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Sample records for mannose-resistant proteus-like fimbriae

  1. Requirement of MrpH for Mannose-Resistant Proteus-Like Fimbria-Mediated Hemagglutination by Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Johnson, David E.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    1999-01-01

    Two new genes, mrpH and mrpJ, were identified downstream of mrpG in the mrp gene cluster encoding mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Since the predicted MrpH has 30% amino acid sequence identity to PapG, the Galα(1-4)Gal-binding adhesin of Escherichia coli P fimbriae, we hypothesized that mrpH encodes the functional MR/P hemagglutinin. MR/P fimbriae, expressed in E. coli DH5α, conferred on bacteria both the ability to cause mannose-resistant hemagglutination and the ability to aggregate to form pellicles on the broth surface. Both a ΔmrpH mutant expressed in E. coli DH5α and an isogenic mrpH::aphA mutant of P. mirabilis were unable to produce normal MR/P fimbriae efficiently, suggesting that MrpH was involved in fimbrial assembly. Amino acid residue substitution of the N-terminal cysteine residues (C66S and C128S) of MrpH abolished the receptor-binding activity (hemagglutinating ability) of MrpH but allowed normal fimbrial assembly, supporting the notion that MrpH was the functional MR/P hemagglutinin. Immunogold electron microscopy of P. mirabilis HI4320 revealed that MrpH was located at the tip of MR/P fimbriae, also consistent with its role in receptor binding. The isogenic mrpH::aphA mutant of HI4320 was less able to colonize the urine, bladder, and kidneys in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection (P < 0.01), and therefore MR/P fimbriae contribute significantly to bacterial colonization in mice. While there are similarities between P. mirabilis MR/P and E. coli P fimbriae, there are more notable differences: (i) synthesis of the MrpH adhesin is required to initiate fimbrial assembly, (ii) MR/P fimbriae confer an aggregation phenotype, (iii) site-directed mutation of specific residues can abolish receptor binding but allows fimbrial assembly, and (iv) mutation of the adhesin gene abolishes virulence in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. PMID:10338487

  2. Proteus mirabilis mannose-resistant, Proteus-like fimbriae: MrpG is located at the fimbrial tip and is required for fimbrial assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Zhao, H; Geymonat, L; Bahrani, F; Johnson, D E; Mobley, H L

    1997-01-01

    The mannose-resistant, Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbria, responsible for mannose-resistant hemagglutination, is a virulence factor for uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Based on known fimbrial gene organization, we postulated that MrpG, a putative minor subunit of the MR/P fimbria, functions as an adhesin responsible for hemagglutination, while MrpA serves as the major structural subunit for the filamentous structure. To test this hypothesis, an mrpG mutant was constructed by allelic-exchange mutagenesis and verified by PCR and Southern blotting. The mrpG mutant was found to be negative for hemagglutination, while wild-type strain H14320 and the complemented mutant were positive. Western blots with antiserum raised against an overexpressed MrpG'-His6 fusion protein showed that MrpG was present in the fimbrial preparations of both the wild-type strain and the complemented mutant but absent in that of the mrpG mutant. The mrpG mutant was significantly less virulent in a CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Western blots with antiserum to whole MR/P fimbriae showed that MrpA protein was also missing from the fimbrial preparation of the mrpG mutant. Using immunogold electron microscopy, we found that the normal MR/P-fimbrial structure was absent in the mrpG mutant, suggesting that MrpG is essential for initiation of normal fimbrial formation. In the wild-type strain, MrpG protein was localized to the tips of the fimbriae or at the surface of the cell when antiserum raised against overexpressed MrpG was used. Given the tip localization, MrpG may be required for initiation of assembly of MR/P fimbriae but does not appear to be the fimbrial adhesin. PMID:9119470

  3. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae: identification, isolation, and characterization of a new ambient-temperature fimbria.

    PubMed Central

    Massad, G; Bahrani, F K; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Urinary tract infections involving Proteus mirabilis may lead to complications including bladder and kidney stones, acute pyelonephritis, and bacteremia. This bacterium produces a number of fimbriae, two of which, MR/P fimbria and P. mirabilis fimbria, have been shown to contribute to the ability of this pathogen to colonize the bladder and kidney. We have now purified and characterized a previously undescribed fimbria of P. mirabilis, named ambient-temperature fimbria (ATF). Electron microscopy of a pure preparation and immunogold labeling of cells demonstrated that ATF was fimbrial in nature. The major fimbrial subunit of ATF has an apparent molecular weight of 24,000. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, E-X-T-G-T-P-A-P-T-E-V-T-V-D-G-G-T-I-D-F, did not show significant similarity to that of any previously described fimbrial protein. ATF was expressed by all eight P. mirabilis strains examined. Culture conditions affected expression of ATF, with optimal expression observed in static broth cultures at 23 degrees C. This fimbria was not produced by cells grown at 42 degrees C or on solid medium. Expression of ATF did not correlate with mannose-resistant/Proteus-like (MR/P) or mannose-resistant/Klebsiella-like (MR/K) hemagglutination and represents a novel fimbria of P. mirabilis. Images PMID:7909538

  4. The expression of nonagglutinating fimbriae and its role in Proteus mirabilis adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tolson, D L; Harrison, B A; Latta, R K; Lee, K K; Altman, E

    1997-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common causative agent of human urinary tract infections, especially in catheterized patients and in those patients with structural abnormalities of the urinary tract. In addition to the production of hemolysin and urease, fimbriae-mediated adherence to uroepithelial cells and kidney epithelium may be essential for virulence of P. mirabilis. A single P. mirabilis strain is capable of expressing several morphologically distinct fimbrial species, which can each be favoured by specific in vitro growth conditions. The fimbrial species reported to date include mannose-resistant/Proteus-like fimbriae, ambient temperature fimbriae, P. mirabilis fimbriae, and nonagglutinating fimbriae (NAF). Here, using intact bacteria or purified NAF as immunogens, we have generated the first reported NAF-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Bacteria expressing NAF as their only fimbrial species adhered strongly to a number of cell lines in vitro, including uroepithelial cell lines. Binding of P. mirabilis was markedly reduced following preincubation with NAF-specific mAbs and Fab fragments. The presence of NAF with highly conserved N-terminal sequences on all P. mirabilis strains so far examined, combined with the ability of both anti-NAF mAbs and purified NAF molecules to inhibit P. mirabilis adherence in vitro, suggests that NAF may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. mirabilis. PMID:9304781

  5. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae- and urease-dependent clusters assemble in an extracellular niche to initiate bladder stone formation.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Norsworthy, Allison N; Sun, Tung-Tien; Pearson, Melanie M

    2016-04-19

    The catheter-associated uropathogenProteus mirabilisfrequently causes urinary stones, but little has been known about the initial stages of bladder colonization and stone formation. We found thatP. mirabilisrapidly invades the bladder urothelium, but generally fails to establish an intracellular niche. Instead, it forms extracellular clusters in the bladder lumen, which form foci of mineral deposition consistent with development of urinary stones. These clusters elicit a robust neutrophil response, and we present evidence of neutrophil extracellular trap generation during experimental urinary tract infection. We identified two virulence factors required for cluster development: urease, which is required for urolithiasis, and mannose-resistantProteus-like fimbriae. The extracellular cluster formation byP. mirabilisstands in direct contrast to uropathogenicEscherichia coli, which readily formed intracellular bacterial communities but not luminal clusters or urinary stones. We propose that extracellular clusters are a key mechanism ofP. mirabilissurvival and virulence in the bladder. PMID:27044107

  6. Interaction of Escherichia coli with Different Fimbriae and Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Björkstén, Bengt; Wadström, Torkel

    1982-01-01

    The effects of Escherichia coli strains with various fimbriae on bacteria-polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) interactions were studied. Strains of E. coli were cultivated at 37°C to express and at 18°C to suppress the formation of fimbriae. The presence of fimbriae was confirmed by electron microscopic studies and hemagglutination and salt aggregation tests. Fimbriated E. coli strains were more readily PMN associated than the nonfimbriated strains in the absence of opsonins, confirming the results of previous studies. However, the PMN chemiluminescence (CL) induced by the various strains in the absence of serum opsonins depended on the type of fimbriae they expressed. Strains with type 1 fimbriae expressing mannose-sensitive hemagglutination induced 5 to 15 times more CL than the same strains grown at 18°C, i.e., not expressing this type of fimbriae. For strains showing mannose-resistant hemagglutination, the differences between fimbriated and nonfimbriated variants of the same strains grown at 37 and 18°C, respectively, were less pronounced. Analysis of enterotoxigenic strains expressing colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae showed that these induced only 25 to 33% of the CL induced by the same E. coli strains not expressing CFA/I, whereas enterotoxigenic strains expressing CFA/II fimbriae induced 100 to 200% of the CL induced by the nonfimbriated variants. Although less CL was induced by bacteria with CFA/I fimbriae than by nonfimbriated variants, this situation was reversed when the microorganisms were opsonized. Thus, CFA/I fimbriae, while enhancing adhesion to cells, induce less activation of PMN-killing mechanisms in a serum-free environment. These findings may be relevant for the virulence in certain body sites, since CFA/I fimbriae, while facilitating adhesiveness, may protect the bacteria from PMN killing. Our findings indicate that PMN interactions with fimbriated E. coli in the host defense may be complex. Certain fimbriae may indeed be

  7. Cloning and expression of an afimbrial adhesin (AFA-I) responsible for P blood group-independent, mannose-resistant hemagglutination from a pyelonephritic Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed Central

    Labigne-Roussel, A F; Lark, D; Schoolnik, G; Falkow, S

    1984-01-01

    The uropathogenic Escherichia coli KS52 strain expresses a mannose-resistant hemagglutinin involving an erythrocyte recognition site distinct from the alpha-digalactoside glycosphingolipid receptor identified for the uropathogenic E. coli strains specifying a P adhesin. The KS52 strain showed three major properties. (i) It agglutinated human erythrocytes of all tested blood groups. (ii) Hemagglutinin activity was found both in the supernatant fluid L-broth cultures and in cells grown on L-agar plates. (iii) No fimbriae in organisms grown on L-agar plates were detected by electron microscopy. Whole-cell DNA from the KS52 strain was size fractionated and cloned into the pHC79 cosmid vector. Three recombinant cosmids expressing a mannose-resistant hemagglutination (MRHA) phenotype were characterized and used to subclone the smallest DNA fragment able to confer the same MRHA properties as the parent strain. A 6.7-kilobase chromosomal DNA fragment cloned in pBR322 (pIL14) was shown to be necessary for host-cell MRHA expression and uroepithelial cell adherence. The insert encoded the production of a 16,000-dalton hemagglutinin. This polypeptide could be detected in culture supernatant fluids, in E. coli minicells harboring the pIL14 plasmid, and, by immunoblotting, in the KS52 strain and E. coli whole cells harboring the pIL14 plasmid. No homology was detected by Southern hybridization between the cloned insert and the DNA of the operon responsible for MRHA in the P-specifying, fimbriate strains (pap operon). Images PMID:6148308

  8. Biochemical Characterization and Agglutinating Properties of Xenorhabdus nematophilus F1 Fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Moureaux, N.; Karjalainen, T.; Givaudan, A.; Bourlioux, P.; Boemare, N.

    1995-01-01

    Xenorhabdus spp., entomopathogenic bacteria symbiotically associated with nematodes of the family Steinernematidae, occur spontaneously in two phases. Only the phase I variants of Xenorhabdus nematophilus F1 expressed fimbriae when the bacteria were grown on a solid medium (nutrient agar; 24 and 48 h of growth). These appendages were purified and characterized. They were rigid, with a diameter of 6.4 (plusmn) 0.3 nm, and were composed of 16-kDa pilin subunits. The latter were synthesized and assembled during the first 24 h of growth. Phase II variants of X. nematophilus did not possess fimbriae and apparently did not synthesize pilin. Phase I variants of X. nematophilus have an agglutinating activity with sheep, rabbit, and human erythrocytes and with hemocytes of the insect Galleria mellonella. The purified fimbriae agglutinated sheep and rabbit erythrocytes. The hemagglutination by bacteria and purified fimbriae was mannose resistant and was inhibited by porcine gastric mucin and N-acetyl-lactosamine. The last sugar seems to be a specific inhibitor of hemagglutination by X. nematophilus. PMID:16535079

  9. Proteus mirabilis flagella and MR/P fimbriae: isolation, purification, N-terminal analysis, and serum antibody response following experimental urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, F K; Johnson, D E; Robbins, D; Mobley, H L

    1991-10-01

    Urinary tract infection with Proteus mirabilis may lead to serious complications, including cystitis, acute pyelonephritis, fever, bacteremia, and death. In addition to the production of hemolysin and the enzyme urease, fimbriae and flagellum-mediated motility have been postulated as virulence factors for this species. We purified mannose-resistant/proteuslike (MR/P) fimbriae and flagella from strains CFT322 and HU2450, respectively. Electron microscopy revealed highly concentrated preparations of fimbriae and flagella. Fimbrial and flagellar structural subunits were estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to be 18.5 and 41 kDa, respectively. N-terminal sequencing revealed that 10 of the first 20 amino acids of the major MR/P subunit matched the sequence of the P. mirabilis uroepithelial cell adhesin N terminus and 11 of 20 amino acids matched the predicted amino acid sequence of the Escherichia coli P fimbriae structural subunit, PapA. In addition, 90 and 80% homologies were found between the first 20 amino acids of P. mirabilis flagellin and those of Salmonella typhimurium phase-1 flagellin and the E. coli hag gene product, respectively. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using purified antigens showed a strong reaction between the MR/P fimbriae or flagella and sera of CBA mice challenged transurethrally with P. mirabilis. A possible role for MR/P fimbriae in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection is supported by (i) a strong immune response to the antigen in experimentally infected animals, (ii) amino acid sequence similarity to other enteric surface structure, and (iii) our previously reported observation that MR/P fimbriae are expressed preferentially as the sole fimbrial type in human pyelonephritis isolates. PMID:1680106

  10. Avian P1 antigens inhibit agglutination mediated by P fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J R; Swanson, J L; Neill, M A

    1992-01-01

    Whole egg white from pigeon, dove, and cockatiel eggs, as well as the ovomucoid fraction of pigeon egg white, exhibited strong P1 antigenic activities and inhibited agglutination of human P1 erythrocytes and of digalactoside-coated latex beads by P-fimbriated Escherichia coli strains. In contrast, chicken egg white exhibited only weak P1 antigenic activity and had little impact on P-fimbrial agglutination. These preparations did not affect hemagglutination by E. coli strains expressing mannose-resistant adhesins other than P fimbriae, i.e., Dr, F1845, and S adhesins. Human anti-P1 serum diminished the P-fimbrial inhibitory activities of pigeon egg white and pigeon ovomucoid. Pigeon ovomucoid was equipotent on a molar basis with globoside, and the pigeon, dove, and cockatiel egg white preparations were equipotent with each other in P-fimbrial inhibition. Incubation of p erythrocytes in whole egg whites or in pigeon ovomucoid did not render them agglutinable by P-fimbriated bacteria, whereas incubation in globoside did. These data demonstrate that whole egg whites (and their ovomucoid fraction) from members of the families Columbidae (pigeons and doves) and Psittacidae (parrots) specifically and potently inhibit P-fimbrial agglutination, probably by providing P1 antigen as a receptor for the P-fimbrial adhesin. Avian egg white preparations may facilitate adhesin characterization of wild-type uropathogenic strains and may useful in preventing upper urinary tract infections due to P-fimbriated E. coli. PMID:1346125

  11. Helical structure of Bordetella pertussis fimbriae.

    PubMed Central

    Steven, A C; Bisher, M E; Trus, B L; Thomas, D; Zhang, J M; Cowell, J L

    1986-01-01

    The helical structures of Bordetella pertussis fimbriae of serotypes 2 and 6 were determined by optical diffraction analysis of electron micrographs of negatively stained paracrystalline bundles of purified fimbriae. The fimbrial structure is based on an axial repeat of 13 nm that contains five repeating units in two complete turns of a single-start helix. This structure was confirmed by direct measurements of mass per unit length for individual fimbriae performed by dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy of unstained specimens. These data further established that the helically repeating unit is a monomer of fimbrial protein (Mr congruent to 22,000 for type 2 and Mr congruent to 21,500 for type 6). Radial density profiles calculated from the scanning transmission electron micrographs showed that the fimbria has peak density at its center, i.e., no axial channel, consistent with the results of conventional negative-staining electron microscopy. The radial profile gives an outermost diameter of approximately 7.5 nm, although the peripheral density is, on average, diffuse, allowing sufficient intercalation between adjacent fimbriae to give a center-to-center spacing of approximately 5.5 nm in the paracrystals. Despite serological and biochemical differences between type 2 and type 6 fimbriae, the packing arrangements of their fimbrial subunits are identical. From this observation, we infer that the respective subunits may have in common conserved regions whose packing dictates the helical geometry of the fimbria. It is plausible that a similar mechanism may underlie the phenomenon of phase variations in other systems of bacterial fimbriae. Images PMID:2875062

  12. Purification and characterization of serotype 6 fimbriae from Bordetella pertussis and comparison of their properties with serotype 2 fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Cowell, J L; Zhang, J M; Urisu, A; Suzuki, A; Steven, A C; Liu, T; Liu, T Y; Manclark, C R

    1987-04-01

    Fimbriae were removed from Bordetella pertussis (serotype 1.3.6) by mechanical shearing and purified by precipitation with ammonium sulfate, pH-dependent precipitation at pH 7.4, followed by two successive extractions of the precipitated fimbriae with 4 M urea. By electron microscopy, the precipitated fimbriae appeared as aggregated bundles of long, relatively straight filaments which were disaggregated to individual flexuous filaments at pH 10.5. These purified fimbriae were identified as serotype 6 agglutinogens, since antibody to the purified fimbriae agglutinated B. pertussis strains serotyped as 1.3.6, 1.2.3.6, or 1.2.3.4.6 but did not agglutinate strains of serotype 1.2.3.4, 1.2.3, or 1.3. In contrast, antibody to serotype 2 fimbriae only agglutinated B. pertussis strains containing serotype 2 agglutinogen. Purified type 6 and 2 fimbriae were found to be weakly cross-reactive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using polyclonal antibody to each type of fimbria. In an immunoblot assay, polyclonal antibodies to a 22,000-dalton subunit of fimbriae from B. bronchiseptica reacted strongly with the type 2 fimbrial subunit of B. pertussis, but only weakly with the type 6 subunit. When subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the protein subunit of the type 6 fimbriae migrated with a molecular weight of 21,500, whereas the type 2 fimbrial subunit had a molecular weight of 22,000. The two types of subunits had similar amino acid compositions and showed amino-terminal sequence homology in 15 of 21 amino acids. The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of the B. pertussis fimbriae were distinct from those reported for fimbriae from other gram-negative bacteria. Neither the type 6 nor the type 2 fimbriae caused hemagglutination when assayed with several types of erythrocytes. PMID:2881893

  13. Purification and characterization of serotype 6 fimbriae from Bordetella pertussis and comparison of their properties with serotype 2 fimbriae.

