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Sample records for manipulated peritoneal cell

  1. Output of peritoneal cells during peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, O; Al-Mondhiry, H; Rifaat, U N; Khalil, M A; Al-Rawi, A M

    1978-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis provides a good source for the collection of macrophages. Six patients with chronic renal failure undergoing peritoneal dialysis for the first time were studied, and maximum cell egress, mostly macrophages, occurred at 24-48 hours and diminished after 48 hours. PMID:670419

  2. Peritonitis

    MedlinePlus

    Acute abdomen ... of blood, body fluids, or pus in the abdomen ( intra-abdominal abscess ). Types of peritonitis are: Spontaneous ... The belly (abdomen) is very painful or tender. The pain may become worse when the belly is touched or when you ...

  3. Recanalization of Obstructed Tenckhoff Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter: Wire/Stylet Manipulation Combined with Endoluminal Electrocauterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Sang Joon; Shim, Hyung Jin; Kwak, Byung Gook; Kim, Hyeon Joo; Park, Hyo Jin; Sa, Eun Jin; Min, Cheol Hong; Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Kun Sang

    1998-09-15

    We report the results of fluoroscopically guided wire/stylet manipulation combined with endoluminal electrocauterization in seven patients with obstructed Tenckhoff peritoneal dialysis catheters. In preparation for clinical application, electrocauterization was performed using a stone basket to recanalize surgically removed Tenckhoff catheters obstructed with omental fat ingrowing through the side holes. All ingrowing omental fat was removed easily by electrocauterization with the rotating movement of a stone basket. The technique was then applied in vivo in seven cases with ingrowing omental fat and malpositioned catheter; six (86%) were successfully recanalized. Among those six cases with initial success, four maintained good catheter function with durable patency (mean 261.3 days). No significant complication was noted.

  4. Lack of galectin-3 up-regulates IgA expression by peritoneal B1 lymphocytes during B cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Felipe L; Bernardes, Emerson S; Brand, Camila; dos Santos, Sofia N; Cabanel, Mariana P; Arcanjo, Kátia D; Brito, José M; Borojevic, Radovan; Chammas, Roger; El-Cheikh, Márcia C

    2016-02-01

    Galectin-3 is a β-galactoside-binding protein with an inhibitory role in B cell differentiation into plasma cells in distinct lymphoid tissues. We use a model of chronic schistosomiasis, a well-characterized experimental disease hallmarked by polyclonal B cell activation, in order to investigate the role of galectin-3 in controlling IgA production through peritoneal B1 cells. Chronically infected, galectin-3-deficient mice (Lgals3(-/-)) display peritoneal fluid hypercellularity, increased numbers of atypical peritoneal IgM(+)/IgA(+) B1a and B1b lymphocytes and histological disturbances in plasma cell niches when compared with Lgals3(+/+) mice. Similar to our infection model, peritoneal B1 cells from uninfected Lgals3(-/-) mice show enhanced switching to IgA after in vitro treatment with interleukin-5 plus transforming growth factor-β (IL-5 + TGF-β1). A higher number of IgA(+) B1a lymphocytes was found in the peritoneal cavity of Lgals3(-/-)-uninfected mice at 1 week after i.p. injection of IL-5 + TGF-β1; this correlates with the increased levels of secreted IgA detected in the peritoneal fluid of these mice after cytokine treatment. Interestingly, a higher number of degranulated mast cells is present in the peritoneal cavity of uninfected and Schistosoma mansoni-infected Lgals3(-/-) mice, indicating that, at least in part, mast cells account for the enhanced differentiation of B1 into IgA-producing B cells found in the absence of galectin-3. Thus, a novel role is revealed for galectin-3 in controlling the expression of surface IgA by peritoneal B1 lymphocytes; this might have important implications for manipulating the mucosal immune response. PMID:26003178

  5. Source of peritoneal proteoglycans. Human peritoneal mesothelial cells synthesize and secrete mainly small dermatan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Yung, S.; Thomas, G. J.; Stylianou, E.; Williams, J. D.; Coles, G. A.; Davies, M.

    1995-01-01

    This study describes experiments that compare the proteoglycans (PGs) extracted from the dialysate from patients receiving continuous peritoneal ambulatory dialysis (CAPD) with those secreted by metabolically labeled human peritoneal mesothelial cells in vitro. The PGs isolated from both sources were predominantly small chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate PGs. Western blot of the core proteins obtained after chondroitin ABC lyase treatment with specific antibodies identified decorin and biglycan. With [35S]sulfate and [35S]methionine as labeling precursors it was shown that dermatan sulfate rather than chondroitin sulfate were the major glycosaminoglycan chains and that decorin was the predominant species. These data provide the first evidence that human peritoneal mesothelial cells may be the principal source of PGs in the peritoneum. Given the proposed functions of decorin and biglycan, the results suggest that these PGs may be involved in the control of transforming growth factor-beta activity and collagen fibril formation in the peritoneum. Images Figure 2 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7856761

  6. Culture and Manipulation of Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lois G.; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The direct manipulation of embryonic cells is an important tool for addressing key questions in cell and developmental biology. C. elegans is relatively unique among genetic model systems in being amenable to manipulation of embryonic cells. Embryonic cell manipulation has allowed the identification of cell interactions by direct means, and it has been an important technique for dissecting mechanisms by which cell fates are specified, cell divisions are oriented, and morphogenesis is accomplished. Here, we present detailed methods for isolating, manipulating and culturing embryonic cells of C. elegans. PMID:22226523

  7. Activation of salt-inducible kinase 2 promotes the viability of peritoneal mesothelial cells exposed to stress of peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H-H; Lin, C-Y; Su, S-H; Chuang, C-T; Chang, Y-L; Lee, T-Y; Lee, S-C; Chang, C-J

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining mesothelial cell viability is critical to long-term successful peritoneal dialysis (PD) treatment. To clarify the viability mechanism of peritoneal mesothelial cells under PD solutions exposure, we examined the mechanisms of cellular response to this stress conditions. Here we report that the proteasome activity is inhibited when treated with PD solutions. Proteasome inhibition-mediated activation of salt-inducible kinase 2 (SIK2), an endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein, is important for mesothelial cell viability. SIK2 is mobilized to promote autophagy and protect the cells from apoptosis under PD solution or MG132 treatment. Immunofluorescence staining showed that SIK2 is colocalized with LC3B in the autophagosomes of mesothelial cells treated with PD solution or derived from patients undergoing PD treatment. SIK2 activation is likely via a two-step mechanism, upstream kinases relieving the autoinhibitory conformation of SIK2 molecule followed by autophosphorylation of Thr175 and activation of kinase activity. These results suggest that activation of SIK2 is required for the cell viability when proteasome activity is inhibited by PD solutions. Maintaining or boosting the activity of SIK2 may promote peritoneal mesothelial cell viability and evolve as a potential therapeutic target for maintaining or restoring peritoneal membrane integrity in PD therapy. PMID:27441650

  8. Peritoneal mast cell stabilization potential of Pothos scandens L

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh; Duraiswamy, B.; Satishkumar, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the peritoneal mast cell stabilization activity of Pothos scandens extracts Materials and Methods: Pothos scandens L. (family- Araceae) aerial part was successively extracted with ethanol and aqueous to prepare extract of the plant. The extracts of P. scandens were evaluated for stabilization of mast cell in rat allergic models. The extract of P. scandens ethanolic, 50% aqueous ethanolic and aqueous (1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) was studied for peritoneal mast cell stabilization activity in rat mesenteric preparation induced by C 48/80. Result: Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of carbohydrates, fixed oil, proteins, alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids and phenolic compounds. The ethanolic, 50% aqueous ethanolic and aqueous extracts of P. scandens L. showed dose dependent increase in the number of intact cells when compare with C48/80 at the concentration of 10 and 100 μg/ml. It virtues further work towards the isolation of phytoconstituents from this plant. Conclusion: This finding provides evidence that the P. scandens L. inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and mast cell degranulation. P. scandens has a potential as allergic anti- asthmatic agent. PMID:23542883

  9. Optoelectronic Tweezers for Microparticle and Cell Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei-Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 micromillimeters or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or group of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  10. Optoelectronic tweezers for microparticle and cell manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 .mu.m or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or groups of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  11. Myofibroblastic Conversion and Regeneration of Mesothelial Cells in Peritoneal and Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lua, Ingrid; Li, Yuchang; Pappoe, Lamioko S; Asahina, Kinji

    2015-12-01

    Mesothelial cells (MCs) form a single epithelial layer and line the surface of body cavities and internal organs. Patients who undergo peritoneal dialysis often develop peritoneal fibrosis that is characterized by the accumulation of myofibroblasts in connective tissue. Although MCs are believed to be the source of myofibroblasts, their contribution has remained obscure. We determined the contribution of peritoneal MCs to myofibroblasts in chlorhexidine gluconate (CG)-induced fibrosis compared with that of phenotypic changes of liver MCs. CG injections resulted in disappearance of MCs from the body wall and the accumulation of myofibroblasts in the connective tissue. Conditional linage tracing with Wilms tumor 1 (Wt1)-CreERT2 and Rosa26 reporter mice found that 17% of myofibroblasts were derived from MCs in peritoneal fibrosis. Conditional deletion of transforming growth factor-β type II receptor in Wt1(+) MCs substantially reduced peritoneal fibrosis. The CG treatment also induced myofibroblastic conversion of MCs in the liver. Lineage tracing with Mesp1-Cre mice revealed that Mesp1(+) mesoderm gave rise to liver MCs but not peritoneal MCs. During recovery from peritoneal fibrosis, peritoneal MCs, but not liver MCs, contribute to the regeneration of the peritoneal mesothelium, indicating an inherent difference between parietal and visceral MCs. In conclusion, MCs partially contribute to myofibroblasts in peritoneal and liver fibrosis, and protection of the MC layer leads to reduced development of fibrous tissue. PMID:26598235

  12. Lineage Tracing Reveals Distinctive Fates for Mesothelial Cells and Submesothelial Fibroblasts during Peritoneal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ting; Chang, Yu-Ting; Pan, Szu-Yu; Chou, Yu-Hsiang; Chang, Fan-Chi; Yeh, Pei-Ying; Liu, Yuan-Hung; Chiang, Wen-Chih; Chen, Yung-Ming; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Tsai, Tun-Jun; Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis of the peritoneal cavity remains a serious, life-threatening problem in the treatment of kidney failure with peritoneal dialysis. The mechanism of fibrosis remains unclear partly because the fibrogenic cells have not been identified with certainty. Recent studies have proposed mesothelial cells to be an important source of myofibroblasts through the epithelial–mesenchymal transition; however, confirmatory studies in vivo are lacking. Here, we show by inducible genetic fate mapping that type I collagen–producing submesothelial fibroblasts are specific progenitors of α-smooth muscle actin–positive myofibroblasts that accumulate progressively in models of peritoneal fibrosis induced by sodium hypochlorite, hyperglycemic dialysis solutions, or TGF-β1. Similar genetic mapping of Wilms’ tumor-1–positive mesothelial cells indicated that peritoneal membrane disruption is repaired and replaced by surviving mesothelial cells in peritoneal injury, and not by submesothelial fibroblasts. Although primary cultures of mesothelial cells or submesothelial fibroblasts each expressed α-smooth muscle actin under the influence of TGF-β1, only submesothelial fibroblasts expressed α-smooth muscle actin after induction of peritoneal fibrosis in mice. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of the PDGF receptor, which is expressed by submesothelial fibroblasts but not mesothelial cells, attenuated the peritoneal fibrosis but not the remesothelialization induced by hypochlorite. Thus, our data identify distinctive fates for injured mesothelial cells and submesothelial fibroblasts during peritoneal injury and fibrosis. PMID:24854266

  13. New insights into heterogeneity of peritoneal B-1a cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongsheng; Lin, Jian-xin; Li, Peng; Skinner, Jeff; Leonard, Warren J; Morse, Herbert C

    2015-12-01

    Peritoneal B-1a cells are characterized by their expression of CD5 and enrichment for germline-encoded IgM B cell receptors. Early studies showing expression of a diverse array of VDJ sequences among purified B-1a cells provided a molecular basis for understanding the heterogeneity of the B-1a cell repertoire. Antigen-driven positive selection and the identification of B-1a specific progenitors suggest multiple origins of B-1a cells. The introduction of new markers such as PD-L2, CD25, CD73, and PC1 (plasma cell alloantigen 1, also known as ectonucleotide phosphodiesterase/pyrophosphatase 1) further helped to identify phenotypically and functionally distinct B-1a subsets. Among many B-1a subsets defined by these new markers, PC1 is unique in that it subdivides B-1a cells into PC1(hi) and PC1(lo) subpopulations with distinct functions, such as production of natural IgM and gut IgA, response to the pneumococcal antigen PPS-3, secretion of interleukin-10, and support for T helper 1 (TH 1) cell differentiation. RNA sequencing of these subsets revealed differential expression of genes involved in cellular movement and immune cell trafficking. We will discuss these new insights underlying the heterogeneous nature of the B-1a cell repertoire. PMID:25988856

  14. Segmented magnetic nanofibers for single cell manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Shi, Jian; Jiang, Lianmei; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Li; Yamamoto, Shinpei; Takano, Mikio; Chang, Mengjie; Zhang, Haoli; Chen, Yong

    2012-07-01

    We report a simple but straightforward approach to fabricate magnetic nanofiber segments for cell manipulation. Electrospinning was used to produce nanofibers from a magnetic nanoparticles containing polymethylglutarimide (PMGI) precursor solution. After sonication, the fabricated nanofibers were uniformly segmented. When dispersed in an aqueous solution, the orientation of the fiber segments could easily be controlled by an external magnetic field. NIH 3T3 cells were then cultured in a medium containing magnetic fibers, resulting in stable cell-nanofiber hybrids which can be conveniently manipulated with a magnet.

  15. Peritoneal seeding and subsequent progression of mantle cell lymphoma after splenectomy for debulking

    PubMed Central

    Bahat, G.; Saka, B.; Yenerel, M.N.; Yilmaz, E.; Tascioglu, C.; Dogan, O.

    2010-01-01

    Background Peritoneal seeding after abdominal surgery is a well known route of metastasis in intra-abdominal solid tumours. Direct mechanical contamination, local peritoneal trauma and subsequent inflammation, postoperative immunosuppression, and laparoscopic surgery are the proposed predisposing factors for this type of metastasis. These factors probably result in enhanced adhesion or growth of tumour cells. However, this route of metastasis has not yet been reported for lymphomas. Here, we report the first case of peritoneal seeding of lymphoma cells after an abdominal surgery. Case Description A 47-year-old man with mantle cell lymphoma had ascites because of infiltration of the liver. He underwent debulking splenectomy. The postoperative ascites cytology and control abdominal computed tomography imaging both confirmed peritoneal involvement and lymphoma progression. Demonstration of negative peritoneal involvement before surgery and close timing of peritoneal involvement after splenectomy suggested to us that the debulking surgery was the main cause of peritoneal seeding of lymphoma cells in our case. Conclusions Factors similar to those in solid tumour seeding may also be valid for lymphomas. Peritoneal seeding and consequent disease progression may be a potential complication of abdominal surgery in lymphoma with extensive intra-abdominal involvement. PMID:20567628

  16. Cell Signaling Experiments Driven by Optical Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Difato, Francesco; Pinato, Giulietta; Cojoc, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Cell signaling involves complex transduction mechanisms in which information released by nearby cells or extracellular cues are transmitted to the cell, regulating fundamental cellular activities. Understanding such mechanisms requires cell stimulation with precise control of low numbers of active molecules at high spatial and temporal resolution under physiological conditions. Optical manipulation techniques, such as optical tweezing, mechanical stress probing or nano-ablation, allow handling of probes and sub-cellular elements with nanometric and millisecond resolution. PicoNewton forces, such as those involved in cell motility or intracellular activity, can be measured with femtoNewton sensitivity while controlling the biochemical environment. Recent technical achievements in optical manipulation have new potentials, such as exploring the actions of individual molecules within living cells. Here, we review the progress in optical manipulation techniques for single-cell experiments, with a focus on force probing, cell mechanical stimulation and the local delivery of active molecules using optically manipulated micro-vectors and laser dissection. PMID:23698758

  17. Inhibition of adhesion and proliferation of peritoneally disseminated tumor cells by pegylated catalase.

    PubMed

    Hyoudou, Kenji; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Yuki; Kuramoto, Yukari; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide may aggravate the peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by activating the expression of a variety of genes. In this study, we used pegylated catalase (PEG-catalase) to examine whether prolonged retention of catalase activity within the peritoneal cavity is effective in inhibiting peritoneal dissemination in mouse models. Murine B16-BL6 cells or colon 26 cells labeled with firefly luciferase gene were inoculated intraperitoneally into syngeneic mice. Compared with unmodified catalase, PEG-catalase was retained in the peritoneal cavity for a long period after intraperitoneal injection. A single injection of PEG-catalase just before tumor inoculation significantly reduced the number of the tumor cells at 1 and 7 days. The changes in the expression of molecules involved in the metastasis were evaluated by real time quantitative PCR analysis. Inoculation of the tumor cells increased the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 in the greater omentum, which was inhibited by PEG-catalase. An injection of PEG-catalase at 3 days after tumor inoculation also reduced the number of the tumor cells, suggesting that processes other than the adhesion of tumor cells to peritoneal organs are also inhibited. Daily doses of PEG-catalase significantly prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that intraperitoneal injection of PEG-catalase inhibits the multiple processes of peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by scavenging hydrogen peroxide in the peritoneal cavity. PMID:17086358

  18. French National Registry of Rare Peritoneal Surface Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Rare Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Peritoneal Mesothelioma; Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Psammocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Carcinoma; Diffuse Peritoneal Leiomyomatosis; Appendiceal Mucinous Neoplasms

  19. Optical manipulation for single-cell studies.

    PubMed

    Ramser, Kerstin; Hanstorp, Dag

    2010-04-01

    In the last decade optical manipulation has evolved from a field of interest for physicists to a versatile tool widely used within life sciences. This has been made possible in particular due to the development of a large variety of imaging techniques that allow detailed information to be gained from investigations of single cells. The use of multiple optical traps has high potential within single-cell analysis since parallel measurements provide good statistics. Multifunctional optical tweezers are, for instance, used to study cell heterogeneity in an ensemble, and force measurements are used to investigate the mechanical properties of individual cells. Investigations of molecular motors and forces on the single-molecule level have led to discoveries that would have been difficult to make with other techniques. Optical manipulation has prospects within the field of cell signalling and tissue engineering. When combined with microfluidic systems the chemical environment of cells can be precisely controlled. Hence the influence of pH, salt concentration, drugs and temperature can be investigated in real time. Fast advancing technical developments of automated and user-friendly optical manipulation tools and cross-disciplinary collaboration will contribute to the routinely use of optical manipulation techniques within the life sciences. PMID:19718682

  20. Genetic Manipulation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Eiges, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    One of the great advantages of embryonic stem (ES) cells over other cell types is their accessibility to genetic manipulation. They can easily undergo genetic modifications while remaining pluripotent, and can be selectively propagated, allowing the clonal expansion of genetically altered cells in culture. Since the first isolation of ES cells in mice, many effective techniques have been developed for gene delivery and manipulation of ES cells. These include transfection, electroporation, and infection protocols, as well as different approaches for inserting, deleting, or changing the expression of genes. These methods proved to be extremely useful in mouse ES cells, for monitoring and directing differentiation, discovering unknown genes, and studying their function, and are now being extensively implemented in human ES cells (HESCs). This chapter describes the different approaches and methodologies that have been applied for the genetic manipulation of HESCs and their applications. Detailed protocols for generating clones of genetically modified HESCs by transfection, electroporation, and infection will be described, with special emphasis on the important technical details that are required for this purpose. All protocols are equally effective in human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. PMID:25520283

  1. Peritoneal fluid immunocytochemistry used for the diagnosis of a possible case of equine gastrointestinal B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Duran, Maria Carolina; Starrak, Gregory; Dickinson, Ryan; Montgomery, Julia

    2016-06-01

    After physical examination, ultrasonographic evaluation of thorax and abdomen, and peritoneal fluid analysis, gastrointestinal neoplasia with suspected diffuse peritoneal metastasis was diagnosed in a 17-year-old Arabian gelding. The owner elected euthanasia and declined postmortem examination. Immunocytochemistry analysis of the peritoneal fluid resulted in a diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma. PMID:27247458

  2. Manipulating Cells with Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, J. M.; Guevorkian, K.

    2005-07-01

    We review our investigations of the use of static magnetic fields, B, for manipulating cells and cellular processes. We describe how B fields modify the cell division pattern of frog embryos and consequently can be used to probe the pattern determinants. We also observe that magnetic fields modify the swimming behavior of Paramecium Caudatum. We describe these modifications and their potential application to investigations of their swimming behavior.

  3. Optofluidic cell manipulation for a biological microbeam

    PubMed Central

    Grad, Michael; Bigelow, Alan W.; Garty, Guy; Attinger, Daniel; Brenner, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and integration of light-induced dielectrophoresis for cellular manipulation in biological microbeams. An optoelectronic tweezers (OET) cellular manipulation platform was designed, fabricated, and tested at Columbia University's Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF). The platform involves a light induced dielectrophoretic surface and a microfluidic chamber with channels for easy input and output of cells. The electrical conductivity of the particle-laden medium was optimized to maximize the dielectrophoretic force. To experimentally validate the operation of the OET device, we demonstrate UV-microspot irradiation of cells containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged DNA single-strand break repair protein, targeted in suspension. We demonstrate the optofluidic control of single cells and groups of cells before, during, and after irradiation. The integration of optofluidic cellular manipulation into a biological microbeam enhances the facility's ability to handle non-adherent cells such as lymphocytes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that OET cell handling is successfully implemented in a biological microbeam. PMID:23387672

  4. Apoptosis transcriptional mechanism of feline infectious peritonitis virus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Shuid, Ahmad Naqib; Safi, Nikoo; Haghani, Amin; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Haron, Mohd Syamsul Reza; Tan, Sheau Wei; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2015-11-01

    Apoptosis has been postulated to play an important role during feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection; however, its mechanism is not well characterized. This study is focused on apoptosis and transcriptional profiling of FIPV-infected cells following in vitro infection of CRFK cells with FIPV 79-1146 WSU. Flow cytometry was used to determine mode of cell death in first 42 h post infection (hpi). FIPV infected cells underwent early apoptosis at 9 hpi (p < 0.05) followed by late apoptosis at 12 hpi (p < 0.05) and necrosis from 24 hpi (p < 0.05). Then, next generation sequencing was performed on 9 hpi and control uninfected cells by Illumina analyzer. An aggregate of 4546 genes (2229 down-regulated and 2317 up-regulated) from 17 cellular process, 11 molecular functions and 130 possible biological pathways were affected by FIPV. 131 genes from apoptosis cluster (80 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated) along with increase of apoptosis, p53, p38 MAPK, VEGF and chemokines/cytokines signaling pathways were probably involved in apoptosis process. Six of the de-regulated genes expression (RASSF1, BATF2, MAGEB16, PDCD5, TNFα and TRAF2) and TNFα protein concentration were analyzed by RT-qPCR and ELISA, respectively, at different time-points. Up-regulations of both pro-apoptotic (i.e. PDCD5) and anti-apoptotic (i.e. TRAF2) were detected from first hpi and continuing to deregulate during apoptosis process in the infected cells. PMID:26386572

  5. Biological cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertz, Frederick; Khitun, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We report a manipulation of biological cells (erythrocytes) by magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The experiment was accomplished on the top of a micro-electromagnet consisting of two magnetic field generating contours. An electric current flowing through the contour(s) produces a non-uniform magnetic field, which is about 1.4 mT/μm in strength at 100 mA current in the vicinity of the current-carrying wire. In responses to the magnetic field, magnetic nanoparticles move towards the systems energy minima. In turn, magnetic nanoparticles drag biological cells in the same direction. We present experimental data showing cell manipulation through the control of electric current. This technique allows us to capture and move cells located in the vicinity (10-20 microns) of the current-carrying wires. One of the most interesting results shows a periodic motion of erythrocytes between the two conducting contours, whose frequency is controlled by an electric circuit. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of non-destructive cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles with micrometer-scale precision.

  6. Methylglyoxal Induced Basophilic Spindle Cells with Podoplanin at the Surface of Peritoneum in Rat Peritoneal Dialysis Model.

    PubMed

    Hirahara, Ichiro; Sato, Hideki; Imai, Toshimi; Onishi, Akira; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a common treatment for patients with reduced or absent renal function. Long-term PD leads to peritoneal injury with structural changes and functional decline. At worst, peritoneal injury leads to encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS), which is a serious complication of PD. In order to carry out PD safely, it is important to define the mechanism of progression of peritoneal injury and EPS. We prepared rat models of peritoneal injury by intraperitoneal administration of glucose degradation products, such as methylglyoxal (MGO) or formaldehyde (FA), chlorhexidine gluconate (CG), and talc. In rats treated with MGO, peritoneal fibrous thickening with the appearance of basophilic spindle cells with podoplanin, cytokeratin, and α-smooth muscle actin at the surface of the peritoneum was observed. These cells may have been derived from mesothelial cells by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. In FA- or CG-treated rats, the peritoneum was thickened, and mesothelial cells were absent at the surface of the peritoneum. The CG- or MGO-treated rats presented with a so-called abdominal cocoon. In the talc-treated rats, extensive peritoneal adhesion and peritoneal thickening were observed. MGO-induced peritoneal injury model may reflect human histopathology and be suitable to analyze the mechanism of progression of peritoneal injury and EPS. PMID:26064894

  7. Methylglyoxal Induced Basophilic Spindle Cells with Podoplanin at the Surface of Peritoneum in Rat Peritoneal Dialysis Model

    PubMed Central

    Hirahara, Ichiro; Sato, Hideki; Imai, Toshimi; Onishi, Akira; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a common treatment for patients with reduced or absent renal function. Long-term PD leads to peritoneal injury with structural changes and functional decline. At worst, peritoneal injury leads to encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS), which is a serious complication of PD. In order to carry out PD safely, it is important to define the mechanism of progression of peritoneal injury and EPS. We prepared rat models of peritoneal injury by intraperitoneal administration of glucose degradation products, such as methylglyoxal (MGO) or formaldehyde (FA), chlorhexidine gluconate (CG), and talc. In rats treated with MGO, peritoneal fibrous thickening with the appearance of basophilic spindle cells with podoplanin, cytokeratin, and α-smooth muscle actin at the surface of the peritoneum was observed. These cells may have been derived from mesothelial cells by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. In FA- or CG-treated rats, the peritoneum was thickened, and mesothelial cells were absent at the surface of the peritoneum. The CG- or MGO-treated rats presented with a so-called abdominal cocoon. In the talc-treated rats, extensive peritoneal adhesion and peritoneal thickening were observed. MGO-induced peritoneal injury model may reflect human histopathology and be suitable to analyze the mechanism of progression of peritoneal injury and EPS. PMID:26064894

  8. POLYMICROBIAL SEPSIS INDUCES DIVERGENT EFFECTS ON SPLENIC AND PERITONEAL DENDRITIC CELL FUNCTION IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yanli; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Newton, Sarah; Chen, Yaping; Carlton, Stacey; Albina, Jorge E.; Ayala, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that act as sentinels in the cell-mediated response against invading pathogens associated with septic challenge. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether there is a loss of dendritic cells and/or changes in function of these cells in septic mice. Here we report that the number of DCs, in both spleen and peritoneum, decreased over 24 h postsepsis [cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)] when compared with sham. The most dramatic change was seen in the peritoneal cavity. This decrease appeared to be caused mainly by the depletion of immature DCs rather than mature DCs. This change was LPS independent and minimally affected by FasL; however, overexpression of human Bcl-2 gene provides protection of the septic peritoneal DCs. Moreover, although the level of IL-12 release decreased significantly in splenic DCs obtained from CLP mice, IL-12 secretion was markedly elevated by peritoneal DCs as well as in both plasma and peritoneal fluid at 24 h post-CLP. In peritoneal cells, the expression of CD40, CD80, and CD86 was unchanged, but their respective ligands CD40L, CD28, and CD152 all increased in mice 24 h after CLP, although no such change was observed in splenocytes. Regardless of the presence or absence of antigen, peritoneal DCs from CLP mice showed higher capacity to stimulate T-cell proliferation than those cells from the sham control. However, splenic DCs from CLP mice only showed augmented capacity to induce antigen-dependent stimulation of T-cell proliferation. Together, these data indicate that sepsis produces divergent functional changes in splenic and peritoneal DC populations. PMID:15257086

  9. Differential susceptibility of human pleural and peritoneal mesothelial cells to asbestos exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dragon, Julie; Thompson, Joyce; MacPherson, Maximilian; Shukla, Arti

    2015-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive cancer of mesothelial cells of pleural and peritoneal cavities. In 85% of cases both pleural and peritoneal MM is caused by asbestos exposure. Although both are asbestos-induced cancers, the incidence of pleural MM is significantly higher (85%) than peritoneal MM (15%). It has been proposed that carcinogenesis is a result of asbestos-induced inflammation but it is not clear what contributes to the differences observed between incidences of these two cancers. We hypothesize that the observed differences in incidences of pleural and peritoneal MM are the result of differences in the direct response of these cell types to asbestos rather than to differences mediated by the in vivo microenvironment. To test this hypothesis we characterized cellular responses to asbestos in a controlled environment. We found significantly greater changes in genome-wide expression in response to asbestos exposure in pleural mesothelial cells as compared to peritoneal mesothelial cells. In particular, a greater response in many common genes (IL-8, ATF3, CXCL2, CXCL3, IL-6, GOS2) was seen in pleural mesothelial cells as compared to peritoneal mesothelial cells. Unique genes expressed in pleural mesothelial cells were mainly pro-inflammatory (G-CSF, IL-1β, IL-1α, GREM1) and have previously been shown to be involved in development of MM. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that differences in incidences of pleural and peritoneal MM upon exposure to asbestos are the result of differences in mesothelial cell physiology that lead to differences in the inflammatory response, which leads to cancer. PMID:25757056

  10. Pasteurella multocida Toxin Manipulates T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Dagmar; Heeg, Klaus; Kubatzky, Katharina F.

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida causes various diseases in a broad range of wild and domestic animals. Toxigenic strains of the serotypes A and D produce an AB protein toxin named Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT). PMT constitutively activates the heterotrimeric G protein subunits Gαq, Gα13, and Gαi through deamidation of a glutamine residue, which results in cytoskeletal rearrangements as well as increased proliferation and survival of the host cell. In human monocytes, PMT alters the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation toward a phenotype that suppresses T cell activation. Here we describe that the toxin also modulates CD4-positive T helper (Th) cells directly. PMT amplifies the expansion of Th cells through enhanced cell cycle progression and suppression of apoptosis and manipulates the differentiation of Th subclasses through activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT) family members and induction of subtype-specific master transcription factors. A large population of toxin-treated T cells is double-positive for Foxp3 and RORγt, the transcription factors expressed by Treg and Th17 cells, respectively. This suggests that these cells could have the potential to turn into Th17 cells or suppressive Treg cells. However, in terms of function, the PMT-differentiated cells behave as inflammatory Th17 cells that produce IL-17 and trigger T cell proliferation. PMID:26635744

  11. Inhibition of peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by cationized catalase in mice.

    PubMed

    Hyoudou, Kenji; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Yuki; Mukai, Sakiko; Ikemura, Mai; Kuramoto, Yukari; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2007-05-14

    To inhibit peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by destroying hydrogen peroxide, ethylenediamine-conjugated catalase (ED-catalase), a cationized derivative, was injected into the peritoneal cavity of mice. ED-catalase had about a 6-fold longer retention time within the cavity than unmodified catalase. Peritoneal dissemination was evaluated after intraperitoneal inoculation of B16-BL6/Luc, a melanoma clone stably expressing firefly luciferase, by measuring luciferase activity. An intraperitoneal injection of ED-catalase just before tumor inoculation significantly reduced the number of tumor cells in peritoneal organs. Catalase was less effective, confirming the importance of the retention of the enzyme within the cavity for the inhibition. ED-catalase injected 3 days after tumor inoculation was also effective in inhibiting tumor growth. A real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that ED-catalase significantly suppressed the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Daily dosing of ED-catalase for 7 days significantly prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. These findings indicate that ED-catalase, which is retained for a long time within the peritoneal cavity, is highly effective in inhibiting the adhesion and proliferation of peritoneally disseminated tumor cells, and in increasing the survival of tumor-bearing mice. PMID:17382424

  12. Advances in microfluidic cell separation and manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Emily L; Lu, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Cellular separations are required in many contexts in biochemical and biomedical applications for the identification, isolation, and analysis of phenotypes or samples of interest. Microfluidics is uniquely suited for handling biological samples, and emerging technologies have become increasingly accessible tools for researchers and clinicians. Here, we review advances in the last few years in techniques for microfluidic cell separation and manipulation. Applications such as high-throughput cell and organism phenotypic screening, purification of heterogeneous stem cell populations, separation of blood components, and isolation of rare cells in patients highlight some of the areas in which these technologies show great potential. Continued advances in separation mechanisms and understanding of cellular systems will yield further improvements in the throughput, resolution, and robustness of techniques. PMID:24701393

  13. Vaccine-induced modulation of gene expression in turbot peritoneal cells. A microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Fontenla, Francisco; Blanco-Abad, Verónica; Pardo, Belén G; Folgueira, Iria; Noia, Manuel; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Martínez, Paulino; Leiro, José M; Lamas, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    We used a microarray approach to examine changes in gene expression in turbot peritoneal cells after injection of the fish with vaccines containing the ciliate parasite Philasterides dicentrarchi as antigen and one of the following adjuvants: chitosan-PVMMA microspheres, Freund́s complete adjuvant, aluminium hydroxide gel or Matrix-Q (Isconova, Sweden). We identified 374 genes that were differentially expressed in all groups of fish. Forty-two genes related to tight junctions and focal adhesions and/or actin cytoskeleton were differentially expressed in free peritoneal cells. The profound changes in gene expression related to cell adherence and cytoskeleton may be associated with cell migration and also with the formation of cell-vaccine masses and their attachment to the peritoneal wall. Thirty-five genes related to apoptosis were differentially expressed. Although most of the proteins coded by these genes have a proapoptotic effect, others are antiapoptotic, indicating that both types of signals occur in peritoneal leukocytes of vaccinated fish. Interestingly, many of the genes related to lymphocytes and lymphocyte activity were downregulated in the groups injected with vaccine. We also observed decreased expression of genes related to antigen presentation, suggesting that macrophages (which were abundant in the peritoneal cavity after vaccination) did not express these during the early inflammatory response in the peritoneal cavity. Finally, several genes that participate in the inflammatory response were differentially expressed, and most participated in resolution of inflammation, indicating that an M2 macrophage response is generated in the peritoneal cavity of fish one day post vaccination. PMID:27318565

  14. Tumor-environment biomimetics delay peritoneal metastasis formation by deceiving and redirecting disseminated cancer cells.

