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Sample records for mannheimia haemolytica a1

  1. Mannheimia haemolytica A1-induced fibrinosuppurative meningoencephalitis in a naturally-infected Holstein-Friesian calf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an opportunistic bacterium that is widely recognized among the bovine respiratory disease complex as the predominant pathogen associated with pleuropneumonia in cattle. Among the characterized M. haemolytica serotypes, A1 is the major cause of severe pulmonary lesions in ca...

  2. Two outer membrane proteins are bovine lactoferrin-binding proteins in Mannheimia haemolytica A1.

    PubMed

    Samaniego-Barrón, Luisa; Luna-Castro, Sarahí; Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; de la Garza, Mireya

    2016-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is a Gram negative bacterium that is part of the bovine respiratory disease, which causes important economic losses in the livestock industry. In the present work, the interaction between M. haemolytica A1 and bovine lactoferrin (BLf) was studied. This iron-chelating glycoprotein is part of the mammalian innate-immune system and is present in milk and mucosal secretions; Lf is also contained in neutrophils secondary granules, which release this glycoprotein at infection sites. It was evidenced that M. haemolytica was not able to use iron-charged BLf (BholoLf) as a sole iron source; nevertheless, iron-lacked BLf (BapoLf) showed a bactericidal effect against M. haemolytica with MIC of 4.88 ± 1.88 and 7.31 ± 1.62 μM for M. haemolytica strain F (field isolate) and M. haemolytica strain R (reference strain), respectively. Through overlay assays and 2-D electrophoresis, two OMP of 32.9 and 34.2 kDa with estimated IP of 8.18 and 9.35, respectively, were observed to bind both BapoLf and BholoLf; these OMP were identified by Maldi-Tof as OmpA (heat-modifiable OMP) and a membrane protein (porin). These M. haemolytica BLf binding proteins could be interacting in vivo with both forms of BLf depending on the iron state of the bovine. PMID:27599994

  3. Genome sequences of Mannheimia haemolytica serotype A1 strains D153 and D193 from bovine pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report two genomes, one complete and one draft, from virulent bovine strains of Mannheimia haemolytica(strains D171 and D35)serotype A2 recovered prior to the field usage of modern antimicrobial drugs....

  4. Complete closed genome sequences of Mannheimia haemolytica serotypes A1 and A6 isolated from cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannhemimia haemolytica is a respiratory pathogen affecting cattle and related ruminants worldwide. M. haemolytica is commonly associated with Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex (BRDC), a polymicrobial, multifactorial disease. We present the first two complete closed genomes of this species using a...

  5. Towards Development of an Edible Vaccine against Bovine Pneumonic Pasteurellosis Using Transgenic White Clover Expressing a Mannheimia haemolytica A1 Leukotoxin 50 Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Raymond W. H.; Strommer, Judith; Hodgins, Doug; Shewen, Patricia E.; Niu, Yongqing; Lo, Reggie Y. C.

    2001-01-01

    Development of vaccines against bovine pneumonia pasteurellosis, or shipping fever, has focused mainly on Mannheimia haemolytica A1 leukotoxin (Lkt). In this study, the feasibility of expressing Lkt in a forage plant for use as an edible vaccine was investigated. Derivatives of the M. haemolytica Lkt in which the hydrophobic transmembrane domains were removed were made. Lkt66 retained its immunogenicity and was capable of eliciting an antibody response in rabbits that recognized and neutralized authentic Lkt. Genes encoding a shorter Lkt derivative, Lkt50, fused to a modified green fluorescent protein (mGFP5), were constructed for plant transformation. Constructs were screened by Western immunoblot analysis for their ability to express the fusion protein after agroinfiltration in tobacco. The fusion construct pBlkt50-mgfp5, which employs the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter for transcription, was selected and introduced into white clover by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Transgenic lines of white clover were recovered, and expression of Lkt50-GFP was monitored and confirmed by laser confocal microscopy and Western immunoblot analysis. Lkt50-GFP was found to be stable in clover tissue after drying of the plant material at room temperature for 4 days. An extract containing Lkt50-GFP from white clover was able to induce an immune response in rabbits (via injection), and rabbit antisera recognized and neutralized authentic Lkt. This is the first demonstration of the expression of an M. haemolytica antigen in plants and paves the way for the development of transgenic plants expressing M. haemolytica antigens as an edible vaccine against bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. PMID:11500456

  6. Response of the ruminant respiratory tract to Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Brogden, K A

    2000-07-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of loss to the sheep and cattle industry throughout the world. Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica is one of the most important respiratory pathogens of domestic ruminants and causes serious outbreaks of acute pneumonia in neonatal, weaned and growing lambs, calves, and goats. M. haemolytica is also an important cause of pneumonia in adult animals. Transportation, viral infections with agents such as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, parainfluenza-3 virus or bovine respiratory syncytial virus, overcrowding, housing of neonates and weaned animals together and other stressful conditions predispose animals to M. haemolytica infection [1, 2]. This review assimilates some of the findings key to cellular and molecular responses of the lung from a pathologist's perspective. It includes some of what is known and underscores areas that are not fully understood. PMID:10967288

  7. Immunogenicity of Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Fenninger, Judith C.; Leitner, Deborah R.; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is able to cause disease in humans and in a wide range of animal hosts, including fowl cholera in birds, atrophic rhinitis in pigs, and snuffles in rabbits. Together with Mannheimia haemolytica, P. multocida also represents a major bacterial causative agent of bovine respiratory disease (BRD), which is one of the most important causes for economic losses for the cattle backgrounding and feedlot industry. Commercially available vaccines only partially prevent infections caused by P. multocida and M. haemolytica. Thus, this study characterized the immunogenicity of P. multocida and M. haemolytica outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) upon intranasal immunization of BALB/c mice. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) revealed that OMVs derived from P. multocida or M. haemolytica are able to induce robust humoral and mucosal immune responses against the respective donor strain. In addition, also significant cross-immunogenic potential was observed for both OMV types. Colonization studies showed that a potential protective immune response against P. multocida is not only achieved by immunization with P. multocida OMVs, but also by immunization with OMVs derived from M. haemolytica. Immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that M. haemolytica OMVs induce a more complex immune response compared to P. multocida OMVs. The outer membrane proteins OmpA, OmpH, and P6 were identified as the three major immunogenic proteins of P. multocida OMVs. Amongst others, the serotype 1-specific antigen, an uncharacterized outer membrane protein, as well as the outer membrane proteins P2 and OmpA were found to be the most important antigens of M. haemolytica OMVs. These findings are useful for the future development of broad-spectrum OMV based vaccines against BRD and other infections caused by P. multocida or M. haemolytica. PMID:23731905

  8. Characterization of Mannheimia haemolytica biofilm formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boukahil, Ismail; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2015-01-30

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the primary bacterial agent in the bovine respiratory disease complex. It is thought that M. haemolytica colonizes the tonsillar crypts of cattle as a commensal and subsequently descends into the lungs to cause disease. Many bacterial species persist in the host as biofilms. There is limited information about the ability of M. haemolytica to form biofilms. The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro model for M. haemolytica biofilm formation. We found that M. haemolytica required at least 36 h to form robust biofilms on plastic in vitro when incubated in RPMI-1640 tissue culture medium at 37 °C, with maximal biofilm formation being evident at 48 h. Biofilm formation was inhibited by adding the monosaccharides d(+) galactose and d(+) mannose to the growth medium. Addition of antibodies to the M. haemolytica surface protein OmpA also reduced biofilm formation. Upon evaluating the macromolecules within the biofilm extracellular polymeric substance we found it contained 9.7 μg/cm(2) of protein, 0.81 μg/cm(2) of total carbohydrate, and 0.47 μg/cm(2) of extracellular DNA. Furthermore, proteinase K treatment significantly decreased biofilms (P<0.05) while α-amylase and micrococcal nuclease decreased biofilms to a lesser extent. M. haemolytica biofilm cells were more resistant than planktonic cells to the antibiotics florfenicol, gentamicin, and tulathromycin. These results provide evidence that M. haemolytica can form biofilms, which could contribute to its ability to persist as a commensal in the bovine upper respiratory tract. PMID:25480166

  9. Molecular epidemiology of Mannheimia haemolytica and Mannheimia glucosida associated with ovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Omaleki, Lida; Browning, Glenn F; Allen, Joanne L; Barber, Stuart R

    2012-07-01

    While Mannheimia haemolytica and Mannheimia glucosida have been recognized as causes of intramammary infection in sheep, there has been no investigation of the epidemiology of the strains involved. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis was used to study the molecular epidemiology of isolates of these 2 species associated with ovine mastitis. Ten distinct strains were recognized among 12 M. haemolytica isolates, and 7 distinct strains among 13 M. glucosida isolates. The results demonstrate a high diversity of isolates with the ability to cause ovine mastitis. However, the presence of some identical isolates may suggest the possibility of horizontal transmission of these species in some flocks, possibly through lamb sucking, and/or differences in the capacity of some isolates to cause mastitis in sheep. PMID:22621951

  10. Genome sequences of mannheimia haemolytica serotype A2: ovine and bovine isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes the genome sequences of Mannheimia haemolytica, serotype A2 isolated from pneumonic lungs of two different ruminant species, one from Ovis aries, designated as Ovine (O) and the other from Bos taurus, designated as Bovine (B)....

  11. Bibersteinia trehalosi Inhibits the Growth of Mannheimia haemolytica by a Proximity-Dependent Mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica is the only pathogen that consistently causes severe bronchopneumonia and rapid death of bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under experimental conditions. Paradoxically, Bibersteinia (Pasteurella) trehalosi and occasionally Pasteurella multocida have been isola...

  12. Bibersteinia trehalosi inhibits the growth of mannheimia haemolytica by a proximity-dependent mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica is the only pathogen that consistently causes severe bronchopneumonia and rapid death of bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under experimental conditions. Paradoxically, Bibersteinia (Pasteurella) trehalosi and Pasteurella multocida have been isolated from BHS ...

  13. Proximity-dependent inhibition of growth of mannheimia haemolytica by pasteurella multocida.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Bibersteinia trehalosi have been identified in the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis). Of these pathogens, M. haemolytica has been shown to consistently cause fatal pneumonia in BHS under experimental conditions. However, M. hae...

  14. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mannheimia haemolytica from Bovine Sources.

    PubMed

    Klima, Cassidy L; Cook, Shaun R; Zaheer, Rahat; Laing, Chad; Gannon, Vick P; Xu, Yong; Rasmussen, Jay; Potter, Andrew; Hendrick, Steve; Alexander, Trevor W; McAllister, Tim A

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease is a common health problem in beef production. The primary bacterial agent involved, Mannheimia haemolytica, is a target for antimicrobial therapy and at risk for associated antimicrobial resistance development. The role of M. haemolytica in pathogenesis is linked to serotype with serotypes 1 (S1) and 6 (S6) isolated from pneumonic lesions and serotype 2 (S2) found in the upper respiratory tract of healthy animals. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 11 strains of M. haemolytica, representing all three serotypes and performed comparative genomics analysis to identify genetic features that may contribute to pathogenesis. Possible virulence associated genes were identified within 14 distinct prophage, including a periplasmic chaperone, a lipoprotein, peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase and a stress response protein. Prophage content ranged from 2-8 per genome, but was higher in S1 and S6 strains. A type I-C CRISPR-Cas system was identified in each strain with spacer diversity and organization conserved among serotypes. The majority of spacers occur in S1 and S6 strains and originate from phage suggesting that serotypes 1 and 6 may be more resistant to phage predation. However, two spacers complementary to the host chromosome targeting a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase and a glycosyl transferases group 1 gene are present in S1 and S6 strains only indicating these serotypes may employ CRISPR-Cas to regulate gene expression to avoid host immune responses or enhance adhesion during infection. Integrative conjugative elements are present in nine of the eleven genomes. Three of these harbor extensive multi-drug resistance cassettes encoding resistance against the majority of drugs used to combat infection in beef cattle, including macrolides and tetracyclines used in human medicine. The findings here identify key features that are likely contributing to serotype related pathogenesis and specific targets for vaccine design intended to reduce the

  15. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mannheimia haemolytica from Bovine Sources

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Cassidy L.; Cook, Shaun R.; Zaheer, Rahat; Laing, Chad; Gannon, Vick P.; Xu, Yong; Rasmussen, Jay; Potter, Andrew; Hendrick, Steve; Alexander, Trevor W.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease is a common health problem in beef production. The primary bacterial agent involved, Mannheimia haemolytica, is a target for antimicrobial therapy and at risk for associated antimicrobial resistance development. The role of M. haemolytica in pathogenesis is linked to serotype with serotypes 1 (S1) and 6 (S6) isolated from pneumonic lesions and serotype 2 (S2) found in the upper respiratory tract of healthy animals. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 11 strains of M. haemolytica, representing all three serotypes and performed comparative genomics analysis to identify genetic features that may contribute to pathogenesis. Possible virulence associated genes were identified within 14 distinct prophage, including a periplasmic chaperone, a lipoprotein, peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase and a stress response protein. Prophage content ranged from 2–8 per genome, but was higher in S1 and S6 strains. A type I-C CRISPR-Cas system was identified in each strain with spacer diversity and organization conserved among serotypes. The majority of spacers occur in S1 and S6 strains and originate from phage suggesting that serotypes 1 and 6 may be more resistant to phage predation. However, two spacers complementary to the host chromosome targeting a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase and a glycosyl transferases group 1 gene are present in S1 and S6 strains only indicating these serotypes may employ CRISPR-Cas to regulate gene expression to avoid host immune responses or enhance adhesion during infection. Integrative conjugative elements are present in nine of the eleven genomes. Three of these harbor extensive multi-drug resistance cassettes encoding resistance against the majority of drugs used to combat infection in beef cattle, including macrolides and tetracyclines used in human medicine. The findings here identify key features that are likely contributing to serotype related pathogenesis and specific targets for vaccine design intended to reduce the

  16. Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin binds cyclophilin D on bovine neutrophil mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Aulik, Nicole A; Hellenbrand, Katrina M; Kisiela, Dagmara; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2011-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an important member of the bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex that causes fibrinous and necrotizing pleuropneumonia in cattle. BRD is characterized by abundant neutrophil infiltration into the alveoli and fibrin deposition. The most important virulence factor of M. haemolytica is its leukotoxin. Previous research in our laboratory has shown that the leukotoxin is able to enter into and traffic to the mitochondria of a bovine lymphoblastoid cell line (BL-3). In this study, we evaluated the ability of LKT to be internalized and travel to mitochondria in bovine neutrophils. We demonstrate that LKT binds bovine neutrophil mitochondria and co-immunoprecipitates with TOM22 and TOM40, which are members of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial (TOM) membrane family. Upon entry into mitochondria, LKT co-immunoprecipitates with cyclophilin D, a member of the mitochondria permeability transition pore. Unlike BL-3 cells, bovine neutrophil mitochondria are not protected against LKT by the membrane-stabilizing agent cyclosporin A, nor were bovine neutrophil mitochondria protected by the permeability transition pore antagonist bongkrekic acid. In addition, we found that bovine neutrophil cyclophilin D is significantly smaller than that found in BL-3 cells. Bovine neutrophils were protected against LKT by protein transfection of an anti-cyclophilin D antibody directed at the C-terminal amino acids, but not an antibody against the first 50 N-terminal amino acids. In contrast, BL-3 cells were protected by antibodies against either the C-terminus or N-terminus of cyclophilin. These data confirm that LKT binds to bovine neutrophil mitochondria, but indicate there are distinctions between neutrophil and BL-3 mitochondria that might reflect differences in cyclophilin D. PMID:21220005

  17. Genome sequences of serotype A6 Mannheimia haemolytica isolates D174 and D38 recovered from bovine pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report two genomes, one complete and one draft, from virulent bovine strains of Mannheimia haemolytica(strains D174 and D38)serotype A2 recovered prior to the field usage of modern antimicrobial drugs....

  18. Characterization of Mannheimia haemolytica in beef calves via nasopharyngeal culture and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Capik, Sarah F; White, Brad J; Lubbers, Brian V; Apley, Michael D; Mosier, Derek A; Larson, Robert L; Murray, Robert W

    2015-09-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is a major bacterial component of bovine respiratory disease (BRD); unfortunately, very little is known about M. haemolytica transmission dynamics among cattle. Identifying potential variation in M. haemolytica populations over time and induction of nasopharyngeal colonization and subsequent shedding are 2 areas where knowledge is lacking. In our study, 2 separate loads of 20 mixed-origin, male calves were purchased through an order buyer on different dates. Deep nasopharyngeal cultures (NPC) were performed on all calves on arrival and, if M. haemolytica-negative, a second screening culture was obtained. Calves that were negative on 2 initial NPCs (NEG; n = 4) were subsequently challenged with a previously isolated field strain of M. haemolytica in both the upper and lower respiratory tract, individually housed, and then monitored for M. haemolytica shedding via NPCs at 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 days postchallenge. Naturally M. haemolytica-positive calves (2 per load) were kept for additional daily cultures (POS; n = 4). Individual calf M. haemolytica status for both the POS and NEG groups was inconsistent between study days. Additionally, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis performed on isolates from the positive cultures showed that the NEG calves did not shed the M. haemolytica challenge strain, but rather 2 distinct clusters of M. haemolytica were shared among POS and NEG calves regardless of their initial status. Although sample sizes were small, these findings illustrate how variable the results of a single nasopharyngeal swab can be and the challenges of using an individual culture to truly represent animal M. haemolytica status. PMID:26330399

  19. Beta(2) integrin Mac-1 is a receptor for Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin on bovine and ovine leukocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pneumonia caused by Mannheimia haemolytica is an important disease of cattle (BO), domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries) and bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis). Leukotoxin (Lkt) produced by M. haemolytica is cytolytic to all leukocyte subsets of these three species. Although it is certain that CD18, the...

  20. Rapid detection of Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from bacterial culture

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jyoti; Dixit, Shivendra Kumar; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed to detect Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from a bacterial culture. Introduction: M. haemolytica is one of the most important and well-established etiological agents of pneumonia in sheep and other ruminants throughout the world. Accurate diagnosis of M. haemolytica primarily relies on bacteriological examination, biochemical characteristics and, biotyping and serotyping of the isolates. In an effort to facilitate rapid M. haemolytica detection, polymerase chain reaction assay targeting Pasteurella haemolytica serotype-1 specific antigens (PHSSA), Rpt2 and 12S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes were used to detect M. haemolytica directly from lung tissues and from bacterial culture. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 archived lung tissues from sheep that died of pneumonia on an organized farm were used. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) based on two-amplicons targeted PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica were used for identification of M. haemolytica isolates in culture from the lung samples. All the 12 lung tissue samples were tested for the presence M. haemolytica by PHSSA and Rpt2 genes based PCR and its confirmation by sequencing of the amplicons. Results: All the 12 lung tissue samples tested for the presence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica by mPCR were found to be positive. Amplification of 12S rRNA gene fragment as internal amplification control was obtained with each mPCR reaction performed from DNA extracted directly from lung tissue samples. All the M. haemolytica were also positive for mPCR. No amplified DNA bands were observed for negative control reactions. All the three nucleotide sequences were deposited in NCBI GenBank (Accession No. KJ534629, KJ534630 and KJ534631). Sequencing of the amplified products revealed the identity of 99-100%, with published sequence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica available in the NCBI database. Sheep specific mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene sequence

  1. Mannheimia haemolytica and Its Leukotoxin Cause Macrophage Extracellular Trap Formation by Bovine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Aulik, Nicole A.; Hellenbrand, Katrina M.

    2012-01-01

    Human and bovine neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of extracellular trapping and killing of pathogens. Recently, we reported that bovine neutrophils release NETs in response to the important respiratory pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin (LKT). Here, we demonstrate macrophage extracellular trap (MET) formation by bovine monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to M. haemolytica or its LKT. Both native fully active LKT and noncytolytic pro-LKT (produced by an lktC mutant of M. haemolytica) stimulated MET formation. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed a network of DNA fibrils with colocalized histones in extracellular traps released from bovine macrophages. Formation of METs required NADPH oxidase activity, as previously demonstrated for NET formation. METs formed in response to LKT trapped and killed a portion of the M. haemolytica cells. Bovine alveolar macrophages, but not peripheral blood monocytes, also formed METs in response to M. haemolytica cells. MET formation was not restricted to bovine macrophages. We also observed MET formation by the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and by human THP-1 cell-derived macrophages, in response to Escherichia coli hemolysin. The latter is a member of the repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxin family related to the M. haemolytica leukotoxin. This study demonstrates that macrophages, like neutrophils, can form extracellular traps in response to bacterial pathogens and their exotoxins. PMID:22354029

  2. Nasal isolation of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida as predictors of respiratory disease in shipped calves.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J D; Holland, B P; Step, D L; Payton, M E; Confer, A W

    2015-04-01

    Three hundred ninety five calves were purchased from sale barns and delivered to the Willard Sparks Beef Research Center. Nasal swabs were collected to determine if presence of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida in the upper respiratory tract (URT) can facilitate diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Samples were collected at arrival and at treatment for BRD. Clinically healthy control calves were sampled at time of treatment of sick calves. M. haemolytica was more commonly isolated from calves at treatment than at time of arrival or from control calves. M. haemolytica was more common in calves requiring treatment than in those never treated. Need for treatment and number of treatments were negatively associated with average daily gain, supporting the accuracy of diagnosis. These results suggest that URT sampling, when combined with clinical diagnosis, may assist in providing greater diagnostic accuracy, improving ability to evaluate risk factors, interventions, and treatments. PMID:25599936

  3. Susceptibility to tulathromycin in Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle over a 3-year period

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Trevor W.; Cook, Shaun; Klima, Cassidy L.; Topp, Ed; McAllister, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle were tested for tulathromycin resistance. Cattle were sampled over a 3-year period, starting 12 months after approval of tulathromycin for prevention and treatment of bovine respiratory disease. Nasopharyngeal samples from approximately 5,814 cattle were collected when cattle entered feedlots (N = 4) and again from the same cattle after ≥60 days on feed. The antimicrobial use history for each animal was recorded. Mannheimia haemolytica was isolated from 796 (13.7%) entry samples and 1,038 (20.6%) ≥ 60 days samples. Of the cattle positive for M. haemolytica, 18.5, 2.9, and 2.4% were administered therapeutic concentrations of tulathromycin, tilmicosin, or tylosin tartrate, respectively. In addition, 13.2% were administered subtherapeutic concentrations of tylosin phosphate in feed. In years one and two, no tulathromycin-resistant M. haemolytica were detected, whereas five isolates (0.4%) were resistant in year three. These resistant isolates were collected from three cattle originating from a single pen, were all serotype 1, and were genetically related (≥89% similarity) according to pulsed-field gel electrophoreses patterns. The five tulathromycin-resistant isolates were multi-drug resistant also exhibiting resistance to oxytetracycline, tilmicosin, ampicillin, or penicillin. The macrolide resistance genes erm(42), erm(A), erm(B), erm(F), erm(X) and msr(E)-mph(E), were not detected in the tulathromycin-resistant M. haemolytica. This study showed that tulathromycin resistance in M. haemolytica from a general population of feedlot cattle in western Canada was low and did not change over a 3-year period after tulathromycin was approved for use in cattle. PMID:24130555

  4. Transmission dynamics of Mannheimia haemolytica in newly-received beef bulls at fattening operations.

    PubMed

    Timsit, E; Christensen, H; Bareille, N; Seegers, H; Bisgaard, M; Assié, S

    2013-01-25

    The primary objective of this study was to determine, at the lung level, whether single or multiple clones of Mannheimia haemolytica are present within a pen during a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) episode. A secondary objective was to assess whether M. haemolytica isolates obtained from nasal swabs (NS) are identical to those isolated deeper within the respiratory tract. Sixteen BRD episodes that naturally occurred in 12 pens of eight to 12 bulls (n=112) newly-received at three fattening operations were investigated. One hundred and seventy five M. haemolytica isolates were collected from 239 pairs of trans-tracheal aspirations (TTA) and NS performed during these 16 BRD episodes. M. haemolytica isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PFGE types obtained from NS and TTA were then compared. M. haemolytica was isolated during 14 BRD episodes. Two to three different clones of M. haemolytica were recovered during 10 episodes whereas only one clone was recovered in four episodes. A moderate agreement (kappa=0.50) between NS and TTA for M. haemolytica isolation was observed. Identical PFGE types were only observed in 77% of matched NS-TTA pairs. The significant within-pen diversity of M. haemolytica during BRD episodes indicates that the disease is not primarily due to the spread of a single virulent clone among cattle and highlights the importance of predisposing factors that enable the resident flora to overcome the cattle's immune system. The results also demonstrate that isolates recovered from NS are not always representative of the isolates present deeper within the respiratory tract. PMID:22901531

  5. Adenosine-5'-triphosphate release by Mannheimia haemolytica, lipopolysaccharide, and interleukin-1 stimulated bovine pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Craddick, Michael; Patel, Rakhi; Lower, Amanda; Highlander, Sarah; Ackermann, Mark; McClenahan, David

    2012-09-15

    Mannheimia haemolytica, one of the agents associated with bovine respiratory disease complex, can cause severe lung pathology including the leakage of vascular products into the airways and alveoli. Previous work by this laboratory has demonstrated that bovine lung endothelial and epithelial cells undergo dramatic permeability increases when exposed to adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP). Therefore, we wanted to determine if ATP levels were elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from calves experimentally infected with M. haemolytica. In addition, cultured bovine pulmonary epithelial (BPE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed and live M. haemolytica bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and zymosan activated plasma (ZAP) to determine whether they might release extracellular ATP during in vitro infection. Calves experimentally exposed to M. haemolytica had an approximately 2-fold higher level of ATP in their BAL samples compared to control. BPE cells exposed to increasing numbers of heat-killed or live M. haemolytica had significantly increased levels of ATP release as compared to time-matched controls. Finally, BPE cells treated with several concentrations of LPS and IL-1 had increases in ATP release as compared to time-matched controls. This increase appeared to be a result of active ATP secretion by the cells, as cell viability was similar between treated and non-treated cells. Neither ZAP nor LTA induced any ATP release by the cells. In conclusion, ATP levels are elevated in lung secretions from calves infected with M. haemolytica. In addition, lung epithelial cells can actively release ATP when exposed to heat-killed or live M. haemolytica, LPS or IL-1. PMID:22771196

  6. Characterization of Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle that were healthy or treated for bovine respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Cassidy L.; Alexander, Trevor W.; Hendrick, Steve; McAllister, Tim A.

    2014-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the principal bacterial pathogen associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). As an opportunistic pathogen, M. haemolytica is also frequently isolated from the respiratory tract of healthy cattle. This study examined the characteristics of M. haemolytica collected using deep nasal swabs from healthy cattle (n = 49) and cattle diagnosed with BRD (n = 41). Isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), serotyped, and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen isolates for virulence [leukotoxin C (lktC), putative adhesin (ahs), outer-membrane lipoprotein (gs60), O-sialoglycoprotease (gcp), transferring-binding protein B (tbpB) and UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-2-epimerase (nmaA)] and antimicrobial resistance [tet(H), blaROB-1, erm(X), erm(42), msr(E)-mph(E) and aphA-1] genes. Isolates were genetically diverse but in three instances, M. haemolytica with the same pulsotype, resistance phenotype, and genotype were collected from cattle with BRD. This occurred once between cattle located in two different feedlots, once between cattle in the same feedlot, but in different pens, and once among cattle from the same feedlot in the same pen. Isolates from healthy cattle were primarily serotype 2 (75.5%) while those from individuals with BRD were serotype 1 (70.7%) or 6 (19.5%). Resistance to at least one antibiotic occurred more frequently (P < 0.001) in M. haemolytica collected from cattle with BRD (37%) compared with those that were healthy (2%). Overall, tetracycline resistance (18%) was the most prevalent resistant phenotype. All tetracycline-resistant M. haemolytica encoded tet(H). Ampicillin resistance (6%) and neomycin resistance (15%) were detected and corresponded to the presence of the blaROB-1 and aphA-1 genes, respectively. Tilmicosin resistance (6%) was also detected, but the resistance genes responsible were not identified. The virulence genes lktC, ahs, gs60, and gcp

  7. Diversity of Mannheimia haemolytica and pasteurella trehalosi serotypes from apparently healthy sheep and abattoir specimens in the highlands of Wollo, North East Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sisay, T; Zerihun, A

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence and serotypic diversity of Mannheimia [Pasteurella] haemolytica and Pasteurella trehalosi from nasal swabs, sera and abattoir specimens from sheep in the highlands of Wollo, North East Ethiopia was investigated. Prevalence rates of 83% and 75% of these microorganisms were found in the serum samples and nasal swabs, respectively, from apparently healthy sheep. In a local abattoir, 205 lungs were investigated, 34% of which showed pneumonia, from which samples were collected from 51 lungs and the same number of corresponding tonsils. Mannheimia and Pasteurella species were isolated from 59% of these pneumonic lungs and 69% of the respective tonsils. M. haemolytica serotypes accounted for 41 (59%) and P. trehalosi for 11 (32%) of the isolates from the abattoir specimens. The majority (67%) of isolates from nasal swabs were P. trehalosi, M. haemolytica being isolated f rom 4 (13%) of the swabs. M. glucosida was isolated only from the tonsils. The predominant serotypes of the isolates from both the nasal swabs and the abattoir specimens were M. haemolytica A1 (17%) and P. trehalosi T4 (16%) and T3 (13%). P. trehalosi T15 was less commonly encountered, while M. haemolytica A9 and A13 were not isolated. Studies on sera from 100 sheep indicated that antibodies against M. haemolytica serotype A1 (14%) were most common, followed by A5 and A8 (each 10%) and A9 and P. trehalosi T3 (each 9%) and T4 (8%). Antibodies against M. glucosida or serotype All occurred in 2% of the sera. Multiple serotypes were common in all types of samples. The importance of including in vaccines the most prevalent serotypes involved in the pneumonia of sheep in the area is discussed. PMID:12625399

  8. Defective bacterial clearance is responsible for the enhanced lung pathology characteristic of Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia in bighorn sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular and cellular basis for the enhanced lung pathology and mortality caused by Mannheimia haemolytica in bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadenesis), in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries), is not clear. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) of BHS are four- to eight-fold more susceptibl...

  9. Serum Headspace Analysis With An Electronic Nose And Comparison With Clinical Signs Following Experimental Infection Of Cattle With Mannheimia Haemolytica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Henri; Turner, Claire; Chambers, Mark; Reinhold, Petra

    2009-05-01

    Electronic noses (e-noses) have been widely used for medical applications or in the food industry. However, little is known about their utility for early disease detection in animals. In this study, 20 calves were experimentally infected with Mannheimia haemolytica A1. Blood serum was collected from 7 days before infection to 5 days after infection and headspace of sera was analysed using the ST214 (Scensive Tech. Ltd., Leeds, UK) e-nose. Differences between pre- and post infection status were investigated and a temporal profile of sensor responses was compared with body temperature over the course of infection. A similar profile for sensor responses and body temperature indicated the e-nose was detecting a genuine physiological response following infection.

  10. Comparison of Passively Transferred Antibodies in Bighorn and Domestic Lambs Reveals One Factor in Differential Susceptibility of These Species to Mannheimia haemolytica-Induced Pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica consistently causes fatal bronchopneumonia in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under natural and experimental conditions. Leukotoxin is the primary virulence factor of this organism. BHS are more susceptible to developing fatal pneumonia than the related species Ovis aries...

  11. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic integration and modelling of marbofloxacin in calves for Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Potter, T; Illambas, J; Pelligand, L; Rycroft, A; Lees, P

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of marbofloxacin were established in calves for six strains of each of the pneumonia pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. The distribution of marbofloxacin into inflamed (exudate) and non-inflamed (transudate) tissue cage fluids allowed comparison with the serum concentration-time profile. To establish the PD profile, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined in Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and calf serum. Moderately higher MICs were obtained for serum compared to MHB. An initial integration of PK-PD data established C(max)/MIC ratios of 45.0 and AUC(24h)/MIC values of 174.7 h, based on serum MICs, for both bacterial species. Using bacterial time-kill curves, generated ex vivo for serum marbofloxacin concentrations, PK-PD modelling established three levels of growth inhibition: AUC(24 h)/MIC ratios for no reduction, 3 log(10) and 4 log(10) reductions in bacterial count from the initial inoculum count were 41.9, 59.5 and 68.0 h for M. haemolytica and 48.6, 64.9 and 74.8 h for P. multocida, on average respectively. Inter-strain variability for 3 log(10) and 4 log(10) reductions in bacterial count was smaller for P. multocida than for M. haemolytica. In conjunction with literature data on MIC(90) values, the present results allowed prediction of dosages for efficacy for each organism for the three levels of growth inhibition. PMID:23084327

  12. Multiplex PCR To Identify Macrolide Resistance Determinants in Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Simon; Desmolaize, Benoit; Jaju, Puneet; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida are major etiological agents in respiratory tract infections of cattle. Although these infections can generally be successfully treated with veterinary macrolide antibiotics, a few recent isolates have shown resistance to these drugs. Macrolide resistance in members of the family Pasteurellaceae is conferred by combinations of at least three genes: erm(42), which encodes a monomethyltransferase and confers a type I MLSB (macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B) phenotype; msr(E), which encodes a macrolide efflux pump; and mph(E), which encodes a macrolide-inactivating phosphotransferase. Here, we describe a multiplex PCR assay that detects the presence of erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) and differentiates between these genes. In addition, the assay distinguishes P. multocida from M. haemolytica by amplifying distinctive fragments of the 23S rRNA (rrl) genes. One rrl fragment acts as a general indicator of gammaproteobacterial species and confirms whether the PCR assay has functioned as intended on strains that are negative for erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E). The multiplex system has been tested on more than 40 selected isolates of P. multocida and M. haemolytica and correlated with MICs for the veterinary macrolides tulathromycin and tilmicosin, and the newer compounds gamithromycin and tildipirosin. The multiplex PCR system gives a rapid and robustly accurate determination of macrolide resistance genotypes and bacterial genus, matching results from microbiological methods and whole-genome sequencing. PMID:22564832

  13. Comparison of Mannheimia haemolytica isolates from an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Rainbolt, S; Pillai, D K; Lubbers, B V; Moore, M; Davis, R; Amrine, D; Mosier, D

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the clonal relatedness of Mannheimia haemolytica isolates responsible for an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease in a commercial feedlot. The isolates were obtained from the lungs of 21 calves with fatal pneumonia that were part of a group of 206 total calves. All isolates were serotyped and analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and for antibiotic sensitivity patterns. ELISA and immunoblotting assays were performed to compare serum antibody levels to M. haemolytica antigens in calves with fatal pneumonia to those calves that survived the outbreak. Isolates were categorized into 14 different PFGE groups based on 90% similarity. Two Group D isolates (1 and 6), and 3 Group H isolates (14, 15, and 16) were characterized as 100% similar. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles defined 8 groups based on differences in patterns of resistance between isolates. The two 100% similar isolates from PFGE Group D were both in susceptibility Group 1. All but isolate 14 from PFGE Group H (3, 15, 16, and 19) were in susceptibility Group 4a. Serum antibody levels to M. haemolytica antigens in the dead calves were not different than the antibody levels in the 185 calves that survived the outbreak. Immunoblots of selected isolates from each of the PFGE groups demonstrated only minimal differences in antigenic profiles between strains when reacted with serum from calves that either died from or survived the outbreak. Based on the characteristics of these isolates, multiple strains of M. haemolytica were responsible for fatal pneumonia during this outbreak. PMID:26711032

  14. Transfection of non-susceptible cells with Ovis aries recombinant lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 renders susceptibility to Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an important etiological agent of pneumonia in domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). Leukotoxin (Lkt) produced by this organism is the principal virulence factor responsible for the acute inflammation and lung injury characteristic of M. haemolytica caused disease. Previously, w...

  15. Bordetella bronchiseptica fimbrial protein-enhanced immunogenicity of a Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin fragment.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, S; Kania, S A; Nair, R V; McPherson, J T; Moore, R N; Bemis, D A

    2001-09-14

    Leukotoxin produced by Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica is an important virulence factor in shipping fever pneumonia in feedlot cattle and is a critical protective antigen. In this study, the immune response to a chimeric protein generated by combining a gene fragment encoding neutralizing epitopes of M. haemolytica leukotoxin and a fimbrial protein gene (fim N) from Bordetella bronchiseptica was evaluated. The recombinant gene was cloned in a bacterial expression vector under the control of the tac promoter and expressed as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in Escherichia coli. Immunization of mice with the recombinant protein, GST-LTXFIM elicited a significantly stronger anti-leukotoxin antibody response than comparable immunizations with GST-LTX fusion proteins lacking FIM N. The GST-LTXFIM was also more stable than GST-LTX during storage at -80 degrees C, thus alleviating a stability problem inherent to leukotoxin. This chimeric protein may be a candidate for inclusion in new generation vaccines against shipping fever pneumonia. PMID:11535337

  16. Differences in susceptibility to Mannheimia haemolytica-associated mastitis between two breeds of dairy sheep.

    PubMed

    Fragkou, Ilectra A; Skoufos, John; Cripps, Peter J; Kyriazakis, Ilias; Papaioannou, Nikos; Boscos, Costas M; Tzora, Athina; Fthenakis, George C

    2007-08-01

    We used a Mannheimia haemolytica isolate to study differences in susceptibility to experimental mastitis between two breeds of dairy sheep. The isolate was deposited into the teat duct of Karagouniko (K, n=8) or Frisarta (F, n=8) ewes. The animals were monitored by means of clinical, bacteriological, cytological and pathological methods. K ewes did not develop any systemic or mammary clinical signs, whilst F ewes became ill and developed acute clinical mastitis 12 h later (P<0.001). Bacteria were isolated from 34/48 samples from K ewes and from 46/46 samples from F ewes. Positive California mastitis test (CMT) results were 17/24 samples from K ewes and 23/23 samples from F ewes; leucocytes were seen in Giemsa-stained films. Total pathology score summed over all group K ewes was 41 (maximum possible: 128); Man. haemolytica was isolated from 12/24 tissue samples. Total pathology score summed over all group F ewes was 93; Man. haemolytica was isolated from 24/24 tissue samples. Hyperplastic lymphoid nodules consisting of lymphocytes and plasma cells with germinal activity were characteristically present at the border between teat duct-teat cistern of group K ewes; no such structures were observed in teats of group F ewes. The results identified differences in susceptibility/resistance to a mastitis pathogen among animals of the two breeds. Defence mechanisms of the teat appeared to be inadequate against the invading organisms; as lymphoid nodules have been considered important defensive mechanisms of the ovine teat, their observed lack in Frisarta ewes might have predisposed them to development of mastitis. PMID:17451623

  17. Effect of subtherapeutic vs. therapeutic administration of macrolides on antimicrobial resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica and enterococci isolated from beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R; Klima, Cassidy L; Stanford, Kim; Alexander, Trevor; Topp, Edward; Read, Ron R; McAllister, Tim A

    2013-01-01

    Macrolides are the first-line treatment against bovine respiratory disease (BRD), and are also used to treat infections in humans. The macrolide, tylosin phosphate, is often included in the diet of cattle as a preventative for liver abscesses in many regions of the world outside of Europe. This study investigated the effects of administering macrolides to beef cattle either systemically through a single subcutaneous injection (therapeutic) or continuously in-feed (subtherapeutic), on the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Mannheimia haemolytica and Enterococcus spp. isolated from the nasopharynx and faeces, respectively. Nasopharyngeal and faecal samples were collected weekly over 28 days from untreated beef steers and from steers injected once with tilmicosin or tulathromycin or continuously fed tylosin phosphate at dosages recommended by manufacturers. Tilmicosin and tulathromycin were effective in lowering (P < 0.05) the prevalence of M. haemolytica, whereas subtherapeutic tylosin had no effect. M. haemolytica isolated from control- and macrolide-treated animals were susceptible to macrolides as well as to other antibiotics. Major bacteria co-isolated with M. haemolytica from the nasopharynx included Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., Escherichia coli and Bacillus spp. With the exception of M. haemolytica and P. multocida, erythromycin resistance was frequently found in other isolated species. Both methods of macrolide administration increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of erythromycin resistant enterococci within the population, which was comprised almost exclusively of Enterococcus hirae. Injectable macrolides impacted both respiratory and enteric microbes, whereas orally administered macrolides only influenced enteric bacteria. PMID:23750157

  18. Effect of subtherapeutic vs. therapeutic administration of macrolides on antimicrobial resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica and enterococci isolated from beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Klima, Cassidy L.; Stanford, Kim; Alexander, Trevor; Topp, Edward; Read, Ron R.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrolides are the first-line treatment against bovine respiratory disease (BRD), and are also used to treat infections in humans. The macrolide, tylosin phosphate, is often included in the diet of cattle as a preventative for liver abscesses in many regions of the world outside of Europe. This study investigated the effects of administering macrolides to beef cattle either systemically through a single subcutaneous injection (therapeutic) or continuously in-feed (subtherapeutic), on the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Mannheimia haemolytica and Enterococcus spp. isolated from the nasopharynx and faeces, respectively. Nasopharyngeal and faecal samples were collected weekly over 28 days from untreated beef steers and from steers injected once with tilmicosin or tulathromycin or continuously fed tylosin phosphate at dosages recommended by manufacturers. Tilmicosin and tulathromycin were effective in lowering (P < 0.05) the prevalence of M. haemolytica, whereas subtherapeutic tylosin had no effect. M. haemolytica isolated from control- and macrolide-treated animals were susceptible to macrolides as well as to other antibiotics. Major bacteria co-isolated with M. haemolytica from the nasopharynx included Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., Escherichia coli and Bacillus spp. With the exception of M. haemolytica and P. multocida, erythromycin resistance was frequently found in other isolated species. Both methods of macrolide administration increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of erythromycin resistant enterococci within the population, which was comprised almost exclusively of Enterococcus hirae. Injectable macrolides impacted both respiratory and enteric microbes, whereas orally administered macrolides only influenced enteric bacteria. PMID:23750157

  19. Effects of experimental challenge of ewes with Mannheimia haemolytica on subsequent milk composition.

    PubMed

    Fragkou, Ilectra A; Solomakos, Nikos; Dagleish, Mark P; Cripps, Peter J; Papaioannou, Nikos; Boscos, Costas M; Ververidis, Haris N; Billinis, Charalambos; Orfanou, Denise C; Govaris, Alexander; Kyriazakis, Ilias; Fthenakis, George C

    2008-08-01

    The objective was to describe the physicochemical changes during the early phase of subclinical mastitis and to associate them with pathological findings. A Mannheimia haemolytica strain was deposited into one teat duct of 25 ewes and the clinical, bacteriological, cytological, physicochemical (pH, milk composition), gross-pathological and histological findings were subsequently recorded. The organism was consistently isolated from samples of teat duct material (140/150) but not from mammary secretion (50/150). California Mastitis Test (CMT) scores increased (>1) and remained high (143/150 samples) after challenge; polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) predominated in milk films, but the proportion of lymphocytes and macrophages progressively increased. Increased pH values (>7.0) were recorded in the mammary secretion from the challenged side. Furthermore, content of fat, total proteins and lactose therein decreased markedly. Histological changes (leucocytic infiltration, destruction of epithelial cells) were observed in the mammary parenchyma of the ewes. The present results confirm that the reduction of milk constituents is the effect of cellular damage and can occur soon after infection. PMID:18680619

  20. Impact of Timing and Dosage of a Fluoroquinolone Treatment on the Microbiological, Pathological, and Clinical Outcomes of Calves Challenged with Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Lhermie, Guillaume; Ferran, Aude A; Assié, Sébastien; Cassard, Hervé; El Garch, Farid; Schneider, Marc; Woerhlé, Frédérique; Pacalin, Diane; Delverdier, Maxence; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain; Meyer, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of an early and low inoculum-adjusted marbofloxacin treatment was evaluated on microbiological and clinical outcomes in calves infected with 4.10(7) CFU of Mannheimia haemolytica A1. Twenty-two calves were included based on their rectal temperature rise in the 10 h after challenge and allocated in four groups, receiving a single intramuscular injection of saline (CON), 2 mg/kg marbofloxacin 2-4 h after inclusion (early treatment, E2), 2 or 10 mg/kg marbofloxacin 35-39 h after inclusion (late treatments, L2, L10). In CON calves, M. haemolytica DNA loads in bronchoalveolar lavages continuously increased from inclusion to day 4, and were associated with persistent respiratory clinical signs and lung lesions. At times of early and late treatments, M. haemolytica loads ranged within 3.5-4 and 5.5-6 log10 DNA copies/mL, respectively. Early 2 mg/kg marbofloxacin treatment led to rapid and total elimination of bacteria in all calves. The late treatments induced a reduction of bacterial loads, but 3 of 6 L2 and 1 of 6 L10 calves were still positive for M. haemolytica at day 4. Except for CON calves, all animals exhibited clinical improvement within 24 h after treatment. However, early 2 mg/kg treatment was more efficacious to prevent pulmonary lesions, as indicated by the reduction of the extension and severity of gross lesions and by the histopathological scores. These results demonstrated for the first time that a reduced antibiotic regimen given at an early stage of the disease and targeting a low bacterial load could be efficacious in a natural bovine model of pneumonia. PMID:26973615

  1. Impact of Timing and Dosage of a Fluoroquinolone Treatment on the Microbiological, Pathological, and Clinical Outcomes of Calves Challenged with Mannheimia haemolytica

    PubMed Central

    Lhermie, Guillaume; Ferran, Aude A.; Assié, Sébastien; Cassard, Hervé; El Garch, Farid; Schneider, Marc; Woerhlé, Frédérique; Pacalin, Diane; Delverdier, Maxence; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain; Meyer, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of an early and low inoculum-adjusted marbofloxacin treatment was evaluated on microbiological and clinical outcomes in calves infected with 4.107 CFU of Mannheimia haemolytica A1. Twenty-two calves were included based on their rectal temperature rise in the 10 h after challenge and allocated in four groups, receiving a single intramuscular injection of saline (CON), 2 mg/kg marbofloxacin 2–4 h after inclusion (early treatment, E2), 2 or 10 mg/kg marbofloxacin 35–39 h after inclusion (late treatments, L2, L10). In CON calves, M. haemolytica DNA loads in bronchoalveolar lavages continuously increased from inclusion to day 4, and were associated with persistent respiratory clinical signs and lung lesions. At times of early and late treatments, M. haemolytica loads ranged within 3.5–4 and 5.5–6 log10 DNA copies/mL, respectively. Early 2 mg/kg marbofloxacin treatment led to rapid and total elimination of bacteria in all calves. The late treatments induced a reduction of bacterial loads, but 3 of 6 L2 and 1 of 6 L10 calves were still positive for M. haemolytica at day 4. Except for CON calves, all animals exhibited clinical improvement within 24 h after treatment. However, early 2 mg/kg treatment was more efficacious to prevent pulmonary lesions, as indicated by the reduction of the extension and severity of gross lesions and by the histopathological scores. These results demonstrated for the first time that a reduced antibiotic regimen given at an early stage of the disease and targeting a low bacterial load could be efficacious in a natural bovine model of pneumonia. PMID:26973615

  2. Co-expression of ovine LPS receptor CD14 with Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin receptor LFA-1 or Mac-1 does not enhance leukotoxin-induced cytotoxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leukotoxin (Lkt) and LPS are the major virulence determinants of Mannheimia haemolytica that contribute to the pathogenesis of bovine and ovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. We have previously identified bovine and ovine CD18 as the functional receptor for Lkt. LPS complexes with Lkt resulting in incre...

  3. Bivalent vaccination against pneumonic pasteurellosis in domestic sheep and goats with modified-live in-frame lktA deletion mutants of Mannheimia haemolytica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A temperature-sensitive shuttle vector, pBB80C, was utilized to generate in-frame deletion mutants of the leukotoxin structural gene (lktA) of Mannheimia haemolytica serotypes 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 12. Culture supernatants from the mutants contained a truncated protein with an approximate molecu...

  4. Mucosal and parenteral vaccination against pneumonic pasteurellosis in cattle with a modified-live in-frame lktA deletion mutant of Mannheimia haemolytica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new temperature-conditional shuttle vector, pBB80C, was constructed and utilized to generate an in-frame deletion in the leukotoxin structural gene of Mannheimia haemolytica serotype 1. Culture supernatants from the mutant contained no detectable cytotoxicity to BL-3 lymphocyte targets, and contai...

  5. Combinations of Macrolide Resistance Determinants in Field Isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida▿

    PubMed Central

    Desmolaize, Benoit; Rose, Simon; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections in cattle are commonly associated with the bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. These infections can generally be successfully treated in the field with one of several groups of antibiotics, including macrolides. A few recent isolates of these species exhibit resistance to veterinary macrolides with phenotypes that fall into three distinct classes. The first class has type I macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B antibiotic resistance and, consistent with this, the 23S rRNA nucleotide A2058 is monomethylated by the enzyme product of the erm(42) gene. The second class shows no lincosamide resistance and lacks erm(42) and concomitant 23S rRNA methylation. Sequencing of the genome of a representative strain from this class, P. multocida 3361, revealed macrolide efflux and phosphotransferase genes [respectively termed msr(E) and mph(E)] that are arranged in tandem and presumably expressed from the same promoter. The third class exhibits the most marked drug phenotype, with high resistance to all of the macrolides tested, and possesses all three resistance determinants. The combinations of erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) are chromosomally encoded and intermingled with other exogenous genes, many of which appear to have been transferred from other members of the Pasteurellaceae. The presence of some of the exogenous genes explains recent reports of resistance to additional drug classes. We have expressed recombinant versions of the erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) genes within an isogenic Escherichia coli background to assess their individually contributions to resistance. Our findings indicate what types of compounds might have driven the selection for these resistance determinants. PMID:21709086

  6. Acylation Enhances, but Is Not Required for, the Cytotoxic Activity of Mannheimia haemolytica Leukotoxin in Bighorn Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Sai A.; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Munske, Gerhard R.; Raghavan, Bindu; Kugadas, Abirami; Bavanthasivam, Jegarubee; Highlander, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica causes pneumonia in domestic and wild ruminants. Leukotoxin (Lkt) is the most important virulence factor of the bacterium. It is encoded within the four-gene lktCABD operon: lktA encodes the structural protoxin, and lktC encodes a trans-acylase that adds fatty acid chains to internal lysine residues in the protoxin, which is then secreted from the cell by a type 1 secretion system apparatus encoded by lktB and lktD. It has been reported that LktC-mediated acylation is necessary for the biological effects of the toxin. However, an LktC mutant that we developed previously was only partially attenuated in its virulence for cattle. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of LktC-mediated acylation in Lkt-induced cytotoxicity. We performed this study in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) (BHS), since they are highly susceptible to M. haemolytica infection. The LktC mutant caused fatal pneumonia in 40% of inoculated BHS. On necropsy, a large number of necrotic polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were observed in the lungs. Lkt from the mutant was cytotoxic to BHS PMNs in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Flow cytometric analysis of mutant Lkt-treated PMNs revealed the induction of necrosis. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed the presence of pores and blebs on mutant-Lkt-treated PMNs. Mass spectrometric analysis confirmed that the mutant secreted an unacylated Lkt. Taken together, these results suggest that acylation is not necessary for the cytotoxic activity of M. haemolytica Lkt but that it enhances the potency of the toxin. PMID:26216418

  7. A Three-way Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mannheimia haemolytica Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Paulraj; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; McDermott, Jason E.; Bumgarner, Roger E.

    2010-10-04

    Mannhemia haemolytica is a Gram- negative bacterium and the principal etiological agent associated with bovine respiratory disease complex. They transform from a benign commensal to a deadly pathogen during stress such as viral infection and transportation to feedlots, and cause acute pleuropneumonia commonly known as shipping fever. The U.S beef industry alone loses more than one billion dollars annually to shipping fever and despite its enormous economic importance there are no specific and accurate genetic markers, which would aid in understanding M. haemolytica pathogenesis and epidemiology at molecular level and assist in devising an effective control strategy.

  8. A chimeric protein comprising the immunogenic domains of Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin and outer membrane protein PlpE induces antibodies against leukotoxin and PlpE.

    PubMed

    Batra, Sai Arun; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Donofrio, Gaetano; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is a very important pathogen of pneumonia in ruminants. Bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are highly susceptible to M. haemolytica-caused pneumonia which has significantly contributed to the drastic decline of bighorn sheep population in North America. Pneumonia outbreaks in wild BHS can cause mortality as high as 90%. Leukotoxin is the critical virulence factor of M. haemolytica. In a 'proof of concept' study, an experimental vaccine containing leukotoxin and surface antigens of M. haemolytica developed by us induced 100% protection of BHS, but required multiple booster injections. Vaccination of wild BHS is difficult. But they can be vaccinated at the time of transplantation into a new habitat. Administration of booster doses, however, is impossible. Therefore, a vaccine that does not require booster doses is necessary to immunize BHS against M. haemolytica pneumonia. Herpesviruses are ideal vectors for development of such a vaccine because of their ability to undergo latency with subsequent reactivation. As the first step towards developing a herpesvirus-vectored vaccine, we constructed a chimeric protein comprising the leukotoxin-neutralizing epitopes and the immuno-dominant epitopes of the outer membrane protein PlpE. The chimeric protein was efficiently expressed in primary BHS lung cells. The immunogenicity of the chimeric protein was evaluated in mice before inoculating BHS. Mice immunized with the chimeric protein developed antibodies against M. haemolytica leukotoxin and PlpE. More importantly, the anti-leukotoxin antibodies effectively neutralized leukotoxin-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, these results represent the successful completion of the first step towards developing a herpesvirus-vectored vaccine for controlling M. haemolytica pneumonia in BHS, and possibly other ruminants. PMID:27269790

  9. N-terminal region of Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin serves as a mitochondrial targeting signal in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kisiela, Dagmara I; Aulik, Nicole A; Atapattu, Dhammika N; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2010-07-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin (LktA) is a member of the RTX toxin family that specifically kills ruminant leukocytes. Previous studies have shown that LktA induces apoptosis in susceptible cells via a caspase-9-dependent pathway that involves binding of LktA to mitochondria. In this study, using the bioinformatics tool MitoProt II we identified an N-terminal amino acid sequence of LktA that represents a mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS). We show that expression of this sequence, as a GFP fusion protein within mammalian cells, directs GFP to mitochondria. By immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that LktA interacts with the Tom22 and Tom40 components of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM), which suggests that import of this toxin into mitochondria involves a classical import pathway for endogenous proteins. We also analysed the amino acid sequences of other RTX toxins and found a MTS in the N-terminal region of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ApxII and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli EhxA, but not in A. pleuropneumoniae ApxI, ApxIII, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans LtxA or the haemolysin (HlyA) from uropathogenic strains of E. coli. These findings provide a new evidence for the importance of the N-terminal region in addressing certain RTX toxins to mitochondria. PMID:20109159

  10. Molecular epidemiology of an outbreak of clinical mastitis in sheep caused by Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Omaleki, Lida; Browning, Glenn F; Allen, Joanne L; Markham, Philip F; Barber, Stuart R

    2016-08-15

    The aetiology and epidemiology of outbreaks of clinical mastitis in sheep under extensive pastoral conditions are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to conduct a detailed investigation of a clinical mastitis outbreak that affected more than 10% of 230 at-risk ewes on a sheep and grain producing property in south east Australia during drought conditions in 2009. Milk samples were collected aseptically from all affected ewes and plated on sheep blood agar for bacterial identification. M. haemolytica was isolated from 80% of the samples that yielded cultivable microorganisms and thus was the main microorganism responsible for the outbreak. Analysis of the restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of the isolates using pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed some evidence of clonality, suggesting the possibility of horizontal transmission, but there was also considerable diversity between the clusters of closely related isolates. Multilocus sequence typing of the M. haemolytica isolates revealed most of the isolates belonged to ST1 with no association between the PFGE and MLST fingerprints of the isolates. Resistance to neomycin, streptomycin and sulphafurazole was detected in some of the isolates, but they were all susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, ceftiofur, amoxycillin/clavulanic acid, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, erythromycin and trimethoprim. This is the first published record of a comparison of the strains of M. haemolytica involved in a clinical mastitis outbreak in sheep and demonstrates the importance of this pathogen in sheep production systems, particularly during adverse climatic conditions and increased stocking rate. PMID:27374911

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1 in normal bovine lung and bovine lung infected with Mannheimia haemolytica

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Amira Talaat; Singh, Baljit; Al-Dissi, Ahmad N.