    PubMed Central

    Cowell, J L; Zhang, J M; Urisu, A; Suzuki, A; Steven, A C; Liu, T; Liu, T Y; Manclark, C R

    1987-01-01

    Fimbriae were removed from Bordetella pertussis (serotype 1.3.6) by mechanical shearing and purified by precipitation with ammonium sulfate, pH-dependent precipitation at pH 7.4, followed by two successive extractions of the precipitated fimbriae with 4 M urea. By electron microscopy, the precipitated fimbriae appeared as aggregated bundles of long, relatively straight filaments which were disaggregated to individual flexuous filaments at pH 10.5. These purified fimbriae were identified as serotype 6 agglutinogens, since antibody to the purified fimbriae agglutinated B. pertussis strains serotyped as 1.3.6, 1.2.3.6, or 1.2.3.4.6 but did not agglutinate strains of serotype 1.2.3.4, 1.2.3, or 1.3. In contrast, antibody to serotype 2 fimbriae only agglutinated B. pertussis strains containing serotype 2 agglutinogen. Purified type 6 and 2 fimbriae were found to be weakly cross-reactive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using polyclonal antibody to each type of fimbria. In an immunoblot assay, polyclonal antibodies to a 22,000-dalton subunit of fimbriae from B. bronchiseptica reacted strongly with the type 2 fimbrial subunit of B. pertussis, but only weakly with the type 6 subunit. When subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the protein subunit of the type 6 fimbriae migrated with a molecular weight of 21,500, whereas the type 2 fimbrial subunit had a molecular weight of 22,000. The two types of subunits had similar amino acid compositions and showed amino-terminal sequence homology in 15 of 21 amino acids. The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of the B. pertussis fimbriae were distinct from those reported for fimbriae from other gram-negative bacteria. Neither the type 6 nor the type 2 fimbriae caused hemagglutination when assayed with several types of erythrocytes. Images PMID:2881893

  14. Release and purification of fimbriae from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Irons, L I; Ashworth, L A; Robinson, A

    1985-01-01

    A competitive ELISA has been used to monitor the release of fimbriae from 1.2.3 serotype of B. pertussis after treatment by different methods and fimbriae have been purified from homogenates or KSCN extracts by chromatography. Fimbriae purified from different serotypes have been studied by inhibition of bacterial agglutination, immunodiffusion and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Fimbriae purified from a 1.2 serotype have been labelled in immunoelectron microscopy with a IgM monoclonal antibody to agglutinogen 2 and evidence is presented that fimbriae purified from a 1.3 serotype also carry the agglutinogen 3 specificity. A difference in subunit molecular weight has been found between fimbriae purified from 1.2 and 1.3 serotypes. PMID:2872101

  15. Identification of Two Laminin-Binding Fimbriae, the Type 1 Fimbria of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and the G Fimbria of Escherichia coli, as Plasminogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kukkonen, Maini; Saarela, Sirkku; Lähteenmäki, Kaarina; Hynönen, Ulla; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita; Rhen, Mikael; Korhonen, Timo K.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains carrying recombinant plasmids encoding either the type 1 fimbria of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or the G fimbria of E. coli exhibited binding of human 125I-Glu-plasminogen and enhanced the tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. Purified type 1 or G fimbriae similarly bound plasminogen and enhanced its activation. The binding of plasminogen did not involve the characteristic carbohydrate-binding property of the fimbriae but was inhibited at low concentrations by the lysine analog ɛ-aminocaproic acid. Because these fimbrial types bind to laminin of basement membranes (M. Kukkonen et al., Mol. Microbiol. 7:229–237, 1993; S. Saarela et al., Infect. Immun. 64:2857–2860, 1996), the results demonstrate a structural unity in the creation and targeting of bacterium-bound proteolytic plasmin activity to basement membranes. PMID:9746604

  16. Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae Bind to Cytokeratin of Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Sharma, Ashu; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    The adherence of Porphyromonas gingivalis to host cells is likely a prerequisite step in the pathogenesis of P. gingivalis-induced periodontal disease. P. gingivalis binds to and invades epithelial cells, and fimbriae are shown to be involved in this process. Little is known regarding epithelial receptor(s) involved in binding of P. gingivalis fimbriae. Using an overlay assay with purified P. gingivalis fimbriae as a probe, two major epithelial cell proteins with masses of 50 and 40 kDa were identified by immunoblotting with fimbria-specific antibodies. Iodinated purified fimbriae also bound to the same two epithelial cell proteins. An affinity chromatography technique was utilized to isolate and purify the epithelial components to which P. gingivalis fimbriae bind. Purified fimbriae were coupled to CNBr-activated Sepharose-4B, and the solubilized epithelial cell extract proteins bound to the immobilized fimbriae were isolated from the column. A major 50-kDa component and a minor 40-kDa component were purified and could be digested with trypsin, suggesting that they were proteins. These affinity-eluted 50- and 40-kDa proteins were then subjected to amino-terminal sequencing, and no sequence could be determined, suggesting that these proteins have blocked amino-terminal residues. CNBr digestion of the 50-kDa component resulted in an internal sequence homologous to that of Keratin I molecules. Further evidence that P. gingivalis fimbriae bind to cytokeratin molecule(s) comes from studies showing that multicytokeratin rabbit polyclonal antibodies cross-react with the affinity-purified 50-kDa epithelial cell surface component. Also, binding of purified P. gingivalis fimbriae to epithelial components can be inhibited in an overlay assay by multicytokeratin rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Furthermore, we showed that biotinylated purified fimbriae bind to purified human epidermal keratin in an overlay assay. These studies suggest that the surface-accessible epithelial

  17. Purification and characterization of fimbriae isolated from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J M; Cowell, J L; Steven, A C; Carter, P H; McGrath, P P; Manclark, C R

    1985-01-01

    Fimbriae were detached from Bordetella pertussis by mechanical shearing and purified by successive precipitations with ammonium sulfate, phosphate buffer (pH 6.0), and magnesium chloride. In each of these purification steps, the fimbriae aggregated into bundles as seen by electron microscopy. These aggregates could be disaggregated at pH 9.5. By electron microscopy, the purified fimbriae appeared as long filaments with a diameter of 5 nm. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified fimbriae showed a single protein subunit with a molecular weight of 22,000. The purified fimbriae did not have hemagglutinating activity when assayed with several types of erythrocytes, and they were antigenically, chemically, and structurally distinct from the filamentous hemagglutinin of B. pertussis. The purified fimbriae were also identified as serotype 2 agglutinogens, since antibody to the purified fimbriae agglutinated B. pertussis strains serotyped as 1.2.4, 1.2.3, or 1.2.3.6 but did not agglutinate those serotyped as 1.3.6. Images PMID:2859248

  18. Simple method for purification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brittany; Grassel, Christen; Laufer, Rachel S; Sears, Khandra T; Pasetti, Marcela F; Barry, Eileen M; Simon, Raphael

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are endemic pathogens in the developing world. They frequently cause illness in travelers, and are among the most prevalent causes of diarrheal disease in children. Pathogenic ETEC strains employ fimbriae as adhesion factors to bind the luminal surface of the intestinal epithelium and establish infection. Accordingly, there is marked interest in immunoprophylactic strategies targeting fimbriae to protect against ETEC infections. Multiple strategies have been reported for purification of ETEC fimbriae, however none is ideal. Purification has typically involved the use of highly virulent wild-type strains. We report here a simple and improved method to purify ETEC fimbriae, which was applied to obtain two different Class 5 fimbriae types of clinical relevance (CFA/I and CS4) expressed recombinantly in E. coli production strains. Following removal from cells by shearing, fimbriae proteins were purified by orthogonal purification steps employing ultracentrifugation, precipitation, and ion-exchange membrane chromatography. Purified fimbriae demonstrated the anticipated size and morphology by electron microscopy analysis, contained negligible levels of residual host cell proteins, nucleic acid, and endotoxin, and were recognized by convalescent human anti-sera. PMID:26581778

  19. Morphogenetic expression of Moraxella bovis fimbriae (pili) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Beard, M K; Mattick, J S; Moore, L J; Mott, M R; Marrs, C F; Egerton, J R

    1990-01-01

    Type 4 fimbriae (pili) are found in a wide variety of gram-negative bacteria and are composed of small structural subunits which share significant sequence homology among different species, especially at their amino-terminal ends. Previous studies demonstrating morphogenetic expression of Bacteroides nodosus fimbriae from cloned subunit genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggested that there is a common mechanism for type 4 fimbriae assembly and that the structural subunits are interchangeable (J. S. Mattick et al., J. Bacteriol. 169:33-41, 1987). Here we have examined the expression of Moraxella bovis fimbrial subunits in P. aeruginosa. M. bovis subunits were assembled into extracellular fimbriae in this host, in some cases as a homopolymer but in others as a mosaic with the indigenous subunit, indicating structural equivalence. This result contrasts with other studies in which recombinant P. aeruginosa expressing different subunits produced fimbriae composed almost exclusively of one subunit or the other (T. C. Elleman and J. E. Peterson, Mol. Microbiol. 1:377-380, 1987). Both observations can be explained by reversibility of subunit-subunit interactions at the site of assembly, with the forward equilibrium favoring chain extension between compatible subunits. Images PMID:1970564

  20. Association between Bordetella pertussis agglutinogen 2 and fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Carter, E J; Preston, N W

    1984-08-01

    Fimbriae have been demonstrated on strains of Bordetella pertussis that possess agglutinogen 2 (types 1, 2, 3 and 1, 2), but not on those that lack it (types 1,3 and 1). This correlation between fimbriation and the presence of agglutinogen 2 has been found with fresh isolates from children and with laboratory strains that are virulent for mice. If fimbriae enhance the attachment of bacteria to mucosal cells, these findings offer an explanation for the predominance of serotypes 1,2,3 and 1,2 in non-vaccinated communities. The findings also suggest that agglutinogen 3 is not a fimbrial antigen, and because this is an essential component of fully effective whole-cell vaccine, a subcellular vaccine prepared from fimbriae alone may be inadequate. PMID:6146723

  1. Morphogenetic expression of Bacteroides nodosus fimbriae in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Mattick, J S; Bills, M M; Anderson, B J; Dalrymple, B; Mott, M R; Egerton, J R

    1987-01-01

    Type 4 fimbriae are found in a range of pathogenic bacteria, including Bacteroides nodosus, Moraxella bovis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The structural subunits of these fimbriae all contain a highly conserved hydrophobic amino-terminal sequence preceding a variable hydrophilic carboxy-terminal region. We show here that recombinant P. aeruginosa cells containing the B. nodosus fimbrial subunit gene under the control of a strong promoter (pL, from bacteriophage lambda) produced large amounts of fimbriae that were structurally and antigenically indistinguishable from those produced by B. nodosus. This was demonstrated by fimbrial isolation and purification, electrophoretic and Western transfer analyses, and immunogold labeling and electron microscopy. These results suggest that type 4 fimbriated bacteria use a common mechanism for fimbrial assembly and that the structural subunits are interchangeable, thereby providing a basis for the development of multivalent vaccines. Images PMID:2878919

  2. Agglutinogens and fimbriae of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, L A; Robinson, A; Funnell, S; Gorringe, A R; Irons, L I; Seabrook, R N

    1988-01-01

    Agglutinogen 2 (AGG2) of Bordetella pertussis is a fimbrial antigen and therefore a potential adhesin and acellular vaccine component. AGG2 was found to dissociate only under harsh conditions into the subunits of mol. wt. 22500 seen in SDS-PAGE. Results from studies of agglutinogen 3 (AGG3) are presented which confirm previous findings from this Laboratory that AGG3 is also a fimbrial protein but with a subunit mol. wt. of 22000. The amino acid sequence of AGG2, deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding it, was used as a basis for synthesis of three peptides. Coupled to Keyhole Limpet Haemocyanin (KLH), the peptides were immunogenic in mice, inducing antibodies which bound well to homologous peptide in ELISA but poorly to intact fimbriae. Monoclonal and polyclonal serotype-specific antibodies failed to react significantly with the peptides or their KLH-conjugates. These results indicate that the synthetic peptides do not represent the serotype 2 epitope. Mice immunized with purified AGG2 or AGG3 were found to be protected against respiratory infection with B. pertussis. Results presented here indicate that this protection is, to a large extent, serotype-specific and that immunization of mice with AGG2 or AGG3 can lead to a change in serotype of the infecting strain. These results are analogous to findings from epidemiological studies of the protection induced in children by whole cell vaccines. They reaffirm the importance of both AGG2 and AGG3 as components of whole cell and acellular vaccines. PMID:2908520

  3. Structure and function of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbriae from differing assembly pathways.

    PubMed

    Mortezaei, Narges; Epler, Chelsea R; Shao, Paul P; Shirdel, Mariam; Singh, Bhupender; McVeigh, Annette; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J; Andersson, Magnus; Bullitt, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the major bacterial cause of diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers, causing significant mortality in children. Adhesive fimbriae are a prime virulence factor for ETEC, initiating colonization of the small intestinal epithelium. Similar to other Gram-negative bacteria, ETEC express one or more diverse fimbriae, some assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway and others by the alternate chaperone pathway. Here, we elucidate structural and biophysical aspects and adaptations of each fimbrial type to its respective host niche. CS20 fimbriae are compared with colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae, which are two ETEC fimbriae assembled via different pathways, and with P-fimbriae from uropathogenic E. coli. Many fimbriae unwind from their native helical filament to an extended linear conformation under force, thereby sustaining adhesion by reducing load at the point of contact between the bacterium and the target cell. CFA/I fimbriae require the least force to unwind, followed by CS20 fimbriae and then P-fimbriae, which require the highest unwinding force. We conclude from our electron microscopy reconstructions, modeling and force spectroscopy data that the target niche plays a central role in the biophysical properties of fimbriae that are critical for bacterial pathophysiology. PMID:25355550

  4. Structure and function of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbriae from differing assembly pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mortezaei, Narges; Epler, Chelsea R.; Shao, Paul P.; Shirdel, Mariam; Singh, Bhupender; McVeigh, Annette; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J.; Andersson, Magnus; Bullitt, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the major bacterial cause of diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers, causing significant mortality in children. Adhesive fimbriae are a prime virulence factor for ETEC, initiating colonization of the small intestinal epithelium. Similar to other Gram-negative bacteria, ETEC express one or more diverse fimbriae, some assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway and others by the alternate chaperone pathway. Here we elucidate structural and biophysical aspects and adaptations of each fimbrial type to its respective host niche. CS20 fimbriae are compared to CFA/I fimbriae, which are two ETEC fimbriae assembled via different pathways, and to P-fimbriae from uropathogenic E. coli. Many fimbriae unwind from their native helical filament to an extended linear conformation under force, thereby sustaining adhesion by reducing load at the point of contact between the bacterium and the target cell. CFA/I fimbriae require the least force to unwind, followed by CS20 fimbriae and then P-fimbriae, which require the highest unwinding force. We conclude from our electron microscopy reconstructions, modeling, and force spectroscopy data that the target niche plays a central role in the biophysical properties of fimbriae that are critical for bacterial pathophysiology. PMID:25355550

  5. Production and characterization of recombinant pertactin, fimbriae 2 and fimbriae 3 from Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Bordetella pertussis is a causative agent of pertussis or whooping cough in humans. Pertactin (Prn), fimbriae 2 (Fim2) and fimbriae 3 (Fim3) of B. pertussis are important virulence factors and immunogens which have been included in some acellular pertussis vaccines. In this present study, we cloned, expressed and purified Prn, Fim2 and Fim3, respectively. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the three recombinant proteins (rPrn, rFim2 and rFim3) were investigated in mouse model. Results Three recombinant proteins with amount of 12 to 25 mg/L were produced. Compared to the control mice only immunized with adjuvant, serum IgG antibody responses were significantly induced in the mice immunized with rPrn, rFim2 or rFim3 (P < 0.001 for all three proteins). Furthermore, T cell responses characteristic of increased production of IL-2 and TNF-α (only for rPrn) were elicited in the mice immunized with the three proteins (P < 0.05 for all three proteins). Immunization with rPrn, but not with rFim2 or rFim3, significantly enhanced clearance of bacteria in the lungs of mice after intranasal challenge with B. pertussis (P < 0.05). When tested in a lethal intracerebral infection model, certain protection was observed in mice immunized with rPrn. Conclusions We have developed an efficient method to produce large amounts of rPrn, rFim2, and rFim3 from B. pertussis. The three recombinant proteins induced both humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. Immunization with rPrn also conferred protection against pertussis in mouse infection models. Our results indicated that the recombinant proteins still retain their immunological properties and highlighted the potential of the recombinant proteins for the future development of the B. pertussis vaccines. PMID:20040101

  6. Fimbriae and determination of host species specificity of Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, E H; Norman, J M; Hatcher, M D; Bemis, D A

    1993-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, designated CF8 and prepared against fimbrial protein enrichments of Bordetella bronchiseptica 110H, was determined by immunogold electron microscopy to bind to some but not all fimbrial filaments on intact bacterial cells. Comparison of the reactivity of this antibody with that of monoclonal antibody BPF2, which is specific for Bordetella pertussis serotype 2 fimbriae, indicated that CF8 recognizes an epitope similar to that recognized by BPF2. By Western blot (immunoblot), it was determined that monoclonal antibody CF8 does not react with proteins denatured by treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate and beta-mercaptoethanol and by boiling for 5 min but that it does recognize fimbrial proteins in their native, nondenatured state. This antibody was used to compare fimbriae between strains of B. bronchiseptica isolated from different species. Strains from pigs, dogs, guinea pigs, and four other species were compared by an enzyme immunoassay. Strains isolated from pigs were found to express significantly more CF8-reactive and B. pertussis serotype 2 cross-reactive fimbriae than strains isolated from guinea pigs. Strains from dogs were more variable in reactivity than those from pigs or guinea pigs. The reactivity with antifimbrial monoclonal antibody CF8 did not correlate with enzyme electromorphotype but did correlate with the host species, suggesting a role for fimbriae in the determination of host species specificity of B. bronchiseptica. Images PMID:8102377

  7. Structure of CFA/I fimbriae from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Fu; Poole, Steven; Nishio, Kazuya; Jang, Ken; Rasulova, Fatima; McVeigh, Annette; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di; Bullitt, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Adhesion pili (fimbriae) play a critical role in initiating the events that lead to intestinal colonization and diarrheal disease by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), an E. coli pathotype that inflicts an enormous global disease burden. We elucidate atomic structures of an ETEC major pilin subunit, CfaB, from colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae. These data are used to construct models for 2 morphological forms of CFA/I fimbriae that are both observed in vivo: the helical filament into which it is typically assembled, and an extended, unwound conformation. Modeling and corroborative mutational data indicate that proline isomerization is involved in the conversion between these helical and extended forms. Our findings affirm the strong structural similarities seen between class 5 fimbriae (from bacteria primarily causing gastrointestinal disease) and class 1 pili (from bacteria that cause urinary, respiratory, and other infections) in the absence of significant primary sequence similarity. They also suggest that morphological and biochemical differences between fimbrial types, regardless of class, provide structural specialization that facilitates survival of each bacterial pathotype in its preferred host microenvironment. Last, we present structural evidence for bacterial use of antigenic variation to evade host immune responses, in that residues occupying the predicted surface-exposed face of CfaB and related class 5 pilins show much higher genetic sequence variability than the remainder of the pilin protein. PMID:19515814

  8. Partially Assembled K99 Fimbriae Are Required for Protection

    PubMed Central

    Ascón, Miguel A.; Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Walters, Nancy; Pascual, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies to K99 fimbriae afford protection to F5+ bovine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). Previous studies show that murine dams immunized with Salmonella vaccine vectors stably expressing K99 fimbriae confer protection to ETEC-challenged neonatal pups. To begin to address adaptation of the K99 scaffold to display heterologous B- and T-cell epitopes, studies were conducted to determine how much of the assembled K99 fimbria is required to maintain protective immunity. Sequential deletions in the K99 gene clusters were made, resulting in diminished localization of the K99 fimbrial subunit in the outer membrane. As placement of the K99 fimbrial subunit became progressively contained within the vaccine vector, diminished immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG1 antibody titers, as well as diminished Th2-type cytokine responses, were observed in orally immunized mice. Deletion of fanGH, which greatly reduced the export of the fimbrial subunit to the outer membrane, showed only partial reduction in protective immunity. By contrast, deletion of fanDEFGH, which also reduced the export of the fimbrial subunit to the outer membrane but retained more subunit in the cytoplasm, resulted in protective immunity being dramatically reduced. Thus, these studies showed that retention of K99 fimbrial subunit as native fimbriae or with the deletion of fanGH is sufficient to confer protection. PMID:16239523

  9. Structure of CFA/I fimbriae from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong-Fu; Poole, Steven; Nishio, Kazuya; Jang, Ken; Rasulova, Fatima; McVeigh, Annette; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di; Bullitt, Esther

    2009-10-21

    Adhesion pili (fimbriae) play a critical role in initiating the events that lead to intestinal colonization and diarrheal disease by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), an E. coli pathotype that inflicts an enormous global disease burden. We elucidate atomic structures of an ETEC major pilin subunit, CfaB, from colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae. These data are used to construct models for 2 morphological forms of CFA/I fimbriae that are both observed in vivo: the helical filament into which it is typically assembled, and an extended, unwound conformation. Modeling and corroborative mutational data indicate that proline isomerization is involved in the conversion between these helical and extended forms. Our findings affirm the strong structural similarities seen between class 5 fimbriae (from bacteria primarily causing gastrointestinal disease) and class 1 pili (from bacteria that cause urinary, respiratory, and other infections) in the absence of significant primary sequence similarity. They also suggest that morphological and biochemical differences between fimbrial types, regardless of class, provide structural specialization that facilitates survival of each bacterial pathotype in its preferred host microenvironment. Last, we present structural evidence for bacterial use of antigenic variation to evade host immune responses, in that residues occupying the predicted surface-exposed face of CfaB and related class 5 pilins show much higher genetic sequence variability than the remainder of the pilin protein.

