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Sample records for manipulating subsurface colloids

  1. MANIPULATING SUBSURFACE COLLOIDS TO ENHANCE CLEANUPS OF DOE WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colloidal phases, such as submicrometer iron oxyhydroxides, aluminosilicate clays, and humic macromolecules, are important subsurface sorbents for the low-solubility chemicals in DOE wastes. Recent research we have performed as part of DOE's Subsurface Science Program has demonst...

  2. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  3. Method for formation of subsurface barriers using viscous colloids

    DOEpatents

    Apps, J.A.; Persoff, P.; Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

    1998-11-17

    A method is described for formation of subsurface barriers using viscous liquids where a viscous liquid solidifies at a controlled rate after injection into soil and forms impermeable isolation of the material enclosed within the subsurface barriers. The viscous liquid is selected from the group consisting of polybutenes, polysiloxanes, colloidal silica and modified colloidal silica of which solidification is controlled by gelling, cooling or cross-linking. Solidification timing is controlled by dilution, addition of brines, coating with alumina, stabilization with various agents and by temperature. 17 figs.

  4. Method for formation of subsurface barriers using viscous colloids

    DOEpatents

    Apps, John A.; Persoff, Peter; Moridis, George; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-01-01

    A method for formation of subsurface barriers using viscous liquids where a viscous liquid solidifies at a controlled rate after injection into soil and forms impermeable isolation of the material enclosed within the subsurface barriers. The viscous liquid is selected from the group consisting of polybutenes, polysilotanes, colloidal silica and modified colloidal silica of which solidification is controlled by gelling, cooling or cross-linking. Solidification timing is controlled by dilution, addition of brines, coating with alumina, stabilization with various agents and by temperature.

  5. Magnetic manipulation of self-assembled colloidal asters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S.

    2011-09-01

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Here we show that a magnetic colloidal suspension confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters, which exhibit locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, we show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles. The ability to manipulate colloidal structures is crucial for the further development of self-assembled microrobots.

  6. Magnetic manipulation of self-assembled colloidal asters.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.

    2011-09-01

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Here we show that a magnetic colloidal suspension confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters, which exhibit locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, we show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles. The ability to manipulate colloidal structures is crucial for the further development of self-assembled microrobots

  7. Controlled manipulation of engineered colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Janine

    This research utilized the Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINTRTM) technology to fabricate highly tailored colloidal particles. The behavior of these engineered particles were studied as they were subjected to different precisely controlled external influences, including electric fields, magnetic fields and a templating approach based on the PRINT process. Given the tunability in particle properties afforded by the PRINT process, exceptional control of the resulting particle assemblies and particle mobility were observed, suggesting potential applications in numerous materials and life science applications that require control on the nanoscale. As the PRINT process was integral to all aspects of this research, it was important to gain a clear understanding of mechanism by which perfluoropolyether (PFPE) elastomeric molds can generate monodisperse arrays of discrete, uniform particles with tailored size, shape and composition. Thus, fundamental studies were conducted on the PFPE elastomers, focusing on contact mechanics measurements and capillary flow experiments. The results confirmed the low surface energy of PFPE, an important property that renders the PFPE molds ideal for the PRINT process. Capillary flow experiments were conducted to study the method by which PFPE molds can be filled during the PRINT process. The flow in closed PFPE microchannels was compared to that in PDMS and glass. Suspensions of PRINT particles were studied in the presence of electric and magnetic fields. Electric field experiments were conducted using non-uniform alternating current electric fields and uniform direct current electric fields. Magnetic field experiments were conducted using both stationary and rotating magnetic fields. Particle assemblies were observed to form and could be tuned by particle shape and composition. Particle motion, both translational and rotational, was also controlled. Properties were found to be both shape and composition dependent. These

  8. SUBSURFACE MOBILE PLUTONIUM SPECIATION: SAMPLING ARTIFACTS FOR GROUNDWATER COLLOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.; Buesseler, K.

    2010-06-29

    A recent review found several conflicting conclusions regarding colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in groundwater and noted that colloids can both facilitate and retard transport. Given these contrasting conclusions and the profound implications even trace concentrations of plutonium (Pu) have on the calculated risk posed to human health, it is important that the methodology used to sample groundwater colloids be free of artifacts. The objective of this study was: (1) to conduct a field study and measure Pu speciation, ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu for reduced-Pu{sub aq}, oxidized-Pu{sub aq}, reduced-Pu{sub colloid}, and oxidized-Pu{sub colloid}), in a Savannah River Site (SRS) aquifer along a pH gradient in F-Area, (2) to determine the impact of pumping rate on Pu concentration, Pu speciation, and Pu isotopic ratios, (3) determine the impact of delayed sample processing (as opposed to processing directly from the well).

  9. Colloid Transport and Surface-Subsurface Exchange in an Acid Mine Drainage-Impacted Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norvell, A. S.; Ryan, J. N.; Ren, J.; McKnight, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Colloidal particles may provide an important control on the mobility of contaminants of concern; e.g., metals introduced into a stream from an acid mine drainage. In order to examine colloidal transport and surface-subsurface exchange, we injected synthesized ferrihydrite colloids along with a conservative tracer, bromide, into Lefthand Creek, a stream contaminated by acid mine drainage in northwestern Boulder County, Colorado. The ferrihydrite colloids were co-precipitated with yttrium to form yttrium-labelled colloids so that we could differentiate them from environmental colloids. Yttrium was measured in samples collected from the surface water and the hyporheic zone. The hyporheic zone samples were collected from a series of mini-piezometers embedded up to 1 m in depth and over a 61 m reach of the stream. A one-dimensional transient storage model (OTIS-P) was used to quantify parameters describing the transport of the conservative tracer and the colloids. Approximately 20% of the colloidal mass was lost over the 61 m reach. The loss of colloids is attributed to deposition in the shallow hyporheic zone. Laboratory column experiments demonstrated that the stream bed sediments effectively remove colloids from suspension at the pH, ionic strength, and dissolved organic matter concentration conditions occurring in Lefthand Creek.

  10. Colloids in groundwater: Their mobilization, subsurface transport, and sorption affinity for toxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, P.M.

    1992-07-10

    Our originally stated objectives included: (1) development of a quantitative source function for colloid mobilization to groundwater, and (2) assessment of the most important colloidal phases to which nonpolar compounds sorb. We have been pursuing a series of studies to elucidate the roles of colloidal phases in subsurface environments. Most notably, we have discovered the critical role of secondary cementitious phases like goethite. We developed a new procedure for measuring surface iron oxides'' which is a great improvement over earlier methodologies. Currently, we are developing a unifying model with which we can predict the mobilization of colloids to groundwater flowing through such porous media. Also, we have been able to show that groundwater samples contain colloidal phases in sufficient quantities and of suitable properties to enhance the mobile load of toxic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Finally, we have synthesized our varied field investigations from sites in Massachusetts, New Jersey, Delaware, Nevada, Connecticut, and New York to yield a protocol for other researchers interested in evaluating colloids in groundwater. These accomplishments are discussed in more detail below. Through these efforts, we have become increasingly convinced of the central role played by colloidal phases in numerous subsurface phenomena controlling contaminant fates.

  11. Colloids in groundwater: Their mobilization, subsurface transport, and sorption affinity for toxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    During the initial project period, we have pursued several activities with the overall goal of characterizing the roles of colloid in groundwater. First, we have collected soil cores from a site where we have previously found large quantities of kaolinite colloids in the groundwater. We have intensely investigated these cores to test our hypothesis that the colloids have been mobilized as a result of iron oxide dissolution. Next, we have constructed a soil core system in our laboratory with which we are attempting to mimic the factors that we think are governing colloid transport in the subsurface. Finally, we have pursued the issue of how well organic chemicals bind to the kinds of colloids that we are seeing at field sites. Together, with our knowledge of colloid mobility, we anticipate that this sorption data will enable us to predict the influence of groundwater colloids on contaminant fates in the subsurface. Our progress in each of these activities is described in this report. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  12. A coupled field study of subsurface fracture flow and colloid transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Tang, Xiang-Yu; Weisbrod, Noam; Zhao, Pei; Reid, Brian J.

    2015-05-01

    Field studies of subsurface transport of colloids, which may act as carriers of contaminants, are still rare. This is particularly true for heterogeneous and fractured matrices. To address this knowledge gap, a 30-m long monitoring trench was constructed at the lower end of sloping farmland in central Sichuan, southwest China. During the summer of 2013, high resolution dynamic and temporal fracture flow discharging from the interface between fractured mudrock and impermeable sandstone was obtained at intervals of 5 min (for fast rising stages), 30-60 min (for slow falling stages) or 15 min (at all other times). This discharge was analyzed to elucidate fracture flow and colloid transport in response to rainfall events. Colloid concentrations were observed to increase quickly once rainfall started (∼15-90 min) and reached peak values of up to 188 mg/L. Interestingly, maximum colloid concentration occurred prior to the arrival of flow discharge peak (i.e. maximum colloid concentration was observed before saturation of the soil layer). Rainfall intensity (rather than its duration) was noted to be the main factor controlling colloid response and transport. Dissolved organic carbon concentration and δ18O dynamics in combination with soil water potential were used to apportion water sources of fracture flow at different stages. These approaches suggested the main source of the colloids discharged to be associated with the flushing of colloids from the soil mesopores and macropores. Beyond the scientific interest of colloid mobilization and transport at the field scale, these results have important implications for a region of about 160,000 km2 in southwest China that featured similar hydrogeologic settings as the experimental site. In this agriculture-dominated area, application of pesticides and fertilizers to farmland is prevalent. These results highlight the need to avoid such applications immediately before rainfall events in order to reduce rapid migration to

  13. (The role of colloidal particles on the subsurface transport of contaminants)

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.

    1990-02-22

    The primary purpose of this foreign travel was to attend the 10th meeting of the European Community's CoCo (colloids and complexation) Club to learn about research on groundwater colloids in Europe and inform the CoCo participants about the colloid subprogram of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Science Program. The goal of CoCo Club research, and of the umbrella MIRAGE (MIgration of RAdionuclides in the GEosphere) Project, is to develop data and understanding necessary to complete safety assessments for licensing nuclear repositories in Europe. The emphasis of CoCo Club research is sorption of radionuclides to organic and inorganic colloidal particles. The traveler also visited the British Geological Survey (BGS) headquarters and a BGS field site. Discussions focused on development of innovative drilling equipment for minimizing aquifer disturbance, development and application of computerized resistivity tomography for aquifer characterization, and laboratory research on the role of organic matter on metal transport. The trip was successful in that the traveler obtained a comprehensive overview of European research on groundwater colloids which will help improve and focus DOE's colloid subprogram, and the traveler learned about advances in specific areas that will contribute to his own DOE-funded project.

  14. Subsurface defect characterization and laser-induced damage performance of fused silica optics polished with colloidal silica and ceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, He; Gang, Wang; Heng, Zhao; Ping, Ma

    2016-04-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the influence of colloidal silica polishing on the damage performance of fused silica optics. In this paper, nanometer sized colloidal silica and micron sized ceria are used to polish fused silica optics. The colloidal silica polished samples and ceria polished samples exhibit that the root-mean-squared (RMS) average surface roughness values are 0.7 nm and 1.0 nm, respectively. The subsurface defects and damage performance of the polished optics are analyzed and discussed. It is revealed that colloidal silica polishing will introduce much fewer absorptive contaminant elements and subsurface damages especially no trailing indentation fracture. The 355-nm laser damage test reveals that each of the fused silica samples polished with colloidal silica has a much higher damage threshold and lower damage density than ceria polished samples. Colloidal silica polishing is potential in manufacturing high power laser optics.

  15. Optical manipulation and imaging of assemblies of topological defects and colloids in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Rahul P.

    Liquid Crystals (LCs) have proven to be important for electro-optic device applications such as displays, spatial light modulators, non-mechanical beam-steerers, etc. Owing to their unique mechanical, electrical, and optical properties, they are also being explored for wide array of advanced technological applications such as biosensors, tunable lenses, distributed feedback lasers, muscle-like actuators, etc. The thesis explores LC media from the standpoint of controlling their elastic and optical properties by generating and manipulating assemblies of defects and colloidal particles. To achieve the goal of optically manipulating these configurations comprising defects and particles at microscale with an unprecedented control, and then to visualize the resultant molecular director patterns, requires development of powerful optical system. The thesis discusses design and implementation of such an integrated system capable of 3D holographic optical manipulation and multi-modal 3D imaging (in nonlinear optical modes like multiphoton fluorescence, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, etc.) and how they are used to extensively study a vast number of LC based systems. Understanding of LCs and topological defects go hand in hand. Appreciation of defects leads to their precise control, which in turn can lead to applications. The thesis describes discovery of optically generated stable, quasiparticle-like, localized defect structures in a LC cell, that we call "Torons". Torons enable twist of molecules in three dimensions and resemble both Skyrmion-like and Hopf fibration features. Under different conditions of generation, we optically realize an intriguing variety of novel solitonic defect structures comprising rather complicated configurations of point and line topological defects. Introducing colloidal particles to LC systems imparts to these hybrid material system a fascinating degree of richness of properties on account of colloidal assemblies supported by networks

  16. Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

    1991-11-01

    Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H[sub 2]O[sub 2], and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H[sub 2]O[sub 2] injection as an oxygenation technique.

  17. Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

    1991-11-01

    Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} injection as an oxygenation technique.

  18. Colloids in groundwater: Their mobilization, subsurface transport, and sorption affinity for toxic chemicals. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, P.M.

    1992-07-10

    Our originally stated objectives included: (1) development of a quantitative source function for colloid mobilization to groundwater, and (2) assessment of the most important colloidal phases to which nonpolar compounds sorb. We have been pursuing a series of studies to elucidate the roles of colloidal phases in subsurface environments. Most notably, we have discovered the critical role of secondary cementitious phases like goethite. We developed a new procedure for measuring ``surface iron oxides`` which is a great improvement over earlier methodologies. Currently, we are developing a unifying model with which we can predict the mobilization of colloids to groundwater flowing through such porous media. Also, we have been able to show that groundwater samples contain colloidal phases in sufficient quantities and of suitable properties to enhance the mobile load of toxic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Finally, we have synthesized our varied field investigations from sites in Massachusetts, New Jersey, Delaware, Nevada, Connecticut, and New York to yield a protocol for other researchers interested in evaluating colloids in groundwater. These accomplishments are discussed in more detail below. Through these efforts, we have become increasingly convinced of the central role played by colloidal phases in numerous subsurface phenomena controlling contaminant fates.

  19. Interim report: Manipulation of natural subsurface processes: Field research and validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchter, J.S.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.

    1994-11-01

    Often the only alternative for treating deep subsurface contamination is in situ manipulation of natural processes to change the mobility or form of contaminants. However, the complex interactions of natural subsurface physical, chemical, and microbial processes limit the predictability of the system-wide impact of manipulation based on current knowledge. This report is a summary of research conducted to examine the feasibility of controlling the oxidation-reduction (redox) potential of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State by introducing chemical reagents and microbial nutrients. The experiment would allow the testing of concepts and hypotheses developed from fundamental research in the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Subsurface Science Program. Furthermore, the achievement of such control is expected to have implications for in situ remediation of dispersed aqueous contaminants in the subsurface environment at DOE sites nationwide, and particularly at the Hanford Site. This interim report summarizes initial research that was conducted between July 1990 and October 1991.

  20. Hydraulic control for manipulating subsurface conditions for in situ experiments of uranium(VI) bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanidis, P.; Luo, J.; Wu, W.; Carley, J.; Mehlhorn, T.; Watson, D.; Criddle, C.; Jardine, P.

    2007-12-01

    A field test on in-situ subsurface bioremediation of uranium (VI) is underway at the Y-12 National Security Complex in the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, TN. A four-well system, including two downgradient extraction and two upgradient injection wells were installed to create an inner cell, which functioned as the treatment zone, nested within an outer cell, which protected the inner cell from the influence of regional flow. The proposed four- well system has several advantages in the subsurface flow field manipulation: (1) the recirculation ratio within the nested inner cell is less sensitive to the regional flow direction; (2) a transitional recirculation zone between the inner and outer cells can capture flow leakage from the inner cell, minimizing the release of untreated contaminants; (3) the size of the recirculation zone and residence times can be better controlled within the inner cell by changing the pumping rates. A three-phase remediation strategy was applied in this experiment. It included first removing nitrate prior to stimulation of U(VI) reduction, then adjusting the pH to levels favorable for activity of U(VI)-reducing bacteria, i.e., to about neutral values, and finally adding electron donor to the in-situ reactor to foster reduction and immobilization of U(VI). Tracer tests and bioremediation experiments demonstrated that the designed multiple-well system and the experimental strategy were successful in creating favorable subsurface chemical and biological conditions for uranium bioremediation.

  1. Creation of a subsurface permeable treatment barrier using in situ redox manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchter, J.S.; Vermeul, V.R.; Szecsody, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Subsurface contaminants at Department of Energy (DOE) sites occur in both the vadose and groundwater saturated zones. Many of the groundwater plumes are already dispersed over large areas (square miles) and are located hundreds of feet below the ground. This type of dispersed, inaccessible contamination, which is more difficult than other types of contamination to treat using excavation or pump-and-treat methods, may only be treated successfully by the in situ manipulation of natural processes to change the mobility or form of the contaminants. An unconfined aquifer is usually an oxidizing environment, therefore, most of the contaminants that are mobile in the aquifer are those that are mobile under oxidizing conditions. If the redox potential of the aquifer is made reducing, then a variety of contaminants can be treated. The goal of In-Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) is to create a permeable treatment zone in the subsurface for remediation of redox sensitive contaminants in the groundwater. The permeable treatment zone is created by reducing the ferric iron to ferrous iron within the clay minerals of the aquifer sediments. This reduction can be accomplished with chemical reducing agents, such as sodium dithionite, or through the stimulation of naturally-occurring iron-reducing bacteria with nutrients (e.g. lactate). After the aquifer sediments are reduced, any reagent or reaction products introduced into the subsurface are removed. Redox sensitive contaminants that can be treated by this technology include chromate, uranium, technetium and some chlorinated solvents (e.g., carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene). Chromate is immobilized by reduction to highly insoluble chromium hydroxide or iron chromium hydroxide solid solution. This case is particularly favorable since chromium is not easily reoxidized under ambient environmental conditions. Uranium and technetium will also be reduced to less soluble forms, and chlorinated solvents will be destroyed.

  2. Subsurface microbial community structure correlates with uranium redox phases during in situ field manipulation in a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Kostka, Joel; Green, Stefan; Wu, Wei-min; Criddle, Craig; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M

    2009-07-01

    Long-term field manipulation experiments investigating the effects of subsurface redox conditions on the fate and transport of soluble uranium(VI) were conducted over a 3 year period at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Center (OR-IFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. In the highly contaminated source zone, introduction of ethanol to the subsurface stimulated native denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, iron-reducing and fermentative microorganisms and reduced U to below 0.03 mg/L. Subsequently, oxygen and nitrate were experimentally re-introduced into the subsurface to examine the potential for re-oxidation and re-mobilization of U(IV). Introduction of oxygen or nitrate caused changes in subsurface geochemistry and re-oxidation of U. After reoxidation, the subsurface experienced several months of starvation conditions before ethanol injection was restored to reduce the treatment zone. Subsurface microorganisms were characterized by community fingerprinting, targeted population analyses, and quantitative PCR of key functional groups in 50 samples taken during multiple phases of field manipulation. Statistical analysis confirmed the hypothesis that the microbial community would co-vary with the shifts in the subsurface geochemistry. The level of hydraulic connectivity of sampling wells to the injection well was readily tracked by microbial community analysis. We demonstrate quantitatively that specific populations, especially Desulfosporosinus, are heavily influenced by geochemical conditions and positively correlate with the immobilization of uranium. Following nitrate reoxidation, populations of Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate reducing organisms (Thiobacillus) showed an increase in relative abundance.

  3. Creation of a subsurface permeable treatment barrier using in situ redox manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchter, J.S.; Cole, C.R.; Williams, M.D.

    1997-12-31

    The goal of in situ redox manipulation is to create a permeable treatment zone in the subsurface for remediating redox-sensitive contaminants in groundwater. The permeable treatment zone is created just downstream of the contaminant plume or contaminant source through the injection of reagents and/or microbial nutrients to alter the redox potential of the aquifer fluids and sediments. Contaminant plumes migrating through this manipulated zone can then be destroyed or immobilized. In a field test at the Hanford Site, {approximately}77,000 L of buffered sodium dithionite solution were successfully injected into the unconfined aquifer at the 100-H Area in September 1995. The target contaminant was chromate. No significant plugging of the well screen or the formation was detected during any phase of the test. Dithionite was detected in monitoring wells at least 7.5 m from the injection point. Data were obtained from all three phases of the test (i.e., injection, reaction, withdrawal). Preliminary core data show that from 60% to 100% of the available reactive iron in the targeted aquifer sediments was reduced by the injected dithionite. One year after the injection, groundwater in the treatment zone remains anoxic. Total and hexavalent chromium levels in groundwater have been reduced from a preexperiment concentration of {approximately}60 {mu}g/L to below the detection limit of the analytical methods.

  4. Creation of a Subsurface Permeable Reactive Barrier Using In Situ Redox Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Szecsody, James E.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Cole, Charles R.; Amonette, James E.

    2002-10-01

    An In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) method for creating a permeable reactive barrier in the subsurface has been developed and a field-scale demonstration has been conducted at a chromate-contaminated site on the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in southeastern Washington State. The ISRM treatment zone is created by reducing the ferric iron [Fe(III)] phases naturally present in the aquifer sediments to ferrous iron phases [mainly adsorbed Fe(II)] with a chemical reducing agent using an injection/withdrawal (i.e., push/pull) emplacement strategy. Sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4) is injected into the aquifer, provided a residence time sufficient to react the sediment, and any remaining unreacted reagent and reaction products are withdrawn from the aquifer. Standard groundwater wells are used, allowing treatment of contaminants too deep below the ground surface for conventional trench-and-fill technologies. Once in place, redox-sensitive contaminants migrating through this manipulated zone are destroyed (organic solvents) or immobilized (metals). In the spring of 1997, an ISRM treatability test was initiated at a chromate-contaminated site located within Hanford's 100-D Area. Analysis of groundwater samples collected from the reduced zone following emplacement of the barrier indicate that concentrations of hexavalent chromium in groundwater have decreased from a pre-emplacement concentration of approximately 1,000 ?g/L to below analytical detection limits (<8 ?g/L). Hexavalent chromium concentrations have also significantly decreased below baseline values in downgradient monitoring wells. Laboratory analysis of iron in the soil indicates the barrier should remain in place for approximately 23 years. If additional reductive capacity is needed, the barrier can be regenerated at a reduced cost using the original injection well network.

  5. Creation of a subsurface permeable treatment zone for aqueous chromate contamination using in situ redox manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchter, J.S.; Cole, C.R.; Williams, M.D.; Vermeul, V.R.; Amonette, J.E.; Szecsody, J.E.; Istok, J.D.; Humphrey, M.D.

    2000-03-31

    An in situ redox manipulation (ISRM) method for creating a permeable treatment zone in the subsurface has been developed at the laboratory bench and intermediate scales and deployed at the field scale for reduction/immobilization of chromate contamination. At other sites, the same redox technology is currently being tested for dechlorination of TCE. The reduced zone is created by injected reagents that reduce iron naturally present in the aquifer sediments from Fe(III) to surface-bound and structural Fe(II) species. Standard ground water wells are used, allowing treatment of contaminants too deep below the ground surface for conventional trench-and-fill technologies. A proof-of-principle field experiment was conducted in September 1995 at a chromate (hexavalent chromium) contaminated ground water site on the Hanford Site in Washington. The test created a 15 m diameter cylindrical treatment zone. The three phases of the test consisted of (1) injection of 77,000 L of buffered sodium dithionite solution in 17.1 hours, (2) reaction for 18.5 hours, and (3) withdrawal of 375,000 L in 83 hours. The withdrawal phase recovered 87% to 90% of the reaction products. Analysis of post-experimental sediment cores indicated that 60% to 100% of the available reactive iron in the treated zone was reduced. The longevity of the reduced zone is estimated between seven and 12 years based on the post-experiment core samples. Three and half years after the field test, the treatment zone remains anoxic, and hexavalent chromium levels have been reduced from 0.060 mg/L to below detection limits (0.008 mg/L). Additionally, no significant permeability changes have been detected during any phase of the experiment.

