic models. Heterogeneity analysis was conducted when indicated, but no evidence for linkage was found. In the course of mapping we found a positive total lod score greater than +3 at the D7S78 locus at {theta} = 0.01 under a dominant, 50% penetrance model. The lod scores for additional markers within the D7S78 region failed to support the initial finding, implying that this was a spurious positive. Analysis with affected pedigree member method for COL1A2 and D7S78 showed no significance for linkage, but for PLANH1, at the weighting functions f(p)=1 and f(p)=1/sqrt(p), borderline P values of 0.036 and 0.047 were obtained. We also detected new polymorphisms at the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MLR) and calmodulin II (CALMII) genes. These genes were genetically mapped and under affection status model 2 and a dominant, high penetrance mode of transmission the lod scores of {le}2 at {theta} = 0.01 were found. 39 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. The depressive situation

    PubMed Central

    A. Jacobs, Kerrin

    2013-01-01

    From a naturalistic perspective on mental illness, depression is often described in terms of biological dysfunctions, while a normative perspective emphasizes the lived experience of depression as a harmful condition. The paper relates a conceptual analysis of “depressive situation” to an analysis of the lived experience of depression. As such, it predominantly aims to specify depression as a harmful condition in lights of normative perspective on mental disorder, but partially refers to empirical research, i.e., naturalistic perspective on depression, to exemplarily stress on the methodological merits and limits of relating phenomenological considerations closer to empirical research. The depressive situation is further specified with an examination of the evaluative dynamics by which individuals meaningfully relate to themselves, others and the world. These evaluative dynamics emerge out of the interplay of pre-reflective and reflective processes, which are significantly altered in depression. Such alterations of the evaluative structure are inextricably intertwined with significant distortions of practical sense in depression. From a phenomenological perspective, these distortions of practical sense show in characteristic experiences of evaluative incoherence and impairments of agency. Finally, this paper focuses on an examination of “evaluative incapacity,” which has the integrative potential to capture a range of typical changes of meaningful relatedness that determine the depressive situation. PMID:23882238

  1. Depression - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  2. Manic Symptoms Due to Methylphenidate Use in an Adolescent with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Ozalp; Direk, Meltem Çobanoğullari; Ekinci, Nuran; Okuyaz, Cetin

    2016-01-01

    Almost one-fifth of children who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are under the risk of attention problems after injury. The efficacy and tolerability of methylphenidate (MPH) in children with a history of TBI have not been completely identified. In this case report, MPH-induced manic symptoms in an adolescent with TBI will be summarized. A male patient aged 17 years was admitted with the complaints of attention difficulties on schoolwork and forgetfullness which became evident after TBI. Long-acting MPH was administered with the dose of 18 mg/day for attention problems. After one week, patient presented with the complaints of talking to himself, delusional thoughts, irritability and sleeplessness. This case highlights the fact that therapeutic dose of MPH may cause mania-like symptoms in children with TBI. Close monitarization and slow dose titration are crucial when considering MPH in children with TBI. PMID:27489389

  3. Manic Symptoms Due to Methylphenidate Use in an Adolescent with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Ozalp; Direk, Meltem Çobanoğullari; Ekinci, Nuran; Okuyaz, Cetin

    2016-08-31

    Almost one-fifth of children who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are under the risk of attention problems after injury. The efficacy and tolerability of methylphenidate (MPH) in children with a history of TBI have not been completely identified. In this case report, MPH-induced manic symptoms in an adolescent with TBI will be summarized. A male patient aged 17 years was admitted with the complaints of attention difficulties on schoolwork and forgetfullness which became evident after TBI. Long-acting MPH was administered with the dose of 18 mg/day for attention problems. After one week, patient presented with the complaints of talking to himself, delusional thoughts, irritability and sleeplessness. This case highlights the fact that therapeutic dose of MPH may cause mania-like symptoms in children with TBI. Close monitarization and slow dose titration are crucial when considering MPH in children with TBI. PMID:27489389

