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Sample records for manipulation orthopedic

  1. Orthopedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, N.W.; Sledge, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a presentation on orthopedic radiology. The book features coverage of the skeleton by anatomic area, with use of radiographs. Each chapter presents radiologic coverage of normal anatomy, normal variants, and common disorders for each system.

  2. Orthopedic services

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Infection of the spine Injury to the spine Scoliosis Spinal stenosis Spinal tumor Fractures Spinal cord injuries ... in the treatment of orthopedics include: Amputation Arthroscopic surgeries Bunionectomy and hammer toe repair Cartilage repair or ...

  3. Orthopedic complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Daniel J; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Ebraheim, Nabil A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a number of lower extremity orthopedic conditions and complications including fractures, Charcot neuroarthropathy, plantar ulcers, and infection. These complications are of significant clinical concern in terms of morbidity, mortality, and socioeconomic costs. A review of each condition is discussed, with particular emphasis on the clinical importance, diagnostic considerations, and orthopedic treatment recommendations. The goal of the article is to provide a clinical picture of the challenges that orthopedic surgeons confront, and highlight the need for specific clinical guidelines in diabetic patients. PMID:26211990

  4. Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 5 Ways to Prepare for an Allergy Emergency Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions ... might be linked to other conditions, such as cerebral palsy, muscle weakness disorders, autism, or other nervous system ...

  5. Lasers in orthopedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherk, Henry H.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Meller, Menachem M.

    1990-06-01

    Orthopedic Surgery is that surgical discipline which deals with the musculoskeletal system. Orthopedists therefore operate on joints, the spine and long bones and engage in such subsecialities as sports medicine, hand surgery, trauma surgery, and joint replacements. Since they must cut and shape bone, cartilage, tendon, and ligament, orthopedists have developed a number of mechanical techniques to achieve these ends and surgical lasers have found few applications in orthopedics because until now they have not been useful for cutting bone. In the past several years, however, there has been considerable interest in several areas within the field of orthopedic surgery that do not entail actual bone surgery and it is expected that as newer and more powerful lasers become available laser osteotomy may become feasible and even routine.

  6. Tourniquets in orthopedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jai Prakash; Salhotra, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    Tourniquets are commonly used in limb surgeries, be it orthopedic or plastic surgeries. But the inflation pressures, the duration, and release guidelines are still not clear. According to a survey, majority of orthopedic surgeons inflate the tourniquet to fixed pressures for the upper and the lower limbs without considering the baseline blood pressure of the patient on whom the tourniquets are being applied. This review was designed to recall and review the safe use of tourniquets and the various techniques that can be employed to minimize the complications of tourniquet use. Google, science direct, and pubmed were searched for appropriate literature and relevant articles were identified. PMID:22912509

  7. Useful apps for orthopedic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Franko, Orrin I

    2012-11-01

    With the advent of smartphones and tablet computers, mobile platform applications, or apps, are now penetrating the orthopedic community. The appeal of apps in a medical setting is a result of their intuitive and interactive interface that allows for the quick reference of information on the go. This review serves to highlight some of the most useful apps available to orthopedic surgeons and trainees. Although this is not a comprehensive list, the apps mentioned below are either free or inexpensive and include both general medical as well as orthopedic-specific apps that can be useful to orthopedic providers at any level of training. PMID:23431517

  8. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  9. Orthopedic issues in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Micah Warren; Marcus, Peter S; Wurtz, L Daniel

    2008-02-01

    Pregnancy taxes the musculoskeletal system. The enlarging gravid uterus alters the maternal body's center of gravity, mechanically stressing the axial and pelvic systems, and compounds the stresses that hormone level fluctuations and fluid retention exert. While the pregnant woman is prone to many musculoskeletal injuries, most can be controlled conservatively, but some require emergent surgical intervention. This article describes pregnancy-related orthopedic problems and related conditions, and discusses their pathogenesis, signs, symptoms, physical examination findings, diagnostic work-up, and interventions. Topics specifically covered include the following: pregnancy-related posterior pelvic pain (PRPPP), lumbar disc herniation with cauda equine syndrome, low back pain, kyphoscoliosis and scoliosis issues for anesthesia during pregnancy and delivery, pubic symphysis rupture, transient osteoporosis versus osteonecrosis, management of pregnancy after hip replacement surgery, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Specific musculoskeletal systems discussed in this article include the spine, pelvis, hip joint, and wrist. PMID:18199383

  10. Moral Dilemmas in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, John J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-12-01

    All orthopedic surgeons face moral dilemmas on a regular basis; however, little has been written about the moral dilemmas that are encountered when providing orthopedic care to pediatric patients and their families. This article aims to provide surgeons with a better understanding of how bioethics and professionalism apply to the care of their pediatric patients. First, several foundational concepts of both bioethics and professionalism are summarized, and definitions are offered for 16 important terms within the disciplines. Next, some of the unique aspects of pediatric orthopedics as a subspecialty are reviewed before engaging in a discussion of 5 common moral dilemmas within the field. Those dilemmas include the following: (1) obtaining informed consent and assent for either surgery or research from pediatric patients and their families; (2) performing cosmetic surgery on pediatric patients; (3) caring for pediatric patients with cognitive or physical impairments; (4) caring for injured pediatric athletes; and (5) meeting the demand for pediatric orthopedic care in the United States. Pertinent considerations are reviewed for each of these 5 moral dilemmas, thereby better preparing surgeons for principled moral decision making in their own practices. Each of these dilemmas is inherently complex with few straightforward answers; however, orthopedic surgeons have an obligation to take the lead and better define these kinds of difficult issues within their field. The lives of pediatric patients and their families will be immeasurably improved as a result. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(12):e1133-e1138.]. PMID:26652336

  11. Roentgen Stereophotogrammetry In Orthopedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvik, Goran

    1983-07-01

    A system for roentgen stereophotogrammetry has been used in Lund, Sweden, since August 1972 and by August 1982 ten thousand stereo films have been evaluated using this method. Patient investigations started March 1973 and of the more than 500 patients investigated 300 have been referred by orthopedic surgeons. The skeletal parts investigated had been permanently marked with tantalum balls 0.5 or 0.8 mm in diameter. The causes for the investigation have been bone growth disorders in the Lower extremity (134 patients), spinal fusions (35 patients), high tibial osteotomies for gonarthrosis (21 patients) and endoprosthetic replacement of the knee (68 patients) or hip (42 patients) joint. By the roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA), information on for instance the development of angular deformities and staple loosening in the leg, the healing process of the intended fusion in the spine or at the knee, and on the migration and stability of prosthetic components have been obtained. RSA is of value both for prognostic and followup purposes, and is versatile enough in proper setting to be used as a routine clinical investigation.

  12. Greening of orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rushyuan J; Mears, Simon C

    2012-06-01

    Every year, 4 billion pounds of waste are produced by health care facilities, and the amount continues to increase annually. In response, a movement toward greening health care has been building, with a particular focus on the operating room. Between 20% and 70% of health care waste originates from a hospital's operating room, and up to 90% of operating room waste is improperly sorted and sent for costly and unneeded hazardous waste processing. Recent successful changes include segregation of hospital waste, substitution of the ubiquitous polypropylene plastic wrap used for the sterilization and handling of surgical equipment with metal cases, and the reintroduction of reusable surgical gowns. Orthopedic-related changes include the successful reprocessing and reuse of external fixators, shavers, blades, burs, and tourniquets. These changes have been shown to be environmentally and economically beneficial. Early review indicates that these changes are feasible, but a need exists for further evaluation of the effect on the operating room and flow of the surgical procedure and of the risks to the surgeons and operating room staff. Other key considerations are the effects of reprocessed and reused equipment on patient care and outcome and the role of surgeons in helping patients make informed decisions regarding surgical care. The goals of this study were to summarize the amount and types of waste produced in hospitals and operating rooms, highlight the methods of disposal used, review disposal methods that have been developed to reduce waste and improve recycling, and explore future developments in greening health care. PMID:22691671

  13. Plasma Biomedicine in Orthopedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satsohi

    2012-10-01

    Various effects of plasmas irradiation on cells, tissues, and biomaterials relevant for orthopedic applications have been examined. For direct application of plasmas to living cells or tissues, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) with helium flows into ambient air were used. For biomaterial processing, on the other hand, either helium DBDs mentioned above or low-pressure discharges generated in a chamber were used. In this presentation, plasma effects on cell proliferation and plasma treatment for artificial bones will be discussed. First, the conditions for enhanced cell proliferation in vitro by plasma applications have been examined. The discharge conditions for cell proliferation depend sensitively on cell types. Since cell proliferation can be enhanced even when the cells are cultured in a plasma pre-treated medium, long-life reactive species generated in the medium by plasma application or large molecules (such as proteins) in the medium modified by the plasma are likely to be the cause of cell proliferation. It has been found that there is strong correlation between (organic) hydroperoxide generation and cell proliferation. Second, effects of plasma-treated artificial bones made of porous hydroxyapatite (HA) have been examined in vitro and vivo. It has been found that plasma treatment increases hydrophilicity of the surfaces of microscopic inner pores, which directly or indirectly promotes differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells introduced into the pores and therefore causes faster bone growth. The work has been performed in collaboration with Prof. H. Yoshikawa and his group members at the School of Medicine, Osaka University.

  14. Management of orthopedic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Bertone, A L

    1994-12-01

    Initial management of injuries includes safely gaining control of the animal and assessing and treating systemic shock. If hemorrhage is life threatening, it must be controlled. If the limb is nonfunctional it should be stabilized. Any open orthopedic injury should be treated by cleaning the tissues, protecting the exposed tissues, and administering systemic antibiotics. A commercial splint is available (Equine Regular Leg Saver Splint, Kimzey Welding Works, Woodland, CA) that can immobilize and relieve weightbearing for cases of phalangeal fracture, flexor tendon rupture, fetlock breakdown, and lower joint luxations/subluxations. Hock and carpal luxation and radius fracture in foals can be stabilized by wooden or metal splint incorporation in a bandage. Tibial fractures can be stabilized with a modified Thomas splint. Injuries that expose a joint or infectious arthritis require emergency diagnosis of joint involvement, and subsequent joint lavage, intra-articular antibiotics, and systemic antibiotics. For further treatment of septic arthritis, the cases can be referred to a hospital for joint drainage. The appropriate emergency treatment of these injuries is often the determining factor in whether the injury remains in a condition that can be successfully repaired. PMID:7704822

  15. Training safer orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Sugand, Kapil; Sperrin, Matthew; Cobb, Justin; Standfield, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Virtual-reality (VR) simulation in orthopedic training is still in its infancy, and much of the work has been focused on arthroscopy. We evaluated the construct validity of a new VR trauma simulator for performing dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation of a trochanteric femoral fracture. Patients and methods 30 volunteers were divided into 3 groups according to the number of postgraduate (PG) years and the amount of clinical experience: novice (14 PG years; less than 10 DHS procedures); intermediate (512 PG years; 10100 procedures); expert (> 12 PG years; > 100 procedures). Each participant performed a DHS procedure and objective performance metrics were recorded. These data were analyzed with each performance metric taken as the dependent variable in 3 regression models. Results There were statistically significant differences in performance between groups for (1) number of attempts at guide-wire insertion, (2) total fluoroscopy time, (3) tip-apex distance, (4) probability of screw cutout, and (5) overall simulator score. The intermediate group performed the procedure most quickly, with the lowest fluoroscopy time, the lowest tip-apex distance, the lowest probability of cutout, and the highest simulator score, which correlated with their frequency of exposure to running the trauma lists for hip fracture surgery. Interpretation This study demonstrates the construct validity of a haptic VR trauma simulator with surgeons undertaking the procedure most frequently performing best on the simulator. VR simulation may be a means of addressing restrictions on working hours and allows trainees to practice technical tasks without putting patients at risk. The VR DHS simulator evaluated in this study may provide valid assessment of technical skill. PMID:25885171

  16. Diagnostic imaging in bovine orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Johann; Geissbhler, Urs; Steiner, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Although a radiographic unit is not standard equipment for bovine practitioners in hospital or field situations, ultrasound machines with 7.5-MHz linear transducers have been used in bovine reproduction for many years, and are eminently suitable for evaluation of orthopedic disorders. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use radiology and ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. These diagnostic imaging techniques improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis in every bovine patient but especially in highly valuable cattle, whose owners demand increasingly more diagnostic and surgical interventions that require high-level specialized techniques. PMID:24534658

  17. Orthopedic Management of Spina Bifida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Jeffrey D.; Segal, Lee S.

    2010-01-01

    The management of orthopedic problems in spina bifida has seen a dramatic change over the past 10 years. The negative effects of spasticity, poor balance, and the tethered cord syndrome on ambulatory function are better appreciated. There is less emphasis on the hip radiograph and more emphasis on the function of the knee and the prevention of…

  18. Porous metal for orthopedics implants

    PubMed Central

    Matassi, Fabrizio; Botti, Alessandra; Sirleo, Luigi; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Porous metal has been introduced to obtain biological fixation and improve longevity of orthopedic implants. The new generation of porous metal has intriguing characteristics that allows bone healing and high osteointegration of the metallic implants. This article gives an overview about biomaterials properties of the contemporary class of highly porous metals and about the clinical use in orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24133527

  19. Orthopedic Management of Spina Bifida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Jeffrey D.; Segal, Lee S.

    2010-01-01

    The management of orthopedic problems in spina bifida has seen a dramatic change over the past 10 years. The negative effects of spasticity, poor balance, and the tethered cord syndrome on ambulatory function are better appreciated. There is less emphasis on the hip radiograph and more emphasis on the function of the knee and the prevention of

  20. FLUOROSCOPY DURATION IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Salvia, Joao Caron La; de Moraes, Pablo Reis; Ammar, Tiago Yossef; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the mean length of radiation emission from fluoroscopic devices during several types of orthopedic surgery and which of these required greater use of radiation. Methods: The times taken to perform sixteen different types of surgery (total of 80 procedures) were measured. At the end of each procedure, the length of time for which fluoroscopy was used directly from the image intensifier was ascertained. Results: The mean time required for fluoroscopy per operation was 61 seconds. The procedures that demanded greatest mean duration of radiation use were bilateral proximal femoral epiphysiodesis (5.1 minutes) and femoral shaft osteosynthesis using a locked intramedullary nail (3.33 min). Conclusion: The mean duration of fluoroscopy use in orthopedic operations was 61 seconds. The procedures using an intramedullary device were the ones that required greatest radiation emission.

  1. Minimally Invasive Orthopedic Surgery: Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Treuting, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Arthroscopy, a minimally invasive alternative to standard open surgical techniques and now the most commonly performed orthopedic surgical procedure, was one of the greatest advances in orthopedic surgery of the 20th century. Minimally invasive surgeries result in less postoperative swelling than open techniques and reduce pain, risk of complications, and recovery times. Arthroscopy has evolved from a diagnostic tool to a therapeutic tool capable of treating a wide range of injuries and disorders. Many injuries, particularly those that at one time would have been career ending for athletes, can now be addressed with arthroscopy allowing a quicker return to full function. While arthroscopy has resulted in an overall decrease in morbidity compared with open techniques, it is still an invasive procedure and inherently involves risks. Almost all arthroscopic procedures can be performed in an outpatient setting. In 1999, 211 arthroscopic procedures were performed at Ochsner. PMID:21765685

  2. Airport detection of implanted orthopedic devices.

    PubMed

    Ostrum, Robert F

    2006-10-01

    Since the attacks of September 11, 2001, the United States and other countries have increased airport security. Metal detectors (archway and handheld wand) are used to detect potentially dangerous instruments during airport screening. One consequence is that orthopedic implants are sometimes detected, and patients are detained and searched. The orthopedic literature is inconsistent in its reports on airport screening of patients with orthopedic implants. In this article, I review that literature and examine the factors that make detection of orthopedic implants a less than consistent science. PMID:17131736

  3. Locking mechanism for orthopedic braces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. I.; Epps, C. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An orthopedic brace locking mechanism is described which under standing or walking conditions cannot be unlocked, however under sitting conditions the mechanism can be simply unlocked so as to permit bending of the patient's knee. Other features of the device include: (1) the mechanism is rendered operable, and inoperable, dependent upon the relative inclination of the brace with respect to the ground; (2) the mechanism is automatically locked under standing or walking conditions and is manually unlocked under sitting conditions; and (3) the mechanism is light in weight and is relatively small in size.

  4. Locking mechanism for orthopedic braces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    I-Lechao, J.; Epps, C. H., Jr. (inventors)

    1976-01-01

    A locking mechanism for orthopedic braces is described which automatically prevents or permits the relative pivotable movement between a lower brace member and an upper brace member. The upper and lower brace members are provided with drilled bores within which a slidable pin is disposed, and depending upon the inclination of the brace members with respect to a vertical plane, the slidable pin will be interposed between both brace members. The secondary or auxiliary latching device includes a spring biased, manually operable lever bar arrangement which is manually unlatched and automatically latched under the influence of the spring.

  5. Thromboembolic Disease After Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Paul S; Jahangir, A Alex

    2016-04-01

    Orthopedic trauma results in systemic physiologic changes that predispose patients to venous thromboembolism (VTE). In the absence of prophylaxis, VTE incidence may be as high as 60%. Mechanical and pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis are effective in decreasing rates of VTE. Combined mechanical and pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis is more efficacious for decreasing VTE incidence than either regimen independently. If pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis is contraindicated, mechanical prophylaxis should be used. Patients with isolated lower extremity fractures who are ambulatory, or those with isolated upper extremity trauma, do not require pharmacologic prophylaxis in the absence of other VTE risk factors. PMID:26772942

  6. Orthopedics

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, D.J.; Tilley, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book presents a method of assessing a variety of entities with pathologic impact on the skeleton. The book covers 97 skeletal abnormalities or diseases. Each case is presented as a question (consisting of a radiography followed by a short clinical history and a query such as What is the abnormality '') followed by an answer (consisting of additional radiographs, an explanation of the radiographic abnormality and causative disease process, and one or two references).

  7. Orthopedic surgery in ancient Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Background — Ancient Egypt might be considered the cradle of medicine. The modern literature is, however, sometimes rather too enthusiastic regarding the procedures that are attributed an Egyptian origin. I briefly present and analyze the claims regarding orthopedic surgery in Egypt, what was actually done by the Egyptians, and what may have been incorrectly ascribed to them. Methods — I reviewed the original sources and also the modern literature regarding surgery in ancient Egypt, concentrating especially on orthopedic surgery. Results — As is well known, both literary sources and the archaeological/osteological material bear witness to treatment of various fractures. The Egyptian painting, often claimed to depict the reduction of a dislocated shoulder according to Kocher’s method, is, however, open to interpretation. Therapeutic amputations are never depicted or mentioned in the literary sources, while the specimens suggested to demonstrate such amputations are not convincing. Interpretation — The ancient Egyptians certainly treated fractures of various kinds, and with varying degrees of success. Concerning the reductions of dislocated joints and therapeutic amputations, there is no clear evidence for the existence of such procedures. It would, however, be surprising if dislocations were not treated, even though they have not left traces in the surviving sources. Concerning amputations, the general level of Egyptian surgery makes it unlikely that limb amputations were done, even if they may possibly have been performed under extraordinary circumstances. PMID:25140982

  8. Addressing Orthopedic Handicaps in the Science Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefanich, Greg P.; And Others

    This paper examines various topics and issues related to the teaching of science to orthopedically handicapped students. It includes: (1) brief descriptions of programs and materials for orthopedically handicapped students in elementary ("Elementary Science Study" and "Science A Process Approach II"), middle ("Science Activities for the Visually

  9. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  10. Imaging of orthopedic trauma and surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book bridges the communication gap, between the radiologist and the orthopedic surgeon in regard to trauma. It also combines ease of use with authoritative information, and includes in each discussion a review of the pertinent anatomy, mechanism of injury, and radiology and orthopedic classification.

  11. [Bone grafts in orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Zrate-Kalfpulos, Barn; Reyes-Snchez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    In orthopedic surgery the demand for the use of bone grafts increases daily because of the increasing quantity and complexity of surgical procedures. At present, the gold standard is the autologous bone graft but the failure rate, morbidity of the donor site and limited availability have stimulated a proliferation for finding materials that work as bone graft substitutes. In order to have good success, we must know the different properties of these choices and the environment where the graft is going to be used. As bone graft substitutes and growth factors become clinical realities, a new gold standard will be defined. Tissue engineering and gene therapy techniques have the objective to create an optimum bone graft substitute with a combination of substances with properties of osteconduction, osteogenesis and osteoinduction. PMID:16875525

  12. Physical modification of polyetheretherketone for orthopedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ya-Wei; Zhang, Li-Nan; Hou, Zeng-Tao; Ye, Xin; Gu, Hong-Sheng; Yan, Guo-Ping; Shang, Peng

    2014-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is regarded as one of the most potential candidates for replacing current implant applications. To obtain good bone-implant interfaces, many modification methods have been developed to enable PEEK and PEEK-based composites from bio-inert to bioactive. Among them, physical methods have aroused significant attention and been widely used to modify PEEK for orthopedic implants. This review summarizes current physical modification techniques of PEEK for orthopedic applications, which include composite strategies, surface coating methods and irradiation treatments. The positive consequences of those modification methods will encourage continuing investigations and stimulate the wide range of applications of PEEK-based implants in orthopedics.

  13. Core Concepts: Orthopedic Intern Curriculum Boot Camp.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Mark A; Kazarian, Erick; King, Brandon; Biermann, Janet S; Carpenter, James E; Caird, Michelle S; Irwin, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical interns must gain a broad array of clinical skills in a short time. However, recent changes in health care have limited resident-patient exposures. With the reported success of simulation training in the surgical literature, the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) and Residency Review Committee for Orthopaedic Surgery have required that surgical simulation training be a component of the intern curricula in orthopedic surgical residencies. This study examined the short-term effectiveness of an orthopedic "intern boot camp" covering 7 of 17 simulation training concept modules published by the ABOS. Eight orthopedic post-graduate year 1 (PGY-1) residents (study group) completed a structured 3-month curriculum and were compared with 7 post-graduate year 2 (PGY-2) residents (comparison group) who had just completed their orthopedic surgical internship. Seven core skills were assessed using both task-specific and global rating scales. The PGY-1 residents demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in all 7 modules with respect to their task-specific pre-test scores: sterile technique (P=.001), wound closure (P<.001), knot tying (P=.017), casting and splinting (P<.001), arthrocentesis (P=.01), basics of internal fixation (P<.001), and compartment syndrome evaluation (P=.004). After the camp, PGY-1 and -2 scores in task-specific measures were not significantly different. A 3-month simulation-based boot camp instituted early in orthopedic internship elevated a variety of clinical skills to levels exhibited by PGY-2 residents. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(1):e62-e67.]. PMID:26730688

  14. Arthroscopic training resources in orthopedic resident education.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan; John, Tamara; Lawler, Jeffrey; Moorman, Claude; Nicandri, Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of use, perceived effectiveness, and preference for arthroscopic surgical skill training resources. An electronic survey was sent to orthopedics residents, residency program directors, and orthopedic sports medicine attending physicians in the United States. The frequency and perceived effectiveness of 10 types of adjunctive arthroscopic skills training was assessed. Residents and faculty members were asked to rate their confidence in resident ability to perform common arthroscopic procedures. Surveys were completed by 40 of 152 (26.3%) orthopedic residency program directors, 70 of 426 (16.4%) sports medicine faculty, and 235 of 3,170 (7.4%) orthopedic residents. The use of adjunctive methods of training varied from only 9.8% of programs with virtual reality training to 80.5% of programs that used reading of published materials to develop arthroscopic skill. Practice on cadaveric specimens was viewed as the most effective and preferred adjunctive method of training. Residents trained on cadaveric specimens reported increased confidence in their ability to perform arthroscopic procedures. The resources for developing arthroscopic surgical skill vary considerably across orthopedic residency programs in the United States. Adjunctive training methods were perceived to be effective at supplementing traditional training in the operating room. PMID:24510522

  15. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(11):684-687.]. PMID:26558661

  16. ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY AMONG THE ELDERLY: CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    PubMed Central

    Leme, Luiz Eugênio Garcez; Sitta, Maria do Carmo; Toledo, Manuella; da Silva Henriques, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Care for elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgery, particularly for those requiring emergency surgery, needs to take into account an analysis of physical capacity and risks specific to elderly individuals, in an attempt to reduce the risks. Nevertheless, these remain high in this group. Despite the risks, procedures developed promptly have a positive effect on these patients’ evolution. Coordinated care, composed of teams of specialists within clinical medicine, geriatrics, orthopedics, anesthesiology and critical care, along with other healthcare professionals, may be highly beneficial for this group of patients.

  17. [Digital video technology in orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Vucetić, C; Milovanović, D; Dulić, B; Dimitrijević, I; Kalezić, N; Tulić, G

    2006-01-01

    Digital video technologies are new and powerful tools with wide applications in orthopaedics. Already integral to several common medical devices, digital images can be used for case documentation and presentation as well for diagnostic and surgical patient care information. Digital technologies allow easy manipulation of photographic, video and graphic materials in ways that were impossible with conventional techniques. Educational presentation has been transformed by use of computers and digital projectors. Understanding the basic foundations of digital imaging technology is important for effectively creating digital images, videos and presentations. In this review, we are going to discuss some of the issues that are raised by digital imaging in orthopaedics, digital image processing, as well as, we are giving some recommendations for good quality of pre-, post- and intra-operative photographs in clinical use. PMID:17688043

  18. [Psychopathologic reactions in orthopedic patients].

    PubMed

    Lesić, Aleksandar; Opalić, Petar

    2003-01-01

    The idea to monitor and research psychopathological responses of physically injured persons in a more systematic manner has come from our observation of huge differences in patient behavior, whose psychological responses were noticeably changed and often inappropriate. The behavior aberrations were all the more striking because we treated war-time injuries in addition to peacetime ones. Our sample had 175 patient subjects, of both sexes, different ages, marital status and professions. A group of 70 patients treated in the Institute for Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology were divided into two subgroups. The first experimental subgroup (E1) consisted of 26 (37.1%) patients physically injured in combat. The second subgroup (E2) had 44 (62.9%) patients physically injured in peacetime circumstances (car accidents, work accidents, etc). The physical injuries encompassed injuries to spinal column and extremities. The control (K) consisted of 105 subjects without physical injuries. The clinical picture and psychological reactions of the patients were examined by means of 4 instruments--PTSD-10 scale or posttraumatic symptoms scale [1], Family Homogeneity Index/FHI/with 19 variables, applied to measure the relation between the family system homogeneity and accident effects [2], Short Eysenck's Personality Inventory applied to investigate neuroticism and extroversion and introversion traits [3], Late Effects of Accidental Injury Questionnaire [4]. Our observations of psychological responses of patients in our ward (insomnia, sedatives intake) were mostly confirmed by tests conducted with the above instruments. In the group of the wartime injured (E1), as well as in the control (K), Eysenck's scale proved a significantly higher degree of neuroticism in comparison to the peacetime injured. Such results indicated that the wartime injured would most probably develop the picture of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Such a conclusion was related not only to the seriousness of injuries but also to the circumstances of their occurrence. The proneness to develop PTSD symptoms was not in correlation with the preparedness for accident, it being much poorer in peace-time injuries, as opposed to wartime patients, who had been prepared to the possibility of injury occurrence. The highest value of family homogeneity (FHI) was established in the wartime injured, which led us to conclude that the injury contributed to the cohesion of the family from which the patient came. By extracting some questions related to psychopathological entities such as insomnia, depression, somatization, anxiety, and cognitive disorders, the following results were obtained. Depression was the most frequent in both groups of injuries. Anxiety was also present in the control group; and insomnia and somatization, that is, conversion symptoms, were present in both groups of the injured. By examining narrower psychological characteristics of the wartime injured revealed dissociation problems--derangement to be the most frequent. Then follow the symptoms of depression, which occur significantly more frequently in the wartime injured in comparison to the peacetime injured. The phenomenological symptoms of derangement and depression proved to be reliable parameters of physical trauma. It is also significant that the three characteristics showed correlation to psychopathological responses: severity of surgery, paralysis, and acute injury. PMID:14692144

  19. Billing and coding knowledge: a comparative survey of professional coders, practicing orthopedic surgeons, and orthopedic residents.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Kevin F; Yousuf, Tariq; Pasque, Charles B; Yousuf, Khalid

    2014-06-01

    Medical knowledge and surgical skills are necessary to become an effective orthopedic surgeon. To run an efficient practice, the surgeon must also possess a basic understanding of medical business practices, including billing and coding. In this study, we surveyed and compared the level of billing and coding knowledge among current orthopedic residents PGY3 and higher, academic and private practice attending orthopedic surgeons, and orthopedic coding professionals. According to the survey results, residents and fellows have a similar knowledge of coding and billing, regardless of their level of training or type of business education received in residency. Most residents would like formal training in coding, billing, and practice management didactics; this is consistent with data from previous studies. PMID:24945481

  20. Imaging of orthopedic trauma and surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses imaging of orthopedia trauma and surgery. A review of the pertinent anatomy, mechanism of injury, and radiology and orthopedic classification is provided for each topic discussed. The book employs recent advances in technique and focuses on adult skeletal trauma, and joint replacement.

  1. Orthopedically Handicapped Children in Ohio Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naples, Victor J.; Todd, Joseph H.

    The historical development of programs for orthopedically handicapped children, class units and hospital classes approved during 1967-68, and the number of therapy units established are presented. Tables give data on program population: enrollment for years 1962-68, percent of handicaps enrolled, and IQ distributions. Aspects of occupational…

  2. Characteristics of highly successful orthopedic surgeons: a survey of orthopedic chairs and editors

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Guy; Hussain, Nasir; Sprague, Sheila; Mehlman, Charles T.; Dogbey, Godwin; Bhandari, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    Background Highly successful orthopedic surgeons are a small group of individuals who exert a large influence on the orthopedic field. However, the characteristics of these leaders have not been well-described or studied. Methods Orthopedic surgeons who are departmental chairs, journal editors, editorial board members of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (British edition), or current or past presidents of major orthopedic associations were invited to complete a survey designed to provide insight into their motivations, academic backgrounds and accomplishments, emotional and physical health, and job satisfaction. Results In all, 152 surgeons completed the questionnaire. We identified several characteristics of highly successful surgeons. Many have contributed prolific numbers of publications and book chapters and obtained considerable funding for research. They were often motivated by a desire for personal development (interesting challenge, new opportunities), whereas relocating to a new institution, financial gain, or lack of alternative candidates played little to no role in their decisions to take positions of leadership. Most respondents were happy with their specialty choice despite long hours and high levels of stress. Despite challenges to their time, successful orthopedic surgeons made a strong effort to maintain their health; compared with other physicians, they exercise more, are more likely to have a primary care physician and feel better physically. Conclusion Departmental chairs, journal editors and presidents of orthopedic associations cope with considerable demands of clinical, administrative, educational and research duties while maintaining a high level of health, happiness and job satisfaction. PMID:23706848

  3. Underwater manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1993-04-20

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer [plus minus]45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer [plus minus]10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  4. Underwater manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Schrum, Phillip B.; Cohen, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is provided for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer .+-.45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer .+-.10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  5. Underwater manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus provided for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer {plus_minus} 45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer {plus_minus} 10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  6. Orthopedic Implant Waste: Analysis and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Payne, Ashley; Slover, James; Inneh, Ifeoma; Hutzler, Lorraine; Iorio, Richard; Bosco, Joseph A

    2015-12-01

    The steadily increasing demand for orthopedic surgeries and declining rates of reimbursement by Medicare and other insurance providers have led many hospitals to look for ways to control the cost of these surgeries. We reviewed administrative records for a 1-year period and recorded total number of surgical cases, number of cases in which an implant was wasted, and cost of each wasted implant. We determined cost incurred because of implant waste, percentage of cases that involved waste, percentage of total implant cost wasted, and average cost of waste per case. We then analyzed the data to determine if case volume or years in surgical practice affected amount of implant waste. Results showed implant waste represents a significant cost for orthopedic procedures within all subspecialties and is an important factor to consider when developing cost-reduction strategies. PMID:26665242

  7. iPad apps for orthopedic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Franko, Orrin I; Bhola, Siddharth

    2011-12-01

    The development and distribution of mobile applications, or apps, designed for medical professionals and patients is quickly expanding, and within this group are apps designed specifically for orthopedic use. Currently, the most popular mobile apps are sponsored by private companies and focus on delivering device-specific information. If this trend toward the use of privately funded educational materials continues, regulations may need to be established to ensure that the information provided is accurate, honest, and supported by peer-reviewed literature. It will likely be the responsibility of the orthopedic community to ensure that the development and use of these apps has appropriate oversight and validation as they are incorporated into clinical practice and training. PMID:22147214

  8. Level of evidence gap in orthopedic research.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Keith D; Bernstein, Joseph; Ahn, Jaimo; McKay, Scott D; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2012-09-01

    Level of evidence is the most widely used metric for the quality of a publication, but instances exist in which a Level I study is neither feasible nor desirable. The goal of this study was to evaluate the level of evidence gap in current orthopedic research, which the authors defined as the disparity between the level of evidence that would be required to optimally answer the primary research question and the level of evidence that was actually used. Five orthopedic surgeons (K.D.B., J.B., J.A., S.D.M., W.N.S.) evaluated blinded articles from the first 6 months of 2010 in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American Volume) (JBJS-Am), classifying the study type and design and extracting a primary research question from each article. Each evaluator then defined the study type and method, along with the level of evidence that would ideally be used to address the primary research question. The level of evidence gap was then calculated by subtracting the actual level of evidence of the manuscript from the level of evidence of the idealized study. Of the 64 JBJS-Am manuscripts eligible for analysis, the average level of evidence was between Level II and III (mean, 2.73). The average level of evidence gap was 1.06 compared with the JBJS-Am-designated level of evidence and 1.28 compared with the evaluators' assessment. Because not all questions require Level I studies, level of evidence alone may not be the best metric for the quality of orthopedic surgery literature. Instead, the authors' concept of a level of evidence gap may be a better tool for assessing the state of orthopedic research publications. PMID:22955411

  9. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective.

    PubMed

    Haaker, Gerrit; Fujak, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective "survival motor neuron" (SMN) protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. PMID:24399883

  10. Prevention of VTE in Orthopedic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Charles W.; Johanson, Norman A.; Curley, Catherine; Dahl, Ola E.; Schulman, Sam; Ortel, Thomas L.; Pauker, Stephen G.; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: VTE is a serious, but decreasing complication following major orthopedic surgery. This guideline focuses on optimal prophylaxis to reduce postoperative pulmonary embolism and DVT. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: In patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery, we recommend the use of one of the following rather than no antithrombotic prophylaxis: low-molecular-weight heparin; fondaparinux; dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban (total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty but not hip fracture surgery); low-dose unfractionated heparin; adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist; aspirin (all Grade 1B); or an intermittent pneumatic compression device (IPCD) (Grade 1C) for a minimum of 10 to 14 days. We suggest the use of low-molecular-weight heparin in preference to the other agents we have recommended as alternatives (Grade 2C/2B), and in patients receiving pharmacologic prophylaxis, we suggest adding an IPCD during the hospital stay (Grade 2C). We suggest extending thromboprophylaxis for up to 35 days (Grade 2B). In patients at increased bleeding risk, we suggest an IPCD or no prophylaxis (Grade 2C). In patients who decline injections, we recommend using apixaban or dabigatran (all Grade 1B). We suggest against using inferior vena cava filter placement for primary prevention in patients with contraindications to both pharmacologic and mechanical thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2C). We recommend against Doppler (or duplex) ultrasonography screening before hospital discharge (Grade 1B). For patients with isolated lower-extremity injuries requiring leg immobilization, we suggest no thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2B). For patients undergoing knee arthroscopy without a history of VTE, we suggest no thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2B). Conclusions: Optimal strategies for thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery include pharmacologic and mechanical approaches. PMID:22315265

  11. Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course: A Collaboration between Anatomists and Orthopedic Surgeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFriez, Curtis B.; Morton, David A.; Horwitz, Daniel S.; Eckel, Christine M.; Foreman, K. Bo; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months…

  12. Orthopedic resident anatomy review course: a collaboration between anatomists and orthopedic surgeons.

    PubMed

    DeFriez, Curtis B; Morton, David A; Horwitz, Daniel S; Eckel, Christine M; Foreman, K Bo; Albertine, Kurt H

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months for all of its residents. The primary purpose of the course is to renew competencies in basic science disciplines so that incoming residents more quickly reach a level of functional proficiency and to afford senior residents a platform to teach their junior colleagues. Before 2005, this course was conducted with minimal participation from anyone outside of the Department of Orthopaedics. Many of the residents voiced concerns that the educational benefits were not proportionate to the time invested. To improve the teaching of orthopedic-related anatomy, an educational collaboration between the Departments of Neurobiology and Anatomy and Orthopaedics was established in 2004 and continues to the present time. The major objectives of refining the course pedagogy, developing a Course Manual and Dissection Guide, and evaluating the results by administering a course survey questionnaire are described in this article. Implementation of all facets of the revised course has resulted in better participation by orthopedic faculty and more favorable reviews by the participating residents. Based on current levels of interest and positive comments from course participants, the Anatomy and Orthopedic faculty course directors plan to continue to develop course materials and pedagogy. PMID:21786430

  13. Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course: A Collaboration between Anatomists and Orthopedic Surgeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFriez, Curtis B.; Morton, David A.; Horwitz, Daniel S.; Eckel, Christine M.; Foreman, K. Bo; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months

  14. Imaging of orthopedic trauma and surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on imaging techniques for diagnosis of trauma of bones. A comparative evaluation is presented for planning of proper diagnosis and treatment. Various techniques discussed are routine radiography; computerized tomography, NMR imaging, angiography, ultrasonography; and use of radioisotopes. The mechanism of injury of bone joints of upper and lower limbs and spine is discussed after discussing the anatomy of each in the beginning of each paper. Topics titled are healing of fractures; fractures of pelvis; knee; shoulder; foot and ankle; fractures of humerus; stress fractures; and orthopedic radiology. Prosthesis use and plastic surgery of joints is also discussed.

  15. Hunting stand-related injuries in orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Lebus, George F; Krueger, Chad A; Stinner, Daniel J; Mir, Hassan R

    2014-09-01

    Hunting remains an extremely popular recreational activity, with nearly 15 million Americans receiving a hunting license annually. Precautions have helped decrease accidents, but hunting-related injuries remain relatively common. The majority of severe, hunting-related accidents involve either a fall from a hunting platform or an accidental shooting. Both of these mechanisms frequently result in orthopedic injuries, many of which require operative care. Although firearms-associated injury has seemingly decreased, hunting platform falls and their sequelae are increasing. Understanding the mechanisms of these injuries and increasing awareness of them may minimize their morbidity and mortality or help prevent them altogether. PMID:25188622

  16. Redundant publications in the orthopedic literature.

    PubMed

    Eck, Jason C; Nachtigall, Dean; Hodges, Scott D; Humphreys, S Craig

    2007-01-01

    Rates of redundant publications in the general surgery literature are approximately 14%. This article identifies the rate of redundant publications in the orthopedic literature. All original articles published during the year 2000 in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American Volume), Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Journal of Spinal Disorders, and Spine were searched using PubMed. Redundancy rate was 4 (3.15%) of 127 for The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American volume), zero (0%) of 70 for Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, 2 (2.90%) of 69 for Journal of Spinal Disorders, and 11 (3.12%) of 353 for Spine. PMID:17260663

  17. Legal issues affecting ancillaries and orthopedic practice.

    PubMed

    Glaser, David M

    2008-01-01

    The federal and state governments have imposed significant regulations on health care generally and on ancillary services in particular. This article focuses on how state and federal laws shape the ability of an orthopedic physician to offer ancillary services, whether as an individual, through a group practice, or as part of a joint venture. It focuses on how the Stark law, the Medicare anti-kickback statute, state anti-kickback, fee-splitting provisions, certificate of need laws, and various Medicare billing and supervision requirements impact the provision of ancillary services. It also briefly discusses how physicians should prepare for and respond to government investigations. PMID:18061773

  18. The potential of tissue engineering in orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Landis, William J; Jacquet, Robin; Hillyer, Jennifer; Zhang, Jean; Siperko, Lorraine; Chubinskaya, Susan; Asamura, Shinichi; Isogai, Noritaka

    2005-01-01

    This article presents models of human phalanges and small joints developed by tissue engineering. Biodegradable polymer scaffolds support growth of osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and tenocytes after implantation of the models in athymic mice. The cell-polymer constructs are vascularized by the host mice, form new bone, cartilage, and tendon with characteristic gene expression and protein synthesis and secretion, and maintain the shape of human phalanges with joints. The study demonstrates critical progress in the design and fabrication of bone, cartilage, and tendon by tissue engineering and the potential of this field for human clinical orthopedic applications. PMID:15542128

  19. Computer assisted 3D pre-operative planning tool for femur fracture orthopedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, Pavan; Xie, Sheng Quan; Delmas, Patrice; Xu, Wei Liang

    2010-02-01

    Femur shaft fractures are caused by high impact injuries and can affect gait functionality if not treated correctly. Until recently, the pre-operative planning for femur fractures has relied on two-dimensional (2D) radiographs, light boxes, tracing paper, and transparent bone templates. The recent availability of digital radiographic equipment has to some extent improved the workflow for preoperative planning. Nevertheless, imaging is still in 2D X-rays and planning/simulation tools to support fragment manipulation and implant selection are still not available. Direct three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) are also still restricted to a minority of complex orthopedic procedures. This paper proposes a software tool which allows orthopedic surgeons to visualize, diagnose, plan and simulate femur shaft fracture reduction procedures in 3D. The tool utilizes frontal and lateral 2D radiographs to model the fracture surface, separate a generic bone into the two fractured fragments, identify the pose of each fragment, and automatically customize the shape of the bone. The use of 3D imaging allows full spatial inspection of the fracture providing different views through the manipulation of the interactively reconstructed 3D model, and ultimately better pre-operative planning.

  20. Disparities in internet use among orthopedic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kenneth P; Rehman, Saqib; Goldhirsh, Jessie

    2014-02-01

    Internet access has lagged behind for patients with lower incomes and from certain ethnic groups. This study investigated the possible improvement of access to health-related information on the Internet for all patients in an urban outpatient setting, regardless of socioeconomic background. A 28-question survey was completed by 100 orthopedic outpatients evaluating associations between their age, ethnicity, income, or education level and their access to the Internet. The survey also examined how patients used the Internet to obtain information about their medical condition, their privacy concerns when conducting online research, and their use of mobile phones as a primary means of Internet access. The Internet was used by 57% of orthopedic outpatients in this urban setting. Internet access decreased with advancing age but increased with increasing income and education, findings consistent with similar studies. Despite the inability to identify an association between ethnicity and Internet access in this patient population, fewer Latinos (33%) than whites (67%) or African Americans (77%) sought information about their medical condition. Among patients who used a mobile phone as the primary method for online access, 74% were African American or Latino and 26% were white. This difference in mobile phone use for online access suggests that mobile phones have provided ethnic minorities with greater Internet access and thus may have narrowed the digital divide among the races. PMID:24679198

  1. RAPID MANUFACTURING SYSTEM OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Relvas, Carlos; Reis, Joana; Potes, José Alberto Caeiro; Fonseca, Fernando Manuel Ferreira; Simões, José Antonio Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This study, aimed the development of a methodology for rapid manufacture of orthopedic implants simultaneously with the surgical intervention, considering two potential applications in the fields of orthopedics: the manufacture of anatomically adapted implants and implants for bone loss replacement. This work innovation consists on the capitation of the in situ geometry of the implant by direct capture of the shape using an elastomeric material (polyvinylsiloxane) which allows fine detail and great accuracy of the geometry. After scanning the elastomeric specimen, the implant is obtained by machining using a CNC milling machine programmed with a dedicated CAD/CAM system. After sterilization, the implant is able to be placed on the patient. The concept was developed using low cost technology and commercially available. The system has been tested in an in vivo hip arthroplasty performed on a sheep. The time increase of surgery was 80 minutes being 40 minutes the time of implant manufacturing. The system developed has been tested and the goals defined of the study achieved enabling the rapid manufacture of an implant in a time period compatible with the surgery time.

  2. Improving Response Rates among Students with Orthopedic and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkens, Christian P.; Kuntzler, Patrice M.; Cardenas, Shaun; O'Malley, Eileen; Phillips, Carolyn; Singer, Jacqueline; Stoeger, Alex; Kindler, Keith

    2014-01-01

    One challenge teachers of students with orthopedic and multiple disabilities face is providing sufficient time and opportunity to communicate. This challenge is universal across countries, schools, and settings: teachers want students to communicate because communication lies at the core of what makes us human. Yet students with orthopedic and

  3. Young Children's Attitudes toward Orthopedic and Sensory Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGrella, Lanier H.; Green, Virginia P.

    1984-01-01

    Attitudes of 64 nondisabled children (three to seven years old) toward orthopedic and sensory disabilities were examined via the Test of Early Attitudes toward Disability. Responses indicated that bias against orthopedic and sensory disabilities increases with age but is not present among three-year-olds. (Author/CL)

  4. Biomaterial systems for orthopedic tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoerke, Erik David

    2003-06-01

    The World Health Organization has estimated that one out of seven Americans suffers from a musculoskeletal impairment, annually incurring 28.6 million musculoskeletal injuries---more than half of all injuries. Bone tissue engineering has evolved rapidly to address this continued health concern. In the last decade, the focus of orthopedic biomaterials design has shifted from the use of common engineering metals and plastics to smart materials designed to mimic nature and elicit favorable bioresponse. Working within this new paradigm, this thesis explores unique chemical and materials systems for orthopedic tissue engineering. Improving on current titanium implant technologies, porous titanium scaffolds were utilized to better approximate the mechanical and structural properties of natural bone. These foam scaffolds were enhanced with bioactive coatings, designed to enhance osteoblastic implant colonization. The biopolymer poly(L-lysine) was incorporated into both hydroxypatite and octacalcium phosphate mineral phases to create modified organoapatite and pLys-CP coatings respectively. These coatings were synthesized and characterized on titanium surfaces, including porous structures such as titanium mesh and titanium foam. In addition, in vitro osteoblastic cell culture experiments probed the biological influences of these coatings. Organoapatite (OA) accelerated preosteoblastic colonization of titanium mesh and improved cellular ingrowth into titanium foam. Alternatively, the thin, uniform pLys-CP coating demonstrated significant potential as a substrate for chemically binding biological molecules and supramolecular assemblies. Biologically, pLys-CP demonstrated enhanced cellular attachment over titanium and inorganic calcium phosphate controls. Supramolecular self-assembled nanofiber assemblies were also explored both as stand-alone tissue engineering gels and as titanium coatings. Self-supporting nanofiber gels induced accelerated, biomimetic mineralization. Osteoblasts encapsulated in mineralizing gels became dormant, down-regulating glucose-lactate metabolism, cell proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase expression. Still viable, though, these cells up-regulated cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase expression upon release from the gel. These self-assembled nanofibers were also applied to titanium surfaces, where they influenced calcium phosphate nucleation and growth on those surfaces. Each of these materials systems is the product of a valuable integration of materials science, chemistry, and medicine. By creatively combining elements of these different disciplines, it is possible to design new and exciting approaches to orthopedic tissue engineering.

  5. Co-Management Arrangements in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Brandon D

    2015-06-01

    A co-management arrangement (CMA) is a contractual relationship between physicians and a hospital that results in a shared-responsibility management structure for a specific service line. In orthopedic surgery, CMAs are becoming increasingly popular as stakeholders in the health care market seek increased value (ie, higher-quality care at lower costs). A CMA can significantly improve the efficiency and the outcomes of a musculoskeletal service line if it adheres to the basic principles of a focus on the patient, evidence-based decision-making, physician leadership, appropriate physician compensation, transparency, reasonable and modifiable goals, and accountability. While the specifics of each CMA will vary, all CMAs have common operational elements that include the arrangement's legal structure, legal compliance, leadership and reporting structure, facilities management, personnel management, clinical data management, financial data management, and quality and effectiveness reporting. PMID:26047000

  6. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  7. Caring for the incarcerated: an orthopedic perspective.

    PubMed

    Munns, Justin; Samora, Julie Balch; Granger, Jeffrey F; Ng, Vincent Y

    2013-12-01

    According to the 1976 Supreme Court case of Estelle v Gamble, the government is required to provide prisoners access to the necessary care for known, serious medical needs. Failure to do so violates the Eighth Amendment prohibiting the imposition of "cruel and unusual punishment." Currently, more than 2.5 million Americans are imprisoned, the highest per capita rate in the world. In the current fiscal climate and with burgeoning health care costs for society as a whole, providing care for prisoners poses both moral and logistical challenges. From an orthopedic standpoint, caring for the incarcerated raises uniquely challenging issues due to the nature of this patient population and their types of musculoskeletal conditions. PMID:24309118

  8. Orthopedic surgical analyzer for percutaneous vertebroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, Gye Rae; Choi, Hyung Guen; Lim, Do H.; Lee, Sung J.

    2001-05-01

    Since the spine is one of the most complex joint structures in the human body, its surgical treatment requires careful planning and high degree of precision to avoid any unwanted neurological compromises. In addition, comprehensive biomechanical analysis can be very helpful because the spine is subject to a variety of load. In case for the osteoporotic spine in which the structural integrity has been compromised, it brings out the double challenges for a surgeon both clinically and biomechanically. Thus, we have been developing an integrated medical image system that is capable of doing the both. This system is called orthopedic surgical analyzer and it combines the clinical results from image-guided examination and the biomechanical data from finite element analysis. In order to demonstrate its feasibility, this system was applied to percutaneous vertebroplasty. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a surgical procedure that has been recently introduced for the treatment of compression fracture of the osteoporotic vertebrae. It involves puncturing vertebrae and filling with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Recent studies have shown that the procedure could provide structural reinforcement for the osteoporotic vertebrae while being minimally invasive and safe with immediate pain relief. However, treatment failures due to excessive PMMA volume injection have been reported as one of complications. It is believed that control of PMMA volume is one of the most critical factors that can reduce the incidence of complications. Since the degree of the osteoporosis can influence the porosity of the cancellous bone in the vertebral body, the injection volume can be different from patient to patient. In this study, the optimal volume of PMMA injection for vertebroplasty was predicted based on the image analysis of a given patient. In addition, biomechanical effects due to the changes in PMMA volume and bone mineral density (BMD) level were investigated by constructing clinically relevant finite element models. In conclusion, we were able to demonstrate the feasibility of our orthopedic surgical analyzer in a case for percutaneous vertebroplasty.

  9. Regenerative treatments to enhance orthopedic surgical outcome.

    PubMed

    Murrell, William D; Anz, Adam W; Badsha, Humeira; Bennett, William F; Boykin, Robert E; Caplan, Arnold I

    2015-04-01

    In orthopedic surgery there has been a never-ending quest to improve surgical outcome and the patient's experience. Progression has been marked by the refinement of surgical techniques and instruments and later by enhanced diagnostic imaging capability, specifically magnetic resonance. Over time implant optimization was achieved, along with the development of innovative minimally invasive arthroscopic technical skills to leverage new versions of classic procedures and implants to improve short-term patient morbidity and initial, mid-term, and long-term patient outcomes. The use of regenerative and/or biological adjuncts to aid the healing process has followed in the drive for continual improvement, and major breakthroughs in basic science have significantly unraveled the mechanisms of key healing and regenerative pathways. A wide spectrum of primary and complementary regenerative treatments is becoming increasingly available, including blood-derived preparations, growth factors, bone marrow preparations, and stem cells. This is a new era in the application of biologically active material, and it is transforming clinical practice by providing effective supportive treatments either at the time of the index procedure or during the postoperative period. Regenerative treatments are currently in active use to enhance many areas of orthopedic surgery in an attempt to improve success and outcome. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview of the peer-reviewed evidence-based literature, highlighting the clinical outcomes in humans both with preclinical data and human clinical trials involving regenerative preparations within the areas of rotator cuff, meniscus, ligament, and articular cartilage surgical repair. PMID:25864660

  10. Application of Tranexamic Acid in Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Jennings, John D; Solarz, Mark K; Haydel, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Tranexamic acid has gained recent interest in orthopedics and trauma surgery because of its demonstrated benefit in several clinical trials. It is inexpensive and effective at reducing blood loss and blood transfusion requirements without a significant increase in morbidity or mortality. The optimal timing, dosing, and route of administration in orthopedics are yet to be elucidated. Significant investigation of tranexamic acid use in joint replacement and spine surgery has promoted its incorporation into the everyday practice of many of these surgeons. The paucity of studies regarding its use in orthopedic trauma has limited its integration into a field that may stand to benefit most from the drug. PMID:26614928

  11. The Effects of Standardized Feedback on Orthopedic Patient Evaluation Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DaRosa, Debra A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A study examined whether there are performance differences between surgery clerks provided corrective reinforcement on orthopedic history and physical examination write-ups and those assessed by traditional feedback means when both groups are exposed to the feedback instrument. (MLW)

  12. [Problems of experiments on rats in orthopedics (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Breitenfelder, J; Rtt, A

    1976-04-01

    A small experimental study on rats in orthopedics shows that it is impossible to achieve constant bipedy as a basis for valid static and biomechanic investigations, particularly of the spine. PMID:1274405

  13. Making the electronic medical record work for the orthopedic surgeon.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Louis F

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the current reasons why orthopedic surgeons might consider the adoption of an electronic medical record system in their practices today. The costs and benefits as well as the barriers to implementation are discussed. PMID:18061775

  14. Orthopedic Health: Osteoarthritis What You Should Know (quiz)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Orthopedic Health Osteoarthritis What You Should Know Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... Javascript on. How much do you know about osteoarthritis, its causes, and its therapies? Take this quiz ...