  6. Observation and manipulation of subsurface hydride in Pd{111} and its effect on surface chemical, physical, and electronic properties

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, E. Charles H.; Fernández-Torres, Luis C.; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U.; Mantooth, Brent A.; Nevin, Ryan M.; Weiss, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    We report the observation and manipulation of hydrogen atoms beneath the surface of a Pd{111} crystal by using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. These subsurface hydride sites have been postulated to have critical roles in hydrogen storage, metal embrittlement, fuel cells, and catalytic reactions, but they have been neither observed directly nor selectively populated previously. We demonstrate that the subsurface region of Pd can be populated with hydrogen atoms from the bulk by applying voltage pulses from a scanning tunneling microscope tip. This phenomenon is explained with an inelastic excitation mechanism, whereby hydrogen atoms in the bulk are excited by tunneling electrons and are promoted to more stable sites in the subsurface region. We show that this selectively placed subsurface hydride affects the electronic, geometric, and chemical properties of the surface. Specifically, we observed the effects of hydride formation on surface deformation and charge and on adsorbed hydrogen on the surface. Hydrogen segregation and overlayer vacancy ordering on the Pd{111} have been characterized and explained in terms of the surface changes attributable to selective hydrogen occupation of subsurface hydride sites in Pd{111}. PMID:16322103

  7. Observation and manipulation of subsurface hydride in Pd[111] and its effect on surface chemical, physical, and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Sykes, E Charles H; Fernández-Torres, Luis C; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U; Mantooth, Brent A; Nevin, Ryan M; Weiss, Paul S

    2005-12-13

    We report the observation and manipulation of hydrogen atoms beneath the surface of a Pd[111] crystal by using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. These subsurface hydride sites have been postulated to have critical roles in hydrogen storage, metal embrittlement, fuel cells, and catalytic reactions, but they have been neither observed directly nor selectively populated previously. We demonstrate that the subsurface region of Pd can be populated with hydrogen atoms from the bulk by applying voltage pulses from a scanning tunneling microscope tip. This phenomenon is explained with an inelastic excitation mechanism, whereby hydrogen atoms in the bulk are excited by tunneling electrons and are promoted to more stable sites in the subsurface region. We show that this selectively placed subsurface hydride affects the electronic, geometric, and chemical properties of the surface. Specifically, we observed the effects of hydride formation on surface deformation and charge and on adsorbed hydrogen on the surface. Hydrogen segregation and overlayer vacancy ordering on the Pd[111] have been characterized and explained in terms of the surface changes attributable to selective hydrogen occupation of subsurface hydride sites in Pd[111]. PMID:16322103

  8. Magnetic and optical holonomic manipulation of colloids, structures and topological defects in liquid crystals for characterization of mesoscale self-assembly and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, Michael C. M.

    Colloidal systems find important applications ranging from fabrication of photonic crystals to direct probing of phenomena encountered in atomic crystals and glasses; topics of great interest for physicists exploring a broad range of scientific, industrial and biomedical fields. The ability to accurately control particles of mesoscale size in various liquid host media is usually accomplished through optical trapping methods, which suffer limitations intrinsic to trap laser intensity and force generation. Other limitations are due to colloid properties, such as optical absorptivity, and host properties, such as viscosity, opacity and structure. Therefore, alternative and/or novel methods of colloidal manipulation are of utmost importance in order to advance the state of the art in technical applications and fundamental science. In this thesis, I demonstrate a magnetic-optical holonomic control system to manipulate magnetic and optical colloids in liquid crystals and show that the elastic structure inherent to nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals may be used to assist in tweezing of particles in a manner impossible in other media. Furthermore, I demonstrate the utility of this manipulation in characterizing the structure and microrheology of liquid crystals, and elucidating the energetics and dynamics of colloids interacting with these structures. I also demonstrate the utility of liquid crystal systems as a table top model system to probe topological defects in a manner that may lead to insights into topologically related phenomena in other fields, such as early universe cosmology, sub-atomic and high energy systems, or Skrymionic structures. I explore the interaction of colloid surface anchoring with the structure inherent in cholesteric liquid crystals, and how this affects the periodic dynamics and localization metastability of spherical colloids undergoing a "falling" motion within the sample. These so called "metastable states" cause colloidal dynamics to

  9. Probing self assembly in biological mixed colloids by SANS, deuteration and molecular manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Hoffman, A.; Alkan-Onyuksel, H.

    1994-12-31

    Small-angle neutron scattering was used to obtain information on the form and molecular arrangement of particles in mixed colloids of bile salts with phosphatidylcholine, and bile salts with monoolein. Both types of systems showed the same general characteristics. The particle form was highly dependent on total lipid concentration. At the highest concentrations the particles were globular mixed micelles with an overall size of 50{Angstrom}. As the concentration was reduced the mixed micelles elongated, becoming rodlike with diameter about 50{Angstrom}. The rods had a radial core-shell structure in which the phosphatidylcholine or monoolein fatty tails were arranged radially to form the core with the headgroups pointing outward to form the shell. The bile salts were at the interface between the shell and core with the hydrophilic parts facing outward as part of the shell. The lengths of the rods increased and became more polydispersed with dilution. At sufficiently low concentrations the mixed micelles transformed into single bilayer vesicles. These results give insight on the physiological function of bile and on the rules governing the self assembly of bile particles in the hepatic duct and the small intestine.

  10. Manipulation of long-term dynamics in a colloidal active matter system using speckle light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pince, Ercag; Velu, Sabareesh K. P.; Callegari, Agnese; Elahi, Parviz; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni; Volpe, Giorgio

    Particles undergoing a stochastic motion within a disordered medium is a ubiquitous physical and biological phenomena. Examples can be given from organelles performing tasks in the cytoplasm to large animals moving in patchy environment. Here, we use speckle light fields to study the anomalous diffusion in an active matter system consisting of micron-sized silica particles(diameter 5 μm) and motile bacterial cells (E. coli). The speckle light fields are generated by mode mixing inside a multimode optical fiber where a small amount of incident laser power is needed to obtain an effective disordered optical landscape for the purpose of optical manipulation. We experimentally show how complex potentials contribute to the long-term dynamics of the active matter system and observed an enhanced diffusion of particles interacting with the active bacterial bath in the speckle light fields. We showed that this effect can be tuned and controlled by varying the intensity and the statistical properties of the speckle pattern. Potentially, these results could be of interest for many technological applications, such as the manipulation of microparticles inside optically disordered media of biological interest.

  11. Manipulation of subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ using a scanning tunneling microscope

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stollenwerk, A. J.; Hurley, N.; Beck, B.; Spurgeon, K.; Kidd, T. E.; Gu, G.

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we present evidence that subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ can be manipulated with nanometer precision using a scanning tunneling microscope. High resolution images indicate that most of the carbon particles remain subsurface after transport observable as a local increase in height as the particle pushes up on the surface. Tunneling spectra in the vicinity of these protrusions exhibit semiconducting characteristics with a band gap of approximately 1.8 eV, indicating that the incorporation of carbon locally alters the electronic properties near the surface.

  12. Phase diagram of dipolar hard and soft spheres: manipulation of colloidal crystal structures by an external field.

    PubMed

    Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2005-04-01

    Phase diagrams of hard and soft spheres with a fixed dipole moment are determined by calculating the Helmholtz free energy using simulations. The pair potential is given by a dipole-dipole interaction plus a hard-core and a repulsive Yukawa potential for soft spheres. Our system models colloids in an external electric or magnetic field, with hard spheres corresponding to uncharged and soft spheres to charged colloids. The phase diagram of dipolar hard spheres shows fluid, face-centered-cubic (fcc), hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), and body-centered-tetragonal (bct) phases. The phase diagram of dipolar soft spheres exhibits, in addition to the above mentioned phases, a body-centered-orthorhombic (bco) phase, and it agrees well with the experimental phase diagram [Nature (London) 421, 513 (2003)]. Our results show that bulk hcp, bct, and bco crystals can be realized experimentally by applying an external field. PMID:15904046

  13. COLLOIDAL CONSIDERATIONS IN GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AND CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT PREDICTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The association of contaminants with suspended colloidal material in groundwater is a possible transport mechanism and a complicating factor for accurate estimations of the aqueous geochemistry of subsurface systems. esearch to date indicates colloidal facilitated transport of co...

  14. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the incre...

  15. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  16. Manipulation of gold colloidal nanoparticles with atomic force microscopy in dynamic mode: influence of particle–substrate chemistry and morphology, and of operating conditions

    PubMed Central

    Darwich, Samer; Rao, Akshata; Gnecco, Enrico; Jayaraman, Shrisudersan; Haidara, Hamidou

    2011-01-01

    Summary One key component in the assembly of nanoparticles is their precise positioning to enable the creation of new complex nano-objects. Controlling the nanoscale interactions is crucial for the prediction and understanding of the behaviour of nanoparticles (NPs) during their assembly. In the present work, we have manipulated bare and functionalized gold nanoparticles on flat and patterned silicon and silicon coated substrates with dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). Under ambient conditions, the particles adhere to silicon until a critical drive amplitude is reached by oscillations of the probing tip. Beyond that threshold, the particles start to follow different directions, depending on their geometry, size and adhesion to the substrate. Higher and respectively, lower mobility was observed when the gold particles were coated with methyl (–CH3) and hydroxyl (–OH) terminated thiol groups. This major result suggests that the adhesion of the particles to the substrate is strongly reduced by the presence of hydrophobic interfaces. The influence of critical parameters on the manipulation was investigated and discussed viz. the shape, size and grafting of the NPs, as well as the surface chemistry and the patterning of the substrate, and finally the operating conditions (temperature, humidity and scan velocity). Whereas the operating conditions and substrate structure are shown to have a strong effect on the mobility of the particles, we did not find any differences when manipulating ordered vs random distributed particles. PMID:21977418

  17. Manipulation of gold colloidal nanoparticles with atomic force microscopy in dynamic mode: influence of particle-substrate chemistry and morphology, and of operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Darwich, Samer; Mougin, Karine; Rao, Akshata; Gnecco, Enrico; Jayaraman, Shrisudersan; Haidara, Hamidou

    2011-01-01

    One key component in the assembly of nanoparticles is their precise positioning to enable the creation of new complex nano-objects. Controlling the nanoscale interactions is crucial for the prediction and understanding of the behaviour of nanoparticles (NPs) during their assembly. In the present work, we have manipulated bare and functionalized gold nanoparticles on flat and patterned silicon and silicon coated substrates with dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). Under ambient conditions, the particles adhere to silicon until a critical drive amplitude is reached by oscillations of the probing tip. Beyond that threshold, the particles start to follow different directions, depending on their geometry, size and adhesion to the substrate. Higher and respectively, lower mobility was observed when the gold particles were coated with methyl (-CH(3)) and hydroxyl (-OH) terminated thiol groups. This major result suggests that the adhesion of the particles to the substrate is strongly reduced by the presence of hydrophobic interfaces. The influence of critical parameters on the manipulation was investigated and discussed viz. the shape, size and grafting of the NPs, as well as the surface chemistry and the patterning of the substrate, and finally the operating conditions (temperature, humidity and scan velocity). Whereas the operating conditions and substrate structure are shown to have a strong effect on the mobility of the particles, we did not find any differences when manipulating ordered vs random distributed particles. PMID:21977418

  18. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  19. Manipulation of subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ using a scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Stollenwerk, A. J.; Hurley, N.; Beck, B.; Spurgeon, K.; Kidd, T. E.; Gu, G.

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we present evidence that subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ can be manipulated with nanometer precision using a scanning tunneling microscope. High resolution images indicate that most of the carbon particles remain subsurface after transport observable as a local increase in height as the particle pushes up on the surface. Tunneling spectra in the vicinity of these protrusions exhibit semiconducting characteristics with a band gap of approximately 1.8 eV, indicating that the incorporation of carbon locally alters the electronic properties near the surface.

  20. Hexadecapolar Colloids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-02-11

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and forbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms’ displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. We describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Becausemore » of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and report the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.« less

  1. Colloidal polypyrrole

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized aromatic heterocyclic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a vinyl pyridine-containing polymer and dopant anions and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are disclosed.

  2. Hexadecapolar colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-02-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of `colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.

  3. Hexadecapolar colloids

    PubMed Central

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously. PMID:26864184

  4. Hexadecapolar colloids.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2016-01-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of 'colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously. PMID:26864184

  5. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the

  6. Topological colloids.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Liu, Qingkun; He, Sailing; Kamien, Randall D; Kusner, Robert B; Lubensky, Tom C; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2013-01-10

    Smoke, fog, jelly, paints, milk and shaving cream are common everyday examples of colloids, a type of soft matter consisting of tiny particles dispersed in chemically distinct host media. Being abundant in nature, colloids also find increasingly important applications in science and technology, ranging from direct probing of kinetics in crystals and glasses to fabrication of third-generation quantum-dot solar cells. Because naturally occurring colloids have a shape that is typically determined by minimization of interfacial tension (for example, during phase separation) or faceted crystal growth, their surfaces tend to have minimum-area spherical or topologically equivalent shapes such as prisms and irregular grains (all continuously deformable--homeomorphic--to spheres). Although toroidal DNA condensates and vesicles with different numbers of handles can exist and soft matter defects can be shaped as rings and knots, the role of particle topology in colloidal systems remains unexplored. Here we fabricate and study colloidal particles with different numbers of handles and genus g ranging from 1 to 5. When introduced into a nematic liquid crystal--a fluid made of rod-like molecules that spontaneously align along the so-called 'director'--these particles induce three-dimensional director fields and topological defects dictated by colloidal topology. Whereas electric fields, photothermal melting and laser tweezing cause transformations between configurations of particle-induced structures, three-dimensional nonlinear optical imaging reveals that topological charge is conserved and that the total charge of particle-induced defects always obeys predictions of the Gauss-Bonnet and Poincaré-Hopf index theorems. This allows us to establish and experimentally test the procedure for assignment and summation of topological charges in three-dimensional director fields. Our findings lay the groundwork for new applications of colloids and liquid crystals that range from

  7. Applications of Geothermally-Produced Colloidal Silica in Reservoir Management - Smart Gels

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hunt, Jonathan

    2013-01-31

    for subsurface applications. Colloidal silica solutions exist as low-viscosity fluids during their “induction period” but then undergo a rapid increase in viscosity (gelation) to form a solid gel. The length of the induction period can be manipulated by varying the properties of the solution, such as silica concentration and colloid size. We believe it is possible to produce colloidal silica gels suitable for use as diverting agents for blocking undesirable fast-paths which result in short-circuiting the EGS once hydraulic fracturing has been deployed. In addition, the gels could be used in conventional geothermal fields to increase overall energy recovery by modifying flow.

  8. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  9. Influence of heteroaggregation processes between intrinsic colloids and carrier colloids on cerium(III) mobility through fractured carbonate rocks.

    PubMed

    Tran, Emily; Klein Ben-David, Ofra; Teutch, Nadya; Weisbrod, Noam

    2016-09-01

    Colloid facilitated transport of radionuclides has been implicated as a major transport vector for leaked nuclear waste in the subsurface. Sorption of radionuclides onto mobile carrier colloids such as bentonite and humic acid often accelerates their transport through saturated rock fractures. Here, we employ column studies to investigate the impact of intrinsic, bentonite and humic acid colloids on the transport and recovery of Ce(III) through a fractured chalk core. Ce(III) recovery where either bentonite or humic colloids were added was 7.7-26.9% Ce for all experiments. Greater Ce(III) recovery was observed when both types of carrier colloids were present (25.4-37.4%). When only bentonite colloids were present, Ce(III) appeared to be fractionated between chemical sorption to the bentonite colloid surfaces and heteroaggregation of bentonite colloids with intrinsic carbonate colloids, precipitated naturally in solution. However, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and colloid stability experiments reveal that in suspensions of humic acid colloids, colloid-facilitated Ce(III) migration results only from the latter attachment mechanism rather than from chemical sorption. This observed heteroaggregation of different colloid types may be an important factor to consider when predicting potential mobility of leaked radionuclides from geological repositories for spent fuel located in carbonate rocks. PMID:27183207

  10. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole–dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single

  11. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon

  12. Colloidal polyaniline

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized amino-substituted aromatic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a random copolymer containing amino-benzene type moieties as side chain constituents, and dopant anions, and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are provided.

  13. Subsurface sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airborne or spaceborne electromagnetic systems used to detect subsurface features are discussed. Data are given as a function of resistivity of ground material, magnetic permeability of free space, and angular frequency. It was noted that resistivities vary with the water content and temperature.

  14. Subsurface Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Target areas for sinking base holes, underground pipelines, etc., can be identified with the assistance of NASA Ames developed technology, by Airborne Pipeline Services, Inc. Subsurface features are computer processed; the system can cover 250 miles a day and was first developed by Applied Science, Inc.

  15. Dielectrophoresis force of colloidal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hao; Ou-Yang, Daniel

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is the motion of a polarizable colloidal particle in a non­uniform electric field. The magnitude of the DEP force is known to be proportional to the gradient of E2. The DEP force also depends on the relative polarizability of the particle to that of the surrounding medium. Due to its ease of use, DEP has been proposed for a variety of applications to manipulate colloidal particles in a microfluidic setting. However, accurate measurements of the DEP force on colloidal nanoparticles are lacking. A new method is proposed to measure accurately the DEP potential force of colloidal nanoparticles by using confocal fluorescence imaging to determine the density distributions of dilute colloidal nanoparticle in a DEP potential force field. The DEP potential field can be calculated from the particle density distributions since the spatial distribution of the particle number density follows the Boltzmann distribution of the DEP potential energy. The validity of the measured DEP force is tested by examining the force as a function of the E field strength and particle size. The classic Maxwell­Wagner­O'Konski is found to be inadequate to fully describe the frequency dependence of the DEP force. NSF 0928299, Emulsion Polymer Institute, Department of Physics of Lehigh University.

  16. Cotransport of bismerthiazol and montmorillonite colloids in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chongyang; Wang, Hong; Lazouskaya, Volha; Du, Yichun; Lu, Weilan; Wu, Junxue; Zhang, Hongyan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2015-06-01

    While bismerthiazol [N,N‧-methylene-bis-(2-amino-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole)] is one of the most widely used bactericides, the transport of bismerthiazol in subsurface environments is unclear to date. Moreover, natural colloids are ubiquitous in the subsurface environments. The cotransport of bismerthiazol and natural colloids has not been investigated. This study conducted laboratory column experiments to examine the transport of bismerthiazol in saturated sand porous media both in the absence and presence of montmorillonite colloids. Results show that a fraction of bismerthiazol was retained in sand and the retention was higher at pH 7 than at pH 4 and 10. The retention did not change with ionic strength. The retention was attributed to the complex of bismerthiazol with metals/metal oxides on sand surfaces through ligand exchange. The transport of bismerthiazol was enhanced with montmorillonite colloids copresent in the solutions and, concurrently, the transport of montmorillonite colloids was facilitated by the bismerthiazol. The transport of montmorillonite colloids was enhanced likely because the bismerthiazol and the colloids competed for the attachment/adsorption sites on collector surfaces and the presence of bismerthiazol changed the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies between colloids and collectors. The transport of bismerthiazol was inhibited if montmorillonite colloids were pre-deposited in sand because bismerthiazol could adsorb onto the colloid surfaces. The adsorbed bismerthiazol could be co-remobilized with the colloids from primary minima by decreasing ionic strength. Whereas colloid-facilitated transport of pesticides has been emphasized, our study implies that transport of colloids could also be facilitated by the presence of pesticides.

  17. MOBILIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS GENERATED FROM CEMENT LEACHATES MOVING THROUGH A SRS SANDY SEDIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Seaman, J.

    2011-09-20

    Naturally occurring mobile colloids are ubiquitous and are involved in many important processes in the subsurface zone. For example, colloid generation and subsequent mobilization represent a possible mechanism for the transport of contaminants including radionuclides in the subsurface environments. For colloid-facilitated transport to be significant, three criteria must be met: (1) colloids must be generated; (2) contaminants must associate with the colloids preferentially to the immobile solid phase (aquifer); and (3) colloids must be transported through the groundwater or in subsurface environments - once these colloids start moving they become 'mobile colloids'. Although some experimental investigations of particle release in natural porous media have been conducted, the detailed mechanisms of release and re-deposition of colloidal particles within natural porous media are poorly understood. Even though this vector of transport is known, the extent of its importance is not known yet. Colloid-facilitated transport of trace radionuclides has been observed in the field, thus demonstrating a possible radiological risk associated with the colloids. The objective of this study was to determine if cementitious leachate would promote the in situ mobilization of natural colloidal particles from a SRS sandy sediment. The intent was to determine whether cementitious surface or subsurface structure would create plumes that could produce conditions conducive to sediment dispersion and mobile colloid generation. Column studies were conducted and the cation chemistries of influents and effluents were analyzed by ICP-OES, while the mobilized colloids were characterized using XRD, SEM, EDX, PSD and Zeta potential. The mobilization mechanisms of colloids in a SRS sandy sediment by cement leachates were studied.

  18. Soil colloidal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent understanding that organic and inorganic contaminants are often transported via colloidal particles has increased interest in colloid science. The primary importance of colloids in soil science stems from their surface reactivity and charge characteristics. Characterizations of size, shape,...

  19. Colloid suspension stability and transport through unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, M.A.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-04-01

    Contaminant transport is traditionally modeled in a two-phase system: a mobile aqueous phase and an immobile solid phase. Over the last 15 years, there has been an increasing awareness of a third, mobile solid phase. This mobile solid phase, or mobile colloids, are organic or inorganic submicron-sized particles that move with groundwater flow. When colloids are present, the net effect on radionuclide transport is that radionuclides can move faster through the system. It is not known whether mobile colloids exist in the subsurface environment of the Hanford Site. Furthermore, it is not known if mobile colloids would likely exist in a plume emanating from a Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal site. No attempt was made in this study to ascertain whether colloids would form. Instead, experiments and calculations were conducted to evaluate the likelihood that colloids, if formed, would remain in suspension and move through saturated and unsaturated sediments. The objectives of this study were to evaluate three aspects of colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides as they specifically relate to the LLW Performance Assessment. These objectives were: (1) determine if the chemical conditions likely to exist in the near and far field of the proposed disposal site are prone to induce flocculation (settling of colloids from suspension) or dispersion of naturally occurring Hanford colloids, (2) identify the important mechanisms likely involved in the removal of colloids from a Hanford sediment, and (3) determine if colloids can move through unsaturated porous media.

  20. Colloids at NAPL-Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Thomas; Metz, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids in subsurface are relevant in the scope of contaminated sites as well as for enhanced oil recovery. In both cases colloids and engineered nanoparticles are applied to increase the efficiency of NAPL removal. Particle tracking experiments using fluoresecent latex beads and opaque particles have been run in micromodels mimicking the pore structure of subsurface media. The results show that the interface between NAPL and water is highly dynamic, especially in its early stage. There is a distinct circular flow pattern at the interface, effectively increasing the interfacial area. Concentration gradients measured with Raman Microspectrometry at low Peclet numbers suggest that the mass transfer of dissolved contaminants from the NAPL into the water is highly affected by the interface dynamics. On the other hand the interfaces themselves are less accessible, which has implications for the remediation of contaminated sites.

  1. Theoretical and experimental investigations of ferrofluids for guiding and detecting liquids in the subsurface. FY 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Borglin, S.E.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Becker, A.

    1998-03-01

    Ferrofluids are stable colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles in various carrier liquids with high saturation magnetizations, which can be manipulated in virtually any fashion, defying gravitational or viscous forces in response to external magnetic fields. In this report, the authors review the results of their investigation of the potential of ferrofluids (1) to accurately and effectively guide reactants (for in-situ treatment) or barrier liquids (low-viscosity permeation grouts) to contaminated target zones in the subsurface using electromagnetic forces, and (2) to trace the movement and position of liquids injected in the subsurface using geophysical methods. They investigate the use of ferrofluids to enhance the efficiency of in-situ treatment and waste containment through (a) accurate guidance and delivery of reagent liquids to the desired subsurface contamination targets and/or (b) effective sweeping of the contaminated zone as ferrofluids move from the application point to an attracting magnet/collection point. They also investigate exploiting the strong magnetic signature of ferrofluids to develop a method for monitoring of liquid movement and position during injection using electromagnetic methods. The authors demonstrated the ability to induce ferrofluid movement in response to a magnetic field, and measured the corresponding magnetopressure. They demonstrated the feasibility of using conventional magnetometry for detecting subsurface zones of various shapes containing ferrofluids for tracing liquids injected for remediation or barrier formation. Experiments involving spherical, cylindrical and horizontal slabs showed a very good agreement between predictions and measurements.