    PubMed

    De Vlieghere, Elly; Gremonprez, Félix; Verset, Laurine; Mariën, Lore; Jones, Christopher J; De Craene, Bram; Berx, Geert; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Remon, Jean-Paul; Ceelen, Wim; Demetter, Pieter; Bracke, Marc; De Geest, Bruno G; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is life threatening and is the result of an extensive communication between disseminated cancer cells, mesothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF). CAFs secrete extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins creating a receptive environment for peritoneal implantation. Considering cancer as an ecosystem may provide opportunities to exploit CAFs to create biomimetic traps to deceive and redirect cancer cells. We have designed microparticles (MP) containing a CAF-derived ECM-surface that is intended to compete with natural niches. CAFs were encapsulated in alginate/gelatine beads (500-750 μm in diameter) functionalised with a polyelectrolyte coating (MP[CAF]). The encapsulated CAFs remain viable and metabolically active (≥35 days), when permanently encapsulated. CAF-derived ECM proteins are retained by the non-biodegradable coating. Adhesion experiments mimicking the environment of the peritoneal cavity show the selective capture of floating cancer cells from different tumor origins by MP[CAF] compared to control MP. MP[CAF] are distributed throughout the abdominal cavity without attachment to intestinal organs and without signs of inflammatory reaction. Intraperitoneal delivery of MP[CAF] and sequential removal redirects cancer cell adhesion from the surgical wound to the MP[CAF], delays peritoneal metastasis formation and prolongs animal survival. Our experiments suggest the use of a biomimetic trap based on tumor-environment interactions to delay peritoneal metastasis. PMID:25907048

  15. Effect of peritoneal cells on tumors cells growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Salwa, J

    1995-01-01

    The cytotoxic and cytostatic activity of PMA-treated macrophages, obtained from pristane-primed BALB/c mice, was analyzed in vitro. The activated macrophages were cytotoxic and cytostatic for YAC-1 lymphoma, P-388 leukemia and P-815 mastocytoma target cells. However, the RPC-5 plasmacytoma target cells appeared to be resistant to their cytotoxicity. The observed cytotoxic or cytostatic effects of macrophages in vitro were not correlated with their ability to produce the superoxide ion. Cytotoxic activity of NK cells, obtained from pristane-primed mice, was also studied. No differences in cytotoxicity of NK cells obtained from pristane-treated and untreated donors, were found. However, only the effector cells from untreated mice were able to respond to stimulatory effect of polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid-poly-L-lysine (poly ICLC). PMID:8744682

  16. DNA microarray analysis of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of mesothelial cells in a rat model of peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Imai, Toshimi; Hirahara, Ichiro; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Onishi, Akir; Inoue, Makoto; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Long-term peritoneal dialysis induces peritoneal hyperpermeability, and the subsequent loss of ultra-filtration causes patients to discontinue peritoneal dialysis. Glucose degradation products (GDPs) in peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDFs) are probably one of the primary causes for peritoneal injury. In the present study, we used a transcriptome analysis to determine the mechanism of peritoneal injury by GDPs. Rats were administered 20 mmol/L methylglyoxal (MGO) in PDF or 20 mmol/L formaldehyde in PDF (100 mL/kg) intraperitoneally for 21 days. The peritoneal membrane in rats that received MGO showed increased thickness and fibrosis. Mesenchymal-like cells over-proliferated on the surface of the peritoneum. A DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of 168 genes had increased by more than a factor of 4. The upregulated genes included those that code for extracellular matrix components (such as types III and lV collagen, among others), cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42), an enabled/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein-like protein [Ena/VASP (Evl)], and actin-related protein 2/3 complex subunits (Arp2/3). In conclusion, a rat model of peritoneal injury by GDPs induced mesothelial cells to redifferentiate and proliferate, with upregulation of Cdc42, the Evl Ena/VASP, and Arp2/3, suggesting that GDPs induce fibrous thickening of the peritoneal membrane by redifferentiation of mesothelial cells, resulting in hyperpermeability of the peritoneum. PMID:22073821

  17. Retinoic Acid Improves Morphology of Cultured Peritoneal Mesothelial Cells from Patients Undergoing Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Retana, Carmen; Sanchez, Elsa I.; Gonzalez, Sirenia; Perez-Lopez, Alejandro; Cruz, Armando; Lagunas-Munoz, Jesus; Alfaro-Cruz, Carmen; Vital-Flores, Socorro; Reyes, José L.

    2013-01-01

    Patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis are classified according to their peritoneal permeability as low transporter (low solute permeability) or High transporter (high solute permeability). Factors that determine the differences in permeability between them have not been fully disclosed. We investigated morphological features of cultured human peritoneal mesothelial cells from low or high transporter patients and its response to All trans retinoic Acid (ATRA, vitamin A active metabolite), as compared to non-uremic human peritoneal mesothelial cells. Control cells were isolated from human omentum. High or low transporter cells were obtained from dialysis effluents. Cells were cultured in media containing ATRA (0, 50, 100 or 200 nM). We studied length and distribution of microvilli and cilia (scanning electron microscopy), epithelial (cytokeratin, claudin-1, ZO-1 and occludin) and mesenchymal (vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin) transition markers by immunofluorescence and Western blot, and transforming growth factor β1 expression by Western blot. Low and high transporter exhibited hypertrophic cells, reduction in claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 expression, cytokeratin and vimentin disorganization and positive α-smooth muscle actin label. Vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor- β1 were overexpressed in low transporter. Ciliated cells were diminished in low and high transporters. Microvilli number and length were severely reduced in high transporter. ATRA reduced hypertrophic cells number in low transporter. It also improved cytokeratin and vimentin organization, decreased vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin expression, and increased claudin 1, occludin and ZO-1 expression, in low and high transporter. In low transporter, ATRA reduced transforming growth factor-β1 expression. ATRA augmented percentage of ciliated cells in low and high transporter. It also augmented cilia length in high transporter. Alterations in

  18. Activation and trafficking of peritoneal B1a B-cells in response to amphibole asbestos.

    PubMed

    Pfau, Jean C; Hurley, Kristina; Peterson, Cody; Coker, Lindsey; Fowers, Cody; Marcum, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    B1a B-cells are concentrated in peritoneal and pleural cavities, are producers of 'natural auto-antibodies', and have been implicated in autoimmune responses. Their numbers are increased in humans and mice with systemic autoimmune diseases, but their role in the immune pathology is not known. Asbestos causes pulmonary, pleural, and peritoneal pathologies by accessing these tissues after inhalation. Amphibole asbestos has been shown to elicit immune dysfunction, including chronic inflammation, fibrosis, and autoantibody production. This study tested the hypothesis that asbestos affects immune dysfunction by activating B1a B-cells to traffic to secondary lymphatic tissue. C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to amphibole asbestos (Libby 6-Mix) either endotracheally or intraperitoneally, and the B1a B-cells in pleural or peritoneal compartments were tested by multi-parameter flow cytometry. Adoptive transfer of peritoneal lymphocytes from CD45.1 transgenic to wild-type mice was used to track the migration. The percentage and numbers of B1a B-cells in pleural and peritoneal cavities decreased 3-6 days following exposure. During that time, asbestos exposure led to a decrease in cells expressing alpha-4 (α4) integrin and MHC II antigen. Peritoneal cells treated in vitro showed decreased α4 integrin with no change in CD5, IgM, or MHC II antigen. Therefore, B1a cells (IgM(+), CD5(+), MHC II(+)) traffic from the peritoneal cavity following loss of α4 integrin expression. Following adoptive transfer into the peritoneum of asbestos-exposed mice, CD45.1(+) B1a cells were detected in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes after 3 days, peaking at 6 days. Interestingly, the percentage of splenic suppressor B-cells (IgM(+), CD5(+), CD11b(+), CD1d(+)) decreased following amphibole exposure, demonstrating that the B1a cells did not contribute to an increased pool of suppressive B-cells. These results show that B1a B-cells respond to asbestos exposure by trafficking to secondary lymphatic

  19. Vascular Endothelial Cell Injury Is an Important Factor in the Development of Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis in Long-Term Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tawada, Mitsuhiro; Ito, Yasuhiko; Hamada, Chieko; Honda, Kazuho; Mizuno, Masashi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Sakata, Fumiko; Terabayashi, Takeshi; Matsukawa, Yoshihisa; Maruyama, Shoichi; Imai, Enyu; Matsuo, Seiichi; Takei, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a rare but serious and life-threatening complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). However, the precise pathogenesis remains unclear; in addition, predictors and early diagnostic biomarkers for EPS have not yet to be established. Methods Eighty-three peritoneal membrane samples taken at catheter removal were examined to identify pathological characteristics of chronic peritoneal deterioration, which promotes EPS in patients undergoing long-term PD treatment with low occurrence of peritonitis. Results According to univariable logistic regression analysis of the pathological findings, thickness of the peritoneal membrane (P = 0.045), new membrane formation score (P = 0.006), ratio of luminal diameter to vessel diameter (L/V ratio, P<0.001), presence of CD31-negative vessels (P = 0.021), fibrin deposition (P<0.001), and collagen volume fraction (P = 0.018) were associated with EPS development. In analyses of samples with and without EPS matched for PD treatment period, non-diabetes, and PD solution, univariable analysis identified L/V ratio (per 0.1 increase: odds ratio (OR) 0.44, P = 0.003) and fibrin deposition (OR 6.35, P = 0.027) as the factors associated with EPS. L/V ratio was lower in patients with fibrin exudation than in patients without fibrin exudation. Conclusions These findings suggest that damage to vascular endothelial cells, as represented by low L/V ratio, could be a predictive finding for the development of EPS, particularly in long-term PD patients unaffected by peritonitis. PMID:27119341

  20. Further analysis of the anti-tumour effect in vitro of peritoneal exudate cells from mice treated with Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Ghaffar, A; Cullen, R T; Woodruff, M A

    1975-01-01

    Administration of C. parvum to both intact and thymectomized mice resulted in the appearance in the peritoneal exudate of cells which inhibited tumour growth in vitro. This effect was mediated by intact, viable adherent cells, which it seems reasonable to categorize as macrophages, and was contingent on contact between the effector and target cells. No co-operation was observed between lymph node cells from C. parvum treated mice and peritoneal exudate cells from normal mice. PMID:1156505

  1. Proliferation and colony-forming ability of peritoneal exudate cells in liquid culture.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C C; Lin, H S; Adles, C

    1975-05-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells, obtained from mice injected with thioglycollate medium and cultured in medium containing L-cell-conditioned medium, will proliferate in an exponential fashion for 18 days with a doubling time of 68 h. After a 2 h pulse of tritiated thymidine, labeled adherent cells increased to a maximum of 22-34% during the 1st and 2nd wk of culture. Increasing the cell concentration from 2 times 10-3 to 2 times 10-5 cells/culture reduced exponential growth to 10 days and the doubling time was increased to 81.6 h. Under these culture conditions, peritoneal exudate cells were shown to form colonies on the surface of culture dishes when plated at low density. The cells within the colony were shown to be macrophages using yeast and antibody-coated sheep erythrocytes as a test for phagocytic function. The plating efficiolonies arose from a single precursor cell. The adherent cell population contains the colony-forming precursors. These precursors can be stimulated to form colonies for at least 2 wk by the addition of conditioned medium to cultures at various times after plating. While very few colony-forming cells could be demonstrated in the unstimulated peritoneal lavage, their numbers begin to increase in the exudate 4 h after injection of thioglycollate medium and reach a maximum by day 3 and then decrease. Isolated colonies may be useful in studying the function of macrophages. PMID:1092793

  2. Endoglin overexpression mediates gastric cancer peritoneal dissemination by inducing mesothelial cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhi-Feng; Wu, Jian-Hua; Wang, Zhen-Ning; Zhao, Ting-Ting; Xu, Hui-Mian; Song, Yong-Xi; Xing, Ya-Nan; Huang, Jin-Yu; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Liu, Xing-Yu; Xu, Hao; Xu, Ying-Ying

    2016-05-01

    Peritoneal dissemination (PD), which is highly frequent in gastric cancer (GC) patients, is the main cause of death in advanced GC. Senescence of human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) may contribute to GC peritoneal dissemination (GCPD). In this study of 126 patients, we investigated the association between Endoglin expression in GC peritoneum and the clinicopathological features. The prognosis of patients was evaluated according to Endoglin and ID1 expression. In vitro, GC cell (GCC)-HPMC coculture was established. Endoglin and ID1 expression was evaluated by Western blot. Cell cycle and HPMC senescence were analyzed after harvesting HPMC from the coculture. GCC adhesion and invasion to HPMC were also assayed. Our results showed that positive staining of Endoglin (38%) was associated with a higher TNM stage and higher incidence of GCPD (both P < .05). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the patients who were Endoglin positive had a shorter survival time compared with Endoglin-negative patients (P = .02). Using the HPMC and GCC adherence and invasion assay, we demonstrated that transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β)1-induced HPMC senescence was attenuated by silencing the Endoglin expression, which also prevented GCC attachment and invasion. Our study indicated a positive correlation between Endoglin overexpression and GCPD. Up-regulated Endoglin expression induced HPMC senescence via TGF-β1 pathway. The findings suggest that Endoglin-induced HPMC senescence may contribute to peritoneal dissemination of GCCs. PMID:27067789

  3. Intracellular replication of Leishmania tropica in mouse peritoneal macrophages: amastigote infection of resident cells and inflammatory exudate macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, A H; Hoover, D L; Nacy, C A

    1982-01-01

    C3HeB/FeJ peritoneal exudate cells elicited by a variety of sterile inflammatory agents were exposed to Leishmania tropica amastigotes in vitro. Cytochemical characterization of cells that contained intracellular parasites suggested that young, peroxidase-positive macrophages were more susceptible to infection by amastigotes than more mature cells. Replication of the parasite in these younger cells, however, was similar to that observed in resident peritoneal macrophages. PMID:7152674

  4. Peritoneal cavity regulatory B cells (B10 cells) modulate IFN-γ+CD4+ T cell numbers during colitis development in mice.

    PubMed

    Maseda, Damian; Candando, Kathleen M; Smith, Susan H; Kalampokis, Ioannis; Weaver, Casey T; Plevy, Scott E; Poe, Jonathan C; Tedder, Thomas F

    2013-09-01

    The spleen regulatory B cell subset with the functional capacity to express IL-10 (B10 cells) modulates both immune responses and autoimmune disease severity. However, the peritoneal cavity also contains relatively high frequencies of functionally defined IL-10-competent B10 cells. In this study, peritoneal cavity B10 cells shared similar cell surface phenotypes with their spleen counterparts. However, peritoneal cavity B10 cells were 10-fold more frequent among B cells than occurred within the spleen, intestinal tract, or mesenteric lymph nodes and were present at higher proportions among the phenotypically defined peritoneal B1a > B1b > B2 cell subpopulations. The development or localization of B10 cells within the peritoneal cavity was not dependent on the presence of commensal microbiota, T cells, IL-10 or B10 cell IL-10 production, or differences between their fetal liver or adult bone marrow progenitor cell origins. The BCR repertoire of peritoneal cavity B10 cells was diverse, as occurs in the spleen, and predominantly included germline-encoded VH and VL regions commonly found in either the conventional or B1 B cell compartments. Thereby, the capacity to produce IL-10 appears to be an intrinsic functional property acquired by clonally diverse B cells. Importantly, IL-10 production by peritoneal cavity B cells significantly reduced disease severity in spontaneous and induced models of colitis by regulating neutrophil infiltration, colitogenic CD4(+) T cell activation, and proinflammatory cytokine production during colitis onset. Thus, the numerically small B10 cell subset within the peritoneal cavity has regulatory function and is important for maintaining homeostasis within gastrointestinal tissues and the immune system. PMID:23918988

  5. Treatment of dextran sodium sulfate-induced experimental colitis by adoptive transfer of peritoneal cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Ren, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wei, Xia-wei; Shen, Guo-bo; Liu, Yan-tong; Luo, Min; Xu, Guang-chao; Shao, Bin; Deng, Sen-yi; He, Zhi-yao; Liang, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Wen, Yan-Zhu; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li; Deng, Hong-xin; Wei, Yu-quan

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of the natural regulatory B cells and macrophages should be a useful treatment for inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, it is usually difficult to isolate these cells from the tissues and expand them. Here, we investigated the feasibility of adoptively transferring peritoneal cells (PCs) as a treatment for DSS-induced colitis. We found that peritoneal cavity can provide an easily accessible site for harvesting enough number of PCs, namely, two-dose PCs for the treatment from a mouse in one operation. Adoptive therapy of these cells from healthy mice or those with disease is effectively in reducing the disease activity score. The natural B cells and macrophages of the infused PCs can selectively migrate to lesion sites and regulate the expression of Stat3, NF−κB, Smad3 and Smad7. Additionally, PCs exert dual activity of IL-10 and TGF-β secreted spontaneously by both peritoneal B cells and macrophages, which in turn enhance the induction of regulatory B cells and Macrophages in microenvironment of inflammation. Moreover, PCs can re-establish immunological tolerance in the OVA-immunized mice. Thus, our findings provide a new strategy for colitis therapy and could be of importance in additional exploration of other inflammation and autoimmune diseases therapy. PMID:26565726

  6. Decreased Cytotoxicity of Peripheral and Peritoneal Natural Killer Cell in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeung, InCheul; Cheon, Keunyoung; Kim, Mee-Ran

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis causes significant chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, and infertility and affects 10% of all women. In endometriosis, ectopic endometrium surviving after retrograde menstruation exhibits an abnormal immune response characterized by increased levels of activated macrophages and inflammatory cytokines. Particularly, dysfunctional natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease by either facilitating or inhibiting the survival, implantation, and proliferation of endometrial cells. NK cells in the peritoneum and peritoneal fluid exhibit reduced levels of cytotoxicity in women with endometriosis. Several cytokines and inhibitory factors in the serum and peritoneal fluid also dysregulate NK cell cytotoxicity. Additionally, increased numbers of immature peripheral NK cells and induction of NK cell apoptosis are evident in the peritoneal fluid of women with endometriosis. The high rate of endometriosis recurrence after pharmaceutical or surgical treatment, which is associated with dysfunctional NK cells, indicates that new immunomodulatory management strategies are required. A good understanding of immune dysfunction would enable improvement of current treatments for endometriosis. PMID:27294113

  7. Human Peritoneal Mesothelial Cells Display Phagocytic and Antigen-Presenting Functions to Contribute to Intraperitoneal Immunity.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Tanya J; Zhang, Xiang Y; Huo, Zhiming; Robertson, David; Lovell, Patricia A; Dalgleish, Angus G; Barton, Desmond P J

    2016-06-01

    Mesothelial cells lining the peritoneal cavity are strategically positioned to respond to and counter intraperitoneal infections, cancer cells, and other challenges. We have investigated human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs) for phagocytic activity, expression of surface Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II and accessory molecules involved in antigen presentation, and the ability to present recall antigens to T cells. Phagocytosis of dextran, latex beads, and Escherichia coli was observed by flow cytometry, and internalization was visualized using confocal and electron microscopy. Flow cytometry and/or cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed constitutive expression of ICAM-1, LFA-3, and B7-1, but not B7-2 or MHC class II. Interferon-gamma induced MHC II and ICAM-1 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Importantly, HPMCs induced autologous CD3 T-lymphocyte proliferation (H incorporation) after pulse with recall antigen. Human peritoneal mesothelial cells equipped with phagocytic and antigen-presenting machinery are anticipated to have an integral role in intraperitoneal immune surveillance. PMID:27120688

  8. Confirmation of destruction of salmonellae within murine peritoneal exudate cells by immunocytochemical technique.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, F R; Hsu, H S; Mumaw, V R; Moncure, C W

    1989-01-01

    A procedure was developed with which peritoneal exudate cell (PEC) preparations were fixed in a glutaraldehyde-picric acid mixture, post-fixed with osmium tetroxide, embedded in LR White resin and then stained with immunogold probe. It provided tissue sections showing both well-defined ultrastructures as well as specifically labelled Salmonella O antigens by electron microscopy. Inbred, male C57BL/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with 2 x 10(7) virulent Salmonella typhimurium. Peritoneal exudate cells were harvested at 16 and 20 hr after infection. Disintegrating intracellular bacteria were identified as salmonellae by the immunogold markers. Deposition of gold particles in the cytoplasm of phagocytes also indicated that intracellular debris contained digested pathogen. This investigation therefore confirms previous findings of the destruction of salmonellae within inflammatory polymorphs and macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:2668159

  9. Neutrophils and monocytes transport tumor cell antigens from the peritoneal cavity to secondary lymphoid tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Terasawa, Masao; Nagata, Kisaburo; Kobayashi, Yoshiro

    2008-12-12

    Antigen-transporting cells take up pathogens, and then migrate from sites of inflammation to secondary lymphoid tissues to induce an immune response. Among antigen-transporting cells, dendritic cells (DCs) are believed to be the most potent and professional antigen-presenting cells that can stimulate naive T cells. However, the cells that transport antigens, tumor cell antigens in particular, have not been clearly identified. In this study we have analyzed what types of cells transport tumor cell antigens to secondary lymphoid tissues. We show that neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages but not DCs engulf X-irradiated P388 leukemic cells after their injection into the peritoneal cavity, and that neutrophils and monocytes but not macrophages migrate to the parathymic lymph nodes (pLN), the blood, and then the spleen. The monocytes in the pLN comprise Gr-1{sup -} and Gr-1{sup +} ones, and some of these cells express CD11c. Overall, this study demonstrates that neutrophils and monocytes transport tumor cell antigens from the peritoneal cavity to secondary lymphoid tissues.

  10. Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumour in a Young Woman with Widespread Metastasis and Peritoneal Caking

    PubMed Central

    Monappa, Vidya; Bhat, Sudha S.; Valiathan, Manna

    2013-01-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumour (DSRCT) is a rare, highly aggressive, mesenchymal tumour that arises from the peritoneal cavity. It is commonly seen in adolescent and young adult males and its occurrence in females is uncommon. We are reporting here a rare case of DSRCT in a young woman, which clinically masqueraded as an ovarian malignancy, with metastasis to liver, lung, spleen and peritoneum. The cytologic findings, Histomorphological and immunohistochemical features have been discussed, with a brief review of literature. PMID:24551689

  11. Manipulation of pancreatic stem cells for cell replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Peshavaria, M; Pang, K

    2000-01-01

    The demonstration of the existence of tissue-specific adult stem cells has had a great impact on our understanding of stem cell biology and its application in clinical medicine. Their existence has revolutionized the implications for the treatment of many degenerative diseases characterized by either the loss or malfunction of discrete cell types. However, successful exploitation of this opportunity requires that we have sufficient know-how of stem cell manipulation. Because stem cells are the founders of virtually all tissues during embryonic development, we believe that understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of embryogenesis and organogenesis will ultimately serve as a platform to identify factors and conditions that regulate stem cell behavior. Discovery of stem cell regulatory factors will create potential pharmaceutical opportunities for treatment of degenerative diseases, as well as providing critical knowledge of the processes by which stem cells can be expanded in vitro, differentiated, and matured into desired functional cells for implantation into humans. A well-characterized example of this is the hematopoietic system where the discovery of erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), which regulate hematopoietic progenitor cell behavior, have provided significant clinical success in disease treatment as well as providing important insights into hematopoiesis. In contrast, little is known about the identity of pancreatic stem cells, the focus of this review. Recent reports of the potential existence of pancreatic stem cells and their utility in rescuing the diabetic state now raise the same possibilities of generating insulin-producing beta cells as well as other cell types of the pancreatic islet from a stem cell. In this review, we will focus on the potential of these new developments and how our understanding of pancreas development can help design strategies and approaches by which a cell replacement therapy

  12. Increased NHC Cells in the Peritoneal Cavity of Plasmacytoma Susceptible BALB/c Mouse.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Berenice; García-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Farfán-Morales, José Eduardo; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis Antonio

    2015-01-01

    BALB/c strain mice are unique in that they develop murine plasmacytoma (MPC) as a consequence of the inflammation induced by pristane oil injection in the peritoneal cavity. In this work the Treg, Th17, B1, B2, and NHC lymphocyte populations from the peritoneal environment of BALB/c, the susceptible strain, and C57BL/6 mice, which do not develop MPC after oil treatment, were studied. Both oil-treated strains showed decreased levels of Th17 lymphocytes, no significant variation in Treg lymphocytes, and a drastic decrease of all B lymphocyte populations. However, only oil-induced BALB/c showed increased levels of natural helper cells (NHC) which could be important in the myeloma induction. PMID:26504358

  13. Increased NHC Cells in the Peritoneal Cavity of Plasmacytoma Susceptible BALB/c Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-González, Berenice; García-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Farfán-Morales, José Eduardo; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis Antonio

    2015-01-01

    BALB/c strain mice are unique in that they develop murine plasmacytoma (MPC) as a consequence of the inflammation induced by pristane oil injection in the peritoneal cavity. In this work the Treg, Th17, B1, B2, and NHC lymphocyte populations from the peritoneal environment of BALB/c, the susceptible strain, and C57BL/6 mice, which do not develop MPC after oil treatment, were studied. Both oil-treated strains showed decreased levels of Th17 lymphocytes, no significant variation in Treg lymphocytes, and a drastic decrease of all B lymphocyte populations. However, only oil-induced BALB/c showed increased levels of natural helper cells (NHC) which could be important in the myeloma induction. PMID:26504358

  14. Effect of glucose degradation products on human peritoneal mesothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Witowski, J; Korybalska, K; Wisniewska, J; Breborowicz, A; Gahl, G M; Frei, U; Passlick-Deetjen, J; Jörres, A

    2000-04-01

    Bioincompatibility of conventional glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDF) has been partially attributed to the presence of glucose degradation products (GDP) generated during heat sterilization of PDF. Most previous studies on GDP toxicity were performed on animal and/or transformed cell lines, and the impact of GDP on peritoneal cells remains obscure. The short-term effects of six identified GDP on human peritoneal mesothelial cell (HPMC) functions were examined in comparison to murine L929 fibroblasts. Exposure of HPMC to acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, furaldehyde, but not to 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural, resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth, viability, and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-stimulated IL-6 release; for several GDP, this suppression was significantly greater compared with L929 cells. Although the addition of GDP to culture medium at concentrations found in PDF had no major impact on HPMC function, the exposure of HPMC to filter-sterilized PDF led to a significantly smaller suppression of HPMC proliferation compared to that induced by heat-sterilized PDF. The growth inhibition mediated by filter-sterilized PDF could be increased after the addition of clinically relevant doses of GDP. These effects were equally evident in L929 cells. In conclusion, GDP reveal a significant cytotoxic potential toward HPMC that may be underestimated in test systems using L929 cells. GDP-related toxicity appears to be particularly evident in experimental systems using proliferating cells and the milieu of dialysis fluids. Thus, these observations may bear biologic relevance in vivo where HPMC are repeatedly exposed to GDP-containing PDF for extended periods of time. PMID:10752532

  15. Paricalcitol reduces peritoneal fibrosis in mice through the activation of regulatory T cells and reduction in IL-17 production.

    PubMed

    González-Mateo, Guadalupe T; Fernández-Míllara, Vanessa; Bellón, Teresa; Liappas, Georgios; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Selgas, Rafael; Aroeira, Luiz S

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a significant health problem associated with a chronic inflammatory reaction. The precise mechanisms involved in the fibrotic process are still poorly understood. However, given that inflammation is a major causative factor, immunomodulation is a possible therapeutic approach to reduce fibrosis. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) that is present in all hematopoietic cells has been associated with immunomodulation. We investigated whether the intraperitoneal administration of paricalcitol, a specific activator of the VDR, modulates peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF)-induced peritoneal fibrosis. We characterized the inflammatory process in the peritoneal cavity of mice treated or not treated with paricalcitol and analyzed the ensuing fibrosis. The treatment reduced peritoneal IL-17 levels, which strongly correlated with a significantly lower peritoneal fibrotic response. In vitro studies demonstrate that both CD4+ and CD8+ regulatory T cells appear to impact the regulation of IL-17. Paricalcitol treatment resulted in a significantly increased frequency of CD8+ T cells showing a regulatory phenotype. The frequency of CD4+ Tregs tends to be increased, but it did not achieve statistical significance. However, paricalcitol treatment increased the number of CD4+ and CD8+ Treg cells in vivo. In conclusion, the activation of immunological regulatory mechanisms by VDR signaling could prevent or reduce fibrosis, as shown in peritoneal fibrosis induced by PDF exposure in mice. PMID:25279459

  16. Paricalcitol Reduces Peritoneal Fibrosis in Mice through the Activation of Regulatory T Cells and Reduction in IL-17 Production

    PubMed Central

    González-Mateo, Guadalupe T.; Fernández-Míllara, Vanessa; Bellón, Teresa; Liappas, Georgios; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Selgas, Rafael; Aroeira, Luiz S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a significant health problem associated with a chronic inflammatory reaction. The precise mechanisms involved in the fibrotic process are still poorly understood. However, given that inflammation is a major causative factor, immunomodulation is a possible therapeutic approach to reduce fibrosis. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) that is present in all hematopoietic cells has been associated with immunomodulation. We investigated whether the intraperitoneal administration of paricalcitol, a specific activator of the VDR, modulates peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF)-induced peritoneal fibrosis. We characterized the inflammatory process in the peritoneal cavity of mice treated or not treated with paricalcitol and analyzed the ensuing fibrosis. The treatment reduced peritoneal IL-17 levels, which strongly correlated with a significantly lower peritoneal fibrotic response. In vitro studies demonstrate that both CD4+ and CD8+ regulatory T cells appear to impact the regulation of IL-17. Paricalcitol treatment resulted in a significantly increased frequency of CD8+ T cells showing a regulatory phenotype. The frequency of CD4+ Tregs tends to be increased, but it did not achieve statistical significance. However, paricalcitol treatment increased the number of CD4+ and CD8+ Treg cells in vivo. In conclusion, the activation of immunological regulatory mechanisms by VDR signaling could prevent or reduce fibrosis, as shown in peritoneal fibrosis induced by PDF exposure in mice. PMID:25279459

  17. Circulating cell-free DNA indicates M1/M2 responses during septic peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yi; Gao, Xingjuan; Wang, Wenxiao; Xu, Xiaojuan; Yu, Lijuan; Ju, Xiuli; Li, Aimin

    2016-09-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has been widely suggested as clinical indicator in diseases, including sepsis. It was thought that the cfDNA was coming from the cell lysis, necrosis and apoptosis caused by tissue damages during sepsis. M1 or M2 macrophage-type responses kill or repair in vivo, which is highly relevant with the tissue damages in sepsis. The correlation between cfDNA and M1/M2 responses during sepsis was never investigated. Here, we used bacteria injection induced septic peritonitis mouse model in both M1-dominant C57bl/6 and M2-dominant Balb/c mouse strains. We found that M2-dominant Balb/c mice showed better prognosis of septic peritonitis than C57bl/6 mice, which is corresponded with lower level of cfDNA in septic Balb/c mice compared to septic C57bl/6 mice. By assessing the M1 and M2 related cytokines in both septic Balb/c and C57bl/6 mice, we found out that Balb/c mice has lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and higher interleukin 10 (IL-10) productions than C57bl/6 mice during septic peritonitis. Especially, when monitoring the monocyte subtypes in peripheral blood of these septic mice, we found out that C57bl/6 showed higher inflammatory (Ly6C(high)) monocyte (corresponding to M1 macrophage) proportion than Balb/c mice. Interestingly, we find out that cfDNA is highly correlated with the ratio of Ly6C(high) monocytes versus Ly6C(low) monocytes, which represents M1/M2 (killing/healing) responses. Our study suggested that the cfDNA is a good indicator for evaluating M1/M2 responses in septic peritonitis. PMID:27335257

  18. Acoustic devices for particle and cell manipulation and sensing.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yongqiang; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E M; Hughes, David A; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Gebhardt, Sylvia; Bolhovitins, Aleksandrs; Poltarjonoks, Romans; Weijer, Kees; Schönecker, Andreas; Hill, Martyn; Cochran, Sandy

    2014-01-01

    An emerging demand for the precise manipulation of cells and particles for applications in cell biology and analytical chemistry has driven rapid development of ultrasonic manipulation technology. Compared to the other manipulation technologies, such as magnetic tweezing, dielectrophoresis and optical tweezing, ultrasonic manipulation has shown potential in a variety of applications, with its advantages of versatile, inexpensive and easy integration into microfluidic systems, maintenance of cell viability, and generation of sufficient forces to handle particles, cells and their agglomerates. This article briefly reviews current practice and reports our development of various ultrasonic standing wave manipulation devices, including simple devices integrated with high frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasonic transducers for the investigation of biological cells and complex ultrasonic transducer array systems to explore the feasibility of electronically controlled 2-D and 3-D manipulation. Piezoelectric and passive materials, fabrication techniques, characterization methods and possible applications are discussed. The behavior and performance of the devices have been investigated and predicted with computer simulations, and verified experimentally. Issues met during development are highlighted and discussed. To assist long term practical adoption, approaches to low-cost, wafer level batch-production and commercialization potential are also addressed. PMID:25123465

  19. Acoustic Devices for Particle and Cell Manipulation and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yongqiang; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Hughes, David A.; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Gebhardt, Sylvia; Bolhovitins, Aleksandrs; Poltarjonoks, Romans; Weijer, Kees; Schönecker, Andreas; Hill, Martyn; Cochran, Sandy

    2014-01-01

    An emerging demand for the precise manipulation of cells and particles for applications in cell biology and analytical chemistry has driven rapid development of ultrasonic manipulation technology. Compared to the other manipulation technologies, such as magnetic tweezing, dielectrophoresis and optical tweezing, ultrasonic manipulation has shown potential in a variety of applications, with its advantages of versatile, inexpensive and easy integration into microfluidic systems, maintenance of cell viability, and generation of sufficient forces to handle particles, cells and their agglomerates. This article briefly reviews current practice and reports our development of various ultrasonic standing wave manipulation devices, including simple devices integrated with high frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasonic transducers for the investigation of biological cells and complex ultrasonic transducer array systems to explore the feasibility of electronically controlled 2-D and 3-D manipulation. Piezoelectric and passive materials, fabrication techniques, characterization methods and possible applications are discussed. The behavior and performance of the devices have been investigated and predicted with computer simulations, and verified experimentally. Issues met during development are highlighted and discussed. To assist long term practical adoption, approaches to low-cost, wafer level batch-production and commercialization potential are also addressed. PMID:25123465

  20. Plasmonic cell manipulation for biomedical and screening applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Kalies, Stefan; Sinram, Merve; Heeger, Patrick; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Meyer, Heiko; Ripken, Tammo

    2015-03-01

    Modulation of the cell membrane permeability by the plasmonic interaction of gold nanoparticles and short laser pulses for cell manipulation or destruction has been the objective of several recent studies. Gold nanoparticles in close vicinity to the cellular membrane are irradiated to evoke a nanoscale membrane perforation, enabling extracellular molecules to enter the cell. However, besides several basic studies no real translation from proof of concept experiments to routine usage of this approach was achieved so far. In order to provide a reproducible and easy-to-use platform for gold nanoparticle mediated (GNOME) laser manipulation, we established an automated and encased laser setup. We demonstrate its feasibility for high-throughput cell manipulation. In particular, protein delivery into canine cancer cells is shown. The biofunctional modification of cells was investigated using the caspase 3 protein, which represents a central effector molecule in the apoptotic signaling cascade. An efficient and temporally well-defined induction of apoptosis was observed with an early onset 2 h after protein delivery by GNOME laser manipulation. Besides protein delivery, modulation of gene function using GNOME laser transfection of antisense molecules was demonstrated, showing the potential of this technique for basic science and screening purposes. Concluding, we established GNOME laser manipulation of cells as a routine method, which can be utilized reliably for the efficient delivery of biomolecules. Its intrinsic features, being low impairment of the cell viability, high delivery efficiency and universal applicability, render this method well suited for a large variety of biomedical application.

  1. Ultrashort laser pulse cell manipulation using nano- and micro- materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomaker, Markus; Killian, Doreen; Willenbrock, Saskia; Diebold, Eric; Mazur, Eric; Bintig, Willem; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Nolte, Ingo; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Junghanß, Christian; Lubatschowski, Holger; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2010-08-01

    The delivery of extra cellular molecules into cells is essential for cell manipulation. For this purpose genetic materials (DNA/RNA) or proteins have to overcome the impermeable cell membrane. To increase the delivery efficiency and cell viability of common methods different nano- and micro material based approaches were applied. To manipulate the cells, the membrane is in contact with the biocompatible material. Due to a field enhancement of the laser light at the material and the resulting effect the cell membrane gets perforated and extracellular molecules can diffuse into the cytoplasm. Membrane impermeable dyes, fluorescent labelled siRNA, as well as plasmid vectors encoded for GFP expression were used as an indicator for successful perforation or transfection, respectively. Dependent on the used material, perforation efficiencies over 90 % with a cell viability of about 80 % can be achieved. Additionally, we observed similar efficiencies for siRNA transfection. Due to the larger molecule size and the essential transport of the DNA into the nucleus cells are more difficult to transfect with GFP plasmid vectors. Proof of principle experiments show promising and adequate efficiencies by applying micro materials for plasmid vector transfection. For all methods a weakly focused fs laser beam is used to enable a high manipulation throughput for adherent and suspension cells. Furthermore, with these alternative optical manipulation methods it is possible to perforate the membrane of sensitive cell types such as primary and stem cells with a high viability.