    2015-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an important cause of pneumonia in feedlot cattle. Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor responsible for the induction of antioxidant enzymes, such as heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), within the lung. The expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 was immunohistochemically evaluated in 4 calves 24 h after experimental infection with M. haemolytica. Calves receiving normal saline served as controls. In the infected lungs, cytoplasmic Nrf2 expression was high in macrophages and bronchioles and low in alveolar epithelium, whereas nuclear expression was high in endothelial cells, macrophages, and bronchioles and lowest in alveolar epithelium. Normal lung samples displayed only faint Nrf2 cytoplasmic staining within bronchiolar epithelium. Expression of HO-1 was detected within the cytoplasm of macrophages and bronchiolar epithelial cells in all infected lung samples, whereas normal lungs displayed only weak cytoplasmic staining in bronchiolar epithelial cells. These findings suggest that bronchiolar epithelial cells and macrophages up-regulate Nrf2 expression early in the course of infection, which results in increased expression of HO-1 within these cells. PMID:25852222

  12. Comparative minimum inhibitory and mutant prevention drug concentrations of enrofloxacin, ceftiofur, florfenicol, tilmicosin and tulathromycin against bovine clinical isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Blondeau, J M; Borsos, S; Blondeau, L D; Blondeau, B J J; Hesje, C E

    2012-11-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the most prevalent cause of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and this disease accounts for 75% of morbidity, 50-70% of feedlot deaths and is estimated to cost up to $1 billion dollars annually in the USA. Antimicrobial therapy is essential for reducing morbidity, mortality and impacting on the financial burden of this disease. Due to the concern of increasing antimicrobial resistance, investigation of antibacterial agents for their potential for selecting for resistance is of paramount importance. A novel in vitro measurement called the mutant prevention concentration (MPC) defines the antimicrobial drug concentration necessary to block the growth of the least susceptible cells present in high density (≥10(7) colony forming units/ml) bacterial populations such as those seen in acute infection. We compared the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and MPC values for 5 antimicrobial agents (ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, florfenicol, tilmicosin, tulathromycin) against 285 M. haemolytica clinical isolates. The MIC(90)/MPC(90) values for each agent respectively were as follows: 0.016/2, 0.125/1, 2/≥16, 8/≥32, 2/8. Dosing to achieve MPC concentrations (where possible) may serve to reduce the selection of bacterial subpopulations with reduced antimicrobial susceptibility. The rank order of potency based on MIC(90) values was ceftiofur > enrofloxacin > florfenicol = tulathromycin > tilmicosin. The rank order of potency based on MPC(90) values was enrofloxacin > ceftiofur > tulathromycin > florfenicol ≥ tilmicosin. PMID:22677482

  13. Bovine Gamma Delta T Cells Contribute to Exacerbated IL-17 Production in Response to Co-Infection with Bovine RSV and Mannheimia haemolytica

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Jodi L.; Rusk, Rachel A.; Guerra-Maupome, Mariana; Briggs, Robert E.; Sacco, Randy E.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in children under five years of age. IL-17 and Th17 responses are increased in children infected with HRSV and have been implicated in both protective and pathogenic roles during infection. Bovine RSV (BRSV) is genetically closely related to HRSV and is a leading cause of severe respiratory infections in young cattle. While BRSV infection in the calf parallels many aspects of human infection with HRSV, IL-17 and Th17 responses have not been studied in the bovine. Here we demonstrate that calves infected with BRSV express significant levels of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22; and both CD4 T cells and γδ T cells contribute to this response. In addition to causing significant morbidity from uncomplicated infections, BRSV infection also contributes to the development of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), a leading cause of morbidity in both beef and dairy cattle. BRDC is caused by a primary viral infection, followed by secondary bacterial pneumonia by pathogens such as Mannheimia haemolytica. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo infection with M. haemolytica results in increased expression of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22. We have also developed an in vitro model of BRDC and show that co-infection of PBMC with BRSV followed by M. haemolytica leads to significantly exacerbated IL-17 production, which is primarily mediated by IL-17-producing γδ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that calves, like humans, mount a robust IL-17 response during RSV infection; and suggest a previously unrecognized role for IL-17 and γδ T cells in the pathogenesis of BRDC. PMID:26942409

  14. Bovine Gamma Delta T Cells Contribute to Exacerbated IL-17 Production in Response to Co-Infection with Bovine RSV and Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    McGill, Jodi L; Rusk, Rachel A; Guerra-Maupome, Mariana; Briggs, Robert E; Sacco, Randy E

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in children under five years of age. IL-17 and Th17 responses are increased in children infected with HRSV and have been implicated in both protective and pathogenic roles during infection. Bovine RSV (BRSV) is genetically closely related to HRSV and is a leading cause of severe respiratory infections in young cattle. While BRSV infection in the calf parallels many aspects of human infection with HRSV, IL-17 and Th17 responses have not been studied in the bovine. Here we demonstrate that calves infected with BRSV express significant levels of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22; and both CD4 T cells and γδ T cells contribute to this response. In addition to causing significant morbidity from uncomplicated infections, BRSV infection also contributes to the development of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), a leading cause of morbidity in both beef and dairy cattle. BRDC is caused by a primary viral infection, followed by secondary bacterial pneumonia by pathogens such as Mannheimia haemolytica. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo infection with M. haemolytica results in increased expression of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22. We have also developed an in vitro model of BRDC and show that co-infection of PBMC with BRSV followed by M. haemolytica leads to significantly exacerbated IL-17 production, which is primarily mediated by IL-17-producing γδ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that calves, like humans, mount a robust IL-17 response during RSV infection; and suggest a previously unrecognized role for IL-17 and γδ T cells in the pathogenesis of BRDC. PMID:26942409

  15. Transmission of mannheimia haemolytica from domestic sheep (ovis aries) to bighorn sheep (ovis canadensis) : Unequivocal demonstration with green fluorescent protien-tagged organisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bighorn sheep (BHS) die of pneumonia when they commingle with domestic sheep (DS). However, these studies did not conclusively prove the transmission of pathogens from DS to BHS. The objective of this study was to determine unambiguously whether Mannheimia hae...

  16. Expression, purification and immunologic analysis of three Pasteurella haemolytica A1 28-30 kDa lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Dabo, S M; Confer, A W; Styre, D; Murphy, G L

    1994-09-01

    Three genes, tandemly arranged on the Pasteurella haemolytica A1 chromosome and encoding similar 28-30 kDa proteins, were previously cloned and sequenced by our laboratory. In this study, we demonstrate that the cloned genes encode lipoproteins, as previously suggested by DNA sequence analysis. To further analyze the bovine immune response to these proteins, the individual genes were cloned separately into an expression vector and recombinant forms of the three proteins were purified after expression in Escherichia coli. Sera from cattle vaccinated with live P. haemolytica or P. haemolytica bacterins and from cattle naturally exposed to P. haemolytica recognized each of the recombinant proteins. Vaccination with live or killed whole bacteria did not elicit an immune response of the same quality as that which developed in response to natural infection. A statistically significant correlation existed between resistance to challenge and a high antibody response to one of these three proteins. PMID:7700132

  17. Molecular gene cloning and nucleotide sequencing and construction of an aroA mutant of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1.

    PubMed Central

    Tatum, F M; Briggs, R E; Halling, S M

    1994-01-01

    The aroA gene of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 was cloned by complementation of the aroA mutation in Escherichia coli K-12 strain AB2829. The nucleotide sequence of a 2.2-kb fragment encoding aroA predicted an open reading frame product 434 amino acids long that shows homology to other bacterial AroA proteins. Several strategies to inactivate aroA were unsuccessful. Gene replacement was finally achieved by constructing a replacement plasmid with aroA inactivated by insertion of a P. haemolytica ampicillin resistance fragment into a unique NdeI site in aroA. A hybrid plasmid was constructed by joining the aroA replacement plasmid with a 4.2-kb P. haemolytica plasmid which encodes streptomycin resistance. Following PhaI methylation, the replacement plasmid was introduced by electroporation into P. haemolytica NADC-D60, a plasmidless strain of serotype 1A. Allelic exchange between the replacement plasmid and the chromosome of P. haemolytica gave rise to an ampicillin-resistant mutant which grew on chemically defined P. haemolytica medium supplemented with aromatic amino acids but failed to grow on the same medium lacking tryptophan. Southern blot analysis confirmed that aroA of the mutant was inactivated and that the mutant was without a plasmid. Images PMID:8031095

  18. Characterization of epitopes involved in the neutralization of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 leukotoxin.

    PubMed

    Lainson, F A; Murray, J; Davies, R C; Donachie, W

    1996-09-01

    Defined segments of the leukotoxin A gene (lktA) from an A1 serotype of Pasteurella haemolytica were cloned into a plasmid vector and expressed as LacZ alpha fusion proteins. These fusion proteins were electrophoresed in SDS-PAGE gels and their immunoblotting reactivities with several monoclonal antibodies characterized. The epitope recognized by a strongly neutralizing monoclonal antibody was localized to a 32 amino acid region near the C terminus of the leukotoxin A (LktA) molecule. The epitope recognized by a non-neutralizing antibody was localized to a 33 amino acid region immediately adjacent. Smaller recombinant peptides containing these epitopes were not antigenic, but a polypeptide encompassing 229 amino acids at the C terminus evoked neutralizing antibodies when used to immunize specific-pathogen-free lambs. The distributions of linear epitopes recognized by this antiserum and by antisera raised to full-length recombinant LktA and to native LktA produced by P. haemolytica serotype A1 were determined by their reactivities with a set of overlapping 10 amino acid synthetic peptides. This revealed a complex distribution of linear epitopes at the C-terminal end of LktA. Toxin-neutralizing antibodies in convalescent sheep serum were shown to be directed against conformational epitopes by selective absorption of antibodies directed against linear epitopes. PMID:8828217

  19. Cloning and expression of the leukotoxin gene of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Lo, R Y; Shewen, P E; Strathdee, C A; Greer, C N

    1985-12-01

    A clone bank of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 was constructed by partial digestion of the genomic DNA with Sau3A and ligation of 5- to 10-kilobase-pair fragments into the BamHI site of the plasmid vector pBR322. After transformation into Escherichia coli K-12, a total of 4 X 10(3) recombinant clones was obtained. These were screened for the production of P. haemolytica soluble antigens by a colony enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay blot method with a rabbit antiserum raised against the soluble antigens. The clones producing P. haemolytica soluble antigens were then analyzed for the production of the leukotoxin by a cytotoxicity assay with cells from a bovine leukemia-derived B-lymphocyte cell line as the target cells. Positive clones were identified, and subsequent restriction analysis of the recombinant plasmids showed that the same 6.3 kilobase pairs of insert DNA was cloned in either of the two orientations into the plasmid vector pBR322. One of the clones was selected for further characterization of the leukotoxin as produced in E. coli. Tests for heat lability and target cell species specificity with canine, porcine, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes indicated that the activity of the cloned leukotoxin was identical to that of the P. haemolytica leukotoxin. Furthermore, the E. coli-produced leukotoxin was also neutralized by bovine or rabbit antiserum known to have antitoxic activity. When cellular proteins from the E. coli clones were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis, a 100,000-dalton protein was identified which corresponded to one of the soluble antigens found in the leukotoxic culture supernatant of P. haemolytica. These results demonstrated that the gene(s) for the P. haemolytica leukotoxin have been cloned and that the leukotoxin was expressed in E. coli. PMID:3905610

  20. The upper respiratory tract is a natural reservoir of haemolytic Mannheimia species associated with ovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Omaleki, Lida; Browning, Glenn F; Allen, Joanne L; Markham, Philip F; Barber, Stuart R

    2015-12-31

    Lamb suckling has been suggested to be an important way of infecting a ewe's udder with different bacteria, including Mannheimia haemolytica. To test the potential role of lambs in transferring Mannheimia species to the ewe's udder, the restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of isolates obtained from nasopharyngeal swabs were compared with those obtained from cases of mastitis. Sterile cotton swabs were used to collect nasopharyngeal samples from 50 ewes and 36 lambs from three flocks. M. haemolytica and Mannheimia glucosida as well as haemolytic Mannheimia ruminalis-like organisms were detected in the upper respiratory tract of lambs and ewes. Comparison of the restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of the isolates suggested that the M. haemolytica isolates obtained from different milk samples from ewes with mastitis were more clonal than those obtained from the nasal swabs. However, some nasal isolates within both Mannheimia species had restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns identical to those obtained from milk samples from ewes with mastitis, indicating that lambs may have a role in transferring these organisms to the udder. More clonality was observed between the M. glucosida isolates than between M. haemolytica isolates. PMID:26542125

  1. Alterations in bovine platelet function and acute phase proteins induced by Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Cheryk, L A; Hooper-McGrevy, K E; Gentry, P A

    1998-01-01

    Platelet function was assessed by aggregometry in 10 Holstein calves before and after exposure to Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) by intrabronchial challenge. At 24 h after exposure the platelets had become more reactive to stimulation with known platelet agonists such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) and the platelet aggregates that formed were more resistant to disaggregation. The activation of platelets was an early response in the challenged calves as platelet function had returned to pretreatment levels 72 h after exposure to the bacteria while the acute phase reactant proteins, haptoglobin and fibrinogen, were approaching their peak values and alpha 2-macroglobulin levels had also risen significantly (P < 0.05) at this time. The plasma levels of these proteins were still elevated and albumin levels were depressed 6 d post-treatment. At post-mortem all calves exhibited pneumonic tissue damage. When P. haemolytica leukotoxin was added directly to bovine platelet suspensions both spontaneous aggregation and an increase in the aggregation response to ADP and PAF stimulation were observed. The morphological appearance of the platelet aggregates exhibited the typical pattern for bovine platelets with 2 distinct zones of cells being visible within each aggregate. One zone contained platelets in which the cytoplasmic granules were still evident and the other zone contained irregularly shaped platelets devoid of granular content. In the latter zone, discrete gaps, or pores, were evident in the plasma membrane of numerous platelets. This pore formation is characteristic of leukotoxin action and is not observed in ADP or PAF induced aggregates. Images Figure 2. PMID:9442932

  2. Sequence diversity, cytotoxicity and antigenic similarities of the leukotoxin of isolates of Mannheimia species from mastitis in domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Omaleki, Lida; Browning, Glenn F; Barber, Stuart R; Allen, Joanne L; Srikumaran, Subramaniam; Markham, Philip F

    2014-11-01

    Species within the genus Mannheimia are among the most important causes of ovine mastitis. Isolates of these species can express leukotoxin A (LktA), a primary virulence factor of these bacteria. To examine the significance of variation in the LktA, the sequences of the lktA genes in a panel of isolates from cases of ovine mastitis were compared. The cross-neutralising capacities of rat antisera raised against LktA of one Mannheimia glucosida, one haemolytic Mannheimia ruminalis, and two Mannheimia haemolytica isolates were also examined to assess the effect that variation in the lktA gene can have on protective immunity against leukotoxins with differing sequences. The lktA nucleotide distance between the M. haemolytica isolates was greater than between the M. glucosida isolates, with the M. haemolytica isolates divisible into two groups based on their lktA sequences. Comparison of the topology of phylogenetic trees of 16S rDNA and lktA sequences revealed differences in the relationships between some isolates, suggesting horizontal gene transfer. Cross neutralisation data obtained with monospecific anti-LktA rat sera were used to derive antigenic similarity coefficients for LktA from the four Mannheimia species isolates. Similarity coefficients indicated that LktA of the two M. haemolytica isolates were least similar, while LktA from M. glucosida was most similar to those for one of the M. haemolytica isolates and the haemolytic M. ruminalis isolate. The results suggested that vaccination with the M. glucosida leukotoxin would generate the greatest cross-protection against ovine mastitis caused by Mannheimia species with these alleles. PMID:25246232

  3. Granulocyte plasma membrane damage by leukotoxic supernatant from Pasteurella haemolytica A1 and protection by immune serum.

    PubMed

    Styrt, B; Walker, R D; White, J C; Dahl, L D; Baker, J C

    1990-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease caused by Pasteurella haemolytica may be partially mediated by a leukotoxin secreted by the microorganism. We examined the effect of leukotoxic Pasteurella supernatants on leakage of the cytosol enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase from bovine granulocytes. Lactate dehydrogenase release (94%) was much higher than arylsulfatase release (38%) over 30 minutes of incubation. The Pasteurella supernatants inhibited superoxide production by stimulated granulocytes at concentrations which also caused substantial cell death as measured by failure to exclude trypan blue. Both toxic effects were prevented by serum from aerosol-immunized calves, and protection appeared to be antibody-specific by comparison with fetal bovine serum or with serum absorbed against intact P. haemolytica. These findings suggest that the leukotoxin may selectively disrupt the granulocyte plasma membrane, and that antibody directed against a surface component of the microorganism is also capable of protecting against the leukotoxin effect. PMID:2306664

  4. Pasteurella haemolytica A1-Derived Leukotoxin and Endotoxin Induce Intracellular Calcium Elevation in Bovine Alveolar Macrophages by Different Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hsuan, S. L.; Kannan, M. S.; Jeyaseelan, S.; Prakash, Y. S.; Sieck, G. C.; Maheswaran, S. K.

    1998-01-01

    Leukotoxin and endotoxin derived from Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 1 are the primary virulence factors contributing to the pathogenesis of lung injury in bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. Activation of bovine alveolar macrophages with endotoxin or leukotoxin results in the induction of cytokine gene expression, with different kinetics (H. S. Yoo, S. K. Maheswaran, G. Lin, E. L. Townsend, and T. R. Ames, Infect. Immun. 63:381–388, 1995; H. S. Yoo, B. S. Rajagopal, S. K. Maheswaran, and T. R. Ames, Microb. Pathog. 18:237–252, 1995). Furthermore, extracellular Ca2+ is required for leukotoxin-induced cytokine gene expression. However, the involvement of Ca2+ in endotoxin effects and the precise signaling mechanisms in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ by leukotoxin and endotoxin are not known. In fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester-loaded alveolar macrophages, intracellular Ca2+ regulation by leukotoxin and endotoxin was studied by video fluorescence microscopy. Leukotoxin induced a sustained elevation of intracellular Ca2+ in a concentration-dependent fashion by influx of extracellular Ca2+ through voltage-gated channels. In the presence of fetal bovine serum, endotoxin elevated intracellular Ca2+ even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Leukotoxin-induced intracellular Ca2+ elevation was inhibited by pertussis toxin, inhibitors of phospholipases A2 and C, and the arachidonic acid analog 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid. Intracellular Ca2+ elevation by endotoxin was inhibited by inhibitors of phospholipase C and protein tyrosine kinase, but not by pertussis toxin, or the arachidonic acid analog. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Ca2+ signaling by leukotoxin through a G-protein-coupled mechanism involving activation of phospholipases A2 and C and release of arachidonic acid in bovine alveolar macrophages. Ca2+ signaling by endotoxin, on the other hand, involves activation of phospholipase C and requires tyrosine phosphorylation. The

  5. Pasteurella multocida- and Pasteurella haemolytica-ghosts: new vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Marchart, J; Dropmann, G; Lechleitner, S; Schlapp, T; Wanner, G; Szostak, M P; Lubitz, W

    2003-09-01

    Pasteurella multocida is an important animal pathogen. Bacterial ghosts produced by the expression of phage PhiX174 lysis gene E are empty cells devoid of cytoplasmic and genomic material. Lysis of P. multocida 7A and P. haemolytica A1 carrying Pasteurella-specific lysis vectors (pSR2 and pSON2) occurred 140 min after induction of gene E expression induced by temperature upshift. The E-mediated cell lysis and killing activity was the same in both Pasteurella species and no viable cells could be detected after lysis of P. multocida and P. haemolytica. Pasteurella ghosts were used for immunization of rabbits and mice. Rabbits immunized subcutaneously with either P. multocida- or P. haemolytica-ghosts developed antibodies reacting with the immunizating strain, as well as with other Pasteurella strains. The number of proteins in whole cell protein extracts recognized by the sera constantly increased during the observation period of 51 days. In addition, dose-dependent protection against homologous challenge was observed in mice immunized with P. multocida-ghosts. Animals which received 1.15 x 10(8) ghosts and a challenge dose of up to 60 cfu (LD90), showed 100% protection. According to these results, we suggest ghosts of P. multocida and P. haemolytica as new vaccine candidates. PMID:12922135

  6. Specificity of bovine serum antibody to capsular carbohydrate antigens from Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    McVey, D S; Loan, R W; Purdy, C W; Shuman, W J

    1990-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the bovine immune response to antigens of Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A, serotype 1, will improve control of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Sera were obtained from blood samples of calves as they transited the market system of eastern Tennessee and were transported to a feedlot in Texas. The clinical histories and performance data were recorded and compared with serologic findings. The calves underwent a natural challenge of BRD. Serologic and bacteriologic evaluation indicated that P. haemolytica A1 was a significant component of the challenge. Serum antibody titers against P. haemolytica A1 capsular antigens (in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hemolysin-in-gel test) increased by day 15 and continued at high levels through day 56. The animals that remained free of BRD had higher initial serum antibody concentrations than those that succumbed to BRD. The specificity of the immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) anticapsular antibody to P. haemolytica A1 increased from day 8 to day 29 as evidenced by a decrease in P. haemolytica A2 absorption inhibition from 60% (day 8) to 15% (day 29). However, IgA, IgG2, and IgM were more serotype specific on both days 8 and 29. There were no significant changes in anti-P. haemolytica A2 antibody titers. Both in vitro complement-dependent bacteriolysis and C3 deposition on the surface of the bacteria increased significantly (P less than 0.01) in a serotype-specific fashion from day 8 to day 29. These calves showed a humoral immune response to capsular polysaccharide antigens of P. haemolytica A1. Such a response may be an important component of immunity to BRD. PMID:2199487

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Lytic Properties of Bacteriophages Specific for M. haemolytica Strains

    PubMed Central

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej; Stęgierska, Diana; Dec, Marta; Dudzic, Anna; Puchalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Aim of Study The objective of this study was isolation and morphological characterization of temperate bacteriophages obtained from M. haemolytica strains and evaluation of their lytic properties in vitro against M. haemolytica isolated from the respiratory tract of calves. Material and Methods The material for the study consisted of the reference strain M. haemolytica serotype 1 (ATCC®) BAA-410™, reference serotypes A1, A2, A5, A6, A7, A9 and A11, and wild-type isolates of M. haemolytica. Bacteriophages were induced from an overnight bacterial starter culture of all examined M. haemolytica strains treated with mitomycin C. The lytic properties and host ranges were determined by plaque assays. The morphology of the bacteriophages was examined in negative-stained smears with 5% uranyl acetate solution using a transmission electron microscope. The genetic analysis of the bacteriophages was followed by restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA. This was followed by analysis of genetic material by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Eight bacteriophages were obtained, like typical of the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae and Podoviridae. Most of the bacteriophages exhibited lytic properties against the M. haemolytica strains. Restriction analysis revealed similarities to the P2-like phage obtained from the strain M. haemolytica BAA-410. The most similar profiles were observed in the case of bacteriophages φA1 and φA5. All of the bacteriophages obtained were characterized by the presence of additional fragments in the restriction profiles with respect to the P2-like reference phage. In the analysis of PCR products for the P2-like reference phage phi-MhaA1-PHL101 (DQ426904) and the phages of the M. haemolytica serotypes, a 734-bp phage PCR product was obtained. The primers were programmed in Primer-Blast software using the structure of the sequence DQ426904 of reference phage PHL101. Conclusions The results obtained indicate the need for further research aimed

  8. Pathogen variation across time and space: sequencing to characterize Mannheimia haemolytica diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex (BRDC) is a major animal health and economic issue that affects cattle industries worldwide. Within the United States, the beef cattle industry loses up to an estimated 1 billion dollars a year due to BRDC. There are many contributors to BRDC, including environme...

  9. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae can predispose bighorn sheep to fatal Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae has been isolated from the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS). However experimental reproduction of fatal pneumonia in BHS with M. ovipneumoniae was not successful. Therefore the specific role, if any, of M. ovipneumoniae in BHS pneumonia is unclear. The objective of th...

  10. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.68 Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine of an avirulent...

  11. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.68 Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine of an avirulent...

  12. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.68 Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine of an avirulent...

  13. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.68 Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine of an avirulent...

  14. Partial characterization of the leukotoxin of Pasteurella haemolytica-like bacteria isolated from swine enteritis.

    PubMed

    DeSilva, R T; Chengappa, M M; Oberst, R D; Staats, J J

    1995-08-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica-like (PHL) strains isolated from diarrheic pigs are known to produce a leukotoxin that is lethal to ruminant leukocytes. In the present study, 12 PHL strains were screened for leukotoxin production using a tetrazolium dye-reduction assay. Sterile culture supernatant from strain 6213A, the maximum leukotoxin producer, was used as the crude leukotoxin for characterization studies. The leukotoxin was inactivated by heat at 60 degrees C and by trypsin, protease, and amylase. Toxicity was retained over a pH range of 3.0-11.0. The leukotoxin was lethal to polymorphoneutrophils (PMNs) of cattle, sheep, goat, and swine. Chromosomal DNA of all 12 PHL strains hybridized with a 3.9 kb Pasteurella haemolytica A1 leukotoxin probe, indicating similarities between the leukotoxin genes of P. haemolytica and PHL strains. PMID:7483245

  15. Plasmids for heterologous expression in Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, N D; Highlander, S K

    1997-02-28

    New cloning and expression vectors that replicate both in Pasteurella haemolytica and in Escherichia coli were constructed based on a native sulfonamide (SuR) and streptomycin (SmR) resistant plasmid of P. haemolytica called pYFC1. Each shuttle vector includes an MCS and a selectable antibiotic resistance marker that is expressed in both organisms. Plasmid pNF2176 carries the P. haemolytica ROB-1 beta-lactamase gene (blaP, ApR) and pNF2214 carries the Tn903 aph3 kanamycin resistance (KmR) element. The expression vector, pNF2176, was created by placing the MCS downstream of the sulfonamide gene promoter (PsulII) on pYFC1; this was used to clone and express the promoterless Tn9 chloramphenicol resistance gene (cat, CmR) in P. haemolytica (pNF2200). A promoter-probe vector (pNF2283) was constructed from pNF2200 by deleting PsulII. PMID:9074498

  16. Human Wound Infection with Mannheimia glucosida following Lamb Bite.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jillian S Y; Omaleki, Lida; Turni, Conny; Barber, Stuart Richard; Browning, Glenn Francis; Francis, Michelle J; Graham, Maryza; Korman, Tony M

    2015-10-01

    Mannheimia spp. are veterinary pathogens that can cause mastitis and pneumonia in domestic cattle and sheep. While Mannheimia glucosida can be found as normal flora in oral and respiratory mucosa in sheep, there have been no reported cases of human infection with this organism. PMID:26202121

  17. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 is a receptor for Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin in bovine leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeyaseelan, S; Hsuan, S L; Kannan, M S; Walcheck, B; Wang, J F; Kehrli, M E; Lally, E T; Sieck, G C; Maheswaran, S K

    2000-01-01

    Pasteurella (Mannheimia) haemolytica leukotoxin (Lkt) causes cell type- and species-specific effects in ruminant leukocytes. Recent studies indicate that P. haemolytica Lkt binds to bovine CD18, the common subunit of all beta2 integrins. We designed experiments with the following objectives: to identify which member of the beta2 integrins is a receptor for Lkt; to determine whether Lkt binding to the receptor is target cell (bovine leukocytes) specific; to define the relationships between Lkt binding to the receptor, calcium elevation, and cytolysis; and to determine whether a correlation exists between Lkt receptor expression and the magnitude of target cell cytolysis. We compared Lkt-induced cytolysis in neutrophils from control calves and from calves with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), because neutrophils from BLAD-homozygous calves exhibit reduced beta2 integrin expression. The results demonstrate for the first time that Lkt binds to bovine CD11a and CD18 (lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 [LFA-1]). The binding was abolished by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb). Lkt-induced calcium elevation in bovine alveolar macrophages (BAMs) was inhibited by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 MAb (65 to 94% and 37 to 98%, respectively, at 5 and 50 Lkt units per ml; P < 0.05). Lkt-induced cytolysis in neutrophils and BAMs was also inhibited by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 MAb in a concentration-dependent manner. Lkt bound to porcine LFA-1 but did not induce calcium elevation or cytolysis. In neutrophils from BLAD calves, Lkt-induced cytolysis was decreased by 44% compared to that of neutrophils from control calves (P < 0.05). These results indicate that LFA-1 is a Lkt receptor, Lkt binding to LFA-1 is not target cell specific, Lkt binding to bovine LFA-1 correlates with calcium elevation and cytolysis, and bovine LFA-1 expression correlates with the magnitude of Lkt-induced target cell cytolysis. PMID:10603370

  18. Induction of CD18-mediated passage of neutrophils by Pasteurella haemolytica in pulmonary bronchi and bronchioles.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Brogden, K A; Florance, A F; Kehrli, M E

    1999-02-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica is an important respiratory pathogen of cattle that incites extensive infiltrates of neutrophils into the lung. In addition to the parenchymal damage caused by factors released by P. haemolytica, neutrophils contribute to the pathologic changes in the lungs. Molecules which mediate neutrophil infiltration into the lungs during P. haemolytica pneumonia are poorly characterized. To determine whether the CD18 family (beta2-integrin) of leukocyte adhesion molecules mediates initial passage of neutrophils into the pulmonary bronchi and bronchioles of lungs infected with P. haemolytica, three Holstein calves homozygous for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) (CD18-deficient neutrophils), and three age- and breed-matched control calves (normal CD18 expression) were inoculated with P. haemolytica A1 via a fiberoptic bronchoscope and euthanized at 2 h postinoculation. Sections of lung were stained for neutrophils, and the intensity of neutrophilic infiltration was determined by computerized image analysis. Significantly fewer (P < 0.05) neutrophils infiltrated the lumen, epithelium, and adventitia of bronchioles and bronchi in lungs of calves with BLAD compared to normal calves, which had dense infiltrates within these sites at 2 h postinoculation. The reduced infiltration in calves with BLAD occurred despite the presence of an extremely large number of neutrophils in peripheral blood that is typical for these calves. The large number of neutrophils in the blood of calves with BLAD is probably a physiologic response that can occur without microbial colonization, since one calf with BLAD that was raised under germ-free conditions had large numbers of neutrophils in the blood that were similar to those in a calf with BLAD that was raised conventionally. Neutrophil counts in the germ-free and conventionally reared calves with BLAD were much higher than those in the three normal calves raised under germ-free conditions. The work in this study

  19. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. 113.68 Section 113.68 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines §...

  20. Binding of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin to bovine leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J F; Leite, F; Czuprynski, C J

    1997-01-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica is the principal bacterial pathogen in the bovine respiratory disease complex. This organism produces an exotoxin (referred to as leukotoxin) during logarithmic-phase growth that is a potent leukocyte-modulating agent. At low concentrations, it activates neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes to release inflammatory mediators, while at the same time making these cells destined to undergo apoptotic cell death. At higher concentrations, the toxin causes rapid swelling and loss of cell viability. In this study, we demonstrated that toxin binding can be directly evaluated by flow cytometry with biologically active biotinylated leukotoxin. Leukotoxin binding was blocked by the addition of a neutralizing anti-leukotoxin monoclonal antibody and was not detected when bovine leukocytes were incubated with culture filtrates from a mutant strain of P. haemolytica that does not produce biologically active leukotoxin. In addition, treatment of bovine leukocytes with protease K eliminated subsequent binding of leukotoxin, suggesting that there is a protein on the leukocyte surface that is either a leukotoxin binding site or is required for stabilization of leukotoxin binding. We did not detect binding of biotinylated leukotoxin to porcine or human leukocytes, which have been reported previously to be resistant to the lytic effects of the leukotoxin. These findings suggest that there may be a specific binding site for P. haemolytica leukotoxin on bovine but not on porcine or human leukocytes and that it might be involved in the activation and lytic activities of the leukotoxin. PMID:9284143

  1. Genome sequence and description of Mannheimia massilioguelmaensis sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Hadjadj, L.; Bentorki, A.A.; Michelle, C.; Amoura, K.; Djahoudi, A.; Rolain, J.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Strain MG13T sp. nov. is the type strain of Mannheimia massilioguelmaensis, a new species within the genus Mannheimia. This strain was isolated from the exudate of a skin lesion of an Algerian man. Mannheimia massilioguelmaensis is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic rod, member of the family Pasteurellaceae. Here we describe this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2 186 813 bp long genome contains 2048 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes, including eight rRNA genes. PMID:26693284

  2. The airborne survival of Pasteurella haemolytica and its deposition in and clearance from the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, M I; Wathes, C M; Taylor, F G

    1990-02-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica A1 was aerosolised by a Collison nebuliser in a Henderson apparatus and its survival in air was measured. The organism was fragile in aerosol and survived best at high humidity and warm temperature. Mice were exposed to the aerosol and clearance from the lung measured. Deposition in the mouse lung showed a good linear correlation with bacterial concentration in the spray suspension fluid. Clearance from the lung was rapid over 24 h although some bacteria could be detected 2 and 4 days after exposure. Mice which received a second exposure 2 weeks later exhibited accelerated clearance from the lung whereby no bacteria could be detected after 12 h. This was associated with serum IgG antibody production, and local and splenic lymphocyte responses to bacterial antigen in vitro. PMID:2138372

  3. Haemolytic effect of Pasteurella haemolytica on blood from young mammals.

    PubMed

    Smith, G R; Turner, A; Hawkey, C M

    1988-09-01

    On agar plates containing young lamb blood, Pasteurella haemolytica produces a wide outer zone of partial haemolysis in addition to the narrow zone of complete clearing seen on adult sheep blood agar. To determine whether this phenomenon was limited to lamb blood, samples from young animals of 20 mammalian species were examined. Two species--the barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia) and scimitar horned oryx (Oryx tao)--possessed blood that gave this effect provided that the samples were taken from young animals. The 18 species that gave negative results included an ovine species, the bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis). PMID:3194597

  4. Pasteurella haemolytica bacteriophage: identification, partial characterization, and relationship of temperate bacteriophages from isolates of Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, A.B.; Renshaw, H.W.; Sneed, L.W.

    1985-05-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) isolates (n = 15) from the upper respiratory tract of clinically normal cattle, as well as from lung lesions from cases of fatal bovine pasteurellosis, were examined for the presence of bacteriophage after irradiation with UV light. Treatment of all P haemolytica isolates with UV irradiation resulted in lysis of bacteria due to the induction of vegetative development of bacteriophages. The extent of growth inhibition and bacterial lysis in irradiated cultures was UV dose-dependent. Bacterial cultures exposed to UV light for 20 s reached peak culture density between 60 and 70 minutes after irradiation; thereafter, culture density declined rapidly, so that by 120 minutes, it was approximately 60% of the original value. When examined ultrastructurally, lytic cultures from each isolate revealed bacteriophages with an overall length of approximately 200 nm and that appeared to have a head with icosahedral symmetry and a contractile tail. Cell-free filtrate from each noninduced bacterial isolate was inoculated onto the other bacterial isolates in a cross-culture sensitivity assay for the presence of phages lytic for the host bacterial isolates. Zones of lysis (plaques) did not develop when bacterial lawns grown from the different isolates were inoculated with filtrates from the heterologous isolates.

  5. Exposure of calves to aerosols of parainfluenza-3 virus and Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Carrière, P D; Maxie, M G; Wilkie, B N; Savan, M; Valli, V E; Johnson, J A

    1983-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate whether sequential exposure to aerosols of parainfluenza-3 virus followed by Pasteurella haemolytica, or P. haemolytica followed by parainfluenza-3 virus, could lead to the production of pulmonary lesions in conventionally-raised calves. Twenty male calves with low serum antibody titres to both organisms were placed in five equal groups. Synergism of parainfluenza-3 virus and P. haemolytica was not demonstrated in any of the sequentially infected groups and pulmonary lesions were mild in all challenged calves. Clinical signs of disease were not present after exposure to parainfluenza-3 virus although the virus was repeatedly isolated from nasal secretions of all inoculated calves. Exposure to P. haemolytica produced a transient response which consisted of increased rectal temperatures and respiratory rates, with a mild neutrophilic leukocytosis and a mild left shift present six hours postinoculation and returning to normal within 24 hours. Results from this study suggest, although do not confirm, that reduced pulmonary clearance of inhaled P. haemolytica in parainfluenza-3 virus infected calves does not necessarily lead to production of severe pulmonary lesions and that previous exposure to aerosols of P. haemolytica may not enhance secondary parainfluenza-3 virus infection. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. PMID:6320999

  6. Bovine gamma delta T cells contribute to exacerbated IL-17 production in response to co-infection with Bovine RSV and Mannheimia haemolytica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in children under five years of age. IL-17 and Th17 responses are increased in children infected with HRSV and have been implicated in both protective and pathogenic roles during infection. Bovi...

  7. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of serum antibodies to Pasteurella haemolytica cytotoxin (leukotoxin) in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, D A; Confer, A W; Hall, S M; Gentry, M J; Panciera, R J

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for detection of bovine serum antibodies to the cytotoxin (leukotoxin) of Pasteurella haemolytica. A partially purified, cytotoxic, and immunogenic protein obtained from supernatants of logarithmic-phase P. haemolytica was used as the ELISA antigen. Preadsorption of sera with various cytotoxic, somatic, and capsular antigen preparations demonstrated that the assay was specific for anticytotoxin antibodies. ELISA anticytotoxin titers had a strong, significant correlation to cytotoxin-neutralizing-antibody titers. The ELISA, however, was more rapid and allowed for greater numbers of samples to be run than did the neutralization technique. ELISA anticytotoxin titers were high in cattle vaccinated with a live P. haemolytica vaccine, whereas unvaccinated cattle and cattle receiving a P. haemolytica bacterin had low ELISA anticytotoxin titers. A significant positive correlation between ELISA titers and resistance to experimental bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis was present. PMID:3745419

  8. 21 CFR 522.955 - Florfenicol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida... Haemophilus somnus. For treatment of bovine interdigital phlegmon (foot rot, acute...

  9. 21 CFR 522.2630 - Tulathromycin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida... infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis associated with Moraxella bovis. For the treatment of bovine foot...

  10. 21 CFR 522.955 - Florfenicol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida... Haemophilus somnus. For treatment of bovine interdigital phlegmon (foot rot, acute...

  11. 21 CFR 522.2630 - Tulathromycin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida... infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis associated with Moraxella bovis. For the treatment of bovine foot...

  12. Influence of beta(2)-integrin adhesion molecule expression and pulmonary infection with Pasteurella haemolytica on cytokine gene expression in cattle.

    PubMed

    Lee, H Y; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A; Gallup, J M; Ackermann, M R

    2000-07-01

    beta(2)-Integrins are leukocyte adhesion molecules composed of alpha (CD11a, -b, -c, or -d) and beta (CD18) subunit heterodimers. Genetic CD18 deficiency results in impaired neutrophil egress into tissues that varies between conducting airways and alveoli of the lung. In this study, we investigated whether CD18 deficiency in cattle affects proinflammatory cytokine (PIC) expression in pulmonary tissue after respiratory infection with Pasteurella haemolytica. Cattle were infected with P. haemolytica via fiberoptic deposition of organisms into the posterior part of the right cranial lung lobe. Animals were euthanized at 2 or 4 h postinoculation (p.i.), and tissues were collected to assess PIC gene expression using antisense RNA probes specific for bovine interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) along with the beta-actin (beta-Act) housekeeping gene. Expression of PIC was induced at 2 h p.i. in P. haemolytica-infected cattle and continued to 4 h p.i. At 2 h p.i., induction of gene expression and increase of cells that expressed PIC were observed both in CD18(+) and CD18(-) cattle after inoculation of P. haemolytica. The induction of gene expression with P. haemolytica inoculation was more prominent in CD18(-) cattle than in CD18(+) cattle by comparison to pyrogen-free saline (PFS)-inoculated control animals. At 4 h p.i., however, the induction of PIC, especially IL-1alpha, IL-6, and IFN-gamma, in the lungs of CD18(+) cattle inoculated with P. haemolytica was greater than that in lungs of the CD18(-) cattle. IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha genes were not increased in P. haemolytica-inoculated CD18(-) cattle lungs compared to the PFS-inoculated control lungs at 4 h p.i. In PFS-inoculated lungs, we generally observed a higher percentage of cells and higher level of gene expression in the lungs of CD18(-) cattle than in the lungs of CD18(+) cattle, especially at 4 h p.i. The rate of neutrophil

  13. Induction of inflammatory cytokines in bovine alveolar macrophages following stimulation with Pasteurella haemolytica lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, H S; Maheswaran, S K; Lin, G; Townsend, E L; Ames, T R

    1995-01-01

    Bovine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) cDNAs were generated by reverse transcription and then by PCR amplification from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated alveolar macrophage RNA. The amplified cDNAs were cloned into pPow and expressed in Escherichia coli DH5 alpha. The expressed proteins were confirmed as TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis and bioassays. We then used the cloned genes as probes in Northern (RNA) blots and investigated the kinetics of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA expression in bovine alveolar macrophages stimulated with purified LPS from Pasteurella haemolytica 12296. The effect of LPS on TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta gene expression was dose dependent, and induction was observed at a concentration of 0.01 microgram/ml. Both TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA expression were detectable within 0.5 h after stimulation with 1 microgram of LPS per ml, peaked at 1 to 2 h, steadily declined up to 16 h, and were undetectable by 24 h. Secreted TNF-alpha measured by bioassay peaked at 4 h and accumulated at a lesser concentration in conditioned medium throughout the 24 h. By contrast, secreted IL-1 beta was induced at 8 h and reached a maximal concentration at 24 h after stimulation. The ability of LPS to induce TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta gene expression and secretion of bioactive proteins were suppressed by polymyxin B. Our findings support a role for LPS from P. haemolytica in the induction of inflammatory cytokines in bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. PMID:7822000

  14. Plane of nutrition during the preweaned period influences the pathophysiological responses to a combined intranasal bovine herpesvirus-1 and intratracheal Mannheimia haemolytica challenge in post-weaned Holstein calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine whether previous plane of milk replacer nutrition (PON) influences the pathophysiological responses to a combined viral-bacterial respiratory challenge. Thirty Holstein calves (1 day of age) were assigned to treatments in a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement with preweaned PO...

  15. Eosinophilic granuloma with Splendore-Hoeppli material caused by Mannheimia granulomatis in a calf.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yuuto; Takahashi, Hiroyasu; Shimoo, Megumi; Tamamura, Yukino; Ishikawa, Yoshiharu; Kadota, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    A large subcutaneous mass, formed on the left lower jaw of a 4-month-old Japanese Black male calf, was partially excised for histological and bacteriological examinations. Antibiotic treatment resulted in a good prognosis. Bacteria isolated from the excised material were characterized by weak hemolysis and positive reactions for catalase and oxidase, and were 99% identical to Mannheimia granulomatis strains. The presence of the leukotoxin gene product was demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Histological examination showed that the excised material was composed of dense fibrous connective tissue with sparsely distributed eosinophilic granulomas or abscesses. These foci frequently contained Splendore-Hoeppli material with rod-shaped Gram-negative bacteria. Except for the absence of lymphangitis and the presence of basophils and mast cells, the histology of this lesion resembled that of lechiguana associated with coinfection of M. granulomatis and Dermatobia hominis. Leukotoxin was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry within Splendore-Hoeppli material and was judged to be responsible for its formation. PMID:26947171

  16. Effects of dissolved CO2 levels on the growth of Mannheimia succiniciproducens and succinic acid production.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyohak; Lee, Jeong Wook; Choi, Sol; You, Jong Kyun; Hong, Won Hi; Lee, Sang Yup

    2007-12-15

    A capnophilic rumen bacterium Mannheimia succiniciproducens produces succinic acid as a major fermentation end product under CO(2)-rich anaerobic condition. Since succinic acid is produced by carboxylation of C3 compounds during the fermentation, intracellular CO(2) availability is important for efficient succinic acid formation. Here, we investigated the metabolic responses of M. succiniciproducens to the different dissolved CO(2) concentrations (0-260 mM). Cell growth was severely suppressed when the dissolved CO(2) concentration was below 8.74 mM. On the other hand, cell growth and succinic acid production increased proportionally as the dissolved CO(2) concentration increased from 8.74 to 141 mM. The yields of biomass and succinic acid on glucose obtained at the dissolved CO(2) concentration of 141 mM were 1.49 and 1.52 times higher, respectively, than those obtained at the dissolved CO(2) concentration of 8.74 mM. It was also found that the additional CO(2) source provided in the form of NaHCO(3), MgCO(3), or CaCO(3) had positive effects on cell growth and succinic acid production. However, growth inhibition was observed when excessive bicarbonate salts were added. By the comparison of the activities of key enzymes, it was found that PEP carboxylation by PEP carboxykinase (PckA) is the most important for succinic acid production as well as the growth of M. succiniciproducens by providing additional ATP. PMID:17570706

  17. Eosinophilic granuloma with Splendore-Hoeppli material caused by Mannheimia granulomatis in a calf

    PubMed Central

    KAWASHIMA, Yuuto; TAKAHASHI, Hiroyasu; SHIMOO, Megumi; TAMAMURA, Yukino; ISHIKAWA, Yoshiharu; KADOTA, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A large subcutaneous mass, formed on the left lower jaw of a 4-month-old Japanese Black male calf, was partially excised for histological and bacteriological examinations. Antibiotic treatment resulted in a good prognosis. Bacteria isolated from the excised material were characterized by weak hemolysis and positive reactions for catalase and oxidase, and were 99% identical to Mannheimia granulomatis strains. The presence of the leukotoxin gene product was demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Histological examination showed that the excised material was composed of dense fibrous connective tissue with sparsely distributed eosinophilic granulomas or abscesses. These foci frequently contained Splendore-Hoeppli material with rod-shaped Gram-negative bacteria. Except for the absence of lymphangitis and the presence of basophils and mast cells, the histology of this lesion resembled that of lechiguana associated with coinfection of M. granulomatis and Dermatobia hominis. Leukotoxin was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry within Splendore-Hoeppli material and was judged to be responsible for its formation. PMID:26947171

  18. Highly selective production of succinic acid by metabolically engineered Mannheimia succiniciproducens and its efficient purification.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sol; Song, Hyohak; Lim, Sung Won; Kim, Tae Yong; Ahn, Jung Ho; Lee, Jeong Wook; Lee, Moon-Hee; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-10-01

    Succinic acid (SA) is one of the fermentative products of anaerobic metabolism, and an important industrial chemical that has been much studied for its bio-based production. The key to the economically viable bio-based SA production is to develop an SA producer capable of producing SA with high yield and productivity without byproducts. Mannheimia succiniciproducens is a capnophilic rumen bacterium capable of efficiently producing SA. In this study, in silico genome-scale metabolic simulations were performed to identify gene targets to be engineered, and the PALK strain (ΔldhA and Δpta-ackA) was constructed. Fed-batch culture of PALK on glucose and glycerol as carbon sources resulted in the production of 66.14 g/L of SA with the yield and overall productivity of 1.34 mol/mol glucose equivalent and 3.39 g/L/h, respectively. SA production could be further increased to 90.68 g/L with the yield and overall productivity of 1.15 mol/mol glucose equivalent and 3.49 g/L/h, respectively, by utilizing a mixture of magnesium hydroxide and ammonia solution as a pH controlling solution. Furthermore, formation of byproducts was drastically reduced, resulting in almost homo-fermentative SA production. This allowed the recovery and purification of SA to a high purity (99.997%) with a high recovery yield (74.65%) through simple downstream processes composed of decolorization, vacuum distillation, and crystallization. The SA producer and processes developed in this study will allow economical production of SA in an industrial-scale. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2168-2177. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27070659

  19. In situ expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA in calves with acute Pasteurella haemolytica pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Radi, Z A; Register, K B; Lee, E K; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A; Gallup, J M; Ackermann, M R

    1999-09-01

    The in situ expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA in normal and pneumonic lung tissues of Holstein calves with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was compared with that of age-matched non-BLAD Holstein calves by in situ hybridization. Twenty-four Holstein calves (both BLAD and non-BLAD) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups and inoculated intrabronchially with Pasteurella haemolytica or pyrogen-free saline. Lung tissues were collected and fixed in 10% neutral formalin at 2 or 4 hours postinoculation (PI). The expression and distribution of ICAM-1 mRNA in the different cell types of the lung tissue was detected by in situ hybridization with a 307-base-pair bovine ICAM-1 riboprobe. In lungs of both non-BLAD and BLAD saline-inoculated calves, ICAM-1 expression was present in epithelial cells but occurred in <30% of cells in bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli. ICAM-1 expression in vascular endothelial cells was present in <30% of cells in pulmonary arteries and veins. The expression of ICAM-1 was significantly greater (>60% of cells) in bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells and pulmonary endothelial cells of arteries and veins in both BLAD and non-BLAD calves inoculated with P. haemolytica. Bronchiolar epithelium had the highest intensity of mRNA expression and highest percentage of cells that were stained, whereas bronchial epithelium had the lowest intensity and percentage of cells stained. Most alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in infected lungs also expressed ICAM-1. ICAM-1 expression was generally increased in infected BLAD calves at 2 hours PI as compared with non-BLAD calves but not at 4 hours PI. The increased expression of ICAM-1 during acute P. haemolytica pneumonia in calves suggests that ICAM-1 is upregulated and may play a role in leukocyte infiltration. The extent of ICAM-1 expression in P. haemolytica-inoculated calves with BLAD was initially enhanced but otherwise similar to that in non

  20. Generation of targeted nonpolar gene insertions and operon fusions in Pasteurella haemolytica and creation of a strain that produces and secretes inactive leukotoxin.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, N D; Highlander, S K

    1997-07-01

    An efficient method for targeted gene inactivation and generation of chromosomal gene fusions in Pasteurella haemolytica has been devised and used to create an lktC::cat operon fusion by allelic exchange at the leukotoxin gene cluster (lktCABD). A copy of the lktC gene was insertionally inactivated by using a nonpolar, promoterless cat cassette and then delivered into P. haemolytica on a shuttle vector. Plasmid incompatibility was used to detect clones where double recombination events had occurred at the chromosomal locus. The insertion in lktC did not affect expression of the downstream genes, and the mutant strain secreted an antigenic proleukotoxin that was neither leukotoxic nor hemolytic. Expression of the lktC gene in trans restored the wild-type phenotype, confirming that LktC is required for activation of the proleukotoxin to the mature leukotoxin. Construction of the lktC::cat operon fusion allowed us to quantitate leukotoxin promoter activity in P. haemolytica and to demonstrate that transcription was maximal during early logarithmic growth phase but was reduced following entry into late logarithmic phase. This allelic exchange system should be useful for future genetic studies in P. haemolytica and could potentially be applied to other members of Haemophilus-Actinobacillus-Pasteurella family, where genetic manipulation is limited. PMID:9199425

  1. Effect of viral dose on experimental pneumonia caused by aerosol exposure of calves to bovine herpesvirus 1 and Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, W D; Jericho, K W; Doige, C E

    1983-01-01

    The effect of various aerosol doses of bovine herpesvirus 1, followed four days later by aerosol exposure to a constant level of Pasteurella haemolytica, was studied in 16 crossbred Hereford range calves. A Collision nebulizer was used to generate aerosols from virus suspensions with concentrations of 10(8.2) (high), 10(5.2) (moderate) or 10(2.2) (low) TCID50/mL. The bacterial suspension contained 10(7) colony forming units/mL. Control calves exposed only to P. haemolytica developed no pulmonary lesions. Calves in the low, moderate and high virus exposure groups developed lobular areas of atelectasis; in addition, one calf in the moderate and all four in the high virus exposure group developed fibrinous pneumonia. One of the latter calves died. The 50% effective dose for fibrinous pneumonia under these experimental conditions was 10(6.0) TCID50 bovine herpesvirus 1/mL of suspension in the nebulizer reservoir, and approximately 10(4.0) infectious units inhaled per calf. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6299485

  2. Variation in Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) and Mannheimia spp. following transport and antibiotic treatment in free-ranging and captive Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis).