  10. Fimbriae have distinguishable roles in Proteus mirabilis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Scavone, Paola; Iribarnegaray, Victoria; Caetano, Ana Laura; Schlapp, Geraldine; Härtel, Steffen; Zunino, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis is one of the most common etiological agents of complicated urinary tract infections, especially those associated with catheterization. This is related to the ability of P. mirabilis to form biofilms on different surfaces. This pathogen encodes 17 putative fimbrial operons, the highest number found in any sequenced bacterial species so far. The present study analyzed the role of four P. mirabilis fimbriae (MR/P, UCA, ATF and PMF) in biofilm formation using isogenic mutants. Experimental approaches included migration over catheter, swimming and swarming motility, the semiquantitative assay based on adhesion and crystal violet staining, and biofilm development by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Different assays were performed using LB or artificial urine. Results indicated that the different fimbriae contribute to the formation of a stable and functional biofilm. Fimbriae revealed particular associated roles. First, all the mutants showed a significantly reduced ability to migrate across urinary catheter sections but neither swimming nor swarming motility were affected. However, some mutants formed smaller biofilms compared with the wild type (MRP and ATF) while others formed significantly larger biofilms (UCA and PMF) showing different bioarchitecture features. It can be concluded that P. mirabilis fimbriae have distinguishable roles in the generation of biofilms, particularly in association with catheters. PMID:27091004

  11. Isolation and characterization of fimbriae from a sparsely fimbriated strain of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Sojar, H T; Hamada, N; Genco, R J

    1997-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 (ATCC 53978) possesses the gene for fimbriae; however, the surface-expressed fimbriae are sparse and have not been previously isolated and characterized. We purified fimbriae from strain W50 to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography [H. T. Sojar, N. Hamada, and R. J. Genco, Protein Expr. Purif. 9(1):49-52, 1997]. Negative staining of purified fimbriae viewed by electron microscopy revealed that the fimbriae were identical in diameter to fimbriae of other P. gingivalis strains, such as 2561, but were shorter in length. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis, the apparent molecular weight of isolated fimbrillin from strain W50 was found to be identical to that of the fimbrillin molecule of strain 2561. Unlike 2561 fimbriae, W50 fimbriae, under reducing condition, exhibited a monomeric structure on SDS-PAGE at room temperature. However, under nonreduced conditions, even at 100 degrees C, no monomer was observed. In immunoblot analysis as well as immunogold labeling of isolated fimbriae, polyclonal antibodies against 2561 fimbriae, as well as antibodies against peptide I (V-V-M-A-N-T-G-A-M-E-V-G-K-T-L-A-E-V-K-Cys) and peptide J (A-L-T-T-E-L-T-A-E-N-Q-E-A-A-G-L-I-M-T-A-E-P-Cys), reacted. However, antifimbrial antibodies against strain 2561 reacted very weakly compared to anti-peptide I and anti-peptide J. Negative staining of whole W50 cells, as well as immunogold electron microscopy with anti-peptide I and anti-peptide J, showed fimbriae shorter in length and very few in number compared to those of strain 2561. Purified fimbriae showed no hemagglutinating activity. Amino acid composition was very similar to that of previously reported fimbriae of the 2561 strain. PMID:9172351

  12. Purification of serotype 2 fimbriae of Bordetella pertussis and their identification as a mouse protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J M; Cowell, J L; Steven, A C; Manclark, C R

    1985-01-01

    Fimbriae were removed from Bordetella pertussis by mechanical shearing and purified by successive precipitations with ammonium sulfate, pH 6.0 phosphate buffer, and magnesium chloride. Electron microscopy showed the purified fimbriae to be long filamentous structures (5 nm in diameter) which aggregated into bundles at pH 6.0. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the purified fimbriae gave a single protein subunit with a molecular weight of 22,000. The purified fimbriae did not have hemagglutinating activity when assayed with a variety of erythrocytes and were shown to be antigenically and structurally distinct from the filamentous hemagglutinin of B. pertussis. The purified fimbriae were identified as serotype 2 agglutinogens as antibody to the purified fimbriae agglutinated B. pertussis strains serotyped as 1.2.4, 1.2.3, or 1.2.3.6, but did not agglutinate serotypes 1.3.6. Immunization of mice with the purified fimbriae (14 micrograms) protected them from a lethal respiratory infection with strain 18323 (agglutinogen serotype 1.2.3.4.6) or with strain 432 (serotype 1.3.6). Immunization of mice with purified fimbriae containing 0.02% LPF also protected them from a lethal intracerebral infection with 18323. The ED50 was about 13 micrograms. Fimbriae containing less than 0.005% LPF did not protect mice from intracerebral challenge. PMID:2872103

  13. Purification and characterization of fimbriae from Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Feutrier, J; Kay, W W; Trust, T J

    1986-01-01

    A human isolate of Salmonella enteritidis which displayed strong pellicle formation during static broth culture and mannose-sensitive hemagglutination produced fimbriae which were morphologically indistinguishable from type 1 fimbriae of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Fimbrin was purified to homogeneity, and the apparent molecular weight (Mr, 14,400) was markedly lower than that reported for the type 1 fimbrin of Salmonella typhimurium (Mr, 22,100). This fimbrin contained 40% hydrophobic amino acids and lacked cysteine. The sequence of the N-terminal 64 amino acids was determined, and sequence alignment revealed that although the 18 N-terminal residues of the S. enteritidis molecule shared considerable homology with Escherichia coli and S. typhimurium type 1 fimbrins, the S. enteritidis fimbrin lacked a 6- to 9-residue terminal sequence present in the other type 1 fimbrins and, after residue 18, shared little homology with the E. coli sequence. Antibodies raised to the purified S. enteritidis fimbrin bound to surface-exposed conformational epitopes on the native fimbriae and displayed pronounced serospecificity. These antibodies were used in the isolation of a nonfimbriated Tn10 insertion mutant which was unable to hemagglutinate. Images PMID:2875990

  14. Structure, Function, and Assembly of Type 1 Fimbriae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Stefan D.; Bouckaert, Julie

    Bacterial infections constitute a major global health problem, acutely accentuated by the rapid spread of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains. The widespread need for bacteria to attach - adhere - to target cells before they can initiate an infection may be used to advantage by targeting the bacterial adhesion tools such as pili and fimbriae for development of novel anti-bacterial vaccines and drugs. Type 1 fimbriae are widely expressed by Escherichia coli. and are used by uropathogenic strains to mediate attachment to specific niches in the urinary tract. These fimbriae belong to a class of fibrillar adhesion organelles assembled through the chaperone/usher pathway, one of the terminal branches of the general secretion pathway in Gram-negative bacteria. Our understanding of the assembly, structure and function of these structures has evolved significantly over the last decade. Here, we summarize current understanding of the function and biogenesis of fibrillar adhesion organelles, and provide some examples of recent progress towards interfering with bacterial adhesion as a means to prevent infection.

  15. Biomechanical and structural features of CS2 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mortezaei, Narges; Singh, Bhupender; Zakrisson, Johan; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide, and infection of children in under-developed countries often leads to high mortality rates. Isolated ETEC expresses a plethora of colonization factors (fimbriae/pili), of which CFA/I and CFA/II, which are assembled via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP), are among the most common. Fimbriae are filamentous structures whose shafts are primarily composed of helically arranged single pilin-protein subunits, with a unique biomechanical ability to unwind and rewind. A sustained ETEC infection, under adverse conditions of dynamic shear forces, is primarily attributed to this biomechanical feature of ETEC fimbriae. Recent understanding about the role of fimbriae as virulence factors points to an evolutionary adaptation of their structural and biomechanical features. In this work, we investigated the biophysical properties of CS2 fimbriae from the CFA/II group. Homology modeling of its major structural subunit, CotA, reveals structural clues related to the niche in which they are expressed. Using optical-tweezers force spectroscopy, we found that CS2 fimbriae unwind at a constant force of 10 pN and have a corner velocity (i.e., the velocity at which the force required for unwinding rises exponentially with increased speed) of 1300 nm/s. The biophysical properties of CS2 fimbriae assessed in this work classify them into a low-force unwinding group of fimbriae together with the CFA/I and CS20 fimbriae expressed by ETEC strains. The three fimbriae are expressed by ETEC, colonize in similar gut environments, and exhibit similar biophysical features, but differ in their biogenesis. Our observation suggests that the environment has a strong impact on the biophysical characteristics of fimbriae expressed by ETEC. PMID:26153701

  16. Biomechanical and Structural Features of CS2 Fimbriae of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mortezaei, Narges; Singh, Bhupender; Zakrisson, Johan; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide, and infection of children in under-developed countries often leads to high mortality rates. Isolated ETEC expresses a plethora of colonization factors (fimbriae/pili), of which CFA/I and CFA/II, which are assembled via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP), are among the most common. Fimbriae are filamentous structures whose shafts are primarily composed of helically arranged single pilin-protein subunits, with a unique biomechanical ability to unwind and rewind. A sustained ETEC infection, under adverse conditions of dynamic shear forces, is primarily attributed to this biomechanical feature of ETEC fimbriae. Recent understanding about the role of fimbriae as virulence factors points to an evolutionary adaptation of their structural and biomechanical features. In this work, we investigated the biophysical properties of CS2 fimbriae from the CFA/II group. Homology modeling of its major structural subunit, CotA, reveals structural clues related to the niche in which they are expressed. Using optical-tweezers force spectroscopy, we found that CS2 fimbriae unwind at a constant force of 10 pN and have a corner velocity (i.e., the velocity at which the force required for unwinding rises exponentially with increased speed) of 1300 nm/s. The biophysical properties of CS2 fimbriae assessed in this work classify them into a low-force unwinding group of fimbriae together with the CFA/I and CS20 fimbriae expressed by ETEC strains. The three fimbriae are expressed by ETEC, colonize in similar gut environments, and exhibit similar biophysical features, but differ in their biogenesis. Our observation suggests that the environment has a strong impact on the biophysical characteristics of fimbriae expressed by ETEC. PMID:26153701

  17. Comparison of type 2 and type 6 fimbriae of Bordetella pertussis by using agglutinating monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Z M; Brennan, M J; David, J L; Carter, P H; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1988-12-01

    Two types of fimbriae have been identified on the pathogenic gram-negative organism Bordetella pertussis. Monoclonal antibodies to these fimbriae were produced to better understand the role of fimbriae as serotype-specific agglutinogens and to investigate the antigenic relationship between these fimbriae. Three monoclonal antibodies were identified that specifically agglutinated B. pertussis cells containing the U.S. Reference Factor 2 agglutinogen, and six monoclonal antibodies were produced that agglutinated only those strains containing the U.S. Reference Factor 6 agglutinogen. Indirect immunofluorescence studies and immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that these monoclonal antibodies bind to an outer membrane component on serotype-specific strains of B. pertussis. All of the monoclonal antibodies reacted with native or partially assembled type-specific fimbriae but not with monomeric fimbrial subunits as indicated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The fimbrial agglutinogens recognized by the monoclonal antibodies were also uniquely reactive with either U.S. Reference Factor 2 or 6 antiserum (Eldering agglutinogen 2 or 6 polyclonal antiserum) in an indirect ELISA. No cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies with the unrelated fimbriae was observed in any of the comparative immunological studies. Some of the monoclonal antibodies agglutinated certain strains of B. bronchiseptica, suggesting that this closely related species can contain antigenically similar fimbriae. These monoclonal antibodies should prove useful for further structural and functional analysis of Bordetella fimbriae and for studies on the role that these antigens play in prevention of infection and disease. PMID:2903125

  18. Comparison of type 2 and type 6 fimbriae of Bordetella pertussis by using agglutinating monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z M; Brennan, M J; David, J L; Carter, P H; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1988-01-01

    Two types of fimbriae have been identified on the pathogenic gram-negative organism Bordetella pertussis. Monoclonal antibodies to these fimbriae were produced to better understand the role of fimbriae as serotype-specific agglutinogens and to investigate the antigenic relationship between these fimbriae. Three monoclonal antibodies were identified that specifically agglutinated B. pertussis cells containing the U.S. Reference Factor 2 agglutinogen, and six monoclonal antibodies were produced that agglutinated only those strains containing the U.S. Reference Factor 6 agglutinogen. Indirect immunofluorescence studies and immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that these monoclonal antibodies bind to an outer membrane component on serotype-specific strains of B. pertussis. All of the monoclonal antibodies reacted with native or partially assembled type-specific fimbriae but not with monomeric fimbrial subunits as indicated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The fimbrial agglutinogens recognized by the monoclonal antibodies were also uniquely reactive with either U.S. Reference Factor 2 or 6 antiserum (Eldering agglutinogen 2 or 6 polyclonal antiserum) in an indirect ELISA. No cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies with the unrelated fimbriae was observed in any of the comparative immunological studies. Some of the monoclonal antibodies agglutinated certain strains of B. bronchiseptica, suggesting that this closely related species can contain antigenically similar fimbriae. These monoclonal antibodies should prove useful for further structural and functional analysis of Bordetella fimbriae and for studies on the role that these antigens play in prevention of infection and disease. Images PMID:2903125

  19. Antigenic relationship between serotype-specific agglutinogen and fimbriae of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, L A; Irons, L I; Dowsett, A B

    1982-09-01

    The widely held view that the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) of Bordetella pertussis is derived from fimbriae (pili) is not supported by studies of fimbriation and FHA content of the organism. Fimbriae do not label specifically with antibody to FHA in immuno-electron microscopy but do label with antibody to serotype-specific agglutinogen. PMID:6127315

  20. Identification, purification, and characterization of the type 4 fimbriae of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed Central

    Ruffolo, C G; Tennent, J M; Michalski, W P; Adler, B

    1997-01-01

    The presence of fimbriae on Pasteurella multocida has been reported, but there have been no prior studies aimed at conclusively characterizing these structures. We now report on the identification and characterization of type 4 fimbriae on serogroup A, B, and D strains of P. multocida. Under microaerophilic conditions P. multocida showed an increased expression of the fimbriae, which were observed to form bundles. Fimbriae purified by high-performance reverse-phase liquid chromatography constituted a single 18-kDa subunit, the first 21 amino acids of which shared very high similarity with the N-terminal amino acid sequence of other type 4 fimbrial subunits. Antiserum against the P. multocida 18-kDa protein immunostained the type 4 fimbrial subunit of Moraxella bovis and Dichelobacter nodosus. Based on these observations we conclude that P. multocida possesses type 4 fimbriae and have designated the P. multocida fimbrial subunit PtfA. PMID:8975936

  1. Pseudocatabolite repression of type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Eisenstein, B I; Dodd, D C

    1982-09-01

    Previous work on the control of fimbriation in bacteria has demonstrated the importance of environmental factors such as static versus shaking broth and the absence versus the presence of glucose on the degree of fimbriation. When the Pil+ K-12 strain of Escherichia coli CSH50 was grown in static broth, the bacteria grown with glucose were less fimbriate (as determined by electron microscopy) than those grown without glucose. In contrast, a derivative, the pil-lac operon fusion strain VL361, gave off similar proportions of Lac+ and Lac- colonies when grown with or without glucose. Introduction of delta cya into either CSH50 or VL361 did not affect synthesis of either fimbriae or beta-galactosidase, respectively. When total synthesis of fimbriae by strain CSH50 was assayed, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent inhibition test, glucose-grown bacteria made less antigen when they were grown in static broth but not when they were grown in shaking broth. When results are taken together, we interpret them as showing that glucose does not suppress fimbrial synthesis by classic catabolite repression but rather merely prevents the outgrowth or fimbriate bacteria in static broth. PMID:6125501

  2. Characterization of 17 chaperone-usher fimbriae encoded by Proteus mirabilis reveals strong conservation

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Lisa; Schaffer, Jessica N.; Zouzias, Christos D.

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative enteric bacterium that causes complicated urinary tract infections, particularly in patients with indwelling catheters. Sequencing of clinical isolate P. mirabilis HI4320 revealed the presence of 17 predicted chaperone-usher fimbrial operons. We classified these fimbriae into three groups by their genetic relationship to other chaperone-usher fimbriae. Sixteen of these fimbriae are encoded by all seven currently sequenced P. mirabilis genomes. The predicted protein sequence of the major structural subunit for 14 of these fimbriae was highly conserved (≥95 % identity), whereas three other structural subunits (Fim3A, UcaA and Fim6A) were variable. Further examination of 58 clinical isolates showed that 14 of the 17 predicted major structural subunit genes of the fimbriae were present in most strains (>85 %). Transcription of the predicted major structural subunit genes for all 17 fimbriae was measured under different culture conditions designed to mimic conditions in the urinary tract. The majority of the fimbrial genes were induced during stationary phase, static culture or colony growth when compared to exponential-phase aerated culture. Major structural subunit proteins for six of these fimbriae were detected using MS of proteins sheared from the surface of broth-cultured P. mirabilis, demonstrating that this organism may produce multiple fimbriae within a single culture. The high degree of conservation of P. mirabilis fimbriae stands in contrast to uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, which exhibit greater variability in their fimbrial repertoires. These findings suggest there may be evolutionary pressure for P. mirabilis to maintain a large fimbrial arsenal. PMID:24809384

  3. How type 1 fimbriae help Escherichia coli to evade extracellular antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Hosseini, Vahid; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Meier, Stefanie; Weber, Stefan S.; Arnoldini, Markus; Ackermann, Martin; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    To survive antibiotics, bacteria use two different strategies: counteracting antibiotic effects by expression of resistance genes or evading their effects e.g. by persisting inside host cells. Since bacterial adhesins provide access to the shielded, intracellular niche and the adhesin type 1 fimbriae increases bacterial survival chances inside macrophages, we asked if fimbriae also influenced survival by antibiotic evasion. Combined gentamicin survival assays, flow cytometry, single cell microscopy and kinetic modeling of dose response curves showed that type 1 fimbriae increased the adhesion and internalization by macrophages. This was caused by strongly decreased off-rates and affected the number of intracellular bacteria but not the macrophage viability and morphology. Fimbriae thus promote antibiotic evasion which is particularly relevant in the context of chronic infections. PMID:26728082

  4. Essential immunogens in human pertussis: the role of fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Preston, N W

    1985-01-01

    After the decline in pertussis vaccination in Britain from the mid-1970s, isolates possessing agglutinogen 2 (types 1.2.3 and 1.2) have replaced type 1.3 as the predominant serotypes. These agglutinogen-2 strains are fimbriate, and their predominance in non-vaccinated communities may result from enhanced attachment to mucosal cells. However, type 1.3 cells are not fimbriate; and, because agglutinogen 3 is essential in fully effective whole-cell vaccine, a subcellular vaccine prepared from fimbriae alone (agglutinogen 2) would probably be inadequate. The mouse can be killed with type 1 strains, devoid of agglutinogens 2 and 3, and is therefore not a suitable model for ensuring that pertussis vaccine contains these essential immunogens. PMID:2872099

  5. Role of Thin Fimbriae in Adherence and Growth of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1 on Hexadecane.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, M; Bayer, E A; Delarea, J; Rosenberg, E

    1982-10-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1, a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium which adheres avidly to hydrocarbons and other hydrophobic surfaces, possesses numerous thin fimbriae (ca. 3.5-nm diameter) on the cell surface. MR-481, a nonadherent mutant of RAG-1 which is unable to grow on hexadecane under conditions of limited emulsification and low initial cell density, lacks these fimbriae. Prolonged incubation of MR-481 in hexadecane medium enriched for partial adherence revertants. The reappearance of thin fimbriae was observed in all such revertant strains. RAG-1 cells and partial revertant strains were agglutinated in the presence of antibody, whereas MR-481 cells were not. Another mutant, AB15, which was previously isolated on the basis of its nonagglutinability in the presence of antibody, also lacked thin fimbriae and was conditionally nonadherent. Furthermore, strain AB15 was unable to grow on hexadecane medium. Adherence of RAG-1 cells to hexadecane was considerably reduced after shearing treatment. The material removed from the cell surface by shearing of RAG-1 and the partial revertant strains yielded a single antigenic band in RAG-1 and partial revertant strains, as observed by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. This band was absent in both fimbriae-less mutants, MR-481 and AB15. The data demonstrate that the thin fimbriae of RAG-1 (i) are a major factor in adherence to polystyrene and hydrocarbon, (ii) may be crucial in enabling growth of cells on hexadecane, and (iii) constitute the major cell surface agglutinogen. PMID:16346118