  2. Plutonium and Cesium Colloid Mediated Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhalfa, H.; Dittrich, T.; Reimus, P. W.; Ware, D.; Erdmann, B.; Wasserman, N. L.; Abdel-Fattah, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Plutonium and cesium have been released to the environment at many different locations worldwide and are present in spent fuel at significant levels. Accurate understanding of the mechanisms that control their fate and transport in the environment is important for the management of contaminated sites, for forensic applications, and for the development of robust repositories for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. Plutonium, which can be present in the environment in multiple oxidations states and various chemical forms including amorphous oxy(hydr)oxide phases, adsorbs/adheres very strongly to geological materials and is usually immobile in all its chemical forms. However, when associated with natural colloids, it has the potential to migrate significant distances from its point of release. Like plutonium, cesium is not very mobile and tends to remain adhered to geological materials near its release point, although its transport can be enhanced by natural colloids. However, the reactivity of plutonium and cesium are very different, so their colloid-mediated transport might be significantly different in subsurface environments. In this study, we performed controlled experiments in two identically-prepared columns; one dedicated to Pu and natural colloid transport experiments, and the other to Cs and colloid experiments. Multiple flow-through experiments were conducted in each column, with the effluent solutions being collected and re-injected into the same column two times to examine the persistence and scaling behavior of the natural colloids, Pu and Cs. The data show that that a significant fraction of colloids were retained in the first elution through each column, but the eluted colloids collected from the first run transported almost conservatively in subsequent runs. Plutonium transport tracked natural colloids in the first run but deviated from the transport of natural colloids in the second and third runs. Cesium transport tracked natural

  3. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  4. Methods for colloid transport visualization in pore networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Naoyuki; Kraft, Erika L.; Selker, John S.

    2006-12-01

    Prediction of colloid transport in the subsurface is relevant to researchers in a variety of fields such as contaminant transport, wastewater treatment, and bioremediation. Investigations have traditionally relied on column studies whereby mechanistic inferences must be drawn on the basis of colloid behavior at the outlet. Over the past decade, development of noninvasive visualization techniques based on visible light, magnetic resonance, and X rays have provided insight into a number of colloid transport mechanisms by enabling direct observation of individual colloids at the pore scale and colloid concentrations at longer length scales. As research focus shifts from transport of ideal colloids in ideal media such as glass beads to natural colloids in natural porous media, these noninvasive techniques will become increasingly useful for studying the collection of mechanisms at work in heterogeneous pore systems. It is useful at this juncture to review recent progress in colloid transport visualization as a starting point for further development of visualization tools to support investigation of colloids in natural systems. We briefly discuss characteristics of visualization systems currently used to study colloid transport in porous media and review representative microscale and mesoscale visualization studies conducted over the past decade, with additional attention given to two optical visualization systems being developed by the authors.

  5. Characterization of uranium corrosion product colloids by dynamic light scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, C.; Bowers, D.; Goldberg, M.; Shelton-Davis, C.

    2000-11-16

    The Department of Energy plans to dispose of approximately 2100 metric tons of spent metallic uranium fuel in the mined repository at Yucca Mountain. Laboratory studies at Argonne National Laboratory have shown that corrosion of metallic uranium fuel with groundwater generates significant quantities of stable colloids. This finding is considered very important in light of the recent report (1) of rapid subsurface transport of radionuclides at the Nevada Test Site via colloids. Thus, sparingly soluble radionuclides can be transported with the colloids through the subsurface aqueous environment to much greater distances than is predicted based on the aqueous volubility of the radionuclides alone. Accordingly, characterization of colloids generated by fuel corrosion is necessary for assessing the long-term fate and transport of radionuclides in the repository environment.

  6. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  7. Colloidal Gelation-2 and Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition-2 Investigations Conducted on STS-95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Monica T.

    2000-01-01

    The Colloidal Gelation-2 (CGEL 2) and Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition-2 (CDOT 2) investigations flew on Space Shuttle Discovery mission STS-95 (also known as the John Glenn Mission). These investigations were part of a series of colloid experiments designed to help scientists answer fundamental science questions and reduce the trial and error involved in developing new and better materials. Industries dealing with semiconductors, electro-optics, ceramics, and composites are just a few that may benefit from this knowledge. The goal of the CGEL 2 investigation was to study the fundamental properties of colloids to help scientists better understand their nature and make them more useful for technology. Colloids consist of very small (submicron) particles suspended in a fluid. They play a critical role in the technology of this country, finding uses in materials ranging from paints and coatings to drugs, cosmetics, food, and drink. Although these products are routinely produced and used, there are still many aspects of their behavior about which scientists know little. Understanding their structures may allow scientists to manipulate the physical properties of colloids (a process called "colloidal engineering") to produce new materials and products. Colloid research may even improve the processing of known products to enhance their desirable properties.

  8. Modeling colloid and microorganism transport and release with transients in solution ionic strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transport and fate of colloids, microorganisms, and nanoparticles in subsurface environments is strongly influenced by transients in solution ionic strength (IS). A sophisticated dual-permeability transport model that is capable of simulating exponential, hyperexponential, uniform, and nonmonot...

  9. Spatially and temporally reconfigurable assembly of colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngri; Shah, Aayush A.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2014-04-01

    The self-assembly of colloidal crystals is important to the production of materials with functional optical, mechanical and conductive properties. Yet, self-assembly methods are limited by their slow kinetics and lack of structural control in space and time. Refinements such as templating and directed assembly partially address the problem, albeit by introducing fixed surface features such as templates or electrodes. A template-free method to reconfigure colloidal crystals simultaneously in three-dimensional space and time would better align work in colloidal assembly with materials applications. Here, we report a photo-induced assembly method that yields regions either filled with colloidal crystals or completely devoid of colloids. The origin of the effect is found to be electrophoresis of colloids generated by photochemistry at an indium tin oxide-coated substrate. Simple optical manipulations are applied to reconfigure these assembly and depletion regions. Thus, the method represents a new kind of template-free, reconfigurable three-dimensional photolithography.

  10. Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russel, W. B.; Saville, D. A.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1992-03-01

    The book covers the physical side of colloid science from the individual forces acting between submicron particles suspended in a liquid through the resulting equilibrium and dynamic properties. The relevant forces include Brownian motion, electrostatic repulsion, dispersion attraction, both attraction and repulsion due to soluble polymer, and viscous forces due to relative motion between the particles and the liquid. The balance among Brownian motion and the interparticle forces decides the questions of stability and phase behavior. Imposition of external fields produces complex effects, i.e. electrokinetic phenomena (electric field), sedimentation (gravitational field), diffusion (concentration/chemical potential gradient), and non-Newtonian rheology (shear field). The treatment aims to impart a sound, quantitative understanding based on fundamental theory and experiments with well-characterized model systems. This broad grasp of the fundamentals lends insight and helps to develop the intuitive sense needed to isolate essential features of technological problems and design critical experiments. Some exposure to fluid mechanics, statistical mechanics, and electricity and magnetism is assumed, but each subject is reintroduced in a self-contained manner.

  11. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and...

  12. Photonic crystals, light manipulation, and imaging in complex nematic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravnik, Miha; Å timulak, Mitja; Mur, Urban; Čančula, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-03-01

    Three selected approaches for manipulation of light by complex nematic colloidal and non-colloidal structures are presented using different own custom developed theoretical and modelling approaches. Photonic crystals bands of distorted cholesteric liquid crystal helix and of nematic colloidal opals are presented, also revealing distinct photonic modes and density of states. Light propagation along half-integer nematic disclinations is shown with changes in the light polarization of various winding numbers. As third, simulated light transmission polarization micrographs of nematic torons are shown, offering a new insight into the complex structure characterization. Finally, this work is a contribution towards using complex soft matter in optics and photonics for advanced light manipulation.

  13. Soil-borne mobile colloids as influenced by water flow and organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.; Bertsch, P.M.; Adriano, D.C.; Miller, W.P. |

    1993-06-01

    Paucity of understanding mechanisms relevant to the generation of subsurface mobile colloids is a major limitation to our current knowledge of colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. To evaluate the roles of natural organic materials and pore water velocity on mobile colloid generation, colloids generated from 14-m{sup 3} lysimeters containing reconstructed soil profiles were collected and characterized. Colloids generated during low flow rates were 1030% less abundant, contained at least 65% more iron oxides and gibbsite, were 80% smaller, and had 40% greater electrophoretic mobility than colloids generated during higher flow rates. Quartz, kaolinite, and hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite were enriched by at least 32% in colloids generated during faster flow rates. Mobile colloid surface charge was greatly enhanced by organic carbon (OC) coatings. Concentrations of OC associated with mobile colloids were higher than or equal to the OC concentrations existing in the bulk soils from which the mobile colloids were derived. The profound effects of pore water flow rate and OC on mobile colloid generation introduces complexity to this potentially critical, yet poorly understood, component of subsurface contaminant transport. 41 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Inventions Utilizing Microfluidics and Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, David W.; Gong, Tieying; Oakey, John; Terray, Alexander V.; Wu, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Several related inventions pertain to families of devices that utilize microfluidics and/or colloidal particles to obtain useful physical effects. The families of devices can be summarized as follows: (1) Microfluidic pumps and/or valves wherein colloidal-size particles driven by electrical, magnetic, or optical fields serve as the principal moving parts that propel and/or direct the affected flows. (2) Devices that are similar to the aforementioned pumps and/or valves except that they are used to manipulate light instead of fluids. The colloidal particles in these devices are substantially constrained to move in a plane and are driven to spatially order them into arrays that function, variously, as waveguides, filters, or switches for optical signals. (3) Devices wherein the ultra-laminar nature of microfluidic flows is exploited to effect separation, sorting, or filtering of colloidal particles or biological cells in suspension. (4) Devices wherein a combination of confinement and applied electrical and/or optical fields forces the colloidal particles to become arranged into three-dimensional crystal lattices. Control of the colloidal crystalline structures could be exploited to control diffraction of light. (5) Microfluidic devices, incorporating fluid waveguides, wherein switching of flows among different paths would be accompanied by switching of optical signals.

  15. Robot Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Space Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (Canadarm) is a 50 foot robot arm used to deploy, retrieve or repair satellites in orbit. Initial spinoff version is designed to remove, inspect and replace large components of Ontario Hydro's CANDU nuclear reactors, which supply 50 percent of Ontario Hydro's total power reduction. CANDU robot is the first of SPAR's Remote Manipulator Systems intended for remote materials handling operations in nuclear servicing, chemical processing, smelting and manufacturing. Inco Limited used remote manipulator for remote control mining equipment to enhance safety and productivity of Inco's hardrock mining operations. System not only improves safety in a hazardous operation that costs more than a score of lives annually, it also increases productivity fourfold. Remote Manipulator System Division is also manufacturing a line of industrial robots and developing additional system for nuclear servicing, mining, defense and space operations.

  16. Colloidal Silver Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be dangerous to your health. What the Science Says About the Safety and Side Effects of ... homemade and commercial colloidal silver products. What the Science Says About the Effectiveness of Colloidal Silver Scientific ...

  17. What Is a Colloid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the properties of colloids, listing those commonly encountered (such as whipped cream, mayonnaise, and fog). Also presents several experiments using colloids and discusses "Silly Putty," a colloid with viscoelastic properties whose counterintuitive properties result from its mixture of polymers. (DH)

  18. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2013-08-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called ``colloid antibodies'', were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating the targeted microbial cells. We successfully demonstrated the shape and size recognition between such colloidal imprints and matching microbial cells. High percentage of binding events of colloidal imprints with the size matching target particles was achieved. We demonstrated selective binding of colloidal imprints to target microbial cells in a binary mixture of cells of different shapes and sizes, which also resulted in high binding selectivity. We explored the role of the electrostatic interactions between the target cells and their colloid imprints by pre-coating both of them with polyelectrolytes. Selective binding occurred predominantly in the case of opposite surface charges of the colloid cell imprint and the targeted cells. The mechanism of the recognition is based on the amplification of the surface adhesion in the case of shape and size match due to the increased contact area between the target cell and the colloidal imprint. We also tested the selective binding for colloid imprints of particles of fixed shape and varying sizes. The concept of cell recognition by colloid imprints could be used for development of colloid antibodies for shape-selective binding of microbes. Such colloid antibodies could be additionally functionalized with surface groups to enhance their binding efficiency to cells of specific shape and deliver a drug payload directly to their surface or allow them to be manipulated using external fields. They could benefit the pharmaceutical industry in developing selective antimicrobial therapies and formulations.

  19. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  20. Electrohydrodynamically patterned colloidal crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, Ryan C. (Inventor); Poon, Hak F. (Inventor); Xiao, Yi (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for assembling patterned crystalline arrays of colloidal particles using ultraviolet illumination of an optically-sensitive semiconducting anode while using the anode to apply an electronic field to the colloidal particles. The ultraviolet illumination increases current density, and consequently, the flow of the colloidal particles. As a result, colloidal particles can be caused to migrate from non-illuminated areas of the anode to illuminated areas of the anode. Selective illumination of the anode can also be used to permanently affix colloidal crystals to illuminated areas of the anode while not affixing them to non-illuminated areas of the anode.

  1. Infrared colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals: synthesis, properties, and photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huiying; Tsang, Sai-Wing

    2012-04-01

    Simple solution phase, catalyst-free synthetic approaches that offer monodispersed, well passivated, and non-aggregated colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have presented many research opportunities not only for fundamental science but also for technological applications. The ability to tune the electrical and optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals by manipulating the size and shape of the crystals during the colloidal synthesis provides potential benefits to a variety of applications including photovoltaic devices, light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, biological imaging/labeling, and more. Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals and the achievements in colloidal PbS or PbSe nanocrystals solar cells have demonstrated the promising application of infrared-emitting colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals in photovoltaic devices. Here, we review recent progress in the synthesis and optical properties of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals. We focus in particular upon the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe nanocrystals by using different precursors and various stabilizing surfactants for the growth of the colloidal nanocrystals. We also summarize recent advancements in the field of colloidal nanocrystals solar cells based on colloidal PbS and PbSe nanocrystals. PMID:22382898

  2. Underwater manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1993-04-20

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer [plus minus]45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer [plus minus]10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  3. Underwater manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus provided for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer {plus_minus} 45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer {plus_minus} 10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  4. Underwater manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Schrum, Phillip B.; Cohen, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is provided for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer .+-.45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer .+-.10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  5. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” - often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  6. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    PubMed Central

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level. PMID:26927706

  7. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Viswanathan; P. Reimus

    2003-09-05

    Colloid retardation is influenced by the attachment and detachment of colloids from immobile surfaces. This analysis demonstrates the development of parameters necessary to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids and, hence, retardation in both fractured tuff and porous alluvium. Field and experimental data specific to fractured tuff are used for the analysis of colloid retardation in fractured tuff. Experimental data specific to colloid transport in alluvial material from Yucca Mountain as well as bacteriophage field studies in alluvial material, which are thought to be good analogs for colloid transport, are used to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids in the alluvial material. There are no alternative scientific approaches or technical methods for calculating these retardation factors.

  8. Microfluidic colloid filtration.

    PubMed

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J C; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today's water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a "cake layer" - often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level. PMID:26927706

  9. Colloidal deposition and aggregation in the presence of charged collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Behnam; Rajendran, Arvind; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Colloids; complex fluid laboratory Team

    2014-11-01

    The transport of colloidal particles in porous media is of great importance in sub-surface environments. These colloidal particles facilitate transport of contaminants, low-soluble compounds and metals in groundwater. Here, we have studied transport dynamics of colloids inside porous medium using a combination of column experiments and batch studies. Polystyrene latex beads (100 nm), as colloidal agents, and soda lime glass beads, as porous medium, are employed in this work. On the one hand, batch experiments are undertaken to better understand concurrent aggregation and deposition of particles. On the other hand, column experiments are performed to understand the flow induced deposition of colloidal particles in the interstitial voids. Effect of collector surface preparation, pH, colloidal suspension concentration and collector beads mass is studied. Chemical release and shear field are revealed as two significant factors lying behind the coagulation of colloidal particles. These findings help us to better distinguish mechanisms responsible for the transport of colloids inside porous medium. We are collaborators. Behnam Sadri is master of science student while two other professor are supervising his research work.

  10. Size-dependent Turbidimatric Quantification of Mobile Colloids in Field Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.; Meng, X.; Jin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Natural colloids, often defined as entities with sizes < 1.0 μm, have attracted much research attention because of their ability to facilitate the transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment. However, due to their small size and generally low concentrations in field samples, quantification of mobile colloids, especially the smaller fractions (< 0.45 µm), which are operationally defined as dissolved, is largely impeded and hence the natural colloidal pool is greatly overlooked and underestimated. The main objectives of this study are to: (1) develop an experimentally and economically efficient methodology to quantify natural colloids in different size fractions (0.1-0.45 and 0.45-1 µm); (2) quantify mobile colloids including small colloids, < 0.45 µm particularly, in different natural aquatic samples. We measured and generated correlations between mass concentration and turbidity of colloid suspensions, made by extracting and fractionating water dispersible colloids in 37 soils from different areas in the U.S. and Denmark, for colloid size fractions 0.1-0.45 and 0.45-1 µm. Results show that the correlation between turbidity and colloid mass concentration is largely affected by colloid size and iron content, indicating the need to generate different correlations for colloids with constrained size range and iron content. This method enabled quick quantification of colloid concentrations in a large number of field samples collected from freshwater, wetland and estuaries in different size fractions. As a general trend, we observed high concentrations of colloids in the < 0.45 µm fraction, which constitutes a significant percentage of the total mobile colloidal pool (< 1 µm). This observation suggests that the operationally defined cut-off size for "dissolved" phase can greatly underestimate colloid concentration therefore the role that colloids play in the transport of associated contaminants or other elements.

  11. Reconfigurable multi-scale colloidal assembly on excluded volume patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Tara D.; Yang, Yuguang; Everett, W. Neil; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    The ability to create multi-scale, periodic colloidal assemblies with unique properties is important to emerging applications. Dynamically manipulating colloidal structures via tunable kT-scale attraction can provide the opportunity to create particle-based nano- and microstructured materials that are reconfigurable. Here, we report a novel tactic to obtain reconfigurable, multi-scale, periodic colloidal assemblies by combining thermoresponsive depletant particles and patterned topographical features that, together, reversibly mediate local kT-scale depletion interactions. This method is demonstrated in optical microscopy experiments to produce colloidal microstructures that reconfigure between well-defined ordered structures and disordered fluid states as a function of temperature and pattern feature depth. These results are well described by Monte Carlo simulations using theoretical depletion potentials that include patterned excluded volume. Ultimately, the approach reported here can be extended to control the size, shape, orientation, and microstructure of colloidal assemblies on multiple lengths scales and on arbitrary pre-defined pattern templates.

  12. Injection of colloidal Fe{sup 0} particles in sand with shear-thinning fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.; Gilmore, T.J.

    1997-08-01

    A novel approach to emplacing chemically reactive barriers is the injection of zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) colloids into the subsurface. A difficulty encountered in this approach is that the dense Fe{sup 0} colloids settle out of solution with time, decreasing the distance the colloids can be injected into the subsurface. Studies were conducted to evaluate if several viscous shear-thinning fluids could enhance Fe{sup 0} colloid emplacement in porous media. Aqueous solutions of three nontoxic polymers at different concentrations were investigated: a synthetic high molecular weight polymer [vinyl polymer, (VP)], a biopolymer (gum xanthan, GX), and a cellulose-type polymer (carboxymethyl cellulose, CMC). The use of shear-thinning fluids greatly increases the mobility of the colloidal Fe{sup 0} suspensions in porous media. VP was superior to GX and GMC because the VP suspensions produced the lowest back pressures, resulting in the highest hydraulic conductivities.

  13. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation

  14. Method for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trau, Mathias (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method apparatus is provided for electrophoretically depositing particles onto an electrode, and electrohydrodynamically assembling the particles into crystalline structures. Specifically, the present method and apparatus creates a current flowing through a solution to cause identically charged electrophoretically deposited colloidal particles to attract each other over very large distances (<5 particle diameters) on the surface of electrodes to form two-dimensional colloidal crystals. The attractive force can be created with both DC and AC fields and can modulated by adjusting either the field strength or frequency of the current. Modulating this lateral attraction between the particles causes the reversible formation of two-dimensional fluid and crystalline colloidal states on the electrode surface. Further manipulation allows for the formation of two or three-dimensional colloidal crystals, as well as more complex designed structures. Once the required structures are formed, these three-dimension colloidal crystals can be permanently frozen or glued by controlled coagulation induced by to the applied field to form a stable crystalline structure.

  15. Apparatus for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trau, Mathias (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method apparatus is provided for electrophoretically depositing particles onto an electrode, and electrohydrodynamically assembling the particles into crystalline structures. Specifically, the present method and apparatus creates a current flowing through a solution to cause identically charged electrophoretically deposited colloidal particles to attract each other over very large distances (<5 particle diameters) on the surface of electrodes to form two-dimensional colloidal crystals. The attractive force can be created with both DC and AC fields and can modulated by adjusting either the field strength or frequency of the current. Modulating this lateral attraction between the particles causes the reversible formation of two-dimensional fluid and crystalline colloidal states on the electrode surface. Further manipulation allows for the formation of two or three-dimensional colloidal crystals, as well as more complex designed structures. Once the required structures are formed, these three-dimension colloidal crystals can be permanently frozen or glued by controlled coagulation induced by to the applied field to form a stable crystalline structure.

  16. PCR detection of groundwater bacteria associated with colloidal transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Perez, P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.; Alvarez, A.J.

    1996-02-29

    Colloidal transport may increase the amount of contaminant material than that which could be transported by water flow alone. The role of colloids in groundwater contaminant transport is complicated and may involve many different processes, including sorption of elements onto colloidal particles, coagulation/dissolution, adsorption onto solid surfaces, filtration, and migration. Bacteria are known to concentrate minerals and influence the transport of compounds in aqueous environments and may also serve as organic colloids, thereby influencing subsurface transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. The initial phase of the project consisted of assembling a list of bacteria capable of sequestering or facilitating mineral transport. The development and optimization of the PCR amplification assay for the detection of the organisms of interest, and the examination of regional groundwaters for those organisms, are presented for subsequent research.

  17. Ring around the colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Marcello, Jr.; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Kamien, Randall D.; Yang, Shu; Baumgart, Tobias; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    In this work, we show that Janus washers, genus-one colloids with hybrid anchoring conditions, form topologically required defects in nematic liquid crystals. Experiments under crossed polarizers reveal the defect structure to be a rigid disclination loop confined within the colloid, with an accompanying defect in the liquid crystal. When confined to a homeotropic cell, the resulting colloid-defect ring pair tilts relative to the far field director, in contrast to the behavior of toroidal colloids with purely homeotropic anchoring. We show that this tilting behavior can be reversibly suppressed by the introduction of a spherical colloid into the center of the toroid, creating a new kind of multi-shape colloidal assemblage.

  18. Remote Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    SPAR Aerospace Limited's "Canadarm," Canada's contribution to the space shuttle. It is a crane which can operate as a 50 foot extension of an astronaut's arm. It can lift 65,000 pounds in space and retrieve satellites for repair, etc. Redesigned versions have energy and mining applications. Some of its hardware has been redeveloped for use as a Hydro manipulator in a nuclear reactor where it is expected to be extremely cost effective.

  19. The DOE Subsurface (SubTER) Initiative: Revolutionizing Responsible use of the Subsurface for Energy Production and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, S. S.; Walck, M. C.; Blankenship, D.; Bonneville, A.; Bromhal, G. S.; Daley, T. M.; Pawar, R.; Polsky, Y.; Mattson, E.; Mellors, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The subsurface supplies more than 80% of the U.S.'s total energy needs through geothermal and hydrocarbon strategies and also provides vast potential for safe storage of CO2 and disposal of nuclear waste. Responsible and efficient use of the subsurface poses many challenges, many of which require the capability to monitor and manipulate sub-surface stress, fractures, and fluid flow at all scales. Adaptive control of subsurface fractures and flow is a multi-disciplinary challenge that, if achieved, has the potential to transform all subsurface energy strategies. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's SubTER (Subsurface Technology and Engineering Research development and demonstration) initiative, a multi-National Laboratory team is developing next-generation approaches that will allow for adaptive control of subsurface fractures and flow. SubTER has identified an initial suite of technical thrust areas to focus work, and has initiated a number of small projects. This presentation will describe early progress associated with the SubTER technical topic areas of wellbore integrity, subsurface stress and induced seismicity, permeability manipulation and new subsurface signals. It will also describe SubTER plans, and provide a venue to solicit suggestions and discuss potential partnerships associated with future research directions.

