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Sample records for mannheimia haemolytica a1

  1. Mannheimia haemolytica A1-induced fibrinosuppurative meningoencephalitis in a naturally-infected Holstein-Friesian calf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an opportunistic bacterium that is widely recognized among the bovine respiratory disease complex as the predominant pathogen associated with pleuropneumonia in cattle. Among the characterized M. haemolytica serotypes, A1 is the major cause of severe pulmonary lesions in ca...

  2. Two outer membrane proteins are bovine lactoferrin-binding proteins in Mannheimia haemolytica A1.

    PubMed

    Samaniego-Barrón, Luisa; Luna-Castro, Sarahí; Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; de la Garza, Mireya

    2016-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is a Gram negative bacterium that is part of the bovine respiratory disease, which causes important economic losses in the livestock industry. In the present work, the interaction between M. haemolytica A1 and bovine lactoferrin (BLf) was studied. This iron-chelating glycoprotein is part of the mammalian innate-immune system and is present in milk and mucosal secretions; Lf is also contained in neutrophils secondary granules, which release this glycoprotein at infection sites. It was evidenced that M. haemolytica was not able to use iron-charged BLf (BholoLf) as a sole iron source; nevertheless, iron-lacked BLf (BapoLf) showed a bactericidal effect against M. haemolytica with MIC of 4.88 ± 1.88 and 7.31 ± 1.62 μM for M. haemolytica strain F (field isolate) and M. haemolytica strain R (reference strain), respectively. Through overlay assays and 2-D electrophoresis, two OMP of 32.9 and 34.2 kDa with estimated IP of 8.18 and 9.35, respectively, were observed to bind both BapoLf and BholoLf; these OMP were identified by Maldi-Tof as OmpA (heat-modifiable OMP) and a membrane protein (porin). These M. haemolytica BLf binding proteins could be interacting in vivo with both forms of BLf depending on the iron state of the bovine. PMID:27599994

  3. Genome sequences of Mannheimia haemolytica serotype A1 strains D153 and D193 from bovine pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report two genomes, one complete and one draft, from virulent bovine strains of Mannheimia haemolytica(strains D171 and D35)serotype A2 recovered prior to the field usage of modern antimicrobial drugs....

  4. Complete closed genome sequences of Mannheimia haemolytica serotypes A1 and A6 isolated from cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannhemimia haemolytica is a respiratory pathogen affecting cattle and related ruminants worldwide. M. haemolytica is commonly associated with Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex (BRDC), a polymicrobial, multifactorial disease. We present the first two complete closed genomes of this species using a...

  5. Towards Development of an Edible Vaccine against Bovine Pneumonic Pasteurellosis Using Transgenic White Clover Expressing a Mannheimia haemolytica A1 Leukotoxin 50 Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Raymond W. H.; Strommer, Judith; Hodgins, Doug; Shewen, Patricia E.; Niu, Yongqing; Lo, Reggie Y. C.

    2001-01-01

    Development of vaccines against bovine pneumonia pasteurellosis, or shipping fever, has focused mainly on Mannheimia haemolytica A1 leukotoxin (Lkt). In this study, the feasibility of expressing Lkt in a forage plant for use as an edible vaccine was investigated. Derivatives of the M. haemolytica Lkt in which the hydrophobic transmembrane domains were removed were made. Lkt66 retained its immunogenicity and was capable of eliciting an antibody response in rabbits that recognized and neutralized authentic Lkt. Genes encoding a shorter Lkt derivative, Lkt50, fused to a modified green fluorescent protein (mGFP5), were constructed for plant transformation. Constructs were screened by Western immunoblot analysis for their ability to express the fusion protein after agroinfiltration in tobacco. The fusion construct pBlkt50-mgfp5, which employs the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter for transcription, was selected and introduced into white clover by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Transgenic lines of white clover were recovered, and expression of Lkt50-GFP was monitored and confirmed by laser confocal microscopy and Western immunoblot analysis. Lkt50-GFP was found to be stable in clover tissue after drying of the plant material at room temperature for 4 days. An extract containing Lkt50-GFP from white clover was able to induce an immune response in rabbits (via injection), and rabbit antisera recognized and neutralized authentic Lkt. This is the first demonstration of the expression of an M. haemolytica antigen in plants and paves the way for the development of transgenic plants expressing M. haemolytica antigens as an edible vaccine against bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. PMID:11500456

  6. Response of the ruminant respiratory tract to Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Brogden, K A

    2000-07-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of loss to the sheep and cattle industry throughout the world. Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica is one of the most important respiratory pathogens of domestic ruminants and causes serious outbreaks of acute pneumonia in neonatal, weaned and growing lambs, calves, and goats. M. haemolytica is also an important cause of pneumonia in adult animals. Transportation, viral infections with agents such as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, parainfluenza-3 virus or bovine respiratory syncytial virus, overcrowding, housing of neonates and weaned animals together and other stressful conditions predispose animals to M. haemolytica infection [1, 2]. This review assimilates some of the findings key to cellular and molecular responses of the lung from a pathologist's perspective. It includes some of what is known and underscores areas that are not fully understood. PMID:10967288

  7. Immunogenicity of Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Fenninger, Judith C.; Leitner, Deborah R.; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is able to cause disease in humans and in a wide range of animal hosts, including fowl cholera in birds, atrophic rhinitis in pigs, and snuffles in rabbits. Together with Mannheimia haemolytica, P. multocida also represents a major bacterial causative agent of bovine respiratory disease (BRD), which is one of the most important causes for economic losses for the cattle backgrounding and feedlot industry. Commercially available vaccines only partially prevent infections caused by P. multocida and M. haemolytica. Thus, this study characterized the immunogenicity of P. multocida and M. haemolytica outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) upon intranasal immunization of BALB/c mice. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) revealed that OMVs derived from P. multocida or M. haemolytica are able to induce robust humoral and mucosal immune responses against the respective donor strain. In addition, also significant cross-immunogenic potential was observed for both OMV types. Colonization studies showed that a potential protective immune response against P. multocida is not only achieved by immunization with P. multocida OMVs, but also by immunization with OMVs derived from M. haemolytica. Immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that M. haemolytica OMVs induce a more complex immune response compared to P. multocida OMVs. The outer membrane proteins OmpA, OmpH, and P6 were identified as the three major immunogenic proteins of P. multocida OMVs. Amongst others, the serotype 1-specific antigen, an uncharacterized outer membrane protein, as well as the outer membrane proteins P2 and OmpA were found to be the most important antigens of M. haemolytica OMVs. These findings are useful for the future development of broad-spectrum OMV based vaccines against BRD and other infections caused by P. multocida or M. haemolytica. PMID:23731905

  8. Characterization of Mannheimia haemolytica biofilm formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boukahil, Ismail; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2015-01-30

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the primary bacterial agent in the bovine respiratory disease complex. It is thought that M. haemolytica colonizes the tonsillar crypts of cattle as a commensal and subsequently descends into the lungs to cause disease. Many bacterial species persist in the host as biofilms. There is limited information about the ability of M. haemolytica to form biofilms. The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro model for M. haemolytica biofilm formation. We found that M. haemolytica required at least 36 h to form robust biofilms on plastic in vitro when incubated in RPMI-1640 tissue culture medium at 37 °C, with maximal biofilm formation being evident at 48 h. Biofilm formation was inhibited by adding the monosaccharides d(+) galactose and d(+) mannose to the growth medium. Addition of antibodies to the M. haemolytica surface protein OmpA also reduced biofilm formation. Upon evaluating the macromolecules within the biofilm extracellular polymeric substance we found it contained 9.7 μg/cm(2) of protein, 0.81 μg/cm(2) of total carbohydrate, and 0.47 μg/cm(2) of extracellular DNA. Furthermore, proteinase K treatment significantly decreased biofilms (P<0.05) while α-amylase and micrococcal nuclease decreased biofilms to a lesser extent. M. haemolytica biofilm cells were more resistant than planktonic cells to the antibiotics florfenicol, gentamicin, and tulathromycin. These results provide evidence that M. haemolytica can form biofilms, which could contribute to its ability to persist as a commensal in the bovine upper respiratory tract. PMID:25480166

  9. Molecular epidemiology of Mannheimia haemolytica and Mannheimia glucosida associated with ovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Omaleki, Lida; Browning, Glenn F; Allen, Joanne L; Barber, Stuart R

    2012-07-01

    While Mannheimia haemolytica and Mannheimia glucosida have been recognized as causes of intramammary infection in sheep, there has been no investigation of the epidemiology of the strains involved. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis was used to study the molecular epidemiology of isolates of these 2 species associated with ovine mastitis. Ten distinct strains were recognized among 12 M. haemolytica isolates, and 7 distinct strains among 13 M. glucosida isolates. The results demonstrate a high diversity of isolates with the ability to cause ovine mastitis. However, the presence of some identical isolates may suggest the possibility of horizontal transmission of these species in some flocks, possibly through lamb sucking, and/or differences in the capacity of some isolates to cause mastitis in sheep. PMID:22621951

  10. Bibersteinia trehalosi inhibits the growth of mannheimia haemolytica by a proximity-dependent mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica is the only pathogen that consistently causes severe bronchopneumonia and rapid death of bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under experimental conditions. Paradoxically, Bibersteinia (Pasteurella) trehalosi and Pasteurella multocida have been isolated from BHS ...

  11. Genome sequences of mannheimia haemolytica serotype A2: ovine and bovine isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes the genome sequences of Mannheimia haemolytica, serotype A2 isolated from pneumonic lungs of two different ruminant species, one from Ovis aries, designated as Ovine (O) and the other from Bos taurus, designated as Bovine (B)....

  12. Bibersteinia trehalosi Inhibits the Growth of Mannheimia haemolytica by a Proximity-Dependent Mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica is the only pathogen that consistently causes severe bronchopneumonia and rapid death of bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under experimental conditions. Paradoxically, Bibersteinia (Pasteurella) trehalosi and occasionally Pasteurella multocida have been isola...

  13. Proximity-dependent inhibition of growth of mannheimia haemolytica by pasteurella multocida.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Bibersteinia trehalosi have been identified in the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis). Of these pathogens, M. haemolytica has been shown to consistently cause fatal pneumonia in BHS under experimental conditions. However, M. hae...

  14. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mannheimia haemolytica from Bovine Sources.

    PubMed

    Klima, Cassidy L; Cook, Shaun R; Zaheer, Rahat; Laing, Chad; Gannon, Vick P; Xu, Yong; Rasmussen, Jay; Potter, Andrew; Hendrick, Steve; Alexander, Trevor W; McAllister, Tim A

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease is a common health problem in beef production. The primary bacterial agent involved, Mannheimia haemolytica, is a target for antimicrobial therapy and at risk for associated antimicrobial resistance development. The role of M. haemolytica in pathogenesis is linked to serotype with serotypes 1 (S1) and 6 (S6) isolated from pneumonic lesions and serotype 2 (S2) found in the upper respiratory tract of healthy animals. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 11 strains of M. haemolytica, representing all three serotypes and performed comparative genomics analysis to identify genetic features that may contribute to pathogenesis. Possible virulence associated genes were identified within 14 distinct prophage, including a periplasmic chaperone, a lipoprotein, peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase and a stress response protein. Prophage content ranged from 2-8 per genome, but was higher in S1 and S6 strains. A type I-C CRISPR-Cas system was identified in each strain with spacer diversity and organization conserved among serotypes. The majority of spacers occur in S1 and S6 strains and originate from phage suggesting that serotypes 1 and 6 may be more resistant to phage predation. However, two spacers complementary to the host chromosome targeting a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase and a glycosyl transferases group 1 gene are present in S1 and S6 strains only indicating these serotypes may employ CRISPR-Cas to regulate gene expression to avoid host immune responses or enhance adhesion during infection. Integrative conjugative elements are present in nine of the eleven genomes. Three of these harbor extensive multi-drug resistance cassettes encoding resistance against the majority of drugs used to combat infection in beef cattle, including macrolides and tetracyclines used in human medicine. The findings here identify key features that are likely contributing to serotype related pathogenesis and specific targets for vaccine design intended to reduce the

  15. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mannheimia haemolytica from Bovine Sources

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Cassidy L.; Cook, Shaun R.; Zaheer, Rahat; Laing, Chad; Gannon, Vick P.; Xu, Yong; Rasmussen, Jay; Potter, Andrew; Hendrick, Steve; Alexander, Trevor W.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease is a common health problem in beef production. The primary bacterial agent involved, Mannheimia haemolytica, is a target for antimicrobial therapy and at risk for associated antimicrobial resistance development. The role of M. haemolytica in pathogenesis is linked to serotype with serotypes 1 (S1) and 6 (S6) isolated from pneumonic lesions and serotype 2 (S2) found in the upper respiratory tract of healthy animals. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 11 strains of M. haemolytica, representing all three serotypes and performed comparative genomics analysis to identify genetic features that may contribute to pathogenesis. Possible virulence associated genes were identified within 14 distinct prophage, including a periplasmic chaperone, a lipoprotein, peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase and a stress response protein. Prophage content ranged from 2–8 per genome, but was higher in S1 and S6 strains. A type I-C CRISPR-Cas system was identified in each strain with spacer diversity and organization conserved among serotypes. The majority of spacers occur in S1 and S6 strains and originate from phage suggesting that serotypes 1 and 6 may be more resistant to phage predation. However, two spacers complementary to the host chromosome targeting a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase and a glycosyl transferases group 1 gene are present in S1 and S6 strains only indicating these serotypes may employ CRISPR-Cas to regulate gene expression to avoid host immune responses or enhance adhesion during infection. Integrative conjugative elements are present in nine of the eleven genomes. Three of these harbor extensive multi-drug resistance cassettes encoding resistance against the majority of drugs used to combat infection in beef cattle, including macrolides and tetracyclines used in human medicine. The findings here identify key features that are likely contributing to serotype related pathogenesis and specific targets for vaccine design intended to reduce the

  16. Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin binds cyclophilin D on bovine neutrophil mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Aulik, Nicole A; Hellenbrand, Katrina M; Kisiela, Dagmara; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2011-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an important member of the bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex that causes fibrinous and necrotizing pleuropneumonia in cattle. BRD is characterized by abundant neutrophil infiltration into the alveoli and fibrin deposition. The most important virulence factor of M. haemolytica is its leukotoxin. Previous research in our laboratory has shown that the leukotoxin is able to enter into and traffic to the mitochondria of a bovine lymphoblastoid cell line (BL-3). In this study, we evaluated the ability of LKT to be internalized and travel to mitochondria in bovine neutrophils. We demonstrate that LKT binds bovine neutrophil mitochondria and co-immunoprecipitates with TOM22 and TOM40, which are members of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial (TOM) membrane family. Upon entry into mitochondria, LKT co-immunoprecipitates with cyclophilin D, a member of the mitochondria permeability transition pore. Unlike BL-3 cells, bovine neutrophil mitochondria are not protected against LKT by the membrane-stabilizing agent cyclosporin A, nor were bovine neutrophil mitochondria protected by the permeability transition pore antagonist bongkrekic acid. In addition, we found that bovine neutrophil cyclophilin D is significantly smaller than that found in BL-3 cells. Bovine neutrophils were protected against LKT by protein transfection of an anti-cyclophilin D antibody directed at the C-terminal amino acids, but not an antibody against the first 50 N-terminal amino acids. In contrast, BL-3 cells were protected by antibodies against either the C-terminus or N-terminus of cyclophilin. These data confirm that LKT binds to bovine neutrophil mitochondria, but indicate there are distinctions between neutrophil and BL-3 mitochondria that might reflect differences in cyclophilin D. PMID:21220005

  17. Genome sequences of serotype A6 Mannheimia haemolytica isolates D174 and D38 recovered from bovine pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report two genomes, one complete and one draft, from virulent bovine strains of Mannheimia haemolytica(strains D174 and D38)serotype A2 recovered prior to the field usage of modern antimicrobial drugs....

  18. Characterization of Mannheimia haemolytica in beef calves via nasopharyngeal culture and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Capik, Sarah F; White, Brad J; Lubbers, Brian V; Apley, Michael D; Mosier, Derek A; Larson, Robert L; Murray, Robert W

    2015-09-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is a major bacterial component of bovine respiratory disease (BRD); unfortunately, very little is known about M. haemolytica transmission dynamics among cattle. Identifying potential variation in M. haemolytica populations over time and induction of nasopharyngeal colonization and subsequent shedding are 2 areas where knowledge is lacking. In our study, 2 separate loads of 20 mixed-origin, male calves were purchased through an order buyer on different dates. Deep nasopharyngeal cultures (NPC) were performed on all calves on arrival and, if M. haemolytica-negative, a second screening culture was obtained. Calves that were negative on 2 initial NPCs (NEG; n = 4) were subsequently challenged with a previously isolated field strain of M. haemolytica in both the upper and lower respiratory tract, individually housed, and then monitored for M. haemolytica shedding via NPCs at 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 days postchallenge. Naturally M. haemolytica-positive calves (2 per load) were kept for additional daily cultures (POS; n = 4). Individual calf M. haemolytica status for both the POS and NEG groups was inconsistent between study days. Additionally, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis performed on isolates from the positive cultures showed that the NEG calves did not shed the M. haemolytica challenge strain, but rather 2 distinct clusters of M. haemolytica were shared among POS and NEG calves regardless of their initial status. Although sample sizes were small, these findings illustrate how variable the results of a single nasopharyngeal swab can be and the challenges of using an individual culture to truly represent animal M. haemolytica status. PMID:26330399

  19. Beta(2) integrin Mac-1 is a receptor for Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin on bovine and ovine leukocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pneumonia caused by Mannheimia haemolytica is an important disease of cattle (BO), domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries) and bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis). Leukotoxin (Lkt) produced by M. haemolytica is cytolytic to all leukocyte subsets of these three species. Although it is certain that CD18, the...

  20. Rapid detection of Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from bacterial culture

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jyoti; Dixit, Shivendra Kumar; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed to detect Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from a bacterial culture. Introduction: M. haemolytica is one of the most important and well-established etiological agents of pneumonia in sheep and other ruminants throughout the world. Accurate diagnosis of M. haemolytica primarily relies on bacteriological examination, biochemical characteristics and, biotyping and serotyping of the isolates. In an effort to facilitate rapid M. haemolytica detection, polymerase chain reaction assay targeting Pasteurella haemolytica serotype-1 specific antigens (PHSSA), Rpt2 and 12S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes were used to detect M. haemolytica directly from lung tissues and from bacterial culture. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 archived lung tissues from sheep that died of pneumonia on an organized farm were used. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) based on two-amplicons targeted PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica were used for identification of M. haemolytica isolates in culture from the lung samples. All the 12 lung tissue samples were tested for the presence M. haemolytica by PHSSA and Rpt2 genes based PCR and its confirmation by sequencing of the amplicons. Results: All the 12 lung tissue samples tested for the presence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica by mPCR were found to be positive. Amplification of 12S rRNA gene fragment as internal amplification control was obtained with each mPCR reaction performed from DNA extracted directly from lung tissue samples. All the M. haemolytica were also positive for mPCR. No amplified DNA bands were observed for negative control reactions. All the three nucleotide sequences were deposited in NCBI GenBank (Accession No. KJ534629, KJ534630 and KJ534631). Sequencing of the amplified products revealed the identity of 99-100%, with published sequence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica available in the NCBI database. Sheep specific mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene sequence

  1. Mannheimia haemolytica and Its Leukotoxin Cause Macrophage Extracellular Trap Formation by Bovine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Aulik, Nicole A.; Hellenbrand, Katrina M.

    2012-01-01

    Human and bovine neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of extracellular trapping and killing of pathogens. Recently, we reported that bovine neutrophils release NETs in response to the important respiratory pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin (LKT). Here, we demonstrate macrophage extracellular trap (MET) formation by bovine monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to M. haemolytica or its LKT. Both native fully active LKT and noncytolytic pro-LKT (produced by an lktC mutant of M. haemolytica) stimulated MET formation. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed a network of DNA fibrils with colocalized histones in extracellular traps released from bovine macrophages. Formation of METs required NADPH oxidase activity, as previously demonstrated for NET formation. METs formed in response to LKT trapped and killed a portion of the M. haemolytica cells. Bovine alveolar macrophages, but not peripheral blood monocytes, also formed METs in response to M. haemolytica cells. MET formation was not restricted to bovine macrophages. We also observed MET formation by the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and by human THP-1 cell-derived macrophages, in response to Escherichia coli hemolysin. The latter is a member of the repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxin family related to the M. haemolytica leukotoxin. This study demonstrates that macrophages, like neutrophils, can form extracellular traps in response to bacterial pathogens and their exotoxins. PMID:22354029

  2. Nasal isolation of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida as predictors of respiratory disease in shipped calves.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J D; Holland, B P; Step, D L; Payton, M E; Confer, A W

    2015-04-01

    Three hundred ninety five calves were purchased from sale barns and delivered to the Willard Sparks Beef Research Center. Nasal swabs were collected to determine if presence of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida in the upper respiratory tract (URT) can facilitate diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Samples were collected at arrival and at treatment for BRD. Clinically healthy control calves were sampled at time of treatment of sick calves. M. haemolytica was more commonly isolated from calves at treatment than at time of arrival or from control calves. M. haemolytica was more common in calves requiring treatment than in those never treated. Need for treatment and number of treatments were negatively associated with average daily gain, supporting the accuracy of diagnosis. These results suggest that URT sampling, when combined with clinical diagnosis, may assist in providing greater diagnostic accuracy, improving ability to evaluate risk factors, interventions, and treatments. PMID:25599936

  3. Susceptibility to tulathromycin in Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle over a 3-year period

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Trevor W.; Cook, Shaun; Klima, Cassidy L.; Topp, Ed; McAllister, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle were tested for tulathromycin resistance. Cattle were sampled over a 3-year period, starting 12 months after approval of tulathromycin for prevention and treatment of bovine respiratory disease. Nasopharyngeal samples from approximately 5,814 cattle were collected when cattle entered feedlots (N = 4) and again from the same cattle after ≥60 days on feed. The antimicrobial use history for each animal was recorded. Mannheimia haemolytica was isolated from 796 (13.7%) entry samples and 1,038 (20.6%) ≥ 60 days samples. Of the cattle positive for M. haemolytica, 18.5, 2.9, and 2.4% were administered therapeutic concentrations of tulathromycin, tilmicosin, or tylosin tartrate, respectively. In addition, 13.2% were administered subtherapeutic concentrations of tylosin phosphate in feed. In years one and two, no tulathromycin-resistant M. haemolytica were detected, whereas five isolates (0.4%) were resistant in year three. These resistant isolates were collected from three cattle originating from a single pen, were all serotype 1, and were genetically related (≥89% similarity) according to pulsed-field gel electrophoreses patterns. The five tulathromycin-resistant isolates were multi-drug resistant also exhibiting resistance to oxytetracycline, tilmicosin, ampicillin, or penicillin. The macrolide resistance genes erm(42), erm(A), erm(B), erm(F), erm(X) and msr(E)-mph(E), were not detected in the tulathromycin-resistant M. haemolytica. This study showed that tulathromycin resistance in M. haemolytica from a general population of feedlot cattle in western Canada was low and did not change over a 3-year period after tulathromycin was approved for use in cattle. PMID:24130555

  4. Transmission dynamics of Mannheimia haemolytica in newly-received beef bulls at fattening operations.

    PubMed

    Timsit, E; Christensen, H; Bareille, N; Seegers, H; Bisgaard, M; Assié, S

    2013-01-25

    The primary objective of this study was to determine, at the lung level, whether single or multiple clones of Mannheimia haemolytica are present within a pen during a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) episode. A secondary objective was to assess whether M. haemolytica isolates obtained from nasal swabs (NS) are identical to those isolated deeper within the respiratory tract. Sixteen BRD episodes that naturally occurred in 12 pens of eight to 12 bulls (n=112) newly-received at three fattening operations were investigated. One hundred and seventy five M. haemolytica isolates were collected from 239 pairs of trans-tracheal aspirations (TTA) and NS performed during these 16 BRD episodes. M. haemolytica isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PFGE types obtained from NS and TTA were then compared. M. haemolytica was isolated during 14 BRD episodes. Two to three different clones of M. haemolytica were recovered during 10 episodes whereas only one clone was recovered in four episodes. A moderate agreement (kappa=0.50) between NS and TTA for M. haemolytica isolation was observed. Identical PFGE types were only observed in 77% of matched NS-TTA pairs. The significant within-pen diversity of M. haemolytica during BRD episodes indicates that the disease is not primarily due to the spread of a single virulent clone among cattle and highlights the importance of predisposing factors that enable the resident flora to overcome the cattle's immune system. The results also demonstrate that isolates recovered from NS are not always representative of the isolates present deeper within the respiratory tract. PMID:22901531

  5. Adenosine-5'-triphosphate release by Mannheimia haemolytica, lipopolysaccharide, and interleukin-1 stimulated bovine pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Craddick, Michael; Patel, Rakhi; Lower, Amanda; Highlander, Sarah; Ackermann, Mark; McClenahan, David

    2012-09-15

    Mannheimia haemolytica, one of the agents associated with bovine respiratory disease complex, can cause severe lung pathology including the leakage of vascular products into the airways and alveoli. Previous work by this laboratory has demonstrated that bovine lung endothelial and epithelial cells undergo dramatic permeability increases when exposed to adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP). Therefore, we wanted to determine if ATP levels were elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from calves experimentally infected with M. haemolytica. In addition, cultured bovine pulmonary epithelial (BPE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed and live M. haemolytica bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and zymosan activated plasma (ZAP) to determine whether they might release extracellular ATP during in vitro infection. Calves experimentally exposed to M. haemolytica had an approximately 2-fold higher level of ATP in their BAL samples compared to control. BPE cells exposed to increasing numbers of heat-killed or live M. haemolytica had significantly increased levels of ATP release as compared to time-matched controls. Finally, BPE cells treated with several concentrations of LPS and IL-1 had increases in ATP release as compared to time-matched controls. This increase appeared to be a result of active ATP secretion by the cells, as cell viability was similar between treated and non-treated cells. Neither ZAP nor LTA induced any ATP release by the cells. In conclusion, ATP levels are elevated in lung secretions from calves infected with M. haemolytica. In addition, lung epithelial cells can actively release ATP when exposed to heat-killed or live M. haemolytica, LPS or IL-1. PMID:22771196

  6. Characterization of Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle that were healthy or treated for bovine respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Cassidy L.; Alexander, Trevor W.; Hendrick, Steve; McAllister, Tim A.