  6. Role of Thin Fimbriae in Adherence and Growth of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1 on Hexadecane

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Mel; Bayer, Edward A.; Delarea, Jacob; Rosenberg, Eugene

    1982-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1, a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium which adheres avidly to hydrocarbons and other hydrophobic surfaces, possesses numerous thin fimbriae (ca. 3.5-nm diameter) on the cell surface. MR-481, a nonadherent mutant of RAG-1 which is unable to grow on hexadecane under conditions of limited emulsification and low initial cell density, lacks these fimbriae. Prolonged incubation of MR-481 in hexadecane medium enriched for partial adherence revertants. The reappearance of thin fimbriae was observed in all such revertant strains. RAG-1 cells and partial revertant strains were agglutinated in the presence of antibody, whereas MR-481 cells were not. Another mutant, AB15, which was previously isolated on the basis of its nonagglutinability in the presence of antibody, also lacked thin fimbriae and was conditionally nonadherent. Furthermore, strain AB15 was unable to grow on hexadecane medium. Adherence of RAG-1 cells to hexadecane was considerably reduced after shearing treatment. The material removed from the cell surface by shearing of RAG-1 and the partial revertant strains yielded a single antigenic band in RAG-1 and partial revertant strains, as observed by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. This band was absent in both fimbriae-less mutants, MR-481 and AB15. The data demonstrate that the thin fimbriae of RAG-1 (i) are a major factor in adherence to polystyrene and hydrocarbon, (ii) may be crucial in enabling growth of cells on hexadecane, and (iii) constitute the major cell surface agglutinogen. Images PMID:16346118

  7. Proteus mirabilis ambient-temperature fimbriae: cloning and nucleotide sequence of the aft gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Massad, G; Fulkerson, J F; Watson, D C; Mobley, H L

    1996-01-01

    Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis produces at least four types of fimbriae. Amino acid sequences from two peptides, derived by tryptic digestion of the structural subunit of one type of these fimbriae, the ambient-temperature fimbriae, were determined: NVVPGQPSSTQ and LIEGENQLNYNA. PCR primers, based on these sequences and that of the N terminus, were used to amplify a 359-bp fragment. A cosmid clone, isolated from a P. mirabilis genomic library by hybridization with the 359-bp PCR product, was used to determine the nucleotide sequence of the atf gene cluster. A 3,903-bp region encodes three polypeptides: AtfA, the structural subunit; AtfB, the chaperone; and AtfC, the outer membrane molecular usher. No fimbria-related genes are evident either 5' or 3' to the three contiguous genes. AtfA demonstrates significant amino acid sequence identity with type 1 major fimbrial subunits of several enteric species. The 359-bp PCR product hybridized strongly with all Proteus isolates (n = 9) and 25% of 355 Escherichia coli isolates but failed to hybridize with any of 26 isolates among nine other uropathogenic species. Ambient-temperature fimbriae of P. mirabilis may represent a novel type of fimbriae of enteric species. PMID:8926119

  8. Construction of an MR/P fimbrial mutant of Proteus mirabilis: role in virulence in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bahrani, F K; Massad, G; Lockatell, C V; Johnson, D E; Russell, R G; Warren, J W; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a cause of acute pyelonephritis, produces at least four types of fimbriae, including MR/P (mannose-resistant/Proteus-like) fimbriae. To investigate the contribution of MR/P fimbriae to colonization of the urinary tract, we constructed an MR/P fimbrial mutant by allelic exchange. A 4.2-kb BamHI fragment carrying the mrpA gene was subcloned into a mobilizable plasmid, pSUP202. A 1.3-kb Kanr cassette was inserted into the mrpA open reading frame, and the construct was transferred to the parent P. mirabilis strain by conjugation. Following passage on nonselective medium, 1 of 500 transconjugants screened was found to have undergone allelic exchange as demonstrated by Southern blot. Colony immunoblot, Western immunoblot, and immunogold labeling with a monoclonal antibody to MR/P fimbriae revealed that MrpA was not expressed. Complementation with cloned mrpA restored MR/P expression as shown by hemagglutination, Western blot, and immunogold electron microscopy. To assess virulence, we challenged 40 CBA mice transurethrally with 10(7) CFU of wild-type or mutant strains. After 1 week, geometric means of log10 CFU per milliliter of urine or per gram of bladder or kidney for the wild-type and mutant strains were as follows: urine, 7.79 (wild type) versus 7.02 (mutant) (P = 0.035); bladder, 6.22 versus 4.78 (P = 0.019); left kidney, 5.02 versus 3.31 (P = 0.009); and right kidney, 5.28 versus 4.46 (P = 0.039). Mice challenged with the wild-type strain showed significantly more severe renal damage than did mice challenged with the MR/P-negative mutant (P = 0.007). We conclude that MR/P fimbriae contribute significantly to colonization of the urinary tract and increase the risk of development of acute pyelonephritis. Images PMID:7913698

  9. In vivo phase variation of MR/P fimbrial gene expression in Proteus mirabilis infecting the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Li, X; Johnson, D E; Blomfield, I; Mobley, H L

    1997-03-01

    Proteus mirabilis, associated with complicated urinary tract infection, expresses mannose-resistant/Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae. Expression of these surface structures, which mediate haemagglutination and have a demonstrated role in virulence, undergoes phase variation. By DNA sequence analysis, a 252 bp invertible element was found in the intergenic region between mrpl, the putative site-specific recombinase gene, and mrpA, the primary structural subunit gene. The invertible segment is flanked by identical 21 bp inverted repeats and the presumptive half-sites for recombinase binding show homology to those recognized by FimB and FimE encoded by the Escherichia coli fim (Type 1 fimbriae) gene cluster. When amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from static broth cultures expressing MR/P fimbriae, the switch region was found in both ON and OFF positions. When PCR was used to amplify agar cultures which do not express the fimbriae, the switch region was OFF only. A canonical sigma 70 promoter inside the invertible element drives the transcription of mrpA when in the ON position; in the OFF position it is directed away from mrpA but does not appear to drive expression of mrpI. The mrpI gene was able to confer inversion of the mrp switch region in trans from both ON to OFF and OFF to ON. To examine the position of the switch in vivo, urine, bladder, and kidneys from mice transurethrally infected with P. mirabilis were used to prepare template DNA for PCR amplification. In the absence of urolithiasis (urease-mediated stone formation), the switch was found 100% in the ON position, a condition never observed following in vitro culture. We conclude that MR/P phase variation is regulated at the transcriptional level by the action of MrpI on an invertible element and that there is strong selective pressure for the expression of MR/P fimbriae in vivo. PMID:9076737

  10. Role of overexpressed CFA/I fimbriae in bacterial swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ling; Suo, Zhiyong; Lim, Timothy; Jun, SangMu; Deliorman, Muhammedin; Riccardi, Carol; Kellerman, Laura; Avci, Recep; Yang, Xinghong

    2012-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I is a protective antigen and has been overexpressed in bacterial vectors, such as Salmonella Typhimurium H683, to generate vaccines. Effects that overexpressed CFA/I may engender on the bacterial host remain largely unexplored. To investigate, we constructed a high CFA/I expression strain, H683-pC2, and compared it to a low CFA/I expression strain, H683-pC, and to a non-CFA/I expression strain, H683-pY. The results showed that H683-pC2 was less able to migrate into semisolid agar (0.35%) than either H683-pC or H683-pY. Bacteria that migrated showed motility halo sizes of H683-pC2 < H683-pC < H683-pY. In the liquid culture media, H683-pC2 cells precipitated to the bottom of the tube, while those of H683-pY did not. In situ imaging revealed that H683-pC2 bacilli tended to auto-agglutinate within the semisolid agar, while H683-pY bacilli did not. When the cfaBE fimbrial fiber encoding genes were deleted from pC2, the new plasmid, pC2(-), significantly recovered bacterial swimming capability. Our study highlights the negative impact of overexpressed CFA/I fimbriae on bacterial swimming motility.

  11. Role of overexpressed CFA/I fimbriae in bacterial swimming.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ling; Suo, Zhiyong; Lim, Timothy; Jun, Sangmu; Deliorman, Muhammedin; Riccardi, Carol; Kellerman, Laura; Avci, Recep; Yang, Xinghong

    2012-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I is a protective antigen and has been overexpressed in bacterial vectors, such as Salmonella Typhimurium H683, to generate vaccines. Effects that overexpressed CFA/I may engender on the bacterial host remain largely unexplored. To investigate, we constructed a high CFA/I expression strain, H683-pC2, and compared it to a low CFA/I expression strain, H683-pC, and to a non-CFA/I expression strain, H683-pY. The results showed that H683-pC2 was less able to migrate into semisolid agar (0.35%) than either H683-pC or H683-pY. Bacteria that migrated showed motility halo sizes of H683-pC2 < H683-pC < H683-pY. In the liquid culture media, H683-pC2 cells precipitated to the bottom of the tube, while those of H683-pY did not. In situ imaging revealed that H683-pC2 bacilli tended to auto-agglutinate within the semisolid agar, while H683-pY bacilli did not. When the cfaBE fimbrial fiber encoding genes were deleted from pC2, the new plasmid, pC2(-), significantly recovered bacterial swimming capability. Our study highlights the negative impact of overexpressed CFA/I fimbriae on bacterial swimming motility. PMID:22562964

  12. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) Increases Survival of Larval Sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonathan S F; Poretsky, Rachel S; Cook, Matthew A; Reyes-Tomassini, Jose J; Berejikian, Barry A; Goetz, Frederick W

    2016-06-01

    High concentrations of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a chemical compound released by lysed phytoplankton, may indicate high rates of grazing by zooplankton and may thus be a foraging cue for planktivorous fishes. Previous studies have shown that some planktivorous fishes and birds aggregate or alter locomotory behavior in response to this chemical cue, which is likely adaptive because it helps them locate prey. These behavioral responses have been demonstrated in juveniles and adults, but no studies have tested for effects on larval fish. Larvae suffer from high mortality rates and are vulnerable to starvation. While larvae are generally thought to be visual predators, they actually have poor vision and cryptic prey. Thus, larval fish should benefit from a chemical cue that provides information on prey abundance. We reared larval sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria, for one week and supplemented feedings with varying concentrations of DMSP to test the hypothesis that DMSP affects larval survival. Ecologically relevant DMSP concentrations increased larval survival by up to 70 %, which has implications for production in aquaculture and recruitment in nature. These results provide a new tool for increasing larval production in aquaculture and also suggest that larvae may use DMSP as an olfactory cue. The release of DMSP may be a previously unappreciated mechanism through which phytoplankton affect larval survival and recruitment. PMID:27306913

  13. Effective assembly of fimbriae in Escherichia coli depends on the translocation assembly module nanomachine.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Christopher; Belousoff, Matthew J; Hay, Iain D; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lillington, James; Tuck, Kellie L; Peters, Kate M; Phan, Minh-Duy; Lo, Alvin W; Schembri, Mark A; Strugnell, Richard A; Waksman, Gabriel; Lithgow, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins are essential for Gram-negative bacteria to rapidly adapt to changes in their environment. Intricate remodelling of the outer membrane proteome is critical for bacterial pathogens to survive environmental changes, such as entry into host tissues(1-3). Fimbriae (also known as pili) are appendages that extend up to 2 μm beyond the cell surface to function in adhesion for bacterial pathogens, and are critical for virulence. The best-studied examples of fimbriae are the type 1 and P fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, the major causative agent of urinary tract infections in humans. Fimbriae share a common mode of biogenesis, orchestrated by a molecular assembly platform called 'the usher' located in the outer membrane. Although the mechanism of pilus biogenesis is well characterized, how the usher itself is assembled at the outer membrane is unclear. Here, we report that a rapid response in usher assembly is crucially dependent on the translocation assembly module. We assayed the assembly reaction for a range of ushers and provide mechanistic insight into the β-barrel assembly pathway that enables the rapid deployment of bacterial fimbriae. PMID:27572967

  14. Distinct Mutations Led to Inactivation of Type 1 Fimbriae Expression in Shigella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Verónica; Puhar, Andrea; Sansonetti, Philippe; Parsot, Claude; Toro, Cecilia S.

    2015-01-01

    Shigella spp. are responsible for bacillary dysentery in humans. The acquisition or the modification of the virulence plasmid encoding factors promoting entry of bacteria into and dissemination within epithelial cells was a critical step in the evolution of these bacteria from their Escherichia coli ancestor(s). Incorporation of genomic islands (GI) and gene inactivation also shaped interactions between these pathogens and their human host. Sequence analysis of the GI inserted next to the leuX tRNA gene in S. boydii, S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. sonnei and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) suggests that this region initially carried the fec, yjhATS and fim gene clusters. The fim cluster encoding type I fimbriae is systematically inactivated in both reference strains and clinical isolates and distinct mutations are responsible for this inactivation in at least three phylogenetic groups. To investigate consequences of the presence of fimbriae on the outcome of the interaction of Shigella with host cells, we used a S. flexneri strain harboring a plasmid encoding the E. coli fim operon. Production of fimbriae by this recombinant strain increased the ability of bacteria to adhere to and enter into epithelial cells and had no effect on their ability to disseminate from cell to cell. The observations that production of type I fimbriae increases invasion of epithelial cells and that independent mutations abolish fimbriae production in Shigella suggest that these mutations correspond to pathoadaptive events. PMID:25811616

  15. Distinct mutations led to inactivation of type 1 fimbriae expression in Shigella spp.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Verónica; Puhar, Andrea; Sansonetti, Philippe; Parsot, Claude; Toro, Cecilia S

    2015-01-01

    Shigella spp. are responsible for bacillary dysentery in humans. The acquisition or the modification of the virulence plasmid encoding factors promoting entry of bacteria into and dissemination within epithelial cells was a critical step in the evolution of these bacteria from their Escherichia coli ancestor(s). Incorporation of genomic islands (GI) and gene inactivation also shaped interactions between these pathogens and their human host. Sequence analysis of the GI inserted next to the leuX tRNA gene in S. boydii, S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. sonnei and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) suggests that this region initially carried the fec, yjhATS and fim gene clusters. The fim cluster encoding type I fimbriae is systematically inactivated in both reference strains and clinical isolates and distinct mutations are responsible for this inactivation in at least three phylogenetic groups. To investigate consequences of the presence of fimbriae on the outcome of the interaction of Shigella with host cells, we used a S. flexneri strain harboring a plasmid encoding the E. coli fim operon. Production of fimbriae by this recombinant strain increased the ability of bacteria to adhere to and enter into epithelial cells and had no effect on their ability to disseminate from cell to cell. The observations that production of type I fimbriae increases invasion of epithelial cells and that independent mutations abolish fimbriae production in Shigella suggest that these mutations correspond to pathoadaptive events. PMID:25811616

  16. P-fimbriae in the presence of anti-PapA antibodies: new insight of antibodies action against pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortezaei, Narges; Singh, Bhupender; Bullitt, Esther; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Andersson, Magnus

    2013-12-01

    Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli establish urinary tract infections by attaching to host epithelial cells using adhesive organelles called fimbriae. Fimbriae are helix-like structures with a remarkable adaptability, offering safeguarding for bacteria exposed to changing fluid forces in the urinary tract. We challenged this property of P-fimbriae by cross-linking their subunits with shaft-specific antibodies and measuring the corresponding force response at a single organelle level. Our data show compromised extension and rewinding of P-fimbriae in the presence of antibodies and reduced fimbrial elasticity, which are important properties of fimbriae contributing to the ability of bacteria to cause urinary tract infections. The reduced elasticity found by cross-linking fimbrial subunits could thus be another assignment for antibodies; in addition to marking bacteria as foreign, antibodies physically compromise fimbrial function. We suggest that our assay and results will be a starting point for further investigations aimed at inhibiting sustained bacterial adhesion by antibodies.

  17. Immuno-electronmicroscopy of fimbriae-like structures on Bordetella pertussis serotype 1.3.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, J H; Namork, E; Frøholm, L O

    1988-04-01

    Fimbriae-like filaments were demonstrated on the surface of Bordetella pertussis, serotype 1.3, by negative staining and electronmicroscopy. Immunoelectronmicroscopy with a monoclonal antibody specific for strains possessing agglutinogen 3, and colloidal gold, gave strong labelling of these structures. However, incubation with adsorbed polyclonal anti-agglutinogen 3 serum gave only weak labelling of the distal parts of the filaments and of the bacterial surface. The different binding patterns of the two antisera suggested that the epitopes involved were dissimilar. Thus, agglutinogen 3, as defined by conventional adsorbed sera, appeared to be associated with the fimbriae-like structures but was not necessarily identical to the fimbrial subunit protein. The monoclonal antibody, however was more likely directed against the subunits of the fimbriae-like structures on serotype 1.3 bacteria. PMID:2895814

  18. Functional differences of Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae in determining periodontal disease pathogenesis: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is implicated in chronic and aggressive periodontitis. This bacterium has numerous virulence factors and one is the Fimbriae, which is quite important for bacterial colonization. Fimbriae are appendices that anchor to the bacterial wall and are comprised of the protein FimBriline encoded by the FimA gene. Thus far, six genotypes have been identified, FimA I to V and Ib. Genotypes II and IV are associated with periodontal disease, while genotype I is related to gingival health. Genotype identification of P. gingivalis FimA in periodontitis would be important to confirm the pathogenic genotypes and to establish risk at population level. This review is about the P. gingivalis FimA genotype prevalence worldwide. A systematic search using Pubmed, Hinary, and Science Direct within the following descriptors: Porphyromonas gingivalis, bacterial adhesion, periodontitis, Fimbriae, FimA, genotipification was performed to April 2011. PMID:24892323

  19. Streptococcus salivarius Fimbriae Are Composed of a Glycoprotein Containing a Repeated Motif Assembled into a Filamentous Nondissociable Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Céline; Vadeboncoeur, Christian; Chandad, Fatiha; Frenette, Michel

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius, a gram-positive bacterium found in the human oral cavity, expresses flexible peritrichous fimbriae. In this paper, we report purification and partial characterization of S. salivarius fimbriae. Fimbriae were extracted by shearing the cell surface of hyperfimbriated mutant A37 (a spontaneous mutant of S. salivarius ATCC 25975) with glass beads. Preliminary experiments showed that S. salivarius fimbriae did not dissociate when they were incubated at 100°C in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. This characteristic was used to separate them from other cell surface components by successive gel filtration chromatography procedures. Fimbriae with molecular masses ranging from 20 × 106 to 40 × 106 Da were purified. Examination of purified fimbriae by electron microscopy revealed the presence of filamentous structures up to 1 μm long and 3 to 4 nm in diameter. Biochemical studies of purified fimbriae and an amino acid sequence analysis of a fimbrial internal peptide revealed that S. salivarius fimbriae were composed of a glycoprotein assembled into a filamentous structure resistant to dissociation. The internal amino acid sequence was composed of a repeated motif of two amino acids alternating with two modified residues: A/X/T-E-Q-M/φ, where X represents a modified amino acid residue and φ represents a blank cycle. Immunolocalization experiments also revealed that the fimbriae were associated with a wheat germ agglutinin-reactive carbohydrate. Immunolabeling experiments with antifimbria polyclonal antibodies showed that antigenically related fimbria-like structures were expressed in two other human oral streptococcal species, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus constellatus. PMID:11292790

  20. Oral Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I fimbriae ameliorate arthritis via IL-35, not IL-27.

    PubMed

    Kochetkova, Irina; Thornburg, Theresa; Callis, Gayle; Holderness, Kathryn; Maddaloni, Massimo; Pascual, David W