  20. Analysis of colloid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1985-12-31

    The population balance methodology is described and applied to the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. The transient model includes particle growth, capture, convective transport, and dispersion. We also follow the dynamic accumulation of captured colloids on the solids. The multidimensional parabolic partial differential equation was solved by a recently enhanced method of characteristics technique. This computational technique minimized numerical dispersion and is computationally very fast. The FORTRAN 77 code ran on a VAX-780 in less than a minute and also runs on an IBM-AT using the Professional FORTRAN compiler. The code was extensively tested against various simplified cases and against analytical models. The packed column experiments by Saltelli et al. were re-analyzed incorporating the experimentally reported size distribution of the colloid feed material. Colloid capture was modeled using a linear size dependent filtration function. The effects of a colloid size dependent filtration factor and various initial colloid size distributions on colloid migration and capture were investigated. Also, we followed the changing colloid size distribution as a function of position in the column. Some simple arguments are made to assess the likelihood of colloid migration at a potential NTS Yucca Mountain waste disposal site. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  2. Colloid Formation at Waste Plume Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Saiz, Eduardo; Larsen, Joern T.; Zheng, Zuoping; Couture, Rex A.

    2004-05-22

    Highly saline and caustic tank waste solutions containing radionuclides and toxic metals have leaked into sediments at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities such as the Hanford Site (Washington State). Colloid transport is frequently invoked to explain migration of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface. To understand colloid formation during interactions between highly reactive fluids and sediments and its impact on contaminant transport, we simulated tank waste solution (TWS) leakage processes in laboratory columns at ambient and elevated (70 C) temperatures. We found that maximum formation of mobile colloids occurred at the plume fronts (hundreds to thousands times higher than within the plume bodies or during later leaching). Concentrations of suspended solids were as high as 3 mass%, and their particle-sizes ranged from tens of nm to a few {micro}m. Colloid chemical composition and mineralogy depended on temperature. During infiltration of the leaked high Na{sup +} waste solution, rapid and completed Na{sup +} replacement of exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} from the sediment caused accumulation of these divalent cations at the moving plume front. Precipitation of supersaturated Ca{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+}-bearing minerals caused dramatic pH reduction at the plume front. In turn, the reduced pH caused precipitation of other minerals. This understanding can help predict the behavior of contaminant trace elements carried by the tank waste solutions, and could not have been obtained through conventional batch studies.

  3. Decreased Salinity and Actinide Mobility: Colloid-Facilitated Transport or pH Change?

    PubMed

    Haliena, Brian; Zheng, Hangping; Melson, Nathan; Kaplan, Daniel I; Barnett, Mark O

    2016-01-19

    Colloids have been implicated in influencing the transport of actinides and other adsorbed contaminants in the subsurface, significantly increasing their mobility. Such colloid-facilitated transport can be induced by changes in groundwater chemistry that occur, for example, when high ionic strength contaminant plumes are displaced by infiltrating rainwater. We studied the transport and mobility of Th(IV), as an analogue for Pu(IV) and other tetravalent actinides [An(IV)], in saturated columns packed with a natural heterogeneous subsurface sandy sediment. As expected, decreases in ionic strength both promoted the mobilization of natural colloids and enhanced the transport of previously adsorbed Th(IV). However, colloid-facilitated transport played only a minor role in enhancing the transport of Th(IV). Instead, the enhanced transport of Th(IV) was primarily due to the pH-dependent desorption of Th(IV) caused by the change in ionic strength. In contrast, the adsorption of Th(IV) had a marked impact on the surface charge of the sandy sediment, significantly affecting the mobility of the colloids. In the absence of Th(IV), changes in ionic strength were ineffective at releasing colloids while in the presence of Th(IV), decreases in ionic strength liberated significant concentrations of colloids. Therefore, under the conditions of our experiments which mimicked acidic, high ionic strength groundwater contaminant plumes, Th(IV) had a much greater effect on colloid transport than colloids had on Th(IV) transport. PMID:26687028

  4. Model simulations of particle aggregation effect on colloid exchange between streams and streambeds.

    PubMed

    Areepitak, Trachu; Ren, Jianhong

    2011-07-01

    Colloids found in natural streams have large reactive surface areas, which makes them significant absorbents and carriers for pollutants. Stream-subsurface exchange plays a critical role in regulating the transport of colloids and contaminants in natural streams. Previous process-based multiphase exchange models were developed without consideration of colloid-colloid interaction. However, many studies have indicated that aggregation is a significant process and needs to be considered in stream process analysis. Herein, a new colloid exchange model was developed by including particle aggregation in addition to colloid settling and filtration. Self-preserving size distribution concepts and classical aggregation theory were employed to model the aggregation process. Model simulations indicate that under conditions of low filtration and high degree of particle-particle interaction, aggregation could either decrease or increase the amount of colloids retained in streambeds, depending on the initial particle size. Thus, two possible cases may occur including enhanced colloid deposition and facilitated colloid transport. Also, when the aggregation rate is high and filtration increases, more particles are retained by bed sediments due to filtration, and fewer are aggregated, which reduces the extent of aggregation effect on colloid deposition. The work presented here will contribute to a better understanding and prediction of colloid transport phenomena in natural streams. PMID:21627165

  5. Nonlinear rheology of colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Brader, J M

    2010-09-15

    Colloidal dispersions are commonly encountered in everyday life and represent an important class of complex fluid. Of particular significance for many commercial products and industrial processes is the ability to control and manipulate the macroscopic flow response of a dispersion by tuning the microscopic interactions between the constituents. An important step towards attaining this goal is the development of robust theoretical methods for predicting from first-principles the rheology and nonequilibrium microstructure of well defined model systems subject to external flow. In this review we give an overview of some promising theoretical approaches and the phenomena they seek to describe, focusing, for simplicity, on systems for which the colloidal particles interact via strongly repulsive, spherically symmetric interactions. In presenting the various theories, we will consider first low volume fraction systems, for which a number of exact results may be derived, before moving on to consider the intermediate and high volume fraction states which present both the most interesting physics and the most demanding technical challenges. In the high volume fraction regime particular emphasis will be given to the rheology of dynamically arrested states. PMID:21386516

  6. Driving magnetic colloidal polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, Joshua; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    Magnetic colloids are of growing interest for applications such as drug delivery and in vitro tissue growth. Recent experiments have synthesized 1D chains of magnetic colloids into permanent colloidal polymers. We study magnetic colloidal polymers theoretically and computationally under the influence of time-varying external fields and find a rich set of controllable, dynamic conformations. By iterating through a sequence of conformations, these polymers can perform mechanical functions. We discuss possible roles for these polymers beyond those considered for single colloids. This work was supported as part of the Center for Bio-Inspired Energy Science, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award # DE-SC0000989.

  7. Digital colloids: reconfigurable clusters as high information density elements.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Carolyn L; Jankowski, Eric; Krishnatreya, Bhaskar Jyoti; Edmond, Kazem V; Sacanna, Stefano; Grier, David G; Pine, David J; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2014-10-14

    Through the design and manipulation of discrete, nanoscale systems capable of encoding massive amounts of information, the basic components of computation are open to reinvention. These components will enable tagging, memory storage, and sensing in unusual environments - elementary functions crucial for soft robotics and "wet computing". Here we show how reconfigurable clusters made of N colloidal particles bound flexibly to a central colloidal sphere have the capacity to store an amount of information that increases as O(N ln(N)). Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we predict dynamical regimes that allow for information to be written, saved, and erased. We experimentally assemble an N = 4 reconfigurable cluster from chemically synthesized colloidal building blocks, and monitor its equilibrium dynamics. We observe state switching in agreement with simulations. This cluster can store one bit of information, and represents the simplest digital colloid. PMID:25034966

  8. Lock and key colloids.

    PubMed

    Sacanna, S; Irvine, W T M; Chaikin, P M; Pine, D J

    2010-03-25

    New functional materials can in principle be created using colloids that self-assemble into a desired structure by means of a programmable recognition and binding scheme. This idea has been explored by attaching 'programmed' DNA strands to nanometre- and micrometre- sized particles and then using DNA hybridization to direct the placement of the particles in the final assembly. Here we demonstrate an alternative recognition mechanism for directing the assembly of composite structures, based on particles with complementary shapes. Our system, which uses Fischer's lock-and-key principle, employs colloidal spheres as keys and monodisperse colloidal particles with a spherical cavity as locks that bind spontaneously and reversibly via the depletion interaction. The lock-and-key binding is specific because it is controlled by how closely the size of a spherical colloidal key particle matches the radius of the spherical cavity of the lock particle. The strength of the binding can be further tuned by adjusting the solution composition or temperature. The composite assemblies have the unique feature of having flexible bonds, allowing us to produce flexible dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric colloidal molecules as well as more complex colloidal polymers. We expect that this lock-and-key recognition mechanism will find wider use as a means of programming and directing colloidal self-assembly. PMID:20336142

  9. Pultonium Colloid-Facilitated Transport in the Environment - Experimental and Transport Modeling Evidence for Plutonium Migration Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, M; Maxwell, R M; Kersting, A B; Zhao, P; Sylwester, E R; Allen, P G; Williams, R W

    2003-02-19

    Natural inorganic colloids (< 1 micron particles) found in groundwater can sorb low-solubility actinides and may provide a pathway for transport in the subsurface. For example, Kerting et al found that Pu, associated with colloids fraction of the groundwater, was detected over 1 km away from the underground nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) where it was originally deposited 28 years earlier. However, laboratory experiments have not identified the mechanisms by which Pu may sorb to colloids or exist as its own colloid and travel relatively unimpeded in the subsurface. Some data suggest that Pu sorption to colloids is a very fast process while desorption is very slow or simply does not occur. Slow desorption of Pu from colloids could allow Pu sorbed to a colloid to travel much farther than if sorption were an equilibrium process. However, PU sorption (and particularly desorption) data in the literature are scant and sometimes contradictory. In some cases, Pu desorption is rather fast, with rates dependent on colloid mineralogy. Moreover, the effect of sorption and desorption kinetics (as well as other mechanisms) on colloid-facilitated transport at the field scale has not been thoroughly evaluated. This is, in part, due to limitations in colloid transport as well as sorption/desorption models.

  10. Natural analogue studies of the role of colloids, natural organics and microorganisms on radionuclide transport

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-10-01

    Colloids may be important as a geochemical transport mechanism for radionuclides at geological repositories if they are (1) present in the groundwater, (2) stable with respect to both colloidal and chemical stabilities, (3) capable of adsorbing radionuclides, especially if the sorption is irreversible, and (4) mobile in the subsurface. The available evidence from natural analogue and other field studies relevant to these issues is reviewed, as is the potential role of mobile microorganisms ({open_quotes}biocolloids{close_quotes}) on radionuclide migration. Studies have demonstrated that colloids are ubiquitous in groundwater, although colloid concentrations in deep, geochemically stable systems may be too low to affect radionuclide transport. However, even low colloid populations cannot be dismissed as a potential concern because colloids appear to be stable, and many radionuclides that adsorb to colloids are not readily desorbed over long periods. Field studies offer somewhat equivocal evidence concerning colloid mobility and cannot prove or disprove the significance of colloid transport in the far-field environment. Additional research is needed at new sites to properly represent a repository far-field. Performance assessment would benefit from natural analogue studies to examine colloid behavior at sites encompassing a suite of probable groundwater chemistries and that mimic the types of formations selected for radioactive waste repositories.

  11. Influences of Flow Transients and Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Colloid-Associated Contaminant Transport in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    James Saiers

    2006-06-28

    Radionuclides, metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids have contaminated about six billion cubic meters of soil at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The subsurface transport of many of these contaminants is facilitated by colloids (i.e., microscopic, waterborne particles). The first step in the transport of contaminants from their sources to off-site surface water and groundwater is migration through the vadose zone. Developing our understanding of the migration of colloids and colloid-associated contaminants through the vadose zone is critical to assessing and controlling the release of contaminants from DOE sites. In this study, we examined the mobilization, transport, and filtration (retention) of mineral colloids and colloid-associated radionuclides within unsaturated porous media. This investigation involved laboratory column experiments designed to identify properties that affect colloid mobilization and retention and pore-scale visualization experiments designed to elucidate mechanisms that govern these colloid-mass transfer processes. The experiments on colloid mobilization and retention were supplemented with experiments on radionuclide transport through porous media and on radionuclide adsorption to mineral colloids. Observations from all of these experiments – the column and visualization experiments with colloids and the experiments with radionuclides – were used to guide the development of mathematical models appropriate for describing colloids and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through the vadose zone.

  12. Manipulating Representations.

    PubMed

    Recchia-Luciani, Angelo N M

    2012-04-01

    The present paper proposes a definition for the complex polysemic concepts of consciousness and awareness (in humans as well as in other species), and puts forward the idea of a progressive ontological development of consciousness from a state of 'childhood' awareness, in order to explain that humans are not only able to manipulate objects, but also their mental representations. The paper builds on the idea of qualia intended as entities posing regular invariant requests to neural processes, trough the permanence of different properties. The concept of semantic differential introduces the properties of metaphorical qualia as an exclusively human ability. Furthermore this paper proposes a classification of qualia, according to the models-with different levels of abstraction-they are implied in, in a taxonomic perspective. This, in turn, becomes a source of categorization of divergent representations, sign systems, and forms of intentionality, relying always on biological criteria. New emerging image-of-the-world-devices are proposed, whose qualia are likely to be only accessible to humans: emotional qualia, where emotion accounts for the invariant and dominant property; and the qualic self where continuity, combined with the oneness of the self, accounts for the invariant and dominant property. The concept of congruence between different domains in a metaphor introduces the possibility of a general evaluation of truth and falsity of all kinds of metaphorical constructs, while the work of Matte Blanco enables us to classify conscious versus unconscious metaphors, both in individuals and in social organizations. PMID:22347988

  13. Colloidal pen lithography.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mianqi; Cai, Xiaojing; Chen, Ghenfu

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal pen lithography, a low-cost, high-throughput scanning probe contact printing method, has been developed, which is based on self-assembled colloidal arrays embedded in a soft elastomeric stamp. Patterned protein arrays are demonstrated using this method, with a feature size ranging from 100 nm to several micrometers. A brief study into the specificity reorganization of protein gives evidence for the feasibility of this method for writing protein chips. PMID:25288364

  14. Biogeochemical Stability of Contaminants in the Subsurface Following In Situ Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, innovative treatment technologies have emerged to meet groundwater cleanup goals. In many cases these methods take advantage of the redox behavior of contaminant species. For example, remedial technologies that strategically manipulate subsurface redox conditio...

  15. Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transortin the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Hu, Q.; Wu, Y.-S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2001-09-01

    The U.S: Department of Energy is actively investigating the technical feasibility of permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a repository to be situated in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this study we investigate, by means of numerical simulation, the transport of radioactive colloids under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table. The site hydrology and the effects of the spatial distribution of hydraulic and transport properties in the Yucca Mountain subsurface are considered. The study of migration and retardation of colloids accounts for the complex processes in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, and includes advection, diffusion, hydrodynamic dispersion, kinetic colloid filtration, colloid straining, and radioactive decay. The results of the study indicate that the most important factors affecting colloid transport are the subsurface geology and site hydrology, i.e., the presence of faults (they dominate and control transport), fractures (the main migration pathways), and the relative distribution of zeolitic and vitric tuffs. The transport of colloids is strongly influenced by their size (as it affects diffusion into the matrix, straining at hydrogeologic unit interfaces, and transport velocity) and by the parameters of the kinetic-filtration model used for the simulations. Arrival times at the water table decrease with an increasing colloid size because of smaller diffusion, increased straining, and higher transport velocities. The importance of diffusion as a retardation mechanism increases with a decreasing colloid size, but appears to be minimal in large colloids.

  16. Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Moridis, G J; Hu, Q; Wu, Y-S; Bodvarsson, G S

    2003-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is actively investigating the technical feasibility of permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a repository to be situated in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. In this study we investigate, by means of numerical simulation, the transport of radioactive colloids under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table. The site hydrology and the effects of the spatial distribution of hydraulic and transport properties in the Yucca Mountain subsurface are considered. The study of migration and retardation of colloids accounts for the complex processes in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, and includes advection, diffusion, hydrodynamic dispersion, kinetic colloid filtration, colloid straining, and radioactive decay. The results of the study indicate that the most important factors affecting colloid transport are the subsurface geology and site hydrology, i.e., the presence of faults (they dominate and control transport), fractures (the main migration pathways), and the relative distribution of zeolitic and vitric tuffs. The transport of colloids is strongly influenced by their size (as it affects diffusion into the matrix, straining at hydrogeologic unit interfaces, and transport velocity) and by the parameters of the kinetic-filtration model used for the simulations. Arrival times at the water table decrease with an increasing colloid size because of smaller diffusion, increased straining, and higher transport velocities. The importance of diffusion as a retardation mechanism increases with a decreasing colloid size, but appears to be minimal in large colloids. PMID:12504362

  17. New technologies for subsurface barrier wall construction

    SciTech Connect

    Mutch, R.D. Jr.; Ash, R.E. IV; Caputi, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    New technologies for subsurface barrier wall construction are entering the marketplace at an unprecedented pace. Much of this innovation centers around construction of geomembrane barrier walls but also includes advancements in self-hardening slurries and in permeation grouts, involving such diverse materials as colloidal silica gel and montan wax emulsions. These advancements come at a time when subsurface barrier walls are cautiously emerging out of the technological closet. During much of the 1980s, barrier walls of any type were regarded in some quarters as crude and antiquated. It was correspondingly predicted that remediation would be dominated by emerging treatment technologies such as bioremediation, air sparging, and surfactant flushing. Notwithstanding the considerable successes of these emerging technologies, particularly bioremediation, the fact remains that a significant percentage of Superfund, RCRA-corrective action and other waste disposal sites present hydrogeologic, chemical, and waste matrix complexities that far exceed the capabilities of current treatment-based remedial technologies. Consequently, containment-based technologies such as subsurface barrier walls and caps are being recognized once again as irreplaceable components of practical remediation programs at many complex sites.

  18. Colloid release and transport processes in natural and model porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.B.; Dzombak, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    Colloidal particles present in porous media may be released and transported over significant distances when contacted with water at low ionic strength. An understanding of this process is of environmental interest because suspended colloidal particles in groundwater may enhance the subsurface transport of contaminants that are sorbed on their surfaces. This research focused on the processes of colloid release and transport in natural porous media of interest in contaminant transport, i.e., high permeability materials with low fines contents. Our objective in this study was to examine the mechanisms of colloid release and transport in a natural sand, and two model systems: latex particles attached on glass beads, and kaolinite particles attached on glass beads. For the appropriate electrolyte conditions, the release of attached colloids from all three porous media was found to be substantial. The total amount of colloids released depended upon the electrolyte composition and concentration. Column effluent data could be described with an advective-dispersive transport equation for colloidal particles with first-order terms for colloid release and deposition rates, by changing the mass of colloids available for release at each electrolyte concentrations.

  19. Size and Fractal Dimension of Colloid Deposits in Model Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, E. J.; Mays, D. C.; Gilbert, B.

    2014-12-01

    Colloids exert significant influence on subsurface hydrology, geochemistry, and microbiology. In particular, colloid deposits reduce permeability, triggering a reduction or realignment of flow. Since many subsurface processes are transport-limited, this reduction or realignment of flow, in turn, influences numerous chemical and biological processes. This work explores a conceptual model linking permeability with colloid deposit morphology, where deposit morphology is quantified by two metrics of the colloid deposit: (1) characteristic size and (2) fractal dimension. These two metrics are measured using static light scattering (SLS) within refractive index matched (RIM) porous media, into which a suspension of 100 nm carboxylate-modified polystyrene microspheres are eluted at constant flow. Scattering data are fitted with a two-parameter model that includes deposit fractal dimension, and with a three-parameter model that also includes deposit size. For each set of scattering measurements, the appropriate model is selected using the Akaike information criterion, and model errors are estimated using the bootstrap with 100 replicates. Results indicate two key findings. First, fractal dimensions generally decrease with time as additional colloids are eluted into the column, indicating a transition from more uniform to more dendritic deposits. Second, permeability reduction is associated with colloid deposits having smaller fractal dimensions, that is, with more dendritic and space-filling deposits. Modeling efforts are currently underway to correlate permeability with the underlying hydrodynamic and geochemical variables that determine colloid deposit morphology.

  20. Plasma enhanced vortex fluidic device manipulation of graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Jones, Darryl B; Chen, Xianjue; Sibley, Alexander; Quinton, Jamie S; Shearer, Cameron J; Gibson, Christopher T; Raston, Colin L

    2016-08-25

    A vortex fluid device (VFD) with non-thermal plasma liquid processing within dynamic thin films has been developed. This plasma-liquid microfluidic platform facilitates chemical processing which is demonstrated through the manipulation of the morphology and chemical character of colloidal graphene oxide in water. PMID:27506139

  1. Influences of Flow Transients and Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Colloid-Associated Contaminant Transport in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    James Saiers; Joseph Ryan

    2006-07-02

    Radionuclides, metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids have contaminated about six billion cubic meters of soil at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The subsurface transport of many of these contaminants is facilitated by colloids (i.e., microscopic, waterborne particles). The first step in the transport of contaminants from their sources to off-site surface water and groundwater is migration through the vadose zone. Developing our understanding of the migration of colloids and colloid-associated contaminants through the vadose zone is critical to assessing and controlling the release of contaminants from DOE sites. In this study, we examined the mobilization, transport, and filtration (retention) of mineral colloids and colloidassociated radionuclides within unsaturated porous media. This investigation involved laboratory column experiments designed to identify properties that affect colloid mobilization and retention and pore-scale visualization experiments designed to elucidate mechanisms that govern these colloid-mass transfer processes. The experiments on colloid mobilization and retention were supplemented with experiments on radionuclide transport through porous media and on radionuclide adsorption to mineral colloids. Observations from all of these experiments – the column and visualization experiments with colloids and the experiments with radionuclides – were used to guide the development of mathematical models appropriate for describing colloids and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through the vadose zone.

  2. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, C.E.

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  3. Subsurface Microbiology and Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Fletcher, Madilyn

    2001-05-01

    Jim contributed a chapter to this book, in addition to co-editing it with Madilyn Fletcher. Fredrickson, J. K., and M. Fletcher. (eds.) 2001 Subsurface Microbiology and Biogeochemistry. Wiley-Liss, Inc., New York.

  4. Non-equilibrium colloidal assembly pathways via synergistic dipolar, depletion, and hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan, Anna; Bevan, Michael

    The ability to assemble nano- and micro- colloidal particles into ordered materials and controllable devices provides the basis for emerging technologies. However, current capabilities for manipulating colloidal assembly are limited by the degree of order, time to generate/reconfigure structures, and scalability to large areas. These limitations are due to problems with designing, controlling, and optimizing the thermodynamics and kinetics of colloidal assembly. Our approach is to provide viable non-equilibrium pathways for rapid assembly of defect free colloidal crystals using combinations of magnetic field and depletion mediated assembly. Results include video microscopy experiments and Stokesian Dynamic computer simulations of superparamagnetic colloidal particles experiencing depletion attraction in time varying magnetic fields. Findings show multi-body hydrodynamic interactions and magnetic dipole relaxation mechanisms are essential to capture assembly and annealing of attractive colloidal crystals. With the ability to measure, model and tune colloidal interactions and dynamics, we demonstrate the use of time varying fields to manipulate non-equilibrium pathways for the assembly, disassembly, and repair of colloidal microstructures.

  5. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  6. Geophysical Monitoring of Two types of Subsurface Injection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nano-scale particles of zero-valent iron (ZVI) were injected into the subsurface at the 100-D area of the DOE Hanford facility. The intent of this iron injection was to repair a gap in the existing in-situ redox manipulation barrier located at the site. A number of geophysical me...