    2014-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the principal bacterial pathogen associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). As an opportunistic pathogen, M. haemolytica is also frequently isolated from the respiratory tract of healthy cattle. This study examined the characteristics of M. haemolytica collected using deep nasal swabs from healthy cattle (n = 49) and cattle diagnosed with BRD (n = 41). Isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), serotyped, and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen isolates for virulence [leukotoxin C (lktC), putative adhesin (ahs), outer-membrane lipoprotein (gs60), O-sialoglycoprotease (gcp), transferring-binding protein B (tbpB) and UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-2-epimerase (nmaA)] and antimicrobial resistance [tet(H), blaROB-1, erm(X), erm(42), msr(E)-mph(E) and aphA-1] genes. Isolates were genetically diverse but in three instances, M. haemolytica with the same pulsotype, resistance phenotype, and genotype were collected from cattle with BRD. This occurred once between cattle located in two different feedlots, once between cattle in the same feedlot, but in different pens, and once among cattle from the same feedlot in the same pen. Isolates from healthy cattle were primarily serotype 2 (75.5%) while those from individuals with BRD were serotype 1 (70.7%) or 6 (19.5%). Resistance to at least one antibiotic occurred more frequently (P < 0.001) in M. haemolytica collected from cattle with BRD (37%) compared with those that were healthy (2%). Overall, tetracycline resistance (18%) was the most prevalent resistant phenotype. All tetracycline-resistant M. haemolytica encoded tet(H). Ampicillin resistance (6%) and neomycin resistance (15%) were detected and corresponded to the presence of the blaROB-1 and aphA-1 genes, respectively. Tilmicosin resistance (6%) was also detected, but the resistance genes responsible were not identified. The virulence genes lktC, ahs, gs60, and gcp

  7. Diversity of Mannheimia haemolytica and pasteurella trehalosi serotypes from apparently healthy sheep and abattoir specimens in the highlands of Wollo, North East Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sisay, T; Zerihun, A

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence and serotypic diversity of Mannheimia [Pasteurella] haemolytica and Pasteurella trehalosi from nasal swabs, sera and abattoir specimens from sheep in the highlands of Wollo, North East Ethiopia was investigated. Prevalence rates of 83% and 75% of these microorganisms were found in the serum samples and nasal swabs, respectively, from apparently healthy sheep. In a local abattoir, 205 lungs were investigated, 34% of which showed pneumonia, from which samples were collected from 51 lungs and the same number of corresponding tonsils. Mannheimia and Pasteurella species were isolated from 59% of these pneumonic lungs and 69% of the respective tonsils. M. haemolytica serotypes accounted for 41 (59%) and P. trehalosi for 11 (32%) of the isolates from the abattoir specimens. The majority (67%) of isolates from nasal swabs were P. trehalosi, M. haemolytica being isolated f rom 4 (13%) of the swabs. M. glucosida was isolated only from the tonsils. The predominant serotypes of the isolates from both the nasal swabs and the abattoir specimens were M. haemolytica A1 (17%) and P. trehalosi T4 (16%) and T3 (13%). P. trehalosi T15 was less commonly encountered, while M. haemolytica A9 and A13 were not isolated. Studies on sera from 100 sheep indicated that antibodies against M. haemolytica serotype A1 (14%) were most common, followed by A5 and A8 (each 10%) and A9 and P. trehalosi T3 (each 9%) and T4 (8%). Antibodies against M. glucosida or serotype All occurred in 2% of the sera. Multiple serotypes were common in all types of samples. The importance of including in vaccines the most prevalent serotypes involved in the pneumonia of sheep in the area is discussed. PMID:12625399

  8. Defective bacterial clearance is responsible for the enhanced lung pathology characteristic of Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia in bighorn sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular and cellular basis for the enhanced lung pathology and mortality caused by Mannheimia haemolytica in bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadenesis), in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries), is not clear. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) of BHS are four- to eight-fold more susceptibl...

  9. Serum Headspace Analysis With An Electronic Nose And Comparison With Clinical Signs Following Experimental Infection Of Cattle With Mannheimia Haemolytica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Henri; Turner, Claire; Chambers, Mark; Reinhold, Petra

    2009-05-01

    Electronic noses (e-noses) have been widely used for medical applications or in the food industry. However, little is known about their utility for early disease detection in animals. In this study, 20 calves were experimentally infected with Mannheimia haemolytica A1. Blood serum was collected from 7 days before infection to 5 days after infection and headspace of sera was analysed using the ST214 (Scensive Tech. Ltd., Leeds, UK) e-nose. Differences between pre- and post infection status were investigated and a temporal profile of sensor responses was compared with body temperature over the course of infection. A similar profile for sensor responses and body temperature indicated the e-nose was detecting a genuine physiological response following infection.

  10. Comparison of Passively Transferred Antibodies in Bighorn and Domestic Lambs Reveals One Factor in Differential Susceptibility of These Species to Mannheimia haemolytica-Induced Pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica consistently causes fatal bronchopneumonia in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under natural and experimental conditions. Leukotoxin is the primary virulence factor of this organism. BHS are more susceptible to developing fatal pneumonia than the related species Ovis aries...

  11. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic integration and modelling of marbofloxacin in calves for Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Potter, T; Illambas, J; Pelligand, L; Rycroft, A; Lees, P

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of marbofloxacin were established in calves for six strains of each of the pneumonia pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. The distribution of marbofloxacin into inflamed (exudate) and non-inflamed (transudate) tissue cage fluids allowed comparison with the serum concentration-time profile. To establish the PD profile, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined in Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and calf serum. Moderately higher MICs were obtained for serum compared to MHB. An initial integration of PK-PD data established C(max)/MIC ratios of 45.0 and AUC(24h)/MIC values of 174.7 h, based on serum MICs, for both bacterial species. Using bacterial time-kill curves, generated ex vivo for serum marbofloxacin concentrations, PK-PD modelling established three levels of growth inhibition: AUC(24 h)/MIC ratios for no reduction, 3 log(10) and 4 log(10) reductions in bacterial count from the initial inoculum count were 41.9, 59.5 and 68.0 h for M. haemolytica and 48.6, 64.9 and 74.8 h for P. multocida, on average respectively. Inter-strain variability for 3 log(10) and 4 log(10) reductions in bacterial count was smaller for P. multocida than for M. haemolytica. In conjunction with literature data on MIC(90) values, the present results allowed prediction of dosages for efficacy for each organism for the three levels of growth inhibition. PMID:23084327

  12. Multiplex PCR To Identify Macrolide Resistance Determinants in Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Simon; Desmolaize, Benoit; Jaju, Puneet; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida are major etiological agents in respiratory tract infections of cattle. Although these infections can generally be successfully treated with veterinary macrolide antibiotics, a few recent isolates have shown resistance to these drugs. Macrolide resistance in members of the family Pasteurellaceae is conferred by combinations of at least three genes: erm(42), which encodes a monomethyltransferase and confers a type I MLSB (macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B) phenotype; msr(E), which encodes a macrolide efflux pump; and mph(E), which encodes a macrolide-inactivating phosphotransferase. Here, we describe a multiplex PCR assay that detects the presence of erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) and differentiates between these genes. In addition, the assay distinguishes P. multocida from M. haemolytica by amplifying distinctive fragments of the 23S rRNA (rrl) genes. One rrl fragment acts as a general indicator of gammaproteobacterial species and confirms whether the PCR assay has functioned as intended on strains that are negative for erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E). The multiplex system has been tested on more than 40 selected isolates of P. multocida and M. haemolytica and correlated with MICs for the veterinary macrolides tulathromycin and tilmicosin, and the newer compounds gamithromycin and tildipirosin. The multiplex PCR system gives a rapid and robustly accurate determination of macrolide resistance genotypes and bacterial genus, matching results from microbiological methods and whole-genome sequencing. PMID:22564832

  13. Comparison of Mannheimia haemolytica isolates from an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Rainbolt, S; Pillai, D K; Lubbers, B V; Moore, M; Davis, R; Amrine, D; Mosier, D

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the clonal relatedness of Mannheimia haemolytica isolates responsible for an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease in a commercial feedlot. The isolates were obtained from the lungs of 21 calves with fatal pneumonia that were part of a group of 206 total calves. All isolates were serotyped and analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and for antibiotic sensitivity patterns. ELISA and immunoblotting assays were performed to compare serum antibody levels to M. haemolytica antigens in calves with fatal pneumonia to those calves that survived the outbreak. Isolates were categorized into 14 different PFGE groups based on 90% similarity. Two Group D isolates (1 and 6), and 3 Group H isolates (14, 15, and 16) were characterized as 100% similar. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles defined 8 groups based on differences in patterns of resistance between isolates. The two 100% similar isolates from PFGE Group D were both in susceptibility Group 1. All but isolate 14 from PFGE Group H (3, 15, 16, and 19) were in susceptibility Group 4a. Serum antibody levels to M. haemolytica antigens in the dead calves were not different than the antibody levels in the 185 calves that survived the outbreak. Immunoblots of selected isolates from each of the PFGE groups demonstrated only minimal differences in antigenic profiles between strains when reacted with serum from calves that either died from or survived the outbreak. Based on the characteristics of these isolates, multiple strains of M. haemolytica were responsible for fatal pneumonia during this outbreak. PMID:26711032

  14. Transfection of non-susceptible cells with Ovis aries recombinant lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 renders susceptibility to Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an important etiological agent of pneumonia in domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). Leukotoxin (Lkt) produced by this organism is the principal virulence factor responsible for the acute inflammation and lung injury characteristic of M. haemolytica caused disease. Previously, w...

  15. Bordetella bronchiseptica fimbrial protein-enhanced immunogenicity of a Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin fragment.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, S; Kania, S A; Nair, R V; McPherson, J T; Moore, R N; Bemis, D A

    2001-09-14

    Leukotoxin produced by Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica is an important virulence factor in shipping fever pneumonia in feedlot cattle and is a critical protective antigen. In this study, the immune response to a chimeric protein generated by combining a gene fragment encoding neutralizing epitopes of M. haemolytica leukotoxin and a fimbrial protein gene (fim N) from Bordetella bronchiseptica was evaluated. The recombinant gene was cloned in a bacterial expression vector under the control of the tac promoter and expressed as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in Escherichia coli. Immunization of mice with the recombinant protein, GST-LTXFIM elicited a significantly stronger anti-leukotoxin antibody response than comparable immunizations with GST-LTX fusion proteins lacking FIM N. The GST-LTXFIM was also more stable than GST-LTX during storage at -80 degrees C, thus alleviating a stability problem inherent to leukotoxin. This chimeric protein may be a candidate for inclusion in new generation vaccines against shipping fever pneumonia. PMID:11535337

  16. Differences in susceptibility to Mannheimia haemolytica-associated mastitis between two breeds of dairy sheep.

    PubMed

    Fragkou, Ilectra A; Skoufos, John; Cripps, Peter J; Kyriazakis, Ilias; Papaioannou, Nikos; Boscos, Costas M; Tzora, Athina; Fthenakis, George C

    2007-08-01

    We used a Mannheimia haemolytica isolate to study differences in susceptibility to experimental mastitis between two breeds of dairy sheep. The isolate was deposited into the teat duct of Karagouniko (K, n=8) or Frisarta (F, n=8) ewes. The animals were monitored by means of clinical, bacteriological, cytological and pathological methods. K ewes did not develop any systemic or mammary clinical signs, whilst F ewes became ill and developed acute clinical mastitis 12 h later (P<0.001). Bacteria were isolated from 34/48 samples from K ewes and from 46/46 samples from F ewes. Positive California mastitis test (CMT) results were 17/24 samples from K ewes and 23/23 samples from F ewes; leucocytes were seen in Giemsa-stained films. Total pathology score summed over all group K ewes was 41 (maximum possible: 128); Man. haemolytica was isolated from 12/24 tissue samples. Total pathology score summed over all group F ewes was 93; Man. haemolytica was isolated from 24/24 tissue samples. Hyperplastic lymphoid nodules consisting of lymphocytes and plasma cells with germinal activity were characteristically present at the border between teat duct-teat cistern of group K ewes; no such structures were observed in teats of group F ewes. The results identified differences in susceptibility/resistance to a mastitis pathogen among animals of the two breeds. Defence mechanisms of the teat appeared to be inadequate against the invading organisms; as lymphoid nodules have been considered important defensive mechanisms of the ovine teat, their observed lack in Frisarta ewes might have predisposed them to development of mastitis. PMID:17451623

  17. Effect of subtherapeutic vs. therapeutic administration of macrolides on antimicrobial resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica and enterococci isolated from beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R; Klima, Cassidy L; Stanford, Kim; Alexander, Trevor; Topp, Edward; Read, Ron R; McAllister, Tim A

    2013-01-01

    Macrolides are the first-line treatment against bovine respiratory disease (BRD), and are also used to treat infections in humans. The macrolide, tylosin phosphate, is often included in the diet of cattle as a preventative for liver abscesses in many regions of the world outside of Europe. This study investigated the effects of administering macrolides to beef cattle either systemically through a single subcutaneous injection (therapeutic) or continuously in-feed (subtherapeutic), on the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Mannheimia haemolytica and Enterococcus spp. isolated from the nasopharynx and faeces, respectively. Nasopharyngeal and faecal samples were collected weekly over 28 days from untreated beef steers and from steers injected once with tilmicosin or tulathromycin or continuously fed tylosin phosphate at dosages recommended by manufacturers. Tilmicosin and tulathromycin were effective in lowering (P < 0.05) the prevalence of M. haemolytica, whereas subtherapeutic tylosin had no effect. M. haemolytica isolated from control- and macrolide-treated animals were susceptible to macrolides as well as to other antibiotics. Major bacteria co-isolated with M. haemolytica from the nasopharynx included Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., Escherichia coli and Bacillus spp. With the exception of M. haemolytica and P. multocida, erythromycin resistance was frequently found in other isolated species. Both methods of macrolide administration increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of erythromycin resistant enterococci within the population, which was comprised almost exclusively of Enterococcus hirae. Injectable macrolides impacted both respiratory and enteric microbes, whereas orally administered macrolides only influenced enteric bacteria. PMID:23750157

  18. Effect of subtherapeutic vs. therapeutic administration of macrolides on antimicrobial resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica and enterococci isolated from beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Klima, Cassidy L.; Stanford, Kim; Alexander, Trevor; Topp, Edward; Read, Ron R.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrolides are the first-line treatment against bovine respiratory disease (BRD), and are also used to treat infections in humans. The macrolide, tylosin phosphate, is often included in the diet of cattle as a preventative for liver abscesses in many regions of the world outside of Europe. This study investigated the effects of administering macrolides to beef cattle either systemically through a single subcutaneous injection (therapeutic) or continuously in-feed (subtherapeutic), on the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Mannheimia haemolytica and Enterococcus spp. isolated from the nasopharynx and faeces, respectively. Nasopharyngeal and faecal samples were collected weekly over 28 days from untreated beef steers and from steers injected once with tilmicosin or tulathromycin or continuously fed tylosin phosphate at dosages recommended by manufacturers. Tilmicosin and tulathromycin were effective in lowering (P < 0.05) the prevalence of M. haemolytica, whereas subtherapeutic tylosin had no effect. M. haemolytica isolated from control- and macrolide-treated animals were susceptible to macrolides as well as to other antibiotics. Major bacteria co-isolated with M. haemolytica from the nasopharynx included Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., Escherichia coli and Bacillus spp. With the exception of M. haemolytica and P. multocida, erythromycin resistance was frequently found in other isolated species. Both methods of macrolide administration increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of erythromycin resistant enterococci within the population, which was comprised almost exclusively of Enterococcus hirae. Injectable macrolides impacted both respiratory and enteric microbes, whereas orally administered macrolides only influenced enteric bacteria. PMID:23750157

  19. Effects of experimental challenge of ewes with Mannheimia haemolytica on subsequent milk composition.

    PubMed

    Fragkou, Ilectra A; Solomakos, Nikos; Dagleish, Mark P; Cripps, Peter J; Papaioannou, Nikos; Boscos, Costas M; Ververidis, Haris N; Billinis, Charalambos; Orfanou, Denise C; Govaris, Alexander; Kyriazakis, Ilias; Fthenakis, George C

    2008-08-01

    The objective was to describe the physicochemical changes during the early phase of subclinical mastitis and to associate them with pathological findings. A Mannheimia haemolytica strain was deposited into one teat duct of 25 ewes and the clinical, bacteriological, cytological, physicochemical (pH, milk composition), gross-pathological and histological findings were subsequently recorded. The organism was consistently isolated from samples of teat duct material (140/150) but not from mammary secretion (50/150). California Mastitis Test (CMT) scores increased (>1) and remained high (143/150 samples) after challenge; polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) predominated in milk films, but the proportion of lymphocytes and macrophages progressively increased. Increased pH values (>7.0) were recorded in the mammary secretion from the challenged side. Furthermore, content of fat, total proteins and lactose therein decreased markedly. Histological changes (leucocytic infiltration, destruction of epithelial cells) were observed in the mammary parenchyma of the ewes. The present results confirm that the reduction of milk constituents is the effect of cellular damage and can occur soon after infection. PMID:18680619

  20. Impact of Timing and Dosage of a Fluoroquinolone Treatment on the Microbiological, Pathological, and Clinical Outcomes of Calves Challenged with Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Lhermie, Guillaume; Ferran, Aude A; Assié, Sébastien; Cassard, Hervé; El Garch, Farid; Schneider, Marc; Woerhlé, Frédérique; Pacalin, Diane; Delverdier, Maxence; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain; Meyer, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of an early and low inoculum-adjusted marbofloxacin treatment was evaluated on microbiological and clinical outcomes in calves infected with 4.10(7) CFU of Mannheimia haemolytica A1. Twenty-two calves were included based on their rectal temperature rise in the 10 h after challenge and allocated in four groups, receiving a single intramuscular injection of saline (CON), 2 mg/kg marbofloxacin 2-4 h after inclusion (early treatment, E2), 2 or 10 mg/kg marbofloxacin 35-39 h after inclusion (late treatments, L2, L10). In CON calves, M. haemolytica DNA loads in bronchoalveolar lavages continuously increased from inclusion to day 4, and were associated with persistent respiratory clinical signs and lung lesions. At times of early and late treatments, M. haemolytica loads ranged within 3.5-4 and 5.5-6 log10 DNA copies/mL, respectively. Early 2 mg/kg marbofloxacin treatment led to rapid and total elimination of bacteria in all calves. The late treatments induced a reduction of bacterial loads, but 3 of 6 L2 and 1 of 6 L10 calves were still positive for M. haemolytica at day 4. Except for CON calves, all animals exhibited clinical improvement within 24 h after treatment. However, early 2 mg/kg treatment was more efficacious to prevent pulmonary lesions, as indicated by the reduction of the extension and severity of gross lesions and by the histopathological scores. These results demonstrated for the first time that a reduced antibiotic regimen given at an early stage of the disease and targeting a low bacterial load could be efficacious in a natural bovine model of pneumonia. PMID:26973615

  1. Impact of Timing and Dosage of a Fluoroquinolone Treatment on the Microbiological, Pathological, and Clinical Outcomes of Calves Challenged with Mannheimia haemolytica

    PubMed Central

    Lhermie, Guillaume; Ferran, Aude A.; Assié, Sébastien; Cassard, Hervé; El Garch, Farid; Schneider, Marc; Woerhlé, Frédérique; Pacalin, Diane; Delverdier, Maxence; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain; Meyer, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of an early and low inoculum-adjusted marbofloxacin treatment was evaluated on microbiological and clinical outcomes in calves infected with 4.107 CFU of Mannheimia haemolytica A1. Twenty-two calves were included based on their rectal temperature rise in the 10 h after challenge and allocated in four groups, receiving a single intramuscular injection of saline (CON), 2 mg/kg marbofloxacin 2–4 h after inclusion (early treatment, E2), 2 or 10 mg/kg marbofloxacin 35–39 h after inclusion (late treatments, L2, L10). In CON calves, M. haemolytica DNA loads in bronchoalveolar lavages continuously increased from inclusion to day 4, and were associated with persistent respiratory clinical signs and lung lesions. At times of early and late treatments, M. haemolytica loads ranged within 3.5–4 and 5.5–6 log10 DNA copies/mL, respectively. Early 2 mg/kg marbofloxacin treatment led to rapid and total elimination of bacteria in all calves. The late treatments induced a reduction of bacterial loads, but 3 of 6 L2 and 1 of 6 L10 calves were still positive for M. haemolytica at day 4. Except for CON calves, all animals exhibited clinical improvement within 24 h after treatment. However, early 2 mg/kg treatment was more efficacious to prevent pulmonary lesions, as indicated by the reduction of the extension and severity of gross lesions and by the histopathological scores. These results demonstrated for the first time that a reduced antibiotic regimen given at an early stage of the disease and targeting a low bacterial load could be efficacious in a natural bovine model of pneumonia. PMID:26973615

  2. Bivalent vaccination against pneumonic pasteurellosis in domestic sheep and goats with modified-live in-frame lktA deletion mutants of Mannheimia haemolytica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A temperature-sensitive shuttle vector, pBB80C, was utilized to generate in-frame deletion mutants of the leukotoxin structural gene (lktA) of Mannheimia haemolytica serotypes 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 12. Culture supernatants from the mutants contained a truncated protein with an approximate molecu...

  3. Mucosal and parenteral vaccination against pneumonic pasteurellosis in cattle with a modified-live in-frame lktA deletion mutant of Mannheimia haemolytica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new temperature-conditional shuttle vector, pBB80C, was constructed and utilized to generate an in-frame deletion in the leukotoxin structural gene of Mannheimia haemolytica serotype 1. Culture supernatants from the mutant contained no detectable cytotoxicity to BL-3 lymphocyte targets, and contai...

  4. Co-expression of ovine LPS receptor CD14 with Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin receptor LFA-1 or Mac-1 does not enhance leukotoxin-induced cytotoxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leukotoxin (Lkt) and LPS are the major virulence determinants of Mannheimia haemolytica that contribute to the pathogenesis of bovine and ovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. We have previously identified bovine and ovine CD18 as the functional receptor for Lkt. LPS complexes with Lkt resulting in incre...

  5. Combinations of Macrolide Resistance Determinants in Field Isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida▿

    PubMed Central

    Desmolaize, Benoit; Rose, Simon; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections in cattle are commonly associated with the bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. These infections can generally be successfully treated in the field with one of several groups of antibiotics, including macrolides. A few recent isolates of these species exhibit resistance to veterinary macrolides with phenotypes that fall into three distinct classes. The first class has type I macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B antibiotic resistance and, consistent with this, the 23S rRNA nucleotide A2058 is monomethylated by the enzyme product of the erm(42) gene. The second class shows no lincosamide resistance and lacks erm(42) and concomitant 23S rRNA methylation. Sequencing of the genome of a representative strain from this class, P. multocida 3361, revealed macrolide efflux and phosphotransferase genes [respectively termed msr(E) and mph(E)] that are arranged in tandem and presumably expressed from the same promoter. The third class exhibits the most marked drug phenotype, with high resistance to all of the macrolides tested, and possesses all three resistance determinants. The combinations of erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) are chromosomally encoded and intermingled with other exogenous genes, many of which appear to have been transferred from other members of the Pasteurellaceae. The presence of some of the exogenous genes explains recent reports of resistance to additional drug classes. We have expressed recombinant versions of the erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) genes within an isogenic Escherichia coli background to assess their individually contributions to resistance. Our findings indicate what types of compounds might have driven the selection for these resistance determinants. PMID:21709086

  6. Acylation Enhances, but Is Not Required for, the Cytotoxic Activity of Mannheimia haemolytica Leukotoxin in Bighorn Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Sai A.; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Munske, Gerhard R.; Raghavan, Bindu; Kugadas, Abirami; Bavanthasivam, Jegarubee; Highlander, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica causes pneumonia in domestic and wild ruminants. Leukotoxin (Lkt) is the most important virulence factor of the bacterium. It is encoded within the four-gene lktCABD operon: lktA encodes the structural protoxin, and lktC encodes a trans-acylase that adds fatty acid chains to internal lysine residues in the protoxin, which is then secreted from the cell by a type 1 secretion system apparatus encoded by lktB and lktD. It has been reported that LktC-mediated acylation is necessary for the biological effects of the toxin. However, an LktC mutant that we developed previously was only partially attenuated in its virulence for cattle. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of LktC-mediated acylation in Lkt-induced cytotoxicity. We performed this study in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) (BHS), since they are highly susceptible to M. haemolytica infection. The LktC mutant caused fatal pneumonia in 40% of inoculated BHS. On necropsy, a large number of necrotic polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were observed in the lungs. Lkt from the mutant was cytotoxic to BHS PMNs in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Flow cytometric analysis of mutant Lkt-treated PMNs revealed the induction of necrosis. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed the presence of pores and blebs on mutant-Lkt-treated PMNs. Mass spectrometric analysis confirmed that the mutant secreted an unacylated Lkt. Taken together, these results suggest that acylation is not necessary for the cytotoxic activity of M. haemolytica Lkt but that it enhances the potency of the toxin. PMID:26216418

  7. A Three-way Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mannheimia haemolytica Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Paulraj; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; McDermott, Jason E.; Bumgarner, Roger E.