  15. Modern Orthopedic Inpatient Care of the Orthopedic Patient With Diabetic Foot Disease.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Antony H; Bradford, Sara; Hester, Thomas W; Kubelka, Igor; Tremlett, Jennifer; Morris, Victoria; Pendry, Elizabeth; Kavarthapu, Venu; Edmonds, Michael E

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we describe emergency and elective pathways within our orthopedic multidisciplinary inpatient care of patients with diabetic foot problems. We performed a retrospective cohort review of 19 complex patients requiring orthopedic surgical treatment of infected ulceration or Charcot feet or deformity at our institution. A total of 30 admissions (19 emergency, 11 elective) were included. The pathways were coordinated by a multidisciplinary team and comprised initial assessment and investigation and a series of key events, which consisted of emergency and elective surgery together with the introduction, and change of intravenous antibiotics when indicated. Patients had rigorous microbiological assessment, in the form of deep ulcer swabs, operative tissue specimens, joint aspirates, and blood cultures according to their clinical presentation as well as close clinical and biochemical surveillance, which expedited the prompt institution of key events. Outcomes were assessed using amputation rates and patient satisfaction. In the emergency group, there were 5.6 ± 3.0 (mean ± SD) key events per admission, including 4.2 ± 2.1 antibiotic changes. In the elective group, there were 4.8 ± 1.4 key events per inpatient episode, with 3.7 ± 1.3 antibiotic changes. Overall, there were 3 minor amputations, and no major amputations. The podiatric and surgical tissue specimens showed a wide array of Gram-positive, Gram-negative, aerobic and anaerobic isolates and 15% of blood cultures showed bacteremia. When 9 podiatric specimens were compared with 9 contemporaneous surgical samples, there was concordance in 2 out of 9 pairs. We have described the successful modern care of the orthopedic diabetic foot patient, which involves close clinical, microbiological, and biochemical surveillance by the multidisciplinary team directing patients through emergency and elective pathways. This has enabled successful surgical intervention involving debridement, pressure relief, and stabilization, with low rates of amputation. PMID:26680750

  16. Are academic orthopedic surgeons interested in global health?

    PubMed

    Makhni, Melvin C; Miao, Diana; Zurakowski, David; Day, Charles S

    2014-03-01

    Two thirds of the world's population lack orthopedic services. Natural disasters such as the 2010 Haiti earthquake temporarily increased volunteering, but the decision to volunteer regularly is likely multifactorial. In the study reported here, we investigated whether academic orthopedic surgeons are interested in volunteering abroad and identified factors that influence participation. Academic orthopedic surgeons were identified through the faculty listings of all 154 orthopedic residency programs listed by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Electronic Residency Application Service and were sent surveys by e-mail. Of the 3,697 eligible academic orthopedic surgeons, 600 were randomly selected, and 109 completed the survey. Of the 109 respondents, 52% had volunteered abroad previously, and 62% said they were highly likely to volunteer abroad in the future. The most common barriers were scheduling, and family and social commitments (65% and 66%, respectively), followed by lack of specialty-specific opportunities (40%). In a multivariate model, the only barrier significantly decreasing likelihood to volunteer abroad was concern for medical safety (P = .015). Altruistic motivations (P = .005), religious sentiments (P = .006), international networking (P = .004), and fulfilling the true medical creed (P = .015) significantly increased likelihood. Academic orthopedic surgeons are interested in volunteering abroad. Addressing common motivations and barriers may help improve care in the developing world. PMID:24660182

  17. Orthopedic rehabilitation using the "Rutgers ankle" interface.

    PubMed

    Girone, M; Burdea, G; Bouzit, M; Popescu, V; Deutsch, J E

    2000-01-01

    A novel ankle rehabilitation device is being developed for home use, allowing remote monitoring by therapists. The system will allow patients to perform a variety of exercises while interacting with a virtual environment (VE). These game-like VEs created with WorldToolKit run on a host PC that controls the movement and output forces of the device via an RS232 connection. Patients will develop strength, flexibility, coordination, and balance as they interact with the VEs. The device will also perform diagnostic functions, measuring the ankle's range of motion, force exertion capabilities and coordination. The host PC transparently records patient progress for remote evaluation by therapists via our existing telerehabilitation system. The "Rutgers Ankle" Orthopedic Rehabilitation Interface uses double-acting pneumatic cylinders, linear potentiometers, and a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) force sensor. The controller contains a Pentium single-board computer and pneumatic control valves. Based on the Stewart platform, the device can move and supply forces and torques in 6 DOFs. A proof-of-concept trial conducted at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) provided therapist and patient feedback. The system measured the range of motion and maximum force output of a group of four patients (male and female). Future medical trials are required to establish clinical efficacy in rehabilitation. PMID:10977590

  18. Orthopedic Rehabilitation of the Stroke Patient

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Richard; Mooney, Vert; Nickel, Vernon L.; Roper, Brian

    1971-01-01

    Rehabilitation of hemiplegic patients begins with setting reasonable functional goals and a treatment plan to reach them. During the initial illness an effort is made to begin range of motion exercising and positioning to prevent contractures. Transfer from bed to chair is recommended as soon as the patient's general condition permits. Upper extremity function depends on sensory and motor function as well as visual and central cerebral impairment. Spastic symptomatic contracture of the shoulder must be prevented by adequate orthopedic management of any musculoskeletal problems such as arthritis or tendinitis and the initiation of an active exercise program. Surgical release of contractures is occasionally indicated in refractory cases. Elbow flexion and pronation flexion deformity of the forearm and hand have also required surgical release on occasion. The goal of lower extremity function is ambulation. A double upright short leg brace aids stability in gait. Long leg braces are not used but a cane may be necessary for balance assistance. Contractures must be prevented by an exercise program or surgically released. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:5117593

  19. Computer-assisted surgery in orthopedic oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gerbers, Jasper G; Stevens, Martin; Ploegmakers, Joris JW; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Jutte, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose In orthopedic oncology, computer-assisted surgery (CAS) can be considered an alternative to fluoroscopy and direct measurement for orientation, planning, and margin control. However, only small case series reporting specific applications have been published. We therefore describe possible applications of CAS and report preliminary results in 130 procedures. Patients and methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all oncological CAS procedures in a single institution from November 2006 to March 2013. Mean follow-up time was 32 months. We categorized and analyzed 130 procedures for clinical parameters. The categories were image-based intralesional treatment, image-based resection, image-based resection and reconstruction, and imageless resection and reconstruction. Results Application to intralesional treatment showed 1 inadequate curettage and 1 (other) recurrence in 63 cases. Image-based resections in 42 cases showed 40 R0 margins; 16 in 17 pelvic resections. Image-based reconstruction facilitated graft creation with a mean reconstruction accuracy of 0.9 mm in one case. Imageless CAS was helpful in resection planning and length- and joint line reconstruction for tumor prostheses. Interpretation CAS is a promising new development. Preliminary results show a high number of R0 resections and low short-term recurrence rates for curettage. PMID:25140984

  20. Physician-Hospital Alignment in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Brandon D

    2015-09-01

    The concept of "alignment" between physicians and hospitals is a popular buzzword in the age of health care reform. Despite their often tumultuous histories, physicians and hospitals find themselves under increasing pressures to work together toward common goals. However, effective alignment is more than just simple cooperation between parties. The process of achieving alignment does not have simple, universal steps. Alignment will differ based on individual situational factors and the type of specialty involved. Ultimately, however, there are principles that underlie the concept of alignment and should be a part of any physician-hospital alignment efforts. In orthopedic surgery, alignment involves the clinical, administrative, financial, and even personal aspects of a surgeon's practice. It must be based on the principles of financial interest, clinical authority, administrative participation, transparency, focus on the patient, and mutual necessity. Alignment can take on various forms as well, with popular models consisting of shared governance and comanagement, gainsharing, bundled payments, accountable care organizations, and other methods. As regulatory and financial pressures continue to motivate physicians and hospitals to develop alignment relationships, new and innovative methods of alignment will also appear. Existing models will mature and evolve, with individual variability based on local factors. However, certain trends seem to be appearing as time progresses and alignment relationships deepen, including regional and national collaboration, population management, and changes in the legal system. This article explores the history, principles, and specific methods of physician-hospital alignment and its critical importance for the future of health care delivery. PMID:26375539

  1. [PDT photodynamic therapy in orthopedic inflammatory conditions?].

    PubMed

    Szlachta, Zbigniew; Frankiewicz, Andrzej; Sto?tny, Tomasz; Koczy, Bogdan; Spindel, Jerzy; Walentek, Tomasz; Siero?-Sto?tny, Karolina; Krawczyk-Krupka, Aleksandra; Siero?, Aleksander

    2006-01-01

    The infections in orthopedic surgery and traumatology represents important medical problem. The results of treatment of motor-organs infections in high degree were improved by the introduction of antisepsis and asepsis in XIX century and the antibiotics' discovery in the beginning of XX century. However, widespread usage of antibiotics leaded to the rise of refractory tribes of bacteria on their activity, which caused higher percentage of fails in the therapy. Also the rapid civilization development, which flown on arising of a new invasive methods of operative trauma protection and stabilizations of fractures in motor-organs area increased the number of infectious complications during treatment. These facts gave a reason to look for a more effective therapeutic methods. It seems that photodynamic therapy gives us the new possibilities of infectious treatment, which avails oneself activity of therapeutic light laser with proper wave length on the human tissue with photosensitizer included. Indeed there are known until now splendid results of PDT in neoplasma treatment, however it seems, based on experimental investigations and publications in medical literature, that this method can be a chance of effectual and non-invasive treatment of the soft tissues and bones inflammations. PMID:17133837

  2. The white blood cell scan in orthopedics

    SciTech Connect

    Propst-Proctor, S.L.; Dillingham, M.F.; McDougall, I.R.; Goodwin, D.

    1982-08-01

    A new nuclear scanning technique was found more specific for bone, joint, and soft tissue infections than any previously described scanning technique. The leukocyte scan, whereby a patient's own cells are labeled with a radioactive tagging agent (/sup 111/In oxine), can distinguish an active infectious process from other pain-inducing conditions. Ninety-seven /sup 111/In labeled autologous leukocyte scans were performed in 88 patients. The findings in 17 of 40 patients scanned for possible acute osteomyelitis, six of nine for suspected septic arthritis, and six for possible soft tissue infections, were positive. Subsequent clinical courses verified the infectious nature of these processes in all patients. Patients who had chronic osteomyelitis (14), bony metastases (four patients), heterotopic ossification (three), and degenerative arthritis (two) demonstrated negative findings. Of the seven patients scanned for acute long-bone fractures, one demonstrated positive findings. Nine scans demonstrated positive findings without determined causes. The leukocyte scan is a useful addition to the diagnostic tools of the orthopedic surgeon.

  3. Manipulator mounted transfer platform

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbins, J.C.; Hoover, M.A.; May, K.W.; Ross, M.J.

    1990-01-23

    The patent describes in a manipulator system for use in hazardous environments including a manipulator adapted for reciprocal movement upon a guide device, a transfer platform. It comprises: a bed frame defining a generally horizontal bed projecting outwardly from the manipulator; and frame mounting means securing the bed frame to the manipulator in a generally cantilevered fashion, thereby essentially minimizing the structure necessary to support the platform outwardly of the manipulator while enhancing operator visibility of the platform and the manipulator during use of the manipulator system.

  4. Dynamic Manipulability of 3-RRR Planar Manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Dois, H. A.; Jha, A. K.; Mishra, R. B.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper a simulation study is proposed to study the factors influencing the dynamic manipulability of 3-RRR planar manipulator with and without payload. Different combinations of robot parameters are examined using design of experiment technique while performing variety of tasks. The kinematic and dynamic models are derived symbolically and used to simulate the dynamic performance of 3-RRR planar manipulator while following different trajectories. Finally, the results generated from the simulation of various parameter combinations are analyzed using analysis of variance and discussed to include the optimization of robot's performance based on the dynamic manipulability measure.

  5. The Quality of Cost-Utility Analyses in Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Schairer, William W; O'Dea, Evan; McCormick, Frank; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    As health care in the United States transitions toward a value-based model, there is increasing interest in applying cost-effectiveness analysis within orthopedic surgery. Orthopedic trauma care has traditionally underemphasized economic analysis. The goals of this review were to identify US-based cost-utility analysis in orthopedic trauma, to assess the quality of the available evidence, and to identify cost-effective strategies within orthopedic trauma. Based on a review of 971 abstracts, 8 US-based cost-utility analyses evaluating operative strategies in orthopedic trauma were identified. Study findings were recorded, and the Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES) instrument was used to grade the overall quality. Of the 8 studies included in this review, 4 studies evaluated hip and femur fractures, 3 studies analyzed upper extremity fractures, and 1 study assessed open tibial fracture management. Cost-effective interventions identified in this review include total hip arthroplasty (over hemiarthroplasty) for femoral neck fractures in the active elderly, open reduction and internal fixation (over nonoperative management) for distal radius and scaphoid fractures, limb salvage (over amputation) for complex open tibial fractures, and systems-based interventions to prevent delay in hip fracture surgery. The mean QHES score of the studies was 79.25 (range, 67-89). Overall, there is a paucity of cost-utility analyses in orthopedic trauma; however, the available evidence suggests that certain operative interventions can be cost-effective. The quality of these studies, however, is fair, based on QHES grading. More attention should be paid to evaluating the cost-effectiveness of operative intervention in orthopedic trauma. PMID:26270752

  6. Orthostetrics: Management of Orthopedic Conditions in the Pregnant Patient.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Leslie J; McConda, David B; Lalli, Trapper A J; Daffner, Scott D

    2015-10-01

    Managing orthopedic conditions in pregnant patients leads to challenges that must be carefully considered so that the safety of both the mother and the fetus is maintained. Both perioperative and intraoperative considerations must be made based on physiologic changes during pregnancy, risks of radiation, and recommendations for monitoring. Operative timing, imaging, and medication selection are also factors that may vary based on trimester and clinical scenario. Pregnancy introduces unique parameters that can result in undesirable outcomes for both mother and fetus if not handled appropriately. Ultimately, pregnant patients offer a distinct challenge to the orthopedic surgeon in that the well-being of 2 patients must be considered in all aspects of care. In addition, not only does pregnancy affect the management of orthopedic conditions but the pregnant state also causes physiologic changes that may actually induce various pathologies. These pregnancy-related orthopedic conditions can interfere with an otherwise healthy pregnancy and should be recognized as possible complications. Although the management of orthopedic conditions in pregnancy is often conservative, pregnancy does not necessarily preclude safely treating pathologies operatively. When surgery is considered, regional anesthesia provides less overall drug exposure to the fetus and less variability in fetal heart rate. Intraoperative fluoroscopy can be used when appropriate, with 360° fetal shielding if possible. Lateral decubitus positioning is ideal to prevent hypotension associated with compression of the inferior vena cava. PMID:26488781

  7. Orthopedic Manifestations of Mobius Syndrome: Case Series and Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Philip; Booy, David; Katarincic, Julia; Eberson, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mobius Syndrome is a rare disease defined by bilateral congenital 7th nerve palsy. We focus on reporting the prevalence of orthopedic disease in this population. Methods. Twenty-three individuals with Mobius Syndrome underwent orthopedic physical examination, and additional 96 patients filled out a survey for self-reported orthopedic diagnoses. Results. Clubfoot was present in 60% of individuals in the physical exam series and 42% of those in the survey. Scoliosis was present in 26% and 28%, respectively. Poland's Syndrome was present in 17% and 30%. In addition to these findings, 27% of patients reported having difficulty with anesthesia, including difficulty in intubation and airway problems. Conclusion. An increased prevalence of scoliosis, clubfoot, transverse limb deficiencies, and Poland's Syndrome is identified in the setting of Mobius Syndrome. In the setting of several deformities often requiring surgical correction, a high incidence of anesthetic difficulty is noted and should be discussed with patients and other providers during surgical planning. PMID:26977161

  8. Mobile Remote Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coryell, S.; Olsen, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Turret, roll arm, and trolley enhance manipulator dexterity. Remote manipulator moves on trolley base along structure. Roll-axis arm positions manipulator arm so it can extend end effector under structure. Yaw-axis rotation gives added reach to arm above structure. Designed for handling, inspecting, and maintaining modules of space station. Manipulators having such capabilities useful on Earth; robots in manufacturing, erection of large structures, or performing complicated tasks in hazardous locations.

  9. Revisiting Mathematics Manipulative Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, Paul; Marshall, Linda

    2010-01-01

    It is over 12 years since "APMC" published Bob Perry and Peter Howard's research on the use of mathematics manipulative materials in primary mathematics classrooms. Since then the availability of virtual manipulatives and associated access to computers and interactive whiteboards have caused educators to rethink the use of mathematics manipulative

  10. Using new oral anticoagulants in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bass, Anne R

    2015-04-01

    Four new oral anticoagulants (NOAC), apixaban, rivaroxaban, edoxaban, and dabigatran, are now available in the USA; however, only apixaban and rivaroxaban are FDA approved for the prevention of venous thromboembolism following orthopedic surgery. Apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban's anticoagulant activity can be measured using a chromogenic anti-factor Xa assay but there is no widely available means of measuring dabigatran blood levels. None of the NOAC has an antidote. Dabigatran is 80% renally excreted, and patients with atrial fibrillation taking dabigatran for stroke prevention should stop the drug 4-5 days prior to major orthopedic surgery. Apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban should be held for 48 h preoperatively in this setting. PMID:25854486

  11. Nanomedicine applications in orthopedic medicine: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri, Mozhdeh; Eslahi, Niloofar; Ordikhani, Farideh; Tamjid, Elnaz; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    The technological and clinical need for orthopedic replacement materials has led to significant advances in the field of nanomedicine, which embraces the breadth of nanotechnology from pharmacological agents and surface modification through to regulation and toxicology. A variety of nanostructures with unique chemical, physical, and biological properties have been engineered to improve the functionality and reliability of implantable medical devices. However, mimicking living bone tissue is still a challenge. The scope of this review is to highlight the most recent accomplishments and trends in designing nanomaterials and their applications in orthopedics with an outline on future directions and challenges. PMID:26451110

  12. Applications of Metal Additive Manufacturing in Veterinary Orthopedic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrysson, Ola L. A.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.; Horn, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Veterinary medicine has undergone a rapid increase in specialization over the last three decades. Veterinarians now routinely perform joint replacement, neurosurgery, limb-sparing surgery, interventional radiology, radiation therapy, and other complex medical procedures. Many procedures involve advanced imaging and surgical planning. Evidence-based medicine has also become part of the modus operandi of veterinary clinicians. Modeling and additive manufacturing can provide individualized or customized therapeutic solutions to support the management of companion animals with complex medical problems. The use of metal additive manufacturing is increasing in veterinary orthopedic surgery. This review describes and discusses current and potential applications of metal additive manufacturing in veterinary orthopedic surgery.

  13. 21 CFR 888.5850 - Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. 888.5850 Section 888.5850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5850 Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and...

  14. Telediagnosis system for orthopedic deformity analysis based on 3D medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myoung-Hee; Hong, Helen; Kim, Min-A.

    2000-04-01

    Due to the structural complexity of the bone, it is difficult to diagnose and make a treatment plan for injuries and diseases in bones. In this paper, we designed and implemented a telediagnosis system for orthopedic deformity analysis based on 3D medical imaging. In order to define the intersseous relationships in each bone and to evaluate a deformity without invasions, the system produces volumetric images by reconstructing the planar images spatially and provides deformity analysis by measuring distance, area, volume and angle among the bones. The reconstructed volumetric images are freely manipulated to simulate surgical operations such as translation, scaling, rotation and so on. Our system integrates three main components: server, clients and communication subsystem. It is also composed of three main functions including the information control manager for event and message process used between client and server, and surgical simulation manager for object visualization and manipulation in individual bones, and the medical database manager for patient information. The system also supports user-friendly graphical user interface and simultaneous use by multiple users.

  15. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment. 1308.12 Section 1308.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD...

  16. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment. 1308.12 Section 1308.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD...

  17. [Orthopedic treatment of labio-maxillo-palatal clefts: our approach].

    PubMed

    Stricker, M; Coing, C; Chassagne, J F; Simon, E; Stricker, C; Chassagne, S; Fyad, J P

    2001-06-01

    Many authors use a preliminary orthopedic procedure before cleft lip and palate surgical closure in order to prevent possible bone distortion following the rupture of the muscle belts resulting from the cleft. Actually, this is generally not only an orthopedic treatment but rather a surgical orthopedic step which includes lip adhesion before the surgical closure of the clefts. Following the procedures proposed by Georgiade and Latham, we have used since 1996 a treatment based on traction applied with an elastic chain on splints attached by transmaxillary pins for certain types of clefts, namely unilateral complete clefts with endognathy of the small fragment, unilateral complete clefts larger than 7 mm, bilateral wide complete clefts with premaxilla protrusion, and bilateral wide complete clefts with collapsus and premaxillary protrusion. Technical procedures vary with the type of cleft. Standard procedures with or without jacks are used for the other types of complete clefts. These orthopedic procedures with elastic traction are performed between the 3rd and 6th week, before lip adhesion of the upper part of the lip (combined with release of skin and subcutaneous tissues from the underlying alar cartilage). A palatine plate with or without a jack, fitted most of the time with a spring for nostril support, is then inserted until surgical closure. PMID:11577473

  18. Left-Handed Preschool Children with Orthopedic Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banham, Katharine M.

    1983-01-01

    The mental development of 332 preschool-age children with orthopedic disabilities was assessed at a children's hospital over a 10-year period, and comparisons were made for right-handed and left-handed. The left-handed children were slower than right-handed children in learning speech and language skills (Author/SEW)

  19. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment. 1308.12 Section 1308.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH...

  20. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment. 1308.12 Section 1308.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD...

  1. [Compensation in leg length inequality with orthopedic shoe measures].

    PubMed

    Meyer, P E; Petersen, D

    1992-06-01

    There are three different methods of compensating for differences in leg length. The first is the construction of special shoes, which is adequate for differences of up to about 3 cm. The heels can be either higher or lower, or a cork sole 5-10 mm thick can be incorporated, the shaft made higher, and supplementary features, such as aids to push-off, can also be implemented. The second method is the wearing of the classic orthopedic boot or shoe, in which the necessary compensation for the shorter leg is incorporated as a part of the orthopedic footwear. The third method is the construction of a shoe within a shoe, for which different designs have crystallized out for the five groups presented. All designs incorporate leather, the tried and tested material, next to the skin. Stabilizing components are made of fiberglass-reinforced synthetic resin or Thermoplast. New materials allow aesthetically acceptable orthopedic footwear. On average, such shoes are 25% lighter than conventional orthopedic boots. The stability and wear-resistance allow large perforations and open-toe designs, which has made it possible to solve the problem of ventilation. PMID:1508545

  2. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment. 1308.12 Section 1308.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD...

  3. Higher Education and Students with Orthopedic Disabilities: A Survey Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Delar K.

    A survey instrument is presented that was used in a national survey of 160 colleges and universities to explore facilities and services to students with orthopedic disabilities. The survey contains 33 items that focus on the following areas: structural accessibility, academic accessibility, dorm-living, and recreational opportunities. The total

  4. Supporting the Educational Needs of Students with Orthopedic Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Swinehart-Jones, Dawn

    2003-01-01

    This article provides information on orthopedic impairments and the unique knowledge and skills required to provide these students with an appropriate education. Information on current practice is provided, as well as training and technical assistance models that can be used to help provide teachers with the necessary training. (Contains

  5. 76 FR 20690 - International Consortium of Orthopedic Registries; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... be on a first- come, first-served basis. Non-U.S. citizens are subject to additional security... the performance of orthopedic devices. II. Who is the target audience for this public workshop? Who should attend this public workshop? This workshop is open to all interested parties. The target...

  6. Therapists, Trainers, and Acupuncturists: Focused Review for the Orthopedic Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Domes, Christopher M; Kruger, Cori L

    2015-12-01

    Effective treatment of orthopedic injuries requires a multidisciplinary team, including physical and occupational therapists, athletic trainers, massage therapists, and acupuncturists. Orthopedic surgeons commonly encounter these practitioners but may not be familiar with the training, credentialing, and most importantly, the appropriate use of members of this team. There are general similarities in practice locations as well as types of symptoms addressed by the providers discussed, which include the treatment of physical pain, evaluation and treatment of physical impairment, and some facilitation of adaptation to the limitations caused by injuries. Across the 5 types of providers discussed there are widely varying training and licensing requirements, specializations, and continuing education requirements to maintain licensure. This article provides a focused review of these members of the multidisciplinary team and highlights the current American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommendations for the use of occupational and physical therapists for orthopedic conditions, including hip fractures, total hip arthroplasty, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(12):e1121-e1126.]. PMID:26652334

  7. Mainstreaming Preschoolers: Children with Orthopedic Handicaps. A Guide for Teachers, Parents, and Others Who Work with Orthopedically Handicapped Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieran, Shari Stokes; And Others

    This guide to mainstreaming preschoolers with orthopedic handicaps is one of a series of eight manuals on mainstreaming preschoolers developed by Project Head Start. The guide is addressed to parents, teachers, and other professionals and paraprofessionals. Chapter I presents information on the meaning, benefits and implementation of…

  8. Manipulator mounted transfer platform

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbins, J.C.; Hoover, M.A.; May, K.W.; Ross, M.J.

    1988-10-12

    This invention is comprised of a transfer platform for the conveyance of objects by a manipulator includes a bed frame and saddle clamp secured along an edge of the bed fame and adapted so as to secure the bed frame to a horizontal crosspiece of the manipulator. The platform may thus move with the manipulator in a reciprocal linear path defined by a guide rail. A bed insert may be provided for the support of conveyed objects and a lifting bail may be provided to permit the manipulator arm to install the bed frame upon the crosspiece under remote control. 5 figs.

  9. [Evolution on rotation manipulation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Through review of ancient literature, the developing history of rotation manipulation is traced, various rotation manipulation techniques in different historical periods are analyzed, and evolution process of rotation manipulation is also summarized. It is found that uni-direction rotation was mainly adopted before the establishment of the Republic of China (1911). Influenced by Japanese technique, back and fro rotation took place of the uni-direction rotation, and became the mainstay of the rotation manipulations. However, it is held that the uni-direction rotation has stronger stimulative effects as well as soft tissue relaxation effect, which can be applied for treatment of various diseases. PMID:24032195

  10. Getting Manipulative about Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheer, Janet K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Math manipulatives that are made from inexpensive, common items help students understand basic mathematics concepts. Learning activities using Cheerios, jellybeans, and clay as teaching materials are suggested. (DF)

  11. Manipulator mounted transfer platform

    DOEpatents

    Dobbins, James C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hoover, Mark A. (Idaho Falls, ID); May, Kay W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ross, Maurice J. (Pocatello, ID)

    1990-01-01

    A transfer platform for the conveyance of objects by a manipulator includes a bed frame and saddle clamp secured along an edge of the bed frame and adapted so as to secure the bed frame to a horizontal crosspiece of the manipulator. The platform may thus move with the manipulator in a reciprocal linear path defined by a guide rail. A bed insert may be provided for the support of conveyed objects and a lifting bail may be provided to permit the manipulator arm to install the bed frame upon the crosspiece under remote control.

  12. Manipulators in teleoperation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Teleoperated manipulators represent a mature technology which has evolved over nearly 40 years of applications experience. The wide range of manipulator concepts developed thus far reflect differing applications, priorities, and philosophies. The technology of teleoperated manipulators is in a rapid state of change (just as are industrial robotics) fueled by microelectronics and materials advances. Large strides in performance and dexterity are now practical and advantageous. Even though improved controls and sensory feedback will increase functionality, overall costs should be reduced as manipulator fabrication and assembly labor costs are reduced through improved manufacturing technology. As these advances begin to materialize, broader applications in nonnuclear areas should occur.

  13. Optimization of manipulator workspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D. C. H.; Lee, T. W.

    An approach for the optimum design of manipulators based on workspace is presented. An effective algorithm is developed which combines the heuristic optimization technique with a computer program called Kinematic Analysis of Manipulators (KAM) to provide a systematic procedure to optimize the manipulator structure based on a workspace. For a given manipulator structure, KAM first defines the workspace, then explores the existence of hole and void outlines in the boundary, and finally calculates the total volume of the workspace. Two problems are considered, the first concerned with the optimization of the RRRS manipulator, the second dealing with the optimization of some commercially available robots. A comparative study between the human arm proportions and the optimized RRRS structure is also presented.

  14. Functional Imaging in Diagnostic of Orthopedic Implant-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Potapova, Inga

    2013-01-01

    Surgeries’ sterile conditions and perioperative antibiotic therapies decrease implant associated infections rates significantly. However, up to 10% of orthopedic devices still fail due to infections. An implant infection generates a high socio-economic burden. An early diagnosis of an infection would significantly improve patients’ outcomes. There are numerous clinical tests to diagnose infections. The “Gold Standard” is a microbiological culture, which requires an invasive sampling and lasts up to several weeks. None of the existing tests in clinics alone is sufficient for a conclusive diagnosis of an infection. Meanwhile, there are functional imaging modalities, which hold the promise of a non-invasive, quick, and specific infection diagnostic. This review focuses on orthopedic implant-associated infections, their pathogenicity, diagnosis and functional imaging. PMID:26824928

  15. Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery: Current State and Future Perspective.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan; Nolte, Lutz P

    2015-01-01

    Introduced about two decades ago, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) has emerged as a new and independent area, due to the importance of treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in orthopedics and traumatology, increasing availability of different imaging modalities, and advances in analytics and navigation tools. The aim of this paper is to present the basic elements of CAOS devices and to review state-of-the-art examples of different imaging modalities used to create the virtual representations, of different position tracking devices for navigation systems, of different surgical robots, of different methods for registration and referencing, and of CAOS modules that have been realized for different surgical procedures. Future perspectives will also be outlined. PMID:26779486

  16. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopy during orthopedic surgical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, S.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The use of fluoroscopy has enabled orthopedic surgeons to become technically more proficient. In addition, these surgical procedures tend to have less associated patient morbidity by decreasing operative time and minimizing the area of the operative field. The trade-off, however, may be an increased risk of radiation exposure to the surgeon on an annual or lifetime basis. The current study was designed to determine the amount of radiation received by the primary surgeon and the first assistant during selected surgical procedures involving the use of fluoroscopy. Five body sites exposed to radiation were monitored for dosage. The results of this study indicate that with appropriate usage, (1) radiation exposure from fluoroscopy is relatively low; (2) the surgeon's dominant hand receives the most exposure per case; and (3) proper maintenance and calibration of fluoroscopic machines are important factors in reducing exposure risks. Therefore, with proper precautions, the use of fluoroscopy in orthopedic procedures can remain a safe practice.

  17. Learning blood management in orthopedic surgery through gameplay.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jing; Chui, Yim-Pan; Pang, Wai-Man; Choi, Kup-Sze; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2010-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery treats the musculoskeletal system, in which bleeding is common and can be fatal. To help train future surgeons in this complex practice, researchers designed and implemented a serious game for learning orthopedic surgery. The game focuses on teaching trainees blood management skills, which are critical for safe operations. Using state-of-the-art graphics technologies, the game provides an interactive and realistic virtual environment. It also integrates game elements, including task-oriented and time-attack scenarios, bonuses, game levels, and performance evaluation tools. To study the system's effect, the researchers conducted experiments on player completion time and off-target contacts to test their learning of psychomotor skills in blood management. PMID:20650710

  18. Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery: Current State and Future Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoyan; Nolte, Lutz P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduced about two decades ago, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) has emerged as a new and independent area, due to the importance of treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in orthopedics and traumatology, increasing availability of different imaging modalities, and advances in analytics and navigation tools. The aim of this paper is to present the basic elements of CAOS devices and to review state-of-the-art examples of different imaging modalities used to create the virtual representations, of different position tracking devices for navigation systems, of different surgical robots, of different methods for registration and referencing, and of CAOS modules that have been realized for different surgical procedures. Future perspectives will also be outlined. PMID:26779486

  19. Current state and use of biological adhesives in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neil V; Meislin, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Bone and tissue adhesives are common and beneficial supplements to standard methods of musculoskeletal tissue suture repair. Knowledge and development of biologically derived or inspired adhesives useful in orthopedic surgery are rapidly advancing. Recent literature demonstrates the increased adjunct or primary use of biological adhesives in the repair of musculoskeletal soft tissues, chondral fractures, and osteochondral fractures. Adhesives offer more benefits and enhancements to tissue healing than current fixation methods afford, including improved biocompatibility, resorbability, and non-immunogenicity. Further investigation is required to determine the extent of the role that these bioadhesives can play in orthopedic surgery. The largest group of biologically derived adhesives and sealants is fibrin sealants, which include first- and second-generation commercially available fibrin sealants, autologous fibrin sealants, and variants. Other groups include gelatin-resorcin aldehydes, protein-aldehyde systems, collagen-based adhesives, polysaccharide- based adhesives, mussel adhesive proteins, and various biologically inspired or biomimetic glues. Potential uses include applications in orthopedic-related blood conservation, arthroplasty, articular cartilage disorders, sports medicine, spine surgery, trauma, and tumors. The development of an adhesive with universal application is likely unfeasible, given the unique characteristics of various musculoskeletal tissues. However, the literature demonstrates the overall underuse of adhesives and indicates the rising probability of the development of a successful variety of bioadhesives for use in orthopedic surgery. As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Describe the difference between adhesives and sealants. 2. Recognize fibrin adhesives commonly used in practice today and identify other biological adhesives with rising potential. 3. Analyze how fibrin sealants work relative to fibrin and fibrinogen. 4. Identify anatomical areas and techniques in which fibrin sealants are used. PMID:24579215

  20. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIALS IN ORTHOPEDICS: DIFFICULTIES AND LIMITATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Imamura, Marta; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are considered to be the gold standard for evidence-based medicine nowadays, and are important for directing medical practice through consistent scientific observations. Steps such as patient selection, randomization and blinding are fundamental for conducting a RCT, but some additional difficulties are presented in trials that involve surgical procedures, as is common in orthopedics. The aim of this article was to highlight and discuss some difficulties and possible limitations on RCTs within the field of surgery.

  1. Blood conservation strategies in orthopedic surgeries: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Balaji; Batra, Sahil; Gupta, Rajat; Agrawal, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    In orthopedics management of surgical blood loss is an important aspect which has evolved along with modern surgeries. Replacement of lost blood by transfusion alone is not the answer as was considered earlier. Complications like infection and immune reaction due to blood transfusion are a major concern. Today numerous techniques are available in place of allogenic blood transfusion which can be employed safely and effectively. In this article we have reviewed these techniques, their merits and demerits. PMID:26403876

  2. Mending injured athletes: a track record of orthopedic advances.

    PubMed

    Schnirring, Lisa

    2003-09-01

    Physicians have long been closely allied with competitive sports. In 157 AD, Galen served as a physician to Greek gladiators.(1) Severe musculoskeletal trauma certainly shortened the careers of ancient pugilists who survived their matches. However, modern gladiators-from pick-up basketball players to football professionals-often get to "play another day" because of advances in orthopedic surgery, particularly those of the last 30 years. PMID:20086486

  3. Postoperative constipation risk assessment in Turkish orthopedic patients.

    PubMed

    ?endir, Merdiye; Byk?ylmaz, Funda; A?t?, Trkinaz; Grp?nar, ?engl; Yazgan, ?lknur

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive, correlational study was conducted to describe constipation risk assessment and the affecting factors of constipation risk of patients who have undergone major orthopedic surgery. Data were collected using a patient information form and the Constipation Risk Assessment Scale (CRAS) on the second postoperative day. Data were analyzed using the SPSS version 11.5 for Windows. The mean age of the 83 patients studied was 53.75 21.29 years. Subjects were hospitalized in the orthopedic wards for 14.39 15.17 days, and their current bowel habit was 2.18 1.80 stools per week. Of the sample, 63.9% were female, 69.9% of the patients had a history of previous surgery, 45.8% had hip/knee arthroplasty surgery, and 55.4% had bowel problems during the hospitalization period. Patients had a medium risk for constipation according to the CRAS subscale (gender, mobility, and pharmacological agents). Total CRAS score was 12.73 4.75 (medium risk) on the second postoperative day. In addition, age, marital status, educational level, having a history of surgery, and bowel elimination problems did have a significant effect on constipation risk. On the basis of the findings from this study, nurses must learn the postoperative constipation risk of orthopedic patients to implement safe and effective interventions. PMID:22472670

  4. Clinical conundrums and challenges during geriatric orthopedic emergency surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Despite so many advancements and innovations in anesthetic techniques, expectations and challenges have also grown in plenty. Cardiac, pediatric, obstetric and neuro-anesthesia have perfectly developed to fulfill the desired needs of respective patient population. However, geriatric anesthesia has been shown a lesser interest in teaching and clinical practices over the years as compared with other anesthetic sub-specialties. The large growing geriatric population globally is also associated with an increase number of elderly patients presenting for orthopedic emergency surgeries. Orthopedic emergency surgery in geriatric population is not only a daunting clinical challenge but also has numerous socio-behavioral and economic ramifications. Decision making in anesthesia is largely influenced by the presence of co-morbidities, neuro-cognitive functions and the current socio-behavioral status. Pre-anesthetic evaluation and optimization are extremely important for a better surgical outcome but is limited by time constraints during emergency surgery. The current review aims to highlight comprehensively the various clinical, social, behavioral and psychological aspects during pre-anesthetic evaluation associated with emergency orthopedic surgery in geriatric population. PMID:25810963

  5. Orthopedic cellular therapy: An overview with focus on clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Moon Jong; Lee, Kwan Hee

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, the authors tried to evaluate the present state of cellular therapy in orthopedic field. The topics the authors try to cover include not only the clinical trials but the various research areas as well. Both the target diseases for cellular therapy and the target cells were reviewed. New methods to activate the cells were interesting to review. Most advanced clinical trials were also included because several of them have advanced to phase III clinical trials. In the orthopedic field, there are many diseases with a definite treatment gap at this time. Because cellular therapies can regenerate damaged tissues, there is a possibility for cellular therapies to become disease modifying drugs. It is not clear whether cellular therapies will become the standard of care in any of the orthopedic disorders, however the amount of research being performed and the number of clinical trials that are on-going make the authors believe that cellular therapies will become important treatment modalities within several years. PMID:26601056

  6. Anthropomorphic Remote Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.

    1991-01-01

    Two-armed telerobot undergoing development manipulates objects with dexterity approaching that of human. Designed to be remotely operated by human. Operator wears harness with exoskeletonlike sleeves and gloves; remote manipulator follows operator's arm, hand, and finger movements and feeds back position and force information so operator has sense of manipulating object held by telerobot. Developed for use in outer space. Suited for such terrestrial uses as handling materials and maintaining equipment in hazardous environments where mechanical dexterity and nearly instantaneous feedback of sensory information needed.

  7. Update: Biochemistry of Genetic Manipulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Various topics on the biochemistry of genetic manipulation are discussed. These include genetic transformation and DNA; genetic expression; DNA replication, repair, and mutation; technology of genetic manipulation; and applications of genetic manipulation. Other techniques employed are also considered. (JN)

  8. Dielectrophoresis for Bioparticle Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Cheng; Huang, Haibo; Chen, Liguo; Li, Xiangpeng; Ge, Zunbiao; Chen, Tao; Yang, Zhan; Sun, Lining

    2014-01-01

    As an ideal method to manipulate biological particles, the dielectrophoresis (DEP) technique has been widely used in clinical diagnosis, disease treatment, drug development, immunoassays, cell sorting, etc. This review summarizes the research in the field of bioparticle manipulation based on DEP techniques. Firstly, the basic principle of DEP and its classical theories are introduced in brief; Secondly, a detailed introduction on the DEP technique used for bioparticle manipulation is presented, in which the applications are classified into five fields: capturing bioparticles to specific regions, focusing bioparticles in the sample, characterizing biomolecular interaction and detecting microorganism, pairing cells for electrofusion and separating different kinds of bioparticles; Thirdly, the effect of DEP on bioparticle viability is analyzed; Finally, the DEP techniques are summarized and future trends in bioparticle manipulation are suggested. PMID:25310652

  9. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Certification Professional Development Continuing Medical Education Research and ... Manipulative Treatment Page Content Nearly every day, medical science unveils new discoveries from brain scans to anti-cancer drugs. In the midst ...

  10. Dexterous manipulator flight demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Edward L.

    1989-01-01

    The Dexterous Manipulator Flight Experiment, an outgrowth of the Dexterous End Effector project, is an experiment to demonstrate newly developed equipment and methods that make for a dexterous manipulator which can be used on the Space Shuttle or other space missions. The goals of the project, the objectives of the flight experiment, the experiment equipment, and the tasks to be performed during the demonstration are discussed.

  11. Remote manipulator dynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, E. C.; Donges, P. K.; Garand, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    A simulator to generate the real time visual scenes required to perform man in the loop investigations of remote manipulator application and design concepts for the space shuttle is described. The simulated remote manipulator consists of a computed display system that uses a digital computer, the electronic scene generator, an operator's station, and associated interface hardware. A description of the capabilities of the implemented simulation is presented. The mathematical models and programs developed for the simulation are included.

  12. Early Total Care versus Damage Control: Current Concepts in the Orthopedic Care of Polytrauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Ratto

    2013-01-01

    The management of the polytraumatized orthopedic patient remains a challenging issue. In recent years many efforts have been made to develop rescue techniques and to promote guidelines for the management of these patients. Currently controversies persist between two orthopedic approaches: the Early Total Care and the Damage Control Orthopedics. An overview of the current literature on the orthopedic management of polytrauma patient is provided. Subsequently, femoral shaft fractures, representing extremely common lesions, and pelvic ring injuries, that are associated with a high mortality rate, are analyzed in detail. PMID:24959356

  13. Micro manipulator motion control to counteract macro manipulator structural vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, J.Y.; Trudnowski, D.J.; Evans, M.S.; Bennett, D.W.

    1995-02-01

    Inertial force damping control by micro manipulator modulation is proposed to suppress the vibrations of a micro/macro manipulator system. The proposed controller, developed using classical control theory, is added to the existing control system. The proposed controller uses real-time measurements of macro manipulator flexibility to adjust the motion of the micro manipulator to counteract structural vibrations. Experimental studies using an existing micro/macro flexible link manipulator testbed demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach to suppression of vibrations in the macro/micro manipulator system using micro-manipulator-based inertial active damping control.

  14. Minocycline-Induced Cutaneous Hyperpigmentation in an Orthopedic Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, Yuri; Berbari, Elie F.; Steckelberg, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and evaluate risk factors for development of minocycline-induced cutaneous hyperpigmentation in patients with orthopedic infections. Methods. Patients with orthopedic infections evaluated at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) and treated with minocycline from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2011 were retrospectively identified. Long-term minocycline suppression was defined as daily minocycline use for at least 3 months. A proportional hazards model was used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results. Of 291 patients receiving long-term minocycline suppression, 54% (156 of 291) developed hyperpigmentation after a mean follow-up of 4.8 years (range, 0.3–13.2 years); 88% involved blue-gray pigmentation of normal skin that appeared most commonly in the lower (75%) and upper extremities (44%). The mean duration of minocycline therapy before hyperpigmentation was 1.5 years (range, 0.1–9 years) with a mean cumulative dosage of 107.3 g (range, 8.6–657 g). Notable risk factors include a history of vitamin D deficiency (relative risk [RR], 6.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.91–15.27; P = .0052), presence of a shoulder prosthesis (RR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.23–6.56; P = .0062), noncirrhotic liver pathology (RR, 3.63; 95% CI, 1.11–8.75; P = .0359), and use of a concurrent medication also known to cause hyperpigmentation (RR, 4.75; 95% CI, 1.83–10.1; P = .0029). Conclusions. Hyperpigmentation associated with the use of long-term minocycline suppression in patients with orthopedic infections is common. PMID:26835479

  15. A History of Orthopedics in San Francisco and the West

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, Peter; Raih, Thomas; Taylor, Lloyd W.

    1976-01-01

    The unique development of early medical specialization in the West can be traced to California's geography and economic development. Such early specialization produced men with orthopedic inclinations. Early orthopedists founded the first medical school and the first modern teaching hospital, helped to found Stanford's Lane Medical Library and made the first use of x-rays in the West. In addition many of these orthopedists were prominent in the political and social activities of the time. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:795165

  16. Management of open wounds: lessons from orthopedic oncology.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Herrick J

    2014-01-01

    The management of complex wounds remains a challenge, and although there have been many promising advances, patients often undergo a morbid and lengthy process to obtain sufficient, satisfactory healing. Sarcoma patients are especially vulnerable to soft tissue wound-healing complications. These patients are often treated with neoadjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy and have compromised local vascularity to healing tissue. The advent and refinement of wound vacuum-assisted closure technology have been shown to have a tremendous impact. This article reviews the benefits of some novel technologies currently undergoing investigation in orthopedic oncology that will likely have applications in wound management from other causes. PMID:24267211

  17. Manipulator comparative testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Handel, S.J.; Sundstrom, E.; Herndon, J.N.; Fujita, Y.; Maida, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Manipulator Comparative Testing Program compared performance of selected manipulator systems under typical remote handling conditions. The site of testing was the Remote Operations and Maintenance Demonstration Facility operated by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Three experiment examined differences among manipulator systems from the US and Japan. The manipulator systems included the Meidensha BILARM 83A, Central Research Laboratories' (CRL's) Model M-2, and GCA PaR systems Model 6000. Six manipulator and control mode combinations were evaluated: (a) the BILARM in master-slave mode without force reflection; (b) the BILARM in master-slave mode with force reflection; (c) the Model M-2 in master-slave mode without force reflection; (d) the Model M-2 in master-slave mode with force reflection; (e) the BILARM with switchbox controls; and (f) the PaR 6000 with switchbox controls. The experiments also examined differences between master-slave systems with and without force reflections, and differences between master-slave systems and switchbox-controlled systems.

  18. Simulation of robot manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M.; Bills, K.C.; Kwon, D.S.; Schoenwald, D.A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s development of an environment for the simulation of robotic manipulators. Simulation includes the modeling of kinematics, dynamics, sensors, actuators, control systems, operators, and environments. Models will be used for manipulator design, proposal evaluation, control system design and analysis, graphical preview of proposed motions, safety system development, and training. Of particular interest is the development of models for robotic manipulators having at least one flexible link. As a first application, models have been developed for the Pacific Northwest Laboratories` Flexible Beam Testbed which is a one-Degree-Of-Freedom, flexible arm with a hydraulic base actuator. Initial results show good agreement between model and experiment.

  19. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions).

  20. Model based manipulator control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosky, Lyman J.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using model based control (MBC) for robotic manipulators was investigated. A double inverted pendulum system was constructed as the experimental system for a general study of dynamically stable manipulation. The original interest in dynamically stable systems was driven by the objective of high vertical reach (balancing), and the planning of inertially favorable trajectories for force and payload demands. The model-based control approach is described and the results of experimental tests are summarized. Results directly demonstrate that MBC can provide stable control at all speeds of operation and support operations requiring dynamic stability such as balancing. The application of MBC to systems with flexible links is also discussed.

  1. ELECTRONIC MASTER SLAVE MANIPULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Goertz, R.C.; Thompson, Wm.M.; Olsen, R.A.

    1958-08-01

    A remote control manipulator is described in which the master and slave arms are electrically connected to produce the desired motions. A response signal is provided in the master unit in order that the operator may sense a feel of the object and may not thereby exert such pressures that would ordinarily damage delicate objects. This apparatus will permit the manipulation of objects at a great distance, that may be viewed over a closed TV circuit, thereby permitting a remote operator to carry out operations in an extremely dangerous area with complete safety.

  2. Angiogenesis and osteogenesis in an orthopedically expanded suture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. N.; Garetto, L. P.; Potter, R. H.; Katona, T. R.; Lee, C. H.; Roberts, W. E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the angiogenic and the subsequent osteogenic responses during a 96-hour time-course after sutural expansion. Fifty rats were divided into: (1) a control group that received only angiogenic induction through injection of 5 ng/gm recombinant human endothelial cell growth factor (rhECGF); (2) an experimental group that received orthopedic expansion and rhECGF; (3) a sham group that received expansion and sodium chloride (NaCl) injection; and (4) a baseline group that received no expansion or injection. All rats were injected with 3H-thymidine (1.0 microCi/gm) 1 hour before death to label the DNA of S-phase cells. Demineralized sections (4 microm thick) were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Angiogenesis and cell migration were analyzed with a previously established cell kinetics model. Analysis of variance was used to test the hypothesis that enhancement of angiogenesis stimulates reestablishment of osteogenic capability. Blood vessel number, area, and endothelial cell-labeled index significantly increased in experimental groups, but no difference was found between control and baseline groups. Labeled-pericyte index and activated pericyte numbers in the experimental group were also higher than in the sham groups. These results show that supplemental rhECGF enhances angiogenesis in expanded sutures but not in nonexpanded sutures. Data also suggest that pericytes are the source of osteoblasts in an orthopedically expanded suture.

  3. Restructuring the Orthopedic Resident Research Curriculum to Increase Scholarly Activity

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Laura; Bostrom, Mathias; Marx, Robert; Roberts, Timothy; Sculco, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited time and funding are challenges to meeting the research requirement of the orthopedic residency curriculum. Objective We report a reorganized research curriculum that increases research quality and productivity at our academic orthopedic medical center. Methods Changes made to the curriculum, which began in 2006 and were fully phased in by 2008, included research milestones for each training year, a built-in support structure, use of an accredited bio-skills laboratory, mentoring by National Institutes of Healthfunded scientists, and protected time to engage in required research and prepare scholarly peer-reviewed publications. Results Total grant funding of resident research increased substantially, from $15,000 in 2007 (8 graduates) to $380,000 in 2010 (9 graduates), and the number of publications also increased. The 12 residents who graduated in 2005 published 16 papers from 2000 to 2006, compared to 84 papers published by the 9 residents who graduated in 2010. The approximate costs per year included $19,000 (0.3 full-time equivalent) for an academic research coordinator; $16,000 for resident travel to professional meetings; reimbursement for 213 faculty hours; and funding for resident salaries while on the research rotation, paid through the general hospital budget. Conclusions The number of grants and peer-reviewed publications increased considerably after our residency research curriculum was reorganized to allow dedicated research time and improved mentoring and infrastructure. PMID:24455016

  4. Publication rates of papers presented at the Brazilian Orthopedic Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Gomes, Guilherme Sev; de Oliveira, Rafael Garcia; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the publication rates of the papers presented at the 2007 Brazilian Orthopedics Meeting (Congresso Brasileiro de Ortopedia - CBOT). METHODS: Evaluation of the proportion of abstracts submitted by the various orthopedic subspecialties and according to the Brazilian states. Then, a Lilacs and PubMed search was performed in order to determine which presentations generated national or international published papers. RESULTS: So Paulo and the Southeast region were responsible for the greatest number of presentations at the congress (54.1% and 68.3% respectively). Shoulder and Elbow were the subspecialty responsible for more presentations (13.8%). Among the 653 studies presented at the congress, 174 (26.6%) were published. Oral presentations obtained a publication rate 3.58 times higher than posters. CONCLUSION: The CBOT publication rate is lower than 30%. Many of the papers presented at the CBOT does not pass the scrutiny of scientific journals and therefore should not be the only source of scientific update of the participants: Descriptive Epidemiologic. PMID:24453684

  5. Orthopedic tissue regeneration: cells, scaffolds, and small molecules.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ok Hee; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Orthopedic tissue regeneration would benefit the aging population or patients with degenerative bone and cartilage diseases, especially osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. Despite progress in surgical and pharmacological interventions, new regenerative approaches are needed to meet the challenge of creating bone and articular cartilage tissues that are not only structurally sound but also functional, primarily to maintain mechanical integrity in their high load-bearing environments. In this review, we discuss new advances made in exploiting the three classes of materials in bone and cartilage regenerative medicine-cells, biomaterial-based scaffolds, and small molecules-and their successes and challenges reported in the clinic. In particular, the focus will be on the development of tissue-engineered bone and cartilage ex vivo by combining stem cells with biomaterials, providing appropriate structural, compositional, and mechanical cues to restore damaged tissue function. In addition, using small molecules to locally promote regeneration will be discussed, with potential approaches that combine bone and cartilage targeted therapeutics for the orthopedic-related disease, especially osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. PMID:26625850

  6. Citrate-based Biodegradable Injectable hydrogel Composites for Orthopedic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Dipendra; Nair, Parvathi; Kim, Harry K.W.; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have confirmed that natural bone apatite crystals are bound with citrate-rich molecules. Citrates on apatite crystals impact bone development and its load-bearing function. However, such understanding has never been translated into bone biomaterials design. Herein, a first citrate-based injectable composite material for orthopedic applications is developed based on our recently developed biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol) maleate citrate (PEGMC) and hydroxyapatite (HA). PEGMC contains rich carboxylic groups that could chelate with calcium-containing HA thus facilitating polymer/HA interactions, similar to natural citrate-bound apatite crystal. The crosslinking of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) with PEGMC/HA composites allows an addition control over degradation and mechanical properties of the crosslinked PEGMC/HA (CPEGMC/HA) composites. CPEGMC/HA composite can serve as an ideal injectable cell carrier as confirmed by the enhanced DNA content, ALP activity, and calcium production through a human fetal osteoblast encapsulation study. Ex vivo study on porcine femoral head demonstrated that PEGMC/HA is a potentially promising injectable biodegradable bone material for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Development of biodegradable citrate-based injectable PEGMC/HA composite is an initial step for the development of the next generation of bone tissue engineering and orthopedic biomaterials. PMID:23977427

  7. Breed susceptibility for developmental orthopedic diseases in dogs.

    PubMed

    LaFond, Elizabeth; Breur, Gert J; Austin, Connie C

    2002-01-01

    A large-scale epidemiological study was conducted to determine breeds at risk for 12 developmental orthopedic diseases (DODs). Developmental orthopedic diseases investigated included canine hip dysplasia (CHD); craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO); fragmented coronoid process; hypertrophic osteodystrophy; Legg-Calv-Perthes disease; osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle, caudal humeral head, femoral condyles, and talar trochlear ridges; panosteitis; patella luxation; and ununited anconeal process. Dogs that were diagnosed with any one of the diseases of interest at any of 10 veterinary teaching hospitals participating in the Veterinary Medical Database from 1986 to 1995 were included as cases. Odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated to determine risk. Frequency of diagnosis during the 10-year period ranged from 35 cases (CMO) to 10,637 cases (CHD). The number of breeds at increased risk for a disease ranged from one (CMO) to 35 (CHD). Breed susceptibility for a DOD may suggest a genetic component in the disease etiology. The results of this study serve to increase veterinarians' awareness of breeds susceptible to DODs and may facilitate the control of such diseases by identifying breeds that might benefit from breeding programs or environmental intervention such as dietary modification. PMID:12220032

  8. Hemolysis as a clinical marker for propionibacterium acnes orthopedic infection.

    PubMed

    Nodzo, Scott R; Hohman, Donald W; Crane, John K; Duquin, Thomas R

    2014-05-01

    Determining if a Propionibacterium acnes culture is a true infection or a contaminant remains a challenge. We conducted a study to distinguish between a true infection and a contaminated culture based on the P acnes hemolytic phenotype and clinical presentation. All P acnes strains were from orthopedic patients who had undergone arthroplasty or nonarthroplasty shoulder procedures. Hemolysis was determined according to P acnes growth on brucella blood agar plates after 48 to 72 hours. Each patient record that corresponded to the obtained P acnes strains was retrospectively reviewed for clinical data. An orthopedic surgeon involved in the care of the patients, but blinded to the hemolytic status of the bacteria, classified these infections as definite, likely, or unlikely. Of the 22 P acnes strains, 13 were hemolytic, and 9 were nonhemolytic. Of the 13 hemolytic strains, 10 were definite infections; only 3 of the 9 nonhemolytic strains were definite infections. Mean (SD) C-reactive protein level was significantly higher (P = .03) in the hemolytic group, 16 (11) mg/mL, than in the nonhemolytic group, 7.9 (10) mg/mL. A hemolytic phenotype of P acnes may represent a more pathogenic strain of bacteria, and may be more likely to be found in patients with a definite infection with P acnes rather than a contaminated culture. PMID:24839635

  9. The Orthopedically Disabled Child: Psychological Implications with an Individual Basis. July 1984 Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This study describes the implications of the Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler and field theory associated with Kurt Lewin in understanding orthopedically disabled children and points out that orthopedically disabled youngsters have a remarkable range of individual differences both in type of disability as well as level of adjustment.