    PubMed

    Weiser, Glen C; Miller, David S; Drew, Mark L; Rhyan, Jack C; Ward, Alton C S

    2009-03-01

    Morbidity and mortality associated with respiratory disease following capture and translocation of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis) is a significant concern, particularly when establishing new or augmenting existing bighorn populations. Administration of prophylactic antibiotics at the time of capture is often done to minimize the risk of respiratory disease, but the efficacy of this practice is unknown. The effects of oxytetracycline and florfenicol on the Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) and Mannheimia spp. isolated from samples collected from the oropharynx at the time of capture and 3 or 42 day later were evaluated in two groups of bighorn sheep. The most evident change in the isolation rates or types of Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) spp., Mannheimia spp., or both was an increase of beta-hemolytic strains isolated from bighorn sheep 3 day following oxytetracycline treatment. Both groups of bighorn sheep carried Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) trehalosi identified as the same biovariants, but they did not share biovariants of Mannheimia spp. No animals had signs of respiratory disease. Isolates representative of all biovariants present in cultures from the two bighorn sheep groups were sensitive to in vitro tests to both oxytetracycline and florfenicol and the majority were also sensitive to seven other antibiotics tested. The administration of neither oxytetracycline nor florfenicol eliminated Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) or Mannheimia from the oropharyngeal mucosa. Resistance to either antibiotic used in these animals was not noted. Although the prophylactic benefits of these drugs in preventing disease are uncertain, therapeutic levels of antibiotics in lung tissue during times of stress may reduce the risk of disease. Representative sampling of the oropharyngeal microflora of bighorn sheep source and recipient populations prior to being intermingled should be considered as one of the tools to minimize exposure of naive populations to potentially pathogenic

  3. Capsular polysaccharide vaccine for Group B Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli K1, and Pasteurella haemolytica A2

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, John B.; Schneerson, Rachel; Xie, Guilin; Hanson, Lars Å.; Miller, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the literature that is the basis for our proposal that (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac conjugates will be safe and effective vaccines for Group B meningococci (GBMs), Escherichia coli K1, and Pasteurella haemolytica A2. Although (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac is a virulence factor and a protective antigen of these three pathogens, it is also a component of normal tissues (neural cell adhesion molecule). Natural, anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac present in most adults, vaccine-induced antibodies, and even high levels of spontaneously appearing monoclonal anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac did not cause autoimmunity. Although it is not possible to prove a null hypothesis, there are no epidemiologic, serologic, immunologic, or clinical data to indicate that (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac antibodies will induce pathology or an autoimmune disease. No increased pathology caused by these antibodies was found, even in neonates and infants of mothers recovered from GBM meningitis. The lack of pathology mediated by anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac may be explained by different presentations of (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac on bacterial and mammalian cells and by the unusual physicochemical properties of anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac. Based on clinical and experimental data collected over 30 y and because (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac is an essential virulence factor and a protective antigen for GBM, E. coli K1, and P. haemolytica A2, protein conjugates of it are easy to prepare using inexpensive and plentiful ingredients, and they would be compatible with routinely administered infant vaccines, clinical studies of these conjugates should proceed. PMID:22025709

  4. Passage of CD18- and CD18+ bovine neutrophils into pulmonary alveoli during acute Pasteurella haemolytica pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A

    1996-11-01

    CD18 is a subunit for three beta 2 integrin molecules (Mac-1, p150, 95, LFA-1), which are expressed on the plasma membrane of neutrophils. These molecules mediate passage of neutrophils into sites of infection. In children and animals that lack CD18 expression, neutrophil infiltration is impaired in most tissues. However, in lung, CD18- neutrophils have been identified in the airway spaces during spontaneous episodes of pneumonia. To determine whether CD18 is vital for passage through the pulmonary alveolar wall, lung lobes of cattle with neutrophils that were deficient in CD18 expression (CD18-) and cattle with normal CD18 expression (CD18+) were inoculated with Pasteurella haemolytica by fiberoptic bronchoscopy; control lobes were inoculated with pyrogen-free saline (PFS). Neutrophil passage into alveolar lumina at 4 and 6 hours postinoculation was measured by computerized image analysis. Blood levels of neutrophils for CD18- cattle ranged from 12- to 26-fold higher than for CD18+ cattle prior to inoculation, and counts in both groups rose slightly postinoculation. In P. haemolytica-inoculated lobes, total numbers of neutrophils in alveolar lumina of the two groups were similar. An increase in the number of neutrophils in the alveolar wall was fourfold greater in CD18- cattle than in CD18+ cattle. In PFS-inoculated lobes, the number of neutrophils in the alveolar wall was sixfold higher in CD18 cattle than in CD18+ cattle. This work shows that by 4 and 6 hours, CD18- neutrophils enter the alveolar lumen at a rate similar to that in CD18+ cattle. Higher numbers of CD18- neutrophils are present in the alveolar wall of control (PFS) and bacteria-inoculated lobes. Thus, the CD18- cells are increased in the walls of alveoli and numbers of neutrophils that enter the alveolar lumen are similar in CD18+ and CD18- cattle. PMID:8952022

  5. The effect of route and dosage of immunization on the serological response to a Pasteurella haemolytica and Haemophilus somnus vaccine in feedlot calves

    PubMed Central

    Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Schumann, Fritz J.; Harland, Richard J.; Potter, Andrew A.; Janzen, Eugene D.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of route and dosage of administration on the serological response to a vaccine containing genetically attenuated leukotoxin of Pasteurella haemolytica combined with bacterial extracts of P. haemolytica and Haemophilus somnus (Somnu-Star Ph, Biostar Inc., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) was evaluated in a controlled field trial in 301 feedlot calves. Vaccination of calves on arrival at the feedlot with Somnu-Star Ph significantly (p < 0.05) increased P. haemolytica and H. somnus serum antibody titers and reduced bovine respiratory disease (BRD) morbidity. A single subcutaneous vaccination with Somnu-Star Ph was as effective in stimulating a humoral antibody response and in reducing BRD morbidity as double vaccination by the intramuscular or the subcutaneous route. Furthermore, there were no swellings or adverse reactions observed with either subcutaneous or intramuscular administration of Somnu-Star Ph. These results suggest that feedlot calves can be immunized subcutaneously once on arrival with Somnu-Star Ph. Double vaccination was of no added value in this trial, because the majority of BRD morbidity occurred prior to revaccination fourteen days postarrival. Additional larger-sized field trials are needed to monitor the duration of immunity following vaccination and to test the effect of route and dosage of vaccination on mortality. PMID:17424338

  6. Complete closed genome sequences of three Bibersteinia trehalosi nasopharyngeal isolates from cattle with shipping fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bibersteinia trehalosi is a respiratory pathogen affecting cattle and related ruminants worldwide. B. trehalosi is closely related to Mannheimia haemolytica, and is often associated with bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), a polymicrobial multifactorial disease. We present three complete clos...

  7. Structure-function studies of the adenylate cyclase toxin of Bordetella pertussis and the leukotoxin of Pasteurella haemolytica by heterologous C protein activation and construction of hybrid proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Westrop, G; Hormozi, K; da Costa, N; Parton, R; Coote, J

    1997-01-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) from Bordetella pertussis and the leukotoxin (LktA) from Pasteurella haemolytica are members of the RTX (stands for repeats in toxin) family of cytolytic toxins. They have pore-forming activity and share significant amino acid homology but show marked differences in biological activity. CyaA is an invasive adenylate cyclase and a weak hemolysin which is active on a wide range of mammalian cells. LktA is a cytolytic protein with a high target cell specificity and is able to lyse only leukocytes and platelets from ruminants. Each toxin is synthesized as an inactive protoxin encoded by the A gene, and the product of the accessory C gene is required for posttranslational activation. Heterologous activation of LktA by CyaC did not result in a change in its specificity for nucleated cells, although the toxin showed a greater hemolytic-to-cytotoxic ratio. LktC was unable to activate CyaA. A hybrid toxin (Hyb1), which contained the N-terminal enzymic domain and the pore-forming domain from CyaA (amino acids [aa] 1 to 687), with the remainder of the protein derived from the C-terminal end of LktA (aa 379 to 953), showed no toxic activity. Replacement of part of the LktA C-terminal domain of Hyb1 by the CyaA C-terminal domain (aa 919 to 1706) to create hybrid toxin 2 (Hyb2) partially restored toxic activity. In contrast to CyaA, Hyb2 was activated more efficiently by LktC than by CyaC, showing the importance of the region between aa 379 and 616 of LktA for activation by LktC. LktC-activated Hyb2 was more active against ruminant than murine nucleated cells, whereas CyaC-activated Hyb2 displayed a similar, but lower, activity against both cell types. These data indicate that LktC and the region with which it interacts have an influence on the target cell specificity of the mature toxin. PMID:9006045

  8. Bighorn sheep pneumonia: Sorting out the cause of a polymicrobial disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pneumonia of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) is a dramatic disease of high morbidity and mortality first described more than 80 years ago. The etiology of the disease has been debated since its initial discovery, and at various times lungworms, Mannheimia haemolytica and other Pasteurellaceae, and M...

  9. MHC class II DR allelic diversity in bighorn sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that decreased diversity and/or unique polymorphisms in MHC class II alleles of bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are responsible for lower titer of antibodies against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). To test this hypothesis, DRA...

  10. Molecular cloning, characterization and in vitro expression of SERPIN B1 of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) and domestic sheep (Ovis aries), and comparison with that of other species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica infection results in enhanced PMN-mediated tissue damage in the lungs of bighorn sheep (BHS) compared to that of domestic sheep (DS). SERPIN B1 is an inhibitor of PMN-derived serine proteases. It prevents lung tissue injury by inhibiting the serine proteases released as a resu...

  11. Causes of pneumonia epizootics among bighorn sheep, western United States, 2008-2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epizootic pneumonia of bighorn sheep is a devastating disease of uncertain etiology. To help clarify the etiology, we used culture and culture-independent methods to compare the prevalence of the bacterial respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica, Bibersteinia trehalosi, Pasteurella multocida, a...

  12. Genome Sequence of Bibersteinia trehalosi Strain Y31 Isolated from the Pneumonic Lung of a Bighorn Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Kugadas, Abirami; Humann, Jodi L.; Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence for Bibersteinia trehalosi strain Y31, isolated from the lungs of a bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) that had succumbed to pneumonia, which exhibits proximity-dependent inhibition (PDI) of Mannheimia haemolytica. The sequence will be used to understand the mechanism of PDI for these organisms. PMID:27445392

  13. 21 CFR 522.522 - Danofloxacin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... § 556.169 of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use in cattle—(1) Amount. 6 mg per kilogram of body weight... Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. (3) Limitations. Animals intended for...

  14. 21 CFR 522.522 - Danofloxacin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... § 556.169 of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use in cattle—(1) Amount. 6 mg per kilogram of body weight... Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. (3) Limitations. Animals intended for...

  15. [Problems in the use of radioactively marked bacteria in animal experiments. 1. Labeling of Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica and Salmonella dublin with eH, 14C, 32P, 59Fe, 99mTc, 125J1].

    PubMed

    Flossmann, K D; Rohrmann, B; Hubald, J; Finsterbusch, L

    1977-01-01

    Several methods are suggested by which to use the radionuclides 3H, 14C, 32P, 59Fe, 99mTc, and 125J for labelling or doublelabelling of Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica, and Salmonella dublin, with particular reference being made to labelling ofr animal experiments. Suitable radioactive substrates for internal labelling in chemically defined or partially defined nutritive media include 3H-thymin, 3H-thymidine, 14C-glucose, 14C-mannose, 14C-aspartic acid, as well as 3H-uracil, 3H-uridine, 3H-orotic acid, 14C-orotic acid, 59Fe-III-citrate or chloride, and Na2H32PO4. The choise of the nuclide and substrate should by governed by the problem at hand. PMID:849104

  16. Pathogens of Bovine Respiratory Disease in North American Feedlots Conferring Multidrug Resistance via Integrative Conjugative Elements

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Cassidy L.; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Booker, Calvin W.; Hendrick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we determined the prevalence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD)-associated viral and bacterial pathogens in cattle and characterized the genetic profiles, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and nature of antimicrobial resistance determinants in collected bacteria. Nasopharyngeal swab and lung tissue samples from 68 BRD mortalities in Alberta, Canada (n = 42), Texas (n = 6), and Nebraska (n = 20) were screened using PCR for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, parainfluenza type 3 virus, Mycoplasma bovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Excepting bovine herpesvirus 1, all agents were detected. M. haemolytica (91%) and BVDV (69%) were the most prevalent, with cooccurrence in 63% of the cattle. Isolates of M. haemolytica (n = 55), P. multocida (n = 8), and H. somni (n = 10) from lungs were also collected. Among M. haemolytica isolates, a clonal subpopulation (n = 8) was obtained from a Nebraskan feedlot. All three bacterial pathogens exhibited a high rate of antimicrobial resistance, with 45% exhibiting resistance to three or more antimicrobials. M. haemolytica (n = 18), P. multocida (n = 3), and H. somni (n = 3) from Texas and Nebraska possessed integrative conjugative elements (ICE) that conferred resistance for up to seven different antimicrobial classes. ICE were shown to be transferred via conjugation from P. multocida to Escherichia coli and from M. haemolytica and H. somni to P. multocida. ICE-mediated multidrug-resistant profiles of bacterial BRD pathogens could be a major detriment to many of the therapeutic antimicrobial strategies currently used to control BRD. PMID:24478472

  17. Observations on macrolide resistance and susceptibility testing performance in field isolates collected from clinical bovine respiratory disease cases.

    PubMed

    DeDonder, Keith D; Harhay, Dayna M; Apley, Michael D; Lubbers, Brian V; Clawson, Michael L; Schuller, Gennie; Harhay, Gregory P; White, Brad J; Larson, Robert L; Capik, Sarah F; Riviere, Jim E; Kalbfleisch, Ted; Tessman, Ronald K

    2016-08-30

    The objectives of this study were; first, to describe gamithromycin susceptibility of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni isolated from cattle diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and previously treated with either gamithromycin for control of BRD (mass medication=MM) or sham-saline injected (control=CON); second, to describe the macrolide resistance genes present in genetically typed M. haemolytica isolates; third, use whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to correlate the phenotypic resistance and genetic determinants for resistance among M. haemolytica isolates. M. haemolytica (n=276), P. multocida (n=253), and H. somni (n=78) were isolated from feedlot cattle diagnosed with BRD. Gamithromycin susceptibility was determined by broth microdilution. Whole-genome sequencing was utilized to determine the presence/absence of macrolide resistance genes and to genetically type M. haemolytica. Generalized linear mixed models were built for analysis. There was not a significant difference between MM and CON groups in regards to the likelihood of culturing a resistant isolate of M. haemolytica or P. multocida. The likelihood of culturing a resistant isolate of M. haemolytica differed significantly by state of origin in this study. A single M. haemolytica genetic subtype was associated with an over whelming majority of the observed resistance. H. somni isolation counts were low and statistical models would not converge. Phenotypic resistance was predicted with high sensitivity and specificity by WGS. Additional studies to elucidate the relationships between phenotypic expression of resistance/genetic determinants for resistance and clinical response to antimicrobials are necessary to inform judicious use of antimicrobials in the context of relieving animal disease and suffering. PMID:27527782

  18. A1C test

    MedlinePlus

    HbA1C test; Glycated hemoglobin test; Glycosylated hemoglobin test; Hemoglobin glycosylated test; Glycohemoglobin test ... have recently eaten does not affect the A1C test, so you do not need to fast to ...

  19. Bacterial Species-Specific Activity of a Fluoroquinolone against Two Closely Related Pasteurellaceae with Similar MICs: Differential In Vitro Inoculum Effects and In Vivo Efficacies

    PubMed Central

    Lhermie, Guillaume; El Garch, Farid; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A.; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial activity of a fluoroquinolone against two genetically close bacterial species belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family. Time-kill experiments were used to measure the in vitro activity of marbofloxacin against two strains of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida with similar MICs. We observed that marbofloxacin was equally potent against 105 CFU/mL inocula M. haemolytica and P. multocida. However, an inoculum effect was observed with P. multocida, meaning that marbofloxacin activity was decreased against a 108 CFU/mL inoculum, whereas no inoculum effect was observed with M. haemolytica. Marbofloxacin activity was also tested in a lung infection model with immunocompromised mice intratracheally infected with 109 CFU of each bacteria. At the same dose, the clinical and bacteriological outcomes were much better for mice infected with M. haemolytica than for those infected with P. multocida. Moreover, bacteriological eradication was obtained with a lower marbofloxacin dose for mice infected with M. haemolytica. Our results suggest that the differential in vivo marbofloxacin efficacy observed with the two bacterial species of similar MIC could be explained by a differential inoculum effect. Consequently, MICs determined on 105 CFU inocula were not predictive of the differences in antibiotic efficacies against high bacterial inocula of closely related bacterial strains. These results could stimulate further investigations on bacterial species-specific antibiotic doses in a clinical setting. PMID:26506096

  20. Bacterial Species-Specific Activity of a Fluoroquinolone against Two Closely Related Pasteurellaceae with Similar MICs: Differential In Vitro Inoculum Effects and In Vivo Efficacies.

    PubMed

    Lhermie, Guillaume; El Garch, Farid; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial activity of a fluoroquinolone against two genetically close bacterial species belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family. Time-kill experiments were used to measure the in vitro activity of marbofloxacin against two strains of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida with similar MICs. We observed that marbofloxacin was equally potent against 105 CFU/mL inocula M. haemolytica and P. multocida. However, an inoculum effect was observed with P. multocida, meaning that marbofloxacin activity was decreased against a 108 CFU/mL inoculum, whereas no inoculum effect was observed with M. haemolytica. Marbofloxacin activity was also tested in a lung infection model with immunocompromised mice intratracheally infected with 109 CFU of each bacteria. At the same dose, the clinical and bacteriological outcomes were much better for mice infected with M. haemolytica than for those infected with P. multocida. Moreover, bacteriological eradication was obtained with a lower marbofloxacin dose for mice infected with M. haemolytica. Our results suggest that the differential in vivo marbofloxacin efficacy observed with the two bacterial species of similar MIC could be explained by a differential inoculum effect. Consequently, MICs determined on 105 CFU inocula were not predictive of the differences in antibiotic efficacies against high bacterial inocula of closely related bacterial strains. These results could stimulate further investigations on bacterial species-specific antibiotic doses in a clinical setting. PMID:26506096

  1. Fusobacterium necrophorum in North American Bighorn Sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Narayanan, Sanjeevkumar; Batra, Sai Arun; Jegarubee, Bavananthasivam; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum has been detected in pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis ) lungs, in addition to the aerobic respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica , Bibersteinia trehalosi , Pasteurella multocida , and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae . Similar to M. haemolytica , F. necrophorum produces a leukotoxin. Leukotoxin-induced lysis and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages are responsible for acute inflammation and lung tissue damage characteristic of M. haemolytica -caused pneumonia. As one approach in elucidating the role of F. necrophorum in BHS pneumonia, we determined the frequency of the presence of F. necrophorum in archived pneumonic BHS lung tissues, and susceptibility of BHS leukocytes to F. necrophorum leukotoxin. A species-specific PCR assay detected F. necrophorum in 37% of pneumonic BHS lung tissues (total tested n=70). Sequences of PCR amplicons were similar to the less virulent F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxin exhibited cytotoxicity to BHS PMNs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As with the M. haemolytica leukotoxin, F. necrophorum leukotoxin was more toxic to BHS PMNs than domestic sheep PMNs. It is likely that F. necrophorum enters the lungs after M. haemolytica and other aerobic respiratory pathogens enter the lungs and initiate tissue damage, thereby creating a microenvironment that is conducive for anaerobic bacterial growth. In summary, Fusobacterium leukotoxin is highly toxic for BHS leukocytes; however, based on the PCR findings, it is unlikely to play a direct role in the development of BHS pneumonia. PMID:27224212

  2. A1C

    MedlinePlus

    A1C is a blood test for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. It measures your average blood glucose, or blood sugar, level over the past 3 ... A1C alone or in combination with other diabetes tests to make a diagnosis. They also use the ...

  3. A1C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to minimize the complications caused by chronically elevated glucose levels, such as progressive damage to body organs like the kidneys, eyes, cardiovascular system, and nerves. The A1c test result ...

  4. Sulfotransferase 4A1.

    PubMed

    Minchin, Rodney F; Lewis, Aaron; Mitchell, Deanne; Kadlubar, Fred F; McManus, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we highlight the physical and enzymatic properties of the novel human sulfotransferase, SULT4A1. The gene is most highly expressed in selective regions of the brain, although work to date has failed to identify any specific endogenous substrate for the enzyme. SULT4A1 shares low homology with other human sulfotransferases. Nevertheless, it is highly conserved between species. Despite the low homology, it is structurally very similar to other cytosolic sulfotransferases with a conserved substrate binding domain, dimerization site and partial cofactor binding sites. However, the catalytic cavity is much smaller, and it has been suggested that the cofactor may not be accommodated within it. A recent link between variability in the 5'UTR of the SULT4A1 gene and schizophrenia has heightened interest in the endogenous function of the enzyme and its possible role in human disease. PMID:18248844

  5. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome by Tildipirosin Compared with Other Veterinary Macrolides

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleotides revealed differences in the interactions of these macrolides within their common ribosomal binding site. PMID:22926570

  6. Effect of Stress on Viral–Bacterial Synergy in Bovine Respiratory Disease: Novel Mechanisms to Regulate Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, P. D.; Aich, P.; Manuja, A.; Hokamp, K.; Roche, F. M.; Brinkman, F. S. L.; Potter, A.; Babiuk, L. A.

    2005-01-01

    The severity of bovine respiratory infections has been linked to a variety of factors, including environmental and nutritional changes, transportation, and social reorganization of weaned calves. Fatal respiratory infections, however, usually occur when a primary viral infection compromises host defences and enhances the severity of a secondary bacterial infection. This viral–bacterial synergy can occur by a number of different mechanisms and disease challenge models have been developed to analyse host responses during these respiratory infections. A primary bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) respiratory infection followed by a secondary challenge with Mannheimia haemolytica results in fatal bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and host responses to these two pathogens have been studied extensively. We used this disease model to demonstrate that stress significantly altered the viral–bacterial synergy resulting in fatal BRD. Functional genomic analysis revealed that BHV-1 infection enhanced toll-like receptors (TLR) expression and increased pro-inflammatory responses which contribute to the severity of a Mannheimia haemolytica infection. TLRs play a critical role in detecting bacterial infections and inducing pro-inflammatory responses. It is difficult to understand, however, how stress-induced corticosteroids could enhance this form of viral–bacterial synergy. Nuclear translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor activates cell signalling pathways which inhibit both TLR signalling and pro-inflammatory responses. The apparent conundrum between stress-induced corticosteroids and enhanced BRD susceptibility is discussed in terms of present data and previous investigations of stress and respiratory disease. PMID:18629190

  7. Etiologic agents and diseases found associated with clinical aspergillosis in falcons.

    PubMed

    Tarello, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe parasitological, microbiological, and pathological findings associated with the isolation of Aspergillus species in 94 clinically diseased captive falcons from Dubai. Concomitant agents and/or diseases were identified in 64 cases, causing either single (n = 36) or multiple coinfections (n = 28). Diagnoses found more often in association with aspergillosis were chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS) (n = 29), Caryospora sp. (n = 16), Serratospiculum seurati infestation (n = 14), cestodiasis (n = 6), bumblefoot (n = 5), trematodosis due to Strigea falconispalumbi (n = 5), trichomoniasis (n = 4), Babesia shortti (n = 4), Mannheimia (Pastorella) haemolytica (n = 4), interstitial hepatitis (n = 4), Escherichia coli (n = 3), and Clostridium perfringens enterotoxemia (n = 2). Compared with a control group of 2000 diseased falcons without evidence of aspergillosis, the prevalence of Babesia shortti, CFIDS, Mannheimia (Pastorella) haemolytica, Escherichia coli, and falcon herpes virus infection was conspicuously higher in association with aspergillosis. These entities may be considered suitable candidates as predisposing factors for the mycosis. PMID:21754937

  8. Etiologic Agents and Diseases Found Associated with Clinical Aspergillosis in Falcons

    PubMed Central

    Tarello, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe parasitological, microbiological, and pathological findings associated with the isolation of Aspergillus species in 94 clinically diseased captive falcons from Dubai. Concomitant agents and/or diseases were identified in 64 cases, causing either single (n = 36) or multiple coinfections (n = 28). Diagnoses found more often in association with aspergillosis were chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS) (n = 29), Caryospora sp. (n = 16), Serratospiculum seurati infestation (n = 14), cestodiasis (n = 6), bumblefoot (n = 5), trematodosis due to Strigea falconispalumbi (n = 5), trichomoniasis (n = 4), Babesia shortti (n = 4), Mannheimia (Pastorella) haemolytica (n = 4), interstitial hepatitis (n = 4), Escherichia coli (n = 3), and Clostridium perfringens enterotoxemia (n = 2). Compared with a control group of 2000 diseased falcons without evidence of aspergillosis, the prevalence of Babesia shortti, CFIDS, Mannheimia (Pastorella) haemolytica, Escherichia coli, and falcon herpes virus infection was conspicuously higher in association with aspergillosis. These entities may be considered suitable candidates as predisposing factors for the mycosis. PMID:21754937

  9. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic integration and modelling of oxytetracycline administered alone and in combination with carprofen in calves.

    PubMed

    Brentnall, C; Cheng, Z; McKellar, Q A; Lees, P

    2013-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of oxytetracycline were investigated, when administered both alone and in the presence of carprofen, in healthy calves. The study comprised a four treatment, four sequences, and four period cross-over design and used a tissue cage model, which permitted the collection of serum, inflamed tissue cage fluid (exudate) and non-inflamed tissue cage fluid (transudate). There were no clinically relevant differences in the PK profile of oxytetracycline when administered alone and when administered with carprofen. PK-PD integration was undertaken for a pathogenic strain of Mannheimia haemolytic (A1 76/1), by correlating in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and time-kill data with in vivo PK data obtained in the cross-over study. Based on in vitro susceptibility in cation adjusted Mueller Hinton Broth (CAMHB) and in vivo determined PK variables, ratios of maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under curve (AUC) to MIC and time for which concentration exceeded MIC (T>MIC) were determined. The CAMHB MIC data satisfied integrated PK/PD relationships predicted to achieve efficacy for approximately 48 h after dosing; mean values for serum were 5.13 (Cmax/MIC), 49.3 h (T>MIC) and 126.6 h (AUC(96h)/MIC). Similar findings were obtained when oxytetracycline was administered in the presence of carprofen, with PK-PD indices based on MIC determined in CAMHB. However, PK-PD integration of data, based on oxytetracycline MICs determined in the biological fluids, serum, exudate and transudate, suggest that it possesses, at most, limited direct killing activity against the M. haemolytica strain A1 76/1; mean values for serum were 0.277 (Cmax/MIC), 0 h (T>MIC) and 6.84 h (AUC(96h)/MIC). The data suggest that the beneficial therapeutic effects of oxytetracycline may depend, at least in part, on actions other than direct inhibition of bacterial growth. PMID:23415880

  10. Identification and analysis of CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Hosaka, Shinya; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450) are important for not only drug metabolism and toxicity, but also biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol and bile acids, and steroid synthesis. In cynomolgus macaques, widely used in biomedical research, we have characterized P450 cDNAs, which were isolated as expressed sequence tags of cynomolgus macaque liver. In this study, cynomolgus CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 cDNAs were characterized by sequence analysis, phylogenetic analysis and tissue expression pattern. By sequence analysis, these five cynomolgus P450s had high sequence identities (94-99%) to the human orthologs in amino acids. By phylogenetic analysis, each cynomolgus P450 was more closely related to the human ortholog as compared with the dog or rat ortholog. By quantitative polymerase chain reaction, among the 10 tissue types, CYP7A1 and CYP17A1 mRNAs were preferentially expressed in liver and adrenal gland, respectively. Cynomolgus CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 mRNAs were most abundantly expressed in liver and testis, respectively. Cynomolgus CYP20A1 mRNA was expressed in all the tissues, including brain and liver. Tissue expression patterns of each cynomolgus P450 were generally similar to that of the human ortholog. These results suggest the molecular similarities of CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 between cynomolgus macaques and humans. PMID:25649950

  11. Induction of immunity against pneumonic pasteurellosis following experimental infection in calves.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H J; Jericho, K W

    1986-01-01

    Immunity against pneumonic pasteurellosis was studied in calves after recovery from experimental respiratory disease with Pasteurella haemolytica. Nine calves were exposed to aerosols of parainfluenza-3 virus and Pasteurella haemolytica A1 six days apart to produce respiratory disease. After recovery from the disease, these nine principal and four control calves were challenged with aerosols of bovine herpesvirus 1 and P. haemolytica A1 four days apart. With this viral-bacterial challenge, the nine principal animals failed to develop clinical responses to this bacterial challenge and their lungs did not show the growth of P. haemolytica on cultures, whereas two of four control calves had elevated temperatures and developed necropurulent pneumonia with the isolation of P. haemolytica from the lungs. The principal calves had developed high levels of cytotoxin neutralizing antibodies in their sera following parainfluenza-3 virus-P. haemolytica infection. This demonstrated that immunity against pneumonic pasteurellosis can be achieved, with a suggestion that further search for an effective vaccine for P. haemolytica is warranted. PMID:3017526

  12. Pharmacodynamics of oxytetracycline administered alone and in combination with carprofen in calves.

    PubMed

    Brentnall, C; Cheng, Z; McKellar, Q A; Lees, P

    2012-09-15

    The pharmacodynamics (PD) of oxytetracycline was investigated against a strain of Mannheimia haemolytica. In vitro measurements, comprising minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration and time-kill curves, were conducted in five matrices; Mueller Hinton Broth (MHB), cation-adjusted MHB (CAMHB) and calf serum, exudate and transudate. MICs were much higher in the biological fluids than in MHB and CAMHB. Ratios of MIC were, serum: CAMHB 19 : 1; exudate:CAMHB 16.1; transudate:CAMHB 14 : 1. Ex vivo data, generated in the tissue cage model of inflammation, demonstrated that oxytetracycline, administered to calves intramuscularly at a dose rate of 20 mg/kg, did not inhibit the growth of M haemolytica in serum, exudate and transudate, even at peak concentration. However, using in vitro susceptibility in CAMHB and in vivo-determined pharmacokinetic (PK) variables, average and minimum oxytetracycline concentrations relative to MIC (C(av)/MIC and C(min)/MIC) predicted achievement of efficacy for approximately 48 hours after dosing. Similar C(av)/MIC and C(min)/MIC data were obtained when oxytetracycline was administered in the presence of carprofen. PK-PD integration of data for oxytetracycline, based on MICs determined in the three biological fluids, suggests that it possesses, at most, limited direct killing activity against M haemolytica. These data raise questions concerning the mechanism(s) of action of oxytetracycline, when administered at clinically recommended dose rates. PMID:22843613

  13. A-1 Test Stand work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A structural steel beam to support the new thrust measurement system on the A-1 Test Stand at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center is lifted to waiting employees for installation. The beam is part of the thrust takeout structure needed to support the new measurement system. Four such beams have been installed at the stand in preparation for installation of the system in upcoming weeks. Operators are preparing the stand for testing the next generation of rocket engines for the U.S. space program.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility monitoring of respiratory tract pathogens isolated from diseased cattle and pigs across Europe: the VetPath study.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Anno; Thomas, Valérie; Simjee, Shabbir; Moyaert, Hilde; El Garch, Farid; Maher, Kirsty; Morrissey, Ian; Butty, Pascal; Klein, Ulrich; Marion, Hervé; Rigaut, Delphine; Vallé, Michel

    2014-08-01

    VetPath is an ongoing pan-European antibiotic susceptibility monitoring programme collecting pathogens from diseased antimicrobial non-treated cattle, pigs and poultry. In the current study, 1001 isolates from cattle and pig respiratory tract infections were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Non-replicate lung samples or nasopharyngeal/nasal swabs were collected from animals with acute clinical signs in 11 countries during 2002-2006. Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica from cattle and P. multocida, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Streptococcus suis from pigs were isolated by standard methods. S. suis was also isolated from meningitis cases. MICs of 16 antibiotics were assessed centrally by broth microdilution following CLSI recommendations. Results were interpreted using CLSI breakpoints where available. P. multocida (231) and M. haemolytica (138) isolates were all susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, enrofloxacin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Resistance to florfenicol and spectinomycin was 0.4% and 3.5% in P. multocida, respectively, and absent in M. haemolytica isolates. Tetracycline resistance was 5.7% and 14.6% for P. multocida and M. haemolytica. In pigs, 230 P. multocida, 220 A. pleuropneumoniae and 182 S. suis isolates were recovered. Resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, florfenicol, tiamulin and tilmicosin was absent or <1%. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance was 3-6% and tetracycline resistance varied from 14.7% in A. pleuropneumoniae to 81.8% in S. suis. In conclusion, low resistance to antibiotics with defined clinical breakpoints, except for tetracycline, was observed among the major respiratory tract pathogens recovered from cattle and pigs. Since for approximately half of the antibiotics in this panel no CLSI-defined breakpoints were available, setting of the missing veterinary breakpoints is important. PMID:24837878

  15. A1C Test and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... laboratory tests. How does the A1C relate to estimated average glucose? Estimated average glucose (eAG) is calculated from the A1C. ... levels have the A1C test twice a year. Estimated average glucose (eAG) is calculated from the A1C ...

  16. 18 CFR 3a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 3a.1 Section 3a.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION General § 3a.1 Purpose. This part 3a describes...

  17. 22 CFR 3a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions. 3a.1 Section 3a.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL ACCEPTANCE OF EMPLOYMENT FROM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS BY MEMBERS OF THE UNIFORMED SERVICES § 3a.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a) Applicant means any person...

  18. 32 CFR 352a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 352a.1 Section 352a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTERS DEFENSE FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SERVICE (DFAS) § 352a.1 Purpose. Pursuant to the authority vested in the Secretary of Defense under provisions...

  19. 14 CFR 374a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 374a.1 Section 374a.1 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS EXTENSION OF CREDIT BY AIRLINES TO FEDERAL POLITICAL CANDIDATES § 374a.1 Purpose. Section 401...

  20. 32 CFR 242a.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability. 242a.1 Section 242a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PUBLIC MEETING PROCEDURES OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS, UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES § 242a.1 Applicability. These...

  1. 12 CFR 708a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions. 708a.1 Section 708a.1 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS BANK CONVERSIONS AND MERGERS Conversion of Insured Credit Unions to Mutual Savings Banks § 708a.1 Definitions. As used in this part: Clear and conspicuous means text...

  2. Led Astray by Hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jean; Diesburg-Stanwood, Amy; Bodor, Geza; Rasouli, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (A1c) is used frequently to diagnose and treat diabetes mellitus. Therefore, it is important be aware of factors that may interfere with the accuracy of A1c measurements. This is a case of a rare hemoglobin variant that falsely elevated a nondiabetic patient’s A1c level and led to a misdiagnosis of diabetes. A 67-year-old male presented to endocrine clinic for further management after he was diagnosed with diabetes based on an elevated A1c of 10.7%, which is approximately equivalent to an average blood glucose of 260 mg/dL. Multiple repeat A1c levels remained >10%, but his home fasting and random glucose monitoring ranged from 92 to 130 mg/dL. Hemoglobin electrophoresis and subsequent genetic analysis diagnosed the patient with hemoglobin Wayne, a rare hemoglobin variant. This variant falsely elevates A1c levels when A1c is measured using cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. When the boronate affinity method was applied instead, the patient’s A1c level was actually 4.7%. Though hemoglobin Wayne is clinically silent, this patient was erroneously diagnosed with diabetes and started on an antiglycemic medication. Due to this misdiagnosis, the patient was at risk of escalation in his “diabetes management” and hypoglycemia. Therefore, it is important that providers are aware of factors that may result in hemoglobin A1c inaccuracy including hemoglobin variants. PMID:26848480

  3. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gershwin, Laurel J.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L.; Anderson, Mark L.; McEligot, Heather A.; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Neibergs, Holly L.; Womack, James

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus), which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, and Histophilus somni. Some cattle appear to be more resistant to BRDC than others. We hypothesize that appropriate immune responses to these pathogens are subject to genetic control. To determine which genes are involved in the immune response to each of these pathogens it was first necessary to experimentally induce infection separately with each pathogen to document clinical and pathological responses in animals from which tissues were harvested for subsequent RNA sequencing. Herein these infections and animal responses are described. PMID:26571015

  4. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex.

    PubMed

    Gershwin, Laurel J; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Anderson, Mark L; McEligot, Heather A; Shao, Matt X; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Taylor, Jeremy F; Neibergs, Holly L; Womack, James

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus), which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, and Histophilus somni. Some cattle appear to be more resistant to BRDC than others. We hypothesize that appropriate immune responses to these pathogens are subject to genetic control. To determine which genes are involved in the immune response to each of these pathogens it was first necessary to experimentally induce infection separately with each pathogen to document clinical and pathological responses in animals from which tissues were harvested for subsequent RNA sequencing. Herein these infections and animal responses are described. PMID:26571015

  5. Mastitis in sheep--The last 10 years and the future of research.

    PubMed

    Gelasakis, A I; Mavrogianni, V S; Petridis, I G; Vasileiou, N G C; Fthenakis, G C

    2015-12-14

    Bacterial mastitis is a significant welfare and financial problem in sheep flocks. This paper reviews the recently published literature, including publications that highlight the significance and virulence factors of the causal agents, especially Staphylococcus aureus and Mannheimia haemolytica, the primary causes of the disease. Research has also contributed to the understanding of risk factors, including genetic susceptibility of animals to infections, supporting future strategies for sustainable disease control. Pathogenetic mechanisms, including the role of the local defenses in the teat, have also been described and can assist formulation of strategies that induce local immune responses in the teat of ewes. Further to well-established diagnostic techniques, i.e., bacteriological tests and somatic cell counting, advanced methodologies, e.g., proteomics technologies, will likely contribute to more rapid and accurate diagnostics, in turn enhancing mastitis control efforts. PMID:26216457

  6. Reversibility of Intersystem Crossing in the {a}1A1(000) and {a}1A1(010) States of Methylene, CH_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh T.; Sears, Trevor; Hall, Gregory

    2015-06-01

    The lowest energy singlet ( {a}1A1) and triplet ( {X}3B1) electronic states of methylene, CH_2, are only separated by 3150 wn, but differ greatly in chemical reactivity. Overall methylene reaction rates and chemical behavior are therefore strongly dependent on collisionally-mediated singlet-triplet interconversion. Collisions with inert partners tend to depopulate the excited singlet state and populate vibrationally excited triplet levels in CH_2. This process is generally considered as irreversible for large molecules, however, this is not the case for small molecules such as CH_2. An investigation of the decay kinetics of CH_2 in the presence of argon and various amounts of oxygen has been carried out using transient frequency modulation (FM) absorption spectroscopy, to monitor ortho and para rotational levels in both the {a}1A1(000) and {a}1A1(010) states. In the {a}1A1(000) state, all observed rotational levels follow double exponential decay kinetics, a direct consequence of reversible intersystem crossing. The relative amplitude of the slower decay component is an indicator of how quickly the reverse crossing from excited triplet levels becomes significant during the reaction and relaxation of singlet methylene. The para rotational levels show more obvious signs of reversibility than ortho rotational levels. Adding oxygen enhances the visibility of reversibility for both ortho and para levels. However, in the {a}1A1(010) state where the FM signal is 5-10 times smaller than the {a}1A1(000) state, there is no evidence of double exponential decay kinetics. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 and DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  7. Pharmacogenetics of SULT1A1

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Jaclyn; Kadlubar, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic SULT1A1 participates in the bioconversion of a plethora of endogenous and xenobiotic substances. Genetic variation in this important enzyme such as SNPs can vary by ethnicity and have functional consequences on its activity. Most SULT1A1 genetic variability studies have been centered on the SULT1A1*1/2 SNP. Highlighted here are not only this SNP, but other genetic variants associated with SULT1A1 that could modify drug efficacy and xenobiotic metabolism. Some studies have investigated how differential metabolism of xenobiotic substances influences susceptibility to or protection from cancer in multiple sites. This review will focus primarily on the impact of SULT1A1 genetic variation on the response to anticancer therapeutic agents and subsequently how it relates to environmental and dietary exposure to both cancer-causing and cancer-preventative compounds. PMID:25493573

  8. A1C Test and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Diabetes Educators American Diabetes Association JDRF MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations ​There are many organizations who provide ... KB). Alternate Language URL The A1C Test and Diabetes Page Content On this page: What is the ...

  9. A-1 modification work under way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Phil Schemanski of Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne removes equipment inside the thrust drum on the A-1 Test Stand as part of a comprehensive modification project to prepare for testing the new J-2X engine.

  10. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    MedlinePlus

    ... the person's average blood sugar levels over that time. Why It's Done Doctors use the hemoglobin A1c test to determine if your child's diabetes management plan needs to be adjusted. Typically the test ...

  11. 32 CFR 383a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DEFENSE COMMISSARY AGENCY (DeCA) § 383a.1 Purpose. Pursuant to the authority vested in the Secretary of Defense under title 10, United States Code, this part establishes the Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA)...

  12. TMS installation at A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Stennis Space Center employees maneuver a new thrust measurement system in preparation for its installation on the A-1 Test Stand on March 3. The system was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois and represents a state-of-the-art upgrade from the equipment used on the stand for more than 40 years. The A-1 Test Stand is being upgraded to provide testing for the next generation of rocket engines for America's space program.

  13. Photoaffinity labeling of A1-adenosine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.N.; Cristalli, G.; Grifantini, M.; Vittori, S.; Lohse, M.J.

    1985-11-25

    The ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling. A photolabile derivative of R-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, R-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine (R-AHPIA), has been synthesized as a covalent specific ligand for A1-adenosine receptors. In adenylate cyclase studies with membranes of rat fat cells and human platelets, R-AHPIA has adenosine receptor agonist activity with a more than 60-fold selectivity for the A1-subtype. It competes for (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding to A1-receptors of rat brain membranes with a Ki value of 1.6 nM. After UV irradiation, R-AHPIA binds irreversibly to the receptor, as indicated by a loss of (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding after extensive washing; the Ki value for this photoinactivation is 1.3 nM. The p-hydroxyphenyl substituent of R-AHPIA can be directly radioiodinated to give a photoaffinity label of high specific radioactivity ( SVI-AHPIA). This compound has a KD value of about 1.5 nM as assessed from saturation and kinetic experiments. Adenosine analogues compete for SVI-AHPIA binding to rat brain membranes with an order of potency characteristic for A1-adenosine receptors. Dissociation curves following UV irradiation at equilibrium demonstrate 30-40% irreversible specific binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicates that the probe is photoincorporated into a single peptide of Mr = 35,000. Labeling of this peptide can be blocked specifically and stereoselectively by adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists in a manner which is typical for the A1-subtype. The results indicate that SVI-AHPIA identifies the ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor, which is a peptide with Mr = 35,000.

  14. 44 CFR Appendix A(1) to Part 61 - Appendix A(1) to Part 61

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Appendix A(1) to Part 61 A(1) Appendix A(1) to Part 61 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program INSURANCE COVERAGE AND RATES Pt. 61, App....

  15. Molecular versus conventional culture for detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens in poultry.

    PubMed

    Ammar, A M; Abd El-Aziz, N K; Abd El Wanis, S; Bakry, N R

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections are leading causes of morbidity in poultry farms allover the world. Six pathogens; Escherichia coli, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were involved in respiratory infections in poultry. Herein, conventional identification procedures and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were applied for detection of the most common respiratory bacterial pathogens in clinical specimens of poultry obtained from 53 Egyptian farms with various respiratory problems and the results were compared statistically. The analyzed data demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of the most recovered microorganisms (P<0.05) by PCR comparing to classical culture procedures. Further, multiplex PCR could detect E. coli, M. gallisepticum, S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa in a single reaction, however, M. haemolytica was reported in a uinplex system. According to PCR results, the most commonly recorded bacterial pathogens in examined poultry farms were E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa (54.71% each), followed by M. haemolylica (35.85%) and M. gallisepticum (20.75%). In conclusion, PCR assay offered an effective alternative to traditional typing methods for the identification and simultaneous detection of the most clinically relevant respiratory pathogens in poultry. PMID:26950451

  16. The nasopharyngeal microbiota of feedlot cattle that develop bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Holman, Devin B; McAllister, Tim A; Topp, Edward; Wright, André-Denis G; Alexander, Trevor W

    2015-10-22

    Bovine respiratory disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle. The objective of this study was to compare the nasopharyngeal bacterial microbiota of healthy cattle and cattle treated for BRD in a commercial feedlot setting using a high-density 16S rRNA gene microarray (Phylochip). Samples were taken from both groups of animals (n=5) at feedlot entry (day 0) and ≥60 days after placement. Cattle diagnosed with BRD had significantly less bacterial diversity and fewer OTUs in their nasopharynx at both sampling times. The predominant phyla in both groups were Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. The relative abundance of the phylum Actinobacteria was lower in cattle treated for BRD. At the family-level there was a greater relative abundance (P<0.05) of Micrococcaceae (day 0 only), Lachnospiraceae (≥60 days), Lactobacillaceae (day 0), and Bacillaceae (day 0) in healthy cattle compared to BRD-affected cattle. The community structure of the BRD-affected and healthy cattle were also significantly different from each other at both sampling times as measured using unweighted UniFrac distances. All entry samples of cattle diagnosed with BRD had 16S rRNA gene sequences representative of the BRD-associated bacteria Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, although 3/5 healthy cattle were also positive for M. haemolytica at this time point. The results also indicate that the bovine nasopharyngeal microbiota is relatively unstable during the first 60 days in the feedlot. PMID:26249828

  17. Structured literature review of responses of cattle to viral and bacterial pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease complex.

    PubMed

    Grissett, G P; White, B J; Larson, R L

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important disease of cattle and continues to be an intensely studied topic. However, literature summarizing the time between pathogen exposure and clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion is minimal. A structured literature review of the published literature was performed to determine cattle responses (time from pathogen exposure to clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion) in challenge models using common BRD viral and bacterial pathogens. After review a descriptive analysis of published studies using common BRD pathogen challenge studies was performed. Inclusion criteria were single pathogen challenge studies with no treatment or vaccination evaluating outcomes of interest: clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion. Pathogens of interest included: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pastuerella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Thirty-five studies and 64 trials were included for analysis. The median days to the resolution of clinical signs after BVDV challenge was 15 and shedding was not detected on day 12 postchallenge. Resolution of BHV-1 shedding resolved on day 12 and clinical signs on day 12 postchallenge. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ceased shedding on day 9 and median time to resolution of clinical signs was on day 12 postchallenge. M. haemolytica resolved clinical signs 8 days postchallenge. This literature review and descriptive analysis can serve as a resource to assist in designing challenge model studies and potentially aid in estimation of duration of clinical disease and shedding after natural pathogen exposure. PMID:25929158

  18. Pneumococcal IgA1 protease subverts specific protection by human IgA1.

    PubMed

    Janoff, E N; Rubins, J B; Fasching, C; Charboneau, D; Rahkola, J T; Plaut, A G; Weiser, J N

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases may sabotage the protective effects of IgA. In vitro, both exogenous and endogenously produced IgA1 protease inhibited phagocytic killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae by capsule-specific IgA1 human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) but not IgA2. These IgA1 proteases cleaved and reduced binding of the the effector Fcα1 heavy chain but not the antigen-binding F(ab)/light chain to pneumococcal surfaces. In vivo, IgA1 protease-resistant IgA2, but not IgA1 protease-sensitive IgA1, supported 60% survival in mice infected with wild-type S. pneumoniae. IgA1 hMAbs protected mice against IgA1 protease-deficient but not -producing pneumococci. Parallel mouse sera with human IgA2 showed more efficient complement-mediated reductions in pneumococci with neutrophils than did IgA1, particularly with protease-producing organisms. After natural human pneumococcal bacteremia, purified serum IgG inhibited IgA1 protease activity in 7 of 11 patients (64%). These observations provide the first evidence in vivo that IgA1 protease can circumvent killing of S. pneumoniae by human IgA. Acquisition of IgA1 protease-neutralizing IgG after infection directs attention to IgA1 protease both as a determinant of successful colonization and infection and as a potential vaccine candidate. PMID:23820749

  19. 38 CFR 8a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 8a.1 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS MORTGAGE LIFE... title to the housing unit for which his or her grant was made. (b) The term Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) means the mortgage protection life insurance authorized for veterans under 38 U.S.C....

  20. 38 CFR 8a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 8a.1 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS MORTGAGE LIFE... title to the housing unit for which his or her grant was made. (b) The term Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) means the mortgage protection life insurance authorized for veterans under 38 U.S.C....

  1. 38 CFR 8a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 8a.1 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS MORTGAGE LIFE... title to the housing unit for which his or her grant was made. (b) The term Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) means the mortgage protection life insurance authorized for veterans under 38 U.S.C....

  2. 38 CFR 8a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 8a.1 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS MORTGAGE LIFE... title to the housing unit for which his or her grant was made. (b) The term Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) means the mortgage protection life insurance authorized for veterans under 38 U.S.C....

  3. 38 CFR 8a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 8a.1 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS MORTGAGE LIFE... title to the housing unit for which his or her grant was made. (b) The term Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) means the mortgage protection life insurance authorized for veterans under 38 U.S.C....

  4. 8 CFR 245a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... more of the following areas of major life activity: (i) Self-care, (ii) receptive and expressive..., services to pregnant women or children under 18 years of age, or treatment in the interest of public health..., if any, or (2) a crime treated as a misdemeanor under 8 CFR 245a.1(p). For purposes of...

  5. 8 CFR 245a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., if any, or (2) a crime treated as a misdemeanor under 8 CFR 245a.1(p). For purposes of this... CFR part 245a, the crime shall be treated as a misdemeanor. (q) Subject of an Order to Show Cause... interview to obtain an immigrant visa at a Consulate or Embassy in Canada or Mexico but who subsequently...

  6. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... which will be codified at 32 CFR part 168b. ... ENGINEERING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS § 168a.1 Purpose. This part: (a) Establishes guidelines for the award of National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191....

  7. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... which will be codified at 32 CFR part 168b. ... ENGINEERING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS § 168a.1 Purpose. This part: (a) Establishes guidelines for the award of National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191....

  8. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... which will be codified at 32 CFR part 168b. ... ENGINEERING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS § 168a.1 Purpose. This part: (a) Establishes guidelines for the award of National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191....

  9. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... which will be codified at 32 CFR part 168b. ... ENGINEERING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS § 168a.1 Purpose. This part: (a) Establishes guidelines for the award of National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191....

  10. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... which will be codified at 32 CFR part 168b. ... ENGINEERING GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS § 168a.1 Purpose. This part: (a) Establishes guidelines for the award of National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191....

  11. 8 CFR 245a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... crime treated as a misdemeanor under 8 CFR 245a.1(p). For purposes of this definition, any crime... the term such alien actually served. Under this exception, for purposes of 8 CFR part 245a, the crime... the applicant had violated his or her nonimmigrant student status prior to January 1, 1982. A...

  12. 8 CFR 245a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... crime treated as a misdemeanor under 8 CFR 245a.1(p). For purposes of this definition, any crime... the term such alien actually served. Under this exception, for purposes of 8 CFR part 245a, the crime... the applicant had violated his or her nonimmigrant student status prior to January 1, 1982. A...

  13. Diversity of bacterial species in the nasal cavity of sheep in the highlands of Ethiopia and first report of Histophilus somni in the country.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Biruk; Sisay Tessema, Tesfaye; Tefera, Genene

    2013-06-01

    A study was conducted to isolate bacterial species/pathogens from the nasal cavity of apparently healthy and pneumonic sheep. Nasal swabs were collected aseptically, transported in tryptose soya broth and incubated for 24 h. Then, each swab was streaked onto chocolate and blood agar for culture. Bacterial species were identified following standard bacteriological procedures. Accordingly, a total of 1,556 bacteria were isolated from 960 nasal swabs collected from three different highland areas of Ethiopia, namely Debre Berhan, Asella, and Gimba. In Debre Berhan, 140 Mannheimia haemolytica, 81 Histophilus somni, 57 Staphylococcus species, and 52 Bibersteinia trehalosi were isolated. While from Gimba M. haemolytica, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and H. somni were isolated at rates of 25.2, 15.9, 11.4, and 5.9 %, respectively, of the total 647 bacterial species. In Asella from 352 bacterial species isolated, 93 (26.4 %) were M. haemolytica, 48 (13.6 %) were Staphylococcus species, 26 (7.4 %) were B. trehalosi, and 17 (4.8 %) H. somni were recognized. Further identification and characterization using BIOLOG identification system Enterococcus avium and Sphingomonas sanguinis were identified at 100 % probability, while, H. somni and Actinobacillus lignerisii were suggested by the system. The study showed that a variety of bacterial species colonize the nasal cavity of the Ethiopian highland sheep with variable proportion between healthy and pneumonic ones. To our knowledge, this is the first report on isolation of H. somni, an important pathogen in cattle, from the respiratory tract of a ruminant species in the country. PMID:23328945

  14. In vitro activity and rodent efficacy of clinafloxacin for bovine and swine respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Michael T.; Quesnell, Rebecca; Tiwari, Raksha; LeMay, Mary; Watts, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinafloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone that was originally developed and subsequently abandoned in the late 1990s as a human health antibiotic for respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of clinafloxacin as a possible treatment for respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommended procedures with recent strains from the Zoetis culture collection. Rodent efficacy was determined in CD-1 mice infected systemically or intranasally with bovine Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, or swine Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and administered clinafloxacin for determination of ED50 (efficacious dose-50%) values. The MIC90 values for clinafloxacin against bovine P. multocida, M. haemolytica, Histophilus somni, and M. bovis were 0.125, 0.5, 0.125, and 1 μg/ml, respectively, and the MIC90 values against swine P. multocida, A. pleuropneumoniae, S. suis, and M. hyopneumoniae were í0.03, í0.03, 0.125, and í0.008 μg/ml, respectively. Efficacy in mouse models showed average ED50 values of 0.019 mg/kg/dose in the bovine M. haemolytica systemic infection model, 0.55 mg/kg in the bovine P. multocida intranasal lung challenge model, 0.08 mg/kg/dose in the bovine P. multocida systemic infection model, and 0.7 mg/kg/dose in the swine A. pleuropneumoniae systemic infection model. Clinafloxacin shows good in vitro activity and efficacy in mouse models and may be a novel treatment alternative for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. PMID:23785362

  15. TMS installation at A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Employees at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center complete installation of the new thrust measurement system on the A-1 Test Stand. The new TMS is a state-of-the-art upgrade from the previous system, which was installed when the testing structure was built in the 1960s. It is an advanced calibration system capable of measuring vertical and horizontal thrust loads with accuracy within 0.15 percent at 225,000 pounds. It also will allow engineers to measure thrust as they gimbal (or tilt) engines during tests. The new TMS is part of upgrades for the A-1 Test Stand in preparation for testing the next generation of American space program rocket engines.

  16. TMS installation at A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A new thrust measurement system is lifted onto the A-1 Test Stand deck at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in preparation for its installation. The new system is a state-of-the-art upgrade for the testing structure, which is being prepared for testing of next-generation rocket engines. The system was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois at a cost of about $3.5 million.

  17. Reliability assessment of a 1 MV LTD.

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Salvador; Chavez, Raymond; Molina, Isidro; Kim, Alexandre A.; Johnson, David L.; Maenchen, John Eric; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Ziska, Derek Raymond

    2005-07-01

    A 1 MV linear transformer driver (LTD) is being tested with a large area e-beam diode load at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The experiments will be utilized to determine the repeatability of the output pulse and the reliability of the components. The 1 MV accelerator is being used to determine the feasibility of designing a 6 MV LTD for radiography experiments. The peak voltage, risetime, and pulse width as well as the cavity timing jitter are analyzed to determine the repeatability of the output pulse.

  18. ApoA1 and ApoA1-specific self-antibodies in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-07-01

    Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) is a main protein moiety in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Generally, ApoA1 and HDL are considered as atheroprotective. In prooxidant and inflammatory microenvironment in the vicinity to the atherosclerotic lesion, ApoA1/HDL are subjected to modification. The chemical modifications such as oxidation, nitration, etc result in altering native architecture of ApoA1 toward dysfunctionality and abnormality. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase has a prominent role in this mechanism. Neo-epitopes could be formed and then exposed that makes them immunogenic. Indeed, these epitopes may be recognized by immune cells and induce production of proatherogenic ApoA1-specific IgG antibodies. These antibodies are biologically relevant because they are able to react with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and TLR4 in target cells and induce a variety of pro-inflammatory responses. Epidemiological and functional studies underline a prognostic value of ApoA1 self-antibodies for several cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome, and severe carotid stenosis. PMID:27183204

  19. PLC Software Program for Leak Detector Station A1 SALW-LD-ST-A1

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2001-01-25

    This document describes the software program for the programmable logic controller for the leak detector station ''SALW-LD-ST-A1''. The appendices contains a copy of the printout of the software program.