  2. Detection methods and clinical significance of free peritoneal tumor cells found during colorectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sibio, Simone; Fiorani, Cristina; Stolfi, Carmine; Divizia, Andrea; Pezzuto, Roberto; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Bagaglini, Giulia; Sammartino, Paolo; Sica, Giuseppe Sigismondo

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal washing is now part of the standard clinical practice in several abdominal and pelvic neoplasias. However, in colorectal cancer surgery, intra-peritoneal free cancer cells (IFCC) presence is not routinely investigated and their prognostic meaning is still unclear. When peritoneal washing results are positive for the presence of IFCC a worse outcome is usually expected in these colorectal cancer operated patients, but it what is not clear is whether it is associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. It is authors’ belief that one of the main reasons why IFCC are not researched as integral part of the routine staging system for colon cancer is that there still isn’t a diagnostic or detection method with enough sensibility and specificity. However, the potential clinical implications of a routine research for the presence IFCC in colon neoplasias are enormous: not only to obtain a more accurate clinical staging but also to offer different therapy protocols, based on the presence of IFCC. Based on this, adjuvant chemotherapy could be offered to those patients found to be positive for IFCC; also, protocols of proactive intraperitoneal chemotherapy could be applied. Although presence of IFCC appears to have a valid prognostic significance, further studies are needed to standardize detection and examination procedures, to determine if there are and which are the stages more likely to benefit from routine search for IFCC. PMID:26425265

  3. Cell mediated immunity to corn starch in starch-induced granulomatous peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Goodacre, R L; Clancy, R L; Davidson, R A; Mullens, J E

    1976-03-01

    Two patients with histologically diagnosed starch induced granulomatous peritonitis (SGP) have been shown to have cell mediated immunity to corn starch using the techniques of macrophage migration inhibition and lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Control groups of normal subjects, patients with uncomplicated laparotomy, and patients with Crohn's disease were negative in both tests. Lymphocytes from two patients with band adhesions, one of whom had biopsy evidence of a granulomatous reaction to starch, were sensitized to starch. Cell mediated immunity to starch may contribute to the pathogenesis of SGP, and some band adhesions may be a chronic low grade manifestation of this disorder. PMID:1269987

  4. Cancer Antigen 125 as a Biomarker in Peritoneal Dialysis: Mesothelial Cell Health or Death?

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Harpaul; Bargman, Joanne M.

    2013-01-01

    The concentration or appearance rate of cancer antigen 125 (CA125) in peritoneal dialysis (PD) effluent has been used for many years as a biomarker for mesothelial cell mass in patients on PD. However, this marker has limitations, and emerging evidence has raised doubts as to its significance. This review explores our current understanding of CA125, its prominent role in studies of “biocompatible” PD solutions, and the ongoing uncertainty concerning its interpretation as a measure of mesothelial cell health. PMID:23843586

  5. Pathogen Tactics to Manipulate Plant Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, M Shahid; McCormack, Maggie E; Argueso, Cristiana T; Pajerowska-Mukhtar, Karolina M

    2016-07-11

    Cell death is a vital process for multicellular organisms. Programmed cell death (PCD) functions in a variety of processes including growth, development, and immune responses for homeostasis maintenance. In particular, plants and animals utilize PCD to control pathogen invasion and infected cell populations. Despite some similarity, there are a number of key differences between how these organisms initiate and regulate cell death. In contrast to animals, plants are sessile, lack a circulatory system, and have additional cellular structures, including cell walls and chloroplasts. Plant cells have the autonomous ability to induce localized cell death using conserved eukaryotic pathways as well as unique plant-specific pathways. Thus, in order to successfully infect host cells, pathogens must subvert immune responses and avoid detection to prevent PCD and allow infection. Here we discuss the roles of cell death in plant immune responses and the tactics pathogens utilize to avert cell death. PMID:27404256

  6. Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Daniel; Ozcelik, Adem; Bojanala, Nagagireesh; Nama, Nitesh; Upadhyay, Awani; Chen, Yuchao; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation. PMID:27004764

  7. Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Daniel; Ozcelik, Adem; Bojanala, Nagagireesh; Nama, Nitesh; Upadhyay, Awani; Chen, Yuchao; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation. PMID:27004764

  8. Aroclor 1254 inhibits the chemiluminescence response of peritoneal cavity cells from sharpsnout sea bream (Diplodus puntazzo).

    PubMed

    Vazzana, Mirella; Reas, Gabriele; Cammarata, Matteo; Arizza, Vincenzo; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Parrinello, Nicolò

    2014-08-01

    Chronic exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) affect the immune system of fish and could lead to a decreased disease resistance. The effects of Aroclor 1254, PCB mixtures, on the Diplodus puntazzo innate immunity were examined by assaying the zymosan stimulated chemiluminescence response (CL) of peritoneal cavity cells (PCCs) at various times (1, 24, 48 h and 1-4 weeks) from intraperitoneal injection of the xenobiotic (1 mg kg(-1) body weight). Controls were performed by assaying cells from medium-treated fish. Since the kinetic of the chemiluminescence response showed the highest peak at 25 min after the zymosan stimulation of the cells, the values found at that time were considered. The CL enhancement observed at 1 h after the treatment with xenobiotic was followed by a decreased response at 24 h and appeared to be lower at 1-4 weeks when compared to the CL response of the control, suggesting a protracted effect of PCBs on the peritoneal cavity. Since PCCs incubated in vitro for 1 h with 0.05 and 0.1 μg ml(-1) Aroclor showed an enhanced CL, the effect of the xenobiotic could be exerted on the cell responsiveness to zymosan. It is known that fish CL response of PCCs can be imputed to phagocyte (macrophages and neutrophils) activation, these cells and their responsiveness to zymosan can be used in immunotoxicology assay to monitor the fish health in polluted environment. PMID:24945575

  9. Digital Microfluidics for Manipulation and Analysis of a Single Cell

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie-Long; Chen, An-Te; Lee, Jyong-Huei; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The basic structural and functional unit of a living organism is a single cell. To understand the variability and to improve the biomedical requirement of a single cell, its analysis has become a key technique in biological and biomedical research. With a physical boundary of microchannels and microstructures, single cells are efficiently captured and analyzed, whereas electric forces sort and position single cells. Various microfluidic techniques have been exploited to manipulate single cells through hydrodynamic and electric forces. Digital microfluidics (DMF), the manipulation of individual droplets holding minute reagents and cells of interest by electric forces, has received more attention recently. Because of ease of fabrication, compactness and prospective automation, DMF has become a powerful approach for biological application. We review recent developments of various microfluidic chips for analysis of a single cell and for efficient genetic screening. In addition, perspectives to develop analysis of single cells based on DMF and emerging functionality with high throughput are discussed. PMID:26389890

  10. Digital Microfluidics for Manipulation and Analysis of a Single Cell.

    PubMed

    He, Jie-Long; Chen, An-Te; Lee, Jyong-Huei; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The basic structural and functional unit of a living organism is a single cell. To understand the variability and to improve the biomedical requirement of a single cell, its analysis has become a key technique in biological and biomedical research. With a physical boundary of microchannels and microstructures, single cells are efficiently captured and analyzed, whereas electric forces sort and position single cells. Various microfluidic techniques have been exploited to manipulate single cells through hydrodynamic and electric forces. Digital microfluidics (DMF), the manipulation of individual droplets holding minute reagents and cells of interest by electric forces, has received more attention recently. Because of ease of fabrication, compactness and prospective automation, DMF has become a powerful approach for biological application. We review recent developments of various microfluidic chips for analysis of a single cell and for efficient genetic screening. In addition, perspectives to develop analysis of single cells based on DMF and emerging functionality with high throughput are discussed. PMID:26389890

  11. Remote Learning for the Manipulation and Control of Robotic Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstain, Ofir; Ben-Gal, Irad; Bukchin, Yossi

    2007-01-01

    This work proposes an approach to remote learning of robotic cells based on internet and simulation tools. The proposed approach, which integrates remote-learning and tele-operation into a generic scheme, is designed to enable students and developers to set-up and manipulate a robotic cell remotely. Its implementation is based on a dedicated…

  12. Murine retroviral vector producer cells survival and toxicity in the peritoneal cavity of dogs.

    PubMed

    Link, C J; Moorman, D W; Ackerman, M; Levy, J P; Seregina, T

    2000-01-01

    Retroviral vector producer cells (VPC) can effectively transfer genes in vivo. To develop a safe method to target gene delivery into intraperitoneal tumors, we have examined the toxicity of intraperitoneal (i.p.) infusion of retroviral VPC in a xenogeneic canine model. Mongrel dogs were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 2 x 10(9) murine LTKOSN.2 VPC. The animals did not demonstrate acute toxicity and tolerated the i.p. infusion of the cells without difficulty. Starting 7 days after i.p. injection, the dogs received intravenous injections of ganciclovir (GCV) twice daily (5 mg/kg) for 7 days. The treatment dogs underwent peritoneal washings on days 3, 7 and 14 after their initial infusion of cells to study the persistence of the VPC. GCV treatment did not cause significant toxicities. Dogs underwent serial blood tests to evaluate bone marrow, renal, liver and immunological function. Complete blood counts, electrolytes and renal function remained normal throughout the study. Although, transient mild elevations occurred of serum alkaline phosphate, the remaining hepatic enzymes remained normal. Histologic examination of tissues from animals sacrificed after the i.p. administration of the VPC revealed no tissue destruction of the normal peritoneal lining. The dogs mounted an antibody response to the murine VPC that was first observed 7 days post injection. PCR analysis of selected tissues after GCV administration did not reveal persistent vector sequences. These results demonstrated that the injection of xenogeneic VPC is not accompanied by significant adverse effects over a 1 month period following administration into the canine peritoneal cavity. These data support the potential clinical application of the VPC in Phase I clinical trials in humans. PMID:11212841

  13. Safety of peritoneal and pleural drain placement in pediatric stem cell transplant recipients with severe veno-occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Madenci, Arin L; Stetson, Alyssa; Weldon, Christopher B; Lehmann, Leslie E

    2016-08-01

    Hepatic VOD (veno-occlusive disease) is a serious complication of HSCT (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation) and has historically been associated with high mortality. This obstruction to hepatic flow often results in fluid collections in the peritoneal and pleural cavities. Catheter placement to drain ascites or pleural fluid may reduce intra-abdominal hypertension and/or improve respiratory parameters. The safety of these interventions among critically ill, immunocompromised children is unknown. Among 32 HSCT recipients (2000-2012) with severe VOD, we assessed the primary outcome of procedural complication from peritoneal drain placement. Twenty-four (75%) patients underwent peritoneal drain placement. No patient sustained visceral perforation or hemorrhage with drain placement. Overall mortality was 47% (n = 15). The procedure was not associated with increased overall mortality (p > 0.99). Eight (25%) peritoneal drains required replacement for malfunction. Of 24 patients with peritoneal drains, one (4%) patient had a positive culture from ascitic fluid. Eight (25%) patients underwent pleural drain placement. No pleural drain-related procedural complication or infection occurred. Four (50%) of the eight patients with pleural drains had de-escalation in oxygen requirement at drain removal, compared to time of placement. In this study, peritoneal and pleural drains were safe interventions for children with severe VOD. PMID:27373552

  14. Perspectives in nanostructure assisted laser manipulation of mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Kalies, Stefan; Hoerdt, Anton; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of cell-adhered nanostructures with laser light has attracted much interest within the biomedical field. Molecular delivery using a variety of plasmonic nanostructures, such as structured surfaces, nanoparticles and particle clusters, is currently evolving from its proof-of-concept into a routine method. Here, gold represents the material of choice, as it provides unique optical properties, different surface modifications as well as biocompatibility. In addition, new materials (e.g. polypyrrole) provide interesting alternatives. Applying this approach, a variety of molecules, such as fluorescent dyes, proteins, antisense structures, and DNA, has been transfected in order to manipulate the cellular functions in different experimental settings. Antisense structures, for example, allow the efficient down regulation of the gene activity of a target, providing insights into the gene's function. The delivery of proteins, as executing molecules in the cell, can exhibit an immediate effect on the cell behavior, allowing a minute observation of the intracellular kinetics. Direct cell manipulation can be achieved with this approach as well. Increasing the nanoparticle concentration and/or the radiant exposure, effective cell destruction is induced. Using targeted nanoparticles (e.g. by antibody conjugation) in combination with spatially selective laser irradiation permits well-directed cell manipulation even in mixed cultures and potentially in tissues. Furthermore, excited gold nanoparticles can directly trigger cellular reactions, which can possibly be utilized for cell stimulation. The manifold possibilities of nanostructure assisted laser manipulation are still in development.

  15. Host manipulation by cancer cells: Expectations, facts, and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Tissot, Tazzio; Arnal, Audrey; Jacqueline, Camille; Poulin, Robert; Lefèvre, Thierry; Mery, Frédéric; Renaud, François; Roche, Benjamin; Massol, François; Salzet, Michel; Ewald, Paul; Tasiemski, Aurélie; Ujvari, Beata; Thomas, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Similar to parasites, cancer cells depend on their hosts for sustenance, proliferation and reproduction, exploiting the hosts for energy and resources, and thereby impairing their health and fitness. Because of this lifestyle similarity, it is predicted that cancer cells could, like numerous parasitic organisms, evolve the capacity to manipulate the phenotype of their hosts to increase their own fitness. We claim that the extent of this phenomenon and its therapeutic implications are, however, underappreciated. Here, we review and discuss what can be regarded as cases of host manipulation in the context of cancer development and progression. We elaborate on how acknowledging the applicability of these principles can offer novel therapeutic and preventive strategies. The manipulation of host phenotype by cancer cells is one more reason to adopt a Darwinian approach in cancer research. PMID:26849295

  16. Is gastrointestinal dysfunction induced by gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis relevant to impairment of interstitial cells of Cajal?

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongqun; He, Yan; Tong, Jinxue; Sun, Lingyu; Yang, Dongdong; Li, Huaming; Ao, Ning; Jin, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qifan

    2011-03-01

    Although impaired gastrointestinal motility from gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis (GCPM) causes extraordinary pain, its cause is unclear. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are apparently pacemaker cells, and their loss could cause motor dysfunction. In this study, we developed a mouse model for GCPM, and investigated electrophysiological changes in the small intestine and attendant changes in ICC. We found decreased ICC and disrupted electrical rhythm in the model. Pathologic ICC changes were well described. Cancer peritoneal metastasis may impair intestinal myoelectrical activity by damaging ICC and ICC networks. Interstitial cells of Cajal will be a target of palliative treatment and merit further study. PMID:21207119

  17. Secondary cell walls: biosynthesis and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Campbell, Liam; Turner, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Secondary cell walls (SCWs) are produced by specialized plant cell types, and are particularly important in those cells providing mechanical support or involved in water transport. As the main constituent of plant biomass, secondary cell walls are central to attempts to generate second-generation biofuels. Partly as a consequence of this renewed economic importance, excellent progress has been made in understanding how cell wall components are synthesized. SCWs are largely composed of three main polymers: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. In this review, we will attempt to highlight the most recent progress in understanding the biosynthetic pathways for secondary cell wall components, how these pathways are regulated, and how this knowledge may be exploited to improve cell wall properties that facilitate breakdown without compromising plant growth and productivity. While knowledge of individual components in the pathway has improved dramatically, how they function together to make the final polymers and how these individual polymers are incorporated into the wall remain less well understood. PMID:26663392

  18. Migration inhibition of peritoneal cells and PHA lymphocyte toxicity in rats during methylcholanthrene carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kalafut, F; Babusíková, O; Klobussická, M; Koníková, E

    1975-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells obtained from rats bearing primary methylcholanthrene-induced tumors were shown to be inhibited in their capillary tube migration capacity as compared to cells from nontreated control litter-mates. The survival of rat peripheral blood lymphocytes harvested from the same individuals were tested simultaneously in short-term cultures with a standard concentration of Phytohemagglutinin. Lymphocytes from tumor-bearing rats survived better than control lymphocytes in 24-hour cultures with Phytohemagglutinin. A correlation was found from a comparison of the results of these two methods. These findings are discussed with regard to the possibility of T cells depletion from peripheral lymphocyte population, together with the enrichment of this population with B cells in tumor-bearing individuals. PMID:1081658

  19. Preservation of the secretory response of peritoneal mast cells in the absence of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Bronner, C; Gies, J P; Vallé, A; Landry, Y

    1987-12-01

    The transfer of rat peritoneal mast cells from balanced salt solution to calcium-free buffer led to a time-dependent decrease in their response to compound 48/80 and to ionophore A23187. The concomittant absence of potassium from the calcium-free buffer enabled the mast cells to retain their secretory response. The increase in potassium level, with a parallel decrease in sodium to maintain osmolarity, led to a slight potentiation of the response to 48/80 and to a large but transient potentiation of the response to A23187. Mast cells can be considered nonexcitable. The apparent dependency upon extracellular calcium of mast cell secretory responses might be related to the presumed tight equilibrium between endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores and extracellular calcium. The control of this equilibrium by transmembrane gradients of monovalent ions is proposed. PMID:2446099

  20. Activated T-cell Therapy, Low-Dose Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That is Stage III-IV, Refractory, or Recurrent

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  1. Efficacy and safety of selenium nanoparticles administered intraperitoneally for the prevention of growth of cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Kang; Tan, Yanping; Wu, Shanshan; Zhang, Jinsong

    2014-07-01

    Peritoneal implantation of cancer cells, particularly postoperative seeding metastasis, frequently occurs in patients with primary tumors in the stomach, colon, liver, and ovary. Peritoneal carcinomatosis is associated with poor prognosis. In this work, we evaluated the prophylactic effect of intraperitoneal administration of selenium (Se), an essential trace element and a putative chemopreventive agent, on peritoneal implantation of cancer cells. Elemental Se nanoparticles were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice, into which highly malignant H22 hepatocarcinoma cells had previously been inoculated. Se concentrations in the cancer cells and tissues, as well as the efficacy of proliferation inhibition and safety, were evaluated. Se was mainly concentrated in cancer cells compared to Se retention in normal tissues, showing at least an order of magnitude difference between the drug target cells (the H22 cells) and the well-recognized toxicity target of Se (the liver). Such a favorable selective distribution resulted in strong proliferation suppression without perceived host toxicity. The mechanism of action of the Se nanoparticle-triggered cytotoxicity was associated with Se-mediated production of reactive oxygen species, which impaired the glutathione and thioredoxin systems. Our results suggest that intraperitoneal administration of Se is a safe and effective means of preventing growth of cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity for the above-mentioned high-risk populations. PMID:24727439

  2. Microfluidic integrated acoustic waving for manipulation of cells and molecules.

    PubMed

    Barani, Alireza; Paktinat, Hossein; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Aminollah; Mosaddegh, Peiman; Fadaei-Tehrani, Alireza; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2016-11-15

    Acoustophoresis with its simple and low-cost fabrication, rapid and localized fluid actuation, compatibility with microfluidic components, and biocompatibility for cellular studies, has been extensively integrated into microfluidics to provide on-chip microdevices for a variety of applications in biology, bioengineering and chemistry. Among different applications, noninvasive manipulation of cells and biomolecules are significantly important, which are addressed by acoustic-based microfluidics. Here in this paper, we briefly explain the principles and different configurations of acoustic wave and acoustic streaming for the manipulation of cells and molecules and overview its applications for single cell isolation, cell focusing and sorting, cell washing and patterning, cell-cell fusion and communication, and tissue engineering. We further discuss the application of acoustic-based microfluidic systems for the mixing and transport of liquids, manipulation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules, followed by explanation on the present challenges of acoustic-based microfluidics for the handling of cells and molecules, and highlighting the future directions. PMID:27262557

  3. 18. Photocopy of photograph. VIEW WITHIN POSTMORTEM CELL OF MANIPULATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph. VIEW WITHIN POST-MORTEM CELL OF MANIPULATOR ARMS BEING USED TO MOVE METAL BARS FROM ONE LOCATION TO ANOTHER. Photographer unknown, ca. 1965, original photograph and negative on file at the Remote Sensing Laboratory, Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  4. Dielectrophoretic Tweezers and Micropost Arrays for Cell and Particle Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Tom; Lee, Hakho; Westervelt, Robert

    2005-03-01

    We describe a micromanipulator system that uses dielectrophoresis to capture and release cells or particles. Dielectrophoretic tweezers are capable of applying hundreds of piconewtons of force to micron scale objects suspended in liquid and precisely positioning objects in three dimensions. Metal electrodes on either side of a sharp pipette tip provide the electric field gradient necessary. This manipulation technique compliments our micropost array (1) for the manipulation of particles in a microfluidic system. We will discuss applications of dielectrophoresis using hybrid integrated circuit/microfluidic devices (2) with applications that include cell sorting and tissue assembly. This work made possible by a gift from Phillip Morris and the NSEC NSF grant PHY-0117795. 1. T. P. Hunt H. Lee and R. M. Westervelt, ``Addressable micropost array for the dielectrophoretic manipulation of particles in fluid," Appl. Phys. Lett. In Press. 2. H. Lee, et Al. ``An IC/ microfluidic hybrid microsystem for 2D magnetic manipulation of individual biological cells," To appear in IEEE ISSCC, Feb. 2005.

  5. Intraperitoneal Mesenchymal Cells Promote the Development of Peritoneal Metastasis Partly by Supporting Long Migration of Disseminated Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishigami, Hironori; Matsuzaki, Keisuke; Sata, Naohiro

    2016-01-01

    The human peritoneal cavity contains a small number of free cells of mesenchymal cell lineage. Intraperitoneal mesenchymal cells (PMC) play supportive roles in metastasis formation on the peritoneum. In this study, we found that PMC, when co-cultuerd with human gastric cancer cells, MKN45, enhanced the proliferation of MKN45 when cultured at low, but not high, cellular density. Also, PMC suppressed apoptotic cell death of MKN45 only under low density culture conditions. Time-lapse videoanalysis clearly demonstrated that PMC randomly migrated more vigorously than did MKN45, and strongly enhanced the migration behavior of co-cultured MKN45. In fact, the majority of MKN45 migrated together in direct physical contact with PMC, and the sum of migration lengths from original position of co-cultured MKN45 for 48 hours was approximately 10 times longer than that of MKN45 cultured alone. Our data suggest that enhanced migration can increase the chance of direct contact or positional proximity among sparcely distributed MKN45, which may bring survival advantages to tumor cells. This may be one of the important mechanisms of peritoneal metastasis, since only a small number of tumor cells are considered to be disseminated in the early step of metastasis formation on the peritoneum. PMID:27136922

  6. Mechanical force characterization in manipulating live cells with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanhua; Sun, Dong; Huang, Wenhao

    2011-02-24

    Laser trapping with optical tweezers is a noninvasive manipulation technique and has received increasing attentions in biological applications. Understanding forces exerted on live cells is essential to cell biomechanical characterizations. Traditional numerical or experimental force measurement assumes live cells as ideal objects, ignoring their complicated inner structures and rough membranes. In this paper, we propose a new experimental method to calibrate the trapping and drag forces acted on live cells. Binding a micro polystyrene sphere to a live cell and moving the mixture with optical tweezers, we can obtain the drag force on the cell by subtracting the drag force on the sphere from the total drag force on the mixture, under the condition of extremely low Reynolds number. The trapping force on the cell is then obtained from the drag force when the cell is in force equilibrium state. Experiments on numerous live cells demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed force calibration approach. PMID:21087769

  7. Cross talk between polysulfide and nitric oxide in rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Amira; Habara, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to define the effects of polysulfide on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and the underlying machinery, especially from the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) perspectives, in rat peritoneal mast cells. We found that a polysulfide donor, Na2S4, increased [Ca(2+)]i, which is both extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) dependent. Intracellular Ca(2+) release induced by Na2S4 was attenuated by the addition of a ryanodine receptor blocker. A slow-releasing H2S donor, GYY4137, dose dependently increased [Ca(2+)]i that was independent from extracellular Ca(2+) influx. The GYY4137-induced [Ca(2+)]i release was partially attenuated in the presence of the ryanodine receptor blocker. Both polysulfide and H2S donors increased the intracellular NO levels in DAF-2-loaded mast cells, which were abolished by an NO scavenger, cPTIO. Inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) significantly abolished the polysulfide- or H2S-donor-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) An NO donor, diethylamine (DEA) NONOate, increased [Ca(2+)]i in a concentration-dependent manner, in which both extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) are associated. At higher concentrations, the DEA NONOate-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases were attenuated in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) and by the addition of the ryanodine receptor blocker. H2S and NO dose dependently induced polysulfide production. Curiously, polysulfide, H2S, and NO donors had no effect on mast cell degranulation. Among synthases, cystathionine-γ-lyase, and neuronal NOS seemed to be the major H2S- and NO-producing synthases, respectively. These results indicate that polysulfide acts as a potential signaling molecule that regulates [Ca(2+)]i homeostasis in rat peritoneal mast cells via a cross talk with NO and H2S. PMID:27053521

  8. A portable and integrated instrument for cell manipulation by dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Burgarella, Sarah; Di Bari, Marco

    2015-07-01

    The physical manipulation of biological cells is a key point in the development of miniaturized systems for point-of-care analyses. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been reported by several laboratories as a promising method in biomedical research for label-free cell manipulation without physical contact, by exploiting the dielectric properties of cells suspended in a microfluidic sample, under the action of high-gradient electric fields. In view of a more extended use of DEP phenomena in lab-on-chip devices for point-of-care settings, we have developed a portable instrument, integrating on the same device the microfluidic biochip for cell manipulation and all the laboratory functions (i.e., DEP electric signal generation, microscopic observation of the biological sample under test and image acquisition) that are normally obtained by combining different nonportable standard laboratory instruments. The nonuniform electric field for cell manipulation on the biochip is generated by microelectrodes, patterned on the silicon substrate of microfluidic channels, using standard microfabrication techniques. Numerical modeling was performed to simulate the electric field distribution, quantify the DEP force, and optimize the geometry of the microelectrodes. The developed instrument includes an electronic board, which allows the control of the electric signal applied to electrodes necessary for DEP, and a miniaturized optical microscope system that allows visual inspection and eventually cell counting, as well as image and video recording. The system also includes the control software. The portable and integrated platform described in this work therefore represents a complete and innovative solution of applied research, suitable for many biological applications. PMID:25808778

  9. Isolation and in vitro translation of mRNA from rat peritoneal mast cells and rat basophilic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, H; Lee, T D; Swieter, M; Saito, A; Tamaoki, T; Befus, A D

    1988-11-10

    In the absence of any specific literature on the isolation of RNA from mast cells, our initial attempts established that unusual measures would be needed to prepare acceptable yields of high quality RNA from peritoneal mast cells of normal adult rats. Accordingly, we developed procedures for the isolation and characterization of RNA from rat peritoneal mast cells (PMC) and basophilic leukemia cells (RBL). The significant components of the procedures include: separation and removal of mast cell granules to minimize contamination of RNA with proteins and proteoglycans; use of bentonite in phenol extractions; and repetition of extractions and precipitation. The amounts of total RNA extracted from PMC were about 15% of those from RBL, although the percentage mRNA of total RNA in PMC and RBL was similar (1.8 and 2.0%). Ribosomal RNA banding patterns in agarose gel electrophoresis and in vitro translation experiments indicate that the isolated RNA can be employed for analysis of molecular mechanisms of mast cell function and heterogeneity. PMID:3183393

  10. Ultra-deep sequencing detects ovarian cancer cells in peritoneal fluid and reveals somatic TP53 mutations in noncancerous tissues.

    PubMed

    Krimmel, Jeffrey D; Schmitt, Michael W; Harrell, Maria I; Agnew, Kathy J; Kennedy, Scott R; Emond, Mary J; Loeb, Lawrence A; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Risques, Rosa Ana

    2016-05-24

    Current sequencing methods are error-prone, which precludes the identification of low frequency mutations for early cancer detection. Duplex sequencing is a sequencing technology that decreases errors by scoring mutations present only in both strands of DNA. Our aim was to determine whether duplex sequencing could detect extremely rare cancer cells present in peritoneal fluid from women with high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs). These aggressive cancers are typically diagnosed at a late stage and are characterized by TP53 mutations and peritoneal dissemination. We used duplex sequencing to analyze TP53 mutations in 17 peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC and 20 from women without cancer. The tumor TP53 mutation was detected in 94% (16/17) of peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC (frequency as low as 1 mutant per 24,736 normal genomes). Additionally, we detected extremely low frequency TP53 mutations (median mutant fraction 1/13,139) in peritoneal fluid from nearly all patients with and without cancer (35/37). These mutations were mostly deleterious, clustered in hotspots, increased with age, and were more abundant in women with cancer than in controls. The total burden of TP53 mutations in peritoneal fluid distinguished cancers from controls with 82% sensitivity (14/17) and 90% specificity (18/20). Age-associated, low frequency TP53 mutations were also found in 100% of peripheral blood samples from 15 women with and without ovarian cancer (none with hematologic disorder). Our results demonstrate the ability of duplex sequencing to detect rare cancer cells and provide evidence of widespread, low frequency, age-associated somatic TP53 mutation in noncancerous tissue. PMID:27152024

  11. Dual effects of protoporphyrin and long wave ultraviolet light on histamine release from rat peritoneal and cutaneous mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, A.; Gigli, I.; Barrett, K.E. )

    1990-06-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of long wave ultraviolet light (UVA) and various doses of protoporphyrin (PP) on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal and cutaneous mast cells. We also correlated these results with morphologic characteristics and viability of the cells. PP at a dose of 30 ng/ml plus UVA-induced negligible histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC), but was able to suppress the ability of the cells to release histamine in response to subsequent exposure to the calcium ionophore A23187, compound 48/80, or the combination of Ag and IgE. This functional change was associated with an increase in cell size, and cell lysis that gradually occurred during 24 h in culture. PP at a dose of 3 ng/ml plus UVA also significantly inhibited secretogogue-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells, but this dose was not associated with significant changes in morphology or viability. These various effects of PP plus UVA were also observed with mast cell preparations obtained by the enzymatic dispersion of rat skin. The suppression of secretogogue-induced histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells treated with PP (3 ng/ml) and UVA could not be reversed by culturing the cells in the dark for 24 h in the absence of PP. Unlike the direct cytotoxic histamine releasing action of high doses of PP plus UVA, the suppressive effect of low PP doses could not be inhibited by catalase, but could be reduced by the absence of calcium. Our results indicate that PP plus UVA has dual effects on mast cells, apparently involving distinct mechanisms. This implies the possibility that PP and UVA at appropriate doses could be used in photochemotherapy of mast cell-mediated skin diseases.

  12. Induction of LAK-like cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice by inactivated Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Scaringi, L; Cornacchione, P; Rosati, E; Boccanera, M; Cassone, A; Bistoni, F; Marconi, P

    1990-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of multiple administrations of inactivated Candida albicans (CA) cells on induction of non-MHC-restricted antitumor cytotoxic responses both in normal and congenitally athymic (nude) mice. Intraperitoneal inoculation of CD2F1 mice with five doses of 2 x 10(7) CA cells over a 2-week interval was associated with the induction of peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) that mediated natural killer cell activity. These cells, in contrast to those elicited by a single dose of CA, killed both NK-sensitive and NK-resistant tumor target cells in vitro. This broad-spectrum, antitumor cytotoxicity peaked 1 day after the last injection of CA, and decreased to control values within 6 (NK-resistant) or 14 (NK-sensitive target cells) days. Cytotoxicity could be recalled to a high level by a boosting injection of CA or a major mannoprotein-soluble antigen (MP) from the Candida cell wall, given 30 days after multiple CA treatment. Upon a 24-hr in vitro incubation, CA-induced peritoneal immunoeffectors lost their killing activity unless human recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) was added to cultures. The non-MHC-restricted cytotoxic PEC activity induced by CA was mainly associated with nonadherent, nonphagocytic large granular lymphocytes (LGL) which exhibited the following phenotypes: (i) asialo GM1+, Lyt 2.2-, and partially Thy 1.2+ (effectors active against NK-sensitive targets) and (ii) asialo GM1+, Lyt 2.2-, and Thy 1.2+ (effectors active against NK-resistant targets). Nude mice also responded to multiple CA inoculations by displaying high cytotoxic activity against NK-sensitive targets and significant cytotoxicity against NK-resistant targets. This cytotoxicity could be recalled on Day +30, and the cytotoxic effectors involved were highly sensitive to anti-asialo GM1 plus complement treatment. Overall, the results add further experimental evidence to the wide range of immunomodulatory properties possessed by C. albicans, and demonstrate that the majority

  13. Anticancer effect of bromelain with and without cisplatin or 5-FU on malignant peritoneal mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Krishna; Ehteda, Anahid; Akhter, Javid; Chua, Terence C; Morris, David L

    2014-02-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare neoplasm of the peritoneum, causally related to asbestos exposure. Nonspecific symptoms with a late diagnosis results in poor survival (<1 year). Treatment with cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has improved survival in some patients (median 3-5 years). Hence, new therapies are urgently needed. MUC1 is a glycosylation-dependent protein that confers tumours with invasiveness, metastasis and chemoresistance. Bromelain (cysteine proteinase) hydrolyses glycosidic bonds. Therefore, we investigated the antitumour effect of bromelain on MUC1-expressing MPM cell lines. MUC1 expressions in cells were assessed using immunofluorescent probes with cells grown on cover slips and western blot analysis on cell lysates. The cell lines were treated with various concentrations of bromelain and after 4 and 72 h, their viability was assessed using standard sulforhodamine assays. The cells were also treated with combinations of bromelain and cytotoxic drugs (cisplatin or 5-FU) and their viability was assessed at 72 h. Finally, with western blotting, the effects of bromelain on cellular survival proteins were investigated. PET cells expressed more MUC1 compared with YOU cells. The cell viability of both PET and YOU cells was adversely affected by bromelain, with PET cells being slightly resistant. The addition of bromelain increased the cytotoxicity of cisplatin significantly in both cell lines. However, 5-FU with bromelain did not show any significant increase in cytotoxicity. Bromelain-induced cell death is by apoptosis and autophagy. Bromelain has the potential of being developed as a therapeutic agent in MPM. PMID:24366282

  14. The Therapeutic Potential of Human Umbilical Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Wharton's Jelly in the Treatment of Rat Peritoneal Dialysis-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Pei; Hsia, Ching-Chih; Tseng, Kuang-Wen; Liao, Chih-Kai; Fu, Tz-Win; Ko, Tsui-Ling; Chiu, Mei-Miao; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Huang, Pei-Yu; Chiang, Yi-Chia; Yang, Chih-Ching; Fu, Yu-Show

    2016-02-01

    A major complication in continuous, ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease who are undergoing long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) is peritoneal fibrosis, which can result in peritoneal structural changes and functional ultrafiltration failure. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) in Wharton's jelly possess stem cell properties and are easily obtained and processed. This study focuses on the effects of HUMSCs on peritoneal fibrosis in in vitro and in vivo experiments. After 24-hour treatment with mixture of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and PD solution at a 1:3 ratio, primary human peritoneal mesothelial cells became susceptible to PD-induced cell death. Such cytotoxic effects were prevented by coculturing with primary HUMSCs. In a rat model, intraperitoneal injections of 20 mM methylglyoxal (MGO) in PD solution for 3 weeks (the PD/MGO 3W group) markedly induced abdominal cocoon formation, peritoneal thickening, and collagen accumulation. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated neoangiogenesis and significant increase in the numbers of ED-1- and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells in the thickened peritoneum in the PD/MGO 3W group, suggesting that PD/MGO induced an inflammatory response. Furthermore, PD/MGO treatment for 3 weeks caused functional impairments in the peritoneal membrane. However, in comparison with the PD/MGO group, intraperitoneal administration of HUMSCs into the rats significantly ameliorated the PD/MGO-induced abdominal cocoon formation, peritoneal fibrosis, inflammation, neoangiogenesis, and ultrafiltration failure. After 3 weeks of transplantation, surviving HUMSCs were found in the peritoneum in the HUMSC-grafted rats. Thus, xenografts of HUMSCs might provide a potential therapeutic strategy in the prevention of peritoneal fibrosis. Significance: This study demonstrated that direct intraperitoneal transplantation of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells into the rat effectively

  15. Advances in Culture and Manipulation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qian, X.; Villa-Diaz, L.G.; Krebsbach, P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cell biology and emerging technologies to reprogram somatic cells to a stem cell–like state are helping bring stem cell therapies for a range of human disorders closer to clinical reality. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have become a promising resource for regenerative medicine and research into early development because these cells are able to self-renew indefinitely and are capable of differentiation into specialized cell types of all 3 germ layers and trophoectoderm. Human PSCs include embryonic stem cells (hESCs) derived from the inner cell mass of blastocyst-stage embryos and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) generated via the reprogramming of somatic cells by the overexpression of key transcription factors. The application of hiPSCs and the finding that somatic cells can be directly reprogrammed into different cell types will likely have a significant impact on regenerative medicine. However, a major limitation for successful therapeutic application of hPSCs and their derivatives is the potential xenogeneic contamination and instability of current culture conditions. This review summarizes recent advances in hPSC culture and methods to induce controlled lineage differentiation through regulation of cell-signaling pathways and manipulation of gene expression as well as new trends in direct reprogramming of somatic cells. PMID:23934156

  16. The effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production by peritoneal cells.

    PubMed

    Moos, A B; Oughton, J A; Kerkvliet, N I

    1997-02-01

    Recent studies in mice have demonstrated that TNF plays a critical role in mediating the TCDD-induced enhanced inflammatory response to intraperitoneal (i.p.) sheep red blood cells. The current studies were designed to evaluate the effects of TCDD on TNF production by ex-vivo peritoneal cells and a peritoneal macrophage cell line (IC-21) stimulated with LPS. In support of the hypothesis that TCDD can act directly on the peritoneal macrophage to increase TNF production, following pretreatment with TCDD, both ex-vivo peritoneal cells and IC-21 cells produced increased levels of bioactive TNF when stimulated with LPS. Flow cytometric analyses of IC-21 cells indicate that TCDD exposure increases intracellular production and secretion of TNF but does not alter levels of membrane associated TNF. PMID:9067482

  17. Influence of salmeterol and benzalkonium chloride on G-protein-mediated exocytotic responses of rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, J; Krebs, D; Ziegler, A

    2000-05-26

    The long-acting beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonist salmeterol and the invert soap benzalkonium chloride share physicochemically important structures, namely a polar head group and a long aliphatic chain. Low concentrations of benzalkonium chloride have been shown to inhibit exocytotic responses in rat peritoneal mast cells by selectively interacting with heterotrimeric G-proteins of the G(i)-type. The present study investigates whether salmeterol inhibits, independently of beta-adrenoceptors, exocytotic responses of rat peritoneal mast cells induced by the direct agonists at G-proteins mastoparan or guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (++GTP gamma S++). Exocytosis was studied by secretion assays ([3H]5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]5-HT)-release) using intact, streptolysin O-permeabilised or metabolically inhibited (antimycin, deoxyglucose) rat peritoneal mast cells. Both amphiphilics, salmeterol, and benzalkonium chloride, dose-dependently exerted biphasic effects on mastoparan-induced [3H]5-HT release in intact mast cells. In contrast to benzalkonium chloride, the dose-response curves for secretostatic and celltoxic effects of salmeterol markedly overlapped. Similar to benzalkonium chloride, salmeterol in non-cytotoxic concentrations (1-25 microg/ml) dose-dependently inhibited exocytosis induced by mastoparan (intact cells) or ++GTP gamma S (permeabilised cells). These findings indicate a direct, adrenoceptor-independent affection of G proteins by salmeterol in mast cells. PMID:10844094

  18. Optical manipulation of microparticles and cells on silicon nitride waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaugiran, S.; Gétin, S.; Fedeli, J. M.; Colas, G.; Fuchs, A.; Chatelain, F.; Dérouard, J.