    2010-10-04

    Mannhemia haemolytica is a Gram- negative bacterium and the principal etiological agent associated with bovine respiratory disease complex. They transform from a benign commensal to a deadly pathogen during stress such as viral infection and transportation to feedlots, and cause acute pleuropneumonia commonly known as shipping fever. The U.S beef industry alone loses more than one billion dollars annually to shipping fever and despite its enormous economic importance there are no specific and accurate genetic markers, which would aid in understanding M. haemolytica pathogenesis and epidemiology at molecular level and assist in devising an effective control strategy.

  8. A chimeric protein comprising the immunogenic domains of Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin and outer membrane protein PlpE induces antibodies against leukotoxin and PlpE.

    PubMed

    Batra, Sai Arun; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Donofrio, Gaetano; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is a very important pathogen of pneumonia in ruminants. Bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are highly susceptible to M. haemolytica-caused pneumonia which has significantly contributed to the drastic decline of bighorn sheep population in North America. Pneumonia outbreaks in wild BHS can cause mortality as high as 90%. Leukotoxin is the critical virulence factor of M. haemolytica. In a 'proof of concept' study, an experimental vaccine containing leukotoxin and surface antigens of M. haemolytica developed by us induced 100% protection of BHS, but required multiple booster injections. Vaccination of wild BHS is difficult. But they can be vaccinated at the time of transplantation into a new habitat. Administration of booster doses, however, is impossible. Therefore, a vaccine that does not require booster doses is necessary to immunize BHS against M. haemolytica pneumonia. Herpesviruses are ideal vectors for development of such a vaccine because of their ability to undergo latency with subsequent reactivation. As the first step towards developing a herpesvirus-vectored vaccine, we constructed a chimeric protein comprising the leukotoxin-neutralizing epitopes and the immuno-dominant epitopes of the outer membrane protein PlpE. The chimeric protein was efficiently expressed in primary BHS lung cells. The immunogenicity of the chimeric protein was evaluated in mice before inoculating BHS. Mice immunized with the chimeric protein developed antibodies against M. haemolytica leukotoxin and PlpE. More importantly, the anti-leukotoxin antibodies effectively neutralized leukotoxin-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, these results represent the successful completion of the first step towards developing a herpesvirus-vectored vaccine for controlling M. haemolytica pneumonia in BHS, and possibly other ruminants. PMID:27269790

  9. N-terminal region of Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin serves as a mitochondrial targeting signal in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kisiela, Dagmara I; Aulik, Nicole A; Atapattu, Dhammika N; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2010-07-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin (LktA) is a member of the RTX toxin family that specifically kills ruminant leukocytes. Previous studies have shown that LktA induces apoptosis in susceptible cells via a caspase-9-dependent pathway that involves binding of LktA to mitochondria. In this study, using the bioinformatics tool MitoProt II we identified an N-terminal amino acid sequence of LktA that represents a mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS). We show that expression of this sequence, as a GFP fusion protein within mammalian cells, directs GFP to mitochondria. By immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that LktA interacts with the Tom22 and Tom40 components of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM), which suggests that import of this toxin into mitochondria involves a classical import pathway for endogenous proteins. We also analysed the amino acid sequences of other RTX toxins and found a MTS in the N-terminal region of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ApxII and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli EhxA, but not in A. pleuropneumoniae ApxI, ApxIII, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans LtxA or the haemolysin (HlyA) from uropathogenic strains of E. coli. These findings provide a new evidence for the importance of the N-terminal region in addressing certain RTX toxins to mitochondria. PMID:20109159

  10. Molecular epidemiology of an outbreak of clinical mastitis in sheep caused by Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Omaleki, Lida; Browning, Glenn F; Allen, Joanne L; Markham, Philip F; Barber, Stuart R

    2016-08-15

    The aetiology and epidemiology of outbreaks of clinical mastitis in sheep under extensive pastoral conditions are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to conduct a detailed investigation of a clinical mastitis outbreak that affected more than 10% of 230 at-risk ewes on a sheep and grain producing property in south east Australia during drought conditions in 2009. Milk samples were collected aseptically from all affected ewes and plated on sheep blood agar for bacterial identification. M. haemolytica was isolated from 80% of the samples that yielded cultivable microorganisms and thus was the main microorganism responsible for the outbreak. Analysis of the restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of the isolates using pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed some evidence of clonality, suggesting the possibility of horizontal transmission, but there was also considerable diversity between the clusters of closely related isolates. Multilocus sequence typing of the M. haemolytica isolates revealed most of the isolates belonged to ST1 with no association between the PFGE and MLST fingerprints of the isolates. Resistance to neomycin, streptomycin and sulphafurazole was detected in some of the isolates, but they were all susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, ceftiofur, amoxycillin/clavulanic acid, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, erythromycin and trimethoprim. This is the first published record of a comparison of the strains of M. haemolytica involved in a clinical mastitis outbreak in sheep and demonstrates the importance of this pathogen in sheep production systems, particularly during adverse climatic conditions and increased stocking rate. PMID:27374911

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1 in normal bovine lung and bovine lung infected with Mannheimia haemolytica

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Amira Talaat; Singh, Baljit; Al-Dissi, Ahmad N.

    2015-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an important cause of pneumonia in feedlot cattle. Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor responsible for the induction of antioxidant enzymes, such as heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), within the lung. The expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 was immunohistochemically evaluated in 4 calves 24 h after experimental infection with M. haemolytica. Calves receiving normal saline served as controls. In the infected lungs, cytoplasmic Nrf2 expression was high in macrophages and bronchioles and low in alveolar epithelium, whereas nuclear expression was high in endothelial cells, macrophages, and bronchioles and lowest in alveolar epithelium. Normal lung samples displayed only faint Nrf2 cytoplasmic staining within bronchiolar epithelium. Expression of HO-1 was detected within the cytoplasm of macrophages and bronchiolar epithelial cells in all infected lung samples, whereas normal lungs displayed only weak cytoplasmic staining in bronchiolar epithelial cells. These findings suggest that bronchiolar epithelial cells and macrophages up-regulate Nrf2 expression early in the course of infection, which results in increased expression of HO-1 within these cells. PMID:25852222

  12. Comparative minimum inhibitory and mutant prevention drug concentrations of enrofloxacin, ceftiofur, florfenicol, tilmicosin and tulathromycin against bovine clinical isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Blondeau, J M; Borsos, S; Blondeau, L D; Blondeau, B J J; Hesje, C E

    2012-11-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the most prevalent cause of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and this disease accounts for 75% of morbidity, 50-70% of feedlot deaths and is estimated to cost up to $1 billion dollars annually in the USA. Antimicrobial therapy is essential for reducing morbidity, mortality and impacting on the financial burden of this disease. Due to the concern of increasing antimicrobial resistance, investigation of antibacterial agents for their potential for selecting for resistance is of paramount importance. A novel in vitro measurement called the mutant prevention concentration (MPC) defines the antimicrobial drug concentration necessary to block the growth of the least susceptible cells present in high density (≥10(7) colony forming units/ml) bacterial populations such as those seen in acute infection. We compared the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and MPC values for 5 antimicrobial agents (ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, florfenicol, tilmicosin, tulathromycin) against 285 M. haemolytica clinical isolates. The MIC(90)/MPC(90) values for each agent respectively were as follows: 0.016/2, 0.125/1, 2/≥16, 8/≥32, 2/8. Dosing to achieve MPC concentrations (where possible) may serve to reduce the selection of bacterial subpopulations with reduced antimicrobial susceptibility. The rank order of potency based on MIC(90) values was ceftiofur > enrofloxacin > florfenicol = tulathromycin > tilmicosin. The rank order of potency based on MPC(90) values was enrofloxacin > ceftiofur > tulathromycin > florfenicol ≥ tilmicosin. PMID:22677482

  13. Bovine Gamma Delta T Cells Contribute to Exacerbated IL-17 Production in Response to Co-Infection with Bovine RSV and Mannheimia haemolytica

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Jodi L.; Rusk, Rachel A.; Guerra-Maupome, Mariana; Briggs, Robert E.; Sacco, Randy E.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in children under five years of age. IL-17 and Th17 responses are increased in children infected with HRSV and have been implicated in both protective and pathogenic roles during infection. Bovine RSV (BRSV) is genetically closely related to HRSV and is a leading cause of severe respiratory infections in young cattle. While BRSV infection in the calf parallels many aspects of human infection with HRSV, IL-17 and Th17 responses have not been studied in the bovine. Here we demonstrate that calves infected with BRSV express significant levels of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22; and both CD4 T cells and γδ T cells contribute to this response. In addition to causing significant morbidity from uncomplicated infections, BRSV infection also contributes to the development of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), a leading cause of morbidity in both beef and dairy cattle. BRDC is caused by a primary viral infection, followed by secondary bacterial pneumonia by pathogens such as Mannheimia haemolytica. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo infection with M. haemolytica results in increased expression of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22. We have also developed an in vitro model of BRDC and show that co-infection of PBMC with BRSV followed by M. haemolytica leads to significantly exacerbated IL-17 production, which is primarily mediated by IL-17-producing γδ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that calves, like humans, mount a robust IL-17 response during RSV infection; and suggest a previously unrecognized role for IL-17 and γδ T cells in the pathogenesis of BRDC. PMID:26942409

  14. Bovine Gamma Delta T Cells Contribute to Exacerbated IL-17 Production in Response to Co-Infection with Bovine RSV and Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    McGill, Jodi L; Rusk, Rachel A; Guerra-Maupome, Mariana; Briggs, Robert E; Sacco, Randy E

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in children under five years of age. IL-17 and Th17 responses are increased in children infected with HRSV and have been implicated in both protective and pathogenic roles during infection. Bovine RSV (BRSV) is genetically closely related to HRSV and is a leading cause of severe respiratory infections in young cattle. While BRSV infection in the calf parallels many aspects of human infection with HRSV, IL-17 and Th17 responses have not been studied in the bovine. Here we demonstrate that calves infected with BRSV express significant levels of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22; and both CD4 T cells and γδ T cells contribute to this response. In addition to causing significant morbidity from uncomplicated infections, BRSV infection also contributes to the development of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), a leading cause of morbidity in both beef and dairy cattle. BRDC is caused by a primary viral infection, followed by secondary bacterial pneumonia by pathogens such as Mannheimia haemolytica. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo infection with M. haemolytica results in increased expression of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22. We have also developed an in vitro model of BRDC and show that co-infection of PBMC with BRSV followed by M. haemolytica leads to significantly exacerbated IL-17 production, which is primarily mediated by IL-17-producing γδ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that calves, like humans, mount a robust IL-17 response during RSV infection; and suggest a previously unrecognized role for IL-17 and γδ T cells in the pathogenesis of BRDC. PMID:26942409

  15. Transmission of mannheimia haemolytica from domestic sheep (ovis aries) to bighorn sheep (ovis canadensis) : Unequivocal demonstration with green fluorescent protien-tagged organisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bighorn sheep (BHS) die of pneumonia when they commingle with domestic sheep (DS). However, these studies did not conclusively prove the transmission of pathogens from DS to BHS. The objective of this study was to determine unambiguously whether Mannheimia hae...

  16. Expression, purification and immunologic analysis of three Pasteurella haemolytica A1 28-30 kDa lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Dabo, S M; Confer, A W; Styre, D; Murphy, G L

    1994-09-01

    Three genes, tandemly arranged on the Pasteurella haemolytica A1 chromosome and encoding similar 28-30 kDa proteins, were previously cloned and sequenced by our laboratory. In this study, we demonstrate that the cloned genes encode lipoproteins, as previously suggested by DNA sequence analysis. To further analyze the bovine immune response to these proteins, the individual genes were cloned separately into an expression vector and recombinant forms of the three proteins were purified after expression in Escherichia coli. Sera from cattle vaccinated with live P. haemolytica or P. haemolytica bacterins and from cattle naturally exposed to P. haemolytica recognized each of the recombinant proteins. Vaccination with live or killed whole bacteria did not elicit an immune response of the same quality as that which developed in response to natural infection. A statistically significant correlation existed between resistance to challenge and a high antibody response to one of these three proteins. PMID:7700132

  17. Molecular gene cloning and nucleotide sequencing and construction of an aroA mutant of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1.

    PubMed Central

    Tatum, F M; Briggs, R E; Halling, S M

    1994-01-01

    The aroA gene of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 was cloned by complementation of the aroA mutation in Escherichia coli K-12 strain AB2829. The nucleotide sequence of a 2.2-kb fragment encoding aroA predicted an open reading frame product 434 amino acids long that shows homology to other bacterial AroA proteins. Several strategies to inactivate aroA were unsuccessful. Gene replacement was finally achieved by constructing a replacement plasmid with aroA inactivated by insertion of a P. haemolytica ampicillin resistance fragment into a unique NdeI site in aroA. A hybrid plasmid was constructed by joining the aroA replacement plasmid with a 4.2-kb P. haemolytica plasmid which encodes streptomycin resistance. Following PhaI methylation, the replacement plasmid was introduced by electroporation into P. haemolytica NADC-D60, a plasmidless strain of serotype 1A. Allelic exchange between the replacement plasmid and the chromosome of P. haemolytica gave rise to an ampicillin-resistant mutant which grew on chemically defined P. haemolytica medium supplemented with aromatic amino acids but failed to grow on the same medium lacking tryptophan. Southern blot analysis confirmed that aroA of the mutant was inactivated and that the mutant was without a plasmid. Images PMID:8031095

  18. Characterization of epitopes involved in the neutralization of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 leukotoxin.

    PubMed

    Lainson, F A; Murray, J; Davies, R C; Donachie, W

    1996-09-01

    Defined segments of the leukotoxin A gene (lktA) from an A1 serotype of Pasteurella haemolytica were cloned into a plasmid vector and expressed as LacZ alpha fusion proteins. These fusion proteins were electrophoresed in SDS-PAGE gels and their immunoblotting reactivities with several monoclonal antibodies characterized. The epitope recognized by a strongly neutralizing monoclonal antibody was localized to a 32 amino acid region near the C terminus of the leukotoxin A (LktA) molecule. The epitope recognized by a non-neutralizing antibody was localized to a 33 amino acid region immediately adjacent. Smaller recombinant peptides containing these epitopes were not antigenic, but a polypeptide encompassing 229 amino acids at the C terminus evoked neutralizing antibodies when used to immunize specific-pathogen-free lambs. The distributions of linear epitopes recognized by this antiserum and by antisera raised to full-length recombinant LktA and to native LktA produced by P. haemolytica serotype A1 were determined by their reactivities with a set of overlapping 10 amino acid synthetic peptides. This revealed a complex distribution of linear epitopes at the C-terminal end of LktA. Toxin-neutralizing antibodies in convalescent sheep serum were shown to be directed against conformational epitopes by selective absorption of antibodies directed against linear epitopes. PMID:8828217

  19. Cloning and expression of the leukotoxin gene of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Lo, R Y; Shewen, P E; Strathdee, C A; Greer, C N

    1985-12-01

    A clone bank of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 was constructed by partial digestion of the genomic DNA with Sau3A and ligation of 5- to 10-kilobase-pair fragments into the BamHI site of the plasmid vector pBR322. After transformation into Escherichia coli K-12, a total of 4 X 10(3) recombinant clones was obtained. These were screened for the production of P. haemolytica soluble antigens by a colony enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay blot method with a rabbit antiserum raised against the soluble antigens. The clones producing P. haemolytica soluble antigens were then analyzed for the production of the leukotoxin by a cytotoxicity assay with cells from a bovine leukemia-derived B-lymphocyte cell line as the target cells. Positive clones were identified, and subsequent restriction analysis of the recombinant plasmids showed that the same 6.3 kilobase pairs of insert DNA was cloned in either of the two orientations into the plasmid vector pBR322. One of the clones was selected for further characterization of the leukotoxin as produced in E. coli. Tests for heat lability and target cell species specificity with canine, porcine, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes indicated that the activity of the cloned leukotoxin was identical to that of the P. haemolytica leukotoxin. Furthermore, the E. coli-produced leukotoxin was also neutralized by bovine or rabbit antiserum known to have antitoxic activity. When cellular proteins from the E. coli clones were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis, a 100,000-dalton protein was identified which corresponded to one of the soluble antigens found in the leukotoxic culture supernatant of P. haemolytica. These results demonstrated that the gene(s) for the P. haemolytica leukotoxin have been cloned and that the leukotoxin was expressed in E. coli. PMID:3905610

  20. The upper respiratory tract is a natural reservoir of haemolytic Mannheimia species associated with ovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Omaleki, Lida; Browning, Glenn F; Allen, Joanne L; Markham, Philip F; Barber, Stuart R

    2015-12-31

    Lamb suckling has been suggested to be an important way of infecting a ewe's udder with different bacteria, including Mannheimia haemolytica. To test the potential role of lambs in transferring Mannheimia species to the ewe's udder, the restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of isolates obtained from nasopharyngeal swabs were compared with those obtained from cases of mastitis. Sterile cotton swabs were used to collect nasopharyngeal samples from 50 ewes and 36 lambs from three flocks. M. haemolytica and Mannheimia glucosida as well as haemolytic Mannheimia ruminalis-like organisms were detected in the upper respiratory tract of lambs and ewes. Comparison of the restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of the isolates suggested that the M. haemolytica isolates obtained from different milk samples from ewes with mastitis were more clonal than those obtained from the nasal swabs. However, some nasal isolates within both Mannheimia species had restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns identical to those obtained from milk samples from ewes with mastitis, indicating that lambs may have a role in transferring these organisms to the udder. More clonality was observed between the M. glucosida isolates than between M. haemolytica isolates. PMID:26542125

  1. Alterations in bovine platelet function and acute phase proteins induced by Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Cheryk, L A; Hooper-McGrevy, K E; Gentry, P A

    1998-01-01

    Platelet function was assessed by aggregometry in 10 Holstein calves before and after exposure to Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) by intrabronchial challenge. At 24 h after exposure the platelets had become more reactive to stimulation with known platelet agonists such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) and the platelet aggregates that formed were more resistant to disaggregation. The activation of platelets was an early response in the challenged calves as platelet function had returned to pretreatment levels 72 h after exposure to the bacteria while the acute phase reactant proteins, haptoglobin and fibrinogen, were approaching their peak values and alpha 2-macroglobulin levels had also risen significantly (P < 0.05) at this time. The plasma levels of these proteins were still elevated and albumin levels were depressed 6 d post-treatment. At post-mortem all calves exhibited pneumonic tissue damage. When P. haemolytica leukotoxin was added directly to bovine platelet suspensions both spontaneous aggregation and an increase in the aggregation response to ADP and PAF stimulation were observed. The morphological appearance of the platelet aggregates exhibited the typical pattern for bovine platelets with 2 distinct zones of cells being visible within each aggregate. One zone contained platelets in which the cytoplasmic granules were still evident and the other zone contained irregularly shaped platelets devoid of granular content. In the latter zone, discrete gaps, or pores, were evident in the plasma membrane of numerous platelets. This pore formation is characteristic of leukotoxin action and is not observed in ADP or PAF induced aggregates. Images Figure 2. PMID:9442932

  2. Sequence diversity, cytotoxicity and antigenic similarities of the leukotoxin of isolates of Mannheimia species from mastitis in domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Omaleki, Lida; Browning, Glenn F; Barber, Stuart R; Allen, Joanne L; Srikumaran, Subramaniam; Markham, Philip F

    2014-11-01

    Species within the genus Mannheimia are among the most important causes of ovine mastitis. Isolates of these species can express leukotoxin A (LktA), a primary virulence factor of these bacteria. To examine the significance of variation in the LktA, the sequences of the lktA genes in a panel of isolates from cases of ovine mastitis were compared. The cross-neutralising capacities of rat antisera raised against LktA of one Mannheimia glucosida, one haemolytic Mannheimia ruminalis, and two Mannheimia haemolytica isolates were also examined to assess the effect that variation in the lktA gene can have on protective immunity against leukotoxins with differing sequences. The lktA nucleotide distance between the M. haemolytica isolates was greater than between the M. glucosida isolates, with the M. haemolytica isolates divisible into two groups based on their lktA sequences. Comparison of the topology of phylogenetic trees of 16S rDNA and lktA sequences revealed differences in the relationships between some isolates, suggesting horizontal gene transfer. Cross neutralisation data obtained with monospecific anti-LktA rat sera were used to derive antigenic similarity coefficients for LktA from the four Mannheimia species isolates. Similarity coefficients indicated that LktA of the two M. haemolytica isolates were least similar, while LktA from M. glucosida was most similar to those for one of the M. haemolytica isolates and the haemolytic M. ruminalis isolate. The results suggested that vaccination with the M. glucosida leukotoxin would generate the greatest cross-protection against ovine mastitis caused by Mannheimia species with these alleles. PMID:25246232

  3. Granulocyte plasma membrane damage by leukotoxic supernatant from Pasteurella haemolytica A1 and protection by immune serum.

    PubMed

    Styrt, B; Walker, R D; White, J C; Dahl, L D; Baker, J C

    1990-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease caused by Pasteurella haemolytica may be partially mediated by a leukotoxin secreted by the microorganism. We examined the effect of leukotoxic Pasteurella supernatants on leakage of the cytosol enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase from bovine granulocytes. Lactate dehydrogenase release (94%) was much higher than arylsulfatase release (38%) over 30 minutes of incubation. The Pasteurella supernatants inhibited superoxide production by stimulated granulocytes at concentrations which also caused substantial cell death as measured by failure to exclude trypan blue. Both toxic effects were prevented by serum from aerosol-immunized calves, and protection appeared to be antibody-specific by comparison with fetal bovine serum or with serum absorbed against intact P. haemolytica. These findings suggest that the leukotoxin may selectively disrupt the granulocyte plasma membrane, and that antibody directed against a surface component of the microorganism is also capable of protecting against the leukotoxin effect. PMID:2306664

  4. Pasteurella haemolytica A1-Derived Leukotoxin and Endotoxin Induce Intracellular Calcium Elevation in Bovine Alveolar Macrophages by Different Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hsuan, S. L.; Kannan, M. S.; Jeyaseelan, S.; Prakash, Y. S.; Sieck, G. C.; Maheswaran, S. K.