  20. Rat Organic Anion Transporting Protein 1A1 (OATP1A1)

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yansen; Nieves, Edward; Angeletti, Ruth H.; Orr, George A.; Wolkoff, Allan W.

    2008-01-01

    Rat organic anion transporting protein 1a1 (oatp1a1), a hepatocyte basolateral plasma membrane protein, mediates transport of various amphipathic compounds. Our previous studies indicated that serine phosphorylation of a single tryptic peptide inhibits its transport activity without changing its cell surface content. The site of phosphorylation is unknown and was the subject of the present study. Following immunoaffinity chromatographic purification from rat liver, oatp1a1 was subjected to trypsin digestion and MALDI-TOF. Except for predicted N-glycosylated peptides, 97% of oatp1a1 tryptic peptides were observed. A single tryptic phosphopeptide was found in the C-terminus (aa 626-647), existing in unphosphorylated, singly, or doubly phosphorylated forms, and sensitive to alkaline phosphatase treatment. β-elimination reaction resulted in mass loss of 98 or 196 Da from this peptide, and subsequent Michael addition with cysteamine increased masses by the predicated 77 and 154 Da, indicating that oatp1a1 can be singly or doubly phosphorylated at serine or threonine residues in the C-terminal sequence SSATDHT (aa 634-640). Subsequent tandem MS/MS analysis revealed that phosphorylation at S634 accounted for all singly phosphorylated peptide, while phosphorylation at S634 and S635 accounted for all doubly phosphorylated peptide. These findings identify the site of oatp1a1 phosphorylation and demonstrate that it is an ordered process, in which phosphorylation at S634 precedes that at S635. The mechanism by which phosphorylation results in loss of transport activity in hepatocytes remains to be established. Whether phosphorylation near the C-terminus inhibits C-terminal oligomerization of oatp1a1, required for normal transport function, can be speculated upon, but is as yet unknown. PMID:16519530

  1. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  2. Architecture for a 1-GHz Digital RADAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallik, Udayan

    2011-01-01

    An architecture for a Direct RF-digitization Type Digital Mode RADAR was developed at GSFC in 2008. Two variations of a basic architecture were developed for use on RADAR imaging missions using aircraft and spacecraft. Both systems can operate with a pulse repetition rate up to 10 MHz with 8 received RF samples per pulse repetition interval, or at up to 19 kHz with 4K received RF samples per pulse repetition interval. The first design describes a computer architecture for a Continuous Mode RADAR transceiver with a real-time signal processing and display architecture. The architecture can operate at a high pulse repetition rate without interruption for an infinite amount of time. The second design describes a smaller and less costly burst mode RADAR that can transceive high pulse repetition rate RF signals without interruption for up to 37 seconds. The burst-mode RADAR was designed to operate on an off-line signal processing paradigm. The temporal distribution of RF samples acquired and reported to the RADAR processor remains uniform and free of distortion in both proposed architectures. The majority of the RADAR's electronics is implemented in digital CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor), and analog circuits are restricted to signal amplification operations and analog to digital conversion. An implementation of the proposed systems will create a 1-GHz, Direct RF-digitization Type, L-Band Digital RADAR--the highest band achievable for Nyquist Rate, Direct RF-digitization Systems that do not implement an electronic IF downsample stage (after the receiver signal amplification stage), using commercially available off-the-shelf integrated circuits.

  3. HDL/ApoA-1 infusion and ApoA-1 gene therapy in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chyu, Kuang-Yuh; Shah, Prediman K.

    2015-01-01

    The HDL hypothesis stating that simply raising HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) may produce cardiovascular benefits has been questioned recently based on several randomized clinical trials using CETP inhibitors or niacin to raise HDL-C levels. However, extensive pre-clinical data support the vascular protective effects of administration of exogenous ApoA-1 containing preβ-HDL like particles. Several small proof-of-concept clinical trials using such HDL/ApoA-1 infusion therapy have shown encouraging results but definitive proof of efficacy must await large scale clinical trials. In addition to HDL infusion therapy an alternative way to exploit beneficial cardiovascular effects of HDL/ApoA-1 is to use gene transfer. Preclinical studies have shown evidence of benefit using this approach; however clinical validation is yet lacking. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the aforementioned strategies. PMID:26388776

  4. Polymorphisms of UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*27 & UGT1A1*28 in three major ethnic groups from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Teh, L. K.; Hashim, H.; Zakaria, Z. A.; Salleh, M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Genetic polymorphisms of uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) have been associated with a wide variation of responses among patients prescribed with irinotecan. Lack of this enzyme is known to be associated with a high incidence of severe toxicity. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of three different variants of UGT1A1 (UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*27 and UGT1A1*28), which are associated with reduced enzyme activity and increased irinotecan toxicity, in the three main ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malays, Chinese and Indians). Methods: A total of 306 healthy unrelated volunteers were screened for UGT1A1*28, UGT1A1*6 and UGT1A1*27. Blood samples (5 ml) were obtained from each subject and DNA was extracted. PCR based methods were designed and validated for detection of UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*27 and UGT1A1*28. Direct DNA sequencing was performed to validate the results of randomly selected samples. Results: Malays and Indian have two-fold higher frequency of homozygous of UGT1A1*28 (7TA/7TA) which was 8 and 8.8 per cent, respectively compared to the Chinese (4.9%). However, the distribution of UGT1A1*6 and UGT1A1*27 showed no significant differences among them. UGT1A1*27 which has not been detected in Caucasian and African American population, was found in the Malaysian Malays (3.33%) and Malaysian Chinese (2.0%). Interpretation & conclusions: There was interethnic variability in the frequency of UGT1A1*28 in the Malaysian population. Our results suggest that genotyping of UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1*27 need to be performed before patients are prescribed with irinotecan due to their high prevalence of allelic variant which could lead to adverse drug reaction. PMID:22960892

  5. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1 - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1 Section 1.666(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1 Amount allocated. (a)(1) If a trust other than a foreign...

  6. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1 - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1 Section 1.666(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1 Amount allocated. (a)(1) If a trust other than a foreign...

  7. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1 - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1 Section 1.666(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1 Amount allocated. (a)(1) If a trust other than a foreign trust created by a...

  8. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1 - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1 Section 1.666(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1 Amount allocated. (a)(1) If a trust other than a foreign...

  9. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1 - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1 Section 1.666(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1 Amount allocated. (a)(1) If a trust other than a foreign...

  10. 29 CFR 2550.404a-1 - Investment duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Investment duties. 2550.404a-1 Section 2550.404a-1 Labor... FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY § 2550.404a-1 Investment duties. (a) In general. Section 404(a)(1)(B) of the... use in the conduct of an enterprise of a like character and with like aims. (b) Investment duties....

  11. 29 CFR 2550.404a-1 - Investment duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Investment duties. 2550.404a-1 Section 2550.404a-1 Labor... FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY § 2550.404a-1 Investment duties. (a) In general. Section 404(a)(1)(B) of the... use in the conduct of an enterprise of a like character and with like aims. (b) Investment duties....

  12. 29 CFR 2550.404a-1 - Investment duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Investment duties. 2550.404a-1 Section 2550.404a-1 Labor... FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY § 2550.404a-1 Investment duties. (a) In general. Section 404(a)(1)(B) of the... use in the conduct of an enterprise of a like character and with like aims. (b) Investment duties....

  13. 29 CFR 2550.404a-1 - Investment duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Investment duties. 2550.404a-1 Section 2550.404a-1 Labor... FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY § 2550.404a-1 Investment duties. (a) In general. Section 404(a)(1)(B) of the... use in the conduct of an enterprise of a like character and with like aims. (b) Investment duties....

  14. 29 CFR 2550.404a-1 - Investment duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Investment duties. 2550.404a-1 Section 2550.404a-1 Labor... FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY § 2550.404a-1 Investment duties. (a) In general. Section 404(a)(1)(B) of the... use in the conduct of an enterprise of a like character and with like aims. (b) Investment duties....

  15. Amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Batten, Margaret R; Senior, Bernard W; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-03-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by IgA1 proteases of different species of Streptococcus were investigated. Recombinant IgA1 antibodies were generated with point mutations at proline 227 and threonine 228, the residues lying on either side of the peptide bond at which all streptococcal IgA1 proteases cleave wild-type human IgA1. The amino acid substitutions produced no major effect upon the structure of the mutant IgA1 antibodies or their functional ability to bind to Fcalpha receptors. However, the substitutions had a substantial effect upon sensitivity to cleavage with some streptococcal IgA1 proteases, with, in some cases, a single point mutation rendering the antibody resistant to a particular IgA1 protease. This effect was least marked with the IgA1 protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which showed no absolute requirement for either proline or threonine at residues 227 to 228. By contrast, the IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis had an absolute requirement for proline at 227 but not for threonine at 228, which could be replaced by valine. There was evidence in S. mitis that proteases from different strains may have different amino acid requirements for cleavage. Remarkably, some streptococcal proteases appeared able to cleave the hinge at a distant alternative site if substitution prevented efficient cleavage of the original site. Hence, this study has identified key residues required for the recognition of the IgA1 hinge as a substrate by streptococcal IgA1 proteases, and it marks a preliminary step towards development of specific enzyme inhibitors. PMID:12595464

  16. Diagnostics for a 1.2 kA, 1 MeV, electron induction injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, T. L.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S. M.; Vanecek, D. L.; Westenskow, G. A.; Yu, S. S.

    1998-12-01

    We are constructing a 1.2 kA, 1 MeV, electron induction injector as part of the RTA program, a collaborative effort between LLNL and LBNL to develop relativistic klystrons for Two-Beam Accelerator applications. The RTA injector will also be used in the development of a high-gradient, low-emittance, electron source and beam diagnostics for the second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility. The electron source will be a 3.5″-diameter, thermionic, flat-surface, m-type cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150 ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 200 π-mm-mr. Precise measurement of the beam parameters is required so that performance of the RTA injector can be confidently scaled to the 4 kA, 3 MeV, and 2-microsecond pulse parameters of the DARHT injector. Planned diagnostics include an isolated cathode with resistive divider for direct measurement of current emission, resistive wall and magnetic probe current monitors for measuring beam current and centroid position, capacitive probes for measuring A-K gap voltage, an energy spectrometer, and a pepperpot emittance diagnostic. Details of the injector, beam line, and diagnostics are presented.

  17. Lattice equations arising from discrete Painlevé systems. I. (A2 + A1)(1) and ( A 1 + A1 ' ) ( 1 ) cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Nalini; Nakazono, Nobutaka; Shi, Yang

    2015-09-01

    We introduce the concept of ω-lattice, constructed from τ functions of Painlevé systems, on which quad-equations of ABS (Adler-Bobenko-Suris) type appear. In particular, we consider the A5 ( 1 ) - and A6 ( 1 ) -surface q-Painlevé systems corresponding affine Weyl group symmetries are of (A2 + A1)(1)- and (A1 + A1)(1)-types, respectively.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of alginate lyases A1-II and A1-II′ from Sphingomonas sp. A1

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, Masayuki; Ogura, Kohei; Moriwaki, Satoko; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku; Mikami, Bunzo

    2005-03-01

    The crystallization and preliminary characterization of the family PL-7 alginate lyases A1-II and A1-II′ from Sphingomonas sp. A1 are presented. Alginate lyases depolymerize alginate, a heteropolysaccharide consisting of α-l-guluronate and β-d-mannuronate, through a β-elimination reaction. The alginate lyases A1-II (25 kDa) and A1-II′ (25 kDa) from Sphingomonas sp. A1, which belong to polysaccharide lyase family PL-7, exhibit 68% homology in primary structure but have different substrate specificities. To determine clearly the structural basis for substrate recognition in the depolymerization mechanism by alginate lyases, both proteins were crystallized at 293 K using the vapour-diffusion method. A crystal of A1-II belonged to space group P2{sub 1} and diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.3, b = 30.1, c = 101.6 Å, β = 100.2°, while a crystal of A1-II′ belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and diffracted to 1.0 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = 34.6, b = 68.5, c = 80.3 Å.

  19. 5 CFR Appendix A-1 to Subpart I... - Windchill Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Pay for Duty Involving Physical Hardship or Hazard Pt. 550, Subpt. I, App. A-1 Appendix A-1 to Subpart I of Part 550—Windchill Chart EC01SE91.002 windchill chart in non-metric units... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Windchill Chart A Appendix A-1 to...

  20. 49 CFR 178.33a-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33a-1 Section 178.33a-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Specifications for Inside Containers, and Linings § 178.33a-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  1. 26 CFR 48.4222(a)-1 - Registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Registration. 48.4222(a)-1 Section 48.4222(a)-1... TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Exemptions, Registration, Etc. § 48.4222(a)-1 Registration. (a) General rule. Except as provided in § 48.4222(b)-1, tax-free sales under section 4221 may...

  2. 26 CFR 48.4222(a)-1 - Registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Registration. 48.4222(a)-1 Section 48.4222(a)-1... TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Exemptions, Registration, Etc. § 48.4222(a)-1 Registration. (a) General rule. Except as provided in § 48.4222(b)-1, tax-free sales under section 4221 may...

  3. 26 CFR 1.512(a)-1 - Definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Definition. 1.512(a)-1 Section 1.512(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations § 1.512(a)-1 Definition. (a) In general. Except as...

  4. 26 CFR 1.167(a)-1 - Depreciation in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Depreciation in general. 1.167(a)-1 Section 1.167(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(a)-1 Depreciation in general. (a)...

  5. 49 CFR 178.33a-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33a-1 Section 178.33a-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers, and Linings § 178.33a-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  6. 49 CFR 178.33a-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33a-1 Section 178.33a-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers, and Linings § 178.33a-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  7. 49 CFR 178.33a-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33a-1 Section 178.33a-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers, and Linings § 178.33a-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  8. 49 CFR 178.33a-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33a-1 Section 178.33a-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Containers, and Linings § 178.33a-1 Compliance. (a) Required in all details. (b)...

  9. 32 CFR 809a.1 - Random installation entry point checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Random installation entry point checks. 809a.1 Section 809a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE... Entry Policy § 809a.1 Random installation entry point checks. The installation commander determines...

  10. [UGT1A1 Genotyping for Proper Use of Irinotecan].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Ayumu; Ando, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    Irinotecan is a camptothecin analog used worldwide for a broad range of solid tumors, including colorectal and lung cancers. It can cause severe adverse drug reactions, such as neutropenia or diarrhea. Irinotecan is metabolized to form active SN-38, which is further conjugated and detoxified by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 enzyme. Recent pharmacogenetic studies on irinotecan have revealed the impact of UGT1A1 polymorphisms on severe adverse effects. A variant in the promoter of the UGT1A1 gene, the UGT1A1 *28 allele, has been extensively studied, and pharmacogenetic relationships between the variant and severe toxicities of irinotecan have been reported. The US FDA and pharmaceutical companies revised the irinotecan label in 2005, and it now includes homozygosity for the UGT1A1*28 genotype as one of the risk factors for severe neutropenia. A variant in exon 1 of the UGT1A1 gene, the UGT1A1*6 allele, mainly found in East Asians, is also an important risk factor associated with severe neutropenia. The concurrence of UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1*6, even when heterozygous, markedly alters the disposition of irinotecan, potentially increasing toxicity, which is now written on the label of irinotecan in Japan. For patients showing homozygosity for UGT1A1*28, *6, or compound heterozygosity for UGT1A1*6 and *28, dose reduction of irinotecan is strongly recommended. Genotyping tests for UGT1A1 *6 and *28 have been approved in Japan and are currently used in oncology practice. Moreover, a recent Phase 2 trial for FOLFIRINOX in Japan excluded patients who showed homozygosity for UGT1A1*28, *6, or compound heterozygosity for UGT1A1*6 and *28. At present, irinotecan chemotherapy based on a patient's UGT1A1 genetic status is scientifically reasonable. PMID:26591441

  11. Effect of mutations in the human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) hinge on its susceptibility to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2005-03-01

    Components of the human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) hinge governing sensitivity to cleavage by bacterial IgA1 proteases were investigated. Recombinant antibodies with distinct hinge mutations were constructed from a hybrid comprised of human IgA2 bearing half of the human IgA1 hinge region. This hybrid antibody and all the mutant antibodies derived from it were resistant to cleavage by the IgA1 proteases from Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 strains but were cleaved to various degrees by those of Streptococcus pneumoniae, some Streptococcus sanguis strains, and the type 1 and 2 IgA1 proteases of Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Remarkably, those proteases that cleave a Pro-Ser peptide bond in the wild-type IgA1 hinge were able to cleave mutant antibodies lacking a Pro-Ser peptide bond in the hinge, and those that cleave a Pro-Thr peptide bond in the wild-type IgA1 hinge were able to cleave mutant antibodies devoid of a Pro-Thr peptide bond in the hinge. Thus, the enzymes can cleave alternatives to their preferred postproline peptide bond when such a bond is unavailable. Peptide sequence analysis of a representative antibody digestion product confirmed this conclusion. The presence of a cleavable peptide bond near the CH2 end of the hinge appeared to result in greater cleavage than if the scissile bond was at the CH1 end of the hinge. Proline-to-serine substitution at residue 230 in a hinge containing potentially cleavable Pro-Ser and Pro-Thr peptide bonds increased the resistance of the antibody to cleavage by many IgA1 proteases. PMID:15731049

  12. Accurate identification of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) inhibitors using UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua; Zhou, Xiaotong; Wu, Baojian

    2015-01-01

    1. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) plays an irreplaceable role in detoxification of bilirubin and many drugs (e.g., SN-38). Here we aimed to explore the potential of UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells (or HeLa1A1 cells) as a tool to accurately identify UGT1A1 inhibitors. 2. Determination of glucuronidation rates (β-estradiol and SN-38 as the substrates) was performed using HeLa1A1 cells and uridine diphosphoglucuronic acid (UDPGA)-supplemented cDNA expressed UGT1A1 enzyme (or microsomes). The inhibitory effects (IC50 values) of 20 structurally diverse compounds on the UGT1A1 activity were determined using HeLa1A1 cells and microsomal incubations. 3. In HeLa1A1 cells, the IC50 values for inhibition of β-estradiol glucuronidation by the tested compounds ranged from 0.33 to 94.6 µM. In the microsomal incubations, the IC50 values ranged from 0.47 to 155 µM. It was found that the IC50 values of all test compounds derived from the cells were well consistent with those from the microsomes (deviated by less than two-fold). Further, the IC50 values from the cells were strongly correlated with those from microsomes (r = 0.944, p < 0.001). Likewise, the IC50 values (0.37-77.3 µM) for inhibition of SN-38 glucuronidation in the cells were close to those (0.42-122 µM) for glucuronidation inhibition in microsomes. A strong correlation was also observed between the two sets of IC50 values (r = 0.978, p < 0.001). 4. In conclusion, UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells were an appropriate tool to accurately depict the inhibition profiles of chemicals against UGT1A1. PMID:26068529

  13. Methods for Tumor Targeting with Salmonella typhimurium A1-R.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) has shown great preclinical promise as a broad-based anti-cancer therapeutic (please see Chapter 1 ). The present chapter describes materials and methods for the preclinical study of S. typhimurium A1-R in clinically-relevant mouse models. Establishment of orthotopic metastatic mouse models of the major cancer types is described, as well as other useful models, for efficacy studies of S. typhimurium A1-R or other tumor-targeting bacteria, as well. Imaging methods are described to visualize GFP-labeled S. typhimurium A1-R, as well as GFP- and/or RFP-labeled cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which S. typhimurium A1-R targets. The mouse models include metastasis to major organs that are life-threatening to cancer patients including the liver, lung, bone, and brain and how to target these metastases with S. typhimurium A1-R. Various routes of administration of S. typhimurium A1-R are described with the advantages and disadvantages of each. Basic experiments to determine toxic effects of S. typhimurium A1-R are also described. Also described are methodologies for combining S. typhimurium A1-R and chemotherapy. The testing of S. typhimurium A1-R on patient tumors in patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse models is also described. The major methodologies described in this chapter should be translatable for clinical studies. PMID:26846809

  14. An abundant dysfunctional apolipoprotein A1 in human atheroma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; DiDonato, Joseph A; Levison, Bruce S; Schmitt, Dave; Li, Lin; Wu, Yuping; Buffa, Jennifer; Kim, Timothy; Gerstenecker, Gary S; Gu, Xiaodong; Kadiyala, Chandra S; Wang, Zeneng; Culley, Miranda K; Hazen, Jennie E; Didonato, Anthony J; Fu, Xiaoming; Berisha, Stela Z; Peng, Daoquan; Nguyen, Truc T; Liang, Shaohong; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Cho, Leslie; Plow, Edward F; Fox, Paul L; Gogonea, Valentin; Tang, W H Wilson; Parks, John S; Fisher, Edward A; Smith, Jonathan D; Hazen, Stanley L

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have indicated that high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) and their major structural protein, apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), recovered from human atheroma are dysfunctional and are extensively oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO). In vitro oxidation of either apoA1 or HDL particles by MPO impairs their cholesterol acceptor function. Here, using phage display affinity maturation, we developed a high-affinity monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes both apoA1 and HDL that have been modified by the MPO-H2O2-Cl(-) system. An oxindolyl alanine (2-OH-Trp) moiety at Trp72 of apoA1 is the immunogenic epitope. Mutagenesis studies confirmed a critical role for apoA1 Trp72 in MPO-mediated inhibition of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)-dependent cholesterol acceptor activity of apoA1 in vitro and in vivo. ApoA1 containing a 2-OH-Trp72 group (oxTrp72-apoA1) is in low abundance within the circulation but accounts for 20% of the apoA1 in atherosclerosis-laden arteries. OxTrp72-apoA1 recovered from human atheroma or plasma is lipid poor, virtually devoid of cholesterol acceptor activity and demonstrated both a potent proinflammatory activity on endothelial cells and an impaired HDL biogenesis activity in vivo. Elevated oxTrp72-apoA1 levels in subjects presenting to a cardiology clinic (n = 627) were associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Circulating oxTrp72-apoA1 levels may serve as a way to monitor a proatherogenic process in the artery wall. PMID:24464187

  15. Camptothecin (CPT) directly binds to human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) and inhibits the hnRNP A1/topoisomerase I interaction.

    PubMed

    Manita, Daisuke; Toba, Yuzuru; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Matsumoto, Yuki; Kusayanagi, Tomoe; Takakusagi, Kaori; Tsukuda, Senko; Takada, Kazunori; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Kamisuki, Shinji; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Sugawara, Fumio

    2011-12-15

    Camptothecin (CPT) is an anti-tumor natural product that forms a ternary complex with topoisomerase I (top I) and DNA (CPT-top I-DNA). In this study, we identified the direct interaction between CPT and human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) using the T7 phage display technology. On an avidin-agarose bead pull down assay, hnRNP A1 protein was selectively pulled down in the presence of C20-biotinylated CPT derivative (CPT-20-B) both in vitro and in vivo. The interaction was also confirmed by an analysis on a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) device, yielding a K(D) value of 82.7 nM. A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis revealed that CPT inhibits the binding of hnRNP A1 to top I (K(D): 260 nM) in a non-competitive manner. Moreover, an in vivo drug evaluation assay using Drosophila melanogaster showed that the knockout of the hnRNP A1 homolog Hrb87F gene showed high susceptibility against 5-50 μM of CPT as compared to a wild-type strain. Such susceptibility was specific for CPT and not observed after treatment with other cytotoxic drugs. Collectively, our data suggests that CPT directly binds to hnRNP A1 and non-competitively inhibits the hnRNP A1/top I interaction in vivo. The knockout strain loses the hnRNP A1 homolog as a both CPT-binding partner and naïve brakes of top I, which enhances the formation of the CPT-top I-DNA ternary complexes and subsequently sensitizes the growth inhibitory effect of CPT in D. melanogaster. PMID:22071521

  16. An abundant dysfunctional apolipoprotein A1 in human atheroma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Levison, Bruce S.; Schmitt, Dave; Li, Lin; Wu, Yuping; Buffa, Jennifer; Kim, Timothy; Gerstenecker, Gary; Gu, Xiaodong; Kadiyala, Chandra; Wang, Zeneng; Culley, Miranda K.; Hazen, Jennie E.; DiDonato, Anthony J.; Fu, Xiaoming; Berisha, Stela; Peng, Daoquan; Nguyen, Truc; Liang, Shaohong; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Cho, Leslie; Plow, Edward F.; Fox, Paul L.; Gogonea, Valentin; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Parks, John S.; Fisher, Edward A.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate high density lipoproteins (HDL) and their major structural protein, apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), recovered from human atheroma, are dysfunctional and extensively oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO), while in vitro oxidation of apoA1/HDL by MPO impairs its cholesterol acceptor function. We developed a high affinity monoclonal antibody (mAb) that specifically recognizes apoA1/HDL modified by the MPO/H2O2/Cl-system using phage display affinity maturation. An oxindolyl alanine (2-OH-Trp) moiety at tryptophan 72 of apoA1 is the immunogenic epitope. Mutagenesis studies confirm a critical role for apoA1 Trp72 in MPO-mediated inhibition of ABCA1-dependent cholesterol acceptor activity of apoA1 in vitro and in vivo. ApoA1 containing a 2-OH-Trp72 group (oxTrp72-apoA1) is in low abundance within the circulation, but accounts for 20% of the apoA1 in atherosclerotic plaque. OxTrp72-apoA1 recovered from human atheroma or plasma was lipid-poor, virtually devoid of cholesterol acceptor activity, and demonstrated both potent pro-inflammatory activities on endothelial cells and impaired HDL biogenesis activity in vivo. Elevated oxTrp72-apoA1 levels in subjects presenting to a cardiology clinic (n=627) were associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Circulating oxTrp72-apoA1 levels may serve as a way to monitor a pro-atherogenic process in the artery wall. PMID:24464187

  17. Acyl-Carbon Bond Cleaving Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP51A1.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad; Wright, J Neville

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes in their resting state contain the heme-iron in a high-spin FeIII state. Binding of a substrate to a P450 enzyme allows transfer of the first electron, producing a Fe(II) species that reacts with oxygen to generate a low-spin iron superoxide intermediate (FeIII-O-O•) ready to accept the second electron to produce an iron peroxy anion intermediate (a, FeIII-O-O-). In classical monooxygenation reactions, the peroxy anion upon protonation fragments to form the reactive Compound I intermediate (Por•+FeIV=O), or its ferryl radical resonance form (FeIV-O•). However, when the substrate projects a carbonyl functionality, of the type b, at the active site as is the case for reactions catalyzed by CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP51A1, the peroxy anion (FeIII-O-O-) is trapped, yielding a tetrahedral intermediate (c) that fragments to an acyl-carbon cleavage product (d plus an acid). Analogous acyl-carbon cleavage reactions are also catalyzed by certain hepatic P450s and CYP125A1 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A further improvisation on the theme is provided by aldehyde deformylases that convert long-chain aliphatic aldehydes to hydrocarbons. CYP17A1 is involved in the biosynthesis of corticoids as well as androgens. The flux toward these two classes of hormones seems to be regulated by cytochrome b 5, at the level of the acyl-carbon cleavage reaction. It is this regulation of CYP17A1 that provides a safety mechanism, ensuring that during corticoid biosynthesis, which requires 17α-hydroxylation by CYP17A1, androgen formation is avoided (Fig. 4.1). PMID:26002733

  18. 26 CFR 1.402A-1 - Designated Roth Accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Designated Roth Accounts. 1.402A-1 Section 1.402A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.402A-1 Designated Roth Accounts. Q-1. What is a designated Roth account?...

  19. 26 CFR 1.669(a)-1 - Limitation on tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitation on tax. 1.669(a)-1 Section 1.669(a)-1... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.669(a)-1 Limitation on tax. (a) In general. Section 669 provides that... having been received by him, from a foreign trust created by a U.S. person, on the last day of...

  20. 26 CFR 1.56A-1 - Imposition of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Imposition of tax. 1.56A-1 Section 1.56A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Regulations Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning in 1969 and Ending in 1970 § 1.56A-1 Imposition of tax. (a) In general. Section 56(a) imposes an income tax...

  1. Evidence for charged B meson decays to a1+/-(1260)pi0 and a1(0)(1260)pi+/-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-12-31

    We present measurements of the branching fractions for the decays B;{+/-}-->a_{1};{+/-}(1260)pi;{0} and B;{+/-}-->a_{1};{0}(1260)pi;{+/-} from a data sample of 232x10;{6} BB[over ] pairs produced in e;{+}e;{-} annihilation through the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We measure the branching fraction B(B;{+/-}-->a_{1};{+/-}(1260)pi;{0})xB(a_{1};{+/-}(1260)-->pi;{-}pi;{+}pi;{+/-})=(13.2+/-2.7+/-2.1)x10;{-6} with a significance of 4.2sigma, and the branching fraction B(B;{+/-}-->a_{1};{0}(1260)pi;{+/-})xB(a_{1};{0}(1260)-->pi;{-}pi;{+}pi;{0})=(20.4+/-4.7+/-3.4)x10;{-6} with a significance of 3.8sigma, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. PMID:18233566

  2. 26 CFR 31.6402(a)-1 - Credits or refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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  9. Note on the photoproduction of the charged A1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condo, G. T.; Handler, T.

    1987-05-01

    Arguments made nearly 15 years ago by Fox and Hey are updated in the light of recent experimental findings. These indicate that the charge-exchange photoproduction of the A1 should dominate that of the A2. Consistency with the experimental data demands an A1 mass of 1335+/-20 MeV and width of 180+/-55 MeV.

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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  17. 42 CFR 5a.1 - Statutory basis and purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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  18. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1A - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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  20. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1A - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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  1. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1A - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1A Section 1.666(a... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1A Amount allocated. (a) In general. In the case of a trust that... trusts that may accumulate income or that distribute corpus), section 666(a) prescribes rules...

  2. 32 CFR 809a.1 - Random installation entry point checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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  7. 26 CFR 49.4262(a)-1 - Taxable transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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  8. 26 CFR 49.4262(a)-1 - Taxable transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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  11. Observation of B+-->a1+(1260)K0 and B0-->a1-(1260)K+.

    PubMed

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Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Bailey, D; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-02-01

    We present branching fraction measurements of the decays B(+)-->a(1)(+)(1260)K(0) and B(0)-->a(1)(-)(1260)K(+) with a(1)(+/-)(1260)-->pi(-/+)pi(+/-)pi(+/-). The data sample corresponds to 383 x 10(6) BB pairs produced in e(+)e(-) annihilation through the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We measure the products of the branching fractions B(B(+)-->a(1)(+)(1260)K(0)B(a(1)(+)(1260)-->pi(-)pi(+)pi(+))=(17.4+/-2.5+/-2.2) x 10(-6) and B(B(0)-->a(1)(-)(1260)K(+)B(a(1)(-)(1260)-->pi(+)pi(-)pi(-)) = (8.2+/-1.5+/-1.2) x 10(-6). We also measure the charge asymmetries A(ch)(B(+)-->a(1)(+)(1260)K(0) = 0.12+/-0.11+/-0.02 and A(ch)(B(0)-->a(1)(-)(1260)K+) = -0.16+/-0.12+/-0.01. The first uncertainty quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. PMID:18352360

  12. Current status of A1 adenosine receptor allosteric enhancers.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Romeo; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Moorman, Allan R; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is an ubiquitous nucleoside involved in various physiological and pathological functions by stimulating A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs). Allosteric enhancers to A1ARs may represent novel therapeutic agents because they increase the activity of these receptors by mediating a shift to their active form in the A1AR-G protein ternary complex. In this manner, they are able to amplify the action of endogenous adenosine, which is produced in high concentrations under conditions of metabolic stress. A1AR allosteric enhancers could be used as a justifiable alternative to the exogenous agonists that are characterized by receptor desensitization and downregulation. In this review, an analysis of some of the most interesting allosteric modulators of A1ARs has been reported. PMID:26144263

  13. A1/Bfl-1 in leukocyte development and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ottina, Eleonora; Tischner, Denise; Herold, Marco J.; Villunger, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The function of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bcl2a1/Bfl-1/A1 is poorly understood due to the lack of appropriate loss-of-function mouse models and redundant effects with other Bcl-2 pro-survival proteins upon overexpression. Expression analysis of A1 suggests predominant roles in leukocyte development, their survival upon viral or bacterial infection, as well as during allergic reactions. In addition, A1 has been implicated in autoimmunity and the pathology and therapy resistance of hematological as well as solid tumors that may aberrantly express this protein. In this review, we aim to summarize current knowledge on A1 biology, focusing on its role in the immune system and compare it to that of other pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins. PMID:22342458

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Benefits of Antibiotic-Induced Neutrophil Apoptosis: Tulathromycin Induces Caspase-3-Dependent Neutrophil Programmed Cell Death and Inhibits NF-κB Signaling and CXCL8 Transcription▿

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carrie D.; Beatty, Jennifer K.; Zvaigzne, Cheryl G.; Morck, Douglas W.; Lucas, Merlyn J.; Buret, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Clearance of apoptotic neutrophils is a central feature of the resolution of inflammation. Findings indicate that immuno-modulation and induction of neutrophil apoptosis by macrolide antibiotics generate anti-inflammatory benefits via mechanisms that remain obscure. Tulathromycin (TUL), a new antimicrobial agent for bovine respiratory disease, offers superior clinical efficacy for reasons not fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify the immuno-modulating effects of tulathromycin and, in this process, to establish tulathromycin as a new model for characterizing the novel anti-inflammatory properties of antibiotics. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from Holstein calves 3 and 24 h postinfection, challenged intratracheally with live Mannheimia haemolytica (2 × 107 CFU), and treated with vehicle or tulathromycin (2.5 mg/kg body weight). Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that tulathromycin treatment significantly increased leukocyte apoptosis and reduced levels of proinflammatory leukotriene B4 in M. haemolytica-challenged calves. In vitro, tulathromycin concentration dependently induced apoptosis in freshly isolated bovine neutrophils from healthy steers in a capase-3-dependent manner but failed to induce apoptosis in bovine fibroblasts, epithelial cells, and endothelial cells, as well as freshly isolated bovine blood monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages. The proapoptotic effects of TUL were also, in part, drug specific; equimolar concentrations of penicillin G, oxytetracycline, and ceftiofur failed to cause apoptosis in bovine neutrophils. In addition, tulathromycin significantly reduced levels of phosphorylated IκBα, nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, and mRNA levels of proinflammatory interleukin-8 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated bovine neutrophils. The findings illustrate novel mechanisms through which

  15. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 in stem cells and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kaori; Tanaka, Takuji; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains 19 putatively functional aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes, which encode enzymes critical for detoxification of endogenous and exogenous aldehyde substrates through NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation. ALDH1 has three main isotypes, ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3, and is a marker of normal tissue stem cells (SC) and cancer stem cells (CSC), where it is involved in self-renewal, differentiation and self-protection. Experiments with murine and human cells indicate that ALDH1 activity, predominantly attributed to isotype ALDH1A1, is tissue- and cancer-specific. High ALDH1 activity and ALDH1A1 overexpression are associated with poor cancer prognosis, though high ALDH1 and ALDH1A1 levels do not always correlate with highly malignant phenotypes and poor clinical outcome. In cancer therapy, ALDH1A1 provides a useful therapeutic CSC target in tissue types that normally do not express high levels of ALDH1A1, including breast, lung, esophagus, colon and stomach. Here we review the functions and mechanisms of ALDH1A1, the key ALDH isozyme linked to SC populations and an important contributor to CSC function in cancers, and we outline its potential in future anticancer strategies. PMID:26783961

  16. The Correlation of Hemoglobin A1c to Blood Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Sikaris, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The understanding that hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) represents the average blood glucose level of patients over the previous 120 days underlies the current management of diabetes. Even in making such a statement, we speak of “average blood glucose” as though “blood glucose” were itself a simple idea. When we consider all the blood glucose forms—arterial versus venous versus capillary, whole blood versus serum versus fluoride-preserved plasma, fasting versus nonfasting—we can start to see that this is not a simple issue. Nevertheless, it seems as though HbA1c correlates to any single glucose measurement. Having more than one measurement and taking those measurements in the preceding month improves the correlation further. In particular, by having glucose measurements that reflect both the relatively lower overnight glucose levels and measurements that reflect the postprandial peaks improves not only our ability to manage diabetes patients, but also our understanding of how HbA1c levels are determined. Modern continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices may take thousands of glucose results over a week. Several studies have shown that CGM glucose averages account for the vast proportion of the variation of HbA1c. The ability to relate HbA1c to average glucose may become a popular method for reporting HbA1c, eliminating current concerns regarding differences in HbA1c standardization. Hemoglobin A1c expressed as an average glucose may be more understandable to patients and improve not only their understanding, but also their ability to improve their diabetes management. PMID:20144279

  17. Lower plasma apolipoprotein A1 levels are found in Parkinson's disease and associate with apolipoprotein A1 genotype.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Christine R; Li, Katherine; Unger, Travis L; Gallagher, Michael D; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Agarwal, Pinky; Leverenz, James; Roberts, John; Samii, Ali; Gross, Rachel Goldmann; Hurtig, Howard; Rick, Jacqueline; Weintraub, Daniel; Trojanowski, John Q; Zabetian, Cyrus; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S

    2015-05-01

    The discovery of novel plasma-based biomarkers could lead to new approaches in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we explore the role of plasma apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) as a risk marker for PD and evaluate the influence of APOA1 promoter variation on plasma ApoA1 levels. Plasma ApoA1 and the single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs670, were assayed in a discovery cohort (cohort 1) of 301 PD patients, 80 normal controls (NCs), and 165 subjects with other neurodegenerative diseases, as well as a cohort (cohort 2) of 158 PD patients from a second clinical site. Additionally, rs670 was genotyped in a third cohort of 1,494 PD and 925 NC subjects from both clinical sites. Compared to both normal and disease controls, PD patients have lower plasma ApoA1 (P < 0.001 for both comparisons). Moreover, in PD patients, plasma ApoA1 levels are correlated with genotype at the APOA1 promoter polymorphism, rs670. Specifically, lower plasma ApoA1 levels were found in rs670 major allele (G) homozygotes in both cohort 1 (P = 0.009) and in a replication cohort (cohort 2; n = 158 PD patients; P = 0.024). Finally, evaluating rs670 genotype frequencies in 1,930 PD cases versus 997 NCs, the rs670 GG genotype shows a trend toward association (odds ratio: 1.1; P = 0.10) with PD. Our results are compatible with a model whereby circulating ApoA1 levels may be useful in risk-stratifying subjects for the development of PD, with higher ApoA1 levels suggesting relative protection. Future studies evaluating modulation of ApoA1 as a novel therapeutic strategy in PD are warranted. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:25227208

  18. Human aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1): biochemical characterization and immunohistochemical localization in the cornea.

    PubMed Central

    Pappa, Aglaia; Estey, Tia; Manzer, Rizwan; Brown, Donald; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2003-01-01

    ALDH3A1 (aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1) is expressed at high concentrations in the mammalian cornea and it is believed that it protects this vital tissue and the rest of the eye against UV-light-induced damage. The precise biological function(s) and cellular distribution of ALDH3A1 in the corneal tissue remain to be elucidated. Among the hypotheses proposed for ALDH3A1 function in cornea is detoxification of aldehydes formed during UV-induced lipid peroxidation. To investigate in detail the biochemical properties and distribution of this protein in the human cornea, we expressed human ALDH3A1 in Sf9 insect cells using a baculovirus vector and raised monoclonal antibodies against ALDH3A1. Recombinant ALDH3A1 protein was purified to homogeneity with a single-step affinity chromatography method using 5'-AMP-Sepharose 4B. Human ALDH3A1 demonstrated high substrate specificity for medium-chain (6 carbons and more) saturated and unsaturated aldehydes, including 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, which are generated by the peroxidation of cellular lipids. Short-chain aliphatic aldehydes, such as acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde and malondialdehyde, were found to be very poor substrates for human ALDH3A1. In addition, ALDH3A1 metabolized glyceraldehyde poorly and did not metabolize glucose 6-phosphate, 6-phosphoglucono-delta-lactone and 6-phosphogluconate at all, suggesting that this enzyme is not involved in either glycolysis or the pentose phosphate pathway. Immunohistochemistry in human corneas, using the monoclonal antibodies described herein, revealed ALDH3A1 expression in epithelial cells and stromal keratocytes, but not in endothelial cells. Overall, these cumulative findings support the metabolic function of ALDH3A1 as a part of a corneal cellular defence mechanism against oxidative damage caused by aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation. Both recombinant human ALDH3A1 and the highly specific monoclonal antibodies described in the present paper may prove to be useful in probing

  19. Selecting an A1C Point-of-Care Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Ee Vonn; Rasinen, Casey

    2015-01-01

    A1C point-of-care (POC) instruments benefit patients with diabetes by facilitating clinician decision making that results in significant glycemic improvements. Three National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP)–certified POC products are available in the United States: the handheld A1CNow (formerly manufactured by Bayer Diabetes Care but now made by Chek Diagnostics) and two bench-top models called the Axis-Shield Afinion Analyzer and the Siemens DCA Vantage. This article compares the three available NGSP-certified POC products in terms of accuracy, precision, ease of use, cost, and additional features. Its goal is to aid health care facilities in conveniently identifying the A1C POC product that best meets their needs. It additionally reviews evidence that supports the continued use of A1C POC instruments in the clinical arena. PMID:26300614

  20. Alterations of adenosine A1 receptors in morphine dependence.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Leite-Morris, K A; Sears, M T

    1994-09-19

    The possibility that central adenosine A1 and A2a receptors mediate opiate dependence was examined in morphine-treated mice using radioligand binding methods. Mice treated with morphine for 72 h demonstrated significant increases in naloxone precipitated abstinence behaviors of jumping, wet-dog shakes, teeth chattering, forepaw trends, forepaw tremors and diarrhea compared to vehicle-treated mice. Increased concentrations of cortical adenosine A1 receptor sites, but not striatal adenosine A2a sites, were found in saturation binding studies from morphine-dependent mice. Decreases in cortical A1 agonist binding affinity values along with increases in agonist binding sites were demonstrated in competition binding studies. These results suggest that adaptive changes of upregulation and sensitization of adenosine A1 receptors play a role in mediating the opiate abstinence syndrome. PMID:7820640

  1. COL4A1 Mutation in Preterm Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Bilguvar, Kaya; DiLuna, Michael L.; Bizzarro, Matthew J.; Bayri, Yasar; Schneider, Karen C.; Lifton, Richard P.; Gunel, Murat; Ment, Laura R.

    2010-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage is a common complication of preterm infants. Mutations in the type IV procollagen gene, COL4A1, are associated with cerebral small vessel disease with hemorrhage in adults and fetuses. We report a rare variant in COL4A1 associated with intraventricular hemorrhage in dizygotic preterm twins. These results expand the spectrum of diseases attributable to mutations in type IV procollagens. PMID:19840616

  2. A 1K Shadow RAM for circumvention applications

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    A 1K bit Shadow RAM has been developed for storage of critical data in a high transient radiation environment. The circuit includes a 1K bit (128 {times} 8) static RAM with two non-volatile (NV) shadows. The NV shadows are used to back-up the data in the static RAM allowing the circuit to be powered down during transient radiation without losing critical data. This paper will describe the circuit's operation and characterization results.

  3. Production of a_1 in heavy meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Zhen-Xing

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we study various decays of heavy B / D mesons into the a_1(1260), based on the form factors derived in different nonperturbative or factorization approaches. These decay modes are helpful to explore the dynamics in the heavy to light transitions. Meanwhile they can also provide insights to a newly discovered state, the a_1(1420) with I^G(J^{PC})= 1^-(1^{++}) observed in the π ^+ f_0(980) final state in the π ^-p→ π ^+π ^-π ^- p process. Available theoretical explanations include tetraquark or rescattering effects due to a_1(1260) decays. If the a_1(1420) were induced by the rescattering, its production rates are completely determined by those of the a_1(1260). Our numerical results for decays into the a_1(1260) indicate that there is a promising prospect to study these decays on experiments including BES-III, LHCb, Babar, Belle, and CLEO-c, the forthcoming Super-KEKB factory and the under-design Circular Electron-Positron Collider.

  4. The Association Between A1C and Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    McNeely, Marguerite J.; McClelland, Robyn L.; Bild, Diane E.; Jacobs, David R.; Tracy, Russell P.; Cushman, Mary; Goff, David C.; Astor, Brad C.; Shea, Steven; Siscovick, David S.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that A1C is associated with subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a population without evident diabetes, after adjusting for traditional CVD risk factors and BMI. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study of 5,121 participants without clinically evident CVD or diabetes (fasting glucose ≥7.0 mmol/l or use of diabetes medication), aged 47–86 years, enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Measurements included carotid intimal-medial wall thickness (CIMT) and coronary artery calcification (CAC). Results were adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, smoking, systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, antihypertensive medication use, lipid-lowering medication use, and BMI. RESULTS Compared with those in the lowest quartile for A1C ([mean ± SD] 5.0 ± 0.2%), participants in the highest quartile (6.0 ± 0.3%) had higher adjusted mean values for common CIMT (0.85 vs. 0.87 mm, P = 0.003) and internal CIMT (1.01 vs. 1.08 mm, P = 0.003). A1C quartile was not associated with prevalence of CAC in the entire cohort (P = 0.27); however, the association was statistically significant in women (adjusted prevalence of CAC in lowest and highest A1C quartiles 37.5 vs. 43.0%, P = 0.01). Among those with some CAC, higher A1C quartile tended to be associated with higher CAC score, but the results were not statistically significant (adjusted P = 0.11). CONCLUSIONS In this multiethnic cohort, there were small, positive associations between A1C, common CIMT, and internal CIMT in the absence of clinically evident diabetes. An association between higher A1C and CAC prevalence was evident only in women. PMID:19549732

  5. Tracking Diabetes: New York City's A1C Registry

    PubMed Central

    Chamany, Shadi; Silver, Lynn D; Bassett, Mary T; Driver, Cynthia R; Berger, Diana K; Neuhaus, Charlotte E; Kumar, Namrata; Frieden, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    Context: In December 2005, in characterizing diabetes as an epidemic, the New York City Board of Health mandated the laboratory reporting of hemoglobin A1C laboratory test results. This mandate established the United States’ first population-based registry to track the level of blood sugar control in people with diabetes. But mandatory A1C reporting has provoked debate regarding the role of public health agencies in the control of noncommunicable diseases and, more specifically, both privacy and the doctor-patient relationship. Methods: This article reviews the rationale for adopting the rule requiring the reporting of A1C test results, experience with its implementation, and criticisms raised in the context of the history of public health practice. Findings: For many decades, public health agencies have used identifiable information collected through mandatory laboratory reporting to monitor the population's health and develop programs for the control of communicable and noncommunicable diseases. The registry program sends quarterly patient rosters stratified by A1C level to more than one thousand medical providers, and it also sends letters, on the provider's letterhead whenever possible, to patients at risk of diabetes complications (A1C level >9 percent), advising medical follow-up. The activities of the registry program are similar to those of programs for other reportable conditions and constitute a joint effort between a governmental public health agency and medical providers to improve patients’ health outcomes. Conclusions: Mandatory reporting has proven successful in helping combat other major epidemics. New York City's A1C Registry activities combine both traditional and novel public health approaches to reduce the burden of an epidemic chronic disease, diabetes. Despite criticism that mandatory reporting compromises individuals’ right to privacy without clear benefit, the early feedback has been positive and suggests that the benefits will

  6. MybA1 gene diversity across the Vitis genus.

    PubMed

    Péros, Jean-Pierre; Launay, Amandine; Berger, Gilles; Lacombe, Thierry; This, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    The MybA1 gene in the genus Vitis encodes a transcription factor, belonging to the R2R3 Myb family, that controls the last steps in the anthocyanins biosynthesis pathway. Polymorphism within MybA1 has been associated with color variation in berries of V. vinifera and other Vitis species. In this work, we analyzed the sequence variation in MybA1 both in the subg. Muscadinia and in an extended set of Asian, American and European genotypes of subg. Vitis. Our aims were to infer the evolution of this gene during the speciation process and to identify polymorphisms that could potentially generate changes in gene regulation. The results show that MybA1 experienced many insertions and deletions in non-coding regions but also in the third exon sequence. Owing to the larger set of Vitis species compared here, new indels were identified and the origin of previously described indels was reconsidered. A large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms were found in non-coding regions but also in the sequence coding for the R2R3 domain and the C terminal part of the protein. Some of these changes led to amino acid substitutions and therefore could have modified MybA1 protein activity. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of all polymorphisms did not provide a consensus tree depicting the geographical partitioning of the species but allowed highlighting several species relationships within subgenus Vitis. Finally, the evolutionary events described could be useful to gain more insight into the role of MybA1 for anthocyanin biosynthesis in grapevine. PMID:25896368

  7. Characterization of SLCO5A1/OATP5A1, a Solute Carrier Transport Protein with Non-Classical Function

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Katrin; Detro-Dassen, Silvia; Rinis, Natalie; Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Merk, Hans F.; Schmalzing, Günther

    2013-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP/SLCO) have been identified to mediate the uptake of a broad range of mainly amphipathic molecules. Human OATP5A1 was found to be expressed in the epithelium of many cancerous and non-cancerous tissues throughout the body but protein characterization and functional analysis have not yet been performed. This study focused on the biochemical characterization of OATP5A1 using Xenopus laevis oocytes and Flp-In T-REx-HeLa cells providing evidence regarding a possible OATP5A1 function. SLCO5A1 is highly expressed in mature dendritic cells compared to immature dendritic cells (∼6.5-fold) and SLCO5A1 expression correlates with the differentiation status of primary blood cells. A core- and complex- N-glycosylated polypeptide monomer of ∼105 kDa and ∼130 kDa could be localized in intracellular membranes and on the plasma membrane, respectively. Inducible expression of SLCO5A1 in HeLa cells led to an inhibitory effect of ∼20% after 96 h on cell proliferation. Gene expression profiling with these cells identified immunologically relevant genes (e.g. CCL20) and genes implicated in developmental processes (e.g. TGM2). A single nucleotide polymorphism leading to the exchange of amino acid 33 (L→F) revealed no differences regarding protein expression and function. In conclusion, we provide evidence that OATP5A1 might be a non-classical OATP family member which is involved in biological processes that require the reorganization of the cell shape, such as differentiation and migration. PMID:24376674

  8. Endoxifen and Other Metabolites of Tamoxifen Inhibit Human Hydroxysteroid Sulfotransferase 2A1 (hSULT2A1)

    PubMed Central

    Squirewell, Edwin J.; Qin, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Although tamoxifen is a successful agent for treatment and prevention of estrogen-dependent breast cancer, its use has been limited by the low incidence of endometrial cancer. Human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase 2A1 (hSULT2A1) catalyzes the formation of an α-sulfooxy metabolite of tamoxifen that is reactive toward DNA, and this has been implicated in its carcinogenicity. Also, hSULT2A1 functions in the metabolism of steroid hormones such as dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and pregnenolone (PREG). These roles of hSULT2A1 in steroid hormone metabolism and in generating a reactive metabolite of tamoxifen led us to examine its interactions with tamoxifen and several of its major metabolites. We hypothesized that metabolites of tamoxifen may regulate the catalytic activity of hSULT2A1, either through direct inhibition or through serving as alternate substrates for the enzyme. We found that 4-hydroxy-N-desmethyltamoxifen (endoxifen) is a potent inhibitor of hSULT2A1-catalyzed sulfation of PREG and DHEA, with Ki values of 3.5 and 2.8 μM, respectively. In the hSULT2A1-catalyzed sulfation of PREG, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHTAM) and N-desmethyltamoxifen (N-desTAM) exhibited Ki values of 12.7 and 9.8 μM, respectively, whereas corresponding Ki values of 19.4 and 17.2 μM were observed with DHEA as substrate. A Ki value of 9.1 μM was observed for tamoxifen-N-oxide with DHEA as substrate, and this increased to 16.9 μM for the hSULT2A1-catalyzed sulfation of PREG. Three metabolites were substrates for hSULT2A1, with relative sulfation rates of 4-OHTAM > N-desTAM > > endoxifen. These results may be useful in interpreting ongoing clinical trials of endoxifen and in improving the design of related molecules. PMID:25157097

  9. Endoxifen and other metabolites of tamoxifen inhibit human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase 2A1 (hSULT2A1).

    PubMed

    Squirewell, Edwin J; Qin, Xiaoyan; Duffel, Michael W

    2014-11-01

    Although tamoxifen is a successful agent for treatment and prevention of estrogen-dependent breast cancer, its use has been limited by the low incidence of endometrial cancer. Human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase 2A1 (hSULT2A1) catalyzes the formation of an α-sulfooxy metabolite of tamoxifen that is reactive toward DNA, and this has been implicated in its carcinogenicity. Also, hSULT2A1 functions in the metabolism of steroid hormones such as dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and pregnenolone (PREG). These roles of hSULT2A1 in steroid hormone metabolism and in generating a reactive metabolite of tamoxifen led us to examine its interactions with tamoxifen and several of its major metabolites. We hypothesized that metabolites of tamoxifen may regulate the catalytic activity of hSULT2A1, either through direct inhibition or through serving as alternate substrates for the enzyme. We found that 4-hydroxy-N-desmethyltamoxifen (endoxifen) is a potent inhibitor of hSULT2A1-catalyzed sulfation of PREG and DHEA, with Ki values of 3.5 and 2.8 μM, respectively. In the hSULT2A1-catalyzed sulfation of PREG, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHTAM) and N-desmethyltamoxifen (N-desTAM) exhibited Ki values of 12.7 and 9.8 μM, respectively, whereas corresponding Ki values of 19.4 and 17.2 μM were observed with DHEA as substrate. A Ki value of 9.1 μM was observed for tamoxifen-N-oxide with DHEA as substrate, and this increased to 16.9 μM for the hSULT2A1-catalyzed sulfation of PREG. Three metabolites were substrates for hSULT2A1, with relative sulfation rates of 4-OHTAM > N-desTAM > > endoxifen. These results may be useful in interpreting ongoing clinical trials of endoxifen and in improving the design of related molecules. PMID:25157097

  10. Purification and structural characterisation of phospholipase A1 (Vespapase, Ves a 1) from Thai banded tiger wasp (Vespa affinis) venom.