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate the optical manipulation of cells and dielectric particles on the surface of silicon nitride waveguides. Glass particles with 2μm diameter are propelled at velocities of 15μm/s with a guided power of 20mW. This is approximately 20 times more efficient than previously reported, and permits to use this device on low refractive index objects such as cells. Red blood cells and yeast cells can be trapped on the waveguide and pushed along it by the action of optical forces. This kind of system can easily be combined with various integrated optical structures and opens the way to the development of new microsystems for cell sorting applications.

  19. Peritonitis - spontaneous

    MedlinePlus

    ... a catheter used in peritoneal dialysis. Antibiotics may control infection in cases of spontaneous peritonitis with liver or kidney disease. Intravenous therapy can treat dehydration . You may need to stay in the hospital so health care providers can rule out conditions ...

  20. Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles: Opportunity for magnetic cell imaging and cell manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This tutorial describes a method of controlled cell labeling with citrate-coated ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. This method may provide basically all kinds of cells with sufficient magnetization to allow cell detection by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to enable potential magnetic manipulation. In order to efficiently exploit labeled cells, quantify the magnetic load and deliver or follow-up magnetic cells, we herein describe the main requirements that should be applied during the labeling procedure. Moreover we present some recommendations for cell detection and quantification by MRI and detail magnetic guiding on some real-case studies in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24564857

  1. Peritoneal dialysis fluid activates calcium signaling and apoptosis in mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Boccellino, Mariarosaria; La Porta, Raffaele; Coppola, Mario; Petronella, Pasquale; Freda, Fulvio; Calderaro, Vincenzo; Quagliuolo, Lucio

    2013-01-01

    A larger diffusion of peritoneal dialysis (PD) is limited by the progressive deterioration of the dialysis membrane structure and function, characterized in vitro and in vivo by mesothelial cell loss and closely related to the use of bioincompatible dialysis solutions. The apoptosis rate of rat and human mesothelial cells incubated in commercial PD fluid (PDF, 4.25 g/dL dextrose) became significant as early as 1 h after PDF addition and reached a plateau at 4-5 h. This pattern was unchanged after exposure to 1.5 g/dL dextrose PDF or freshly prepared PDF, indicating that effects were independent on the dextrose strength and manufacturing procedures but strictly dependent on PDF composition. Molecular studies revealed that PDF exposure inactivated the physiological volume recovery from hypertonic shrinkage, accompanied by an abnormal Ca(2+) signaling: a progressive intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) rise resulting from an increased Ca(2+) entry. PDF also affected cytoskeleton integrity: early dissolution of actin filaments occurred well before the appearance of typical apoptosis features. Lastly, the PDF dependent apoptosis was almost completely prevented by the contemporary Ca(2+) concentration decrease and K(+) addition. This study suggests that the PDF dependent apoptosis arises from the extreme volume perturbations in mesothelial cells, turned out unable to regulate their volume back once exposed to a hyperosmolal medium containing high Ca(2+) levels in the absence of K(+), such PDF. PMID:23100160

  2. Human satellite cells have regenerative capacity and are genetically manipulable

    PubMed Central

    Marg, Andreas; Escobar, Helena; Gloy, Sina; Kufeld, Markus; Zacher, Joseph; Spuler, Andreas; Birchmeier, Carmen; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Spuler, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Muscle satellite cells promote regeneration and could potentially improve gene delivery for treating muscular dystrophies. Human satellite cells are scarce; therefore, clinical investigation has been limited. We obtained muscle fiber fragments from skeletal muscle biopsy specimens from adult donors aged 20 to 80 years. Fiber fragments were manually dissected, cultured, and evaluated for expression of myogenesis regulator PAX7. PAX7+ satellite cells were activated and proliferated efficiently in culture. Independent of donor age, as few as 2 to 4 PAX7+ satellite cells gave rise to several thousand myoblasts. Transplantation of human muscle fiber fragments into irradiated muscle of immunodeficient mice resulted in robust engraftment, muscle regeneration, and proper homing of human PAX7+ satellite cells to the stem cell niche. Further, we determined that subjecting the human muscle fiber fragments to hypothermic treatment successfully enriches the cultures for PAX7+ cells and improves the efficacy of the transplantation and muscle regeneration. Finally, we successfully altered gene expression in cultured human PAX7+ satellite cells with Sleeping Beauty transposon–mediated nonviral gene transfer, highlighting the potential of this system for use in gene therapy. Together, these results demonstrate the ability to culture and manipulate a rare population of human tissue-specific stem cells and suggest that these PAX7+ satellite cells have potential to restore gene function in muscular dystrophies. PMID:25157816

  3. Development of an autonomous biological cell manipulator with single-cell electroporation and visual servoing capabilities.

    PubMed

    Sakaki, Kelly; Dechev, Nikolai; Burke, Robert D; Park, Edward J

    2009-08-01

    Studies of single cells via microscopy and microinjection are a key component in research on gene functions, cancer, stem cells, and reproductive technology. As biomedical experiments become more complex, there is an urgent need to use robotic systems to improve cell manipulation and microinjection processes. Automation of these tasks using machine vision and visual servoing creates significant benefits for biomedical laboratories, including repeatability of experiments, higher throughput, and improved cell viability. This paper presents the development of a new 5-DOF robotic manipulator, designed for manipulating and microinjecting single cells. This biological cell manipulator (BCM) is capable of autonomous scanning of a cell culture followed by autonomous injection of cells using single-cell electroporation (SCE). SCE does not require piercing the cell membrane, thereby keeping the cell membrane fully intact. The BCM features high-precision 3-DOF translational and 2-DOF rotational motion, and a second z-axis allowing top-down placement of a micropipette tip onto the cell membrane for SCE. As a technical demonstration, the autonomous visual servoing and microinjection capabilities of the single-cell manipulator are experimentally shown using sea urchin eggs. PMID:19605307

  4. Manipulation of red blood cells with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2009-11-01

    Manipulation of bioparticles and macromolecules is the central task in many biological and biotechnological processes. The current methods for physical manipulation takes advantage of different forces such as acoustic, centrifugal, magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric forces, as well as using optical tweezers or filtration. Among all these methods, however, the electrical forces are particularly attractive because of their favorable scale up with the system size which makes them well-suited for miniaturization. Currently the electric field is used for transportation, poration, fusion, rotation, and separation of biological cells. The aim of the current research is to gain fundamental understanding of the effect of electric field on the human red blood cells (RBCs) using direct numerical simulation. A front tracking/finite difference technique is used to solve the fluid flow and electric field equations, where the fluid in the cell and the blood (plasma) is modeled as Newtonian and incompressible, and the interface separating the two is treated as an elastic membrane. The behavior of RBCs is investigated as a function of the controlling parameters of the problem such as the strength of the electric field.

  5. Pyrazolopyrimidines: synthesis, effect on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Quintela, J M; Peinador, C; Moreira, M J; Alfonso, A; Botana, L M; Riguera, R

    2001-04-01

    A series of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines (3--6) substituted at positions 1 (R(1)=Ph, H, tert-butyl and ribosetribenzoate), 4 (R(2)=chlorine, nitrogen and oxygen nucleophiles), and 6 (dimethylamino) have been synthesized and their effect on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells measured. After chemical stimulation, (polymer 48/80), several compounds (i.e. 3b, 4a, 4b, 4d, 4g, 5a), produce inhibition two to three times higher (40--60%) than DSCG but this action is lower after preincubation. 4b (R(1)=Ph, R(2)=NHCH(2)Ph; 50--70% inhibition) and 5a (R(1)=H, R(2)=OMe; 50--55% inhibition) are the most active ones in both experiments. With ovoalbumin as stimulus, several pyrazolopyrimidines show inhibition similar to DSCG, the most active compounds being 6a--d (IC(50)=12--16 microM; R(1)=ribosetribenzoate, R(2)=methoxy and amino). Compounds 4e (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=OMe) and 4g (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=piperidino) are inducers of the release of histamine (60 and 150% increase). Compounds 4b and 4c showed cytotoxic activity (IC(50)=1 microg/mL) to HT-29 human colon cancer cells. PMID:11461757

  6. Intestinal and peritoneal mast cells differ in kinetics of quantal release.

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Ramirez-Ponce, M Pilar; Acosta, Jorge; Ales, Eva; Flores, Juan A

    2016-01-15

    5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT, serotonin) storage and release in mast cell (MC) secretory granules (SG) are dependent on serglycin proteoglycans (PG). This notion is based on the studies of MC of the connective tissue subtype that predominantly contain PG of the heparin type, whereas intestinal mucosal MC, which contain predominantly chondroitin sulfate, have been poorly explored. In the present study, we addressed the possibility that PG contents may differently affect the storage and release of preformed mediators in these two MC subclasses and explain in part their different functional properties. Rat peritoneal (PMC) and intestinal mast cells (IMC) were isolated and purified using a percoll gradient, and the efflux of 5-HT from each SG was measured by amperometric detection. IMC exhibited a ∼34% reduction in the release of 5-HT compared with PMC because of a lower number of exocytotic events, rather than a lower secretion per single exocytotic event. Amperometric spikes from IMC exhibited a slower decay phase and increased half-width but a similar ascending phase and foot parameters, indicating that the fusion pore kinetics are comparable in both MC subclasses. We conclude that both PG subtypes are equally efficient systems, directly involved in serotonin accumulation, and play a crucial role in regulating the kinetics of exocytosis from SG, providing specific secretory properties for the two cellular subtypes. PMID:26692491

  7. Stimulated arachidonate metabolism during foam cell transformation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Yokode, M; Kita, T; Kikawa, Y; Ogorochi, T; Narumiya, S; Kawai, C

    1988-01-01

    Changes in arachidonate metabolism were examined in mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated with various types of lipoproteins. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) was incorporated by macrophages and stimulated macrophage prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene C4 syntheses, respectively, 10.8- and 10.7-fold higher than by the control. Production of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin, was also stimulated. No stimulation was found with native LDL, which was minimally incorporated by the cells. Acetylated LDL and beta-migrating very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), though incorporated more efficiently than oxidized LDL, also had no stimulatory effect. When oxidized LDL was separated into the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex and free lipid peroxides, most of the stimulatory activity was found in the former fraction, indicating that stimulation of arachidonate metabolism in the cell is associated with uptake of the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex. These results suggest that peroxidative modification of LDL could contribute to the progression of atheroma by stimulating arachidonate metabolism during incorporation into macrophages. Images PMID:3125226

  8. Isolation, culture and genetic manipulation of mouse pancreatic ductal cells.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Maximilian; Takano, Shigetsugu; Heeg, Steffen; Bakir, Basil; Botta, Gregory P; Rustgi, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    The most common subtype of pancreatic cancer is pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). PDAC resembles duct cells morphologically and, to some extent, at a molecular level. Recently, genetic-lineage labeling has become popular in the field of tumor biology in order to study cell-fate decisions or to trace cancer cells in the mouse. However, certain biological questions require a nongenetic labeling approach to purify a distinct cell population in the pancreas. Here we describe a protocol for isolating mouse pancreatic ductal epithelial cells and ductlike cells directly in vivo using ductal-specific Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) lectin labeling followed by magnetic bead separation. Isolated cells can be cultured (in two or three dimensions), manipulated by lentiviral transduction to modulate gene expression and directly used for molecular studies. This approach is fast (~4 h), affordable, results in cells with high viability, can be performed on the bench and is applicable to virtually all genetic and nongenetic disease models of the pancreas. PMID:23787893

  9. Dynamic Manipulation of Hydrogels to Control Cell Behavior: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vats, Kanika

    2013-01-01

    For many tissue engineering applications and studies to understand how materials fundamentally affect cellular functions, it is important to have the ability to synthesize biomaterials that can mimic elements of native cell–extracellular matrix interactions. Hydrogels possess many properties that are desirable for studying cell behavior. For example, hydrogels are biocompatible and can be biochemically and mechanically altered by exploiting the presentation of cell adhesive epitopes or by changing hydrogel crosslinking density. To establish physical and biochemical tunability, hydrogels can be engineered to alter their properties upon interaction with external driving forces such as pH, temperature, electric current, as well as exposure to cytocompatible irradiation. Additionally, hydrogels can be engineered to respond to enzymes secreted by cells, such as matrix metalloproteinases and hyaluronidases. This review details different strategies and mechanisms by which biomaterials, specifically hydrogels, can be manipulated dynamically to affect cell behavior. By employing the appropriate combination of stimuli and hydrogel composition and architecture, cell behavior such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation can be controlled in real time. This three-dimensional control in cell behavior can help create programmable cell niches that can be useful for fundamental cell studies and in a variety of tissue engineering applications. PMID:23541134

  10. Nanocoating of single cells: from maintenance of cell viability to manipulation of cellular activities.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Hun; Yang, Sung Ho; Lee, Juno; Ko, Eun Hyea; Hong, Daewha; Choi, Insung S

    2014-04-01

    The chronological progresses in single-cell nanocoating are described. The historical developments in the field are divided into biotemplating, cytocompatible nanocoating, and cells in nano-nutshells, depending on the main research focuses. Each subfield is discussed in conjunction with the others, regarding how and why to manipulate living cells by nanocoating at the single-cell level. PMID:24452932

  11. High spatial and temporal resolution cell manipulation techniques in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Novo, Pedro; Dell'Aica, Margherita; Janasek, Dirk; Zahedi, René P

    2016-03-21

    The advent of microfluidics has enabled thorough control of cell manipulation experiments in so called lab on chips. Lab on chips foster the integration of actuation and detection systems, and require minute sample and reagent amounts. Typically employed microfluidic structures have similar dimensions as cells, enabling precise spatial and temporal control of individual cells and their local environments. Several strategies for high spatio-temporal control of cells in microfluidics have been reported in recent years, namely methods relying on careful design of the microfluidic structures (e.g. pinched flow), by integration of actuators (e.g. electrodes or magnets for dielectro-, acousto- and magneto-phoresis), or integrations thereof. This review presents the recent developments of cell experiments in microfluidics divided into two parts: an introduction to spatial control of cells in microchannels followed by special emphasis in the high temporal control of cell-stimulus reaction and quenching. In the end, the present state of the art is discussed in line with future perspectives and challenges for translating these devices into routine applications. PMID:26891209

  12. Production of IL1-beta by ovarian cancer cells induces mesothelial cell beta1-integrin expression facilitating peritoneal dissemination

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A crucial step in the metastatic spread of ovarian cancer (OC) is the adhesion and implantation of tumor cells to the peritoneal mesothelium. In order to study this step in the cascade, we derived a pro-metastatic human ovarian carcinoma cell line (MFOC3) from the non-metastatic FOC3 line. Methods Molecular profiling of the isogeneic lines identified differentially expressed genes, and investigation for a role in dissemination for specific factors was achieved by development of a co-culture adhesion assay utilizing monolayers of human mesothelial cells. Results After murine intraperitoneal inoculation, the FOC3 cell line formed no metastases, but the MFOC3 subline formed metastases in > 80% of SCID mice. MFOC3 cells also adhered 2-3 times more avidly to mesothelial monolayers. This adhesion was inhibited by neutralizing antibodies to IL-1β and enhanced by recombinant IL-1β (p < 0.01). IL-1β induced mesothelial cell β1-integrin, and an antibody to this subunit also inhibited the adhesion of MFOC3 to mesothelial cells in vitro and significantly reduced metastases in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis of a cohort of 96 ovarian cancer cases showed that negative IL-1β expression was significantly associated with an improved overall survival rate. Conclusions These results suggest that a IL-1β/β1-integrin axis plays a role in ovarian tumor cell adhesion to mesothelia, a crucial step in ovarian cancer dissemination. PMID:22296757

  13. Peritonitis - secondary

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure. Tests may include: Blood culture Blood chemistry, including pancreatic enzymes Complete blood count Liver and kidney function tests X-rays or CT scan Peritoneal fluid culture Urinalysis

  14. Peritoneal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your peritoneum is the tissue that lines your abdominal wall and covers most of the organs in your abdomen. ... the surface of this tissue. Disorders of the peritoneum are not common. They include Peritonitis - an inflammation ...

  15. GSK-3β inhibition protects mesothelial cells during experimental peritoneal dialysis through upregulation of the heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Rusai, K; Herzog, R; Kuster, L; Kratochwill, K; Aufricht, C

    2013-09-01

    Non-physiological components of peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDF) lead to the injury of peritoneal mesothelial cells resulting in the failure of peritoneal dialysis (PD) potentially via inadequate induction of the protective heat shock response (HSR). Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is a negative regulator of cell survival partly by suppression of the HSR and is influenced by stress stimuli also present in conventional PDF. The effects of PDF on GSK-3β activation and the impact of GSK-3β inhibition with lithium (LiCl) were investigated on cell survival with special regard to HSR, in particular to heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF-1) activation and Hsp72 production in an in vitro model of PD using MeT-5A and primary mesothelial cells. Incubation of cells with the PDF Dianeal® (glucose-based, low pH, high glucose degradation products (GDP)) and Extraneal® (icodextrin-based, low pH, low GDP) caused activation of GSK-3β compared to the other tested PDF, i.e. Balance®, Physioneal® (normal pH, glucose-based, low GDP) and Nutrineal® (moderately acidic, amino acid-based). Inhibition of GSK-3β with LiCl in Dianeal® and Extraneal®-treated cells dose-dependently decreased cell damage and death rate and was paralleled by higher HSF-1 activation and Hsp72 expression. GSK-3β is activated by low pH GDP containing PDF with and without glucose as osmotic agent, indicating that GSK-3β is involved in mesothelial cell signalling in response to experimental PD. Inhibition of GSK-3β with LiCl ameliorated cell injury and improved HSR upon PDF exposure. Thus, GSK-3β inhibitors likely have therapeutic potential as cytoprotective additive for decreasing PDF toxicity. PMID:23494401

  16. Secretory TRAIL-Armed Natural Killer Cell-Based Therapy: In Vitro and In Vivo Colorectal Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinxin; Hong, Se-Hoon; Kwon, William T; Bailey, Lisa M; Basse, Per; Bartlett, David L; Kwon, Yong Tae; Lee, Yong J

    2016-07-01

    Since its discovery in 1995, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has sparked growing interest among oncologists due to its remarkable ability to induce apoptosis in malignant human cells, but not in most normal cells. However, one major drawback is its fast clearance rate in vivo Thus, the development of an alternative means of delivery may increase the effectiveness of TRAIL-based therapy. In this study, we developed a secretory TRAIL-armed natural killer (NK) cell-based therapy and assessed its cytotoxic effects on colorectal cancer cells and its tumoricidal efficacy on colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis xenograft. We generated genetically modified NK cells by transduction with a lentiviral vector consisting of a secretion signal domain, a trimerization domain, and an extracellular domain of the TRAIL gene. These NK cells secreted a glycosylated form of TRAIL fusion protein that induced apoptotic death. Intraperitoneally, but not intravenously, injected NK cells effectively accumulated at tumor sites, infiltrated tumor tissue, induced apoptosis, and delayed tumor growth. These results shed light on the therapeutic potential of genetically engineered NK cells to treat peritoneal carcinomatosis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1591-601. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196776

  17. CD22 expression mediates the regulatory functions of peritoneal B-1a cells during the remission phase of contact hypersensitivity reactions1

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroko; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Watanabe, Rei; Ishiura, Nobuko; Kuwano, Yoshihiro; Okochi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Sato, Shinichi; Tedder, Thomas F.; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    While contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered a prototype of T cell-mediated immune reactions, recently a significant contribution of regulatory B cell subsets in the suppression of CHS has been demonstrated. CD22, one of the Siglecs, is a B cell-specific molecule that negatively regulates B cell receptor signaling. To clarify the roles of B cells in CHS, CHS in CD22-/- mice was investigated. CD22-/- mice showed delayed recovery from CHS reactions compared with wild type mice. Transfer of wild type peritoneal B-1a cells reversed the prolonged CHS reaction seen in CD22-/- mice, and this was blocked by the simultaneous injection with IL-10 receptor Ab. While CD22-/- peritoneal B-1a cells were capable of producing IL-10 at wild type levels, intraperitoneal injection of differentially labeled wild type/CD22-/- B cells demonstrated that a smaller number of CD22-/- B cells resided in lymphoid organs 5 days after CHS elicitation, suggesting a defect in survival or retention in activated CD22-/- peritoneal B-1 cells. Thus, our current study reveals a regulatory role for peritoneal B-1a cells in CHS. Two distinct regulatory B cell subsets cooperatively inhibit CHS responses. While splenic CD1dhiCD5+ B cells have a crucial role in suppressing the acute exacerbating phase of CHS, peritoneal B-1a cells are likely to suppress the late remission phase as “regulatory B cells”. CD22 deficiency results in disturbed CHS remission by impaired retention or survival of peritoneal B-1a cells that migrate into lymphoid organs. PMID:20335532

  18. Cells and Stripes: A novel quantitative photo-manipulation technique.

    PubMed

    Mistrik, Martin; Vesela, Eva; Furst, Tomas; Hanzlikova, Hana; Frydrych, Ivo; Gursky, Jan; Majera, Dusana; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Laser micro-irradiation is a technology widely used in the DNA damage response, checkpoint signaling, chromatin remodeling and related research fields, to assess chromatin modifications and recruitment of diverse DNA damage sensors, mediators and repair proteins to sites of DNA lesions. While this approach has aided numerous discoveries related to cell biology, maintenance of genome integrity, aging and cancer, it has so far been limited by a tedious manual definition of laser-irradiated subcellular regions, with the ensuing restriction to only a small number of cells treated and analyzed in a single experiment. Here, we present an improved and versatile alternative to the micro-irradiation approach: Quantitative analysis of photo-manipulated samples using innovative settings of standard laser-scanning microscopes. Up to 200 cells are simultaneously exposed to a laser beam in a defined pattern of collinear rays. The induced striation pattern is then automatically evaluated by a simple algorithm, which provides a quantitative assessment of various laser-induced phenotypes in live or fixed cells. Overall, this new approach represents a more robust alternative to existing techniques, and provides a versatile tool for a wide range of applications in biomedicine. PMID:26777522

  19. Cells and Stripes: A novel quantitative photo-manipulation technique

    PubMed Central

    Mistrik, Martin; Vesela, Eva; Furst, Tomas; Hanzlikova, Hana; Frydrych, Ivo; Gursky, Jan; Majera, Dusana; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Laser micro-irradiation is a technology widely used in the DNA damage response, checkpoint signaling, chromatin remodeling and related research fields, to assess chromatin modifications and recruitment of diverse DNA damage sensors, mediators and repair proteins to sites of DNA lesions. While this approach has aided numerous discoveries related to cell biology, maintenance of genome integrity, aging and cancer, it has so far been limited by a tedious manual definition of laser-irradiated subcellular regions, with the ensuing restriction to only a small number of cells treated and analyzed in a single experiment. Here, we present an improved and versatile alternative to the micro-irradiation approach: Quantitative analysis of photo-manipulated samples using innovative settings of standard laser-scanning microscopes. Up to 200 cells are simultaneously exposed to a laser beam in a defined pattern of collinear rays. The induced striation pattern is then automatically evaluated by a simple algorithm, which provides a quantitative assessment of various laser-induced phenotypes in live or fixed cells. Overall, this new approach represents a more robust alternative to existing techniques, and provides a versatile tool for a wide range of applications in biomedicine. PMID:26777522

  20. Cell manipulation tool with combined microwell array and optical tweezers for cell isolation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Gou, Xue; Chen, Shuxun; Yan, Xiao; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    Isolation from rare cells and deposition of sorted cells with high accuracy for further study are critical to a wide range of biomedical applications. In the current paper, we report an automated cell manipulation tool with combined optical tweezers and a uniquely designed microwell array, which functions for recognition, isolation, assembly, transportation and deposition of the interesting cells. The microwell array allows the passive hydrodynamic docking of cells, while offering the opportunity to inspect the interesting cell phenotypes with high spatio-temporal resolution based on the flexible image processing technique. In addition, dynamic and parallel cell manipulation in three dimensions can realize the target cell levitation from microwell and pattern assembly with multiple optical traps. Integrated with the programmed motorized stage, the optically levitated and assembled cells can be transported and deposited to the predefined microenvironment, so the tool can facilitate the integration of other on-chip functionalities for further study without removing these isolated cells from the chip. Experiments on human embryonic stem cells and yeast cells are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed cell manipulation tool. Besides the application to cell isolation and deposition, three other biological applications with this tool are also presented.

  1. Effects of immunomodulatory drugs on TNF-α and IL-12 production by purified epidermal langerhans cells and peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Langerhans cells constitute a special subset of immature dendritic cells localized in the epidermis that play a key role in the skin's immune response. The production of cytokines is a key event in both the initiation and the regulation of immune responses, and different drugs can be used to remove or modify their production by DC and, therefore, alter immune responses in a broad spectrum of diseases, mainly in human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we examined the effects of prednisone, thalidomide, cyclosporine A, and amitriptyline, drugs used in a variety of clinical conditions, on the production of TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 by purified epidermal Langerhans cells and peritoneal macrophages in BALB/c mice. Findings All drugs inhibited TNF-α production by Langerhans cells after 36 hours of treatment at two different concentrations, while prednisone and thalidomide decreased IL-12 secretion significantly, amitriptyline caused a less pronounced reduction and cyclosporine A had no effect. Additionally, TNF-α and IL-12 production by macrophages decreased, but IL-10 levels were unchanged after all treatments. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that these drugs modulate the immune response by regulating pro-inflammatory cytokine production by purified epidermal Langerhans cells and peritoneal macrophages, indicating that these cells are important targets for immunosuppression in various clinical settings. PMID:21276247

  2. Peritoneal "melanosis".

    PubMed

    Chang, Ea-sle; Bachul, Piotr; Szura, Mirosław; Szpor, Joanna; Okoń, Krzysztof; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2015-09-01

    A case of a23 year old female with peritoneal melanosis associated with adenocarcinoma of the rectum is reported. During laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum, diffuse black pigmentations on the parietal peritoneum, greater omentum, mesenteric lymph nodes and ovaries were discovered. The histopathological findings revealed the presence of macrophages packed with black pigment. These results together with clinical data excluded metastatic melanoma and confirmed the diagnosis of the race condition called peritoneal melanosis. Due to the begin character of the lesions the laparoscopic treatment was continued. There were no remissions or progression of the reported in English literature and this is the second case of peritoneal melanosis that has been associated with adenocarcinoma of the large intestine. PMID:26619112

  3. Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Natour, Mohammed; Thompson, Dustin

    2016-03-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is becoming more important in the management of patients with end-stage renal disease. Because of the efforts of the "Fistula First Breakthrough Initiative," dialysis venous access in the United States has become focused on promoting arteriovenous fistula creation and reducing the number of patients who start dialysis with a tunneled catheter. This is important because tunneled catheters can lead to infection, endocarditis, and early loss of more long-term access. When planned for, peritoneal dialysis can offer patients the opportunity to start dialysis at home without jeopardizing central access or the possibilities of eventual arteriovenous fistula creation. The purpose of this review is to highlight the indications, contraindications, and procedural methods for implanting peritoneal dialysis catheters in the interventional radiology suite. PMID:27011420

  4. Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis—a rare but devastating peritoneal disease

    PubMed Central

    Moinuddin, Zia; Summers, Angela; Van Dellen, David; Augustine, Titus; Herrick, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a devastating but, fortunately, rare complication of long-term peritoneal dialysis. The disease is associated with extensive thickening and fibrosis of the peritoneum resulting in the formation of a fibrous cocoon encapsulating the bowel leading to intestinal obstruction. The incidence of EPS ranges between 0.7 and 3.3% and increases with duration of peritoneal dialysis therapy. Dialysis fluid is hyperosmotic, hyperglycemic, and acidic causing chronic injury and inflammation in the peritoneum with loss of mesothelium and extensive tissue fibrosis. The pathogenesis of EPS, however, still remains uncertain, although a widely accepted hypothesis is the “two-hit theory,” where, the first hit is chronic peritoneal membrane injury from long standing peritoneal dialysis followed by a second hit such as an episode of peritonitis, genetic predisposition and/or acute cessation of peritoneal dialysis, leading to EPS. Recently, EPS has been reported in patients shortly after transplantation suggesting that this procedure may also act as a possible second insult. The process of epithelial–mesenchymal transition of mesothelial cells is proposed to play a central role in the development of peritoneal sclerosis, a common characteristic of patients on dialysis, however, its importance in EPS is less clear. There is no established treatment for EPS although evidence from small case studies suggests that corticosteroids and tamoxifen may be beneficial. Nutritional support is essential and surgical intervention (peritonectomy and enterolysis) is recommended in later stages to relieve bowel obstruction. PMID:25601836

  5. Optogenetic Manipulation of Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tsubota, Tadashi; Ohashi, Yohei; Tamura, Keita; Sato, Ayana; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    Purkinje cells (PCs) are the sole output neurons of the cerebellar cortex. Although their anatomical connections and physiological response properties have been extensively studied, the causal role of their activity in behavioral, cognitive and autonomic functions is still unclear because PC activity cannot be selectively controlled. Here we developed a novel technique using optogenetics for selective and rapidly reversible manipulation of PC activity in vivo. We injected into rat cerebellar cortex lentiviruses expressing either the light-activated cationic channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) or light-driven chloride pump halorhodopsin (eNpHR) under the control of the PC-specific L7 promoter. Transgene expression was observed in most PCs (ChR2, 92.6%; eNpHR, 95.3%), as determined by immunohistochemical analysis. In vivo electrophysiological recordings showed that all light-responsive PCs in ChR2-transduced rats increased frequency of simple spike in response to blue laser illumination. Similarly, most light-responsive PCs (93.8%) in eNpHR-transduced rats decreased frequency of simple spike in response to orange laser illumination. We then applied these techniques to characterize the roles of rat cerebellar uvula, one of the cardiovascular regulatory regions in the cerebellum, in resting blood pressure (BP) regulation in anesthetized rats. ChR2-mediated photostimulation and eNpHR-mediated photoinhibition of the uvula had opposite effects on resting BP, inducing depressor and pressor responses, respectively. In contrast, manipulation of PC activity within the neighboring lobule VIII had no effect on BP. Blue and orange laser illumination onto PBS-injected lobule IX didn't affect BP, indicating the observed effects on BP were actually due to PC activation and inhibition. These results clearly demonstrate that the optogenetic method we developed here will provide a powerful way to elucidate a causal relationship between local PC activity and functions of the cerebellum

  6. MicroBioRobots for single cell manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakar, Mahmut Selman

    One of the great challenges in nano and micro scale science and engineering is the independent manipulation of biological cells and small man-made objects with active sensing. For such biomedical applications as single cell manipulation, telemetry, and localized targeted delivery of chemicals, it is important to fabricate microstructures that can be powered and controlled without a tether in fluidic environments. These microstructures can be used to develop microrobots that have the potential to make existing therapeutic and diagnostic procedures less invasive. Actuation can be realized using various different organic and inorganic methods. Previous studies explored different forms of actuation and control with microorganisms. Bacteria, in particular, offer several advantages as controllable microactuators: they draw chemical energy directly from their environment, they are genetically modifiable, and they are scalable and configurable in the sense that any number of bacteria can be selectively patterned. Additionally, the study of bacteria inspires inorganic schemes of actuation and control. For these reasons, we chose to employ bacteria while controlling their motility using optical and electrical stimuli. In the first part of the thesis, we demonstrate a biointegrated approach by introducing MicroBioRobots (MBRs). MBRs are negative photosensitive epoxy (SU8) microfabricated structures with typical feature sizes ranging from 1-100 mum coated with a monolayer of the swarming Serratia marcescens . The adherent bacterial cells naturally coordinate to propel the microstructures in fluidic environments which we call Self-Actuation. First, we demonstrate the control of MBRs using self-actuation, DC electric fields and ultra-violet radiation and develop an experimentally-validated mathematical model for the MBRs. This model allows us to to steer the MBR to any position and orientation in a planar micro channel using visual feedback and an inverted microscope. Examples

  7. [Experience of the Pharmacotherapy against Appendix and Sigmoid Colon Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma with the Peritoneal Dissemination].