    2014-01-15

    A Salmonella therapeutic expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor Ag I (CFA/I) fimbriae protects against collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) by eliciting two regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets: TGF-β-producing Foxp3(-)CD39(+)CD4(+) T cells and IL-10-producing Foxp3(+)CD39(+)CD4(+) T cells. However, it is unclear whether CFA/I fimbriae alone are protective and whether other regulatory cytokines are involved, especially in the context for the EBI3-sharing cytokines, Treg-derived IL-35 and APC-derived IL-27, both capable of suppressing Th17 cells and regulating autoimmune diseases. Subsequent evaluation revealed that a single oral dose of purified, soluble CFA/I fimbriae protected against CIA as effectively as did Salmonella-CFA/I and found that Foxp3(+)CD39(+)CD4(+) T cells were the source of secreted IL-35, whereas IL-27 production by CD11c(+) cells was inhibited. Inquiring into their relevance, CFA/I fimbriae-treated IL-27R-deficient (WSX-1(-/-)) mice were equally protected against CIA as were wild-type mice, suggesting a limited role for IL-27. In contrast, CFA/I fimbriae-mediated protection was abated in EBI3(-/-) mice, accompanied by the loss of TGF-β- and IL-10-producing Tregs. Adoptive transfer of C57BL/6 CD39(+)CD4(+) T cells to EBI3(-/-) mice with concurrent CFA/I plus IL-35 treatment effectively stimulated Tregs suppressing proinflammatory collagen II-specific Th cells. In contrast, recipients cotransferred with C57BL/6 and EBI3(-/-) CD39(+)CD4(+) T cells and treated with CFA/I plus IL-35 were not protected, implicating the importance of endogenous IL-35 for conferring CFA/I-mediated protection. Thus, CFA/I fimbriae stimulate IL-35 required for the coinduction of TGF-β and IL-10. PMID:24337375

  1. Role of the Amino-Terminal Region of Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae in Adherence to Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Han, Yiping; Hamada, Nobushiro; Sharma, Ashu; Genco, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae elicit many responses in eukaryotic cells, including mitogenicity, cytokine production, epithelial cell invasion, and cellular immune response. Specific domains of the major fimbrial protein (FimA) have been shown to be important in triggering some of these functions. The goal of the present study was to identify the domain(s) of P. gingivalis FimA responsible for specific interaction with human mucosal epithelial cells. Fimbriated P. gingivalis strains have been shown to bind to buccal epithelial cells, whereas nonfimbriated strains bind at low levels or not at all. This and other studies provide evidence that FimA mediates the adherence of P. gingivalis to oral epithelial cells. To determine the specific region(s) of P. gingivalis FimA involved in epithelial cell binding, specific antipeptide antibodies were used to inhibit the binding of iodinated purified fimbriae as well as the binding of P. gingivalis cells to epithelial cells. Antibodies directed against peptides 49 to 68 (VVMANTAGAMELVGKTLAEVK) and 69 to 90 (ALTTELTAENQEAAGLIMTAEP) were found to highly inhibit both the binding of fimbriae and the binding of P. gingivalis cells to epithelial cells. The antibody against FimA peptides 69 to 90 also reacted with P. gingivalis fimbriae in immunogold labeling and immunoblot analysis, thereby indicating that this peptide domain is exposed on the surface of fimbriae. Our results suggest that the amino-terminal domain corresponding to amino acid residues 49 to 90 of the fimbrillin protein is a major epithelial cell binding domain of P. gingivalis fimbriae. PMID:10531284

  2. Proteus mirabilis MR/P fimbrial operon: genetic organization, nucleotide sequence, and conditions for expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bahrani, F K; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, an agent of urinary tract infection, expresses at least four fimbrial types. Among these are the MR/P (mannose-resistant/Proteus-like) fimbriae. MrpA, the structural subunit, is optimally expressed at 37 degrees C in Luria broth cultured statically for 48 h by each of seven strains examined. Genes encoding this fimbria were isolated, and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The mrp gene cluster encoded by 7,293 bp predicts eight polypeptides: MrpI (22,133 Da), MrpA (17,909 Da), MrpB (19,632 Da), MrpC (96,823 Da), MrpD (27,886 Da), MrpE (19,470 Da), MrpF (17,363 Da), and MrpG (13,169 Da). mrpI is upstream of the gene encoding the major structural subunit gene mrpA and is transcribed in the direction opposite to that of the rest of the operon. All predicted polypeptides share > or = 25% amino acid identity with at least one other enteric fimbrial gene product encoded by the pap, fim, smf, fan, or mrk gene clusters. Images PMID:7910820

  3. Development of an intranasal vaccine to prevent urinary tract infection by Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Lockatell, C Virginia; Johnson, David E; Lane, M Chelsea; Warren, John W; Mobley, Harry L T

    2004-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis commonly infects the complicated urinary tract and is associated with urolithiasis. Stone formation is caused by bacterial urease, which hydrolyzes urea to ammonia, causing local pH to rise, and leads to the subsequent precipitation of magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) and calcium phosphate (apatite) crystals. To prevent these infections, we vaccinated CBA mice with formalin-killed bacteria or purified mannose-resistant, Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae, a surface antigen expressed by P. mirabilis during experimental urinary tract infection, via four routes of immunization: subcutaneous, intranasal, transurethral, and oral. We assessed the efficacy of vaccination using the CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Subcutaneous or intranasal immunization with formalin-killed bacteria and intranasal or transurethral immunization with purified MR/P fimbriae significantly protected CBA mice from ascending urinary tract infection by P. mirabilis (P < 0.05). To investigate the potential of MrpH, the MR/P fimbrial tip adhesin, as a vaccine, the mature MrpH peptide (residues 23 to 275, excluding the signal peptide), and the N-terminal receptor-binding domain of MrpH (residues 23 to 157) were overexpressed as C-terminal fusions to maltose-binding protein (MBP) and purified on amylose resins. Intranasal immunization of CBA mice with MBP-MrpH (residues 23 to 157) conferred effective protection against urinary tract infection by P. mirabilis (P < 0.002). PMID:14688082

  4. Active sites of salivary proline-rich protein for binding to Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae.

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, K; Amano, A; Kuboniwa, M; Horie, H; Nagata, H; Shizukuishi, S

    1997-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae specifically bind salivary acidic proline-rich protein 1 (PRP1) through protein-protein interactions. The binding domains of fimbrillin (a subunit of fimbriae) for PRP1 were analyzed previously (A. Amano, A. Sharma, J.-Y. Lee, H. T. Sojar, P. A. Raj, and R. J. Genco, Infect. Immun. 64:1631-1637, 1996). In this study, we investigated the sites of binding of the PRP1 molecules to the fimbriae. PRP1 (amino acid residues 1 to 150) was proteolysed to three fragments (residues 1 to 74 [fragment 1-74], 75 to 129, and 130 to 150). 125I-labeled fimbriae clearly bound fragments 75-129 and 130-150, immobilized on a polyvinylidene difluoride membrane; both fragments also inhibited whole-cell binding to PRP1-coated hydroxyapatite (HAP) beads by 50 and 83%, respectively. However, the N-terminal fragment failed to show any effect. Analogous peptides corresponding to residues 75 to 89, 90 to 106, 107 to 120, 121 to 129, and 130 to 150 of PRP1 were synthesized. The fimbriae significantly bound peptide 130-150, immobilized on 96-well plates, and the peptide also inhibited binding of 125I-labeled fimbriae to PRP1-coated HAP beads by almost 100%. Peptides 75-89, 90-106, and 121-129, immobilized on plates, showed considerable ability to bind fimbriae. For further analysis of active sites in residues 130 to 150, synthetic peptides corresponding to residues 130 to 137, 138 to 145, and 146 to 150 were prepared. Peptide 138-145 (GRPQGPPQ) inhibited fimbrial binding to PRP1-coated HAP beads by 97%. This amino acid sequence was shared in the alignment of residues 75 to 89, 90 to 106, and 107 to 120. Six synthetic peptides were prepared by serial deletions of individual residues from the N and C termini of peptide GRPQGPPQ. Peptide PQGPPQ was as inhibitory as peptide GRPQGPPQ. Further deletions of the dipeptide Pro-Gln from the N and C termini of peptide PQGPPQ resulted in significant loss of the inhibitory effect. These results strongly suggest that PQGPPQ

  5. Fimbriae and lipopolysaccharides are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Furukawa, Soichi; Usui, Yumi; Ishiba, Madoka; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Cells of Lactobacilli co-aggregated with Escherichia coli K-12 cells to form co-aggregates under mixed-culture conditions at 37 °C for 24 h. Co-aggregation was inhibited by sodium dodecyl sulfate but not by protease. E. coli deletion mutants of fimbriae formation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) formation did not co-aggregate with Lactobacilli. These results showed that fimbriae and LPS are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and E. coli. PMID:25209514

  6. Identification of Bacterial Factors Involved in Type 1 Fimbria Expression using an Escherichia coli K12 Proteome Chip*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Teng, Ching-Hao; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Jessica Ho, Tien Yu; Huang, Wen-Chun; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Chiang, I-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae are filamentous structures on Escherichia coli. These structures are important adherence factors. Because binding to the host cells is the first step of infection, type 1 fimbria is an important virulence factor of pathogenic E. coli. Expression of type 1 fimbria is regulated by a phase variation in which each individual bacterium can alternate between fimbriated (phase-ON) and nonfimbriated (phase-OFF) states. The phase variation is regulated by the flipping of the 314-bp fimS fragment, which contains the promoter driving the expression of the genes required for the synthesis of type 1 fimbria. Thus, the bacterial proteins able to interact with fimS are likely to be involved in regulating the expression of type 1 fimbria. To identify novel type 1 fimbria-regulating factors, we used an E. coli K12 proteome chip to screen for the bacterial factors able to interact with a 602-bp DNA fragment containing fimS and its adjacent regions. The Spr protein was identified by the proteome chip-based screening and further confirmed to be able to interact with fimS by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Deletion of spr in the neonatal meningitis E. coli strain RS218 significantly increased the ratio of the bacterial colonies that contained the type 1 fimbria phase-ON cells on agar plates. In addition, Spr interfered with the interactions of fimS with the site-specific recombinases, FimB and FimE, which are responsible for mediating the flipping of fimS. These results suggest that Spr is involved in the regulation of type 1 fimbria expression through direct interaction with the invertible element fimS. These findings facilitate our understanding of the regulation of type 1 fimbria. PMID:24692643

  7. Genetic variability between complete mitochondrion genomes of the sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria (Pallas, 1814).

    PubMed

    Galván-Tirado, Carolina; Del Río-Portilla, Miguel Angel; Delgado-Vega, Rigoberto; García-De León, Francisco J

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria (Genbank accession KP777542) is 16,507 bp in size and contains the typical 37 genes (13 protein-coding, 2 ribosomal RNA, and 22 transfer RNA) found in teleosts mitogenomes. The genome varies in 118 positions with respect to another mitogenome sablefish specimen. PMID:26065847

  8. Fimbria-mediated adherence of Candida albicans to glycosphingolipid receptors on human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L; Lee, K K; Sheth, H B; Lane-Bell, P; Srivastava, G; Hindsgaul, O; Paranchych, W; Hodges, R S; Irvin, R T

    1994-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunist fungal pathogen that has the ability to adhere to host cell surface receptors via a number of adhesins. Yu et al. (L. Yu, K. K. Lee, K. Ens, P. C. Doig, M. R. Carpenter, W. Staddon, R. S. Hodges, W. Paranchych, and R. T. Irvin, Infect. Immun. 62:2834-2842, 1994) described the purification and initial characterization of a fimbrial adhesin from C. albicans. In this paper, we show that C. albicans fimbriae also bind to asialo-GM1 [gangliotetraosylceramide: beta Gal(1-3)beta GalNAc(1-4) beta Gal(1-4)beta Glc(1-1)Cer] immobilized on microtiter plates in a saturable and concentration-dependent manner. C. albicans fimbrial binding to exfoliated human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) was inhibited by asialo-GM1 in in vitro binding assays. The fimbriae interact with the glycosphingolipid receptors via the carbohydrate portion of the receptors, since fimbriae were observed to bind to synthetic beta GalNAc(1-4)beta Gal-protein conjugates and the disaccharide was able to inhibit binding of fimbriae to BECs in in vitro binding assays. We conclude from these results that the C. albicans yeast form expresses a fimbrial adhesin that binds to glycosphingolipids displayed on the surface of human BECs. Images PMID:8005674

  9. Antibody-mediated disruption of the mechanics of CS20 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Preventive vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are being developed, many of which target common fimbrial colonization factors as the major constituent, based on empirical evidence that these function as protective antigens. Particularly, passive oral administration of ETEC anti-fimbrial antibodies prevent ETEC diarrhea. Little is, however, known regarding the specific mechanisms by which intestinal antibodies against ETEC fimbriae function to prevent disease. Using coli surface antigen 20 (CS20) fimbriae as a model ETEC colonization factor, we show using force spectroscopy that anti-fimbrial antibodies diminish fimbrial elasticity by inhibiting their natural capacity to unwind and rewind. In the presence of anti-CS20 antibodies the force required to unwind a single fimbria was increased several-fold and the extension length was shortened several-fold. Similar measurements in the presence of anti-CS20 Fab fragments did not show any effect, indicating that bivalent antibody binding is required to reduce fimbrial elasticity. Based on these findings, we propose a model for an in-vivo mechanism whereby antibody-mediated disruption of the biomechanical properties of CS20 fimbriae impedes sustained adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosal surface. Further elucidation of the role played by intestinal antibodies in mechanical disruption of fimbrial function may provide insights relevant to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:26411657

  10. A role for fimbriae in Porphyromonas gingivalis invasion of oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, T; Genco, R J; Sojar, H T; Hamada, N; Genco, C A

    1997-01-01

    Isogenic mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis which differ in the expression of fimbriae were used to examine the contribution of fimbriae in invasion of a human oral epithelial cell line (KB). At a multiplicity of infection of 100, the wild-type P. gingivalis strains 33277, 381, and A7436 exhibited adherence efficiencies of 5.5, 0.11, and 5.0%, respectively, and invasion efficiencies of 0.15, 0.03, and 0.10%, respectively. However, adherence to and invasion of KB cells was not detected with the P. gingivalis fimA mutants, DPG3 and MPG1. Adherence of P. gingivalis wild-type strains to KB cells was completely inhibited by the addition of hyperimmune sera raised to the major fimbriae. Examination by electron microscopy of invasion of epithelial cells by the P. gingivalis wild-type strain 381 revealed microvillus-like extensions around adherent bacteria; this was not observed with P. gingivalis fim mutants. Taken together, these results indicate that the P. gingivalis major fimbriae are required for adherence to and invasion of oral epithelial cells. PMID:9125593

  11. Transcriptional profiling of human smooth muscle cells infected with gingipain and fimbriae mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boxi; Sirsjö, Allan; Khalaf, Hazem; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is considered to be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the role of different virulence factors produced by P. gingivalis in this process is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional profiling of human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) infected with wild type, gingipain mutants or fimbriae mutants of P. gingivalis. AoSMCs were exposed to wild type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutants (E8 and K1A), or fimbriae mutants (DPG-3 and KRX-178) of P. gingivalis. We observed that wild type P. gingivalis changes the expression of a considerable larger number of genes in AoSMCs compare to gingipain and fimbriae mutants, respectively. The results from pathway analysis revealed that the common differentially expressed genes for AoSMCs infected by 3 different wild type P. gingivalis strains were enriched in pathways of cancer, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling pathway. Disease ontology analysis showed that various strains of P. gingivalis were associated with different disease profilings. Our results suggest that gingipains and fimbriae, especially arginine-specific gingipain, produced by P. gingivalis play important roles in the association between periodontitis and other inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26907358

  12. Antibody-mediated disruption of the mechanics of CS20 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J.; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Preventive vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are being developed, many of which target common fimbrial colonization factors as the major constituent, based on empirical evidence that these function as protective antigens. Particularly, passive oral administration of ETEC anti-fimbrial antibodies prevent ETEC diarrhea. Little is, however, known regarding the specific mechanisms by which intestinal antibodies against ETEC fimbriae function to prevent disease. Using coli surface antigen 20 (CS20) fimbriae as a model ETEC colonization factor, we show using force spectroscopy that anti-fimbrial antibodies diminish fimbrial elasticity by inhibiting their natural capacity to unwind and rewind. In the presence of anti-CS20 antibodies the force required to unwind a single fimbria was increased several-fold and the extension length was shortened several-fold. Similar measurements in the presence of anti-CS20 Fab fragments did not show any effect, indicating that bivalent antibody binding is required to reduce fimbrial elasticity. Based on these findings, we propose a model for an in-vivo mechanism whereby antibody-mediated disruption of the biomechanical properties of CS20 fimbriae impedes sustained adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosal surface. Further elucidation of the role played by intestinal antibodies in mechanical disruption of fimbrial function may provide insights relevant to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:26411657

  13. Receptor for the F4 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC).

    PubMed

    Xia, Pengpeng; Zou, Yajie; Wang, Yiting; Song, Yujie; Liu, Wei; Francis, David H; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2015-06-01

    Infection with F4(+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) responsible for diarrhea in neonatal and post-weaned piglets leads to great economic losses in the swine industry. These pathogenic bacteria express either of three fimbrial variants F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad, which have long been known for their importance in host infection and initiating protective immune responses. The initial step in infection for the bacterium is to adhere to host enterocytes through fimbriae-mediated recognition of receptors on the host cell surface. A number of receptors for ETEC F4 have now been described and characterized, but their functions are still poorly understood. The current review summarizes the latest research addressing the characteristics of F4 fimbriae receptors and the interactions of F4 fimbriae and their receptors on host cells. These include observations that as follows: (1) FaeG mediates the binding activities of F4 and is an essential component of the F4 fimbriae, (2) the F4 fimbrial receptor gene is located in a region of chromosome 13, (3) the biochemical properties of F4 fimbrial receptors that form the binding site of the bacterium are now recognized, and (4) specific receptors confer susceptibility/resistance to ETEC F4 infection in pigs. Characterizing the host-pathogen interaction will be crucial to understand the pathogenicity of the bacteria, provide insights into receptor activation of the innate immune system, and develop therapeutic strategies to prevent this illness. PMID:25967654

  14. Transcriptional profiling of human smooth muscle cells infected with gingipain and fimbriae mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boxi; Sirsjö, Allan; Khalaf, Hazem; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is considered to be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the role of different virulence factors produced by P. gingivalis in this process is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional profiling of human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) infected with wild type, gingipain mutants or fimbriae mutants of P. gingivalis. AoSMCs were exposed to wild type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutants (E8 and K1A), or fimbriae mutants (DPG-3 and KRX-178) of P. gingivalis. We observed that wild type P. gingivalis changes the expression of a considerable larger number of genes in AoSMCs compare to gingipain and fimbriae mutants, respectively. The results from pathway analysis revealed that the common differentially expressed genes for AoSMCs infected by 3 different wild type P. gingivalis strains were enriched in pathways of cancer, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling pathway. Disease ontology analysis showed that various strains of P. gingivalis were associated with different disease profilings. Our results suggest that gingipains and fimbriae, especially arginine-specific gingipain, produced by P. gingivalis play important roles in the association between periodontitis and other inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26907358

  15. Identification and characterization of S fimbria-binding sialoglycoproteins on brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Prasadarao, N V; Wass, C A; Kim, K S

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that S-fimbriated Escherichia coli binds brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) via a lectin-like activity of SfaS adhesin specific for NeuAc alpha2,3-galactose; however, BMEC molecules bearing these epitopes have not been identified. In the present study, we showed that the expression of S fimbriae conferred a three-fold increase in adhesion of E. coli to cow, human, and rat BMEC but did not enhance E. coli adhesion to systemic vascular endothelial cells such as human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human aortic arterial endothelial cells. Two BMEC-binding molecules for S fimbriae were identified as 65 (major)- and 130 (minor)-kDa sialoglycoproteins by S fimbria immunoblotting and were purified from bovine BMEC by wheat germ agglutinin and Maackia amurensis lectin (specific to NeuAc alpha2,3-galactose) affinity chromatography. The 65-kDa BMEC glycoprotein showed effective inhibition of S fimbria-mediated binding of E. coli to BMEC. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the mixture of 65- and 130-kDa proteins reacted to 65-kDa protein present only on BMEC, not on systemic vascular endothelial cells. Immunoprecipitation of biotinylated BMEC membrane proteins and immunocytochemistry studies of BMEC with anti-S fimbria-binding protein antibodies revealed that the 65-kDa protein is a surface protein. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of 65- and 130-kDa proteins showed no significant sequence homology with any other known proteins. These findings suggest that 65- and 130-kDa proteins represent novel sialoglycoproteins involved in the binding of S-fimbriated E. coli to BMEC. PMID:9199459

  16. DNA-based diagnostic tests for Salmonella species targeting agfA, the structural gene for thin, aggregative fimbriae.