    PubMed

    Sukprasert, Sophida; Rungsa, Prapenpuksiri; Uawonggul, Nunthawun; Incamnoi, Paroonkorn; Thammasirirak, Sompong; Daduang, Jureerut; Daduang, Sakda

    2013-01-01

    The Thai banded tiger wasp (Vespa affinis) is one of the most dangerous vespid species in Southeast Asia, and stinging accidents involving this species still cause fatalities. In the present study, four forms of V. affinis phospholipase A(1) were identified through a proteomics approach. Two of these enzymes were purified by reverse-phase chromatography, and their biochemical properties were characterised. These enzymes, designated Ves a 1s, are not glycoproteins and exist as 33441.5 and 33474.4 Da proteins, which corresponded with the 34-kDa band observed via SDS-PAGE. The thermal stabilities of these enzymes were stronger than snake venom. Using an in vivo assay, no difference was found in the toxicities of the different isoforms. Furthermore, the toxicity of these enzymes does not appear to be correlated with their PLA(1) activity. The cDNAs of the full-length version of Ves a 1s revealed that the Ves a 1 gene consists of a 1005-bp ORF, which encodes 334 amino acid residues, and 67- and 227-bp 5' and 3' UTRs, respectively. The two isoforms are different by three nucleotide substitutions, resulting in the replacement of two amino acids. Through sequence alignment, these enzymes were classified as members of the pancreatic lipase family. The structural modelling of Ves a 1 used the rat pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (1bu8A) as a template because it has PLA(1) activity, which demonstrated that this enzyme belongs to the α/β hydrolase fold family. The Ves a 1 structure, which is composed of seven α-helixes and eleven β-strands, contains the β-strand/ɛSer/α-helix structural motif, which contains the Gly-X-Ser-X-Gly consensus sequence. The typical surface structures that play important roles in substrate selectivity (the lid domain and the β9 loop) were shortened in the Ves a 1 structure, which suggests that this enzyme may only exhibit phospholipase activity. Moreover, the observed insertion of proline into the lid domain of the Ves a 1 structure is rare

  11. Kinetic analysis of bile acid sulfation by stably expressed human sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1).

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Bathena, S P; Tong, J; Roth, M; Hagenbuch, B; Alnouti, Y

    2010-03-01

    Human sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1) is a member of the hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase (SULT2) family that mediates sulfo-conjugation of a variety of endogenous molecules including dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and bile acids. In this study, we have constructed a stable cell line expressing SULT2A1 by transfection into HEK293 cells. The expression system was used to characterize and compare the sulfation kinetics of DHEA and 15 human bile acids by SULT2A1. Formation of DHEA sulfate demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics with apparent K(m) and V(max) values of 3.8 muM and 130.8 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, respectively. Sulfation kinetics of bile acids also demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a marked variation in apparent K(m) and V(max) values between individual bile acids. Sulfation affinity was inversely proportional to the number of hydroxyl groups of bile acids. The monohydroxy- and most toxic bile acid (lithocholic acid) had the highest affinity, whereas the trihydroxy- and least toxic bile acid (cholic acid) had the lowest affinity to sulfation by SULT2A1. Intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was approximately 1.5- and 9.0-fold higher than that of deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), respectively, despite the fact that all three are dihydroxy bile acids. PMID:20102295

  12. PTSD and Sexual Orientation: An Examination of Criterion A1 and Non-Criterion A1 Events

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Edward J.; Meyer, Ilan H.; Martin, James I.

    2015-01-01

    This large-scale cross-sectional study compared posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) prevalence among White, Black, and Latino lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals (LGBs; n = 382) and compared them with heterosexual individuals (n = 126). Building on previous research, we relaxed the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM–IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994), allowing non-Criterion A1 events such as ending a relationship, unemployment, homelessness, and separation from parents to qualify, and we assessed differences in PTSD prevalence between standard DSM–IV criteria and the relaxed criteria. Findings revealed that participants reporting a non-Criterion A1 event were more likely than those reporting a Criterion A1 event to have symptoms diagnosable as PTSD. There was no significant difference in either DSM–IV or relaxed Criterion A1 PTSD prevalence between lesbian and gay, and heterosexual individuals or between bisexual and heterosexual individuals. Compared with White LGBs, Black and Latino LGBs had higher prevalence of PTSD with the relaxed Criterion A1 definition, but this was statistically significant only for Latinos. PMID:26113955

  13. 29 CFR 1912a.1 - Purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH § 1912a.1 Purpose and scope. (a) Section 7(a) of the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 establishes a...

  14. Mutations in SLC26A1 Cause Nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Gee, Heon Yung; Jun, Ikhyun; Braun, Daniela A; Lawson, Jennifer A; Halbritter, Jan; Shril, Shirlee; Nelson, Caleb P; Tan, Weizhen; Stein, Deborah; Wassner, Ari J; Ferguson, Michael A; Gucev, Zoran; Sayer, John A; Milosevic, Danko; Baum, Michelle; Tasic, Velibor; Lee, Min Goo; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2016-06-01

    Nephrolithiasis, a condition in which urinary supersaturation leads to stone formation in the urinary system, affects about 5%-10% of individuals worldwide at some point in their lifetime and results in significant medical costs and morbidity. To date, mutations in more than 30 genes have been described as being associated with nephrolithiasis, and these mutations explain about 15% of kidney stone cases, suggesting that additional nephrolithiasis-associated genes remain to be discovered. To identify additional genes whose mutations are linked to nephrolithiasis, we performed targeted next-generation sequencing of 18 hypothesized candidate genes in 348 unrelated individuals with kidney stones. We detected biallelic mutations in SLC26A1 (solute carrier family 26 member 1) in two unrelated individuals with calcium oxalate kidney stones. We show by immunofluorescence, immunoblotting, and glycosylation analysis that the variant protein mimicking p.Thr185Met has defects in protein folding or trafficking. In addition, by measuring anion exchange activity of SLC26A1, we demonstrate that all the identified mutations in SLC26A1 result in decreased transporter activity. Our data identify SLC26A1 mutations as causing a recessive Mendelian form of nephrolithiasis. PMID:27210743

  15. 26 CFR 1.267(a)-1 - Deductions disallowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX... sale or exchange, are within any one of the relationships specified in section 267(b). See § 1.267(b)-1... expenses otherwise deductible under section 162, for expenses for production of income otherwise...

  16. 26 CFR 1.267(a)-1 - Deductions disallowed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX... exchange, are within any one of the relationships specified in section 267(b). See § 1.267(b)-1. (b) Unpaid... otherwise deductible under section 162, for expenses for production of income otherwise deductible...

  17. 26 CFR 1.167(a)-1 - Depreciation in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Depreciation in general. 1.167(a)-1 Section 1... Depreciation in general. (a) Reasonable allowance. Section 167(a) provides that a reasonable allowance for the... general experience in the industry may be used until such time as the taxpayer's own experience forms...

  18. 26 CFR 1.167(a)-1 - Depreciation in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Depreciation in general. 1.167(a)-1 Section 1... Depreciation in general. (a) Reasonable allowance. Section 167(a) provides that a reasonable allowance for the... general experience in the industry may be used until such time as the taxpayer's own experience forms...

  19. 7 CFR 15a.1 - Purpose and effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Introduction § 15a.1 Purpose and effective date. The purpose of this part is to effectuate title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended by Public Law 93-568, 88 Stat. 1855 and Public Law 94-482, 90 Stat. 2234 (except sections 904 and 906 of those Amendments)...

  20. 26 CFR 31.6402(a)-1 - Credits or refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE... limitation upon credit or refund of taxes imposed by the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, see § 301.6511(a)-1... credit or refund of any tax imposed by the Internal Revenue Code of 1939, see the regulations...

  1. 26 CFR 31.6402(a)-1 - Credits or refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE... limitation upon credit or refund of taxes imposed by the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, see § 301.6511(a)-1... credit or refund of any tax imposed by the Internal Revenue Code of 1939, see the regulations...

  2. 26 CFR 1.926(a)-1 - Distributions to shareholders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the administrative pricing methods of section 925(a)(1) or (2), (D) Out of earnings and profits... income determined solely because of the operation of section 923(a)(4)) allocable to the marketing of... income and other exempt foreign trade income determined under either of the administrative...

  3. The Heart of a 1:1 Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulbert, Carrie Ann

    2012-01-01

    Many educators believe that the act of building relationships is the core of learning. When technology is integrated into every classroom, do relationships improve or disintegrate among the key stakeholders in an educational environment? The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which technology in a 1:1 school district can alter…

  4. 26 CFR 1.50A-1 - Determination of amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Computing Credit for Expenses of Work Incentive Programs § 1.50A-1 Determination of amount. (a) In general. Except as otherwise provided in this section and in § 1.50A-2, the amount of the work incentive program... certain capital gains of subchapter S corporations), and any additional tax imposed for the taxable...

  5. Design and Interpretation of Human Sulfotransferase 1A1 Assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Cook, Ian; Leyh, Thomas S

    2016-04-01

    The human sulfotransferases (SULTs) regulate the activities of hundreds, if not thousands, of small molecule metabolites via transfer of the sulfuryl-moiety (-SO3) from the nucleotide donor, 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to the hydroxyls and amines of the recipients. Our understanding of the molecular basis of SULT catalysis has expanded considerably in recent years. The basic kinetic mechanism of these enzymes, previously thought to be ordered, has been redefined as random for SULT2A1, a representative member of the superfamily. An active-site cap whose structure and dynamics are highly responsive to nucleotides was discovered and shown to be critical in determining SULT selectivity, a topic of longstanding interest to the field. We now realize that a given SULT can operate in two specificity modes-broad and narrow-depending on the disposition of the cap. More recent work has revealed that the caps of the SULT1A1 are controlled by homotropic allosteric interactions between PAPS molecules bound at the dimer's active sites. These interactions cause the catalytic efficiency of SULT1A1 to vary in a substrate-dependent fashion by as much as two orders of magnitude over a range of PAPS concentrations that spans those found in human tissues. SULT catalysis is further complicated by the fact that these enzymes are frequently inhibited by their substrates. This review provides an overview of the mechanistic features of SULT1A1 that are important for the design and interpretation of SULT1A1 assays. PMID:26658224

  6. Dietary Lecithin Decreases Skeletal Muscle COL1A1 and COL3A1 Gene Expression in Finisher Gilts

    PubMed Central

    Akit, Henny; Collins, Cherie; Fahri, Fahri; Hung, Alex; D’Souza, Daryl; Leury, Brian; Dunshea, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary In this study, the effect of dietary lecithin on skeletal muscle gene expression of collagen precursors and enzymes was investigated in gilts. Thirty-six finisher gilts were fed with diets containing either 0, 4, 20 or 80 g/kg soybean lecithin for six weeks. Then, rectus abdominis muscle was sampled and analyzed for eight genes involved in collagen synthesis and degradation (COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP-1, MMP-13, TIMP-1, TIMP-3, lysyl oxidase and α-subunit P4H) using quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that lecithin down-regulated COL1A1 and COL3A1 as well as tended to down-regulate α-subunit P4H expression. Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary lecithin on skeletal muscle gene expression of collagen precursors and enzymes involved in collagen synthesis and degradation. Finisher gilts with an average start weight of 55.9 ± 2.22 kg were fed diets containing either 0, 4, 20 or 80 g/kg soybean lecithin prior to harvest for six weeks and the rectus abdominis muscle gene expression profile was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Lecithin treatment down-regulated Type I (α1) procollagen (COL1A1) and Type III (α1) procollagen (COL3A1) mRNA expression (p < 0.05, respectively), indicating a decrease in the precursors for collagen synthesis. The α-subunit of prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H) mRNA expression also tended to be down-regulated (p = 0.056), indicating a decrease in collagen synthesis. Decreased matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) mRNA expression may reflect a positive regulatory response to the reduced collagen synthesis in muscle from the pigs fed lecithin (p = 0.035). Lecithin had no effect on tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) and lysyl oxidase mRNA expression. In conclusion, lecithin down-regulated COL1A1 and COL3A1 as well as tended to down-regulate α-subunit P4H expression. However, determination of muscle collagen content and solubility are required

  7. Evaluation of LLTR Series II tests A-1A and A-1B test results. [Large Leak Test Rig

    SciTech Connect

    Shoopak, B F; Amos, J C; Norvell, T J

    1980-03-01

    The standard methodology, with minor modifications provides conservative yet realistic predictions of leaksite and other sodium system pressures in the LLTR Series II vessel and piping. The good agreement between predicted and measured pressures indicates that the TRANSWRAP/RELAP modeling developed from the Series I tests is applicable to larger scale units prototypical of the Clinch River steam generator design. Calculated sodium system pressures are sensitive to several modeling parameters including rupture disc modeling, acoustic velocity in the test vessel, and flow rate from the rupture tube. The acoustic velocity which produced best agreement with leaksite pressures was calculated based on the shroud diameter and shroud wall thickness. The corresponding rupture tube discharge coefficient was that of the standard design methodology developed from Series I testing. As found in Series I testing, the Series II data suggests that the leading edge of the flow in the relief line is two phase for a single, doubled-ended guillotine tube rupture. The steam generator shroud acts as if it is relatively transparent to the transmission of radial pressures to the vessel wall. Slightly lower sodium system maximum pressures measured during Test A-1b compared to Test A-1a are attributed to premature failure (failure at a lower pressure) of the rupture disc in contact with the sodium for test A-1b. The delay in failure of the second disc in Test A-1b, which was successfully modeled with TRANSWRAP, is attributed to the limited energy in the nitrogen injection.

  8. The Allosteric Binding Sites of Sulfotransferase 1A1

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian; Wang, Ting; Falany, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Human sulfotransferases (SULTs) comprise a small, 13-member enzyme family that regulates the activities of thousands of compounds—endogenous metabolites, drugs, and other xenobiotics. SULTs transfer the sulfuryl-moiety (–SO3) from a nucleotide donor, PAPS (3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate), to the hydroxyls and primary amines of acceptors. SULT1A1, a progenitor of the family, has evolved to sulfonate compounds that are remarkably structurally diverse. SULT1A1, which is found in many tissues, is the predominant SULT in liver, where it is a major component of phase II metabolism. Early work demonstrated that catechins and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit SULT1A1 and suggested that the inhibition was not competitive versus substrates. Here, the mechanism of inhibition of a single, high affinity representative from each class [epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and mefenamic acid] is determined using initial-rate and equilibrium-binding studies. The findings reveal that the inhibitors bind at sites separate from those of substrates, and at saturation turnover of the enzyme is reduced to a nonzero value. Further, the EGCG inhibition patterns suggest a molecular explanation for its isozyme specificity. Remarkably, the inhibitors bind at sites that are separate from one another, and binding at one site does not affect affinity at the other. For the first time, it is clear that SULT1A1 is allosterically regulated, and that it contains at least two, functionally distinct allosteric sites, each of which responds to a different class of compounds. PMID:25534770

  9. C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring vs. Mars)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Althea; Cooke, William

    2013-01-01

    Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring): recently discovered long period comet. Will have close encounter with Mars on October 19, 2014. Collision is extremely unlikely. Passing through the coma and/or tail is likely. Increases risk to Martian spacecraft. Meteoroids (100 microns or larger): approx. or <20% chance of impact per square meter due to coma and tail. Gas may also a ect Martian atmosphere.

  10. SPICE macromodel for a 1-megawatt power MOSFET switch

    SciTech Connect

    Helms, C.; Ackermann, M.; Fischer, T.; Deveney, M.

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents a SPICE macromodel for a 1-megawatt high power electrical switch which uses power MOSFETs as the active switching elements. The model accurately predicts the time dependent switching current and provides a reasonable representation of the time dependent switch resistance and voltage drop across the switch. Techniques for extracting model parameters for commercial power MOSFETs are discussed along with suggestions for extending the model to spark gaps and other high power switches.

  11. Mutations in COL1A1 Gene Change Dentin Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaohong; Liu, Zhenxia; Gan, Yunna; Xia, Dan; Li, Qiang; Li, Yanling; Yang, Jiaji; Gao, Shan; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have attempted to associate specific gene mutations with dentin phenotypic severity, it remains unknown how the mutations in COL1A1 gene influence the mechanical behavior of dentin collagen and matrix. Here, we reported one osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) pedigree caused by two new inserting mutations in exon 5 of COL1A1 (NM_000088.3:c.440_441insT;c.441_442insA), which resulted in the unstable expression of COL1A1 mRNA and half quantity of procollagen production. We investigated the morphological and mechanical features of proband's dentin using atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. Increased D-periodic spacing, variably enlarged collagen fibrils coating with fewer minerals were found in the mutated collagen. AFM analysis demonstrated rougher dentin surface and sparsely decreased Young's modulus in proband's dentin. We believe that our findings provide new insights into the genetic-/nano- mechanisms of dentin diseases, and may well explain OI dentin features with reduced mechanical strength and a lower crosslinked density. Anat Rec, 299:511-519, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26694865

  12. Pyogranulomatous Pneumonia in Goats Caused by an Undescribed Porphyromonas Species, “Porphyromonas katsikii”

    PubMed Central

    Filioussis, George; Petridou, Evanthia; Karavanis, Emmanouel

    2014-01-01

    A yet-undescribed bacterial species, tentatively named “Porphyromonas katsikii,” was isolated from individuals of a small goat herd with pyogranulomatous pneumonia during an outbreak of acute respiratory disease. The isolated bacteria grew in the form of black-pigmented colonies after 14 days of incubation under anaerobic conditions at 37°C on a tryptic soy blood agar medium. The bacteria were identified as a yet-undescribed Porphyromonas species by determination of the nucleotide sequence of the rrs 16S rRNA gene, and this species was tentatively named Porphyromonas katsikii. PCR amplification with specific primers for this yet-undescribed species revealed the presence of P. katsikii in the lung tissue of all affected animals, while no PCR signals were evidenced from the lungs of healthy goats or from goats with pasteurellosis caused by Mannheimia haemolytica. These data indicate P. katsikii as the causative agent of acute respiratory distress. P. katsikii is phylogenetically related to Porphyromonas somerae and Porphyromonas levii, which cause pathologies in humans and animals, respectively. P. katsikii was not detected by PCR from samples of the gingival pockets or of the faces of healthy goats. PMID:25540395

  13. Bovine respiratory disease research (1983-2009).

    PubMed

    Fulton, Robert W

    2009-12-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) research has provided significant understanding of the disease over the past 26 years. Modern research tools that have been used include monoclonal antibodies, genomics, polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry (IHC), DNA vaccines and viral vectors coding for immunogens. Emerging/reemerging viruses and new antigenic strains of viruses and bacteria have been identified. Methods of detection and the role for cattle persistently infected bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) were identified; viral subunits, cellular components and bacterial products have been characterized. Product advances have included vaccines for bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida; the addition of BVDV2 to the existing vaccines and new antibiotics. The role of Mycoplasma spp., particularly Mycoplasma bovis in BRD, has been more extensively studied. Bovine immunology research has provided more specific information on immune responses, T cell subsets and cytokines. The molecular and genetic basis for viral-bacterial synergy in BRD has been described. Attempts have been made to document how prevention of BRD by proper vaccination and management prior to exposure to infectious agents can minimize disease and serve as economic incentives for certified health programs. PMID:20003649

  14. Identification of an immunogenic protein of Actinobacillus seminis that is present in microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Actinobacillus seminis is a gram-negative bacterium of the Pasteurellaceae family that is involved in ovine epididymitis. Looking for a protein specific to this species, we determined the protein profile of subcellular fractions of A. seminis (American Type Culture Collection number 15768): proteins from the outer membrane (OMPs), inner membrane (IMPs), and cytoplasm (CPs). These profiles provide the first data, to our knowledge, regarding subcellular fractions of A. seminis. In the OMP fraction, we identified a protein with a molecular mass of 75 kDa that proved to be immunogenic and apparently specific for A. seminis. This conclusion was based on the reaction of hyperimmune serum of rabbits inoculated with whole cells of A. seminis that was tested against sonicated complete cells of reference strains and field isolates of Brucella ovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni. No protein of these bacteria cross-reacted with the 75-kDa protein of A. seminis. Furthermore, when each type of hyperimmune serum was tested against the sonicated cells and each of the subcellular fractions of A. seminis, it did not recognize the A. seminis 75-kDa protein. We also isolated and identified this protein in microvesicles released to the culture supernatant. The results suggest that the 75-kDa protein could be used to establish a diagnostic test specific for ovine epididymitis caused by A. seminis. PMID:16548331

  15. Diseases and pathogens associated with mortality in Ontario beef feedlots.

    PubMed

    Gagea, Mihai I; Bateman, Kenneth G; van Dreumel, Tony; McEwen, Beverly J; Carman, Susy; Archambault, Marie; Shanahan, Rachel A; Caswell, Jeff L

    2006-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of diseases and pathogens associated with mortality or severe morbidity in 72 Ontario beef feedlots in calves that died or were euthanized within 60 days after arrival. Routine pathologic and microbiologic investigations, as well as immunohistochemical staining for detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) antigen, were performed on 99 calves that died or were euthanized within 60 days after arrival. Major disease conditions identified included fibrinosuppurative bronchopneumonia (49%), caseonecrotic bronchopneumonia or arthritis (or both) caused by Mycoplasma bovis (36%), viral respiratory disease (19%), BVDV-related diseases (21%), Histophilus somni myocarditis (8%), ruminal bloat (2%), and miscellaneous diseases (8%). Viral infections identified were BVDV (35%), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (9%), bovine herpesvirus-1 (6%), parainfluenza-3 virus (3%), and bovine coronavirus (2%). Bacteria isolated from the lungs included M. bovis (82%), Mycoplasma arginini (72%), Ureaplasma diversum (25%), Mannheimia haemolytica (27%), Pasteurella multocida (19%), H. somni (14%), and Arcanobacterium pyogenes (19%). Pneumonia was the most frequent cause of mortality of beef calves during the first 2 months after arrival in feedlots, representing 69% of total deaths. The prevalence of caseonecrotic bronchopneumonia caused by M. bovis was similar to that of fibrinosuppurative bronchopneumonia, and together, these diseases were the most common causes of pneumonia and death. M. bovis pneumonia and polyarthritis has emerged as an important cause of mortality in Ontario beef feedlots. PMID:16566254

  16. Tulathromycin Exerts Proresolving Effects in Bovine Neutrophils by Inhibiting Phospholipases and Altering Leukotriene B4, Prostaglandin E2, and Lipoxin A4 Production

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carrie D.; Duquette, Stephanie C.; Renaux, Bernard S.; Feener, Troy D.; Morck, Douglas W.; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Lucas, Merlyn J.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of neutrophils and proinflammatory mediators, such as leukotriene B4 (LTB4), is a classic marker of inflammatory disease. The clearance of apoptotic neutrophils, inhibition of proinflammatory signaling, and production of proresolving lipids (including lipoxins, such as lipoxin A4 [LXA4]) are imperative for resolving inflammation. Tulathromycin (TUL), a macrolide used to treat bovine respiratory disease, confers immunomodulatory benefits via mechanisms that remain unclear. We recently reported the anti-inflammatory properties of TUL in bovine phagocytes in vitro and in Mannheimia haemolytica-challenged calves. The findings demonstrated that this system offers a powerful model for investigating novel mechanisms of pharmacological immunomodulation. In the present study, we examined the effects of TUL in a nonbacterial model of pulmonary inflammation in vivo and characterized its effects on lipid signaling. In bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples from calves challenged with zymosan particles (50 mg), treatment with TUL (2.5 mg/kg of body weight) significantly reduced pulmonary levels of LTB4 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In calcium ionophore (A23187)-stimulated bovine neutrophils, TUL inhibited phospholipase D (PLD), cytosolic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity, and the release of LTB4. In contrast, TUL promoted the secretion of LXA4 in resting and A23187-stimulated neutrophils, while levels of its precursor, 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid [15(S)-HETE], were significantly lower. These findings indicate that TUL directly modulates lipid signaling by inhibiting the production of proinflammatory eicosanoids and promoting the production of proresolving lipoxins. PMID:24820086

  17. Pyogranulomatous pneumonia in goats caused by an undescribed Porphyromonas species, "Porphyromonas katsikii".

    PubMed

    Filioussis, George; Petridou, Evanthia; Karavanis, Emmanouel; Frey, Joachim

    2015-03-01

    A yet-undescribed bacterial species, tentatively named "Porphyromonas katsikii," was isolated from individuals of a small goat herd with pyogranulomatous pneumonia during an outbreak of acute respiratory disease. The isolated bacteria grew in the form of black-pigmented colonies after 14 days of incubation under anaerobic conditions at 37°C on a tryptic soy blood agar medium. The bacteria were identified as a yet-undescribed Porphyromonas species by determination of the nucleotide sequence of the rrs 16S rRNA gene, and this species was tentatively named Porphyromonas katsikii. PCR amplification with specific primers for this yet-undescribed species revealed the presence of P. katsikii in the lung tissue of all affected animals, while no PCR signals were evidenced from the lungs of healthy goats or from goats with pasteurellosis caused by Mannheimia haemolytica. These data indicate P. katsikii as the causative agent of acute respiratory distress. P. katsikii is phylogenetically related to Porphyromonas somerae and Porphyromonas levii, which cause pathologies in humans and animals, respectively. P. katsikii was not detected by PCR from samples of the gingival pockets or of the faces of healthy goats. PMID:25540395

  18. Vaccination schedules in small ruminant farms.

    PubMed

    Lacasta, D; Ferrer, L M; Ramos, J J; González, J M; Ortín, A; Fthenakis, G C

    2015-12-14

    Development and implementation of health management plans is the cornerstone of profitable farms; prevention of microbial diseases by means of vaccination is an integral part of such a plan. In every production type and management system in small ruminants, microbial diseases have a major significance, hence their proper control must be based in good health management practices, including use of effective and safe vaccines. Development of various types of vaccines is evolving very quickly in recent years and the improvement of new type of vaccines offers prospects. The article reviews and discusses vaccination programs and latest advances in development of vaccines against diseases that cause major economic losses in small ruminants. Specifically, vaccination schedules for the following diseases are reviewed: bacterial abortion (abortion associated with Brucella melitensis, Campylobacter spp., Chlamydophila abortus, Coxiella burnetii, Salmonella abortus ovis or Salmonella brandenburg), caseous lymphadenitis, clostridial diseases, colibacillosis, contagious echtyma, epididymitis caused by Brucella ovis, footrot, mammary diseases (contagious agalactia, mastitis), paratuberculosis and respiratory diseases (respiratory disease caused by Mannheimia haemolytica or other Pasteurellaceae). PMID:26220514

  19. Dietary Lecithin Decreases Skeletal Muscle COL1A1 and COL3A1 Gene Expression in Finisher Gilts.

    PubMed

    Akit, Henny; Collins, Cherie; Fahri, Fahri; Hung, Alex; D'Souza, Daryl; Leury, Brian; Dunshea, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary lecithin on skeletal muscle gene expression of collagen precursors and enzymes involved in collagen synthesis and degradation. Finisher gilts with an average start weight of 55.9 ± 2.22 kg were fed diets containing either 0, 4, 20 or 80 g/kg soybean lecithin prior to harvest for six weeks and the rectus abdominis muscle gene expression profile was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Lecithin treatment down-regulated Type I (α1) procollagen (COL1A1) and Type III (α1) procollagen (COL3A1) mRNA expression ( p < 0.05, respectively), indicating a decrease in the precursors for collagen synthesis. The α-subunit of prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H) mRNA expression also tended to be down-regulated ( p = 0.056), indicating a decrease in collagen synthesis. Decreased matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) mRNA expression may reflect a positive regulatory response to the reduced collagen synthesis in muscle from the pigs fed lecithin ( p = 0.035). Lecithin had no effect on tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) and lysyl oxidase mRNA expression. In conclusion, lecithin down-regulated COL1A1 and COL3A1 as well as tended to down-regulate α-subunit P4H expression. However, determination of muscle collagen content and solubility are required to support the gene functions. PMID:27338483

  20. Catechol-O-methyltransferase association with hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Kathryn T.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Chen, Ling; Harden, Maegan; Tolkin, Benjamin R.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Bray, George A.; Ridker, Paul M.; Florez, Jose C.; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Catecholamines have metabolic effects on blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and blood glucose. Genetic variation in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme that degrades catecholamines, is associated with cardiometabolic risk factors and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD). Here we examined COMT effects on glycemic function and type 2 diabetes. Methods We tested whether COMT polymorphisms were associated with baseline HbA1c in the Women’s Genome Health Study (WGHS), and Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC), and with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in WGHS, DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis consortium (DIAGRAM), and the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Given evidence that COMT modifies some drug responses, we examined association with type 2 diabetes and randomized metformin and aspirin treatment. Results COMT rs4680 high-activity G-allele was associated with lower HbA1c in WGHS (β = −0.032% [0.012], p = 0.008) and borderline significant in MAGIC (β = −0.006% [0.003], p = 0.07). Combined COMT per val allele effects on type 2 diabetes were significant (OR = 0.98 [0.96–0.998], p = 0.03) in fixed-effects analyses across WGHS, DIAGRAM, and DPP. Similar results were obtained for 2 other COMT SNPs rs4818 and rs4633. In the DPP, the rs4680 val allele was borderline associated with lower diabetes incidence among participants randomized to metformin (HR = 0.81 [0.65–1.00], p = 0.05). Conclusions COMT rs4680 high-activity G-allele was associated with lower HbA1c and modest protection from type 2 diabetes. The directionality of COMT associations was concordant with those previously observed for cardiometabolic risk factors and CVD. PMID:27282867

  1. Structure of the BoNT/A1--receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Roger M; Frey, Daniel; Wieser, Mara M; Thieltges, Katherine M; Jaussi, Rolf; Capitani, Guido; Kammerer, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A causes botulism but is also used for medical and cosmetic applications. A detailed molecular understanding of BoNT/A--host receptor interactions is therefore fundamental for improving current clinical applications and for developing new medical strategies targeting human disorders. Towards this end, we recently solved an X-ray crystal structure of BoNT/A1 in complex with its neuronal protein receptor SV2C. Based on our findings, we discuss the potential implications for BoNT/A function. PMID:26260692

  2. Dysspondyloenchondromatosis: Another COL2A1-Related Skeletal Dysplasia?

    PubMed Central

    Nakane, T.; Tando, T.; Aoyagi, K.; Hatakeyama, K.; Nishimura, G.; Coucke, I.P.J.; Mortier, G.; Sugita, K.

    2011-01-01

    Dysspondyloenchondromatosis (DSC) is a rare skeletal dysplasia that has currently been classified into the group of spondylometaphyseal dysplasias. To date, only 12 affected individuals have been reported. All cases are sporadic, and the etiology remains unknown. Distinctive features of DSC are anisospondyly and enchondroma-like lesions in the metaphyseal and diaphyseal portions of the long tubular bones. Affected individuals usually develop kyphoscoliosis and asymmetric limb shortening at an early age. Interestingly, some of the skeletal changes overlap with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) Strudwick type, a rare type II collagen disorder. Based on this resemblance we postulated that DSC may be allelic to SEMD Strudwick type and therefore performed a COL2A1 analysis in an affected boy who was diagnosed as having DSC at the age of 3 years. The identification of a novel heterozygous COL2A1 missense mutation (p.Gly753Asp) in the proband confirms our hypothesis and suggests that DSC may be another type II collagen disorder. PMID:22570642

  3. Concept of a (1-. cap alpha. ) performance confidence interval

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, H.H.; Johnson, G.R.; Bechtel, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-input, single-output system is assumed to be represented by some model. The distribution functions of the input and the output variables are considered to be at least obtainable through experimental data. Associated with the computer response of the model corresponding to given inputs, a conditional pseudoresponse set is generated. This response can be constructed by means of the model by using the simulated pseudorandom input variates from a neighborhood defined by a preassigned probability allowance. A pair of such pseudoresponse values can then be computed by a procedure corresponding to a (1-..cap alpha..) probability for the conditional pseudoresponse set. The range defined by such a pair is called a (1-..cap alpha..) performance confidence interval with respect to the model. The application of this concept can allow comparison of the merit of two models describing the same system, or it can detect a system change when the current response is out of the performance interval with respect to the previously identified model. 6 figures.

  4. Development of a Neutron Detector for A1 at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Zoe

    2015-04-01

    The Mainz A1 spectrometers perform high precision measurements to investigate the structure of the nucleus and its constituents. Previous knowledge of the neutron form factor (FF) is limited due to poor detection efficiencies. Our goal is to create a neutron detector with an efficiency better than 80%, leading to the improvement of the measurements of the neutron electric FF and reducing systematic uncertainties. This new detector would also open up the possibility to study non-mesonic two-body weak decays. The neutron detector should have a large active detector volume, a high detection efficiency (>80%), a good resolution (<.5 ns), and must be low in cost. The proposed design of the detector follows a modular concept with an active detector volume of approximately one cubic meter. In order to allow high beam currents and their resulting high rates, this detector will be highly segmented using 32 crossed layers consisting of 64 bars, utilizing solid and liquid organic scintillators, with dimensions (15 x 30 x 960) mm3. In total 4096 channels have to be read out via WLS fibers using silicon multi pixel photon counters (MPPC). Funded by NSF IRES Award IIA-1358175 Collaboration: MAMI A1 Collaboration.

  5. Lessons Learned in Decommissioning of NPP A-1 After Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Prazska, M.; Rezbarik, J.; Majersky, D.; Sekely, S.; Solcanyi, S.

    2002-02-25

    Decommissioning of the NPP A-1 in Jaslovske Bohunice is encountered with great variation of the problems connected primarily with the high radiation fields and the high activity of the contaminated materials. Decontamination of the contaminated objects and the thorough radiological protection of decontamination workers are therefore the tasks of top priority. The successful realization of these jobs is based on the experience, good working practice and the utilization of all proven methods together with the newly developed ones. Since 1996, AllDeco Ltd. has applied the decontamination methods and processes in a wide scale in the decommissioning and dismantling of the NPP A-1 in the cooperation with SE-VYZ Inc. The monitoring of the radiation situation and the investigation of the type and character of the radioactive waste were first steps in the decontamination of all objects. For this works, remote controlled mechanical manipulators and remote controlled electrical carriage equipped with instruments recording the levels of dose rates and with telemetric data transmission system were used. The recorded data were used for the modeling and 3D visualization of the radiation fields and for following planning and preparation of the decontamination projects or ''working programs'' based on the ALARA principle. The minimization of the radioactive waste was also taken into consideration. A lot of time and energy was spent on the preparation and training of the staff including non-active trials of planned procedures. The gained experience was evaluated and lessons learned were given in the final reports.

  6. Collisionally-Mediated Singlet-Triplet Crossing in ˜{a}1A1 CH_2 Revisited: (010) Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh T.; Hall, Gregory; Sears, Trevor

    2014-06-01

    Methylene, CH2, possesses a ground ˜{X}3B1 ground electronic state and an excited ˜{a}1A1 state only 3150cm-1 higher in energy. The collision-induced singlet-triplet crossing in the gaseous mixtures is important in determining overall reaction rates and chemical behavior. Accidental near-degeneracies between rotational levels of the singlet state and the vibrationally excited triplet state result in a few gateway rotational levels that mediate collision-induced intersystem crossing. The mixed states can be recognized and quantified by deperturbation, knowing the zero-order singlet and triplet energy levels. Hyperfine structure can be used as alternative indicator of singlet-triplet mixing. Non-zero mixing will induce hyperfine splittings intermediate between the unresolved hyperfine structure of pure singlet and the resolvable (≈50MHz) splittings of pure triplet, arising from the (I\\cdotS) interaction in the ortho states, where nuclear spin I=1. Collision-induced intersystem crossing rates from the (010) state are comparable to those for (000), yet the identities and characters of the presumed gateway states are unknown. A new spectrometer is under construction to investigate triplet mixing rotational levels of ˜{a}1A1(010) by sub-Doppler measurements of perturbation-induced hyperfine splittings. Their observation will permit the identification of gateway states and quantification of the degree of triplet contamination of the singlet wavefunction. Progress in the measurements and the analysis of rotational energy transfer in (010) will be reported. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. C.-H. Chang, G. E. Hall, T. J. Sears, J. Chem. Phys 133, 144310(2010) G. E. Hall, A. V. Komissarov, and T. J. Sears, J. Phys. Chem. A 108 7922-7927 (2004)

  7. Antineoplastic Agents 552. Oxidation of Combretastatin A-1

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, George R.; Thornhill, Andrew J.; Moser, Bryan R.; Hogan, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    The very unstable (< 10 min at rt) o-quinone (5) derived from the vicinal diphenol anticancer drug combretastatin A-1 (1) has been obtained by careful oxidation with NaIO4 and tetrabutylammonium bromide in water/dichloromethane. Immediate reaction with phenylenediamine (6) allowed o-quinone 5 to be trapped as the stable phenazine derivative (7). For further confirmation, 5 was also captured as a dimethoxyphenylenediamine-derived phenazine (11). Both phenazines 7 and 11 significantly inhibited (ED50 ~ 0.2 μg/mL) growth of the murine P388 lymphocytic leukemia cell line and provided a new SAR insight in the combretastatin series of naturally occurring anticancer drugs. PMID:18729517

  8. Circuit Simulations of a 1 MV LTD for radiography.

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Salvador; Johnson, David L.; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Rose, David Vincent; Kim, Alexandre A.; Ziska, Derek Raymond; Chavez, Raymond; Molina, Isidro; Maenchen, John Eric

    2005-07-01

    A 1 MV linear transformer driver (LTD), capable of driving a radiographic diode load, has been built and tested. A circuit model of this accelerator has been developed using the BERTHA circuit simulation code. Simulations are compared to data from power-flow experiments utilizing a large area electron-beam diode load. Results show that the simulation model performs well in modeling the baseline operation of the accelerator. In addition, the circuit model has been used to predict several possible fault modes. Simulations of switch prefires, main capacitor failure, vacuum insulator flashover, and core saturation have been used to estimate the probability of inducing further failures and the impact on the load voltage and current.

  9. Underwater Imaging Using a 1 × 16 CMUT Linear Array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Wendong; He, Changde; Zhang, Yongmei; Song, Jinlong; Xue, Chenyang

    2016-01-01

    A 1 × 16 capacitive micro-machined ultrasonic transducer linear array was designed, fabricated, and tested for underwater imaging in the low frequency range. The linear array was fabricated using Si-SOI bonding techniques. Underwater transmission performance was tested in a water tank, and the array has a resonant frequency of 700 kHz, with pressure amplitude 182 dB (μPa·m/V) at 1 m. The -3 dB main beam width of the designed dense linear array is approximately 5 degrees. Synthetic aperture focusing technique was applied to improve the resolution of reconstructed images, with promising results. Thus, the proposed array was shown to be suitable for underwater imaging applications. PMID:26938536

  10. Powder metallurgy titanium 6A1-4V plate

    SciTech Connect

    Geisendorfer, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    A powder metallurgical approach has been combined with controlled mill processing to produce a highly uniform plate material suitable for structural applications. Prealloyed ELI Titanium 6A1-4V powder produced by the rotating electrode process was consolidated into billet by hot isostatic pressing. The resulting billet of uniform composition and random texture was then hot cross-rolled to 3 cm thick plate. Following rolling, the plate was given a beta annealing heat treatment to maximize damage tolerance. The plate was characterized with respect to metallurgical structure, composition, texture, and room temperature mechanical properties. The results of the study show that a powder metallurgy titanium mill product possessing uniform macro- and microstructure is technically feasible and exhibits tensile and fatigue properties equivalent to those of conventionally produced ingot-source wrought plate.

  11. A 1,3-Dihydro-1,3-azaborine Debuts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Senmiao; Zakharov, Lev N.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first synthesis and characterization of a 1,3-dihydro-1,3-azaborine, a long-sought BN isostere of benzene. 1,3-Dihydro-1,3-azaborine is a stable structural motif with considerable aromatic character as evidenced by structural analysis and its reaction chemistry. Single crystal X-ray analysis indicates bonding consistent with significant electron delocalization. 1,3-Dihydro-1,3-azaborines also undergo nucleophilic substitutions at boron and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions. In view of the versatility and impact of aromatic compounds in the biomedical field and in materials science, the present study further expands the available chemical space of arenes via BN/CC isosterism. PMID:22091703

  12. Underwater Imaging Using a 1 × 16 CMUT Linear Array

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Wendong; He, Changde; Zhang, Yongmei; Song, Jinlong; Xue, Chenyang

    2016-01-01

    A 1 × 16 capacitive micro-machined ultrasonic transducer linear array was designed, fabricated, and tested for underwater imaging in the low frequency range. The linear array was fabricated using Si-SOI bonding techniques. Underwater transmission performance was tested in a water tank, and the array has a resonant frequency of 700 kHz, with pressure amplitude 182 dB (μPa·m/V) at 1 m. The −3 dB main beam width of the designed dense linear array is approximately 5 degrees. Synthetic aperture focusing technique was applied to improve the resolution of reconstructed images, with promising results. Thus, the proposed array was shown to be suitable for underwater imaging applications. PMID:26938536

  13. A 1.2--Millimeter Broad--Band Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Jason; Walker, Christopher K.; Young, Erick T.

    1996-05-01

    We describe a 1.2--millimeter polarimeter to be used on the Steward Observatory and Max--Planck--Institut fur Radioastronomie 10--meter Submillimeter Telescope Observatory. The construction, performance parameters, and scientific purpose of the instrument are presented. The detector is a Ge bolometer with a Si absorber operated in a cavity cooled to 0.36 K by a liquid He(3) refrigerator. The bandpass has a central wavelength of 1.2 mm and a width of 0.3 mm. The system noise equivalent power is 1.5*E(-14) W Hz(-{1/2}) at 20 Hz. Polarimetric modulation is accomplished with a room temperature, rotating Rexolite half-wave plate. Unidirectional grooves provide the lambda /2 phase shift between the orthogonal senses of polarization. The polarization analyzer is a stationary, room temperature, unidirectional wire grid that transmits only one sense of polarization with 99% efficiency. The system polarimetric efficiency is 87% and the laboratory instrumental polarization is a well defined 3.7%. Detection of a 1% linear polarization is possible at the several sigma level. The primary scientific goal of this instrument is to probe the magnetic field orientations in the protostellar dust cores of molecular clouds. Non--spherical dust grains are aligned in the presence of a magnetic field resulting in linear polarization of the far--infrared thermal dust emission perpendicular to the magnetic field vector. Observed field orientations will be compared to protostellar molecular outflow orientations and magnetic fields on larger scales. With these comparisons we will assess the role of magnetic fields in cloud collapse and star formation.

  14. Splicing analysis of unclassified variants in COL2A1 and COL11A1 identifies deep intronic pathogenic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Allan J; McNinch, Annie; Whittaker, Joanne; Treacy, Becky; Oakhill, Kim; Poulson, Arabella; Snead, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    UK NHS diagnostic service sequence analysis of genes generally examines and reports on variations within a designated region 5′ and 3′ of each exon, typically 30 bp up and downstream. However, because of the degenerate nature of the splice sites, intronic variants outside the AG and GT dinucleotides of the acceptor and donor splice sites (ASS and DSS) are most often classified as being of unknown clinical significance, unless there is some functional evidence of their pathogenicity. It is now becoming clear that mutations deep within introns can also interfere with normal processing of pre-mRNA and result in pathogenic effects on the mature transcript. In diagnostic laboratories, these deep intronic variants most often fall outside of the regions analysed and so are rarely reported. With the likelihood that next generation sequencing will identify more of these unclassified variants, it will become important to perform additional studies to determine the pathogenicity of such sequence anomalies. Here, we analyse variants detected in either COL2A1 or COL11A1 in patients with Stickler syndrome. These have been analysed both in silico and functionally using either RNA isolated from the patient's cells or, more commonly, minigenes as splicing reporters. We show that deep intronic mutations are not a rare occurrence, including one variant that results in multiple transcripts, where both de novo donor and ASS are created by the mutation. Another variant produces transcripts that result in either haploinsufficiency or a dominant negative effect, potentially modifying the disease phenotype. PMID:22189268

  15. Annexin A1 localization and its relevance to cancer.

    PubMed

    Boudhraa, Zied; Bouchon, Bernadette; Viallard, Claire; D'Incan, Michel; Degoul, Françoise

    2016-02-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a Ca(2+)-regulated phospholipid-binding protein involved in various cell processes. ANXA1 was initially widely studied in inflammation resolution, but its overexpression was later reported in a large number of cancers. Further in-depth investigations have revealed that this protein could have many roles in cancer progression and act at different levels (from cancer initiation to metastasis). This is partly due to the location of ANXA1 in different cell compartments. ANXA1 can be nuclear, cytoplasmic and/or membrane associated. This last location allows ANXA1 to be proteolytically cleaved and/or to become accessible to its cognate partners, the formyl-peptide receptors. Indeed, in some cancers, ANXA1 is found at the cell surface, where it stimulates formyl-peptide receptors to trigger oncogenic pathways. In the present review, we look at the different locations of ANXA1 and their association with the deregulated pathways often observed in cancers. We have specifically detailed the non-classic pathways of ANXA1 externalization, the significance of its cleavage and the role of the ANXA1-formyl-peptide receptor complex in cancer progression. PMID:26769657

  16. Evaluation of a 1% iodophor postmilking teat sanitizer.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, J J; Murdough, P A; Howard, A B; Drechsler, P A; Pankey, J W; Ledbetter, G A; Richards, D A; Day, L L

    1994-03-01

    A natural exposure field trial a with positive control was conducted to evaluate bacteriological efficacy and teat conditioning qualities of an experimental postmilking teat dip. An experimental 1% iodine postmilking teat sanitizer with a 10% emollient system was compared with a 1% iodine plus 10% glycerin teat sanitizer. Efficacy of the two sanitizers was equivalent for all new IMI, major pathogens, and environmental pathogens. The products were not equivalent for efficacy against coliforms and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Fewer coliform IMI were diagnosed in the control group than in the treatment group. Differences were determined for efficacy against coagulase-negative staphylococci in favor of the treatment product. The products were equivalent for all clinical mastitis, including previously existing IMI that became clinical. The products were not equivalent for all or new clinical IMI with major pathogens, all environmental pathogens, or coliforms. Fewer infections were diagnosed in the control group than in the treatment group. Teat end and teat skin conditions improved with the use of the triple emollient, postmilking teat sanitizer under the winter conditions experienced during this field trial. PMID:8169282

  17. Development of a 1-m Robotic Telescope System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wonyong; Mack, Peter; Lee, Chung-Uk; Park, Jang-Hyun; Jin, Ho; Kim, Seung-Lee; Kim, Ho-Il; Yuk, In-Soo; Lee, Woo-Baik; Bradstreet, Matthew

    2005-10-01

    Korea Astronomy & Space Science Institute (KASI) has installed a 1-m robotic telescope at Mt. Lemmon, AZ, in collaboration with a company, Astronomical Consultants & Equipment, Inc (ACE). The telescope system is totally designed to make fully robotic observations, and can be operated in both interactive and unattended robotic modes. The telescope is newly designed and manufactured regarding both mechanical and optical parts. The optical system is designed to collect 80% of the incident light within 0.''5 with an f/7.5 Ritchey-Chretien design. The telescope mount is an equatorial fork with a friction drive system, and it allows fully programmable tracking speeds with a typical range of 15'' s-1 and an accuracy of ±5''hr-1. The mount system includes an integral pointing model to correct for mechanical errors and misalignments, and an auto-guide unit is also available. To gather environmental information a weather station and an all sky camera are installed at the site. In this paper we introduce the system design and the performance of the mechanical and optical quality of the telescope system based on the results of test observations using some variable stars.

  18. A 1-Joule laser for a 16-fiber injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, J

    2004-04-06

    A 1-J laser was designed to launch light down 16, multi-mode fibers (400-{micro}m-core dia.). A diffractive-optic splitter was designed in collaboration with Digital Optics Corporation (DOC), and was delivered by DOC. Using this splitter, the energy injected into each fiber varied <1%. The spatial profile out of each fiber was such that there were no ''hot spots,'' a flyer could successfully be launched and a PETN pellet could be initiated. Preliminary designs of the system were driven by system efficiency where a pristine TEM{sub 00} laser beam would be required. The laser is a master oscillator, power amplifier (MOPA) consisting of a 4-mm-dia. Nd:YLF rod in the stable, q-switched oscillator and a 9.5-mm-dia. Nd:YLF rod in the double-passed amplifier. Using a TEM{sub 00} oscillator beam resulted in excellent transmission efficiencies through the fibers at lower energies but proved to be quite unreliable at higher energies, causing premature fiber damage, flyer plate rupture, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). Upon further investigation, it was found that both temporal and spatial beam formatting of the laser were required to successfully initiate the PETN. Results from the single-mode experiments, including fiber damage, SRS and SBS losses, will be presented. In addition, results showing the improvement that can be obtained by proper laser beam formatting will also be presented.

  19. Development of a 1×2 piezoelectric optical fiber switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, M.; Yue, J.; Razak, K. A.; Haemmerle, E.; Hodgson, M.; Gao, W.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and performance of a 1×2 piezoelectric optical switch. The optical switch is developed based on the concept that the input fiber is directly moved by the deflection of a piezoelectric tube actuator. The piezoelectric tube actuator used in this switch is manufactured through an electrophoretic deposition process. The tube is inexpensive to produce and compact in size with high mechanical performance. It has a maximum deflection of 30μm which is capable to actuate the input fiber for switching. The multimode fiber optical switch has been successfully assembled. To reduce the misalignment loss between the fibers, the output fibers are precisely aligned in silicon vgrooves. Different components are bonded with low shrinkage adhesive in order to minimize their position inaccuracy. The performance characteristics of the optical switch have been measured, with an insertion loss of 1dB, crosstalk of -45dB and switching speed from 5 to 10ms. The switch also shows good reliability and requires small driving power. The development of multimode optical switch prototypes proves that the idea of piezoelectric switching is feasible. Further developments include the improvement of switching performance, reduction of the prototype size and the fabrication of multiple output prototypes.

  20. Active flow control on a 1:4 car model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Till; Springer, Matthias; Lienhart, Hermann; Kniesburges, Stefan; Othmer, Carsten; Becker, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Lift and drag of a passenger car are strongly influenced by the flow field around its rear end. The bluff body geometry produces a detached, transient flow which induces fluctuating forces on the body, affecting the rear axle, which may distress dynamic stability and comfort significantly. The investigations presented here deal with a 1:4 scale model of a simplified test car geometry that produces fluctuating lift and drag due to its strongly rounded rear geometry. To examine the influence of active flow control on this behavior, steady air jets were realized to exhaust from thin slots across the rear in three different configurations. Investigations were performed at and included the capturing of effective integral lift and drag, velocity measurements in the surrounding flow field with Laser Doppler Anemometry, surface pressure measurements and surface oil flow visualization on the rear. The flow field was found to be dominated by two longitudinal vortices, developing from the detachment of the flow at the upper C-pillar positions, and a recirculating, transverse vortex above the rear window. With an air jet emerging from a slot across the surface right below the rear window section, tangentially directed upstream toward the roof section, total lift could be reduced by more than 7 %, with rear axle lift reduction of about 5 % and negligible drag affection (1 %).

  1. Towards a 1km resolution global flood risk model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeff; Sampson, Chris; Smith, Andy

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in computationally efficient numerical algorithms and new High Performance Computing architectures now make high (1-2km) resolution global hydrodynamic models a realistic proposition. However in many areas of the world the data sets and tools necessary to undertake such modelling do not currently exist. In particular, five major problems need to be resolved: (1) the best globally available terrain data (SRTM) was generated from X-band interferometric radar data which does not penetrate vegetation canopies and which has significant problems in determining ground elevations in urban areas; (2) a global river bathymetry data set does not currently exist; (3) most river channels globally are less than the smallest currently resolvable grid scale (1km) and therefore require a sub-grid treatment; (4) a means to estimate the magnitude of the T year flood at any point along the global river network does not currently exist; and (5) a large proportion of flood losses are generated by off-floodplain surface water flows which are not well represented in current hydrodynamic modelling systems. In this paper we propose solutions to each of these five issues as part of a concerted effort to develop a 1km (or better) resolution global flood hazard model. We describe the new numerical algorithms, computer architectures and computational resources used, and demonstrate solutions to the five previously intractable problems identified above. We conduct a validation study of the modelling against satellite imagery of major flooding on the Mississippi-Missouri confluence plain in the central USA before outlining a proof-of-concept regional study for SE Asia as a step towards a global scale model. For SE Asia we simulate flood hazard for ten different flood return periods over the entire Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia and Laos region at 1km resolution and show that the modelling produces coherent, consistent and sensible simulations of extent and water depth.

  2. Hubble Space Telescope View of Comet C/2013 A1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Kelley, Michael S.; Farnham, Tony L.; Bodewits, Dennis; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Lisse, Carey M.; Delamere, W. A.; Mutchler, Max J.

    2014-11-01

    Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is a dynamically new comet whose physical and chemical status should be the least evolved since the formation of cometesimals during the planetary system formation processes. Its close encounter with Mars on October 19, 2014 at a distance of 138,000 km allows for imaging its nucleus and inner coma by MRO/HiRISE at 140 m/pix resolution. Such an encounter offers us the opportunity to do cometary flyby science for a dynamically new comet for the first time ever. We observed C/Siding Spring using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) from October 2013 to March 2014 when the comet was at 4.58, 3.77, and 3.28 AU from the Sun, and will observe it again during its close encounter with Mars at 1.40 AU heliocentric distance. One of the objectives of these observations is to study the long-term evolution of the dust coma of C/Siding Spring, including its dust features and color, in order to provide context for better understanding the evolution of the activity of a dynamically new comet from the “flyby” observations during its Mars encounter. Our early observations show that C/Siding Spring’s coma contains two dust features, and the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the color of its coma are consistent with the existence of icy grains. New observations to be performed during the encounter will reveal the evolution of the dust features and color from previously observed, as well as any newly developed features. We will report our results from the HST observations, including the preliminary results from the encounter observations.

  3. A 1-D morphodynamic model of postglacial valley incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnicliffe, Jon F.; Church, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Chilliwack River is typical of many Cordilleran valley river systems that have undergone dramatic Holocene degradation of valley fills that built up over the course of Pleistocene glaciation. Downstream controls on base level, mainly blockage of valleys by glaciers, led to aggradation of significant glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine valley fills and fan deposits, subsequently incised by fluvial action. Models of such large-scale, long-term degradation present a number of important challenges since the evolution of model parameters, such as the rate of bedload transport and grain size characteristics, are governed by the nature of the deposit. Sediment sampling in the Chilliwack Valley reveals a complex sequence of very coarse to fine textural modes. We present a 1-D numerical morphodynamic model for the river-floodplain system tailored to conditions in the valley. The model is adapted to dynamically adjust channel width to optimize sediment transporting capacity and to integrate relict valley fill material as the channel incises through valley deposits. Sensitivity to model parameters is studied using four principal criteria: profile concavity, rate of downstream grain size fining, bed surface sand content, and the timescale to equilibrium. Model results indicate that rates of abrasion and coarsening of the grain size distributions exert the strongest controls on all of the interrelated model performance criteria. While there are a number of difficulties in satisfying all model criteria simultaneously, results indicate that 1-D models of valley bottom sedimentary systems can provide a suitable framework for integrating results from sediment budget studies and chronologies of sediment evacuation established from dating.