    PubMed

    Harada, Shingo; Tsuchida, Kazuhito; Shibuya, Taisuke; Doi, Yuki; Kikuchi, Akitomo; Mori, Koichi; Yabushita, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takuo; Murakami, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Seiji; Fukushima, Tadao; Ike, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    We report 2 cases of signet ring cell carcinoma of the appendix and colon. Case 1: A 61-year-old man was admitted for lower abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed an elevated lesion in the orifice of the appendix. Signet ring cell carcinoma was diagnosed on biopsy. The surgical findings showed multiple peritoneal dissemination nodules, while the primary tumor was unresectable owing to extensive invasion into the retroperitoneum. The histopathological findings were signet ring cell carcinoma, T4b (retroperitoneum), NX, P3, Stage Ⅳ. Although the patient received 14 courses of treatment with S-1 as postoperative chemotherapy, he died of his illness at 32 postoperative months. Case 2: A 76-year-old man was admitted for abdominal pain. Perforation of the lower gastrointestinal tract was diagnosed on abdominal CT, and an emergency operation was performed. The surgical findings demonstrated a large number of peritoneal dissemination nodules, cecal invasion of a sigmoid tumor, and perforation of the ascending colon. The primary tumor was thought to be unresectable, and the perforated segment was resected. The histopathological findings were signet ring cell carcinoma, T4b (cecum), NX, P3, Stage Ⅳ. Although 11 courses of treatment using FOLFIRI+Bev were administered as postoperative chemotherapy, the patient died of his illness at 26 postoperative months. PMID:26489568

  8. [Peritoneal echinococcosis].

    PubMed

    Vara-Thorbeck, C; Vara-Thorbeck, R

    1986-01-01

    Secondary peritoneal echinococcosis was recorded from 50 in 312 patients (16 per cent) who had been hospitalised for liver echinococcosis. Hydatido and peritoneal hydatidiosis were recorded from 34 of these patients and thus accounted for the two most common pathological forms of secondary peritoneal echinococcosis, according to Dévè. Peritoneal echinococcosis usually is not diagnosed until conspicuous symptoms grow manifest due to cyst growth or other complications. Positive responses were recorded from all the above cases to laboratory tests (eosinophilia in over five to nine per cent) and were also established on the basis of immune reactions, including the complement fixation reaction according to Weinberg, the intracutaneous test by Casoni, and latex echinococcus reaction. Surgery, at present, is the only promising therapeutic approach to the problem. Surgical intervention could not even be avoided by application of mebendazol. Postoperative lethality amounted to four per cent and morbidity to ten per cent. They were comparatively low, measured by the generally poor prognosis of the disease. PMID:3776378

  9. Dialysis - peritoneal

    MedlinePlus

    ... The number of exchanges and amount of dwell time depends on the method of PD you use and other factors. Your ... PD: Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) . For this ... routine until it is time to drain the fluid. You are not hooked ...

  10. Differential expression of receptors for advanced glycation end-products in peritoneal mesothelial cells exposed to glucose degradation products

    PubMed Central

    LAI, K N; LEUNG, J C K; CHAN, L Y Y; LI, F F K; TANG, S C W; LAM, M F; TSE, K C; YIP, T P; CHAN, T M; WIESLANDER, A; VLASSARA, H

    2004-01-01

    Autoclaving peritoneal dialysate fluid (PDF) degrades glucose into glucose degradation products (GDPs) that impair peritoneal mesothelial cell functions. While glycation processes leading to formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) were viewed commonly as being mediated by glucose present in the PDF, recent evidence indicates that certain GDPs are even more powerful inducers of AGE formation than glucose per se. In the present study, we examined the expression and modulation of AGE receptors on human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) cultured with GDPs, conventional PDF or PDF with low GDP content. HPMC cultured with GDPs differentially modulated AGE receptors (including RAGE, AGE–R1, AGE–R2 and AGE–R3) expression in a dose-dependent manner. At subtoxic concentrations, GDPs increased RAGE mRNA expression in HPMC. 2-furaldehyde (FurA), methylglyoxal (M-Glx) and 3,4-dideoxy-glucosone-3-Ene (3,4-DGE) increased the expression of AGE–R1 and RAGE, the receptors that are associated with toxic effects. These three GDPs up-regulated the AGE synthesis by cultured HPMC. In parallel, these GDPs also increased the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in HPMC. PDF with lower GDP content exerted less cytotoxic effect than traditional heat-sterilized PDF. Both PDF preparations up-regulated the protein expression of RAGE and VEGF. However, the up-regulation of VEGF in HPMC following 24-h culture with conventional PDF was higher than values from HPMC cultured with PDF containing low GDP. We have demonstrated, for the first time, that in addition to RAGE, other AGE receptors including AGE–R1, AGE–R2 and AGE–R3 are expressed on HPMC. Different GDPs exert differential regulation on the expression of these receptors on HPMC. The interactions between GDPs and AGE receptors may bear biological relevance to the intraperitoneal homeostasis and membrane integrity. PMID:15544624

  11. Manipulating cell shape by placing cells into micro-fabricated chambers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fred; Atilgan, Erdinc; Burgess, David; Minc, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Cell shape is an important cellular parameter that influences the spatial organization and function of cells. However, it has often been challenging to study the effects of cell shape because of difficulties in experimentally controlling cell shape in a defined way. We describe here a method of physically manipulating sea urchin cells into specified shapes by inserting them into micro-fabricated chambers of different shapes. This method allows for generation of large systematic and quantitative data sets and may be adaptable for different cell types and contexts. PMID:24633802

  12. Immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Momoko; Ose, Saya; Nishi, Kosuke; Sugahara, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    We herein report the immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract (SAE) on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. SAE significantly enhanced the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α by both J774.1 cells and peritoneal macrophages by enhancing the expression levels of these cytokine genes. In addition, the phagocytosis activity of J774.1 cells was facilitated by SAE. Immunoblot analysis revealed that SAE activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB cascades. It was found that SAE activates macrophages through not only TLR4, but also other receptors. The production of IL-6 was significantly enhanced by peritoneal macrophages from SAE-administered BALB/c mice, suggesting that SAE has a potential to stimulate macrophage activity in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that SAE would be a beneficial functional food with immunostimulatory effects on macrophages. PMID:27095137

  13. Cross-omics comparison of stress responses in mesothelial cells exposed to heat- versus filter-sterilized peritoneal dialysis fluids.

    PubMed

    Kratochwill, Klaus; Bender, Thorsten O; Lichtenauer, Anton M; Herzog, Rebecca; Tarantino, Silvia; Bialas, Katarzyna; Jörres, Achim; Aufricht, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that cytoprotective responses, such as expression of heat-shock proteins, might be inadequately induced in mesothelial cells by heat-sterilized peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids. This study compares transcriptome data and multiple protein expression profiles for providing new insight into regulatory mechanisms. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) based proteomics and topic defined gene expression microarray-based transcriptomics techniques were used to evaluate stress responses in human omental peritoneal mesothelial cells in response to heat- or filter-sterilized PD fluids. Data from selected heat-shock proteins were validated by 2D western-blot analysis. Comparison of proteomics and transcriptomics data discriminated differentially regulated protein abundance into groups depending on correlating or noncorrelating transcripts. Inadequate abundance of several heat-shock proteins following exposure to heat-sterilized PD fluids is not reflected on the mRNA level indicating interference beyond transcriptional regulation. For the first time, this study describes evidence for posttranscriptional inadequacy of heat-shock protein expression by heat-sterilized PD fluids as a novel cytotoxic property. Cross-omics technologies introduce a novel way of understanding PDF bioincompatibility and searching for new interventions to reestablish adequate cytoprotective responses. PMID:26495307

  14. Optical trapping and manipulation of single cells using infrared laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkin, A.; Dziedzic, J. M.; Yamane, T.

    1987-12-01

    The use of infrared light to make improved laser traps with significantly less optical damage to a variety of living cells is reported. IR light was used to observe the reproduction of E. coli within optical traps at power levels sufficient to manipulate at velocities up to about 5000 micron/s. Reproduction of yeast cells by budding was also achieved in IR traps capable of manipulating individual cells and clumps of cells at velocities of about 100 microns/s. Damage-free trapping and manipulation of suspensions of human red blood cells and organelles within individual living cells of spirogyra was also achieved. The manipulative capabilities of optical techniques were exploited in experiments showing separation of individual bacteria from one sample and their introduction into another sample. Optical orientation of individual bacterial cells in space was also achieved using a pair of laser-beam traps.

  15. Recent patents and advances on applications of magnetic nanoparticles and thin films in cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Eslamian, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Cell manipulation is instrumental in most biological applications. One of the most promising methods in handling cells and other biological particles is the magnetic manipulation technique. In this technique, magnetic nanoparticles are employed to magnetize cells. Such cells then can be manipulated, sorted, or separated by applying an external magnetic field. In this work, first recent works and patents on the synthesis methods used for producing magnetic nanoparticles are investigated. These methods include co-precipitation, solvothermal, electrical wire explosion, microemulsion, laser pyrolysis, spray pyrolysis and carbon reduction. Then recent patents and articles on surface modification and functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles using polymers, dithiocarbamate, superparamagnetic shells, antibodies, graphene shells, and fluorescent materials are reviewed. Finally, different techniques on magnetic cell manipulation, such as direct attaching of magnetic particles to cells, employing intercellular markers or extra support molecules, as well as magnetic thin films, microfluidic channels and magnetic beads, are studied. PMID:25336173

  16. Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (abdominal cocoon) associated with liver cirrhosis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Tanimoto, Akihide; Matsuki, Yasumasa; Hisada, Yuji; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2009-09-01

    A case of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) associated with liver cirrhosis (LC) and complicated by diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is reported herein. A 49-year-old Japanese man had undergone peritoneo-venous shunt against refractory ascites due to hepatitis C virus-positive uncompensated LC for 2 years. After he received a diagnosis of DLBCL of the left neck lymph node 3 months before his death, palliative care was given because of his poor general condition. He developed severe abdominal distention and pain over 1 week and was found to have marked ascites and whole bowel lumped together on abdominal CT. At autopsy, the peritoneum was covered with a thick white membrane and the bowel could not be distinguished, which was macroscopically characterized by a cocoon-like appearance. Histology indicated a proliferation of diffusely thickened or hyalinized fibrocollagenous tissue in the entire peritoneum with a slight chronic inflammatory infiltrate and without remarkable change of mucosa. A diagnosis of SEP, also known as abdominal cocoon, was established based on these features. Additionally, in the abdominal cavity, a large amount of serous ascites and multiple peritoneal nodules or masses involved by DLBCL were recognized. To the authors' knowledge this is the first case report of SEP associated with LC and complicated by the invasion of DLBCL in the abdominal cavity. PMID:19712139

  17. [Peritoneal carcinomatosis: new strategies for more efficacious treatment].

    PubMed

    Zanon, Claudio

    2002-09-01

    The peritoneal carcinomatosis is considered an unlikely treatable disease using standard procedures as surgery or systemic chemotherapy. New improvements in the knowledge of the peritoneum are inducing to consider the mesothelium of the abdominal cavity as an organ similar to the other body organs. This new consideration, unified with the understanding of conditions permitting the implant of the tumor cell into the peritoneal space previous or during the surgical manipulation of the abdominal cancers, leads to the application of news strategies as the advanced cytoreduction with every nodes reduced less than 2.5 mm followed by the chemohyperthermic peritoneal perfusion (CHPP). Last papers indicate improvements in overall survival and quality of the life in ovarian, colonic and gastric cancer treated with an extensive surgical debulking plus CHPP. These results induce surgeons and oncologists to avoid incorrect strategies in the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis originating from ovarian and gastrointestinal tumors. In case of malignant untreatable ascites a peritoneo-venous shunt allows a control of the ascites avoiding several hospital admissions for continuous fastidious and sometime dangerous paracentesis. A palliative surgical operation in selected patients effected by trained surgical group permits an improvement of the patient's conditions in more than 80% with a positive feed back on his or her psychological behavior. PMID:12355981

  18. Peroxisome-proliferator activator receptor-gamma activation decreases attachment of endometrial cells to peritoneal mesothelial cells in an in vitro model of the early endometriotic lesion.

    PubMed

    Kavoussi, S K; Witz, C A; Binkley, P A; Nair, A S; Lebovic, D I

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma activation has an effect on the attachment of endometrial cells to peritoneal mesothelial cells in a well-established in vitro model of the early endometriotic lesion. The endometrial epithelial cell line EM42 and mesothelial cell line LP9 were used for this study. EM42 cells, LP9 cells or both were treated with the PPAR-gamma agonist ciglitazone (CTZ) at varying concentrations (10, 20 and 40 microM) x 48 h with subsequent co-culture of EM42 and LP9 cells. The rate of EM42 attachment and invasion through LP9 cells was then assessed and compared with control (EM42 and LP9 cells co-cultured without prior treatment with CTZ). Next, attachment of CTZ-treated and untreated EM42 cells to hyaluronic acid (HA), a cell adhesion molecule (CAM) on peritoneal mesothelial cells, were assessed. Although there was no difference in EM42 attachment when LP9 cells alone were treated with CTZ, treatment of EM42 cells with 40 microM CTZ decreased EM42 attachment to LP9 cells by 27% (P < 0.01). Treatment of both EM42 and LP9 cells with 40 microM CTZ decreased EM42 attachment to LP9 by 37% (P < 0.01). Treatment of EM42 cells with 40 microM CTZ decreased attachment to HA by 66% (P = 0.056). CTZ did not decrease invasion of EM42 cells through the LP9 monolayer. CTZ may inhibit EM42 cell proliferation. In conclusion, CTZ significantly decreased EM42 attachment to LP9 cells and HA in an in vitro model of the early endometriotic lesion. PMID:19643817

  19. Peritoneal and hematogenous metastases of ovarian cancer cells are both controlled by the p90RSK through a self-reinforcing cell autonomous mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Torchiaro, Erica; Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Valdembri, Donatella; Gagliardi, Paolo Armando; Gai, Marta; Erriquez, Jessica; Serini, Guido; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms orchestrating peritoneal and hematogenous metastases of ovarian cancer cells are assumed to be distinct. We studied the p90RSK family of serine/threonine kinases that lie downstream the RAS-ERK/MAPK pathway and modulate a variety of cellular processes including cell proliferation, survival, motility and invasiveness. We found the RSK1 and RSK2 isoforms expressed in a number of human ovarian cancer cell lines, where they played redundant roles in sustaining in vitro motility and invasiveness. In vivo, silencing of both RSK1 and RSK2 almost abrogated short-term and long-term metastatic engraftment of ovarian cancer cells in the peritoneum. In addition, RSK1/RSK2 silenced cells failed to colonize the lungs after intravenous injection and to form hematogenous metastasis from subcutaneous xenografts. RSK1/RSK2 suppression resulted in lessened ovarian cancer cell spreading on endogenous fibronectin (FN). Mechanistically, RSK1/RSK2 knockdown diminished FN transcription, α5β1 integrin activation and TGF-β1 translation. Reduced endogenous FN deposition and TGF-β1 secretion depended on the lack of activating phosphorylation of the transcription/translation factor YB-1 by p90RSK. Altogether data show how p90RSK activates a self-reinforcing cell autonomous pro-adhesive circuit necessary for metastatic seeding of ovarian cancer cells. Thus, p90RSK inhibitors might hinder both the hematogenous and the peritoneal metastatic spread of human ovarian cancer. PMID:26625210

  20. Effect of immunochemotherapy with OK-432 and yeast cell wall on the activities of peritoneal macrophages of mice.

    PubMed

    Mashiba, H; Matsunaga, K; Gojobori, M

    1979-10-01

    The effect of chemotherapy combined with immunostimulants on the activities of macrophages in mice was studied. The number of macrophages and exudate cells in the peritoneal cavity increased 3 days after ip injection with mitomycin-C, cyclophosphamide, and 5-fluorouracil together with OK-432 or yeast cell wall and decreased to normal level after 9 days, while the number of the cells remained decreased in mice receiving multi-drugs alone. Acid phosphatase activity of the macrophages of mice was elevated after the simultaneous injection of yeast cell wall and OK-432, and high activity was preserved in the macrophages of mice receiving yeast cell wall even after 9 days. Spreading of these cells was also enhanced. Macrophage activities examined by these assays were maximal in every respect 6 days after combination therapy. Cytostatic activity of the cells was strengthened after 6 days by combined use of OK-432 or yeast cell wall. Role of the activated macrophages in combination therapy was discussed. PMID:520759

  1. Suppressed histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells by ultraviolet B irradiation: decreased diacylglycerol formation as a possible mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Danno, K.; Fujii, K.; Tachibana, T.; Toda, K.; Horio, T.

    1988-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation on mast cell functions. Purified mast cells obtained from rat peritoneal cavity were irradiated with UVB and subsequently exposed to a degranulator, compound 48/80, or the calcium ionophore A-23187. The amount of histamine released from mast cells measured by the enzyme isotopic assay was significantly decreased by UVB irradiation (100-400 mJ/cm2). Within this dose range, UVB alone was not cytotoxic to the cells because it did not induce histamine release. The suppression was observed when mast cells were subjected to degranulation without intervals after UVB irradiation, and even after 5 h postirradiation. The wavelength of 300 nm from a monochromatic light source showed the maximum effect. When mast cells prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)arachidonate were irradiated and challenged by compound 48/80, label accumulation in diacylglycerol produced by the phosphatidylinositol cycle was considerably decreased by UVB irradiation. From these results, we hypothesize that, within an adequate irradiation dose, UVB irradiation suppresses histamine release from mast cells, probably by causing noncytotoxic damage to the membrane phospholipid metabolism, which is tied to the degranulation mechanisms.

  2. Suppression of NK cells and regulatory T lymphocytes in cats naturally infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Ben L; Devriendt, Bert; Olyslaegers, Dominique A; Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Favoreel, Herman W; Dewerchin, Hannah L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-05-31

    A strong cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is thought to be indispensable for protection against infection with feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) in cats. In this study, the role of natural killer (NK) cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), central players in the innate and adaptive CMI respectively, was examined during natural FIPV infection. When quantified, both NK cells and Tregs were drastically depleted from the peripheral blood, mesenteric lymph node (LN) and spleen in FIP cats. In contrast, mesentery and kidney from FIP cats did not show any difference when compared to healthy non-infected control animals. In addition, other regulatory lymphocytes (CD4+CD25-Foxp3+ and CD3+CD8+Foxp3+) were found to be depleted from blood and LN as well. Phenotypic analysis of blood-derived NK cells in FIP cats revealed an upregulation of activation markers (CD16 and CD25) and migration markers (CD11b and CD62L) while LN-derived NK cells showed upregulation of only CD16 and CD62L. LN-derived NK cells from FIPV-infected cats were also significantly less cytotoxic when compared with healthy cats. This study reveals for the first time that FIPV infection is associated with severe suppression of NK cells and Tregs, which is reflected by cell depletion and lowered cell functionality (only NK cells). This will un-doubtfully lead to a reduced capacity of the innate immune system (NK cells) to battle FIPV infection and a decreased capacity (Tregs) to suppress the immunopathology typical for FIP. However, these results will also open possibilities for new therapies targeting specifically NK cells and Tregs to enhance their numbers and/or functionality during FIPV infection. PMID:23434014

  3. Fluid dwell impact induces peritoneal fibrosis in the peritoneal cavity reconstructed in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Shigehisa; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Takezawa, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Satoshi; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Toda, Shuji

    2016-03-01

    Peritoneal fluid dwell impacts the peritoneum by creating an abnormal physiological microenvironment. Little is known about the precise effects of fluid dwell on the peritoneum, and no adequate in vitro models to analyze the impact of fluid dwell have been established. In this study, we developed a peritoneal fluid dwell model combined with an artificial peritoneal cavity and fluid stirring generation system to clarify the effects of different dwelling solutions on the peritoneum over time. To replicate the peritoneal cavity, we devised a reconstructed peritoneal cavity utilizing a mesothelial layer, endothelial layer, and collagen membrane chamber. The reconstructed peritoneal cavity was infused with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, saline, lactated Ringer's solution or peritoneal dialysis solution with repeated 4-h dwells for 10 or 20 consecutive days. The above-described solutions induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and hyperplasia of mesothelial cells. All solution types modulated nitric oxide synthase activities in mesothelial and endothelial cells and nitric oxide concentrations in dwelling solutions. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase activity acted synergistically on mesothelial EMT and hyperplasia. The present findings suggest that solutions infused into the peritoneal cavity are likely to affect nitric oxide production in the peritoneum and promote peritoneal fibrosis. Our newly devised peritoneal cavity model should be a promising tool for understanding peritoneal cellular kinetics and homeostasis. PMID:26318752

  4. Protective Effects of Paricalcitol on Peritoneal Remodeling during Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Stavenuiter, Andrea W. D.; Farhat, Karima; Vila Cuenca, Marc; Schilte, Margot N.; Keuning, Eelco D.; Paauw, Nanne J.; ter Wee, Pieter M.; Beelen, Robert H. J.; Vervloet, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is associated with structural and functional alterations of the peritoneal membrane, consisting of fibrosis, angiogenesis, and loss of ultrafiltration capacity. Vitamin D receptor activation (VDRA) plays an important role in mineral metabolism and inflammation, but also antiangiogenic and antifibrotic properties have been reported. Therefore, the effects of active vitamin D treatment on peritoneal function and remodeling were investigated. Rats were either kept naïve to PDF exposure or daily exposed to 10 mL PDF and were treated for five or seven weeks with oral paricalcitol or vehicle control. Non-PDF-exposed rats showed no peritoneal changes upon paricalcitol treatment. Paricalcitol reduced endogenous calcitriol but did not affect mineral homeostasis. However, upon PDF exposure, loss of ultrafiltration capacity ensued which was fully rescued by paricalcitol treatment. Furthermore, PD-induced ECM thickening was significantly reduced and omental PD-induced angiogenesis was less pronounced upon paricalcitol treatment. No effect of paricalcitol treatment on total amount of peritoneal cells, peritoneal leukocyte composition, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) was observed. Our data indicates that oral VDRA reduces tissue remodeling during chronic experimental PD and prevents loss of ultrafiltration capacity. Therefore, VDRA is potentially relevant in the prevention of treatment technique failure in PD patients. PMID:26605330

  5. Interactions of Dietary Fats and Proteins on Fatty Acid Composition of Immune Cells and LTB4 Production by Peritoneal Exudate Cells of Rats.

    PubMed

    Kaku, S; Yunoki, S; Ohkura, K; Sugano, M; Nonaka, M; Tachibana, H; Yamada, K

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of dietary fats and proteins on lipid parameters of rats was studied using safflower oil (linoleic acid-rich), borage oil (γ-linolenic acid-rich) or perilla oil (α-linolenic acid-rich) in combination with casein or soybean protein. The experiment was focused on the fatty acid composition of immune cells and the leukotriene B4 production by peritoneal exudate cells. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid levels were low in perilla oil-fed or soybean protein-fed rats. Fatty acid compositions of serum and liver phospholipids reflected those of dietary fats. However, feeding borage oil resulted in a marked increase in the proportion of dihomo-γ-linolenic acid in phospholipids of peritoneal exudate cells, spleen lymphocytes, and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes in relation to those of liver and serum. It is suggested that activities of metabolic n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids are different between immune and other tissues. In addition, the magnitude of the reduction of the proportion of linoleic acid of perilla oil in immune cells was considerably more moderate than serum and liver, indicating a different degree of interference of α-linolenic acid with linoleic acid metabolism. Leukotriene B4 release from peritoneal exudate cells was in the order of safflower oil>borage oil>perilla oil groups as reflecting the proportion of arachidonic acid, and tended to be lower in soybean protein-fed groups. These suggest an anti-inflammatory property of γ-linolenic acid as well as α-linolenic acid tended to be strengthened when they were combined with soybean protein than with casein. PMID:27374271

  6. Interactions of dietary fats and proteins on fatty acid composition of immune cells and LTB4 production by peritoneal exudate cells of rats.

    PubMed

    Kaku, S; Yunoki, S; Ohkura, K; Sugano, M; Nonaka, M; Tachibana, H; Yamada, K

    2001-02-01

    The interaction of dietary fats and proteins on lipid parameters of rats was studied using safflower oil (linoleic acid-rich), borage oil (gamma-linolenic acid-rich) or perilla oil (alpha-linolenic acid-rich) in combination with casein or soybean protein. The experiment was focused on the fatty acid composition of immune cells and the leukotriene B4 production by peritoneal exudate cells. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid levels were low in perilla oil-fed or soybean protein-fed rats. Fatty acid compositions of serum and liver phospholipids reflected those of dietary fats. However, feeding borage oil resulted in a marked increase in the proportion of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid in phospholipids of peritoneal exudate cells, spleen lymphocytes, and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes in relation to those of liver and serum. It is suggested that activities of metabolic n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids are different between immune and other tissues. In addition, the magnitude of the reduction of the proportion of linoleic acid of perilla oil in immune cells was considerably more moderate than serum and liver, indicating a different degree of interference of alpha-linolenic acid with linoleic acid metabolism. Leukotriene release from peritoneal exudate cells was in the order of safflower oil > borage oil > perilla oil groups as reflecting the proportion of arachidonic acid, and tended to be lower in soybean protein-fed groups. These suggest an anti-inflammatory property of gamma-linolenic acid as well as alpha-linolenic acid tended to be strengthened when they were combined with soybean protein than with casein. PMID:11302164

  7. Continuous Hyperthermic Peritoneal Perfusion (CHPP) With Cisplatin for Children With Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-29

    Peritoneal Neoplasms; Retroperitoneal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Adenocarcinoma; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Neoplasms; Sarcoma; Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor

  8. Vitamin D Can Ameliorate Chlorhexidine Gluconate-Induced Peritoneal Fibrosis and Functional Deterioration through the Inhibition of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition of Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Che; Hung, Shih-Yuan; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Tsai, Chu-Hung; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Tsai, Yau-Sheng; Chang, Min-Yu; Wang, Hsi-Hao; Ho, Li-Chun; Chen, Yi-Ting; Wu, Ching-Fang; Chen, Ho-Ching; Chen, Hsin-Pao; Liu, Kuang-Wen; Chen, Chih-I.; She, Kuan Min; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Lin, Chi-Wei; Chiou, Yuan-Yow

    2015-01-01

    Background. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) can induce fibrosis and functional alterations in PD patients' peritoneal membranes, due to long-term unphysiological dialysate exposure, partially occurring via triggering of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in peritoneal mesothelial cells (MCs). Vitamin D can ameliorate these negative effects; however, the mechanism remains unexplored. Therefore, we investigated its possible links to MCs EMT inhibition. Methods. Peritoneal fibrosis was established in Sprague-Dawley rats by chlorhexidine gluconate (CG) intraperitoneal injection for 21 days, with and without 1α,25(OH)2D3 treatment. Morphological and functional evaluation and western blot analysis of EMT marker were performed upon peritoneum tissue. In vitro study was also performed in a primary human peritoneal MC culture system; MCs were incubated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in the absence or presence of 1α,25(OH)2D3. EMT marker expression, migration activities, and cytoskeleton redistribution of MCs were determined. Results. 1α,25(OH)2D3 ameliorated CG-induced morphological and functional deterioration in animal model, along with CG-induced upregulation of α-SMA and downregulation of E-cadherin expression. Meanwhile, 1α,25(OH)2D3 also ameliorated TGF-β1-induced decrease in E-cadherin expression, increase in Snai1 and α-SMA expression, intracellular F-actin redistribution, and migration activity in vitro. Conclusion. 1α,25(OH)2D3 can ameliorate CG-induced peritoneal fibrosis and attenuate functional deterioration through inhibiting MC EMT. PMID:26495304

  9. Bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells and peritoneal mast cells as targets of a growth activity secreted by BALB/3T3 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Jozaki, K.; Kuriu, A.; Hirota, S.; Onoue, H.; Ebi, Y.; Adachi, S.; Ma, J.Y.; Tarui, S.; Kitamura, Y. )

    1991-03-01

    When fibroblast cell lines were cultured in contact with bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (CMC), both NIH/3T3 and BALB/3T3 cell lines supported the proliferation of CMC. In contrast, when contact between fibroblasts and CMC was prohibited by Biopore membranes or soft agar, only BALB/3T3 fibroblasts supported CMC proliferation, suggesting that BALB/3T3 but not NIH/3T3 cells secreted a significant amount of a mast cell growth activity. Moreover, the BALB/3T3-derived growth activity induced the incorporation of (3H)thymidine by CMC and the clonal growth of peritoneal mast cells in methylcellulose. The mast cell growth activity appeared to be different from interleukin 3 (IL-3) and interleukin 4 (IL-4), because mRNAs for these interleukins were not detectable in BALB/3T3 fibroblasts. Although mast cells are genetically deficient in tissues of W/Wv mice, CMC did develop when bone marrow cells of W/Wv mice were cultured with pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen cell-conditioned medium. Because BALB/3T3 fibroblast-conditioned medium (BALB-FCM) did not induce the incorporation of (3H)thymidine by W/Wv CMC, the growth activity in BALB-FCM appeared to be a ligand for the receptor encoded by the W (c-kit) locus. Because CMC and peritoneal mast cells are obtained as homogeneous suspensions rather easily, these cells may be potentially useful as targets for the fibroblast-derived mast cell growth activity.

  10. Three-dimensional cell manipulation and patterning using dielectrophoresis via a multi-layer scaffold structure.

    PubMed

    Chu, H K; Huan, Z; Mills, J K; Yang, J; Sun, D

    2015-02-01

    Cell manipulation is imperative to the areas of cellular biology and tissue engineering, providing them a useful tool for patterning cells into cellular patterns for different analyses and applications. This paper presents a novel approach to perform three-dimensional (3D) cell manipulation and patterning with a multi-layer engineered scaffold. This scaffold structure employed dielectrophoresis as the non-contact mechanism to manipulate cells in the 3D domain. Through establishing electric fields via this multi-layer structure, the cells in the medium became polarized and were attracted towards the interior part of the structure, forming 3D cellular patterns. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the manipulation and the patterning processes with the proposed structure. Results show that with the presence of a voltage input, this multi-layer structure was capable of manipulating different types of biological cells examined through dielectrophoresis, enabling automatic cell patterning in the time-scale of minutes. The effects of the voltage input on the resultant cellular pattern were examined and discussed. Viability test was performed after the patterning operation and the results confirmed that majority of the cells remained viable. After 7 days of culture, 3D cellular patterns were observed through SEM. The results suggest that this scaffold and its automated dielectrophoresis-based patterning mechanism can be used to construct artificial tissues for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:25501324

  11. Contactless dielectrophoretic manipulation of biological cells using pulsed magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Novickij, Vitalij; Grainys, Audrius; Novickij, Jurij

    2014-06-01

    Contactless method for manipulation of polar or polarisable micro and nanoscale particles based on the dielectrophoresis force exerted by the induced electric field in high pulsed magnetic field is presented in this study. Finite element method analysis of the magnetic and resulting induced electric fields is carried out. The structure of the magnetic field generator that was based on a controlled frequency spark gap, and the structure of the coil that was used as a load are described. Experimental data showing positive dielectrophoresis on the Jurkat T-lymphoblasts is presented. The study discusses further developments of the technique, its limitations and possible applications. PMID:25014083

  12. Optoelectronic Tweezers as a Tool for Parallel Single-Cell Manipulation and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Justin K.; Ohta, Aaron T.; Hsu, Hsan-Yin; Neale, Steven L.; Jamshidi, Arash; Wu, Ming C.

    2010-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) is a promising approach for the parallel manipulation of single cells for a variety of biological applications. By combining the manipulation capabilities of OET with other relevant biological techniques (such as cell lysis and electroporation), one can realize a true parallel, single-cell diagnostic and stimulation tool. Here, we demonstrate the utility of the OET device by integrating it onto single-chip systems capable of performing in-situ, electrode-based electroporation/lysis, individual cell, light-induced lysis, and light-induced electroporation. PMID:20543904

  13. 5-Fluorouracil causes leukocytes attraction in the peritoneal cavity by activating autophagy and HMGB1 release in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cottone, Lucia; Capobianco, Annalisa; Gualteroni, Chiara; Perrotta, Cristiana; Bianchi, Marco E; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Manfredi, Angelo A

    2015-03-15

    Signals released by leukocytes contribute to tumor growth and influence the efficacy of antineoplastic treatments. The outcome of peritoneal carcinomatosis treatments is unsatisfactory, possibly because chemotherapy activates events that have in the long-term deleterious effects. In this study we offer evidence that 5-fluorouracile (5-FU), besides provoking apoptosis of MC38 colon carcinoma cells, induces a striking attraction of leukocytes both in an orthotopic model of colon carcinomatosis in vivo and in monocyte-migration assays in vitro. Leukocyte attraction depends on the presence of High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), an endogenous immune adjuvant and chemoattractant released by dying cells. Leukocyte recruitment is prevented in vivo and in vitro using blocking antibodies against HMGB1 and its competitive antagonist BoxA or by interfering with HMGB1 expression. Autophagy is required for leukocyte chemoattraction, since the latter abates upon pharmacological blockade of the autophagic flux while activation of autophagy per se, in the absence of death of colon carcinoma cells, is not sufficient to attract leukocytes. Our results identify autophagy induction and HMGB1 release in colon carcinoma cells as key events responsible for 5-FU elicited leukocyte attraction and define a novel rate-limiting target for combinatorial therapies. PMID:25098891

  14. Protein kinase C α inhibition prevents peritoneal damage in a mouse model of chronic peritoneal exposure to high-glucose dialysate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Balzer, Michael S; Rong, Song; Menne, Jan; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle; Dong, Lei; Gueler, Faikah; Jang, Mi-Sun; Xu, Gang; Timrott, Kai; Tkachuk, Sergey; Hiss, Marcus; Haller, Hermann; Shushakova, Nelli

    2016-06-01

    Chronic exposure to commercial glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluids during peritoneal dialysis induces peritoneal membrane damage leading to ultrafiltration failure. In this study the role of protein kinase C (PKC) α in peritoneal membrane damage was investigated in a mouse model of peritoneal dialysis. We used 2 different approaches: blockade of biological activity of PKCα by intraperitoneal application of the conventional PKC inhibitor Go6976 in C57BL/6 wild-type mice and PKCα-deficient mice on a 129/Sv genetic background. Daily administration of peritoneal dialysis fluid for 5 weeks induced peritoneal upregulation and activation of PKCα accompanied by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of peritoneal mesothelial cells, peritoneal membrane fibrosis, neoangiogenesis, and macrophage and T cell infiltration, paralleled by reduced ultrafiltration capacity. All pathological changes were prevented by PKCα blockade or deficiency. Moreover, treatment with Go6976 and PKCα deficiency resulted in strong reduction of proinflammatory, profibrotic, and proangiogenic mediators. In cell culture experiments, both treatment with Go6976 and PKCα deficiency prevented peritoneal dialysis fluid-induced release of MCP-1 from mouse peritoneal mesothelial cells and ameliorated transforming growth factor-β1-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and peritoneal dialysis fluid-induced MCP-1 release in human peritoneal mesothelial cells. Thus, PKCα plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of peritoneal membrane dysfunction induced by peritoneal dialysis fluids, and we suggest that its therapeutic inhibition might be a valuable treatment option for peritoneal dialysis patients. PMID:27142955

  15. Optoelectronic tweezers system for single cell manipulation and fluorescence imaging of live immune cells.

    PubMed

    Jeorrett, Abigail H; Neale, Steven L; Massoubre, David; Gu, Erdan; Henderson, Robert K; Millington, Owain; Mathieson, Keith; Dawson, Martin D

    2014-01-27

    A compact optoelectronic tweezers system for combined cell manipulation and analysis is presented. CMOS-controlled gallium nitride micro-LED arrays are used to provide simultaneous spatio-temporal control of dielectrophoresis traps within an optoelectronic tweezers device and fluorescence imaging of contrasting dye labelled cells. This capability provides direct identification, selection and controlled interaction of single T-lymphocytes and dendritic cells. The trap strength and profile for two emission wavelengths of micro-LED array have been measured and a maximum trapping force of 13.1 and 7.6 pN was achieved for projected micro-LED devices emitting at λmax 520 and 450 nm, respectively. A potential application in biological research is demonstrated through the controlled interaction of live immune cells where there is potential for this method of OET to be implemented as a compact device. PMID:24515144

  16. Bactericidal Activity of Ceragenin CSA-13 in Cell Culture and in an Animal Model of Peritoneal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wnorowska, Urszula; Byfield, Fitzroy J.; Piktel, Ewelina; Wątek, Marzena; Janmey, Paul A.; Savage, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Ceragenins constitute a novel family of cationic antibiotics characterized by a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities, which have mostly been assessed in vitro. Using a polarized human lung epithelial cell culture system, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of the ceragenin CSA-13 against two strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1 and Xen5). Additionally, the biodistribution and bactericidal activity of a CSA-13–IRDye 800CW derivate were assessed using an animal model of peritoneal infection after PAO1 challenge. In cell culture, CSA-13 bactericidal activities against PAO1 and Xen5 were higher than the activities of the human cathelicidin peptide LL-37. Increased CSA-13 activity was observed in polarized human lung epithelial cell cultures subjected to butyric acid treatment, which is known to increase endogenous LL-37 production. Eight hours after intravenous or intraperitoneal injection, the greatest CSA-13–IRDye 800CW accumulation was observed in mouse liver and kidneys. CSA-13–IRDye 800CW administration resulted in decreased bacterial outgrowth from abdominal fluid collected from animals subjected to intraperitoneal PAO1 infection. These observations indicate that CSA-13 may synergistically interact with antibacterial factors that are naturally present at mucosal surfaces and it maintains its antibacterial activity in the infected abdominal cavity. Cationic lipids such as CSA-13 represent excellent candidates for the development of new antibacterial compounds. PMID:26248361

  17. Measurement of UV absorption of single living cell for cell manipulation using NIR femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Kwang-Ryul; Hong, Jong Wook

    2009-02-01

    Optical UV absorption of single human living cells ranging from 200 nm to 360 nm was measured in situ for the study of cell manipulation using the near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser . Human breast living cells of MCF-10A, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231 were used in this experiment. The selective photo-disruptions of single living cell and its sub-organelle (nucleus) were also demonstrated using the tightly focused 790 nm wavelength femtosecond laser with pulse duration of 110 fs. It was found that each living cell has its own absorption spectrum in UV wavelength ranges. It was also inferred that intrinsic absorption spectrum is attributed to the amount of DNA and protein of living cell. For the study of photo-disruption of single cell using the multi-photon absorption excited by the NIR femtosecond laser pulse, the origin UV absorption spectrum of targeted living cell is important and fundamental information to understand nonlinear interaction between NIR ultrashort, high-intensity laser light and transparent living cell.