    1998-01-01

    Leukotoxin and endotoxin derived from Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 1 are the primary virulence factors contributing to the pathogenesis of lung injury in bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. Activation of bovine alveolar macrophages with endotoxin or leukotoxin results in the induction of cytokine gene expression, with different kinetics (H. S. Yoo, S. K. Maheswaran, G. Lin, E. L. Townsend, and T. R. Ames, Infect. Immun. 63:381–388, 1995; H. S. Yoo, B. S. Rajagopal, S. K. Maheswaran, and T. R. Ames, Microb. Pathog. 18:237–252, 1995). Furthermore, extracellular Ca2+ is required for leukotoxin-induced cytokine gene expression. However, the involvement of Ca2+ in endotoxin effects and the precise signaling mechanisms in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ by leukotoxin and endotoxin are not known. In fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester-loaded alveolar macrophages, intracellular Ca2+ regulation by leukotoxin and endotoxin was studied by video fluorescence microscopy. Leukotoxin induced a sustained elevation of intracellular Ca2+ in a concentration-dependent fashion by influx of extracellular Ca2+ through voltage-gated channels. In the presence of fetal bovine serum, endotoxin elevated intracellular Ca2+ even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Leukotoxin-induced intracellular Ca2+ elevation was inhibited by pertussis toxin, inhibitors of phospholipases A2 and C, and the arachidonic acid analog 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid. Intracellular Ca2+ elevation by endotoxin was inhibited by inhibitors of phospholipase C and protein tyrosine kinase, but not by pertussis toxin, or the arachidonic acid analog. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Ca2+ signaling by leukotoxin through a G-protein-coupled mechanism involving activation of phospholipases A2 and C and release of arachidonic acid in bovine alveolar macrophages. Ca2+ signaling by endotoxin, on the other hand, involves activation of phospholipase C and requires tyrosine phosphorylation. The

  5. Pasteurella multocida- and Pasteurella haemolytica-ghosts: new vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Marchart, J; Dropmann, G; Lechleitner, S; Schlapp, T; Wanner, G; Szostak, M P; Lubitz, W

    2003-09-01

    Pasteurella multocida is an important animal pathogen. Bacterial ghosts produced by the expression of phage PhiX174 lysis gene E are empty cells devoid of cytoplasmic and genomic material. Lysis of P. multocida 7A and P. haemolytica A1 carrying Pasteurella-specific lysis vectors (pSR2 and pSON2) occurred 140 min after induction of gene E expression induced by temperature upshift. The E-mediated cell lysis and killing activity was the same in both Pasteurella species and no viable cells could be detected after lysis of P. multocida and P. haemolytica. Pasteurella ghosts were used for immunization of rabbits and mice. Rabbits immunized subcutaneously with either P. multocida- or P. haemolytica-ghosts developed antibodies reacting with the immunizating strain, as well as with other Pasteurella strains. The number of proteins in whole cell protein extracts recognized by the sera constantly increased during the observation period of 51 days. In addition, dose-dependent protection against homologous challenge was observed in mice immunized with P. multocida-ghosts. Animals which received 1.15 x 10(8) ghosts and a challenge dose of up to 60 cfu (LD90), showed 100% protection. According to these results, we suggest ghosts of P. multocida and P. haemolytica as new vaccine candidates. PMID:12922135

  6. Specificity of bovine serum antibody to capsular carbohydrate antigens from Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    McVey, D S; Loan, R W; Purdy, C W; Shuman, W J

    1990-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the bovine immune response to antigens of Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A, serotype 1, will improve control of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Sera were obtained from blood samples of calves as they transited the market system of eastern Tennessee and were transported to a feedlot in Texas. The clinical histories and performance data were recorded and compared with serologic findings. The calves underwent a natural challenge of BRD. Serologic and bacteriologic evaluation indicated that P. haemolytica A1 was a significant component of the challenge. Serum antibody titers against P. haemolytica A1 capsular antigens (in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hemolysin-in-gel test) increased by day 15 and continued at high levels through day 56. The animals that remained free of BRD had higher initial serum antibody concentrations than those that succumbed to BRD. The specificity of the immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) anticapsular antibody to P. haemolytica A1 increased from day 8 to day 29 as evidenced by a decrease in P. haemolytica A2 absorption inhibition from 60% (day 8) to 15% (day 29). However, IgA, IgG2, and IgM were more serotype specific on both days 8 and 29. There were no significant changes in anti-P. haemolytica A2 antibody titers. Both in vitro complement-dependent bacteriolysis and C3 deposition on the surface of the bacteria increased significantly (P less than 0.01) in a serotype-specific fashion from day 8 to day 29. These calves showed a humoral immune response to capsular polysaccharide antigens of P. haemolytica A1. Such a response may be an important component of immunity to BRD. PMID:2199487

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Lytic Properties of Bacteriophages Specific for M. haemolytica Strains

    PubMed Central

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej; Stęgierska, Diana; Dec, Marta; Dudzic, Anna; Puchalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Aim of Study The objective of this study was isolation and morphological characterization of temperate bacteriophages obtained from M. haemolytica strains and evaluation of their lytic properties in vitro against M. haemolytica isolated from the respiratory tract of calves. Material and Methods The material for the study consisted of the reference strain M. haemolytica serotype 1 (ATCC®) BAA-410™, reference serotypes A1, A2, A5, A6, A7, A9 and A11, and wild-type isolates of M. haemolytica. Bacteriophages were induced from an overnight bacterial starter culture of all examined M. haemolytica strains treated with mitomycin C. The lytic properties and host ranges were determined by plaque assays. The morphology of the bacteriophages was examined in negative-stained smears with 5% uranyl acetate solution using a transmission electron microscope. The genetic analysis of the bacteriophages was followed by restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA. This was followed by analysis of genetic material by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Eight bacteriophages were obtained, like typical of the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae and Podoviridae. Most of the bacteriophages exhibited lytic properties against the M. haemolytica strains. Restriction analysis revealed similarities to the P2-like phage obtained from the strain M. haemolytica BAA-410. The most similar profiles were observed in the case of bacteriophages φA1 and φA5. All of the bacteriophages obtained were characterized by the presence of additional fragments in the restriction profiles with respect to the P2-like reference phage. In the analysis of PCR products for the P2-like reference phage phi-MhaA1-PHL101 (DQ426904) and the phages of the M. haemolytica serotypes, a 734-bp phage PCR product was obtained. The primers were programmed in Primer-Blast software using the structure of the sequence DQ426904 of reference phage PHL101. Conclusions The results obtained indicate the need for further research aimed

  8. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae can predispose bighorn sheep to fatal Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae has been isolated from the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS). However experimental reproduction of fatal pneumonia in BHS with M. ovipneumoniae was not successful. Therefore the specific role, if any, of M. ovipneumoniae in BHS pneumonia is unclear. The objective of th...

  9. Pathogen variation across time and space: sequencing to characterize Mannheimia haemolytica diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex (BRDC) is a major animal health and economic issue that affects cattle industries worldwide. Within the United States, the beef cattle industry loses up to an estimated 1 billion dollars a year due to BRDC. There are many contributors to BRDC, including environme...

  10. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.68 Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine of an avirulent...

  11. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.68 Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine of an avirulent...

  12. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.68 Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine of an avirulent...

  13. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.68 Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine of an avirulent...

  14. Partial characterization of the leukotoxin of Pasteurella haemolytica-like bacteria isolated from swine enteritis.

    PubMed

    DeSilva, R T; Chengappa, M M; Oberst, R D; Staats, J J

    1995-08-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica-like (PHL) strains isolated from diarrheic pigs are known to produce a leukotoxin that is lethal to ruminant leukocytes. In the present study, 12 PHL strains were screened for leukotoxin production using a tetrazolium dye-reduction assay. Sterile culture supernatant from strain 6213A, the maximum leukotoxin producer, was used as the crude leukotoxin for characterization studies. The leukotoxin was inactivated by heat at 60 degrees C and by trypsin, protease, and amylase. Toxicity was retained over a pH range of 3.0-11.0. The leukotoxin was lethal to polymorphoneutrophils (PMNs) of cattle, sheep, goat, and swine. Chromosomal DNA of all 12 PHL strains hybridized with a 3.9 kb Pasteurella haemolytica A1 leukotoxin probe, indicating similarities between the leukotoxin genes of P. haemolytica and PHL strains. PMID:7483245

  15. Plasmids for heterologous expression in Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, N D; Highlander, S K

    1997-02-28

    New cloning and expression vectors that replicate both in Pasteurella haemolytica and in Escherichia coli were constructed based on a native sulfonamide (SuR) and streptomycin (SmR) resistant plasmid of P. haemolytica called pYFC1. Each shuttle vector includes an MCS and a selectable antibiotic resistance marker that is expressed in both organisms. Plasmid pNF2176 carries the P. haemolytica ROB-1 beta-lactamase gene (blaP, ApR) and pNF2214 carries the Tn903 aph3 kanamycin resistance (KmR) element. The expression vector, pNF2176, was created by placing the MCS downstream of the sulfonamide gene promoter (PsulII) on pYFC1; this was used to clone and express the promoterless Tn9 chloramphenicol resistance gene (cat, CmR) in P. haemolytica (pNF2200). A promoter-probe vector (pNF2283) was constructed from pNF2200 by deleting PsulII. PMID:9074498

  16. Human Wound Infection with Mannheimia glucosida following Lamb Bite.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jillian S Y; Omaleki, Lida; Turni, Conny; Barber, Stuart Richard; Browning, Glenn Francis; Francis, Michelle J; Graham, Maryza; Korman, Tony M

    2015-10-01

    Mannheimia spp. are veterinary pathogens that can cause mastitis and pneumonia in domestic cattle and sheep. While Mannheimia glucosida can be found as normal flora in oral and respiratory mucosa in sheep, there have been no reported cases of human infection with this organism. PMID:26202121

  17. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 is a receptor for Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin in bovine leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeyaseelan, S; Hsuan, S L; Kannan, M S; Walcheck, B; Wang, J F; Kehrli, M E; Lally, E T; Sieck, G C; Maheswaran, S K

    2000-01-01

    Pasteurella (Mannheimia) haemolytica leukotoxin (Lkt) causes cell type- and species-specific effects in ruminant leukocytes. Recent studies indicate that P. haemolytica Lkt binds to bovine CD18, the common subunit of all beta2 integrins. We designed experiments with the following objectives: to identify which member of the beta2 integrins is a receptor for Lkt; to determine whether Lkt binding to the receptor is target cell (bovine leukocytes) specific; to define the relationships between Lkt binding to the receptor, calcium elevation, and cytolysis; and to determine whether a correlation exists between Lkt receptor expression and the magnitude of target cell cytolysis. We compared Lkt-induced cytolysis in neutrophils from control calves and from calves with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), because neutrophils from BLAD-homozygous calves exhibit reduced beta2 integrin expression. The results demonstrate for the first time that Lkt binds to bovine CD11a and CD18 (lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 [LFA-1]). The binding was abolished by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb). Lkt-induced calcium elevation in bovine alveolar macrophages (BAMs) was inhibited by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 MAb (65 to 94% and 37 to 98%, respectively, at 5 and 50 Lkt units per ml; P < 0.05). Lkt-induced cytolysis in neutrophils and BAMs was also inhibited by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 MAb in a concentration-dependent manner. Lkt bound to porcine LFA-1 but did not induce calcium elevation or cytolysis. In neutrophils from BLAD calves, Lkt-induced cytolysis was decreased by 44% compared to that of neutrophils from control calves (P < 0.05). These results indicate that LFA-1 is a Lkt receptor, Lkt binding to LFA-1 is not target cell specific, Lkt binding to bovine LFA-1 correlates with calcium elevation and cytolysis, and bovine LFA-1 expression correlates with the magnitude of Lkt-induced target cell cytolysis. PMID:10603370

  18. Induction of CD18-mediated passage of neutrophils by Pasteurella haemolytica in pulmonary bronchi and bronchioles.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Brogden, K A; Florance, A F; Kehrli, M E

    1999-02-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica is an important respiratory pathogen of cattle that incites extensive infiltrates of neutrophils into the lung. In addition to the parenchymal damage caused by factors released by P. haemolytica, neutrophils contribute to the pathologic changes in the lungs. Molecules which mediate neutrophil infiltration into the lungs during P. haemolytica pneumonia are poorly characterized. To determine whether the CD18 family (beta2-integrin) of leukocyte adhesion molecules mediates initial passage of neutrophils into the pulmonary bronchi and bronchioles of lungs infected with P. haemolytica, three Holstein calves homozygous for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) (CD18-deficient neutrophils), and three age- and breed-matched control calves (normal CD18 expression) were inoculated with P. haemolytica A1 via a fiberoptic bronchoscope and euthanized at 2 h postinoculation. Sections of lung were stained for neutrophils, and the intensity of neutrophilic infiltration was determined by computerized image analysis. Significantly fewer (P < 0.05) neutrophils infiltrated the lumen, epithelium, and adventitia of bronchioles and bronchi in lungs of calves with BLAD compared to normal calves, which had dense infiltrates within these sites at 2 h postinoculation. The reduced infiltration in calves with BLAD occurred despite the presence of an extremely large number of neutrophils in peripheral blood that is typical for these calves. The large number of neutrophils in the blood of calves with BLAD is probably a physiologic response that can occur without microbial colonization, since one calf with BLAD that was raised under germ-free conditions had large numbers of neutrophils in the blood that were similar to those in a calf with BLAD that was raised conventionally. Neutrophil counts in the germ-free and conventionally reared calves with BLAD were much higher than those in the three normal calves raised under germ-free conditions. The work in this study

  19. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. 113.68 Section 113.68 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines §...

  20. Binding of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin to bovine leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J F; Leite, F; Czuprynski, C J

    1997-01-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica is the principal bacterial pathogen in the bovine respiratory disease complex. This organism produces an exotoxin (referred to as leukotoxin) during logarithmic-phase growth that is a potent leukocyte-modulating agent. At low concentrations, it activates neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes to release inflammatory mediators, while at the same time making these cells destined to undergo apoptotic cell death. At higher concentrations, the toxin causes rapid swelling and loss of cell viability. In this study, we demonstrated that toxin binding can be directly evaluated by flow cytometry with biologically active biotinylated leukotoxin. Leukotoxin binding was blocked by the addition of a neutralizing anti-leukotoxin monoclonal antibody and was not detected when bovine leukocytes were incubated with culture filtrates from a mutant strain of P. haemolytica that does not produce biologically active leukotoxin. In addition, treatment of bovine leukocytes with protease K eliminated subsequent binding of leukotoxin, suggesting that there is a protein on the leukocyte surface that is either a leukotoxin binding site or is required for stabilization of leukotoxin binding. We did not detect binding of biotinylated leukotoxin to porcine or human leukocytes, which have been reported previously to be resistant to the lytic effects of the leukotoxin. These findings suggest that there may be a specific binding site for P. haemolytica leukotoxin on bovine but not on porcine or human leukocytes and that it might be involved in the activation and lytic activities of the leukotoxin. PMID:9284143

  1. Genome sequence and description of Mannheimia massilioguelmaensis sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Hadjadj, L.; Bentorki, A.A.; Michelle, C.; Amoura, K.; Djahoudi, A.; Rolain, J.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Strain MG13T sp. nov. is the type strain of Mannheimia massilioguelmaensis, a new species within the genus Mannheimia. This strain was isolated from the exudate of a skin lesion of an Algerian man. Mannheimia massilioguelmaensis is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic rod, member of the family Pasteurellaceae. Here we describe this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2 186 813 bp long genome contains 2048 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes, including eight rRNA genes. PMID:26693284

  2. The airborne survival of Pasteurella haemolytica and its deposition in and clearance from the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, M I; Wathes, C M; Taylor, F G

    1990-02-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica A1 was aerosolised by a Collison nebuliser in a Henderson apparatus and its survival in air was measured. The organism was fragile in aerosol and survived best at high humidity and warm temperature. Mice were exposed to the aerosol and clearance from the lung measured. Deposition in the mouse lung showed a good linear correlation with bacterial concentration in the spray suspension fluid. Clearance from the lung was rapid over 24 h although some bacteria could be detected 2 and 4 days after exposure. Mice which received a second exposure 2 weeks later exhibited accelerated clearance from the lung whereby no bacteria could be detected after 12 h. This was associated with serum IgG antibody production, and local and splenic lymphocyte responses to bacterial antigen in vitro. PMID:2138372

  3. Haemolytic effect of Pasteurella haemolytica on blood from young mammals.

    PubMed

    Smith, G R; Turner, A; Hawkey, C M

    1988-09-01

    On agar plates containing young lamb blood, Pasteurella haemolytica produces a wide outer zone of partial haemolysis in addition to the narrow zone of complete clearing seen on adult sheep blood agar. To determine whether this phenomenon was limited to lamb blood, samples from young animals of 20 mammalian species were examined. Two species--the barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia) and scimitar horned oryx (Oryx tao)--possessed blood that gave this effect provided that the samples were taken from young animals. The 18 species that gave negative results included an ovine species, the bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis). PMID:3194597

  4. Pasteurella haemolytica bacteriophage: identification, partial characterization, and relationship of temperate bacteriophages from isolates of Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, A.B.; Renshaw, H.W.; Sneed, L.W.

    1985-05-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) isolates (n = 15) from the upper respiratory tract of clinically normal cattle, as well as from lung lesions from cases of fatal bovine pasteurellosis, were examined for the presence of bacteriophage after irradiation with UV light. Treatment of all P haemolytica isolates with UV irradiation resulted in lysis of bacteria due to the induction of vegetative development of bacteriophages. The extent of growth inhibition and bacterial lysis in irradiated cultures was UV dose-dependent. Bacterial cultures exposed to UV light for 20 s reached peak culture density between 60 and 70 minutes after irradiation; thereafter, culture density declined rapidly, so that by 120 minutes, it was approximately 60% of the original value. When examined ultrastructurally, lytic cultures from each isolate revealed bacteriophages with an overall length of approximately 200 nm and that appeared to have a head with icosahedral symmetry and a contractile tail. Cell-free filtrate from each noninduced bacterial isolate was inoculated onto the other bacterial isolates in a cross-culture sensitivity assay for the presence of phages lytic for the host bacterial isolates. Zones of lysis (plaques) did not develop when bacterial lawns grown from the different isolates were inoculated with filtrates from the heterologous isolates.

  5. Exposure of calves to aerosols of parainfluenza-3 virus and Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Carrière, P D; Maxie, M G; Wilkie, B N; Savan, M; Valli, V E; Johnson, J A

    1983-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate whether sequential exposure to aerosols of parainfluenza-3 virus followed by Pasteurella haemolytica, or P. haemolytica followed by parainfluenza-3 virus, could lead to the production of pulmonary lesions in conventionally-raised calves. Twenty male calves with low serum antibody titres to both organisms were placed in five equal groups. Synergism of parainfluenza-3 virus and P. haemolytica was not demonstrated in any of the sequentially infected groups and pulmonary lesions were mild in all challenged calves. Clinical signs of disease were not present after exposure to parainfluenza-3 virus although the virus was repeatedly isolated from nasal secretions of all inoculated calves. Exposure to P. haemolytica produced a transient response which consisted of increased rectal temperatures and respiratory rates, with a mild neutrophilic leukocytosis and a mild left shift present six hours postinoculation and returning to normal within 24 hours. Results from this study suggest, although do not confirm, that reduced pulmonary clearance of inhaled P. haemolytica in parainfluenza-3 virus infected calves does not necessarily lead to production of severe pulmonary lesions and that previous exposure to aerosols of P. haemolytica may not enhance secondary parainfluenza-3 virus infection. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. PMID:6320999

  6. Bovine gamma delta T cells contribute to exacerbated IL-17 production in response to co-infection with Bovine RSV and Mannheimia haemolytica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in children under five years of age. IL-17 and Th17 responses are increased in children infected with HRSV and have been implicated in both protective and pathogenic roles during infection. Bovi...

  7. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of serum antibodies to Pasteurella haemolytica cytotoxin (leukotoxin) in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, D A; Confer, A W; Hall, S M; Gentry, M J; Panciera, R J

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for detection of bovine serum antibodies to the cytotoxin (leukotoxin) of Pasteurella haemolytica. A partially purified, cytotoxic, and immunogenic protein obtained from supernatants of logarithmic-phase P. haemolytica was used as the ELISA antigen. Preadsorption of sera with various cytotoxic, somatic, and capsular antigen preparations demonstrated that the assay was specific for anticytotoxin antibodies. ELISA anticytotoxin titers had a strong, significant correlation to cytotoxin-neutralizing-antibody titers. The ELISA, however, was more rapid and allowed for greater numbers of samples to be run than did the neutralization technique. ELISA anticytotoxin titers were high in cattle vaccinated with a live P. haemolytica vaccine, whereas unvaccinated cattle and cattle receiving a P. haemolytica bacterin had low ELISA anticytotoxin titers. A significant positive correlation between ELISA titers and resistance to experimental bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis was present. PMID:3745419

  8. 21 CFR 522.955 - Florfenicol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida... Haemophilus somnus. For treatment of bovine interdigital phlegmon (foot rot, acute...

  9. 21 CFR 522.2630 - Tulathromycin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida... infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis associated with Moraxella bovis. For the treatment of bovine foot...

  10. 21 CFR 522.955 - Florfenicol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida... Haemophilus somnus. For treatment of bovine interdigital phlegmon (foot rot, acute...

  11. 21 CFR 522.2630 - Tulathromycin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida... infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis associated with Moraxella bovis. For the treatment of bovine foot...

  12. Influence of beta(2)-integrin adhesion molecule expression and pulmonary infection with Pasteurella haemolytica on cytokine gene expression in cattle.

    PubMed

    Lee, H Y; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A; Gallup, J M; Ackermann, M R

    2000-07-01

    beta(2)-Integrins are leukocyte adhesion molecules composed of alpha (CD11a, -b, -c, or -d) and beta (CD18) subunit heterodimers. Genetic CD18 deficiency results in impaired neutrophil egress into tissues that varies between conducting airways and alveoli of the lung. In this study, we investigated whether CD18 deficiency in cattle affects proinflammatory cytokine (PIC) expression in pulmonary tissue after respiratory infection with Pasteurella haemolytica. Cattle were infected with P. haemolytica via fiberoptic deposition of organisms into the posterior part of the right cranial lung lobe. Animals were euthanized at 2 or 4 h postinoculation (p.i.), and tissues were collected to assess PIC gene expression using antisense RNA probes specific for bovine interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) along with the beta-actin (beta-Act) housekeeping gene. Expression of PIC was induced at 2 h p.i. in P. haemolytica-infected cattle and continued to 4 h p.i. At 2 h p.i., induction of gene expression and increase of cells that expressed PIC were observed both in CD18(+) and CD18(-) cattle after inoculation of P. haemolytica. The induction of gene expression with P. haemolytica inoculation was more prominent in CD18(-) cattle than in CD18(+) cattle by comparison to pyrogen-free saline (PFS)-inoculated control animals. At 4 h p.i., however, the induction of PIC, especially IL-1alpha, IL-6, and IFN-gamma, in the lungs of CD18(+) cattle inoculated with P. haemolytica was greater than that in lungs of the CD18(-) cattle. IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha genes were not increased in P. haemolytica-inoculated CD18(-) cattle lungs compared to the PFS-inoculated control lungs at 4 h p.i. In PFS-inoculated lungs, we generally observed a higher percentage of cells and higher level of gene expression in the lungs of CD18(-) cattle than in the lungs of CD18(+) cattle, especially at 4 h p.i. The rate of neutrophil

  13. Induction of inflammatory cytokines in bovine alveolar macrophages following stimulation with Pasteurella haemolytica lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, H S; Maheswaran, S K; Lin, G; Townsend, E L; Ames, T R

    1995-01-01

    Bovine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) cDNAs were generated by reverse transcription and then by PCR amplification from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated alveolar macrophage RNA. The amplified cDNAs were cloned into pPow and expressed in Escherichia coli DH5 alpha. The expressed proteins were confirmed as TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis and bioassays. We then used the cloned genes as probes in Northern (RNA) blots and investigated the kinetics of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA expression in bovine alveolar macrophages stimulated with purified LPS from Pasteurella haemolytica 12296. The effect of LPS on TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta gene expression was dose dependent, and induction was observed at a concentration of 0.01 microgram/ml. Both TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA expression were detectable within 0.5 h after stimulation with 1 microgram of LPS per ml, peaked at 1 to 2 h, steadily declined up to 16 h, and were undetectable by 24 h. Secreted TNF-alpha measured by bioassay peaked at 4 h and accumulated at a lesser concentration in conditioned medium throughout the 24 h. By contrast, secreted IL-1 beta was induced at 8 h and reached a maximal concentration at 24 h after stimulation. The ability of LPS to induce TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta gene expression and secretion of bioactive proteins were suppressed by polymyxin B. Our findings support a role for LPS from P. haemolytica in the induction of inflammatory cytokines in bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. PMID:7822000

  14. Plane of nutrition during the preweaned period influences the pathophysiological responses to a combined intranasal bovine herpesvirus-1 and intratracheal Mannheimia haemolytica challenge in post-weaned Holstein calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine whether previous plane of milk replacer nutrition (PON) influences the pathophysiological responses to a combined viral-bacterial respiratory challenge. Thirty Holstein calves (1 day of age) were assigned to treatments in a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement with preweaned PO...