    PubMed Central

    Doran, J L; Collinson, S K; Burian, J; Sarlós, G; Todd, E C; Munro, C K; Kay, C M; Banser, P A; Peterkin, P I; Kay, W W

    1993-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis 27655-3b and a few diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains produce morphologically and antigenically related, thin, aggregative fimbriae, collectively named GVVPQ fimbriae (S. K. Collinson, L. Emödy, T. J. Trust, and W. W. Kay, J. Bacteriol. 174:4490-4495, 1992). To determine whether GVVPQ fimbriae are common to Salmonella spp. and other enteropathogenic members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, 113 isolates were phenotypically screened for Congo red binding and aggregative colony morphology. Presumptive positive and representative negative strains were examined by Western blotting (immunoblotting) by using antiserum to SEF 17, the native GVVPQ fimbria of S. enteritidis. Only four S. enteritidis strains and six E. coli isolates possessed substantial amounts of GVVPQ fimbriae after 24 h of incubation on T medium. Following 5 days of incubation, 56 of 93 Salmonella isolates (60%) and 1 of 7 additional E. coli clinical isolates possessed detectable levels of GVVPQ fimbriae. Since variable expression of GVVPQ fimbriae was observed among Salmonella isolates and some E. coli strains produced scant amounts, as revealed by immunoelectron microscopy, the ability to produce these fimbriae was evaluated by genotypic screening. The structural gene for the SEF 17 fimbrin, agfA, was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, cloned, and sequenced to provide a characterized DNA probe. An agfA DNA fragment hybridized strongly to 603 of 604 (99.8%) Salmonella isolates but very weakly to 31 of 266 other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae including 26 of 137 E. coli strains, 3 of 14 Citrobacter spp., and single isolates of Shigella sonnei and Enterobacter cloacae. The agfA DNA probe proved to be a valuable diagnostic tool for Salmonella isolates arrayed on hydrophobic grid membrane filters. Unique agfA sequences were targeted in the development of a polymerase chain reaction assay specific for Salmonella spp. Images PMID:8104955

  17. Anchoring and length regulation of Porphyromonas gingivalis Mfa1 fimbriae by the downstream gene product Mfa2

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Iwami, Jun; Sato, Keiko; Park, Yoonsuk; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Atsumi, Tatsuo; Moriguchi, Keiichi; Murakami, Yukitaka; Lamont, Richard J.; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Ohno, Norikazu; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2009-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a causative agent of periodontitis, has at least two types of thin, single-stranded fimbriae, termed FimA and Mfa1 (according to the names of major subunits), which can be discriminated by filament length and by the size of their major fimbrilin subunits. FimA fimbriae are long filaments that are easily detached from cells, whereas Mfa1 fimbriae are short filaments that are tightly bound to cells. However, a P. gingivalis ATCC 33277-derived mutant deficient in mfa2, a gene downstream of mfa1, produced long filaments (10 times longer than those of the parent), easily detached from the cell surface, similar to FimA fimbriae. Longer Mfa1 fimbriae contributed to stronger autoaggregation of bacterial cells. Complementation of the mutant with the wild-type mfa2 allele in trans restored the parental phenotype. Mfa2 is present in the outer membrane of P. gingivalis, but does not co-purify with the Mfa1 fimbriae. However, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Mfa2 and Mfa1 are associated with each other in whole P. gingivalis cells. Furthermore, immunogold microscopy, including double labelling, confirmed that Mfa2 was located on the cell surface and likely associated with Mfa1 fimbriae. Mfa2 may therefore play a role as an anchor for the Mfa1 fimbriae and also as a regulator of Mfa1 filament length. Two additional downstream genes (pgn0289 and pgn0290) are co-transcribed with mfa1 (pgn0287) and mfa2 (pgn0288), and proteins derived from pgn0289, pgn0290 and pgn0291 appear to be accessory fimbrial components. PMID:19589838

  18. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor in the Ovarian Follicle Attracts the Stromal Cells of the Fallopian Tube Fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiu-Hua; Hsu, Che-Fang; Huang, Rui-Len; Ding, Dah-Ching; Chu, Tang-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    During human ovulation, the fallopian tube fimbriae must move to the ovulation site to catch the oocyte. As the tissue-of-origin of the majority of ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC), the fallopian tube fimbriae carrying a precursor cancer lesion may also approach the ovulatory site for metastasis. We hypothesize that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in mature follicle fluid (FF) attracts the migration of PDGFR-expressing fimbriae toward the ovulating follicle. We observed that more PDGFR-β was expressed in the distal part than in the proximal parts of the fallopian tube, particularly in stromal cells in the lamina propria. The stromal cells, but not the epithelial cells, from normal fimbriae and fallopian tube HGSC were highly chemotactic to mature FF. The chemotactic activities were positively correlated with PDGF-BB and estradiol levels in FF and were abolished by a blocking antibody of PDGFR-β and by tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. When PDGF-BB/AB was depleted from the FF, more than 80% of chemotaxis activities were diminished. This study suggests an ovarian follicle-directed and PDGF-dependent attraction of fallopian tube fimbriae before ovulation. The same mechanism may also be crucial for the ovarian homing of HGSC, which largely originates in the fimbriae. PMID:27379403

  19. Targeting aminopeptidase N, a newly identified receptor for F4ac fimbriae, enhances the intestinal mucosal immune response.

    PubMed

    Melkebeek, V; Rasschaert, K; Bellot, P; Tilleman, K; Favoreel, H; Deforce, D; De Geest, B G; Goddeeris, B M; Cox, E

    2012-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a major cause of diarrhea in human and animal. In piglets, ETEC having F4 fimbriae (F4(+) ETEC) induce severe diarrhea, dependent on the presence of receptors for F4 (F4R). In this study, porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN) was identified as an F4R by comparative proteomic analysis of brush border proteins of F4R(+) and F4R(-) pigs and by adherence/internalization experiments on pAPN-transfected cells. Binding of F4 fimbriae to pAPN depended on sialic acid containing carbohydrate moieties, and resulted in clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the fimbriae. Endocytosis via pAPN was not restricted to F4 fimbriae, but was also observed for anti-pAPN antibodies. Both F4 fimbriae- and pAPN-specific antibodies were taken up in vivo by porcine enterocytes and induced subsequently a rapid immunoglobulin A and G response. In conclusion, we identified pAPN as an endocytotic receptor for F4 fimbriae and highlight the opportunity to target vaccine antigens to this epithelial receptor. PMID:22669578

  20. S fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli bind to primary human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells but do not induce expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, B; Placzek, M; Doehn, C; Hacker, J; Schmidt, G; Wasenauer, G; Daha, M R; van der Woude, F J; Sack, K

    1995-01-01

    We have recently reported an increase of expression of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 by renal carcinoma cells in response to S fimbriae of Escherichia coli. Now we demonstrate that E. coli expressing S and P fimbriae strongly binds to human proximal tubular epithelial cells. However, in primary and simian virus 40-transfected renal tubular epithelial cells S fimbriae do not enhance the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1. PMID:7622256

  1. Twitching motility and possession of polar fimbriae in spreading Streptococcus sanguis isolates from the human throat.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, S D; Henrichsen, J

    1975-04-01

    A collection of 19 strains of alpha haemolytic streptococci, isolated from throat swabs and characterized by production of spreading zones around colonies on blood agar, was found to constitute a very homogeneous group with morphological, physiological and biochemical characters corresponding to those of streptococci of ser-group H, or Streptococcus sanguis, and they all appeared to possess the group H antigen. They all had a common agglutinogen and, in addition, heterogeneous agglutinogens. The spreading growth, which appears to be a common property of S. sanguis, was due to twitching motility, and the spreading cultures possessed polar fimbriae. tneither twitching motility nor the possession of polar fimbriae have been observed in gram-positive bacteria before. PMID:1171576

  2. Streptococcus salivarius strains carry either fibrils or fimbriae on the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Handley, P S; Carter, P L; Fielding, J

    1984-01-01

    Strains of Streptococcus salivarius were screened by negative staining for the presence of surface structures. Two structural subgroups were found, carrying either fibrils or fimbriae, projecting from the cell surface. Eight strains carried a very dense peritrichous array of fibrils of two distinct lengths. Long fibrils had an average length of 175 nm, and short fibrils had an average length of 95 nm. Two strains carried only long fibrils, one strain carried only short fibrils, and another strain carried a lateral tuft of very prominent fibrils of two lengths, with a fibrillar fuzz covering the remainder of the cell surface. In all the strains in which they were present, the long fibrils were unaffected by protease or trypsin treatment. In contrast, the short fibrils were completely digested by protease and partially removed by trypsin. Neither long nor short fibrils were affected structurally by mild pepsin digestion or by lipase. The Lancefield extraction procedure removed both long and short fibrils. These twelve fibrillar strains were therefore divisible into four structural subgroups. Extracts of all the fibrillar strains reacted with group K antiserum. The second main structural subgroup consisted of nine strains of S. salivarius, all of which carried morphologically identical, flexible fimbriae arranged peritrichously over the cell surface. The fimbriae were structurally distinct from fibrils and measured 0.5 to 1.0 micron long and 3 to 4 nm wide, with an irregular outline and no obvious substructure. There was no obvious reduction in the number of fimbriae after protease or trypsin treatment. Extracts of the fimbriated strains did not react with the group K antiserum. The two serological and structural subgroups could also be distinguished by colony morphology. Images PMID:6197404

  3. Promoting crystallisation of the Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae 14 pilin SefD using deuterium oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Garnett, James A; Lee, Wei-chao; Lin, Jing; Salgado, Paula; Taylor, Jonathan; Xu, Yingqi; Lambert, Sebastian; Cota, Ernesto; Matthews, Steve

    2012-05-01

    The use of heavy water (D(2)O) as a solvent is commonplace in many spectroscopic techniques for the study of biological macromolecules. A significant deuterium isotope effect exists where hydrogen-bonding is important, such as in protein stability, dynamics and assembly. Here we illustrate the use of D(2)O in additive screening for the production of reproducible diffraction-quality crystals for the Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae 14 (SEF14) putative tip adhesin, SefD. PMID:22497887

  4. Altered fimbria-fornix white matter integrity in anorexia nervosa predicts harm avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Kazlouski, Demitry; Rollin, Michael D.H.; Tregellas, Jason; Shott, Megan E.; Jappe, Leah M.; Hagman, Jennifer O.; Pryor, Tamara; Yang, Tony T.; Frank, Guido K.W.

    2011-01-01

    The eating disorder anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with high anxiety. The brain mechanisms that drive those behaviors are unknown. In this study we wanted to test whether brain WM integrity is altered in AN, and related to heightened anxiety. Sixteen adult women with AN (mean age 24±7 years) and 17 healthy control women (CW, mean age 25±4 years) underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the brain. The DTI brain images were used to calculate the fractional anisotropy (FA) of WM tracts, which is a measure for WM integrity. AN individuals compared to CW showed clusters of significantly reduced FA (p<0.05, corrected) in the bilateral fimbria-fornix, fronto-occipital fasciculus, as well as posterior cingulum WM. In the AN group, Harm Avoidance was predicted by left (F=5.8, Beta=−0.54, p<0.03) and right (F=6.0, Beta=−0.55, p<0.03) fimbria-fornix FA. Those findings were not due to WM volume deficits in AN. This study indicates that WM integrity is abnormal in AN in limbic and association pathways, which could contribute to disturbed feeding, emotion processing and body perception in AN. The prediction of Harm Avoidance in AN by fimbria-fornix WM integrity suggests that this pathway may be mechanistically involved in high anxiety in AN. PMID:21498054

  5. Oral streptococcal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mediates interaction with Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Hideki; Nonaka, Aya; Kataoka, Kosuke; Tanaka, Muneo; Shizukuishi, Satoshi

    2004-11-01

    Interaction of Porphyromonas gingivalis with plaque-forming bacteria is necessary for its colonization in periodontal pockets. Participation of Streptococcus oralis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and P. gingivalis fimbriae in this interaction has been reported. In this investigation, the contribution of various oral streptococcal GAPDHs to interaction with P. gingivalis fimbriae was examined. Streptococcal cell surface GAPDH activity was measured by incubation of a constant number of streptococci with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and analysis for the conversion of NAD+ to NADH based on the absorbance at 340 nm. Coaggregation activity was measured by a turbidimetric assay. Cell surface GAPDH activity was correlated with coaggregation activity (r = 0.854, P < 0.01) with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. S. oralis ATCC 9811 and ATCC 10557, Streptococcus gordonii G9B, Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556, and Streptococcus parasanguinis ATCC 15909 exhibited high cell surface GAPDH activity and coaggregation activity; consequently, their cell surface GAPDHs were extracted with mutanolysin and purified on a Cibacron Blue Sepharose column. Subsequently, their DNA sequences were elucidated. Purified GAPDHs bound P. gingivalis recombinant fimbrillin by Western blot assay, furthermore, their DNA sequences displayed a high degree of homology with one another. Moreover, S. oralis recombinant GAPDH inhibited coaggregation between P. gingivalis and the aforementioned five streptococcal strains in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that GAPDHs of various plaque-forming streptococci may be involved in their attachment to P. gingivalis fimbriae and that they may contribute to P. gingivalis colonization. PMID:15488735

  6. F4+ ETEC infection and oral immunization with F4 fimbriae elicits an IL-17-dominated immune response.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu; Van Nguyen, Ut; de la Fe Rodriguez, Pedro Y; Devriendt, Bert; Cox, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are an important cause of post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) in piglets. Porcine-specific ETEC strains possess different fimbrial subtypes of which F4 fimbriae are the most frequently associated with ETEC-induced diarrhea in piglets. These F4 fimbriae are potent oral immunogens that induce protective F4-specific IgA antibody secreting cells at intestinal tissues. Recently, T-helper 17 (Th17) cells have been implicated in the protection of the host against extracellular pathogens. However, it remains unknown if Th17 effector responses are needed to clear ETEC infections. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate if ETEC elicits a Th17 response in piglets and if F4 fimbriae trigger a similar response. F4(+) ETEC infection upregulated IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21 and IL-23p19, but not IL-12 and IFN-γ mRNA expression in the systemic and mucosal immune system. Similarly, oral immunization with F4 fimbriae triggered a Th17 signature evidenced by an upregulated mRNA expression of IL-17F, RORγt, IL-23p19 and IL-21 in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Intriguingly, IL-17A mRNA levels were unaltered. To further evaluate this difference between systemic and mucosal immune responses, we assayed the cytokine mRNA profile of F4 fimbriae stimulated PBMCs. F4 fimbriae induced IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22 and IL-23p19, but downregulated IL-17B mRNA expression. Altogether, these data indicate a Th17 dominated response upon oral immunization with F4 fimbriae and F4(+) ETEC infection. Our work also highlights that IL-17B and IL-17F participate in the immune response to protect the host against F4(+) ETEC infection and could aid in the design of future ETEC vaccines. PMID:26490738

  7. Identification and Regulation of a Novel Citrobacter rodentium Gut Colonization Fimbria (Gcf)

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Flores, Gustavo G.; Croxen, Matthew A.; Martínez-Santos, Verónica I.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-negative enteric bacterium Citrobacter rodentium is a natural mouse pathogen that has been extensively used as a surrogate model for studying the human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. All three pathogens produce similar attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions in the intestinal epithelium. During infection, these bacteria employ surface structures called fimbriae to adhere and colonize the host intestinal epithelium. For C. rodentium, the roles of only a small number of its genome-carried fimbrial operons have been evaluated. Here, we report the identification of a novel C. rodentium colonization factor, called gut colonization fimbria (Gcf), which is encoded by a chaperone-usher fimbrial operon. A gcfA mutant shows a severe colonization defect within the first 10 days of infection. The gcf promoter is not active in C. rodentium under several in vitro growth conditions; however, it is readily expressed in a C. rodentium Δhns1 mutant lacking the closest ortholog of the Escherichia coli histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) but not in mutants with deletion of the other four genes encoding H-NS homologs. H-NS binds to the regulatory region of gcf, further supporting its direct role as a repressor of the gcf promoter that starts transcription 158 bp upstream of the start codon of its first open reading frame. The gcf operon possesses interesting novel traits that open future opportunities to expand our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function during infection of these important bacterial structures. IMPORTANCE Fimbriae are surface bacterial structures implicated in a variety of biological processes. Some have been shown to play a critical role during host colonization and thus in disease. Pathogenic bacteria possess the genetic information for an assortment of fimbriae, but their function and regulation and the interplay between them have not been studied in detail. This work provides new insights

  8. The Shaft of the Type 1 Fimbriae Regulates an External Force to Match the FimH Catch Bond

    PubMed Central

    Zakrisson, Johan; Wiklund, Krister; Axner, Ove; Andersson, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae mediate adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to host cells. It has been hypothesized that due to their ability to uncoil under exposure to force, fimbriae can reduce fluid shear stress on the adhesin-receptor interaction by which the bacterium adheres to the surface. In this work, we develop a model that describes how the force on the adhesin-receptor interaction of a type 1 fimbria varies as a bacterium is affected by a time-dependent fluid flow mimicking in vivo conditions. The model combines in vivo hydrodynamic conditions with previously assessed biomechanical properties of the fimbriae. Numerical methods are used to solve for the motion and adhesion force under the presence of time-dependent fluid profiles. It is found that a bacterium tethered with a type 1 pilus will experience significantly reduced shear stress for moderate to high flow velocities and that the maximum stress the adhesin will experience is limited to ∼120 pN, which is sufficient to activate the conformational change of the FimH adhesin into its stronger state but also lower than the force required for breaking it under rapid loading. Our model thus supports the assumption that the type 1 fimbria shaft and the FimH adhesin-receptor interaction are optimized to each other, and that they give piliated bacteria significant advantages in rapidly changing fluidic environments. PMID:23708354

  9. P-fimbriae in the presence of anti-PapA antibodies: new insight of antibodies action against pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Mortezaei, Narges; Singh, Bhupender; Bullitt, Esther; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Andersson, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli establish urinary tract infections by attaching to host epithelial cells using adhesive organelles called fimbriae. Fimbriae are helix-like structures with a remarkable adaptability, offering safeguarding for bacteria exposed to changing fluid forces in the urinary tract. We challenged this property of P-fimbriae by cross-linking their subunits with shaft-specific antibodies and measuring the corresponding force response at a single organelle level. Our data show compromised extension and rewinding of P-fimbriae in the presence of antibodies and reduced fimbrial elasticity, which are important properties of fimbriae contributing to the ability of bacteria to cause urinary tract infections. The reduced elasticity found by cross-linking fimbrial subunits could thus be another assignment for antibodies; in addition to marking bacteria as foreign, antibodies physically compromise fimbrial function. We suggest that our assay and results will be a starting point for further investigations aimed at inhibiting sustained bacterial adhesion by antibodies. PMID:24292100

  10. pap-2-encoded fimbriae adhere to the P blood group-related glycosphingolipid stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 in the human kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Karr, J F; Nowicki, B J; Truong, L D; Hull, R A; Moulds, J J; Hull, S I

    1990-01-01

    A subtype of P fimbriae, encoded by the pap-2 gene cluster, has been analyzed for agglutination of erythrocytes and for binding to cryostat sections of the human kidney. We have demonstrated that pap-2-encoded fimbriae are capable of binding to erythrocytes from some animal species and to human erythrocytes which express globoside and the LKE (stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 [SSEA-4]) antigen. The pap-2 fimbriae bind to Bowman's capsule in the human kidney. Monoclonal antibodies directed against glycosphingolipids were used for the detection of specific P blood group-related antigens in the human kidney and on erythrocytes. Preincubation of kidney sections with monoclonal antibody MC813-70, which binds to the SSEA-4 antigen, inhibited adherence of purified pap-2-encoded fimbriae to Bowman's capsule. We suggest that one receptor for pap-2-encoded fimbriae is the antigen known as LKE (Luke) on human erythrocytes or SSEA-4 in the tissues. Images PMID:1979319