  18. Manipulation of Cell Cycle and Chromatin Configuration by Means of Cell-Penetrating Geminin

    PubMed Central

    Yasunaga, Shin’ichiro; Kurogi, Toshiaki; Santo, Mimoko; Masuhiro, Yoshikazu; Hanazawa, Shigemasa; Ohtsubo, Motoaki; Naka, Kazuhito; Takihara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Geminin regulates chromatin remodeling and DNA replication licensing which play an important role in regulating cellular proliferation and differentiation. Transcription of the Geminin gene is regulated via an E2F-responsive region, while the protein is being closely regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Our objective was to directly transduce Geminin protein into cells. Recombinant cell-penetrating Geminin (CP-Geminin) was generated by fusing Geminin with a membrane translocating motif from FGF4 and was efficiently incorporated into NIH 3T3 cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The withdrawal study indicated that incorporated CP-Geminin was quickly reduced after removal from medium. We confirmed CP-Geminin was imported into the nucleus after incorporation and also that the incorporated CP-Geminin directly interacted with Cdt1 or Brahma/Brg1 as the same manner as Geminin. We further demonstrated that incorporated CP-Geminin suppressed S-phase progression of the cell cycle and reduced nuclease accessibility in the chromatin, probably through suppression of chromatin remodeling, indicating that CP-Geminin constitutes a novel tool for controlling chromatin configuration and the cell cycle. Since Geminin has been shown to be involved in regulation of stem cells and cancer cells, CP-Geminin is expected to be useful for elucidating the role of Geminin in stem cells and cancer cells, and for manipulating their activity. PMID:27195810

  19. Separation of a single cell by red-laser manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikano, Shuji; Horio, Koji; Ohtsuka, Yoshihiro; Eto, Yuzuro

    1999-10-01

    A single cell of yeast was separated from a bulk sample of yeast without causing damage to the cell. A focused red-laser light beam was used for trapping and transporting the cell. A specially designed microchannel separator played an essential role in the success of the separation.

  20. Stem cell maintenance by manipulating signaling pathways: past, current and future

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Ye, Shoudong; Ying, Qi-Long

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells only exist in a narrow window during early embryonic development, whereas multipotent stem cells are abundant throughout embryonic development and are retainedin various adult tissues and organs. While pluripotent stem cell lines have been established from several species, including mouse, rat, and human, it is still challenging to establish stable multipotent stem cell lines from embryonic or adult tissues. Based on current knowledge, we anticipate that by manipulating extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways, most if not all types of stem cells can be maintained in a long-term culture. In this article, we summarize current culture conditions established for the long-term maintenance of authentic pluripotent and multipotent stem cells and the signaling pathways involved. We also discuss the general principles of stem cell maintenance and propose several strategies on the establishment of novel stem cell lines through manipulation of signaling pathways. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(12): 668-676] PMID:26497581

  1. Manipulation of dendritic cell functions by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, John

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the mammalian immune system and are central to the initiation and maintenance of the adaptive immune response. They are crucial for the presentation of antigen to T cells and B cells, as well as the induction of chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines, which orchestrate the balance of the cell-mediated (Th1) and antibody (Th2) response. This ability of dendritic cells to present antigen and release chemokines and cytokines also bridges the innate and adaptive immune responses by driving T cell activation. These cells thus possess key immunological functions that make them the front line of defence for the targeting and clearance of any invading pathogen and, as such, they underpin the host immune response to infection. For efficient infection, invading pathogens often need to overcome these sentinel immune functions. It is therefore not surprising that pathogens have evolved numerous mechanisms to target dendritic cell functions directly or indirectly during infection, and at least one herpesvirus--human cytomegalovirus--has evolved a life cycle that hijacks dendritic cells for its long-term persistence in the infected host. PMID:19025715

  2. Structure-activity relationship of polyphenols on inhibition of chemical mediator release from rat peritoneal exudate cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Shoji, K; Mori, M; Ueyama, T; Matsuo, N; Oka, S; Nishiyama, K; Sugano, M

    1999-03-01

    The effect of phenolic compounds in foodstuffs on histamine and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) release from rat peritoneal exudate cells and their antioxidative activity were examined to assess their antiallergenic activities. Among them, triphenols such as pyrogallol and gallic acid inhibited histamine release from the cells, but diphenols did not. On the other hand, o- and p-diphenols such as catechol and hydroquinone with strong antioxidative activity inhibited LTB4 release as strongly as pyrogallol, but an m-derivative resorcinol with weak antioxidative activity did not. Though carboxylated compounds and their noncarboxylated counterparts were antioxidative, the former exerted a much weaker inhibitory effect on the LTB4 release than the latter. In flavonols, only myricetin with a triphenolic B ring strongly inhibited histamine release, but all flavonols strongly suppressed LTB4 release irrespective of the number of OH groups in the B ring. Among flavonoids with an o-diphenolic B ring, flavonol and flavone with a C4-carbonyl group strongly inhibited LTB4 release, whereas the activity of anthocyan without C4-carbonyl was much weaker than the above compounds. These results suggest that triphenolic structure is essential for the inhibition of histamine release. On the other hand, antioxidative activity and membrane permeability of phenolic compounds seemed to be essential for the inhibition of LTB4 release. In addition, the C4-carbonyl group seemed to be important for strongly inhibiting LTB4 release. PMID:10476914

  3. Characterization of prostanoid receptors mediating inhibition of histamine release from anti-IgE-activated rat peritoneal mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, C L; Jones, R L; Lau, H Y A

    2000-01-01

    Prostanoid receptors mediating inhibition of anti-IgE induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells have been characterized pharmacologically. PGD2 and the specific DP receptor agonists BW 245C and ZK 118182 were the most potent inhibitors with half-maximal concentrations of 0.26, 0.06 and 0.02 μM respectively. The maximum inhibition attainable was 60–65% with 10−5 M BW 245C and ZK 118182. Among several EP receptor agonists investigated, only PGE2 and the EP2/EP3 receptor agonist misoprostol induced significant inhibition (46.8±4.7% at 10−4 M and 18.7±6.8% at 10−5 M respectively). The IP receptor agonists cicaprost and iloprost were both less potent than the DP agonists in inhibiting histamine release (45.2±3.3% and 35.1±2.5% inhibition respectively at 10−5 M), whereas PGF2α and the TP receptor agonist U-46619 were only marginally effective. The EP4/TP receptor antagonist AH 23848 failed to affect the inhibitory actions of PGD2 or PGE2 even at 10−5 M, whereas the DP/EP1/EP2 receptor antagonist AH 6809 slightly enhanced the effect of PGD2 at 10−6 M. At concentrations of 3×10−6 to 10−5 M, the putative DP receptor antagonist ZK 138357 dose-dependently suppressed the inhibitory activities of the DP agonists, PGE2 and cicaprost. The antagonism of ZK 138357 against the DP receptor agonists appeared to be competitive with pA2 values of around six. In conclusion, these data support our earlier proposal that an inhibitory DP receptor is the predominant prostanoid receptor in rat peritoneal mast cell. The properties of this receptor in relation to putative DP receptor subtypes reported in the literature are discussed. PMID:10711359

  4. Image-guided precision manipulation of cells and nanoparticles in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Zachary

    Manipulation of single cells and particles is important to biology and nanotechnology. Our electrokinetic (EK) tweezers manipulate objects in simple microfluidic devices using gentle fluid and electric forces under vision-based feedback control. In this dissertation, I detail a user-friendly implementation of EK tweezers that allows users to select, position, and assemble cells and nanoparticles. This EK system was used to measure attachment forces between living breast cancer cells, trap single quantum dots with 45 nm accuracy, build nanophotonic circuits, and scan optical properties of nanowires. With a novel multi-layer microfluidic device, EK was also used to guide single microspheres along complex 3D trajectories. The schemes, software, and methods developed here can be used in many settings to precisely manipulate most visible objects, assemble objects into useful structures, and improve the function of lab-on-a-chip microfluidic systems.

  5. Inflammation and the Peritoneal Membrane: Causes and Impact on Structure and Function during Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, Gilberto; Schuinski, Adriana; de Moraes, Thyago P.; Meyer, Fernando; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis therapy has increased in popularity since the end of the 1970s. This method provides a patient survival rate equivalent to hemodialysis and better preservation of residual renal function. However, technique failure by peritonitis, and ultrafiltration failure, which is a multifactorial complication that can affect up to 40% of patients after 3 years of therapy. Encapsulant peritoneal sclerosis is an extreme and potentially fatal manifestation. Causes of inflammation in peritoneal dialysis range from traditional factors to those related to chronic kidney disease per se, as well as from the peritoneal dialysis treatment, including the peritoneal dialysis catheter, dialysis solution, and infectious peritonitis. Peritoneal inflammation generated causes significant structural alterations including: thickening and cubic transformation of mesothelial cells, fibrin deposition, fibrous capsule formation, perivascular bleeding, and interstitial fibrosis. Structural alterations of the peritoneal membrane described above result in clinical and functional changes. One of these clinical manifestations is ultrafiltration failure and can occur in up to 30% of patients on PD after five years of treatment. An understanding of the mechanisms involved in peritoneal inflammation is fundamental to improve patient survival and provide a better quality of life. PMID:22547910

  6. Magnetic micro-device for manipulating PC12 cell migration and organization.

    PubMed

    Alon, N; Havdala, T; Skaat, H; Baranes, K; Marcus, M; Levy, I; Margel, S; Sharoni, A; Shefi, O

    2015-05-01

    Directing neuronal migration and growth has an important impact on potential post traumatic therapies. Magnetic manipulation is an advantageous method for remotely guiding cells. In the present study, we have generated highly localized magnetic fields with controllable magnetic flux densities to manipulate neuron-like cell migration and organization at the microscale level. We designed and fabricated a unique miniaturized magnetic device composed of an array of rectangular ferromagnetic bars made of permalloy (Ni80Fe20), sputter-deposited onto glass substrates. The asymmetric shape of the magnets enables one to design a magnetic landscape with high flux densities at the poles. Iron oxide nanoparticles were introduced into PC12 cells, making the cells magnetically sensitive. First, we manipulated the cells by applying an external magnetic field. The magnetic force was strong enough to direct PC12 cell migration in culture. Based on time lapse observations, we analysed the movement of the cells and estimated the amount of MNPs per cell. We plated the uploaded cells on the micro-patterned magnetic device. The cells migrated towards the high magnetic flux zones and aggregated at the edges of the patterned magnets, corroborating that the cells with magnetic nanoparticles are indeed affected by the micro-magnets and attracted to the bars' magnetic poles. Our study presents an emerging method for the generation of pre-programmed magnetic micro-'hot spots' to locate and direct cellular growth, setting the stage for implanted magnetic devices. PMID:25792133

  7. Changes in numbers and types of mast cell colony-forming cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice after injection of distilled water: evidence that mast cells suppress differentiation of bone marrow-derived precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakura, Y.; Kuriu, A.; Waki, N.; Nakano, T.; Asai, H.; Yonezawa, T.; Kitamura, Y.

    1988-03-01

    Two different types of cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice produce mast cell colonies in methylcellulose. Large mast cell colonies are produced by bone marrow-derived precursors resembling lymphoid cells by light microscopy (L-CFU-Mast), whereas medium and small mast cell colonies are produced by morphologically identifiable mast cells (M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast, respectively). In the present study we eradicated peritoneal mast cells by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of distilled water. The regeneration process was investigated to clarify the relationship between L-CFU-Mast, M-CFU-Mast, and S-CFU-Mast. After injection of distilled water, M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast disappeared, but L-CFU-Mast increased, and then M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast appeared, suggesting the presence of a hierarchic relationship. When purified peritoneal mast cells were injected two days after the water injection, the L-CFU-Mast did not increase. In the peritoneal cavity of WBB6F1-+/+ mice that had been lethally irradiated and rescued by bone marrow cells of C57BL/6-bgJ/bgJ (beige, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice, L-CFU-Mast were of bgJ/bgJ type, but M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast were of +/+ type. The injection of distilled water to the radiation chimeras resulted in the development of bgJ/bgJ-type M-CFU-Mast and then S-CFU-Mast. The presence of mast cells appeared to suppress the recruitment of L-CFU-Mast from the bloodstream and to inhibit the differentiation of L-CFU-Mast to M-CFU-Mast.

  8. Ehrlichia's molecular tricks to manipulate their host cells.

    PubMed

    Moumène, Amal; Meyer, Damien F

    2016-03-01

    Ehrlichia is a large genus of obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacteria transmitted by ticks that cause several emerging infectious diseases in humans and are pathogenic on rodents, ruminants, and dogs. Ehrlichia spp. invade and replicate either in endothelial cells, white blood cells, or within midgut cells and salivary glands of their vector ticks. In this review, we discuss the insights that functional studies are providing on how this group of bacteria exploits their host by subverting host innate immunity and hijacking cellular processes. PMID:26617397

  9. Peritoneal fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at fluid that has built up in the space in the abdomen around the internal organs. This area is called the peritoneal space. ... sample of fluid is removed from the peritoneal space using a needle and syringe. Your health care ...

  10. Peritoneal Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Related tests: Pleural Fluid Analysis , Pericardial Fluid ...

  11. Peritoneal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... based on more than just the peritoneal fluid culture (which may be negative even if you have ...

  12. Chronic Infusion of Sterile Peritoneal Dialysis Solution Abrogates Enhanced Peritoneal Gene Expression Responses to Chronic Peritoneal Catheter Presence

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, El Rasheid; Matheson, Paul J.; Hurt, Ryan T.; Garrison, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic exposure to sterile peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions is associated with microvascular and interstitial changes within the blood–peritoneal barrier (peritoneum). These changes are commonly linked to loss of peritoneal function over time, presumably because of angiogenesis-related increased vascular area. However, the effects on peritoneal microvascular function of chronic peritoneal exposure to PD solutions are unknown. The present study examined peritoneal microvascular function after chronic exposure to sterile PD solution. Six rats underwent permanent catheter insertion under anesthesia. Three rats were treated with approximately 16 mL conventional PD solution daily for 6 weeks; catheter insertion controls received 1 mL saline daily. At 6 weeks, visceral peritoneal microvascular function was assessed in vivo using intravital microscopy. Endothelial cell functions were assessed using messenger RNA (mRNA) gene microarray analysis. In both groups, significant angiogenesis was seen, predominantly in the base of the mesentery. Sensitivity and reactivity of the intestinal visceral peritoneal pre-capillary arterioles (A3 arterioles, 8 – 15μm in diameter) were decreased in the catheter controls, but not in the chronic PD infusion rats. Chronic catheter presence increased the expression of 18 genes in the controls as compared with 12 genes in the chronic infusion rats. In both groups, expression of fibronectin, integrin-β, integrin-α5, collagen type XVIII-α1, and matrix metalloproteinase was enhanced. Endothelial expression of proinflammatory genes (interleukin-1β tissue pathway inhibitor, chemokine ligand 2) was enhanced by chronic catheter insertion, but not after chronic PD fluid infusion. Increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in inflammation and tissue remodeling results from peritoneal catheter–related endothelial cell activation. Chronic exposure of the nonuremic peritoneum to sterile PD solutions overrides the catheter

  13. [Biocompatibility of peritoneal dialysis fluids].

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Eric; Moranne, Olivier; Wautier, Marie-Paule; Rougier, Jean-Phillipe; Ronco, Pierre; Pagniez, Dominique; Wautier, Jean-Luc

    2005-03-01

    Repeated and long-term exposure to conventional glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDFs) with poor biocompatibility plays a central role in the pathogenesis of the functional and structural changes of the peritoneal membrane. We have used immortalized human peritoneal mesothelial cells in culture to assess in vitro the biocompatibility of PDFs. Low pH, high glucose concentration and heat sterilization represent major factors of low biocompatibility. Two recent groups of glucose derivatives have been described. Glucose degradation products (GDPs) are formed during heat sterilization (glycoxidation) and storage. GDPs can bind protein and form AGEs (Advanced Glycation End-products), which can also result from the binding of glucose to free NH2 residues of proteins (glycation). The physiological pH, and the separation of glucose during heat sterilization (low GDP content) in the most recent PDFs dramatically increase the biocompatibility. The choice of PD programs with high biocompatibility PDFs allows preserving the function of the peritoneal membrane. Improvement of PDF biocompatibility may limit the occurrence of chronic chemical peritonitis and may allow long-term PD treatment. PMID:16895663

  14. Manipulating directional cell motility using intracellular superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael; Clemons, Tristan D.; Ho, Diwei; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Lázaro, Francisco J.; House, Michael J.; St. Pierre, Timothy G.; Fear, Mark W.; Wood, Fiona M.; Iyer, K. Swaminathan

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the ability for magnetic nanoparticles to influence cellular migration in the presence of an external magnetic field. We found that the direction of migrating keratinocytes can be controlled and the migration speed of fibroblasts can be increased with the internalisation of these nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The possibility of shepherding cells towards a region of interest through the use of internalized nanoparticles is an attractive prospect for cell tracking, cell therapies, and tissue engineering applications.This study investigated the ability for magnetic nanoparticles to influence cellular migration in the presence of an external magnetic field. We found that the direction of migrating keratinocytes can be controlled and the migration speed of fibroblasts can be increased with the internalisation of these nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The possibility of shepherding cells towards a region of interest through the use of internalized nanoparticles is an attractive prospect for cell tracking, cell therapies, and tissue engineering applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle characterisation, supporting experimental data, video time course study of cellular uptake of the nanoparticles and complete experimental details are all provided in the ESI. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06594h

  15. In vitro immune toxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on murine peritoneal macrophages: apoptosis and immune cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi-Yan; Wan, Bin; Guo, Liang-Hong; Zhao, Lixia; Yang, Yu

    2015-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as flame retardants and are often detected in the environment, wildlife, and humans, presenting potential threats to ecosystem and human health. PBDEs can cause neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and endocrine disruption. However, data on PBDE immunotoxicity are limited, and the toxicity mechanisms remain largely unknown. Both immune cell death and dysfunction can modulate the responses of the immune system. This study examined the toxic effects of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on the immune system by using peritoneal macrophages as the model. The macrophages were exposed to PBDEs, and cell death was determined through flow cytometry and immunochemical blot. The results showed that after 24h of exposure, BDE-47 (>5 μM) and BDE-209 (>20 μM) induced cell apoptosis, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and depleted glutathione. BDE-47 was more potent than BDE-209; the cytotoxic concentrations for BDE-47 and BDE-209 were determined to be 5 μM and 20 μM, respectively, during 24h of exposure. However, pretreatment with n-acetyl-l-cysteine (ROS scavenger) partially reversed the cytotoxic effects. Further gene expression analyses on Caspase-3,-8,-9, TNFR1, and Bax revealed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were activated. More importantly, non-cytotoxic concentrations BDE-47 (<2 μM) and BDE-209 (<10 μM) could impair macrophage accessory cell function in a concentration-dependent manner, but no effects were observed on phagocytic responses. These revealed effects of PBDEs on macrophages may shed light on the toxicity mechanisms of PBDEs and suggest the necessity of evaluating cellular functionality during the risk assessment of PBDE immunotoxicity. PMID:25462306

  16. Manipulating biological agents and cells in micro-scale volumes for applications in medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, Savas; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Wang, ShuQi

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances provide new tools to manipulate cells and biological agents in micro/nano-liter volumes. With precise control over small volumes, the cell microenvironment and other biological agents can be bioengineered; interactions between cells and external stimuli can be monitored; and the fundamental mechanisms such as cancer metastasis and stem cell differentiation can be elucidated. Technological advances based on the principles of electrical, magnetic, chemical, optical, acoustic, and mechanical forces lead to novel applications in point-of-care diagnostics, regenerative medicine, in vitro drug testing, cryopreservation, and cell isolation/purification. In this review, we first focus on the underlying mechanisms of emerging examples for cell manipulation in small volumes targeting applications such as tissue engineering. Then, we illustrate how these mechanisms impact the aforementioned biomedical applications, discuss the associated challenges, and provide perspectives for further development. PMID:23575660

  17. Comparative functional characterization of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells and peritoneal mast cells in response to non-immunological stimuli.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Kumar, P; Gupta, P P

    2001-04-01

    The cultured mouse mast cells that are dependent on spleen-derived factor for their proliferation and maintenance and have been shown to be similar to mucosal mast cells in terms of their T-cell dependence and histochemical staining characteristics. Mast cell heterogeneity has been confirmed by functional characterization of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (MBMMC) and mouse peritoneal mast cells (MPMCs). MPMCs released around 30% of histamine when stimulated with compound 48/80 whereas MBMMC were almost unresponsive to the same stimulus. Calcium Ionophore A23187 on the other hand, released histamine in dose-dependent manner from MBMMC. The study was undertaken to investigate the effect of antiallergic drug, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), a synthetic cromone and quercetin, a plant-derived flavonoid on Ca ionophore A23187 induced histamine release from MBMMC. MBMMCs were almost unresponsive to DSCG whereas Ca Ionophore induced histamine release was blocked by Quercetin. The results indicate that response of mast cells at one anatomic site to a given stimulus does not necessarily predict the response of mast cells at a different anatomic location to the same stimulus. It shows functional heterogeneity within a single species. So, it cannot be assumed that antiallergic compounds stabilizing mast cells in one tissue site or organ will be equally efficacious against mast cells in other sites. PMID:11491575

  18. Manipulation of hematopoietic stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Nakajima-Takagi, Yaeko; Osawa, Mitsujiro; Iwama, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are defined by their capacity to self-renew and to differentiate into all blood cell lineages while retaining robust capacity to regenerate hematopoiesis. Based on these characteristics, they are widely used for transplantation and gene therapy. However, the dose of HSCs available for use in treatments is limited. Therefore, extensive work has been undertaken to expand HSCs in culture and to produce HSCs from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in order to improve the efficiency and outcome of HSC-based therapies. Various surface markers have been characterized to improve the purification of HSCs and a huge number of cytokines and small-molecule compounds have been screened for use in the expansion of HSCs. In addition, attempts to generate not only HSCs but also mature blood cells from ESCs and iPSCs are currently ongoing. This review covers recent approaches for the purification, expansion or production of human HSCs and provides insight into problems that need to be resolved. PMID:24293004

  19. Magnetic Manipulation of Nanorods in the Nucleus of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Celedon, Alfredo; Hale, Christopher M.; Wirtz, Denis

    2011-01-01

    The organization of chromatin in the cell nucleus is crucial for gene expression regulation. However, physically probing the nuclear interior is challenging because high forces have to be applied using minimally invasive techniques. Here, magnetic nanorods embedded in the nucleus of living cells are subjected to controlled rotational forces, producing micron-sized displacements in the nuclear interior. The resulting time-dependent rotation of the nanorods is analyzed in terms of viscoelastic parameters of the nucleus, in wild-type and Lamin A/C deficient cells. This method and analysis reveal that Lamin A/C knockout, together perhaps with other changes that result from the knockout, induce significant decreases in the nuclear viscosity and elasticity. PMID:22004741

  20. A toxic substance from the sea urchin Toxopneustes pileolus induces histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Takei, M; Nakagawa, H; Kimura, A; Endo, K

    1991-03-01

    A toxic substance (P-II fraction), fractionated from the pedicellariae of the sea urchin Toxopneustes pileolus, dose-dependently caused the histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. The histamine release induced by P-II fraction increased with time, while compound 48/80 caused a more rapid histamine release. The dose-response curve for P-II fraction was studied with concentration 0.03-2.0 mg/ml. This reaction was dependent on Ca2+ and temperature. When glucose (5.5 mM) was omitted during the incubation step, the histamine release induced by P-II fraction was significantly reduced as compared to that of compound 48/80. Pyruvate reversed this reduction. On the other hand, the histamine release induced by P-II fraction was effectively potentiated by the addition of glucose (11.0 mM), but not that by compound 48/80. These results suggest that P-II fraction-induced histamine release differs from that of compound 48/80 disregards to the effects of glucose, because this histamine release appears to be more sensitive to the glycolytic pathway than compound 48/80-induced histamine release. PMID:1713736

  1. Development of an optimum end-effector with a nano-scale uneven surface for non-adhesion cell manipulation using a micro-manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horade, M.; Kojima, M.; Kamiyama, K.; Kurata, T.; Mae, Y.; Arai, T.

    2015-11-01

    In order to realize effective micro-manipulation using a micro-manipulator system, an optimum end-effector is proposed. Cell-manipulation experiments using mouse fibroblast cells are conducted, and the usability of the proposed end-effector is confirmed. A key advantage of the micro-manipulator is high-accuracy, high-speed 3D micro- and nano-scale positioning. Micro-manipulation has often been used in research involving biological cells. However, there are two important concerns with the micro-manipulator system: gripping efficiency and the release of gripped objects. When it is not possible to grip a micro-object, such as a cell, near its center, the object may be dropped during manipulation. Since the acquisition of exact position information for a micro-object in the vertical direction is difficult using a microscope, the gripping efficiency of the end-effector should be improved. Therefore, technical skill or operational support is required. Since, on the micro-scale, surface forces such as the adsorption force are greater than body forces, such as the gravitational force, the adhesion force between the end-effector and the object is strong. Therefore, manipulation techniques without adhesion are required for placed an object at an arbitrary position. In the present study, we consider direct physical contact between the end-effector and objects. First, the design and materials of the end-effector for micro-scale manipulation were optimized, and an end-effector with an optimum shape to increase the grip force was fabricated. Second, the surface of the end-effector tip was made uneven, and the adhesion force from increasing on the micro-scale was prevented. When an end-effector with an uneven surface was used, release without adhesion was successful 85.0% of the time. On the other hand, when an end-effector without an uneven surface was used, release without adhesion was successful 6.25% of the time. Therefore, the superiority of a structure with an uneven

  2. Magnetic tweezers for manipulation of magnetic particles in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, H.; Giesguth, M.; Dietz, K.-J.; Reiss, G.; Herth, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic tweezers gain increasing interest for applications in biology. Here, a setup of magnetic tweezers is introduced using micropatterned conducting lines on transparent glass slides. Magnetic particles of 1 μm diameter were injected in barley cell vacuoles using a microinject system under microscopic control. Time dependent tracking of the particles after application of a magnetic field was used to determine the viscosity of vacuolar sap in vivo relative to water and isolated vacuolar fluid. The viscosity of vacuolar sap in cells was about 2-fold higher than that of extracted vacuolar fluid and 5 times higher than that of water.

  3. Conditioned medium from concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells inhibits the IgE-dependent sensitization of murine peritoneal mast cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, J W

    1990-01-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated murine spleen cells inhibited release of histamine and 5-HT from murine peritoneal mast cells sensitized with monoclonal IgE anti-DNP antibody and challenged with DNP-human serum albumin (HSA) antigen. Inhibition was seen when the CM was added to the mast cells either 24 hr before or simultaneous with, but not 24 hr subsequent to, the IgE, thus showing that inhibition was at the IgE-dependent stage of mast cell sensitization. Unconditioned medium, prepared in the same way as CM but not exposed to spleen cells was without activity, demonstrating that inhibition was due to a spleen cell-derived factor. CM from unstimulated spleen cells was likewise without activity. The sensitization inhibitory factor appears to be a protein, since it was retained upon dialysis, and destroyed by heating at 70 degrees and above. The factor does not appear to be IgE, since it was stable at 56 degrees, and is not IL-1 or IL-2, since recombinant human IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta, and recombinant mouse IL-1 alpha and IL-2 were without inhibitory activity. The active CM and all recombinant IL-1 and IL-2 preparations did not release histamine or 5-HT directly from mast cells during 48 hr of culture, and did not modulate the histamine content of these cells, nor their capacity to incorporate [3H]5-HT. PMID:2312153

  4. microRNA Regulation of Peritoneal Cavity Homeostasis in Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Anton, Melisa; Bowen, Timothy; Jenkins, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of peritoneal cavity homeostasis and peritoneal membrane function is critical for long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) treatment. Several microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the regulation of key molecular pathways driving peritoneal membrane alterations leading to PD failure. miRNAs regulate the expression of the majority of protein coding genes in the human genome, thereby affecting most biochemical pathways implicated in cellular homeostasis. In this review, we report published findings on miRNAs and PD therapy, with emphasis on evidence for changes in peritoneal miRNA expression during long-term PD treatment. Recent work indicates that PD effluent- (PDE-) derived cells change their miRNA expression throughout the course of PD therapy, contributing to the loss of peritoneal cavity homeostasis and peritoneal membrane function. Changes in miRNA expression profiles will alter regulation of key molecular pathways, with the potential to cause profound effects on peritoneal cavity homeostasis during PD treatment. However, research to date has mainly adopted a literature-based miRNA-candidate methodology drawing conclusions from modest numbers of patient-derived samples. Therefore, the study of miRNA expression during PD therapy remains a promising field of research to understand the mechanisms involved in basic peritoneal cell homeostasis and PD failure. PMID:26495316

  5. Inhibition of PRL-3 gene expression in gastric cancer cell line SGC7901 via microRNA suppressed reduces peritoneal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhengrong; Zhan Wenhua . E-mail: wcywk@hotmail.com; Wang Zhao; Zhu Baohe; He Yulong; Peng Junsheng; Cai Shirong; Ma Jinping

    2006-09-15

    High expression of PRL-3, a protein tyrosine phosphatase, is proved to be associated with lymph node metastasis in gastric carcinoma from previous studies. In this paper, we examined the relationship between PRL-3 expression and peritoneal metastasis in gastric carcinoma. We applied the artificial miRNA (pCMV-PRL3miRNA), which is based on the murine miR-155 sequence, to efficiently silence the target gene expression of PRL-3 in SGC7901 gastric cancer cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Then we observed that, in vitro, pCMV-PRL3miRNA significantly depressed the SGC7901 cell invasion and migration independent of cellular proliferation. In vivo, PRL-3 knockdown effectively suppressed the growth of peritoneal metastases and improved the prognosis in nude mice. Therefore, we concluded that artificial miRNA can depress the expression of PRL-3, and that PRL-3 might be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis.

  6. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Epigenetically Manipulate Host Cell Death Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Wang, Ming; Eisel, Florian; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas; Bhushan, Sudhanshu

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in human. It is well established that UPEC can subvert innate immune responses, but the role of UPEC in interfering with host cell death pathways is not known. Here, we show that UPEC abrogates activation of the host cell prosurvival protein kinase B signaling pathway, which results in the activation of mammalian forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors. Although FOXOs were localized in the nucleus and showed increased DNA-binding activity, no change in the expression levels of FOXO target genes were observed. UPEC can suppress BIM expression induced by LY249002, which results in attenuation of caspase 3 activation and blockage of apoptosis. Mechanistically, BIM expression appears to be epigenetically silenced by a decrease in histone 4 acetylation at the BIM promoter site. Taken together, these results suggest that UPEC can epigenetically silence BIM expression, a molecular switch that prevents apoptosis. PMID:26621912

  7. Characterisation and manipulation of docetaxel resistant prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is no effective treatment strategy for advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. Although Docetaxel (Taxotere®) represents the most active chemotherapeutic agent it only gives a modest survival advantage with most patients eventually progressing because of inherent or acquired drug resistance. The aims of this study were to further investigate the mechanisms of resistance to Docetaxel. Three Docetaxel resistant sub-lines were generated and confirmed to be resistant to the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of increasing concentrations of Docetaxel. Results The resistant DU-145 R and 22RV1 R had expression of P-glycoprotein and its inhibition with Elacridar partially and totally reversed the resistant phenotype in the two cell lines respectively, which was not seen in the PC-3 resistant sublines. Resistance was also not mediated in the PC-3 cells by cellular senescence or autophagy but multiple changes in pro- and anti-apoptotic genes and proteins were demonstrated. Even though there were lower basal levels of NF-κB activity in the PC-3 D12 cells compared to the Parental PC-3, docetaxel induced higher NF-κB activity and IκB phosphorylation at 3 and 6 hours with only minor changes in the DU-145 cells. Inhibition of NF-κB with the BAY 11-7082 inhibitor reversed the resistance to Docetaxel. Conclusion This study confirms that multiple mechanisms contribute to Docetaxel resistance and the central transcription factor NF-κB plays an immensely important role in determining docetaxel-resistance which may represent an appropriate therapeutic target. PMID:21982118

  8. Femtosecond laser fabricated integrated chip for manipulation of single cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keloth, Anusha; Jimenez, Melanie; Bridle, H.; Paterson, Lynn; Markx, Gerard H.; Kar, Ajoy K.