  15. Eosinophilic granuloma with Splendore-Hoeppli material caused by Mannheimia granulomatis in a calf.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yuuto; Takahashi, Hiroyasu; Shimoo, Megumi; Tamamura, Yukino; Ishikawa, Yoshiharu; Kadota, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    A large subcutaneous mass, formed on the left lower jaw of a 4-month-old Japanese Black male calf, was partially excised for histological and bacteriological examinations. Antibiotic treatment resulted in a good prognosis. Bacteria isolated from the excised material were characterized by weak hemolysis and positive reactions for catalase and oxidase, and were 99% identical to Mannheimia granulomatis strains. The presence of the leukotoxin gene product was demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Histological examination showed that the excised material was composed of dense fibrous connective tissue with sparsely distributed eosinophilic granulomas or abscesses. These foci frequently contained Splendore-Hoeppli material with rod-shaped Gram-negative bacteria. Except for the absence of lymphangitis and the presence of basophils and mast cells, the histology of this lesion resembled that of lechiguana associated with coinfection of M. granulomatis and Dermatobia hominis. Leukotoxin was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry within Splendore-Hoeppli material and was judged to be responsible for its formation. PMID:26947171

  16. Effects of dissolved CO2 levels on the growth of Mannheimia succiniciproducens and succinic acid production.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyohak; Lee, Jeong Wook; Choi, Sol; You, Jong Kyun; Hong, Won Hi; Lee, Sang Yup

    2007-12-15

    A capnophilic rumen bacterium Mannheimia succiniciproducens produces succinic acid as a major fermentation end product under CO(2)-rich anaerobic condition. Since succinic acid is produced by carboxylation of C3 compounds during the fermentation, intracellular CO(2) availability is important for efficient succinic acid formation. Here, we investigated the metabolic responses of M. succiniciproducens to the different dissolved CO(2) concentrations (0-260 mM). Cell growth was severely suppressed when the dissolved CO(2) concentration was below 8.74 mM. On the other hand, cell growth and succinic acid production increased proportionally as the dissolved CO(2) concentration increased from 8.74 to 141 mM. The yields of biomass and succinic acid on glucose obtained at the dissolved CO(2) concentration of 141 mM were 1.49 and 1.52 times higher, respectively, than those obtained at the dissolved CO(2) concentration of 8.74 mM. It was also found that the additional CO(2) source provided in the form of NaHCO(3), MgCO(3), or CaCO(3) had positive effects on cell growth and succinic acid production. However, growth inhibition was observed when excessive bicarbonate salts were added. By the comparison of the activities of key enzymes, it was found that PEP carboxylation by PEP carboxykinase (PckA) is the most important for succinic acid production as well as the growth of M. succiniciproducens by providing additional ATP. PMID:17570706

  17. Eosinophilic granuloma with Splendore-Hoeppli material caused by Mannheimia granulomatis in a calf

    PubMed Central

    KAWASHIMA, Yuuto; TAKAHASHI, Hiroyasu; SHIMOO, Megumi; TAMAMURA, Yukino; ISHIKAWA, Yoshiharu; KADOTA, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A large subcutaneous mass, formed on the left lower jaw of a 4-month-old Japanese Black male calf, was partially excised for histological and bacteriological examinations. Antibiotic treatment resulted in a good prognosis. Bacteria isolated from the excised material were characterized by weak hemolysis and positive reactions for catalase and oxidase, and were 99% identical to Mannheimia granulomatis strains. The presence of the leukotoxin gene product was demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Histological examination showed that the excised material was composed of dense fibrous connective tissue with sparsely distributed eosinophilic granulomas or abscesses. These foci frequently contained Splendore-Hoeppli material with rod-shaped Gram-negative bacteria. Except for the absence of lymphangitis and the presence of basophils and mast cells, the histology of this lesion resembled that of lechiguana associated with coinfection of M. granulomatis and Dermatobia hominis. Leukotoxin was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry within Splendore-Hoeppli material and was judged to be responsible for its formation. PMID:26947171

  18. Highly selective production of succinic acid by metabolically engineered Mannheimia succiniciproducens and its efficient purification.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sol; Song, Hyohak; Lim, Sung Won; Kim, Tae Yong; Ahn, Jung Ho; Lee, Jeong Wook; Lee, Moon-Hee; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-10-01

    Succinic acid (SA) is one of the fermentative products of anaerobic metabolism, and an important industrial chemical that has been much studied for its bio-based production. The key to the economically viable bio-based SA production is to develop an SA producer capable of producing SA with high yield and productivity without byproducts. Mannheimia succiniciproducens is a capnophilic rumen bacterium capable of efficiently producing SA. In this study, in silico genome-scale metabolic simulations were performed to identify gene targets to be engineered, and the PALK strain (ΔldhA and Δpta-ackA) was constructed. Fed-batch culture of PALK on glucose and glycerol as carbon sources resulted in the production of 66.14 g/L of SA with the yield and overall productivity of 1.34 mol/mol glucose equivalent and 3.39 g/L/h, respectively. SA production could be further increased to 90.68 g/L with the yield and overall productivity of 1.15 mol/mol glucose equivalent and 3.49 g/L/h, respectively, by utilizing a mixture of magnesium hydroxide and ammonia solution as a pH controlling solution. Furthermore, formation of byproducts was drastically reduced, resulting in almost homo-fermentative SA production. This allowed the recovery and purification of SA to a high purity (99.997%) with a high recovery yield (74.65%) through simple downstream processes composed of decolorization, vacuum distillation, and crystallization. The SA producer and processes developed in this study will allow economical production of SA in an industrial-scale. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2168-2177. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27070659

  19. In situ expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA in calves with acute Pasteurella haemolytica pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Radi, Z A; Register, K B; Lee, E K; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A; Gallup, J M; Ackermann, M R

    1999-09-01

    The in situ expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA in normal and pneumonic lung tissues of Holstein calves with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was compared with that of age-matched non-BLAD Holstein calves by in situ hybridization. Twenty-four Holstein calves (both BLAD and non-BLAD) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups and inoculated intrabronchially with Pasteurella haemolytica or pyrogen-free saline. Lung tissues were collected and fixed in 10% neutral formalin at 2 or 4 hours postinoculation (PI). The expression and distribution of ICAM-1 mRNA in the different cell types of the lung tissue was detected by in situ hybridization with a 307-base-pair bovine ICAM-1 riboprobe. In lungs of both non-BLAD and BLAD saline-inoculated calves, ICAM-1 expression was present in epithelial cells but occurred in <30% of cells in bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli. ICAM-1 expression in vascular endothelial cells was present in <30% of cells in pulmonary arteries and veins. The expression of ICAM-1 was significantly greater (>60% of cells) in bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells and pulmonary endothelial cells of arteries and veins in both BLAD and non-BLAD calves inoculated with P. haemolytica. Bronchiolar epithelium had the highest intensity of mRNA expression and highest percentage of cells that were stained, whereas bronchial epithelium had the lowest intensity and percentage of cells stained. Most alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in infected lungs also expressed ICAM-1. ICAM-1 expression was generally increased in infected BLAD calves at 2 hours PI as compared with non-BLAD calves but not at 4 hours PI. The increased expression of ICAM-1 during acute P. haemolytica pneumonia in calves suggests that ICAM-1 is upregulated and may play a role in leukocyte infiltration. The extent of ICAM-1 expression in P. haemolytica-inoculated calves with BLAD was initially enhanced but otherwise similar to that in non

  20. Generation of targeted nonpolar gene insertions and operon fusions in Pasteurella haemolytica and creation of a strain that produces and secretes inactive leukotoxin.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, N D; Highlander, S K

    1997-07-01

    An efficient method for targeted gene inactivation and generation of chromosomal gene fusions in Pasteurella haemolytica has been devised and used to create an lktC::cat operon fusion by allelic exchange at the leukotoxin gene cluster (lktCABD). A copy of the lktC gene was insertionally inactivated by using a nonpolar, promoterless cat cassette and then delivered into P. haemolytica on a shuttle vector. Plasmid incompatibility was used to detect clones where double recombination events had occurred at the chromosomal locus. The insertion in lktC did not affect expression of the downstream genes, and the mutant strain secreted an antigenic proleukotoxin that was neither leukotoxic nor hemolytic. Expression of the lktC gene in trans restored the wild-type phenotype, confirming that LktC is required for activation of the proleukotoxin to the mature leukotoxin. Construction of the lktC::cat operon fusion allowed us to quantitate leukotoxin promoter activity in P. haemolytica and to demonstrate that transcription was maximal during early logarithmic growth phase but was reduced following entry into late logarithmic phase. This allelic exchange system should be useful for future genetic studies in P. haemolytica and could potentially be applied to other members of Haemophilus-Actinobacillus-Pasteurella family, where genetic manipulation is limited. PMID:9199425

  1. Effect of viral dose on experimental pneumonia caused by aerosol exposure of calves to bovine herpesvirus 1 and Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, W D; Jericho, K W; Doige, C E

    1983-01-01

    The effect of various aerosol doses of bovine herpesvirus 1, followed four days later by aerosol exposure to a constant level of Pasteurella haemolytica, was studied in 16 crossbred Hereford range calves. A Collision nebulizer was used to generate aerosols from virus suspensions with concentrations of 10(8.2) (high), 10(5.2) (moderate) or 10(2.2) (low) TCID50/mL. The bacterial suspension contained 10(7) colony forming units/mL. Control calves exposed only to P. haemolytica developed no pulmonary lesions. Calves in the low, moderate and high virus exposure groups developed lobular areas of atelectasis; in addition, one calf in the moderate and all four in the high virus exposure group developed fibrinous pneumonia. One of the latter calves died. The 50% effective dose for fibrinous pneumonia under these experimental conditions was 10(6.0) TCID50 bovine herpesvirus 1/mL of suspension in the nebulizer reservoir, and approximately 10(4.0) infectious units inhaled per calf. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6299485

  2. Variation in Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) and Mannheimia spp. following transport and antibiotic treatment in free-ranging and captive Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis).

    PubMed

    Weiser, Glen C; Miller, David S; Drew, Mark L; Rhyan, Jack C; Ward, Alton C S

    2009-03-01

    Morbidity and mortality associated with respiratory disease following capture and translocation of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis) is a significant concern, particularly when establishing new or augmenting existing bighorn populations. Administration of prophylactic antibiotics at the time of capture is often done to minimize the risk of respiratory disease, but the efficacy of this practice is unknown. The effects of oxytetracycline and florfenicol on the Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) and Mannheimia spp. isolated from samples collected from the oropharynx at the time of capture and 3 or 42 day later were evaluated in two groups of bighorn sheep. The most evident change in the isolation rates or types of Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) spp., Mannheimia spp., or both was an increase of beta-hemolytic strains isolated from bighorn sheep 3 day following oxytetracycline treatment. Both groups of bighorn sheep carried Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) trehalosi identified as the same biovariants, but they did not share biovariants of Mannheimia spp. No animals had signs of respiratory disease. Isolates representative of all biovariants present in cultures from the two bighorn sheep groups were sensitive to in vitro tests to both oxytetracycline and florfenicol and the majority were also sensitive to seven other antibiotics tested. The administration of neither oxytetracycline nor florfenicol eliminated Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) or Mannheimia from the oropharyngeal mucosa. Resistance to either antibiotic used in these animals was not noted. Although the prophylactic benefits of these drugs in preventing disease are uncertain, therapeutic levels of antibiotics in lung tissue during times of stress may reduce the risk of disease. Representative sampling of the oropharyngeal microflora of bighorn sheep source and recipient populations prior to being intermingled should be considered as one of the tools to minimize exposure of naive populations to potentially pathogenic

  3. Capsular polysaccharide vaccine for Group B Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli K1, and Pasteurella haemolytica A2

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, John B.; Schneerson, Rachel; Xie, Guilin; Hanson, Lars Å.; Miller, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the literature that is the basis for our proposal that (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac conjugates will be safe and effective vaccines for Group B meningococci (GBMs), Escherichia coli K1, and Pasteurella haemolytica A2. Although (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac is a virulence factor and a protective antigen of these three pathogens, it is also a component of normal tissues (neural cell adhesion molecule). Natural, anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac present in most adults, vaccine-induced antibodies, and even high levels of spontaneously appearing monoclonal anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac did not cause autoimmunity. Although it is not possible to prove a null hypothesis, there are no epidemiologic, serologic, immunologic, or clinical data to indicate that (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac antibodies will induce pathology or an autoimmune disease. No increased pathology caused by these antibodies was found, even in neonates and infants of mothers recovered from GBM meningitis. The lack of pathology mediated by anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac may be explained by different presentations of (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac on bacterial and mammalian cells and by the unusual physicochemical properties of anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac. Based on clinical and experimental data collected over 30 y and because (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac is an essential virulence factor and a protective antigen for GBM, E. coli K1, and P. haemolytica A2, protein conjugates of it are easy to prepare using inexpensive and plentiful ingredients, and they would be compatible with routinely administered infant vaccines, clinical studies of these conjugates should proceed. PMID:22025709

  4. Passage of CD18- and CD18+ bovine neutrophils into pulmonary alveoli during acute Pasteurella haemolytica pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A

    1996-11-01

    CD18 is a subunit for three beta 2 integrin molecules (Mac-1, p150, 95, LFA-1), which are expressed on the plasma membrane of neutrophils. These molecules mediate passage of neutrophils into sites of infection. In children and animals that lack CD18 expression, neutrophil infiltration is impaired in most tissues. However, in lung, CD18- neutrophils have been identified in the airway spaces during spontaneous episodes of pneumonia. To determine whether CD18 is vital for passage through the pulmonary alveolar wall, lung lobes of cattle with neutrophils that were deficient in CD18 expression (CD18-) and cattle with normal CD18 expression (CD18+) were inoculated with Pasteurella haemolytica by fiberoptic bronchoscopy; control lobes were inoculated with pyrogen-free saline (PFS). Neutrophil passage into alveolar lumina at 4 and 6 hours postinoculation was measured by computerized image analysis. Blood levels of neutrophils for CD18- cattle ranged from 12- to 26-fold higher than for CD18+ cattle prior to inoculation, and counts in both groups rose slightly postinoculation. In P. haemolytica-inoculated lobes, total numbers of neutrophils in alveolar lumina of the two groups were similar. An increase in the number of neutrophils in the alveolar wall was fourfold greater in CD18- cattle than in CD18+ cattle. In PFS-inoculated lobes, the number of neutrophils in the alveolar wall was sixfold higher in CD18 cattle than in CD18+ cattle. This work shows that by 4 and 6 hours, CD18- neutrophils enter the alveolar lumen at a rate similar to that in CD18+ cattle. Higher numbers of CD18- neutrophils are present in the alveolar wall of control (PFS) and bacteria-inoculated lobes. Thus, the CD18- cells are increased in the walls of alveoli and numbers of neutrophils that enter the alveolar lumen are similar in CD18+ and CD18- cattle. PMID:8952022

  5. The effect of route and dosage of immunization on the serological response to a Pasteurella haemolytica and Haemophilus somnus vaccine in feedlot calves

    PubMed Central

    Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Schumann, Fritz J.; Harland, Richard J.; Potter, Andrew A.; Janzen, Eugene D.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of route and dosage of administration on the serological response to a vaccine containing genetically attenuated leukotoxin of Pasteurella haemolytica combined with bacterial extracts of P. haemolytica and Haemophilus somnus (Somnu-Star Ph, Biostar Inc., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) was evaluated in a controlled field trial in 301 feedlot calves. Vaccination of calves on arrival at the feedlot with Somnu-Star Ph significantly (p < 0.05) increased P. haemolytica and H. somnus serum antibody titers and reduced bovine respiratory disease (BRD) morbidity. A single subcutaneous vaccination with Somnu-Star Ph was as effective in stimulating a humoral antibody response and in reducing BRD morbidity as double vaccination by the intramuscular or the subcutaneous route. Furthermore, there were no swellings or adverse reactions observed with either subcutaneous or intramuscular administration of Somnu-Star Ph. These results suggest that feedlot calves can be immunized subcutaneously once on arrival with Somnu-Star Ph. Double vaccination was of no added value in this trial, because the majority of BRD morbidity occurred prior to revaccination fourteen days postarrival. Additional larger-sized field trials are needed to monitor the duration of immunity following vaccination and to test the effect of route and dosage of vaccination on mortality. PMID:17424338

  6. Complete closed genome sequences of three Bibersteinia trehalosi nasopharyngeal isolates from cattle with shipping fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bibersteinia trehalosi is a respiratory pathogen affecting cattle and related ruminants worldwide. B. trehalosi is closely related to Mannheimia haemolytica, and is often associated with bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), a polymicrobial multifactorial disease. We present three complete clos...

  7. Structure-function studies of the adenylate cyclase toxin of Bordetella pertussis and the leukotoxin of Pasteurella haemolytica by heterologous C protein activation and construction of hybrid proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Westrop, G; Hormozi, K; da Costa, N; Parton, R; Coote, J

    1997-01-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) from Bordetella pertussis and the leukotoxin (LktA) from Pasteurella haemolytica are members of the RTX (stands for repeats in toxin) family of cytolytic toxins. They have pore-forming activity and share significant amino acid homology but show marked differences in biological activity. CyaA is an invasive adenylate cyclase and a weak hemolysin which is active on a wide range of mammalian cells. LktA is a cytolytic protein with a high target cell specificity and is able to lyse only leukocytes and platelets from ruminants. Each toxin is synthesized as an inactive protoxin encoded by the A gene, and the product of the accessory C gene is required for posttranslational activation. Heterologous activation of LktA by CyaC did not result in a change in its specificity for nucleated cells, although the toxin showed a greater hemolytic-to-cytotoxic ratio. LktC was unable to activate CyaA. A hybrid toxin (Hyb1), which contained the N-terminal enzymic domain and the pore-forming domain from CyaA (amino acids [aa] 1 to 687), with the remainder of the protein derived from the C-terminal end of LktA (aa 379 to 953), showed no toxic activity. Replacement of part of the LktA C-terminal domain of Hyb1 by the CyaA C-terminal domain (aa 919 to 1706) to create hybrid toxin 2 (Hyb2) partially restored toxic activity. In contrast to CyaA, Hyb2 was activated more efficiently by LktC than by CyaC, showing the importance of the region between aa 379 and 616 of LktA for activation by LktC. LktC-activated Hyb2 was more active against ruminant than murine nucleated cells, whereas CyaC-activated Hyb2 displayed a similar, but lower, activity against both cell types. These data indicate that LktC and the region with which it interacts have an influence on the target cell specificity of the mature toxin. PMID:9006045

  8. 21 CFR 522.522 - Danofloxacin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... § 556.169 of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use in cattle—(1) Amount. 6 mg per kilogram of body weight... Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. (3) Limitations. Animals intended for...

  9. 21 CFR 522.522 - Danofloxacin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... § 556.169 of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use in cattle—(1) Amount. 6 mg per kilogram of body weight... Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. (3) Limitations. Animals intended for...

  10. MHC class II DR allelic diversity in bighorn sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that decreased diversity and/or unique polymorphisms in MHC class II alleles of bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are responsible for lower titer of antibodies against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). To test this hypothesis, DRA...

  11. Molecular cloning, characterization and in vitro expression of SERPIN B1 of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) and domestic sheep (Ovis aries), and comparison with that of other species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica infection results in enhanced PMN-mediated tissue damage in the lungs of bighorn sheep (BHS) compared to that of domestic sheep (DS). SERPIN B1 is an inhibitor of PMN-derived serine proteases. It prevents lung tissue injury by inhibiting the serine proteases released as a resu...

  12. Bighorn sheep pneumonia: Sorting out the cause of a polymicrobial disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pneumonia of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) is a dramatic disease of high morbidity and mortality first described more than 80 years ago. The etiology of the disease has been debated since its initial discovery, and at various times lungworms, Mannheimia haemolytica and other Pasteurellaceae, and M...

  13. Causes of pneumonia epizootics among bighorn sheep, western United States, 2008-2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epizootic pneumonia of bighorn sheep is a devastating disease of uncertain etiology. To help clarify the etiology, we used culture and culture-independent methods to compare the prevalence of the bacterial respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica, Bibersteinia trehalosi, Pasteurella multocida, a...

  14. Genome Sequence of Bibersteinia trehalosi Strain Y31 Isolated from the Pneumonic Lung of a Bighorn Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Kugadas, Abirami; Humann, Jodi L.; Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence for Bibersteinia trehalosi strain Y31, isolated from the lungs of a bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) that had succumbed to pneumonia, which exhibits proximity-dependent inhibition (PDI) of Mannheimia haemolytica. The sequence will be used to understand the mechanism of PDI for these organisms. PMID:27445392

  15. [Problems in the use of radioactively marked bacteria in animal experiments. 1. Labeling of Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica and Salmonella dublin with eH, 14C, 32P, 59Fe, 99mTc, 125J1].

    PubMed

    Flossmann, K D; Rohrmann, B; Hubald, J; Finsterbusch, L

    1977-01-01

    Several methods are suggested by which to use the radionuclides 3H, 14C, 32P, 59Fe, 99mTc, and 125J for labelling or doublelabelling of Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica, and Salmonella dublin, with particular reference being made to labelling ofr animal experiments. Suitable radioactive substrates for internal labelling in chemically defined or partially defined nutritive media include 3H-thymin, 3H-thymidine, 14C-glucose, 14C-mannose, 14C-aspartic acid, as well as 3H-uracil, 3H-uridine, 3H-orotic acid, 14C-orotic acid, 59Fe-III-citrate or chloride, and Na2H32PO4. The choise of the nuclide and substrate should by governed by the problem at hand. PMID:849104

  16. Pathogens of Bovine Respiratory Disease in North American Feedlots Conferring Multidrug Resistance via Integrative Conjugative Elements

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Cassidy L.; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Booker, Calvin W.; Hendrick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we determined the prevalence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD)-associated viral and bacterial pathogens in cattle and characterized the genetic profiles, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and nature of antimicrobial resistance determinants in collected bacteria. Nasopharyngeal swab and lung tissue samples from 68 BRD mortalities in Alberta, Canada (n = 42), Texas (n = 6), and Nebraska (n = 20) were screened using PCR for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, parainfluenza type 3 virus, Mycoplasma bovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Excepting bovine herpesvirus 1, all agents were detected. M. haemolytica (91%) and BVDV (69%) were the most prevalent, with cooccurrence in 63% of the cattle. Isolates of M. haemolytica (n = 55), P. multocida (n = 8), and H. somni (n = 10) from lungs were also collected. Among M. haemolytica isolates, a clonal subpopulation (n = 8) was obtained from a Nebraskan feedlot. All three bacterial pathogens exhibited a high rate of antimicrobial resistance, with 45% exhibiting resistance to three or more antimicrobials. M. haemolytica (n = 18), P. multocida (n = 3), and H. somni (n = 3) from Texas and Nebraska possessed integrative conjugative elements (ICE) that conferred resistance for up to seven different antimicrobial classes. ICE were shown to be transferred via conjugation from P. multocida to Escherichia coli and from M. haemolytica and H. somni to P. multocida. ICE-mediated multidrug-resistant profiles of bacterial BRD pathogens could be a major detriment to many of the therapeutic antimicrobial strategies currently used to control BRD. PMID:24478472

  17. Observations on macrolide resistance and susceptibility testing performance in field isolates collected from clinical bovine respiratory disease cases.

    PubMed

    DeDonder, Keith D; Harhay, Dayna M; Apley, Michael D; Lubbers, Brian V; Clawson, Michael L; Schuller, Gennie; Harhay, Gregory P; White, Brad J; Larson, Robert L; Capik, Sarah F; Riviere, Jim E; Kalbfleisch, Ted; Tessman, Ronald K

    2016-08-30

    The objectives of this study were; first, to describe gamithromycin susceptibility of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni isolated from cattle diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and previously treated with either gamithromycin for control of BRD (mass medication=MM) or sham-saline injected (control=CON); second, to describe the macrolide resistance genes present in genetically typed M. haemolytica isolates; third, use whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to correlate the phenotypic resistance and genetic determinants for resistance among M. haemolytica isolates. M. haemolytica (n=276), P. multocida (n=253), and H. somni (n=78) were isolated from feedlot cattle diagnosed with BRD. Gamithromycin susceptibility was determined by broth microdilution. Whole-genome sequencing was utilized to determine the presence/absence of macrolide resistance genes and to genetically type M. haemolytica. Generalized linear mixed models were built for analysis. There was not a significant difference between MM and CON groups in regards to the likelihood of culturing a resistant isolate of M. haemolytica or P. multocida. The likelihood of culturing a resistant isolate of M. haemolytica differed significantly by state of origin in this study. A single M. haemolytica genetic subtype was associated with an over whelming majority of the observed resistance. H. somni isolation counts were low and statistical models would not converge. Phenotypic resistance was predicted with high sensitivity and specificity by WGS. Additional studies to elucidate the relationships between phenotypic expression of resistance/genetic determinants for resistance and clinical response to antimicrobials are necessary to inform judicious use of antimicrobials in the context of relieving animal disease and suffering. PMID:27527782

  18. A1C test

    MedlinePlus

    HbA1C test; Glycated hemoglobin test; Glycosylated hemoglobin test; Hemoglobin glycosylated test; Glycohemoglobin test ... have recently eaten does not affect the A1C test, so you do not need to fast to ...

  19. Fusobacterium necrophorum in North American Bighorn Sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Narayanan, Sanjeevkumar; Batra, Sai Arun; Jegarubee, Bavananthasivam; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum has been detected in pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis ) lungs, in addition to the aerobic respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica , Bibersteinia trehalosi , Pasteurella multocida , and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae . Similar to M. haemolytica , F. necrophorum produces a leukotoxin. Leukotoxin-induced lysis and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages are responsible for acute inflammation and lung tissue damage characteristic of M. haemolytica -caused pneumonia. As one approach in elucidating the role of F. necrophorum in BHS pneumonia, we determined the frequency of the presence of F. necrophorum in archived pneumonic BHS lung tissues, and susceptibility of BHS leukocytes to F. necrophorum leukotoxin. A species-specific PCR assay detected F. necrophorum in 37% of pneumonic BHS lung tissues (total tested n=70). Sequences of PCR amplicons were similar to the less virulent F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxin exhibited cytotoxicity to BHS PMNs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As with the M. haemolytica leukotoxin, F. necrophorum leukotoxin was more toxic to BHS PMNs than domestic sheep PMNs. It is likely that F. necrophorum enters the lungs after M. haemolytica and other aerobic respiratory pathogens enter the lungs and initiate tissue damage, thereby creating a microenvironment that is conducive for anaerobic bacterial growth. In summary, Fusobacterium leukotoxin is highly toxic for BHS leukocytes; however, based on the PCR findings, it is unlikely to play a direct role in the development of BHS pneumonia. PMID:27224212

  20. Bacterial Species-Specific Activity of a Fluoroquinolone against Two Closely Related Pasteurellaceae with Similar MICs: Differential In Vitro Inoculum Effects and In Vivo Efficacies

    PubMed Central

    Lhermie, Guillaume; El Garch, Farid; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A.; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial activity of a fluoroquinolone against two genetically close bacterial species belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family. Time-kill experiments were used to measure the in vitro activity of marbofloxacin against two strains of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida with similar MICs. We observed that marbofloxacin was equally potent against 105 CFU/mL inocula M. haemolytica and P. multocida. However, an inoculum effect was observed with P. multocida, meaning that marbofloxacin activity was decreased against a 108 CFU/mL inoculum, whereas no inoculum effect was observed with M. haemolytica. Marbofloxacin activity was also tested in a lung infection model with immunocompromised mice intratracheally infected with 109 CFU of each bacteria. At the same dose, the clinical and bacteriological outcomes were much better for mice infected with M. haemolytica than for those infected with P. multocida. Moreover, bacteriological eradication was obtained with a lower marbofloxacin dose for mice infected with M. haemolytica. Our results suggest that the differential in vivo marbofloxacin efficacy observed with the two bacterial species of similar MIC could be explained by a differential inoculum effect. Consequently, MICs determined on 105 CFU inocula were not predictive of the differences in antibiotic efficacies against high bacterial inocula of closely related bacterial strains. These results could stimulate further investigations on bacterial species-specific antibiotic doses in a clinical setting. PMID:26506096

  1. Bacterial Species-Specific Activity of a Fluoroquinolone against Two Closely Related Pasteurellaceae with Similar MICs: Differential In Vitro Inoculum Effects and In Vivo Efficacies.