  10. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Orthopedic Specialist, Classroom Course 10-13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX. Health Care Research Div.

    These military-developed curriculum materials for a course for orthopedic specialists are targeted for students from grades 11 through the adult level. The course is designed to provide a working knowledge of the application of casts, traction, and splints to orthopedic patients and the removal of these devices; a working knowledge of assisting in

  11. Age, Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, Body Composition, and Incidence of Orthopedic Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Effects of age, physical activity, physical fitness, and body mass index (BMI) on the occurrence of orthopedic problems were examined. For men, physical fitness, BMI, and physical activity were associated with orthopedic problems; for women, physical activity was the main predictor. Age was not a factor for either gender. (JD)

  12. Guidelines for the Implementation of Programs for Pupils Who Are Orthopedically Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Robert S.; Fusco, Carol B.

    Guidelines are provided for the development of programs in South Carolina for orthopedically handicapped (OH) pupils. Basic information is given concerning the definition of orthopedic handicap, the legal mandates on the education of OH pupils, funding sources, authorized programs (whether self-contained programs, resource rooms, or itinerant

  13. Kinematically redundant robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baillieul, J.; Hollerbach, J.; Brockett, R.; Martin, D.; Percy, R.; Thomas, R.

    1987-01-01

    Research on control, design and programming of kinematically redundant robot manipulators (KRRM) is discussed. These are devices in which there are more joint space degrees of freedom than are required to achieve every position and orientation of the end-effector necessary for a given task in a given workspace. The technological developments described here deal with: kinematic programming techniques for automatically generating joint-space trajectories to execute prescribed tasks; control of redundant manipulators to optimize dynamic criteria (e.g., applications of forces and moments at the end-effector that optimally distribute the loading of actuators); and design of KRRMs to optimize functionality in congested work environments or to achieve other goals unattainable with non-redundant manipulators. Kinematic programming techniques are discussed, which show that some pseudo-inverse techniques that have been proposed for redundant manipulator control fail to achieve the goals of avoiding kinematic singularities and also generating closed joint-space paths corresponding to close paths of the end effector in the workspace. The extended Jacobian is proposed as an alternative to pseudo-inverse techniques.

  14. Manipulating the Gradient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaze, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a cooperative learning, group lab for a Calculus III course to facilitate comprehension of the gradient vector and directional derivative concepts. The lab is a hands-on experience allowing students to manipulate a tangent plane and empirically measure the effect of partial derivatives on the direction of optimal ascent. (Contains 7…

  15. Door breaching robotic manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenfeld, Erik; Parrington, Lawrence; von Muehlen, Stephan

    2008-04-01

    As unmanned systems become more commonplace in military, police, and other security forces, they are tasked to perform missions that the original hardware was not designed for. Current military robots are built for rough outdoor conditions and have strong inflexible manipulators designed to handle a wide range of operations. However, these manipulators are not well suited for some essential indoor tasks, including opening doors. This is a complicated kinematic task that places prohibitively difficult control challenges on the robot and the operator. Honeybee and iRobot have designed a modular door-breaching manipulator that mechanically simplifies the demands upon operator and robot. The manipulator connects to the existing robotic arm of the iRobot PackBot EOD. The gripper is optimized for grasping a variety of door knobs, levers, and car-door handles. It works in conjunction with a compliant wrist and magnetic lock-out mechanism that allows the wrist to remain rigid until the gripper has a firm grasp of the handle and then bend with its rotation and the swing of the door. Once the door is unlatched, the operator simply drives the robot through the doorway while the wrist compensates for the complex, multiple degree-of-freedom motion of the door. Once in the doorway the operator releases the handle, the wrist pops back into place, and the robot is ready for the next door. The new manipulator dramatically improves a robot's ability to non-destructively breach doors and perform an inspection of a room's content, a capability that was previously out of reach of unmanned systems.

  16. Validity of subjective smoking status in orthopedic patients

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Daniel; Haubruck, Patrick; Boxriker, Sonja; Korff, Sebastian; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Moghaddam, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this level 1 diagnostic study, we analyzed the validity of subjective smoking status and, as secondary research question, the smoking cessation adherence in orthopedic patients during a routine hospital stay of nonunion patients by measuring serum cotinine. Methods We included patients undergoing revision surgery due to nonunion of long bones. Patients were interviewed about their smoking status. Blood samples were taken from all the patients prior to surgery and for an additional 6 weeks following surgery. Serum levels of cotinine were measured, and coherence between subjective smoking status and objective cotinine analysis was evaluated. Results Between March 2012 and August 2014, we enrolled 136 patients. Six of the 26 previous smokers (23%) and four of the 65 nonsmokers (6%) had serum cotinine above cutoff levels. In self-labeled smokers, serum cotinine levels averaged at 2,367.414,885.9 ng/mL (with a median of 100 ng/mL), whereas in previous smokers the levels averaged at 4,27019,619.4 ng/mL (with a median of 0 ng/mL) and in the nonsmokers group the levels averaged at 1253.9 ng/mL (with a median of 0.03 ng/mL). Overall, the subjective smoking status matched serum cotinine testing in 88% of the cases. Sensitivity was 79.6% and specificity was 93.1%. Ninety-one percent of the patients with preoperative positive serum values were still positive at follow-up. Conclusion In this study, we could show that subjective smoking status in orthopedic patients is predominantly reliable as validated by objective cotinine measurements; however, patients who declare themselves as previous smokers are at elevated risk for underreporting continued smoking and patients who smoked preoperatively are at high risk for continuing their habit. In the future, caregivers should consider introducing effective treatments for smoking cessation to smokers and furthermore offer effective treatments to maintain smoking cessation in previous smokers during their routine consultation prior to orthopedic and trauma surgery. PMID:26345646

  17. Cultural Nuance in Orthopedic Foreign Aid: Differences in Patient Concerns.

    PubMed

    Kavolus, Joseph J; Ritter, Merrill A; Claverie, J Guillermo; Salas, Marcos D; Kavolus, Christopher H; Trousdale, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic aid to developing nations is expanding and becoming a unique facet of the specialty. This investigation seeks to compare patient impressions and concerns regarding the care patients receive as part of an itinerant surgical aid trip in 2 nations. In 2013 and 2014, patients from 2 separate nations completed a Likert scale survey assessing impressions of the care they received at the hands of a surgical team from abroad. Mean response scores were calculated and compared using a t test. This is the first investigation to compare patient concerns across 2 nations in a surgical aid trip setting. The results highlight the importance of culture in understanding patients and the impressions of the care they receive. PMID:26350258

  18. Dominance of foreign citations in Brazilian orthopedics journals???

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Renan Kleber Costa; Yamaki, Vitor Nagai; Rosa, Rita de Cssia Rodrigues; de Barros, Rui Sergio Monteiro; Botelho, Nara Macedo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether there is any preference for citing journals from other countries to the detriment of Brazilian journals, in three Brazilian orthopedics journals. Methods All the references of articles published in 2011 by the journals Acta Ortopdica Brasileira, Coluna/Columna and Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia were evaluated to as certain how many of these came from Brazilian journals and how many from foreign journals. Results 3813 references distributed among 187 articles were analyzed. Out of this total, 306 (8.02%) were from Brazilian journals. There was no difference between the three journals analyzed. There were 76 articles (40.64%) without any citations of articles in Brazilian journals and only two articles (1%) cited more Brazilian articles than articles published elsewhere. Conclusion There is a need for Brazilian researchers to cite articles from Brazilian journals more often. PMID:26229879

  19. ADVANCES IN THE USE OF STEM CELLS IN ORTHOPEDICS

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Narazaki, Douglas Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Primordial cells or stem cells are multipotent undifferentiated cells with the capacity to originate any type of cell in the organism. They may have their origins in the blastocyst and thus are classified as embryonic, or tissues developed in fetuses, newborns or adults and thus are known as somatic stem cells. Bone marrow is one of the main locations for isolating primordial cells, and there are two lineages: hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells. There are several uses for these undifferentiated cells in orthopedics, going from cartilaginous lesions in osteoarthrosis, osteochondritis dissecans and patellar chondromalacia, to bone lesions like in pseudarthrosis or bone losses, or nerve lesions like in spinal cord trauma. Studying stem cells is probably the most promising field of study of all within medicine, and this is shortly going to revolutionize all medical specialties (both clinical and surgical) and thus provide solutions for diseases that today are difficult to deal with.

  20. Barriers to the clinical translation of orthopedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher H

    2011-12-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been the subject of increasingly intensive research for over 20 years, and there is concern in some quarters over the lack of clinically useful products despite the large sums of money invested. This review provides one perspective on orthopedic applications from a biologist working in academia. It is suggested that the delay in clinical application is not atypical of new, biologically based technologies. Some barriers to progress are acknowledged and discussed, but it is also noted that preclinical studies have identified several promising types of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenetic signals, which, although not optimal, are worth advancing toward human trials to establish a bridgehead in the clinic. Although this transitional technology will be replaced by more sophisticated, subsequent systems, it will perform valuable pioneering functions and facilitate the clinical development of the field. Some strategies for achieving this are suggested. PMID:21682607

  1. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sulieman, A; Alzimami, K; Habeeballa, B; Osman, H; Abdelaziz, I; Sassi, S A; Sam, A K

    2015-06-01

    This study intends to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) and (ii) Dynamic Cannula Screw (DCS) and to evaluate entrance surface Air kerma (ESAK) dose and organ doses and effective doses. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used. The mean patients' doses were 0.46mGy and 0.07mGy for DHS and DCS procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69mGy and 1.21mGy per procedure. The mean organ and effective dose for patients and staff were higher in DHS compared to DCS. Orthopedic surgeons were exposed to unnecessary radiation doses due to the lack of protection measures. The radiation dose per hip procedure is within the safety limit and less than the previous studies. PMID:25557979

  2. Microradiographic microsphere manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Russell M.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for radiographic characterization of small hollow spherical members (microspheres), constructed of either optically transparent or opaque materials. The apparatus involves a microsphere manipulator which holds a batch of microspheres between two parallel thin plastic films for contact microradiographic characterization or projection microradiography thereof. One plastic film is translated to relative to and parallel to the other to roll the microspheres through any desired angle to allow different views of the microspheres.

  3. Microradiographic microsphere manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, R.M.

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for radiographic characterization of small hollow spherical members (microspheres), constructed of either optically transparent or opaque materials. The apparatus involves a microsphere manipulator which holds a batch of microspheres between two parallel thin plastic films for contact microradiographic characterization or projection microradiography thereof. One plastic film is translated relative to and parallel to the other to roll the microspheres through any desired angle to allow different views of the microspheres.

  4. MANIPULATOR FOR SLAVE ROBOT

    DOEpatents

    Goertz, R.C.; Grimson, J.H.; Kohut, F.A.

    1961-04-01

    A remote-control manipulator comprising two stationary master units, two slave units on a movable vehicle, and electrical connections between the master and slave units is reported. The slave units are side by side with a minimum over-all width, which is made feasible by an arrangement of transducers producing most movements of each slave unit to one side of the support of said slave unit.

  5. Manipulation force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Feder, J.

    1999-06-01

    The manipulation force microscope is a novel atomic force microscope adapted to measuring the force necessary to displace micron-size samples adhering to surfaces. It has successfully characterized the adhesion of both proteins and living cells to substrates. This instrument enables measurement of samples not previously accessible to atomic force microscopes. Here, we give a detailed account of this new method, and report on computer simulations and models to assist the interpretation of data.

  6. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  7. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  8. Welding nozzle position manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L. (inventor); Gutow, David A. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a welding nozzle position manipulator. The manipulator consists of an angle support to which the remaining components of the device are attached either directly or indirectly. A pair of pivotal connections attach a weld nozzle holding link to the angle support and provide a two axis freedom of movement of the holding link with respect to the support angle. The manipulator is actuated by a pair of adjusting screws angularly mounted to the angle support. These screws contact a pair of tapered friction surfaces formed on the upper portion of the welding nozzle holding link. A spring positioned between the upper portions of the support angle and the holding link provides a constant bias engagement between the friction surfaces of the holding link and the adjustment screws, so as to firmly hold the link in position and to eliminate any free play in the adjustment mechanism. The angular relationships between the adjustment screws, the angle support and the tapered friction surfaces of the weld nozzle holding link provide a geometric arrangement which permits precision adjustment of the holding link with respect to the angle support and also provides a solid holding link mount which is resistant to movement from outside forces.

  9. Osteochondromas originating from unusual locations complicating orthopedic discipline: case series.

    PubMed

    Gkku?, Kemal; Atmaca, Halil; Sa?ta?, Ergin; Saylik, Murat; Aydin, Ahmet Turan

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report clinical, radiological, and follow-up results of seven cases of extraordinary located osteochondromas and highlight the importance of rare and unusual properties of unusual locations of osteochondromas. Seven patients with extraordinary located osteochondromas were treated in our institution (Antalya Memorial Hospital) between the period of February 2009 and March 2014 were reported. The patients were classified according to the localization, symptomatology, and the presence of neurovascular involvement or organ compression. The results were discussed with the existing literature data. Five of our patients had unusual symptomatology. Surgical excision was performed on six of seven patients. One patient was followed with scheduled outpatient visits alone. Our clinical follow-up results were good to excellent. In our case series, one patient with clavicular involvement had impaired shoulder mechanic which resulted in painful shoulder, while another with pubic ramus involvement had obstructive urination symptoms and dysuria. One patient with scapular involvement had snapping scapula symptoms, while two patients with fibular head involvement had peroneal nerve compression and tibial nerve compression symptoms in each. One patient with ischial ramus involvement had sciatica, whereas another with first rib involvement had radiological evidences for subclavian artery compression due to osteochondroma without any symptom. Based our experience, the flat bones which are usually ossified by intramembranous type of ossification during the fetal period (including the scapula, ilium, pubic ramus, ischium ramus, ribs and clavicle) are much less commonly affected and often have unusual symptoms. The osteochondromas originating from the fibular head may seem innocent to an orthopedic surgeon. However, an orthopedic surgeon should be alert to tibiofibular synostosis and nerve compression in this patient population. PMID:26165714

  10. Epidural nalbuphine for postoperative analgesia in orthopedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Attri, Joginder Pal; Bala, Anju; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Ahuja, Deepti; Kaur, Sawinder

    2015-01-01

    Background: The challenging task of postoperative pain relief comes within the realm of the anesthesiologist. Combined spinal epidural (CSE) anesthesia can be used as the sole technique for carrying out surgical procedures and managing postoperative pain using various drug regimes. Epidural administration of opioids in combination with local anesthetic agents in low dose offers new dimensions in the management of postoperative pain. Aims: Comparative evaluation of bupivacaine hydrochloride with nalbuphine versus bupivacaine with tramadol for postoperative analgesia in lower limb orthopedic surgeries under CSE anesthesia to know the quality of analgesia, incidence of side effects, surgical outcome and level of patient satisfaction. Settings and Design: A prospective, randomized and double-blind study was conducted involving 80 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II coming for elective lower limb orthopedic surgeries carried under spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Anesthesia was given with 0.5% of 2.5 ml bupivacaine intrathecally in both the groups. Epidurally 0.25% bupivacaine along with 10 mg nalbuphine (group A) or tramadol 100 mg (group B) diluted to 2 ml to make a total volume of 10 ml was administered at sensory regression to T10. Statistical Analysis: The data were collected, compiled and statistically analyzed with the help of MS Excel, EPI Info 6 and SPSS to draw the relative conclusions. Results and Conclusions: The mean duration of analgesia in group A was 380 11.49 min and in group B was 380 9.8 min. The mean sedation score was found to be more in group B than group A. The mean patient satisfaction score in group A was 4.40 0.871 and in group B was 3.90 1.150 which was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). We concluded that the addition of nalbuphine with bupivacaine was effective for postoperative analgesia in terms of quality of analgesia and patient satisfaction score as compared to tramadol. PMID:26712968

  11. Orthopedic specialty hospitals: centers of excellence or greed machines?

    PubMed

    Badlani, Neil; Boden, Scott; Phillips, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Orthopedic specialty hospitals have recently been the subject of debate. They are patient-centered, physician-friendly health care alternatives that take advantage of the economic efficiencies of specialization. Medically, they provide a higher quality of care and increase patient and physician satisfaction. Economically, they are more efficient and profitable than general hospitals. They also positively affect society through the taxes they pay and the beneficial aspects of the competition they provide to general hospitals. Their ability to provide a disruptive innovation to the existing hospital industry will lead to lower costs and greater access to health care. However, critics say that physician ownership presents potential conflicts of interest and leads to overuse of medical care. Some general hospitals are suffering as a result of unfair specialty hospital practices, and a few drastic medical complications have occurred at specialty hospitals. Specialty hospitals have been scrutinized for increasing the inequality of health care and continue to be a target of government regulations. In this article, the pros and cons are examined, and the Emory Orthopaedics and Spine Hospital is analyzed as an example. Orthopedic specialty hospitals provide excellent care and are great assets to society. Competition between specialty and general hospitals has provided added value to patients and taxpayers. However, physicians must take more responsibility in their appropriate and ethical leadership. It is critical to recognize financial conflicts of interest, disclose ownership, and act ethically. Patient care cannot be compromised. With thoughtful and efficient leadership, specialty hospitals can be an integral part of improving health care in the long term. PMID:22385456

  12. Hydroxyapatite-nanotube composites and coatings for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Debrupa

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has received wide attention in orthopedics, due to its biocompatibility and osseointegration ability. Despite these advantages, the brittle nature and low fracture toughness of HA often results in rapid wear and premature fracture of implant. Hence, there is a need to improve the fracture toughness and wear resistance of HA without compromising its biocompatibility. The aim of the current research is to explore the potential of nanotubes as reinforcement to HA for orthopedic implants. HA- 4 wt.% carbon nanotube (CNT) composites and coatings are synthesized by spark plasma sintering and plasma spraying respectively, and investigated for their mechanical, tribological and biological behavior. CNT reinforcement improves the fracture toughness (>90%) and wear resistance (>66%) of HA for coating and free standing composites. CNTs have demonstrated a positive influence on the proliferation, differentiation and matrix mineralization activities of osteoblasts, during in-vitro biocompatibility studies. In-vivo exposure of HA-CNT coated titanium implant in animal model (rat) shows excellent histocompatibility and neobone integration on the implant surface. The improved osseointegration due to presence of CNTs in HA is quantified by the adhesion strength measurement of single osteoblast using nano-scratch technique. Considering the ongoing debate about cytotoxicity of CNTs in the literature, the present study also suggests boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) as an alternative reinforcement. BNNT with the similar elastic modulus and strength as CNT, were added to HA. The resulting composite having 4 wt.% BNNTs improved the fracture toughness (85%) and wear resistance (75%) of HA in the similar range as HA-CNT composites. BNNTs were found to be non-cytotoxic for osteoblasts and macrophages. In-vitro evaluation shows positive role of BNNT in osteoblast proliferation and viability. Apatite formability of BNNT surface in 4 days establishes its osseointegration ability.

  13. Controlled release of antibiotics from coated orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Price, J S; Tencer, A F; Arm, D M; Bohach, G A

    1996-03-01

    Chronic osteomyelitis is one of the most serious complications of orthopedic open fracture treatment. The objective of this study was to develop a biodegradable implant coating with impregnated antibiotics as an adjunct to current therapy. We used a polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer (PLGA) as the biodegradable carrier and gentamicin as the antibiotic. Our objectives were to establish elution characteristics of the antibiotic from the polymer, and determine if the coated orthopedic implants would inhibit bacterial growth in vitro. In the elution study, coated implants were incubated in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 37 degrees C and sampled daily for gentamicin levels. The in vitro model consisted of test tubes containing Mueller-Hinton culture broth inoculated with 5 x 10(6) cfu of Staphylococcus aureus and incubated at 37 degrees C. The implants were switched to a new set of inoculated tubes each day. Tubes were sampled for colony counting to determine bactericidal effects. Implant coatings consisted of 40 mg of gentamicin as a 20% mixture with PLGA. The elution curve showed an average level of 138 micrograms/mL over 15 days. This local concentration would be more than adequate to kill susceptible organisms. The in vitro study showed a significant reduction in bacterial growth in the test tubes containing coated implants. Control tubes averaged 2.5 x 10(8) cfu/mL of S.aureus over 24 days. Coated implant tubes averaged 0.9 cfu/mL. This was a reduction of greater than 99.999% (p < 0.0001). This study showed that a thin biodegradable implant coating can be developed with bactericidal activity against the organisms frequently associated with osteomyelitis in cases of open fractures. PMID:8698690

  14. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoino, Jos; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Purtolas, Sergio; Lpez, Enrique; Mateo, Jess; Gracia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect correlation of the different structures, in any region of the human body. Authors have developed a mixed technique, joining the use of a three-dimensional laser scanner Roland Picza captured together with computed tomography (CT) and 3D CT images, to achieve a perfect reproduction of the anatomy. Finite element (FE) simulation lets us know the biomechanical changes that take place after hip prostheses or osteosynthesis implantation and biological responses of bone to biomechanical changes. The simulation models are able to predict changes in bone stress distribution around the implant, so allowing preventing future pathologies. The development of a FE model of lumbar spine is another interesting application of the simulation. The model allows research on the lumbar spine, not only in physiological conditions but also simulating different load conditions, to assess the impact on biomechanics. Different degrees of disc degeneration can also be simulated to determine the impact on adjacent anatomical elements. Finally, FE models may be useful to test different fixation systems, i.e., pedicular screws, interbody devices or rigid fixations compared with the dynamic ones. We have also developed models of lumbar spine and hip joint to predict the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures, based on densitometric determinations and specific biomechanical models, including approaches from damage and fracture mechanics. FE simulations also allow us to predict the behavior of orthopedic splints applied to the correction of deformities, providing the recovering force-displacement and angle-moment curves that characterize the mechanical behavior of the splint in the overall range of movement. PMID:22550621

  15. SPECT/CT imaging in general orthopedic practice.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Stephen

    2009-09-01

    The availability of hybrid devices that combine the latest single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging technology with multislice computed tomography (CT) scanning has allowed us to detect subtle, nonspecific abnormalities on bone scans and interpret them as specific focal areas of pathology. Abnormalities in the spine can be separated into those caused by pars fractures, facet joint arthritis, or osteophyte formation on vertebral bodies. Compression fractures can be distinguished from severe degenerative disease, both of which can cause intense activity across the spine on either planar or SPECT imaging. Localizing activity in patients who have had spinal fusion can provide tremendous insight into the causes of therapeutic failures. Infections of the spine now can be diagnosed with gallium SPECT/CT, despite the fact that gallium has long been abandoned because of its failure to detect spine infection on either planar or SPECT imaging. Small focal abnormalities in the feet and ankles can be localized well enough to make specific orthopedic diagnoses on the basis of their location. Moreover, when radiographic imaging provides equivocal or inadequate information, SPECT/CT can provide a road map for further diagnostic studies and has been invaluable in planning surgery. Our ability to localize activity within a bone or at an articular surface has allowed us to distinguish between fractures and joint disease. Increased activity associated with congenital anomalies, such as tarsal coalition and Bertolotti's syndrome have allowed us to understand the pathophysiology of these conditions, to confirm them as the cause of the patient's symptoms, and to provide information that is useful in determining appropriate clinical management. As our experience broadens, SPECT/CT will undoubtedly become an important tool in the evaluation and management of a wider variety of orthopedic patients. PMID:19646556

  16. Insights into Avicennas knowledge of the science of orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Dalfardi, Behnam; Yarmohammadi, Hassan; Meibodi, Mohammad Kalantari

    2014-01-01

    The art of orthopedics traces its history back to ancient civilizations like those of the Egyptians. The evolution of this branch of medicine is indebted to investigations of many scientists, including Greek, Roman and Persian scholars. The Persian physician Avicenna (980-1037 AD) is one such scientist who investigated different aspects of orthopedics. It is possible to analyze Avicennas knowledge of orthopedics and his contributions to this branch of medicine by an examination of his epic encyclopedia of medicine, Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine). PMID:24649417

  17. Spatial manipulation with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Benjamin; Levchenko, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical gradients convey information through space, time, and concentration, and are ultimately capable of spatially resolving distinct cellular phenotypes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. How these gradients develop, evolve, and function during development, homeostasis, and various disease states is a subject of intense interest across a variety of disciplines. Microfluidic technologies have become essential tools for investigating gradient sensing in vitro due to their ability to precisely manipulate fluids on demand in well-controlled environments at cellular length scales. This review will highlight their utility for studying gradient sensing along with relevant applications to biology. PMID:25905100

  18. Spatial Manipulation with Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Benjamin; Levchenko, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical gradients convey information through space, time, and concentration, and are ultimately capable of spatially resolving distinct cellular phenotypes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. How these gradients develop, evolve, and function during development, homeostasis, and various disease states is a subject of intense interest across a variety of disciplines. Microfluidic technologies have become essential tools for investigating gradient sensing in vitro due to their ability to precisely manipulate fluids on demand in well-controlled environments at cellular length scales. This review will highlight their utility for studying gradient sensing along with relevant applications to biology. PMID:25905100

  19. Single Molecule Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2011-10-01

    Single-molecule manipulation studies open a door for a close-up investigation of complex biological interactions at the molecular level. In these studies, single biomolecules are pulled while their force response is being monitored. The process is often nonequilibrium, and interpretation of the results has been challenging. We used the atomic force microscope to pull proteins and DNA, and determined the equilibrium properties of the molecules using the recently derived nonequilibrium work theorem. I will present applications of the technique in areas ranging from fundamental biological problems such as DNA mechanics, to complex medical processes such as the mechanical activation of von Willebrand Factor, a key protein in blood coagulation.

  20. Manipulation of thermal phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chung-Hao

    Developing materials that can conduct electricity easily, but block the motion of phonons is necessary in the applications of thermoelectric devices, which can generate electricity from temperature differences. In converse, a key requirement as chips get faster is to obtain better ways to dissipate heat. Controlling heat transfer in these crystalline materials devices --- such as silicon --- is important. The heat is actually the motion or vibration of atoms known as phonons. Finding ways to manipulate the behavior of phonons is crucial for both energy applications and the cooling of integrated circuits. A novel class of artificially periodic structured materials --- phononic crystals --- might make manipulation of thermal phonons possible. In many fields of physical sciences and engineering, acoustic wave propagation in solids attracts many researchers. Wave propagation phenomena can be analyzed by mathematically solving the acoustic wave equation. However, wave propagation in inhomogeneous media with various geometric structures is too complex to find an exact solution. Hence, the Finite Difference Time Domain method is developed to investigate these complicated problems. In this work, the Finite-Difference Time-Domain formula is derived from acoustic wave equations based on the Taylor's expansion. The numerical dispersion and stability problems are analyzed. In addition, the convergence conditions of numerical acoustic wave are stated. Based on the periodicity of phononic crystal, the Bloch's theorem is applied to fulfill the periodic boundary condition of the FDTD method. Then a wide-band input signal is used to excite various acoustic waves with different frequencies. In the beginning of the calculation process, the wave vector is chosen and fixed. By means of recording the displacement field and taking the Fourier transformation, we can obtain the eigenmodes from the resonance peaks of the spectrum and draw the dispersion relation curve of acoustic waves. With the large investment in silicon nanofabrication techniques, this makes tungsten/silicon phononic crystal a particularly attractive platform for manipulating thermal phonons. Phononic crystal makes use of the fundamental properties of waves to create band gap over which there can be no propagation of acoustic waves in the crystal. This crystal can be applied to deterministically manipulate the phonon dispersion curve affected by different crystal structures and to modify the phonon thermal conductivity accordingly. We can expect this unique metamaterial is a promising route to creating unprecedented thermal properties for highly-efficient energy harvesting and thermoelectric cooling.

  1. Performance measurement of mobile manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostelman, Roger; Hong, Tsai; Marvel, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a concept for measuring the reproducible performance of mobile manipulators to be used for assembly or other similar tasks. An automatic guided vehicle with an onboard robot arm was programmed to repeatedly move to and stop at a novel, reconfigurable mobile manipulator artifact (RMMA), sense the RMMA, and detect targets on the RMMA. The manipulator moved a laser retroreflective sensor to detect small reflectors that can be reconfigured to measure various manipulator positions and orientations (poses). This paper describes calibration of a multi-camera, motion capture system using a 6 degree-of-freedom metrology bar and then using the camera system as a ground truth measurement device for validation of the reproducible mobile manipulator's experiments and test method. Static performance measurement of a mobile manipulator using the RMMA has proved useful for relatively high tolerance pose estimation and other metrics that support standard test method development for indexed and dynamic mobile manipulator applications.

  2. Biomechanical and bioactivity concepts of polyetheretherketone composites for use in orthopedic implants-a review.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Mohamed Ruslan; Goharian, Amirhossein; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Wahit, Mat Uzir

    2015-11-01

    The use of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composites in the trauma plating system, total replacement implants, and tissue scaffolds has found great interest among researchers. In recent years (2008 afterward), this type of composites has been examined for suitability as substitute material over stainless steel, titanium alloys, ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, or even biodegradable materials in orthopedic implant applications. Biomechanical and bioactivity concepts were contemplated for the development of PEEK orthopedic implants and a few primary clinical studies reported the clinical outcomes of PEEK-based orthopedic implants. This study aims to review and discuss the recent concepts and contribute further concepts in terms of biomechanical and bioactivity challenges for the development of PEEK and PEEK composites in orthopedic implants. PMID:25856801

  3. Global research coaching in orthopedic surgery: seeding for an international network

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ana Paula Bonilauri; Rajgor, Dimple; Shah, Jatin; Shah, Anand; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance of delivering evidence-based health care, orthopedic surgeons have directed fewer efforts towards the generation of such evidence. Even when present, published evidence lacks methodological rigor and is known to be inaccurate. One of the main reasons for the lack of generation of quality evidence, and the low involvement in research among orthopedic surgeons, is the lack of structured research coaching environments where they can learn concepts and hone their research skills. There is a palpable need for a pragmatic and outcome-oriented approach that can equip orthopedic surgeons with effective ways of communicating their research in writing. We describe a pragmatic research coaching program, designed and developed by the Research on Research group, which aims to build a global network of orthopedic researchers trained in streamlined and standardized research methods. We also provide a brief overview of the course principles and tools, and the platforms used in this program. PMID:24453591

  4. 78 FR 17940 - Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... COMMISSION Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof..., Software, Implants, and Components Thereof, DN 2945; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public... devices, software, implants, and components thereof. The complaint names as respondents Stanmore...

  5. Rational design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bing; Xie, Jingwei; Jiang, Jiang; Shuler, Franklin D; Bartlett, David E

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews recent significant advances in the design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It begins with a brief introduction on the limitations of current approaches for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It then illustrates that rationally designed scaffolds made up of electrospun nanofibers could be a promising solution to overcome the problems that current approaches encounter. The article also discusses the intriguing properties of electrospun nanofibers, including control of composition, structures, orders, alignments and mechanical properties, use as carriers for topical drug and/or gene sustained delivery, and serving as substrates for the regulation of cell behaviors, which could benefit musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration. It further highlights a few of the many recent applications of electrospun nanofiber scaffolds in repairing and regenerating various orthopedic tissues. Finally, the article concludes with perspectives on the challenges and future directions for better design, fabrication and utilization of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue engineering. PMID:23987110

  6. Nanophase hydroxyapatite coatings for dental and orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Michiko

    In order to improve dental and orthopedic implant performance, the objective of this study was to synthesize nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) powders to coat metals (specifically, titanium and tantalum). Precipitated HA powders were either sintered in order to produce UltraCaP HA (or microcrystalline size HA) or were treated hydrothermally to produce nanocrystalline HA. Some of the UltraCaP and nanocrystalline HA powders were doped with yttrium (Y) since previous in vitro studies demonstrated that Y-doped HA in bulk improved osteoblast (or bone-forming cell) function over undoped HA. The nanocrystalline HA powders were also mixed with nanophase titania powders because previous studies demonstrated that titania/HA composite coatings increased coating adhesive strength and HA nucleation. These powders were then deposited onto titanium by a novel room-temperature process, called IonTiteT(TM). The results demonstrated that the chemical properties and crystallite size of the original HA powders were maintained in the coatings. More importantly, in vitro studies showed increased osteoblast (bone-forming cell) adhesion on the single phase nanocrystalline HA and nano-titania/HA coatings compared to traditionally used plasma-sprayed HA coatings and uncoated metals. Results further demonstrated greater amounts of calcium deposition by osteoblasts cultured on nanocrystalline HA coatings compared to UltraCaP coatings and conventionally used plasma-sprayed HA coatings. To elucidate mechanisms that influenced osteoblast functions on the HA coatings, the amount of proteins (fibronectin and vitronectin) onto the HA powders and the adsorbed fibronectin conformation were investigated. Exposure of cell integrin binding domains (in fibronectin III10 segments) was greater in fibronectin adsorbed onto 1.2 mole% Y-doped UltraCaP HA coatings compared to nanocrystalline HA coatings tested. However, 1.2 mole% Y-doped UltraCaP HA coatings did not increase mineralization by osteoblasts compared to the nanocrystalline HA coatings. These results suggested that the availability of integrin binding domains in fibronectin did not correlate to enhanced mineralization by osteoblasts on nanocrystalline HA coatings. Lastly, undoped nanocrystalline HA coatings were studied using a well-established rat calvaria in vivo. Histological analysis showed that nanocrystalline HA coated on tantalum scaffolds increased bone and fibrous tissue infiltration into the scaffolds while uncoated and UltraCaP HA coated scaffolds did not after as early as 6 weeks. In summary, these results encourage further studies on nanocrystalline IonTiteTM HA coatings on various metals for orthopedic and dental applications.

  7. Do Astronauts Havbe a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions Than a Cohort of Working Professionals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murray, J. D.; Young, M.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.; Tarver, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated [1], but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  8. Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Love, L.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL`s flexible/prismatic test stand.

  9. Biofilm Disrupting Technology for Orthopedic Implants: What’s on the Horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Connaughton, Alexander; Childs, Abby; Dylewski, Stefan; Sabesan, Vani J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of orthopedic implants in joints has revolutionized the treatment of patients with many debilitating chronic musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the introduction of foreign material into the human body predisposes the body to infection. The treatment of these infections has become very complicated since the orthopedic implants serve as a surface for multiple species of bacteria to grow at a time into a resistant biofilm layer. This biofilm layer serves as a protectant for the bacterial colonies on the implant making them more resistant and difficult to eradicate when using standard antibiotic treatment. In some cases, the use of antibiotics alone has even made the bacteria more resistant to treatment. Thus, there has been surge in the creation of non-antibiotic anti-biofilm agents to help disrupt the biofilms on the orthopedic implants to help eliminate the infections. In this study, we discuss infections of orthopedic implants in the shoulder then we review the main categories of anti-biofilm agents that have been used for the treatment of infections on orthopedic implants. Then, we introduce some of the newer biofilm disrupting technology that has been studied in the past few years that may advance the treatment options for orthopedic implants in the future. PMID:25705632

  10. Academic characteristics of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with high school, collegiate, and professional teams.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Buza, John A; Byram, Ian; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a study to determine the academic involvement and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians at high school, college, and professional levels of sport. Through Internet and telephone queries, we identified 1054 team physicians from 362 institutions, including 120 randomly selected high schools and colleges and 122 professional teams (baseball, basketball, football, hockey). For all physicians included in the study, we performed a comprehensive search of the Internet and of a citation database to determine academic affiliations, number of publications, and h-index values. Of the 1054 physicians, 678 (64%) were orthopedic surgeons. Percentage of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with an academic medical center was highest in professional sports (64%; 173/270) followed by collegiate sports (36%; 98/275) and high school sports (20%; 27/133). Median number of publications per orthopedic team physician was significantly higher in professional sports (30.6) than in collegiate sports (10.7) or high school sports (6). Median number of publications by orthopedic physicians also varied by sport, with the highest number in Major League Baseball (37.9; range, 0-225) followed by the National Basketball Association (32.0; range, 0-227) and the National Football League (30.4; range, 0-460), with the lowest number within the National Hockey League (20.7; range, 0-144). Academic affiliation and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians vary by competition level and professional sporting league. PMID:26566551

  11. Greater osteoblast functions on multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown from anodized nanotubular titanium for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Yao, Chang; Xiao, Xingcheng; Sheldon, Brian W.; Webster, Thomas J.

    2007-09-01

    Titanium (Ti) is the most widely implanted orthopedic material. However, current formulations of Ti have an average orthopedic implant functional lifetime of only 10-15 years. While there are many reasons why orthopedic implants fail, one is a lack of initial and sustained integration into juxtaposed bone. To improve the cytocompatibility properties of Ti for orthopedic applications, parallel multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown from the pores of anodized nanotubular Ti by a chemical vapor deposition process in the present study. The results of this study provided evidence, for the first time, that osteoblast (bone forming cell) functions (specifically, alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition) were significantly greater on CNTs grown from anodized Ti than on anodized Ti without CNTs and currently-used Ti in orthopedics for up to 21 days. In summary, this study showed that bone growth could possibly be enhanced on currently-used Ti implants with protruding CNTs and, thus, they should be further studied for orthopedic applications.

  12. Snow Catastrophe Conditions: What is its Impact on Orthopedic Injuries?

    PubMed Central

    Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Karimi-Mobarakeh, Mahmoud; Kazemnejad, Ehsan; Saheb-Ekhtiari, Khashayar; Hashemi-Motlagh, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Iran places sixth amongst high risk natural disaster countries and Guilan province of Iran shoulders a large amount of socio-economic burden due to snow catastrophes. The more knowledge of circumstances we have, the more efficient our future encounters will be. Methods: In this retrospective study, of all of the patients admitted to Poursina Hospital due to snow and ice related trauma in the first two weeks of February 2014, 306 cases were found eligible for entry into the present study. Results: Of the 306 eligible patients (383 injuries), there were 175 men (57.2%) and 131 women (42.8%). Most patients suffered from orthopedic injuries (81%) and the most common fractures were distal radius fractures in the upper extremities and hip fractures in the lower extremities. Slipping was the most common and motor vehicle accidents had the rarest injury mechanisms. It was shown that the frequency of injuries were higher on icy days (67.6%) than snowy days (32.4%). Conclusions: Snow crises may lead to increased risk of slipping and falling situations, especially on icy days. The peak of injury rates is a few days after snowfall with the most common injury being distal radius fracture. Providing essential instructions and supporting resource allocation to better handle such catastrophes may improve outcomes. PMID:25207329

  13. PEEK Biomaterials in Trauma, Orthopedic, and Spinal Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, S. M.; Devine, J. N.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1980s, polyaryletherketones (PAEKs) have been increasingly employed as biomaterials for trauma, orthopedic, and spinal implants. We have synthesized the extensive polymer science literature as it relates to structure, mechanical properties, and chemical resistance of PAEK biomaterials. With this foundation, one can more readily appreciate why this family of polymers will be inherently strong, inert, and biocompatible. Due to its relative inertness, PEEK biomaterials are an attractive platform upon which to develop novel bioactive materials, and some steps have already been taken in that direction, with the blending of HA and TCP into sintered PEEK. However, to date, blended HA-PEEK composites have involved a trade-off in mechanical properties in exchange for their increased bioactivity. PEEK has had the greatest clinical impact in the field of spine implant design, and PEEK is now broadly accepted as a radiolucent alternative to metallic biomaterials in the spine community. For mature fields, such as total joint replacements and fracture fixation implants, radiolucency is an attractive but not necessarily critical material feature. PMID:17686513

  14. Proximal Femoral Fractures: What the Orthopedic Surgeon Wants to Know.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Scott E; Shyu, Jeffrey Y; Weaver, Michael J; Sodickson, Aaron D; Khurana, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Each year, more than 250,000 hip fractures occur in the United States, resulting in considerable patient mortality and morbidity. The various types of adult proximal femoral fractures require different treatment strategies that depend on a variety of considerations, including the location, morphologic features, injury mechanism, and stability of the fracture, as well as the patient's age and baseline functional status. The authors discuss femoral head, femoral neck, intertrochanteric, and subtrochanteric fractures in terms of injury mechanisms, specific anatomic and biomechanical features, and important diagnostic and management considerations, including the diagnostic utility of imaging modalities. The authors review clinically important classification systems, such as the Pipkin, Garden, Pauwels, and Evans-Jensen classification systems, with emphasis on differentiating subchondral insufficiency fractures from avascular necrosis of the femoral head and typical subtrochanteric fractures from atypical (often bisphosphonate-related) subtrochanteric fractures. In addition, the authors describe the potential complications and management strategies for each fracture type on the basis of the patient's age and physical condition. A clear understanding of these considerations allows the radiologist to better provide appropriate and relevant diagnostic information and management guidance to the orthopedic surgeon. PMID:26186669

  15. Hydroxyapatite electrodeposition on anodized titanium nanotubes for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcharoen, Yardnapar; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat; Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Termsuksawad, Preecha

    2014-08-01

    Nanotubes modification for orthopedic implants has shown interesting biological performances (such as improving cell adhesion, cell differentiation, and enhancing osseointegration). The purpose of this study is to investigate effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube feature on performance of hydroxyapatite-coated titanium (Ti) bone implants. TiO2 nanotubes were prepared by anodization using ammonium fluoride electrolyte (NH4F) with and without modifiers (PEG400 and Glycerol) at various potential forms, and times. After anodization, the nanotubes were subsequently annealed. TiO2 nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. The amorphous to anatase transformation due to annealing was observed. Smooth and highly organized TiO2 nanotubes were found when high viscous electrolyte, NH4F in glycerol, was used. Negative voltage (-4 V) during anodization was confirmed to increase nanotube thickness. Length of the TiO2 nanotubes was significantly increased by times. The TiO2 nanotube was electrodeposited with hydroxyapatite (HA) and its adhesion was estimated by adhesive tape test. The result showed that nanotubes with the tube length of 560 nm showed excellent adhesion. The coated HA were tested for biological test by live/dead cell straining. HA coated on TiO2 nanotubes showed higher cells density, higher live cells, and more spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells than that growing on titanium plate surface.

  16. Why medical students choose orthopedic surgery as a specialty?

    PubMed

    Erraji, Moncef; Kharraji, Abdessamad; Abbasi, Najib; Najib, Abdeljawad; Yacoubi, Hicham

    2015-01-01

    Before the crisis announced the Moroccan surgery, the objectives of this study were to analyze the choice of specialties newly appointed to the internal review and the guidance of medical students and to determine the factors influencing this choice. Data on specialty choice students were analyzed and a questionnaire was offered to students of Morocco at the beginning of academic year 2013-20014 The form consisted of questions on the year of study. sex, professional guidelines and reasons for choice. candidates were male, the average age of our residents was 28 years. We also noted the importance of the passage as well as external service trauma. Care provided to patients, lifestyle and income reported by 85% of respondents to be the most important factors to pursue orthopedics as a career. The TR-Orth is now a specialty that responds to a positive choice. The choice of TR-Orth by students at the end of medical school curriculum is reinforced by teaching and practicing the specialty during the internship. The overall training is unsatisfactory overall. Students would deepen in some areas. This study confirms that there is currently a shift in trauma surgery, mostly induced by an a priori negative for particular workloads. PMID:26185556

  17. The Top 100 Cited Articles in Clinical Orthopedic Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Suresh K; Dein, Eric J; Spiker, Andrea M; Bernard, Johnathan A; Zikria, Bashir A

    2015-08-01

    Orthopedic sports medicine continues to evolve, owing much of its clinical management and practice to rigorous academic research. In this review, we identify and describe the top 100 cited articles in clinical sports medicine and recognize the authors and institutions driving the research. We collected articles (excluding basic science, animal, and cadaveric studies) from the 25 highest-impact sports medicine journals and analyzed them by number of citations, journal, publication date, institution, country, topic, and author. Mean number of citations was 408 (range, 229-1629). The articles were published in 7 journals, most in the 1980s to 2000s, and represented 15 countries. Thirty topics were addressed, with a heavy emphasis on anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction, knee rating systems, rotator cuff reconstruction, and chondrocyte transplantation. The 3 most cited articles, by Insall and colleagues, Constant and Murley, and Tegner and Lysholm, addressed a knee, a shoulder, and another knee rating system, respectively. Several authors contributed multiple articles. The Hospital for Special Surgery and the University of Bern contributed the most articles (5 each). This study provides a comprehensive list of the past century's major academic contributions to sports medicine. Residents and fellows may use this list to guide their scholarly investigations. PMID:26251939

  18. Studies of host response to orthopedic implants and biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, S; Takagi, M; Gmez-Barrena, E; Nevalainen, J; Lassus, J; Salo, J; Konttinen, Y T

    1999-01-01

    The use of implanted biomaterials in orthopedic surgery has increased rapidly during the past two decades. Total joint replacement of the hip or knee joint has become common treatment; at the same time, an increasing number of fractures are treated with osteosynthesis. The original Charnley low-friction arthroplasty of the hip is still widely used and gives in large series excellent results. Aseptic loosening of this arthroplasty has been thought to be due to wear debris of the methylmethacrylate used for fixation of the implants, or to debris generated from wear of the polyethylene socket. To date, many different materials have been tried in order to reduce wear and generation of macrophage irritating submicron sized particles, or to provide more biocompatible components. However, trials to improve the methylmethacrylate cement or to invent better polyethylenes have often failed. Diamond coating of the metallic components seems promising: there is less wear and diamond is very biocompatible in bulk and small particulate form. Biodegradable implants have also been found useful in treating fractures. Bioactive bioabsorbable materials may also make possible a tissue engineering approach and can be used as carriers for selected drugs and cytokines. Because many promising materials and designs have failed in clinical use, extensive theoretical and experimental testing is mandatory before introducing new materials and implants in a clinical setting. PMID:10537589

  19. Infection Mitigation Efficacy of Photoactive Titania on Orthopedic Implant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed; Hershey, Ryan; Aboelzahab, Asem; Goel, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    In order to impede infection and achieve accelerated wound healing in the postorthopaedic surgery patients, a simple and benign procedure for creating nanotubular or nanofibrillar structure of photoactive TiO2 on the surface of Ti plates and wires is described. The nanoscale TiO2 films on titanium were grown by hydrothermal processing in one case and by anodization in the presence of dilute mineral acids under mild and benign conditions in the other. Confocal microscopy results demonstrated at least 50% reduction in the population of E. coli colonies (concentration 2.15 × 107 cells/mL) on TiO2-coated implants upon an IR exposure of up to 30 s; it required ∼20 min of exposure to UV beam for the same effect. These findings suggest the probability of eliminating wound infection during and after orthopedic surgical procedures by brief illumination of photoactive titania films on the implants with an IR beam. PMID:21994891

  20. Substance P and Acute Pain in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lisowska, Barbara; Siewruk, Katarzyna; Lisowski, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a limited information about the role of Substance P (SP) in acute pain nociception following surgical stimulation in patients with a chronic inflammatory state not to mention the link between this neuropeptide level changes and intensity of pain. The goal of the research was to find the correlation between SP level changes and acute pain intensity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. Material and Methods Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were enrolled in the study. The correlation between acute pain intensity and concentration of SP in serum as well as in drainage fluid from postoperative wound was assessed in patients with RA who underwent Total Knee Replacement (TKA) under spinal anesthesia. Results In patients with RA a correlation between intensity of acute pain and serum SP was found postoperatively, whereas there was no correlation between intensity of acute pain and concentration of SP in drainage fluid. Conclusions 1. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP serum concentration was found postoperatively in patients with RA. 2. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP concentration in drainage fluid was not found postoperatively in patients with RA. PMID:26731421

  1. Parametric Analysis of Orthopedic Screws in Relation to Bone Density

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Elisabetta M; Salaorno, Massimiliano; Grasso, Giovanni; Audenino, Alberto L

    2009-01-01

    A global study of geometry and material properties of orthopedic screws was performed, considering not only the effect of each single factor (screw pitch, number of threads, fillet angle, etc.) but also their interactions with respect to bone density. The stress patterns resulting from different screw geometries and bone densities were analyzed using finite element techniques, taking into account different levels of osseointegration between the screw and the bone. These numerical models where validated through experimental pull-out tests, where a pull out force of 120 N produced localized failure of the last thread (stresses above 0.42 MPa). The results of the numerical simulations were then summarised using a multi-factorial parametric analysis. This demonstrated the great relevance of the interaction between bone density and screw pitch, showing that the optimal screw pitch can vary by more than 25% for different densities (0.35 g/cm3 and 0.47 g/cm3, respectively). The parameters calculated by means of the multi-factorial analysis allow the pull out force to be estimated for different osseointegration levels, different screw geometries and material properties, and for different bone densities. The final objective is to determine the best choice of implant for each individual patient. PMID:19587807

  2. Ion manipulation device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Baker, Erin M

    2014-09-16

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area.

  3. Interactive protein manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  4. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T. (3927 Almon Dr., Martinez, GA 30907)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm.

  5. Advanced servo manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Holt, W.E.; Kuban, D.P.; Martin, H.L.

    1988-10-25

    An advanced servo manipulator has modular parts. Modular motor members drive individual input gears to control shoulder roll, shoulder pitch, elbow pitch, wrist yaw, wrist pitch, wrist roll, and tong spacing. The modules include a support member, a shoulder module for controlling shoulder roll, and a sleeve module attached to the shoulder module in fixed relation thereto. The shoulder roll sleeve module has an inner cylindrical member rotatable relative to the outer cylindrical member, and upon which a gear pod assembly is mounted. A plurality of shafts are driven by the gears, which are in turn driven by individual motor modules to transmit rotary power to control elbow pitch as well as to provide four different rotary shafts across the bendable elbow joint to supply rotary motive power to a wrist member and tong member. 41 figs.

  6. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1993-11-23

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm. 6 figures.

  7. Advanced servo manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Holt, William E. (Knoxville, TN); Kuban, Daniel P. (Oak Ridge, TN); Martin, H. Lee (Knoxville, TN)

    1988-01-01

    An advanced servo manipulator has modular parts. Modular motor members drive individual input gears to control shoulder roll, shoulder pitch, elbow pitch, wrist yaw, wrist pitch, wrist roll, and tong spacing. The modules include a support member, a shoulder module for controlling shoulder roll, and a sleeve module attached to the shoulder module in fixed relation thereto. The shoulder roll sleeve module has an inner cylindrical member rotatable relative to the outer cylindrical member, and upon which a gear pod assembly is mounted. A plurality of shafts are driven by the gears, which are in turn driven by individual motor modules to transmit rotary power to control elbow pitch as well as to provide four different rotary shafts across the bendable elbow joint to supply rotary motive power to a wrist member and tong member.

  8. Liquid Propellant Manipulated Acoustically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Chato, David J.; Mann, Adin, III

    2003-01-01

    Fluids are difficult to manage in the space environment. Without gravity, the liquid and gas do not always remain separated as they do in the 1g environment of Earth. Instead the liquid and gas volumes mix and migrate under the influence of surface tension, thermodynamic forces, and external disturbances. As a result, liquid propellants may not be in a useable location or may even form a chaotic mix of liquid and gas bubbles. In the past, mechanical pumps, baffles, and a variety of specialized passive devices have been used to control the liquid and gas volumes. These methods need to be carefully tuned to a specific configuration to be effective. With increasing emphasis on long-term human activity in space there is a trend toward liquid systems that are more flexible and provide greater control. We are exploring new methods of manipulating liquids by using the nonlinear acoustic effects achieved by using beams of highly directed high-intensity acoustic waves.

  9. A History of Manipulative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pettman, Erland

    2007-01-01

    Manipulative therapy has known a parallel development throughout many parts of the world. The earliest historical reference to the practice of manipulative therapy in Europe dates back to 400 BCE. Over the centuries, manipulative interventions have fallen in and out of favor with the medical profession. Manipulative therapy also was initially the mainstay of the two leading alternative health care systems, osteopathy and chiropractic, both founded in the latter part of the 19th century in response to shortcomings in allopathic medicine. With medical and osteopathic physicians initially instrumental in introducing manipulative therapy to the profession of physical therapy, physical therapists have since then provided strong contributions to the field, thereby solidifying the profession's claim to have manipulative therapy within in its legally regulated scope of practice. PMID:19066664

  10. Torque-Limiting Manipulation Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moetteli, John B. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A device for manipulating a workpiece in space includes a fixture, a stanchion assembly, a manipulation mechanism, an actuation mechanism, and a reaction mechanism. The fixture has an end onto which the workpiece affixes. The stanchion assembly has an upper and a lower end. The manipulation mechanism connects the fixture and the upper end of the stanchion assembly. The lower end of the stanchion assembly mounts, via probe and a socket, to a structure. The actuation mechanism operably connects to the manipulation mechanism, and moves the fixture in space. The reaction mechanism provides a point through which force inputs into the actuation mechanism may react.

  11. Manipulation hardware for microgravity research

    SciTech Connect

    Herndon, J.N.; Glassell, R.L.; Butler, P.L.; Williams, D.M. ); Rohn, D.A. . Lewis Research Center); Miller, J.H. )

    1990-01-01

    The establishment of permanent low earth orbit occupation on the Space Station Freedom will present new opportunities for the introduction of productive flexible automation systems into the microgravity environment of space. The need for robust and reliable robotic systems to support experimental activities normally intended by astronauts will assume great importance. Many experimental modules on the space station are expected to require robotic systems for ongoing experimental operations. When implementing these systems, care must be taken not to introduce deleterious effects on the experiments or on the space station itself. It is important to minimize the acceleration effects on the experimental items being handled while also minimizing manipulator base reaction effects on adjacent experiments and on the space station structure. NASA Lewis Research Center has been performing research on these manipulator applications, focusing on improving the basic manipulator hardware, as well as developing improved manipulator control algorithms. By utilizing the modular manipulator concepts developed during the Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed an experimental testbed system called the Microgravity Manipulator, incorporating two pitch-yaw modular positioners to provide a 4 dof experimental manipulator arm. A key feature in the design for microgravity manipulation research was the use of traction drives for torque transmission in the modular pitch-yaw differentials.