  7. Mobile colloid generation induced by a cementitious plume: mineral surface-charge controls on mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I; Roberts, Kimberly A; Seaman, John C

    2012-03-01

    Cementitious materials are increasingly used as engineered barriers and waste forms for radiological waste disposal. Yet their potential effect on mobile colloid generation is not well-known, especially as it may influence colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. Whereas previous papers have studied the introduction of cement colloids into sediments, this study examined the influence of cement leachate chemistry on the mobilization of colloids from a subsurface sediment collected from the Savannah River Site, USA. A sharp mobile colloid plume formed with the introduction of a cement leachate simulant. Colloid concentrations decreased to background concentrations even though the aqueous chemical conditions (pH and ionic strength) remained unchanged. Mobile colloids were mainly goethite and to a lesser extent kaolinite. The released colloids had negative surface charges and the mean particle sizes ranged primarily from 200 to 470 nm. Inherent mineralogical electrostatic forces appeared to be the controlling colloid removal mechanism in this system. In the background pH of ~6.0, goethite had a positive surface charge, whereas quartz (the dominant mineral in the immobile sediment) and kaolinite had negative surface charges. Goethite acted as a cementing agent, holding kaolinite and itself onto the quartz surfaces due to the electrostatic attraction. Once the pH of the system was elevated, as in the cementitious high pH plume front, the goethite reversed to a negative charge, along with quartz and kaolinite, then goethite and kaolinite colloids were mobilized and a sharp spike in turbidity was observed. Simulating conditions away from the cementitious source, essentially no colloids were mobilized at 1:1000 dilution of the cement leachate or when the leachate pH was ≤ 8. Extreme alkaline pH environments of cementitious leachate may change mineral surface charges, temporarily promoting the formation of mobile colloids. PMID:22316126

  8. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a

  9. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; Yunker, Peter; Lohr, Matthew; Gratale, Matthew; Lynch, Matthew; Kodger, Thomas; Piazza, Roberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Cipelletti, Luca; Schall, Peter; Veen, Sandra; Wegdam, Gerhard; Lee, Chand-Soo; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J.; Cohen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Colloids Experiment is being conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). Work to date will be discussed and future plans and opportunities will be highlighted. The LMM is a microscope facility designed to allow scientists to process, manipulate, and characterize colloidal samples in micro-gravity where the absence of gravitational settling and particle jamming enables scientists to study such things as:a.The role that disordered and ordered-packing of spheres play in the phase diagram and equation of state of hard sphere systems,b.crystal nucleation and growth, growth instabilities, and the glass transition, c.gelation and phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures,d.crystallization of colloidal binary alloys,e.competition between crystallization and phase separation,f.effects of anisotropy and specific interactions on packing, aggregation, frustration and crystallization,g.effects of specific reversible and irreversible interactions mediated in the first case by hybridization of complementary DNA strands attached to separate colloidal particles,h.Lock and key interactions between colloids with dimples and spheres which match the size and shape of the dimples,i.finding the phase diagrams of isotropic and interacting particles,j.new techniques for complex self-assembly including scenarios for self-replication, k.critical Casimir forces,l.biology (real and model systems) in microgravity,m.etc. By adding additional microscopy capabilities to the existing LMM, NASA will increase the tools available for scientists that fly experiments on the ISS enabling scientists to observe directly what is happening at the particle level. Presently, theories are needed to bridge the gap between what is being observed (at a macroscopic level when photographing samples) with what is happening at a particle (or microscopic) level. What is happening at a microscopic level will be directly

  10. Control over Colloidal Particle Morphology by Dispersion Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, B.

    2013-03-01

    The main subject of this thesis is the structure and morphology control of colloidal polymer particles, in particular, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles, by dispersion polymerization in polar solvents. The structure control, ranging from surface morphology and internal structure to shape manipulation of polymer particles, was attempted through copolymerization of monomers with various types of materials, such as cross-linkers, dyes, and colloidal silica spheres or rods. The obtained spherical or non-spherical particles are interesting as model systems as they mimic molecules at colloidal scales. Their phase behavior can be studied in the presence or absence of external fields (like electric and gravity fields). Additionally, they can be used for various applications, such as photonic crystals

  11. Colloid-guided assembly of oriented 3D neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Pautot, Sophie; Wyart, Claire; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2009-01-01

    A central challenge in neuroscience is to understand the formation and function of three-dimensional (3D) neuronal networks. In vitro studies have been mainly limited to measurements of small numbers of neurons connected in two dimensions. Here we demonstrate the use of colloids as moveable supports for neuronal growth, maturation, transfection and manipulation, where the colloids serve as guides for the assembly of controlled 3D, millimeter-sized neuronal networks. Process growth can be guided into layered connectivity with a density similar to what is found in vivo. The colloidal superstructures are optically transparent, enabling remote stimulation and recording of neuronal activity using layer-specific expression of light-activated channels and indicator dyes. The modular approach toward in vitro circuit construction provides a stepping stone for applications ranging from basic neuroscience to neuron-based screening of targeted drugs. PMID:18641658

  12. Interactions and Collective Behaviour of Chemotactic Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Suropriya; Hablani, Surbhi; Golestanian, Ramin; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2015-03-01

    Artificial realizations of motility point in the direction of a new paradigm in engineering, through the design of emergent behavior by manipulating properties at the scale of the individual components. Catalytic colloidal swimmers are a particularly promising example of such systems. Here we present a comprehensive theoretical description of gradient-sensing of an individual swimmer, leading controllably to chemotactic or anti-chemotactic behavior. We use it to study the scattering of such a swimmer off a reactant source and construct a framework for studying their two body interactions and finally their collective behavior. We find that both the positional and the orientational degrees of freedom of the active colloids can exhibit condensation, signalling formation of clusters and asters. We present prescriptions for how to tune the surface properties of the colloids during fabrication to achieve each type of behavior. We further study the athermal fluctuations of a pointed tracer particle in a bath of such swimmers.

  13. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  14. Three-Dimensional Radionuclide Transport Through the Unsaturated Zone of the Yucca Mountain Site 3 Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    G. J. Moridis; Y. Seol

    2007-01-26

    The authors investigated colloid transport in the unsaturated fractured zone by means of three-dimensional site-scale numerical model under present-day climate infiltration, considering varying colloid diameters, kinetic declogging, and filtration. The radionuclide transport model was used to simulate continuous release of colloids into fractures throughout the proposed repository, in which any components of engineered barrier system such as waste package or drip shield were not considered. the results of the study indicate the importance of subsurface geology and site hydrology, i.e., the presence of faults (they dominate and control transport), fractures (the main migration pathways), and the relative distribution of zeolitic and vitric tuffs. The simulations indicate that (1) colloid transport is not significantly affected by varying the filtration parameters, (2) travel time to the water table decreases with the colloid size, (3) larger colloids show little retardation whereas very small ones are retarded significantly, and (4) fracture filtration can have an impact on transport. Because of uncertainties in the fundamentals of colloid transport and an extremely conservative approach (based on an improbably adverse worst-case scenario), caution should be exercised in the analysis and interpretation of the 3-D simulation results. The results discussed here should be viewed as an attempt to identify and evaluate the mechanisms, processes, and geological features that control colloidal transport.

  15. Best Practice -- Subsurface Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Clark Scott

    2010-03-01

    These best practices for Subsurface Survey processes were developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and later shared and formalized by a sub-committee, under the Electrical Safety Committee of EFCOG. The developed best practice is best characterized as a Tier II (enhanced) survey process for subsurface investigations. A result of this process has been an increase in the safety and lowering of overall cost, when utility hits and their related costs are factored in. The process involves improving the methodology and thoroughness of the survey and reporting processes; or improvement in tool use rather than in the tools themselves. It is hoped that the process described here can be implemented at other sites seeking to improve their Subsurface Investigation results with little upheaval to their existing system.

  16. Equilibrium adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Bennett D.

    2016-07-01

    A theory is developed to describe the equilibrium adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels. The adsorption theory is developed in classical density functional theory, with the adsorbed phase and fluid phase chemical potentials modeled using thermodynamic perturbation theory. Adsorption of nonpatchy colloids in microchannels is typically achieved through nonequilibrium routes such as spin coating and evaporation. These methods are required due to the entropic penalty of adsorption. In this work we propose that the introduction of patches on the colloids greatly enhances the temperature dependent and reversible adsorption of colloids in microchannels. It is shown how bulk fluid density, temperature, patch size, and channel diameter can be manipulated to achieve the adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels.

  17. Equilibrium adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Bennett D

    2016-07-01

    A theory is developed to describe the equilibrium adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels. The adsorption theory is developed in classical density functional theory, with the adsorbed phase and fluid phase chemical potentials modeled using thermodynamic perturbation theory. Adsorption of nonpatchy colloids in microchannels is typically achieved through nonequilibrium routes such as spin coating and evaporation. These methods are required due to the entropic penalty of adsorption. In this work we propose that the introduction of patches on the colloids greatly enhances the temperature dependent and reversible adsorption of colloids in microchannels. It is shown how bulk fluid density, temperature, patch size, and channel diameter can be manipulated to achieve the adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels. PMID:27575187

  18. COLLOIDS. Colloidal matter: Packing, geometry, and entropy.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-08-28

    Colloidal particles with well-controlled shapes and interactions are an ideal experimental system for exploring how matter organizes itself. Like atoms and molecules, these particles form bulk phases such as liquids and crystals. But they are more than just crude analogs of atoms; they are a form of matter in their own right, with complex and interesting collective behavior not seen at the atomic scale. Their behavior is affected by geometrical or topological constraints, such as curved surfaces or the shapes of the particles. Because the interactions between the particles are often short-ranged, we can understand the effects of these constraints using geometrical concepts such as packing. The geometrical viewpoint gives us a window into how entropy affects not only the structure of matter, but also the dynamics of how it forms. PMID:26315444

  19. The Serpentinite Subsurface Microbiome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrenk, M. O.; Nelson, B. Y.; Brazelton, W. J.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial habitats hosted in ultramafic rocks constitute substantial, globally-distributed portions of the subsurface biosphere, occurring both on the continents and beneath the seafloor. The aqueous alteration of ultramafics, in a process known as serpentinization, creates energy rich, high pH conditions, with low concentrations of inorganic carbon which place fundamental constraints upon microbial metabolism and physiology. Despite their importance, very few studies have attempted to directly access and quantify microbial activities and distributions in the serpentinite subsurface microbiome. We have initiated microbiological studies of subsurface seeps and rocks at three separate continental sites of serpentinization in Newfoundland, Italy, and California and compared these results to previous analyses of the Lost City field, near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In all cases, microbial cell densities in seep fluids are extremely low, ranging from approximately 100,000 to less than 1,000 cells per milliliter. Culture-independent analyses of 16S rRNA genes revealed low-diversity microbial communities related to Gram-positive Firmicutes and hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. Interestingly, unlike Lost City, there has been little evidence for significant archaeal populations in the continental subsurface to date. Culturing studies at the sites yielded numerous alkaliphilic isolates on nutrient-rich agar and putative iron-reducing bacteria in anaerobic incubations, many of which are related to known alkaliphilic and subsurface isolates. Finally, metagenomic data reinforce the culturing results, indicating the presence of genes associated with organotrophy, hydrogen oxidation, and iron reduction in seep fluid samples. Our data provide insight into the lifestyles of serpentinite subsurface microbial populations and targets for future quantitative exploration using both biochemical and geochemical approaches.

  20. Quantification and Composition Analysis of Small Mobile Colloids from Different Aquatic Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Lazouskaya, Volha; Jin, Yan

    2014-05-01

    Natural colloids, often defined as entities with sizes < 1.0 μm, have attracted much attention due to their small size and large surface area, leading to their high reactivity with and ability to facilitate the transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment. However, the role of mobile colloids in carbon and phosphorus cycling is largely unknown, especially on the role of smaller colloids (< 0.45 μm), which are operationally considered as "dissolved" species in most studies. Our special focus is on smaller colloids in different size fractions. Colloids are sampled from different aquatic ecosystems, such as freshwater, wetland and estuary area, and include soil solution, stream water and groundwater samples. Colloids of various size fractions are separated using centrifugation or membrane filters and quantified gravimetrically and characterized using SEM or TEM with XEDs to analyze the morphology and compositions of colloidal organo-mineral associations. Preliminary results based on stream water at base flow, during storm event and wetland soil water showed that, in general, small natural colloids (0.1 - 0.45 µm or 0.2 - 0.4 µm) contribute significantly to the whole colloidal pools (< 0.7 or 1.2 µm), and even dominant in some samples and play an important role in carbon and phosphorus mobilization. However, colloid concentrations varied with many factors such as stream order, precipitation time and intensity, and redox conditions. In this presentation, we will present results on quantification and characterization of mobile colloids from field samples and factors that control their mobilization and stabilization, and their role in carbon and phosphorus fate and transport.

  1. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Low-Solubility Radionuclides: A Field, Experimental, and Modeling Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kersting, A B; Reimus, P W; Abdel-Fattah, A; Allen, P G; Anghel, I; Benedict, F C; Esser, B K; Lu, N; Kung, K S; Nelson, J; Neu, M P; Reilly, S D; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Ware, S D; Warren, RG; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2003-02-01

    For the last several years, the Underground Test Area (UGTA) program has funded a series of studies carried out by scientists to investigate the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of low-solubility radionuclides in groundwater, specifically plutonium (Pu). Although the studies were carried out independently, the overarching goals of these studies has been to determine if colloids in groundwater at the NTS can and will transport low-solubility radionuclides such as Pu, define the geochemical mechanisms under which this may or may not occur, determine the hydrologic parameters that may or may not enhance transport through fractures and provide recommendations for incorporating this information into future modeling efforts. The initial motivation for this work came from the observation in 1997 and 1998 by scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that low levels of Pu originally from the Benham underground nuclear test were detected in groundwater from two different aquifers collected from wells 1.3 km downgradient (Kersting et al., 1999). Greater than 90% of the Pu and other radionuclides were associated with the naturally occurring colloidal fraction (< 1 micron particles) in the groundwater. The colloids consisted mainly of zeolite (mordenite, clinoptilolite/heulandite), clays (illite, smectite) and cristobalite (SiO{sub 2}). These minerals were also identified as alteration mineral components in the host rock aquifer, a rhyolitic tuff. The observation that Pu can and has migrated in the subsurface at the NTS has forced a rethinking of our basic assumptions regarding the mechanical and geochemical transport pathways of low-solubility radionuclides. If colloid-facilitated transport is the primary mechanism for transporting low-solubility radionuclides in the subsurface, then current transport models based solely on solubility arguments and retardation estimates may underestimate the flux and

  2. Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Bass, Ronald Marshall; Kim, Dong Sub; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Stegemeier, George Leo; Keltner, Thomas Joseph; Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon

    2010-12-28

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

  3. Reconfigurable multi-scale colloidal assembly on excluded volume patterns

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Tara D.; Yang, Yuguang; Everett, W. Neil; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to create multi-scale, periodic colloidal assemblies with unique properties is important to emerging applications. Dynamically manipulating colloidal structures via tunable kT-scale attraction can provide the opportunity to create particle-based nano- and microstructured materials that are reconfigurable. Here, we report a novel tactic to obtain reconfigurable, multi-scale, periodic colloidal assemblies by combining thermoresponsive depletant particles and patterned topographical features that, together, reversibly mediate local kT-scale depletion interactions. This method is demonstrated in optical microscopy experiments to produce colloidal microstructures that reconfigure between well-defined ordered structures and disordered fluid states as a function of temperature and pattern feature depth. These results are well described by Monte Carlo simulations using theoretical depletion potentials that include patterned excluded volume. Ultimately, the approach reported here can be extended to control the size, shape, orientation, and microstructure of colloidal assemblies on multiple lengths scales and on arbitrary pre-defined pattern templates. PMID:26330058

  4. Reconfigurable multi-scale colloidal assembly on excluded volume patterns.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Tara D; Yang, Yuguang; Everett, W Neil; Bevan, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The ability to create multi-scale, periodic colloidal assemblies with unique properties is important to emerging applications. Dynamically manipulating colloidal structures via tunable kT-scale attraction can provide the opportunity to create particle-based nano- and microstructured materials that are reconfigurable. Here, we report a novel tactic to obtain reconfigurable, multi-scale, periodic colloidal assemblies by combining thermoresponsive depletant particles and patterned topographical features that, together, reversibly mediate local kT-scale depletion interactions. This method is demonstrated in optical microscopy experiments to produce colloidal microstructures that reconfigure between well-defined ordered structures and disordered fluid states as a function of temperature and pattern feature depth. These results are well described by Monte Carlo simulations using theoretical depletion potentials that include patterned excluded volume. Ultimately, the approach reported here can be extended to control the size, shape, orientation, and microstructure of colloidal assemblies on multiple lengths scales and on arbitrary pre-defined pattern templates. PMID:26330058

  5. Mars penetrator: Subsurface science mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    A penetrator system to emplace subsurface science on the planet Mars is described. The need for subsurface science is discussed, and the technologies for achieving successful atmospheric entry, Mars penetration, and data retrieval are presented.

  6. Mobile Remote Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coryell, S.; Olsen, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Turret, roll arm, and trolley enhance manipulator dexterity. Remote manipulator moves on trolley base along structure. Roll-axis arm positions manipulator arm so it can extend end effector under structure. Yaw-axis rotation gives added reach to arm above structure. Designed for handling, inspecting, and maintaining modules of space station. Manipulators having such capabilities useful on Earth; robots in manufacturing, erection of large structures, or performing complicated tasks in hazardous locations.

  7. Release of colloidal particles in natural porous media by monovalent and divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Grolimund, Daniel; Borkovec, Michal

    2006-10-10

    We study mobilization of colloidal particles from natural porous media, such as soils and groundwater aquifers. Extensive laboratory scale column experiments of particle release from four different subsurface materials are presented. The important characteristics of the release process are (i) its non-exponential kinetics, (ii) the finite supply of colloidal particles and (iii) the strong dependence of the release kinetic on the nature of the adsorbed cations. Particle release depends most sensitively on the relative saturation of the medium with divalent cations. We propose a mathematic model, which captures all these aspects quantitatively, and can be used to describe the coupling between transport of major cations and the release of colloidal particles. The present experimental investigations as well as the developed modeling framework represent an important step towards the understanding of colloid-facilitated transport phenomena in natural porous media. PMID:16844263

  8. Colloid migration in fractured media

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.R. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1989-09-15

    Field studies at the Nevada Test Site by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have demonstrated that radionuclides are being transported by colloidal material suspended in groundwater. This observation is counter to most predictions from contaminant transport models because the models assume adsorbed species are immobile. The purpose of this research is to quantify the transport processes for colloidal materials and develop the mechanistic understanding necessary to predict radionuclide transport in fractured media. There were three areas of investigation during this year that have addressed these issues: chemical control of colloid deposition on clean mineral surfaces, colloid accumulation on fracture surfaces, and the influence of deposited colloids on colloid and tracer migration. 7 refs.

  9. Linking deposit morphology and clogging in subsurface remediation: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, David C.

    2013-12-11

    Groundwater is a crucial resource for water supply, especially in arid and semiarid areas of the United States west of the 100th meridian. Accordingly, remediation of contaminated groundwater is an important application of science and technology, particularly for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which oversees a number of groundwater remediation sites from Cold War era mining. Groundwater remediation is complex, because it depends on identifying, locating, and treating contaminants in the subsurface, where remediation reactions depend on interacting geological, hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological factors. Within this context, permeability is a fundamental concept, because it controls the rates and pathways of groundwater flow. Colloid science is intimately related to permeability, because when colloids are present (particles with equivalent diameters between 1 nanometer and 10 micrometers), changes in hydrological or geochemical conditions can trigger a detrimental reduction in permeability called clogging. Accordingly, clogging is a major concern in groundwater remediation. Several lines of evidence suggest that clogging by colloids depends on (1) colloid deposition, and (2) deposit morphology, that is, the structure of colloid deposits, which can be quantified as a fractal dimension. This report describes research, performed under a 2-year, exploratory grant from the DOE’s Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program. This research employed a novel laboratory technique to simultaneously measure flow, colloid deposition, deposit morphology, and permeability in a flow cell, and also collected field samples from wells at the DOE’s Old Rifle remediation site. Field results indicate that suspended solids at the Old Rifle site have fractal structures. Laboratory results indicate that clogging is associated with colloid deposits with smaller fractal dimensions, in accordance with previous studies on initially clean granular media. Preliminary

  10. Equilibrium and Kinetic Models for Colloid Release Under Transient Solution Chemistry Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, S. A.; Torkzaban, S.; Leij, F. J.; Simunek, J.

    2014-12-01

    Colloid retention and release is well known to depend on a wide variety of physical, chemical, and microbiological factors that may vary temporally in the subsurface environment. We present equilibrium, kinetic, combined equilibrium and kinetic, and two-site kinetic models of colloid release during transient physicochemical conditions. Our mathematical modeling approach relates colloid release under transient conditions to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. The developed models were subsequently applied to experimental colloid release datasets to investigate the influence of variations in ionic strength (IS), pH, cation exchange, colloid size, and water velocity on release. Various combinations of equilibrium and/or kinetic release models were needed to describe the experimental data depending on the transient conditions and colloid type. Release of E. coli D21g was promoted by a decrease in solution IS and an increase in pH, similar to expected trends for a reduction in the secondary minimum and nanoscale chemical heterogeneity, respectively. The retention and release of 20 nm carboxyl modified latex nanoparticles (NPs) were demonstrated to be more sensitive to the presence of Ca2+ than D21g. Specifically, retention of NPs was greater than D21g in the presence of 2 mM CaCl2 solution, and release of NPs only occurred after exchange of Ca2+ by Na+ and then a reduction in the solution IS. These findings highlight the limitations of conventional interaction energy calculations to describe colloid retention and release, and point to the need to consider Born repulsion and nanoscale heterogeneity. Temporal changes in the water velocity did not have a large influence on the release of D21g. This insensitivity was likely due to factors that reduce the applied hydrodynamic torque and/or increase the resisting adhesive torque. Collectively, experimental and modeling results indicate that episodic colloid transport in the

  11. Progress in nonprehensile manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, M.T.

    1999-11-01

    This paper reviews my recent research in robotic manipulation and speculates on potentially fruitful directions for future work. My recent work is focused on nonprehensile manipulation: manipulating objects without grasping them. In particular, the paper surveys work on a single joint robot that orients parts on a conveyor belt; a robot that uses dynamics to snatch, roll, or throw objects; hitting things to position them; manipulating things whose shapes are not completely known; and integration of manipulation with locomotion. In the future, a broad view of robotics will allow us to focus on fundamental principles and at the same time address a variety of new applications.