    PubMed

    Lhermie, Guillaume; El Garch, Farid; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial activity of a fluoroquinolone against two genetically close bacterial species belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family. Time-kill experiments were used to measure the in vitro activity of marbofloxacin against two strains of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida with similar MICs. We observed that marbofloxacin was equally potent against 105 CFU/mL inocula M. haemolytica and P. multocida. However, an inoculum effect was observed with P. multocida, meaning that marbofloxacin activity was decreased against a 108 CFU/mL inoculum, whereas no inoculum effect was observed with M. haemolytica. Marbofloxacin activity was also tested in a lung infection model with immunocompromised mice intratracheally infected with 109 CFU of each bacteria. At the same dose, the clinical and bacteriological outcomes were much better for mice infected with M. haemolytica than for those infected with P. multocida. Moreover, bacteriological eradication was obtained with a lower marbofloxacin dose for mice infected with M. haemolytica. Our results suggest that the differential in vivo marbofloxacin efficacy observed with the two bacterial species of similar MIC could be explained by a differential inoculum effect. Consequently, MICs determined on 105 CFU inocula were not predictive of the differences in antibiotic efficacies against high bacterial inocula of closely related bacterial strains. These results could stimulate further investigations on bacterial species-specific antibiotic doses in a clinical setting. PMID:26506096

  2. A1C

    MedlinePlus

    A1C is a blood test for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. It measures your average blood glucose, or blood sugar, level over the past 3 ... A1C alone or in combination with other diabetes tests to make a diagnosis. They also use the ...

  3. A1C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to minimize the complications caused by chronically elevated glucose levels, such as progressive damage to body organs like the kidneys, eyes, cardiovascular system, and nerves. The A1c test result ...

  4. Sulfotransferase 4A1.

    PubMed

    Minchin, Rodney F; Lewis, Aaron; Mitchell, Deanne; Kadlubar, Fred F; McManus, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we highlight the physical and enzymatic properties of the novel human sulfotransferase, SULT4A1. The gene is most highly expressed in selective regions of the brain, although work to date has failed to identify any specific endogenous substrate for the enzyme. SULT4A1 shares low homology with other human sulfotransferases. Nevertheless, it is highly conserved between species. Despite the low homology, it is structurally very similar to other cytosolic sulfotransferases with a conserved substrate binding domain, dimerization site and partial cofactor binding sites. However, the catalytic cavity is much smaller, and it has been suggested that the cofactor may not be accommodated within it. A recent link between variability in the 5'UTR of the SULT4A1 gene and schizophrenia has heightened interest in the endogenous function of the enzyme and its possible role in human disease. PMID:18248844

  5. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome by Tildipirosin Compared with Other Veterinary Macrolides

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleotides revealed differences in the interactions of these macrolides within their common ribosomal binding site. PMID:22926570

  6. Etiologic agents and diseases found associated with clinical aspergillosis in falcons.

    PubMed

    Tarello, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe parasitological, microbiological, and pathological findings associated with the isolation of Aspergillus species in 94 clinically diseased captive falcons from Dubai. Concomitant agents and/or diseases were identified in 64 cases, causing either single (n = 36) or multiple coinfections (n = 28). Diagnoses found more often in association with aspergillosis were chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS) (n = 29), Caryospora sp. (n = 16), Serratospiculum seurati infestation (n = 14), cestodiasis (n = 6), bumblefoot (n = 5), trematodosis due to Strigea falconispalumbi (n = 5), trichomoniasis (n = 4), Babesia shortti (n = 4), Mannheimia (Pastorella) haemolytica (n = 4), interstitial hepatitis (n = 4), Escherichia coli (n = 3), and Clostridium perfringens enterotoxemia (n = 2). Compared with a control group of 2000 diseased falcons without evidence of aspergillosis, the prevalence of Babesia shortti, CFIDS, Mannheimia (Pastorella) haemolytica, Escherichia coli, and falcon herpes virus infection was conspicuously higher in association with aspergillosis. These entities may be considered suitable candidates as predisposing factors for the mycosis. PMID:21754937

  7. Effect of Stress on Viral–Bacterial Synergy in Bovine Respiratory Disease: Novel Mechanisms to Regulate Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, P. D.; Aich, P.; Manuja, A.; Hokamp, K.; Roche, F. M.; Brinkman, F. S. L.; Potter, A.; Babiuk, L. A.

    2005-01-01

    The severity of bovine respiratory infections has been linked to a variety of factors, including environmental and nutritional changes, transportation, and social reorganization of weaned calves. Fatal respiratory infections, however, usually occur when a primary viral infection compromises host defences and enhances the severity of a secondary bacterial infection. This viral–bacterial synergy can occur by a number of different mechanisms and disease challenge models have been developed to analyse host responses during these respiratory infections. A primary bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) respiratory infection followed by a secondary challenge with Mannheimia haemolytica results in fatal bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and host responses to these two pathogens have been studied extensively. We used this disease model to demonstrate that stress significantly altered the viral–bacterial synergy resulting in fatal BRD. Functional genomic analysis revealed that BHV-1 infection enhanced toll-like receptors (TLR) expression and increased pro-inflammatory responses which contribute to the severity of a Mannheimia haemolytica infection. TLRs play a critical role in detecting bacterial infections and inducing pro-inflammatory responses. It is difficult to understand, however, how stress-induced corticosteroids could enhance this form of viral–bacterial synergy. Nuclear translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor activates cell signalling pathways which inhibit both TLR signalling and pro-inflammatory responses. The apparent conundrum between stress-induced corticosteroids and enhanced BRD susceptibility is discussed in terms of present data and previous investigations of stress and respiratory disease. PMID:18629190

  8. Etiologic Agents and Diseases Found Associated with Clinical Aspergillosis in Falcons

    PubMed Central

    Tarello, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe parasitological, microbiological, and pathological findings associated with the isolation of Aspergillus species in 94 clinically diseased captive falcons from Dubai. Concomitant agents and/or diseases were identified in 64 cases, causing either single (n = 36) or multiple coinfections (n = 28). Diagnoses found more often in association with aspergillosis were chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS) (n = 29), Caryospora sp. (n = 16), Serratospiculum seurati infestation (n = 14), cestodiasis (n = 6), bumblefoot (n = 5), trematodosis due to Strigea falconispalumbi (n = 5), trichomoniasis (n = 4), Babesia shortti (n = 4), Mannheimia (Pastorella) haemolytica (n = 4), interstitial hepatitis (n = 4), Escherichia coli (n = 3), and Clostridium perfringens enterotoxemia (n = 2). Compared with a control group of 2000 diseased falcons without evidence of aspergillosis, the prevalence of Babesia shortti, CFIDS, Mannheimia (Pastorella) haemolytica, Escherichia coli, and falcon herpes virus infection was conspicuously higher in association with aspergillosis. These entities may be considered suitable candidates as predisposing factors for the mycosis. PMID:21754937

  9. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic integration and modelling of oxytetracycline administered alone and in combination with carprofen in calves.

    PubMed

    Brentnall, C; Cheng, Z; McKellar, Q A; Lees, P

    2013-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of oxytetracycline were investigated, when administered both alone and in the presence of carprofen, in healthy calves. The study comprised a four treatment, four sequences, and four period cross-over design and used a tissue cage model, which permitted the collection of serum, inflamed tissue cage fluid (exudate) and non-inflamed tissue cage fluid (transudate). There were no clinically relevant differences in the PK profile of oxytetracycline when administered alone and when administered with carprofen. PK-PD integration was undertaken for a pathogenic strain of Mannheimia haemolytic (A1 76/1), by correlating in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and time-kill data with in vivo PK data obtained in the cross-over study. Based on in vitro susceptibility in cation adjusted Mueller Hinton Broth (CAMHB) and in vivo determined PK variables, ratios of maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under curve (AUC) to MIC and time for which concentration exceeded MIC (T>MIC) were determined. The CAMHB MIC data satisfied integrated PK/PD relationships predicted to achieve efficacy for approximately 48 h after dosing; mean values for serum were 5.13 (Cmax/MIC), 49.3 h (T>MIC) and 126.6 h (AUC(96h)/MIC). Similar findings were obtained when oxytetracycline was administered in the presence of carprofen, with PK-PD indices based on MIC determined in CAMHB. However, PK-PD integration of data, based on oxytetracycline MICs determined in the biological fluids, serum, exudate and transudate, suggest that it possesses, at most, limited direct killing activity against the M. haemolytica strain A1 76/1; mean values for serum were 0.277 (Cmax/MIC), 0 h (T>MIC) and 6.84 h (AUC(96h)/MIC). The data suggest that the beneficial therapeutic effects of oxytetracycline may depend, at least in part, on actions other than direct inhibition of bacterial growth. PMID:23415880

  10. Identification and analysis of CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Hosaka, Shinya; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450) are important for not only drug metabolism and toxicity, but also biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol and bile acids, and steroid synthesis. In cynomolgus macaques, widely used in biomedical research, we have characterized P450 cDNAs, which were isolated as expressed sequence tags of cynomolgus macaque liver. In this study, cynomolgus CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 cDNAs were characterized by sequence analysis, phylogenetic analysis and tissue expression pattern. By sequence analysis, these five cynomolgus P450s had high sequence identities (94-99%) to the human orthologs in amino acids. By phylogenetic analysis, each cynomolgus P450 was more closely related to the human ortholog as compared with the dog or rat ortholog. By quantitative polymerase chain reaction, among the 10 tissue types, CYP7A1 and CYP17A1 mRNAs were preferentially expressed in liver and adrenal gland, respectively. Cynomolgus CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 mRNAs were most abundantly expressed in liver and testis, respectively. Cynomolgus CYP20A1 mRNA was expressed in all the tissues, including brain and liver. Tissue expression patterns of each cynomolgus P450 were generally similar to that of the human ortholog. These results suggest the molecular similarities of CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 between cynomolgus macaques and humans. PMID:25649950

  11. Induction of immunity against pneumonic pasteurellosis following experimental infection in calves.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H J; Jericho, K W

    1986-01-01

    Immunity against pneumonic pasteurellosis was studied in calves after recovery from experimental respiratory disease with Pasteurella haemolytica. Nine calves were exposed to aerosols of parainfluenza-3 virus and Pasteurella haemolytica A1 six days apart to produce respiratory disease. After recovery from the disease, these nine principal and four control calves were challenged with aerosols of bovine herpesvirus 1 and P. haemolytica A1 four days apart. With this viral-bacterial challenge, the nine principal animals failed to develop clinical responses to this bacterial challenge and their lungs did not show the growth of P. haemolytica on cultures, whereas two of four control calves had elevated temperatures and developed necropurulent pneumonia with the isolation of P. haemolytica from the lungs. The principal calves had developed high levels of cytotoxin neutralizing antibodies in their sera following parainfluenza-3 virus-P. haemolytica infection. This demonstrated that immunity against pneumonic pasteurellosis can be achieved, with a suggestion that further search for an effective vaccine for P. haemolytica is warranted. PMID:3017526

  12. Pharmacodynamics of oxytetracycline administered alone and in combination with carprofen in calves.

    PubMed

    Brentnall, C; Cheng, Z; McKellar, Q A; Lees, P

    2012-09-15

    The pharmacodynamics (PD) of oxytetracycline was investigated against a strain of Mannheimia haemolytica. In vitro measurements, comprising minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration and time-kill curves, were conducted in five matrices; Mueller Hinton Broth (MHB), cation-adjusted MHB (CAMHB) and calf serum, exudate and transudate. MICs were much higher in the biological fluids than in MHB and CAMHB. Ratios of MIC were, serum: CAMHB 19 : 1; exudate:CAMHB 16.1; transudate:CAMHB 14 : 1. Ex vivo data, generated in the tissue cage model of inflammation, demonstrated that oxytetracycline, administered to calves intramuscularly at a dose rate of 20 mg/kg, did not inhibit the growth of M haemolytica in serum, exudate and transudate, even at peak concentration. However, using in vitro susceptibility in CAMHB and in vivo-determined pharmacokinetic (PK) variables, average and minimum oxytetracycline concentrations relative to MIC (C(av)/MIC and C(min)/MIC) predicted achievement of efficacy for approximately 48 hours after dosing. Similar C(av)/MIC and C(min)/MIC data were obtained when oxytetracycline was administered in the presence of carprofen. PK-PD integration of data for oxytetracycline, based on MICs determined in the three biological fluids, suggests that it possesses, at most, limited direct killing activity against M haemolytica. These data raise questions concerning the mechanism(s) of action of oxytetracycline, when administered at clinically recommended dose rates. PMID:22843613

  13. A-1 Test Stand work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A structural steel beam to support the new thrust measurement system on the A-1 Test Stand at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center is lifted to waiting employees for installation. The beam is part of the thrust takeout structure needed to support the new measurement system. Four such beams have been installed at the stand in preparation for installation of the system in upcoming weeks. Operators are preparing the stand for testing the next generation of rocket engines for the U.S. space program.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility monitoring of respiratory tract pathogens isolated from diseased cattle and pigs across Europe: the VetPath study.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Anno; Thomas, Valérie; Simjee, Shabbir; Moyaert, Hilde; El Garch, Farid; Maher, Kirsty; Morrissey, Ian; Butty, Pascal; Klein, Ulrich; Marion, Hervé; Rigaut, Delphine; Vallé, Michel

    2014-08-01

    VetPath is an ongoing pan-European antibiotic susceptibility monitoring programme collecting pathogens from diseased antimicrobial non-treated cattle, pigs and poultry. In the current study, 1001 isolates from cattle and pig respiratory tract infections were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Non-replicate lung samples or nasopharyngeal/nasal swabs were collected from animals with acute clinical signs in 11 countries during 2002-2006. Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica from cattle and P. multocida, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Streptococcus suis from pigs were isolated by standard methods. S. suis was also isolated from meningitis cases. MICs of 16 antibiotics were assessed centrally by broth microdilution following CLSI recommendations. Results were interpreted using CLSI breakpoints where available. P. multocida (231) and M. haemolytica (138) isolates were all susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, enrofloxacin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Resistance to florfenicol and spectinomycin was 0.4% and 3.5% in P. multocida, respectively, and absent in M. haemolytica isolates. Tetracycline resistance was 5.7% and 14.6% for P. multocida and M. haemolytica. In pigs, 230 P. multocida, 220 A. pleuropneumoniae and 182 S. suis isolates were recovered. Resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, florfenicol, tiamulin and tilmicosin was absent or <1%. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance was 3-6% and tetracycline resistance varied from 14.7% in A. pleuropneumoniae to 81.8% in S. suis. In conclusion, low resistance to antibiotics with defined clinical breakpoints, except for tetracycline, was observed among the major respiratory tract pathogens recovered from cattle and pigs. Since for approximately half of the antibiotics in this panel no CLSI-defined breakpoints were available, setting of the missing veterinary breakpoints is important. PMID:24837878

  15. A1C Test and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... laboratory tests. How does the A1C relate to estimated average glucose? Estimated average glucose (eAG) is calculated from the A1C. ... levels have the A1C test twice a year. Estimated average glucose (eAG) is calculated from the A1C ...

  16. 12 CFR 708a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions. 708a.1 Section 708a.1 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS BANK CONVERSIONS AND MERGERS Conversion of Insured Credit Unions to Mutual Savings Banks § 708a.1 Definitions. As used in this part: Clear and conspicuous means text...

  17. 32 CFR 352a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 352a.1 Section 352a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTERS DEFENSE FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SERVICE (DFAS) § 352a.1 Purpose. Pursuant to the authority vested in the Secretary of Defense under provisions...

  18. 14 CFR 374a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 374a.1 Section 374a.1 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS EXTENSION OF CREDIT BY AIRLINES TO FEDERAL POLITICAL CANDIDATES § 374a.1 Purpose. Section 401...

  19. 18 CFR 3a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 3a.1 Section 3a.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION General § 3a.1 Purpose. This part 3a describes...

  20. 22 CFR 3a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions. 3a.1 Section 3a.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL ACCEPTANCE OF EMPLOYMENT FROM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS BY MEMBERS OF THE UNIFORMED SERVICES § 3a.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a) Applicant means any person...

  1. 32 CFR 242a.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability. 242a.1 Section 242a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PUBLIC MEETING PROCEDURES OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS, UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES § 242a.1 Applicability. These...

  2. Led Astray by Hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jean; Diesburg-Stanwood, Amy; Bodor, Geza; Rasouli, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (A1c) is used frequently to diagnose and treat diabetes mellitus. Therefore, it is important be aware of factors that may interfere with the accuracy of A1c measurements. This is a case of a rare hemoglobin variant that falsely elevated a nondiabetic patient’s A1c level and led to a misdiagnosis of diabetes. A 67-year-old male presented to endocrine clinic for further management after he was diagnosed with diabetes based on an elevated A1c of 10.7%, which is approximately equivalent to an average blood glucose of 260 mg/dL. Multiple repeat A1c levels remained >10%, but his home fasting and random glucose monitoring ranged from 92 to 130 mg/dL. Hemoglobin electrophoresis and subsequent genetic analysis diagnosed the patient with hemoglobin Wayne, a rare hemoglobin variant. This variant falsely elevates A1c levels when A1c is measured using cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. When the boronate affinity method was applied instead, the patient’s A1c level was actually 4.7%. Though hemoglobin Wayne is clinically silent, this patient was erroneously diagnosed with diabetes and started on an antiglycemic medication. Due to this misdiagnosis, the patient was at risk of escalation in his “diabetes management” and hypoglycemia. Therefore, it is important that providers are aware of factors that may result in hemoglobin A1c inaccuracy including hemoglobin variants. PMID:26848480

  3. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gershwin, Laurel J.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L.; Anderson, Mark L.; McEligot, Heather A.; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Neibergs, Holly L.; Womack, James

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus), which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, and Histophilus somni. Some cattle appear to be more resistant to BRDC than others. We hypothesize that appropriate immune responses to these pathogens are subject to genetic control. To determine which genes are involved in the immune response to each of these pathogens it was first necessary to experimentally induce infection separately with each pathogen to document clinical and pathological responses in animals from which tissues were harvested for subsequent RNA sequencing. Herein these infections and animal responses are described. PMID:26571015

  4. Mastitis in sheep--The last 10 years and the future of research.

    PubMed

    Gelasakis, A I; Mavrogianni, V S; Petridis, I G; Vasileiou, N G C; Fthenakis, G C

    2015-12-14

    Bacterial mastitis is a significant welfare and financial problem in sheep flocks. This paper reviews the recently published literature, including publications that highlight the significance and virulence factors of the causal agents, especially Staphylococcus aureus and Mannheimia haemolytica, the primary causes of the disease. Research has also contributed to the understanding of risk factors, including genetic susceptibility of animals to infections, supporting future strategies for sustainable disease control. Pathogenetic mechanisms, including the role of the local defenses in the teat, have also been described and can assist formulation of strategies that induce local immune responses in the teat of ewes. Further to well-established diagnostic techniques, i.e., bacteriological tests and somatic cell counting, advanced methodologies, e.g., proteomics technologies, will likely contribute to more rapid and accurate diagnostics, in turn enhancing mastitis control efforts. PMID:26216457

  5. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex.

    PubMed

    Gershwin, Laurel J; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Anderson, Mark L; McEligot, Heather A; Shao, Matt X; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Taylor, Jeremy F; Neibergs, Holly L; Womack, James

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus), which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, and Histophilus somni. Some cattle appear to be more resistant to BRDC than others. We hypothesize that appropriate immune responses to these pathogens are subject to genetic control. To determine which genes are involved in the immune response to each of these pathogens it was first necessary to experimentally induce infection separately with each pathogen to document clinical and pathological responses in animals from which tissues were harvested for subsequent RNA sequencing. Herein these infections and animal responses are described. PMID:26571015

  6. Reversibility of Intersystem Crossing in the {a}1A1(000) and {a}1A1(010) States of Methylene, CH_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh T.; Sears, Trevor; Hall, Gregory

    2015-06-01

    The lowest energy singlet ( {a}1A1) and triplet ( {X}3B1) electronic states of methylene, CH_2, are only separated by 3150 wn, but differ greatly in chemical reactivity. Overall methylene reaction rates and chemical behavior are therefore strongly dependent on collisionally-mediated singlet-triplet interconversion. Collisions with inert partners tend to depopulate the excited singlet state and populate vibrationally excited triplet levels in CH_2. This process is generally considered as irreversible for large molecules, however, this is not the case for small molecules such as CH_2. An investigation of the decay kinetics of CH_2 in the presence of argon and various amounts of oxygen has been carried out using transient frequency modulation (FM) absorption spectroscopy, to monitor ortho and para rotational levels in both the {a}1A1(000) and {a}1A1(010) states. In the {a}1A1(000) state, all observed rotational levels follow double exponential decay kinetics, a direct consequence of reversible intersystem crossing. The relative amplitude of the slower decay component is an indicator of how quickly the reverse crossing from excited triplet levels becomes significant during the reaction and relaxation of singlet methylene. The para rotational levels show more obvious signs of reversibility than ortho rotational levels. Adding oxygen enhances the visibility of reversibility for both ortho and para levels. However, in the {a}1A1(010) state where the FM signal is 5-10 times smaller than the {a}1A1(000) state, there is no evidence of double exponential decay kinetics. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 and DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  7. Pharmacogenetics of SULT1A1

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Jaclyn; Kadlubar, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic SULT1A1 participates in the bioconversion of a plethora of endogenous and xenobiotic substances. Genetic variation in this important enzyme such as SNPs can vary by ethnicity and have functional consequences on its activity. Most SULT1A1 genetic variability studies have been centered on the SULT1A1*1/2 SNP. Highlighted here are not only this SNP, but other genetic variants associated with SULT1A1 that could modify drug efficacy and xenobiotic metabolism. Some studies have investigated how differential metabolism of xenobiotic substances influences susceptibility to or protection from cancer in multiple sites. This review will focus primarily on the impact of SULT1A1 genetic variation on the response to anticancer therapeutic agents and subsequently how it relates to environmental and dietary exposure to both cancer-causing and cancer-preventative compounds. PMID:25493573

  8. A1C Test and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Diabetes Educators American Diabetes Association JDRF MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations ​There are many organizations who provide ... KB). Alternate Language URL The A1C Test and Diabetes Page Content On this page: What is the ...

  9. A-1 modification work under way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Phil Schemanski of Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne removes equipment inside the thrust drum on the A-1 Test Stand as part of a comprehensive modification project to prepare for testing the new J-2X engine.

  10. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    MedlinePlus

    ... the person's average blood sugar levels over that time. Why It's Done Doctors use the hemoglobin A1c test to determine if your child's diabetes management plan needs to be adjusted. Typically the test ...

  11. 32 CFR 383a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DEFENSE COMMISSARY AGENCY (DeCA) § 383a.1 Purpose. Pursuant to the authority vested in the Secretary of Defense under title 10, United States Code, this part establishes the Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA)...

  12. TMS installation at A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Stennis Space Center employees maneuver a new thrust measurement system in preparation for its installation on the A-1 Test Stand on March 3. The system was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois and represents a state-of-the-art upgrade from the equipment used on the stand for more than 40 years. The A-1 Test Stand is being upgraded to provide testing for the next generation of rocket engines for America's space program.

  13. Photoaffinity labeling of A1-adenosine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.N.; Cristalli, G.; Grifantini, M.; Vittori, S.; Lohse, M.J.

    1985-11-25

    The ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling. A photolabile derivative of R-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, R-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine (R-AHPIA), has been synthesized as a covalent specific ligand for A1-adenosine receptors. In adenylate cyclase studies with membranes of rat fat cells and human platelets, R-AHPIA has adenosine receptor agonist activity with a more than 60-fold selectivity for the A1-subtype. It competes for (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding to A1-receptors of rat brain membranes with a Ki value of 1.6 nM. After UV irradiation, R-AHPIA binds irreversibly to the receptor, as indicated by a loss of (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding after extensive washing; the Ki value for this photoinactivation is 1.3 nM. The p-hydroxyphenyl substituent of R-AHPIA can be directly radioiodinated to give a photoaffinity label of high specific radioactivity ( SVI-AHPIA). This compound has a KD value of about 1.5 nM as assessed from saturation and kinetic experiments. Adenosine analogues compete for SVI-AHPIA binding to rat brain membranes with an order of potency characteristic for A1-adenosine receptors. Dissociation curves following UV irradiation at equilibrium demonstrate 30-40% irreversible specific binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicates that the probe is photoincorporated into a single peptide of Mr = 35,000. Labeling of this peptide can be blocked specifically and stereoselectively by adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists in a manner which is typical for the A1-subtype. The results indicate that SVI-AHPIA identifies the ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor, which is a peptide with Mr = 35,000.