  12. Manipulating and Visualizing Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.

    2003-12-05

    ProteinShop Gives Researchers a Hands-On Tool for Manipulating, Visualizing Protein Structures. The Human Genome Project and other biological research efforts are creating an avalanche of new data about the chemical makeup and genetic codes of living organisms. But in order to make sense of this raw data, researchers need software tools which let them explore and model data in a more intuitive fashion. With this in mind, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Davis, have developed ProteinShop, a visualization and modeling program which allows researchers to manipulate protein structures with pinpoint control, guided in large part by their own biological and experimental instincts. Biologists have spent the last half century trying to unravel the ''protein folding problem,'' which refers to the way chains of amino acids physically fold themselves into three-dimensional proteins. This final shape, which resembles a crumpled ribbon or piece of origami, is what determines how the protein functions and translates genetic information. Understanding and modeling this geometrically complex formation is no easy matter. ProteinShop takes a given sequence of amino acids and uses visualization guides to help generate predictions about the secondary structures, identifying alpha helices and flat beta strands, and the coil regions that bind them. Once secondary structures are in place, researchers can twist and turn these pre-configurations until they come up with a number of possible tertiary structure conformations. In turn, these are fed into a computationally intensive optimization procedure that tries to find the final, three-dimensional protein structure. Most importantly, ProteinShop allows users to add human knowledge and intuition to the protein structure prediction process, thus bypassing bad configurations that would otherwise be fruitless for optimization. This saves compute cycles and accelerates the entire process, so that more and larger problems can be attempted. Currently, the program designers are working to make ProteinShop more applicable and adaptable to different protein folding methodologies. If users could manipulate structures from a biological point of view, and then put them back in the queue for more optimization, the process of experimentation and discovery in protein research could be greatly enhanced. The group is also investigating the use of stereoscopic rendering and three-dimensional input devices to remove the limitations of a two-dimensional interface. Clearly, protein-folding research will have far-reaching ramifications. It could lead to new insights about diseases ranging from Alzheimer's to Cystic fibrosis, which scientists believe are caused by protein folding gone wrong. A better understanding of protein structures could also lead to the engineering of altogether new proteins, and shed light on how drugs bind proteins to alter their structure and function. Above all, ProteinShop is an important tool that will help scientists unravel one of the most challenging problems that theoretical and computational chemistry has to offer.

  13. Embryo manipulation and experimentation.

    PubMed

    Warren, M A

    1991-09-01

    I have argued that early human embryos are not human beings, and do not have normal rights. Like human sperm and ova, they are both alive and biologically human. However, they lack the physiological development necessary to sustain a capacity for sentience. If Ford is right, then they are not yet individual human organisms. But the more important point is that their lack of a capacity for sentience makes them inappropriate candidates for the ascription of moral rights. Thus, research on human embryos produced in vitro is not a wrong against them--at least so long as experimentally manipulated embryos are not returned to the womb, or artificially gestated to a stage at which they might become sentient. Some of the more difficult issues about embryo experimentation involve the rights of women as experimental subject and donors. The consent of both male and female gamete donors should normally be required for the production or experimental use of IVF embryos. (Possible exceptions might include cases in which one or both progenitors have died, and the survivor or other responsible family member wished to donate the (frozen) IVF embryos for research or other uses.) However, it is women's rights that are most apt to be endangered, for example, if the large scale therapeutic or commercial use of human embryos leads to a demand for large numbers of ova. Thus, it is vital that researchers and policy-makers heed feminist concerns about embryo research and the new biomedical technologies it may yield. Given adequate information and appropriate procedural protections, women are capable of making autonomous decisions about donating ova or embryos for biomedical research. But regulatory safeguards are needed to ensure against their being coerced, deceived, or manipulated into becoming ovum or embryo donors. As Daniel Callahan has detailed, biomedical technology has reached the point where we can no longer afford to provide everyone with all of the innovative therapies that might prove beneficial (Callahan, 1989, p 523). Thus, questions about the just and cost-effective distribution of medical resources will become increasingly difficult and important. Among these questions will be whether it is wise or just to invest large sums in the development of innovative methods of assisting human reproduction. We must also consider the interests of future persons who may suffer because of the methods used to bring them into existence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1954730

  14. R + C Factors and Sacro Occipital Technique Orthopedic Blocking: a pilot study using pre and post VAS assessment

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The concept of a systematic or predictive relationship between distant vertebral levels distinct from accumulative functional compensatory mechanisms, such as in scoliosis, has been perpetuated within chiropractic technique systems based on clinical observation and experience. This study seeks to investigate this relationship between the cervical and lumbar vertebrae. Methods: Patients (experimental group n=26 and control group n=12) were selected from the patient base of one office, and were limited to patients that had sensitivity at specific cervical reflex points. Using a pre and post outcome measurement and sacro occipital technique R + C protocols, the related lumbar vertebra was adjusted in the direction indicated by the cervical vertebral sensitivity. Results: Statistical analysis revealed there was a statistically significant difference between pre- and post-VAS measurements and found that the notable difference in mean change in VAS scores were statistically significantly different between the experimental and control groups (p < .001). Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that further research into cervical and lumbar vertebra interrelationships, and the efficacy of orthopedic block treatment, may be warranted. Further studies are needed to confirm whether a causal relationship exists between lumbar manipulation and decreased cervical spine sensitivity. PMID:26136605

  15. Orthopedic manifestations in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome) enrolled in the Hunter Outcome Survey

    PubMed Central

    Link, Bianca; de Camargo Pinto, Louise Lapagesse; Giugliani, Roberto; Wraith, James Edmond; Guffon, Nathalie; Eich, Elke; Beck, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome) is a rare, inherited disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. As a result of this deficiency, glycosaminoglycans accumulate in lysosomes in many tissues, leading to progressive multisystemic disease. The cardiopulmonary and neurological problems associated with MPS II have received considerable attention. Orthopedic manifestations are common but not as well characterized. This study aimed to characterize the prevalence and severity of orthopedic manifestations of MPS II and to determine the relationship of these signs and symptoms with cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system involvement. Orthopedic manifestations of MPS II were studied using cross-sectional data from the Hunter Outcome Survey (HOS). The HOS is a global, physician-led, multicenter observational database that collects information on the natural history of MPS II and the long-term safety and effectiveness of enzyme replacement therapy. As of January 2009, the HOS contained baseline data on joint range of motion in 124 males with MPS II. In total, 79% of patients had skeletal manifestations (median onset, 3.5 years) and 25% had abnormal gait (median onset, 5.4 years). Joint range of motion was restricted for all joints assessed (elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and ankle). Extension was the most severely affected movement: the exception to this was the shoulder. Surgery for orthopedic problems was rare. The presence of orthopedic manifestations was associated with the presence of central nervous system and pulmonary involvement, but not so clearly with cardiovascular involvement. Orthopedic interventions should be considered on an individual-patient basis. Although some orthopedic manifestations associated with MPS II may be managed routinely, a good knowledge of other concurrent organ system involvement is essential. A multidisciplinary approach is required. PMID:21808707

  16. A citric acid-based hydroxyapatite composite for orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hongjin; Yang, Jian; Kodali, Pradeep; Koh, Jason; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2006-12-01

    We describe a novel approach to process bioceramic microparticles and poly(diol citrates) into bioceramic-elastomer composites for potential use in orthopedic surgery. The composite consists of the biodegradable elastomer poly(1,8-octanediol-citrate) (POC) and the bioceramic hydroxyapatite (HA). The objective of this work was to characterize POC-HA composites and assess the feasibility of fabricating tissue fixation devices using machining and molding techniques. The mechanical properties of POC-HA composites with HA (40, 50, 60, 65wt.%) were within the range of values reported for tissue fixation devices (for POC-HA 65wt.%, S(b)=41.4+/-3.1, E(b)=501.7+/-40.3, S(c)=74.6+/-9.0, E(c)=448.8+/-27.0, S(t)=9.7+/-2.3, E(t)=334.8+/-73.5, S(s)=27.7+/-2.4, T(s)=27.3+/-4.9, all values in MPa). At 20 weeks, the weight loss of POC-HA composites ranged between 8 and 12wt.%, with 65wt.% HA composites degrading the slowest. Exposure of POC-HA to simulated body fluid resulted in extensive mineralization in the form of calcium phosphate with Ca/P of 1.5-1.7 similar to bone. POC-HA supported osteoblast adhesion in vitro and histology results from POC-HA samples that were implanted in rabbit knees for 6 weeks suggest that the composite is biocompatible. Synthesis of POC-HA is easy and inexpensive, does not involve harsh solvents or initiators, and the mechanical properties of POC-HA with 65wt.% HA are suitable for the fabrication of potentially osteoconductive bone screws. PMID:16919720

  17. Chitosan for gene delivery and orthopedic tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Rosanne; O'Brien, Fergal J; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy involves the introduction of foreign genetic material into cells in order exert a therapeutic effect. The application of gene therapy to the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is extremely promising as the controlled release of therapeutic proteins such as bone morphogenetic proteins have been shown to stimulate bone repair. However, there are a number of drawbacks associated with viral and synthetic non-viral gene delivery approaches. One natural polymer which has generated interest as a gene delivery vector is chitosan. Chitosan is biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic. Much of the appeal of chitosan is due to the presence of primary amine groups in its repeating units which become protonated in acidic conditions. This property makes it a promising candidate for non-viral gene delivery. Chitosan-based vectors have been shown to transfect a number of cell types including human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Aside from its use in gene delivery, chitosan possesses a range of properties that show promise in tissue engineering applications; it is biodegradable, biocompatible, has anti-bacterial activity, and, its cationic nature allows for electrostatic interaction with glycosaminoglycans and other proteoglycans. It can be used to make nano- and microparticles, sponges, gels, membranes and porous scaffolds. Chitosan has also been shown to enhance mineral deposition during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss the use of chitosan as a gene delivery vector with emphasis on its application in orthopedic tissue engineering. PMID:23676471

  18. Corrosion behavior of a welded stainless-steel orthopedic implant.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, L; Lerf, R; Eschler, P Y; Meyer, J M

    2001-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of combinations of materials used in an orthopedic implant: the spherical part (forged or forged and annealed) constituting the head, the weld (tungsten inert gas (TIG) or electron beam (EB) techniques), and the cylindrical part (annealed) constituting the shaft of a femoral prosthesis - has been investigated. Open-circuit potentials, potentiodynamic curves, Tafel slope, mixed potential theory and susceptibility to intergranular attack are electrochemical and chemical procedures selected for this work. Electrochemical measurements using a microelectrode have been made in the following zones: spherical part, cylindrical part, weld, and weld/sphere, and weld/shaft interfaces. To detect intergranular attack, the Strauss test has been used. At the interfaces, corrosion currents, measured (Icorr) and predicted (Icouple) are low, in the order of the pico- to nanoampere. The electrochemical behavior of the electron beam (EB) weld is better than that of the tungsten inert gas (TIG). Welds at interfaces can behave either anodically or cathodically. It is better if welds, which are sensitive parts of the femoral prosthesis, behave cathodically. In this way, the risk of starting localized corrosion (pitting, crevice or intergranular corrosion) from a galvanic couple, remains low. From this point of view, the sample with the EB weld offers the best behavior. All the other samples containing a TIG type of weld exhibit a less favorable behavior. The mechanical treatments (forged, and forged and annealed) of the steel sphere did not show any difference in the corrosion behavior. No intergranular corrosion has been observed at the weld/steel interface for unsensitized samples. With sensitized samples, however, a TIG sample has exhibited some localized intergranular corrosion at a distance of 500 microm along the weld/stainless steel (sphere) interface. PMID:11197502

  19. Modeling Manipulation in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Jason I.

    2010-01-01

    As residents and medical students progress through their medical training, they are presented with multiple instances in which they feel they must manipulate the healthcare system and deceive others in order to efficiently treat their patients. This, however, creates a culture of manipulation resulting in untoward effects on trainees' ethical and

  20. Modeling Manipulation in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Jason I.

    2010-01-01

    As residents and medical students progress through their medical training, they are presented with multiple instances in which they feel they must manipulate the healthcare system and deceive others in order to efficiently treat their patients. This, however, creates a culture of manipulation resulting in untoward effects on trainees' ethical and…

  1. Image Manipulation: Then and Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Ronald E.

    The images of photography have been manipulated almost from the moment of their discovery. The blending together in the studio and darkroom of images not found in actual scenes from life has been a regular feature of modern photography in both art and advertising. Techniques of photograph manipulation include retouching; blocking out figures or

  2. Smart Hand For Manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Paolo

    1987-10-01

    Sensor based, computer controlled end effectors for mechanical arms are receiving more and more attention in the robotics industry, because commonly available grippers are only adequate for simple pick and place tasks. This paper describes the current status of the research at JPL on a smart hand for a Puma 560 robot arm. The hand is a self contained, autonomous system, capable of executing high level commands from a supervisory computer. The mechanism consists of parallel fingers, powered by a DC motor, and controlled by a microprocessor embedded in the hand housing. Special sensors are integrated in the hand for measuring the grasp force of the fingers, and for measuring forces and torques applied between the arm and the surrounding environment. Fingers can be exercised under position, velocity and force control modes. The single-chip microcomputer in the hand executes the tasks of communication, data acquisition and sensor based motor control, with a sample cycle of 2 ms and a transmission rate of 9600 baud. The smart hand described in this paper represents a new development in the area of end effector design because of its multi-functionality and autonomy. It will also be a versatile test bed for experimenting with advanced control schemes for dexterous manipulation.

  3. Advanced teleoperators. [remote manipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced teleoperators are discussed, with emphasis on the remote manipulation system designed to perform such actions as grasping, orienting, moving, placing, and inserting objects. Geometrical performance dimensions are considered, indicating that a manipulator is limited to three-orders-of-magnitude ratio of workspace extension to positioning accuracy. The control system is examined, showing that a manipulative task requires coordination of several joints, with the relationship between the task definers and the joint variables given by complex trigonometrical transformations. Control modes developed in the last 30 years are noted, including program controlled industrial 'robots' which can endlessly repeat a fixed sequence of motions without operator intervention, and the sensor-referenced/computer-controlled mode manipulators. Advanced proximity sensor systems are taken into account, with emphasis on the applications of the force-torque and slip models. The proximity sensor system for the shuttle-size manipulator is described.

  4. Dexterous Manipulation: Making Remote Manipulators Easy to Use

    SciTech Connect

    HARRIGAN, RAYMOND W.; BENNETT, PHIL C.

    2001-11-01

    Perhaps the most basic barrier to the widespread deployment of remote manipulators is that they are very difficult to use. Remote manual operations are fatiguing and tedious, while fully autonomous systems are seldom able to function in changing and unstructured environments. An alternative approach to these extremes is to exploit computer control while leaving the operator in the loop to take advantage of the operator's perceptual and decision-making capabilities. This report describes research that is enabling gradual introduction of computer control and decision making into operator-supervised robotic manipulation systems, and its integration on a commercially available, manually controlled mobile manipulator.

  5. Manipulability, force, and compliance analysis for planar continuum manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravagne, Ian A.; Walker, Ian D.

    2002-01-01

    Continuum manipulators, inspired by the natural capabilities of elephant trunks and octopus tentacles, may find niche applications in areas like human-robot interaction, multiarm manipulation, and unknown environment exploration. However, their true capabilities will remain largely inaccessible without proper analytical tools to evaluate their unique properties. Ellipsoids have long served as one of the foremost analytical tools available to the robotics researcher, and the purpose of this paper is to first formulate, and then to examine, three types of ellipsoids for continuum robots: manipulability, force, and compliance.

  6. Parametric study of orthopedic insole of valgus foot on partial foot amputation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-Chao; Wang, Li-Zhen; Chen, Wei; Du, Cheng-Fei; Mo, Zhong-Jun; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-06-01

    Orthopedic insole was important for partial foot amputation (PFA) to achieve foot balance and avoid foot deformity. The inapposite insole orthosis was thought to be one of the risk factors of reamputation for foot valgus patient, but biomechanical effects of internal tissues on valgus foot had not been clearly addressed. In this study, plantar pressure on heel and metatarsal regions of PFA was measured using F-Scan. The three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of partial foot evaluated different medial wedge angles (MWAs) (0.0°-10.0°) of orthopedic insole on valgus foot. The effect of orthopedic insole on the internal bone stress, the medial ligament tension of ankle, plantar fascia tension, and plantar pressure was investigated. Plantar pressure on medial heel region was about 2.5 times higher than that of lateral region based on the F-Scan measurements. FE-predicted results showed that the tension of medial ankle ligaments was the lowest, and the plantar pressure was redistributed around the heel, the first metatarsal, and the lateral longitudinal arch regions when MWA of orthopedic insole ranged from 7.5° to 8.0°. The plantar fascias maintained about 3.5% of the total load bearing on foot. However, the internal stresses from foot bones increased. The simulation in this study would provide the suggestion of guiding optimal design of orthopedic insole and therapeutic planning to pedorthist. PMID:26291149

  7. Opioid use for Chronic Pain Management in Italy: Results from the Orthopedic Instant Pain Survey Project

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Guido; Cherubino, Paolo; Compagnone, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common symptom in orthopedic patients, but is managed sub-optimally, partly due to scarce opioid use in severe cases. The aim of the Orthopedic Instant Pain Survey (POIS) was to evaluate changes in pain management in Italian orthopedic practice 2 years after a legislative change (Law 38/2010) simplifying opioid access for pain control. A web-based survey on the knowledge of this law and trends observed in clinical practice for severe pain treatment was administered to 143 Italian orthopedic specialists. In total, 101 (70%) respondents showed a high level of knowledge. Nevertheless, 54.5% stated that they do not use opioids for severe osteo-articular pain management. Main barriers to opioid use are fear of adverse events (61.4%), especially nausea/vomiting and constipation, and patient resistance (29.7%). A modest knowledge of pain classification was also demonstrated. Opioid use remains very limited in Italian orthopedic practice. Physicians fear of side effects showed poor knowledge of strategies for effective management of opioid-related adverse events, such as combined oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone. Continuing educational programs could improve delivery of evidence-based pain management. PMID:25002934

  8. [Hopes for future practice of junior orthopedic surgeons in France: a sociological study].

    PubMed

    Grgory, T; Gaillard, R; Grenier, A

    2007-09-01

    Medical demographics have become a major public health issue in France since the publication of the Berlan report in 2002 which announced an upcoming shortage in the next 20 years. But demographic projections cannot be limited to an accounting of training and retirement figures. Other factors such as demographic distribution, changing societal aspirations (free time), modes and sites of occupational activities, the influence of feminization, and initial training and its effects on professional practice must be taken into consideration. The purpose of this work was to study these parameters in orthopedic and traumatology surgery. This was a sociological study designed to ascertain the aspirations of junior orthopedic surgeons. Forty-seven interns in orthopedic surgery in the Paris area were invited to complete a questionnaire in March 2003. Forty-two responded. The choice of orthopedics was an intellectual choice. The attractiveness of the specialty was particularly important during the final years of medical school. Fewer junior surgeons would rather practice in a university hospital setting, more preferring a mixed setting with a private (fees) and a public (salary) component. The desire for "free time" was particularly important. Fewer juniors wanted to practice in general hospitals. For orthopedic surgeons, private practice and payment by fees are the cornerstones of medical practice. PMID:17878833

  9. Direct Manipulation in Virtual Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Virtual Reality interfaces offer several advantages for scientific visualization such as the ability to perceive three-dimensional data structures in a natural way. The focus of this chapter is direct manipulation, the ability for a user in virtual reality to control objects in the virtual environment in a direct and natural way, much as objects are manipulated in the real world. Direct manipulation provides many advantages for the exploration of complex, multi-dimensional data sets, by allowing the investigator the ability to intuitively explore the data environment. Because direct manipulation is essentially a control interface, it is better suited for the exploration and analysis of a data set than for the publishing or communication of features found in that data set. Thus direct manipulation is most relevant to the analysis of complex data that fills a volume of three-dimensional space, such as a fluid flow data set. Direct manipulation allows the intuitive exploration of that data, which facilitates the discovery of data features that would be difficult to find using more conventional visualization methods. Using a direct manipulation interface in virtual reality, an investigator can, for example, move a data probe about in space, watching the results and getting a sense of how the data varies within its spatial volume.

  10. Manipulator control by exact linearization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruetz, K.

    1987-01-01

    Comments on the application to rigid link manipulators of geometric control theory, resolved acceleration control, operational space control, and nonlinear decoupling theory are given, and the essential unity of these techniques for externally linearizing and decoupling end effector dynamics is discussed. Exploiting the fact that the mass matrix of a rigid link manipulator is positive definite, a consequence of rigid link manipulators belonging to the class of natural physical systems, it is shown that a necessary and sufficient condition for a locally externally linearizing and output decoupling feedback law to exist is that the end effector Jacobian matrix be nonsingular. Furthermore, this linearizing feedback is easy to produce.

  11. Patient perception of Medicare reimbursement to orthopedic surgeons for THA and TKA.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Joel A; Scott, Carolyn C; Thomas, Colleen S; O'Connor, Mary I

    2013-09-01

    A survey study was performed of individuals in an orthopedic clinic waiting room regarding their knowledge of Medicare reimbursement to orthopedic surgeons for primary THA and TKA. A total of 1200 surveys were submitted by individuals (median age 64 years, 61% female, 50% with Medicare as their primary insurance and 29% having had THA or TKA). The median amount respondents felt that a reasonable fee to the orthopedic surgeon for performing THA or TKA was $5000, while they estimated the Medicare reimbursement to be much less. When asked what was the most they would be willing to pay out-of-pocket to have the surgery performed or for advanced technology related to the procedure, the median was $2000. Most respondents were willing to wait 3-7 weeks for surgery to be performed. Participants tended to value THA and TKA more relative to Medicare payments and tended to overestimate Medicare reimbursement to surgeons for THA and TKA. PMID:23891056

  12. Computer navigation in orthopedic trauma: safer surgeries with less irradiation and more precision.

    PubMed

    Akins, Ralitsa; Abdelgawad, Amr A; Kanlic, Enes M

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of patients and practitioners to ionizing radiation for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes has become the norm rather than the exception. This article discusses the findings from a literature review of intraoperative risks from ionizing radiation to patients and surgeons and the validity of substituting the conventional intraoperative fluoroscopy with computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) in orthopedic trauma surgery. Diversity of study designs and measurements exists in reporting intraoperative ionizing radiation, making direct study comparisons difficult. CAOS can effectively reduce the amount of radiation exposure. There are definite advantages and disadvantages for using CAOS in the field of orthopedic trauma. Implementation of CAOS may hold the answer to better patient and surgeon intraoperative radiation safety with decreased operative time and increased procedure precision. The increased safety for patients and surgeons is a critical consideration in recommending CAOS in trauma surgery. PMID:23327842

  13. LASER Additive Manufacturing of Titanium-Tantalum Alloy Structured Interfaces for Modular Orthopedic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, Jacob; Medlin, Dana; Carter, Michael; Sears, James; Vander Voort, George

    2015-04-01

    Tantalum is recognized to have better biocompatibility and osseointegrative properties than other more commonly used orthopedic grade alloys. There are several novel methods that tantalum or tantalum-titanium could be used to augment orthopedic implants. A tantalum or tantalum-titanium alloy at the bone/implant or modular component interfaces would substantially increase the longevity and performance of modular devices. Bonding a functional tantalum coating to a titanium orthopedic device is inherently difficult because of the small difference between the melting temperature of tantalum, 3017C, and the boiling point of titanium, 3287C. LASER powder deposition (LPD) is a fusion operation using an Nd:YAG to melt a small volume of substrate into which metal powder is sprayed achieving high temperature with a high solidification rate. LPD of Ti-Ta onto a Ti-6Al-4V substrate produced both a solid surface and structured coating with a pore size in the optimal 350-500 ?m range.

  14. Mobile Device Trends in Orthopedic Surgery: Rapid Change and Future Implications.

    PubMed

    Andrawis, John P; Muzykewicz, David A; Franko, Orrin I

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly becoming integral communication and clinical tools. Monitoring the prevalence and utilization characteristics of surgeons and trainees is critical to understanding how these new technologies can be best used in practice. The authors conducted a prospective Internet-based survey over 7 time points from August 2010 to August 2014 at all nationwide American Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited orthopedic programs. The survey questionnaire was designed to evaluate the use of devices and mobile applications (apps) among trainees and physicians in the clinical setting. Results were analyzed and summarized for orthopedic surgeons and trainees. During the 48-month period, there were 7 time points with 467, 622, 329, 223, 237, 111, and 134 responses. Mobile device use in the clinical setting increased across all fields and levels of training during the study period. Orthopedic trainees increased their use of Smartphone apps in the clinical setting from 60% to 84%, whereas attending use increased from 41% to 61%. During this time frame, use of Apple/Android platforms increased from 45%/13% to 85%/15%, respectively. At all time points, 70% of orthopedic surgeons believed their institution/hospital should support mobile device use. As measured over a 48-month period, mobile devices have become an ubiquitous tool in the clinical setting among orthopedic surgeons and trainees. The authors expect these trends to continue and encourage providers and trainees to be aware of the limitations and risks inherent with new technology. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(1):e51-e56.]. PMID:26730684

  15. The TROJAN Project: Creating a Customized International Orthopedic Training Program for Junior Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Kalraiya, Ashish; Buddhdev, Pranai

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal problems account for a vast proportion of presentations encountered by doctors globally, with figures ranging from 15-36%. However, the time medical schools allocate to learning orthopedics is by no means proportional to this. This study aims to bridge this gap by developing an international orthopedic teaching program tailored to the specific knowledge and skills required by junior doctors in different countries. This prospective study asked fifty junior doctors, who had recently completed an orthopedics job, what three orthopedic teaching topics taught retrospectively would have benefitted their clinical practice. The most requested topics were used to design educational workshops for junior doctors and these consequently comprised the TROJAN (Teaching Requested by Orthopaedic Juniors And Novices) training program. Data was collected from twenty-five junior doctors in KwaZulu-Natale State, South Africa, and twenty-five in London, UK. It is therefore in these two countries that the TROJAN program was subsequently made available. Participants who selected topics were within two years of graduating medical school and had worked an orthopedic or Accident and Emergency job within the last year. 49% of topics chosen by SA doctors were practical skills such as wrist and ankle fracture reduction techniques, and management of open fractures. The most requested topic by UK doctors (11 out of 25) was management of neck of femur fractures. This is rationalized by the fact South African doctors require more hands-on responsibility in their daily practice whereas in the UK greater emphasis is placed on optimizing patients for theatre and making sound management plans. TROJAN currently develops orthopedic skills and knowledge in junior doctors in South Africa and United Kingdom with teaching customized based upon location. Feedback has been exceptionally positive with every candidate thus far rating the usefulness of TROJAN as the highest option, very useful. PMID:25874064

  16. The TROJAN Project: Creating a Customized International Orthopedic Training Program for Junior Doctors.

    PubMed

    Kalraiya, Ashish; Buddhdev, Pranai

    2015-03-01

    Musculoskeletal problems account for a vast proportion of presentations encountered by doctors globally, with figures ranging from 15-36%. However, the time medical schools allocate to learning orthopedics is by no means proportional to this. This study aims to bridge this gap by developing an international orthopedic teaching program tailored to the specific knowledge and skills required by junior doctors in different countries. This prospective study asked fifty junior doctors, who had recently completed an orthopedics job, what three orthopedic teaching topics taught retrospectively would have benefitted their clinical practice. The most requested topics were used to design educational workshops for junior doctors and these consequently comprised the TROJAN (Teaching Requested by Orthopaedic Juniors And Novices) training program. Data was collected from twenty-five junior doctors in KwaZulu-Natale State, South Africa, and twenty-five in London, UK. It is therefore in these two countries that the TROJAN program was subsequently made available. Participants who selected topics were within two years of graduating medical school and had worked an orthopedic or Accident and Emergency job within the last year. 49% of topics chosen by SA doctors were practical skills such as wrist and ankle fracture reduction techniques, and management of open fractures. The most requested topic by UK doctors (11 out of 25) was management of neck of femur fractures. This is rationalized by the fact South African doctors require more hands-on responsibility in their daily practice whereas in the UK greater emphasis is placed on optimizing patients for theatre and making sound management plans. TROJAN currently develops orthopedic skills and knowledge in junior doctors in South Africa and United Kingdom with teaching customized based upon location. Feedback has been exceptionally positive with every candidate thus far rating the usefulness of TROJAN as the highest option, very useful. PMID:25874064

  17. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Transfusion of Allogeneic Blood in Orthopedics Patients With Intraoperative Blood Salvage

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jia-Hua; Lyu, Yi; Cheng, Li-Ming; Li, Ying-Chuan; Gou, Da-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to explore the risk factors affecting the postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in patients undergoing orthopedics surgery with intraoperative blood salvage (IBS). A retrospective study of 279 patients undergoing orthopedic surgeries with IBS from May 2013 to May 2015 was enrolled. The binary logistic regression was used to find out the risk factors associated with postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in orthopedics patients with IBS, and then receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn to determine the optimal threshold of the regression model. Single factor analysis showed that age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, preoperative hemoglobin, operation time, received autologous blood, the laying time of autologous blood, bleeding volume, and postoperative drainage volume had significant effects on postoperative allogeneic blood transfusion. In binary logistic regression analysis, the independent factors predicting orthopedic patients with IBS need to transfuse allogeneic blood after surgeries were age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.415, P = 0.006), ASA grade (OR = 2.393, P = 0.035), preoperative hemoglobin (OR = 0.532, P = 0.022), and postoperative drainage volume (OR = 4.279, P = 0.000). The area under ROC curve was 0.79 and the predicted accuracy rate of the model was 81.58%. After operation, the orthopedic patients with IBS still have a high allogeneic blood transfusion rate, and IBS is not a perfect blood protection method. The logistic regression model of our study provides a reliable prediction for postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in orthopedic patients with IBS, which have a certain reference value. PMID:26937919

  18. Building Fractal Models with Manipulatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coes, Loring

    1993-01-01

    Uses manipulative materials to build and examine geometric models that simulate the self-similarity properties of fractals. Examples are discussed in two dimensions, three dimensions, and the fractal dimension. Discusses how models can be misleading. (Contains 10 references.) (MDH)

  19. Chaos motion in robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokshin, A.; Zak, M.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that a simple two-link planar manipulator exhibits a phenomenon of global instability in a subspace of its configuration space. A numerical example, as well as results of a graphic simulation, is given.

  20. Rehabilitation and physical therapy for selected orthopedic conditions in veterinary patients.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Andrea L; Latimer, Christian; Millis, Darryl L

    2015-01-01

    A specific diagnosis is needed to perform optimal rehabilitation of orthopedic problems. A well-planned rehabilitation program is important for orthopedic patients when surgical repairs are mechanically weak (eg, when repairing fractures in skeletally immature patients or when repairing tendons or ligaments). Joint immobilization is sometimes used to protect weak surgical repairs. The duration of immobilization should be minimized, particularly in situations with potential loss of joint motion. Evidence-based information regarding specific modalities and techniques for rehabilitation of injured dogs and cats is generally lacking. The choice of modalities and techniques must be based on common sense, knowledge of rehabilitation techniques, and clinical experience. PMID:25432683

  1. Low power IC design of the Wireless Monitoring System of the Orthopedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Liu, Ming; Jia, Chen; Zhang, Chun; Wang, Zhihua

    2007-01-01

    A low power IC of the Wireless Monitoring System of the Orthopedic Implants (WMSoOI) is put forth. The analog-digital mix-mode system monitors the implant duty cycle, detects abnormal asymmetry, wear, and high amounts of force, and other conditions of the orthopedic implants. Data for diagnosis is communicated wirelessly between the embedded chip (inside body) and the remote circuit (outside body). The Radio Frequency (RF) circuits have been taped out and tested. The power circuit is presented and verified by simulation. Future work includes the test of circuits of Analog Digital Converter (ADC) and Micro control Unit (MCU) and the integrating of the entire system. PMID:18003323

  2. Do Astronauts have a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions than a Cohort of Working Professionals?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Young, Millenia; Wear, Mary L.; Tarver, W. J.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. NASA has implemented several occupational health initiatives during the past 20 years to decrease the number and severity of injuries, but the individual success rate is unknown. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated, but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. The purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  3. The PLATO PPTK System: An Alternative Keyboard Using the PLATO Computer-Based Education System for the Orthopedically Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, William J.

    Developed in response to the complex problems involved in providing equal educational opportunities for the intellectually alert orthopedically handicapped, the PLATO Programmable Terminal Keyset (PPTK) system makes the resources of PLATO compatible to the functional problems of a wide range of orthopedic conditions. This report describes the

  4. Manipulation of colloidal crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermolen, E. C. M.

    2008-11-01

    Colloidal particles (approximately a micrometer in diameter) that are dispersed in a fluid, behave thermodynamically similar to atoms and molecules: at low concentrations they form a fluid, while at high concentrations they can crystallize into a colloidal crystal to gain entropy. The analogy with molecular crystallization, combined with the easy access to real-space data (because of longer time and length scales as compared to molecules), makes this system ideal for studying crystallization and nucleation processes. Furthermore, colloidal crystals are studied because of their applicability in new developing technologies based on light: the length scale of the periodically varying refractive index in the crystals is of the same order as the wavelength of visible light, giving the possibility to open up an optical band gap, similar to the energy band gap in semiconductors. Whether or not a photonic band gap opens depends sensitively on the crystal lattice, the refractive index contrast and the quality of the colloidal crystals. Increased control over crystallization and nucleation processes can increase the tunability of the colloidal crystals and therefore increase the possibilities for producing photonic crystals. In this thesis, we present techniques to manipulate colloidal crystallization such that crystals are formed with a well-defined stacking, a low amount of defects and with a crystal lattice that is suitable for forming a 3D photonic band gap in the visible. Sedimentation of colloids on a templated surface (epitaxial growth) is combined with other external fields, such as electric fields and dielectrophoresis to reach optimal control. Using these techniques we were able to grow and dry a binary colloidal crystal with a NaCl structure. This crystal consists of two types of colloids with different sizes, which has a band gap when the dielectric contrast is inverted. Another binary colloidal crystal, with the MgCu2-structure, consists of small spheres on a pyrochlore lattice and large spheres on a diamond lattice. Both lattices can have a large photonic band gap. A procedure was designed to selectively grow the colloidal MgCu2-structure on a templated surface and photonic band structures were calculated of related dielectric and metallo-dielectric structures. Optical tweezers were used to fix a seed structure of tracer particles in the bulk of the (refractive index matched) host dispersion, inducing nucleation of the host dispersion at the seed structure. Using confocal microscopy, the effect of the seed structure on the host dispersion was studied for different configurations of the seed structure. The volume fraction of the dispersion was changed in-situ by dielectrophoretic compression. The nucleus grown on a square seed consisted of multiple domains and was non-spherical. These findings disagree with the assumptions in classical nucleation theory. Preliminary results are presented of a method, combining dielectrophoresis and epitaxial growth, to grow large oriented colloidal crystals using only a small template structure. The last chapter discusses the mechanism behind the formation of colloidal crystals by spin coating colloids from volatile media. The structure of the crystals was studied using real-space imaging and scattering techniques, demonstrating well-defined orientational correlation, but no long-range positional order.

  5. [The construction of a medical discipline and its challenges: Orthopedics in Switzerland during the 19th and 20th centuries].

    PubMed

    Kaba, Mariama

    2015-07-01

    During the 19th century, numerous figures, with different qualifications, claimed to practice orthopedics: doctors, surgeons, inventors of equipment and instruments, and other empiricists. They performed certain types of techniques, massages, surgical operationsand/or fitted prostheses. The polysemous notion of orthopedics had created conflicts of interest that would reach their height at the end of the 19th century. The integration of orthopedics into the training at the university level enhanced its proximity to surgery, a discipline that has dominated the so-called modern medicine. During the 20th century, various medical branches defend the legitimacy of certain orthopedic practices, thereby threating to a degree the title itself of this specialization. By examining the challenges that have shaped the history of orthopedics in Switzerland, this article also seeks to shed light on the strategies that were implemented in adopting a medical and technical discipline within a transforming society. PMID:26111839

  6. Selective laser sintering of calcium phosphate materials for orthopedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Goonhee

    Two technologies, Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) and bioceramics are combined in this work to prepare bone replacement implants with complex geometry. SFF has emerged as a crucial technique for rapid prototyping in the last decade. Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is one of the established SFF manufacturing processes that can build three-dimensional objects directly from computer models without part-specific tooling or human intervention. Meanwhile, there have been great efforts to develop implantable materials that can assist in regeneration of bone defects and injuries. However, little attention has been focused in shaping bones from these materials. The main thrust of this research was to develop a process that can combine those two separate efforts. The specific objective of this research is to develop a process that can construct bone replacement material of complex geometry from synthetic calcium phosphate materials by using the SLS process. The achievement of this goal can have a significant impact on the quality of health care in the sense that complete custom-fit bone and tooth structures suitable for implantation can be prepared within 24--48 hours of receipt of geometric information obtained either from patient Computed Tomographic (CT) data, from Computer Aided Design (CAD) software or from other imaging systems such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Holographic Laser Range Imaging (HLRI). In this research, two different processes have been developed. First is the SLS fabrication of porous bone implants. In this effort, systematic procedures have been established and calcium phosphate implants were successfully fabricated from various sources of geometric information. These efforts include material selection and preparation, SLS process parameter optimization, and development of post-processing techniques within the 48-hour time frame. Post-processing allows accurate control of geometry and of the chemistry of calcium phosphate, as well as control of micro and macro pore structure, to maximize bone healing and provide sufficient mechanical strength. It also permits the complete removal of the polymeric binders that are resided in the SLS process. In collaboration with the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and BioMedical Enterprises, Inc., porous implants based on anatomical geometry have been successfully implanted in rabbits and dogs. These histologic animal studies reveal excellent biocompatibility and show its great potential for commercial custom-fit implant manufacture. The second research effort involves fabrication of fully dense bone for application in dental restoration and load-bearing orthopedic functions. Calcium phosphate glass melts, proven to be biocompatible in the first effort, were cast into carbon molds. Processes were developed for preparing the molds. These carbon molds of anatomic shape can be prepared from either Computer Numerical Control (CNC) milling of slab stock or SLS processing of thermoset-coated graphite powder. The CNC milling method provides accurate dimension of the molds in a short period of time, however, the capable geometries are limited; generally two pieces of molds are required for complex shapes. The SLS method provides very complex shape green molds. However, they need to go through pyrolysis of thermoset binder to provide the high temperature capability reached at calcium phosphate melt temperatures (1100C) and noticeable shrinkage was observed during pyrolysis. The cast glass was annealed to develop polycrystalline calcium phosphate. This process also exhibits great potential.

  7. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states

  8. Social Networking as a Tool for Lifelong Learning with Orthopedically Impaired Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersoy, Metin; Gneyli, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how Turkish Cypriot orthopedically impaired learners who are living in North Cyprus use social networking as a tool for leisure and education, and to what extent they satisfy their personal development needs by means of these digital platforms. The case study described, conducted in North Cyprus in 2015 followed a qualitative

  9. A Review of the Design Process for Implantable Orthopedic Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Aitchison, G.A; Hukins, D.W.L; Parry, J.J; Shepherd, D.E.T; Trotman, S.G

    2009-01-01

    The design process for medical devices is highly regulated to ensure the safety of patients. This paper will present a review of the design process for implantable orthopedic medical devices. It will cover the main stages of feasibility, design reviews, design, design verification, manufacture, design validation, design transfer and design changes. PMID:19662153

  10. The orthopedic gender gap: trends in authorship and editorial board representation over the past 4 decades.

    PubMed

    Okike, Kanu; Liu, Bella; Lin, Yijie Brittany; Torpey, Jennifer L; Kocher, Mininder S; Mehlman, Charles T; Bhandari, Mohit; Biermann, J Sybil

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the representation of women among the authors and editorial board members of prominent general orthopedics journals and to determine how these proportions have changed over time. Gender was determined for the authors of all original research studies, case reports, and review articles published in 2 prominent general orthopedics journals in 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007. Gender was also determined for each individual serving on the editorial boards of these journals during these years. Between 1970 and 2007, the representation of women increased from 0.8% to 6.5% among first authors (P<.001), from 0.0% to 4.3% among last authors (P = .015), and from 1.6% to 5.4% among editorial board members (P = .16). However, the rates of increase observed in orthopedics were lower than those observed in other fields (P<.05). Between 1970 and 2007, female representation increased significantly among physicians publishing in 2 prominent general orthopedics journals, but these rates of increase were lower than those observed in other fields of medicine. PMID:22893880

  11. Perceptions of Practice Problems Encountered by Family Physicians, Pediatricians, and Orthopedic Surgeons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Gang; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Information about practice problems was solicited through a structured questionnaire completed by 59 family physicians, 101 pediatricians, and 102 orthopedic surgeons. Across all three groups, a lack of personal time was the major concern. Practice concerns vary among the specialties, a finding of interest to physician education. (SLD)

  12. Carcinogenicity of metal alloys in orthopedic prostheses: clinical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Sunderman, F W

    1989-08-01

    Case reports of malignant tumors at sites of metal orthopedic implants in humans and domestic animals reviewed; results of carcinogenesis bioassays of implanted metal alloys and of nickel, chromium, cobalt, and titanium powders in rodents are summarized; mobilization of metals from implanted prostheses is discussed; and in vitro assays for morphological transformation of mammalian cells by metal compounds are surveyed. These considerations suggest that occurrence of sarcoma at the implantation site constitutes a complication, albeit rare, of implanted orthopedic prostheses. The author recommends (a) that orthopedic surgeons select prostheses with minimal susceptibility to metal corrosion and wear and, if feasible, replace implanted prostheses when there is evidence of corrosion or mechanical failure; (b) that epidemiological studies be undertaken to quantify cancer risks in patients with various types of metal implants; (c) that an international registry of implant-associated tumors be established; and (d) that research be focused on improved in vitro assays for carcinogenicity of alloys intended for use in orthopedic prostheses. PMID:2676672

  13. Social Networking as a Tool for Lifelong Learning with Orthopedically Impaired Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersoy, Metin; Güneyli, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how Turkish Cypriot orthopedically impaired learners who are living in North Cyprus use social networking as a tool for leisure and education, and to what extent they satisfy their personal development needs by means of these digital platforms. The case study described, conducted in North Cyprus in 2015 followed a qualitative…

  14. [Orthopedic made-to-measure shoes for diabetics. Long-term 5-year outcome].

    PubMed

    Illgner, U; Whr, J; Rmmler, M; Drerup, B; Wetz, H H

    2009-12-01

    For patients with diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot syndrome customized orthopedic shoes represent the most effective treatment to avoid foot ulceration and amputation. A total of 53 patients suffering from diabetes and treated with customized orthopedic shoes for more than 5 years were included in the study. Of the patients 91% had peripheral artery occlusion disease, polyneuropathy and diabetic neuropathic osteoarthropathy (DNOAP) and in nearly 25% amputation of one limb had already been carried out. The incidence of ulcers over a time period of 5 years was assessed from the patient records and questioning the patients. Questions on the duration of wearing orthopedic shoes, the durability of the shoes and resulting pain were also included. All patients except for one had problems walking on uneven surfaces. Of the patients 89% claimed to have used their shoes always or nearly always and 25% of the shoes had to be replaced after 1 year. The incidence of ulcers was 38% after 5 years. Treatment with customized orthopedic shoes is an effective method to prevent ulcers and amputation. To be successful it is necessary to control that the shoes are made correctly. Not all shoes last as long as 2 years. PMID:19924391

  15. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…

  16. A Survey on Transfusion Status in Orthopedic Surgery at a Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanha, Mehran; Haghighi, Mohammad; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Sedighinejad, Abbas; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Naderi-Nabi, Bahram; Chavoshi, Tahereh; Mehrnoosh, Mehrnoosh Ghandili

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased costs and mortality associated with inappropriate blood transfusions have led to investigations about blood request and blood transfusion techniques. We investigated the transfusion status in patients who underwent orthopedic surgery in Poursina Hospital (Rasht, Iran) to optimizing blood usage and determine if a scheduled transfusion program for every orthopedic surgery could improve blood transfusion management. Method: In this descriptive-prospective study, all orthopedic surgeries in Poursina Hospital, Rasht, between April to June 2013 were reviewed. All patient information was recorded, including: demographics, type of surgery, hemoglobin level, cross-match test, duration of surgery, and blood loss, and transfusion. Based on the one-way ANOVA and independent samples test analysis, cross-match to transfusion ratio and transfusion possibility, the transfusion index, and maximal surgical blood order schedule were calculated to determine blood transfusion status. Results: Among 872 selected orthopedic surgery candidates, 318 of them were cross-matched and among those, 114 patients received a blood transfusion. In this study, the cross-match to transfusion ratio was 6.4, transfusion possibility 36.47%, transfusion index 0.6, and maximal surgical blood order schedule 0.9. Conclusion: We found that blood ordering was moderately higher than the standard; so it is highly recommended to focus on the knowledge of evidence based on transfusion and standard guidelines for blood transfusion to avoid over-ordering.

  17. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations

  18. High energy devices versus low energy devices in orthopedics treatment modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultheiss, Reiner

    2003-10-01

    The orthopedic consensus group defined in 1997 the 42 most likely relevant parameters of orthopedic shock wave devices. The idea of this approach was to correlate the different clinical outcomes with the physical properties of the different devices with respect to their acoustical waves. Several changes in the hypothesis of the dose effect relationship have been noticed since the first orthopedic treatments. The relation started with the maximum pressure p+, followed by the total energy, the energy density; and finally the single treatment approach using high, and then the multiple treatment method using low energy. Motivated by the reimbursement situation in Germany some manufacturers began to redefine high and low energy devices independent of the treatment modality. The OssaTron as a high energy, single treatment electro hydraulic device gained FDA approval as the first orthopedic ESWT device for plantar fasciitis and, more recently, for lateral epicondylitis. Two low energy devices have now also gained FDA approval based upon a single treatment. Comparing the acoustic data, differences between the OssaTron and the other devices are obvious and will be elaborated upon. Cluster analysis of the outcomes and the acoustical data are presented and new concepts will be suggested.

  19. Late orthopedic effects in children with Wilms' tumor treated with abdominal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rate, W.R.; Butler, M.S.; Robertson, W.W. Jr.; D'Angio, G.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1984, 31 children with biopsy-proven Wilms' tumor received nephrectomy, chemotherapy, and abdominal irradiation and were followed beyond skeletal maturity. Three patients (10%) developed late orthopedic abnormalities requiring intervention. Ten children received orthovoltage irradiation, and all cases requiring orthopedic intervention or developing a scoliotic curve of greater than 20 degrees were confined to this group, for a complication frequency of 50%. Those children who developed a significant late orthopedic abnormality (SLOA) as defined were treated to a higher median dose (2,890 cGy) and a larger field size (150 cm2) than those who did not (2,580 cGy and 120 cm2). Age at irradiation, sex, and initial stage of disease did not appear to influence the risk of developing an SLOA. No child who received megavoltage irradiation developed an SLOA despite treatment up to 4,000 cGy or to field sizes of 400 cm2. We conclude that modern radiotherapy techniques rarely lead to significant late orthopedic abnormalities previously associated with abdominal irradiation in children with Wilms' tumor.

  20. A Prototype Robotic Arm for Use by Severely Orthopedically Handicapped Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Richard

    This 18-month pilot project, which ran from October 1, 1987 to March 31, 1989, developed a prototype robotic arm for educational use by students with severe orthopedic disabilities in the Columbus (Ohio) Public Schools. The developmental effort was intended first, to provide direct access to currently available instructional materials and, second,

  1. A virtual reality simulator for orthopedic basic skills: a design and validation study.

    PubMed

    Vankipuram, Mithra; Kahol, Kanav; McLaren, Alex; Panchanathan, Sethuraman

    2010-10-01

    Orthopedic drilling as a skill demands high levels of dexterity and expertise from the surgeon. It is a basic skill that is required in many orthopedic procedures. Inefficient drilling can be a source of avoidable medical errors that may lead to adverse events. It is hence important to train and evaluate residents in safe environments for this skill. This paper presents a virtual orthopedic drilling simulator that was designed to provide visiohaptic interaction with virtual bones. The simulation provides a realistic basic training environment for orthopedic surgeons. It contains modules to track and analyze movements of surgeons, in order to determine their surgical proficiency. The simulator was tested with senior surgeons, residents and medical students for validation purposes. Through the multi-tiered testing strategy it was shown that the simulator was able to produce a learning effect that transfers to real-world drilling. Further, objective measures of surgical performance were found to be able to differentiate between experts and novices. PMID:20685316

  2. Increased osteoblast cell density on nanostructured PLGA-coated nanostructured titanium for orthopedic applications

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lester J; Swaim, John S; Yao, Chang; Haberstroh, Karen M; Nauman, Eric A; Webster, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    There are more than 30,000 orthopedic implant revision surgeries necessary each year in part due to poor implant fixation with juxtaposed bone. A further emphasis on the current problems associated with insufficient bone implant performance is the fact that many patients are receiving hip implants earlier in life, remaining active older, and that the human lifespan is continuously increasing. Collectively, it is clear that there is a strong clinical need to improve implant performance through proper, prolonged fixation. For these reasons, the objective of the present in vitro study was to improve the performance of titanium (Ti), one of the most popular orthopedic implant materials. Accordingly, the proliferative response of osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) on novel nanostructured Ti/PLGA (poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid) composites was examined. This study showed that nano-topography can be easily applied to Ti (through anodization) and porous PLGA (through NaOH chemical etching) to enhance osteoblast cell proliferation which may lead to better orthopedic implant performance. This straight forward application of nano-topography on current bone implant materials represents a new direction in the design of enhanced biomaterials for the orthopedic industry. PMID:18019847

  3. High precision redundant robotic manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Young, Kar-Keung David

    1998-01-01

    A high precision redundant robotic manipulator for overcoming contents imposed by obstacles or imposed by a highly congested work space. One embodiment of the manipulator has four degrees of freedom and another embodiment has seven degreed of freedom. Each of the embodiments utilize a first selective compliant assembly robot arm (SCARA) configuration to provide high stiffness in the vertical plane, a second SCARA configuration to provide high stiffness in the horizontal plane. The seven degree of freedom embodiment also utilizes kinematic redundancy to provide the capability of avoiding obstacles that lie between the base of the manipulator and the end effector or link of the manipulator. These additional three degrees of freedom are added at the wrist link of the manipulator to provide pitch, yaw and roll. The seven degrees of freedom embodiment uses one revolute point per degree of freedom. For each of the revolute joints, a harmonic gear coupled to an electric motor is introduced, and together with properly designed based servo controllers provide an end point repeatability of less than 10 microns.

  4. High precision redundant robotic manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Young, K.K.D.

    1998-09-22

    A high precision redundant robotic manipulator for overcoming contents imposed by obstacles or imposed by a highly congested work space is disclosed. One embodiment of the manipulator has four degrees of freedom and another embodiment has seven degrees of freedom. Each of the embodiments utilize a first selective compliant assembly robot arm (SCARA) configuration to provide high stiffness in the vertical plane, a second SCARA configuration to provide high stiffness in the horizontal plane. The seven degree of freedom embodiment also utilizes kinematic redundancy to provide the capability of avoiding obstacles that lie between the base of the manipulator and the end effector or link of the manipulator. These additional three degrees of freedom are added at the wrist link of the manipulator to provide pitch, yaw and roll. The seven degrees of freedom embodiment uses one revolute point per degree of freedom. For each of the revolute joints, a harmonic gear coupled to an electric motor is introduced, and together with properly designed based servo controllers provide an end point repeatability of less than 10 microns. 3 figs.

  5. Mobile camera-space manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seelinger, Michael J. (Inventor); Yoder, John-David S. (Inventor); Skaar, Steven B. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a method of using computer vision to control systems consisting of a combination of holonomic and nonholonomic degrees of freedom such as a wheeled rover equipped with a robotic arm, a forklift, and earth-moving equipment such as a backhoe or a front-loader. Using vision sensors mounted on the mobile system and the manipulator, the system establishes a relationship between the internal joint configuration of the holonomic degrees of freedom of the manipulator and the appearance of features on the manipulator in the reference frames of the vision sensors. Then, the system, perhaps with the assistance of an operator, identifies the locations of the target object in the reference frames of the vision sensors. Using this target information, along with the relationship described above, the system determines a suitable trajectory for the nonholonomic degrees of freedom of the base to follow towards the target object. The system also determines a suitable pose or series of poses for the holonomic degrees of freedom of the manipulator. With additional visual samples, the system automatically updates the trajectory and final pose of the manipulator so as to allow for greater precision in the overall final position of the system.

  6. Learning Area and Perimeter with Virtual Manipulatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily; Flanagan, Sara; Bouck, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Manipulatives are considered a best practice for educating students with disabilities, but little research exists which examines virtual manipulatives as tool for supporting students in mathematics. This project investigated the use of a virtual manipulative through the National Library of Virtual Manipulatives--polynominoes (i.e., tiles)--as a

  7. Learning Area and Perimeter with Virtual Manipulatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily; Flanagan, Sara; Bouck, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Manipulatives are considered a best practice for educating students with disabilities, but little research exists which examines virtual manipulatives as tool for supporting students in mathematics. This project investigated the use of a virtual manipulative through the National Library of Virtual Manipulatives--polynominoes (i.e., tiles)--as a…

  8. Manipulation strategies for massive space payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, Wayne J.

    1991-01-01

    Motion planning and control for the joints of flexible manipulators are discussed. Specific topics covered include control of a flexible braced manipulator, control of a small working robot on a large flexible manipulator to suppress vibrations, control strategies for ensuring cooperation among disparate manipulators, and motion planning for robots in free-fall.

  9. Use of Portable Ultrasound Machine for Outpatient Orthopedic Diagnosis: An Implementation Study

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, Sean; Fishman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used to evaluate shoulder disorders. This implementation study investigated outpatient ultrasonography at an orthopedic practice in a managed care setting. Methods: A portable ultrasound machine was introduced at an orthopedic clinic in a group practice. An orthopedic surgeon who primarily treated shoulder disorders received 15 hours of training. The impact of physician-performed ultrasonography on subsequent MRI and other outcomes of patients with shoulder disorders from January 2011 through October 2011 was determined using automated administrative and clinical data. Comparisons were made to patients who did not undergo ultrasonography at the experimental practice and 2 orthopedic clinics in the same practice. Results: During the study, 146 ultrasound examinations were administered. Compared with patients who did not undergo ultrasonography, patients who received ultrasonography had significantly higher comorbidity. However, they were significantly less likely to have MRI (9.7% with ultrasonography vs 14.4% without; p = 0.03) although equally likely to undergo surgery (33.6% with ultrasonography vs 22.1% without, p = 0.77). Mean time to surgery was 89.3 49.3 days for patients with ultrasonography vs 32.9 43.3 days for patients without (p < 0.05). No ultrasonography-examined patients had an incorrect diagnosis at surgery. For patients receiving ultrasonography, an estimated 35 MRIs were avoided, saving a predicted $17,603, a 50% return in less than 1 year on a $34,897 investment for an ultrasound machine and supplies. Conclusion: Outpatient ultrasonography by an orthopedic surgeon can be useful for diagnosing shoulder disorders and might reduce MRI utilization. PMID:24355886

  10. Developing a Minimum Data Set of the Information Management System for Orthopedic Injuries in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Ali; Chraghbaigi, Ramin; Fathi, Taimur; Shojaee Baghini, Mahdieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Orthopedic injuries are the most common types of injuries. To identify the main causes of injuries, collecting data in a standard manner at the national level are needed, which justifies necessity of making a minimum data set (MDS). Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop an MDS of the information management system for orthopedic injuries in Iran. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed in 2013. Data were collected from hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences that had orthopedic department, medical documents centers, legal medicine centers, emergency centers, internet access, and library. Investigated documents were orthopedic injury records in 2012, documents that retrieved from the internet, and printed materials. Records with Random sampling by S22-S99 categories from ICD-10 were selected and the related internet-sourced data were evaluated entirely. Data were collected using a checklist. In order to make a consensus about the data elements, the decision Delphi technique was applied by a questionnaire. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaire were assessed by expert’s opinions and test-retest method, respectively. Results: An MDS of orthopedic injuries were assigned to two categories: administrative category with six classes including 142 data elements, and clinical category with 17 classes including 250 data elements. Conclusions: This study showed that some of the essential data elements included in other country’s MDS or required for organizations and healthcare providers were not included. Therefore, a complete list of an MDS elements was created. Existence of comprehensive data concerning the causes and mechanisms of injuries informs public health policy-makers about injuries occurrence and enables them to take rationale measures to deal with these problems. PMID:25237576

  11. ADMAP (automatic data manipulation program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, F. I.

    1971-01-01

    Instructions are presented on the use of ADMAP, (automatic data manipulation program) an aerospace data manipulation computer program. The program was developed to aid in processing, reducing, plotting, and publishing electric propulsion trajectory data generated by the low thrust optimization program, HILTOP. The program has the option of generating SC4020 electric plots, and therefore requires the SC4020 routines to be available at excution time (even if not used). Several general routines are present, including a cubic spline interpolation routine, electric plotter dash line drawing routine, and single parameter and double parameter sorting routines. Many routines are tailored for the manipulation and plotting of electric propulsion data, including an automatic scale selection routine, an automatic curve labelling routine, and an automatic graph titling routine. Data are accepted from either punched cards or magnetic tape.