  4. Varicella paediatric hospitalisations in Belgium: a 1-year national survey

    PubMed Central

    Blumental, Sophie; Sabbe, Martine; Lepage, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Varicella universal vaccination (UV) has been implemented in many countries for several years. Nevertheless, varicella UV remains debated in Europe and few data are available on the real burden of infection. We assessed the burden of varicella in Belgium through analysis of hospitalised cases during a 1-year period. Methods Data on children admitted to hospital with varicella were collected through a national network from November 2011 to October 2012. Inclusion criteria were either acute varicella or related complications up to 3 weeks after the rash. Results Participation of 101 hospitals was obtained, covering 97.7% of the total paediatric beds in Belgium. 552 children were included with a median age of 2.1 years. Incidence of paediatric varicella hospitalisations reached 29.5/105 person-years, with the highest impact among those 0–4 years old (global incidence and odds of hospitalisation: 79/105 person-years and 1.6/100 varicella cases, respectively). Only 14% (79/552) of the cohort had an underlying chronic condition. 65% (357/552) of children had ≥1 complication justifying their admission, 49% were bacterial superinfections and 10% neurological disorders. Only a quarter of children (141/552) received acyclovir. Incidence of complicated hospitalised cases was 19/105 person-years. Paediatric intensive care unit admission and surgery were required in 4% and 3% of hospitalised cases, respectively. Mortality among Belgian paediatric population was 0.5/106 and fatality ratio 0.2% among our cohort. Conclusions Varicella demonstrated a substantial burden of disease in Belgian children, especially among the youngest. Our thorough nationwide study, run in a country without varicella UV, offers data to support varicella UV in Belgium. PMID:26130380

  5. Dynamical functions of a 1D correlated quantum liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Bozi, D.; Penc, K.

    2008-10-01

    The dynamical correlation functions in one-dimensional electronic systems show power-law behaviour at low energies and momenta close to integer multiples of the charge and spin Fermi momenta. These systems are usually referred to as Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids. However, near well defined lines of the (k,ω) plane the power-law behaviour extends beyond the low-energy cases mentioned above, and also appears at higher energies, leading to singular features in the photoemission spectra and other dynamical correlation functions. The general spectral-function expressions derived in this paper were used in recent theoretical studies of the finite-energy singular features in photoemission of the organic compound tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) metallic phase. They are based on a so-called pseudofermion dynamical theory (PDT), which allows us to systematically enumerate and describe the excitations in the Hubbard model starting from the Bethe ansatz, as well as to calculate the charge and spin object phase shifts appearing as exponents of the power laws. In particular, we concentrate on the spin-density m\\rightarrow 0 limit and on effects in the vicinity of the singular border lines, as well as close to half filling. Our studies take into account spectral contributions from types of microscopic processes that do not occur for finite values of the spin density. In addition, the specific processes involved in the spectral features of TTF-TCNQ are studied. Our results are useful for the further understanding of the unusual spectral properties observed in low-dimensional organic metals and also provide expressions for the one- and two-atom spectral functions of a correlated quantum system of ultracold fermionic atoms in a 1D optical lattice with on-site two-atom repulsion.

  6. TRAPPIST monitoring of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opitom, Cyrielle; Jehin, Emmanuël; Manfroid, Jean; Hutsemékers, Damien; Gillon, Michaël

    2014-11-01

    C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is a long period comet discovered by Robert H McNaught at Siding Spring Observatory in Australia on January 3, 2013 at 7.2 au from the Sun. This comet will make a close encounter with Mars on October 19, 2014. At this occasion the comet will be extensively observed both from Earth and from several orbiters around Mars.On September 20, 2013 when the comet was around 5 au from the Sun, we started a monitoring with the TRAPPIST robotic telescope installed at La Silla observatory [1]. A set of narrowband cometary filters designed by the NASA for the Hale-Bopp Observing Campaign [2] is permanently mounted on the telescope along with classic Johnson-Cousins B, V, Rc, and Ic filters.We observed the comet continuously at least once a week from September 20, 2013 to April 6, 2014 with broad band filters. We then recovered the comet on May 20. At this time we could detect the gas and started the observations with narrow band filters until early November, covering the close approach to Mars and the perihelion passage.We present here our first results about comet Siding Springs. From the images in the broad band filters and in the dust continuum filters we derived A(θ)fρ values [3] and studied the evolution of the comet activity with the heliocentric distance from September 20, 2013 to early November 2014. We could also detect gas since May 20, 2014. We thus derived gas production rates using a Haser model [4]. We present the evolution of gas production rates and gas production rates ratios with the heliocentric distance.Finally, we discuss the dust and gas coma morphology.

  7. The linker between the D3 and A1 domains of vWF suppresses A1-GPIbα catch bonds by site-specific binding to the A1 domain

    PubMed Central

    Tischer, Alexander; Cruz, Miguel A; Auton, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Platelet attachment to von Willebrand factor (vWF) requires the interaction between the platelet GP1bα and exposed vWF-A1 domains. Structural insights into the mechanism of the A1-GP1bα interaction have been limited to an N-terminally truncated A1 domain that lacks residues Q1238 − E1260 that make up the linker between the D3 and A1 domains of vWF. We have demonstrated that removal of these residues destabilizes quaternary interactions in the A1A2A3 tridomain and contributes to platelet activation under high shear (Auton et al., J Biol Chem 2012;287:14579–14585). In this study, we demonstrate that removal of these residues from the single A1 domain enhances platelet pause times on immobilized A1 under rheological shear. A rigorous comparison between the truncated A1-1261 and full length A1-1238 domains demonstrates a kinetic stabilization of the A1 domain induced by these N-terminal residues as evident in the enthalpy of the unfolding transition. This stabilization occurs through site and sequence-specific binding of the N-terminal peptide to A1. Binding of free N-terminal peptide to A1-1261 has an affinity and this binding although free to dissociate is sufficient to suppress the platelet pause times to levels comparable to A1-1238 under shear stress. Our results support a dual-structure/function role for this linker region involving a conformational equilibria that maintains quaternary A domain associations in the inactive state of vWF at low shear and an intra-A1-domain conformation that regulates the strength of platelet GP1bα-vWF A1 domain associations in the active state of vWF at high shear. PMID:23775931

  8. 17 CFR 270.3a-1 - Certain prima facie investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... companies. 270.3a-1 Section 270.3a-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.3a-1 Certain prima facie investment companies. Notwithstanding section 3(a)(1)(C) of the Act (15 U.S.C. 80a-3(a)(1)(c)), an issuer will...

  9. A1c Variability Can Predict Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes with Mean A1c Levels Greater than 7

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, You Jeong; Kim, Tae Nyun; Kim, Tae Ik; Lee, Won Kee; Park, Jeong Hyun; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggested that the association of acute glucose variability and diabetic complications was not consistent, and that A1c variability representing long term glucose fluctuation may be related to coronary atherosclerosis in patients with type 1 diabetes. In this study, we attempt to determine whether or not A1c variability can predict coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We reviewed data of patients with type 2 diabetes who had undergone coronary angiography (CAG) and had been followed up with for 5 years. The intrapersonal standard deviation (SD) of serially-measured A1c levels adjusted by the different number of assessments among patients (adj-A1c-SD) was considered to be a measure of the variability of A1c. Results Among the 269 patients, 121 of them had type 2 diabetes with CAD. In patients with A1c ≥7%, the mean A1c levels and A1c levels at the time of CAG among the three groups were significantly different. The ratio of patients with CAD was the highest in the high adj-A1c-SD group and the lowest in the low adj-A1c-SD group (P=0.017). In multiple regression analysis, adj-A1c-SD was an independent predictor for CAD in subjects with A1c ≥7% (odds ratio, 2.140; P=0.036). Conclusion Patients with higher A1c variability for several years showed higher mean A1c levels. A1c variability can be an independent predictor for CAD as seen in angiographs of patients with type 2 diabetes with mean A1c levels over 7%. PMID:24396666

  10. Cleavage of a Recombinant Human Immunoglobulin A2 (IgA2)-IgA1 Hybrid Antibody by Certain Bacterial IgA1 Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Bernard W.; Dunlop, James I.; Batten, Margaret R.; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M.

    2000-01-01

    To understand more about the factors influencing the cleavage of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) by microbial IgA1 proteases, a recombinant human IgA2/IgA1 hybrid molecule was generated. In the hybrid, termed IgA2/A1 half hinge, a seven-amino-acid sequence corresponding to one half of the duplicated sequence making up the IgA1 hinge was incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA2. Insertion of the IgA1 half hinge into IgA2 did not affect antigen binding capacity or the functional activity of the hybrid molecule, as judged by its ability to bind to IgA Fcα receptors and trigger respiratory bursts in neutrophils. Although the IgA2/A1 hybrid contained only half of the IgA1 hinge, it was found to be cleaved by a variety of different bacterial IgA1 proteases, including representatives of those that cleave IgA1 in the different duplicated halves of the hinge, namely, those of Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. sanguis, Neisseria meningitidis types 1 and 2, N. gonorrhoeae types 1 and 2, and Haemophilus influenzae type 2. Thus, for these enzymes the recognition site for IgA1 cleavage is contained within half of the IgA1 hinge region; additional distal elements, if required, are provided by either an IgA1 or an IgA2 framework. In contrast, the IgA2/A1 hybrid appeared to be resistant to cleavage with S. oralis and some H. influenzae type 1 IgA1 proteases, suggesting these enzymes require additional determinants for efficient substrate recognition. PMID:10639405

  11. Cleavage of a recombinant human immunoglobulin A2 (IgA2)-IgA1 hybrid antibody by certain bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Dunlop, J I; Batten, M R; Kilian, M; Woof, J M

    2000-02-01

    To understand more about the factors influencing the cleavage of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) by microbial IgA1 proteases, a recombinant human IgA2/IgA1 hybrid molecule was generated. In the hybrid, termed IgA2/A1 half hinge, a seven-amino-acid sequence corresponding to one half of the duplicated sequence making up the IgA1 hinge was incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA2. Insertion of the IgA1 half hinge into IgA2 did not affect antigen binding capacity or the functional activity of the hybrid molecule, as judged by its ability to bind to IgA Fcalpha receptors and trigger respiratory bursts in neutrophils. Although the IgA2/A1 hybrid contained only half of the IgA1 hinge, it was found to be cleaved by a variety of different bacterial IgA1 proteases, including representatives of those that cleave IgA1 in the different duplicated halves of the hinge, namely, those of Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. sanguis, Neisseria meningitidis types 1 and 2, N. gonorrhoeae types 1 and 2, and Haemophilus influenzae type 2. Thus, for these enzymes the recognition site for IgA1 cleavage is contained within half of the IgA1 hinge region; additional distal elements, if required, are provided by either an IgA1 or an IgA2 framework. In contrast, the IgA2/A1 hybrid appeared to be resistant to cleavage with S. oralis and some H. influenzae type 1 IgA1 proteases, suggesting these enzymes require additional determinants for efficient substrate recognition. PMID:10639405

  12. Sites in the CH3 domain of human IgA1 that influence sensitivity to bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2006-09-15

    The influence of regions, other than the hinge, on the susceptibility of human IgA1 to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases, was examined using IgA1 mutants bearing amino acid deletions, substitutions, and domain swaps. IgA1 lacking the tailpiece retained its susceptibility to cleavage by all of the IgA1 proteases. The domain swap molecule alpha1alpha2gamma3, in which the CH3 domain of IgA1 was exchanged for that of human IgG1, was resistant to cleavage with the type 1 and 2 serine IgA1 proteases of Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Haemophilus influenzae, but remained sensitive to cleavage with the metallo-IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis. Substitution of the IgA1 Calpha3 domain motif Pro440 -Phe443 into the corresponding position in the Cgamma3 domain of alpha1alpha2gamma3 resulted now in sensitivity to the type 2 IgA1 protease of N. meningitidis, indicating the possible requirement of these amino acids for sensitivity to this protease. For the H. influenzae type 2 protease, resistance of an IgA1 mutant in which the CH3 domain residues 399-409 were exchanged with those from IgG1, but sensitivity of mutant HuBovalpha3 in which the Calpha3 domain of bovine IgA replaces that of human IgA1, suggests that CH3 domain residues Glu403, Gln406, and Thr409 influence sensitivity to this enzyme. Hence, unlike the situation with the metallo-IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus spp., the sensitivity of human IgA1 to cleavage with the serine IgA1 proteases of Neisseria and Haemophilus involves their binding to different sites specifically in the CH3 domain. PMID:16951354

  13. 17 CFR 240.11a1-1(T) - Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... section 11(a)(1) of the Act or specified in 17 CFR 240.11a1-4(T) shall be deemed to be revenue derived..., parity, and precedence. 240.11a1-1(T) Section 240.11a1-1(T) Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... (rule 11a-1) § 240.11a1-1(T) Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence. (a) A...

  14. 17 CFR 240.11a1-1(T) - Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... section 11(a)(1) of the Act or specified in 17 CFR 240.11a1-4(T) shall be deemed to be revenue derived..., parity, and precedence. 240.11a1-1(T) Section 240.11a1-1(T) Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... (rule 11a-1) § 240.11a1-1(T) Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence. (a) A...

  15. 17 CFR 240.11a1-1(T) - Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... section 11(a)(1) of the Act or specified in 17 CFR 240.11a1-4(T) shall be deemed to be revenue derived..., parity, and precedence. 240.11a1-1(T) Section 240.11a1-1(T) Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... (rule 11a-1) § 240.11a1-1(T) Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence. (a) A...

  16. 17 CFR 240.11a1-1(T) - Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... section 11(a)(1) of the Act or specified in 17 CFR 240.11a1-4(T) shall be deemed to be revenue derived..., parity, and precedence. 240.11a1-1(T) Section 240.11a1-1(T) Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... (rule 11a-1) § 240.11a1-1(T) Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence. (a) A...

  17. 17 CFR 240.11a1-1(T) - Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section 11(a)(1) of the Act or specified in 17 CFR 240.11a1-4(T) shall be deemed to be revenue derived..., parity, and precedence. 240.11a1-1(T) Section 240.11a1-1(T) Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... (rule 11a-1) § 240.11a1-1(T) Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence. (a) A...

  18. The Impacts of SLC22A1 rs594709 and SLC47A1 rs2289669 Polymorphisms on Metformin Therapeutic Efficacy in Chinese Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Di; Guo, Yu; Li, Xi; Yin, Ji-Ye; Zheng, Wei; Qiu, Xin-Wen; Xiao, Ling; Liu, Rang-Ru; Wang, Sai-Ying; Gong, Wei-Jing; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background. We aimed to investigate the distributive characteristics of SLC22A1 rs594709 and SLC47A1 rs2289669 polymorphisms and their influence on metformin efficacy in Chinese T2DM patients. Methods. The distributions of SLC22A1 rs594709 and SLC47A1 rs2289669 polymorphisms were determined in 267 T2DM patients and 182 healthy subjects. Subsequently, 53 newly diagnosed patients who received metformin monotherapy were recruited to evaluate metformin efficacy. Results. No significant difference was found between T2DM patients and healthy subjects in SLC22A1 rs594709 and SLC47A1 rs2289669 allele frequencies and genotype frequencies. After metformin treatment, SLC22A1 rs594709 GG genotype patients showed a higher increase in FINS (p = 0.015) and decrease in HOMA-IS (p = 0.001) and QUICKI (p = 0.002) than A allele carriers. SLC47A1 rs2289669 GG genotype patients had a higher decrease in TChol (p = 0.030) and LDL-C (p = 0.049) than A allele carriers. Among SLC22A1 rs594709 AA genotype, patients with SLC47A1 rs2289669 AA genotype showed a higher decrease in FBG (p = 0.015), PINS (p = 0.041), and HOMA-IR (p = 0.014) than G allele carriers. However, among SLC22A1 rs594709 G allele carriers, SLC47A1 rs2289669 AA genotype patients showed a higher decrease in TChol (p = 0.013) than G allele carriers. Conclusion. Our data suggest that SLC22A1 rs594709 and SLC47A1 rs2289669 polymorphisms may influence metformin efficacy together in Chinese T2DM patients. PMID:26977146

  19. The A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 2 Has Higher Affinity for Ribosomes and Higher Catalytic Activity than the A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 1.

    PubMed

    Basu, Debaleena; Li, Xiao-Ping; Kahn, Jennifer N; May, Kerrie L; Kahn, Peter C; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections can lead to life-threatening complications, including hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children in the United States. Stx1 and Stx2 are AB5 toxins consisting of an enzymatically active A subunit associated with a pentamer of receptor binding B subunits. Epidemiological evidence suggests that Stx2-producing E. coli strains are more frequently associated with HUS than Stx1-producing strains. Several studies suggest that the B subunit plays a role in mediating toxicity. However, the role of the A subunits in the increased potency of Stx2 has not been fully investigated. Here, using purified A1 subunits, we show that Stx2A1 has a higher affinity for yeast and mammalian ribosomes than Stx1A1. Biacore analysis indicated that Stx2A1 has faster association and dissociation with ribosomes than Stx1A1. Analysis of ribosome depurination kinetics demonstrated that Stx2A1 depurinates yeast and mammalian ribosomes and an RNA stem-loop mimic of the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) at a higher catalytic rate and is a more efficient enzyme than Stx1A1. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes at a higher level in vivo and was more cytotoxic than Stx1A1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes and inhibited translation at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1 in human cells. These results provide the first direct evidence that the higher affinity for ribosomes in combination with higher catalytic activity toward the SRL allows Stx2A1 to depurinate ribosomes, inhibit translation, and exhibit cytotoxicity at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1. PMID:26483409

  20. Isolation and characterization of cyp19a1a and cyp19a1b promoters in the protogynous hermaphrodite orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weimin; Lu, Huijie; Jiang, Haiyan; Li, Mu; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Qiongyou; Zhang, Lihong

    2012-02-01

    Aromatase (CYP19A1) catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens. In teleosts, duplicated copies of cyp19a1 genes, namely cyp19a1a and cyp19a1b, were identified, however, the transcriptional regulation of these two genes remains poorly understood. In the present study, the 5'-flanking regions of the orange-spotted grouper cyp19a1a (gcyp19a1a) and cyp19a1b (gcyp19a1b) genes were isolated and characterized. The proximal promoter regions of both genes were relatively conserved when compared to those of the other teleosts. Notably, a conserved FOXO transcriptional factor binding site was firstly reported in the proximal promoter of gcyp19a1a, and deletion of the region (-112 to -60) containing this site significantly decreased the promoter activities. The deletion of the region (-246 to -112) containing the two conserved FTZ-F1 sites also dramatically decreased the transcriptional activities of gcyp19a1a promoter, and both two FTZ-F1 sites were shown to be stimulatory cis-acting elements. A FTZ-F1 homologue isolated from ricefield eel (eFTZ-F1) up-regulated gcyp19a1a promoter activities possibly via the FTZ-F1 sites, however, a previously identified orange-spotted grouper FTZ-F1 homologue (gFTZ-F1) did not activate the transcription of gcyp19a1a promoter unexpectedly. As to gcyp19a1b promoter, all the deletion constructs did not show good promoter activities in either TM4 or U251-MG cells. Estradiol (100nM) up-regulated gcyp19a1b promoter activities by about 13- and 36-fold in TM4 and U251-MG cells, respectively, via the conserved ERE motif, but did not stimulate gcyp19a1a promoter activities. These results are helpful to further elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of cyp19a1a and cyp19a1b expression in the orange-spotted grouper as well as other teleosts. PMID:22197207

  1. 40 CFR Appendix A1 to Subpart F of... - Generic Maximum Contaminant Levels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Generic Maximum Contaminant Levels A1 Appendix A1 to Subpart F of Part 82 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Recycling and Emissions Reduction Pt. 82, Subpt. F, App. A1 Appendix A1 to Subpart...

  2. The PRY/SPRY/B30.2 Domain of Butyrophilin 1A1 (BTN1A1) Binds to Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jaekwang; Rao, Anita U.; Xu, Jinling; Ogg, Sherry L.; Hathout, Yetrib; Fenselau, Catherine; Mather, Ian H.

    2009-01-01

    Butyrophilin 1A1 (BTN1A1) and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) are highly expressed in the lactating mammary gland and are secreted into milk associated with the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). Ablation of the genes encoding either protein causes severe defects in the secretion of milk lipid droplets, suggesting that the two proteins may function in the same pathway. Therefore, we determined whether BTN1A1 and XOR directly interact using protein binding assays, surface plasmon resonance analysis, and gel filtration. Bovine XOR bound with high affinity in a pH- and salt-sensitive manner (KD = 101 ± 31 nm in 10 mm HEPES, 150 mm NaCl, pH 7.4) to the PRY/SPRY/B30.2 domain in the cytoplasmic region of bovine BTN1A1. Binding was stoichiometric, with one XOR dimer binding to either two BTN1A1 monomers or one dimer. XOR bound to BTN1A1 orthologs from mice, humans, or cows but not to the cytoplasmic domains of the closely related human paralogs, BTN2A1 or BTN3A1, or to the B30.2 domain of human RoRet (TRIM 38), a protein in the TRIM family. Analysis of the protein composition of the MFGM of wild type and BTN1A1 null mice showed that most of the XOR in mice lacking BTN1A1 was released from the MFGM in a soluble form when the milk lipid droplets were disrupted to prepare membrane, compared with wild-type mice, in which most of the XOR remained membrane-bound. Thus BTN1A1 functions in vivo to stabilize the association of XOR with the MFGM by direct interactions through the PRY/SPRY/B30.2 domain. The potential significance of BTN1A1/XOR interactions in the mammary gland and other tissues is discussed. PMID:19531472

  3. Secretoglobin 1A1 and 1A1A Differentially Regulate Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species Production, Phagocytosis and Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Olivier; Clark, Mary Ellen; Viel, Laurent; Labbé, Geneviève; Seah, Stephen Y. K.; Khan, Meraj A.; Douda, David N.; Palaniyar, Nades; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2014-01-01

    Secretoglobin family 1A member 1 (SCGB 1A1) is a small protein mainly secreted by mucosal epithelial cells of the lungs and uterus. SCGB 1A1, also known as club (Clara) cell secretory protein, represents a major constituent of airway surface fluid. The protein has anti-inflammatory properties, and its concentration is reduced in equine recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) and human asthma. RAO is characterized by reversible airway obstruction, bronchoconstriction and neutrophilic inflammation. Direct effects of SCGB 1A1 on neutrophil functions are unknown. We have recently identified that the SCGB1A1 gene is triplicated in equids and gives rise to two distinct proteins. In this study we produced the endogenously expressed forms of SCGBs (SCGB 1A1 and 1A1A) as recombinant proteins, and analyzed their effects on reactive oxygen species production, phagocytosis, chemotaxis and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation ex vivo. We further evaluated whether NETs are present in vivo in control and inflamed lungs. Our data show that SCGB 1A1A but not SCGB 1A1 increase neutrophil oxidative burst and phagocytosis; and that both proteins markedly reduce neutrophil chemotaxis. SCGB 1A1A reduced chemotaxis significantly more than SCGB 1A1. NET formation was significantly reduced in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by SCGB 1A1 and 1A1A. SCGB mRNA in bronchial biopsies, and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, was lower in horses with RAO. NETs were present in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from horses with exacerbated RAO, but not in fluid from horses with RAO in remission or in challenged healthy horses. These findings indicate that SCGB 1A1 and 1A1A have overlapping and diverging functions. Considering disparities in the relative abundance of SCGB 1A1 and 1A1A in airway secretions of animals with RAO suggests that these functional differences may contribute to the pathogenesis of RAO and other neutrophilic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:24777050

  4. Amino acid sequence requirements in the human IgA1 hinge for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Batten, M R; Kilian, M; Woof, J M

    2002-08-01

    All the IgA1 proteases of the different pathogenic species of Streptococcus cleave the hinge of the alpha chain of human IgA1 only at one proline-threonine peptide bond. In order to study the importance of these amino acids for cleavage, several hinge mutant recombinant IgA1 antibodies were constructed. The mutations were found to be without major effect upon the structure or functional abilities of the antibodies. However, they had a major effect upon their sensitivity to cleavage by some of the IgA1 proteases. PMID:12196126

  5. Binding capacity of in vitro deglycosylated IgA1 to human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-jun; Xu, Li-xia; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2006-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common glomerular disease and it is characterized by deposition of IgA1 molecules in mesangium. Recent studies had demonstrated that serum and mesangial IgA1 in IgAN were deglycosylated and IgA1 could bind to human mesangial cells (HMC) through a novel receptor. The aim of the current study is to investigate and compare the binding capacities of different in vitro deglycosylated IgA1 on human mesangial cells. Serum IgA1 was purified by jacalin affinity chromatography and then was desialylated (DesIgA1) and/or degalactosylated (Des/DeGalIgA1) with neuraminidase and/or beta-galactosidase. The efficacy of deglycosylations was assessed by Peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Vicia villosa (VV) lectin. The sizes of normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1 were determined by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography and binding capacities to primary HMC were evaluated by radioligand binding assays. Normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1 could bind to HMC in a dose-dependent, saturable manner. The maximal binding capacities and binding sites/cell of DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA were significantly higher than that of normal IgA1. However, more aggregated IgA1 was found in DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1. Scatchard analysis revealed a similar Kd of normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1. The current study suggested that the binding capacities of DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1 to HMC were significantly higher than that of normal IgA1, which at least in part was due to more macromolecular IgA1 in deglycoslated IgA1. However, there were no significant differences in the affinities of normal IgA1, DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1 with HMC. Deglycosylated IgA1 might play an important role in pathogenesis of IgAN. PMID:16442846

  6. Marked variability in hepatic expression of cytochromes CYP7A1 and CYP27A1 as compared to cerebral CYP46A1. Lessons from a dietary study with omega 3 fatty acids in hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Natalia; Shafaati, Marjan; Zaman, Wahiduz; Zheng, Wenchao; Prusak, Deborah; Wood, Thomas; Ansari, G. A. S.; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Olin, Maria; Bjorkhem, Ingemar; Pikuleva, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Two diets simulating the recommendations of the American Heart Association to increase the intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) were tested on Golden Syrian hamsters and compared to the diet simulating the current estimated consumption of fat in the United States. N-3 PUFAs were evaluated for their effects on serum and brain lipids and on the three cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs 7A1, 27A1, and 46A1) that play key roles in cholesterol elimination from different organs. Hamsters on the highest concentration of n-3 PUFAs had a statistically significant decrease in LDL and HDL cholesterol and no change in serum total cholesterol and triglycerides levels. CYP27A1 and CYP46A1 mRNA levels were increased in the liver and brain, respectively, whereas possible effects on CYP7A1 were obscured by a marked intergroup variability at mRNA, protein and sterol product levels. Increased levels of CYP46A1 mRNA in the brain did not lead to significant changes in the levels of lathosterol, 24S-hydroxycholesterol or cholesterol in this organ. The data obtained are discussed in relation to inconsistent effects of n-3 PUFAs on serum lipids in human trials and reported positive effects of fish oil on cognitive function. PMID:20298807

  7. Characterization of a human surfactant protein A1 (SP-A1) gene-specific antibody; SP-A1 content variation among individuals of varying age and pulmonary health.

    PubMed

    Tagaram, Hephzibah Rani S; Wang, Guirong; Umstead, Todd M; Mikerov, Anatoly N; Thomas, Neal J; Graff, Gavin R; Hess, Joseph C; Thomassen, Mary Jane; Kavuru, Mani S; Phelps, David S; Floros, Joanna

    2007-05-01

    The human surfactant protein A (SP-A) locus consists of two functional genes (SP-A1, SP-A2) with gene-specific products exhibiting qualitative and quantitative differences. The aim here was twofold: 1) generate SP-A1 gene-specific antibody, and 2) use this to assess gene-specific SP-A content in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). An SP-A1-specific polyclonal antibody (hSP-A1_Ab(68-88)_Col) was raised in chicken, and its specificity was determined by immunoblot and ELISA using mammalian Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell-expressed SP-A1 and SP-A2 variants and by immunofluorescence with stably transfected CHO cell lines expressing SP-A1 or SP-A2 variants. SP-A1 content was evaluated according to age and lung status. A gradual decrease (P < 0.05) in SP-A1/SP-A ratio was observed in healthy subjects (HS) with increased age, although no significant change was observed in total SP-A content among age groups. Total SP-A and SP-A1 content differed significantly between alveolar proteinosis (AP) patients and HS, with no significant difference observed in SP-A1/SP-A ratio between AP and HS. The cystic fibrosis (CF) ratio was significantly higher compared with AP, HS, and noncystic fibrosis (NCF), even though SP-A1 and total SP-A were decreased in CF compared with most of the other groups. The ratio was higher in culture-positive vs. culture-negative samples from CF and NCF (P = 0.031). A trend of an increased ratio was observed in culture-positive CF (0.590 +/- 0.10) compared with culture-positive NCF (0.368 +/- 0.085). In summary, we developed and characterized an SP-A1 gene-specific antibody and used it to identify gene-specific SP-A content in BALFs as a function of age and lung health. PMID:17189324

  8. Development of Selective Inhibitors for Human Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) for the Enhancement of Cyclophosphamide Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Bibek; Georgiadis, Taxiarchis M.; Fishel, Melissa L.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) plays an important role in many cellular oxidative processes, including cancer chemo-resistance by metabolizing activated forms of oxazaphosphorine drugs such as cyclophosphamide (CP) and its analogues such as mafosfamide (MF), ifosfamide (IFM), 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HPCP). Compounds that can selectively target ALDH3A1 may permit delineation of its roles in these processes and could restore chemosensitivity in cancer cells that express this isoenzyme. Here we report the detailed kinetic and structural characterization of an ALDH3A1 selective inhibitor, CB29, previously identified in a high throughput screen. Kinetic and crystallographic studies demonstrate that CB29 binds within the aldehyde substrate-binding site of ALDH3A1. Cellular proliferation of ALDH3A1-expressing lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and glioblastoma (SF767) cell lines, as well as the ALDH3A1 non-expressing lung fibroblast cells, CCD-13Lu, is unaffected by treatment with CB29 and its analogues alone. However, the sensitivity toward the anti-proliferative effects of mafosfamide is enhanced by treatment with CB29 and its analogue in the tumour cells. In contrast, the sensitivity of CCD-13Lu cells toward mafosfamide was unaffected by the addition of these same compounds. CB29 is chemically distinct from the previously reported small molecule inhibitors of ALDH isoenzymes and does not inhibit ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, ALDH1A3, ALDH1B1 or ALDH2 isoenzymes at concentrations up to 250 μM. Thus, CB29 is a novel small molecule inhibitor of ALDH3A1, which may be useful as a chemical tool to delineate the role of ALDH3A1 in numerous metabolic pathways, including sensitizing ALDH3A1-positive cancer cells to oxazaphosphorines. PMID:24677340

  9. Kidney-specific reconstitution of the A1 adenosine receptor in A1 adenosine receptor knockout mice reduces renal ischemia–reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minjae; Chen, Sean W.C.; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Yang, Jay; Lee, H. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Genetic deletion of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) increased renal injury following ischemia-reperfusion injury suggesting that receptor activation is protective in vivo. Here we tested this hypothesis by expressing the human-A1AR in A1AR knockout mice. Renal ischemia-reperfusion was induced in knockout mice 2 days after intrarenal injection of saline or a lentivirus encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or EGFP-human-A1AR. We found that the latter procedure induced a robust expression of the reporter protein in the kidneys of knockout mice. Mice with kidney-specific human-A1AR reconstitution had significantly lower plasma creatinine, tubular necrosis, apoptosis, and tubular inflammation as evidenced by decreased leukocyte infiltration, pro-inflammatory cytokine, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in the kidney following injury compared to mice injected with saline or the control lentivirus. Additionally, there were marked disruptions of the proximal tubule epithelial filamentous (F)-actin cytoskeleton in both sets of control mice upon renal injury, whereas the reconstituted mice had better preservation of the renal tubule actin cytoskeleton, which co-localized with the human-A1ARs. Consistent with reduced renal injury, there was a significant increase in heat shock protein-27 expression, also co-localizing with the preserved F-actin cytoskeleton. Our findings suggest that selective expression of cytoprotective A1ARs in the kidney can attenuate renal injury. PMID:19190680

  10. Mutation survey and genotype-phenotype analysis of COL2A1 and COL11A1 genes in 16 Chinese patients with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xun; Jia, Xiaoyun; Xiao, Xueshan; Li, Shiqiang; Li, Jie; Li, Yadi; Wei, Yantao; Liang, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify mutations in COL2A1 and COL11A1 genes and to examine the genotype-phenotype correlation in a cohort of Chinese patients with Stickler syndrome. Methods A total of 16 Chinese probands with Stickler syndrome were recruited, including nine with a family history of an autosomal dominant pattern and seven sporadic cases. All patients underwent full ocular and systemic examinations. Sanger sequencing was used to analyze all coding and adjacent regions of the COL2A1 and COL11A1 genes. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect the gross indels of COL2A1 and COL11A1. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to evaluate the pathogenicity of the variants. Results Five mutations in COL2A1 were identified in six of 16 probands, including three novel (c.85C>T, c.3356delG, c.3401delG) mutations and two known mutations (c.1693C>T, c.2710C>T). Of the five mutations, three were truncated mutations, and the other two were missense mutations. Putative pathogenic mutations of the COL11A1 gene were absent in this cohort of patients. Gross indels were not found in COL2A1 or COL11A1 in any of the probands. High myopia was the most frequent initial ocular phenotype of Stickler syndrome. In this study, 12 Chinese probands lacked obvious systemic phenotypes. Conclusions In this study, three novel and two known mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified in six of 16 Chinese patients with Stickler syndrome. This is the first study in a cohort of Chinese patients with Stickler syndrome, and the results expand the mutation spectrum of the COL2A1 gene. Analysis of the genotype-phenotype correlation showed that the early onset of high myopia with vitreous abnormalities may serve as a key indicator of Stickler syndrome, while the existence of mandibular protrusion in pediatric patients may be an efficient indicator for the absence of mutations in COL2A1 and COL11A1. PMID:27390512

  11. Knowledge of A1c Predicts Diabetes Self-Management and A1c Level among Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengnan; Kong, Weimin; Hsue, Cunyi; Fish, Anne F; Chen, Yufeng; Guo, Xiaohui; Lou, Qingqing; Anderson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This study was to identify current A1c understanding status among Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes, assess if knowledge of A1c affects their diabetes self-management and their glycemic control and recognize the factors influencing knowledge of A1c among patients with type 2 diabetes. A multi-center, cross-sectional survey was conducted between April and July 2010 in 50 medical centers in the Mainland China. Participants were recruited from inpatients and outpatients who were admitted to or visited those medical centers. The survey included core questions about their demographic characteristics, diabetes self-management behavior, and A1c knowledge. Overall, of 5957 patients, the percentage of patients with good understanding was 25.3%. In the multivariable logistic regression model, the variables related to the knowledge of A1c status are presented. We discovered that patients with longer diabetes duration (OR = 1.05; 95%CI = 1.04-1.06) and having received diabetes education (OR = 1.80; 95%CI = 1.49-2.17) were overrepresented in the good understanding of A1c group. In addition, compared to no education level, higher education level was statistically associated with good understanding of A1c (P<0.001). The percentage of patients with good understanding varied from region to region (P<0.001), with Eastern being highest (OR = 1.54; 95%CI = 1.32-1.80), followed by Central (OR = 1.25; 95%CI = 1.02-1.53), when referring to Western. Only a minority of patients with type 2 diabetes in China understood their A1c value. The patients who had a good understanding of their A1c demonstrated significantly better diabetes self-management behavior and had lower A1c levels than those who did not. PMID:26959422

  12. Haemoglobin J-Baltimore can be detected by HbA1c electropherogram but with underestimated HbA1c value

    PubMed Central

    Brunel, Valéry; Lahary, Agnčs; Chagraoui, Abdeslam; Thuillez, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is considered the gold standard for assessing diabetes compensation and treatment. In addition, fortuitous detection of haemoglobin variants during HbA1c measurement is not rare. Recently, two publications reported different conclusions on accuracy of HbA1c value using capillary electrophoresis method in presence of haemoglobin J-Baltimore (HbJ).
Here we describe the fortuitous detection of unknown HbJ using capillary electrophoresis for measurement of HbA1c. A patient followed for gestational diabetes in our laboratory presented unknown haemoglobin on Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing analyser which was identified as HbJ. HbJ is not associated with haematological abnormalities. High Performance Liquid Chromatography methods are known to possibly underestimate HbA1c value in the presence of this variant. This variant and its glycated form are clearly distinguished on electropherogram but HbJ was responsible for underestimating the true area of HbA1c.
Capillary electrophoresis is a good method for detecting HbJ but does not seem suitable for evaluation of HbA1C value in patients in presence of HbJ variant. PMID:27346969

  13. Development of a High-Throughput Screen and Its Use In the Discovery of Streptococcus pneumoniae Immunoglobulin A1 Protease (IgA1P) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Amanda L.; Fullagar, Jessica L.; Day, Joshua A.; Cohen, Seth M.; Janda, Kim D.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae relies on a number of virulence factors, including immunoglobulin A1 protease (IgA1P), a Zn2+ metalloprotease produced on the extracellular surface of the bacteria, to promote pathogenic colonization. IgA1P exhibits a unique function, in that it catalyzes the proteolysis of human IgA1 at its hinge region to leave the bacterial cell surface masked by IgA1 Fab, enabling the bacteria to evade the host's immune system and adhere to host epithelial cells to promote colonization. Thus, S. pneumoniae IgA1P has emerged as a promising antibacterial target; however, the lack of an appropriate screening assay has limited the investigation of this metalloprotease virulence factor. Relying on electrostatics-mediated AuNP aggregation, we have designed a promising high-throughput colorimetric assay for IgA1P. By using this assay, we have uncovered inhibitors of the enzyme that should be useful in deciphering its role in pneumococcal colonization and virulence. PMID:23808771

  14. 17 CFR 240.11a-1 - Regulation of floor trading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., particularly sections 11(a) and 23(a) thereof, and Rule 11a-1 (17 CFR 240.11a-1) under the Act, deeming it... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Regulation of floor trading... Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Adoption of Floor Trading Regulation (rule 11a-1) § 240.11a-1 Regulation...

  15. 26 CFR 1.652(a)-1 - Simple trusts; inclusion of amounts in income of beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Simple trusts; inclusion of amounts in income of beneficiaries. 1.652(a)-1 Section 1.652(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Only § 1.652(a)-1 Simple trusts; inclusion of amounts in income of beneficiaries. Subject to the...

  16. 26 CFR 1.1314(a)-1 - Ascertainment of amount of adjustment in year of error.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of error. 1.1314(a)-1 Section 1.1314(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Years and Special Limitations § 1.1314(a)-1 Ascertainment of amount of adjustment in year of error. (a... ascertained the amount of the tax previously determined for the taxpayer as to whom the error was made for...

  17. 26 CFR 1.1314(a)-1 - Ascertainment of amount of adjustment in year of error.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... error. 1.1314(a)-1 Section 1.1314(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Limitations § 1.1314(a)-1 Ascertainment of amount of adjustment in year of error. (a) In computing the amount... of the tax previously determined for the taxpayer as to whom the error was made for the taxable...

  18. 42 CFR 63a.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 63a.1 Section 63a.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH TRAINING GRANTS § 63a.1 To what programs do...

  19. 42 CFR 63a.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 63a.1 Section 63a.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH TRAINING GRANTS § 63a.1 To what programs do...

  20. 42 CFR 63a.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 63a.1 Section 63a.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH TRAINING GRANTS § 63a.1 To what programs do...

  1. 26 CFR 1.409A-1 - Definitions and covered plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definitions and covered plans. 1.409A-1 Section 1.409A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.409A-1 Definitions and covered plans. (a)...

  2. 26 CFR 1.409A-1 - Definitions and covered plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definitions and covered plans. 1.409A-1 Section 1.409A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.409A-1 Definitions and covered plans. (a)...

  3. 26 CFR 1.409A-1 - Definitions and covered plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definitions and covered plans. 1.409A-1 Section 1.409A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.409A-1 Definitions and covered plans. (a)...

  4. 26 CFR 1.409A-1 - Definitions and covered plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Definitions and covered plans. 1.409A-1 Section 1.409A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.409A-1 Definitions and covered plans. (a)...

  5. 17 CFR 270.38a-1 - Compliance procedures and practices of certain investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance procedures and practices of certain investment companies. 270.38a-1 Section 270.38a-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.38a-1 Compliance procedures and...

  6. 17 CFR 270.20a-1 - Solicitation of proxies, consents and authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Solicitation of proxies, consents and authorizations. 270.20a-1 Section 270.20a-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.20a-1 Solicitation of proxies, consents...

  7. 26 CFR 53.4941(a)-1 - Imposition of initial taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imposition of initial taxes. 53.4941(a)-1...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Self-Dealing § 53.4941(a)-1 Imposition of initial taxes. (a) Tax on self-dealer—(1) In general. Section 4941(a)(1) of the code imposes...

  8. 76 FR 61762 - Rule 19a-1 Extension; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... COMMISSION Rule 19a-1 Extension; Proposed Collection; Comment Request Upon Written Request, Copies Available...(a)) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the ``Act'') \\1\\ makes it unlawful for any registered... form of such statement by rule. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 80a. Rule 19a-1 (17 CFR 270.19a-1) under the...

  9. 26 CFR 40.6071(a)-1 - Time for filing returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Time for filing returns. 40.6071(a)-1 Section 40.6071(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.6071(a)-1 Time for filing returns....

  10. 26 CFR 40.6071(a)-1 - Time for filing returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Time for filing returns. 40.6071(a)-1 Section 40.6071(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.6071(a)-1 Time for filing returns....

  11. 26 CFR 1.381(a)-1 - General rule relating to carryovers in certain corporate acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corporate acquisitions. 1.381(a)-1 Section 1.381(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Insolvency Reorganizations § 1.381(a)-1 General rule relating to carryovers in certain corporate acquisitions. (a) Allowance of...

  12. 26 CFR 1.381(a)-1 - General rule relating to carryovers in certain corporate acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... corporate acquisitions. 1.381(a)-1 Section 1.381(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Insolvency Reorganizations § 1.381(a)-1 General rule relating to carryovers in certain corporate acquisitions. (a) Allowance of...

  13. BLOCKAGE OF A-1 ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR INHIBOTS HEPATIC DNA SYNTHESIS STIMULATED BY TUMOR PROMOTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies with regenerating liver and hepatocyte cultures have shown that the a-1 adrenergic receptor (A1AR) is involved in the early events which transmit a mitogenic signal to hepatocytes after 2/3 partial hepatectomy. n this study, we investigated the role of A1AR in DNA synthes...

  14. 26 CFR 1.6031(a)-1 - Return of partnership income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Return of partnership income. 1.6031(a)-1 Section 1.6031(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6031(a)-1 Return of partnership income. (a) Domestic partnerships—(1)...

  15. 26 CFR 1.6031(a)-1 - Return of partnership income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Return of partnership income. 1.6031(a)-1 Section 1.6031(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6031(a)-1 Return of partnership income. (a) Domestic partnerships—(1)...

  16. 42 CFR 63a.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 63a.1 Section 63a.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH TRAINING GRANTS § 63a.1 To what programs do...

  17. 42 CFR 63a.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 63a.1 Section 63a.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH TRAINING GRANTS § 63a.1 To what programs do...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: COL4A1-related brain small-vessel disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... COL4A1-related brain small-vessel disease COL4A1-related brain small-vessel disease Enable Javascript to view the ... PDF Open All Close All Description COL4A1 -related brain small-vessel disease is part of a group ...

  19. 17 CFR 270.19a-1 - Written statement to accompany dividend payments by management companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dividend payments by management companies. 270.19a-1 Section 270.19a-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....19a-1 Written statement to accompany dividend payments by management companies. (a) Every written statement made pursuant to section 19 by or on behalf of a management company shall be made on a...

  20. 26 CFR 1.989(a)-1 - Definition of a qualified business unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of a qualified business unit. 1.989(a)-1 Section 1.989(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Export Trade Corporations § 1.989(a)-1 Definition of a qualified business unit. (a) Applicability—(1)...

  1. 26 CFR 301.6224(a)-1 - Participation in administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Participation in administrative proceedings. 301.6224(a)-1 Section 301.6224(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6224(a)-1 Participation in...

  2. 26 CFR 301.6031(a)-1 - Return of partnership income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Return of partnership income. 301.6031(a)-1....6031(a)-1 Return of partnership income. For provisions relating to the requirement of returns of partnership income, see § 1.6031(a)-1 of this chapter....

  3. 26 CFR 301.6031(a)-1 - Return of partnership income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Return of partnership income. 301.6031(a)-1....6031(a)-1 Return of partnership income. For provisions relating to the requirement of returns of partnership income, see § 1.6031(a)-1 of this chapter....

  4. Hyperalgesia, anxiety, and decreased hypoxic neuroprotection in mice lacking the adenosine A1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B; Halldner, L; Dunwiddie, T V; Masino, S A; Poelchen, W; Giménez-Llort, L; Escorihuela, R M; Fernández-Teruel, A; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z; Xu, X J; Hårdemark, A; Betsholtz, C; Herlenius, E; Fredholm, B B

    2001-07-31

    Caffeine is believed to act by blocking adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors (A(1)R, A(2A)R), indicating that some A(1) receptors are tonically activated. We generated mice with a targeted disruption of the second coding exon of the A(1)R (A(1)R(-/-)). These animals bred and gained weight normally and had a normal heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature. In most behavioral tests they were similar to A(1)R(+/+) mice, but A(1)R(-/-) mice showed signs of increased anxiety. Electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices revealed that both adenosine-mediated inhibition and theophylline-mediated augmentation of excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission were abolished in A(1)R(-/-) mice. In A(1)R(+/-) mice the potency of adenosine was halved, as was the number of A(1)R. In A(1)R(-/-) mice, the analgesic effect of intrathecal adenosine was lost, and thermal hyperalgesia was observed, but the analgesic effect of morphine was intact. The decrease in neuronal activity upon hypoxia was reduced both in hippocampal slices and in brainstem, and functional recovery after hypoxia was attenuated. Thus A(1)Rs do not play an essential role during development, and although they significantly influence synaptic activity, they play a nonessential role in normal physiology. However, under pathophysiological conditions, including noxious stimulation and oxygen deficiency, they are important. PMID:11470917

  5. 26 CFR 1.642(a)(1)-1 - Partially tax-exempt interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partially tax-exempt interest. 1.642(a)(1)-1 Section 1.642(a)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(a)(1)-1 Partially...

  6. 26 CFR 301.6231(a)(1)-1 - Exception for small partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....6231(a)(1)-1T contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exception for small partnerships. 301.6231(a)(1)-1 Section 301.6231(a)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  7. 26 CFR 301.6231(a)(1)-1 - Exception for small partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....6231(a)(1)-1T contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exception for small partnerships. 301.6231(a)(1)-1 Section 301.6231(a)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  8. 26 CFR 31.3121(a)(1)-1 - Annual wage limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annual wage limitation. 31.3121(a)(1)-1 Section 31.3121(a)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... § 31.3121(a)(1)-1 Annual wage limitation. (a) In general. (1) The term “wages” does not include...

  9. 17 CFR 275.202(a)(1)-1 - Certain transactions not deemed assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain transactions not deemed assignments. 275.202(a)(1)-1 Section 275.202(a)(1)-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 § 275.202(a)(1)-1 Certain transactions not...

  10. 26 CFR 1.263A-1 - Uniform capitalization of costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Uniform capitalization of costs. 1.263A-1 Section 1.263A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.263A-1 Uniform capitalization of costs. (a) Introduction—(1) In general....

  11. 26 CFR 1.652(a)-1 - Simple trusts; inclusion of amounts in income of beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Simple trusts; inclusion of amounts in income of beneficiaries. 1.652(a)-1 Section 1.652(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE....652(a)-1 Simple trusts; inclusion of amounts in income of beneficiaries. Subject to the rules in §§...

  12. 26 CFR 1.927(a)-1T - Temporary regulations; definition of export property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Temporary regulations; definition of export property. 1.927(a)-1T Section 1.927(a)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Earned Income of Citizens of United States § 1.927(a)-1T Temporary...

  13. 26 CFR 1.927(a)-1T - Temporary regulations; definition of export property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Temporary regulations; definition of export property. 1.927(a)-1T Section 1.927(a)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Earned Income of Citizens of United States § 1.927(a)-1T Temporary...

  14. Risk factors and impacts of clinical and subclinical mastitis in commercial meat-producing sheep flocks in Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Julie; Dubreuil, Pascal; Higgins, Robert; Bélanger, Denise

    2008-11-17

    We conducted a prospective observational study on clinical and subclinical mastitis in 30 commercial meat-producing sheep flocks from 2 regions of the province of Quebec, Canada. A total of 2,792 ewes selected in late gestation were followed from lambing to weaning of lambs. The incidence of clinical mastitis for the total lactation period (average of 58 days) ranged among flocks from 0 to 6.6%, with a median of 1.2%. The most frequently isolated bacteria from the cases of clinical mastitis, in pure or mixed culture, were Mannheimia haemolytica (26%), Staphylococcus aureus (23%), and coagulase-negative staphylococci (17%). Incidence of clinical mastitis was higher in ewes that gave birth to 3 or more lambs and from the Estrie region, and was associated with an increase in ewe mortality, an increase in lamb mortality at the litter level, and a decrease in lamb's weaning weight for lambs born in multiple litter size or from ewes >or=4 years old. Among 354 selected ewes with clinically normal udder at the end of lactation, 28.8% had potentially pathogenic bacteria isolated from milk. The most prevalent bacteria were S. aureus (9.3%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (9.3%). The risk of having a positive culture in at least one half was different between the two regions. Prevalence of ewes (n=261) with California Mastitis Test (CMT) positive result in at least one half was 24.1 and 14.9% using a cut-off of >or=1+ and >or=2+, respectively. Prevalence of culture-positive udder halves was 11.7% for CMT-negative compared with 53.6% for CMT 3+ halves. CMT status was positively associated with the isolation of coagulase-negative staphylococci, M. haemolytica, S. aureus, and various Streptococcus species, but not with other isolated bacteria. Additionally, prevalence of CMT-positive halves was higher in ewes from the Estrie region, aged of >or=4 years versus 1 year, having clinical mastitis previously detected in the lactation and/or with low body condition score. Lamb

  15. Discovery of NCT-501, a Potent and Selective Theophylline-Based Inhibitor of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1).

    PubMed

    Yang, Shyh-Ming; Yasgar, Adam; Miller, Bettina; Lal-Nag, Madhu; Brimacombe, Kyle; Hu, Xin; Sun, Hongmao; Wang, Amy; Xu, Xin; Nguyen, Kimloan; Oppermann, Udo; Ferrer, Marc; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Maloney, David J

    2015-08-13

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize reactive aldehydes and possess important physiological and toxicological functions in areas such as CNS, metabolic disorders, and cancers. Increased ALDH (e.g., ALDH1A1) gene expression and catalytic activity are vital biomarkers in a number of malignancies and cancer stem cells, highlighting the need for the identification and development of small molecule ALDH inhibitors. A new series of theophylline-based analogs as potent ALDH1A1 inhibitors is described. The optimization of hits identified from a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) campaign led to analogs with improved potency and early ADME properties. This chemotype exhibits highly selective inhibition against ALDH1A1 over ALDH3A1, ALDH1B1, and ALDH2 isozymes as well as other dehydrogenases such as HPGD and HSD17β4. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic evaluation of selected analog 64 (NCT-501) is also highlighted. PMID:26207746

  16. Physicochemical properties of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls aid in predicting their interactions with rat sulfotransferase 1A1 (rSULT1A1)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yungang; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Duffel, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Hydroxylated metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyls (OHPCBs) interact with rat sulfotransferase 1A1 (rSULT1A1) as substrates and inhibitors. Previous studies have shown that there are complex and incompletely understood structure-activity relationships governing the interaction of rSULT1A1 with these molecules. Furthermore, modification of the enzyme with glutathione disulfide (GSSG) results in the conversion of some OHPCBs from inhibitors to substrates. We have now examined estimated values for the acid-dissociation constant (Ka) and the octanol-water distribution coefficient (D), as well as experimentally determined dissociation constants for enzyme complexes, to assist in the prediction of interactions of OHPCBs with rSULT1A1. Under reducing conditions, initial velocities for rSULT1A1-catalyzed sulfation exhibited a positive correlation with pKa and a negative correlation with log D of the OHPCBs. IC50 values of inhibitory OHPCBs decreased with decreasing pKa values for both the glutathione (GSH)-pretreated and GSSG-pretreated forms of rSULT1A1. Comparison of GSH- and GSSG-pretreated forms of rSULT1A1 with respect to binding of OHPCB in the presence and absence of adenosine 3’,5’-diphosphate (PAP) revealed that the dissociation constants with the two redox states of the enzyme were similar for each OHPCB. Thus, pKa and log D values are useful in predicting the binding of OHPCBs to the two redox forms of rSULT1A1 as well as the rates of sulfation of those OHPCBs that are substrates. However, the differences in substrate specificity for OHPCBs that are seen with changes in redox status of the enzyme are not directly related to specific structural effects of individual OHPCBs within inhibitory enzyme-PAP-OHPCB complexes. PMID:21130751

  17. Cytochrome P450 20A1 in zebrafish: Cloning, regulation and potential involvement in hyperactivity disorders.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Benjamin; Kubota, Akira; O'Meara, Conor M; Lamb, David C; Tanguay, Robert L; Goldstone, Jared V; Stegeman, John J

    2016-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes for which there is no functional information are considered "orphan" CYPs. Previous studies showed that CYP20A1, an orphan, is expressed in human hippocampus and substantia nigra, and in zebrafish (Danio rerio) CYP20A1 maternal transcript occurs in eggs, suggesting involvement in brain and in early development. Moreover, hyperactivity is reported in humans with chromosome 2 microdeletions including CYP20A1. We examined CYP20A1 in zebrafish, including impacts of chemical exposure on expression. Zebrafish CYP20A1 cDNA was cloned, sequenced, and aligned with cloned human CYP20A1 and predicted vertebrate orthologs. CYP20A1s share a highly conserved N-terminal region and unusual sequences in the I-helix and the heme-binding CYP signature motifs. CYP20A1 mRNA expression was observed in adult zebrafish organs including the liver, heart, gonads, spleen and brain, as well as the eye and optic nerve. Putative binding sites in proximal promoter regions of CYP20A1s, and response of zebrafish CYP20A1 to selected nuclear and xenobiotic receptor agonists, point to up-regulation by agents involved in steroid hormone response, cholesterol and lipid metabolism. There also was a dose-dependent reduction of CYP20A1 expression in embryos exposed to environmentally relevant levels of methylmercury. Morpholino knockdown of CYP20A1 in developing zebrafish resulted in behavioral effects, including hyperactivity and a slowing of the optomotor response in larvae. The results suggest that altered expression of CYP20A1 might be part of a mechanism linking methylmercury exposure to neurobehavioral deficits. The expanded information on CYP20A1 brings us closer to "deorphanization", that is, identifying CYP20A1 functions and its roles in health and disease. PMID:26853319

  18. Cytochrome P450 20A1 in zebrafish: Cloning, regulation and potential involvement in hyperactivity disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Akira; O'Meara, Conor M.; Lamb, David C.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Goldstone, Jared V.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes for which there is no functional information are considered “orphan” CYPs. Previous studies showed that CYP20A1, an orphan, is expressed in human hippocampus and substantia nigra, and in zebrafish (Danio rerio) CYP20A1 maternal transcript occurs in eggs, suggesting involvement in brain and in early development. Moreover, hyperactivity is reported in humans with chromosome 2 microdeletions including CYP20A1. We examined CYP20A1 in zebrafish, including impacts of chemical exposure on expression. Zebrafish CYP20A1 cDNA was cloned, sequenced, and aligned with cloned human CYP20A1 and predicted vertebrate orthologs. CYP20A1s share a highly conserved N-terminal region and unusual sequences in the I-helix and the heme-binding CYP signature motifs. CYP20A1 mRNA expression was observed in adult zebrafish organs including liver, heart, gonads, spleen and brain, as well as eye and optic nerve. Putative binding sites in proximal promoter regions of CYP20A1s, and response of zebrafish CYP20A1 to selected nuclear and xenobiotic receptor agonists, point to up-regulation by agents involved in steroid hormone response, cholesterol and lipid metabolism. There also was a dose-dependent reduction of CYP20A1 expression in embryos exposed to environmentally relevant levels of methylmercury. Morpholino knockdown of CYP20A1 in developing zebrafish resulted in behavioral effects, including hyperactivity and a slowing of the optomotor response in larvae. The results suggest that altered expression of CYP20A1 might be part of a mechanism linking methylmercury exposure to neurobehavioral deficits. The expanded information on CYP20A1 brings us closer to “deorphanization”, that is, identifying CYP20A1 functions and its roles in health and disease. PMID:26853319

  19. ALDH3A1 Plays a Functional Role in Maintenance of Corneal Epithelial Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Gaurav; Orlicky, David J.; Thompson, David C.; Jester, James V.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) and ALDH3A1 are corneal crystallins. They protect inner ocular tissues from ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced oxidative damage through catalytic and non-catalytic mechanisms. Additionally, ALDH3A1 has been postulated to play a regulatory role in the corneal epithelium based on several studies that report an inverse association between ALDH3A1 expression and corneal cell proliferation. The underlying molecular mechanisms and the physiological significance of such association remain poorly understood. In the current study, we established Tet-On human corneal epithelial cell (hTCEpi) lines, which express tetracycline-inducible wild-type (wt) or catalytically-inactive (mu) ALDH3A1. Utilizing this cellular model system, we confirmed that human ALDH3A1 decreases corneal cell proliferation; importantly, this effect appears to be partially mediated by its enzymatic activity. Mechanistically, wt-ALDH3A1, but not mu-ALDH3A1, promotes sequestering of tumor suppressor p53 in the nucleus. In the mouse cornea, however, augmented cell proliferation is noted only in Aldh1a1-/-/3a1-/- double knockout (DKO) mice, indicating in vivo the anti-proliferation effect of ALDH3A1 can be rescued by the presence of ALDH1A1. Interestingly, the hyper-proliferative epithelium of the DKO corneas display nearly complete loss of p53 expression, implying that p53 may be involved in ALDH3A1/1A1-mediated effect. In hTCEpi cells grown in high calcium concentration, mRNA levels of a panel of corneal differentiation markers were altered by ALDH3A1 expression and modulated by its enzyme activity. In conclusion, we show for the first time that: (i) ALDH3A1 decreases corneal epithelial proliferation through both non-enzymatic and enzymatic properties; (ii) ALDH1A1 contributes to the regulation of corneal cellular proliferation in vivo; and (iii) ALDH3A1 modulates corneal epithelial differentiation. Collectively, our studies indicate a functional role of ALDH3A1 in the

  20. Measurements of CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->a1+/-(1260)pi-/+ decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-05-01

    We present measurements of CP-violating asymmetries in the decay B(0)-->a(1)(+/-)(1260)pi(-/+) with a(1)(+/-)(1260)-->pi(-/+)pi(+/-)pi(+/-). The data sample corresponds to 384x10(6) BB[over ] pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory at SLAC. We measure the CP-violating asymmetry A(CP)(a(1)pi)=-0.07+/-0.07+/-0.02, the mixing-induced CP violation parameter S(a(1)pi)=0.37+/-0.21+/-0.07, the direct CP violation parameter C(a(1)pi)=-0.10+/-0.15+/-0.09, and the parameters DeltaC(a(1)pi)=0.26+/-0.15+/-0.07 and DeltaS(a(1)pi)=-0.14+/-0.21+/-0.06. From these measured quantities we determine the angle alpha(eff)=78.6 degrees +/-7.3 degrees. PMID:17501562

  1. Induction of CYP26A1 by Metabolites of Retinoic Acid: Evidence That CYP26A1 Is an Important Enzyme in the Elimination of Active Retinoids

    PubMed Central

    Topletz, Ariel R.; Tripathy, Sasmita; Foti, Robert S.; Shimshoni, Jakob A.; Nelson, Wendel L.