  14. 44 CFR Appendix A(1) to Part 61 - Appendix A(1) to Part 61

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Appendix A(1) to Part 61 A(1) Appendix A(1) to Part 61 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program INSURANCE COVERAGE AND RATES Pt. 61, App....

  15. Pneumococcal IgA1 protease subverts specific protection by human IgA1.

    PubMed

    Janoff, E N; Rubins, J B; Fasching, C; Charboneau, D; Rahkola, J T; Plaut, A G; Weiser, J N

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases may sabotage the protective effects of IgA. In vitro, both exogenous and endogenously produced IgA1 protease inhibited phagocytic killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae by capsule-specific IgA1 human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) but not IgA2. These IgA1 proteases cleaved and reduced binding of the the effector Fcα1 heavy chain but not the antigen-binding F(ab)/light chain to pneumococcal surfaces. In vivo, IgA1 protease-resistant IgA2, but not IgA1 protease-sensitive IgA1, supported 60% survival in mice infected with wild-type S. pneumoniae. IgA1 hMAbs protected mice against IgA1 protease-deficient but not -producing pneumococci. Parallel mouse sera with human IgA2 showed more efficient complement-mediated reductions in pneumococci with neutrophils than did IgA1, particularly with protease-producing organisms. After natural human pneumococcal bacteremia, purified serum IgG inhibited IgA1 protease activity in 7 of 11 patients (64%). These observations provide the first evidence in vivo that IgA1 protease can circumvent killing of S. pneumoniae by human IgA. Acquisition of IgA1 protease-neutralizing IgG after infection directs attention to IgA1 protease both as a determinant of successful colonization and infection and as a potential vaccine candidate. PMID:23820749

  16. Molecular versus conventional culture for detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens in poultry.

    PubMed

    Ammar, A M; Abd El-Aziz, N K; Abd El Wanis, S; Bakry, N R

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections are leading causes of morbidity in poultry farms allover the world. Six pathogens; Escherichia coli, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were involved in respiratory infections in poultry. Herein, conventional identification procedures and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were applied for detection of the most common respiratory bacterial pathogens in clinical specimens of poultry obtained from 53 Egyptian farms with various respiratory problems and the results were compared statistically. The analyzed data demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of the most recovered microorganisms (P<0.05) by PCR comparing to classical culture procedures. Further, multiplex PCR could detect E. coli, M. gallisepticum, S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa in a single reaction, however, M. haemolytica was reported in a uinplex system. According to PCR results, the most commonly recorded bacterial pathogens in examined poultry farms were E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa (54.71% each), followed by M. haemolylica (35.85%) and M. gallisepticum (20.75%). In conclusion, PCR assay offered an effective alternative to traditional typing methods for the identification and simultaneous detection of the most clinically relevant respiratory pathogens in poultry. PMID:26950451

  17. The nasopharyngeal microbiota of feedlot cattle that develop bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Holman, Devin B; McAllister, Tim A; Topp, Edward; Wright, André-Denis G; Alexander, Trevor W

    2015-10-22

    Bovine respiratory disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle. The objective of this study was to compare the nasopharyngeal bacterial microbiota of healthy cattle and cattle treated for BRD in a commercial feedlot setting using a high-density 16S rRNA gene microarray (Phylochip). Samples were taken from both groups of animals (n=5) at feedlot entry (day 0) and ≥60 days after placement. Cattle diagnosed with BRD had significantly less bacterial diversity and fewer OTUs in their nasopharynx at both sampling times. The predominant phyla in both groups were Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. The relative abundance of the phylum Actinobacteria was lower in cattle treated for BRD. At the family-level there was a greater relative abundance (P<0.05) of Micrococcaceae (day 0 only), Lachnospiraceae (≥60 days), Lactobacillaceae (day 0), and Bacillaceae (day 0) in healthy cattle compared to BRD-affected cattle. The community structure of the BRD-affected and healthy cattle were also significantly different from each other at both sampling times as measured using unweighted UniFrac distances. All entry samples of cattle diagnosed with BRD had 16S rRNA gene sequences representative of the BRD-associated bacteria Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, although 3/5 healthy cattle were also positive for M. haemolytica at this time point. The results also indicate that the bovine nasopharyngeal microbiota is relatively unstable during the first 60 days in the feedlot. PMID:26249828

  18. Structured literature review of responses of cattle to viral and bacterial pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease complex.

    PubMed

    Grissett, G P; White, B J; Larson, R L

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important disease of cattle and continues to be an intensely studied topic. However, literature summarizing the time between pathogen exposure and clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion is minimal. A structured literature review of the published literature was performed to determine cattle responses (time from pathogen exposure to clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion) in challenge models using common BRD viral and bacterial pathogens. After review a descriptive analysis of published studies using common BRD pathogen challenge studies was performed. Inclusion criteria were single pathogen challenge studies with no treatment or vaccination evaluating outcomes of interest: clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion. Pathogens of interest included: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pastuerella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Thirty-five studies and 64 trials were included for analysis. The median days to the resolution of clinical signs after BVDV challenge was 15 and shedding was not detected on day 12 postchallenge. Resolution of BHV-1 shedding resolved on day 12 and clinical signs on day 12 postchallenge. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ceased shedding on day 9 and median time to resolution of clinical signs was on day 12 postchallenge. M. haemolytica resolved clinical signs 8 days postchallenge. This literature review and descriptive analysis can serve as a resource to assist in designing challenge model studies and potentially aid in estimation of duration of clinical disease and shedding after natural pathogen exposure. PMID:25929158

  19. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... which will be codified at 32 CFR part 168b. ... ENGINEERING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS § 168a.1 Purpose. This part: (a) Establishes guidelines for the award of National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191....

  20. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... which will be codified at 32 CFR part 168b. ... ENGINEERING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS § 168a.1 Purpose. This part: (a) Establishes guidelines for the award of National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191....

  1. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... which will be codified at 32 CFR part 168b. ... ENGINEERING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS § 168a.1 Purpose. This part: (a) Establishes guidelines for the award of National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191....

  2. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... which will be codified at 32 CFR part 168b. ... ENGINEERING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS § 168a.1 Purpose. This part: (a) Establishes guidelines for the award of National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191....

  3. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... which will be codified at 32 CFR part 168b. ... ENGINEERING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS § 168a.1 Purpose. This part: (a) Establishes guidelines for the award of National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191....

  4. 38 CFR 8a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 8a.1 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS MORTGAGE LIFE... title to the housing unit for which his or her grant was made. (b) The term Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) means the mortgage protection life insurance authorized for veterans under 38 U.S.C....

  5. 38 CFR 8a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 8a.1 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS MORTGAGE LIFE... title to the housing unit for which his or her grant was made. (b) The term Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) means the mortgage protection life insurance authorized for veterans under 38 U.S.C....

  6. 38 CFR 8a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 8a.1 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS MORTGAGE LIFE... title to the housing unit for which his or her grant was made. (b) The term Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) means the mortgage protection life insurance authorized for veterans under 38 U.S.C....

  7. 38 CFR 8a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 8a.1 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS MORTGAGE LIFE... title to the housing unit for which his or her grant was made. (b) The term Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) means the mortgage protection life insurance authorized for veterans under 38 U.S.C....

  8. 38 CFR 8a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 8a.1 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS MORTGAGE LIFE... title to the housing unit for which his or her grant was made. (b) The term Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) means the mortgage protection life insurance authorized for veterans under 38 U.S.C....

  9. 8 CFR 245a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... crime treated as a misdemeanor under 8 CFR 245a.1(p). For purposes of this definition, any crime... the term such alien actually served. Under this exception, for purposes of 8 CFR part 245a, the crime... the applicant had violated his or her nonimmigrant student status prior to January 1, 1982. A...

  10. 8 CFR 245a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... crime treated as a misdemeanor under 8 CFR 245a.1(p). For purposes of this definition, any crime... the term such alien actually served. Under this exception, for purposes of 8 CFR part 245a, the crime... the applicant had violated his or her nonimmigrant student status prior to January 1, 1982. A...

  11. 8 CFR 245a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., if any, or (2) a crime treated as a misdemeanor under 8 CFR 245a.1(p). For purposes of this... CFR part 245a, the crime shall be treated as a misdemeanor. (q) Subject of an Order to Show Cause... interview to obtain an immigrant visa at a Consulate or Embassy in Canada or Mexico but who subsequently...

  12. 8 CFR 245a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... more of the following areas of major life activity: (i) Self-care, (ii) receptive and expressive..., services to pregnant women or children under 18 years of age, or treatment in the interest of public health..., if any, or (2) a crime treated as a misdemeanor under 8 CFR 245a.1(p). For purposes of...

  13. In vitro activity and rodent efficacy of clinafloxacin for bovine and swine respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Michael T.; Quesnell, Rebecca; Tiwari, Raksha; LeMay, Mary; Watts, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinafloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone that was originally developed and subsequently abandoned in the late 1990s as a human health antibiotic for respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of clinafloxacin as a possible treatment for respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommended procedures with recent strains from the Zoetis culture collection. Rodent efficacy was determined in CD-1 mice infected systemically or intranasally with bovine Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, or swine Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and administered clinafloxacin for determination of ED50 (efficacious dose-50%) values. The MIC90 values for clinafloxacin against bovine P. multocida, M. haemolytica, Histophilus somni, and M. bovis were 0.125, 0.5, 0.125, and 1 μg/ml, respectively, and the MIC90 values against swine P. multocida, A. pleuropneumoniae, S. suis, and M. hyopneumoniae were í0.03, í0.03, 0.125, and í0.008 μg/ml, respectively. Efficacy in mouse models showed average ED50 values of 0.019 mg/kg/dose in the bovine M. haemolytica systemic infection model, 0.55 mg/kg in the bovine P. multocida intranasal lung challenge model, 0.08 mg/kg/dose in the bovine P. multocida systemic infection model, and 0.7 mg/kg/dose in the swine A. pleuropneumoniae systemic infection model. Clinafloxacin shows good in vitro activity and efficacy in mouse models and may be a novel treatment alternative for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. PMID:23785362

  14. Diversity of bacterial species in the nasal cavity of sheep in the highlands of Ethiopia and first report of Histophilus somni in the country.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Biruk; Sisay Tessema, Tesfaye; Tefera, Genene

    2013-06-01

    A study was conducted to isolate bacterial species/pathogens from the nasal cavity of apparently healthy and pneumonic sheep. Nasal swabs were collected aseptically, transported in tryptose soya broth and incubated for 24 h. Then, each swab was streaked onto chocolate and blood agar for culture. Bacterial species were identified following standard bacteriological procedures. Accordingly, a total of 1,556 bacteria were isolated from 960 nasal swabs collected from three different highland areas of Ethiopia, namely Debre Berhan, Asella, and Gimba. In Debre Berhan, 140 Mannheimia haemolytica, 81 Histophilus somni, 57 Staphylococcus species, and 52 Bibersteinia trehalosi were isolated. While from Gimba M. haemolytica, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and H. somni were isolated at rates of 25.2, 15.9, 11.4, and 5.9 %, respectively, of the total 647 bacterial species. In Asella from 352 bacterial species isolated, 93 (26.4 %) were M. haemolytica, 48 (13.6 %) were Staphylococcus species, 26 (7.4 %) were B. trehalosi, and 17 (4.8 %) H. somni were recognized. Further identification and characterization using BIOLOG identification system Enterococcus avium and Sphingomonas sanguinis were identified at 100 % probability, while, H. somni and Actinobacillus lignerisii were suggested by the system. The study showed that a variety of bacterial species colonize the nasal cavity of the Ethiopian highland sheep with variable proportion between healthy and pneumonic ones. To our knowledge, this is the first report on isolation of H. somni, an important pathogen in cattle, from the respiratory tract of a ruminant species in the country. PMID:23328945

  15. TMS installation at A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Employees at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center complete installation of the new thrust measurement system on the A-1 Test Stand. The new TMS is a state-of-the-art upgrade from the previous system, which was installed when the testing structure was built in the 1960s. It is an advanced calibration system capable of measuring vertical and horizontal thrust loads with accuracy within 0.15 percent at 225,000 pounds. It also will allow engineers to measure thrust as they gimbal (or tilt) engines during tests. The new TMS is part of upgrades for the A-1 Test Stand in preparation for testing the next generation of American space program rocket engines.

  16. TMS installation at A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A new thrust measurement system is lifted onto the A-1 Test Stand deck at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in preparation for its installation. The new system is a state-of-the-art upgrade for the testing structure, which is being prepared for testing of next-generation rocket engines. The system was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois at a cost of about $3.5 million.

  17. Reliability assessment of a 1 MV LTD.

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Salvador; Chavez, Raymond; Molina, Isidro; Kim, Alexandre A.; Johnson, David L.; Maenchen, John Eric; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Ziska, Derek Raymond

    2005-07-01

    A 1 MV linear transformer driver (LTD) is being tested with a large area e-beam diode load at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The experiments will be utilized to determine the repeatability of the output pulse and the reliability of the components. The 1 MV accelerator is being used to determine the feasibility of designing a 6 MV LTD for radiography experiments. The peak voltage, risetime, and pulse width as well as the cavity timing jitter are analyzed to determine the repeatability of the output pulse.

  18. ApoA1 and ApoA1-specific self-antibodies in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-07-01

    Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) is a main protein moiety in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Generally, ApoA1 and HDL are considered as atheroprotective. In prooxidant and inflammatory microenvironment in the vicinity to the atherosclerotic lesion, ApoA1/HDL are subjected to modification. The chemical modifications such as oxidation, nitration, etc result in altering native architecture of ApoA1 toward dysfunctionality and abnormality. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase has a prominent role in this mechanism. Neo-epitopes could be formed and then exposed that makes them immunogenic. Indeed, these epitopes may be recognized by immune cells and induce production of proatherogenic ApoA1-specific IgG antibodies. These antibodies are biologically relevant because they are able to react with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and TLR4 in target cells and induce a variety of pro-inflammatory responses. Epidemiological and functional studies underline a prognostic value of ApoA1 self-antibodies for several cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome, and severe carotid stenosis. PMID:27183204

  19. PLC Software Program for Leak Detector Station A1 SALW-LD-ST-A1

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2001-01-25

    This document describes the software program for the programmable logic controller for the leak detector station ''SALW-LD-ST-A1''. The appendices contains a copy of the printout of the software program.

  20. Rat Organic Anion Transporting Protein 1A1 (OATP1A1)

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yansen; Nieves, Edward; Angeletti, Ruth H.; Orr, George A.; Wolkoff, Allan W.

    2008-01-01

    Rat organic anion transporting protein 1a1 (oatp1a1), a hepatocyte basolateral plasma membrane protein, mediates transport of various amphipathic compounds. Our previous studies indicated that serine phosphorylation of a single tryptic peptide inhibits its transport activity without changing its cell surface content. The site of phosphorylation is unknown and was the subject of the present study. Following immunoaffinity chromatographic purification from rat liver, oatp1a1 was subjected to trypsin digestion and MALDI-TOF. Except for predicted N-glycosylated peptides, 97% of oatp1a1 tryptic peptides were observed. A single tryptic phosphopeptide was found in the C-terminus (aa 626-647), existing in unphosphorylated, singly, or doubly phosphorylated forms, and sensitive to alkaline phosphatase treatment. β-elimination reaction resulted in mass loss of 98 or 196 Da from this peptide, and subsequent Michael addition with cysteamine increased masses by the predicated 77 and 154 Da, indicating that oatp1a1 can be singly or doubly phosphorylated at serine or threonine residues in the C-terminal sequence SSATDHT (aa 634-640). Subsequent tandem MS/MS analysis revealed that phosphorylation at S634 accounted for all singly phosphorylated peptide, while phosphorylation at S634 and S635 accounted for all doubly phosphorylated peptide. These findings identify the site of oatp1a1 phosphorylation and demonstrate that it is an ordered process, in which phosphorylation at S634 precedes that at S635. The mechanism by which phosphorylation results in loss of transport activity in hepatocytes remains to be established. Whether phosphorylation near the C-terminus inhibits C-terminal oligomerization of oatp1a1, required for normal transport function, can be speculated upon, but is as yet unknown. PMID:16519530

  1. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  2. Architecture for a 1-GHz Digital RADAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallik, Udayan

    2011-01-01

    An architecture for a Direct RF-digitization Type Digital Mode RADAR was developed at GSFC in 2008. Two variations of a basic architecture were developed for use on RADAR imaging missions using aircraft and spacecraft. Both systems can operate with a pulse repetition rate up to 10 MHz with 8 received RF samples per pulse repetition interval, or at up to 19 kHz with 4K received RF samples per pulse repetition interval. The first design describes a computer architecture for a Continuous Mode RADAR transceiver with a real-time signal processing and display architecture. The architecture can operate at a high pulse repetition rate without interruption for an infinite amount of time. The second design describes a smaller and less costly burst mode RADAR that can transceive high pulse repetition rate RF signals without interruption for up to 37 seconds. The burst-mode RADAR was designed to operate on an off-line signal processing paradigm. The temporal distribution of RF samples acquired and reported to the RADAR processor remains uniform and free of distortion in both proposed architectures. The majority of the RADAR's electronics is implemented in digital CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor), and analog circuits are restricted to signal amplification operations and analog to digital conversion. An implementation of the proposed systems will create a 1-GHz, Direct RF-digitization Type, L-Band Digital RADAR--the highest band achievable for Nyquist Rate, Direct RF-digitization Systems that do not implement an electronic IF downsample stage (after the receiver signal amplification stage), using commercially available off-the-shelf integrated circuits.

  3. HDL/ApoA-1 infusion and ApoA-1 gene therapy in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chyu, Kuang-Yuh; Shah, Prediman K.

    2015-01-01

    The HDL hypothesis stating that simply raising HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) may produce cardiovascular benefits has been questioned recently based on several randomized clinical trials using CETP inhibitors or niacin to raise HDL-C levels. However, extensive pre-clinical data support the vascular protective effects of administration of exogenous ApoA-1 containing preβ-HDL like particles. Several small proof-of-concept clinical trials using such HDL/ApoA-1 infusion therapy have shown encouraging results but definitive proof of efficacy must await large scale clinical trials. In addition to HDL infusion therapy an alternative way to exploit beneficial cardiovascular effects of HDL/ApoA-1 is to use gene transfer. Preclinical studies have shown evidence of benefit using this approach; however clinical validation is yet lacking. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the aforementioned strategies. PMID:26388776

  4. Polymorphisms of UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*27 & UGT1A1*28 in three major ethnic groups from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Teh, L. K.; Hashim, H.; Zakaria, Z. A.; Salleh, M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Genetic polymorphisms of uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) have been associated with a wide variation of responses among patients prescribed with irinotecan. Lack of this enzyme is known to be associated with a high incidence of severe toxicity. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of three different variants of UGT1A1 (UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*27 and UGT1A1*28), which are associated with reduced enzyme activity and increased irinotecan toxicity, in the three main ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malays, Chinese and Indians). Methods: A total of 306 healthy unrelated volunteers were screened for UGT1A1*28, UGT1A1*6 and UGT1A1*27. Blood samples (5 ml) were obtained from each subject and DNA was extracted. PCR based methods were designed and validated for detection of UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*27 and UGT1A1*28. Direct DNA sequencing was performed to validate the results of randomly selected samples. Results: Malays and Indian have two-fold higher frequency of homozygous of UGT1A1*28 (7TA/7TA) which was 8 and 8.8 per cent, respectively compared to the Chinese (4.9%). However, the distribution of UGT1A1*6 and UGT1A1*27 showed no significant differences among them. UGT1A1*27 which has not been detected in Caucasian and African American population, was found in the Malaysian Malays (3.33%) and Malaysian Chinese (2.0%). Interpretation & conclusions: There was interethnic variability in the frequency of UGT1A1*28 in the Malaysian population. Our results suggest that genotyping of UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1*27 need to be performed before patients are prescribed with irinotecan due to their high prevalence of allelic variant which could lead to adverse drug reaction. PMID:22960892

  5. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1 - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1 Section 1.666(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1 Amount allocated. (a)(1) If a trust other than a foreign...

  6. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1 - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1 Section 1.666(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1 Amount allocated. (a)(1) If a trust other than a foreign...

  7. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1 - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1 Section 1.666(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1 Amount allocated. (a)(1) If a trust other than a foreign trust created by a...

  8. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1 - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1 Section 1.666(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1 Amount allocated. (a)(1) If a trust other than a foreign...

  9. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1 - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1 Section 1.666(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1 Amount allocated. (a)(1) If a trust other than a foreign...

  10. 29 CFR 2550.404a-1 - Investment duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Investment duties. 2550.404a-1 Section 2550.404a-1 Labor... FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY § 2550.404a-1 Investment duties. (a) In general. Section 404(a)(1)(B) of the... use in the conduct of an enterprise of a like character and with like aims. (b) Investment duties....

  11. 29 CFR 2550.404a-1 - Investment duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Investment duties. 2550.404a-1 Section 2550.404a-1 Labor... FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY § 2550.404a-1 Investment duties. (a) In general. Section 404(a)(1)(B) of the... use in the conduct of an enterprise of a like character and with like aims. (b) Investment duties....

  12. 29 CFR 2550.404a-1 - Investment duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Investment duties. 2550.404a-1 Section 2550.404a-1 Labor... FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY § 2550.404a-1 Investment duties. (a) In general. Section 404(a)(1)(B) of the... use in the conduct of an enterprise of a like character and with like aims. (b) Investment duties....

  13. 29 CFR 2550.404a-1 - Investment duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Investment duties. 2550.404a-1 Section 2550.404a-1 Labor... FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY § 2550.404a-1 Investment duties. (a) In general. Section 404(a)(1)(B) of the... use in the conduct of an enterprise of a like character and with like aims. (b) Investment duties....

  14. 29 CFR 2550.404a-1 - Investment duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Investment duties. 2550.404a-1 Section 2550.404a-1 Labor... FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY § 2550.404a-1 Investment duties. (a) In general. Section 404(a)(1)(B) of the... use in the conduct of an enterprise of a like character and with like aims. (b) Investment duties....

  15. Amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Batten, Margaret R; Senior, Bernard W; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-03-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by IgA1 proteases of different species of Streptococcus were investigated. Recombinant IgA1 antibodies were generated with point mutations at proline 227 and threonine 228, the residues lying on either side of the peptide bond at which all streptococcal IgA1 proteases cleave wild-type human IgA1. The amino acid substitutions produced no major effect upon the structure of the mutant IgA1 antibodies or their functional ability to bind to Fcalpha receptors. However, the substitutions had a substantial effect upon sensitivity to cleavage with some streptococcal IgA1 proteases, with, in some cases, a single point mutation rendering the antibody resistant to a particular IgA1 protease. This effect was least marked with the IgA1 protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which showed no absolute requirement for either proline or threonine at residues 227 to 228. By contrast, the IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis had an absolute requirement for proline at 227 but not for threonine at 228, which could be replaced by valine. There was evidence in S. mitis that proteases from different strains may have different amino acid requirements for cleavage. Remarkably, some streptococcal proteases appeared able to cleave the hinge at a distant alternative site if substitution prevented efficient cleavage of the original site. Hence, this study has identified key residues required for the recognition of the IgA1 hinge as a substrate by streptococcal IgA1 proteases, and it marks a preliminary step towards development of specific enzyme inhibitors. PMID:12595464

  16. Diagnostics for a 1.2 kA, 1 MeV, electron induction injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, T. L.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S. M.; Vanecek, D. L.; Westenskow, G. A.; Yu, S. S.

    1998-12-01

    We are constructing a 1.2 kA, 1 MeV, electron induction injector as part of the RTA program, a collaborative effort between LLNL and LBNL to develop relativistic klystrons for Two-Beam Accelerator applications. The RTA injector will also be used in the development of a high-gradient, low-emittance, electron source and beam diagnostics for the second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility. The electron source will be a 3.5″-diameter, thermionic, flat-surface, m-type cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150 ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 200 π-mm-mr. Precise measurement of the beam parameters is required so that performance of the RTA injector can be confidently scaled to the 4 kA, 3 MeV, and 2-microsecond pulse parameters of the DARHT injector. Planned diagnostics include an isolated cathode with resistive divider for direct measurement of current emission, resistive wall and magnetic probe current monitors for measuring beam current and centroid position, capacitive probes for measuring A-K gap voltage, an energy spectrometer, and a pepperpot emittance diagnostic. Details of the injector, beam line, and diagnostics are presented.