  12. Mapping and manipulating facial expression.

    PubMed

    Theobald, Barry-John; Matthews, Iain; Mangini, Michael; Spies, Jeffrey R; Brick, Timothy R; Cohn, Jeffrey F; Boker, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Nonverbal visual cues accompany speech to supplement the meaning of spoken words, signify emotional state, indicate position in discourse, and provide back-channel feedback. This visual information includes head movements, facial expressions and body gestures. In this article we describe techniques for manipulating both verbal and nonverbal facial gestures in video sequences of people engaged in conversation. We are developing a system for use in psychological experiments, where the effects of manipulating individual components of nonverbal visual behavior during live face-to-face conversation can be studied. In particular, the techniques we describe operate in real-time at video frame-rate and the manipulation can be applied so both participants in a conversation are kept blind to the experimental conditions. PMID:19624037

  13. Manipulating Complex Light with Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jinwei; Wang, Xi; Sun, Jingbo; Pandey, Apra; Cartwright, Alexander N.; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of metamaterials have revealed unparalleled opportunities for engineering space for light propagation; opening a new paradigm in spin- and quantum-related phenomena in optical physics. Here we show that unique optical properties of metamaterials (MMs) open unlimited prospects to engineer light itself. We propose and demonstrate for the first time a novel way of complex light manipulation in few-mode optical fibers using optical MMs. Most importantly, these studies highlight how unique properties of MMs, namely the ability to manipulate both electric and magnetic field components of electromagnetic (EM) waves, open new degrees of freedom in engineering complex polarization states of light at will, while preserving its orbital angular momentum (OAM) state. These results lay the first steps in manipulating complex light in optical fibers, likely providing new opportunities for high capacity communication systems, quantum information, and on-chip signal processing. PMID:24084836

  14. A grid quality manipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ning; Eiseman, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    A grid quality manipulation system is described. The elements of the system are the measures by which quality is assessed, the computer graphic display of those measures, and the local grid manipulation to provide a response to the viewed quality indication. The display is an overlaid composite where the region is first covered with colors to reflect the values of the quality indicator, the grid is then placed on top of those colors, and finally a control net is placed on top of everything. The net represents the grid in terms of the control point form of algebraic grid generation. As a control point is moved, both the grid and the colored quality measures also move. This is a real time dynamic action so that the consequences of the manipulation are continuously seen.

  15. Mapping and Manipulating Facial Expression

    PubMed Central

    Theobald, Barry-John; Matthews, Iain; Mangini, Michael; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Brick, Timothy R.; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Boker, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Non-verbal visual cues accompany speech to supplement the meaning of spoken words, signify emotional state, indicate position in discourse, and provide back-channel feedback. This visual information includes head movements, facial expressions and body gestures. In this paper we describe techniques for manipulating both verbal and non-verbal facial gestures in video sequences of people engaged in conversation. We are developing a system for use in psychological experiments, where the effects of manipulating individual components of non-verbal visual behaviour during live face-to-face conversation can be studied. In particular, the techniques we describe operate in real-time at video frame-rate and the manipulation can be applied so both participants in a conversation are kept blind to the experimental conditions. PMID:19624037

  16. Understanding pharmaceutical research manipulation in the context of accounting manipulation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    The problem of the manipulation of data that arises when there is both opportunity and incentive to mislead is better accepted and studied - though by no means solved - in financial accounting than in medicine. This article analyzes pharmaceutical company manipulation of medical research as part of a broader problem of corporate manipulation of data in the creation of accounting profits. The article explores how our understanding of accounting fraud and misinformation helps us understand the risk of similar information manipulation in the medical sciences. This understanding provides a framework for considering how best to improve the quality of medical research and analysis in light of the current system of medical information production. I offer three possible responses: (1) use of the Dodd-Frank whistleblower provisions to encourage reporting of medical research fraud; (2) a two-step academic journal review process for clinical trials; and (3) publicly subsidized trial-failure insurance. These would improve the release of negative information about drugs, thereby increasing the reliability of positive information. PMID:24088151

  17. Precision Manipulation with Cooperative Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroupe, Ashley; Huntsberger, Terry; Okon, Avi; Aghzarian, Hrand

    2005-01-01

    This work addresses several challenges of cooperative transportThis work addresses several challenges of cooperative transport and precision manipulation. Precision manipulation requires a rigid grasp, which places a hard constraint on the relative rover formation that must be accommodated, even though the rovers cannot directly observe their relative poses. Additionally, rovers must jointly select appropriate actions based on all available sensor information. Lastly, rovers cannot act on independent sensor information, but must fuse information to move jointly; the methods for fusing information must be determined.

  18. Direct Adaptive Impedance Control Of Redundant Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Colbaugh, Richard D.; Glass, Kristin L.

    1995-01-01

    Method of controlling mechanical impedance of end effector of robotic manipulator related to method described in "Adaptive Impedance Control of Redundant Manipulators" (NPO-18606). Present method does not require detailed knowledge and computation of dynamics and inverse kinematic transformation of manipulator. Provides for control globally stable in presence of bounded disturbances. Applicable to both nonredundant and redundant manipulators performing tasks involving impacts between manipulator and objects in its environment, and controlled contact between end effector and object, such as deburring.

  19. COGNITION, ACTION, AND OBJECT MANIPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Weigelt, Matthias; Weiss, Daniel J.; van der Wel, Robrecht

    2012-01-01

    Although psychology is the science of mental life and behavior, it has paid little attention to the means by which mental life is translated into behavior. One domain where links between cognition and action have been explored is the manipulation of objects. This article reviews psychological research on this topic, with special emphasis on the tendency to grasp objects differently depending on what one plans to do with the objects. Such differential grasping has been demonstrated in a wide range of object manipulation tasks, including grasping an object in a way that reveals anticipation of the object's future orientation, height, and required placement precision. Differential grasping has also been demonstrated in a wide range of behaviors, including one-hand grasps, two-hand grasps, walking, and transferring objects from place to place as well as from person to person. The populations in whom the tendency has been shown are also diverse, including nonhuman primates as well as human adults, children, and babies. Meanwhile, the tendency is compromised in a variety of clinical populations and in children of a surprisingly advanced age. Verbal working memory is compromised as well if words are memorized while object manipulation tasks are performed; the recency portion of the serial position curve is reduced in this circumstance. In general, the research reviewed here points to rich connections between cognition and action as revealed through the study of object manipulation. Other implications concern affordances, Donders' Law, and naturalistic observation and the teaching of psychology. PMID:22448912

  20. Ants: the supreme soil manipulators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review focuses on the semiochemical interactions between ants and their soil environment. Ants occupy virtually every ecological niche and have evolved mechanisms to not just cope with, but also manipulate soil organisms. The metapleural gland, specific to ants was thought to be the major sourc...

  1. Manipulating Genetic Material in Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Lisa Crawford, a graduate research assistant from the University of Toledo, works with Laurel Karr of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the molecular biology laboratory. They are donducting genetic manipulation of bacteria and yeast for the production of large amount of desired protein. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  2. Proximity Indicator for Remote Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    Display indicates pitch, yaw, and distance of remote manipulator with respect to object to be grasped. Displays numerical values and bargraph simulation of position and orientation of hand. When errors in position and orientation are small enough to ensure successful grasp, unit alerts operator with audible and visible signals.

  3. Teaching Integration Applications Using Manipulatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Kavita; Premadasa, Kirthi; Martin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Calculus students' difficulties in understanding integration have been extensively studied. Research shows that the difficulty lies with students understanding of the definition of the definite integral as a limit of a Riemann sum and with the idea of accumulation inherent in integration. We have created a set of manipulatives and activities

  4. Master/slave manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; King, R. F.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    System capabilities are equivalent to mobility, dexterity, and strength of human arm. Arrangement of torque motor, harmonic drive, and potentiometer combination allows all power and control leads to pass through center of slave with position-transducer arrangement of master, and "stovepipe joint" is incorporated for manipulator applications.

  5. Indicator tensor manipulation on MACSYMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogen, R. A.; Pavelle, R.

    1977-01-01

    A new computational tool for physical calculations is described. It is the first computer system capable of performing indicial tensor calculus (as opposed to component tensor calculus). It is now operational on the symbolic manipulation system MACSYMA. The capabilities of the system are outlined.

  6. DATACUBE: A datacube manipulation package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Alasdair; Currie, Malcolm J.

    2014-05-01

    DATACUBE is a command-line package for manipulating and visualizing data cubes. It was designed for integral field spectroscopy but has been extended to be a generic data cube tool, used in particular for sub-millimeter data cubes from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. It is part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

  7. Teaching Integration Applications Using Manipulatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Kavita; Premadasa, Kirthi; Martin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Calculus students' difficulties in understanding integration have been extensively studied. Research shows that the difficulty lies with students understanding of the definition of the definite integral as a limit of a Riemann sum and with the idea of accumulation inherent in integration. We have created a set of manipulatives and activities…

  8. MODULAR MANIPULATOR FOR ROBOTICS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph W. Geisinger, Ph.D.

    2001-07-31

    ARM Automation, Inc. is developing a framework of modular actuators that can address the DOE's wide range of robotics needs. The objective of this effort is to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technology by constructing a manipulator from these actuators within a glovebox for Automated Plutonium Processing (APP). At the end of the project, the system of actuators was used to construct several different manipulator configurations, which accommodate common glovebox tasks such as repackaging. The modular nature and quickconnects of this system simplify installation into ''hot'' boxes and any potential modifications or repair therein. This work focused on the development of self-contained robotic actuator modules including the embedded electronic controls for the purpose of building a manipulator system. Both of the actuators developed under this project contain the control electronics, sensors, motor, gear train, wiring, system communications and mechanical interfaces of a complete robotics servo device. Test actuators and accompanying DISC{trademark}s underwent validation testing at The University of Texas at Austin and ARM Automation, Inc. following final design and fabrication. The system also included custom links, an umbilical cord, an open architecture PC-based system controller, and operational software that permitted integration into a completely functional robotic manipulator system. The open architecture on which this system is based avoids proprietary interfaces and communication protocols which only serve to limit the capabilities and flexibility of automation equipment. The system was integrated and tested in the contractor's facility for intended performance and operations. The manipulator was tested using the full-scale equipment and process mock-ups. The project produced a practical and operational system including a quantitative evaluation of its performance and cost.

  9. Position control of robot manipulators manipulating a flexible payload

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, D.; Mills, J.K.; Liu, Y.

    1999-03-01

    Robotic manipulation of a flexible payload is a complex and challenging control problem. This paper demonstrates from both theoretical and experimental perspectives that through proper design of the control gains, the simple scheme of PD plus gravity compensation can control a flexible payload manipulated by multiple robots to a desired position/orientation while damping the vibrations of the payload at each contact. The suppression of the vibration at each contact is helpful to suppress all vibrations of the flexible body. If the payload has a large stiffness or small mass, the proposed scheme can regulate the deformations at the contacts to zero, and also, the offsets of all static deformations of the payload with reference to the original positions decay to zero. A clamped-free model is used to decompose the dynamics of the payload into two distinct dynamic subsystems. This allows them to treat these dynamic subsystems separately and prove that desired motion trajectories can be achieved with the proposed scheme. As an example, the experiment of manipulating a flexible sheet using two CRS A460 robots is further described.

  10. Combined therapy of orthopedic surgery after deep brain stimulation in cerebral palsy mixed type - a case report -.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong Souk; Park, Eun Sook; Chang, Jin Woo; Lee, Ki Seok; Suh, Young Joo; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2011-10-01

    Dystonia is a symptom defined by involuntary and irregular contractions of the muscles, which cause movement disorders and postural problems. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in globus pallidus interna (GPi) is a good option for controlling dystonia. DBS has already been shown to have significant effects on primary dystonia as well as Parkinson's disease. Dystonia is very difficult to manage, as seen in cerebral palsy (CP) mixed with spasticity. As CP patients grow, their musculoskeletal problems may require orthopedic surgery. However, the outcome of orthopedic surgery is not usually suitable due to dystonia. Therefore, we attempted to control dystonia through DBS initially and perform orthopedic surgery to correct musculoskeletal deformities after treatment of dystonia. Herein, we report a case that showed remarkable improvement in terms of the dystonia rating scale and gait pattern after combined therapy of DBS and orthopedic surgery. PMID:22506201

  11. Societal impacts of regenerative medicine: reflections on the views of orthopedic professionals.

    PubMed

    Niemansburg, Sophie L; Tempels, Tjidde H; Dhert, Wouter J A; van Delden, Johannes J M; Bredenoord, Annelien L

    2015-01-01

    As the amount of clinical studies in orthopedic regenerative medicine (RM) is increasing, it is time to take into account its impact on society. A total of 36 biomedical professionals working at the front row of orthopedic RM were interviewed to explore their attitudes, opinions and expectations regarding the societal impacts of RM. Professionals mainly recognized the societal impacts of counteraction of aging, prevention of disease and social justice. The 'soft' sides of these impacts were hardly mentioned. Whereas they did not perceive themselves in the position to mitigate these impacts, professionals should take up their role as actor and become involved in the societal debate. This is important as they can co-shape the societal impacts during the developmental process of technologies and thereby stimulate responsible innovation. PMID:25562349

  12. Requirements analysis of a 5 degree of freedom haptic simulator for orthopedic trauma surgery.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Alastair; Akhtar, Kash; Gupte, Chinmay; Bello, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    There are currently few Virtual Reality simulators for orthopedic trauma surgery. The current simulators provide only a basic recreation of the manual skills involved, focusing instead on the procedural and anatomical knowledge required. One factor limiting simulation of the manual skills is the complexity of adding realistic haptic feedback, particularly torques. This paper investigates the requirements, in terms of forces and workspace (linear and rotational), of a haptic interface to simulate placement of a lag screw in the femoral head, such as for fixation of a fracture in the neck of the femur. To measure these requirements, a study has been conducted involving 5 subjects with experience performing this particular procedure. The results gathered are being used to inform the design of a new haptic simulator for orthopedic trauma surgery. PMID:23400127

  13. The Medical Education and Best Practice in Orthopedic Patient Care in Poland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2012-07-01

    The leadership organization focuses on education, teamwork, customer relationship and developing strategy which help in building added value, in managing activities, time and quality. Everyday orthopedic experience shows that medical education is a mixture of: specific knowledge, skills and attitudes of people working together, and that creates effective teamwork in a hospital environment. Apart from the main reason of medical education, teaching about disease treatment and health problem solving, medical education should also concentrate on human factors and behavioral aspects of patient treatment in hospital.Assessment of an organization and medical education process by cultural and teamwork criteria, offers a powerful new way to think about performance at the frontlines of healthcare and in the future it could be gold standard for assessing the success of an organization, and standards in medical education, not only in orthopedics.

  14. Priming the Surface of Orthopedic Implants for Osteoblast Attachment in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The development of better orthopedic implants is incessant. While current implants can function reliably in the human body for a long period of time, there are still a significant number of cases for which the implants can fail prematurely due to poor osseointegration of the implant with native bone. Increasingly, it is recognized that it is extremely important to facilitate the attachment of osteoblasts on the implant so that a proper foundation of extracellular matrix (ECM) can be laid down for the growth of new bone tissue. In order to facilitate the osseointegration of the implant, both the physical nanotopography and chemical functionalization of the implant surface have to be optimized. In this short review, however, we explore how simple chemistry procedures can be used to functionalize the surfaces of three major classes of orthopedic implants, i.e. ceramics, metals, and polymers, so that the attachment of osteoblasts on implants can be facilitated in order to promote implant osseointegration. PMID:26392807

  15. Adaptive hybrid control of manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    Simple methods for the design of adaptive force and position controllers for robot manipulators within the hybrid control architecuture is presented. The force controller is composed of an adaptive PID feedback controller, an auxiliary signal and a force feedforward term, and it achieves tracking of desired force setpoints in the constraint directions. The position controller consists of adaptive feedback and feedforward controllers and an auxiliary signal, and it accomplishes tracking of desired position trajectories in the free directions. The controllers are capable of compensating for dynamic cross-couplings that exist between the position and force control loops in the hybrid control architecture. The adaptive controllers do not require knowledge of the complex dynamic model or parameter values of the manipulator or the environment. The proposed control schemes are computationally fast and suitable for implementation in on-line control with high sampling rates.

  16. Genetic Manipulation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    The sexually-transmitted pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, undergoes natural transformation at high frequency. This property has led to the rapid dissemination of antibiotic resistance markers and to the panmictic structure of the gonococcal population. However, high frequency transformation also makes N. gonorrhoeae one of the easiest bacterial species to manipulate genetically in the laboratory. Techniques have been developed that result in transformation frequencies >50%, allowing the identification of mutants by screening and without selection. Constructs have been created to take advantage of this high frequency transformation, facilitating genetic mutation, complementation, and heterologous gene expression. Techniques are described for genetic manipulation of N. gonorrhoeae, as well as for growth of this fastidious organism. PMID:22045584

  17. Do malaria parasites manipulate mosquitoes?

    PubMed Central

    Cator, Lauren J.; Lynch, Pennelope A.; Read, Andrew F.; Thomas, Matthew B.

    2012-01-01

    Malaria parasites have been suggested to alter the behavior of mosquito vectors to increase the likelihood of transmission. Some empirical evidence supports this hypothesis, yet the role of manipulation is ignored in most epidemiological models, and behavioral differences between infected and uninfected females are not considered in the development or implementation of control measures. We suggest that this disconnect exists because the link between behavioral alteration and actual transmission in the field has yet to be fully demonstrated or quantified. We review and discuss the current evidence for manipulation, explore its potential significance for malaria transmission and suggest ways to move this hypothesis forward from theory to potential application in malaria control. PMID:23044288

  18. Adaptation of NASA technology for the optimum design of orthopedic knee implants.

    PubMed

    Saravanos, D A; Mraz, P J; Davy, D T; Hopkins, D A

    1991-03-01

    NASA technology originally developed for designing aircraft turbine-engine blades has been adapted and applied to orthopedic knee implants. This article describes a method for tailoring an implant for optimal interaction with the environment of the tibia. The implant components are designed to control stresses in the bone for minimizing bone degradation and preventing failures. Engineers expect the tailoring system to improve knee prosthesis design and allow customized implants for individual patients. PMID:10150099

  19. Risk Factors for Postoperative Ileus Following Orthopedic Surgery: The Role of Chronic Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hee; Lee, Joon Seong; Hong, Su Jin; Jang, Jae Young; Jeon, Seong Ran; Byun, Dong Won; Park, Won Young; Kim, Soon Im; Choi, Hyung Suk; Lee, Jae Chul; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Distinction is vague between severe constipation and postoperative ileus (POI) in terms of pathogenesis, clinical features, and treatment options. However, no data are available regarding their associations. Methods After retrospective review of data from patients who underwent orthopedic surgery during the first 6 months of 2011, a total of 612 patients were included. Severe constipation was defined as symptoms of constipation requiring treatment using at least 2 laxatives from different classes for at least 6 months. POI was defined as paralytic ileus lasting more than 3 days post-surgery and associated with 2 or more of the following: (1) nausea/vomiting, (2) inability to tolerate an oral diet over a 24-hour period, and (3) absence of flatus over a 24-hour period. The subjects were divided into non-POI and POI groups, and we compared patient-, surgery-, and pharmaceutical-related factors. Results Thirteen (2.1%) out of 612 experienced POI. In comparisons between the non-POI and POI groups, univariate analysis showed significant differences in the mean age (51.4 vs 71.6 years), mean body mass index (24.1 vs 21.8 kg/m2), severe constipation (5.8% vs 76.9%), co-morbidities (33.2% vs 84.6%), type of orthopedic surgery (spine/hip/limb: 19.4/11.0/65.6% vs 23.1/61.5/15.4%), and estimated blood loss (50 vs 300 mL). Multivariate logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for age, body mass index, co-morbidities, type of orthopedic surgery, and estimated blood loss, showed that severe constipation was an independent risk factor for POI (OR, 35.23; 95% CI, 7.72–160.82; P < 0.001). Conclusions Severe constipation is associated with POI after orthopedic surgery. PMID:25537675

  20. Brandon Research, Inc. Orthopedic Implant Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, W.R.

    1999-04-22

    The project was a joint research effort between the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP) and Brandon Research, Inc. to develop ways to improve implants used for orthopedic surgery for joint replacement. The primary product produced by this study is design information, which may be used to develop implants that will improve long-term fixation and durability in the host bone environment.

  1. In-vivo orthopedic implant diagnostic device for sensing load, wear, and infection

    DOEpatents

    Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen; Thundat, Thomas G.; Komistek, Richard D.; Dennis, Douglas A.; Mahfouz, Mohamed

    2006-08-29

    A device for providing in vivo diagnostics of loads, wear, and infection in orthopedic implants having at least one load sensor associated with the implant, at least one temperature sensor associated with the implant, at least one vibration sensor associated with the implant, and at least one signal processing device operatively coupled with the sensors. The signal processing device is operable to receive the output signal from the sensors and transmit a signal corresponding with the output signal.

  2. Use of carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implants in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hak, David J; Mauffrey, Cyril; Seligson, David; Lindeque, Bennie

    2014-12-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone implants offer several benefits over traditional metal implants. Their radiolucent property permits improved, artifact-free radiographic imaging. Their lower modulus of elasticity better matches that of bone. Their fatigue strength is greater than most metal implants. This article reviews the use of these implants in orthopedic surgery, including treatment of conditions involving the spine, trauma, tumor, and infection. PMID:25437074

  3. Epidemiological survey of orthopedic joint dislocations based on nationwide insurance data in Taiwan, 2000-2005

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of acute orthopedic dislocations is poorly understood. A nationwide database provides a valuable resource for examining this issue in the Taiwanese population. Methods A 6-year retrospective cohort study of 1,000,000 randomly-sampled beneficiaries from the year 2005 was used as the original population. Based on the hospitalized and ambulatory data, the concomitant ICD9-CM diagnosis codes and treatment codes were evaluated and classified into 8 and 3 major categories, respectively. The cases matching both inclusive criteria of dislocation-related diagnosis codes and treatment codes were defined as incident cases. Results During 2000-2005, the estimated annual incidence (per 100,000 population) of total orthopedic dislocations in Taiwan was 42.1 (95%CI: 38.1-46.1). The major cause of these orthopedic dislocations was traffic accidents (57.4%), followed by accident falls (27.5%). The annual incidence dislocation by location was shoulder, 15.3; elbow, 7.7; wrist, 3.5; finger, 4.6; hip, 5.2; knee, 1.4; ankle, 2.0; and foot, 2.4. Approximately 16% of shoulder dislocations occurred with other concomitant fractures, compared with 17%, 53%, 16%, 76% and 52%, respectively, of dislocated elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle cases. Including both simple and complex dislocated cases, the mean medical cost was US$612 for treatment of a shoulder dislocation, $504 for the elbow, $1,232 for the wrist, $1,103 for the hip, $1,888 for the knee, and $1,248 for the ankle. Conclusions In Taiwan, three-quarters of all orthopedic dislocations were of the upper limbs. The most common complex fracture-dislocation was of the knee, followed by the wrist and the ankle. Those usually needed a treatment combined with open reduction of fractures and resulted in a higher direct medical expenditure. PMID:22053727

  4. Association of Serum Sodium With Morbidity and Mortality in Hospitalized Patients Undergoing Major Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mc Causland, Finnian R.; Wright, John; Waikar, Sushrut S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dysnatremia may predispose to falls and fractures, and serum sodium may influence bone health. Little is known of the association of perioperative dysnatremia and clinical outcomes in those undergoing major orthopedic surgery. OBJECTIVE We examined the association of serum sodium (corrected for glucose) with morbidity and mortality in a sample of hospitalized patients undergoing major orthopedic procedures at 2 large academic medical centers. DESIGN Retrospective observational study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Adult patients admitted to major academic teaching hospitals for a major orthopedic procedure from January 2006 to January 2011. METHODS The association of serum sodium with log-transformed hospital length of stay was assessed by fitting linear regression models. The association with 30-day mortality was assessed by fitting Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS There were 16,206 unique admissions, of which 44.8% were male, with a mean age of 62.5 years. Mean corrected serum sodium was 138.5 ± 2.9 mmol/L; 1.2% had moderate/severe hyponatremia, 6.4% had mild hyponatremia, and 2.5% were hypernatremic. In adjusted models, compared with normonatremia, moderate/severe hyponatremia, mild hyponatremia, and hypernatremia were associated with a 1.6-, 1.4-, and 1.4-day-longer hospital stay, respectively, and greater risk of 30-day mortality (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33–4.59 for moderate/severe hyponatremia; HR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.21–2.66 for mild hyponatremia; and HR: 2.99, 95% CI: 1.79–4.98 for hypernatremia). CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE Dysnatremia is relatively common in the hospitalized orthopedic population and associated with greater length of stay and 30-day mortality. Future studies should address potential mechanisms underlying these associations and whether correction of perioperative dysnatremia may improve patient outcomes. PMID:24523043

  5. Orthopedic emergencies: a practical emergency department classification (US-VAGON) in pelvic fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Coppola, Paolo T; Coppola, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Trauma is one of the leading causes of death before the age of 40 years and approximately 5% of patients with trauma who require hospital admission have pelvic fractures. This article updates the emergency department classification of pelvic fractures first described in 2000. This information is of practical value to emergency physicians in identifying the potential vascular, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, orthopedic, and neurologic complications and further assists them in the initial evaluation and treatment of patients with pelvic fractures. PMID:25892731

  6. Viruses manipulate the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Forest; Thurber, Rebecca Vega

    2009-05-14

    Marine viruses affect Bacteria, Archaea and eukaryotic organisms and are major components of the marine food web. Most studies have focused on their role as predators and parasites, but many of the interactions between marine viruses and their hosts are much more complicated. A series of recent studies has shown that viruses have the ability to manipulate the life histories and evolution of their hosts in remarkable ways, challenging our understanding of this almost invisible world. PMID:19444207

  7. Manipulating the edge of instability.

    PubMed

    Venkadesan, Madhusudhan; Guckenheimer, John; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the integration of visual and tactile sensory input for dynamic manipulation. Our experimental data and computational modeling reveal that time-delays are as critical to task-optimal multisensory integration as sensorimotor noise. Our focus is a dynamic manipulation task "at the edge of instability." Mathematical bifurcation theory predicts that this system will exhibit well-classified low-dimensional dynamics in this regime. The task was using the thumbpad to compress a slender spring prone to buckling as far as possible, just shy of slipping. As expected from bifurcation theory, principal components analysis gives a projection of the data onto a low dimensional subspace that captures 91-97% of its variance. In this subspace, we formulate a low-order model for the brain+hand+spring dynamics based on known mechanical and neurophysiological properties of the system. By systematically occluding vision and anesthetically blocking thumbpad sensation in 12 consenting subjects, we found that vision contributed to dynamic manipulation only when thumbpad sensation was absent. The reduced ability of the model system to compress the spring with absent sensory channels closely resembled the experimental results. Moreover, we found that the model reproduced the contextual usefulness of vision only if we took account of time-delays. Our results shed light on critical features of dynamic manipulation distinct from those of static pinch, as well as the mechanism likely responsible for loss of manual dexterity and increased reliance on vision when age or neuromuscular disease increase noisiness and/or time-delays during sensorimotor integration. PMID:17400231

  8. Orthopedic surgery and bone fracture pain are both significantly attenuated by sustained blockade of nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Majuta, Lisa A.; Longo, Geraldine; Fealk, Michelle N.; McCaffrey, Gwen; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients suffering from postoperative pain due to orthopedic surgery and bone fracture is projected to dramatically increase because the human life span, weight, and involvement in high-activity sports continue to rise worldwide. Joint replacement or bone fracture frequently results in skeletal pain that needs to be adequately controlled for the patient to fully participate in needed physical rehabilitation. Currently, the 2 major therapies used to control skeletal pain are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates, both of which have significant unwanted side effects. To assess the efficacy of novel therapies, mouse models of orthopedic and fracture pain were developed and evaluated here. These models, orthopedic surgery pain and bone fracture pain, resulted in skeletal painrelated behaviors that lasted 3 weeks and 8 to 10 weeks, respectively. These skeletal pain behaviors included spontaneous and palpation-induced nocifensive behaviors, dynamic weight bearing, limb use, and voluntary mechanical loading of the injured hind limb. Administration of antinerve growth factor before orthopedic surgery or after bone fracture attenuated skeletal pain behaviors by 40% to 70% depending on the end point being assessed. These data suggest that nerve growth factor is involved in driving pain due to orthopedic surgery or bone fracture. These animal models may be useful in developing an understanding of the mechanisms that drive postoperative orthopedic and bone fracture pain and the development of novel therapies to treat these skeletal pains. PMID:25599311

  9. Fluid Manipulation Utilizing Electrowetting Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Laura; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The fraction of the pore space in rock occupied by a given fluid is called saturation. The relationship between saturation and capillary pressure for porous media is hysteretic between imbibition and drainage cycles. If the wetting phase saturation increases, the capillary pressure follows an imbibition curve, and, if the wetting phase saturation decreases, the capillary pressure follows the drainage curve. Due to this hysteresis, researchers have suggested that there is a third variable that should be considered called interfacial area per volume that removes the ambiguity in the capillary pressure - saturation relationship. Before the relationship can be explored in more detail, we first must be able to manipulate the saturation internally rather than externally. We used electrowetting techniques to manipulate the contact angle of a salt water drop. This technique affects the interfacial energy and, therefore, enables manipulation of the contact angles and saturation. Once mastered, the technique could be used to explore the effect of interfacial area per volume on micromodel systems. NSF REU

  10. Detection and manipulation of phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Idevall-Hagren, Olof; De Camilli, Pietro

    2015-06-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) are minor components of cell membranes, but play key roles in cell function. Recent refinements in techniques for their detection, together with imaging methods to study their distribution and changes, have greatly facilitated the study of these lipids. Such methods have been complemented by the parallel development of techniques for the acute manipulation of their levels, which in turn allow bypassing the long-term adaptive changes implicit in genetic perturbations. Collectively, these advancements have helped elucidate the role of PIs in physiology and the impact of the dysfunction of their metabolism in disease. Combining methods for detection and manipulation enables the identification of specific roles played by each of the PIs and may eventually lead to the complete deconstruction of the PI signaling network. Here, we review current techniques used for the study and manipulation of cellular PIs and also discuss advantages and disadvantages associated with the various methods. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phosphoinositides. PMID:25514766

  11. Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Whitaker, K.W.; Kirkegaard, R.D.

    1998-08-15

    The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  12. Endovascular Treatment in Emergency Setting of Acute Arterial Injuries After Orthopedic Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Fontana, Federico Mangini, Monica Ierardi, Anna Maria Lagana, Domenico; Piacentino, Filippo Vizzari, Francesco Alberto Spano, Emanuela Fugazzola, Carlo

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of acute arterial injuries after orthopedic surgery. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients (mean age 68.3 years) with acute arterial injuries after orthopedic surgery were observed, in particular, 5 patients with pseudoaneurysm, 9 patients with active bleeding, and 1 patient with arterial dissection. Transarterial embolization (TAE) and positioning of covered and noncovered stents were the treatments performed. Follow-up after stent implantation (mean 36 months) was performed with color Doppler US (CDU) at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Plain X-ray was performed to evidence dislodgment or fracture of the graft. A minimum of 12 months' follow-up is available after TAE. Results: Immediate technical success was obtained in all cases. No major complications occurred. Overall clinical success rate was 100%. During mean follow-up, stent-graft occlusions did not occurred. No recurrence and/or consequence of TAE was registered during a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Conclusions: Percutaneous treatment is a feasible and safe tool for treating arterial injuries because it can provide fast and definitive resolution of the damage. This low-invasiveness approach can be proposed as first-line treatment in patients with acute injuries after orthopedic surgery.

  13. Pilot study for an orthopedic surgical training laboratory for basic motor skills.

    PubMed

    Christy, Jonathan M; Kolovich, Gregory P; Beal, Matthew D; Mayerson, Joel L

    2014-11-01

    The most effective way to teach and assess a resident's knowledge of musculoskeletal medicine, including orthopedic-specific surgical skills, remains unclear. We designed a surgical skills training session to educate junior-level orthopedic residents in 4 core areas: comfort with basic power equipment, casting/splinting, suturing, and surgical instrument identification. As part of the study reported here, 11 orthopedic residents (postgraduate year 1-3) completed a skills session and were evaluated with written examinations and an ankle fracture model before and after the session. Four other junior residents were unable to attend the session because of clinical responsibilities. For the group of 11 residents who completed the written examination, mean (SD) presession percentile was 87.3 (10.4), mean (SD) postsession percentile was 92 (8.4), median was 96, and mode was 96. There was a significant pre-post difference among all test takers, regardless of training level (P < .05). In the ankle fracture model, for the entire group, mean (SD) overall presession percentile was 68.6 (13.9), and mean (SD) overall postsession percentile was 95.2 (5.2). There was a significant pre-post difference among all test takers, regardless of training level (P = .03). An intensive laboratory has the potential to improve junior-level residents' basic surgical skills and knowledge. PMID:25379752

  14. The Use of Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced (CFR) PEEK Material in Orthopedic Implants: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan Silvia; Vannabouathong, Christopher; Sprague, Sheila; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) has been successfully used in orthopedic implants. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the properties, technical data, and safety of CFR-PEEK biomaterial and to evaluate its potential for new innovation in the design of articulating medical devices. A comprehensive search in PubMed and EMBASE was conducted to identify articles relevant to the outcomes of CFR-PEEK orthopedic implants. The search was also expanded by reviewing the reference sections of selected papers and references and benchmark reports provided by content experts. A total of 23 articles were included in this review. There is limited literature available assessing the performance of CFR-PEEK, specifically as an implant material for arthroplasty systems. Nevertheless, available studies strongly support CFR-PEEK as a promising and suitable material for orthopedic implants because of its biocompatibility, material characteristics, and mechanical durability. Future studies should continue to investigate CFR-PEEK’s potential benefits. PMID:25780341

  15. Orthopedic Surgeon's Awareness Can Improve Osteoporosis Treatment Following Hip Fracture: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Rim; Park, Yong-Geun; Lee, Sung-Rak; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2011-01-01

    Through retrospective Jeju-cohort study at 2005, we found low rates of detection of osteoporosis (20.1%) and medication for osteoporosis (15.5%) in those who experienced hip fracture. This study was to determine the orthopedic surgeons' awareness could increase the osteoporosis treatment rate after a hip fracture and the patient barriers to osteoporosis management. We prospectively followed 208 patients older than 50 yr who were enrolled for hip fractures during 2007 in Jeju-cohort. Thirty four fractures in men and 174 in women were treated at the eight hospitals. During the study period, orthopedic surgeons who worked at these hospitals attended two education sessions and were provided with posters and brochures. Patients were interviewed 6 months after discharge using an evaluation questionnaire regarding their perceptions of barriers to osteoporosis treatment. The patients were followed for a minimum of one year. Ninety-four patients (45.2%) underwent detection of osteoporosis by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and 67 (32.2%) were prescribed medication for osteoporosis at the time of discharge. According to the questionnaire, the most common barrier to treatment for osteoporosis after a hip fracture was patients reluctance. The detection and medication rate for osteoporosis after hip fracture increased twofold after orthopedic surgeons had attended the intervention program. Nevertheless, the osteoporosis treatment rate remains inadequate. PMID:22065908

  16. The Factor Structure of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in Orthopedic Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Man; Bounsanga, Jerry; Tang, Philip; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background Many instruments exist to assess mental disorders and anxiety, such as the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Nothing has been evaluated on the HADS factor structure for use with orthopedic trauma patients. The aim of this study was to validate the underlying structure of the HADS. Specifically, we sought to understand which of the factor structures found in the literature is appropriate for the orthopedic trauma patient population. Methods This study included 348 patients with an average age of 49.8 years (SD: 18.4; range: 18 - 95). Confirmatory data analysis was performed to analyze the latent structure of the HADS. Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to compare all the models, with the lowest AIC being the best fitting model. Results We found that both the anxiety and the depression factors were highly correlated (with Pearson correlations greater than 0.700). After removing one item from each subscale, we found that a two-factor model was the best fitting one (AIC: 8,298.901); all other models had an AIC over 10,000. Conclusion Our results support a satisfactory two-factor structure for the HADS in the orthopedic trauma patients. Further studies are needed to test for higher factor structures in larger samples and in a different population. PMID:25883709

  17. Is the orthopedic fellowship interview process broken? A survey of program directors and residents.

    PubMed

    Oladeji, Lasun O; Pehler, Stephen F; Raley, James A; Khoury, Joseph G; Ponce, Brent A

    2015-11-01

    Most orthopedic surgery residents pursue fellowship training. The fellowship interview process requires considerable time and financial investment from residents and residency programs. We conducted a study of the time, financial, and program disruption impact the fellowship interview process has on residents and residency programs. Two mixed-response questionnaires were sent to orthopedic surgery residency directors and postgraduate year 4 and 5 residents. Responses were received from 45 program directors and 129 residents. Sixty-two percent of the directors thought the interview process was extremely disruptive to their program. On average, the residents applied to 19 programs, received 14 interview offers, attended 11 interviews, were away from residency training 11 days, and spent $5875 on travel. About 70% of directors and residents wanted changes made to the orthopedic fellowship interview process. Sixty percent of the directors wanted interviews conducted in a central location. Our results highlight that time away from residency training, financial costs associated with the fellowship interview process, and disruption of the residency program are substantial. PMID:26566560

  18. Orthopedic Injuries and Their Treatment in Children During Earthquakes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Ilaria; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Bortolin, Michelangelo

    2015-10-01

    Orthopedic injuries commonly affect children during earthquakes, but reports about them are rare. This setting may lead to different standards of care, but guidelines are still missing in this field. A systematic review was performed to: (1) assess type and body distribution of pediatric earthquake-related injuries, treatment performed, length of stay, and complications; and (2) identify starting points to define standards of care. PubMed database was researched for papers (1999-2014 period) in agreement with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement. Inclusion criteria were: English, French, Spanish, or Italian language and data reported about orthopedic lesions in children (?18 years old). Reviews, letters, commentaries, editorials, and single case reports were excluded. Two independent reviewers selected articles after abstract and full-text reading. Traumatic injuries caused child hospital admissions ranging from 46.9% to 100.0%; 16% to 53% suffered fractures. Lower limbs mostly were involved. Soft-tissue injuries affected 55% of patients. Debridement and external fixation (EF) were the most frequent surgical treatments. Amputation rates varied from 5% to 11%. This study revealed that field hospitals should be prepared to: (1) treat mainly lower extremities fractures in children; and (2) use especially EF techniques. The presence of orthopedic surgeons familiar with pediatric traumatology should be considered. PMID:26286704

  19. The roles of funding source, clinical trial outcome, and quality of reporting in orthopedic surgery literature.

    PubMed

    Khan, Safdar N; Mermer, Matthew J; Myers, Elizabeth; Sandhu, Harvinder S

    2008-12-01

    Compared with nonfunded or peer-reviewed funded projects, industry-sponsored clinical trials have traditionally been associated with more positive results. This relationship has been extensively studied in the nonsurgical literature. Although a few authors have addressed specialties, little has been reported on orthopedic clinical trials and their association with funding, study outcome, and efforts to reduce bias after randomization across journals of multiple subspecialties. For the study reported here, we selected 5 major orthopedic subspecialty journals: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American Volume), Spine, Journal of Arthroplasty, Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, and American Journal of Sports Medicine. We chose a 2-year limit for investigation (2002-2004); included all original randomized clinical trials reported in these 5 journals; and examined these trials for their study design, funding source, outcome, bias potential, and conclusion reached. Support for the 100 eligible orthopedic clinical trials was stated as coming from industry (26 trials, 26%), nonprofit sources (19 trials, 19%), and mixed sources (5 trials, 5%); no support was stated in 46 trials (46%), and support was not reported in 4 trials (4%). Of the 26 trials reporting industry support, 22 (85%) were graded as indicating an outcome favorable to the new treatment. The association between industry funding and favorable outcome was strong and significant (P<.001). In almost half of the studies reported in Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery and Spine, measures taken to reduce bias were not documented. PMID:19212579

  20. Sol-Gel Derived Hydroxyapatite Coating on Mg-3Zn Alloy for Orthopedic Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sanjay; Manoj Kumar, R.; Kuntal, Kishor Kumar; Gupta, Pallavi; Das, Snehashish; Jayaganthan, R.; Roy, Partha; Lahiri, Debrupa

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, magnesium and its alloys have gained a lot of interest as orthopedic implant constituents because their biodegradability and mechanical properties are closer to that of human bone. However, one major concern with Mg in orthopedics is its high corrosion rate that results in the reduction of mechanical integrity before healing the bone tissue. The current study evaluates the sol-gel-derived hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on a selected Mg alloy (Mg-3Zn) for decreasing the corrosion rate and increasing the bioactivity of the Mg surface. The mechanical integrity of the coating is established as a function of the surface roughness of the substrate and the sintering temperature of the coating. Coating on a substrate roughness of 15-20 nm and sintering at 400C shows the mechanical properties in similar range of bone, thus making it suitable to avoid the stress-shielding effect. The hydroxyapatite coating on the Mg alloy surface also increases corrosion resistance very significantly by 40 times. Bone cells are also found proliferating better in the HA-coated surface. All these benefits together establish the candidature of sol-gel HA-coated Mg-3Zn alloy in orthopedic application.

  1. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among orthopedic trauma surgeons: an OTA survey

    PubMed Central

    AlQahtani, Saad M.; Alzahrani, Mohammad M.; Harvey, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Occupational injuries and hazards have gained increased attention in the surgical community in general and in the orthopedic literature specifically. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence and characteristics of musculoskeletal disorders among orthopedic trauma surgeons and the impact of these injuries on the surgeons’ practices. Methods We sent a modified version of the physical discomfort survey to surgeon members of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) via email. Data were collected and descriptive statistics were analyzed. Results A total of 86 surgeons completed the survey during the period of data collection; 84.9% were men, more than half were 45 years or older and 40.6% were in practice for 10 years or more. More than 66% of respondents reported a musculoskeletal disorder that was related to work; the most common was low back pain (29.3%). The number of body regions involved and disorders diagnosed was associated with increasing age and number of years in practice (p = 0.033). Time off work owing to these disorders was associated with working in a private setting (p = 0.045) and working in more than 1 institute (p = 0.009). Conclusion To our knowledge, our study is the first to report a high percentage of orthopedic trauma surgeons sustaining occupational injuries some time in their careers. The high cost of management and rehabilitation of these injuries in addition to the related number of missed work days indicate the need for increased awareness and implementation of preventive measures. PMID:26812408

  2. Perioperative management of patients with severe pulmonary hypertension in major orthopedic surgery: experience-based recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Seyfarth, Hans-Jrgen; Gille, Jochen; Sablotzki, Armin; Gerlach, Stefan; Malcharek, Michael; Gosse, Andreas; Gahr, Ralf H.; Czeslick, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: It is known that pulmonary hypertension is associated with worse outcome in both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. The aims of our retrospective analysis were to evaluate the outcomes of our patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing major orthopedic surgery and to give experience-based recommendations for the perioperative management. Material and methods: From 92 patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing different kinds of surgical procedures from 20112014 in a tertiary academic hospital we evaluated 16 patients with major orthopedic surgery for perioperative morbidity and mortality. Results: Regarding the in-hospital morbidity and mortality, one patient died postoperatively due to pulmonary infection and right heart failure (6.25%) and 6 patients suffered significant postoperative complications (37.5%; bleeding = 1, infection = 1, wound healing deficits = 3; dysrhythmia = 1). Conclusion: Our data show that major orthopedic surgery is feasible with satisfactory outcome even in cases of severe pulmonary hypertension by an individualized, disease-adapted interdisciplinary treatment concept. PMID:26504732

  3. Self indentified personality patterns of children with facial or orthopedic disfigurement.

    PubMed

    Richman, L C; Harper, D C

    1979-07-01

    This study compared personality characteristics of children with cleft lip and palate to another group of children with different observable physical impairment (orthopedic disability) and speech difficulties. It was hypothesized that different types of observable physical stigmata may result in different personality adaptations. Forty-five children from each of two groups (25 males and 20 females) were matched for sex, age, and intelligence. They were compared using the Missouri Children's Picture Series, a non-verbal personality test, on the following dimensions: Conformity, Masculinity/Femininity, Maturity, Agression, Inhibition, Activity Level Sleep Disturbance and Somatization. The results indicate that males with cleft lip and palate are significantly higher on Maturity and Inhibition while Orthopedically Disabled males are higher on Agression, Activity Level, and Somatization. Cleft lip and palate females are significantly higher on Maturity and Inhibition while Orthopedically Disabled females are higher on Masculinity. The results indicate differential personality adaptations in the two different types of observable physical impairments. Results are discussed in terms of their relationship to selected psychosocial variables. PMID:156610

  4. Intravenous paracetamol reduces postoperative opioid consumption after orthopedic surgery: a systematic review of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jebaraj, Bright; Maitra, Souvik; Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Khanna, Puneet

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative pain management is one of the most challenging jobs in orthopedic surgical population as it comprises of patients from extremes of ages and with multiple comorbidities. Though effective, opioids may contribute to serious adverse effects particularly in old age patients. Intravenous paracetamol is widely used in the postoperative period with the hope that it may reduce opioid consumption and produce better pain relief. A brief review of human clinical trials where intravenous paracetamol was compared with placebo or no treatment in postoperative period in orthopedic surgical population has been done here. We found that four clinical trials reported that there is a significant reduction in postoperative opioid consumption. When patients received an IV injection of 2 g propacetamol, reduction of morphine consumption up to 46% has been reported. However, one study did not find any reduction of opioid requirement after spinal surgery in children and adolescent. Four clinical trials reported better pain scores when paracetamol has been used, but other three trials denied. We conclude that postoperative intravenous paracetamol is a safe and effective adjunct to opioid after orthopedic surgery, but at present there is no data to decide whether paracetamol reduces opioid related adverse effects or not. PMID:24307945

  5. The Mystery and History of Spinal Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Michael C. P.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of spinal manipulation and shows its origin in an obscure past among many cultures. The author suggests reasons for the medical profession's relative disinterest in manipulation, but questions this attitude. PMID:20469344

  6. Iterative inverse kinematics with manipulator configuration control

    SciTech Connect

    Grudic, G.Z.; Lawrence, P.D.

    1993-08-01

    A new method, termed the offset modification method (OM method), for solving the manipulator inverse kinematics problem is presented. The OM method works by modifying the link offset values of a manipulator until it is possible to derive closed-form inverse kinematics equations for the resulting manipulator (termed the model manipulator). This procedure allows one to derive a set of three nonlinear equations in three unknowns that, when numerically solved, give an inverse kinematics solution for the original manipulator. The OM method can be applied to manipulators with any number of degrees of freedom, as long as the manipulator satisfies a given set of conditions (Theorem 1). The OM method is tested on a 6-degree-of-freedom manipulator that has no known closed-form inverse kinematics equations. It is shown that the OM method is applicable to real-time manipulator control, can be used to guarantee convergence to a desired endpoint position and orientation (if it exists), and allows one to directly choose which inverse kinematics solution the algorithm will converge to (as specified in the model manipulator closed-form inverse kinematics equations). Applications of the method to other 6-DOF manipulator geometries and to redundant manipulators (i.e. greater than 6 DOF geometries) are discussed.

  7. Manipulative therapy (Feldenkrais, massage, chiropractic manipulation) for neck pain.

    PubMed

    Plastaras, Christopher; Schran, Seth; Kim, Natasha; Darr, Deborah; Chen, Mary Susan

    2013-07-01

    Neck pain is an extremely common symptom with many possible etiologies. A substantial number of patients are turning to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Low-quality evidence supports the beneficial effects of CAM. Feldenkrais, massage therapy, and spinal manipulation are discussed in detail. Complications are generally benign and self-limited, although occasional catastrophic consequences have been documented. Despite the favorable opinion many rheumatologists have of some CAM therapy, many patients are not disclosing CAM use to their medical providers. By expressing interest, asking questions, and taking a shared-decision-making approach, providers can encourage disclosure and provide valuable input. PMID:23666468

  8. Models of remote manipulation in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannaford, Blake

    1991-01-01

    Robots involved in high value manipulation must be effectively coupled to a human operator either at the work-site or remotely connected via communication links. In order to make use of experimental performance evaluation data, models must be developed. Powerful models of remote manipulation by humans can be used to predict manipulation performance in future systems based on today's laboratory systems. In this paradigm, the models are developed from experimental data, and then used to predict performance in slightly different situations. Second, accurate telemanipulation will allow design of manipulation systems which extend manipulation capability beyond its current bounds.

  9. Earth orbital teleoperator manipulator system evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brye, R. G.; Frederick, P. N.; Kirkpatrick, M., III; Shields, N. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The operator's ability to perform five manipulator tip movements while using monoptic and stereoptic video systems was assessed. Test data obtained were compared with previous results to determine the impact of camera placement and stereoptic viewing on manipulator system performance. The tests were performed using the NASA MSFC extendible stiff arm Manipulator and an analog joystick controller. Two basic manipulator tasks were utilized. The minimum position change test required the operator to move the manipulator arm to touch a target contract. The dexterity test required removal and replacement of pegs.

  10. Failure tolerant operation of kinematically redundant manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Christopher L.; Maciejewski, Anthony A.

    1994-01-01

    Redundant manipulators may compensate for failed joints with their additional degrees of freedom. In this paper such a manipulator is considered fault tolerant if it can guarantee completion of a task after any one of its joints has failed. This fault tolerance of kinematically redundant manipulators is insured here. Methods to analyze the manipulator's work space find regions inherently suitable for critical tasks because of their high level of failure tolerance. Constraints are then placed on the manipulator's range of motion to guarantee completion of a task.

  11. Technology for concrete pipe manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Wang, Dan; Lin, Renzhi

    2009-12-01

    The pipe manipulator is a developing mechatronic system to enhance productivity and protects workers from cave-ins in the trench while excavating and laying pipe. The pipe manipulator is for installing concrete pipe into the trench. It is an optical-electro-mechanical system. The mechanism is make up of two parts, the upside and underside. The upside is for lifting the equipment by backhoe and rotating the underside mechanism. It includes rigidity lift beams, holding pad, four-bar linkages, hydraulic cylinder, rotating support, and rotating mechanism. Holding pad will press the bucket back to keep the bucket hooking the pipe man safely and stably. The underside mechanism is for lifting, holding and adjusting the pipe section's stance. The underside mechanism includes support trolley, and lift fork. The support trolley is driven by hydraulic cylinder for moving the fork forward or backward while laying a pipe into trench. The fork is with a self-lock mechanism for preventing the pipe from slide out of the prongs. A new photoelectric locating system is developed for auto-measuring the installing pipe section's stance within the work area. The laser target has been developed as a key part in the photoelectric locating systems. The photoelectric target is a rotating polar coordinate. Photodiodes are used for making the polar radius. There is an angular displacement sensor sitting on the heart-axis of the target for measuring angle of the target rotating. The pipe manipulator can be located by the system, and the locating methods have been presented at last of the paper.

  12. Technology for concrete pipe manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Wang, Dan; Lin, Renzhi

    2010-01-01

    The pipe manipulator is a developing mechatronic system to enhance productivity and protects workers from cave-ins in the trench while excavating and laying pipe. The pipe manipulator is for installing concrete pipe into the trench. It is an optical-electro-mechanical system. The mechanism is make up of two parts, the upside and underside. The upside is for lifting the equipment by backhoe and rotating the underside mechanism. It includes rigidity lift beams, holding pad, four-bar linkages, hydraulic cylinder, rotating support, and rotating mechanism. Holding pad will press the bucket back to keep the bucket hooking the pipe man safely and stably. The underside mechanism is for lifting, holding and adjusting the pipe section's stance. The underside mechanism includes support trolley, and lift fork. The support trolley is driven by hydraulic cylinder for moving the fork forward or backward while laying a pipe into trench. The fork is with a self-lock mechanism for preventing the pipe from slide out of the prongs. A new photoelectric locating system is developed for auto-measuring the installing pipe section's stance within the work area. The laser target has been developed as a key part in the photoelectric locating systems. The photoelectric target is a rotating polar coordinate. Photodiodes are used for making the polar radius. There is an angular displacement sensor sitting on the heart-axis of the target for measuring angle of the target rotating. The pipe manipulator can be located by the system, and the locating methods have been presented at last of the paper.

  13. Genetic Manipulation of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Welker, Elliott; Domfeh, Yayra; Tyagi, Deepti; Sinha, Sanjivni; Fisher, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, environmental bacterium that is emerging as an important nosocomial pathogen with high rates of attributable mortality in severely ill patients. S. maltophilia is of particular concern to patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) as it has been shown to colonize airway epithelial and establish a chronic infection. Here we describe several molecular techniques for the genetic manipulation of this bacterium, including DNA extraction, RNA extraction, conjugation of plasmids from Escherichia coli and allelic exchange. PMID:26344220

  14. Control & Manipulation of Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piot, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The concepts of the advanced accelerators and light source rely on the production of bright electron beams. The rms areas of the beam phase space often need to be tailored to the specific applications. Furthermore, a new class of the forefront research calls for detailed specific distribution such as the particle density in the time coordinate. Several groups are tackling these various challenges and in this report we attempt to give a review of the state-of-the-art of the control and manipulation of the electron beams.