    2015-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, induces gene transcription via binding to nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). The primary hydroxylated metabolites formed from atRA by CYP26A1, and the subsequent metabolite 4-oxo-atRA, bind to RARs and potentially have biologic activity. Hence, CYP26A1, the main atRA hydroxylase, may function either to deplete bioactive retinoids or to form active metabolites. This study aimed to determine the role of CYP26A1 in modulating RAR activation via formation and elimination of active retinoids. After treatment of HepG2 cells with atRA, (4S)-OH-atRA, (4R)-OH-atRA, 4-oxo-atRA, and 18-OH-atRA, mRNAs of CYP26A1 and RARβ were increased 300- to 3000-fold, with 4-oxo-atRA and atRA being the most potent inducers. However, >60% of the 4-OH-atRA enantiomers were converted to 4-oxo-atRA in the first 12 hours of treatment, suggesting that the activity of the 4-OH-atRA was due to 4-oxo-atRA. In human hepatocytes, atRA, 4-OH-atRA, and 4-oxo-atRA induced CYP26A1 and 4-oxo-atRA formation was observed from 4-OH-atRA. In HepG2 cells, 4-oxo-atRA formation was observed even in the absence of CYP26A1 activity and this formation was not inhibited by ketoconazole. In human liver microsomes, 4-oxo-atRA formation was supported by NAD+, suggesting that 4-oxo-atRA formation is mediated by a microsomal alcohol dehydrogenase. Although 4-oxo-atRA was not formed by CYP26A1, it was depleted by CYP26A1 (Km = 63 nM and intrinsic clearance = 90 μl/min per pmol). Similarly, CYP26A1 depleted 18-OH-atRA and the 4-OH-atRA enantiomers. These data support the role of CYP26A1 to clear bioactive retinoids, and suggest that the enzyme forming active 4-oxo-atRA may be important in modulating retinoid action. PMID:25492813

  2. Expression and Functional Significance of HtrA1 Loss in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Sally A.; Moslemi-Kebria, Mehdi; Rattan, Ramandeep; Khurana, Ashwani; Clayton, Amy; Ota, Takayo; Mariani, Andrea; Podratz, Karl C.; Chien, Jeremy; Shridhar, Viji

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if loss of serine protease HtrA1 in endometrial cancer will promote the invasive potential of EC cell lines. Experimental design Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry methods were used to determine HtrA1 expression in EC cell lines and primary tumors, respectively. Migration, invasion assays and in vivo xenograft experiment were performed to compare the extent of metastasis between HtrA1 expressing and HtrA-1 knocked down clones. Results Western blot analysis of HtrA1 in 13 EC cell lines revealed complete loss of HtrA1 expression in all 7 papillary serous EC cell lines. Downregulation of HtrA1 in Hec1A and Hec1B cell lines resulted in a 3-4 fold increase in the invasive potential. Exogenous expression of HtrA1 in Ark 1 and Ark 2 cells resulted in 3-4 fold decrease in both invasive and migration potential of these cells. There was an increased rate of metastasis to the lungs associated with HtrA1 downregulation in Hec1B cells compared to control cells with endogenous HtrA1 expression. Enhanced expression of HtrA1 in Ark 2 cells resulted in significantly less tumor nodules metastasizing to the lungs compared to parental or protease deficient (SA mutant) Ark 2 cells. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis showed 57% (105/184) of primary EC tumors had low HtrA1 expression. The association of low HtrA1 expression with high-grade endometrioid tumors was statistically significant (p=0.016). Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate loss of HtrA1 may contribute to the aggressiveness and metastatic ability of endometrial tumors. PMID:21098697

  3. Expression and immunohistochemical localization of the cytochrome P450 isoform 356A1 (CYP356A1) in oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Silva, Christielly; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício; Vernal, Javier I; Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2015-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 family (CYP) is a group of proteins virtually found in all living organisms. The main role of most CYPs is to metabolize endo and xenobiotics. Most of the studies on CYP have been carried out in mammals and other vertebrates, however recently a growing interest has been devoted to the identification of CYP isoforms in invertebrates. A gene belonging to the CYP sub-family, CYP356A1, was identified in sanitary sewage-exposed Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas. Through heterologous expression, we produced CYP356A1 purified protein and raised a mouse polyclonal antibody. Dot blot tests showed that oysters exposed in situ for 14 days to untreated urban effluent discharges had significantly higher levels of CYP356A1 in digestive gland. Using immunohistochemical techniques we observed that the lining epithelial cells of mantle, stomach and intestine showed a strong CYP356A1 staining, but the mucus and secretory cells were negative. Digestive diverticulum parenchyma and gills lining cells showed strong CYP356A1 reaction, while the filamentary rod (connective tissue) was negative. Free cells, as hemocytes and brown cells also showed CYP356A1 immunoreactions indicating the presence of biotransformation activity in these cells. Male germ cells at early stages expressed CYP356A1 but not sperm mature cells, suggesting that this protein could be involved in the male gonadal development. This study shows the use of a specific antibody to a mollusk CYP isoform and that this protein is inducible in oysters environmentally exposed to urban sewage effluents. PMID:25569847

  4. Identification of Interacting Motifs Between Armadillo Repeat Containing 1 (ARC1) and Exocyst 70 A1 (Exo70A1) Proteins in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhang, Hecui; Lian, Xiaoping; Converse, Richard; Zhu, Liquan

    2016-02-01

    In order to identify the functional domains which regulate the interaction between the self-incompatibility proteins armadillo repeat containing 1 (ARC1) and exocyst 70 A1 (Exo70A1) in Brassica oleracea, fragments containing selected motifs of ARC1 (ARC1210, ARC1246, ARC1279, ARC1354) and site-specific mutants with substitutions at possible interaction sites (ARC1354m, ARC1664m) were PCR amplified and inserted into pGADT7, while coding sequences from Exo70A1 (Exo70A185, Exo70A1) were subcloned into pGBKT7. The interactions between the protein products produced by these constructs were then analyzed utilizing a yeast two-hybrid system. Our data indicate that both ARC1210 and ARC1246 interact strongly with Exo70A185 and Exo70A1, while ARC1279, ARC1354, ARC1354m and ARC1664m exhibited a weak interaction, indicating that the recognition sites are located within the 210 N-terminal amino acids of ARC1 and the 85 N-terminal amino acids of Exo70A1. This was further verified by GST pull-down analysis. This supports a model in which the N-terminal leucine zipper of ARC1 and the first 85 N-terminal amino acids of Exo70A1 mediate the interaction between these two proteins. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that these motifs were highly conserved across different species, indicating that the interaction characterized in B. oleracea may operate in a wide array of cultivars. PMID:26696546

  5. Bilirubin UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) Gene Promoter Polymorphisms and HPRT, Glycophorin A, and Micronuclei Mutant Frequencies in Human Blood

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D; Hall, I J; Eastmond, D; Jones, I M; Bell, D A

    2004-10-06

    A dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-TA units) has been identified within the promoter region of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene (UGT1A1). The 7-TA repeat allele has been associated with elevated serum bilirubin levels that cause a mild hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert's syndrome). Studies suggest that promoter transcriptional activity of UGT1A1 is inversely related to the number of TA repeats and that unconjugated bilirubin concentration increases directly with the number of TA repeat elements. Because bilirubin is a known antioxidant, we hypothesized that UGT1A1 repeats associated with higher bilirubin may be protective against oxidative damage. We examined the effect of UGT1A1 genotype on somatic mutant frequency in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene in human lymphocytes and the glycophorin A (GPA) gene of red blood cells (both N0, NN mutants), and the frequency of lymphocyte micronuclei (both kinetochore (K) positive or micronuclei K negative) in 101 healthy smoking and nonsmoking individuals. As hypothesized, genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA displayed marginally lower GPA{_}NN mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). In contrast, our analysis showed that lower expressing UGT1A1 alleles (7-TA and 8-TA) were associated with modestly increased HPRT mutation frequency (p<0.05) while the same low expression genotypes were not significantly associated with micronuclei frequencies (K-positive or K-negative) when compared to high expression genotypes (5-TA and 6-TA). We found weak evidence that UGT1A1 genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA were associated with increased GPA{_}N0 mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). These data suggest that UGT1A1 genotype may modulate somatic mutation of some types, in some cell lineages, by a mechanism not involving bilirubin antioxidant activity. More detailed studies examining UGT1A1 promoter variation, oxidant/antioxidant balance and genetic

  6. Experimental murine myopia induces collagen type Iα1 (COL1A1) DNA methylation and altered COL1A1 messenger RNA expression in sclera

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangtian; Ji, Fengtao; An, Jianhong; Zhao, Fuxin; Shi, Fanjun; Huang, Furong; Li, Yuan; Jiao, Shiming; Yan, Dongsheng; Chen, Xiaoyan; Chen, JiangFan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether myopia development is associated with changes of scleral DNA methylation in cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites in the collagen 1A1 (COL1A1) promoter and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels following murine form deprivation myopia. Methods Fifty-seven C57BL/6 mice (postnatal day 23) were randomly assigned to four groups: (1) monocular form deprivation (MD) in which a diffuser lens was placed over one eye for 28 days; (2) normal controls without MD; (3) MD recovery in which the diffuser lens was removed for seven days; and (4) MD recovery normal controls. The DNA methylation pattern in COL1A1 promoter and exon 1 was determined by bisulfite DNA sequencing, and the COL1A1 mRNA level in sclera was determined by quantitative PCR. Results MD was found to induce myopia in the treated eyes. Six CpG sites in the promoter and exon 1 region of COL1A1 were methylated with significantly higher frequency in the treated eyes than normal control eyes (p<0.05), with CpG island methylation in MD-contralateral eyes being intermediate. Consistent with the CpG methylation, scleral COL1A1 mRNA was reduced by 57% in the MD-treated eyes compared to normal controls (p<0.05). After seven days of MD recovery, CpG methylation was significantly reduced (p=0.01). The methylation patterns returned to near normal level in five CpG sites, but the sixth was hypomethylated compared to normal controls. Conclusions In parallel with the development of myopia and the reduced COL1A1 mRNA, the frequency of methylation in CpG sites of the COL1A1 promoter/exon 1 increased during MD and returned to near normal during recovery. Thus, hypermethylation of CpG sites in the promoter/exon 1 of COL1A1 may underlie reduced collagen synthesis at the transcriptional level in myopic scleras. PMID:22690110

  7. Immunoglobulin A1 Protease, an Exoenzyme of Pathogenic Neisseriae, Is a Potent Inducer of Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, Dirk R.; Düx, Frank; Wölk, Uwe; Tsirpouchtsidis, Anastasios; Haas, Gaby; Meyer, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    A characteristic of human pathogenic Neisseriae is the production and secretion of an immunoglobulin (Ig)A1-specific serine protease (IgA1 protease) that cleaves preferentially human IgA1 and other target proteins. Here we show a novel function for native IgA1 protease, i.e., the induction of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The capacity of IgA1 protease to elicit such cytokine responses in monocytes was enhanced in the presence of T lymphocytes. IgA1 protease did not induce the regulatory cytokine IL-10, which was, however, found in response to lipopolysaccharide and phytohemagglutinin. The immunomodulatory effects caused by IgA1 protease require a native form of the enzyme, and denaturation abolished cytokine induction. However, the proteolytic activity is not required for the cytokine induction by IgA1 protease. Our results indicate that IgA1 protease exhibits important immunostimulatory properties and may contribute substantially to the pathogenesis of neisserial infections by inducing large amounts of TNF-α and other proinflammatory cytokines. In particular, IgA1 protease may represent a key virulence determinant of bacterial meningitis. PMID:10523603

  8. 17β-Estradiol Induces Sulfotransferase 2A1 Expression through Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Ning, Miaoran; Koh, Kwi Hye; Kim, Heesue

    2014-01-01

    Sulfotransferase (SULT) 2A1 catalyzes sulfonation of drugs and endogenous compounds and plays an important role in xenobiotic metabolism as well as in the maintenance of steroid and lipid homeostasis. A recent study showed that 17β-estradiol (E2) increases the mRNA levels of SULT2A1 in human hepatocytes. Here we report the underlying molecular mechanisms. E2 enhanced SULT2A1 expression in human hepatocytes and HepG2-ER cells (HepG2 stably expressing ERα). SULT2A1 induction by E2 was abrogated by antiestrogen ICI 182,780, indicating a key role of ERα in the induction. Results from deletion and mutation assays of SULT2A1 promoter revealed three cis-elements located within –257/+140 region of SULT2A1 that are potentially responsible for the induction. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay verified the recruitment of ERα to the promoter region. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that AP-1 proteins bind to one of the cis-elements. Interestingly, SULT2A1 promoter assays using ERα mutants revealed that the DNA-binding domain of ERα is indispensable for SULT2A1 induction by E2, suggesting that direct ERα binding to the SULT2A1 promoter is also necessary for the induction. Taken together, our results indicate that E2 enhances SULT2A1 expression by both the classical and nonclassical mechanisms of ERα action. PMID:24492894

  9. Orally Active Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonists with Antinociceptive Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Rittiner, Joseph E.; Randhawa, Amarjit S.; Coleman, Jennifer; Fitzpatrick, Brendan J.; Setola, Vincent; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.; Jin, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists have antinociceptive effects in multiple preclinical models of acute and chronic pain. Although numerous A1AR agonists have been developed, clinical applications of these agents have been hampered by their cardiovascular side effects. Herein we report a series of novel A1AR agonists, some of which are structurally related to adenosine 5′-monophosphate (5′-AMP), a naturally occurring nucleotide that itself activates A1AR. These novel compounds potently activate A1AR in several orthogonal in vitro assays and are subtype selective for A1AR over A2AAR, A2BAR, and A3AR. Among them, UNC32A (3a) is orally active and has dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in wild-type mice. The antinociceptive effects of 3a were completely abolished in A1AR knockout mice, revealing a strict dependence on A1AR for activity. The apparent lack of cardiovascular side effects when administered orally and high affinity (Ki of 36 nM for the human A1AR) make this compound potentially suitable as a therapeutic. PMID:22738238

  10. Snail and serpinA1 promote tumor progression and predict prognosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Hwa; Lee, Ja Rang; Kim, Hye Kyung; Jo, Hong-jae; Kim, Hyun Sung; Oh, Nahmgun; Song, Geun Am; Park, Do Youn

    2015-01-01

    The role of Snail and serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 (serpinA1) in tumorigenesis has been previously identified. However, the exact role and mechanism of these proteins in progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) are controversial. In this study, we investigated the role of Snail and serpinA1 in colorectal cancer (CRC) and examined the mechanisms through which these proteins mediate CRC progression. Immunohistochemical analysis of 528 samples from patients with CRC showed that elevated expression of Snail or serpinA1 was correlated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, and poor prognosis. Moreover, we detected a correlation between Snail and serpinA1 expression. Functional studies performed using the CRC cell lines DLD-1 and SW-480 showed that overexpression of Snail or serpinA1 significantly increased CRC cell invasion and migration. Conversely, knockdown of Snail or serpinA1 expression suppressed CRC cell invasion and migration. ChIP analysis revealed that Snail regulated serpinA1 by binding to its promoter. In addition, fibronectin mediated Snail and serpinA1 signaling was involved in CRC cell invasion and migration. Taken together, our data showed that Snail and serpinA1 promoted CRC progression through fibronectin. These findings suggested that Snail and serpinA1 were novel prognostic biomarkers and candidate therapeutic targets in CRC. PMID:26015410

  11. Evidence for a SULT4A1 haplotype correlating with baseline psychopathology and atypical antipsychotic response

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Timothy L; Meltzer, Herbert Y; Brock, Guy N; Mehrotra, Bharat; Jayathilake, Karu; Bobo, William V; Brennan, Mark D

    2011-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the impact of SULT4A1 gene variation on psychopathology and antipsychotic drug response in Caucasian subjects from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study and a replication sample. Patients & methods SULT4A1 haplotypes were determined using SNP data. The relationship to baseline psychopathology was evaluated using linear regression of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score. Drug response was evaluated using Mixed Model Repeat Measures (MMRM) for change in PANSS. Results For the CATIE sample, patients carrying a haplotype designated SULT4A1-1(+) displayed higher baseline PANSS (p = 0.03) and, when treated with olanzapine, demonstrated a significant interaction with time (p = 0.009) in the MMRM. SULT4A1-1(+) patients treated with olanzapine displayed improved response compared with SULT4A1-1(−) patients treated with olanzapine (p = 0.008) or to SULT4A1-1(+) patients treated with risperidone (p = 0.006). In the replication sample, SULT4A1-1(+) patients treated with olanzapine demonstrated greater improvement than SULT4A1-1(−) patients treated with olanzapine (p = 0.05) or than SULT4A1-1(+) patients treated with risperidone (p = 0.05). Conclusion If validated, determination of SULT4A1-1 haplotype status might be useful for identifying patients who show an enhanced response to long-term olanzapine treatment. PMID:21521020

  12. Annexin A1 Deficiency does not Affect Myofiber Repair but Delays Regeneration of Injured Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Leikina, Evgenia; Defour, Aurelia; Melikov, Kamran; Van der Meulen, Jack H.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Gebert, Claudia; Pfeifer, Karl; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.

    2015-01-01

    Repair and regeneration of the injured skeletal myofiber involves fusion of intracellular vesicles with sarcolemma and fusion of the muscle progenitor cells respectively. In vitro experiments have identified involvement of Annexin A1 (Anx A1) in both these fusion processes. To determine if Anx A1 contributes to these processes during muscle repair in vivo, we have assessed muscle growth and repair in Anx A1-deficient mouse (AnxA1−/−). We found that the lack of Anx A1 does not affect the muscle size and repair of myofibers following focal sarcolemmal injury and lengthening contraction injury. However, the lack of Anx A1 delayed muscle regeneration after notexin-induced injury. This delay in muscle regeneration was not caused by a slowdown in proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, lack of Anx A1 lowered the proportion of differentiating myoblasts that managed to fuse with the injured myofibers by days 5 and 7 after notexin injury as compared to the wild type (w.t.) mice. Despite this early slowdown in fusion of Anx A1−/− myoblasts, regeneration caught up at later times post injury. These results establish in vivo role of Anx A1 in cell fusion required for myofiber regeneration and not in intracellular vesicle fusion needed for repair of myofiber sarcolemma. PMID:26667898

  13. Protoporphyrins Enhance Oligomerization and Enzymatic Activity of HtrA1 Serine Protease

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hakryul; Patterson, Victoria; Stoessel, Sean; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Hoh, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    High temperature requirement protein A1 (HtrA1), a secreted serine protease of the HtrA family, is associated with a multitude of human diseases. However, the exact functions of HtrA1 in these diseases remain poorly understood. We seek to unravel the mechanisms of HtrA1 by elucidating its interactions with chemical or biological modulators. To this end, we screened a small molecule library of 500 bioactive compounds to identify those that alter the formation of extracellular HtrA1 complexes in the cell culture medium. An initial characterization of two novel hits from this screen showed that protoporphyrin IX (PPP-IX), a precursor in the heme biosynthetic pathway, and its metalloporphyrin (MPP) derivatives fostered the oligomerization of HtrA1 by binding to the protease domain. As a result of the interaction with MPPs, the proteolytic activity of HtrA1 against Fibulin-5, a specific HtrA1 substrate in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), was increased. This physical interaction could be abolished by the missense mutations of HtrA1 found in patients with cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CARASIL). Furthermore, knockdown of HtrA1 attenuated apoptosis induced by PPP-IX. These results suggest that PPP-IX, or its derivatives, and HtrA1 may function as co-factors whereby porphyrins enhance oligomerization and the protease activity of HtrA1, while active HtrA1 elevates the pro-apoptotic actions of porphyrin derivatives. Further analysis of this interplay may shed insights into the pathogenesis of diseases such as AMD, CARASIL and protoporphyria, as well as effective therapeutic development. PMID:25506911

  14. Histone acetylation regulates orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 expression in hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xina; Song, Xuhong; Yuan, Song; Cai, Haitao; Chen, Yequn; Chang, Xiaolan; Liang, Bin; Huang, Dongyang

    2015-12-01

    Hypercholesterolaemia and inflammation are correlated with atherogenesis. Orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1, as a key regulator of inflammation, is closely associated with lipid levels in vivo. However, the mechanism by which lipids regulate NR4A1 expression remains unknown. We aimed to elucidate the underlying mechanism of NR4A1 expression in monocytes during hypercholesterolaemia, and reveal the potential role of NR4A1 in hypercholesterolaemia-induced circulating inflammation. Circulating leucocytes were collected from blood samples of 139 patients with hypercholesterolaemia and 139 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. We found that there was a low-grade inflammatory state and higher expression of NR4A1 in patients. Both total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in plasma were positively correlated with NR4A1 mRNA level. ChIP revealed that acetylation of histone H3 was enriched in the NR4A1 promoter region in patients. Human mononuclear cell lines THP-1 and U937 were treated with cholesterol. Supporting our clinical observations, cholesterol enhanced p300 acetyltransferase and decreased HDAC7 (histone deacetylase 7) recruitment to the NR4A1 promoter region, resulting in histone H3 hyperacetylation and further contributing to NR4A1 up-regulation in monocytes. Moreover, cytosporone B, an NR4A1 agonist, completely reversed cholesterol-induced IL-6 (interleukin 6) and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) expression to below basal levels, and knockdown of NR4A1 expression by siRNA not only mimicked, but also exaggerated the effects of cholesterol on inflammatory biomarker up-regulation. Thus we conclude that histone acetylation contributes to the regulation of NR4A1 expression in hypercholesterolaemia, and that NR4A1 expression reduces hypercholesterolaemia-induced inflammation. PMID:26396259

  15. The Cardioprotective Protein Apolipoprotein A1 Promotes Potent Anti-tumorigenic Effects*♦

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian-Daryoush, Maryam; Lindner, Daniel; Tallant, Thomas C.; Wang, Zeneng; Buffa, Jennifer; Klipfell, Elizabeth; Parker, Yvonne; Hatala, Denise; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Rayman, Pat; Yusufishaq, Mohamed Sharif S.; Fisher, Edward A.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Finke, Jim; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we show that apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), the major protein component of high density lipoprotein (HDL), through both innate and adaptive immune processes, potently suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in multiple animal tumor models, including the aggressive B16F10L murine malignant melanoma model. Mice expressing the human apoA1 transgene (A1Tg) exhibited increased infiltration of CD11b+ F4/80+ macrophages with M1, anti-tumor phenotype, reduced tumor burden and metastasis, and enhanced survival. In contrast, apoA1-deficient (A1KO) mice showed markedly heightened tumor growth and reduced survival. Injection of human apoA1 into A1KO mice inoculated with tumor cells remarkably reduced both tumor growth and metastasis, enhanced survival, and promoted regression of both tumor and metastasis burden when administered following palpable tumor formation and metastasis development. Studies with apolipoprotein A2 revealed the anti-cancer therapeutic effect was specific to apoA1. In vitro studies ruled out substantial direct suppressive effects by apoA1 or HDL on tumor cells. Animal models defective in different aspects of immunity revealed both innate and adaptive arms of immunity contribute to complete apoA1 anti-tumor activity. This study reveals a potent immunomodulatory role for apoA1 in the tumor microenvironment, altering tumor-associated macrophages from a pro-tumor M2 to an anti-tumor M1 phenotype. Use of apoA1 to redirect in vivo elicited tumor-infiltrating macrophages toward tumor rejection may hold benefit as a potential cancer therapeutic. PMID:23720750

  16. Crystalline silica is a negative modifier of pulmonary cytochrome P-4501A1 induction.

    PubMed

    Battelli, Lori A; Ghanem, Mohamed M; Kashon, Michael L; Barger, Mark; Ma, Jane Y C; Simoskevitz, Ricki L; Miles, Philip R; Hubbs, Ann F

    2008-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are products of incomplete combustion that are commonly inhaled by workers in the dusty trades. Many PAHs are metabolized by cytochrome P-4501A1 (CYP1A1), which may facilitate excretion but may activate pulmonary carcinogens. PAHs also stimulate their own metabolism by inducing CYP1A1. Recent studies suggest that respirable coal dust exposure inhibits induction of pulmonary CYP1A1 using the model PAH beta-naphthoflavone. The effect of the occupational particulate respirable crystalline silica was investigated on PAH-dependent pulmonary CYP1A1 induction. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to intratracheal silica or vehicle and then intraperitoneal beta-naphthoflavone, a CYP1A1 inducer, and/or phenobarbital, an inducer of hepatic CYP2B1, or vehicle. Beta-naphthoflavone induced pulmonary CYP1A1, but silica attenuated this beta-naphthoflavone-induced CYP1A1 activity and also suppressed the activity of CYP2B1, the major constitutive CYP in rat lung. The magnitude of CYP activity suppression was similar regardless of silica exposure dose within a range of 5 to 20 mg/rat. Phenobarbital and beta-naphthoflavone had no effect on pulmonary CYP2B1 activity. Both enzymatic immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescent staining for CYP1A1 indicated that sites of CYP1A1 induction were nonciliated airway epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and the alveolar septum. Using immunofluorescent colocalization of CYP1A1 with cytokeratin 8, a marker of alveolar type II cells, the proximal alveolar region was the site of both increased alveolar type II cells and decreased proportional CYP1A1 expression in alveolar type II cells. Our findings suggest that in PAH-exposed rat lung, silica is a negative modifier of CYP1A1 induction and CYP2B1 activity. PMID:18338287

  17. Folate and Thiamine Transporters mediated by Facilitative Carriers (SLC19A1-3 and SLC46A1) and Folate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I. David

    2013-01-01

    The reduced folate carrier (RFC,SLC19A1), thiamine transporter-1 (ThTr1,SLC19A2) and thiamine transporter-2 (ThTr2,SLC19A3) evolved from the same family of solute carriers. SLC19A1 transports folates but not thiamine. SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 transport thiamine but not folates. SLC19A1 and SLC19A2 deliver their substrates to systemic tissues; SLC19A3 mediates intestinal thiamine absorption. The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT,SLC46A1) is the mechanism by which folates are absorbed across the apical-brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine. Two folate receptors (FOLR1 and FOLR2) mediate folate transport across epithelia by an endocytic process. Folate transporters are routes of delivery of drugs for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases. There are autosomal recessive disorders associated with mutations in genes encoded for SLC46A1 (hereditary folate malabsorption), FOLR1 (cerebral folate deficiency), SLC19A2 (thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia), and SLC19A3 (biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease). PMID:23506878

  18. Folate and thiamine transporters mediated by facilitative carriers (SLC19A1-3 and SLC46A1) and folate receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I David

    2013-01-01

    The reduced folate carrier (RFC, SLC19A1), thiamine transporter-1 (ThTr1, SLC19A2) and thiamine transporter-2 (ThTr2, SLC19A3) evolved from the same family of solute carriers. SLC19A1 transports folates but not thiamine. SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 transport thiamine but not folates. SLC19A1 and SLC19A2 deliver their substrates to systemic tissues; SLC19A3 mediates intestinal thiamine absorption. The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT, SLC46A1) is the mechanism by which folates are absorbed across the apical-brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine. Two folate receptors (FOLR1 and FOLR2) mediate folate transport across epithelia by an endocytic process. Folate transporters are routes of delivery of drugs for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases. There are autosomal recessive disorders associated with mutations in genes encoded for SLC46A1 (hereditary folate malabsorption), FOLR1 (cerebral folate deficiency), SLC19A2 (thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia), and SLC19A3 (biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease). PMID:23506878

  19. The Glucose Measurement Industry and Hemoglobin A1c: An Opportunity for Creative Destruction.

    PubMed

    Cembrowski, George

    2016-01-01

    The MyStar Extra self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG) system provides moving estimates of the patient's hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). There is a treasure trove of highly accurate glucose data available from highly accurate SMBG, CGM and FGM along with highly accurate HPLC HbA1c. If Nathan's criteria are used to select subjects whose glucoses can be correlated to the HbA1c, then algorithms can be developed for robustly transforming glucose into HbA1c. These algorithms can then be implemented in any SMBG or with the CGM and FGM software. This calculated HbA1c would even be accurate with Nathan's excluded population thus reducing the use of fructosamine and glycated protein. Finally, the developer of these new algorithms is advised to use a specific approach for testing her algorithm. PMID:26481643

  20. Protein expression of CYP1A1, CYP1B1, ALDH1A1, and ALDH2 in young patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kaminagakura, E; Caris, A; Coutinho-Camillo, C; Soares, F A; Takahama-Júnior, A; Kowalski, L P

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of the enzymes involved in the biotransformation of tobacco and alcohol. A study group of 41 young patients (≤40 years old) with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was compared to 59 control subjects (≥50 years old) with tumours of similar clinical stages and topographies. The immunohistochemical expression of CYP1A1, CYP1B1, ALDH1A1, and ALDH2 was evaluated using the tissue microarray technique. There was a predominance of males, smokers, and alcohol drinkers in both groups. Most tumours were located in the tongue (43.9% vs. 50.8%), were well-differentiated (63.4% vs. 56.6%), and were in clinical stages III or IV (80.5% vs. 78.0%). No difference was observed in the expression of CYP1A1, ALDH1A1, or ALDH2 between the two groups. CYP1A1 and ALDH2 protein expression had no influence on the prognosis. The immunoexpression of CYP1B1 was significantly higher in the control group than in the young group (P<0.001). The 5-year relapse-free survival was better in patients with CYP1B1 overexpression vs. protein underexpression (64% vs. 25%; P<0.05), regardless of age. ALDH1A1 expression improved relapse-free survival in young patients. These results suggest a lower risk of recurrence with increased metabolism of carcinogens by CYP1B1. Further studies involving other genes and proteins are necessary to complement the results of this research. PMID:26944893

  1. Catalytic and immunochemical detection of hepatic and extrahepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) in white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus).

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joanna Y; Moore, Michael J; Stegeman, John J

    2010-02-18

    We have characterized microsomal systems and measured the levels of microsomal cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in multiple internal organs of male and female white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus) from the northwest Atlantic Ocean. Internal organs were sampled within 24h of death, sometimes in a period of hours, collection times which are significantly less than usually seen for marine mammals. Tissue autolysis, as assessed by histological analysis of liver, was minimal to none in all individuals. Total P420 did not correlate with time from death to sampling, suggesting that it is a poor indicator of P450 degradation in cetacean tissues where perfusion is not practical. The total hepatic microsomal P450 content, cytochrome b5 content, and NADPH-cytochrome c (P450) reductase (CPR) activity averaged 0.29nmolmg(-1), 0.12nmolmg(-1), and 238nmolmg(-1)min(-1), respectively. Microsomal CPR activity in liver was higher than that in lung and kidney, and was higher than that reported in liver of most other cetacean species. Immunodetected CYP1A1 content was low in all organs, less than 3pmolesCYP1A equivalentsmg(-1). EROD activity ranged from 9 to 376pmolesmg(-1)min(-1) and was greater in liver than in other tissues. Hepatic microsomal EROD activity and CYP1A1 content did not correlate. However, hepatic EROD activity, but not CYP1A1 protein content, was well correlated with both total PCB and Sigmamono-ortho PCB concentrations in blubber. Length, as a proxy for age, did not correlate with hepatic EROD activity or CYP1A1 protein levels, and sex did not influence the relationship between EROD and contaminant concentrations. We cannot easily control for the extent of tissue degradation in cetacean studies nor do we have a complete history of these animals. Therefore, other factors such as degradation or hormonal state may have a role in the observed relationships. Yet, as in other mammals, hepatic tissues appear to be a major

  2. Catalytic and Immunochemical Detection of Hepatic and Extrahepatic Microsomal Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) in White-sided Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus)

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Joanna Y.; Moore, Michael J.; Stegeman, John J.

    2009-01-01

    We have characterized microsomal systems and measured the levels of microsomal cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in multiple internal organs of male and female white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus) from the northwest Atlantic Ocean. Internal organs were sampled within 24 hours of death, sometimes in a period of hours, collection times which are significantly less than usually seen for marine mammals. Tissue autolysis, as assessed by histological analysis of liver, was minimal to none in all individuals. Total P420 did not correlate with time from death to sampling, suggesting that it is a poor indicator of P450 degradation in cetacean tissues where perfusion isn’t practical. The total hepatic microsomal P450 content, cytochrome b5 content, and NADPH-cytochrome c (P450) reductase (CPR) activity averaged 0.29 nmol mg−1, 0.12 nmol mg−1, and 238 nmol mg−1 min−1, respectively. Microsomal CPR activity in liver was higher than that in lung and kidney, and was higher than that reported in liver of most other cetacean species. Immunodetected CYP1A1 content was low in all organs, less than 3 pmoles CYP1A equivalents mg−1. EROD activity ranged from 9 – 376 pmoles mg−1 min−1 and was greater in liver than in other tissues. Hepatic microsomal EROD activity and CYP1A1 content did not correlate. However, hepatic EROD activity, but not CYP1A1 protein content, was well correlated with both total PCB and Σmono-ortho PCB concentrations in blubber. Length, as a proxy for age, did not correlate with hepatic EROD activity or CYP1A1 protein levels, and sex did not influence the relationship between EROD and contaminant concentrations. We cannot easily control for the extent of tissue degradation in cetacean studies nor do we have a complete history of these animals. Therefore, other factors such as degradation or hormonal state may have a role in the observed relationships. Yet, as in other mammals, hepatic tissues appear to be

  3. 40 CFR Appendix A-1 to Part 60 - Test Methods 1 through 2F

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test Methods 1 through 2F A Appendix A-1 to Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES (CONTINUED) Pt. 60, App. A-1 Appendix A-1 to Part 60—Test Methods 1 through 2F Method...

  4. 26 CFR 1.25A-1 - Calculation of education tax credit and general eligibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calculation of education tax credit and general eligibility requirements. 1.25A-1 Section 1.25A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Changes in Rates During A Taxable Year § 1.25A-1 Calculation of education tax credit and...

  5. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 71 - Determination of A1 and A2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Determination of A1 and A2 A Appendix A to Part 71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Pt. 71, App. A Appendix A to Part 71—Determination of A1 and A2 I. Values of A1 and A2 for individual radionuclides, which are the bases for many...

  6. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 71 - Determination of A1 and A2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of A1 and A2 A Appendix A to Part 71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Pt. 71, App. A Appendix A to Part 71—Determination of A1 and A2 I. Values of A1 and A2 for individual radionuclides, which are the bases for many...

  7. Crystal structure of stable protein CutA1 from psychrotrophic bacterium Shewanella sp. SIB1

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Aya; Yokotani, Sonoko; Tadokoro, Takashi; Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2011-01-01

    CutA1 is widely found in bacteria, plants and animals, including humans. The functions of CutA1, however, have not been well clarified. It is known that CutA1s from Pyrococcus horikoshii, Thermus thermophilus and Oryza sativa unfold at temperatures remarkably higher than the growth temperatures of the host organisms. In this work the crystal structure of CutA1 from the psychrotrophic bacterium Shewanella sp. SIB1 (SIB1–CutA1) in a trimeric form was determined at 2.7 Å resolution. This is the first crystal structure of a psychrotrophic CutA1. The overall structure of SIB1–CutA1 is similar to those of CutA1 from Homo sapiens, Escherichia coli, Pyrococcus horikoshii, Thermus thermophilus, Termotoga maritima, Oryza sativa and Rattus norvergicus. A peculiarity is observed in the β2 strand. The β2 strand is divided into two short β strands, β2a and β2b, in SIB1–CutA1. A thermal denaturation experiment revealed that SIB1–CutA1 does not unfold completely at 363 K at pH 7.0, although Shewanella sp. SIB1 cannot grow at temperatures exceeding 303 K. These results indicate that the trimeric structural motif of CutA1 is the critical factor in its unusually high stability and suggest that CutA1 needs to maintain its high stability in order to function, even in psychrotrophs. PMID:21169681

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 circumscribes high invasive glioma cells and predicts poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sen-Lin; Liu, Sha; Cui, Wei; Shi, Yu; Liu, Qin; Duan, Jiang-Jie; Yu, Shi-Cang; Zhang, Xia; Cui, You-Hong; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Bian, Xiu-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most aggressive brain tumor with high invasiveness and poor prognosis. More reliable, sensitive and practical biomarkers to reveal glioma high invasiveness remain to be explored for the guidance of therapy. We herein evaluated the diagnostic and prognostic value of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) in the glioma specimens from 237 patients, and found that ADLH1A1 was frequently overexpressed in the high-grade glioma (WHO grade III-IV) as compared to the low-grade glioma (WHO grade I-II) patients. The tumor cells with ALDH1A1 expression were more abundant in the region between tumor and the borderline of adjacent tissue as compared to the central part of the tumor. ALDH1A1 overexpression was associated with poor differentiation and dismal prognosis. Notably, the overall and disease-free survivals of the patients who had ALDH1A1(+) tumor cells sparsely located in the adjacent tissue were much worse. Furthermore, ALDH1A1 expression was correlated with the "classical-like" (CL) subtype as we examined GBM specimens from 72 patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that ALDH1A1 was an independent marker for glioma patients' outcome. Mechanistically, both in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that ALDH1A1(+) cells isolated from either a glioblastoma cell line U251 or primary glioblastoma cells displayed significant invasiveness, clonogenicity, and proliferation as compared to ALDH1A1(-) cells, due to increased levels of mRNA and protein for matrix metalloproteinase 2, 7 and 9 (MMP2, MMP7 and MMP9). These results indicate that ALDH1A1(+) cells contribute to the progression of glioma including invasion, proliferation and poor prognosis, and suggest that targeting ALDH1A1 may have important implications for the treatment of highly invasive glioma. PMID:26101711

  9. 26 CFR 31.6161(a)(1)-1 - Extensions of time for paying tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extensions of time for paying tax. 31.6161(a)(1)-1 Section 31.6161(a)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Provisions of Subtitle F, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.6161(a)(1)-1 Extensions of time for paying...

  10. Characterization of Prohibitin 1 as a Host Partner of Vibrio vulnificus RtxA1 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo A; Lim, Ju Young; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Kim, Young Ran

    2016-01-01

    RtxA1 toxin, which results in cytoskeletal rearrangement, contact cytotoxicity, hemolysis, tissue invasion, and lethality in mice, is the most potent cytotoxic virulence factor of Vibrio vulnificus. Bioinformatics analysis of rtxA1 predicted 4 functional domains that presumably performed discrete functions during host cell killing. V. vulnificus RtxA1 has a unique domain designated as RtxA1-D2, corresponding to amino acids 1951-2574, which is absent in Vibrio cholerae multifunctional-autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin, suggesting that this domain confers specific biological functions to V. vulnificus RtxA1. HeLa cells expressing green fluorescent protein-RtxA1-D2 became round and lost their viability. A yeast 2-hybrid system identified prohibitin (PHB) 1 as the host partner of RtxA1-D2. The specific interaction of RtxA1-D2 with PHB1 was confirmed by performing immunoprecipitation. Interestingly, V. vulnificus RtxA1 up-regulated PHB1 expression on the cytoplasmic membrane of host cells. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were confirmed as being important in the up-regulation of PHB1 by using inhibitors. Down-regulation of PHB1 by small interfering RNAs decreased the cytotoxicity of RtxA1-D2 against HeLa cells. The pretreatment of an anti-PHB1 antibody impaired the cytotoxicity of V. vulnificus RtxA1. These results suggest that the involvement PHB1 in the RtxA1 cytotoxicity has significant implications for the pathogenesis of V. vulnificus infections. PMID:26136468

  11. Cloning and expression of Che a 1, the major allergen of Chenopodium album in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vahedi, Fatemeh; Sankian, Mojtaba; Moghadam, Malihe; Mohaddesfar, Maryam; Ghobadi, Sirous; Varasteh, Abdol Reza

    2011-04-01

    Chenopodium album is a weedy annual plant in the genus Chenopodium. C. album pollen represents a predominant allergen source in Iran. The main C. album pollen allergens have been described as Che a 1, Che a 2, and Che a 3. The aim of this work was to clone the Che a 1 in Escherichia coli to establish a system for overproduction of the recombinant Che a 1 (rChe a 1). In order to clone this allergen, the pollens were subjected to RNA extraction. A full-length fragment encoding Che a 1 was prepared by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the first-strand cDNA synthesized from extracted RNA. Cloning was carried out by inserting the cDNA into the pET21b+ vector, thereafter the construct was transformed into E. coli Top10 cells and expression of the protein was induced by IPTG. The rChe a 1 was purified using histidine tag in recombinant protein by means of Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. IgE immunoblotting, ELISA, and inhibition ELISA were done to evaluate IgE binding of the purified protein. In conclusion, the cDNA for the major allergen of the C. album pollen, Che a 1, was successfully cloned and rChe a 1 was purified. Inhibition assays demonstrated allergic subjects sera reacted with rChe a 1 similar to natural Che a 1 in crude extract of C. album pollen. This study is the first report of using the E. coli as a prokaryotic system for Che a 1 cloning and production of rChe a 1. PMID:20872185

  12. Transcriptional regulation of human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase SULT2A1 by LXRα.

    PubMed

    Ou, Zhimin; Jiang, Mengxi; Hu, Bingfang; Huang, Yixian; Xu, Meishu; Ren, Songrong; Li, Song; Liu, Suhuan; Xie, Wen; Huang, Min

    2014-10-01

    The nuclear receptor liver X receptor (LXR) plays an important role in the metabolism and homeostasis of cholesterol, lipids, bile acids, and steroid hormones. In this study, we uncovered a function of LXRα (NR1H3) in regulating the human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase SULT2A1, a phase II conjugating enzyme known to sulfonate bile acids, hydroxysteroid dehydroepiandrosterone, and related androgens. We showed that activation of LXR induced the expression of SULT2A1 at mRNA, protein, and enzymatic levels. A combination of promoter reporter gene and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that LXRα transactivated the SULT2A1 gene promoter through its specific binding to the -500- to -258-base pair region of the SULT2A1 gene promoter. LXR small interfering RNA knockdown experiments suggested that LXRα, but not LXRβ, played a dominant role in regulating SULT2A1. In primary human hepatocytes, we found a positive correlation between the expression of SULT2A1 and LXRα, which further supported the regulation of SULT2A1 by LXRα. In summary, our results established human SULT2A1 as a novel LXRα target gene. The expression of LXRα is a potential predictor for the expression of SULT2A1 in human liver. PMID:25028566

  13. Transcriptional Regulation of Human Hydroxysteroid Sulfotransferase SULT2A1 by LXRα

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Zhimin; Jiang, Mengxi; Hu, Bingfang; Huang, Yixian; Xu, Meishu; Ren, Songrong; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor liver X receptor (LXR) plays an important role in the metabolism and homeostasis of cholesterol, lipids, bile acids, and steroid hormones. In this study, we uncovered a function of LXRα (NR1H3) in regulating the human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase SULT2A1, a phase II conjugating enzyme known to sulfonate bile acids, hydroxysteroid dehydroepiandrosterone, and related androgens. We showed that activation of LXR induced the expression of SULT2A1 at mRNA, protein, and enzymatic levels. A combination of promoter reporter gene and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that LXRα transactivated the SULT2A1 gene promoter through its specific binding to the −500- to −258-base pair region of the SULT2A1 gene promoter. LXR small interfering RNA knockdown experiments suggested that LXRα, but not LXRβ, played a dominant role in regulating SULT2A1. In primary human hepatocytes, we found a positive correlation between the expression of SULT2A1 and LXRα, which further supported the regulation of SULT2A1 by LXRα. In summary, our results established human SULT2A1 as a novel LXRα target gene. The expression of LXRα is a potential predictor for the expression of SULT2A1 in human liver. PMID:25028566

  14. Genomic organization of SLC3A1, a transporter gene mutated in cystinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Pras, E.; Sood, R.; Raben, N.

    1996-08-15

    The SLC3A1 gene encodes a transport protein for cystine and the dibasic amino acids. Recently mutations in this gene have been shown to cause cystinuria. We report the genomic structure and organization of SLC3A1, which is composed of 10 exons and spans nearly 45 kb. Until now screening for mutations in SLC3A1 has been based on RT-PCR amplification of illegitimate mRNA transcripts from white blood cells. In this report we provide primers for amplification of exons from genomic DNA, thus simplifying the process of screening for SLC3A1 mutations in cystinuria. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guideline for UGT1A1 and Atazanavir Prescribing.

    PubMed

    Gammal, R S; Court, M H; Haidar, C E; Iwuchukwu, O F; Gaur, A H; Alvarellos, M; Guillemette, C; Lennox, J L; Whirl-Carrillo, M; Brummel, S S; Ratain, M J; Klein, T E; Schackman, B R; Caudle, K E; Haas, D W

    2016-04-01

    The antiretroviral protease inhibitor atazanavir inhibits hepatic uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1, thereby preventing the glucuronidation and elimination of bilirubin. Resultant indirect hyperbilirubinemia with jaundice can cause premature discontinuation of atazanavir. Risk for bilirubin-related discontinuation is highest among individuals who carry two UGT1A1 decreased function alleles (UGT1A1*28 or *37). We summarize published literature that supports this association and provide recommendations for atazanavir prescribing when UGT1A1 genotype is known (updates at www.pharmgkb.org). PMID:26417955

  16. NR4A1 Antagonists Inhibit β1-Integrin-Dependent Breast Cancer Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Erik; Lee, Syng-Ook; Doddapaneni, Ravi; Singh, Mandip; Safe, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of the nuclear receptor 4A1 (NR4A1) in breast cancer patients is a prognostic factor for decreased survival and increased metastasis, and this has been linked to NR4A1-dependent regulation of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling. Results of RNA interference studies demonstrate that basal migration of aggressive SKBR3 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells is TGF-β independent and dependent on regulation of β1-integrin gene expression by NR4A1 which can be inhibited by the NR4A1 antagonists 1,1-bis(3'-indolyl)-1-(p-hydroxyphenyl)methane (DIM-C-pPhOH) and a relatedp-carboxymethylphenyl [1,1-bis(3'-indolyl)-1-(p-carboxymethylphenyl)methane (DIM-C-pPhCO2Me)] analog. The NR4A1 antagonists also inhibited TGF-β-induced migration of MDA-MB-231 cells by blocking nuclear export of NR4A1, which is an essential step in TGF-β-induced cell migration. We also observed that NR4A1 regulates expression of both β1- and β3-integrins, and unlike other β1-integrin inhibitors which induce prometastatic β3-integrin, NR4A1 antagonists inhibit expression of both β1- and β3-integrin, demonstrating a novel mechanism-based approach for targeting integrins and integrin-dependent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26929200

  17. FoxA1 as a lineage-specific oncogene in luminal type breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Ito, Emi; Azuma, Sakura; Honma, Reiko; Yanagisawa, Yuka; Nishikawa, Akira; Kawamura, Mika; Imai, Jun-ichi

    2008-01-25

    The forkhead transcription factor FoxA1 is thought to be involved in mammary tumorigenesis. However, the precise role of FoxA1 in breast cancer development is controversial. We examined expression of FoxA1 in 35 human breast cancer cell lines and compared it with that of ErbB2, a marker of poor prognosis in breast cancer. We found that FoxA1 is expressed at high levels in all ErbB2-positive cell lines and a subset of ErbB2-negative cell lines. Down-regulation of FoxA1 by RNA interference significantly suppressed proliferation of ErbB2-negative and FoxA1-positive breast cancer cell lines. Down-regulation of FoxA1 also enhanced the toxic effect of Herceptin on ErbB2-positive cell lines through induction of apoptosis. Taken together with previous data that FoxA1 is a marker of luminal cells in mammary gland, our present results suggest that FoxA1 plays an important role as a lineage-specific oncogene in proliferation of cancer cells derived from mammary luminal cells.