  12. Influence of mineral colloids and humic substances on uranium(VI) transport in water-saturated geologic porous media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Cheng, Tao; Wu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Mineral colloids and humic substances often co-exist in subsurface environment and substantially influence uranium (U) transport. However, the combined effects of mineral colloids and humic substances on U transport are not clear. This study is aimed at quantifying U transport and elucidating geochemical processes that control U transport when both mineral colloids and humic acid (HA) are present. U-spiked solutions/suspensions were injected into water-saturated sand columns, and U and colloid concentrations in column effluent were monitored. We found that HA promoted U transport via (i) formation of aqueous U-HA complexes, and (ii) competition against aqueous U for surface sites on transport media. Illite colloids had no influence on U transport at pH5 in the absence of HA due to low mobility of the colloids. At pH9, U desorbed from mobile illite and the presence of illite decreased U transport. At pH5, high U transport occurred when both illite colloids and HA were present, which was attributed to enhanced U adsorption to illite colloids via formation of ternary illite-HA-U surface complexes, and enhanced illite transport due to HA attachment to illite and transport media. This study demonstrates that the combined effects of mineral colloids and HA on contaminant transport is different from simple addition of the individual effect. PMID:25444118

  13. Development and testing of conceptual models describing plutonium subsurface transport (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding coupled chemical, physical, and biological processes controlling plutonium subsurface transport is fundamental to predicting the fate and transport of actinides in the subsurface. In previous conceptual models of plutonium transport, it is assumed that low solubility and high affinity for mineral surfaces will limit the mobility of plutonium in the environment. However, this traditional model has been challenged based on observations of accelerated subsurface migration. Revised conceptual models developed through a combination of field scale observations and targeted laboratory experiments will be discussed in the context of two subsurface environments. Conceptual models of colloid facilitated plutonium transport in the southwestern United States will be discussed. Field observations and measurements show kilometer scale transport of plutonium. However, the identity of the colloidal fraction has not yet been confirmed. Laboratory experiments indicate that plutonium has strong interactions with smectite clays and iron oxide colloids. Interfacial modeling of plutonium interactions with smectite indicate that sorption of plutonium occurs through both ion exchange and surface complexation mechanisms. Batch, column, and batch flow-through experiments examining plutonium interactions with metal (oxyhydr)oxide minerals indicate strong sorption hysteresis which is believed to be the result of plutonium reduction to more strongly sorbing oxidation states as well as dehydration of the plutonium ion upon formation of a surface complex. Furthermore, nanoscale plutonium hydrous oxide colloids also appear to have strong interactions with iron oxide colloids. These data aid in the validation of the observed kilometer scale transport of plutonium in subsurface environments. A second set of long-term experiments have focused on vadoze zone transport of plutonium at the Savannah River Site in the southeastern United States. Based on a series of batch and column studies

  14. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  15. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Certain contaminants may travel faster through soils when they are sorbed to subsurface colloidal particles. Indeed, subsurface colloids may act as carriers of some contaminants accelerating their translocation through the soil into the water table. This phenomenon is known as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. It plays a significant role in contaminant transport in soils and has been recognized as a source of groundwater contamination. From a mechanistic point of view, the attachment/detachment of the colloidal particles from the soil matrix or from the air-water interface and the straining process may modify the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Šimůnek et al. (2006) developed a model that can simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in variably saturated porous media. The model is based on the solution of a modified advection-dispersion equation that accounts for several processes, namely: straining, exclusion and attachement/detachement kinetics of colloids through the soil matrix. The solutions of these governing, partial differential equations are obtained using a standard Galerkin-type, linear finite element scheme, implemented in the HYDRUS-2D/3D software (Šimůnek et al., 2012). Modeling colloid transport through the soil and the interaction of colloids with the soil matrix and other contaminants is complex and requires the characterization of many model parameters. In practice, it is very difficult to assess actual transport parameter values, so they are often calibrated. However, before calibration, one needs to know which parameters have the greatest impact on output variables. This kind of information can be obtained through a sensitivity analysis of the model. The main objective of this work is to perform local and global sensitivity analyses of the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport module of HYDRUS. Sensitivity analysis was performed in two steps: (i) we applied a screening method based on Morris' elementary

  16. Glassy dislocation dynamics in colloidal dimer crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbode, Sharon

    2012-02-01

    Dislocation mobility is central to both the mechanical response and the relaxation mechanisms of crystalline materials. Recent experiments have explored the role of novel particle anisotropies in affecting the rules of defect motion in crystals. ``Peanut-shaped'' colloidal dimer particles consisting of two connected spherical lobes form densely packed crystals in 2D. In these ``degenerate crystals,'' the particle lobes occupy triangular lattice sites while the particle axes are randomly oriented among the three crystalline directions. One consequence of the random orientations of the dimers is that dislocation glide is severely limited by certain particle arrangements in the degenerate crystals. Using optical tweezers to manipulate single lobe-sized spherical intruder particles, we locally deform the crystal, creating defects. During subsequent relaxation, the dislocations formed during the deformation leave the crystal grain, either via annihilation with other dislocations or by moving to a grain boundary. Interestingly, in large crystalline grains this dislocation relaxation occurs through a two-stage process reminiscent of slow relaxations in glassy systems, suggesting the novel concept that glassy phenomena may be introduced to certain kinds of colloidal crystals via simple anisotropic constituents.

  17. Applications of subsurface microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Farahi, Rubye H; Voy, Brynn H; Thundat, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Exploring the interior of a cell is of tremendous importance in order to assess the effects of nanomaterials on biological systems. Outside of a controlled laboratory environment, nanomaterials will most likely not be conveniently labeled or tagged so that their translocation within a biological system cannot be easily identified and quantified. Ideally, the characterization of nanomaterials within a cell requires a nondestructive, label-free, and subsurface approach. Subsurface nanoscale imaging represents a real challenge for instrumentation. Indeed the tools available for high resolution characterization, including optical, electron or scanning probe microscopies, mainly provide topography images or require taggants that fluoresce. Although the intercellular environment holds a great deal of information, subsurface visualization remains a poorly explored area. Recently, it was discovered that by mechanically perturbing a sample, it was possible to observe its response in time with nanoscale resolution by probing the surface with a micro-resonator such as a microcantilever probe. Microcantilevers are used as the force-sensing probes in atomic force microscopy (AFM), where the nanometer-scale probe tip on the microcantilever interacts with the sample in a highly controlled manner to produce high-resolution raster-scanned information of the sample surface. Taking advantage of the existing capabilities of AFM, we present a novel technique, mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM), which has the ability to probe subsurface structures such as non-labeled nanoparticles embedded in a cell. In MSAFM mechanical actuators (PZTs) excite the probe and the sample at different frequencies as depicted in the first figure of this chapter. The nonlinear nature of the tip-sample interaction, at the point of contact of the probe and the surface of the sample, in the contact mode AFM configuration permits the mixing of the elastic waves. The new dynamic system comprises new

  18. Optical Manipulation of Shape-Morphing Elastomeric Liquid Crystal Microparticles Doped with Gold Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y. R.; Evans, J. S.; Lee, T.; Senyuk, B.; Keller, P.; He, S. L.; Smalyukh, I. I.

    2012-06-11

    We demonstrate facile optical manipulation of shape of birefringent colloidal microparticles made from liquid crystal elastomers. Using soft lithography and polymerization, we fabricate elastomeric microcylinders with weakly undulating director oriented on average along their long axes. These particles are infiltrated with gold nanospheres acting as heat transducers that allow for an efficient localized transfer of heat from a focused infrared laser beam to a submicrometer region within a microparticle. Photothermal control of ordering in the liquid crystal elastomer using scanned beams allows for a robust control of colloidal particles, enabling both reversible and irreversible changes of shape. Possible applications include optomechanics, microfluidics, and reconfigurable colloidal composites with shape-dependent self-assembly.

  19. Magnetofluidic Tweezing of Nonmagnetic Colloids.

    PubMed

    Timonen, Jaakko V I; Demirörs, Ahmet F; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2016-05-01

    Magnetofluidic tweezing based on negative magnetophoresis and microfabricated core-shell magnetic microtips allows controlled on-demand assembly of colloids and microparticles into various static and dynamic structures such as colloidal crystals (as shown for 3.2 μm silica particles). PMID:26990182

  20. Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M.; Cantrell, K.J.; Phillips, S.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods.

  1. Coupled effect of pH and porous media type on transport and deposition of variably-charged soil colloids in saturated sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Kawamoto, K.; Moldrup, P.; de Jonge, L. W.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding colloid transport and deposition in subsurface is essential for predicting colloid-associated contaminant transport and developing effective remedial strategies. Compared to numerous studies using model colloids and model porous media, limited studies have been conducted with natural soil-colloids and porous media. This study investigated transport and deposition of suspended soil-colloids with diameter less than 1 μm extracted from a volcanic ash-soil (VAS colloids) from Nishi-Tokyo, Japan and a red-yellow soil (RYS colloids) from Okinawa, Japan. The extracted soil colloids were applied to 10-cm long saturated sand columns repacked with either Narita sand (mean diameter = 0.64 mm) or Toyoura sand (mean diameter = 0.21 mm) at different flow rates, input concentrations and pH conditions. The pH was adjusted using 0.1 M HCl and 0.01 M NaBr was used as a conservative tracer. Colloid transport and deposition were studied by analyzing colloid effluent concentration breakthrough curves, corresponding deposition profiles and particle size distributions. Based on zeta potential measurements, VAS colloids and Toyoura sand were characterized as pH-dependent surface charge dominant whereas, RYS colloids and Narita sand were categorized as less pH-dependent surface charge dominant colloids and porous media. The results of column studies indicated that decreasing pH decreased the colloid breakthrough curves and increased the deposition of colloids through both porous media. The effect of pH was more significant for VAS colloids than for RYS colloids and for Toyoura sand than for Narita sand, mainly attributed to the pH-dependent surface charge characteristics of VAS colloids and Toyoura sand. The results also demonstrated that if either a colloid or a porous medium is pH-dependent, a significant decrease in breakthrough curves is accompanied by depth-dependent deposition profiles. This study indicated that surface charge properties of colloids coupled with

  2. Colloid Formation in Hanford Sediments Reacted with Simulated Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Mashal, Kholoud; Harsh, James B.; Flury, Markus; Felmy, Andrew R.; Zhao, Hongting

    2004-11-01

    Solutions of high pH, ionic strength, and aluminum concentration have leaked into the subsurface from underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Reservation in Washington State. Here, we test the hypothesis that these waste solutions alter and dissolve the native minerals present in the sediments and that colloidal (diameter < 2 m) feldspathoids form. We reacted Hanford sediments with simulated solutions representative of Hanford waste tanks. The solutions consisted of 1.4 or 2.8 mol/kg NaOH, 0.125 or 0.25 mol/kg NaAlO4, and 3.7 mol/kg NaNO3 and were contacted with the sediments for a period of 25 or 40 days at 50 C. The colloidal size fraction was separated from the sediments and characterized in terms of mineralogy, morphology, chemical composition, and electrophoretic mobility. Upon reaction with tank waste solutions, native minerals released Si and other elements into the solution phase. This Si precipitated with the Al present in the waste solutions to form secondary minerals, identified as the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite. The solution phase was modeled with the chemical equilibrium model GMIN for solution speciation and saturation indices with respect to sodalite and cancrinite. The amount of colloidal material in the sediments increased upon reaction with waste solutions. At the natural pH found in Hanford sediments (pH 8) the newly formed minerals are negatively charged, similar to the unreacted colloidal material present in the sediments. The formation of colloidal material in Hanford sediments upon reaction with tank waste solutions is an important aspect to consider in the characterization of Hanford tank leaks and may affect the fate of hazardous radionuclides present in the tank waste.

  3. Colloid formation in Hanford sediments reacted with simulated tank waste.

    PubMed

    Mashal, Kholoud; Harsh, James B; Flury, Markus; Felmy, Andrew R; Zhao, Hongting

    2004-11-01

    Solutions of high pH, ionic strength, and aluminum concentration have leaked into the subsurface from underground waste storage tanks atthe Hanford Reservation in Washington State. Here, we test the hypothesis that these waste solutions alter and dissolve the native minerals present in the sediments and that colloidal (diameter < 2 microm) feldspathoids form. We reacted Hanford sediments with simulated solutions representative of Hanford waste tanks. The solutions consisted of 1.4 or 2.8 mol/kg NaOH, 0.125 or 0.25 mol/kg NaAlO4, and 3.7 mol/kg NaNO3 and were contacted with the sediments for a period of 25 or 40 days at 50 degrees C. The colloidal size fraction was separated from the sediments and characterized in terms of mineralogy, morphology, chemical composition, and electrophoretic mobility. Upon reaction with tank waste solutions, native minerals released Si and other elements into the solution phase. This Si precipitated with the Al present in the waste solutions to form secondary minerals, identified as the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite. The solution phase was modeled with the chemical equilibrium model GMIN for solution speciation and saturation indices with respect to sodalite and cancrinite. The amount of colloidal material in the sediments increased upon reaction with waste solutions. At the natural pH found in Hanford sediments (pH 8) the newly formed minerals are negatively charged, similar to the unreacted colloidal material present in the sediments. The formation of colloidal material in Hanford sediments upon reaction with tank waste solutions is an important aspect to consider in the characterization of Hanford tank leaks and may affect the fate of hazardous radionuclides present in the tank waste. PMID:15575296

  4. Crystalline Colloidal Arrays in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunkara, Hari B.; Penn, B. G.; Frazier, D. O.; Ramachandran, N.

    1997-01-01

    Crystalline Colloidal Arrays (CCA, also known as colloidal crystals), composed of aqueous or nonaqueous dispersions of self-assembled nanosized polymer colloidal spheres, are emerging toward the development of advanced optical devices for technological applications. The spontaneous self assembly of polymer spheres in a dielectric medium results from the electrostatic repulsive interaction between particles of uniform size and charge distribution. In a way similar to atomic crystals that diffract X-rays, CCA dispersions in thin quartz cells selectively and efficiently Bragg diffract the incident visible light. The reason for this diffraction is because the lattice (body or face centered cubic) spacing is on the order of the wavelength of visible light. Unlike the atomic crystals that diffract a fixed wavelength, colloidal crystals in principle, depending on the particle size, particle number and charge density, can diffract W, Vis or IR light. Therefore, the CCA dispersions can be used as laser filters. Besides, the diffraction intensity depends on the refractive index mismatch between polymer spheres and dielectric medium; therefore, it is possible to modulate incident light intensities by manipulating the index of either the spheres or the medium. Our interest in CCA is in the fabrication of all-optical devices such as optical switches, limiters, and spatial light modulators for optical signal processing. The two major requirements from a materials standpoint are the incorporation of suitable nonlinear optical materials (NLO) into polymer spheres which will allow us to alter the refractive index of the spheres by intense laser radiation, and preparation of solid CCA filters which can resist laser damage. The fabrication of solid composite filters not only has the advantage that the films are easier to handle, but also the arrays in solid films are more robust than in liquid media. In this paper, we report the photopolymerization process used to trap CCA in polymer

  5. Excited-State Dynamics in Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Rabouw, Freddy T; de Mello Donega, Celso

    2016-10-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have attracted continuous worldwide interest over the last three decades owing to their remarkable and unique size- and shape-, dependent properties. The colloidal nature of these nanomaterials allows one to take full advantage of nanoscale effects to tailor their optoelectronic and physical-chemical properties, yielding materials that combine size-, shape-, and composition-dependent properties with easy surface manipulation and solution processing. These features have turned the study of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals into a dynamic and multidisciplinary research field, with fascinating fundamental challenges and dazzling application prospects. This review focuses on the excited-state dynamics in these intriguing nanomaterials, covering a range of different relaxation mechanisms that span over 15 orders of magnitude, from a few femtoseconds to a few seconds after photoexcitation. In addition to reviewing the state of the art and highlighting the essential concepts in the field, we also discuss the relevance of the different relaxation processes to a number of potential applications, such as photovoltaics and LEDs. The fundamental physical and chemical principles needed to control and understand the properties of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are also addressed. PMID:27573500

  6. Non-equilibrium tuning of attractive colloidal gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2015-11-01

    In colloidal gel systems, the presence of multiple interactions in multiple length scales such as Van der Waals, depletion attractions, and electrostatic repulsions makes these systems challenging from both experimental and simulation aspects. Recently, there has been growing interest to tune and manipulate the structural and dynamics properties of those systems without adjusting interparticle interactions, just by taking them out of equilibrium. In this work, we used Core-Modified Dissipative Particle Dynamics (CM-DPD) with a modified depletion potential, as a coarse-grain model to address the gel formation process in short ranged-attractive colloidal suspensions for a range of volume fractions and attraction strengths. It is suggested that at high volume fractions and near the glass transition, there is a transformation from non-bonded glass to bonded-glass for which that the effect of topological frustration (caging) will be alleviated by the presence of attractive potentials (bonding) i.e. melting during cooling. In the first part of the presentation, we discuss our similar findings for semi-dilute volume fraction of attractive bimodal colloidal gels at equilibrium, which can be explained through local densification of attractive colloidal gels. In the second part, structural and dynamics properties of arrested gels will be studied under shear and after cessation of shear to study how the different flow profiles and history will alter final morphology of the gel systems.

  7. Intrinsic and Carrier Colloid-facilitated transport of lanthanides through discrete fractures in chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, N.; Tran, E. L.; Klein-BenDavid, O.; Teutsch, N.

    2015-12-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the long term solution for the disposal of long lived radionuclides and spent fuel. However, some radionuclides might be released from these repositories into the subsurface as a result of leakage, which ultimately make their way into groundwater. Engineered bentonite barriers around nuclear waste repositories are generally considered sufficient to impede the transport of radionuclides from their source to the groundwater. However, colloidal-sized mobile bentonite particles ("carrier" colloids) originating from these barriers have come under investigation as a potential transport vector for radionuclides sorbed to them. As lanthanides are generally accepted to have the same chemical behaviors as their more toxic actinide counterparts, lanthanides are considered an acceptable substitute for research on radionuclide transportation. This study aims to evaluate the transport behaviors of lanthanides in colloid-facilitated transport through a fractured chalk matrix and under geochemical conditions representative the Negev desert, Israel. The migration of Ce both with and without colloidal particles was explored and compared to the migration of a conservative tracer (bromide) using a flow system constructed around a naturally fractured chalk core. Results suggest that mobility of Ce as a solute is negligible. In experiments conducted without bentonite colloids, the 1% of the Ce that was recovered migrated as "intrinsic" colloids in the form of carbonate precipitates. However, the total recovery of the Ce increased to 9% when it was injected into the core in the presence of bentonite colloids and 13% when both bentonite and precipitate colloids were injected. This indicates that lanthanides are essentially immobile in chalk as a solute but may be mobile as carbonate precipitates. Bentonite colloids, however, markedly increase the mobility of lanthanides through fractured chalk matrices.

  8. Colloidal aggregation in polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, M; Ridouane, H; Hachem, E-K; Derouiche, A; Rahmoune, M

    2005-06-22

    We consider here a low-density assembly of colloidal particles immersed in a critical polymer mixture of two chemically incompatible polymers. We assume that, close to the critical point of the free mixture, the colloids prefer to be surrounded by one polymer (critical adsorption). As result, one is assisted to a reversible colloidal aggregation in the nonpreferred phase, due the existence of a long-range attractive Casimir force between particles. This aggregation is a phase transition driving the colloidal system from dilute to dense phases, as the usual gas-liquid transition. We are interested in a quantitative investigation of the phase diagram of the immersed colloids. We suppose that the positions of particles are disordered, and the disorder is quenched and follows a Gaussian distribution. To apprehend the problem, use is made of the standard phi(4) theory, where the field phi represents the composition fluctuation (order parameter), combined with the standard cumulant method. First, we derive the expression of the effective free energy of colloids and show that this is of Flory-Huggins type. Second, we find that the interaction parameter u between colloids is simply a linear combination of the isotherm compressibility and specific heat of the free mixture. Third, with the help of the derived effective free energy, we determine the complete shape of the phase diagram (binodal and spinodal) in the (Psi,u) plane, with Psi as the volume fraction of immersed colloids. The continuous "gas-liquid" transition occurs at some critical point K of coordinates (Psi(c) = 0.5,u(c) = 2). Finally, we emphasize that the present work is a natural extension of that, relative to simple liquid mixtures incorporating colloids. PMID:16035822

  9. Revisiting Mathematics Manipulative Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, Paul; Marshall, Linda

    2010-01-01

    It is over 12 years since "APMC" published Bob Perry and Peter Howard's research on the use of mathematics manipulative materials in primary mathematics classrooms. Since then the availability of virtual manipulatives and associated access to computers and interactive whiteboards have caused educators to rethink the use of mathematics manipulative…

  10. Direct Manipulation Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Edwin L.; And Others

    This paper presents a cognitive account of both the advantages and disadvantages of direct manipulation interfaces, i.e., the use of icons to manipulate and interact directly with data rather than writing programs or calling on a set of statistical subroutines. Two underlying phenomena that give rise to the sensation of directness are identified.…

  11. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. PMID:27600123

  12. Two-dimensional dipolar nematic colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Skarabot, M; Ravnik, M; Zumer, S; Tkalec, U; Poberaj, I; Babic, D; Osterman, N; Musevic, I

    2007-11-01

    We study the interactions and directed assembly of dipolar nematic colloidal particles in planar nematic cells using laser tweezers. The binding energies for two stable configurations of a colloidal pair with homeotropic surface alignment are determined. It is shown that the orientation of the dipolar colloidal particle can efficiently be controlled and changed by locally quenching the nematic liquid crystal from the laser-induced isotropic phase. The interaction of a single colloidal particle with a single colloidal chain is determined and the interactions between pairs of colloidal chains are studied. We demonstrate that dipolar colloidal chains self-assemble into the two-dimensional (2D) dipolar nematic colloidal crystals. An odd-even effect is observed with increasing number of colloidal chains forming the 2D colloidal crystal. PMID:18233658

  13. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Shannon M.; Walkowski, Stevan

    2012-01-01

    Dermatological diseases, such as dysesthesia syndromes, stasis dermatoses, and hyperhidrosis are difficult to treat due to their complex etiologies. Current theories suggest these diseases are caused by physiological imbalances, such as nerve impingement, localized tissue congestion, and impaired autonomic regulation. Osteopathic manipulative therapy targets these physiological dysfunctions and may serve as a beneficial therapeutic option. Osteopathic manipulative therapy techniques include high velocity low amplitude, muscle energy, counterstrain, myofascial release, craniosacral, and lymphatic drainage. An osteopathic manipulative therapy technique is chosen based on its physiological target for a particular disease. Osteopathic manipulative therapy may be useful alone or in combination with standard therapeutic options. However, due to the lack of standardized trials supporting the efficacy of osteopathic manipulative therapy treatment for dermatological disease, randomized, well-controlled studies are necessary to confirm its therapeutic value. PMID:23125887

  14. Manipulator comparative testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Handel, S.J.; Sundstrom, E.; Herndon, J.N.; Fujita, Y.; Maeda, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Manipulator Comparative Testing Program examined differences among manipulator systems from the United States and Japan. The manipulator systems included the Meidensha BILARM 83A, the Model M-2 of Central Research Laboratories Division of Sargent Industries (CRL), and the GCA Corporation PaR Systems Model 6000. The site of testing was the Remote Operations Maintenance Demonstration (ROMD) facility, operated by the Fuel Recycle Division in the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In all stages of testing, operators using the CRL Model M-2 manipulator had consistently lower times to completion and error rates than they did using other machines. Performance was second best with the Meidensha BILARM 83A in master-slave mode. Performance with the BILARM in switchbox mode and the PaR 6000 manipulator was approximately equivalent in terms of criteria recorded in testing. These data show no impact of force reflection on task performance.

  15. Information storage and retrieval in a single levitating colloidal particle.

    PubMed

    Myers, Christopher J; Celebrano, Michele; Krishnan, Madhavi

    2015-10-01

    The binary switch is a basic component of digital information. From phase-change alloys to nanomechanical beams, molecules and atoms, new strategies for controlled bistability hold great interest for emerging technologies. We present a generic methodology for precise and parallel spatiotemporal control of nanometre-scale matter in a fluid, and demonstrate the ability to attain digital functionalities such as switching, gating and data storage in a single colloid, with further implications for signal amplification and logic operations. This fluid-phase bit can be arrayed at high densities, manipulated by either electrical or optical fields, supports low-energy, high-speed operation and marks a first step toward 'colloidal information'. The principle generalizes to any system where spatial perturbation of a particle elicits a differential response amenable to readout. PMID:26280408

  16. Information storage and retrieval in a single levitating colloidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Christopher J.; Celebrano, Michele; Krishnan, Madhavi

    2015-10-01

    The binary switch is a basic component of digital information. From phase-change alloys to nanomechanical beams, molecules and atoms, new strategies for controlled bistability hold great interest for emerging technologies. We present a generic methodology for precise and parallel spatiotemporal control of nanometre-scale matter in a fluid, and demonstrate the ability to attain digital functionalities such as switching, gating and data storage in a single colloid, with further implications for signal amplification and logic operations. This fluid-phase bit can be arrayed at high densities, manipulated by either electrical or optical fields, supports low-energy, high-speed operation and marks a first step toward ‘colloidal information’. The principle generalizes to any system where spatial perturbation of a particle elicits a differential response amenable to readout.

  17. Building micro-soccer-balls with evaporating colloidal fakir drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Marín, Álvaro G.; Susarrey-Arce, Arturo; van Housselt, Arie; Lefferts, Leon; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2013-11-01

    Drop evaporation can be used to self-assemble particles into three-dimensional microstructures on a scale where direct manipulation is impossible. We present a unique method to create highly-ordered colloidal microstructures in which we can control the amount of particles and their packing fraction. To this end, we evaporate colloidal dispersion drops from a special type of superhydrophobic microstructured surface, on which the drop remains in Cassie-Baxter state during the entire evaporative process. The remainders of the drop consist of a massive spherical cluster of the microspheres, with diameters ranging from a few tens up to several hundreds of microns. We present scaling arguments to show how the final particle packing fraction of these balls depends on the drop evaporation dynamics, particle size, and number of particles in the system.