  11. Evolutionary and Functional Relationships of Colonization Factor Antigen I and Other Class 5 Adhesive Fimbriae of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Anantha, Ravi P.; McVeigh, Annette L.; Lee, Lanfong H.; Agnew, Mary K.; Cassels, Frederick J.; Scott, Daniel A.; Whittam, Thomas S.; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) is the archetype of eight genetically related fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) designated class 5 fimbriae. Assembled by the alternate chaperone pathway, these organelles comprise a rigid stalk of polymerized major subunits and an apparently tip-localized minor adhesive subunit. We examined the evolutionary relationships of class 5-specific structural proteins and correlated these with functional properties. We sequenced the gene clusters encoding coli surface antigen 4 (CS4), CS14, CS17, CS19, and putative colonization factor antigen O71 (PCFO71) and analyzed the deduced proteins and the published homologs of CFA/I, CS1, and CS2. Multiple alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the proteins encoded by each operon define three subclasses, 5a (CFA/I, CS4, and CS14), 5b (CS1, CS17, CS19, and PCFO71), and 5c (CS2). These share distant evolutionary relatedness to fimbrial systems of three other genera. Subclass divisions generally correlate with distinguishing in vitro adherence phenotypes of strains bearing the ETEC fimbriae. Phylogenetic comparisons of the individual structural proteins demonstrated greater intrasubclass conservation among the minor subunits than the major subunits. To correlate this with functional attributes, we made antibodies against CFA/I and CS17 whole fimbriae and maltose-binding protein fusions with the amino-terminal half of the corresponding minor subunits. Anti-minor subunit Fab preparations showed hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) of ETEC expressing homologous and intrasubclass heterologous colonization factors while anti-fimbrial Fab fractions showed HAI activity limited to colonization factor-homologous ETEC. These results were corroborated with similar results from the Caco-2 cell adherence assay. Our findings suggest that the minor subunits of class 5 fimbriae may be superior to whole fimbriae in inducing antiadhesive immunity. PMID:15557644

  12. Regulation and binding properties of S fimbriae cloned from E. coli strains causing urinary tract infection and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Morschhäuser, J; Vetter, V; Korhonen, T; Uhlin, B E; Hacker, J

    1993-04-01

    S fimbriae are able to recognize receptor molecules containing sialic acid and are produced by pathogenic E. coli strains causing urinary tract infection and menigitis. In order to characterize the corresponding genetic determinant, termed S fimbrial adhesin (sfa) gene cluster, we have cloned the S-specific genes from a urinary pathogen and from a meningitis isolate. Nine genes are involved in the production of S fimbriae, two of these, sfaB and sfaC code for regulatory proteins being necessary for the expression of S fimbriae. Two promoters, PB and PC, are located in front of these genes. Transcription of the sfa determinant is influenced by activation of the promoters via SfaB and SfaC, the action of the H-NS protein and an RNaseE-specific mRNA processing. In addition, a third promoter, PA, located in front of the major subunit gene sfaA, can be activated under special circumstances. Four genes of the sfa determinant code for the subunit-specific proteins, SfaA (16 kda), SfaG (17 kda), SfaS (14 kda) and SfaH (29 kda). It was demonstrated that the protein SfaA is the major subunit protein while SfaS is identical to the sialic-acid-specific adhesin of S fimbriae. The introduction of specific mutations into sfaS revealed that a region of six amino acids of the adhesin which includes two lysine and one arginine residues is involved in the receptor specific interaction of S fimbriae. Additionally, it has been shown that SfaS is necessary for the induction of fimbriation while SfaH plays a role in the stringency of binding of S fimbriae to erythrocytes. PMID:8102267

  13. Transcriptome of Proteus mirabilis in the murine urinary tract: virulence and nitrogen assimilation gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Melanie M; Yep, Alejandra; Smith, Sara N; Mobley, Harry L T

    2011-07-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of complicated urinary tract infections. In this study, microarrays were used to analyze P. mirabilis gene expression in vivo from experimentally infected mice. Urine was collected at 1, 3, and 7 days postinfection, and RNA was isolated from bacteria in the urine for transcriptional analysis. Across nine microarrays, 471 genes were upregulated and 82 were downregulated in vivo compared to in vitro broth culture. Genes upregulated in vivo encoded mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae, urease, iron uptake systems, amino acid and peptide transporters, pyruvate metabolism enzymes, and a portion of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Flagella were downregulated. Ammonia assimilation gene glnA (glutamine synthetase) was repressed in vivo, while gdhA (glutamate dehydrogenase) was upregulated in vivo. Contrary to our expectations, ammonia availability due to urease activity in P. mirabilis did not drive this gene expression. A gdhA mutant was growth deficient in minimal medium with citrate as the sole carbon source, and loss of gdhA resulted in a significant fitness defect in the mouse model of urinary tract infection. Unlike Escherichia coli, which represses gdhA and upregulates glnA in vivo and cannot utilize citrate, the data suggest that P. mirabilis uses glutamate dehydrogenase to monitor carbon-nitrogen balance, and this ability contributes to the pathogenic potential of P. mirabilis in the urinary tract. PMID:21505083

  14. Effects of guanidinium hydrochloride on the structure and immunological properties of Bordetella pertussis fimbriae.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, A M; Irons, L I; Robinson, A; Seabrook, R N

    1992-01-01

    Denaturation of Bordetella pertussis fimbrial preparations by guanidinium hydrochloride (GdnHCl) has been characterized using static light scattering, c.d., fluorescence and antibody recognition. The susceptibility of Fim2 + 3 (a mixed preparation of two fimbrial types) to GdnHCl was found to be highly dependent on pH; as the pH was increased from pH 7.2 to 10.5, the concentration of GdnHCl required to induce 50% denaturation was decreased. At pH 10.5, Fim2 + 3 was denatured by GdnHCl in a three-step pathway comprising: (1) formation of a pre-denaturational intermediate at less than 1.0 M-GdnHCl; (2) dissociation of the fimbrial polymer into subunits between 2 M- and 3.2 M-GdnHCl; and (3) subunit unfolding between 2.8 M- and 3.6 M-GdnHCl. A similar pathway was also found for the denaturation of the individual fimbrial types, Fim2 and Fim3, except that unfolding of either subunit commenced at a lower GdnHCl concentration (2.2 M) than that found for the mixture of fimbriae, Fim2 + 3. The second step in the denaturation pathway, dissociation into subunits, was partially reversible, but the renaturation and reassociation of fully unfolded subunits to form fimbriae-like structures was not achieved. These findings demonstrate that the GdnHCl denaturation of complex polymeric proteins is unlikely to follow a reversible two-state denaturation pathway, and support the involvement of a chaperone-like protein in the folding and assembly of the fimbriae in vivo. Measurement of the ability of anti-fimbrial monoclonal antibodies to recognize intermediates in the denaturation pathway enabled the identification of two types of epitope which were dependent on different aspects of fimbrial tertiary/quaternary structure. PMID:1375451

  15. sRNA-Mediated Regulation of P-Fimbriae Phase Variation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khandige, Surabhi; Kronborg, Tina; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2015-08-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are capable of occupying physiologically distinct intracellular and extracellular niches within the urinary tract. This feat requires the timely regulation of gene expression and small RNAs (sRNAs) are known to mediate such rapid adjustments in response to changing environmental cues. This study aimed to uncover sRNA-mediated gene regulation in the UPEC strain UTI89, during infection of bladder epithelial cells. Hfq is an RNA chaperone known to facilitate and stabilize sRNA and target mRNA interactions with bacterial cells. The co-immunoprecipitation and high throughput RNA sequencing of Hfq bound sRNAs performed in this study, revealed distinct sRNA profiles in UPEC in the extracellular and intracellular environments. Our findings emphasize the importance of studying regulatory sRNAs in a biologically relevant niche. This strategy also led to the discovery of a novel virulence-associated trans-acting sRNA-PapR. Deletion of papR was found to enhance adhesion of UTI89 to both bladder and kidney cell lines in a manner independent of type-1 fimbriae. We demonstrate PapR mediated posttranscriptional repression of the P-fimbriae phase regulator gene papI and postulate a role for such regulation in fimbrial cross-talk at the population level in UPEC. Our results further implicate the Leucine responsive protein (LRP) as a transcriptional activator regulating PapR expression. Our study reports, for the first time, a role for sRNAs in regulation of P-fimbriae phase variation and emphasizes the importance of studying pathogenesis-specific sRNAs within a relevant biological niche. PMID:26291711

  16. Identification of Type 3 Fimbriae in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Reveals a Role in Biofilm Formation▿

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y.; Ulett, Glen C.; Mabbett, Amanda N.; Beatson, Scott A.; Webb, Richard I.; Monaghan, Wayne; Nimmo, Graeme R.; Looke, David F.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the most common nosocomial infection in the United States. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the most common cause of CAUTI, can form biofilms on indwelling catheters. Here, we identify and characterize novel factors that affect biofilm formation by UPEC strains that cause CAUTI. Sixty-five CAUTI UPEC isolates were characterized for phenotypic markers of urovirulence, including agglutination and biofilm formation. One isolate, E. coli MS2027, was uniquely proficient at biofilm growth despite the absence of adhesins known to promote this phenotype. Mini-Tn5 mutagenesis of E. coli MS2027 identified several mutants with altered biofilm growth. Mutants containing insertions in genes involved in O antigen synthesis (rmlC and manB) and capsule synthesis (kpsM) possessed enhanced biofilm phenotypes. Three independent mutants deficient in biofilm growth contained an insertion in a gene locus homologous to the type 3 chaperone-usher class fimbrial genes of Klebsiella pneumoniae. These type 3 fimbrial genes (mrkABCDF), which were located on a conjugative plasmid, were cloned from E. coli MS2027 and could complement the biofilm-deficient transconjugants when reintroduced on a plasmid. Primers targeting the mrkB chaperone-encoding gene revealed its presence in CAUTI strains of Citrobacter koseri, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Klebsiella oxytoca. All of these mrkB-positive strains caused type 3 fimbria-specific agglutination of tannic acid-treated red blood cells. This is the first description of type 3 fimbriae in E. coli, C. koseri, and C. freundii. Our data suggest that type 3 fimbriae may contribute to biofilm formation by different gram-negative nosocomial pathogens. PMID:18055599

  17. Radial maze performance in three strains of mice - Role of the fimbria/fornix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinstein, D. K.; Deboissiere, T.; Robinson, N.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Three strains of mice were tested on an 8-arm radial maze, an index of hippocampus-dependent spatial memory. Levels of performance differed betweens strains with C57Br/cdj greater than Balb/cj greater than C57B1/6j. Lesions of the fimbria/fornix disrupted performance in the C57Br and Balb strains: the C57Bl mice never performed better than chance before or after surgery. Choline acetyltransferase activity in hippocampus was not correlated with radial maze performance. These findings suggest a possible genetic contribution towards radial maze behavior.

  18. Variation in the structural subunit and basal protein antigens of Bacteroides nodosus fimbriae.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, B J; Kristo, C L; Egerton, J R; Mattick, J S

    1986-01-01

    The fimbriae of Bacteroides nodosus play a major role in protective immunity against ovine footrot and are an important determinant in the serological classification system that divides field isolates into at least eight serogroups and 16 serotypes. Purified fimbriae contain two polypeptide antigens, the structural subunit of the fimbrial strand (molecular weight about 17,000) and a basal protein (molecular weight about 80,000), both of which exhibit structural variation. Fimbriae were prepared from all prototype strains, as well as from a number of other isolates representative of each of the B. nodosus serotypes, and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Substantial variation was observed in the electrophoretic mobility of the fimbrial subunits from the prototypes of each of the eight serogroups. With the exception of serogroup H, which is an unusual case, the apparent molecular weights of the fimbrial subunits ranged from about 16,500 in serogroup D to 19,000 in serogroup F (serotype 1); in serogroup A, B, C and E, the apparent molecular weights were clustered in the range of 17,000 to 17,500, whereas serogroup G was about 18,500. Serogroup H fimbriae appeared to consist of two smaller polypeptides, which in the prototype (H1) had apparent molecular weights of about 6,000 and 10,000 and which seem to have arisen as a consequence of an internal proteolytic nick in the original subunit. Electrophoretic variation in the fimbrial subunit was also observed between different serotypes, although with the exceptions of serogroups F and H, this was not as pronounced as between the serogroups. Examination of a number of isolates classified within the same serotypes showed that some variation, although minor, also occurred at this level. The basal antigen exhibited significant variation at all levels of the serotypic hierarchy in a manner apparently unrelated to the classification system. Among the range of isolates examined, the apparent

  19. Crystallization of the FaeE chaperone of Escherichia coli F4 fimbriae

    SciTech Connect

    Van Molle, Inge Buts, Lieven; Coppens, Fanny; Qiang, Liu; Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy; Bouckaert, Julie; De Greve, Henri

    2005-04-01

    The periplasmic chaperone FaeE of E. coli F4 fimbriae crystallizes in three crystal forms. F4 (formerly K88) fimbriae from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are assembled via the FaeE/FaeD chaperone/usher pathway. The chaperone FaeE crystallizes in three crystal forms, all belonging to space group C2. Crystals of form 1 diffract to 2.3 Å and have unit-cell parameters a = 195.7, b = 78.5, c = 184.6 Å, β = 102.2°. X-ray data for crystal form 2 were collected to 2.7 Å using an SeMet variant of FaeE. The crystals have unit-cell parameters a = 136.4, b = 75.7, c = 69.4 Å, β = 92.8°. Crystals of form 3 were formed in a solution containing the FaeE–FaeG complex and diffract to 2.8 Å. Unit-cell parameters are a = 109.7, b = 78.6, c = 87.8 Å, β = 96.4°.

  20. Inversion-independent phase variation of type 1 fimbriae in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    McClain, M S; Blomfield, I C; Eberhardt, K J; Eisenstein, B I

    1993-01-01

    The roles of fimB and fimE in the phase-variable expression of type 1 fimbriae in Escherichia coli were examined. A method was developed to study the effects of fimB and fimE on both recombination of the fim invertible element and fimbrial expression. The method used an allelic exchange procedure consisting of two steps. The first step, construction of intermediate strains, deleted fimB and fimE. This step locked the invertible element in either the on or the off orientation. The second step of the exchange procedure introduced either wild-type or mutant alleles of fimB and/or fimE into the chromosome of the intermediate strains. Analysis of the resulting strains supported the current, plasmid-based model of recombination. Unexpectedly, strains in which the invertible element was locked in the on orientation (either by mutation of both fimB and fimE or, in a control strain, by mutation of the left inverted repeat sequence of the invertible element) continued to exhibit phase-variable expression of type 1 fimbriae. A strain in which fimA was transcribed from the tac promoter continued to exhibit phase-variable fimbrial expression, suggesting that inversion-independent phase variation cannot be explained by variable transcription initiation of fimA. Images PMID:8101185

  1. Regulation and production of Tcf, a cable-like fimbriae from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Jean-Mathieu; Quevillon, Eve-Lyne; Houde, Yoan; Paranjape, Kiran; Dozois, Charles M; Daigle, France

    2016-05-01

    tcf (Typhi colonization factor) is one of the 12 putative chaperone/usher fimbrial clusters present in the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi genome. We investigated the production, expression and regulation of tcf as well as its role during interaction with human cells. The tcf gene cluster was cloned and induced in Escherichia coli and S. Typhi, and the production of intertwined fibres similar to the Cbl (cable) pili of Burkholderia cepacia was observed on the bacterial surface by electron microscopy. In S. Typhi, tcf was expressed more after growth in M63 minimal medium than in standard Luria-Bertani medium. Analysis of the promoter region identified putative binding sites for the global regulators RcsB, ArgR and Fur. The expression of tcf was measured in isogenic strains lacking these global regulators. Under the conditions tested, the results showed that tcf expression was higher in the fur mutant and was regulated by iron concentration. Fur may regulate these fimbriae indirectly via the small RNAs RyhB1 and RyhB2. An isogenic mutant harbouring a deletion of the tcf cluster did not demonstrate any defect in adhesion or invasion of human epithelial cells, or in phagocytosis or survival in macrophages, when compared to the WT serovar Typhi strain. However, the tcf cluster contributed to adherence to human epithelial cells when introduced into E. coli. Thus, tcf genes encode functional fimbriae that can act as an adhesin and may contribute to colonization during typhoid fever. PMID:26944792

  2. Age-dependent competition of porcine enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) with different fimbria genes - short communication.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Lee, Kyeong Min; Lee, John Hwa

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the association of pathogenic Escherichia coli fimbrial adhesins with the development of diarrhoea in piglets of different age groups and to test their relative competitiveness, piglets were orally inoculated with a mixture of E. coli strains harbouring F4, F5, F6, F18 and F41 fimbrial genes. A total of 537 E. coli strains with haemolytic activity were isolated from 36 diarrhoeic piglets. The F4 fimbrial gene was observed in 98.5%, 97.6% and 80.6% strains carrying fimbrial genes isolated from diarrhoeic piglets that were infected at 1, 3 and 5 weeks of age, respectively. These data demonstrate that F4 fimbriae are highly associated with diarrhoea in piglets of all age groups. Interestingly, the F18 fimbrial gene was observed in 2.4% and 25.4% strains carrying fimbrial genes isolated from the 3- and 5-week-old groups, respectively, which confirms that F18 fimbriae are associated with diarrhoea in piglets from late stages of suckling to post-weaning, and are more related to diarrhoea in weaned than in unweaned piglets. PMID:22079701

  3. Production of cellulose and curli fimbriae by members of the family Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Zogaj, Xhavit; Bokranz, Werner; Nimtz, Manfred; Römling, Ute

    2003-07-01

    Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., and Klebsiella spp. isolated from the human gut were investigated for the biosynthesis of cellulose and curli fimbriae (csg). While Citrobacter spp. produced curli fimbriae and cellulose and Enterobacter spp. produced cellulose with various temperature-regulatory programs, Klebsiella spp. did not show pronounced expression of those extracellular matrix components. Investigation of multicellular behavior in two Citrobacter species and Enterobacter sakazakii showed an extracellular matrix, cell clumping, pellicle formation, and biofilm formation associated with the expression of cellulose and curli fimbriae. In those three strains, the csgD-csgBA region and the cellulose synthase gene bcsA were conserved. PCR screening for the presence of csgD, csgA and bcsA revealed that besides Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca, all species investigated harbored the genetic information for expression of curli fimbriae and cellulose. Since Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., and Klebsiella spp. are frequently found to cause biofilm-related infections such as catheter-associated urinary tract infections, the human gut could serve as a reservoir for dissemination of biofilm-forming isolates. PMID:12819107

  4. Production of Cellulose and Curli Fimbriae by Members of the Family Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from the Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Zogaj, Xhavit; Bokranz, Werner; Nimtz, Manfred; Römling, Ute

    2003-01-01

    Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., and Klebsiella spp. isolated from the human gut were investigated for the biosynthesis of cellulose and curli fimbriae (csg). While Citrobacter spp. produced curli fimbriae and cellulose and Enterobacter spp. produced cellulose with various temperature-regulatory programs, Klebsiella spp. did not show pronounced expression of those extracellular matrix components. Investigation of multicellular behavior in two Citrobacter species and Enterobacter sakazakii showed an extracellular matrix, cell clumping, pellicle formation, and biofilm formation associated with the expression of cellulose and curli fimbriae. In those three strains, the csgD-csgBA region and the cellulose synthase gene bcsA were conserved. PCR screening for the presence of csgD, csgA and bcsA revealed that besides Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca, all species investigated harbored the genetic information for expression of curli fimbriae and cellulose. Since Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., and Klebsiella spp. are frequently found to cause biofilm-related infections such as catheter-associated urinary tract infections, the human gut could serve as a reservoir for dissemination of biofilm-forming isolates. PMID:12819107

  5. Curli fimbriae are conditionally required in Escherichia coli O157:H7 for initial attachment and biofilm formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several species of enteric pathogens produce curli fimbriae, which may affect their interaction with surfaces and other microbes in nonhost environments. Here we used two E. coli O157:H7 outbreak strains with distinct genotypes to understand the role of curli in surface attachment and biofilm format...