  18. Frequent Monitoring of A1C During Pregnancy as a Treatment Tool to Guide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovič, Lois; Savas, Hatice; Mehta, Manish; Trujillo, Angelina; Pettitt, David J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE No guidelines for A1C measurement exist for women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aim of this study was to document the rate of A1C decline in women with GDM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Women with GDM in the Santa Barbara County Endocrine Clinic are managed with a carbohydrate-restricted diet and self-monitored blood glucose before and 1-h postprandial. Insulin is started if the preprandial glucose concentration is ≥90 mg/dl and/or a 1-h postprandial glucose concentration is ≥120 mg/dl. Capillary A1C was tested weekly using the DCA2000+ analyzer. RESULTS Twenty-four women with GDM (aged 29.0 ± 7.3 years) with initial A1C ≥7.0% were recruited. Baseline A1C was 8.8 ± 1.8%. Mean A1C decline was 0.47% per week (range 0.10–1.15%); the maximum was 4.3% in 4 weeks. CONCLUSIONS This study documents rapid decline in A1C during pregnancy and the utility of weekly A1C to guide therapy. PMID:20921215

  19. Observation of B0 meson decay to a 1 +/(1260)pi /+.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Nardo, G De; del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F

    2006-08-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction of the decay B(0)-->a1 (+/)(1260)pi(/+) with a1 (+/)(1260)-->pi(/+)pi(+/)pi(+/). The data sample corresponds to 218 x 10(6) BB[over ] pairs produced in e+e- annihilation through the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We measure the branching fraction Beta(B(0)-->a1(+/)(1260)pi(/+))Beta(a1(+/)(1260)-->pi(/+)pi(+/)pi(+/)) = (16.6+/1.9+/1.5) x 10(-6), where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. PMID:17026094

  20. Polymorphisms in the cytochrome P450 genes CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP11A1, CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Bethke, Lara; Webb, Emily; Sellick, Gabrielle; Rudd, Matthew; Penegar, Stephen; Withey, Laura; Qureshi, Mobshra; Houlston, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes have the potential to affect colorectal cancer (CRC) risk by determining the genotoxic impact of exogenous carcinogens and levels of sex hormones. Methods To investigate if common variants of CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP11A1, CYP17A1 and CYP19A1 influence CRC risk we genotyped 2,575 CRC cases and 2,707 controls for 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have not previously been shown to have functional consequence within these genes. Results There was a suggestion of increased risk, albeit insignificant after correction for multiple testing, of CRC for individuals homozygous for CYP1B1 rs162558 and heterozygous for CYP1A2 rs2069522 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03–1.80 and OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.00–1.79 respectively). Conclusion This study provides some support for polymorphic variation in CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 playing a role in CRC susceptibility. PMID:17615053

  1. Methods, units and quality requirements for the analysis of haemoglobin A1c in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, Ilkka; Penttilä, Karri; Holm, Päivi; Laitinen, Harri; Ranta, Päivi; Törrönen, Jukka; Rauramaa, Rainer

    2016-06-26

    The formation of glycohemoglobin, especially the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) fraction, occurs when glucose becomes coupled with the amino acid valine in the β-chain of Hb; this reaction is dependent on the plasma concentration of glucose. Since the early 1970s it has been known that diabetics display higher values OF HbA1C because they have elevated blood glucose concentrations. Thus HbA1c has acquired a very important role in the treatment and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. After the introduction of the first quantitative measurement OF HbA1C, numerous methods for glycohemoglobin have been introduced with different assay principles: From a simple mini-column technique to the very accurate automated high-pressure chromatography and lastly to many automated immunochemical or enzymatic assays. In early days, the results of the quality control reports for HbA1c varied extensively between laboratories, therefore in United States and Canada working groups (WG) of the Diabetes Controls and Complications Trial (DCCT) were set up to standardize the HbA1c assays against the DCCT/National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program reference method based on liquid chromatography. In the 1990s, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) appointed a new WG to plan a reference preparation and method for the HBA1c measurement. When the reference procedures were established, in 2004 IFCC recommended that all manufacturers for equipment used in HbA1c assays should calibrate their methods to their proposals. This led to an improvement in the coefficient of variation (CV%) associated with the assay. In this review, we describe the glycation of Hb, methods, standardization of the HbA1c assays, analytical problems, problems with the units in which HbA1c values are expressed, reference values, quality control aspects, target requirements for HbA1c, and the relationship of the plasma glucose values to HbA1c concentrations. We also note that the acceptance

  2. Prostaglandin Transporter (PGT/SLCO2A1) Protects the Lung from Bleomycin-Induced Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Takeo; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Uetoko, Yuka; Komori, Hisakazu; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Hosoya, Ken-ichi; Tamai, Ikumi

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2 exhibits an anti-fibrotic effect in the lung in response to inflammatory reactions and is a high-affinity substrate of PG transporter (SLCO2A1). The present study aimed to evaluate the pathophysiological relevance of SLCO2A1 to bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that Slco2a1 protein was expressed in airway and alveolar type I (ATI) and II (ATII) epithelial cells, and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry further demonstrated cell surface expression of Slco2a1 in ATI cells in wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice. PGE2 uptake activity was abrogated in ATI-like cells from Slco2a1-deficient (Slco2a1-/-) mice, which was clearly observed in the cells from WT mice. Furthermore, the PGE2 concentrations in lung tissues were lower in Slco2a1-/- than in WT mice. The pathological relevance of SLCO2A1 was further studied in mouse BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis models. BLM (1 mg/kg) or vehicle (phosphate buffered saline) was intratracheally injected into WT and Slco2a1-/- mice, and BLM-induced fibrosis was evaluated on day 14. BLM induced more severe fibrosis in Slco2a1-/- than in WT mice, as indicated by thickened interstitial connective tissue and enhanced collagen deposition. PGE2 levels were higher in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, but lower in lung tissues of Slco2a1-/- mice. Transcriptional upregulation of TGF-β1 was associated with enhanced gene transcriptions of downstream targets including plasminogen activator inhitor-1. Furthermore, Western blot analysis demonstrated a significant activation of protein kinase C (PKC) δ along with a modest activation of Smad3 in lung from Slco2a1-/- mice, suggesting a role of PKCδ associated with TGF-β signaling in aggravated fibrosis in BLM-treated Slco2a1-/- mice. In conclusion, pulmonary PGE2 disposition is largely regulated by SLCO2A1, demonstrating that SLCO2A1 plays a critical role in protecting the lung from BLM-induced fibrosis. PMID:25923111

  3. Cytochrome P450 1A1 Regulates Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Mariangellys; Potter, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) is an extrahepatic phase I metabolizing enzyme whose expression is suppressed under physiologic conditions, but can be induced by substrates via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Nonetheless, recent studies show that the majority of breast tumors constitutively express CYP1A1. These findings led us to test the hypothesis that CYP1A1 promotes breast cancer progression by evaluating the effects of CYP1A1 knock down on the proliferation and survival of the MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 lines. Independently of estrogen receptor status, CYP1A1 knock down decreases cell proliferation, decreases colony formation, blocks the cell cycle at G0/G1 associated with reduction of cyclin D1, and increases apoptosis associated with reduction of survivin. CYP1A1 knock down markedly increases phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and decreases phosphorylation of AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and 70kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (P70S6K). AMPK inhibition by compound C partially abrogates the pro-apoptotic effects of CYP1A1siRNA, suggesting that CYP1A1siRNA effects are mediated, in part, through AMPK signaling. Consistent with CYP1A1 knock down results, pharmacologic reduction of CYP1A1 levels by the phytopolyphenol carnosol also correlates with impaired proliferation and induced AMPK phosphorylation. These results indicate that reduction of basal CYP1A1 expression is critical for inhibition of proliferation, which is not affected by alpha-naphthoflavone-mediated inhibition of CYP1A1 activity nor modulated by AhR silencing. This study supports that CYP1A1 may promote breast cancer proliferation and survival, at least in part, through AMPK signaling and that reduction of CYP1A1 levels is a potential strategy for breast cancer therapeutics. PMID:23576571

  4. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 null mice are sensitive to cholestatic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youcai; Csanaky, Iván L; Cheng, Xingguo; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2012-06-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 (Oatp1a1) is predominantly expressed in livers of mice and is thought to transport bile acids (BAs) from blood into liver. Because Oatp1a1 expression is markedly decreased in mice after bile duct ligation (BDL). We hypothesized that Oatp1a1-null mice would be protected against liver injury during BDL-induced cholestasis due largely to reduced hepatic uptake of BAs. To evaluate this hypothesis, BDL surgeries were performed in both male wild-type (WT) and Oatp1a1-null mice. At 24 h after BDL, Oatp1a1-null mice showed higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels and more severe liver injury than WT mice, and all Oatp1a1-null mice died within 4 days after BDL, whereas all WT mice survived. At 24 h after BDL, surprisingly Oatp1a1-null mice had higher total BA concentrations in livers than WT mice, suggesting that loss of Oatp1a1 did not prevent BA accumulation in the liver. In addition, secondary BAs dramatically increased in serum of Oatp1a1-null BDL mice but not in WT BDL mice. Oatp1a1-null BDL mice had similar basolateral BA uptake (Na(+)-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and Oatp1b2) and BA-efflux (multidrug resistance-associated protein [Mrp]-3, Mrp4, and organic solute transporter α/β) transporters, as well as BA-synthetic enzyme (Cyp7a1) in livers as WT BDL mice. Hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner Cyp3a11, Cyp4a14, and Nqo1, which are target genes of farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, and NF-E2-related factor 2, respectively, were increased in WT BDL mice but not in Oatp1a1-null BDL mice. These results demonstrate that loss of Oatp1a1 function exacerbates cholestatic liver injury in mice and suggest that Oatp1a1 plays a unique role in liver adaptive responses to obstructive cholestasis. PMID:22461449

  5. Methods, units and quality requirements for the analysis of haemoglobin A1c in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Penttilä, Ilkka; Penttilä, Karri; Holm, Päivi; Laitinen, Harri; Ranta, Päivi; Törrönen, Jukka; Rauramaa, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The formation of glycohemoglobin, especially the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) fraction, occurs when glucose becomes coupled with the amino acid valine in the β-chain of Hb; this reaction is dependent on the plasma concentration of glucose. Since the early 1970s it has been known that diabetics display higher values OF HbA1C because they have elevated blood glucose concentrations. Thus HbA1c has acquired a very important role in the treatment and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. After the introduction of the first quantitative measurement OF HbA1C, numerous methods for glycohemoglobin have been introduced with different assay principles: From a simple mini-column technique to the very accurate automated high-pressure chromatography and lastly to many automated immunochemical or enzymatic assays. In early days, the results of the quality control reports for HbA1c varied extensively between laboratories, therefore in United States and Canada working groups (WG) of the Diabetes Controls and Complications Trial (DCCT) were set up to standardize the HbA1c assays against the DCCT/National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program reference method based on liquid chromatography. In the 1990s, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) appointed a new WG to plan a reference preparation and method for the HBA1c measurement. When the reference procedures were established, in 2004 IFCC recommended that all manufacturers for equipment used in HbA1c assays should calibrate their methods to their proposals. This led to an improvement in the coefficient of variation (CV%) associated with the assay. In this review, we describe the glycation of Hb, methods, standardization of the HbA1c assays, analytical problems, problems with the units in which HbA1c values are expressed, reference values, quality control aspects, target requirements for HbA1c, and the relationship of the plasma glucose values to HbA1c concentrations. We also note that the acceptance

  6. Attenuation of Cigarette Smoke-Induced Emphysema in Mice by Apolipoprotein A-1 Overexpression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chorong; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Sung-Woo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Lee, Myoung Won; Paik, Sanghyun; Jang, An Soo; Kim, Do Jin; Uh, Sootaek; Kim, Yonghoon; Park, Choon-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and proteolysis participate primarily in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/emphysema. COPD is a highly prevalent smoking-related disease for which no effective therapy exists to improve the disease course. Although apolipoprotein A-1 (ApoA1) has antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties as well as cholesterol efflux potential, its role in cigarette smoke (CS)-induced emphysema has not been determined. Therefore, we investigated whether human ApoA1 transgenic (TG) mice, with conditionally induced alveolar epithelium to overexpress ApoA1, are protected against the CS-induced lung inflammatory response and development of emphysema. In this study, ApoA1 levels were significantly decreased in the lungs of patients with COPD and in the lungs of mice exposed to CS. ApoA1 TG mice did not develop emphysema when chronically exposed to CS. Compared with the control TG mice, ApoA1 overexpression attenuated lung inflammation, oxidative stress, metalloprotease activation, and apoptosis in CS-exposed mouse lungs. To explore a plausible mechanism of antiapoptotic activity of ApoA1, alveolar epithelial cells (A549) were treated with CS extract (CSE). ApoA1 prevented CSE-induced translocation of Fas and downstream death-inducing signaling complex into lipid rafts, thereby inhibiting Fas-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, the data showed that ApoA1 overexpression attenuated CS-induced lung inflammation and emphysema in mice. Augmentation of ApoA1 in the lung may have therapeutic potential in preventing smoking-related COPD/emphysema. PMID:26086425

  7. The in vivo respiratory phenotype of the adenosine A1 receptor knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Heitzmann, Dirk; Buehler, Philipp; Schweda, Frank; Georgieff, Michael; Warth, Richard; Thomas, Joerg

    2016-02-01

    The nucleoside adenosine has been implicated in the regulation of respiration, especially during hypoxia in the newborn. In this study the role of adenosine A1 receptors for the control of respiration was investigated in vivo. To this end, respiration of unrestrained adult and neonatal adenosine A1 receptor knockout mice (A1R(-/-)) was measured in a plethysmographic device. Under control conditions (21% O2) and mild hypoxia (12-15% O2) no difference of respiratory parameters was observed between adult wildtype (A1R(+/+)) and A1R(-/-) mice. Under more severe hypoxia (6-10% O2) A1R(+/+) mice showed, after a transient increase of respiration, a decrease of respiration frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) leading to a decrease of minute volume (MV). This depression of respiration during severe hypoxia was absent in A1R(-/-) mice which displayed a stimulated respiration as indicated by the enhancement of MV by some 50-60%. During hypercapnia-hyperoxia (3-10% CO2/97-90 % O2), no obvious differences in respiration of A1R(-/-) and A1R(+/+) was observed. In neonatal mice, the respiratory response to hypoxia was surprisingly similar in both genotypes. However, neonatal A1R(-/-) mice appeared to have more frequently periods of apnea during hypoxia and in the post-hypoxic control period. In conclusion, these data indicate that the adenosine A1 receptor is an important molecular component mediating hypoxic depression in adult mice and it appears to stabilize respiration of neonatal mice. PMID:26593641

  8. Epigenetic Regulation of Vitamin D 24-Hydroxylase/CYP24A1 in Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Karpf, Adam R.; Deeb, Kristin K.; Muindi, Josephia R.; Morrison, Carl D.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Calcitriol, a regulator of calcium homeostasis with antitumor properties, is degraded by the product of the CYP24A1 gene which is downregulated in human prostate cancer by unknown mechanisms. We found that CYP24A1 expression is inversely correlated with promoter DNA methylation in prostate cancer cell lines. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) activates CYP24A1 expression in prostate cancer cells. In vitro methylation of the CYP24A1 promoter represses its promoter activity. Furthermore, inhibition of histone deacetylases by trichostatin A (TSA) enhances the expression of CYP24A1 in prostate cancer cells. ChIP-qPCR reveals that specific histone modifications are associated with the CYP24A1 promoter region. Treatment with TSA increases H3K9ac and H3K4me2 and simultaneously decreases H3K9me2 at the CYP24A1 promoter. ChIP-qPCR assay reveals that treatment with DAC and TSA increases the recruitment of VDR to the CYP24A1 promoter. RT-PCR analysis of paired human prostate samples reveals that CYP24A1 expression is down-regulated in prostate malignant lesions compared to adjacent histologically benign lesions. Bisulfite pyrosequencing shows that CYP24A1 gene is hypermethylated in malignant lesions compared to matched benign lesions. Our findings indicate that repression of CYP24A1 gene expression in human prostate cancer cells is mediated in part by promoter DNA methylation and repressive histone modifications. PMID:20587525

  9. Sulfotransferase 4A1 Haplotype 1 (SULT4A1-1) Is Associated With Decreased Hospitalization Events in Antipsychotic-Treated Patients With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Ramsey, Timothy L.; Meltzer, Herbert Y.; Massey, Bill W.; Padmanabhan, Saranya

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a common genetic variant, sulfotransferase 4A1 haplotype 1 (SULT4A1-1), as a predictor of hospitalization events due to the exacerbation of schizophrenia for patients treated with antipsychotic medications. Haplotypes were determined using single nucleotide polymorphism data. Method: The study included 417 white subjects from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia. Patients were assigned to 1 of 4 atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, or ziprasidone) or to the first-generation antipsychotic perphenazine. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to measure if haplotype status impacted hospitalization events for these 5 treatments. Haplotype status was evaluated for its relationship to hospitalization events regardless of treatment and for the individual treatments, with or without previous exacerbation. Data for the CATIE study were collected from January 2001 to December 2004. The current post hoc analysis was performed between May 2011 and August 2011. Results: In phase 1 of the trial, considering only the first hospitalization events, the haplotype had a significant impact on hospitalization events, with a hazard ratio for SULT4A1-1(−) versus SULT4A1-1(+) of 2.54 (P = .048). When prior exacerbation was included in the model for phase 1, the hazard ratio was 2.34 (P = .072) considering only the first hospitalization event and 2.71 (P = .039) considering all hospitalization events in the phase. When data for all phases were evaluated, SULT4A1-1(−) status was associated with increased hospitalization risk for subjects treated with olanzapine, with a hazard ratio of 8.26 (P = .041), and possibly for subjects treated with quetiapine, with a hazard ratio of 6.80 (P = .070). Conclusions: The SULT4A1-1 haplotype may be an important predictor of risk of hospitalization. SULT4A1-1(+) status was

  10. Epizootic Pneumonia of Bighorn Sheep following Experimental Exposure to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Thomas E.; Cassirer, E. Frances; Potter, Kathleen A.; Lahmers, Kevin; Oaks, J. Lindsay; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Srikumaran, Subramaniam; Foreyt, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bronchopneumonia is a population limiting disease of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis). The cause of this disease has been a subject of debate. Leukotoxin expressing Mannheimia haemolytica and Bibersteinia trehalosi produce acute pneumonia after experimental challenge but are infrequently isolated from animals in natural outbreaks. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, epidemiologically implicated in naturally occurring outbreaks, has received little experimental evaluation as a primary agent of bighorn sheep pneumonia. Methodology/Principal Findings In two experiments, bighorn sheep housed in multiple pens 7.6 to 12 m apart were exposed to M. ovipneumoniae by introduction of a single infected or challenged animal to a single pen. Respiratory disease was monitored by observation of clinical signs and confirmed by necropsy. Bacterial involvement in the pneumonic lungs was evaluated by conventional aerobic bacteriology and by culture-independent methods. In both experiments the challenge strain of M. ovipneumoniae was transmitted to all animals both within and between pens and all infected bighorn sheep developed bronchopneumonia. In six bighorn sheep in which the disease was allowed to run its course, three died with bronchopneumonia 34, 65, and 109 days after M. ovipneumoniae introduction. Diverse bacterial populations, predominantly including multiple obligate anaerobic species, were present in pneumonic lung tissues at necropsy. Conclusions/Significance Exposure to a single M. ovipneumoniae infected animal resulted in transmission of infection to all bighorn sheep both within the pen and in adjacent pens, and all infected sheep developed bronchopneumonia. The epidemiologic, pathologic and microbiologic findings in these experimental animals resembled those seen in naturally occurring pneumonia outbreaks in free ranging bighorn sheep. PMID:25302992

  11. Associations between prior management of cattle and risk of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Hay, K E; Morton, J M; Schibrowski, M L; Clements, A C A; Mahony, T J; Barnes, T S

    2016-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the major cause of clinical disease and death in feedlot populations worldwide. A longitudinal study was conducted to assess associations between risk factors related to on-farm management prior to transport to the feedlot and risk of BRD in a population of feedlot beef cattle sourced from throughout the cattle producing regions of Australia. Exposure variables were derived from questionnaire data provided by farmers supplying cattle (N=10,721) that were a subset of the population included in a nationwide prospective study investigating numerous putative risk factors for BRD. Causal diagrams were used to inform model building to allow estimation of effects of interest. Multilevel mixed effects logistic regression models were fitted within the Bayesian framework. Animals that were yard weaned were at reduced risk (OR: 0.7, 95% credible interval: 0.5-1.0) of BRD at the feedlot compared to animals immediately returned to pasture after weaning. Animals that had previously been fed grain (OR: 0.6, 95% credible interval: 0.3-1.1) were probably at reduced risk of BRD at the feedlot compared to animals not previously fed grain. Animals that received prior vaccinations against Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (OR: 0.8, 95% credible interval: 0.5-1.1) or Mannheimia haemolytica (OR: 0.8, 95% credible interval: 0.6-1.0) were also probably at reduced risk compared to non-vaccinated animals. The results of this study confirm that on-farm management before feedlot entry can alter risk of BRD after beef cattle enter feedlots. PMID:27094138

  12. Histophilosis as a Natural Disease.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, D; Sondgeroth, K S

    2016-01-01

    Histophilus somni is responsible for sporadic disease worldwide in cattle and, to a lesser extent, in small ruminants, bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), and North American bison (Bison bison). The importance of H. somni diseases can be attributed to improved clinical and laboratory recognition, combined with the growth in intensive management practices for cattle. Although outbreaks of bovine histophilosis can occur year-round, in northern and southern hemispheres, it is most frequent in late fall and early winter. Weather, stress, dietary changes, and comingling of cattle are likely to be major triggers for outbreaks. The most frequent clinical expressions of histophilosis include undifferentiated fever, fibrinosuppurative pneumonia, encephalitis-leptomeningitis, necrotizing myocarditis, and diffuse pleuritis. Neurological disease occurs either as thrombotic meningoencephalitis (TME) or as suppurative meningitis with ventriculitis. Acute myocarditis is characteristically necrotizing and generally involves one or both papillary muscles in the left ventricular myocardium. Biofilm-like aggregates of bacteria occur in capillaries and veins in myocardium, in the central nervous system, and on endocardial surfaces. H. somni is a component of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex. In our experience, it is most commonly diagnosed in subacute-to-chronic polymicrobial pulmonary infections in combination with Mannheimia haemolytica, Trueperella pyogenes, Pasteurella multocida, or Mycoplasma bovis. Other, less common forms of H. somni disease present as polyarthritis/tenosynovitis, abortion with placentitis and fetal septicemia, epididymitis-orchitis, and ocular infections. It is likely that H. somni is under-recognized clinically and diagnostically. Most state and provincial laboratories in North America rely on bacterial isolation to confirm infection. The use of more sensitive detection methods on field cases of histophilosis will help resolve the pathogenesis of H

  13. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic testing of marbofloxacin administered as a single injection for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Vallé, M; Schneider, M; Galland, D; Giboin, H; Woehrlé, F

    2012-12-01

    New approaches in Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) integration suggested that marbofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone already licensed for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease at a daily dosage of 2 mg/kg for 3-5 days, would be equally clinically effective at 10 mg/kg once (Forcyl(®)), whilst also reducing the risk of resistance. This marbofloxacin dosage regimen was studied using mutant prevention concentration (MPC), PK simulation, PK/PD integration and an in vitro dynamic system. This system simulated the concentration-time profile of marbofloxacin in bovine plasma established in vivo after a single 10 mg/kg intramuscular dose and killing curves of field isolated Pasteurellaceae strains of high (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) MIC ≤ 0.03 μg/mL), average (MIC of 0.12-0.25 μg/mL) and low (MIC of 1 μg/mL) susceptibility to marbofloxacin. The marbofloxacin MPC values were 2- to 4-fold the MIC values for all Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida tested. Marbofloxacin demonstrated a concentration-dependent killing profile with bactericidal activity observed within 1 h for most strains. No resistance development (MIC ≥ 4 μg/mL) was detected in the dynamic tests. Target values for risk of resistance PK/PD surrogates (area under the curve (AUC) AUC(24 h) /MPC and T(>MPC) /T(MSW) ratio) were achieved for all clinically susceptible pathogens. The new proposed dosing regimen was validated in vitro and by PK/PD integration confirming the single-injection short-acting antibiotic concept. PMID:22126438

  14. One year duration of immunity of the modified live bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 and type 2 and bovine herpesvirus-1 fractions of Vista® Once SQ vaccine.

    PubMed

    Purtle, Lisa; Mattick, Debra; Schneider, Corey; Smith, Linda; Xue, Wenzhi; Trigo, Emilio

    2016-03-18

    Three studies were performed to determine the duration of immunity of the bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 and type 2 (BVDV-1 and BVDV-2) and bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) fractions of a commercially prepared modified-live vaccine. Vista® Once SQ (Vista®) vaccine contains five modified-live viruses, BVDV-1, BVDV-2, BHV-1, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, and bovine parainfluenza 3 virus, and two modified-live bacteria, Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica. For all three studies, calves were administered a single dose of vaccine or placebo vaccine subcutaneously, and were challenged with one of the three virulent viruses at least one year following vaccination. Calves were evaluated daily following challenge for clinical signs of disease associated with viral infection, nasal swab samples were evaluated for virus shedding, and serum was tested for neutralizing antibodies. Following the BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 challenges, whole blood was evaluated for white blood cell counts, and for the BVDV-2 study, whole blood was also evaluated for platelet counts. Calves vaccinated with BVDV type 1a, were protected from challenge with BVDV type 1b, and had significant reductions in clinical disease, fever, leukopenia, and virus shedding compared to control calves. Vaccinated calves in the BVDV-2 study were protected from clinical disease, mortality, fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and virus shedding compared to controls. Vaccinated calves in the BHV-1 study were protected from clinical disease and fever, and had significantly reduced duration of nasal virus shedding. These three studies demonstrated that a single administration of the Vista® vaccine to healthy calves induces protective immunity against BVDV-1, BVDV-2 and BHV-1 that lasts at least one year following vaccination. PMID:26859238

  15. New plasmid tools for genetic analysis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and other pasteurellaceae.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Janine T; Durham, Andrew L; Rycroft, Andrew N; Kroll, J Simon; Langford, Paul R

    2009-10-01

    We have generated a set of plasmids, based on the mobilizable shuttle vector pMIDG100, which can be used as tools for genetic manipulation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and other members of the Pasteurellaceae. A tandem reporter plasmid, pMC-Tandem, carrying promoterless xylE and gfpmut3 genes downstream of a multiple-cloning site (MCS), can be used for identification of transcriptional regulators and conditions which favor gene expression from different cloned promoters. The ability to detect transcriptional regulators using the tandem reporter system was validated in A. pleuropneumoniae using the cloned rpoE (sigma(E)) promoter (P). The resulting plasmid, pMCrpoEP, was used to identify a mutant defective in production of RseA, the negative regulator of sigma(E), among a bank of random transposon mutants, as well as to detect induction of sigma(E) following exposure of A. pleuropneumoniae to ethanol or heat shock. pMCsodCP, carrying the cloned sodC promoter of A. pleuropneumoniae, was functional in A. pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parasuis, Mannheimia haemolytica, and Pasteurella multocida. Two general expression vectors, pMK-Express and pMC-Express, which differ in their antibiotic resistance markers (kanamycin and chloramphenicol, respectively), were constructed for the Pasteurellaceae. Both plasmids have the A. pleuropneumoniae sodC promoter upstream of the gfpmut3 gene and an extended MCS. Replacement of gfpmut3 with a gene of interest allows complementation and heterologous gene expression, as evidenced by expression of the Haemophilus ducreyi nadV gene in A. pleuropneumoniae, rendering the latter NAD independent. PMID:19666733

  16. Immunological Response to Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex: An RNA-Sequence Analysis of the Bronchial Lymph Node Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Tizioto, Polyana C; Kim, JaeWoo; Seabury, Christopher M; Schnabel, Robert D; Gershwin, Laurel J; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Neibergs, Holly L; Taylor, Jeremy F

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility to bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is multi-factorial and is influenced by stress in conjunction with infection by both bacterial and viral pathogens. While vaccination is broadly used in an effort to prevent BRD, it is far from being fully protective and cases diagnosed from a combination of observed clinical signs without any attempt at identifying the causal pathogens are usually treated with antibiotics. Dairy and beef cattle losses from BRD are profound worldwide and genetic studies have now been initiated to elucidate host loci which underlie susceptibility with the objective of enabling molecular breeding to reduce disease prevalence. In this study, we employed RNA sequencing to examine the bronchial lymph node transcriptomes of controls and beef cattle which had individually been experimentally challenged with bovine respiratory syncytial virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine viral diarrhea virus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica or Mycoplasma bovis to identify the genes that are involved in the bovine immune response to infection. We found that 142 differentially expressed genes were located in previously described quantitative trait locus regions associated with risk of BRD. Mutations affecting the expression or amino acid composition of these genes may affect disease susceptibility and could be incorporated into molecular breeding programs. Genes involved in innate immunity were generally found to be differentially expressed between the control and pathogen-challenged animals suggesting that variation in these genes may lead to a heritability of susceptibility that is pathogen independent. However, we also found pathogen-specific expression profiles which suggest that host genetic variation for BRD susceptibility is pathogen dependent. PMID:26121276

  17. Acute-phase responses in cattle infected with hydatid cysts and microbial agents.

    PubMed

    Sevimli, A; Sevimli, F K; Şeker, E; Ulucan, A; Demirel, H H

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydatid cysts and microbial agents on the acute-phase response in cattle. Twenty-seven cattle with hydatid cysts and eight apparently healthy cattle comprised the study and control groups, respectively. Parasitological, microbiological, histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations of the liver and lungs were undertaken, and 49 of these organs were infected with cysts. In 14 of 31 (45.1%) livers and 10 of 18 (55.5%) lungs microbial growth was observed. The most frequent species occurring in the liver were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium spp. and Campylobacter spp., whereas in the lungs the most common species was Candida spp., followed by Streptococcus spp., Mannheimia haemolytica, Corynebacterium spp., Micrococcus spp. and S. aureus. The concentration of serum interleukin (IL-6) in infected cattle, 455.35 ± 39.68 pg/ml, was significantly higher than that of 83.02 ± 17.87 pg/ml in the control group (P0.05). The highest concentrations of IL-6 were detected in serum of the cattle where microbial growth had been detected, followed by cattle infected with bacteria + Trichostrongylus sp. (P< 0.001). Consequently, SAA showed an important increase in the group infected with hydatid cysts, whereas haptoglobin level decreased. It was noticed that IL-6, like SAA, had a significant role in hydatid cyst infection. Therefore IL-6 and SAA appear to be major markers in the detection of infection of cattle with hydatid cysts. PMID:26017333

  18. Brief heat treatment causes a structural change and enhances cytotoxicity of the Escherichia coli α-hemolysin.

    PubMed

    Aulik, Nicole A; Atapattu, Dhammika N; Czuprynski, Charles J; McCaslin, Darrel R

    2013-02-01

    α-Hemolysin (HLY) is an important virulence factor for uropathogenic Escherichia coli. HLY is a member of the RTX family of exotoxins secreted by a number of Gram-negative bacteria. Recently, it was reported that a related RTX toxin, the Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, exhibits increased cytotoxicity following brief heat treatment. In this article, we show that brief heat treatment (1 min at 100°C) increases cytotoxicity of HLY for human bladder cells, kidney epithelial cells (A498) and neutrophils. Heat treatment also increased hemolysis of human red blood cells (RBCs). Furthermore, heat treatment of previously inactived HLY restored its cytotoxicity. Heat-activated and native HLY both required glycophorin A to lyse RBCs. Native and heat-activated HLY appeared to bind equally well to the surface of A498 cells; although, Western blot analyses demonstrated binding to different proteins on the surface. Confocal microscopy revealed that heat-activated HLY bound more extensively to internal structures of permeabilized A498 cells than did native HLY. Several lines of spectroscopic evidence demonstrate irreversible changes in the structure of heat activated compared to native HLY. We show changes in secondary structure, increased exposure of tryptophan residues to the aqueous environment, an increase in molecular dimension and an increase in hydrophobic surface area. These properties are among the most common characteristics described for the molten globule state, first identified as an intermediate in protein folding. We hypothesize that brief heat treatment of HLY causes a conformational change leading to significant differences in protein-protein interactions that result in increased cytotoxicity for target cells. PMID:22994841

  19. A comparison of 2 vaccination programs in feedlot calves at ultra-high risk of developing undifferentiated fever/bovine respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Brian K.; Perrett, Tye; Abutarbush, Sameeh M.; Guichon, P. Timothy; Pittman, Tom J.; Booker, Calvin W.; Schunicht, Oliver C.; Fenton, R. Kent; Jim, G. Kee

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 2 vaccination programs in feedlot calves at ultra-high risk of developing undifferentiated fever (UF)/bovine respiratory disease (BRD). At feedlot arrival, 3882 calves were enrolled in the study and randomly allocated to 2 groups, which were housed by group in 12 pens. At the time of allocation, 1 group (MLV3-BT2) received a multivalent, modified-live viral vaccine containing infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV) and types I and II bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), as well as a Mannheimia haemolytica (MH) and Pasteurella multocida bacterin-toxoid. The other group (MLV4-BT1) received a vaccine containing IBRV, type I BVDV, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza-3 virus, as well as a MH bacterin-toxoid. At an average of 69 days post arrival, the groups received their respective viral vaccines. The initial UF treatment, overall chronicity, overall wastage, overall mortality, and BRD mortality rates were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the MLV3-BT2 group than in the MLV4-BT1 group. Average daily gain and the proportions of yield grade Canada 3 and quality grade E carcasses were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the MLV3-BT2 group than in the MLV4-BT1 group. No significant (P ≥ 0.05) difference in the dry matter intake to gain ratio was detected between the 2 groups. In economic terms, there was a net advantage of $20.86 CDN/animal in the MLV3-BT2 group. This study demonstrates that it is more cost effective to use an MLV3-BT2 vaccination program than a MLV4-BT1 vaccination program in feedlot calves at ultra-high risk of developing UF/BRD. PMID:18512457

  20. Comparison of Active Drug Concentrations in the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid and Interstitial Fluid of Calves Injected with Enrofloxacin, Florfenicol, Ceftiofur, or Tulathromycin

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Derek M.; Martin, Luke G.; Papich, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is the most common reason for parenteral antimicrobial administration to beef cattle in the United States. Yet there is little information describing the antimicrobial concentrations at the site of action. The objective of this study was to compare the active drug concentrations in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and interstitial fluid of four antimicrobials commonly used in cattle. After injection, plasma, interstitial fluid, and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentrations and protein binding were measured to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of each drug. A cross-over design with six calves per drug was used. Following sample collection and drug analysis, pharmacokinetic calculations were performed. For enrofloxacin and metabolite ciprofloxacin, the interstitial fluid concentration was 52% and 78% of the plasma concentration, while pulmonary fluid concentrations was 24% and 40% of the plasma concentration, respectively. The pulmonary concentrations (enrofloxacin + ciprofloxacin combined) exceeded the MIC90 of 0.06 μg/mL at 48 hours after administration. For florfenicol, the interstitial fluid concentration was almost 98% of the plasma concentration, and the pulmonary concentrations were over 200% of the plasma concentrations, exceeding the breakpoint (≤ 2 μg/mL), and the MIC90 for Mannheimia haemolytica (1.0 μg/mL) for the duration of the study. For ceftiofur, penetration to the interstitial fluid was only 5% of the plasma concentration. Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentration represented 40% of the plasma concentration. Airway concentrations exceeded the MIC breakpoint for susceptible respiratory pathogens (≤ 2 μg/mL) for a short time at 48 hours after administration. The plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of tulathromcyin were lower than the concentrations in pulmonary fluid throughout the study. The bronchial concentrations were higher than the plasma or interstitial concentrations, with over 900

  1. Comparison of Active Drug Concentrations in the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid and Interstitial Fluid of Calves Injected with Enrofloxacin, Florfenicol, Ceftiofur, or Tulathromycin.

    PubMed

    Foster, Derek M; Martin, Luke G; Papich, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is the most common reason for parenteral antimicrobial administration to beef cattle in the United States. Yet there is little information describing the antimicrobial concentrations at the site of action. The objective of this study was to compare the active drug concentrations in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and interstitial fluid of four antimicrobials commonly used in cattle. After injection, plasma, interstitial fluid, and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentrations and protein binding were measured to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of each drug. A cross-over design with six calves per drug was used. Following sample collection and drug analysis, pharmacokinetic calculations were performed. For enrofloxacin and metabolite ciprofloxacin, the interstitial fluid concentration was 52% and 78% of the plasma concentration, while pulmonary fluid concentrations was 24% and 40% of the plasma concentration, respectively. The pulmonary concentrations (enrofloxacin + ciprofloxacin combined) exceeded the MIC90 of 0.06 μg/mL at 48 hours after administration. For florfenicol, the interstitial fluid concentration was almost 98% of the plasma concentration, and the pulmonary concentrations were over 200% of the plasma concentrations, exceeding the breakpoint (≤ 2 μg/mL), and the MIC90 for Mannheimia haemolytica (1.0 μg/mL) for the duration of the study. For ceftiofur, penetration to the interstitial fluid was only 5% of the plasma concentration. Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentration represented 40% of the plasma concentration. Airway concentrations exceeded the MIC breakpoint for susceptible respiratory pathogens (≤ 2 μg/mL) for a short time at 48 hours after administration. The plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of tulathromcyin were lower than the concentrations in pulmonary fluid throughout the study. The bronchial concentrations were higher than the plasma or interstitial concentrations, with over 900

  2. Immunological Response to Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex: An RNA-Sequence Analysis of the Bronchial Lymph Node Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Seabury, Christopher M.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L.; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Neibergs, Holly L.; Taylor, Jeremy F.

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility to bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is multi-factorial and is influenced by stress in conjunction with infection by both bacterial and viral pathogens. While vaccination is broadly used in an effort to prevent BRD, it is far from being fully protective and cases diagnosed from a combination of observed clinical signs without any attempt at identifying the causal pathogens are usually treated with antibiotics. Dairy and beef cattle losses from BRD are profound worldwide and genetic studies have now been initiated to elucidate host loci which underlie susceptibility with the objective of enabling molecular breeding to reduce disease prevalence. In this study, we employed RNA sequencing to examine the bronchial lymph node transcriptomes of controls and beef cattle which had individually been experimentally challenged with bovine respiratory syncytial virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine viral diarrhea virus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica or Mycoplasma bovis to identify the genes that are involved in the bovine immune response to infection. We found that 142 differentially expressed genes were located in previously described quantitative trait locus regions associated with risk of BRD. Mutations affecting the expression or amino acid composition of these genes may affect disease susceptibility and could be incorporated into molecular breeding programs. Genes involved in innate immunity were generally found to be differentially expressed between the control and pathogen-challenged animals suggesting that variation in these genes may lead to a heritability of susceptibility that is pathogen independent. However, we also found pathogen-specific expression profiles which suggest that host genetic variation for BRD susceptibility is pathogen dependent. PMID:26121276

  3. Central Activation of the A1 Adenosine Receptor (A1AR) Induces a Hypothermic, Torpor-Like State in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Christopher J.; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2013-01-01

    Since central activation of A1 adenosine receptors (A1ARs) plays an important role in the induction of the hypothermic and hypometabolic torpid state in hibernating mammals, we investigated the potential for the A1AR agonist N6-cyclohexyladenosine to induce a hypothermic, torpor-like state in the (nonhibernating) rat. Core and brown adipose tissue temperatures, EEG, heart rate, and arterial pressure were recorded in free-behaving rats, and c-fos expression in the brain was analyzed, following central administration of N6-cyclohexyladenosine. Additionally, we recorded the sympathetic nerve activity to brown adipose tissue; expiratory CO2 and skin, core, and brown adipose tissue temperatures; and shivering EMGs in anesthetized rats following central and localized, nucleus of the solitary tract, administration of N6-cyclohexyladenosine. In rats exposed to a cool (15°C) ambient temperature, central A1AR stimulation produced a torpor-like state similar to that in hibernating species and characterized by a marked fall in body temperature due to an inhibition of brown adipose tissue and shivering thermogenesis that is mediated by neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract. During the induced hypothermia, EEG amplitude and heart rate were markedly reduced. Skipped heartbeats and transient bradycardias occurring during the hypothermia were vagally mediated since they were eliminated by systemic muscarinic receptor blockade. These findings demonstrate that a deeply hypothermic, torpor-like state can be pharmacologically induced in a nonhibernating mammal and that recovery of normothermic homeostasis ensues upon rewarming. These results support the potential for central activation of A1ARs to be used in the induction of a hypothermic, therapeutically beneficial state in humans. PMID:24005302

  4. Relationship between the G75A polymorphism in the apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) gene and the lipid regulatory effects of pravastatin in patients with hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, T N; Wu, C T; He, F; Yuan, W; Li, S X; Li, H W; Yu, H Y; Wu, M

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the G75A polymorphism in the apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) gene and the lipid regulatory effect of pravastatin in patients with hyperlipidemia. A total of 179 patients were divided into two groups: the pravastatin (N = 97) and policosanol (N = 82) treatment groups. The total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-c), high-density lipoprotein, ApoA, and ApoB concentrations in the serum were measured using an automatic biochemical analyzer before and after treatment for 12 weeks. The genotypes of the ApoA1 G75A SNP were detected by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, and were subsequently statistically analyzed. Pravastatin treatment induced a significant decrease in the TC, LDL-c, and ApoB levels in patients expressing the ApoA1 AA+GA genotype (P < 0.05), and not in those expressing the GG genotype (P > 0.05). However, policosanol treatment induced a non-significant decrease in the serum TC levels (P > 0.05) and a significant decrease in the ApoB levels (P < 0.05), and did not induce a decrease in the LDL-c (P > 0.05) levels in patients with the AA+GA genotype. Policosanol also induced a significant decrease in the TC and LDL-c levels in patients with the GG genotype (P < 0.05). The various genotypes of the ApoA1 G75A SNP influence the efficacy of lipid regulation by pravastatin and policosanol in patients with hyperlipidemia. PMID:27323196

  5. UGT1A1 predicts outcome in colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Shen, Lin; Xu, Nong; Wang, Jin-Wan; Jiao, Shun-Chang; Liu, Ze-Yuan; Xu, Jian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate effects of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase1A1 (UGT1A1) and thymidylate synthetase (TS) gene polymorphisms on irinotecan in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). METHODS: Two irinotecan- and fluorouracil-based regimens, FOLFIRI and IFL, were selected as second-line therapy for 138 Chinese mCRC patients. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples before treatment. UGT1A1 and TS gene polymorphisms were determined by direct sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism, respectively. Gene polymorphisms of UGT1A1*28, UGT1A1*6 and promoter enhancer region of TS were analyzed. The relationship between genetic polymorphisms and clinical outcome, that is, response, toxicity and survival were assessed. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed in a subgroup patients based on different UGT1A1 genotypes. Plasma concentration of irinotecan and its active metabolite SN-38 and inactive metabolite SN-38G were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Differences in irinotecan and its metabolites between UGT1A1 gene variants were compared. RESULTS: One hundred and eight patients received the FOLFIRI regimen, 29 the IFL regimen, and one irinotecan monotherapy. One hundred and thirty patients were eligible for toxicity and 111 for efficacy evaluation. One hundred and thirty-six patients were tested for UGT1A1*28 and *6 genotypes and 125 for promoter enhancer region of TS. Patients showed a higher frequency of wild-type UGT1A1*28 (TA6/6) compared with a Caucasian population (69.9% vs 45.2%). No significant difference was found between response rates and UGT1A1 genotype, although wild-type showed lower response rates compared with other variants (17.9% vs 24.2% for UGT1A1*28, 15.7% vs 26.8% for UGT1A1*6). When TS was considered, the subgroup with homozygous UGT1A1*28 (TA7/7) and non-3RG genotypes showed the highest response rate (33.3%), while wild-type UGT1A1*28 (TA6/6) with non-3RG only had a 13.6% response rate, but no significant

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A-1 to Part 60 - Test Methods 1 through 2F

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Requirements) of 40 CFR part 60, subpart A (General Provisions). Specific uses of these test methods are...-1 to Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES (CONTINUED) Pt. 60, App. A-1 Appendix A-1...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix A-1 to Part 60 - Test Methods 1 through 2F

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Requirements) of 40 CFR part 60, subpart A (General Provisions). Specific uses of these test methods are...-1 to Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES (CONTINUED) Pt. 60, App. A-1 Appendix A-1...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix A-1 to Part 60 - Test Methods 1 through 2F

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Requirements) of 40 CFR part 60, subpart A (General Provisions). Specific uses of these test methods are...-1 to Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES (CONTINUED) Pt. 60, App. A-1 Appendix A-1...

  9. 26 CFR 31.6081(a)-1 - Extensions of time for filing returns and other documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... documents. 31.6081(a)-1 Section 31.6081(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Administrative Provisions of Special Application to Employment...

  10. 26 CFR 53.4942(a)-1 - Taxes for failure to distribute income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxes for failure to distribute income. 53.4942(a)-1 Section 53.4942(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Failure...

  11. 26 CFR 1.924(a)-1T - Temporary regulations; definition of foreign trading gross receipts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (f)), other than the GSM-4 program provided under 7 CFR part 1488, and section 407 of the... either any provision of the Department of Defense Federal Acquisition Regulations Supplement (48 CFR... trading gross receipts. 1.924(a)-1T Section 1.924(a)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE...

  12. 26 CFR 1.925(a)-1 - Transfer pricing rules for FSCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transfer pricing rules for FSCs. 1.925(a)-1... pricing rules for FSCs. (a)-(c)(7) . For further guidance, see § 1.925(a)-1T(a) through (c)(7). (c)(8...-transaction basis. However, at the annual choice made by the related supplier if the administrative...

  13. Apolipoprotein A1/C3/A5 haplotypes and serum lipid levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the apolipoprotein (Apo) A1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster and serum lipid profiles is inconsistent. The present study was undertaken to detect the association between the ApoA1/C3/A5 gene polymorphisms and their haplotypes with serum lipid levels ...

  14. 26 CFR 1.411(a)-1 - Minimum vesting standards; general rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 are provided under 29 CFR Part 2530 (Department of... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum vesting standards; general rules. 1.411(a)-1 Section 1.411(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  15. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-1 - Minimum participation standards; general rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in service. For rules relating to years of service and breaks in service, see 29 CFR Part 2530... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum participation standards; general rules. 1.410(a)-1 Section 1.410(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  16. 26 CFR 48.4062(a)-1 - Specific parts or accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Specific parts or accessories. 48.4062(a)-1 Section 48.4062(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Motor Vehicles, Tires, Tubes, Tread...

  17. 26 CFR 48.4062(a)-1 - Specific parts or accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Specific parts or accessories. 48.4062(a)-1 Section 48.4062(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Motor Vehicles, Tires, Tubes, Tread...

  18. 26 CFR 48.4062(a)-1 - Specific parts or accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Specific parts or accessories. 48.4062(a)-1 Section 48.4062(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Motor Vehicles, Tires, Tubes, Tread...

  19. 26 CFR 1.6038A-1 - General requirements and definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false General requirements and definitions. 1.6038A-1 Section 1.6038A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME.... trade or business, is 75 percent owned by FC1, a foreign corporation that, in turn, is wholly owned...

  20. 26 CFR 1.6038A-1 - General requirements and definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false General requirements and definitions. 1.6038A-1 Section 1.6038A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME.... trade or business, is 75 percent owned by FC1, a foreign corporation that, in turn, is wholly owned...

  1. 26 CFR 1.6038A-1 - General requirements and definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false General requirements and definitions. 1.6038A-1 Section 1.6038A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME.... trade or business, is 75 percent owned by FC1, a foreign corporation that, in turn, is wholly owned...

  2. NEK2 mediates ALDH1A1-dependent drug resistance in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jiliang; Gu, Zhimin; Wendlandt, Erik; Zhan, Xin; Janz, Siegfried; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2014-01-01

    We reported previously that increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) in multiple myeloma (MM) is a marker of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) that is further associated with chromosomal instability (CIN). Here we demonstrate that member A1 of the ALDH1 family of proteins, ALDH1A1, is most abundantly expressed in myeloma. Enforced expression of ALDH1A1 in myeloma cells led to increased clonogenicity, tumor formation in mice, and resistance to myeloma drugs in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism underlying these phenotypes included the ALDH1A1-dependent activation of drug-efflux pump, ABCB1, and survival proteins, AKT and BCL2. Over expression of ALDH1A1 in myeloma cells led to increased mRNA and protein levels of NIMA-related kinase 2 (NEK2), whereas shRNA-mediated knock down of NEK2 decreased drug efflux pump activity and drug resistance. The activation of NEK2 in myeloma cells relied on the ALDH1A1-dependent generation of the retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) ligand, 9-cis retinoic acid (9CRA) – not the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) ligand, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). These findings implicate the ALDH1A1-RXRα-NEK2 pathway in drug resistance and disease relapse in myeloma and suggest that specific inhibitors of ALDH1A1 are worthy of consideration for clinical development of new approaches to overcome drug resistance in myeloma. PMID:25230277

  3. NR4A1 promotes PDGF-BB-induced cell colony formation in soft agar.

    PubMed

    Eger, Glenda; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast mitogen platelet-derived growth factor -BB (PDGF-BB) induces a transient expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (also named Nur77, TR3 or NGFIB). The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathways through which NR4A1 is induced by PDGF-BB and its functional role. We demonstrate that in PDGF-BB stimulated NIH3T3 cells, the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040 strongly represses NR4A1 expression, whereas Erk5 downregulation delays the expression, but does not block it. Moreover, we report that treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 suppresses NR4A1 mRNA and protein expression. The majority of NR4A1 in NIH3T3 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and only a fraction was translocated to the nucleus after continued PDGF-BB treatment. Silencing NR4A1 slightly increased the proliferation rate of NIH3T3 cells; however, it did not affect the chemotactic or survival abilities conferred by PDGF-BB. Moreover, overexpression of NR4A1 promoted anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells and the glioblastoma cell lines U-105MG and U-251MG. Thus, whereas NR4A1, induced by PDGF-BB, suppresses cell growth on a solid surface, it increases anchorage-independent growth. PMID:25269081

  4. NR4A1 Promotes PDGF-BB-Induced Cell Colony Formation in Soft Agar

    PubMed Central

    Eger, Glenda; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast mitogen platelet-derived growth factor -BB (PDGF-BB) induces a transient expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (also named Nur77, TR3 or NGFIB). The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathways through which NR4A1 is induced by PDGF-BB and its functional role. We demonstrate that in PDGF-BB stimulated NIH3T3 cells, the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040 strongly represses NR4A1 expression, whereas Erk5 downregulation delays the expression, but does not block it. Moreover, we report that treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 suppresses NR4A1 mRNA and protein expression. The majority of NR4A1 in NIH3T3 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and only a fraction was translocated to the nucleus after continued PDGF-BB treatment. Silencing NR4A1 slightly increased the proliferation rate of NIH3T3 cells; however, it did not affect the chemotactic or survival abilities conferred by PDGF-BB. Moreover, overexpression of NR4A1 promoted anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells and the glioblastoma cell lines U-105MG and U-251MG. Thus, whereas NR4A1, induced by PDGF-BB, suppresses cell growth on a solid surface, it increases anchorage-independent growth. PMID:25269081

  5. 49 CFR 173.435 - Table of A1 and A2 values for radionuclides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.435 Table of A1... Radioactive Material, No. TS-R-1” (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). b The values of A1 and A2 in curies... rate of decay or a measurement of the radiation level at a prescribed distance from the source. d...

  6. Col4a1 mutations cause progressive retinal neovascular defects and retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Marcel V.; Mao, Mao; Pawlikowski, Bradley T.; Kvezereli, Manana; Duncan, Jacque L.; Libby, Richard T.; John, Simon W. M.; Gould, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in collagen, type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1), a major component of basement membranes, cause multisystem disorders in humans and mice. In the eye, these include anterior segment dysgenesis, optic nerve hypoplasia and retinal vascular tortuosity. Here we investigate the retinal pathology in mice carrying dominant-negative Col4a1 mutations. To this end, we examined retinas longitudinally in vivo using fluorescein angiography, funduscopy and optical coherence tomography. We assessed retinal function by electroretinography and studied the retinal ultrastructural pathology. Retinal examinations revealed serous chorioretinopathy, retinal hemorrhages, fibrosis or signs of pathogenic angiogenesis with chorioretinal anastomosis in up to approximately 90% of Col4a1 mutant eyes depending on age and the specific mutation. To identify the cell-type responsible for pathogenesis we generated a conditional Col4a1 mutation and determined that primary vascular defects underlie Col4a1-associated retinopathy. We also found focal activation of Müller cells and increased expression of pro-angiogenic factors in retinas from Col4a1+/Δex41mice. Together, our findings suggest that patients with COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations may be at elevated risk of retinal hemorrhages and that retinal examinations may be useful for identifying patients with COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations who are also at elevated risk of hemorrhagic strokes. PMID:26813606

  7. Epigenetic Modulation of Collagen 1A1: Therapeutic Implications in Fibrosis and Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ye; Khan, Zaraq; Zanfagnin, Valentina; Correa, Luiz F; Delaney, Abigail A; Daftary, Gaurang S

    2016-04-01

    Progressive fibrosis is recalcitrant to conventional therapy and commonly complicates chronic diseases and surgical healing. We evaluate here a novel mechanism that regulates scar-tissue collagen (COL1A1/Col1a1) expression and characterizes its translational relevance as a targeted therapy for fibrosis in an endometriosis disease model. Endometriosis is caused by displacement and implantation of uterine endometrium onto abdominal organs and spreads with progressive scarring. Transcription factor KLF11 is specifically diminished in endometriosis lesions. Loss of KLF11-mediated repression of COL1A1/Col1a1 expression resulted in increased fibrosis. To determine the biological significance of COL1A1/Col1a1 expression on fibrosis, we modulated its expression. In human endometrial-stromal fibroblasts, KLF11 recruited SIN3A/HDAC (histone deacetylase), resulting in COL1A1-promoter deacetylation and repression. This role of KLF11 was pharmacologically replicated by a histone acetyl transferase inhibitor (garcinol). In contrast, opposite effects were obtained with a HDAC inhibitor (suberoyl anilide hydroxamic acid), confirming regulatory specificity for these reciprocally active epigenetic mechanisms. Fibrosis was concordantly reversed in Klf11(-/-)animals by histone acetyl transferase inhibitor and in wild-type animals by HDAC inhibitor treatments. Aberrant lesional COL1A1 regulation is significant because fibrosis depended on lesion rather than host genotype. This is the first report demonstrating feasibility for targeted pharmacological reversal of fibrosis, an intractable phenotype of diverse chronic diseases. PMID:26935598

  8. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Global Warming Potentials

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Global Warming Potentials A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING General Provision Pt. 98, Subpt. A, Table A-1...

  9. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Global Warming Potentials

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Global Warming Potentials A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING General Provision Pt. 98, Subpt. A, Table A-1...

  10. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Global Warming Potentials

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Global Warming Potentials A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING General Provision Pt. 98, Subpt. A, Table A-1...

  11. Comparison of Technology Use between Biology and Physics Teachers in a 1:1 Laptop Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, Simon J.; Sharma, Manjula D.; Wilson, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Using a mixed-methods approach the authors compared the associated practices of senior physics teachers (n = 7) and students (n = 53) in a 1:1 laptop environment with those of senior biology teachers (n = 10) and students (n = 125) also in a 1:1 laptop environment, in seven high schools in Sydney, NSW, Australia. They found that the physics…

  12. 26 CFR 1.6031(a)-1 - Return of partnership income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Return of partnership income. 1.6031(a)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Information Returns § 1.6031(a)-1 Return of partnership income. (a..., every domestic partnership must file a return of partnership income under section 6031...

  13. 26 CFR 1.6031(a)-1 - Return of partnership income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Return of partnership income. 1.6031(a)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6031(a)-1 Return of partnership income. (a) Domestic partnerships—(1) Return required. Except as provided in paragraphs (a)(3) and (c)...

  14. 26 CFR 1.6031(a)-1 - Return of partnership income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Return of partnership income. 1.6031(a)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6031(a)-1 Return of partnership income. (a) Domestic partnerships—(1) Return required. Except as provided in paragraphs (a)(3) and (c)...

  15. 16 CFR Appendix A1 to Part 305 - Refrigerators With Automatic Defrost

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Refrigerators With Automatic Defrost A1 Appendix A1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING DISCLOSURES REGARDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND WATER USE OF CERTAIN HOME...

  16. 16 CFR Appendix A1 to Part 305 - Refrigerators With Automatic Defrost

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Refrigerators With Automatic Defrost A1 Appendix A1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING DISCLOSURES REGARDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND WATER USE OF CERTAIN HOME...

  17. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Global Warming Potentials

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Global Warming Potentials A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... A-1 to Subpart A of Part 98—Global Warming Potentials Name CAS No. Chemical formula Global...

  18. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Global Warming Potentials

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Global Warming Potentials A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... A-1 to Subpart A of Part 98—Global Warming Potentials Name CAS No. Chemical formula Global...

  19. Glucose induces intestinal human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 to prevent neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Naoya; Fujie, Yoshiko; Itoh, Tomoo; Tukey, Robert H; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate calorie intake or starvation has been suggested as a cause of neonatal jaundice, which can further cause permanent brain damage, kernicterus. This study experimentally investigated whether additional glucose treatments induce the bilirubin-metabolizing enzyme--UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1--to prevent the onset of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Neonatal humanized UGT1 (hUGT1) mice physiologically develop jaundice. In this study, UGT1A1 expression levels were determined in the liver and small intestine of neonatal hUGT1 mice that were orally treated with glucose. In the hUGT1 mice, glucose induced UGT1A1 in the small intestine, while it did not affect the expression of UGT1A1 in the liver. UGT1A1 was also induced in the human intestinal Caco-2 cells when the cells were cultured in the presence of glucose. Luciferase assays demonstrated that not only the proximal region (-1300/-7) of the UGT1A1 promoter, but also distal region (-6500/-4050) were responsible for the induction of UGT1A1 in the intestinal cells. Adequate calorie intake would lead to the sufficient expression of UGT1A1 in the small intestine to reduce serum bilirubin levels. Supplemental treatment of newborns with glucose solution can be a convenient and efficient method to treat neonatal jaundice while allowing continuous breastfeeding. PMID:25209391

  20. 42 CFR 65a.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 65a.1 Section 65a.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES BASIC...