  18. Experimental study on thermophoresis of colloids in aqueous surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruo-Yu; Zhou, Yi; Yang, Chun; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2015-12-16

    Thermophoresis refers to the motion of particles under a temperature gradient and it is one of the particle manipulation techniques. Regarding the thermophoresis of particles in liquid media, however, many open questions still remain, especially the role of the interfacial effect. This work reports on a systematic experimental investigation of surfactant effects, especially the induced interfacial effect, on the thermophoresis of colloids in aqueous solutions via a microfluidic approach. Two kinds of commonly used surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), are selected and the results show that from relatively large concentrations, the two surfactants can greatly enhance the thermophilic mobilities. Specifically, it is found that the colloid-water interfaces modified with more polar end groups can potentially lead to a stronger thermophilic tendency. Due to the complex effects of surfactants, further theoretical model development is needed to quantitatively describe the dependence of thermophoresis on the interface characteristics. PMID:26596230

  19. Experimental study on thermophoresis of colloids in aqueous surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruo-Yu; Zhou, Yi; Yang, Chun; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2015-12-01

    Thermophoresis refers to the motion of particles under a temperature gradient and it is one of the particle manipulation techniques. Regarding the thermophoresis of particles in liquid media, however, many open questions still remain, especially the role of the interfacial effect. This work reports on a systematic experimental investigation of surfactant effects, especially the induced interfacial effect, on the thermophoresis of colloids in aqueous solutions via a microfluidic approach. Two kinds of commonly used surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), are selected and the results show that from relatively large concentrations, the two surfactants can greatly enhance the thermophilic mobilities. Specifically, it is found that the colloid-water interfaces modified with more polar end groups can potentially lead to a stronger thermophilic tendency. Due to the complex effects of surfactants, further theoretical model development is needed to quantitatively describe the dependence of thermophoresis on the interface characteristics.

  20. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  1. Method of making colloid labeled with radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  2. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.J.

    1990-11-13

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints. No Drawings

  3. In situ mobilization of colloids and transport of cesium in Hanford sediments.

    PubMed

    Flury, Markus; Mathison, Jon B; Harsh, James B

    2002-12-15

    Radioactive waste, accumulated during Pu production, has leaked into the subsurface from underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site. The leaking solutions contained 137Cs and were of high ionic strength. Such a tank leak was simulated experimentally in steady-state flow experiments with packed Hanford sediments. The initial leak was simulated by a 1 M NaNO3 solution, followed by a decrease of ionic strength to 1 mM NaNO3. Cesium breakthrough curves were determined in both 1 M and 1 mM NaNO3 background. Colloidal particles were mobilized during the change of ionic strength. Mobilized colloids consisted mainly of quartz, mica, illite, kaolinite, and chlorite. Electrophoretic mobilities of colloids in the eluent solution were -3(microm/s)(V/cm) and increased to less negative values during later stages of mobilization. Mobilized colloids carried a fraction of the cesium along. While transport of cesium in 1 M NaNO3 background was much faster than in 1 mM NaNO3, cesium attached to colloids moved almost unretarded through the sediments. Cesium attached to mobilized colloids was likely associated with high affinity sorption sites on micas and illites. PMID:12521158

  4. A 3D interactive optical manipulation platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Rodrigo, Peter J.; Nielson, Ivan P.

    2005-12-01

    Three-dimensional light structures can be created by modulating the spatial phase and polarization properties of the laser light. A particularly promising technique is the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method invented and patented at Riso National Laboratory. Based on the combination of programmable spatial light modulator devices and an advanced graphical user-interface the GPC method enables real-time, interactive and arbitrary control over the dynamics and geometry of synthesized light patterns. Recent experiments have shown that GPC-driven micro-manipulation provides a unique technology platform for fully user-guided assembly of a plurality of particles in a plane, control of particle stacking along the beam axis, manipulation of multiple hollow beads, and the organization of living cells into three-dimensional colloidal structures. These demonstrations illustrate that GPC-driven micro-manipulation can be utilized not only for the improved synthesis of functional microstructures but also for non-contact and parallel actuation crucial for sophisticated opto- and micro-fluidic based lab-on-a-chip systems.

  5. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John C.

    1994-01-01

    A barrier for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates.

  6. Nonintrusive subsurface surveying capability

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T.W.; Cave, S.P.

    1994-06-01

    This presentation describes the capabilities of a ground-pentrating radar (GPR) system developed by EG&G Energy Measurements (EM), a prime contractor to the Department of Energy (DOE). The focus of the presentation will be on the subsurface survey of DOE site TA-21 in Los Alamos, New Mexico. EG&G EM developed the system for the Department of Defense. The system is owned by the Department of the Army and currently resides at KO in Albuquerque. EM is pursuing efforts to transfer this technology to environmental applications such as waste-site characterization with DOE encouragement. The Army has already granted permission to use the system for the waste-site characterization activities.

  7. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.

    1994-09-06

    A barrier is disclosed for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates. 5 figs.

  8. Emergent behavior in active colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöttl, Andreas; Stark, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Active colloids are microscopic particles, which self-propel through viscous fluids by converting energy extracted from their environment into directed motion. We first explain how artificial microswimmers move forward by generating near-surface flow fields via self-phoresis or the self-induced Marangoni effect. We then discuss generic features of the dynamics of single active colloids in bulk and in confinement, as well as in the presence of gravity, field gradients, and fluid flow. In the third section, we review the emergent collective behavior of active colloidal suspensions, focusing on their structural and dynamic properties. After summarizing experimental observations, we give an overview of the progress in modeling collectively moving active colloids. While active Brownian particles are heavily used to study collective dynamics on large scales, more advanced methods are necessary to explore the importance of hydrodynamic and phoretic particle interactions. Finally, the relevant physical approaches to quantify the emergent collective behavior are presented.

  9. SUBSURFACE FACILITY WORKER DOES ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    V. Arakali; E. Faillace; A. Linden

    2004-02-27

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the subsurface facility of the repository performing emplacement, maintenance, and retrieval operations under normal conditions. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the subsurface facilities and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application.

  10. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form

  11. Colloidal Suspended Iron in Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiller, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Iron is transported in most rivers predominantly in two physical-chemical forms: a) organic complexes of Fe(III) and b) crystalline or poorly-ordered suspended phases frequently dominated by iron oxides. These two forms have different properties with respect to transport, bioavailability, and sorption. For the suspended phase iron, the fraction in the colloidal size range may be especially important given the interactions of ferric oxide surfaces with dissolved metal ions and organic compounds. We report the concentrations of colloidal (20 - 450 nm) suspended particulate iron in a wide variety of rivers. Goals of this effort are to ascertain the ubiquity of this material and also to examine other fluvial variables as indicators of its sources and nature. This, in turn, should lead to an understanding of how landscape/climate change could affect fluvial colloidal suspended iron. Possible sources of suspended colloidal iron include ferric oxides precipitated from the oxidation of ferrous iron derived from reducing environments, alumino-silicates derived from physical weathering, products of chemical weathering, and flushing of soils. We observe most commonly that increasing concentrations of colloidal suspended iron follow indicators of reducing sources (e.g., higher dissolved Mn and Ce anomaly close to 1), suggesting that this material is dominated by freshly precipitated iron oxides. Only in glacial watersheds do we find colloidal suspended iron instead correlating with colloidal suspended Si, and hence, likely to be associated with alumino-silicates. We also observe that colloidal suspended iron correlates well with the UV absorbance associated with this size range (20 - 450 nm).

  12. Re-shaping colloidal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the geometry and yield of anisotropic colloidal particles remains a challenge for hierarchical self-assembly. I will discuss a synthetic strategy for fabricating colloidal clusters by creating order in randomly aggregated polymer spheres using surface tension and geometrical constraints. The technique can be extended to a variety of charge-stabilized polymer spheres and offers control over the cluster size distribution. VENI grant from The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  13. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size. PMID:27253725

  14. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-25

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  15. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    2000-10-12

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  16. Update: Biochemistry of Genetic Manipulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Various topics on the biochemistry of genetic manipulation are discussed. These include genetic transformation and DNA; genetic expression; DNA replication, repair, and mutation; technology of genetic manipulation; and applications of genetic manipulation. Other techniques employed are also considered. (JN)

  17. Direct ground water flow direction and velocity measurements using the colloidal borescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, R.A.; Rueth, L.R.; Landgraf, R.K.

    1995-07-01

    The colloidal borescope is an in situ instrument capable of directly observing suspended colloidal size particles (1 to 10 {mu}m) and determining ground water flow direction and velocity in an open borehole or monitor well in real time. In addition, the borescope can be used to investigate colloid mobilization during well sampling and the influence of pumping, tides, and subsurface drains. The fixed-focus colloidal borescope was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory-Grand Junction (ORNL-GJ) in Colorado, and has been used to characterize ground water flow at several DOE facilities including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Kansas City, Fernald, Savannah River, Hanford, Portsmouth, and Paducah. The borescope consists of a video camera, compass, optical 14OX magnification lens, and illumination source, all encased in a stainless steel, waterproof housing. The colloidal borescope is lowered to the desired depth in the well and video images of colloids are tracked by a Video Image Analysis System (VIAS) which uses a PC computer with a video frame-grabber board to digitize up to 256 colloids every 4 seconds. The VIAS analyses the digitized video images and calculates the number, size, flow direction, and flow rate of the colloids. These data are recorded on the PC hard drive and plotted. Two borescopes have been used at the LLNL facilities: the original fixed-focus borescope instrument with software designed by the ORNL-GJ, and the remote-focus, variable-illumination borescope with particle image processing LabView software designed by LLNL. Both instruments function similarly, however, the remote-focus borescope provides a 500-mm focal range, variable illumination for better particle tracking, a flux-gate compass, an alpha-numeric image encoder, and LabView processing software that provides several real-time image processing options and digital sampling frequencies. A typical borescope log is shown.

  18. Classifying human manipulation behavior.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Ian M; Dollar, Aaron M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a taxonomy for detailed classification of human and anthropomorphic manipulation behavior. This hand-centric, motion-centric taxonomy differentiates tasks based on criteria such as object contact, prehension, and the nature of object motion relative to a hand frame. A sub-classification of the most dexterous categories, within-hand manipulation, is also presented, based on the principal axis of object rotation or translation in the hand frame. Principles for categorizing complex, multi-faceted tasks are also presented, along with illustrative examples. We hope that the proposed taxonomy will both establish a standard language around human and anthropomorphic manipulation as well as enable improved understanding of the differences in hand use for a wide variety of behavior. Although designed for human and anthropomorphic hands, the taxonomy might easily be extended to a wide range of robot manipulators and end-effectors. PMID:22275611

  19. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... what patients really need is a healing touch. Osteopathic physicians haven't forgotten. Osteopathic manipulative treatment, or OMT, ... and prevent illness or injury. Using OMT, your osteopathic physician will move your muscles and joints using techniques ...

  20. Dielectrophoresis for bioparticle manipulation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Cheng; Huang, Haibo; Chen, Liguo; Li, Xiangpeng; Ge, Zunbiao; Chen, Tao; Yang, Zhan; Sun, Lining

    2014-01-01

    As an ideal method to manipulate biological particles, the dielectrophoresis (DEP) technique has been widely used in clinical diagnosis, disease treatment, drug development, immunoassays, cell sorting, etc. This review summarizes the research in the field of bioparticle manipulation based on DEP techniques. Firstly, the basic principle of DEP and its classical theories are introduced in brief; Secondly, a detailed introduction on the DEP technique used for bioparticle manipulation is presented, in which the applications are classified into five fields: capturing bioparticles to specific regions, focusing bioparticles in the sample, characterizing biomolecular interaction and detecting microorganism, pairing cells for electrofusion and separating different kinds of bioparticles; Thirdly, the effect of DEP on bioparticle viability is analyzed; Finally, the DEP techniques are summarized and future trends in bioparticle manipulation are suggested. PMID:25310652

  1. Dielectrophoresis for Bioparticle Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Cheng; Huang, Haibo; Chen, Liguo; Li, Xiangpeng; Ge, Zunbiao; Chen, Tao; Yang, Zhan; Sun, Lining

    2014-01-01

    As an ideal method to manipulate biological particles, the dielectrophoresis (DEP) technique has been widely used in clinical diagnosis, disease treatment, drug development, immunoassays, cell sorting, etc. This review summarizes the research in the field of bioparticle manipulation based on DEP techniques. Firstly, the basic principle of DEP and its classical theories are introduced in brief; Secondly, a detailed introduction on the DEP technique used for bioparticle manipulation is presented, in which the applications are classified into five fields: capturing bioparticles to specific regions, focusing bioparticles in the sample, characterizing biomolecular interaction and detecting microorganism, pairing cells for electrofusion and separating different kinds of bioparticles; Thirdly, the effect of DEP on bioparticle viability is analyzed; Finally, the DEP techniques are summarized and future trends in bioparticle manipulation are suggested. PMID:25310652

  2. Stokes trap for multiplexed particle manipulation and assembly using fluidics.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Anish; Rao, Christopher V; Schroeder, Charles M

    2016-04-12

    The ability to confine and manipulate single particles and molecules has revolutionized several fields of science. Hydrodynamic trapping offers an attractive method for particle manipulation in free solution without the need for optical, electric, acoustic, or magnetic fields. Here, we develop and demonstrate the Stokes trap, which is a new method for trapping multiple particles using only fluid flow. We demonstrate simultaneous manipulation of two particles in a simple microfluidic device using model predictive control. We further show that this approach can be used for fluidic-directed assembly of multiple particles in solution. Overall, this technique opens new vistas for fundamental studies of particle-particle interactions and provides a new method for the directed assembly of colloidal particles. PMID:27035979

  3. Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Daniel; Ozcelik, Adem; Bojanala, Nagagireesh; Nama, Nitesh; Upadhyay, Awani; Chen, Yuchao; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation. PMID:27004764

  4. Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Daniel; Ozcelik, Adem; Bojanala, Nagagireesh; Nama, Nitesh; Upadhyay, Awani; Chen, Yuchao; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation. PMID:27004764

  5. Dexterous manipulator flight demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Edward L.

    1989-01-01

    The Dexterous Manipulator Flight Experiment, an outgrowth of the Dexterous End Effector project, is an experiment to demonstrate newly developed equipment and methods that make for a dexterous manipulator which can be used on the Space Shuttle or other space missions. The goals of the project, the objectives of the flight experiment, the experiment equipment, and the tasks to be performed during the demonstration are discussed.

  6. Remote manipulator dynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, E. C.; Donges, P. K.; Garand, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    A simulator to generate the real time visual scenes required to perform man in the loop investigations of remote manipulator application and design concepts for the space shuttle is described. The simulated remote manipulator consists of a computed display system that uses a digital computer, the electronic scene generator, an operator's station, and associated interface hardware. A description of the capabilities of the implemented simulation is presented. The mathematical models and programs developed for the simulation are included.

  7. New collector efficiency equation for colloid filtration in both natural and engineered flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Kirk E.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2011-05-01

    A new equation for the collector efficiency (η) of the colloid filtration theory (CFT) is developed via nonlinear regression on the numerical data generated by a large number of Lagrangian simulations conducted in Happel's sphere-in-cell porous media model over a wide range of environmentally relevant conditions. The new equation expands the range of CFT's applicability in the natural subsurface primarily by accommodating departures from power law dependence of η on the Peclet and gravity numbers, a necessary but as of yet unavailable feature for applying CFT to large-scale field transport (e.g., of nanoparticles, radionuclides, or genetically modified organisms) under low groundwater velocity conditions. The new equation also departs from prior equations for colloids in the nanoparticle size range at all fluid velocities. These departures are particularly relevant to subsurface colloid and colloid-facilitated transport where low permeabilities and/or hydraulic gradients lead to low groundwater velocities and/or to nanoparticle fate and transport in porous media in general. We also note the importance of consistency in the conceptualization of particle flux through the single collector model on which most η equations are based for the purpose of attaining a mechanistic understanding of the transport and attachment steps of deposition. A lack of sufficient data for small particles and low velocities warrants further experiments to draw more definitive and comprehensive conclusions regarding the most significant discrepancies between the available equations.

  8. New Collector Efficiency Equation for Colloid Filtration in Both Natural and Engineered Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Kirk E.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2011-05-28

    new equation for the collector efficiency (η) of the colloid filtration theory (CFT) is developed via nonlinear regression on the numerical data generated by a large number of Lagrangian simulations conducted in Happel's sphere-in-cell porous media model over a wide range of environmentally relevant conditions. The new equation expands the range of CFT's applicability in the natural subsurface primarily by accommodating departures from power law dependence of η on the Peclet and gravity numbers, a necessary but as of yet unavailable feature for applying CFT to large-scale field transport (e.g., of nanoparticles, radionuclides, or genetically modified organisms) under low groundwater velocity conditions. The new equation also departs from prior equations for colloids in the nanoparticle size range at all fluid velocities. These departures are particularly relevant to subsurface colloid and colloid-facilitated transport where low permeabilities and/or hydraulic gradients lead to low groundwater velocities and/or to nanoparticle fate and transport in porous media in general. We also note the importance of consistency in the conceptualization of particle flux through the single collector model on which most η equations are based for the purpose of attaining a mechanistic understanding of the transport and attachment steps of deposition. A lack of sufficient data for small particles and low velocities warrants further experiments to draw more definitive and comprehensive conclusions regarding the most significant discrepancies between the available equations.

  9. A laboratory study of colloid and solute transport in surface runoff on saturated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Congrong; Gao, Bin; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Tian, Yuan; Wu, Lei; Perez-Ovilla, Oscar

    2011-05-01

    SummaryColloids in surface runoff may pose risks to the ecosystems not only because some of them (e.g., pathogens) are toxic, but also because they may facilitate the transport of other contaminants. Although many studies have been conducted to explore colloid fate and transport in the environment, current understanding of colloids in surface runoff is still limited. In this study, we conducted a range of laboratory experiments to examine the transport behavior of colloids in a surface runoff system, made of a soil box packed with quartz sand with four soil drainage outlets and one surface flow outlet. A natural clay colloid (kaolinite) and a conservative chemical tracer (bromide) were applied to the system under a simulated rainfall event (64 mm/h). Effluent soil drainage and surface flow samples were collected to determine the breakthrough concentrations of bromide and kaolinite. Under the experimental conditions tested, our results showed that surface runoff dominated the transport processes. As a result, kaolinite and bromide were found more in surface flow than in soil drainage. Comparisons between the breakthrough concentrations of bromide and kaolinite showed that kaolinite had lower mobility than bromide in the subsurface flow (i.e., soil drainage), but behaved almost identical to bromide in the surface runoff. Student's t-test confirmed the difference between kaolinite and bromide in subsurface flow ( p = 0.02). Spearman's test and linear regression analysis, however, showed a strong 1:1 correlation between kaolinite and bromide in surface runoff ( p < 0.0001). Our result indicate that colloids and chemical solutes may behave similarly in overland flow on bare soils with limited drainage when surface runoff dominates the transport processes.

  10. Subsurface Facility System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-31

    The Subsurface Facility System encompasses the location, arrangement, size, and spacing of the underground openings. This subsurface system includes accesses, alcoves, and drifts. This system provides access to the underground, provides for the emplacement of waste packages, provides openings to allow safe and secure work conditions, and interfaces with the natural barrier. This system includes what is now the Exploratory Studies Facility. The Subsurface Facility System physical location and general arrangement help support the long-term waste isolation objectives of the repository. The Subsurface Facility System locates the repository openings away from main traces of major faults, away from exposure to erosion, above the probable maximum flood elevation, and above the water table. The general arrangement, size, and spacing of the emplacement drifts support disposal of the entire inventory of waste packages based on the emplacement strategy. The Subsurface Facility System provides access ramps to safely facilitate development and emplacement operations. The Subsurface Facility System supports the development and emplacement operations by providing subsurface space for such systems as ventilation, utilities, safety, monitoring, and transportation.

  11. Surface chemistry investigation of colloid transport in packed beds. Final report, August 1, 1989--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    The importance of colloids as co-transport agents for pollutants in subsurface systems hinges on the extent to which electrostatic or other sources of repulsive colloid-collector interactions inhibit their filtration. When electrostatic interactions are favorable, for example when the colloid and groundwater media have opposite charge, colloids may be expected to travel only a few centimeters in saturated porous media. Repulsive electrostatic interactions between colloids and aquifer media with the same charge sign are postulated to significantly mobilize particles. As it happens, however, theories describing particle filtration from first principles, i.e., DLVO (Derjagin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek) theory, dramatically underestimate filtration rates when colloid-collector interactions are electrostatically repulsive. One of the primary objectives of the project was to experimentally investigate potential reasons for the historical lack of agreement between particle filtration models based on DLVO theory and observed particle deposition rates. An important hypothesis of the study was to test the validity of the assumption of surface homogeneity, as required by these models. The approach was to focus on collector surfaces that were commonly used as model systems, e.g., glass beads and quartz sand. Laboratory-scale column filtration experiments were conducted with colloidal polystyrene latex spheres. Collector surface preparation and cleaning approaches were examined, as well as the effects of solution chemistry.

  12. Colloid transport and deposition in water-saturated Yucca Mountain tuff as determined by ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Gamerdinger, A P; Kaplan, D I

    2001-08-15

    Colloid mobility and deposition were determined in model systems consisting of quartz sand or crushed Yucca Mountain tuff, latex microspheres (colloidal particles), and simulated groundwater. Ionic strength (I) was manipulated as a first step in defining limiting conditions for colloid transport in a system modeled after geochemical conditions at the Yucca Mountain site. Solutions of deionized water (DI), 0.1x, 1x, and 10x (the ionic strength of simulated groundwater) (I = 0.0116 M) were used in saturated columns under steady-state flow conditions. Separate experiments with conservative tracers indicated stable hydrodynamic conditions that were independent of I. Colloids were completely mobile (no deposition) in the DI and 0.1x solutions; deposition increased to 11-13% for 1x and to 89-97% for 10x treatments with similar results for sand and tuff. Deposition was described as a pseudo-first-order process; however, a decreasing rate of deposition was apparent for colloid transport at the 10x condition through the tuff. A linear dependence of colloid removal (extent and deposition rate coefficient) on I is illustrated for the model Yucca Mountain system and for a glass-KCl system reported in the literature. This simple relationship for saturated systems may be useful for predicting deposition efficiencies under conditions of varying ionic strength. PMID:11529572

  13. Micro manipulator motion control to counteract macro manipulator structural vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, J.Y.; Trudnowski, D.J.; Evans, M.S.; Bennett, D.W.

    1995-02-01

    Inertial force damping control by micro manipulator modulation is proposed to suppress the vibrations of a micro/macro manipulator system. The proposed controller, developed using classical control theory, is added to the existing control system. The proposed controller uses real-time measurements of macro manipulator flexibility to adjust the motion of the micro manipulator to counteract structural vibrations. Experimental studies using an existing micro/macro flexible link manipulator testbed demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach to suppression of vibrations in the macro/micro manipulator system using micro-manipulator-based inertial active damping control.

  14. Adverse possession of subsurface minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, P.N.

    1983-01-01

    Concepts applicable to adverse possession of subsurface minerals are generally the same as those that apply to adverse possession of all real estate. However, special requirements must be satisfied in order to perfect title to subsurface minerals by adverse possession, particularly when there has been a severance of the true title between surface and subsurface minerals. In those jurisdictions where senior and junior grants came from the state or commonwealth covering the same or some of the same land and in those areas where descriptions of land were vague or not carefully drawn, adverse possession serves to solidify land and mineral ownership. There may be some public, social, and economic justification in rewarding, with good title, those who take possession and use real estate for its intended use, including the extraction of subsurface minerals. 96 refernces.

  15. Manipulator comparative testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Handel, S.J.; Sundstrom, E.; Herndon, J.N.; Fujita, Y.; Maida, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Manipulator Comparative Testing Program compared performance of selected manipulator systems under typical remote handling conditions. The site of testing was the Remote Operations and Maintenance Demonstration Facility operated by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Three experiment examined differences among manipulator systems from the US and Japan. The manipulator systems included the Meidensha BILARM 83A, Central Research Laboratories' (CRL's) Model M-2, and GCA PaR systems Model 6000. Six manipulator and control mode combinations were evaluated: (a) the BILARM in master-slave mode without force reflection; (b) the BILARM in master-slave mode with force reflection; (c) the Model M-2 in master-slave mode without force reflection; (d) the Model M-2 in master-slave mode with force reflection; (e) the BILARM with switchbox controls; and (f) the PaR 6000 with switchbox controls. The experiments also examined differences between master-slave systems with and without force reflections, and differences between master-slave systems and switchbox-controlled systems.