  4. Variation in the spillover effects of illness on parents, spouses and children of the chronically ill

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Tara A.; Wittenberg, Eve; Lamarand, Kara; Prosser, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the broad scope of the spillover effects of illness, it is important to characterize the variability in these outcomes in order to identify relationship types in which secondary impacts of illness are particularly important to include in health economic evaluations. Purpose To examine heterogeneity in spillover effects of chronic conditions on family members by type of familial relationship with patient. Methods Adults (≥18 years) and adolescents (13-17 years) who had a parent, spouse or child in their household with a chronic condition (including Alzheimer's disease/dementia, arthritis, cancer and depression) were recruited from a U.S. national panel to participate in an on-line survey. Respondents were asked to rate the spillover effect of their family member's illness on their own health on a 0-100 scale, with lower scores indicating greater spillover. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between rating scale scores and relationship with ill family member (ill parent, child, or spouse) for each illness separately, controlling for caregiving responsibility and the health status of the ill family member. Results 1267 adults and 102 adolescents met inclusion criteria. In adjusted analyses, having a sick child was significantly (p<0.05) associated with lower rating scale scores compared to having a spouse with the same condition (cancer: -24.2; depression -9.7). Having a non-elderly or elderly adult parent with a condition, compared to a spouse, was significantly associated with lower rating scale scores for arthritis (-3.8) and depression (-5.3), but not for Alzheimer's disease/dementia or cancer. Conclusions The impact of illness on family members, measured with a rating scale, varies by relationship type for certain illnesses. Having a child with cancer, a parent with arthritis, or either with depression, is significantly associated with greater spillover, compared to having a spouse with one of these conditions. PMID

  5. Effects of Maternal Depression on Youth Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jennifer

    Depressive disorders are chronic illnesses affecting women and their families for extended periods of time. This paper summarizes research related to the effects of maternal depression on children's short and long term adjustment. Children of depressed mothers are at risk for internalizing and externalizing disorders. Genetics account for a small…

  6. Aging and Depression: Some Unanswered Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvik, Lissy F.

    1976-01-01

    The subject of aging and depression leaves many unanswered questions which this author raises. Little is known regarding the differentiation of depressive illness from a melancholic response to the stressful aging process, and equally little regarding the natural history of depressions with onset in the teens, 20s, or 30s. (Author)

  7. Depression: What Every Woman Should Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This publication, written in English, explains why women are at greater risk for depression than men. Types of depressive illnesses are explained along with the symptoms. It states that some women are predisposed genetically to depression but biochemical, environmental, psychological, and social factors also contribute to its occurrence.…

  8. Epigenetic Basis of Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Eric J; Peña, Catherine J; Kundakovic, Marija; Mitchell, Amanda; Akbarian, Schahram

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric disorders are complex multifactorial illnesses involving chronic alterations in neural circuit structure and function as well as likely abnormalities in glial cells. While genetic factors are important in the etiology of most mental disorders, the relatively high rates of discordance among identical twins, particularly for depression and other stress-related syndromes, clearly indicate the importance of additional mechanisms. Environmental factors such as stress are known to play a role in the onset of these illnesses. Exposure to such environmental insults induces stable changes in gene expression, neural circuit function, and ultimately behavior, and these maladaptations appear distinct between developmental versus adult exposures. Increasing evidence indicates that these sustained abnormalities are maintained by epigenetic modifications in specific brain regions. Indeed, transcriptional dysregulation and the aberrant epigenetic regulation that underlies this dysregulation is a unifying theme in psychiatric disorders. Here, we provide a progress report of epigenetic studies of the three major psychiatric syndromes, depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. We review the literature derived from animal models of these disorders as well as from studies of postmortem brain tissue from human patients. While epigenetic studies of mental illness remain at early stages, understanding how environmental factors recruit the epigenetic machinery within specific brain regions to cause lasting changes in disease susceptibility and pathophysiology is revealing new insight into the etiology and treatment of these conditions. PMID:26450593

  9. Perinatal mental illness: definition, description and aetiology.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Michael W; Wisner, Katherine L

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal mental illness is a significant complication of pregnancy and the postpartum period. These disorders include depression, anxiety disorders, and postpartum psychosis, which usually manifests as bipolar disorder. Perinatal depression and anxiety are common, with prevalence rates for major and minor depression up to almost 20% during pregnancy and the first 3 months postpartum. Postpartum blues are a common but lesser manifestation of postpartum affective disturbance. Perinatal psychiatric disorders impair a woman's function and are associated with suboptimal development of her offspring. Risk factors include past history of depression, anxiety, or bipolar disorder, as well psychosocial factors, such as ongoing conflict with the partner, poor social support, and ongoing stressful life events. Early symptoms of depression, anxiety, and mania can be detected through screening in pregnancy and the postpartum period. Early detection and effective management of perinatal psychiatric disorders are critical for the welfare of women and their offspring. PMID:24140480

  10. [Awareness of illness in affective psychosis].

    PubMed

    Jarosz, M; Poprawska, I

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of analyzed clinical material several observations were attempted which were related to the patients' awareness of one's own affective psychosis. It was discovered that patients with endogenous depression considered themselves to be ill, but only in relation to depression. They usually do not perceive in themselves any psychotic illness. It was noticed that in depression past achievements appeared to be foreign to the patients. This was described in among other terms as "emotionally empty judgments". Analyzing the clinical picture of hypomanic states, stress was placed on the notion of the coexistence of logical thinking (and in some cases these thinking patterns are concerned with a feeling of heightened cognitive ability) with thinking styles based on logical errors. In all patients hypermnesia appears more important than other factors. The above mentioned phenomena are the subject of further research. PMID:1301600