  17. Lattice equations arising from discrete Painlevé systems. I. (A2 + A1)(1) and ( A 1 + A1 ' ) ( 1 ) cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Nalini; Nakazono, Nobutaka; Shi, Yang

    2015-09-01

    We introduce the concept of ω-lattice, constructed from τ functions of Painlevé systems, on which quad-equations of ABS (Adler-Bobenko-Suris) type appear. In particular, we consider the A5 ( 1 ) - and A6 ( 1 ) -surface q-Painlevé systems corresponding affine Weyl group symmetries are of (A2 + A1)(1)- and (A1 + A1)(1)-types, respectively.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of alginate lyases A1-II and A1-II′ from Sphingomonas sp. A1

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, Masayuki; Ogura, Kohei; Moriwaki, Satoko; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku; Mikami, Bunzo

    2005-03-01

    The crystallization and preliminary characterization of the family PL-7 alginate lyases A1-II and A1-II′ from Sphingomonas sp. A1 are presented. Alginate lyases depolymerize alginate, a heteropolysaccharide consisting of α-l-guluronate and β-d-mannuronate, through a β-elimination reaction. The alginate lyases A1-II (25 kDa) and A1-II′ (25 kDa) from Sphingomonas sp. A1, which belong to polysaccharide lyase family PL-7, exhibit 68% homology in primary structure but have different substrate specificities. To determine clearly the structural basis for substrate recognition in the depolymerization mechanism by alginate lyases, both proteins were crystallized at 293 K using the vapour-diffusion method. A crystal of A1-II belonged to space group P2{sub 1} and diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.3, b = 30.1, c = 101.6 Å, β = 100.2°, while a crystal of A1-II′ belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and diffracted to 1.0 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = 34.6, b = 68.5, c = 80.3 Å.

  19. 26 CFR 48.4222(a)-1 - Registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Registration. 48.4222(a)-1 Section 48.4222(a)-1... TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Exemptions, Registration, Etc. § 48.4222(a)-1 Registration. (a) General rule. Except as provided in § 48.4222(b)-1, tax-free sales under section 4221 may...

  20. 26 CFR 48.4222(a)-1 - Registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Registration. 48.4222(a)-1 Section 48.4222(a)-1... TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Exemptions, Registration, Etc. § 48.4222(a)-1 Registration. (a) General rule. Except as provided in § 48.4222(b)-1, tax-free sales under section 4221 may...

  1. 26 CFR 1.512(a)-1 - Definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Definition. 1.512(a)-1 Section 1.512(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations § 1.512(a)-1 Definition. (a) In general. Except as...

  2. 26 CFR 1.167(a)-1 - Depreciation in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Depreciation in general. 1.167(a)-1 Section 1.167(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(a)-1 Depreciation in general. (a)...

  3. 5 CFR Appendix A-1 to Subpart I... - Windchill Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Pay for Duty Involving Physical Hardship or Hazard Pt. 550, Subpt. I, App. A-1 Appendix A-1 to Subpart I of Part 550—Windchill Chart EC01SE91.002 windchill chart in non-metric units... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Windchill Chart A Appendix A-1 to...

  4. 49 CFR 178.33a-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33a-1 Section 178.33a-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Specifications for Inside Containers, and Linings § 178.33a-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  5. 32 CFR 809a.1 - Random installation entry point checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Random installation entry point checks. 809a.1 Section 809a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE... Entry Policy § 809a.1 Random installation entry point checks. The installation commander determines...

  6. 49 CFR 178.33a-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33a-1 Section 178.33a-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers, and Linings § 178.33a-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  7. 49 CFR 178.33a-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33a-1 Section 178.33a-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers, and Linings § 178.33a-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  8. 49 CFR 178.33a-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33a-1 Section 178.33a-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers, and Linings § 178.33a-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  9. 49 CFR 178.33a-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33a-1 Section 178.33a-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers, and Linings § 178.33a-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  10. [UGT1A1 Genotyping for Proper Use of Irinotecan].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Ayumu; Ando, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    Irinotecan is a camptothecin analog used worldwide for a broad range of solid tumors, including colorectal and lung cancers. It can cause severe adverse drug reactions, such as neutropenia or diarrhea. Irinotecan is metabolized to form active SN-38, which is further conjugated and detoxified by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 enzyme. Recent pharmacogenetic studies on irinotecan have revealed the impact of UGT1A1 polymorphisms on severe adverse effects. A variant in the promoter of the UGT1A1 gene, the UGT1A1 *28 allele, has been extensively studied, and pharmacogenetic relationships between the variant and severe toxicities of irinotecan have been reported. The US FDA and pharmaceutical companies revised the irinotecan label in 2005, and it now includes homozygosity for the UGT1A1*28 genotype as one of the risk factors for severe neutropenia. A variant in exon 1 of the UGT1A1 gene, the UGT1A1*6 allele, mainly found in East Asians, is also an important risk factor associated with severe neutropenia. The concurrence of UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1*6, even when heterozygous, markedly alters the disposition of irinotecan, potentially increasing toxicity, which is now written on the label of irinotecan in Japan. For patients showing homozygosity for UGT1A1*28, *6, or compound heterozygosity for UGT1A1*6 and *28, dose reduction of irinotecan is strongly recommended. Genotyping tests for UGT1A1 *6 and *28 have been approved in Japan and are currently used in oncology practice. Moreover, a recent Phase 2 trial for FOLFIRINOX in Japan excluded patients who showed homozygosity for UGT1A1*28, *6, or compound heterozygosity for UGT1A1*6 and *28. At present, irinotecan chemotherapy based on a patient's UGT1A1 genetic status is scientifically reasonable. PMID:26591441

  11. Effect of mutations in the human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) hinge on its susceptibility to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2005-03-01

    Components of the human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) hinge governing sensitivity to cleavage by bacterial IgA1 proteases were investigated. Recombinant antibodies with distinct hinge mutations were constructed from a hybrid comprised of human IgA2 bearing half of the human IgA1 hinge region. This hybrid antibody and all the mutant antibodies derived from it were resistant to cleavage by the IgA1 proteases from Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 strains but were cleaved to various degrees by those of Streptococcus pneumoniae, some Streptococcus sanguis strains, and the type 1 and 2 IgA1 proteases of Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Remarkably, those proteases that cleave a Pro-Ser peptide bond in the wild-type IgA1 hinge were able to cleave mutant antibodies lacking a Pro-Ser peptide bond in the hinge, and those that cleave a Pro-Thr peptide bond in the wild-type IgA1 hinge were able to cleave mutant antibodies devoid of a Pro-Thr peptide bond in the hinge. Thus, the enzymes can cleave alternatives to their preferred postproline peptide bond when such a bond is unavailable. Peptide sequence analysis of a representative antibody digestion product confirmed this conclusion. The presence of a cleavable peptide bond near the CH2 end of the hinge appeared to result in greater cleavage than if the scissile bond was at the CH1 end of the hinge. Proline-to-serine substitution at residue 230 in a hinge containing potentially cleavable Pro-Ser and Pro-Thr peptide bonds increased the resistance of the antibody to cleavage by many IgA1 proteases. PMID:15731049

  12. Accurate identification of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) inhibitors using UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua; Zhou, Xiaotong; Wu, Baojian

    2015-01-01

    1. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) plays an irreplaceable role in detoxification of bilirubin and many drugs (e.g., SN-38). Here we aimed to explore the potential of UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells (or HeLa1A1 cells) as a tool to accurately identify UGT1A1 inhibitors. 2. Determination of glucuronidation rates (β-estradiol and SN-38 as the substrates) was performed using HeLa1A1 cells and uridine diphosphoglucuronic acid (UDPGA)-supplemented cDNA expressed UGT1A1 enzyme (or microsomes). The inhibitory effects (IC50 values) of 20 structurally diverse compounds on the UGT1A1 activity were determined using HeLa1A1 cells and microsomal incubations. 3. In HeLa1A1 cells, the IC50 values for inhibition of β-estradiol glucuronidation by the tested compounds ranged from 0.33 to 94.6 µM. In the microsomal incubations, the IC50 values ranged from 0.47 to 155 µM. It was found that the IC50 values of all test compounds derived from the cells were well consistent with those from the microsomes (deviated by less than two-fold). Further, the IC50 values from the cells were strongly correlated with those from microsomes (r = 0.944, p < 0.001). Likewise, the IC50 values (0.37-77.3 µM) for inhibition of SN-38 glucuronidation in the cells were close to those (0.42-122 µM) for glucuronidation inhibition in microsomes. A strong correlation was also observed between the two sets of IC50 values (r = 0.978, p < 0.001). 4. In conclusion, UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells were an appropriate tool to accurately depict the inhibition profiles of chemicals against UGT1A1. PMID:26068529

  13. Methods for Tumor Targeting with Salmonella typhimurium A1-R.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) has shown great preclinical promise as a broad-based anti-cancer therapeutic (please see Chapter 1 ). The present chapter describes materials and methods for the preclinical study of S. typhimurium A1-R in clinically-relevant mouse models. Establishment of orthotopic metastatic mouse models of the major cancer types is described, as well as other useful models, for efficacy studies of S. typhimurium A1-R or other tumor-targeting bacteria, as well. Imaging methods are described to visualize GFP-labeled S. typhimurium A1-R, as well as GFP- and/or RFP-labeled cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which S. typhimurium A1-R targets. The mouse models include metastasis to major organs that are life-threatening to cancer patients including the liver, lung, bone, and brain and how to target these metastases with S. typhimurium A1-R. Various routes of administration of S. typhimurium A1-R are described with the advantages and disadvantages of each. Basic experiments to determine toxic effects of S. typhimurium A1-R are also described. Also described are methodologies for combining S. typhimurium A1-R and chemotherapy. The testing of S. typhimurium A1-R on patient tumors in patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse models is also described. The major methodologies described in this chapter should be translatable for clinical studies. PMID:26846809

  14. An abundant dysfunctional apolipoprotein A1 in human atheroma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; DiDonato, Joseph A; Levison, Bruce S; Schmitt, Dave; Li, Lin; Wu, Yuping; Buffa, Jennifer; Kim, Timothy; Gerstenecker, Gary S; Gu, Xiaodong; Kadiyala, Chandra S; Wang, Zeneng; Culley, Miranda K; Hazen, Jennie E; Didonato, Anthony J; Fu, Xiaoming; Berisha, Stela Z; Peng, Daoquan; Nguyen, Truc T; Liang, Shaohong; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Cho, Leslie; Plow, Edward F; Fox, Paul L; Gogonea, Valentin; Tang, W H Wilson; Parks, John S; Fisher, Edward A; Smith, Jonathan D; Hazen, Stanley L

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have indicated that high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) and their major structural protein, apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), recovered from human atheroma are dysfunctional and are extensively oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO). In vitro oxidation of either apoA1 or HDL particles by MPO impairs their cholesterol acceptor function. Here, using phage display affinity maturation, we developed a high-affinity monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes both apoA1 and HDL that have been modified by the MPO-H2O2-Cl(-) system. An oxindolyl alanine (2-OH-Trp) moiety at Trp72 of apoA1 is the immunogenic epitope. Mutagenesis studies confirmed a critical role for apoA1 Trp72 in MPO-mediated inhibition of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)-dependent cholesterol acceptor activity of apoA1 in vitro and in vivo. ApoA1 containing a 2-OH-Trp72 group (oxTrp72-apoA1) is in low abundance within the circulation but accounts for 20% of the apoA1 in atherosclerosis-laden arteries. OxTrp72-apoA1 recovered from human atheroma or plasma is lipid poor, virtually devoid of cholesterol acceptor activity and demonstrated both a potent proinflammatory activity on endothelial cells and an impaired HDL biogenesis activity in vivo. Elevated oxTrp72-apoA1 levels in subjects presenting to a cardiology clinic (n = 627) were associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Circulating oxTrp72-apoA1 levels may serve as a way to monitor a proatherogenic process in the artery wall. PMID:24464187

  15. Camptothecin (CPT) directly binds to human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) and inhibits the hnRNP A1/topoisomerase I interaction.

    PubMed

    Manita, Daisuke; Toba, Yuzuru; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Matsumoto, Yuki; Kusayanagi, Tomoe; Takakusagi, Kaori; Tsukuda, Senko; Takada, Kazunori; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Kamisuki, Shinji; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Sugawara, Fumio

    2011-12-15

    Camptothecin (CPT) is an anti-tumor natural product that forms a ternary complex with topoisomerase I (top I) and DNA (CPT-top I-DNA). In this study, we identified the direct interaction between CPT and human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) using the T7 phage display technology. On an avidin-agarose bead pull down assay, hnRNP A1 protein was selectively pulled down in the presence of C20-biotinylated CPT derivative (CPT-20-B) both in vitro and in vivo. The interaction was also confirmed by an analysis on a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) device, yielding a K(D) value of 82.7 nM. A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis revealed that CPT inhibits the binding of hnRNP A1 to top I (K(D): 260 nM) in a non-competitive manner. Moreover, an in vivo drug evaluation assay using Drosophila melanogaster showed that the knockout of the hnRNP A1 homolog Hrb87F gene showed high susceptibility against 5-50 μM of CPT as compared to a wild-type strain. Such susceptibility was specific for CPT and not observed after treatment with other cytotoxic drugs. Collectively, our data suggests that CPT directly binds to hnRNP A1 and non-competitively inhibits the hnRNP A1/top I interaction in vivo. The knockout strain loses the hnRNP A1 homolog as a both CPT-binding partner and naïve brakes of top I, which enhances the formation of the CPT-top I-DNA ternary complexes and subsequently sensitizes the growth inhibitory effect of CPT in D. melanogaster. PMID:22071521

  16. An abundant dysfunctional apolipoprotein A1 in human atheroma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Levison, Bruce S.; Schmitt, Dave; Li, Lin; Wu, Yuping; Buffa, Jennifer; Kim, Timothy; Gerstenecker, Gary; Gu, Xiaodong; Kadiyala, Chandra; Wang, Zeneng; Culley, Miranda K.; Hazen, Jennie E.; DiDonato, Anthony J.; Fu, Xiaoming; Berisha, Stela; Peng, Daoquan; Nguyen, Truc; Liang, Shaohong; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Cho, Leslie; Plow, Edward F.; Fox, Paul L.; Gogonea, Valentin; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Parks, John S.; Fisher, Edward A.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate high density lipoproteins (HDL) and their major structural protein, apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), recovered from human atheroma, are dysfunctional and extensively oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO), while in vitro oxidation of apoA1/HDL by MPO impairs its cholesterol acceptor function. We developed a high affinity monoclonal antibody (mAb) that specifically recognizes apoA1/HDL modified by the MPO/H2O2/Cl-system using phage display affinity maturation. An oxindolyl alanine (2-OH-Trp) moiety at tryptophan 72 of apoA1 is the immunogenic epitope. Mutagenesis studies confirm a critical role for apoA1 Trp72 in MPO-mediated inhibition of ABCA1-dependent cholesterol acceptor activity of apoA1 in vitro and in vivo. ApoA1 containing a 2-OH-Trp72 group (oxTrp72-apoA1) is in low abundance within the circulation, but accounts for 20% of the apoA1 in atherosclerotic plaque. OxTrp72-apoA1 recovered from human atheroma or plasma was lipid-poor, virtually devoid of cholesterol acceptor activity, and demonstrated both potent pro-inflammatory activities on endothelial cells and impaired HDL biogenesis activity in vivo. Elevated oxTrp72-apoA1 levels in subjects presenting to a cardiology clinic (n=627) were associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Circulating oxTrp72-apoA1 levels may serve as a way to monitor a pro-atherogenic process in the artery wall. PMID:24464187

  17. Acyl-Carbon Bond Cleaving Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP51A1.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad; Wright, J Neville

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes in their resting state contain the heme-iron in a high-spin FeIII state. Binding of a substrate to a P450 enzyme allows transfer of the first electron, producing a Fe(II) species that reacts with oxygen to generate a low-spin iron superoxide intermediate (FeIII-O-O•) ready to accept the second electron to produce an iron peroxy anion intermediate (a, FeIII-O-O-). In classical monooxygenation reactions, the peroxy anion upon protonation fragments to form the reactive Compound I intermediate (Por•+FeIV=O), or its ferryl radical resonance form (FeIV-O•). However, when the substrate projects a carbonyl functionality, of the type b, at the active site as is the case for reactions catalyzed by CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP51A1, the peroxy anion (FeIII-O-O-) is trapped, yielding a tetrahedral intermediate (c) that fragments to an acyl-carbon cleavage product (d plus an acid). Analogous acyl-carbon cleavage reactions are also catalyzed by certain hepatic P450s and CYP125A1 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A further improvisation on the theme is provided by aldehyde deformylases that convert long-chain aliphatic aldehydes to hydrocarbons. CYP17A1 is involved in the biosynthesis of corticoids as well as androgens. The flux toward these two classes of hormones seems to be regulated by cytochrome b 5, at the level of the acyl-carbon cleavage reaction. It is this regulation of CYP17A1 that provides a safety mechanism, ensuring that during corticoid biosynthesis, which requires 17α-hydroxylation by CYP17A1, androgen formation is avoided (Fig. 4.1). PMID:26002733

  18. 26 CFR 1.56A-1 - Imposition of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Imposition of tax. 1.56A-1 Section 1.56A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Regulations Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning in 1969 and Ending in 1970 § 1.56A-1 Imposition of tax. (a) In general. Section 56(a) imposes an income tax...

  19. 26 CFR 1.402A-1 - Designated Roth Accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Designated Roth Accounts. 1.402A-1 Section 1.402A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.402A-1 Designated Roth Accounts. Q-1. What is a designated Roth account?...

  20. 26 CFR 1.669(a)-1 - Limitation on tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitation on tax. 1.669(a)-1 Section 1.669(a)-1... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.669(a)-1 Limitation on tax. (a) In general. Section 669 provides that... having been received by him, from a foreign trust created by a U.S. person, on the last day of...

  1. Evidence for charged B meson decays to a1+/-(1260)pi0 and a1(0)(1260)pi+/-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-12-31

    We present measurements of the branching fractions for the decays B;{+/-}-->a_{1};{+/-}(1260)pi;{0} and B;{+/-}-->a_{1};{0}(1260)pi;{+/-} from a data sample of 232x10;{6} BB[over ] pairs produced in e;{+}e;{-} annihilation through the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We measure the branching fraction B(B;{+/-}-->a_{1};{+/-}(1260)pi;{0})xB(a_{1};{+/-}(1260)-->pi;{-}pi;{+}pi;{+/-})=(13.2+/-2.7+/-2.1)x10;{-6} with a significance of 4.2sigma, and the branching fraction B(B;{+/-}-->a_{1};{0}(1260)pi;{+/-})xB(a_{1};{0}(1260)-->pi;{-}pi;{+}pi;{0})=(20.4+/-4.7+/-3.4)x10;{-6} with a significance of 3.8sigma, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. PMID:18233566

  2. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1A - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1A Section 1.666(a... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1A Amount allocated. (a) In general. In the case of a trust that... trusts that may accumulate income or that distribute corpus), section 666(a) prescribes rules...

  3. 26 CFR 1.501(a)-1 - Exemption from taxation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Exemption from taxation. 1.501(a)-1 Section 1.501... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(a)-1 Exemption from taxation. (a) In... law or regulations or for other good cause, an organization that has been determined by...

  4. 17 CFR 240.14a-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 240.14a-1 Section 240.14a-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14a:...

  5. 42 CFR 5a.1 - Statutory basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Statutory basis and purpose. 5a.1 Section 5a.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS RURAL... the Public Health Service Act. These provisions define “underserved rural community” for purposes...

  6. 42 CFR 5a.1 - Statutory basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Statutory basis and purpose. 5a.1 Section 5a.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS RURAL... the Public Health Service Act. These provisions define “underserved rural community” for purposes...

  7. 42 CFR 5a.1 - Statutory basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Statutory basis and purpose. 5a.1 Section 5a.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS RURAL... the Public Health Service Act. These provisions define “underserved rural community” for purposes...

  8. 42 CFR 5a.1 - Statutory basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statutory basis and purpose. 5a.1 Section 5a.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS RURAL... the Public Health Service Act. These provisions define “underserved rural community” for purposes...

  9. 42 CFR 5a.1 - Statutory basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Statutory basis and purpose. 5a.1 Section 5a.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS RURAL... the Public Health Service Act. These provisions define “underserved rural community” for purposes...

  10. 26 CFR 31.6402(a)-1 - Credits or refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credits or refunds. 31.6402(a)-1 Section 31... Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.6402(a)-1 Credits or refunds. (a) In general. For regulations under section 6402 of special application to credits or refunds of employment taxes, see §§ 31.6402(a)-2,...

  11. 26 CFR 31.6402(a)-1 - Credits or refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Credits or refunds. 31.6402(a)-1 Section 31... Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.6402(a)-1 Credits or refunds. (a) In general. For regulations under section 6402 of special application to credits or refunds of employment taxes, see §§ 31.6402(a)-2,...

  12. 26 CFR 31.6402(a)-1 - Credits or refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credits or refunds. 31.6402(a)-1 Section 31... Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.6402(a)-1 Credits or refunds. (a) In general. For regulations under section 6402 of special application to credits or refunds of employment taxes, see §§ 31.6402(a)-2,...

  13. 26 CFR 1.643(a)-1 - Deduction for distributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Deduction for distributions. 1.643(a)-1 Section 1.643(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME... distributions. The deduction allowable to a trust under section 651 and to an estate or trust under section...

  14. 26 CFR 1.643(a)-1 - Deduction for distributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deduction for distributions. 1.643(a)-1 Section 1.643(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME... distributions. The deduction allowable to a trust under section 651 and to an estate or trust under section...

  15. 26 CFR 1.56A-1 - Imposition of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) or by reason of a special rate of tax (such as the rate of tax on corporate capital gains). The tax... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Imposition of tax. 1.56A-1 Section 1.56A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES...

  16. 26 CFR 1.665(a)-1 - Undistributed net income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Undistributed net income. 1.665(a)-1 Section 1... Before January 1, 1969 § 1.665(a)-1 Undistributed net income. (a) The term undistributed net income means for any taxable year the distributable net income of the trust for that year as determined...

  17. Note on the photoproduction of the charged A1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condo, G. T.; Handler, T.

    1987-05-01

    Arguments made nearly 15 years ago by Fox and Hey are updated in the light of recent experimental findings. These indicate that the charge-exchange photoproduction of the A1 should dominate that of the A2. Consistency with the experimental data demands an A1 mass of 1335+/-20 MeV and width of 180+/-55 MeV.

  18. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1A - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1A Section 1.666(a... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1A Amount allocated. (a) In general. In the case of a trust that... trusts that may accumulate income or that distribute corpus), section 666(a) prescribes rules...

  19. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1A - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1A Section 1.666(a... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1A Amount allocated. (a) In general. In the case of a trust that... trusts that may accumulate income or that distribute corpus), section 666(a) prescribes rules...

  20. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1A - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1A Section 1.666(a... Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1A Amount allocated. (a) In general. In the case of a trust that is... that may accumulate income or that distribute corpus), section 666(a) prescribes rules for...

  1. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1A - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1A Section 1.666(a... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1A Amount allocated. (a) In general. In the case of a trust that... trusts that may accumulate income or that distribute corpus), section 666(a) prescribes rules...

  2. 32 CFR 809a.1 - Random installation entry point checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Random installation entry point checks. 809a.1... Entry Policy § 809a.1 Random installation entry point checks. The installation commander determines when, where, and how to implement random checks of vehicles or pedestrians. The commander conducts...

  3. 5 CFR Appendix A-1 to Subpart I... - Windchill Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Windchill Chart A Appendix A-1 to Subpart I of Part 550 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY... A-1 to Subpart I of Part 550—Windchill Chart EC01SE91.002 windchill chart in non-metric...

  4. 5 CFR Appendix A-1 to Subpart I... - Windchill Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Windchill Chart A Appendix A-1 to Subpart I of Part 550 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY... A-1 to Subpart I of Part 550—Windchill Chart EC01SE91.002 windchill chart in non-metric...

  5. 5 CFR Appendix A-1 to Subpart I... - Windchill Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Windchill Chart A Appendix A-1 to Subpart I of Part 550 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY... A-1 to Subpart I of Part 550—Windchill Chart EC01SE91.002 windchill chart in non-metric...

  6. 5 CFR Appendix A-1 to Subpart I... - Windchill Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Windchill Chart A Appendix A-1 to Subpart I of Part 550 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY... A-1 to Subpart I of Part 550—Windchill Chart EC01SE91.002 windchill chart in non-metric...

  7. 26 CFR 49.4262(a)-1 - Taxable transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Taxable transportation. 49.4262(a)-1 Section 49...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Transportation of Persons § 49.4262(a)-1 Taxable transportation. (a) In general. Unless excluded under section 4262(b) (see § 49.4262(b)-1),...

  8. 26 CFR 49.4262(a)-1 - Taxable transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Taxable transportation. 49.4262(a)-1 Section 49...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Transportation of Persons § 49.4262(a)-1 Taxable transportation. (a) In general. Unless excluded under section 4262(b) (see § 49.4262(b)-1),...

  9. 26 CFR 49.4262(a)-1 - Taxable transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Taxable transportation. 49.4262(a)-1 Section 49...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Transportation of Persons § 49.4262(a)-1 Taxable transportation. (a) In general. Unless excluded under section 4262(b) (see § 49.4262(b)-1),...

  10. 26 CFR 49.4262(a)-1 - Taxable transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Taxable transportation. 49.4262(a)-1 Section 49...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Transportation of Persons § 49.4262(a)-1 Taxable transportation. (a) In general. Unless excluded under section 4262(b) (see § 49.4262(b)-1),...