  16. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  17. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-a; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:26279317

  18. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:26279317

  19. Gel transitions in colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergenholtz, J.; Fuchs, M.

    1999-12-01

    The idealized mode-coupling theory (MCT) is applied to colloidal systems interacting via short-range attractive interactions of Yukawa form. At low temperatures, MCT predicts a slowing down of the local dynamics and ergodicity-breaking transitions. The non-ergodicity transitions share many features with the colloidal gel transition, and are proposed to be the source of gelation in colloidal systems. Previous calculations of the phase diagram are complemented with additional data for shorter ranges of the attractive interaction, showing that the path of the non-ergodicity transition line is then unimpeded by the gas-liquid critical curve at low temperatures. Particular attention is given to the critical non-ergodicity parameters; this is motivated by recent experimental measurements. An asymptotic model is developed, valid for dilute systems of spheres interacting via strong short-range attractions, and is shown to capture all aspects of the low-temperature MCT non-ergodicity transitions.

  20. Polymeric stabilization of colloidal asphaltenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, Sara; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2010-03-01

    Asphaltenes, the heaviest component of crude oil, cause many problems in petroleum extraction and recovery. Operationally defined as insoluble in long chain alkanes but soluble in toluene, asphaltenes have been described by bulk thermodynamic models such as the Flory-Huggins theory. However, bulk models work well only for asphaltenes in good solvents. Characterization of asphaltenes in poor solvents remains elusive: molecular scale asphaltenes readily aggregate to the colloidal scale and become highly unstable in solution. We investigate the ability of polymers to stabilize colloidal asphaltene suspensions in heptane. In the absence of added polymer, sedimentation measurements reveal dynamics reminiscent of collapsing gels. Adding polymers to colloidal asphaltene suspensions can delay the characteristic sedimentation time by orders of magnitude. Light scattering results suggest that the mechanism of stabilization may be related to a decrease in both particle size and polydispersity as a function of added polymer.

  1. Entropy favours open colloidal lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaoming; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Burgeoning experimental and simulation activity seeks to understand the existence of self-assembled colloidal structures that are not close-packed. Here we describe an analytical theory based on lattice dynamics and supported by experiments that reveals the fundamental role entropy can play in stabilizing open lattices. The entropy we consider is associated with the rotational and vibrational modes unique to colloids interacting through extended attractive patches. The theory makes predictions of the implied temperature, pressure and patch-size dependence of the phase diagram of open and close-packed structures. More generally, it provides guidance for the conditions at which targeted patchy colloidal assemblies in two and three dimensions are stable, thus overcoming the difficulty in exploring by experiment or simulation the full range of conceivable parameters.

  2. Doped colloidal artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libál, A.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Reichhardt, C.

    2015-10-01

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is raised. In contrast, the kagome ice ground state can absorb the doping charge without generating non-ground-state excitations, while at elevated temperatures the hopping of individual colloids is suppressed near the doping sites. These results indicate that in the square ice, doping adds degeneracy to the ordered ground state and creates local weak spots, while in the kagome ice, which has a highly degenerate ground state, doping locally decreases the degeneracy and creates local hard regions.

  3. In Situ Redox Manipulation Field Injection Test Report - Hanford 100-H Area

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchter, J.S.; Amonette, J.E.; Cole, C.R.

    1996-11-01

    This report presents results of an In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Field Injection Withdrawal Test performed at the 100-H Area of the US. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in Washington State in Fiscal Year 1996 by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The test is part of the overall ISRM project, the purpose of which is to determine the potential for remediating contaminated groundwater with a technology based on in situ manipulation of subsurface reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions. The ISRM technology would be used to treat subsurface contaminants in groundwater zones at DOE sites.

  4. Clusters, asters, and collective oscillations in chemotactic colloids.

    PubMed

    Saha, Suropriya; Golestanian, Ramin; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2014-06-01

    The creation of synthetic systems that emulate the defining properties of living matter, such as motility, gradient-sensing, signaling, and replication, is a grand challenge of biomimetics. Such imitations of life crucially contain active components that transform chemical energy into directed motion. These artificial realizations of motility point in the direction of a new paradigm in engineering, through the design of emergent behavior by manipulating properties at the scale of the individual components. Catalytic colloidal swimmers are a particularly promising example of such systems. Here we present a comprehensive theoretical description of gradient-sensing of an individual swimmer, leading controllably to chemotactic or anti-chemotactic behavior, and use it to construct a framework for studying their collective behavior. We find that both the positional and the orientational degrees of freedom of the active colloids can exhibit condensation, signaling formation of clusters and asters. The kinetics of catalysis introduces a natural control parameter for the range of the interaction mediated by the diffusing chemical species. For various regimes in parameter space in the long-ranged limit our system displays precise analogs to gravitational collapse, plasma oscillations, and electrostatic screening. We present prescriptions for how to tune the surface properties of the colloids during fabrication to achieve each type of behavior. PMID:25019785

  5. Clusters, asters, and collective oscillations in chemotactic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Suropriya; Golestanian, Ramin; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2014-06-01

    The creation of synthetic systems that emulate the defining properties of living matter, such as motility, gradient-sensing, signaling, and replication, is a grand challenge of biomimetics. Such imitations of life crucially contain active components that transform chemical energy into directed motion. These artificial realizations of motility point in the direction of a new paradigm in engineering, through the design of emergent behavior by manipulating properties at the scale of the individual components. Catalytic colloidal swimmers are a particularly promising example of such systems. Here we present a comprehensive theoretical description of gradient-sensing of an individual swimmer, leading controllably to chemotactic or anti-chemotactic behavior, and use it to construct a framework for studying their collective behavior. We find that both the positional and the orientational degrees of freedom of the active colloids can exhibit condensation, signaling formation of clusters and asters. The kinetics of catalysis introduces a natural control parameter for the range of the interaction mediated by the diffusing chemical species. For various regimes in parameter space in the long-ranged limit our system displays precise analogs to gravitational collapse, plasma oscillations, and electrostatic screening. We present prescriptions for how to tune the surface properties of the colloids during fabrication to achieve each type of behavior.

  6. Colloidal particle assembly using piezoelectric inkjet printing of polystyrene colloidal ink formulations.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Younghwan

    2014-10-01

    We report the feasibility of piezoelectric inkjet printing of colloidal dispersion inks for geometrical patterning to arrange colloids in desired locations. Polystyrene colloid (dia. = 3 μm) inks dispersed with thermally curable binder in organic solvents are explored for fundamental study on colloidal patterning. The inkjet printability of colloidal inks is systematically investigated with different ink formulations and inkjet process variables. In addition, in order to maintain the structural stability of colloidal patterns fabricated on the substrate from externally applied forces such as mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli, thermally curable binder was formulated into the colloidal ink formulations. PMID:25942838

  7. Simulation of robot manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M.; Bills, K.C.; Kwon, D.S.; Schoenwald, D.A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s development of an environment for the simulation of robotic manipulators. Simulation includes the modeling of kinematics, dynamics, sensors, actuators, control systems, operators, and environments. Models will be used for manipulator design, proposal evaluation, control system design and analysis, graphical preview of proposed motions, safety system development, and training. Of particular interest is the development of models for robotic manipulators having at least one flexible link. As a first application, models have been developed for the Pacific Northwest Laboratories` Flexible Beam Testbed which is a one-Degree-Of-Freedom, flexible arm with a hydraulic base actuator. Initial results show good agreement between model and experiment.

  8. Magnetic assembly route to colloidal responsive photonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    He, Le; Wang, Mingsheng; Ge, Jianping; Yin, Yadong

    2012-09-18

    Responsive photonic structures can respond to external stimuli by transmitting optical signals. Because of their important technological applications such as color signage and displays, biological and chemical sensors, security devices, ink and paints, military camouflage, and various optoelectronic devices, researchers have focused on developing these functional materials. Conventionally, self-assembled colloidal crystals containing periodically arranged dielectric materials have served as the predominant starting frameworks. Stimulus-responsive materials are incorporated into the periodic structures either as the initial building blocks or as the surrounding matrix so that the photonic properties can be tuned. Although researchers have proposed various versions of responsive photonic structures, the low efficiency of fabrication through self-assembly, narrow tunability, slow responses to the external stimuli, incomplete reversibility, and the challenge of integrating them into existing photonic devices have limited their practical application. In this Account, we describe how magnetic fields can guide the assembly of superparamagnetic colloidal building blocks into periodically arranged particle arrays and how the photonic properties of the resulting structures can be reversibly tuned by manipulating the external magnetic fields. The application of the external magnetic field instantly induces a strong magnetic dipole-dipole interparticle attraction within the dispersion of superparamagnetic particles, which creates one-dimensional chains that each contains a string of particles. The balance between the magnetic attraction and the interparticle repulsions, such as the electrostatic force, defines the interparticle separation. By employing uniform superparamagnetic particles of appropriate sizes and surface charges, we can create one-dimensional periodicity, which leads to strong optical diffraction. Acting remotely over a large distance, magnetic forces drove the

  9. Colloid cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grasu, Beatrice L; Alberico, Anthony M

    2011-01-01

    Colloid cysts are a rare clinical finding with a unique clinical presentation: non-specific paroxysmal headaches. The current recommended treatment is microsurgery, which poses the greatest risk to the patient but allows complete removal of the cyst to prevent recurrence. A 41-year old man presented with a colloid cyst located in the foramen of Monro causing obstructive hydrocephalus. He had paroxysmal headaches and memory and personality changes. Transcortical transventricle microsurgery was performed to remove the entire cyst. A temporary shunt was placed to prevent post-operative hydrocephalus. Normal neurological function returned upon cyst removal. PMID:22034805

  10. Potential artifacts in interpretation of differential breakthrough of colloids and dissolved tracers in the context of transport in a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, P.; Johnson, W.P.; Piana, M.J.; Fuller, C.C.; Naftz, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Many published studies have used visual comparison of the timing of peak breakthrough of colloids versus conservative dissolved tracers (hereafter referred to as dissolved tracers or tracers) in subsurface media to determine whether they are advected differently, and to elucidate the mechanisms of differential advection. This purely visual approach of determining differential advection may have artifacts, however, due to the attachment of colloids to subsurface media. The attachment of colloids to subsurface media may shift the colloidal peak breakthrough to earlier times, causing an apparent "faster" peak breakthrough of colloids relative to dissolve tracers even though the transport velocities for the colloids and the dissolved tracers may actually be equivalent. In this paper, a peak shift analysis was presented to illustrate the artifacts associated with the purely visual approach in determining differential advection, and to quantify the peak shift due to colloid attachment. This peak shift analysis was described within the context of microsphere and bromide transport within a zero-valent iron (ZVI) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) located in Fry Canyon, Utah. Application of the peak shift analysis to the field microsphere and bromide breakthrough data indicated that differential advection of the microspheres relative to the bromide occurred in the monitoring wells closest to the injection well in the PRB. It was hypothesized that the physical heterogeneity at the grain scale, presumably arising from differences in inter- versus intra-particle porosity, contributed to the differential advection of the microspheres versus the bromide in the PRB. The relative breakthrough (RB) of microspheres at different wells was inversely related to the ionic strength of ground water at these wells, in agreement with numerous studies showing that colloid attachment is directly related to solution ionic strength.

  11. Potential artifacts in interpretation of differential breakthrough of colloids and dissolved tracers in the context of transport in a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B P; Johnson, W P; Piana, M J; Fuller, C C; Naftz, D L

    2001-01-01

    Many published studies have used visual comparison of the timing of peak breakthrough of colloids versus conservative dissolved tracers (hereafter referred to as dissolved tracers or tracers) in subsurface media to determine whether they are advected differently, and to elucidate the mechanisms of differential advection. This purely visual approach of determining differential advection may have artifacts, however, due to the attachment of colloids to subsurface media. The attachment of colloids to subsurface media may shift the colloidal peak breakthrough to earlier times, causing an apparent "faster" peak breakthrough of colloids relative to dissolve tracers even though the transport velocities for the colloids and the dissolved tracers may actually be equivalent. In this paper, a peak shift analysis was presented to illustrate the artifacts associated with the purely visual approach in determining differential advection, and to quantify the peak shift due to colloid attachment. This peak shift analysis was described within the context of microsphere and bromide transport within a zero-valent iron (ZVI) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) located in Fry Canyon, Utah. Application of the peak shift analysis to the field microsphere and bromide breakthrough data indicated that differential advection of the microspheres relative to the bromide occurred in the monitoring wells closest to the injection well in the PRB. It was hypothesized that the physical heterogeneity at the grain scale, presumably arising from differences in inter- versus intra-particle porosity, contributed to the differential advection of the microspheres versus the bromide in the PRB. The relative breakthrough (RB) of microspheres at different wells was inversely related to the ionic strength of ground water at these wells, in agreement with numerous studies showing that colloid attachment is directly related to solution ionic strength. PMID:11708449

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Supramolecular Colloids.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Neus; De Feijter, Isja; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-01-01

    Control over colloidal assembly is of utmost importance for the development of functional colloidal materials with tailored structural and mechanical properties for applications in photonics, drug delivery and coating technology. Here we present a new family of colloidal building blocks, coined supramolecular colloids, whose self-assembly is controlled through surface-functionalization with a benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derived supramolecular moiety. Such BTAs interact via directional, strong, yet reversible hydrogen-bonds with other identical BTAs. Herein, a protocol is presented that describes how to couple these BTAs to colloids and how to quantify the number of coupling sites, which determines the multivalency of the supramolecular colloids. Light scattering measurements show that the refractive index of the colloids is almost matched with that of the solvent, which strongly reduces the van der Waals forces between the colloids. Before photo-activation, the colloids remain well dispersed, as the BTAs are equipped with a photo-labile group that blocks the formation of hydrogen-bonds. Controlled deprotection with UV-light activates the short-range hydrogen-bonds between the BTAs, which triggers the colloidal self-assembly. The evolution from the dispersed state to the clustered state is monitored by confocal microscopy. These results are further quantified by image analysis with simple routines using ImageJ and Matlab. This merger of supramolecular chemistry and colloidal science offers a direct route towards light- and thermo-responsive colloidal assembly encoded in the surface-grafted monolayer. PMID:27168201

  13. Colloids and Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range

  14. ELECTRONIC MASTER SLAVE MANIPULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Goertz, R.C.; Thompson, Wm.M.; Olsen, R.A.

    1958-08-01

    A remote control manipulator is described in which the master and slave arms are electrically connected to produce the desired motions. A response signal is provided in the master unit in order that the operator may sense a feel of the object and may not thereby exert such pressures that would ordinarily damage delicate objects. This apparatus will permit the manipulation of objects at a great distance, that may be viewed over a closed TV circuit, thereby permitting a remote operator to carry out operations in an extremely dangerous area with complete safety.

  15. Model based manipulator control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosky, Lyman J.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using model based control (MBC) for robotic manipulators was investigated. A double inverted pendulum system was constructed as the experimental system for a general study of dynamically stable manipulation. The original interest in dynamically stable systems was driven by the objective of high vertical reach (balancing), and the planning of inertially favorable trajectories for force and payload demands. The model-based control approach is described and the results of experimental tests are summarized. Results directly demonstrate that MBC can provide stable control at all speeds of operation and support operations requiring dynamic stability such as balancing. The application of MBC to systems with flexible links is also discussed.

  16. Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

    2003-12-17

    The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce

  17. An explanation for differences in the process of colloid adsorption in batch and column studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treumann, Svantje; Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A.; Visalakshan, Rahul M.; Page, Declan

    2014-08-01

    It is essential to understand the mechanisms that control virus and bacteria removal in the subsurface environment to assess the risk of groundwater contamination with fecal microorganisms. This study was conducted to explicitly provide a critical and systematic comparison between batch and column experiments. The aim was to investigate the underlying factors causing the commonly observed discrepancies in colloid adsorption process in column and batch systems. We examined the colloid adsorption behavior of four different sizes of carboxylate-modified latex (CML) microspheres, as surrogates for viruses and bacteria, on quartz sand in batch and column experiments over a wide range of solution ionic strengths (IS). Our results show that adsorption of colloids in batch systems should be considered as an irreversible attachment because the attachment/detachment model was found to be inadequate in describing the batch results. An irreversible attachment-blocking model was found to accurately describe the results of both batch and column experiments. The rate of attachment was found to depend highly on colloid size, solution IS and the fraction of the sand surface area favorable for attachment (Sf). The rate of attachment and Sf values were different in batch and column experiments due to differences in the hydrodynamic of the system, and the role of surface roughness and pore structure on colloid attachment. Results from column and batch experiments were generally not comparable, especially for larger colloids (≥ 0.5 μm). Predictions based on classical DLVO theory were found to inadequately describe interaction energies between colloids and sand surfaces.

  18. Colloidal Wormlike Micelles with Highly Ferromagnetic Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenrong; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-10-20

    For the first time, a new fabrication method for manipulating the ferromagnetic property of molecular magnets by forming wormlike micelles in magnetic-ionic-liquid (mag-IL) complexes is reported. The ferromagnetism of the mag-IL complexes was enhanced 4-fold because of the formation of wormlike micelles, presenting new evidence for the essence of magnetism generation at a molecular level. Characteristics such as morphology and magnetic properties of the wormlike micelle gel were investigated in detail by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM), rheological measurements, circular dichroism (CD), FT-IR spectra, and the superconducting quantum interference device method (SQUID). An explanation of ferromagnetism elevation from the view of the molecular (ionic) distribution is also given. For the changes of magnetic properties (ferromagnetism elevation) in the wormlike micelle systems, the ability of CTAFe in magnetizing AzoNa4 (or AzoH4) can be ascribed to an interplay of the magnetic [FeCl3Br](-) ions both in the Stern layer and in the cores of the wormlike micelles. Formation of colloidal aggregates, i.e., wormlike micelles, provides a new strategy to tune the magnetic properties of novel molecular magnets. PMID:26411638

  19. Manipulating the Gradient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaze, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a cooperative learning, group lab for a Calculus III course to facilitate comprehension of the gradient vector and directional derivative concepts. The lab is a hands-on experience allowing students to manipulate a tangent plane and empirically measure the effect of partial derivatives on the direction of optimal ascent. (Contains 7…

  20. Manipulating Combinatorial Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labelle, Gilbert

    This set of transparencies shows how the manipulation of combinatorial structures in the context of modern combinatorics can easily lead to interesting teaching and learning activities at every level of education from elementary school to university. The transparencies describe: (1) the importance and relations of combinatorics to science and…

  1. Trust versus Manipulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anne C.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the issue of trust in the education system. What is different about the issue of trust in the education system is the assault upon it, sometimes overt but most often subtle. There is a difference between strong criticism and willful manipulation. The nation's schools are responding to the former--perhaps too slowly for…

  2. Kinematically redundant robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baillieul, J.; Hollerbach, J.; Brockett, R.; Martin, D.; Percy, R.; Thomas, R.

    1987-01-01

    Research on control, design and programming of kinematically redundant robot manipulators (KRRM) is discussed. These are devices in which there are more joint space degrees of freedom than are required to achieve every position and orientation of the end-effector necessary for a given task in a given workspace. The technological developments described here deal with: kinematic programming techniques for automatically generating joint-space trajectories to execute prescribed tasks; control of redundant manipulators to optimize dynamic criteria (e.g., applications of forces and moments at the end-effector that optimally distribute the loading of actuators); and design of KRRMs to optimize functionality in congested work environments or to achieve other goals unattainable with non-redundant manipulators. Kinematic programming techniques are discussed, which show that some pseudo-inverse techniques that have been proposed for redundant manipulator control fail to achieve the goals of avoiding kinematic singularities and also generating closed joint-space paths corresponding to close paths of the end effector in the workspace. The extended Jacobian is proposed as an alternative to pseudo-inverse techniques.

  3. Computer Algebra versus Manipulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zand, Hossein; Crowe, David

    2004-01-01

    In the UK there is increasing concern about the lack of skill in algebraic manipulation that is evident in students entering mathematics courses at university level. In this note we discuss how the computer can be used to ameliorate some of the problems. We take as an example the calculations needed in three dimensional vector analysis in polar…

  4. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for studying the groundwater colloids for the Yucca Mountain Project in conjunction with the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. Colloidal particle size distributions and total particle concentration in groundwater samples are quantified and characterized. Colloid materials from cavity waters collected near underground nuclear explosion sites by HRMP field sampling personnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were quantified. Selected colloid samples were further characterized by electron microscope to evaluate the colloid shapes, elemental compositions, and mineral phases. The authors have evaluated the colloid size and concentration in the natural groundwater sample that was collected from the ER-20-5 well and stored in a 50-gallon (about 200-liter) barrel for several months. This groundwater sample was studied because HRMP personnel have identified trace levels of radionuclides in the water sample. Colloid results show that even though the water sample had filtered through a series of Millipore filters, high-colloid concentrations were identified in all unfiltered and filtered samples. They had studied the samples that were diluted with distilled water and found that diluted samples contained more colloids than the undiluted ones. These results imply that colloids are probably not stable during the storage conditions. Furthermore, results demonstrate that undesired colloids have been introduced into the samples during the storage, filtration, and dilution processes. They have evaluated possible sources of colloid contamination associated with sample collection, filtrating, storage, and analyses of natural groundwaters. The effects of container types and sample storage time on colloid size distribution and total concentration were studied to evaluate colloid stability by using J13 groundwater. The data suggests that groundwater samples

  5. Physics of Colloids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, Dave; Weeks, Eric; Gasser, Urs; Dinsmore, Tony; Mawley, Suliana; Segre, Phil; Cipelletti, Lucia

    2000-01-01

    This talk will present recent results from ground-based research to support the "Physics of Colloids in Space" project which is scheduled to fly in the ISS approximately one year from now. In addition, results supporting future planned flights will be discussed.

  6. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-09-01

    Drying suspensions often leave behind complex patterns of particulates, as might be seen in the coffee stains on a table. Here, we consider the dynamics of periodic band or uniform solid film formation on a vertical plate suspended partially in a drying colloidal solution. Direct observations allow us to visualize the dynamics of band and film deposition, where both are made of multiple layers of close packed particles. We further see that there is a transition between banding and filming when the colloidal concentration is varied. A minimal theory of the liquid meniscus motion along the plate reveals the dynamics of the banding and its transition to the filming as a function of the ratio of deposition and evaporation rates. We also provide a complementary multiphase model of colloids dissolved in the liquid, which couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving meniscus to the fluid and particulate flows and the transition from a dilute suspension to a porous plug. This allows us to determine the concentration dependence of the bandwidth and the deposition rate. Together, our findings allow for the control of drying-induced patterning as a function of the colloidal concentration and evaporation rate.

  7. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs.

  8. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  9. Sonochemical synthesis of iron colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.; Fang, M.; Hyeon, T.

    1996-11-27

    We present here a new method for the preparation of stable ferromagnetic colloids of iron using high-intensity ultrasound to sonochemically decompose volatile organometallic compounds. These colloids have narrow size distributions centered at a few nanometers and are found to be superparamagnetic. In conclusion, a simple synthetic method has been discovered to produce nanosized iron colloid using high-intensity ultrasound. Nanometer iron particles dispersed in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) matrix or stabilized by adsorption of oleic acid have been synthesized by sonochemical decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5}. Transmission electron micrographs show that the iron particles have a relatively narrow range in size from 3 to 8 nm for polyvinylpyrrolidone, while oleic acid gives an even more uniform distribution at 8 nm. magnetic measurements revealed that these nanometer iron particles are superparamagnetic with a saturation magnetization of 101 emu/g (Fe) at 290 K. This work is easily extended to colloids of other metals and to alloys of two or more metals, simply by using multiple volatile precursors. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Towards Structural Complexity with Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Colloids rather easily assemble into simple crystal structures like the face-centered cubic lattice or the body-centered cubic lattice. More complex phases are harder to achieve, but have recently been reported using a number of approaches. Yet, assembling complex structures often results from trial-and-error and is not well understood. In this presentation, we show how novel crystals, quasicrystals, and liquid crystals can be achieved with colloidal building blocks by varying the interactions and the shapes of the building blocks. Using computer simulations, we demonstrate the formation of unusually ordered phases both with isotropic pair potentials, as well as with facetted shapes like polyhedra. We describe new tools we have developed to perform complex structural analysis on simulated systems and show how they may be used to analyze real space images from colloid experiments. We also compare the assembled structures with densest packings of the building blocks and show that good packings can often be distinct from what is observed to assemble from the disordered state. This suggests that dense packings may not be illustrative of what is achievable in colloid experiments.