  15. Staphylococcus epidermidis in Orthopedic Device Infections: The Role of Bacterial Internalization in Human Osteoblasts and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Valour, Florent; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Lustig, Sbastien; Chanard, Emmanuel; Meugnier, Hlne; Tigaud, Sylvestre; Vandenesch, Franois; Etienne, Jrome; Ferry, Tristan; Laurent, Frdric

    2013-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus epidermidis orthopedic device infections are caused by direct inoculation of commensal flora during surgery and remain rare, although S. epidermidis carriage is likely universal. We wondered whether S. epidermidis orthopedic device infection strains might constitute a sub-population of commensal isolates with specific virulence ability. Biofilm formation and invasion of osteoblasts by S. aureus contribute to bone and joint infection recurrence by protecting bacteria from the host-immune system and most antibiotics. We aimed to determine whether S. epidermidis orthopedic device infection isolates could be distinguished from commensal strains by their ability to invade osteoblasts and form biofilms. Materials and Methods Orthopedic device infection S. epidermidis strains (n?=?15) were compared to nasal carriage isolates (n?=?22). Osteoblast invasion was evaluated in an ex vivo infection model using MG63 osteoblastic cells co-cultured for 2 hours with bacteria. Adhesion of S. epidermidis to osteoblasts was explored by a flow cytometric approach, and internalized bacteria were quantified by plating cell lysates after selective killing of extra-cellular bacteria with gentamicin. Early and mature biofilm formations were evaluated by a crystal violet microtitration plate assay and the Biofilm Ring Test method. Results No difference was observed between commensal and infective strains in their ability to invade osteoblasts (internalization rate 308+/?631 and 347+/?431 CFU/well, respectively). This low internalization rate correlated with a low ability to adhere to osteoblasts. No difference was observed for biofilm formation between the two groups. Conclusion Osteoblast invasion and biofilm formation levels failed to distinguish S. epidermidis orthopedic device infection strains from commensal isolates. This study provides the first assessment of the interaction between S. epidermidis strains isolated from orthopedic device infections and osteoblasts, and suggests that bone cell invasion is not a major pathophysiological mechanism in S. epidermidis orthopedic device infections, contrary to what is observed for S. aureus. PMID:23840636

  16. On the dynamics of space manipulators using the Virtual Manipulator, with applications to path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vafa, Z.; Dubowsky, S.

    1990-01-01

    Robotic manipulators carried by future spacecraft are expected to perform important tasks in space, such as the servicing of satellites. However, the performance of these systems could be severely degraded by dynamic disturbances to the spacecraft caused by manipulator motions. This paper presents a method for representing the dynamics of space manipulator systems using the recently developed Virtual Manipulator (VM) concept. This representation is then applied to develop algorithms which can be used to plan manipulator motions that minimize disturbances of the spacecraft.

  17. Precise control of flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Bindford, T. O.; Schmitz, E.

    1984-01-01

    The design and experimental testing of end point position controllers for a very flexible one link lightweight manipulator are summarized. The latest upgraded version of the experimental set up, and the basic differences between conventional joint angle feedback and end point position feedback are described. A general procedure for application of modern control methods to the problem is outlined. The relationship between weighting parameters and the bandwidth and control stiffness of the resulting end point position closed loop system is shown. It is found that joint rate angle feedback in addition to the primary end point position sensor is essential for adequate disturbance rejection capability of the closed loop system. The use of a low order multivariable compensator design computer code; called Sandy is documented. A solution to the problem of control mode switching between position sensor sets is outlined. The proof of concept for endpoint position feedback for a one link flexible manipulator was demonstrated. The bandwidth obtained with the experimental end point position controller is about twice as fast as the beam's first natural cantilevered frequency, and comes within a factor of four of the absolute physical speed limit imposed by the wave propagation time of the beam.

  18. Genetic manipulation of Methanosarcina spp.

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Petra R. A.; Metcalf, William W.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of the third domain of life, the Archaea, is one of the most exciting findings of the last century. These remarkable prokaryotes are well known for their adaptations to extreme environments; however, Archaea have also conquered moderate environments. Many of the archaeal biochemical processes, such as methane production, are unique in nature and therefore of great scientific interest. Although formerly restricted to biochemical and physiological studies, sophisticated systems for genetic manipulation have been developed during the last two decades for methanogenic archaea, halophilic archaea and thermophilic, sulfur-metabolizing archaea. The availability of these tools has allowed for more complete studies of archaeal physiology and metabolism and most importantly provides the basis for the investigation of gene expression, regulation and function. In this review we provide an overview of methods for genetic manipulation of Methanosarcina spp., a group of methanogenic archaea that are key players in the global carbon cycle and which can be found in a variety of anaerobic environments. PMID:22837755

  19. Semantics of directly manipulating spatializations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinran; Bradel, Lauren; Maiti, Dipayan; House, Leanna; North, Chris; Leman, Scotland

    2013-12-01

    When high-dimensional data is visualized in a 2D plane by using parametric projection algorithms, users may wish to manipulate the layout of the data points to better reflect their domain knowledge or to explore alternative structures. However, few users are well-versed in the algorithms behind the visualizations, making parameter tweaking more of a guessing game than a series of decisive interactions. Translating user interactions into algorithmic input is a key component of Visual to Parametric Interaction (V2PI) [13]. Instead of adjusting parameters, users directly move data points on the screen, which then updates the underlying statistical model. However, we have found that some data points that are not moved by the user are just as important in the interactions as the data points that are moved. Users frequently move some data points with respect to some other 'unmoved' data points that they consider as spatially contextual. However, in current V2PI interactions, these points are not explicitly identified when directly manipulating the moved points. We design a richer set of interactions that makes this context more explicit, and a new algorithm and sophisticated weighting scheme that incorporates the importance of these unmoved data points into V2PI. PMID:24051771

  20. Actuators for a space manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, W.; Brunson, P.

    1987-01-01

    The robotic manipulator can be decomposed into distinct subsytems. One particular area of interest of mechanical subsystems is electromechanical actuators (or drives). A drive is defined as a motor with an appropriate transmission. An overview is given of existing, as well as state-of-the-art drive systems. The scope is limited to space applications. A design philosophy and adequate requirements are the initial steps in designing a space-qualified actuator. The focus is on the d-c motor in conjunction with several types of transmissions (harmonic, tendon, traction, and gear systems). The various transmissions will be evaluated and key performance parameters will be addressed in detail. Included in the assessment is a shuttle RMS joint and a MSFC drive of the Prototype Manipulator Arm. Compound joints are also investigated. Space imposes a set of requirements for designing a high-performance drive assembly. Its inaccessibility and cryogenic conditions warrant special considerations. Some guidelines concerning these conditions are present. The goal is to gain a better understanding in designing a space actuator.

  1. Self mobile space manipulator project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H. Ben; Friedman, Mark; Xu, Yangsheng; Kanade, Takeo

    1992-01-01

    A relatively simple, modular, low mass, low cost robot is being developed for space EVA that is large enough to be independently mobile on a space station or platform exterior, yet versatile enough to accomplish many vital tasks. The robot comprises two long flexible links connected by a rotary joint, with 2-DOF 'wrist' joints and grippers at each end. It walks by gripping pre-positioned attachment points, such as trusswork nodes, and alternately shifting its base of support from one foot (gripper) to the other. The robot can perform useful tasks such as visual inspection, material transport, and light assembly by manipulating objects with one gripper, while stabilizing itself with the other. At SOAR '90, we reported development of 1/3 scale robot hardware, modular trusswork to serve as a locomotion substrate, and a gravity compensation system to allow laboratory tests of locomotion strategies on the horizontal face of the trusswork. In this paper, we report on project progress including the development of: (1) adaptive control for automatic adjustment to loads; (2) enhanced manipulation capabilities; (3) machine vision, including the use of neural nets, to guide autonomous locomotion; (4) locomotion between orthogonal trusswork faces; and (5) improved facilities for gravity compensation and telerobotic control.

  2. Mobile remote manipulator vehicle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, Richard E. (Inventor); Jensen, J. Kermit (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A mobile remote manipulator system is disclosed for assembly, repair and logistics transport on, around and about a space station square bay truss structure. The vehicle is supported by a square track arrangement supported by guide pins integral with the space station truss structure and located at each truss node. Propulsion is provided by a central push-pull drive mechanism that extends out from the vehicle one full structural bay over the truss and locks drive rods into the guide pins. The draw bar is now retracted and the mobile remote manipulator system is pulled onto the next adjacent structural bay. Thus, translation of the vehicle is inchworm style. The drive bar can be locked onto two guide pins while the extendable draw bar is within the vehicle and then push the vehicle away one bay providing bidirectional push-pull drive. The track switches allow the vehicle to travel in two orthogonal directions over the truss structure which coupled with the bidirectional drive, allow movement in four directions on one plane. The top layer of this trilayered vehicle is a logistics platform. This platform is capable of 369 degees of rotation and will have two astronaut foot restraint platforms and a space crane integral.

  3. Autonomous manipulation on a robot: Summary of manipulator software functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    A six degree-of-freedom computer-controlled manipulator is examined, and the relationships between the arm's joint variables and 3-space are derived. Arm trajectories using sequences of third-degree polynomials to describe the time history of each joint variable are presented and two approaches to the avoidance of obstacles are given. The equations of motion for the arm are derived and then decomposed into time-dependent factors and time-independent coefficients. Several new and simplifying relationships among the coefficients are proven. Two sample trajectories are analyzed in detail for purposes of determining the most important contributions to total force in order that relatively simple approximations to the equations of motion can be used.

  4. Risk level analysis for deep vein thrombosis (DVT): A study of Turkish patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Byky?lmaz, Funda; ?endir, Merdiye; Autar, Ricky; Yazgan, ?lknur

    2015-09-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a prevalent problem for orthopedic patients, particularly owing to the nature of operative interventions and treatment procedures, predisposing to an high risk of DVT. This descriptive study was conducted to determine the levels of risk, the risk factors, and their odds ratio for DVT in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery. Data were collected using a Patient Information Form and the Autar DVT Risk Assessment Scale (DVTRAS) in orthopedic wards of a university hospital on postoperative day 2. Data were analyzed using descriptive, comparative analysis, and binary logistic regression. The 102 patients (mean age, 52.58 21.58 years) were hospitalized for a mean of 14.35 14.56. Of the sample, 53.9% were female, 65.7% had a history of previous surgery, and 54.9% had undergone total hip/knee arthroplastic surgery, 67.6% of patients wore graduated compression stockings, and 62.7% were administered liquid infusion. Those patients had moderate risk score (12.77 5.66) in the Autar DVTRAS. According to binary logistic regression analysis, aging, obesity, immobility, and acute and chronic diseases were significant risk factors for postoperative DVT (p ? .05). This study highlights evidence on the degree of DVT risk, risk factors, and impact of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing major orthopedic operations. For evidence-based clinical practice, these high-level risk factors should be taken into account in the prevention of DVT in orthopedic patients. PMID:26298613

  5. Reviewing the blood ordering schedule for elective orthopedic surgeries at a level one trauma care center

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Arulselvi; Rangarajan, Kanchana; Kumar, Sudeep; Sharma, Vijay; Farooque, Kamran; Misra, Mahesh Chandra

    2010-01-01

    Background: Patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgeries often incur excess blood loss necessitating transfusion. The preoperative placement of blood requests frequently overshoots the actual need resulting in unnecessary crossmatching. Aims: Our primary goal was to audit the blood utilization in elective orthopedic surgeries in our hospital over a 1-year period and recommend a blood ordering schedule. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent elective orthopedic surgeries over a period of 1 year was done. The data collected include patients age, sex, type of surgical procedure, pre- and postoperative hemoglobin (Hb) levels, number of units crossmatched, returned, transfused, crossmatch to transfusion ratio (C:T), transfusion indices, estimated blood loss for each surgical procedure, and the actual and predicted fall in Hb. We propose a blood ordering schedule based on surgical blood ordering equation. Results and Conclusions: A total of 487 patients with a median age of 3717 years (mean standard deviation) were evaluated. One thousand three hundred and seventy-seven units of blood were crossmatched and only 564 units were transfused to 260 patients. Fifty-nine percent of the units crossmatched were not transfused. Six of the 12 elective procedures had a C:T ratio higher than 2.5. Ten of the 12 procedures (83.3%) had a low transfusion index (TI < 0.5). The calculated red blood cell units were less than 0.5 in 5 of the 12 elective procedures, and hence we recommend a group and save policy for these procedures. Blood ordering schedule based on patient and surgical variables would provide an efficient way of blood utilization and management of resources. PMID:20930965

  6. The Use of Finite Element Analysis to Enhance Research and Clinical Practice in Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Ferris M

    2016-02-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) is a very powerful tool for the evaluation of biomechanics in orthopedics. Finite element (FE) simulations can effectively and efficiently evaluate thousands of variables (such as implant variation, surgical techniques, and various pathologies) to optimize design, screening, prediction, and treatment in orthopedics. Additionally, FEA can be used to retrospectively evaluate and troubleshoot complications or failures to prevent similar future occurrences. Finally, FE simulations are used to evaluate implants, procedures, and techniques in a time- and cost-effective manner. In this work, an overview of the development of FE models is provided and an example application is presented to simulate knee biomechanics for a specimen with medial meniscus insufficiency. FE models require the development of the geometry of interest, determination of the material properties of the tissues simulated, and an accurate application of a numerical solver to produce an accurate solution and representation of the field variables. The objectives of this work are to introduce the reader to the application of FEA in orthopedic analysis of the knee joint. A brief description of the model development process as well as a specific application to the investigation of knee joint stability in geometries with normal or compromised medial meniscal attachment is included. Significant increases in stretch of the anterior cruciate ligament were predicted in specimens with medial meniscus insufficiency (such behavior was confirmed in corresponding biomechanical testing). It can be concluded from this work that FE analysis of the knee can provide significant new information with which more effective clinical decisions can be made. PMID:26745731

  7. Is routine thromboprophylaxis justified among Indian patients sustaining major orthopedic trauma? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ramesh K; Tripathy, Sujit K; Singh, Amit K

    2011-05-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the most common preventable cause of morbidity and mortality after trauma. Though most of the western countries have their guidelines for thromboprophylaxis in these patients, India still does not have these. The increasing detection of VTE among Indian population, lack of awareness, underestimation of the risk, and fear of bleeding complications after chemical prophylaxis have made deep vein thrombosis (DVT) a serious problem, hence a standard guideline for thromboprophylaxis after trauma is essential. The present review article discusses the incidence of DVT and role of thromboprophylaxis in Indian patients who have sustained major orthopedic trauma. A thorough search of 'PubMed' and 'Google Scholar' revealed 10 studies regarding venous thromboembolism in Indian patients after major orthopedic trauma surgery (hip or proximal femur fracture and spine injury). Most of these studies have evaluated venous thromboembolism in patients of arthroplasty and trauma. The incidence, risk factors, diagnosis and management of VTE in the subgroup of trauma patients (1049 patients) were separately evaluated after segregating them from the arthroplasty patients. Except two studies, which were based on spinal injury, all other studies recommended screening/ thromboprophylaxis in posttraumatic conditions in the Indian population. Color Doppler was used as common diagnostic or screening tool in most of the studies (eight studies, 722 patients). The incidence of VTE among thromboprophylaxis-receiving group was found to be 8% (10/125), whereas it was much higher (14.49%, 40/276) in patients not receiving any form of prophylaxis. Indian patients have definite risk of venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic trauma (except spinal injury), and thromboprophylaxis either by chemical or mechanical methods seems to be justified in them. PMID:21559098

  8. Solutions for reducing lawsuits in orthopedic surgery by using psychology and IT technology.

    PubMed

    Purcarea, V L; Cazac, C

    2015-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery is among the top 5 medical specialties with an increased risk of facing a lawsuit. A large part of medical malpractice claims are due to poor communication between physician and patient; therefore, by addressing this issue and implementing psychological methods as well as IT solutions, a reduction in the incidence of medical lawsuits can be achieved. Some of these solutions include implementing and applying psychometric tools such as the SF-36 and SCL-90R tests, creating virtual information hubs for the patient, and establishing efficient communication methods by using IT technology between physician and patient. PMID:26361511

  9. Differences in the Clinical Outcome of Osteomyelitis by Treating Specialty: Orthopedics or Infectology

    PubMed Central

    Cardona Arango, Doris; Capataz Taffur, Cesar Antonio; Correa Prada, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a heterogeneous infection with regard to etiology and treatment, and currently no single management protocol exists. Management of the condition is typically an interdisciplinary approach between orthopedics and infectious disease; however, the orthopedist is often the person who manages treatment. The aim of the study was to determine differences in the outcome of osteomyelitis according to its treating specialty and to identify factors associated with the recurrence of the disease. An ambispective cohort study of 129 patients with osteomyelitis was conducted and the proportions for qualitative variables and central tendency and dispersion measures for quantitative variables were calculated; the latter were tested for normality using the Shapiro-Wilk test. A bivariate analysis was conducted with measures of association based on the chi square test and crude relative risk. A logistic regression model was applied and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05, including the model of relevant clinical variables that fit the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. We found that 70% of patients were treated either by orthopedics or infectious disease. Patients who were treated by an orthopedist alone presented a greater risk of relapse or reinfection (RR = 4.6; 95% CI 2.3;8.9). Risk factors of osteomyelitis recurrence as determined in the regression model included the following: age of 57 years or older (RR = 1.3; 95% 0.3;5.2), long bones (RR = 1.9; 95% CI 0.5;7.1), fracture (RR = 5.0; 95% CI 0.4;51.4), monotherapy (RR = 3.0; 95% CI 0.6;14.5), receiving less than 4 weeks of antibiotics (RR = 1.5; 95% CI 0.2;10.1), inadequate treatment (RR = 3.1; 95% CI 0.4;20.1), and receiving orthopedics treatment (RR = 5.5; 95% CI 1.6;18.2). Most patients evaluated jointly by orthopedics and infectious disease received adequate treatment for osteomyelitis and had fewer relapses. PMID:26678551

  10. Non-Osteotomy and Osteotomy Large Animal Fracture Models in Orthopedic Trauma Research

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Sebastian; Reifenrath, Janin; Omar, Mohamed; Krettek, Christian; Müller, Christian W.

    2014-01-01

    Large animal fracture models are important in the field of orthopedic trauma research. New implants are tested in animals before being implanted into humans. Large animals like sheep or swine often are more properly to simulate conditions in humans, e.g. biomechanical demands, compared to rodents. Cited articles mainly analyze shock or fracture healing. Both osteotomy and non-osteotomy fracture models have been used in the past. However, comparative studies are rare and clear recommendation when to use which model are missing. This review will summarize large animal fracture models putting special emphasis on non-osteotomy fracture models. PMID:25568730

  11. Adaptation of NASA technology for the optimization of orthopedic knee implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology originally developed for the optimization of composite structures (engine blades) is adapted and applied to the optimization of orthopedic knee implants. A method is developed enabling the tailoring of the implant for optimal interaction with the environment of the tibia. The shape of the implant components are optimized, such that the stresses in the bone are favorably controlled to minimize bone degradation and prevent failures. A pilot tailoring system is developed and the feasibility of the concept is elevated. The optimization system is expected to provide the means for improving knee prosthesis and individual implant tailoring for each patient.

  12. iPhone and iPad Use in Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Scott F. M.; Hendawi, Tariq K.; Sperling, John; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Hartsock, Landon

    2015-01-01

    Background Thousands of healthcare mobile applications (apps) are available, and physicians are increasingly recognizing that mobile technology can improve their workflow and allow them to practice medicine in a better and/or more efficient manner. Methods This article highlights apps compatible with the iPhone and iPad and their utility to the busy orthopedic surgeon. Results Currently available apps address every aspect of healthcare: patient management, reference, education, and research. Conclusion Key aspects of helpful apps include low cost (preferably free), a user-friendly interface, and simplicity. PMID:25829881

  13. The Evidence-Based Principles of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Trauma & Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    A, Novak; Khan, Wasim S; J, Palmer

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a popular treatment for the management of both acute and chronic wounds. Its use in trauma and orthopedics is diverse and includes the acute traumatic setting as well as chronic troublesome wounds associated with pressure sores and diabetic foot surgery. Efforts have been made to provide an evidence base to guide its use however this has been limited by a lack of good quality evidence. The following review article explores the available evidence and describes future developments for its use in trauma and orthopaedic practice. PMID:25067971

  14. Solutions for reducing lawsuits in orthopedic surgery by using psychology and IT technology

    PubMed Central

    Purcarea, VL; Cazac, C

    2015-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery is among the top 5 medical specialties with an increased risk of facing a lawsuit. A large part of medical malpractice claims are due to poor communication between physician and patient; therefore, by addressing this issue and implementing psychological methods as well as IT solutions, a reduction in the incidence of medical lawsuits can be achieved. Some of these solutions include implementing and applying psychometric tools such as the SF-36 and SCL-90R tests, creating virtual information hubs for the patient, and establishing efficient communication methods by using IT technology between physician and patient. PMID:26361511

  15. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Orthopedic Surgery under Combined Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Vilhena, Ditza; Pereira, Lus; Duarte, Delfim; Oliveira, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative hearing loss following nonotologic surgery is rare. For patients undergoing subarachnoid anesthesia, the loss of cerebral spinal fluid and hence the drop in intracranial pressure can result in hearing loss and cranial nerve palsy. We report a case in which a patient sustained orthopedic surgery under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia complicated by severe and persistent sensorineural hearing loss. This report is a reminder that postoperative sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a poorly understood complication. A high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis of this complication, although prompt treatment does not guarantee a good outcome. PMID:26904339

  16. The evidence-based principles of negative pressure wound therapy in trauma & orthopedics.

    PubMed

    A, Novak; Khan, Wasim S; J, Palmer

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a popular treatment for the management of both acute and chronic wounds. Its use in trauma and orthopedics is diverse and includes the acute traumatic setting as well as chronic troublesome wounds associated with pressure sores and diabetic foot surgery. Efforts have been made to provide an evidence base to guide its use however this has been limited by a lack of good quality evidence. The following review article explores the available evidence and describes future developments for its use in trauma and orthopaedic practice. PMID:25067971

  17. An Er:YAG laser bone cutting manipulator for precise rotational acetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, D; Owada, H; Hata, N; Dohi, T

    2004-01-01

    Rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) has an important advantage in that surgical bony defects are reconstructed with a patients' own tissue. We propose a surgical robot for the RAO using Er:YAG laser irradiating mounted on iliac bone to operate RAO precisely and to reduce recovery and trauma. A water-cooling Er:YAG laser (30 J/cm/sup 2/, l=2.94 mum, 20 Hz, 200 msec) that used optical fiber was operated 4-8 irradiation-overlapping ratio. We kept the distance between the laser and the bone at 0.25 mm using force sensor and spring to maintain effective ablation. Swine scapulae were ablated and performance was evaluated. The manipulator was operated mounting on iliac bone to get a filed position whereby resulting in precise bone cutting. The precision of the manipulator was within 0.3 mm and the efficiency of laser bone ablations per unit time optimized to 0.21 mm/sup 3//secW at the overlapping ratio of the irradiation area was 0.8, meaning a given ablated area was irradiated five times. The troughs showed m charring at this condition and the temperature of the surface was raised to 41.3 degrees C and it lasted only 5 seconds. We are sure that this research will be applied to orthopedics in the near future. PMID:17270846

  18. Controlling multiple manipulators using RIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yulun; Jordan, Steve; Mangaser, Amante; Butner, Steve

    1989-01-01

    A prototype of the RIPS architecture (Robotic Instruction Processing System) was developed. A two arm robot control experiment is underway to characterize the architecture as well as research multi-arm control. This experiment uses two manipulators to cooperatively position an object. The location of the object is specified by the host computer's mouse. Consequently, real time kinematics and dynamics are necessary. The RIPS architecture is specialized so that it can satisfy these real time constraints. The two arm experimental set-up is discussed. A major part of this work is the continued development of a good programming environment for RIPS. The C++ language is employed and favorable results exist in the targeting of this language to the RIPS hardware.

  19. Genetic Manipulation of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Anna C; Thompson, Mitchell G; Gebhardt, Michael; Corey, Brendan W; Yildirim, Suleyman; Shuman, Howard A; Zurawski, Daniel V

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative nosocomial pathogen of clinical importance. A lack of genetic tools has hindered the research of this organism in the past; however, recently, various methods have been designed, modified, and optimized to facilitate the genetic manipulation of A. baumannii. This unit describes some of the recent genetic advances and new recombinant tools developed for this pathogen, including standard transformation and conjugation techniques specifically developed for the bacteria. As the need to understand the basic biology of A. baumannii increases with the prospect of developing new therapeutics, the use of the basic genetic methods herein can provide the critical first step to identify genes required for infection. 2014 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:25367274

  20. Incretin manipulation in diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    Pappachan, Joseph M; Raveendran, AV; Sriraman, Rajagopalan

    2015-01-01

    Incretin-based therapies have revolutionized the medical management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the 21st century. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) suppresses appetite and gastric motility, and has trophic effects on pancreas, cardio-protective and renal effects. GLP-1 analogues and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors form the incretin-based therapies. Significant reduction of hemoglobin A1c when used as monotherapy and in combination regimens, favorable effects on body weight, and low risk of hypoglycemia are their unique therapeutic benefits. Their safety and tolerability are comparable to other anti-diabetic medications. Concern about elevated risk of pancreatitis has been discarded by two recent meta-analyses. This article discusses the therapeutic manipulation of incretin system for the management of T2DM. PMID:26131320

  1. Mobile manipulator configuration optimization using evolutionary programming

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, J.R.; Andersen, B.L.; Page, W.C.; Pin, F.G.

    1992-11-01

    Multi-degree-of-freedom manipulators are becoming commonplace on mobile platforms. Full autonomy of mobile manipulator robotic systems will depend on the ability to resolve the inherent kinematic redundancy in task commutation. This work investigates the application of an evolutionary search strategy for determining near-optimal mobile manipulator configurations. Joint torques, obstacle avoidance and manipulability are incorporated in a multi-criteria optimization formulation. A variety of aspects of the evolutionary programming paradigm are addressed via empirical studies on a two degree-of-freedom (DOF) manipulator. These studies investigate full configuration vector versus partial configuration vector mutation as well as mutation strategies which incorporate cost and iteration number. The results of this study are then applied to a planar three DOF manipulator mounted on a single DOF mobile base. Experiments indicate that the configuration optimization problem is amenable to a variety of mutation strategies.

  2. Virus manipulation of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, R; Costa, H; Parkhouse, R M E

    2012-07-01

    Viruses depend on host cell resources for replication and access to those resources may be limited to a particular phase of the cell cycle. Thus manipulation of cell cycle is a commonly employed strategy of viruses for achieving a favorable cellular environment. For example, viruses capable of infecting nondividing cells induce S phase in order to activate the host DNA replication machinery and provide the nucleotide triphosphates necessary for viral DNA replication (Flemington in J Virol 75:4475-4481, 2001; Sullivan and Pipas in Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 66:179-202, 2002). Viruses have developed several strategies to subvert the cell cycle by association with cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase complexes and molecules that regulate their activity. Viruses tend to act on cellular proteins involved in a network of interactions in a way that minimal protein-protein interactions lead to a major effect. The complex and interactive nature of intracellular signaling pathways controlling cell division affords many opportunities for virus manipulation strategies. Taking the maxim "Set a thief to catch a thief" as a counter strategy, however, provides us with the very same virus evasion strategies as "ready-made tools" for the development of novel antivirus therapeutics. The most obvious are attenuated virus vaccines with critical evasion genes deleted. Similarly, vaccines against viruses causing cancer are now being successfully developed. Finally, as viruses have been playing chess with our cell biology and immune responses for millions of years, the study of their evasion strategies will also undoubtedly reveal new control mechanisms and their corresponding cellular intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:21986922

  3. Bracing micro/macro manipulators control

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, J.Y.; Book, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    This paper proposes a bracing strategy for micro/macro manipulators. The bracing micro/macro manipulator can provide advantages in accurate positioning, large work-space, and contact-task capability however, in exchange for improvement in performance one must accept the complex control problem along wit the complex dynamics. This research develops a control scheme for a bracing manipulator which makes multiple contacts with the environment. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed ideas for real world applications.

  4. Spatial-Operator Algebra For Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo; Kreutz, Kenneth K.; Milman, Mark H.

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses spatial-operator algebra developed in recent studies of mathematical modeling, control, and design of trajectories of robotic manipulators. Provides succinct representation of mathematically complicated interactions among multiple joints and links of manipulator, thereby relieving analyst of most of tedium of detailed algebraic manipulations. Presents analytical formulation of spatial-operator algebra, describes some specific applications, summarizes current research, and discusses implementation of spatial-operator algebra in the Ada programming language.

  5. Social Manipulation of Online Recommender Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Juan; Spear, Matt; Wu, S. Felix

    Online recommender systems are a common target of attack. Existing research has focused on automated manipulation of recommender systems through the creation of shill accounts, and either do not consider attacks by coalitions of real users, downplay the impact of such attacks, or state that such attacks are difficult to impossible to detect. In this study, we examine a recommender system that is part of an online social network, show that users successfully induced other users to manipulate their recommendations, that these manipulations were effective, and that most such manipulations are detectable even when performed by ordinary, non-automated users.

  6. Compliant Gripper for a Robotic Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipra, Raymond; Das, Hari

    2003-01-01

    A figure depicts a prototype of a robotic-manipulator gripping device that includes two passive compliant fingers, suitable for picking up and manipulating objects that have irregular shapes and/or that are, themselves, compliant. The main advantage offered by this device over other robotic-manipulator gripping devices is simplicity: Because of the compliance of the fingers, force-feedback control of the fingers is not necessary for gripping objects of a variety of sizes, shapes, textures, and degrees of compliance. Examples of objects that can be manipulated include small stones, articles of clothing, and parts of plants.

  7. Culture and Manipulation of Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lois G.; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The direct manipulation of embryonic cells is an important tool for addressing key questions in cell and developmental biology. C. elegans is relatively unique among genetic model systems in being amenable to manipulation of embryonic cells. Embryonic cell manipulation has allowed the identification of cell interactions by direct means, and it has been an important technique for dissecting mechanisms by which cell fates are specified, cell divisions are oriented, and morphogenesis is accomplished. Here, we present detailed methods for isolating, manipulating and culturing embryonic cells of C. elegans. PMID:22226523

  8. Influence of preoperative emotional state on postoperative pain following orthopedic and trauma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Robleda, Gemma; Sillero-Sillero, Amalia; Puig, Teresa; Gich, Ignasi; Baos, Josep-E

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to analyze the relationship between preoperative emotional state and the prevalence and intensity of postoperative pain and to explore predictors of postoperative pain. METHOD: observational retrospective study undertaken among 127 adult patients of orthopedic and trauma surgery. Postoperative pain was assessed with the verbal numeric scale and with five variables of emotional state: anxiety, sweating, stress, fear, and crying. The Chi-squared test, Student's t test or ANOVA and a multivariate logistic regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis. RESULTS: the prevalence of immediate postoperative pain was 28%. Anxiety was the most common emotional factor (72%) and a predictive risk factor for moderate to severe postoperative pain (OR: 4.60, 95% CI 1.38 to 15.3, p<0.05, AUC: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.62 to 0.83). Age exerted a protective effect (OR 0.96, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99, p<0.01). CONCLUSION: preoperative anxiety and age are predictors of postoperative pain in patients undergoing orthopedic and trauma surgery. PMID:25493674

  9. Evaluating the reliability of surgical assessment methods in an orthopedic residency program

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nicholas; Harnett, John; Furey, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Orthopedic surgical education in Canada has seen major change in the last 15 years. Work hour restrictions and external influence have led to new approaches for surgical training. With a change toward competency-based educational models under the CanMEDS headings there is a need to ensure the validity of modern assessment methods. Our objective was to evaluate the reliability of a currently used surgical skill assessment tool within an orthopedic residency program, as measured by the Surgical Encounters Form. Methods A surgical assessment tool has previously been created at our institution that comprises 15 items spanning 4 of the CanMEDS competencies. Results were blinded to the primary investigator and coded by a third party. The assessments were collected, and we measured percent agreement using Cronbach’s α and Fleiss κ. Results Over a 5-month period 11 staff members assessed 10 residents. Eighty-eight assessments were completed in total. Weighted percent agreement was 90.9%. Cronbach’s α averaged 0.865 for the medical expert role, 0.920 for technical skills, 0.934 for the communicator role, 1.00 for the collaborator role and 1.00 for the health advocate role. The mean Fleiss κ score was 0.147 (95% confidence interval &0.071 to 0.364), demonstrating low interrater reliability. Conclusion Despite the development of a validated assessment tool to evaluate surgical skills acquisition, interrater reliability results suggest low levels of agreement among assessors. PMID:26204142

  10. Open access of evidence-based publications: the case of the orthopedic and musculoskeletal literature.

    PubMed

    Yammine, Kaissar

    2015-11-01

    The open access model, where researchers can publish their work and make it freely available to the whole medical community, is gaining ground over the traditional type of publication. However, fees are to be paid by either the authors or their institutions. The purpose of this paper is to assess the proportion and type of open access evidence-based articles in the form of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in the field of musculoskeletal disorders and orthopedic surgery. PubMed database was searched and the results showed a maximal number of hits for low back pain and total hip arthroplasty. We demonstrated that despite a 10-fold increase in the number of evidence-based publications in the past 10 years, the rate of free systematic reviews in the general biomedical literature did not change for the last two decades. In addition, the average percentage of free open access systematic reviews and meta-analyses for the commonest painful musculoskeletal conditions and orthopedic procedures was 20% and 18%, respectively. Those results were significantly lower than those of the systematic reviews and meta-analyses in the remaining biomedical research. Such findings could indicate a divergence between the efforts engaged at promoting evidence-based principles and those at disseminating evidence-based findings in the field of musculoskeletal disease and trauma. The high processing fee is thought to be a major limitation when considering open access model for publication. PMID:26779696

  11. Psychological Distress After Orthopedic Trauma: Prevalence in Patients and Implications for Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Heather K; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Vincent, Kevin R; Brisbane, Sonya T; Sadasivan, Kalia K

    2015-09-01

    Orthopedic trauma is an unforeseen life-changing event. Serious injuries include multiple fractures and amputation. Physical rehabilitation has traditionally focused on addressing functional deficits after traumatic injury, but important psychological factors also can dramatically affect acute and long-term recovery. This review presents the effects of orthopedic trauma on psychological distress, potential interventions for distress reduction after trauma, and implications for participation in rehabilitation. Survivors commonly experience post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression, and anxiety, all of which interfere with functional gains and quality of life. More than 50% of survivors have psychological distress that can last decades after the physical injury has been treated. Early identification of patients with distress can help care teams provide the resources and support to offset the distress. Several options that help trauma patients navigate their short-term recovery include holistic approaches, pastoral care, coping skills, mindfulness, peer visitation, and educational resources. The long-term physical and mental health of the trauma survivor can be enhanced by strategies that connect the survivor to a network of people with similar experiences or injuries, facilitate support groups, and social support networking (The Trauma Survivors Network). Rehabilitation specialists can help optimize patient outcomes and quality of life by participating in and advocating these strategies. PMID:25772720

  12. Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Orthopedic Biodegradable Implants

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Ami R.; Wallace, James S.; Nukavarapu, Syam P.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, orthopedic and oral/maxillofacial implants represent a combined $2.8 billion market, a figure expected to experience significant and continued growth. Although traditional permanent implants have been proved clinically efficacious, they are also associated with several drawbacks, including secondary revision and removal surgeries. Non-permanent, biodegradable implants offer a promising alternative for patients, as they provide temporary support and degrade at a rate matching tissue formation, and thus, eliminate the need for secondary surgeries. These implants have been in clinical use for nearly 25 years, competing directly with, or maybe even exceeding, the performance of permanent implants. The initial implantation of biodegradable materials, as with permanent materials, mounts an acute host inflammatory response. Over time, the implant degradation profile and possible degradation product toxicity mediate long-term biodegradable implant-induced inflammation. However, unlike permanent implants, this inflammation is likely to cease once the material disappears. Implant-mediated inflammation is a critical determinant for implant success. Thus, for the development of a proactive biodegradable implant that has the ability to promote optimal bone regeneration and minimal detrimental inflammation, a thorough understanding of short- and long-term inflammatory events is required. Here, we discuss an array of biodegradable orthopedic implants, their associated short- and long- term inflammatory effects, and methods to mediate these inflammatory events. PMID:22043969

  13. Magnesium biomaterials for orthopedic application: a review from a biological perspective.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jemimah; Shadanbaz, Shaylin; Woodfield, Timothy B F; Staiger, Mark P; Dias, George J

    2014-08-01

    Magnesium (Mg) has a long history of investigation as a degradable biomaterial. Physicians first began using Mg for biomedical applications in the late 19th century. Experimentation continued with varying levels of success until the mid-20th century when interest in the metal waned. In recent years the field of Mg-based biomaterials has once again become popular, likely due to advancements in technology allowing improved control of corrosion. Although this has led to success in vascular applications, continued difficulties in predicting and controlling the corrosion rate of Mg in an intraosseous environment has impeded the development of Mg-based biomaterials for orthopedic applications. In this review, an initial summary of the basic properties and the physiological role of Mg are followed by a discussion of the physical characteristics of the metal which lend it to use as a degradable biomaterial. A description of the historical and modern applications for Mg in the medical field is followed by a discussion of the methods used to control and assess Mg corrosion, with an emphasis on alloying. The second part of this review concentrates on the methods used to assess the corrosion and biocompatibility of Mg-based orthopedic biomaterials. This review provides a summary of Mg as a biomaterial from a biological perspective. PMID:24458999

  14. Anodization: a promising nano-modification technique of titanium implants for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chang; Webster, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    Anodization is a well-established surface modification technique that produces protective oxide layers on valve metals such as titanium. Many studies have used anodization to produce micro-porous titanium oxide films on implant surfaces for orthopedic applications. An additional hydrothermal treatment has also been used in conjunction with anodization to deposit hydroxyapatite on titanium surfaces; this is in contrast to using traditional plasma spray deposition techniques. Recently, the ability to create nanometer surface structures (e.g., nano-tubular) via anodization of titanium implants in fluorine solutions have intrigued investigators to fabricate nano-scale surface features that mimic the natural bone environment. This paper will present an overview of anodization techniques used to produce micro-porous titanium oxide structures and nano-tubular oxide structures, subsequent properties of these anodized titanium surfaces, and ultimately their in vitro as well as in vivo biological responses pertinent for orthopedic applications. Lastly, this review will emphasize why anodized titanium structures that have nanometer surface features enhance bone forming cell functions. PMID:17048475

  15. Clinical use of parnaparin in major and minor orthopedic sugery: a review

    PubMed Central

    Bugamelli, Stefano; Zangheri, Elena; Montebugnoli, Milena; Guerra, Lucia

    2008-01-01

    Patients undergoing arthroplasty or other orthopedic surgery show a high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), involving mortality, morbidity, and social costs; however, the risk for VTE in minor orthopedic surgery should not be underestimated and antithrombotic prophylaxis may be required. According to the literature, low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) are more effective in preventing VTE than unfractionated heparins (UFHs) or vitamin K antagonists, and have a lower hemorrhagic risk. By comparing different prophylactic regimens, it has been shown that starting the prophylaxis near the time of the operation is the most critical point for efficacy, whether or not the first dose is administered pre- or post-operatively. Moreover, most thromboembolic complications are observed after discharge and, therefore, many clinicians advocate continuing prophylaxis for longer times (6–8 weeks) in order to further reduce the rate for VTE. The literature on parnaparin, a new LMWH, in VTE prophylaxis was reviewed. Parnaparin is equally effective as UFH, but it offers the advantages of a once-daily administration and improved tolerability, thus allowing the home management of patients with no need for laboratory coagulation tests. PMID:19183746

  16. Application of Orthopedic Dual Sliding Compression Plate (ODSCP) in High Medial Tibial Open Wedge Osteotomies

    PubMed Central

    Samani, Seyed Salman; Kachooei, Amir Reza; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hosein; Omidi Kashani, Farzad; Mahdavian Naghashzargar, Reza; Razi, Shiva

    2013-01-01

    Background Angular deformities about the knee are one of the common disorders. High Tibial osteotomy is a way of correcting the deformity. Although the general agreement is focused toward the open wedge technique, discussion about the type of device is a subject to debate. Objectives This current study has attempted to evaluate the results of Orthopedic Dual Sliding Compression Plate (ODSCP) in high medial open wedge osteotomies of the tibia. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, 16 patients with genuvarum undergone high medial tibial open wedge osteotomy and fixed by Orthopedic Dual Sliding Compression Plate. At the time of the last follow up visit, Lysholm score was gathered. Results The mean follow-up time was 9.33 ± 1.87 month. The average age was 45.13 ± 7.25 years. Three patients were male and 13 patients were female. The lysholm score showed a significant difference before and after surgery. Conclusions The ODSCP has many advantages over the other type of plates. It can help the surgeon to operate with a relaxed mind and it is advisable for high tibial medial open wedge osteotomies. PMID:24083009

  17. HOW DOES THE BRAZILIAN ORTHOPEDIC SURGEONS TREAT ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE SPRAIN?

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara; Nakama, Gilberto Yoshinobu; Shoiti, Marcus Vinicius; Gomes, Rodrigo Vick Fernandes; Belloti, João Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Acute lateral ankle sprain (ALAS) is a common injury, but its treatment has yet to be firmly established. The purpose of this study was to investigate how Brazilian Orthopedists (including residents) manage the diagnosis, classification, treatment and complications of ALAS. Methods: A multiple-choice questionnaire was developed with the aim of addressing the main aspects of the treatment of ALAS. The questionnaire was made available on the official website of the Brazilian Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology between June 15 and August 1, 2004. Results: 444 questionnaires were included in the analysis. The results showed agreement among most of the interviewees in the following regards: 90.8% used a classification method to guide treatment of the sprain; 59% classified the ankle sprain with certainty; 63.7% used rigid immobilization in cases of totally torn ligaments; 60.6% used anti-inflammatory medication in cases of partial ligament tears; and 75.9% reported that residual pain was the most frequent complication. There was no consensus regarding the immobilization method for partial ALAS, given that immobilization and functional treatment were chosen with the same frequency (47%). There was no significant difference between the responses from residents and from orthopedists (p = 0.81). Conclusions: Orthopedists and orthopedic residents in Brazil have difficulty classifying ALAS and there is no consensus about the best therapeutic option for partial ALAS.

  18. History of computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Douglas W; Simon, Timothy M

    2008-06-01

    Computer-assisted orthopedic surgery and navigation applications have a history rooted in the desire to link imaging technology with real-time anatomic landmarks. Although applications are still evolving in the clinical and research setting, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery has already demonstrated in certain procedures its potential for improving the surgeon's accuracy, reproducibility (once past the learning curve), and in reducing outlier outcomes. It is also being used as an educational tool to assist less experienced surgeons in interpreting measurements and precision placements related to well defined anatomic landmarks. It also can assist experienced surgeons, in real-time, plan their bony cuts, tunnel placement, and with ligament balancing. Presently, the additional time, the expense to acquire the needed software and hardware, and restricted reimbursement have slowed the widespread use of navigation. Its current applications have been primarily in joint replacement surgery, spine surgery, and trauma. It has not been widely used in the clinical setting for sports medicine procedures. Sports medicine applications such as individualizing tunnel placement in ligament surgery, opening wedge osteotomy with and without accompanying ligament reconstruction, and balancing and tensioning of the ligaments during the procedure (allowing real-time corrections if necessary) are currently being evaluated and being used on a limited clinical basis. PMID:18480724

  19. Updates in the management of orthopedic soft-tissue injuries associated with lower extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Park, Justin J; Campbell, Kirk A; Mercuri, John J; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2012-02-01

    Management of traumatic soft-tissue injuries remains a challenging and ever evolving field within orthopedic surgery. The basic principle of addressing life before limb in the initial assessment of critically injured patients has not changed. Although arteriography remains the gold standard for vascular injury screening, computed tomography angiography is being used more often to determine limb viability, and its sensitivity and specificity for detecting vascular lesions are reported to be excellent. Thorough debridement and irrigation with early institution of antibiotics are crucial in preventing infection; debridement should be performed urgently once life-threatening conditions have been addressed. Increasing use of vacuum-assisted closure therapy has created a trend down the reconstructive ladder, with improvements in resulting wound closure. Although the orthoplastics approach and new microsurgical techniques have made limb salvage possible in even the most severely injured extremities, it is important to clearly identify the zone of injury and to inform patients and their families of the outcomes of limb salvage versus amputation. Results from the LEAP (Lower Extremity Assessment Project) trials and similar studies should guide orthopedic surgeons in the management of these complex injuries. Nevertheless, it is important to individualize management plans according to patient factors. PMID:22482099

  20. [Diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Position of the Mexican College of Orthopedics and Traumatology].

    PubMed

    Cymet-Ramrez, J; Cisneros-Dreinhofer, F A; Alvarez-Martnez, M M; Cruz-Gonzlez, I; de la Fuente-Zuno, J C; Figueroa-Cal y Mayor, F J; Garca-Lpez, O F; Gmez-Garca, F; Mirassou-Ortega, M; Legorreta-Cuevas, J G; Medinaveitia, A; Njera-Castro, M A; Sierra-Martnez, O; Ojeda-Padilla, E A; Surez-Espinosa, V F; Vallejo-Almada, J; Valles-Figueroa, J F; Villalobos-Garduo, F E; Vzquez-Camacho, L

    2011-01-01

    Our current in Mexico is that it represents a serious health problem not yet recognized as low-energy fractures in older adults account for approximately 10% of subjects over 65 years (compared with 29% in Japan) about 4.4 million fractures in patients over 70 years, taking into account that we are a nation of 112 million, the problem is minor compared with other diseases in this and other population groups. In the Mexican health system, orthopedic services instead share with other health priorities, so that the authorities do not understand osteoporosis as a health problem, not observe increased morbidity and mortality that implicitly leads, there are few centers to support the diagnosis of osteoporosis (densitometers do not have), and recruitment, diagnosis and management of patients who have suffered a broken ground mechanically compromised. Have increased the frequency of fractures in osteoporotic ground, and institutional level has only treatments based on calcitriol and calcium to maintain bone mineral density. In the Mexican health system, orthopedic services instead share with other health priorities, so that the authorities do not understand osteoporosis as a health problem, not observe increased morbidity and mortality that implicitly leads, there are few centers to support the diagnosis of osteoporosis (we don't count with densitometers), and recruitment, diagnosis and management of patients who have suffered a broken ground mechanically compromised. Have increased the frequency of fractures in osteoporotic ground, and institutional level has only treatments based on calcitriol and calcium to maintain bone mineral density. PMID:22509637

  1. Orthopedic injuries experienced by U.S. prisoners of war during Operation Desert Storm: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Steinfeld, R; Baggett, J C; Mitchell, R E

    1995-04-01

    U.S. prisoners of war from Operation Desert Storm suffered significant orthopedic injuries. The repatriated prisoners of war (RPOWs) have been medically evaluated over a 3-year period with orthopedic follow-up. A significant proportion of the musculoskeletal injuries were located around the neck and spine, shoulder, and upper extremity. Aircraft ejection was the cause of the majority of these injuries. Lower extremity injuries after ejection, aside from the knee, were not reported. Flail injuries of the lower extremities were absent as well. These results were examined with reference to Vietnam RPOW data. PMID:7617224

  2. Kinematics and Control of Robot Manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paden, Bradley Evan

    This dissertation focuses on the kinematics and control of robot manipulators. The contribution to kinematics is a fundamental theorem on the design of manipulators with six revolute joints. The theorem states, roughly speaking, that manipulators which have six revolute joints and are modeled after the human arm are optimal and essentially unique. In developing the mathematical framework to prove this theorem, we define precisely the notions of length of a manipulator, well-connected-workspace, and work-volume. We contribute to control a set of analysis techniques for the design of variable structure (sliding mode) controllers for manipulators. The organization of the dissertation is the following. After introductory remarks in chapter one, the group of proper rigid motions, G, is introduced in chapter two. The tangent bundle of G is introduced and it is shown that the velocity of a rigid body can be represented by an element in the Lie algebra of G (commonly called a twist). Further, rigid motions which are exponentials of twists are used to describe four commonly occurring subproblems in robot kinematics. In chapter three, the exponentials of twists are used to write the forward kinematic map of robot manipulators and the subproblems of chapter two are used to solve the Stanford manipulator and an elbow manipulator. Chapter four focuses on manipulator singularities. Twist coordinates are used to find critical points of the forward kinematic map. The contribution to kinematics is contained in chapter five where a mathematical framework for studying the relationship between the design of 6R manipulators and their performance is developed. Chapter seven contains the contribution to control. The work of A. F. Filippov on differential equations with discontinuous right-hand-side and the work of F. H. Clarke on generalized gradients are combined to obtain a calculus for analyzing nonsmooth gradient systems. The techniques developed are applied to design a simple variable structure controller for the nonlinear dynamics of robot manipulators.

  3. Performance Robustness of Manipulator Collision Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, D.; Lee, S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we propose that the manipulator impact control problem be approached from a stochastic optimal control perspective. The reason is that not only is such approach be able to model uncertainties in contact environment, force sensing, as well as manipulator dynamics, the controllers obtained is optimally robust in terms of performance. This result is verified by analyses and simulations.

  4. Welding torch and wire feed manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. T.

    1967-01-01

    Welding torch and wire feed manipulator increase capability for performing automatic welding operations. The manipulator rotates on its horizontal axis to avoid obstacles as they approach the torch. The initial individual attitudes of the torch and wire guide are set with respect to the general configuration of the part.

  5. Information Manipulation Theory: A Replication and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Scott; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Replicates S. McCornack's 1992 study with the inclusion of explicit checks to determine the covertness of the purported deceptive messages and to check manipulation of information type. Finds that none of the results are consistent with information manipulation theory predictions, but that instead, the results uniformly support a model of…

  6. The Stealth Curriculum: Manipulating America's History Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stotsky, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is: (1) To point out the features of a number of manipulative supplemental resources for history and social studies teachers; and (2) to show how similarly manipulative professional development workshops propagate the distorted content and recommended teaching practices of such materials to teachers and their…

  7. Manipulating Language: A Strategy for Teaching Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Prudence P.

    Literary artists manipulate language. If educators could develop in their students the same sense that language is manipulable, they could help them to better appreciate literature. Emily Dickinson's poem "I Like to See It Lap the Miles" could be approached by changing it on several levels--graphics, phonics, syntax, and semantics--and seeing how…

  8. Teachers' Beliefs and Teaching Mathematics with Manipulatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golafshani, Nahid

    2013-01-01

    To promote the implementation of manipulatives into mathematics instruction, this research project examined how the instructional practices of four Grade 9 applied mathematics teachers related to their beliefs about the use of manipulatives in teaching mathematics, its effects on students' learning, and enabling and disabling factors. Teacher

  9. Count on It: Congruent Manipulative Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Joe; Samelson, Vicki M.

    2015-01-01

    Representations that create informative visual displays are powerful tools for communicating mathematical concepts. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics encourages the use of manipulatives (NCTM 2000). Manipulative materials are often used to present initial representations of basic numerical principles to young children, and it is

  10. Mathematical Modeling For Control Of A Flexible Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Anren

    1996-01-01

    Improved method of mathematical modeling of dynamics of flexible robotic manipulators developed for use in controlling motions of manipulators. Involves accounting for effect, upon modes of vibration of manipulator, of changes in configuration of manipulator and manipulated payload(s). Flexible manipulator has one or more long, slender articulated link(s), like those used in outer space, method also applicable to terrestrial industrial robotic manipulators with relatively short, stiff links, or to such terrestrial machines as construction cranes.

  11. Use of commercial manipulator to handle a nuclear weapon component

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.P.

    1994-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed a manipulator workcell to load and unload nuclear weapon pit assemblies from a cart. To develop this workcell, PNL procured a commercially available manipulator, equipped it with force-sensing and vision equipment, and developed manipulator control software. Manipulator workcell development demonstrated that commercially available manipulator systems can successfully perform this task if the appropriate manipulator is selected and the manipulator workcell tooling and software are carefully designed.

  12. On stiffening cables of a long reach manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.L.; Santiago, P.

    1996-02-01

    A long reach manipulator will be used for waste remediation in large underground storage tanks. The manipulator`s slenderness makes it flexible and difficult to control. A low-cost and effective method to enhance the manipulator`s stiffness is proposed in this research by using suspension cables. These cables can also be used to accurately measure the position of the manipulator`s wrist.

  13. Manipulating duckweed through genome duplication.

    PubMed

    Vunsh, R; Heinig, U; Malitsky, S; Aharoni, A; Avidov, A; Lerner, A; Edelman, M

    2015-01-01

    Significant inter- and intraspecific genetic variation exists in duckweed, thus the potential for genome plasticity and manipulation is high. Polyploidy is recognised as a major mechanism of adaptation and speciation in plants. We produced several genome-duplicated lines of Landoltia punctata (Spirodela oligorrhiza) from both whole plants and regenerating explants using a colchicine-based cocktail. These lines stably maintained an enlarged frond and root morphology. DNA ploidy levels determined by florescence-activated cell sorting indicated genome duplication. Line A4 was analysed after 75 biomass doublings. Frond area, fresh and dry weights, rhizoid number and length were significantly increased versus wild type, while the growth rate was unchanged. This resulted in accumulation of biomass 17-20% faster in the A4 plants. We sought to determine if specific differences in gene products are found in the genome duplicated lines. Non-targeted ultra performance LC-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry was employed to compare some of the lines and the wild type to seek identification of up-regulated metabolites. We putatively identified differential metabolites in Line A65 as caffeoyl hexoses. The combination of directed genome duplication and metabolic profiling might offer a path for producing stable gene expression, leading to altered production of secondary metabolites. PMID:25040392

  14. Using solitons for manipulating qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuccoli, Alessandro; Nuzzi, Davide; Vaia, Ruggero; Verrucchi, Paola

    2014-04-01

    Many proposals for quantum devices are based on qubits that are physically realized by the spin magnetic moment of some quantum object. In this case, one of the most often adopted strategies for manipulating qubits is that of using external magnetic fields. However, selectively applying a field just to one qubit may be a practically unattainable goal, as it is, for instance, in most solid-state based setups. In this work, we present a proposal for using nonlinear excitations of solitonic type to accomplish the above task. Our scheme entails the generation of a dynamical soliton in a classical spin-chain which is locally coupled with one qubit: as the soliton runs through, the qubit behaves, due to its interaction with the chain, as if it were subject to a magnetic field with a time dependence that follows from the soliton's features. We here present results for the time evolution of the qubit density-matrix induced by the overall dynamics of the above scheme.

  15. Interactive digital image manipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, J.; Dezur, R.

    1975-01-01

    The system is designed for manipulation, analysis, interpretation, and processing of a wide variety of image data. LANDSAT (ERTS) and other data in digital form can be input directly into the system. Photographic prints and transparencies are first converted to digital form with an on-line high-resolution microdensitometer. The system is implemented on a Hewlett-Packard 3000 computer with 128 K bytes of core memory and a 47.5 megabyte disk. It includes a true color display monitor, with processing memories, graphics overlays, and a movable cursor. Image data formats are flexible so that there is no restriction to a given set of remote sensors. Conversion between data types is available to provide a basis for comparison of the various data. Multispectral data is fully supported, and there is no restriction on the number of dimensions. In this way multispectral data collected at more than one point in time may simply be treated as a data collected with twice (three times, etc.) the number of sensors. There are various libraries of functions available to the user: processing functions, display functions, system functions, and earth resources applications functions.