    2016-03-01

    Optical micromanipulation techniques and microfluidic techniques can be used in same platform for manipulating biological samples at single cell level. Novel microfluidic devices with integrated channels and waveguides fabricated using ultrafast laser inscription combined with selective chemical etching can be used to enable sorting and isolation of biological cells. In this paper we report the design and fabrication of a three dimensional chip that can be used to manipulate single cells in principle with a higher throughput than is possible using optical tweezers. The capability of ultrafast laser inscription followed by selective chemical etching to fabricate microstructures and waveguides have been utilised to fabricate the device presented in this paper. The complex three dimensional microfluidic structures within the device allow the injected cell population to focus in a hydrodynamic flow. A 1064 nm cw laser source, coupled to the integrated waveguide, is used to exert radiation pressure on the cells to be manipulated. As the cells in the focussed stream flow past the waveguide, optical scattering force induced by the laser beam pushes the cell from out of the focussed stream to the sheath fluid, which can be then collected at the outlet. Thus cells can be controllably deflected from the focussed flow to the side channel for downstream analysis or culture.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Peritoneal EMT and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Strippoli, Raffaele; Moreno-Vicente, Roberto; Battistelli, Cecilia; Cicchini, Carla; Noce, Valeria; Amicone, Laura; Marchetti, Alessandra; del Pozo, Miguel Angel; Tripodi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is a form of renal replacement alternative to the hemodialysis. During this treatment, the peritoneal membrane acts as a permeable barrier for exchange of solutes and water. Continual exposure to dialysis solutions, as well as episodes of peritonitis and hemoperitoneum, can cause acute/chronic inflammation and injury to the peritoneal membrane, which undergoes progressive fibrosis, angiogenesis, and vasculopathy, eventually leading to discontinuation of the peritoneal dialysis. Among the different events controlling this pathological process, epithelial to mesenchymal transition of mesothelial cells plays a main role in the induction of fibrosis and in subsequent functional deterioration of the peritoneal membrane. Here, the main extracellular inducers and cellular players are described. Moreover, signaling pathways acting during this process are elucidated, with emphasis on signals delivered by TGF-β family members and by Toll-like/IL-1β receptors. The understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying fibrosis of the peritoneal membrane has both a basic and a translational relevance, since it may be useful for setup of therapies aimed at counteracting the deterioration as well as restoring the homeostasis of the peritoneal membrane. PMID:26941801

  10. Enhanced cell sorting and manipulation with combined optical tweezer and microfluidic chip technologies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Chen, Shuxun; Kong, Marco; Wang, Zuankai; Costa, Kevin D; Li, Ronald A; Sun, Dong

    2011-11-01

    Sorting (or isolation) and manipulation of rare cells with high recovery rate and purity are of critical importance to a wide range of physiological applications. In the current paper, we report on a generic single cell manipulation tool that integrates optical tweezers and microfluidic chip technologies for handling small cell population sorting with high accuracy. The laminar flow nature of microfluidics enables the targeted cells to be focused on a desired area for cell isolation. To recognize the target cells, we develop an image processing methodology with a recognition capability of multiple features, e.g., cell size and fluorescence label. The target cells can be moved precisely by optical tweezers to the desired destination in a noninvasive manner. The unique advantages of this sorter are its high recovery rate and purity in small cell population sorting. The design is based on dynamic fluid and dynamic light pattern, in which single as well as multiple laser traps are employed for cell transportation, and a recognition capability of multiple cell features. Experiments of sorting yeast cells and human embryonic stem cells are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed cell sorting approach. PMID:21918752

  11. System-level biochip for impedance sensing and programmable manipulation of bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Cheng-Hsin; Huang, Yao-Wei; Wu, Yao-Tung

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops a dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip with multi-layer electrodes and a micro-cavity array for programmable manipulations of cells and impedance measurement. The DEP chip consists of an ITO top electrode, flow chamber, middle electrode on an SU-8 surface, micro-cavity arrays of SU-8 and distributed electrodes at the bottom of the micro-cavity. Impedance sensing of single cells could be performed as follows: firstly, cells were trapped in a micro-cavity array by negative DEP force provided by top and middle electrodes; then, the impedance measurement for discrimination of different stage of bladder cancer cells was accomplished by the middle and bottom electrodes. After impedance sensing, the individual releasing of trapped cells was achieved by negative DEP force using the top and bottom electrodes in order to collect the identified cells once more. Both cell manipulations and impedance measurement had been integrated within a system controlled by a PC-based LabVIEW program. In the experiments, two different stages of bladder cancer cell lines (grade III: T24 and grade II: TSGH8301) were utilized for the demonstration of programmable manipulation and impedance sensing; as the results show, the lower-grade bladder cancer cells (TSGH8301) possess higher impedance than the higher-grade ones (T24). In general, the multi-step manipulations of cells can be easily programmed by controlling the electrical signal in our design, which provides an excellent platform technology for lab-on-a-chip (LOC) or a micro-total-analysis-system (Micro TAS). PMID:22346685

  12. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. SHIELDED WINDOWS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED. MANIPULATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. SHIELDED WINDOWS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED. MANIPULATORS AWAIT ATTACHMENT TO HAND CONTROLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 9001. Unknown Photographer, photo is identified as taken 10/28/1953, but it may be an error as it shows progress since ID-33-G-266 of same date. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Gold nanoparticle mediated cell manipulation using fs and ps laser pulses for cell perforation and transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, D.; Schomaker, M.; Motekaitis, D.; Krawinkel, J.; Killian, D.; Escobar, H. M.; Junghanß, Christian; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    Manipulation of cells requires the delivery of membrane-impermeable substances like genetic materials or proteins into the cytoplasm. Thus delivery of molecules over the cell membrane barrier is one of the key technologies in molecular biology. Many techniques concerning especially the delivery foreign DNA have been developed. Notwithstanding there still is a range of applications where these standard techniques fail to raise the desired results due to low efficiencies, high toxicity or other safety issues. Especially the transfection of sensitive cell types like primary and stem cells can be problematic. Here we present an alternative, laser based technique to perforate the cell membrane and thus allowing efficient delivery of extra cellular molecules: Gold nanoparticles (GNP) are brought into close contact with the cell, were the laser-GNP interaction leads to membrane perforation. This allows the utilisation of a weakly focused laser beam leading to fast scanning of the sample and thus to a high throughput. To investigate the GNP-laser interaction in more detail we have compared membrane perforation obtained by different laser pulse lengths. From our results we assume strong light absorption for ps laser pulses and relatively small particles as the initiating perforation mechanism, whereas an enhanced near field scattering occurs at 200 nm GNP when using fs laser pulses. SEM and ESEM imaging were applied to give a deeper insight in the GNP-cell interaction and the effects of laser radiation on the GNP. Additionally dextran- FITC derivatives of varying sizes were used to investigate the impact of molecule size on delivery efficiency.

  14. Effects of melanin-induced free radicals on the isolated rat peritoneal mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ranadive, N.S.; Shirwadkar, S.; Persad, S.; Menon, I.A.

    1986-03-01

    Pheomelanin from human red hair (RHM) produces considerably more cellular damage in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells when subjected to radiations of wavelength 320-700 nm than eumelanin from black hair (BHM). Irradiation of RHM generated large amounts of superoxide while BHM did not produce detectable amounts of superoxide. The present investigations describe the effects of irradiation of mast cells in the presence of various natural and synthetic melanins. Irradiation of mast cells in the presence of RHM and red hair melanoprotein released large amounts of histamine while BHM and synthetic melanins prepared from dopa, cysteinyldopa, or a mixture of dopa and cysteinyldopa did not release histamine. The release of histamine at lower concentrations of RHM was not accompanied by the release of /sup 51/Cr from chromium-loaded cells, suggesting that this release was of noncytotoxic nature. On the other hand, the release of histamine at higher concentrations of RHM was due to cell lysis since both histamine and cytoplasmic marker /sup 51/Cr were released to the same extent. The release evoked by large concentration RHM was not inhibited by superoxide dismutase or catalase. This suggests that the cell lysis under these conditions was not due to H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or O-2. The finding that mast cells release histamine when irradiated in the presence of RHM suggests that the immediate and late-phase reactions seen in sunburn may in part be due to the release of mediators from these cells.

  15. Delayed antibody synthesis in mice after transfer of immune peritoneal fluid cells

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, E.

    1964-01-01

    Ascites fluid, rich in bacteriophage-neutralizing antibody, was produced when mice were treated first, with lethal or near-lethal whole body X-radiation; secondly, intravenous injection of spleen cells from donor mice immunized against bacteriophage; and thirdly, with an intraperitoneal injection of bacteriophage in Freund's adjuvant. The `immune ascites cells' were washed and transferred to other mice without further addition of antigen. The production of phage-neutralizing antibody in recipient mice showed the following properties. (1) The highest rate of antibody synthesis occurred between the 5th and the 11th day after cell transfer. In contrast, spleen cells similarly transferred gave rise to antibody formation with the maximum rate of synthesis immediately after transfer. (2) The antibody formation occurred essentially only in isologous recipients, not in homologous ones, whether the latter were pre-immunized against cells of the donor strain or not. With spleen cells, antibody synthesis was not impaired in homologous hosts for about 4 days after transfer, if the hosts were not pre-immunized against the donor strain. (3) Freezing and thawing of the donor cells prior to injection into the hosts abolished subsequent antibody synthesis. (4) Irradiation of the cells with 650 R. abolished antibody formation after transfer. (5) Whole-body irradiation of the recipient mice resulted in increased antibody formation. (6) When immune ascites cells were injected into newborn mice, high levels of antibody were found 13 days afterwards. It is concluded (a) that the population of immune ascites cells carries both the specific information and the stimulus for antibody synthesis, and (b) that the antibody-forming apparatus is not yet present in a functional state at the time of transfer, but develops several days afterwards in the host mice. PMID:14169104

  16. Observation and manipulation of glial cell function by virtue of sufficient probe expression

    PubMed Central

    Natsubori, Akiyo; Takata, Norio; Tanaka, Kenji F.

    2015-01-01

    The development of gene-encoded indicators and actuators to observe and manipulate cellular functions is being advanced and investigated. Expressing these probe molecules in glial cells is expected to enable observation and manipulation of glial cell activity, leading to elucidate the behaviors and causal roles of glial cells. The first step toward understanding glial cell functions is to express the probes in sufficient amounts, and the Knockin-mediated ENhanced Gene Expression (KENGE)-tet system provides a strategy for achieving this. In the present article, three examples of KENGE-tet system application are reviewed: depolarization of oligodendrocytes, intracellular acidification of astrocytes, and observation of intracellular calcium levels in the fine processes of astrocytes. PMID:26005405

  17. Surface-modified complex SU-8 microstructures for indirect optical manipulation of single cells.

    PubMed

    Aekbote, Badri L; Fekete, Tamás; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Ormos, Pál; Kelemen, Lóránd

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a method that combines two-photon polymerization (TPP) and surface functionalization to enable the indirect optical manipulation of live cells. TPP-made 3D microstructures were coated specifically with a multilayer of the protein streptavidin and non-specifically with IgG antibody using polyethylene glycol diamine as a linker molecule. Protein density on their surfaces was quantified for various coating methods. The streptavidin-coated structures were shown to attach to biotinated cells reproducibly. We performed basic indirect optical micromanipulation tasks with attached structure-cell couples using complex structures and a multi-focus optical trap. The use of such extended manipulators for indirect optical trapping ensures to keep a safe distance between the trapping beams and the sensitive cell and enables their 6 degrees of freedom actuation. PMID:26819816

  18. Surface-modified complex SU-8 microstructures for indirect optical manipulation of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Aekbote, Badri L.; Fekete, Tamás; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Ormos, Pál; Kelemen, Lóránd

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a method that combines two-photon polymerization (TPP) and surface functionalization to enable the indirect optical manipulation of live cells. TPP-made 3D microstructures were coated specifically with a multilayer of the protein streptavidin and non-specifically with IgG antibody using polyethylene glycol diamine as a linker molecule. Protein density on their surfaces was quantified for various coating methods. The streptavidin-coated structures were shown to attach to biotinated cells reproducibly. We performed basic indirect optical micromanipulation tasks with attached structure-cell couples using complex structures and a multi-focus optical trap. The use of such extended manipulators for indirect optical trapping ensures to keep a safe distance between the trapping beams and the sensitive cell and enables their 6 degrees of freedom actuation. PMID:26819816

  19. Survey on indirect optical manipulation of cells, nucleic acids, and motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ashis Gopal; Chowdhury, Sagar; Losert, Wolfgang; Gupta, Satyandra K

    2011-05-01

    Optical tweezers have emerged as a promising technique for manipulating biological objects. Instead of direct laser exposure, more often than not, optically-trapped beads are attached to the ends or boundaries of the objects for translation, rotation, and stretching. This is referred to as indirect optical manipulation. In this paper, we utilize the concept of robotic gripping to explain the different experimental setups which are commonly used for indirect manipulation of cells, nucleic acids, and motor proteins. We also give an overview of the kind of biological insights provided by this technique. We conclude by highlighting the trends across the experimental studies, and discuss challenges and promising directions in this domain of active current research. PMID:21639562

  20. Real-space Wigner-Seitz Cells Imaging of Potassium on Graphite via Elastic Atomic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Feng; Koskinen, Pekka; Kulju, Sampo; Akola, Jaakko; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic manipulation in the scanning tunnelling microscopy, conventionally a tool to build nanostructures one atom at a time, is here employed to enable the atomic-scale imaging of a model low-dimensional system. Specifically, we use low-temperature STM to investigate an ultra thin film (4 atomic layers) of potassium created by epitaxial growth on a graphite substrate. The STM images display an unexpected honeycomb feature, which corresponds to a real-space visualization of the Wigner-Seitz cells of the close-packed surface K atoms. Density functional simulations indicate that this behaviour arises from the elastic, tip-induced vertical manipulation of potassium atoms during imaging, i.e. elastic atomic manipulation, and reflects the ultrasoft properties of the surface under strain. The method may be generally applicable to other soft e.g. molecular or biomolecular systems. PMID:25651973

  1. Acoustic cavity transducers for the manipulation of cells and biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovar, Armando; Patel, Maulik; Lee, Abraham P.

    2010-02-01

    A novel fluidic actuator that is simple to fabricate, integrate, and operate is demonstrated for use within microfluidic systems. The actuator is designed around the use of trapped air bubbles in lateral cavities and the resultant acoustic streaming generated from an outside acoustic energy source. The orientation of the lateral cavities to the main microchannel is used to control the bulk fluid motion within the device. The first order flow generated by the oscillating bubble is used to develop a pumping platform that is capable of driving fluid within a chip. This pump is integrated into a recirculation immunoassay device for enhanced biomolecule binding through fluid flow for convection limited transport. The recirculation system showed an increase in binding site concentration when compared with traditional passive and flow-through methods. The acoustic cavity transducer has also been demonstrated for application in particle switching. Bursts of acoustic energy are used to generate a second order streaming pattern near the cavity interface to drive particles away or towards the cavity. The use of this switching mechanism is being extended to the application of sorting cells and other particles within a microfluidic system.

  2. Cell-Specific Cre Strains For Genetic Manipulation in Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Eri O.; Aure, Marit H.; Xie, Xiaoling; Myal, Yvonne; Gan, Lin; Ovitt, Catherine E.

    2016-01-01

    The secretory acinar cells of the salivary gland are essential for saliva secretion, but are also the cell type preferentially lost following radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. The source of replacement acinar cells is currently a matter of debate. There is evidence for the presence of adult stem cells located within specific ductal regions of the salivary glands, but our laboratory recently demonstrated that differentiated acinar cells are maintained without significant stem cell contribution. To enable further investigation of salivary gland cell lineages and their origins, we generated three cell-specific Cre driver mouse strains. For genetic manipulation in acinar cells, an inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER) was targeted to the prolactin-induced protein (Pip) gene locus. Targeting of the Dcpp1 gene, encoding demilune cell and parotid protein, labels intercalated duct cells, a putative site of salivary gland stem cells, and serous demilune cells of the sublingual gland. Duct cell-specific Cre expression was attempted by targeting the inducible Cre to the Tcfcp2l1 gene locus. Using the R26Tomato Red reporter mouse, we demonstrate that these strains direct inducible, cell-specific expression. Genetic tracing of acinar cells using PipGCE supports the recent finding that differentiated acinar cells clonally expand. Moreover, tracing of intercalated duct cells expressing DcppGCE confirms evidence of duct cell proliferation, but further analysis is required to establish that renewal of secretory acinar cells is dependent on stem cells within these ducts. PMID:26751783

  3. [Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma].

    PubMed

    Scripcariu, V; Dajbog, Elena; Lefter, L; Ferariu, D; Pricop, Adriana; Grigoraş, M; Dragomir, Cr

    2006-01-01

    Mesothelioma is a neoplasm originating from the mesothelial surface lining cells of the serous human cavities. It may involve the pleura, less frequently the peritoneum rarely, the pericardium, the tunica vaginalis testis and ovarian epithelium. Asbestos has been widely used in industry. A causal relationship between asbestos exposure and pleural, peritoneal and pericardial malign mesothelioma was suggested, the risk of cancer being correlated to cumulate exposure. Studies from National Cancer Institute, USA, show that the malignant mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive asbestos related malignancy. The symptomatology is insidious and poses difficult problems in diagnosis and treatment. This paper presents the case of a 59 year old patient with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma who worked almost 40 years as an electrician, exposed to asbestos fibers. He was hospitalized for important weight loss, abdominal pain and tiredness being diagnosed after imaging tests with a giant tumor, localized at the abdominal upper level, which seems to originate from the spleen's superior pole. During surgery we discovered a tumor with cystic parts, intense vascularized, which turn to be adherent in the upper side to the lower face of the left midriff cupola, to the spleen superior pole and 1/3 middle level of the great gastric curve. It was performed surgical ablation of the tumor, splenectomy with favorable postoperative evolution, the patient being now under chemotherapy treatment. PMID:17283842

  4. Adaptive tuning of a 2DOF controller for robust cell manipulation using IPMC actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaid, A. J.; Aw, K. C.; Haemmerle, E.; Shahinpoor, M.; Xie, S. Q.

    2011-12-01

    Rapid advancement in medicine and bioscience is causing demand for faster, more accurate and dexterous as well as safer and more reliable micro-manipulators capable of handling biological cells. Current micro-manipulation techniques commonly damage cell walls and membranes due to their stiffness and rigidity. Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuators have inherent compliance and with their ability to operate well in fluid and cellular environments they present a unique solution for safe cell manipulation. The reason for the downfall of IPMCs is that their complex behaviour makes them hard to control precisely in unknown environments and in the presence of sizeable external disturbances. This paper presents a novel scheme for adaptively tuning IPMC actuators for precise and robust micro-manipulation of biological cells. A two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) controller is developed to allow optimal performance for both disturbance rejection (DR) and set point (SP) tracking. These criteria are optimized using a proposed IFT algorithm which adaptively updates the controller parameters, with no model or prior knowledge of the operating conditions, to achieve a compliant manipulation system which can precisely track targets in the presence of large external disturbances, as will be encountered in real biological environments. Experiments are presented showing the performance optimization of an IPMC actuator in the presence of external mechanical disturbances as well as the optimization of the SP tracking. The IFT algorithm successfully tunes the DR and SP to an 85% and 69% improvement, respectively. Results are also presented for a one-degree-of-freedom (1DOF) controller tuned first for DR and then for SP, for a comparison with the 2DOF controller. Validation has been undertaken to verify that the 2DOF controller does indeed outperform both 1DOF controllers over a variety of operating conditions.

  5. Dual stimuli-responsive smart beads that allow "on-off" manipulation of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Fujii, Teruo; Matsunaga, Yukiko T

    2016-06-24

    Temperature- and electric field-responsive polymer-conjugated polystyrene beads, termed smart beads, are designed to isolate cancer cells. In smart beads, the reversible "on-off" antigen-antibody reaction and dielectrophoresis force on an electrode are accomplished to realize "on-off" remote manipulation of smart beads and cancer cells. Both the zeta-potential and the hydrodynamic diameter of the smart beads are sensitive to temperature, allowing "on-off" reversible capture and release of cancer cells. Cancer cell-captured smart beads are then localized on electrodes by applying an electrical signal. PMID:27146341

  6. Programmable manipulation of motile cells in optoelectronic tweezers using a grayscale image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonjae; Nam, Seong-Won; Hwang, Hyundoo; Park, Sungsu; Park, Je-Kyun

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes a grayscale optoelectronic tweezers (OET) which allows adjustment of the electric field strength at each position of OET. A grayscale light image was used to pattern vertical electric field strength on an OET. As an electric field depends on the brightness at each point, the brighter light patterns generate the stronger electric field in the OET. Its feasibility for application to cell manipulation was demonstrated by aligning highly motile protozoan cells in vertical direction. Depending on the brightness of each pixel, the behaviors of aligned cells varied due to the different electric field strength to each cell.

  7. Eicosanoid production by mouse peritoneal macrophages during Toxoplasma gondii penetration: role of parasite and host cell phospholipases.

    PubMed Central

    Thardin, J F; M'Rini, C; Beraud, M; Vandaele, J; Frisach, M F; Bessieres, M H; Seguela, J P; Pipy, B

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of endogenous arachidonic acid by mouse resident peritoneal macrophages infected in vitro with Toxoplasma gondii was studied. Prelabeling of macrophages with [5,6,8,9,11,12,14,15-3H]arachidonic acid and challenge with tachyzoites for 15 min resulted in a high mobilization of free labeled arachidonic acid (178%) in the culture medium. The parasites also triggered the synthesis of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (47%), prostaglandin E2 (44%), leukotrienes C4 and D4 (33%) and 5-, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (155%). The study indicated that during the intracellular development phase of the parasites, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (38%), prostaglandin E2 (31%) leukotrienes C4 and D4 (15%), hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (43%), and free arachidonic acid (110%) were secreted into the culture medium. Pretreatment of tachyzoites with phospholipase A2 inhibitors (4-p-bromophenacyl bromide and quinacrine) and no calcium in the culture medium resulted in inhibition of tachyzoite penetration into the macrophages and a decrease of the arachidonic acid metabolism. The triggering of the arachidonic acid cascade by T. gondii was dependent on the active penetration of the parasites into the macrophages, whereas preincubation of the macrophages with phospholipase A2 inhibitors did not affect penetration or free arachidonic acid release, thereby supporting a role for parasite phospholipase in the penetration process and in arachidonic acid mobilization from macrophage membrane phospholipids. Moreover, treatment of macrophages with phospholipase A2 inhibitors decreased the activities of the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways, also suggesting an activation of host cell phospholipase A2 by the parasite. PMID:8454347

  8. Effects of methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (methyl paraben) on Ca2+ concentration and histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukugasako, Sanae; Ito, Shinichi; Ikemoto, Yoshimi

    2003-01-01

    Mechanisms of methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (methyl paraben) action in allergic reactions were investigated by measuring the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). In the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, methyl paraben (0.1–10 mM) increased [Ca2+]i, in a concentration-dependent manner. Under both the conditions, methyl paraben alone did not evoke histamine release. In RPMCs pretreated with a protein kinase C (PKC) activator (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) 3 and 10 nM), methyl paraben (0.3–3 mM) induced histamine release. However, a high concentration (10 mM) of the agent did not increase the histamine release. U73122 (0.1 and 0.5 μM), an inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC), significantly inhibited the methyl paraben-induced histamine release in PMA-pretreated RPMCs. U73343 (0.5 μM), an inactive analogue of U73122, did not inhibit the histamine release caused by methyl paraben. In Ca2+-free solution, PLC inhibitors (U73122 0.1 and 0.5 μM, D609 1–10 μM) inhibited the methyl paraben-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, whereas U73343 (0.5 μM) did not. Xestospongin C (2–20 μM) and 2 aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (30 and 100 μM), blockers of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, inhibited the methyl paraben-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in Ca2+-free solution. In conclusion, methyl paraben causes an increase in [Ca2+]i, which may be due to release of Ca2+ from storage sites by IP3 via activation of PLC in RPMCs. In addition, methyl paraben possibly has some inhibitory effects on histamine release via unknown mechanisms. PMID:12770943

  9. Holographic optical manipulation of motor-driven membranous structures in living NG-108 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farré, Arnau; López-Quesada, Carol; Andilla, Jordi; Martín-Badosa, Estela; Montes-Usategui, Mario

    2010-08-01

    Optical tweezer experiments have partially unveiled the mechanical properties of processive motor proteins while driving polystyrene or silica microbeads in vitro. However, the set of forces underlying the more complex transport mechanisms in living samples remains poorly understood. Several studies have shown that optical tweezers are capable of trapping vesicles and organelles in the cytoplasm of living cells, which can be used as handles to mechanically interact with engaged (active) motors, or other components regulating transport. This may ultimately enable the exploration of the mechanics of this trafficking mechanism in vivo. These cell manipulation experiments have been carried out using different strategies to achieve dynamic beam steering capable of trapping these subcellular structures. We report here the first trapping and manipulation, to our knowledge, of such small motor-propelled cargos in living cells using holographic technology.

  10. Activation of cell signaling via optical manipulation of gold-coated liposomes encapsulating signaling molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Leung, Sarah J.; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-02-01

    Many diseases involve changes in cell signaling cascades, as seen commonly in drug resistant cancers. To better understand these intricate signaling events in diseased cells and tissues, experimental methods of probing cellular communication at a single to multi-cell level are required. We recently introduced a general platform for activation of selected signaling pathways by optically controlled delivery and release of water soluble factors using gold-coated liposomes. In the example presented here, we encapsulated inositol trisphosphate (IP3), a ubiquitous intracellular secondary messenger involved in GPCR and Akt signaling cascades, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes. The high polarizability of the liposome's unique gold pseudo-shell allows stable optical trapping for subcellular manipulation in the presence of cells. We take this optical manipulation further by optically injecting IP3-containing liposomes into the cytosol of a single cell to initiate localized cell signaling. Upon optical injection of liposomal IP3 into a single ovarian carcinoma cell, we observed localized activation as reported by changes in Indo-1 fluorescence intensity. With established gap junctions between the injected cell and neighboring cells, we monitored propagation of this signaling to and through nearby cells.

  11. Therapeutic manipulation of natural killer (NK) T cells in autoimmunity: are we close to reality?

    PubMed Central

    Simoni, Y; Diana, J; Ghazarian, L; Beaudoin, L; Lehuen, A

    2013-01-01

    T cells reactive to lipids and restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like molecules represent more than 15% of all lymphocytes in human blood. This heterogeneous population of innate cells includes the invariant natural killer T cells (iNK T), type II NK T cells, CD1a,b,c-restricted T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. These populations are implicated in cancer, infection and autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the role of these cells in autoimmunity. We summarize data obtained in humans and preclinical models of autoimmune diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and atherosclerosis. We also discuss the promise of NK T cell manipulations: restoration of function, specific activation, depletion and the relevance of these treatments to human autoimmune diseases. PMID:23199318

  12. 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits high glucose-induced apoptosis and ROS production in human peritoneal mesothelial cells via the MAPK/P38 pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Wu, Lan; Du, Shuyan; Hu, Ye; Fan, Yi; Ma, Jianfei

    2016-07-01

    The regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and immunomodulation are affected by 1,25(OH)2D3. However, its function during apoptosis and oxidative stress in human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs) remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the regulation of apoptosis and oxidative stress have therapeutic relevance in peritoneal dialysis (PD) therapy. The present study investigated the effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on high glucose (HG)-induced apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in HPMCs, and examined the underlying molecular mechanisms. Flow cytometry and western blotting were performed to detect cell apoptosis, 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate was used to measure reactive oxygen species production and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide was used to measure cell viability. The results of the present study demonstrated that exposure to HG increased apoptosis and ROS production in HPMCs, whereas pretreatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 significantly inhibited HG‑induced apoptosis and ROS production. Further analysis revealed that 1,25(OH)2D3 facilitated cell survival via the MAPK/P38 pathway. The results of the present study indicate that 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits apoptosis and ROS production in HG‑induced HPMCs via inhibition of the MAPK/P38 pathway. PMID:27220355

  13. Interactions of IFN-gamma with IL-3 and IL-4 in the regulation of serotonin and arachidonate release from mouse peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, M R; Banks, E M; Dearman, R J; Kimber, I; Coleman, J W

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the interactions between interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-3 (IL-3) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) in the regulation of IgE/antigen-induced secretory responses of mouse peritoneal mast cells. The cytokines were added either alone or in various combinations to cultured mast cells sensitized passively with IgE antibody. In experiments with unfractionated peritoneal cells (containing approx. 1% mast cells), IL-3 and IL-4 enhanced in an additive manner antigen-induced release of serotonin (5-HT), while IFN-gamma inhibited release regardless of whether IL-3 and/or IL-4 were present. In experiments employing mast cells purified to > 90%, IL-3 and IL-4 retained their enhancing activities whereas the inhibitory effect of IFN-gamma was considerably diminished. Nevertheless, IFN-gamma still inhibited significantly IL-4-enhanced secretion. The effects of IL-3 and IL-4 +/- IFN-gamma on arachidonate release were identical to those seen for 5-HT release, indicating that the secretion of both preformed mediators and newly synthesized eicosanoids is regulated in a similar way by these cytokines. PMID:8045595

  14. Detection of disseminated peritoneal tumors by fluorescein diacrylate in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Yoshinori; Furuta, Hirokazu; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Dai, Ping; Fujikawa, Yuta; Urano, Yasuteru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Morishita, Koki; Hasegawa, Akira; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2009-02-01

    Tumor invasion to the peritoneum is a poor prognostic factor in cancer patients. Accurate diagnosis of disseminated peritoneal tumors is essential to accurate cancer staging. To date, peritoneal washing cytology during laparotomy has been used for diagnosis of peritoneal dissemination of gastrointestinal cancer, but its sensitivity has not been satisfactory. Thus, a more direct approach is indispensable to detect peritoneal dissemination in vivo. Fluorescein diacrylate (FDAcr) is an esterase-sensitive fluorescent probe derived from fluorescein. In cancer cells, fluorescent fluorescein generated by exogenous application of FDAcr selectively deposits owing to its stronger hydrolytic enzyme activity and its lower leakage rate. We examined whether FDAcr can specifically detect disseminated peritoneal tumors in athymic nude mouse models. Intraperitoneally administered FDAcr revealed disseminated peritoneal microscopic tumors not readily recognized on white-light imaging. These results suggest that FDAcr is a useful probe for detecting disseminated peritoneal tumors.

  15. Effluent Tenascin-C Levels Reflect Peritoneal Deterioration in Peritoneal Dialysis: MAJOR IN PD Study

    PubMed Central

    Hirahara, Ichiro; Kusano, Eiji; Imai, Toshimi; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Inoue, Makoto; Akimoto, Tetsu; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Nagata, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal deterioration causing structural changes and functional decline is a major complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). The aim of this study was to explore effluent biomarkers reflecting peritoneal deterioration. In an animal study, rats were intraperitoneally administered with PD fluids adding 20 mM methylglyoxal (MGO) or 20 mM formaldehyde (FA) every day for 21 days. In the MGO-treated rats, tenascin-C (TN-C) levels in the peritoneal effluents were remarkably high and a cluster of TN-C-positive mesothelial cells with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition- (EMT-) like change excessively proliferated at the peritoneal surface, but not in the FA-treated rats. Effluent matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) levels increased in both the MGO- and FA-treated rats. In a clinical study at 18 centers between 2006 and 2013, effluent TN-C and MMP-2 levels were quantified in 182 PD patients with end-stage renal disease. Peritoneal function was estimated using the peritoneal equilibration test (PET). From the PET results, the D/P Cr ratio was correlated with effluent levels of TN-C (ρ = 0.57, p < 0.001) and MMP-2 (ρ = 0.73, p < 0.001). We suggest that TN-C in the effluents may be a diagnostic marker for peritoneal deterioration with EMT-like change in mesothelial cells in PD. PMID:26770971

  16. Peritonitis caused by Rothia mucilaginosa in a peritoneal dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Gosmanova, Elvira O; Garrett, Tiffani R; Wall, Barry M

    2013-12-01

    Peritonitis is an important cause of morbidity in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Rothia mucilaginosa has been reported as an unusual cause of peritoneal dialysis associated peritonitis. Difficulty in the management of this microorganism lies in the absence of uniform recommendations for anti-microbial therapy directed against this pathogen. The current report describes the clinical course of an episode of peritoneal dialysis associated peritonitis caused by Rothia mucilaginosa. Treatment options for this organism are summarized. PMID:24263080

  17. Polymeric optical fiber tweezers as a tool for single cell micro manipulation and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Soppera, O.; Guerreiro, A.; Jorge, P. A...

    2015-09-01

    In this paper a new type of polymeric fiber optic tweezers for single cell manipulation is reported. The optical trapping of a yeast cell using a polymeric micro lens fabricated by guided photo polymerization at the fiber tip is demonstrated. The 2D trapping of the yeast cells is analyzed and maximum optical forces on the pN range are calculated. The experimental results are supported by computational simulations using a FDTD method. Moreover, new insights on the potential for simultaneous sensing and optical trapping, are presented.

  18. Development and characterization of hollow microprobe array as a potential tool for versatile and massively parallel manipulation of single cells.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Moeto; Oohara, Kiyotaka; Kato, Keita; Kawashima, Takahiro; Shibata, Takayuki

    2015-04-01

    Parallel manipulation of single cells is important for reconstructing in vivo cellular microenvironments and studying cell functions. To manipulate single cells and reconstruct their environments, development of a versatile manipulation tool is necessary. In this study, we developed an array of hollow probes using microelectromechanical systems fabrication technology and demonstrated the manipulation of single cells. We conducted a cell aspiration experiment with a glass pipette and modeled a cell using a standard linear solid model, which provided information for designing hollow stepped probes for minimally invasive single-cell manipulation. We etched a silicon wafer on both sides and formed through holes with stepped structures. The inner diameters of the holes were reduced by SiO2 deposition of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to trap cells on the tips. This fabrication process makes it possible to control the wall thickness, inner diameter, and outer diameter of the probes. With the fabricated probes, single cells were manipulated and placed in microwells at a single-cell level in a parallel manner. We studied the capture, release, and survival rates of cells at different suction and release pressures and found that the cell trapping rate was directly proportional to the suction pressure, whereas the release rate and viability decreased with increasing the suction pressure. The proposed manipulation system makes it possible to place cells in a well array and observe the adherence, spreading, culture, and death of the cells. This system has potential as a tool for massively parallel manipulation and for three-dimensional hetero cellular assays. PMID:25749639

  19. Novel Endothelial Cell-Specific AQP1 Knockout Mice Confirm the Crucial Role of Endothelial AQP1 in Ultrafiltration during Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Freichel, Marc; van der Hoeven, Frank; Nawroth, Peter Paul; Katus, Hugo; Kälble, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) mediates about 50% ultrafiltration during a 2-hour hypertonic dwell in global AQP1 knockout (AQP1-/-) mice. Although AQP1 is widely expressed in various cell types including mesothelial cells, the ultrafiltration has been assumed to be mediated via endothelial AQP1 of the peritoneum. The partial embryonic lethality and reduced body weight in AQP1-/- mice may reflect potential confounding phenotypic effects evoked by ubiquitous AQP1 deletion, which may interfere with functional analysis of endothelial AQP1. Using a Cre/loxP approach, we generated and characterised endothelial cell- and time-specific AQP1 knockout (AQP1fl/fl; Cdh5-Cre+) mice. Compared to controls, AQP1fl/fl; Cdh5-Cre+ mice showed no difference in an initial clinical and biological analysis at baseline, including body weight and survival. During a 1-hour 3.86% mini-peritoneal equilibration test (mini-PET), AQP1fl/fl; Cdh5-Cre+ mice exhibited strongly decreased indices for AQP1-related transcellular water transport (43.0% in net ultrafiltration, 93.0% in sodium sieving and 57.9% in free water transport) compared to controls. The transport rates for small solutes of urea and glucose were not significantly altered. Our data provide the first direct experimental evidence for the functional relevance of endothelial AQP1 to the fluid transport in peritoneal dialysis and thereby further validate essential predictions of the three-pore model of peritoneal transport. PMID:26760974

  20. Investigation of Biophysical Mechanisms in Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Manipulation of Cells Using a Multimodal Holographic and Fluorescence Imaging Setup

    PubMed Central

    Rakoski, Mirko S.; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Laser based cell manipulation has proven to be a versatile tool in biomedical applications. In this context, combining weakly focused laser pulses and nanostructures, e.g. gold nanoparticles, promises to be useful for high throughput cell manipulation, such as transfection and photothermal therapy. Interactions between laser pulses and gold nanoparticles are well understood. However, it is still necessary to study cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation. While parameters like cell viability or perforation efficiency are commonly addressed, the influence of the manipulation process on other essential cell parameters is not sufficiently investigated yet. Thus, we set out to study four relevant cell properties: cell volume and area, ion exchange and cytoskeleton structure after gold nanoparticle based laser manipulation. For this, we designed a multimodal imaging and manipulation setup. 200 nm gold nanoparticles were attached unspecifically to canine cells and irradiated by weakly focused 850 ps laser pulses. Volume and area change in the first minute post laser manipulation was monitored using digital holography. Calcium imaging and cells expressing a marker for filamentous actin (F-actin) served to analyze the ion exchange and the cytoskeleton, respectively. High radiant exposures led to cells exhibiting a tendency to shrink in volume and area, possibly due to outflow of cytoplasm. An intracellular raise in calcium was observed and accompanied by an intercellular calcium wave. This multimodal approach enabled for the first time a comprehensive analysis of the cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated cell manipulation. Additionally, this work can pave the way for a better understanding and the evaluation of new applications in the context of cell transfection or photothermal therapy. PMID:25909631

  1. Pathophysiology of the Peritoneal Membrane during Peritoneal Dialysis: The Role of Hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Susan; Chan, Tak Mao

    2011-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), constant exposure of mesothelial cells to bioincompatible PD solutions results in the denudation of the mesothelial monolayer and impairment of mesothelial cell function. Hyaluronan, a major component of extracellular matrices, is synthesized by mesothelial cells and contributes to remesothelialization, maintenance of cell phenotype, and tissue remodeling and provides structural support to the peritoneal membrane. Chronic peritoneal inflammation is observed in long-term PD patients and is associated with increased hyaluronan synthesis. During inflammation, depolymerization of hyaluronan may occur with the generation of hyaluronan fragments. In contrast to native hyaluronan which offers a protective role to the peritoneum, hyaluronan fragments exacerbate inflammatory and fibrotic processes and therefore assist in the destruction of the tissue. This paper will discuss the contribution of mesothelial cells to peritoneal membrane alterations that are induced by PD and the putative role of hyaluronan in these processes. PMID:22203782

  2. On-chip manipulation of single microparticles, cells, and organisms using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Kiraly, Brian; Yue, Hongjun; Li, Sixing; Chiang, I-Kao; Shi, Jinjie; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-01-01

    Techniques that can dexterously manipulate single particles, cells, and organisms are invaluable for many applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and physics. Here, we demonstrate standing surface acoustic wave based “acoustic tweezers” that can trap and manipulate single microparticles, cells, and entire organisms (i.e., Caenorhabditis elegans) in a single-layer microfluidic chip. Our acoustic tweezers utilize the wide resonance band of chirped interdigital transducers to achieve real-time control of a standing surface acoustic wave field, which enables flexible manipulation of most known microparticles. The power density required by our acoustic device is significantly lower than its optical counterparts (10,000,000 times less than optical tweezers and 100 times less than optoelectronic tweezers), which renders the technique more biocompatible and amenable to miniaturization. Cell-viability tests were conducted to verify the tweezers’ compatibility with biological objects. With its advantages in biocompatibility, miniaturization, and versatility, the acoustic tweezers presented here will become a powerful tool for many disciplines of science and engineering. PMID:22733731

  3. Live-cell analysis of plant reproduction: live-cell imaging, optical manipulation, and advanced microscopy technologies.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Daisuke; Hamamura, Yuki; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2013-05-01

    Sexual reproduction ensures propagation of species and enhances genetic diversity within populations. In flowering plants, sexual reproduction requires complicated and multi-step cell-to-cell communications among male and female cells. However, the confined nature of plant reproduction processes, which occur in the female reproductive organs and several cell layers of the pistil, limits our ability to observe these events in vivo. In this review, we discuss recent live-cell imaging in in vitro systems and the optical manipulation techniques that are used to capture the dynamic mechanisms representing molecular and cellular communications in sexual plant reproduction. PMID:23438900

  4. Femtosecond optical transfection as a tool for genetic manipulation of human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Mapa, M. L.; Gardner, J.; Bradburn, H.; King, J.; Dholakia, K.; Gunn-Moore, F.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate the use of femtosecond optical transfection for the genetic manipulation of human embryonic stem cells. Using a system with an SLM combined with a scanning mirror allows poration of both single-cell and colony-formed human embryonic stem cells in a rapid and targeted manner. In this work, we show successful transfection of plasmid DNA tagged with fluorescent reporters into human embryonic stem cells using three doses of focused femtosecond laser. A significant number of transfected cells retained their undifferentiated morphological feature of large nucleus with high nucleus to cytoplasmic ratio, 48h after photoporation. Furthermore, DNA constructs driven by different types of promoters were also successfully transfected into human embryonic stem cells using this technique.