  16. Microcrystal manipulation with laser tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Armin Duman, Ramona; Stevens, Bob; Ward, Andy

    2013-07-01

    Optical trapping has successfully been applied to select and mount microcrystals for subsequent X-ray diffraction experiments. X-ray crystallography is the method of choice to deduce atomic resolution structural information from macromolecules. In recent years, significant investments in structural genomics initiatives have been undertaken to automate all steps in X-ray crystallography from protein expression to structure solution. Robotic systems are widely used to prepare crystallization screens and change samples on synchrotron beamlines for macromolecular crystallography. The only remaining manual handling step is the transfer of the crystal from the mother liquor onto the crystal holder. Manual mounting is relatively straightforward for crystals with dimensions of >25 m; however, this step is nontrivial for smaller crystals. The mounting of microcrystals is becoming increasingly important as advances in microfocus synchrotron beamlines now allow data collection from crystals with dimensions of only a few micrometres. To make optimal usage of these beamlines, new approaches have to be taken to facilitate and automate this last manual handling step. Optical tweezers, which are routinely used for the manipulation of micrometre-sized objects, have successfully been applied to sort and mount macromolecular crystals on newly designed crystal holders. Diffraction data from CPV type 1 polyhedrin microcrystals mounted with laser tweezers are presented.

  17. Robustness of centrality measures against network manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Qikai; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2015-11-01

    Node centrality is an important quantity to consider in studying complex networks as it is related to many applications ranging from the prediction of network structure to the control of dynamics on networks. In the literature, much effort has been devoted to design new centrality measurements. However, the reliability of these centrality measurements has not been fully assessed, particularly with respect to the fact that many real networks are facing different kinds of manipulations such as addition, removal or rewiring of links. In this paper, we focus on the robustness of classic centrality measures against network manipulation. Our analysis is based on both artificial and real networks. We find that the centrality measurements are generally more robust in heterogeneous networks. Biased link manipulation could more seriously distort the centrality measures than random link manipulation. Moreover, the top part of the centrality ranking is more resistant to manipulation.

  18. Interaction control of a redundant mobile manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.H.; Velinsky, S.A.; Hess, R.A.

    1998-12-01

    This paper discusses the modeling and control of a spatial mobile manipulator that consists of a robotic manipulator mounted on a wheeled mobile platform. The Lagrange-d`Alembert formulation is used to obtain a concise description of the dynamics of the system, which is subject to nonholonomic constraints. The complexity of the model is increased by introducing kinematic redundancy, which is created when a multilinked manipulator is used. The kinematic redundancy is resolved by decomposing the mobile manipulator into two subsystems: the mobile platform and the manipulator. The redundancy resolution scheme employs a nonlinear interaction-control algorithm, which is developed and applied to coordinate the two subsystems` controllers. The subsystem controllers are independently designed, based on each subsystem`s dynamic characteristics. Simulation results show the promise of the developed algorithm.

  19. Damping control of a large flexible manipulator through inertial forces of a small manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.; Baker, C.P.; Evans, M.S.

    1993-06-01

    Damping control is applied to a detailed computer model of a long- reach flexible manipulator test bed. The test bed consists of a long slender link with a dexterous manipulator mounted at its tip. The movement of the dexterous manipulator is controlled to create inertial damping forces on the long link. Parameter identification and sequential loop-closure are used to design a controller that feeds back relative tip position and velocity of the long link to control the azimuth angle of the dexterous manipulator. The controller is designed to be robust to varying manipulator loading conditions and reliable under sensor failures.

  20. Seasonal variation in orthopedic health services utilization in Switzerland: The impact of winter sport tourism

    PubMed Central

    Matter-Walstra, Klazien; Widmer, Marcel; Busato, Andr

    2006-01-01

    Background Climate- or holiday-related seasonality in hospital admission rates is well known for many diseases. However, little research has addressed the impact of tourism on seasonality in admission rates. We therefore investigated the influence of tourism on emergency admission rates in Switzerland, where winter and summer leisure sport activities in large mountain regions can generate orthopedic injuries. Methods Using small area analysis, orthopedic hospital service areas (HSAo) were evaluated for seasonality in emergency admission rates. Winter sport areas were defined using guest bed accommodation rate patterns of guest houses and hotels located above 1000 meters altitude that show clear winter and summer peak seasons. Emergency admissions (years 20002002, n = 135'460) of local and nonlocal HSAo residents were evaluated. HSAo were grouped according to their area type (regular or winter sport area) and monthly analyses of admission rates were performed. Results Of HSAo within the defined winter sport areas 70.8% show a seasonal, summer-winter peak hospital admission rate pattern and only 1 HSAo outside the defined winter sport areas shows such a pattern. Seasonal hospital admission rates in HSAo in winter sport areas can be up to 4 times higher in winter than the intermediate seasons, and they are almost entirely due to admissions of nonlocal residents. These nonlocal residents are in general -and especially in winter- younger than local residents, and nonlocal residents have a shorter length of stay in winter sport than in regular areas. The overall geographic distribution of nonlocal residents admitted for emergencies shows highest rates during the winter as well as the summer in the winter sport areas. Conclusion Small area analysis using orthopedic hospital service areas is a reliable method for the evaluation of seasonality in hospital admission rates. In Switzerland, HSAo defined as winter sport areas show a clear seasonal fluctuation in admission rates of only nonlocal residents, whereas HSAo defined as regular, non-winter sport areas do not show such seasonality. We conclude that leisure sport, and especially ski/snowboard tourism demands great flexibility in hospital beds, staff and resource planning in these areas. PMID:16512923

  1. Oral rifampin plus ofloxacin for treatment of Staphylococcus-infected orthopedic implants.

    PubMed Central

    Drancourt, M; Stein, A; Argenson, J N; Zannier, A; Curvale, G; Raoult, D

    1993-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness and safety of the combination of rifampin plus ofloxacin given orally for treating prosthetic orthopedic implants infected with staphylococci. The prospective cohort study was conducted in a referral public hospital with ambulatory care services between 1985 and 1991. Consecutive patients from whom Staphylococcus organisms susceptible to the study drugs were isolated from their orthopedic implants and who had no contraindication to the treatment were eligible for the study. All patients were treated orally with rifampin, 900 mg/day, plus ofloxacin, 600 mg/day. Patients with hip prosthesis infection were treated for 6 months, with removal of any unstable prostheses after 5 months of treatment; patients with knee prosthesis infection were treated for 9 months, with removal of the prosthesis after 6 months of treatment; and patients with infected bone plates were treated for 6 months, with removal of the plate after 3 months of treatment, if necessary. Monthly clinical evaluations were conducted until the completion of the treatment and follow-up or telephone interviews were conducted at 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months thereafter. Treatment failures were documented by clinical evaluation, sampling of the infected site for culture and antibiotic activity measurement, and fistulography, if possible. Cure was defined as the absence of clinical, biological, and radiological evidence of infection 6 months after the completion of treatment, treatment failure was defined as the absence of cure, and relapse was defined as the reappearance of infection caused by the same Staphylococcus isolate that caused the original infection, regardless of the timing of this secondary infection. Among 51 patients included in the study and evaluable for safety, 4 patients had side effects and were not evaluable for treatment effectiveness; the overall success rate was 74% among 47 patients, with a success rate of 81% for the hip prosthesis group, 69% for the knee prosthesis group, and 69% for the osteosynthesis device group. Eight treatment failures were relaxed to the isolation of a resistant bacterium. The combination of rifampin administered orally plus ofloxacin is a suitable alternative to the conventional long-term intravenous therapy for treatment of orthopedic implants infected with staphylococci. PMID:8328772

  2. A cohort study on the incidence and outcome of pulmonary embolism in trauma and orthopedic patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to determine the incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE) in trauma and orthopedic patients within a regional tertiary referral center and its association with the pattern of injury, type of treatment, co-morbidities, thromboprophylaxis and mortality. Methods All patients admitted to our institution between January 2010 and December 2011, for acute trauma or elective orthopedic procedures, were eligible to participate in this study. Our cohort was formed by identifying all patients with clinical features of PE who underwent Computed Tomography-Pulmonary Angiogram (CT-PA) to confirm or exclude the clinical suspicion of PE, within six months after the injury or the surgical procedure. Case notes and electronic databases were reviewed retrospectively to identify each patient’s venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk factors, type of treatment, thromboprophylaxis and mortality. Results Out of 18,151 patients admitted during the study period only 85 (0.47%) patients developed PE (positive CT-PA) (24 underwent elective surgery and 61 sustained acute trauma). Of these, only 76% of the patients received thromboprophylaxis. Hypertension, obesity and cardiovascular disease were the most commonly identifiable risk factors. In 39% of the cases, PE was diagnosed during the in-hospital stay. The median time of PE diagnosis, from the date of injury or the surgical intervention was 23 days (range 1 to 312). The overall mortality rate was 0.07% (13/18,151), but for those who developed PE it was 15.29% (13/85). Concomitant deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was identified in 33.3% of patients. The presence of two or more co-morbidities was significantly associated with the incidence of mortality (unadjusted odds ratio (OR) = 3.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.34, 18.99), P = 0.034). Although there was also a similar clinical effect size for polytrauma injury on mortality (unadjusted OR = 1.90 (0.38, 9.54), P = 0.218), evidence was not statistically significant for this factor. Conclusions The incidence of VTE was comparable to previously reported rates, whereas the mortality rate was lower. Our local protocols that comply with the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines in the UK appear to be effective in preventing VTE and reducing mortality in trauma and orthopedic patients. PMID:24589368

  3. Influence of Ketamine on Early Postoperative Cognitive Function After Orthopedic Surgery in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ki Hwa; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jeong Won; Park, Jang Su; Lee, Kyu Won; Jeon, Sang Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a serious and frequent complication after surgery, especially in elderly patients. Ketamine is an N-methyl D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist with demonstrated neuroprotective effects. An intravenous bolus of a sub-anesthetic dose (0.5 mg/kg) of ketamine can reduce postoperative delirium (POD) and POCD after cardiac surgery. But, the influence of ketamine on early POCD after non-cardiac surgery is unclear. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the influence of ketamine on early postoperative cognitive function after orthopedic surgery in elderly patients. Patients and Methods: Fifty six elderly patients (> 60-years-old), scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery during general anesthesia (duration of anesthesia > two hours) were enrolled. Patients received intravenous bolus, a total of 3 mL mixed with 0.9% normal saline and 0.5 mg/kg ketamine (K group) or 3 mL of 0.9% normal saline (N group). Three neurocognitive function tests (mini-mental status examination, trail-making test, digit substitution test), and c-reactive protein (CRP) concentration were determined before surgery and on postoperative day one (POD 1) and postoperative day six (POD 6). Results: The two groups had similar demographic characteristics except for the gender. Surgical and anesthetic data were not significantly different. A statistically significant difference was observed in comparison of trail-making test score. Trail-making test score increased more in the N group (52.5 points) than the K group (13 points) at POD 1 (P = 0.047) compared with baseline scores. There were no significant differences in the mini-mental status examination, digit substitution test and CRP concentration at POD 1 and POD 6 between the two groups. POCD (the two Z-scores in more than two tests or the combined Z-score was 1.96 or more) was present in one patient (4%) in the K group at POD 6 (P = 0.98). Conclusions: The incidence of POCD was not significantly influenced by a bolus dose of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) after orthopedic surgery in elderly patients. There were no negative effects of ketamine on early POCD. PMID:26587403

  4. Single high dose gentamicin for perioperative prophylaxis in orthopedic surgery: Evaluation of nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovskaya, Yanina; Tejada, Rainer; Bosco, Joseph; Stachel, Anna; Chen, Donald; Feng, Melinda; Rosenberg, Andrew; Phillips, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies described an increase in acute kidney injury when high dose gentamicin was included in perioperative prophylaxis for orthopedic surgeries. To this effect, we compared the rate of nephrotoxicity for selected orthopedic surgeries where gentamicin was included (Gentamicin Group) to those where it was not included (Control Group) for perioperative prophylaxis and evaluated risk factors for nephrotoxicity. Methods: Spine, hip and knee surgeries performed between April 2011 and December 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Gentamicin was given to eligible patients based on age, weight and Creatinine Clearance. Nephrotoxicity was assessed using Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage kidney disease (RIFLE) criteria. Results: Among selected surgeries (N = 1590 in Gentamicin Group: hip = 926, spine = 600, knee = 64; N = 2587 in Control Group: hip = 980, spine = 902, knee = 705), patients’ body weight, serum creatinine, comorbidities and surgery duration were similar in Gentamicin Group and Control Group. Gentamicin median dose was 4.5 mg/kg of dosing weight. Nephrotoxicity rate was 2.5% in Gentamicin Group and 1.8% in Control Group, p = 0.17. Most cases of nephrotoxicity were Risk category by RIFLE criteria (67% in Gentamicin Group and 72% in Control Group, p = 0.49). In logistic regression, risk factors for nephrotoxicity were hospital stay >1 day prior to surgery (odds ratio = 8.1; 95% confidence interval = 2.25–28.97, p = 0.001), knee or hip surgery (odds ratio = 4.7; 95% confidence interval = 2.9–9.48, p = 0.0005) and diabetes (odds ratio = 1.95; 95% confidence interval = 1.13–3.35, p = 0.016). Receipt of gentamicin was not an independent predictor of nephrotoxicity (odds ratio = 1.5; 95% confidence interval = 0.97–2.35, p = 0.07). Conclusion: In this cohort, rate of nephrotoxicity was similar between Gentamicin Group and Control Group. Single high dose gentamicin is a safe and acceptable option for perioperative prophylaxis in eligible patients undergoing orthopedic surgeries. PMID:26770808

  5. Dynamics and Manipulation of Nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liufei

    This thesis presents my work on the spin dynamics of nanomagnets and investigates the possibility of manipulating nanomagnets by various means. Most of the work has been published. Some has been submitted for publication. The structure of this thesis is as follows. In Chapter 1, I present the theory of manipulation of a nanomagnet by rotating ac fields whose frequency is time dependent. Theory has been developed that maps the problem onto Landau-Zener problem. For the linear frequency sweep the switching phase diagrams are obtained on the amplitude of the ac field and the frequency sweep rate. Switching conditions have been obtained numerically and analytically. For the nonlinear frequency sweep, the optimal time dependence of the frequency is obtained analytically with account of damping that gives the fastest controllable switching of the magnetization. In Chapter 2, interaction between a nanomagnet and a Josephson junction has been studied. The I-V curve of the Josephson junction in the proximity of a nanomagnet shows Shapiro-like steps due to the ac field generated by the precessing magnetic moment. Possibility of switching of the magnetic moment by a time-linear voltage in the Josephson junction is demonstrated. Realization of the optimal switching is suggested that employs two perpendicular Josephson junctions with time-dependent voltage signals. The result is shown to be robust against voltage noises. Quantum-mechanical coupling between the nanomagnet considered as a two-level system and a Josephson junction has been studied and quantum oscillations of the populations of the spin states have been computed. In Chapter 3, the switching dynamics of a nanomagnet embedded in a torsional oscillator that serves as a conducting wire for a spin current has been investigated. Generalized Slonczewski's equation is derived. The coupling of the nanomagnet, the torsional oscillator and the spin current generates a number of interesting phenomena. The mechanically-assisted magnetization switching is studied, in which the magnetization can be reversed by tilting the torsional oscillator. The effect of the torsional oscillator on the switching of the magnetization in the presence of spin-polarized current is computed. Combined effects of the spin current and a mechanical kick of the torsional oscillator have been studied. In Chapter 4, skyrmion dynamics and interaction of the skyrmion with an electron have been studied. Corrections to the spin texture of the skyrmion due to the crystal lattice have been computed. Due to the lattice effects the skyrmion collapses in clean ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic materials. The lifetime of the skyrmion has been computed numerically and compared with analytical theory. In doped anti-ferromagnetic materials the weak attraction between a skyrmion and an electron may generate a bound state. In Chapter 5, experimental results of the NIST group on magnetic multilayer microcantilevers have been analyzed. Theoretical framework has been suggested that explains the observed strong damping effect of the platinum layer on the mechanical oscillations of Py-Pt bilayer cantilevers. The strong spin-orbit coupling of platinum is shown to impede the motion of the domain wall in permalloy and to dramatically increase the damping of the cantilever motion.

  6. Laser speckle technology in stomatology. diagnostics of stresses and strains of hard biotissues and orthodontic and orthopedic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, Yu. L.; Bazylev, N. B.; Rubnikovich, S. P.; Fomin, N. A.

    2013-07-01

    We have investigated the formation and dynamics of speckle biofi elds formed by hard biotissues of the oral cavity irradiated with low-intensity radiation. We present experimental methods for diagnosing the stressed-strained state of the maxillodental system and orthodontic and orthopedic structures based on speckle technologies and crosscorrelation analysis of speckle biofi elds.

  7. An Intelligibility Assessment of Toddlers with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Received and Did Not Receive Presurgical Infant Orthopedic Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konst, Emmy M.; Weersink-Braks, Hanny; Rietveld, Toni; Peters, Herman

    2000-01-01

    The influence of presurgical infant orthopedic treatment (PIO) on speech intelligibility was evaluated with 10 toddlers who used PIO during the first year of life and 10 who did not. Treated children were rated as exhibiting greater intelligibility, however, transcription data indicated there were not group differences in actual intelligibility.

  8. Patient refusal for regional anesthesia in elderly orthopedic population: A cross-sectional survey at a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Asma Abdus; Afshan, Gauhar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Improvements in pain management techniques in the last decade have had a major impact on the practice of orthopedic surgeries, for example, total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. Although there are a number of treatment options for postoperative pain, a gold standard has not been established. In our institution, both general anesthesia and regional anesthesia (RA), are being offered to the elderly orthopedic population but RA is not frequently accepted by elderly population. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of various reasons for refusal of RA in elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgeries. Material and Methods: A prospective study conducted over a period of 1 year, had 549 patients with ages above 60 years who underwent different types of elective orthopedic procedures 182 patients who refused RA were interviewed according to a structured questionnaire designed to assess the reasons of refusal. Results: Most common reason for the refusal of RA was surgeon's choice (38.5%), whereas 20.3% of the patients were unaware about the RA. There was a significant association between female gender and refusing RA due to backache (17.2%) and fear of being awake during the operation (24.1%) respectively. Conclusion: This survey showed that the main reasons among elderly female population were the fear of remaining awake and backache. However, overall it was the surgeon's choice which made patients refuse RA, and the anesthesiologists were the main source of information. PMID:27006550

  9. An Intelligibility Assessment of Toddlers with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Received and Did Not Receive Presurgical Infant Orthopedic Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konst, Emmy M.; Weersink-Braks, Hanny; Rietveld, Toni; Peters, Herman

    2000-01-01

    The influence of presurgical infant orthopedic treatment (PIO) on speech intelligibility was evaluated with 10 toddlers who used PIO during the first year of life and 10 who did not. Treated children were rated as exhibiting greater intelligibility, however, transcription data indicated there were not group differences in actual intelligibility.…

  10. The Living Stage Improvisational Theatre Demonstration Project for Orthopedically Handicapped Children, Ages 4-8. Overview, 1978-1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Robert; Haynes, Wendy

    The Living Stage Improvisational Theatre Demonstration Project (Washington, D.C.) conducts weekly workshops to enhance the creative expression and self esteem of orthopedically handicapped children, aged 4 to 8 years. The Living Stage program is designed to demonstrate that methods of improvisational theatre can have a positive impact on parental…

  11. Program Director Opinions of Core Competencies in Hand Surgery Training: Analysis of Differences Between Plastic and Orthopedic Surgery Accredited Programs

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Erika Davis; Larson, Bradley P.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to conduct a national survey of hand surgery fellowship program directors to determine differences of opinions of essential components of hand surgery training among program directors from plastic and orthopedic surgery programs. Methods We performed a web-based survey of 74 program directors from all ACGME accredited hand surgery fellowship programs to determine components that are essential for hand surgery training. The survey included assessment of 9 general areas of practice, 97 knowledge topics, and 172 procedures. 27 scales of related survey items were created to determine differences between specialty groups based on clinical themes. Results We had an 84% response rate, including 49 orthopedic and 12 plastic surgery program directors. There were significant differences in mean responses between the specialty groups in 11 of 27 scales. Only one scale, forearm fractures, contained items with a significantly stronger preference for essential rating among orthopedic surgeons. The other 10 scales contained items with a significantly higher preference for essential rating among plastic surgeons, most of which related to soft tissue injury and reconstruction. The burn scale had the greatest discrepancy in opinion of essential ratings between the groups, followed by pedicled and free tissue transfer, and amputation and fingertip injuries. Conclusions Despite being united under the subspecialty of hand surgery, program directors tend to emphasize clinical areas that are stressed in their respective primary disciplines. These differences promote the advantage of programs providing exposure to both plastic and orthopedic surgery trained hand surgeons. PMID:23446569

  12. Fuzzy logic control of telerobot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, Ernest A.; Nedungadi, Ashok

    1992-01-01

    Telerobot systems for advanced applications will require manipulators with redundant 'degrees of freedom' (DOF) that are capable of adapting manipulator configurations to avoid obstacles while achieving the user specified goal. Conventional methods for control of manipulators (based on solution of the inverse kinematics) cannot be easily extended to these situations. Fuzzy logic control offers a possible solution to these needs. A current research program at SRI developed a fuzzy logic controller for a redundant, 4 DOF, planar manipulator. The manipulator end point trajectory can be specified by either a computer program (robot mode) or by manual input (teleoperator). The approach used expresses end-point error and the location of manipulator joints as fuzzy variables. Joint motions are determined by a fuzzy rule set without requiring solution of the inverse kinematics. Additional rules for sensor data, obstacle avoidance and preferred manipulator configuration, e.g., 'righty' or 'lefty', are easily accommodated. The procedure used to generate the fuzzy rules can be extended to higher DOF systems.

  13. Task based synthesis of serial manipulators.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarosh; Sobh, Tarek

    2015-05-01

    Computing the optimal geometric structure of manipulators is one of the most intricate problems in contemporary robot kinematics. Robotic manipulators are designed and built to perform certain predetermined tasks. There is a very close relationship between the structure of the manipulator and its kinematic performance. It is therefore important to incorporate such task requirements during the design and synthesis of the robotic manipulators. Such task requirements and performance constraints can be specified in terms of the required end-effector positions, orientations and velocities along the task trajectory. In this work, we present a comprehensive method to develop the optimal geometric structure (DH parameters) of a non-redundant six degree of freedom serial manipulator from task descriptions. In this work we define, develop and test a methodology to design optimal manipulator configurations based on task descriptions. This methodology is devised to investigate all possible manipulator configurations that can satisfy the task performance requirements under imposed joint constraints. Out of all the possible structures, the structures that can reach all the task points with the required orientations are selected. Next, these candidate structures are tested to see whether they can attain end-effector velocities in arbitrary directions within the user defined joint constraints, so that they can deliver the best kinematic performance. Additionally least power consuming configurations are also identified. PMID:26257946

  14. Task based synthesis of serial manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sarosh; Sobh, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Computing the optimal geometric structure of manipulators is one of the most intricate problems in contemporary robot kinematics. Robotic manipulators are designed and built to perform certain predetermined tasks. There is a very close relationship between the structure of the manipulator and its kinematic performance. It is therefore important to incorporate such task requirements during the design and synthesis of the robotic manipulators. Such task requirements and performance constraints can be specified in terms of the required end-effector positions, orientations and velocities along the task trajectory. In this work, we present a comprehensive method to develop the optimal geometric structure (DH parameters) of a non-redundant six degree of freedom serial manipulator from task descriptions. In this work we define, develop and test a methodology to design optimal manipulator configurations based on task descriptions. This methodology is devised to investigate all possible manipulator configurations that can satisfy the task performance requirements under imposed joint constraints. Out of all the possible structures, the structures that can reach all the task points with the required orientations are selected. Next, these candidate structures are tested to see whether they can attain end-effector velocities in arbitrary directions within the user defined joint constraints, so that they can deliver the best kinematic performance. Additionally least power consuming configurations are also identified. PMID:26257946

  15. Ecological consequences of manipulative parasites: chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic "puppet masters", with their twisted, self-serving life history strategies and impressive evolutionary takeovers of host minds, capture the imagination of listenerseven those that might not normally fi nd the topic of parasitism appealing (which includes most everyone). A favorite anecdote concerns the trematode Leucochloridium paradoxum migrating to the eyestalks of its intermediate host snail and pulsating its colored body, presumably to attract the predatory birds that are the final hosts for the worm. Identifying a parasite as manipulative infers that a change in host behavior or appearance is a direct consequence of the parasites adaptive actions that, on average, will increase the fi tness of the parasite. The list of parasites that manipulate their hosts is long and growing. Holmes and Bethel (1972) presented the earliest comprehensive review and brought the subject to mainstream ecologists. Over two decades ago, Andy Dobson (1988) listed seven cestodes, seven trematodes, ten acanthocephalans, and three nematodes that manipulated host behavior. Fifteen years later, Janice Moore (2002) filled a book with examples. The five infectious trophic strategies, typical parasites (macroparasites), pathogens, trophically transmitted parasites, parasitic castrators, and parasitoids (Kuris and Lafferty 2000; Lafferty and Kuris 2002, 2009) can modify host behavior, but the likelihood that a parasite manipulates behavior differs among strategies. The most studied infectious agents, non-trophically transmitted pathogens and macroparasites, have enormous public health, veterinary, and wildlife disease importance, yet few manipulate host behavior. The beststudied manipulative infectious agents are trophically transmitted parasites in their prey intermediate hosts. Parasitoids and parasitic castrators can also manipulate host behavior, but for different purposes and with different implications. Several studies of manipulative parasites conclude with phrases such as may ultimately infl uence community structure (Kiesecker and Blaustein 1999), yet few demonstrate ecological effects. Here, we consider the conditions under which manipulative parasites might have a substantial ecological effect in nature and highlight those for which evidence exists (see also Chapter 10).

  16. Patient satisfaction with perioperative care among patients having orthopedic surgery in a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jlala, Hatem A; Caljouw, Monique A; Bedforth, Nigel M; Hardman, Jonathan G

    2010-01-01

    This survey aimed to validate the English version of the multidimensional Leiden Perioperative Patient Satisfaction questionnaire (LPPSq) and use it to assess patient satisfaction with perioperative care and the influence of type of anesthesia. One hundred patients having orthopedic surgery under regional and general anesthesia verbally consented to participate. Different aspects of satisfaction were assessed (eg, provision of information, and staff-patient relationship). The reliability estimate of the LPPSq (Cronbachs-?) was good (0.94). Overall, patient satisfaction score was 86.7%, lowest was for information (80.8%) and highest for staff-patient relationships (90.3%). Patients were more satisfied with the provision of information regarding regional anesthesia. PMID:22915869

  17. Fabrication aspects of PLA-CaP/PLGA-CaP composites for orthopedic applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Lawrence, Joseph G; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2012-07-01

    For several decades, composites made of polylactic acid-calcium phosphates (PLA-CaP) and polylactic acid-co-glycolic acid-calcium phosphates (PLGA-CaP) have seen widespread uses in orthopedic applications. This paper reviews the fabrication aspects of these composites, following the ubiquitous materials science approach by studying "processing-structure-property" correlations. Various fabrication processes such as microencapsulation, phase separation, electrospinning, supercritical gas foaming, etc., are reviewed, with specific examples of their applications in fabricating these composites. The effect of the incorporation of CaP materials on the mechanical and biological performance of PLA/PLGA is addressed. In addition, this paper describes the state of the art on challenges and innovations concerning CaP dispersion, incorporation of biomolecules/stem cells and long-term degradation of the composites. PMID:22342596

  18. Ion beam sputter etching of orthopedic implanted alloy MP35N and resulting effects on fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Christopher, M.; Bahnuik, E.; Wang, S.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of two types of argon ion sputter etched surface structures on the tensile stress fatigue properties of orthopedic implant alloy MP35N were investigated. One surface structure was a natural texture resulting from direct bombardment by 1 keV argon ions. The other structure was a pattern of square holes milled into the surface by a 1 keV argon ion beam through a Ni screen mask. The etched surfaces were subjected to tensile stress only in fatigue tests designed to simulate the cyclic load conditions experienced by the stems of artificial hip joint implants. Both types of sputter etched surface structures were found to reduce the fatigue strength below that of smooth surface MP35N.

  19. Cutting tool system to minimize soft tissue damage for robot-assisted minimally invasive orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Naohiko; Nakajima, Yoshikazu; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Kawata, Shosaku; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Abe, Nobuhiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Masahiko

    2007-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery in orthopedic field is considered to be a challenging problem with a milling robot. One objective of this study is to minimize collision of the cutting tool with soft tissue. The authors have developed a robot with redundant axis to avoid the collision so far. Some important components are modeled based on physical requirements, and a geometric optimization approach based on the model has been also proposed to improve performance. In this paper, a protective mechanism to cover the non-working part of the cutting edge is proposed to avoid soft tissue damage. Hardware and software have been developed for this application and the effectiveness of this technique was evaluated with urethane bone. PMID:18051155

  20. Biomarkers of Brain Damage and Postoperative Cognitive Disorders in Orthopedic Patients: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in orthopedic patients varies from 16% to 45%, although it can be as high as 72%. As a consequence, the hospitalization time of patients who developed POCD was longer, the outcome and quality of life were worsened, and prolonged medical and social assistance were necessary. In this review the short description of such biomarkers of brain damage as the S100B protein, NSE, GFAP, Tau protein, metalloproteinases, ubiquitin C terminal hydrolase, microtubule-associated protein, myelin basic protein, α-II spectrin breakdown products, and microRNA was made. The role of thromboembolic material in the development of cognitive decline was also discussed. Special attention was paid to optimization of surgical and anesthetic procedures in the prevention of postoperative cognitive decline. PMID:26417595

  1. Wear Properties of Porous NiTi Orthopedic Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuilin; Liu, Xiangmei; Yeung, K. W. K.; Xu, Z. S.; Chung, C. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2012-12-01

    Porous NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) scaffolds have great potential to be used as orthopedic implants because of their porous structure and superior physical properties. Its metallic nature provides it with better mechanical properties and Young's modulus close to that of natural bones. Besides allowing tissue ingrowth and transfer of nutrients, porous SMA possesses unique pseudoelastic properties compatible to natural hard tissues like bones and tendons, thus expediting in vivo osseointegration. However, the nickel release from debris and the metal surface may cause osteocytic osteolysis at the interface between the artificial implants and bone tissues. Subsequent mobilization may finally lead to implant failure. In this study, the wear properties of porous NiTi with different porosities processed at different treatment temperatures are determined. The results of the study show that the porosity, phase transformation temperature, and annealing temperature are major factors influencing the wear characteristics of porous NiTi SMA.

  2. [Medical controlling as medical economical service center. Successful concept for orthopedics and trauma surgery centers?].

    PubMed

    Auhuber, T C; Hoffmann, R

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients from administrative admission through the orthopedic-surgical treatment to completion of the billing is complex. Additional challenges originate from the necessity to treat patients in both outpatient and inpatient departments and in more than one medical sector. A superior coordination is essential for a successful cooperation of the various procedures of controlling. The model of a medical controlling department as a service center with effective competence in the management of service and cost, functions as a successful solution to the problem. Central elements of a successful medical economical case management are a well-defined assignment of tasks and definitions of intersections, the integration of health professionals and administrative employees, the utilization of software for process control and the implementation of inlier controlling. PMID:25630885

  3. Prosthesis Infections after Orthopedic Joint Replacement: The Possible Role of Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhijun; Borgwardt, Lotte; Hiby, Niels; Wu, Hong; Srensen, Torben Sandberg; Borgwardt, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Prosthesis-related infection is a serious complication for patients after orthopedic joint replacement, which is currently difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy. Consequently, in most cases, removal of the infected prosthesis is the only solution to cure the infection. It is, therefore, important to understand the comprehensive interaction between the microbiological situation and the host immune responses that lead to prosthesis infections. Evidence indicates that prosthesis infections are actually biofilm-correlated infections that are highly resistant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune responses. The authors reviewed the related literature in the context of their clinical experience, and discussed the possible etiology and mechanism leading to the infections, especially problems related to bacterial biofilm, and prophylaxis and treatment of infection, including both microbiological and surgical measures. Recent progress in research into bacterial biofilm and possible future treatment options of prosthesis-related infections are discussed. PMID:23888204

  4. The Choice Between Total Hip Arthroplasty and Arthrodesis in Adolescent Patients: A Survey of Orthopedic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Mark G; Studdert, David M; Callaghan, John J; Farid, Monica S; Titan, Ashley L; Dietz, Frederick R

    2016-01-01

    For adolescent patients with end-stage hip disease, the choice between total hip arthroplasty (THA) and arthrodesis is complex; the clinical evidence is not definitive, and there are difficult trade-offs between clear short-term benefits from THA and uncertain long-term risks. We surveyed nearly 700 members of the Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Respondents chose between a recommendation of THA or arthrodesis in four clinical vignettes. A clear majority of surgeons recommended THA in two of the vignettes, however opinion was somewhat divided in one vignette (overweight adolescent) and deeply divided in another (adolescent destined for manual labor job). Across all vignettes, recommendations varied systematically according to surgeons' age and their attitudes regarding tradeoffs between life stages. PMID:26298281

  5. Old Drugs for New Applications: Can Orthopedic Research Benefit from This Strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaohua; Cheng, Wenxiang; Wang, Jiali; Qin, Ling; Lai, Yuxiao; Tang, Jian; Shang, Peng; Ren, Peigen; Zhang, Peng

    2011-01-01

    New drug exploration is difficult in a clinical setting and the development of new drugs may be costly and time consuming. With further research into the pathological mechanisms and etiology of diseases as well as the rapid development of biological techniques, many old drugs that have been applied in clinics may have new therapeutic functions which may shed light on clinical management. Based on this, we have investigated the old drugs for new applications strategy in pharmacology which may be less expensive and more efficient in the clinical setting. In this paper we have explored and illustrated the potential applications of old drugs for the treatment of orthopedic diseases, especially in arthritis and osteoporosis therapy. PMID:22870479

  6. Quaternized Chitosan as an Antimicrobial Agent: Antimicrobial Activity, Mechanism of Action and Biomedical Applications in Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Honglue; Ma, Rui; Lin, Chucheng; Liu, Ziwei; Tang, Tingting

    2013-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) is a linear polysaccharide with good biodegradability, biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity, which makes it potentially useful for biomedical applications, including an antimicrobial agent either alone or blended with other polymers. However, the poor solubility of CS in most solvents at neutral or high pH substantially limits its use. Quaternary ammonium CS, which was prepared by introducing a quaternary ammonium group on a dissociative hydroxyl group or amino group of the CS, exhibited improved water solubility and stronger antibacterial activity relative to CS over an entire range of pH values; thus, this quaternary modification increases the potential biomedical applications of CS in the field of anti-infection. This review discusses the current findings on the antimicrobial properties of quaternized CS synthesized using different methods and the mechanisms of its antimicrobial actions. The potential antimicrobial applications in the orthopedic field and perspectives regarding future studies in this field are also considered. PMID:23325051

  7. [Contribution of the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method to dentofacial orthopedics: update].

    PubMed

    Elhaddaoui, R; Benyahia, H; Azaroual, F; Zaoui, F

    2014-11-01

    The successful orthopedic treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusions is closely related to the reasoned determination of the optimal time to initiate the treatment. This is why various methods have been proposed to assess skeletal maturation, such as a hand-wrist radiograph or the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method. The hand-wrist radiograph was up to now the most frequently used method to assess skeletal maturation. However, the clinical and biological limitations of this technique, as well as the need to perform an additional radiograph, were reasons to develop another method to explore the maturation stages of visible cervical vertebrae on a simple lateral cephalometric radiograph. The authors compare the 2 methods and prove the greater contribution of the CVM method compared to the hand-wrist radiograph. PMID:25444244

  8. Therapeutic approach to Class II, Division 1 malocclusion with maxillary functional orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    de Bittencourt, Aristeu Corra; Saga, Armando Yukio; Pacheco, Ariel Adriano Reyes; Tanaka, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Interceptive treatment of Class II, Division 1 malocclusion is a challenge orthodontists commonly face due to the different growth patterns they come across and the different treatment strategies they have available. OBJECTIVE: To report five cases of interceptive orthodontics performed with the aid of Klammt's elastic open activator (KEOA) to treat Class II, Division 1 malocclusion. METHODS: Treatment comprehends one or two phases; and the use of functional orthopedic appliances, whenever properly recommended, is able to minimize dentoskeletal discrepancies with consequent improvement in facial esthetics during the first stage of mixed dentition. The triad of diagnosis, correct appliance manufacture and patient's compliance is imperative to allow KEOA to contribute to Class II malocclusion treatment. RESULTS: Cases reported herein showed significant improvement in skeletal, dental and profile aspects, as evinced by cephalometric analysis and clinical photographs taken before, during and after interceptive orthodontics. PMID:26352852

  9. [Drug prevention of pulmonary embolism in orthopedic practice: traditional and novel approaches].

    PubMed

    Preobrazhenski?, D V; Sidorenko, B A; Batyraliev, T A; Nekrasova, N I

    2011-01-01

    We consider in this review traditional and novel approaches to drug prevention of pulmonary embolism (PE) which in predominant number of cases is related to deep vein thrombosis of lower extremities. Risk of PE development is especially high in patients after orthopedic hip or knee surgery. Modern recommendations contemplate use of unfractionated and low molecular weight heparins, vitamin K antagonists (warfarin in the first place), fondaparinux. Oral direct anticoagulants related to selective inhibitors of blood coagulation factors IIa (thrombin) and Xa have appeared recently and proved their preventive efficacy and safety in randomized controlled studies. Preventive efficacy and safety of dabigatran among direct selective factor IIa (thrombin) inhibitors and of rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban among direct selective factor IIa inhibitors have been studied best. PMID:21649596

  10. New Oral Anticoagulants in Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolic Disease in Major Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Despite widespread diffusion of pharmacological prophylaxis, deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is still a common cause of morbidity after major orthopedic surgery (total hip replacement - THR- and total knee replacement -TKR). At present, clear evidence has been provided that pharmacological primary prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is associated with a significant decrease in the incidence of venous thromboembolism. The main limitation of LMWH prophylaxis however is the need for parenteral administration with a not negligible drop-out of treatment. Newer oral anticoagulants (NAOs) dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixiban and edoxaban may be valid alternatives in elective surgery. Several studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of NAOs after THR and TKR. The research for new compounds and their antidote is under continuous development Aim of this paper was to review the indications and clinical results of DVT prophylaxis with NAO in patients undergoing major orthopaedic surgery. PMID:26721520

  11. 3D Bioprinting of Cartilage for Orthopedic Surgeons: Reading between the Lines

    PubMed Central

    Di Bella, Claudia; Fosang, Amanda; Donati, Davide M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Choong, Peter F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral lesions represent one of the most challenging and frustrating scenarios for the orthopedic surgeon and for the patient. The lack of therapeutic strategies capable to reconstitute the function and structure of hyaline cartilage and to halt the progression toward osteoarthritis has brought clinicians and scientists together, to investigate the potential role of tissue engineering as a viable alternative to current treatment modalities. In particular, the role of bioprinting is emerging as an innovative technology that allows for the creation of organized 3D tissue constructs via a “layer-by-layer” deposition process. This process also has the capability to combine cells and biomaterials in an ordered and predetermined way. Here, we review the recent advances in cartilage bioprinting and we identify the current challenges and the directions for future developments in cartilage regeneration. PMID:26322314

  12. A controlled antibiotic release system to prevent orthopedic-implant associated infections: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, Marina; Pinczowski, Pedro; Pérez, Marta; Giorello, Antonella; Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Santamaría, Jesús; Arruebo, Manuel; Luján, Lluís

    2015-01-01

    A new device for local delivery of antibiotics is presented, with potential use as a drug-eluting fixation pin for orthopedic applications. The implant consists of a stainless steel hollow tubular reservoir packed with the desired antibiotic. Release takes place through several orifices previously drilled in the reservoir wall, a process that does not compromise the mechanical properties required for the implant. Depending on the antibiotic chosen and the number of orifices, the release profile can be tailored from a rapid release of the load (ca. 20 h) to a combination of rapid initial release and slower, sustained release for a longer period of time (ca. 200 h). An excellent bactericidal action is obtained, with 4-log reductions achieved in as little as 2 h, and total bacterial eradication in 8 h using 6-pinholed implants filled with cefazolin. PMID:26297104

  13. In-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in suspected orthopedic prosthesis infection: comparison with other imaging modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, J.E.; Brown, M.L.; Hauser, M.F.; Berquist, T.H.; Fitzgerald, R.H. Jr.; Klee, G.G.

    1988-07-01

    When infection of prosthetic orthopedic implants is suspected, optimal management requires accurate confirmation or exclusion of infection. The authors retrospectively studied 98 patients with possible infection who underwent scanning with indium-111-labeled white blood cells (WBCs) and subsequently underwent surgery within 14 days. At surgery, 50 patients had infections, as determined by means of culture or histologic results. The diagnostic accuracy of In-111 scanning was compared with that of plain radiography, arthrography, three-phase bone scanning, and various clinical and laboratory findings classically associated with infection. Positive findings on In-111 WBC scans and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rates were found to be the most predictive variables in the diagnosis of septic prostheses (P less than or equal to .001 and P less than or equal to .002, respectively). Likelihood ratio analysis more clearly demonstrated the superiority of In-111 WBC scanning, with positive and negative scans yielding likelihood ratios of 5.0 and 0.16, respectively.

  14. Large planar maneuvers for articulated flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Yang, Li-Farn

    1988-01-01

    An articulated flexible manipulator carried on a translational cart is maneuvered by an active controller to perform certain position control tasks. The nonlinear dynamics of the articulated flexible manipulator are derived and a transformation matrix is formulated to localize the nonlinearities within the inertia matrix. Then a feedback linearization scheme is introduced to linearize the dynamic equations for controller design. Through a pole placement technique, a robust controller design is obtained by properly assigning a set of closed-loop desired eigenvalues to meet performance requirements. Numerical simulations for the articulated flexible manipulators are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed position control algorithms.

  15. Mapping tasks into fault tolerant manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Paredis, C.J.J.; Khosla, P.K.; Kanade, T.

    1994-12-31

    The application of robots in critical missions in hazardous environments requires the development of reliable or fault tolerant manipulators. In this paper, we define fault tolerance as the ability to continue the performance of a task after immobilization of a joint due to failure. Initially, no joint limits are considered, in which case we prove the existence of fault tolerant manipulators and develop an analysis tool to determine the fault tolerant work space. We also derive design templates for spatial fault tolerant manipulators. When joint limits are introduced, analytic solutions become infeasible but instead a numerical design procedure can be used, as is illustrated through an example.

  16. W-026, acceptance test report manipulator system

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-04-15

    The purpose of the WRAP Manipulator System Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) is to verify that the 4 glovebox sets of WRAP manipulator components, including rail/carriage, slave arm, master controller and auxiliary equipment, meets the requirements of the functional segments of 14590 specification. The demonstration of performance elements of the ATP are performed as a part of the Assembly specifications. Manipulator integration is integrated in the performance testing of the gloveboxes. Each requirement of the Assembly specification will be carried out in conjunction with glovebox performance tests.

  17. Clinical and Cost Implications of Inpatient Versus Outpatient Orthopedic Surgeries: A Systematic Review of the Published Literature

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Dennis C.; Sprague, Sheila; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    The number of outpatient orthopedic surgeries performed within North America continues to increase. The impact of this change in services on patient outcomes is largely unknown. The objective of this review is to compare patient outcomes and associated costs for outpatient orthopedic surgeries traditionally performed in hospital to inpatient surgeries, as well as to summarize the eligibility and preoperative education requirements for outpatient orthopedic surgery in North America. We performed a systematic review of Medline, Pubmed and Embase databases for articles comparing the clinical and economic impact of outpatient orthopedic surgical procedures versus inpatient procedures in North America. We reported on requirements for inpatient versus outpatient care, preoperative education requirements, complications and patient outcomes, patient satisfaction, and when available total mean costs. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria for this review. Eligibility requirements for outpatient orthopedic surgery within the included studies varied, but generally included: patient consent, a caregiver at home following surgery, close proximity to an outpatient center, and no history of serious medical problems. Preoperative education programs were not always compulsory and practices varied between outpatient centers. All of the reviewed studies reported that outpatient surgeries had similar or improved level of pain and rates of nausea. Outpatients reported increased satisfaction with the care they received. As expected, outpatient procedures were less expensive than inpatient procedures. This review found that outpatient procedures in North America appear to be less expensive and safe alternatives to inpatient care for patients who are at lower risk for complications and procedures that do not necessarily require close hospital level care monitoring following same day surgery. PMID:26793295

  18. Mechanical properties of dispersed ceramic nanoparticles in polymer composites for orthopedic applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huinan; Webster, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Ceramic/polymer composites have been considered as third-generation orthopedic biomaterials due to their ability to closely match properties (such as surface, chemistry, biological, and mechanical) of natural bone. It has already been shown that the addition of nanophase compared with conventional (or micron-scale) ceramics to polymers enhances bone cell functions. However, in order to fully take advantage of the promising nanometer size effects that nanoceramics can provide when added to polymers, it is critical to uniformly disperse them in a polymer matrix. This is critical since ceramic nanoparticles inherently have a strong tendency to form larger agglomerates in a polymer matrix which may compromise their properties. Therefore, in this study, model ceramic nanoparticles, specifically titania and hydroxyapatite (HA), were dispersed in a model polymer (PLGA, poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid) using high-power ultrasonic energy. The mechanical properties of the resulting PLGA composites with well-dispersed ceramic (either titania or HA) nanoparticles were investigated and compared with composites with agglomerated ceramic nanoparticles. Results demonstrated that well-dispersed ceramic nanoparticles (titania or HA) in PLGA improved mechanical properties compared with agglomerated ceramic nanoparticles even though the weight percentage of the ceramics was the same. Specifically, well-dispersed nanoceramics in PLGA enhanced the tensile modulus, tensile strength at yield, ultimate tensile strength, and compressive modulus compared with the more agglomerated nanoceramics in PLGA. In summary, supplemented by previous studies that demonstrated greater osteoblast (bone-forming cell) functions on well-dispersed nanophase ceramics in polymers, the present study demonstrated that the combination of PLGA with well-dispersed nanoceramics enhanced mechanical properties necessary for load-bearing orthopedic/dental applications. PMID:20463945

  19. Effects of intrathecal hyperbaric ropivacaine versus hyperbaric bupivacaine for lower limb orthopedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Somjit; Bisui, Bikash; Mandal, Anamitra; Sheet, Jagabandhu; Sengupta, Swapnadeep; Majumdar, Shakya; Swaika, Sarbari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Regional anesthesia, increasingly used for infraumbilical surgery, has advantages of decreased stress response to surgery, nausea, vomiting, and cardio-respiratory depression with improved postoperative analgesia, in comparison to general anesthesia. Intrathecal isobaric ropivacaine (RP) had been found, in various clinical studies, to be shorter acting in comparison to bupivacaine (BP). Our present study was, hence, aimed to compare the anesthetic and analgesic efficacy of intrathecal hyperbaric RP relative to hyperbaric BP in lower limb orthopedic surgery. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients aged ranges between 18 and 60 years of either sex, ASAPS 1 and 2, undergoing elective lower limb orthopedic surgeries were divided into two groups, RP group and BP group receiving intrathecal 0.75% RP 3 ml and glucose 50%, 0.5 ml and 0.5% hyperbaric BP 3 ml and 0.9% normal saline 0.5 ml, respectively. The efficacy in terms of onset and duration of anesthesia and analgesia were assessed along with the heart rate, blood pressure at regular intervals throughout the perioperative period. Result: The two study groups were comparable in terms of demography and duration of surgery. Patients in group RP experienced significantly late onset and shorter duration of sensory and motor block in comparison to patients in group BP. There were clinically insignificant differences in perioperative hemodynamics and side-effects noted in each group. Hence, it was observed in this study that equipotent dose of hyperbaric RP had shorter duration of analgesia and anesthesia than with equipotent dose of hyperbaric BP. PMID:25886334

  20. Relationship of orthopedic examination, goniometric measurements, and radiographic signs of degenerative joint disease in cats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Available information suggests a mismatch between radiographic and orthopedic examination findings in cats with DJD. However, the extent of the discrepancy between clinical and radiographic signs of OA in companion animals has not been described in detail. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between orthopedic examination findings, joint goniometry, and radiographic signs of DJD in 100 cats, in a prospective observational design. Cat temperament, pain response to palpation, joint crepitus, effusion and thickening were graded. Radiographs of appendicular joints and the axial skeleton were made under sedation. Joint motion was measured by use of a plastic goniometer before and after sedation. Associations between radiographic degenerative joint disease (DJD) and examination findings were assessed to determine sensitivity, specificity and likelihood estimations. Results Pain response to palpation was elicited in 0-67% of the joints with DJD, with a specificity ranging from 62-99%; crepitus was detected in 0-56% of the joints and its specificity varied between 87 and 99%; for effusion, values ranged between 6 and 38% (specificity, 82-100%), and thickening, 0-59% (specificity, 74-99%). Joints with DJD tended to have a decreased range of motion. The presence of pain increased the odds of having DJD in the elbow (right: 5.5; left: 4.5); the presence of pain in the lower back increased the odds of spinal DJD being present (2.97 for lumbar; 4.67 for lumbo-sacral). Conclusions Radiographic DJD cannot be diagnosed with certainty using palpation or goniometry. However, negative findings tend to predict radiographically normal joints. Palpation and goniometry may be used as a tool to help to screen cats, mostly to rule out DJD. PMID:22281125

  1. High-strength, surface-porous polyether-ether-ketone for load-bearing orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nathan T; Torstrick, F Brennan; Lee, Christopher S D; Dupont, Kenneth M; Safranski, David L; Chang, W Allen; Macedo, Annie E; Lin, Angela S P; Boothby, Jennifer M; Whittingslow, Daniel C; Carson, Robert A; Guldberg, Robert E; Gall, Ken

    2015-02-01

    Despite its widespread clinical use in load-bearing orthopedic implants, polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) is often associated with poor osseointegration. In this study, a surface-porous PEEK material (PEEK-SP) was created using a melt extrusion technique. The porous layer was 399.663.3 ?m thick and possessed a mean pore size of 279.931.6 ?m, strut spacing of 186.855.5 ?m, porosity of 67.33.1% and interconnectivity of 99.90.1%. Monotonic tensile tests showed that PEEK-SP preserved 73.9% of the strength (71.062.17 MPa) and 73.4% of the elastic modulus (2.450.31 GPa) of as-received, injection-molded PEEK. PEEK-SP further demonstrated a fatigue strength of 60.0 MPa at one million cycles, preserving 73.4% of the fatigue resistance of injection-molded PEEK. Interfacial shear testing showed the pore layer shear strength to be 23.962.26 MPa. An osseointegration model in the rat revealed substantial bone formation within the pore layer at 6 and 12 weeks via microcomputed tomography and histological evaluation. Ingrown bone was more closely apposed to the pore wall and fibrous tissue growth was reduced in PEEK-SP when compared to non-porous PEEK controls. These results indicate that PEEK-SP could provide improved osseointegration while maintaining the structural integrity necessary for load-bearing orthopedic applications. PMID:25463499

  2. Manipulating meat quality and composition.

    PubMed

    Wood, J D; Enser, M; Fisher, A V; Nute, G R; Richardson, R I; Sheard, P R

    1999-05-01

    Meat quality describes the attractiveness of meat to consumers. The present paper focuses on two major aspects of meat quality, tenderness and flavour. Both aspects of quality can be influenced by nutrition, principally through its effects on the amount and type of fat in meat. In several countries, high levels of intramuscular fat (marbling fat), i.e. above 30 g/kg muscle weight in longissimus, are deemed necessary for optimum tenderness, although poor relationships between fat content and tenderness have generally been found in European studies, where fat levels are often very low, e.g. below 10 g/kg in UK pigs. Muscle lipid may be a marker for red oxidative (type 1) muscle fibres which are found at higher concentrations in tender muscles and carcasses. Nutritional treatment can be used to manipulate the fatty acid content of muscle to improve nutritional balance, i.e. increase the polyunsaturated (PUFA): saturated fatty acid value and reduce the n-6:n-3 PUFA value. Increasing PUFA levels may also change flavour because of their greater susceptibility to oxidative breakdown and the generation of abnormal volatile compounds during cooking. This situation particularly applies to the n-3 PUFA which are the most unsaturated meat lipids. In pigs, a concentration of 3 mg alpha-linolenic acid (18:3)/100 mg in muscle and fat tissue fatty acids can easily be achieved by including whole linseed in the diet. This level has led to abnormal odours and flavours in some studies, but not in others. In cattle and sheep, feeding whole linseed raised 18:3 concentrations in muscle fatty acids from about 0.7 mg/100 mg to > 1 mg/100 mg. As with pigs, this diet also increased levels of long-chain n-3 PUFA formed from 18:3, including eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5). Although this increase led to greater oxidative breakdown of lipids during storage and the generation of large quantities of lipid-derived volatile compounds during cooking, there were no deleterious effects on odour or flavour. When 18:3 levels are raised in lamb and beef because of grass feeding, the intensity of the flavours increases in comparison with grain-fed animals which consume and deposit relatively more linoleic acid (18:2). In ruminants, very high levels of 18:2 produced by feeding protected oil supplements cause the cooked beef to be described as oily, bland or pork-like. PMID:10466178

  3. Ive never asked one question. Understanding the barriers among orthopedic surgery residents to screening female patients for intimate partner violence

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Young, Aynsely; Rotstein, Ori D.; Schemitsch, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global public health problem. Orthopedic surgery residents may identify IPV among injured patients treated in fracture clinics. Yet, these residents face a number of barriers to recognizing and discussing IPV with patients. We sought to explore orthopedic surgery residents knowledge of IPV and their preparedness to screen patients for IPV in academic fracture clinic settings with a view to developing targeted IPV education and training. Methods We conducted focus groups with junior and intermediate residents. Discussions explored residents knowledge of and experiences with IPV screening and preparedness for screening and responding to IPV among orthopedic patients. Data were analyzed iteratively using an inductive approach. Results Residents were aware of the issue of abuse generally, but had received no specific information or training on IPV in orthopedics. Residents did not see orthopedics faculty screen patients for IPV or advocate for screening. They did not view IPV screening or intervention as part of the orthopedic surgeons role. Residents clinical experiences emphasized time management and surgical intervention by effectively getting through clinic and dealing with the surgical problem. Communication with patients about other health issues was minimal or nonexistent. Conclusion Orthopedic surgery residents are entering a career path where IPV is well documented. They encounter cultural and structural barriers preventing the incorporation of IPV screening into their clinical and educational experiences. Hospitals and academic programs must collaborate in efforts to build capacity for sustainable IPV screening programs among these trainees. PMID:25421078

  4. The modelling of industrial robot manipulator vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Marcham, L.J.; Rao, B.K.N.; Noroozi, S.; Penson, R.P.