  5. [Peritonitis due to Kocuria rosea in a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis case].

    PubMed

    Kaya, Kiliç Esra; Kurtoğlu, Yasemin; Cesur, Salih; Bulut, Cemal; Kinikli, Sami; Irmak, Hasan; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan; Karakoç, Esra

    2009-04-01

    Micrococcus strains which are the normal flora members of skin, mucosa and oropharynx, may lead to infections associated with intravenous catheter, chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, venticular shunt and prosthetic valve. In this paper, a case of peritonitis due to Kocuria rosea of Micrococcea family, in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), was presented. Fiftysix years old female patient was admitted to the hospital by complaints of abdominal pain, nausea and fever. The patient was undergoing CAPD due to chronic renal failure for one and a half year and turbidity was detected in the peritoneal fluid during dialysis. Examination of the peritoneal fluid revealed 1800 cells/mm3, with no evidence of bacteria in Gram and Ziehl-Neelsen stained smears. No bacterial growth was detected in conventional culture media, however, bacteria was isolated from the peritoneal fluid culture on second day by Bactec (Becton Dickinson, USA) automated blood culture system. By means of API identification system (bioMerieux, USA), the causative agent was identified as Kocuria rosea. The patient was successfully treated with intraperitoneal teicoplanin (4 x 40 mg) for 14 days. In conclusion, in patients undergoing CAPD, rare pathogens should be considered in case of peritonitis and peritoneal fluid samples should be inoculated into automated culture systems. PMID:19621623

  6. Dynamic O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine Modification of Proteins Affects Stress Responses and Survival of Mesothelial Cells Exposed to Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Rebecca; Bender, Thorsten O.; Vychytil, Andreas; Bialas, Katarzyna; Aufricht, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The ability of cells to respond and survive stressful conditions is determined, in part, by the attachment of O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) to proteins (O-GlcNAcylation), a post-translational modification dependent on glucose and glutamine. This study investigates the role of dynamic O-GlcNAcylation of mesothelial cell proteins in cell survival during exposure to glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF). Immortalized human mesothelial cells and primary mesothelial cells, cultured from human omentum or clinical effluent of PD patients, were assessed for O-GlcNAcylation under normal conditions or after exposure to PDF. The dynamic status of O-GlcNAcylation and effects on cellular survival were investigated by chemical modulation with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) to decrease or O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucopyranosylidene)amino N-phenyl carbamate (PUGNAc) to increase O-GlcNAc levels. Viability was decreased by reducing O-GlcNAc levels by DON, which also led to suppressed expression of the cytoprotective heat shock protein 72. In contrast, increasing O-GlcNAc levels by PUGNAc or alanyl-glutamine led to significantly improved cell survival paralleled by higher heat shock protein 72 levels during PDF treatment. Addition of alanyl-glutamine increased O-GlcNAcylation and partly counteracted its inhibition by DON, also leading to improved cell survival. Immunofluorescent analysis of clinical samples showed that the O-GlcNAc signal primarily originates from mesothelial cells. In conclusion, this study identified O-GlcNAcylation in mesothelial cells as a potentially important molecular mechanism after exposure to PDF. Modulating O-GlcNAc levels by clinically feasible interventions might evolve as a novel therapeutic target for the preservation of peritoneal membrane integrity in PD. PMID:24854264

  7. Dynamic O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification of proteins affects stress responses and survival of mesothelial cells exposed to peritoneal dialysis fluids.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Rebecca; Bender, Thorsten O; Vychytil, Andreas; Bialas, Katarzyna; Aufricht, Christoph; Kratochwill, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    The ability of cells to respond and survive stressful conditions is determined, in part, by the attachment of O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) to proteins (O-GlcNAcylation), a post-translational modification dependent on glucose and glutamine. This study investigates the role of dynamic O-GlcNAcylation of mesothelial cell proteins in cell survival during exposure to glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF). Immortalized human mesothelial cells and primary mesothelial cells, cultured from human omentum or clinical effluent of PD patients, were assessed for O-GlcNAcylation under normal conditions or after exposure to PDF. The dynamic status of O-GlcNAcylation and effects on cellular survival were investigated by chemical modulation with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) to decrease or O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucopyranosylidene)amino N-phenyl carbamate (PUGNAc) to increase O-GlcNAc levels. Viability was decreased by reducing O-GlcNAc levels by DON, which also led to suppressed expression of the cytoprotective heat shock protein 72. In contrast, increasing O-GlcNAc levels by PUGNAc or alanyl-glutamine led to significantly improved cell survival paralleled by higher heat shock protein 72 levels during PDF treatment. Addition of alanyl-glutamine increased O-GlcNAcylation and partly counteracted its inhibition by DON, also leading to improved cell survival. Immunofluorescent analysis of clinical samples showed that the O-GlcNAc signal primarily originates from mesothelial cells. In conclusion, this study identified O-GlcNAcylation in mesothelial cells as a potentially important molecular mechanism after exposure to PDF. Modulating O-GlcNAc levels by clinically feasible interventions might evolve as a novel therapeutic target for the preservation of peritoneal membrane integrity in PD. PMID:24854264

  8. Three-dimensional manipulation of single cells using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Xie, Zhiwei; Lata, James P; Li, Peng; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Yang, Jian; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-01

    The ability of surface acoustic waves to trap and manipulate micrometer-scale particles and biological cells has led to many applications involving "acoustic tweezers" in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Here, we present 3D acoustic tweezers, which use surface acoustic waves to create 3D trapping nodes for the capture and manipulation of microparticles and cells along three mutually orthogonal axes. In this method, we use standing-wave phase shifts to move particles or cells in-plane, whereas the amplitude of acoustic vibrations is used to control particle motion along an orthogonal plane. We demonstrate, through controlled experiments guided by simulations, how acoustic vibrations result in micromanipulations in a microfluidic chamber by invoking physical principles that underlie the formation and regulation of complex, volumetric trapping nodes of particles and biological cells. We further show how 3D acoustic tweezers can be used to pick up, translate, and print single cells and cell assemblies to create 2D and 3D structures in a precise, noninvasive, label-free, and contact-free manner. PMID:26811444

  9. Detection, manipulation and post processing of circulating tumor cells using optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtiaridoost, Somayyeh; Habibiyan, Hamidreza; Ghafoorifard, Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are malignant cells that are derived from a solid tumor in the metastasis stage and are shed into the blood stream. These cells hold great promise to be used as liquid biopsy that is less aggressive than traditional biopsy. Recently, detection and enumeration of these cells has received ever-increasing attention from researchers as a way of early detection of cancer metastasis, determining the effectiveness of treatment and studying the mechanism of formation of secondary tumors. CTCs are found in blood at low concentration, which is a major limitation of isolation and detection of these cells. Over the last few years, multifarious research studies have been conducted on accurate isolation and detection and post processing of CTCs. Among all the proposed systems, microfluidic systems seem to be more attractive for researchers due to their numerous advantages. On the other hand, recent developments in optical methods have made the possibility of cellular studies at single-cell level. Thus, accuracy and efficiency of separation, detection and manipulation of CTCs can be improved using optical techniques. In this review, we describe optical methods that have been used for CTC detection, manipulation and post processing.

  10. Three-dimensional manipulation of single cells using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Xie, Zhiwei; Lata, James P.; Li, Peng; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Yang, Jian; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The ability of surface acoustic waves to trap and manipulate micrometer-scale particles and biological cells has led to many applications involving “acoustic tweezers” in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Here, we present 3D acoustic tweezers, which use surface acoustic waves to create 3D trapping nodes for the capture and manipulation of microparticles and cells along three mutually orthogonal axes. In this method, we use standing-wave phase shifts to move particles or cells in-plane, whereas the amplitude of acoustic vibrations is used to control particle motion along an orthogonal plane. We demonstrate, through controlled experiments guided by simulations, how acoustic vibrations result in micromanipulations in a microfluidic chamber by invoking physical principles that underlie the formation and regulation of complex, volumetric trapping nodes of particles and biological cells. We further show how 3D acoustic tweezers can be used to pick up, translate, and print single cells and cell assemblies to create 2D and 3D structures in a precise, noninvasive, label-free, and contact-free manner. PMID:26811444

  11. Manipulation of a Single Circulating Tumor Cell Using Visualization of Hydrogel Encapsulation toward Single-Cell Whole-Genome Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Seita; Negishi, Ryo; Hosokawa, Masahito; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2016-07-19

    Genetic characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could guide the choice of therapies for individual patients and also facilitate the development of new drugs. We previously developed a CTC recovery system using a microcavity array, which demonstrated highly efficient CTC recovery based on differences in cell size and deformability. However, the CTC recovery system lacked an efficient cell manipulation tool suitable for subsequent genetic analysis. Here, we resolve this issue and present a simple and rapid manipulation method for single CTCs using a photopolymerized hydrogel, polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), which is useful for subsequent genetic analysis. First, PEGDA was introduced into the cells entrapped on the microcavity array. Then, excitation light was projected onto the target single cells for encapsulation of each CTC by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The encapsulated single CTCs could be visualized by the naked eye and easily handled with tweezers. The single CTCs were only partially encapsulated on the PEGDA hydrogel, which allowed for sufficient whole-genome amplification and accurate genotyping. Our proposed methodology is a valuable tool for the rapid and simple manipulation of single CTCs and is expected to become widely utilized for analyses of mammalian cells and microorganisms in addition to CTCs. PMID:27299849

  12. ANALYSIS OF DOSE RATES DURING REPLACEMENT OF MANIPULATORS IN THE FFTF INTERIM EXAMINATION & MAINTENANCE (IEM) CELL

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON, J.V.

    2002-01-23

    Replacement of a master-slave manipulator in the Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell at the Fast Flux Test Facility was carried out in August 2001. This operation created a 178-mm opening in the thick concrete wall of the hot cell. To aid in radiological work planning, dose rates outside the penetration in the wall were predicted using MCNP{trademark} photon transport calculations. The predicted dose rate was 7.7 mrem/h, which was reasonably close to the value of 10.4 mrem/h inferred from measurements.

  13. Methods to Manipulate and Monitor Wnt Signaling in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Ian J; Brafman, David; Willert, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) may revolutionize medical practice by providing: (a) a renewable source of cells for tissue replacement therapies, (b) a powerful system to model human diseases in a dish, and (c) a platform for examining efficacy and safety of novel drugs. Furthermore, these cells offer a unique opportunity to study early human development in vitro, in particular, the process by which a seemingly uniform cell population interacts to give rise to the three main embryonic lineages: ectoderm, endoderm. and mesoderm. This process of lineage allocation is regulated by a number of inductive signals that are mediated by growth factors, including FGF, TGFβ, and Wnt. In this book chapter, we introduce a set of tools, methods, and protocols to specifically manipulate the Wnt signaling pathway with the intention of altering the cell fate outcome of hPSCs. PMID:27590161

  14. Manipulating mammalian cell by phase transformed titanium surface fabricated through ultra-short pulsed laser synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Sivaprasad; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Developing cell sensitive indicators on interacting substrates that allows specific cell manipulation by a combination of physical, chemical or mechanical cues is a challenge for current biomaterials. Hence, various fabrication approaches have been created on a variety of substrates to mimic or create cell specific cues. However, to achieve cell specific cues a multistep process or a post-chemical treatment is often necessitated. So, a simple approach without any chemical or biological treatment would go a long way in developing bio-functionalized substrates to effectively modulate cell adhesion and interaction. The present investigation is aimed to study the manipulative activity induced by phase transformed titanium surface. An ultra-short laser is used to fabricate the phase transformed titanium surface where a polymorphic titanium oxide phases with titanium monoxide (TiO), tri-titanium oxide (Ti3O) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) have been synthesized on commercially pure titanium. Control over oxide phase transformed area was demonstrated via a combination of laser scanning time (laser pulse interaction time) and laser pulse widths (laser pulse to pulse separation time). The interaction of phase transformed titanium surface with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells developed a new bio-functionalized platforms on titanium based biomaterials to modulate cell migration and adhesion. The synthesized phase transformed titanium surface on the whole appeared to induce directional cues for cell migration with unique preferential cell adhesion unseen by other fabrication approaches. The precise bio-functionalization controllability exhibited during fabrication offers perceptible edge for developing a variety of smart bio-medical devices, implants and cardiovascular stents where the need in supressing specific cell adhesion and proliferation is of great demand. PMID:26546983

  15. Genetic Manipulations Reveal Dynamic Cell and Gene Functions: Cre-ating a New View of Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, David A.; Kardon, Gabrielle

    2010-01-01

    Development of multicellular organisms is temporally and spatially complex. The Cre/loxP and Flp/FRT systems for genetic manipulation in mammals now enable researchers to explicitly examine in vivo the temporal and spatial role of cells and genes during development via cell lineage and ablation studies and conditional gene inactivation and activation. Recently we have used these methods to genetically dissect the role of Pax3+ and Pax7+ progenitor populations and the function of β-catenin, an important regulator of myogenesis, in vertebrate limb myogenesis. Our lineage and ablation studies of Pax3+ and Pax7+ progenitors revealed surprising insights into myogenesis not apparent from Pax3 and Pax7 expression and functional studies. In addition, conditional inactivation and activation of β-catenin in different progenitor populations and their progeny demonstrated that β-catenin plays several cell-autonomous roles in myogenesis. Our studies highlight the hierarchical (i.e. genes versus cells), temporal, and spatial complexity of development and demonstrate that manipulations of both cells and genes will be required to obtain a full understanding of the development of multicellular organisms. PMID:19844163

  16. Can manipulation of differentiation conditions eliminate proliferative cells from a population of ES cell-derived forebrain cells?

    PubMed

    Precious, Sophie V; Kelly, Claire M; Allen, Nicholas D; Rosser, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    There is preliminary evidence that implantation of primary fetal striatal cells provides functional benefit in patients with Huntington's disease, a neurodegenerative condition resulting in loss of medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN) of the striatum. Scarcity of primary fetal tissue means it is important to identify a renewable source of cells from which to derive donor MSNs. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, which predominantly default to telencephalic-like precursors in chemically defined medium (CDM), offer a potentially inexhaustible supply of cells capable of generating the desired neurons. Using an ES cell line, with the forebrain marker FoxG1 tagged to the LacZ reporter, we assessed effects of known developmental factors on the yield of forebrain-like precursor cells in CDM suspension culture. Addition of FGF2, but not DKK1, increased the proportion of FoxG1-expressing cells at day 8 of neural induction. Oct4 was expressed at day 8, but was undetectable by day 16. Differentiation of day 16 precursors generated GABA-expressing neurons, with few DARPP32 positive MSNs. Transplantation of day 8 precursor cells into quinolinic acid-lesioned striata resulted in generation of teratomas. However, transplantation of day 16 precursors yielded grafts expressing neuronal markers including NeuN, calbindin and parvalbumin, but no DARPP32 6 weeks post-transplantation. Manipulation of fate of ES cells requires optimization of both concentration and timing of addition of factors to culture systems to generate the desired phenotypes. Furthermore, we highlight the value of increasing the precursor phase of ES cell suspension culture when directing differentiation toward forebrain fate, so as to dramatically reduce the risk of teratoma formation. PMID:27606335

  17. Tamoxifen Ameliorates Peritoneal Membrane Damage by Blocking Mesothelial to Mesenchymal Transition in Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    del Peso, Gloria; Gónzalez-Mateo, Guadalupe; Fernández-Millara, Vanessa; Santamaria, Beatríz; Bajo, Maria Auxiliadora; Sánchez-Tomero, José Antonio; Guerra-Azcona, Gonzalo; Selgas, Rafael; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Aguilera, Abelardo I.

    2013-01-01

    Mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) is an auto-regulated physiological process of tissue repair that in uncontrolled conditions such as peritoneal dialysis (PD) can lead to peritoneal fibrosis. The maximum expression of peritoneal fibrosis induced by PD fluids and other peritoneal processes is the encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) for which no specific treatment exists. Tamoxifen, a synthetic estrogen, has successfully been used to treat retroperitoneal fibrosis and EPS associated with PD. Hence, we used in vitro and animal model approaches to evaluate the efficacy of Tamoxifen to inhibit the MMT as a trigger of peritoneal fibrosis. In vitro studies were carried out using omentum-derived mesothelial cells (MCs) and effluent-derived MCs. Tamoxifen blocked the MMT induced by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, as it preserved the expression of E-cadherin and reduced the expression of mesenchymal-associated molecules such as snail, fibronectin, collagen-I, α-smooth muscle actin, and matrix metalloproteinse-2. Tamoxifen-treatment preserved the fibrinolytic capacity of MCs treated with TGF-β1 and decreased their migration capacity. Tamoxifen did not reverse the MMT of non-epitheliod MCs from effluents, but it reduced the expression of some mesenchymal molecules. In mice PD model, we demonstrated that MMT progressed in parallel with peritoneal membrane thickness. In addition, we observed that Tamoxifen significantly reduced peritoneal thickness, angiogenesis, invasion of the compact zone by mesenchymal MCs and improved peritoneal function. Tamoxifen also reduced the effluent levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and leptin. These results demonstrate that Tamoxifen is a therapeutic option to treat peritoneal fibrosis, and that its protective effect is mediated via modulation of the MMT process. PMID:23637793

  18. Dielectrophoretic lab-on-CMOS platform for trapping and manipulation of cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoungchul; Kabiri, Shideh; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2016-02-01

    Trapping and manipulation of cells are essential operations in numerous studies in biology and life sciences. We discuss the realization of a Lab-on-a-Chip platform for dielectrophoretic trapping and repositioning of cells and microorganisms on a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, which we define here as Lab-on-CMOS (LoC). The LoC platform is based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) which is the force experienced by any dielectric particle including biological entities in non-uniform AC electrical field. DEP force depends on the permittivity of the cells, its size and shape and also on the permittivity of the medium and therefore it enables selective targeting of cells based on their phenotype. In this paper, we address an important matter that of electrode design for DEP for which we propose a three-dimensional (3D) octapole geometry to create highly confined electric fields for trapping and manipulation of cells. Conventional DEP-based platforms are implemented stand-alone on glass, silicon or polymers connected to external infrastructure for electronics and optics, making it bulky and expensive. In this paper, the use of CMOS as a platform provides a pathway to truly miniaturized lab-on-CMOS or LoC platform, where DEP electrodes are designed using built-in multiple metal layers of the CMOS process for effective trapping of cells, with built-in electronics for in-situ impedance monitoring of the cell position. We present electromagnetic simulation results of DEP force for this unique 3D octapole geometry on CMOS. Experimental results with yeast cells validate the design. These preliminary results indicate the promise of using CMOS technology for truly compact miniaturized lab-on-chip platform for cell biotechnology applications. PMID:26780441

  19. A Mammalian enhancer trap resource for discovering and manipulating neuronal cell types

    PubMed Central

    Shima, Yasuyuki; Sugino, Ken; Hempel, Chris Martin; Shima, Masami; Taneja, Praveen; Bullis, James B; Mehta, Sonam; Lois, Carlos; Nelson, Sacha B

    2016-01-01

    There is a continuing need for driver strains to enable cell-type-specific manipulation in the nervous system. Each cell type expresses a unique set of genes, and recapitulating expression of marker genes by BAC transgenesis or knock-in has generated useful transgenic mouse lines. However, since genes are often expressed in many cell types, many of these lines have relatively broad expression patterns. We report an alternative transgenic approach capturing distal enhancers for more focused expression. We identified an enhancer trap probe often producing restricted reporter expression and developed efficient enhancer trap screening with the PiggyBac transposon. We established more than 200 lines and found many lines that label small subsets of neurons in brain substructures, including known and novel cell types. Images and other information about each line are available online (enhancertrap.bio.brandeis.edu). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13503.001 PMID:26999799

  20. Force-controlled manipulation of single cells: from AFM to FluidFM.

    PubMed

    Guillaume-Gentil, Orane; Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Franz, Clemens M; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A

    2014-07-01

    The ability to perturb individual cells and to obtain information at the single-cell level is of central importance for addressing numerous biological questions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers great potential for this prospering field. Traditionally used as an imaging tool, more recent developments have extended the variety of cell-manipulation protocols. Fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM) combines AFM with microfluidics via microchanneled cantilevers with nano-sized apertures. The crucial element of the technology is the connection of the hollow cantilevers to a pressure controller, allowing their operation in liquid as force-controlled nanopipettes under optical control. Proof-of-concept studies demonstrated a broad spectrum of single-cell applications including isolation, deposition, adhesion and injection in a range of biological systems. PMID:24856959

  1. Characterization and genetic manipulation of human umbilical cord vein mesenchymal stem cells: potential application in cell-based gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Fathi, Fardin; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells are defined by two main characteristics: self-renewal capacity and commitment to multi-lineage differentiation. The cells have a great therapeutic potential in repopulating damaged tissues as well as being genetically manipulated and used in cell-based gene therapy. Umbilical cord vein is a readily available and inexpensive source of stem cells that are capable of generating various cell types. Despite the recent isolation of human umbilical cord vein mesenchymal stem cells (UVMSC), the self-renewal capacity and the potential clinical application of the cells are not well known. In the present study, we have successfully isolated and cultured human UVMSCs. Our data further revealed that the isolated cells express the self-renewal genes Oct-4, Nanog, ZFX, Bmi-1, and Nucleostemin; but not Zic-3, Hoxb-4, TCL-1, Tbx-3 and Esrrb. In addition, our immunocytochemistry results revealed the expression of SSEA-4, but not SSEA-3, TRA-1-60, and TRA-1-81 embryonic stem cell surface markers in the cells. Also, we were able to transfect the cells with a reporter, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), and a therapeutic human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) gene by means of electroporation and obtained a stable cell line, which could constantly express both transgenes. The latter data provide further evidence on the usefulness of umbilical cord vein mesenchymal stem cells as a readily available source of stem cells, which could be genetically manipulated and used in cell-based gene therapy applications. PMID:18399786

  2. Induction of cytotoxic peritoneal exudate cells by T-cell immune adjuvants of the beta(1 leads to 3) glucan-type lentinan and its analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Hamuro, J; Röllinghoff, M; Wagner, H

    1980-01-01

    Eight distinct polysaccharides (PS) of beta(1 leads to 3) glucan type were tested for their capacity to render murine peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) cytotoxic. After intraperitoneal injection of lentinan, pachymaran and HE-pachyman 3 and 4 highly cytotoxic PEC were induced. Pachyman and HE-pachyman 1 and 2 were of moderate effect, whereas CM-pachymaran and HE-pachyman 3 and 4, highly cytotoxic PEC were induced. Pachyman and HE-pachymacrophages. The induction of PEC-dependent cytotoxicity exhibited a strict dose relationship. Optimal administration of PS resulted in the induction of cytotoxicity, which persisted for more than 25 days. Surprisingly, none of the PS tested was capable of rendering normal or thioglycollate-induced PEC cytoxic under in vitro conditions. It is suggested that the capacity of PS to render in vivo macrophages cytotoxic is related to the potency of these PS to activate the alternative pathway of complement system (APC) in so far as C3b may be the essential component required to render macrophages cytotoxic. PMID:6966608

  3. Minireview: beta-cell replacement therapy for diabetes in the 21st century: manipulation of cell fate by directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yechoor, Vijay; Chan, Lawrence

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell failure underlies type 1 diabetes; it also contributes in an essential way to type 2 diabetes. beta-Cell replacement is an important component of any cure for diabetes. The current options of islet and pancreas transplantation are not satisfactory as definitive forms of therapy. Here, we review strategies for induced de novo pancreatic beta-cell formation, which depend on the targeted differentiation of cells into pancreatic beta-cells. With this objective in mind, one can manipulate the fate of three different types of cells: 1) from terminally differentiated cells, e.g. exocrine pancreatic cells, into beta-cells; 2) from multipotent adult stem cells, e.g. hepatic oval cells, into pancreatic islets; and 3) from pluripotent stem cells, e.g. embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, into beta-cells. We will examine the pros and cons of each strategy as well as the hurdles that must be overcome before these approaches to generate new beta-cells will be ready for clinical application. PMID:20219891

  4. [Adjuvant therapy with WT1 peptide-pulsed dendritic cell therapy in combination with TS-1 for pancreatic cancer with positive peritoneal cytology after curative operation].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Tono, Takeshi; Abe, Hirofumi; Nishida, Kentaro; Yanagawa, Takehiro; Fujie, Yujiro; Fujita, Shoichiro; Fujita, Junya; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Ohnishi, Tadashi; Imaoka, Shingi; Monden, Takushi

    2014-10-01

    A 66-year-old woman was diagnosed with pancreatic tail cancer, and she was referred to our hospital. Abdominal computed tomography(CT)revealed a tumor(2.5 cm in diameter)in the pancreatic tail, with invasion to the spleen and splenic vein. In February 2013, we performed distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, left adrenal gland resection, and D2 lymph node dissection. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage cytology during surgery was positive; however, we performed curative resection because there were no signs of peritoneal dissemination and distant metastasis. The patient was discharged from the hospital 23 days after the operation, with good postoperative course. Histological diagnosis was pancreatic tail cancer, pT4N0H0P0M(-) fStage IVa. Subsequently, the patient received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy(TS-1: 100mg/day, 4 courses)combined with Wilms'tumor 1(WT1)peptide-pulsed dendritic cell therapy. No serious adverse events occurred during the postoperative adjuvant therapy. The patient remains alive without recurrence 16 months after the operation. PMID:25335723

  5. Design and experimental demonstration of low-power CMOS magnetic cell manipulation platform using charge recycling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niitsu, Kiichi; Yoshida, Kohei; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    We present the world’s first charge-recycling-based low-power technique of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) magnetic cell manipulation. CMOS magnetic cell manipulation associated with magnetic beads is a promissing tool for on-chip biomedical-analysis applications such as drug screening because CMOS can integrate control electronics and electro-chemical sensors. However, the conventional CMOS cell manipulation requires considerable power consumption. In this work, by concatenating multiple unit circuits and recycling electric charge among them, power consumption is reduced by a factor of the number of the concatenated unit circuits (1/N). For verifying the effectiveness, test chip was fabricated in a 0.6-µm CMOS. The chip successfully manipulates magnetic microbeads with achieving 49% power reduction (from 51 to 26.2 mW). Even considering the additional serial resistance of the concatenated inductors, nearly theoretical power reduction effect can be confirmed.

  6. Multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Tentes, Antonios-Apostolos; Zorbas, Georgios; Pallas, Nicolaos; Fiska, Aliki

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare disease. It is not certain if it is a benign or a borderline tumor. Although many therapeutic approaches have been used, complete cytoreductive surgery in combination with hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy has gained acceptance. Case Report: A case of multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma in a 16-year old patient is reported. The patient underwent complete cytoreduction and received intraoperative hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. The patient is disease-free one year after surgery. Conclusions: Complete cytoreductive surgery in combination with hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy appears to be a rational therapeutic approach in multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma. PMID:23569544

  7. Probing Dynein and Kinesin Stepping with Mechanical Manipulation in a Living Cell

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Peter A.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2013-01-01

    We report a label-free assay for simultaneous optical manipulation and tracking of endogenous lipid droplets as actively transported cargoes in a living mammalian cell with sub-millisecond time resolution. Using an EM-CCD camera as a highly sensitive quadrant detector, we can detect steps of dynein- and kinesin-driven cargoes under known force loads. We can distinguish single and multiple motor-driven cargoes and show that the stall forces for inward and outward transported cargoes are similar. By combining the stall force observable with the ability to detect individual steps, we can characterize kinesin- and dynein-driven active transport in different force regimes. PMID:19504528

  8. Imaging and manipulating the structural machinery of living cells on the micro- and nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Chown, Matthew G; Kumar, Sanjay

    2007-01-01

    The structure, physiology, and fate of living cells are all highly sensitive to mechanical forces in the cellular microenvironment, including stresses and strains that originate from encounters with the extracellular matrix (ECM), blood and other flowing materials, and neighbouring cells. This relationship between context and physiology bears tremendous implications for the design of cellular micro-or nanotechnologies, since any attempt to control cell behavior in a device must provide the appropriate physical microenvironment for the desired cell behavior. Cells sense, process, and respond to biophysical cues in their environment through a set of integrated, multi-scale structural complexes that span length scales from single molecules to tens of microns, including small clusters of force-sensing molecules at the cell surface, micron-sized cell-ECM focal adhesion complexes, and the cytoskeleton that permeates and defines the entire cell. This review focuses on several key technologies that have recently been developed or adapted for the study of the dynamics of structural micro-and nanosystems in living cells and how these systems contribute to spatially-and temporally-controlled changes in cellular structure and mechanics. We begin by discussing subcellular laser ablation, which permits the precise incision of nanoscale structural elements in living cells in order to discern their mechanical properties and contributions to cell structure. We then discuss fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and fluorescent speckle microscopy, two live-cell fluorescence imaging methods that enable quantitative measurement of the binding and transport properties of specific proteins in the cell. Finally, we discuss methods to manipulate cellular structural networks by engineering the extracellular environment, including microfabrication of ECM distributions of defined geometry and microdevices designed to measure cellular traction forces at micron-scale resolution. Together

  9. Multiple bidirectional alterations of phenotype and changes in proliferative potential during the in vitro and in vivo passage of clonal mast cell populations derived from mouse peritoneal mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakura, Y.; Thompson, H.; Nakano, T.; Yamamura, T.; Asai, H.; Kitamura, Y.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Galli, S.J.

    1988-09-01

    Mouse peritoneal mast cells (PMC) express a connective tissue-type mast cell (CTMC) phenotype, including reactivity with the heparin-binding fluorescent dye berberine sulfate and incorporation of (35S) sulfate predominantly into heparin proteoglycans. When PMC purified to greater than 99% purity were cultured in methylcellulose with IL-3 and IL-4, approximately 25% of the PMC formed colonies, all of which contained both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative mast cells. When these mast cells were transferred to suspension culture, they generated populations that were 100% berberine sulfate-negative, a characteristic similar to that of mucosal mast cells (MMC), and that synthesized predominantly chondroitin sulfate (35S) proteoglycans. When ''MMC-like'' cultured mast cells derived from WBB6F1-+/+ PMC were injected into the peritoneal cavities of mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice, the adoptively transferred mast cell population became 100% berberine sulfate-positive. In methylcellulose culture, these ''second generation PMC'' formed clonal colonies containing both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative cells, but exhibited significantly less proliferative ability than did normal +/+ PMC. Thus, clonal mast cell populations initially derived from single PMC exhibited multiple and bidirectional alterations between CTMC-like and MMC-like phenotypes. However, this process was associated with a progressive diminution of the mast cells' proliferative ability.

  10. Mast Cells Play No Role in the Pathogenesis of Postoperative Ileus Induced by Intestinal Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J.; Farro, Giovanna; Di Giovangiulio, Martina; Stakenborg, Nathalie; Némethova, Andrea; de Vries, Annick; Liston, Adrian; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimwer; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Matteoli, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal manipulation (IM) during abdominal surgery results in intestinal inflammation leading to hypomotility or ileus. Mast cell activation is thought to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of postoperative ileus (POI). However, this conclusion was mainly drawn using mast cell-deficient mouse models with abnormal Kit signaling. These mice also lack interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) resulting in aberrant gastrointestinal motility even prior to surgery, compromising their use as model to study POI. To avoid these experimental weaknesses we took advantage of a newly developed knock-in mouse model, Cpa3Cre/+, devoid of mast cells but with intact Kit signaling. Design The role of mast cells in the development of POI and intestinal inflammation was evaluated assessing gastrointestinal transit and muscularis externa inflammation after IM in two strains of mice lacking mast cells, i.e. KitW-sh/W-sh and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, and by use of the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn. Results KitW-sh/W-sh mice lack ICC networks and already revealed significantly delayed gastrointestinal transit even before surgery. IM did not further delay intestinal transit, but induced infiltration of myeloperoxidase positive cells, expression of inflammatory cytokines and recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils into the muscularis externa. On the contrary, Cpa3Cre/+ mice have a normal network of ICC and normal gastrointestinal. Surprisingly, IM in Cpa3Cre/+ mice caused delay in gut motility and intestinal inflammation as in wild type littermates mice (Cpa3+/+). Furthermore, treatment with the mast cell inhibitor cromolyn resulted in an inhibition of mast cells without preventing POI. Conclusions Here, we confirm that IM induced mast cell degranulation. However, our data demonstrate that mast cells are not required for the pathogenesis of POI in mice. Although there might be species differences between mouse and human, our results argue against mast cell inhibitors as a therapeutic