    1996-11-01

    The work reported in this paper addresses the modelling of robot manipulator vibration, with the specific aim of producing a model suitable to be employed within an active compensation controller. An overview of existing work on the modelling of robot dynamics, both mathematically and empirically, is reported. A model of the dynamics of an industrial manipulator, inclusive of vibration, derived using Lagrangian mechanics is presented and further developed through the application of experimental modal analysis, by which the position dependent modal parameters of an industrial robot manipulator are determined. The model results are compared with experimental vibration data taken from the end-effector of a PUMA562C industrial manipulator using laser interferometry. Control of an end-effector located, active compensator for vibration suppression, based upon the derived model is discussed and recommendations which form the basis of further investigations, currently being undertaken, are presented.

  5. Tension Stiffened and Tendon Actuated Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R. (Inventor); Dorsey, John T. (Inventor); Ganoe, George G. (Inventor); King, Bruce D. (Inventor); Jones, Thomas C. (Inventor); Mercer, Charles D. (Inventor); Corbin, Cole K. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A tension stiffened and tendon actuated manipulator is provided performing robotic-like movements when acquiring a payload. The manipulator design can be adapted for use in-space, lunar or other planetary installations as it is readily configurable for acquiring and precisely manipulating a payload in both a zero-g environment and in an environment with a gravity field. The manipulator includes a plurality of link arms, a hinge connecting adjacent link arms together to allow the adjacent link arms to rotate relative to each other and a cable actuation and tensioning system provided between adjacent link arms. The cable actuation and tensioning system includes a spreader arm and a plurality of driven and non-driven elements attached to the link arms and the spreader arm. At least one cable is routed around the driven and non-driven elements for actuating the hinge.

  6. Spinal Manipulation for Low-Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with low-back pain, spinal manipulation affected pain perception in specific ways that other therapies (stationary bicycle ... A–Z Medical Dictionary Related Topics Chiropractic: In Depth Massage Therapy for Health Purposes: What You Need ...

  7. Optoelectronic tweezers for microparticle and cell manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 .mu.m or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or groups of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  8. Optoelectronic Tweezers for Microparticle and Cell Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei-Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 micromillimeters or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or group of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  9. Reconfigurable mobile manipulation for accident response

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON,ROBERT J.; MORSE,WILLIAM D.; SHIREY,DAVID L.; CDEBACA,DANIEL M.; HOFFMAN JR.,JOHN P.; LUCY,WILLIAM E.

    2000-06-06

    The need for a telerobotic vehicle with hazard sensing and integral manipulation capabilities has been identified for use in transportation accidents where nuclear weapons are involved. The Accident Response Mobile Manipulation System (ARMMS) platform has been developed to provide remote dexterous manipulation and hazard sensing for the Accident Response Group (ARG) at Sandia National Laboratories. The ARMMS' mobility platform is a military HMMWV [High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle] that is teleoperated over RF or Fiber Optic communication channels. ARMMS is equipped with two high strength Schilling Titan II manipulators and a suite of hazardous gas and radiation sensors. Recently, a modular telerobotic control architecture call SMART (Sandia Modular Architecture for Robotic and Teleoperation) has been applied to ARMMS. SMART enables input devices and many system behaviors to be rapidly configured in the field for specific mission needs. This paper summarizes current SMART developments applied to ARMMS.

  10. Hybrid Image-Plane/Stereo Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Eric; Robinson, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid Image-Plane/Stereo (HIPS) manipulation is a method of processing image data, and of controlling a robotic manipulator arm in response to the data, that enables the manipulator arm to place an end-effector (an instrument or tool) precisely with respect to a target (see figure). Unlike other stereoscopic machine-vision-based methods of controlling robots, this method is robust in the face of calibration errors and changes in calibration during operation. In this method, a stereoscopic pair of cameras on the robot first acquires images of the manipulator at a set of predefined poses. The image data are processed to obtain image-plane coordinates of known visible features of the end-effector. Next, there is computed an initial calibration in the form of a mapping between (1) the image-plane coordinates and (2) the nominal three-dimensional coordinates of the noted end-effector features in a reference frame fixed to the main robot body at the base of the manipulator. The nominal three-dimensional coordinates are obtained by use of the nominal forward kinematics of the manipulator arm that is, calculated by use of the currently measured manipulator joint angles and previously measured lengths of manipulator arm segments under the assumption that the arm segments are rigid, that the arm lengths are constant, and that there is no backlash. It is understood from the outset that these nominal three-dimensional coordinates are likely to contain possibly significant calibration errors, but the effects of the errors are progressively reduced, as described next. As the end-effector is moved toward the target, the calibration is updated repeatedly by use of data from newly acquired images of the end-effector and of the corresponding nominal coordinates in the manipulator reference frame. By use of the updated calibration, the coordinates of the target are computed in manipulator-reference-frame coordinates and then used to the necessary manipulator joint angles to position and orient the end-effector at the target with respect to the same kinematic model from the calibration step. As the end-effector/target distance decreases, the computed coordinates of the end-effector and target become more nearly affected by the same errors, so that the differences between their coordinates become increasingly precise. When the end-effector reaches the target, the remaining effective position error is the distance that corresponds to more than about one pixel in the stereoscopic images of the target.

  11. Efficient Computation Of Manipulator Inertia Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1991-01-01

    Improved method for computation of manipulator inertia matrix developed, based on concept of spatial inertia of composite rigid body. Required for implementation of advanced dynamic-control schemes as well as dynamic simulation of manipulator motion. Motivated by increasing demand for fast algorithms to provide real-time control and simulation capability and, particularly, need for faster-than-real-time simulation capability, required in many anticipated space teleoperation applications.

  12. Efficient Kinematic Computations For 7-DOF Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Long, Mark K.; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    Efficient algorithms for forward kinematic mappings of seven-degree-of-freedom (7-DOF) robotic manipulator having revolute joints developed on basis of representation of redundant DOF in terms of parameter called "arm angle." Continuing effort to exploit redundancy in manipulator according to concept of basic and additional tasks. Concept also discussed in "Configuration-Control Scheme Copes With Singularities" (NPO-18556) and "Increasing the Dexterity of Redundant Robots" (NPO-17801).

  13. Billing and coding for osteopathic manipulative treatment.

    PubMed

    Snider, Karen T; Jorgensen, Douglas J

    2009-08-01

    Some osteopathic physicians are not properly reimbursed by insurance companies after providing osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) to their patients. Common problems associated with lack of reimbursements include insurers bundling OMT with the standard evaluation and management service and confusing OMT with chiropractic manipulative treatment or physical therapy services. The authors suggest methods of appeal for denied reimbursement claims that will also prevent future payment denials. PMID:19706830

  14. Optical Trapping, Cell Manipulation, And Robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buican, Tudor N.; Neagley, Daniel L.; Morrison, William C.; Upham, Bryan D.

    1989-06-01

    A new type of analytical and preparative cytometric instrument was developed. The instrument combines image analysis and machine vision with single cell and chromosome manipulation by means of optical trapping. A proof-of-principle instrument, OCAM, has the ability to locate and analyze biological particles inside an enclosed manipulation chamber, as well as the ability to move and position particles according to preprogrammed protocols. Preliminary results and potential biological applications of such a microrobot are discussed.

  15. On the manipulability of dual cooperative robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiacchio, P.; Chiaverini, S.; Sciavicco, L.; Siciliano, B.

    1989-01-01

    The definition of manipulability ellipsoids for dual robot systems is given. A suitable kineto-static formulation for dual cooperative robots is adopted which allows for a global task space description of external and internal forces, and relative velocities. The well known concepts of force and velocity manipulability ellipsoids for a single robot are formally extended and the contributions of the two single robots to the cooperative system ellipsoids are illustrated. Duality properties are discussed. A practical case study is developed.

  16. New control concept of anthropomorphic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovic, M.; Stokic, D.; Hristic, D.

    1975-01-01

    The control of active articulated mechanisms involves the construction of trajectories and corresponding forces (torques). Two procedures for developing mathematical models of manipulator dynamics are explored. The control task can be formulated as follows: define the dynamic control parameters of the basic manipulator configuration with three degrees of freedom, which should perform movements at N points of the working space. The task can be solved by forming programmed coordinated motion which have to realize the adopted tip trajectory.

  17. Direct manipulation of virtual objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Long K.

    Interacting with a Virtual Environment (VE) generally requires the user to correctly perceive the relative position and orientation of virtual objects. For applications requiring interaction in personal space, the user may also need to accurately judge the position of the virtual object relative to that of a real object, for example, a virtual button and the user's real hand. This is difficult since VEs generally only provide a subset of the cues experienced in the real world. Complicating matters further, VEs presented by currently available visual displays may be inaccurate or distorted due to technological limitations. Fundamental physiological and psychological aspects of vision as they pertain to the task of object manipulation were thoroughly reviewed. Other sensory modalities -- proprioception, haptics, and audition -- and their cross-interactions with each other and with vision are briefly discussed. Visual display technologies, the primary component of any VE, were canvassed and compared. Current applications and research were gathered and categorized by different VE types and object interaction techniques. While object interaction research abounds in the literature, pockets of research gaps remain. Direct, dexterous, manual interaction with virtual objects in Mixed Reality (MR), where the real, seen hand accurately and effectively interacts with virtual objects, has not yet been fully quantified. An experimental test bed was designed to provide the highest accuracy attainable for salient visual cues in personal space. Optical alignment and user calibration were carefully performed. The test bed accommodated the full continuum of VE types and sensory modalities for comprehensive comparison studies. Experimental designs included two sets, each measuring depth perception and object interaction. The first set addressed the extreme end points of the Reality-Virtuality (R-V) continuum -- Immersive Virtual Environment (IVE) and Reality Environment (RE). This validated, linked, and extended several previous research findings, using one common test bed and participant pool. The results provided a proven method and solid reference points for further research. The second set of experiments leveraged the first to explore the full R-V spectrum and included additional, relevant sensory modalities. It consisted of two full-factorial experiments providing for rich data and key insights into the effect of each type of environment and each modality on accuracy and timeliness of virtual object interaction. The empirical results clearly showed that mean depth perception error in personal space was less than four millimeters whether the stimuli presented were real, virtual, or mixed. Likewise, mean error for the simple task of pushing a button was less than four millimeters whether the button was real or virtual. Mean task completion time was less than one second. Key to the high accuracy and quick task performance time observed was the correct presentation of the visual cues, including occlusion, stereoscopy, accommodation, and convergence. With performance results already near optimal level with accurate visual cues presented, adding proprioception, audio, and haptic cues did not significantly improve performance. Recommendations for future research include enhancement of the visual display and further experiments with more complex tasks and additional control variables.

  18. Control of a flexible bracing manipulator: Integration of current research work to realize the bracing manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, Dong-Soo

    1991-01-01

    All research results about flexible manipulator control were integrated to show a control scenario of a bracing manipulator. First, dynamic analysis of a flexible manipulator was done for modeling. Second, from the dynamic model, the inverse dynamic equation was derived, and the time domain inverse dynamic method was proposed for the calculation of the feedforward torque and the desired flexible coordinate trajectories. Third, a tracking controller was designed by combining the inverse dynamic feedforward control with the joint feedback control. The control scheme was applied to the tip position control of a single link flexible manipulator for zero and non-zero initial condition cases. Finally, the contact control scheme was added to the position tracking control. A control scenario of a bracing manipulator is provided and evaluated through simulation and experiment on a single link flexible manipulator.

  19. Beliefs and Practice Patterns in Spinal Manipulation and Spinal Motion Palpation Reported by Canadian Manipulative Physiotherapists

    PubMed Central

    Macdermid, Joy C.; Santaguida, P. Lina; Thabane, Lehana; Giulekas, Kevin; Larocque, Leo; Millard, James; Williams, Caitlin; Miller, Jack; Chesworth, Bert M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: This practice survey describes how Fellows of the Canadian Academy of Manipulative Physiotherapy (FCAMPT) use spinal manipulation and mobilization and how they perceive their competence in performing spinal assessment; it also quantifies relationships between clinical experience and use of spinal manipulation. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was designed based on input from experts and the literature was administered to a random sample of the FCAMPT mailing list. Descriptive (including frequencies) and inferential statistical analyses (including linear regression) were performed. Results: The response rate was 82% (278/338 eligible FCAMPTs). Most (99%) used spinal manipulation. Two-thirds (62%) used clinical presentation as a factor when deciding to mobilize or manipulate. The least frequently manipulated spinal region was the cervical spine (2% of patients); 60% felt that cervical manipulation generated more adverse events. Increased experience was associated with increased use of upper cervical manipulation among male respondents (14% more often for every 10 years after certification; ?, 95%CI=1.37, 0.891.85, p<0.001) but not among female respondents. Confidence in palpation accuracy decreased in lower regions of the spine. Conclusion: The use of spinal manipulation/mobilization is prevalent among FCAMPTs, but is less commonly used in the neck because of a perceived association with adverse events. PMID:24403681

  20. Tribological characterization of zirconia coatings deposited on Ti6Al4V components for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Berni, M; Lopomo, N; Marchiori, G; Gambardella, A; Boi, M; Bianchi, M; Visani, A; Pavan, P; Russo, A; Marcacci, M

    2016-05-01

    One of the most important issues leading to the failure of total joint arthroplasty is related to the wear of the plastic components, which are generally made of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Therefore, the reduction of joint wear represents one of the main challenges the research in orthopedics is called to address nowadays. Surface treatments and coatings have been recognized as innovative methods to improve tribological properties, also in the orthopedic field. This work investigated the possibility to realize hard ceramic coatings on the metal component of a prosthesis, by means of Pulsed Plasma Deposition, in order to reduce friction and wear in the standard coupling against UHMWPE. Ti6Al4V substrates were coated with a 2μm thick yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) layer. The mechanical properties of the YSZ coatings were assessed by nanoindentation tests performed on flat Ti6Al4V substrates. Tribological performance was evaluated using a ball-on-disk tribometer in dry and lubricated (i.e. with fetal bovine serum) highly-stressing conditions, up to an overall distance of 10km. Tribology was characterized in terms of coefficient of friction (CoF) and wear rate of the UHMWPE disk. After testing, specimens were analyzed through optical microscopy and SEM images, in order to check the wear degradation mechanisms. Progressive loading scratch tests were also performed in dry and wet conditions to determine the effects of the environment on the adhesion of the coating. Our results supported the beneficial effect of YSZ coating on metal components. In particular, the proposed solution significantly reduced UHMWPE wear rate and friction. At 10km of sliding distance, a wear rate reduction of about 18% in dry configuration and of 4% in presence of serum, was obtained by the coated group compared to the uncoated group. As far as friction in dry condition is concerned, the coating allowed to maintain low CoF values until the end of the tests, with an overall difference of about 40% compared to the uncoated balls. In wet conditions, the friction values were found to be comparable between coated and uncoated materials, mainly due to a premature delamination of the coating. Scratch tests in wet showed in fact a reduction of the critical load required to a complete delamination due to a formation of blister, although no change or damage occurred at the coating during the soaking period. Although conditions of high values of contact pressure were considered, further analyses are however required to fully understand the behavior of YSZ coatings in wet environment and additional research on the deposition process will be mandatory in order to improve the coating tribological performance at long distances addressing orthopedic applications. PMID:26952468

  1. Intra-operative 3D imaging system for robot-assisted fracture manipulation.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, G; Georgilas, I; Tarassoli, P; Atkins, R; Dogramadzi, S

    2015-08-01

    Reduction is a crucial step in the treatment of broken bones. Achieving precise anatomical alignment of bone fragments is essential for a good fast healing process. Percutaneous techniques are associated with faster recovery time and lower infection risk. However, deducing intra-operatively the desired reduction position is quite challenging due to the currently available technology. The 2D nature of this technology (i.e. the image intensifier) doesn't provide enough information to the surgeon regarding the fracture alignment and rotation, which is actually a three-dimensional problem. This paper describes the design and development of a 3D imaging system for the intra-operative virtual reduction of joint fractures. The proposed imaging system is able to receive and segment CT scan data of the fracture, to generate the 3D models of the bone fragments, and display them on a GUI. A commercial optical tracker was included into the system to track the actual pose of the bone fragments in the physical space, and generate the corresponding pose relations in the virtual environment of the imaging system. The surgeon virtually reduces the fracture in the 3D virtual environment, and a robotic manipulator connected to the fracture through an orthopedic pin executes the physical reductions accordingly. The system is here evaluated through fracture reduction experiments, demonstrating a reduction accuracy of 1.04 ± 0.69 mm (translational RMSE) and 0.89 ± 0.71 ° (rotational RMSE). PMID:26736188

  2. Subacute Pain as a Predictor of Long-Term Pain Following Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Veal, Felicity C.; Bereznicki, Luke R.E.; Thompson, Angus J.; Peterson, Gregory M.; Orlikowski, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to document the level of pain and functionality in the 12 months following orthopedic surgery and identify if high pain levels following discharge were associated with pain persisting at 12 months. An observational prospective cohort study was undertaken, following 87 patients (mean age 62.4 years [1892]; 47.1% male) who required orthopedic surgery at the Royal Hobart Hospital, Australia. Following an initial survey, patients were telephoned at 10 days, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months after discharge. Postdischarge pain levels were high with 97.4% of patients suffering pain at 10 days, 81.2% at 6 weeks and 79.5% at 3 months. Pain affected the ability to undertake activities of daily living (ADLs) for 32.7% and 20.0% of patients at 10 days and 6 weeks, respectively. Twelve months after discharge, 65.5% of patients reported pain persisting at the surgical site, with 29.9% of all patients suffering moderatesevere incidental pain; and nearly one quarter of patients reported pain affected their sleep or ADLs. Average pain levels rated as moderatesevere at 10 days (P?=?0.01) and 6 weeks (P?=?0.02) and pain of neuropathic origin at 3 months (30.2% vs 10.3% P?=?0.03) and 12 months (30.4% vs 4.9% P?=?0.01) were associated with persistent pain at 12 months. Pain in the period following discharge from hospital is significant and undermanaged. Previous studies has shown that that acute pain, particularly in the first 48?hours following surgery is a predictor for long-term pain after surgery. This study adds to the current literature by showing that pain in the subacute period, following discharge from hospital is also associated with the pain persisting at 12 months. These findings have important implications for improving quality of life as well as potentially preventing persistent pain with increased follow-up and more intensive management of post-discharge pain. PMID:26356717

  3. Dynamic whole-body robotic manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Yeuhi; Stephens, Benjamin; Murphy, Michael P.; Rizzi, Alfred A.

    2013-05-01

    The creation of dynamic manipulation behaviors for high degree of freedom, mobile robots will allow them to accomplish increasingly difficult tasks in the field. We are investigating how the coordinated use of the body, legs, and integrated manipulator, on a mobile robot, can improve the strength, velocity, and workspace when handling heavy objects. We envision that such a capability would aid in a search and rescue scenario when clearing obstacles from a path or searching a rubble pile quickly. Manipulating heavy objects is especially challenging because the dynamic forces are high and a legged system must coordinate all its degrees of freedom to accomplish tasks while maintaining balance. To accomplish these types of manipulation tasks, we use trajectory optimization techniques to generate feasible open-loop behaviors for our 28 dof quadruped robot (BigDog) by planning trajectories in a 13 dimensional space. We apply the Covariance Matrix Adaptation (CMA) algorithm to solve for trajectories that optimize task performance while also obeying important constraints such as torque and velocity limits, kinematic limits, and center of pressure location. These open-loop behaviors are then used to generate desired feed-forward body forces and foot step locations, which enable tracking on the robot. Some hardware results for cinderblock throwing are demonstrated on the BigDog quadruped platform augmented with a human-arm-like manipulator. The results are analogous to how a human athlete maximizes distance in the discus event by performing a precise sequence of choreographed steps.

  4. Distinguishing manipulated stocks via trading network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Qian; Cheng, Xue-Qi; Shen, Hua-Wei; Wang, Zhao-Yang

    2011-10-01

    Manipulation is an important issue for both developed and emerging stock markets. For the study of manipulation, it is critical to analyze investor behavior in the stock market. In this paper, an analysis of the full transaction records of over a hundred stocks in a one-year period is conducted. For each stock, a trading network is constructed to characterize the relations among its investors. In trading networks, nodes represent investors and a directed link connects a stock seller to a buyer with the total trade size as the weight of the link, and the node strength is the sum of all edge weights of a node. For all these trading networks, we find that the node degree and node strength both have tails following a power-law distribution. Compared with non-manipulated stocks, manipulated stocks have a high lower bound of the power-law tail, a high average degree of the trading network and a low correlation between the price return and the seller-buyer ratio. These findings may help us to detect manipulated stocks.

  5. Better with Byzantine: Manipulation-Optimal Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Abraham; Sandholm, Tuomas

    A mechanism is manipulable if it is in some agents best interest to misrepresent their private information. The revelation principle establishes that, roughly, anything that can be accomplished by a manipulable mechanism can also be accomplished with a truthful mechanism. Yet agents often fail to play their optimal manipulations due to computational limitations or various flavors of incompetence and cognitive biases. Thus, manipulable mechanisms in particular should anticipate byzantine play. We study manipulation-optimal mechanisms: mechanisms that are undominated by truthful mechanisms when agents act fully rationally, and do better than any truthful mechanism if any agent fails to act rationally in any way. This enables the mechanism designer to do better than the revelation principle would suggest, and obviates the need to predict byzantine agents irrational behavior. We prove a host of possibility and impossibility results for the concept which have the impression of broadly limiting possibility. These results are largely in line with the revelation principle, although the considerations are more subtle and the impossibility not universal.

  6. Space truss assembly using teleoperated manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, Walter W., III; Mixon, Randolph W.; Jones, Howard C.; Burgess, Thomas W.

    1987-01-01

    Teleoperator experiments were conducted which have demonstrated that a realistic, complex task, typical of those accomplished on-orbit by EVA astronauts, can be done in a smooth, timely manner with manipulators remotely controlled by humans. The real concerns were: (1) do manipulators have sufficient dexterity for these tasks, (2) can sufficient information from the remote site be provided to permit adequate teleoperator control, (3) can reasonable times relative to EVA times be achieved, (4) can the task be completed without frequent and/or damaging impacts among the task components and the manipulators? Positive answers were found to all of these concerns. Tasks times, operator fatigue, and smoothness of operation could be improved by designing the task components and the manipulators for greater compatibility. The data recorded supplements a data base of performance metrics for the same task done in the water immersion training facility as well as space flight and provides management with an objective basis for deciding how and where to apply manipulators in space.

  7. Identification and analysis of robot manipulator singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Tourassis, V.D. ); Ang, M.H. Jr. )

    1992-06-01

    The existence of singular positions inside the robot workspace is an inherent problem for task planning and robot control. At manipulator configurations near singular positions, very large joint motions are required to produce relatively small end-effector displacements. In the limit, when a singularity is encountered, the required joint motions become unbounded and the manipulator loses at least one degree of freedom. Identifying the singularities in the robot workspace is not always an analytically tractable problem, except for manipulators with opportune placement of the joint axes. Typically, it is easier and more informative to evaluate the robot arm and wrist singularities, which reflect the limitation of the lower-order robot subsystems responsible for positioning and orienting, respectively, the end effector in space. The objective of this article is to define analytically the interplay between the individual arm and wrist singularities. Specifically, a general formula that defines manipulator singularities in terms of the subsystem singularities is developed. The analysis leads to a novel, efficient method for identifying the singularities of six-axis manipulator. This is then illustrated through an example.

  8. Introducing a New Technique for Limb Prepping in Orthopedic Surgeries: Designing, Construction, and Evaluation of Limb-Lifting Assistive Device.

    PubMed

    Taghi Mojeni, Mohammad; Najafi, Soroosh Aminolsharieh; Nomali, Mahin

    2015-05-01

    Lifting and holding patients' limbs while preparing the skin for orthopedic surgeries may be a lengthy process causing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) for preoperative team members. Studies reported weight limits for lifting and holding limbs; whenever this weight is greater than a specific amount, additional staff or assistive devices are needed because nurses and support staff working in orthopedic operating rooms (ORs) are at high risk of MSDs. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the design, construction, and effectiveness of a limb-lifting assistive device installed in the OR of 5 Azar Hospital affiliated with Golestan University of Medical Sciences and used during the surgical preparation process. PMID:26031695

  9. A comparison of coping responses among high school and college athletes with concussion, orthopedic injuries, and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anthony P; Elbin, R J; Newcomer Appaneal, Renee; Covassin, Tracey; Collins, Michael W

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the coping responses of concussed athletes with those with an orthopedic injury and healthy controls and explored sex differences in coping behaviors following sport injury. Sixty-eight athletes with a concussion (CONCUSS), 42 with an orthopedic injury (ORTHO), and 33 healthy controls (CONTROL) completed the Brief COPE approximately 1 week following sport injury. The CONCUSS group reported lower active, planning, acceptance, religion, self-distraction, venting, and self-blame coping than the ORTHO group. The ORTHO group reported lower acceptance, venting, and substance use coping than CONTROLS. Females reported higher levels of planning, humor, instrumental support, and venting than males. Females reported more venting than males in the ORTHO and CONTROL groups, but not in the CONCUSS group. In conclusion, concussed athletes may not engage in coping to the same extent as athletes with other injuries. PMID:24067122

  10. Improvement of corrosion resistance and antibacterial effect of NiTi orthopedic materials by chitosan and gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rasha A.; Fadl-allah, Sahar A.; El-Bagoury, Nader; El-Rab, Sanaa M. F. Gad

    2014-02-01

    Biocomposite consists of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and a natural polymer as Chitosan (CS) was electrodeposited over NiTi alloy to improve biocompatibility, biostability, surface corrosion resistance and antibacterial effect for orthopedic implantation. The forming process and surface morphology of this biocomposite coats over NiTi alloy were studied. The results showed that the nm-scale gold particles were embedded in the composite forming compact, thick and smooth coat. Elemental analysis revealed significant less Ni ion release from the coated NiTi alloy compared with the uncoated one by 20 fold. Furthermore, the electrochemical corrosion measurements indicated that AuNPs/CS composite coat was effective for improving corrosion resistance in different immersion times and at all pH values, which suggests that the coated NiTi alloys have potential for orthopedic applications. Additionally, the efficiencies of the biocomposite coats for inhibiting bacterial growth indicate high antibacterial effect.

  11. [Time to bury the adrenaline-myth!--Safe use of adrenaline anesthesia in hand surgery and orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Hagert, Elisabet; Lalonde, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The epinephrine myth originated in the 1940s, when acidic (pH 1) procaine-epinephrine was injected into fingers, causing finger necrosis. Today, level 1 evidence exists for the safe use of epinephrine in fingers. The ability to use lidocaine-epinephrine in hand surgery and orthopedics eliminates the need for a tourniquet, or "bloodless field". Surgery using Wide Awake, Lidocaine-epinephrine Anesthesia, No Tourniquet (WALANT) reduces patient discomfort, facilitates patient participation in surgery, improves safe outcomes following reconstructions and greatly reduces the cost of medical care. Furthermore, patients regarded as high-risk can be safely treated without risk of cardiac or pulmonary side effects. In this manuscript, the background of the epinephrine myth is described, as well as recommended use of WALANT in hand surgery and orthopedics. PMID:25647103

  12. The business side of medicine for orthopedic residents and fellows: when were we supposed to learn this?

    PubMed

    Gum, Jeffrey L

    2014-08-01

    CPT, CMS, RAC, ICD-10, ACA, RVU, ACO-these are a few of the 3-letter acronyms I find myself swimming in while completing my final years of orthopedic training. It has suddenly become clear that this aspect of my future career, the business side, has lacked appropriate preparation. From countless hours buried in textbooks as a first-year medical student to late nights in the operating room as a fellow, I realize that I have had no formal business training, not even a single course, while nearing the completion of, effectively, the 28th grade. All while just days away from running my own business-my clinical practice as an orthopedic surgeon. PMID:25136878

  13. Risk of Orthopedic Surgical Site Infections in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated with Antitumor Necrosis Factor Alfa Therapy

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Bernardo Matos; Maria Henrique da Mota, Licia; dos Santos-Neto, Leopoldo Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. International guidelines recommend interruption of anti-TNF medications in the perioperative period, but there are no randomized trials to support such recommendation. Objectives. To study literature evidence assessing the risk of surgical site infections in orthopedic surgery patients with RA using anti-TNF drugs, compared to untreated patients or those using conventional DMARD. Methods. Systematic review of cohort studies is concerning surgical site infections in orthopedic procedures in patients with RA. Results. Three studies were selected. Only one was considered of high-quality, albeit with low statistical power. The review resulted in inconclusive data, since the best quality study showed no significant differences between groups, while others showed increased risk of infections in patients using anti-TNF medications. Conclusion. It is unclear whether patients with RA using anti-TNF medications are at increased risk of surgical site infections. Randomized controlled trials or new high quality observational studies are needed to clarify the issue. PMID:22500176

  14. [THE INFLUENCE OF MODERN ORTHOPEDIC CONSTRUCTIONS ON THE CONDITION OF PERIODONTAL TISSUES OF PATIENTS WITH GENERALIZED PERIODONTITIS].

    PubMed

    Kochkina, N A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with generalized periodontitis studied the effect of the partial removable denture made from acrylic met and thermoplastic materials on the state of periodontal tissues. The results of clin- ical studies have shown a significant improvement in oral hygiene, positive change in activity indi- cators current generalized periodontitis: patients for whom orthopedic constructions are made of thermoplastic mass, reduce the depth of periodontl pockets, tooth mobility, bleeding and inflamma- tion of the interdental, papillae and the gingival margin. PMID:26118029

  15. Concentration of Sonication Fluid through Centrifugation Is Superior to Membrane Filtration for Microbial Diagnosis of Orthopedic Implant-Associated Infection.

    PubMed

    Zitron, Renato; Wajsfeld, Tali; Klautau, Giselle Burlamaqui; da Silva, Cely Barreto; Nigro, Stanley; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik; Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Cury, Ricardo de Paula Leite; Salles, Mauro Jose Costa

    2016-03-01

    Microbial identification of orthopedic implant-associated infections using sonication fluid (SF) submitted to a concentration step by membrane filtration (SMF) was compared with the standard centrifugation (SC) method. Among 33 retrieved infected implants, sonication identified microorganisms in 26 (78.8%). The sensitivity of SC was higher than that of SMF (78.8% versus 30.3%; P < 0.001). PMID:26719446

  16. Manipulators live better, but are they always parasites?

    PubMed

    Heil, Martin

    2015-09-01

    A recent study reports partner manipulation for an interaction that was considered a reward-for-defence mutualism. Secretions of lycaenid caterpillars altered ant locomotion and aggressiveness, likely by manipulating dopaminergic signalling. This study opens the question whether such manipulation is common and whether manipulation necessarily characterises an interaction as parasitism. PMID:26298610

  17. Force reflecting hand controller for manipulator teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryfogle, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    A force reflecting hand controller based upon a six degree of freedom fully parallel mechanism, often termed a Stewart Platform, has been designed, constructed, and tested as an integrated system with a slave robot manipulator test bed. A force reflecting hand controller comprises a kinesthetic device capable of transmitting position and orientation commands to a slave robot manipulator while simultaneously representing the environmental interaction forces of the slave manipulator back to the operator through actuators driving the hand controller mechanism. The Stewart Platform was chosen as a novel approach to improve force reflecting teleoperation because of its inherently high ratio of load generation capability to system mass content and the correspondingly high dynamic bandwidth. An additional novelty of the program was to implement closed loop force and torque control about the hand controller mechanism by equipping the handgrip with a six degree of freedom force and torque measuring cell. The mechanical, electrical, computer, and control systems are discussed and system tests are presented.

  18. Electrochemical Processes Enhanced by Acoustic Liquid Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic liquid manipulation is a family of techniques that employ the nonlinear acoustic effects of acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming to manipulate the behavior of liquids. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are exploring new methods of manipulating liquids for a variety of space applications, and we have found that acoustic techniques may also be used in the normal Earth gravity environment to enhance the performance of existing fluid processes. Working in concert with the NASA Commercial Technology Office, the Great Lakes Industrial Technology Center, and Alchemitron Corporation (Elgin, IL), researchers at Glenn have applied nonlinear acoustic principles to industrial applications. Collaborating with Alchemitron Corporation, we have adapted the devices to create acoustic streaming in a conventional electroplating process.

  19. Motion Control of Rover-Mounted Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a simple online approach for motion control of rover-mounted manipulators. An integrated kinetic model of the rover-plus-manipulator system is derived which incorporates the nonholonomic rover constraint with the holonomic end-effector constraint. The redundancy introduced by the rover mobility is exploited to perform a set of user-specified additional tasks during end-effector motion. The configuration control approach is utilized to satisfy the nonholonomic rover constraint, while accomplishing the end-effector motion and the redundancy resolution goal simultaneously. This framework allows the user to assign weighting factors to the rover movement and manipulator motion, as well as to each task specification. The computational efficiency of the control scheme makes it particularly suitable for real-time implementation. The proposed method is applied to a planar two-jointed arm mounted on a rover, and computer simulation results are presented for illustration.

  20. Dynamic Analysis of a Two Member Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinley, W. Mark; Shen, Ji Y.

    1997-01-01

    Attenuating start-up and stopping vibrations when maneuvering large payloads attached to flexible manipulator systems is a great concern for many space missions. To address this concern, it was proposed that the use of smart materials, and their applications in smart structures, may provide an effective method of control for aerospace structures. In this paper, a modified finite element model has been developed to simulate the performance of piezoelectric ceramic actuators, and was applied to a flexible two-arm manipulator system. Connected to a control voltage, the piezoelectric actuators produce control moments based on the optimal control theory. The computer simulation modeled the end-effector vibration suppression of the NASA manipulator testbed for berthing operations of the Space Shuttle to the Space Station. The results of the simulation show that the bonded piezoelectric actuators can effectively suppress follow-up vibrations of the end-effector, stimulated by some external disturbance.

  1. Targeted manipulation of single large DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Zubair; Riehn, Robert

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a technique to manipulate one or more strands of DNA independently inside junctions of nanochannels. The work extends the concept of controlling DNA configurations through confinement by adding deliberate real-time control. The technique is based on independent control of fluid flow or voltages in the channels leading to the nanochannel junctions. By mismatching the flows into each of the channels, we create flow gradients at the channel junctions that manipulate the DNA configuration. Specific examples of DNA configuration control are the folding single DNA molecules, and the colocation of two independent molecules in the same channel segment. We believe that these manipulation techniques aid the study of DNA-DNA interactions.

  2. Coordinated Control Of Mobile Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1995-01-01

    Computationally efficient scheme developed for on-line coordinated control of both manipulation and mobility of robots that include manipulator arms mounted on mobile bases. Applicable to variety of mobile robotic manipulators, including robots that move along tracks (typically, painting and welding robots), robots mounted on gantries and capable of moving in all three dimensions, wheeled robots, and compound robots (consisting of robots mounted on other robots). Theoretical basis discussed in several prior articles in NASA Tech Briefs, including "Increasing the Dexterity of Redundant Robots" (NPO-17801), "Redundant Robot Can Avoid Obstacles" (NPO-17852), "Configuration-Control Scheme Copes With Singularities" (NPO-18556), "More Uses for Configuration Control of Robots" (NPO-18607/NPO-18608).

  3. Optical trapping and manipulation of nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Marag, Onofrio M; Jones, Philip H; Gucciardi, Pietro G; Volpe, Giovanni; Ferrari, Andrea C

    2013-11-01

    Optical trapping and manipulation of micrometre-sized particles was first reported in 1970. Since then, it has been successfully implemented in two size ranges: the subnanometre scale, where light-matter mechanical coupling enables cooling of atoms, ions and molecules, and the micrometre scale, where the momentum transfer resulting from light scattering allows manipulation of microscopic objects such as cells. But it has been difficult to apply these techniques to the intermediate - nanoscale - range that includes structures such as quantum dots, nanowires, nanotubes, graphene and two-dimensional crystals, all of crucial importance for nanomaterials-based applications. Recently, however, several new approaches have been developed and demonstrated for trapping plasmonic nanoparticles, semiconductor nanowires and carbon nanostructures. Here we review the state-of-the-art in optical trapping at the nanoscale, with an emphasis on some of the most promising advances, such as controlled manipulation and assembly of individual and multiple nanostructures, force measurement with femtonewton resolution, and biosensors. PMID:24202536

  4. Manipulating cyanobacteria: Spirulina for potential CELSS diet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadros, Mahasin G.; Smith, Woodrow; Mbuthia, Peter; Joseph, Beverly

    1989-01-01

    Spirulina sp. as a bioregenerative photosynthetic and an edible alga for spacecraft crew in a CELSS, was characterized for the biomass yield in batch cultures, under various environmental conditions. The partitioning of the assimalitory products (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids) were manipulated by varying the environmental growth conditions. Experiments with Spirulina have shown that under stress conditions (i.e., high light 160 uE/sq m/s, temperature 38 C, nitrogen or phosphate limitation; 0.1 M sodium chloride) carbohydrates increased at the expense of proteins. In other experiments, where the growth media were sufficient in nutrients and incubated under optimum growth conditions, the total of the algal could be manipulated by growth conditions. These results support the feasibility of considering Spirulina as a subsystem in CELSS because of the ease with which its nutrient content can be manipulated.

  5. Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, J. W.; Couteau, E.; Umek, P.; Hernadi, K.; Marcoux, P.; Lukic, B.; Mik, Cs; Milas, M.; Gal, R.; Forr, L.

    2003-09-01

    This paper reviews recent results in the field of carbon nanotube (CNT) research obtained at our institute at EPFL. We show in particular that CNTs can be synthesized by the catalytic vapour deposition (CVD) technique with high efficiency and purity. Furthermore, we present recent examples of advances in the large-scale production of CNTs as well as in the chemical and mechanical manipulation of CNTs. The chemical manipulation involves covalent and non-covalent sidewall functionalization of single-wall CNTs and preparation of inorganic coatings on CVD-grown nanotubes for the realization of fibres and CNT-reinforced composites. Mechanical manipulation aims at the application of CNTs as tips for scanning probe microscopy.

  6. Optical trapping and manipulation of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marag, Onofrio M.; Jones, Philip H.; Gucciardi, Pietro G.; Volpe, Giovanni; Ferrari, Andrea C.

    2013-11-01

    Optical trapping and manipulation of micrometre-sized particles was first reported in 1970. Since then, it has been successfully implemented in two size ranges: the subnanometre scale, where light-matter mechanical coupling enables cooling of atoms, ions and molecules, and the micrometre scale, where the momentum transfer resulting from light scattering allows manipulation of microscopic objects such as cells. But it has been difficult to apply these techniques to the intermediate -- nanoscale -- range that includes structures such as quantum dots, nanowires, nanotubes, graphene and two-dimensional crystals, all of crucial importance for nanomaterials-based applications. Recently, however, several new approaches have been developed and demonstrated for trapping plasmonic nanoparticles, semiconductor nanowires and carbon nanostructures. Here we review the state-of-the-art in optical trapping at the nanoscale, with an emphasis on some of the most promising advances, such as controlled manipulation and assembly of individual and multiple nanostructures, force measurement with femtonewton resolution, and biosensors.

  7. Chimpanzees strategically manipulate what others can see.

    PubMed

    Karg, Katja; Schmelz, Martin; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Humans often strategically manipulate the informational access of others to their own advantage. Although chimpanzees know what others can and cannot see, it is unclear whether they can strategically manipulate others' visual access. In this study, chimpanzees were given the opportunity to save food for themselves by concealing it from a human competitor and also to get more food for themselves by revealing it to a human cooperator. When knowing that a competitor was approaching, chimpanzees kept more food hidden (left it covered) than when expecting a cooperator to approach. When the experimenter was already at the location of the hidden food, they actively revealed less food to the competitor than to the cooperator. They did not actively hide food (cover up food in the open) from the competitor, however. Chimpanzees thus strategically manipulated what another could see in order to maximize their payoffs and showed their ability to plan for future situations. PMID:25964096

  8. Sensing Temperatures Via Prostheses And Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerkus, Mike

    1991-01-01

    Proposed temperature-sensing system applies heat to (or removes heat from) human user's skin according to temperature of remote object. Used in artificial limbs and in telerobotic manipulators. In prosthetic arm and hand, sensors on tips of artificial fingers send signals to electronic control network that drives small, lightweight thermoelectric heat pump worn on back of user's shoulder. Heat pump heats or cools skin according to signals from sensors. Heat pump and control network worn like article of clothing. In manual control of remote robot, sensors placed in fingers of remote manipulator. Sensors drive, via similar electronic control network, thermoelectric heat pumps in fingers of glove worn by operator, who then has benefit of information about temperatures on manipulated object.

  9. Dynamics and control of coordinated multiple manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is presented for controlling multiple manipulators which are holding a single object and therefore form a closed kinematic chain. The object, which may or may not be in contact with a rigid environment, is assumed to be held rigidly by robot end-effectors. The derivation is based on setting up constraint equations which reduce the 6 x n degrees of freedom of a manipulators each having six joints. Additional constraint equations are considered when one or more of the degrees of freedom of the object is reduced due to external constraints. Utilizing the operational space dynamics equations, a decoupling controller is designed to control both the position and the interaction forces of the object with the environment. Finally, simulation results for the control of a pair of two-link manipulators are presented.

  10. The value of suction drainage fluid culture during aseptic and septic orthopedic surgery: a prospective study of 901 patients.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L; Pron, B; Vuagnat, A; Gleizes, V; Signoret, F; Denormandie, P; Si-Ali, A; Perrone, C; Feron, J M; Gaillard, J L

    2002-01-01

    There are no guidelines on the value of suction drainage fluid culture (SDC), and it is difficult to determine whether the organisms cultured from suction drainage fluid samples are pathogenic or simply contaminants. We performed 2989 cultures of suction drainage fluid samples obtained, during a 1-year period, from 901 patients who underwent aseptic or septic orthopedic surgery (946 operations). The culture results were analyzed to evaluate their ability to detect postoperative infection after aseptic operations or to detect either a persistent or new episode of sepsis in patients known to have infection. For aseptic operations, the sensitivity of SDC was 25%, the specificity was 99%, the positive predictive value was 25%, and the negative predictive value was 99%. For septic operations, the sensitivity of SDC was 81%, the specificity was 96%, the positive predictive value was 87%, and the negative predictive value was 94%. We conclude that, for aseptic orthopedic surgery, SDC is not useful in detecting postoperative infection. However, for septic orthopedic surgery, it is of clinical importance. PMID:11731944

  11. Progress and outlook of inorganic nanoparticles for delivery of nucleic acid sequences related to orthopedic pathologies: a review.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Darcy E; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2012-02-01

    The anticipated growth in the aging population will drastically increase medical needs of society; of which, one of the largest components will undoubtedly be from orthopedic-related pathologies. There are several proposed solutions being investigated to cost-effectively prepare for the future--pharmaceuticals, implant devices, cell and gene therapies, or some combination thereof. Gene therapy is one of the more promising possibilities because it seeks to correct the root of the problem, thereby minimizing treatment duration and cost. Currently, viral vectors have shown the highest efficacies, but immunological concerns remain. Nonviral methods show reduced immune responses but are regarded as less efficient. The nonviral paradigms consist of mechanical and chemical approaches. While organic-based materials have been used more frequently in particle-based methods, inorganic materials capable of delivery have distinct advantages, especially advantageous in orthopedic applications. The inorganic gene therapy field is highly interdisciplinary in nature, and requires assimilation of knowledge across the broad fields of cell biology, biochemistry, molecular genetics, materials science, and clinical medicine. This review provides an overview of the role each area plays in orthopedic gene therapy as well as possible future directions for the field. PMID:21707439

  12. Prevalence of Hepatitis B virus, Hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections among patients candidate for orthopedic trauma surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Ali; Hatami, Negin; Mahmoudi, Mani; Boduhi, Bahram; Saidifard, Mahzad; Otoukesh, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infectious diseases are major public health problems, among which blood-borne ones are the most important infections. Patients who undergo orthopedic surgery are at higher risk of transmitting infectious diseases from and to others, due to repeated blood examinations and injection, drains secretion and receiving blood products. Accordingly, in this study we determined prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections in patients who underwent surgery in a general training hospital. Methods: In this cross-sectional study the prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV infections was determined among 320 patients under orthopedic trauma surgeries in a general training hospital in Tehran, Iran from 2009 to 2011. Associations of these rates with age, gender, marital status, residence location, substance abuse history, hospital admission history, previous surgery, blood transfusion, dentistry procedures, and previous medical history were also assessed. Results: A total of 320 patients (290 male, 30 female) were studied. Ten patients (3.2%) had at least one of these three infections. Totally 10 patients (3.2%), 2 subjects (0.6%), and 8 patients (2.5%) had HCV, HIV, and HBV infections, respectively. None of the evaluated variables had significant relationship with HCV, HBV, and HIV infections (p> 0.05). Conclusion: According to the obtained results, routine use of diagnostic tests for infectious disease such as HIV and viral hepatitis is recommended and should be considered before orthopedic operations. PMID:26793665

  13. Effects of Immediate Orthodontic and Orthopedic Forces on Peri-Miniscrew Bones: Histomorphologic and Histomorphometric Assessment in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rismanchian, Mansour; Raji, Sayed Hamid; Teimori Rik, Danesh; Mohammad Razavi, Sayed; Khalighinejad, Navid; Goroohi, Hossein; Badrian, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was histomorphologic and histomorphometric evaluation of peri-screw bone after immediate orthodontic and orthopedic forces and comparing them with a control group. Materials and Methods. 18 dual-top miniscrews were inserted in the premolar region of three Iranian dogs. Screws were divided into three groups: (1) the first group undergoing immediate orthodontic force of 300?cN, (2) the second group undergoing immediate orthopedic force of 600?cN and (3) a control group. Screws were explanted with adequate amount of surrounding bone after three months. Bone-screw contact (BSC), percentage of lamellar bone, and percentage of woven bone were evaluated. Wilcoxon and Man Whitney tests were used to analyze the data using SPSS software ver. 15 (? = 0.05). Results. There was no significant difference among the groups in terms of bone-screw contact (P??value = 0.42), percentage of lamellar bone (P??value = 0.83), and percentage of woven bone (P??value = 0.88). Conclusion. By applying orthodontic and orthopedic forces to mini-screws the quality of surrounding bone and osseointegration will not be affected. Clinical Significance. Application of force to mini-screws is helpful in orthodontic-screw therapies. PMID:23319949

  14. Optimal Culture Incubation Time in Orthopedic Device-Associated Infections: a Retrospective Analysis of Prolonged 14-Day Incubation

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Peter; Fracheboud, Dominique; Gautier, Emanuel

    2014-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of orthopedic device-associated infections can be challenging. Culture of tissue biopsy specimens is often considered the gold standard; however, there is currently no consensus on the ideal incubation time for specimens. The aim of our study was to assess the yield of a 14-day incubation protocol for tissue biopsy specimens from revision surgery (joint replacements and internal fixation devices) in a general orthopedic and trauma surgery setting. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively in order to identify cases of infection according to predefined diagnostic criteria. From August 2009 to March 2012, 499 tissue biopsy specimens were sampled from 117 cases. In 70 cases (59.8%), at least one sample showed microbiological growth. Among them, 58 cases (82.9%) were considered infections and 12 cases (17.1%) were classified as contaminations. The median time to positivity in the cases of infection was 1 day (range, 1 to 10 days), compared to 6 days (range, 1 to 11 days) in the cases of contamination (P < 0.001). Fifty-six (96.6%) of the infection cases were diagnosed within 7 days of incubation. In conclusion, the results of our study show that the incubation of tissue biopsy specimens beyond 7 days is not productive in a general orthopedic and trauma surgery setting. Prolonged 14-day incubation might be of interest in particular situations, however, in which the prevalence of slow-growing microorganisms and anaerobes is higher. PMID:24153117

  15. Design of a reconfigurable modular manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, D.; Kanade, T.

    1987-01-01

    Using manipulators with a fixed configuration for specific tasks is appropriate when the task requirements are known beforehand. However, in less predictable situations, such as an outdoor construction site or aboard a space station, a manipulator system requires a wide range of capabilities, probably beyond the limitations of a single, fixed-configuration manipulator. To fulfill this need, researchers have been working on a Reconfigurable Modular Manipulator System (RMMS). Researchers have designed and are constructing a prototype RMMS. The prototype currently consists of two joint modules and four link modules. The joints utilize a conventional harmonic drive and torque motor actuator, with a small servo amplifier included in the assembly. A brushless resolver is used to sense the joint position and velocity. For coupling the modules together, a standard electrical connector and V-band clamps for mechanical connection are used, although more sophisticated designs are under way for future versions. The joint design yields an output torque to 50 ft-lbf at joint speeds up to 1 radian/second. The resolver and associated electronics have resolutions of 0.0001 radians, and absolute accuracies of plus or minus 0.001 radians. Manipulators configured from these prototype modules will have maximum reaches in the 0.5 to 2 meter range. The real-time RMMS controller consists of a Motorola 68020 single-board computer which will perform real time servo control and path planning of the manipulator. This single board computer communicates via shared memory with a SUN3 workstation, which serves as a software development system and robot programming environment. Researchers have designed a bus communication network to provide multiplexed communication between the joint modules and the computer controller. The bus supports identification of modules, sensing of joint states, and commands to the joint actuator. This network has sufficient bandwidth to allow servo sampling rates in excess of 500 Hz.

  16. Synthesis of spherical calcium phosphate particles for dental and orthopedic applications

    PubMed Central

    Bohner, Marc; Tadier, Solène; van Garderen, Noémie; de Gasparo, Alex; Döbelin, Nicola; Baroud, Gamal

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate materials have been used increasingly in the past 40 years as bone graft substitutes in the dental and orthopedic fields. Accordingly, numerous fabrication methods have been proposed and used. However, the controlled production of spherical calcium phosphate particles remains a challenge. Since such particles are essential for the synthesis of pastes and cements delivered into the host bone by minimally-invasive approaches, the aim of the present document is to review their synthesis and applications. For that purpose, production methods were classified according to the used reagents (solutions, slurries, pastes, powders), dispersion media (gas, liquid, solid), dispersion tools (nozzle, propeller, sieve, mold), particle diameters of the end product (from 10 nm to 10 mm), and calcium phosphate phases. Low-temperature calcium phosphates such as monetite, brushite or octacalcium phosphate, as well as high-temperature calcium phosphates, such as hydroxyapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate or tetracalcium phosphate, were considered. More than a dozen production methods and over hundred scientific publications were discussed. PMID:23719177

  17. Development of porous Ti6Al4V/chitosan sponge composite scaffold for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Miao; Li, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    A novel composite scaffold consisting of porous Ti6Al4V part filled with chitosan sponge was fabricated using a combination of electron beam melting and freeze-drying. The mechanical properties of porous Ti6Al4V part were examined via compressive test. The ultimate compressive strength was 85.35 8.68 MPa and the compressive modulus was 2.26 0.42 GPa. The microstructure of composite scaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The chitosan sponge filled in Ti6Al4V part exhibited highly porous and well-interconnected micro-pore architecture. The osteoblastic cells were seeded on scaffolds to test their seeding efficiency and biocompatibility. Significantly higher cell seeding efficiency was found on composite scaffold. The biological response of osteoblasts on composite scaffolds was superior in terms of improved cell attachment, higher proliferation, and well-spread morphology in relation to porous Ti6Al4V part. These results suggest that the Ti6Al4V/chitosan composite scaffold is potentially useful as a biomedical scaffold for orthopedic applications. PMID:26478418

  18. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics, basic research, and clinical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorf, Joerg; Jansson, Volkmar; Maier, Markus; Delius, Michael

    2005-04-01

    The molecular events following shock wave treatment of bone are widely unknown. Nevertheless patients with osteonecrosis and non unions are already treated partly successful with shock waves. Concerning the first indication, the question of the permeation of the shock wave into the bone was addressed. Therefore shockwaves were applied to porcine femoral heads and the intraosseous pressure was measured. A linear correlation of the pressure to the intraosseous distance was found. Approximately 50% of the pressure are still measurable 10 mm inside the femoral head. These findings should encourage continued shock wave research on this indication. Concerning the second indication (non union), osteoblasts were subjected to 250 or 500 shock waves at 25 kV. After 24, 48, and 72 h the levels of the bone and vascular growth factors bFGF, TGFbeta1, and VEGF were examined. After 24 h there was a significant increase in bFGF levels (p<0.05) with significant correlation (p<0.05) to the number of impulses. TGFbeta1, and VEGF showed no significant changes. This may be one piece in the cascade of new bone formation following shock wave treatment and may lead to a more specific application of shock waves in orthopedic surgery.

  19. Laser deposition and deformation behavior of Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta alloys for orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Nag, S; Banerjee, R

    2012-12-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of laser deposited complex quaternary Ti-34Nb-7Zr-7Ta (all wt%), an orthopedic load-bearing implant alloy, has been investigated in detail in both as-deposited as well as heat-treated (?-solutionized and quenched) conditions. The difference in stress-strain behavior of this alloy in the above conditions has been characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compared to the sample in heat-treated condition, the as-deposited sample showed evidence of strong growth related texture. Again in the as-deposited post tensile-tested condition formation of a high density of shear bands, possibly arising from slip localization due to shearing of ? precipitates in the ? matrix is observed. TEM investigations also show the presence of lenticular shaped deformation induced ? phase within the shear bands. In contrast, in case of the ?-solutionized sample, twinning and the formation of stress-induced plates appears to be the primary mode of deformation. The change in deformation mechanism and thus the tensile property of this alloy could be attributed to the crystallographic texture along the growth direction as well as diffusion mediated isothermal ? precipitates, that cause an enrichment of Nb and Ta in the ? matrix, during the laser-deposition process. This is no longer present after the solutionizing treatment. PMID:23137619

  20. Development of nanofluorapatite polymer-based composite for bioactive orthopedic implants and prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gangfeng; Wang, Hui; Yao, Xiaocong; Bi, Dawei; Zhu, Gang; Tang, Songchao; Wei, Jie; Yang, Lili; Tong, Peijian; Xiao, Luwei

    2014-01-01

    Fluorapatite with low solubility is a promising biomaterial due to its structure, which is similar to hydroxyapatite. In this study a bioactive composite of nanofluorapatite (n-FA) and polyamide 12 (PA12) was fabricated. The results revealed that the mechanical properties (such as compressive strength and elastic modulus), hydrophilicity, and antibacterial properties of n-FA/PA12 composite were obviously improved by adding n-FA into PA12 as compared with PA12. In addition, cell proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on n-FA/PA12 composite was significantly higher than with PA12, and alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells on the n-FA/PA12 composite was expressed at obviously higher levels as compared with PA12. The results suggest that n-FA/PA12 composite could support cell proliferation and differentiation, showing good cytocompatibility. Histological evaluation indicates that n-FA/PA12 composite enhances the efficiency of new bone formation with the introduction of n-FA into PA12, and the quantity of the newly formed bone for n-FA/PA12 composite is significantly higher than with PA12. In conclusion, n-FA/PA12 composite exhibits good biocompatibility and osteogenesis, which might be used for various orthopedic prostheses and dental implants. PMID:25143735