  6. Structural and functional insight into the carbohydrate receptor binding of F4 fimbriae-producing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Moonens, Kristof; Van den Broeck, Imke; De Kerpel, Maia; Deboeck, Francine; Raymaekers, Hanne; Remaut, Han; De Greve, Henri

    2015-03-27

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are important causes of intestinal disease in humans and lead to severe production losses in animal farming. A range of fimbrial adhesins in ETEC strains determines host and tissue tropism. ETEC strains expressing F4 fimbriae are associated with neonatal and post-weaning diarrhea in piglets. Three naturally occurring variants of F4 fimbriae (F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad) exist that differ in the primary sequence of their major adhesive subunit FaeG, and each features a related yet distinct receptor binding profile. Here the x-ray structure of FaeGad bound to lactose provides the first structural insight into the receptor specificity and mode of binding by the poly-adhesive F4 fimbriae. A small D'-D″-α1-α2 subdomain grafted on the immunoglobulin-like core of FaeG hosts the carbohydrate binding site. Two short amino acid stretches Phe(150)-Glu(152) and Val(166)-Glu(170) of FaeGad bind the terminal galactose in the lactosyl unit and provide affinity and specificity to the interaction. A hemagglutination-based assay with E. coli expressing mutant F4ad fimbriae confirmed the elucidated co-complex structure. Interestingly, the crucial D'-α1 loop that borders the FaeGad binding site adopts a different conformation in the two other FaeG variants and hints at a heterogeneous binding pocket among the FaeG serotypes. PMID:25631050

  7. FIMBRIA-FORNIX TRANSECTIONS DISRUPT THE ONTOGENY OF DELAYED ALTERNATION BUT NOT POSITION DISCRIMINATION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Experiment 1, Long-Evans rat pups received fimbria-fornix transections or sham surgery on postnatal day 10 (PND10) and were then trained on PND23 to perform either a discrete-trials delayed alternation or a simple position discrimination (position habit) in a T-maze. at pups i...

  8. Downregulation of the DNA-Binding Activity of Nuclear Factor-κB p65 Subunit in Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbria-Induced Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Genco, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae induce high levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-dependent cytokine release upon primary but not secondary stimulation of monocytic cells (FimA tolerance). In this study, fimbriae induced Toll-like receptor-mediated activation of both p50 and p65 subunits of NF-κB upon primary cellular activation. However, activation of the transactivating p65 subunit (but not of the transcriptionally inactive p50 subunit) was significantly inhibited in fimbria-restimulated cells. Moreover, expression of a NF-κB-dependent reporter gene was inhibited upon secondary stimulation with fimbriae. NF-κB p65 downregulation may thus contribute to induction of FimA tolerance. PMID:14742573

  9. Involvement of polyphosphate kinase in virulence and stress tolerance of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Jiang, Qiao; Pan, Jia-Yun; Deng, Cong; Yu, Jing-Yi; Wu, Xiao-Man; Huang, Sheng-He; Deng, Xiao-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis), a gram-negative enteric bacterium, frequently causes urinary tract infections. Many virulence factors of uropathogenic P. mirabilis have been identified, including urease, flagella, hemolysin and fimbriae. However, the functions of polyphosphate kinase (PPK), which are related to the pathogenicity of many bacteria, remain entirely unknown in P. mirabilis. In this study, a ppk gene encoding the PPK insertional mutant in P. mirabilis strain HI4320 was constructed, and its biological functions were examined. The results of survival studies demonstrated that the ppk mutant was deficient in resistance to oxidative, hyperosmotic and heat stress. The swarming and biofilm formation abilities of P. mirabilis were also attenuated after the ppk interruption. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggested that ppk was required for P. mirabilis to invade the bladder. The negative phenotypes of the ppk mutant could be restored by ppk gene complementation. Furthermore, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to analyze the proteomes of the wild-type strain and the ppk mutant. Compared with the wild-type strain, seven proteins including TonB-dependent receptor, universal stress protein G, major mannose-resistant/Proteus-like fimbrial protein (MR/P fimbriae), heat shock protein, flagellar capping protein, putative membrane protein and multidrug efflux protein were down-regulated, and four proteins including exported peptidase, repressor protein for FtsI, FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and phosphotransferase were up-regulated in the ppk mutant. As a whole, these results indicate that PPK is an important regulator and plays a crucial role in stress tolerance and virulence in uropathogenic P. mirabilis. PMID:26233310

  10. [Fimbriae of animal-originated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli--a review].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Zhu, Jun; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2012-06-01

    Animal-originated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major pathogens resulting in newborn and young animal diarrhea. Adhesins and enterotoxins, both are essential for the pathogenicity of ETEC, are two major virulent factors of ETEC. Adhesion of animal-originated ETEC fimbrial adhesins (mainly including K88, K99, 987P, F18, F17 and F41) to intestinal epithelial cells is the initial and most important step involved in the ETEC infection. From the 1960s, studies on ETEC fimbrial genes, structure, biosynthesis, regulation of expression, interaction between fimbriae and host receptors have helped to better understand the biology and role of these organelles in pathogenesis. These studies also provide insight into new diagnostic tools and development of vaccines and inhibitors of ETEC colonization. PMID:22934347

  11. Detection of antibodies against fimbria type 3 (Fim3) is useful diagnostic assay for pertussis.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Kaoru; Miyata, Akiko; Kazuyama, Yukimasa; Noda, Atsuya; Suzuki, Eri; Watanabe, Mineo; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2015-09-01

    Isolation of Bordetella pertussis and detection of the pertussis genome are not always successful because of low bacterial loads in adult patients with pertussis. Antibodies against pertussis toxin (PT) are measured but have low sensitivity in vaccinated subjects. There is no reliable diagnostic method at present. In this study, a fluorescent-EIA against several pertussis antigens and genome detection were investigated to establish clinical laboratory diagnostic methods for pertussis. The study was conducted in an outpatient clinic between September 2007 and 2013. Subjects consisted of 209 patients including adults suspected of pertussis and 35 staff members of the clinic. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was performed to detect the pertussis genome in 5' UTR of the pertussis toxin (PT) gene. The catalytic region of the adenylate cyclase toxin (catACT), C-terminal of filamentous hemagglutinin (cFHA), and type 3 fimbria (Fim3) were selected, which are not pertussis vaccine component. Conventional PT and FHA antibodies were examined together with type 2 fimbria (Fim2) antibodies, and these are vaccine antigens. Pertussis DNA was detected in 23 (11%) out of 209. Detection sensitivity was high in young infants. Antibodies against Fim3 showed a higher positive rate in all age groups. Staff members at the pediatric outpatient clinic showed serological booster responses in Fim2 and Fim3 antibodies more sensitively than those in PT antibodies during outbreaks. LAMP was useful for detecting the pertussis genome in young infants, whereas a serological assay for fluorescent-EIA against Fim2 and Fim3 was preferable for adolescents and adults. PMID:26134278

  12. F9 Fimbriae of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Are Expressed at Low Temperature and Recognise Galβ1-3GlcNAc-Containing Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Wurpel, Daniël J.; Totsika, Makrina; Allsopp, Luke P.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Day, Christopher J.; Peters, Kate M.; Sarkar, Sohinee; Ulett, Glen C.; Yang, Ji; Tiralongo, Joe; Strugnell, Richard A.; Jennings, Michael P.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the leading causative agent of urinary tract infections (UTI) in the developed world. Among the major virulence factors of UPEC, surface expressed adhesins mediate attachment and tissue tropism. UPEC strains typically possess a range of adhesins, with type 1 fimbriae and P fimbriae of the chaperone-usher class the best characterised. We previously identified and characterised F9 as a new chaperone-usher fimbrial type that mediates biofilm formation. However, the regulation and specific role of F9 fimbriae remained to be determined in the context of wild-type clinical UPEC strains. In this study we have assessed the distribution and genetic context of the f9 operon among diverse E. coli lineages and pathotypes and demonstrated that f9 genes are significantly more conserved in a UPEC strain collection in comparison to the well-defined E. coli reference (ECOR) collection. In the prototypic UPEC strain CFT073, the global regulator protein H-NS was identified as a transcriptional repressor of f9 gene expression at 37°C through its ability to bind directly to the f9 promoter region. F9 fimbriae expression was demonstrated at 20°C, representing the first evidence of functional F9 fimbriae expression by wild-type E. coli. Finally, glycan array analysis demonstrated that F9 fimbriae recognise and bind to terminal Galβ1-3GlcNAc structures. PMID:24671091

  13. Volunteer Challenge With Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli That Express Intestinal Colonization Factor Fimbriae CS17 and CS19

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Robin; Porter, Chad K.; Cantrell, Joyce A.; DeNearing, Barbara; O’Dowd, Aisling; Grahek, Shannon L.; Sincock, Stephanie A.; Woods, Colleen; Sebeny, Peter; Sack, David A.; Tribble, David R.; Bourgeois, A. Louis

    2011-01-01

    Human challenges with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) have broadened our understanding of this important enteropathogen. We report findings from the first challenge studies using ETEC-expressing colonization factor fimbria CS17 and CS19. LSN03-016011/A (LT, CS17) elicited a dose-dependent effect, with the upper dose (6 × 109 organisms) causing diarrhea in 88% of recipients. WS0115A (LTSTp, CS19) also showed a dose response, with a 44% diarrhea rate at 9 × 109 organisms. Both strains elicited homologous antifimbrial and anti-LT antibody seroconversion. These studies establish the relative pathogenicity of ETEC expressing newer class 5 fimbriae and suggest suitability of the LT|CS17-ETEC challenge model for interventional trials. PMID:21628659

  14. Volunteer challenge with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that express intestinal colonization factor fimbriae CS17 and CS19.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Robin; Porter, Chad K; Cantrell, Joyce A; Denearing, Barbara; O'Dowd, Aisling; Grahek, Shannon L; Sincock, Stephanie A; Woods, Colleen; Sebeny, Peter; Sack, David A; Tribble, David R; Bourgeois, A Louis; Savarino, Stephen J

    2011-07-01

    Human challenges with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) have broadened our understanding of this important enteropathogen. We report findings from the first challenge studies using ETEC-expressing colonization factor fimbria CS17 and CS19. LSN03-016011/A (LT, CS17) elicited a dose-dependent effect, with the upper dose (6 × 10(9) organisms) causing diarrhea in 88% of recipients. WS0115A (LTSTp, CS19) also showed a dose response, with a 44% diarrhea rate at 9 × 10(9) organisms. Both strains elicited homologous antifimbrial and anti-LT antibody seroconversion. These studies establish the relative pathogenicity of ETEC expressing newer class 5 fimbriae and suggest suitability of the LT|CS17-ETEC challenge model for interventional trials. PMID:21628659

  15. Role of Fimbriae, Flagella and Cellulose on the Attachment of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 to Plant Cell Wall Models.

    PubMed

    Tan, Michelle S F; White, Aaron P; Rahman, Sadequr; Dykes, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    Cases of foodborne disease caused by Salmonella are frequently associated with the consumption of minimally processed produce. Bacterial cell surface components are known to be important for the attachment of bacterial pathogens to fresh produce. The role of these extracellular structures in Salmonella attachment to plant cell walls has not been investigated in detail. We investigated the role of flagella, fimbriae and cellulose on the attachment of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 and a range of isogenic deletion mutants (ΔfliC fljB, ΔbcsA, ΔcsgA, ΔcsgA bcsA and ΔcsgD) to bacterial cellulose (BC)-based plant cell wall models [BC-Pectin (BCP), BC-Xyloglucan (BCX) and BC-Pectin-Xyloglucan (BCPX)] after growth at different temperatures (28°C and 37°C). We found that all three cell surface components were produced at 28°C but only the flagella was produced at 37°C. Flagella appeared to be most important for attachment (reduction of up to 1.5 log CFU/cm2) although both cellulose and fimbriae also aided in attachment. The csgD deletion mutant, which lacks both cellulose and fimbriae, showed significantly higher attachment as compared to wild type cells at 37°C. This may be due to the increased expression of flagella-related genes which are also indirectly regulated by the csgD gene. Our study suggests that bacterial attachment to plant cell walls is a complex process involving many factors. Although flagella, cellulose and fimbriae all aid in attachment, these structures are not the only mechanism as no strain was completely defective in its attachment. PMID:27355584

  16. Structural and Functional Insight into the Carbohydrate Receptor Binding of F4 Fimbriae-producing Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli *

    PubMed Central

    Moonens, Kristof; Van den Broeck, Imke; De Kerpel, Maia; Deboeck, Francine; Raymaekers, Hanne; Remaut, Han; De Greve, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are important causes of intestinal disease in humans and lead to severe production losses in animal farming. A range of fimbrial adhesins in ETEC strains determines host and tissue tropism. ETEC strains expressing F4 fimbriae are associated with neonatal and post-weaning diarrhea in piglets. Three naturally occurring variants of F4 fimbriae (F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad) exist that differ in the primary sequence of their major adhesive subunit FaeG, and each features a related yet distinct receptor binding profile. Here the x-ray structure of FaeGad bound to lactose provides the first structural insight into the receptor specificity and mode of binding by the poly-adhesive F4 fimbriae. A small D′-D″-α1-α2 subdomain grafted on the immunoglobulin-like core of FaeG hosts the carbohydrate binding site. Two short amino acid stretches Phe150–Glu152 and Val166–Glu170 of FaeGad bind the terminal galactose in the lactosyl unit and provide affinity and specificity to the interaction. A hemagglutination-based assay with E. coli expressing mutant F4ad fimbriae confirmed the elucidated co-complex structure. Interestingly, the crucial D′-α1 loop that borders the FaeGad binding site adopts a different conformation in the two other FaeG variants and hints at a heterogeneous binding pocket among the FaeG serotypes. PMID:25631050

  17. Regulation of type 1 fimbriae synthesis and biofilm formation by the transcriptional regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blumer, Caroline; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Lehnen, Daniela; Heintz, Margit; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Nagy, Gábor; Michaelis, Kai; Emödy, Levente; Polen, Tino; Rachel, Reinhard; Wendisch, Volker F; Unden, Gottfried

    2005-10-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli facilitate attachment to the host mucosa and promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The transcriptional regulator LrhA, which is known as a repressor of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes, regulates biofilm formation and expression of type 1 fimbriae. Whole-genome expression profiling revealed that inactivation of lrhA results in an increased expression of structural components of type 1 fimbriae. In vitro, LrhA bound to the promoter regions of the two fim recombinases (FimB and FimE) that catalyse the inversion of the fimA promoter, and to the invertible element itself. Translational lacZ fusions with these genes and quantification of fimE transcript levels by real-time PCR showed that LrhA influences type 1 fimbrial phase variation, primarily via activation of FimE, which is required for the ON-to-OFF transition of the fim switch. Enhanced type 1 fimbrial expression as a result of lrhA disruption was confirmed by mannose-sensitive agglutination of yeast cells. Biofilm formation was stimulated by lrhA inactivation and completely suppressed upon LrhA overproduction. The effects of LrhA on biofilm formation were exerted via the changed levels of surface molecules, most probably both flagella and type 1 fimbriae. Together, the data show a role for LrhA as a repressor of type 1 fimbrial expression, and thus as a regulator of the initial stages of biofilm development and, presumably, bacterial adherence to epithelial host cells also. PMID:16207912

  18. Role of Fimbriae, Flagella and Cellulose on the Attachment of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 to Plant Cell Wall Models

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Michelle S. F.; White, Aaron P.; Rahman, Sadequr

    2016-01-01

    Cases of foodborne disease caused by Salmonella are frequently associated with the consumption of minimally processed produce. Bacterial cell surface components are known to be important for the attachment of bacterial pathogens to fresh produce. The role of these extracellular structures in Salmonella attachment to plant cell walls has not been investigated in detail. We investigated the role of flagella, fimbriae and cellulose on the attachment of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 and a range of isogenic deletion mutants (ΔfliC fljB, ΔbcsA, ΔcsgA, ΔcsgA bcsA and ΔcsgD) to bacterial cellulose (BC)-based plant cell wall models [BC-Pectin (BCP), BC-Xyloglucan (BCX) and BC-Pectin-Xyloglucan (BCPX)] after growth at different temperatures (28°C and 37°C). We found that all three cell surface components were produced at 28°C but only the flagella was produced at 37°C. Flagella appeared to be most important for attachment (reduction of up to 1.5 log CFU/cm2) although both cellulose and fimbriae also aided in attachment. The csgD deletion mutant, which lacks both cellulose and fimbriae, showed significantly higher attachment as compared to wild type cells at 37°C. This may be due to the increased expression of flagella-related genes which are also indirectly regulated by the csgD gene. Our study suggests that bacterial attachment to plant cell walls is a complex process involving many factors. Although flagella, cellulose and fimbriae all aid in attachment, these structures are not the only mechanism as no strain was completely defective in its attachment. PMID:27355584

  19. Inhibition of S-fimbria-mediated adhesion to human ileostomy glycoproteins by a protein isolated from bovine colostrum.

    PubMed Central

    Ouwehand, A C; Conway, P L; Salminen, S J

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and purify the component in bovine colostrum which is responsible for the inhibition of S-fimbria-mediated adhesion of Escherichia coli. Whey from defatted colostrum was fractionated by ultrafiltration, and the < 100K, < 30K, and < 10K fractions and the colostral whey were tested for inhibition of in vitro adhesion of radiolabelled S-fimbria-bearing E. coli to human ileostomy glycoproteins, which provide a model for human intestinal mucus. The inhibiting compound was purified from a dialyzed < 30K fraction with an anion exchange column which was eluted with a NaCl gradient (0 to 1.0 M). The compound was found to be a heat-resistant but pepsin-sensitive protein with an Mr of approximately 18,000 and an isoelectric point of approximately 5.75. The protein appears to block receptor sites for S-fimbriae on ileostomy glycoproteins, with steric hindrance being the most likely mechanism. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the amino terminus of the 18K protein showed similarity with the sequence of beta-lactoglobulin. PMID:7591156

  20. Role of pili (fimbriae) in attachment of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to soybean roots

    SciTech Connect

    Vesper, S.J.; Bauer, W.D.

    1986-07-01

    Pili (fimbriae) were observed on cells of each of the five strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and the one strain of Rhizobium trifolii examined. Pili on B. japonicum were about 4 nm in diameter and polarly expressed. Piliated cells were estimated by transmission electron microscopy and hydrophobic attachment to polystyrene to constitute only a small percentage of the total population. The proportion of piliated cells in these populations was dependent on culture age in some strains. Piliated B. japonicum cells were selectively and quantitatively removed from suspension when cultures were incubated with either soybean roots or hydrophobic plastic surfaces, indicating that pili were involved in the attachment of the bacteria to these surfaces. Pili from B. japonicum 110 ARS were purified and found to have a subunit molecular weight of approximately 21,000. Treatment of B. japonicum suspensions with antiserum against the isolated pili reduced attachment to soybean roots by about 90% and nodulation by about 80%. Pili appear to be important mediators of attachment of B. japonicum to soybean roots under the conditions examined.

  1. Bordetella filamentous hemagglutinin and fimbriae: critical adhesins with unrealized vaccine potential.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Erich V; Cotter, Peggy A

    2015-11-01

    Pertussis, or whooping cough, is a highly contagious respiratory disease that is caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Bordetella pertussis, which is transmitted exclusively from human to human. While vaccination against B. pertussis has been successful, replacement of the whole cell vaccine with an acellular component vaccine has correlated with reemergence of the disease, especially in adolescents and infants. Based on their presumed importance in mediating adherence to host tissues, filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) and fimbria (FIM) were selected as components of most acellular pertussis vaccines. In this review, we describe the biogenesis of FHA and FIM, recent data that show that these factors do, in fact, play critical roles in adherence to respiratory epithelium, and evidence that they also contribute to persistence in the lower respiratory tract by modulating the host immune response. We also discuss shortcomings of whole cell and acellular pertussis vaccines and the possibility that FHA and FIM could serve as effective protective antigens in next-generation vaccines. PMID:26416077

  2. Development of blood vessel-related radiation damage in the fimbria of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, H.S.; Calvo, W.; Hopewell, J.W.; van der Berg, A.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The identification problem of the dose-limiting tissue component was investigated in the CNS of rats. Moderate single doses of radiation, ranging from 20 to 25 Gy were applied to the brain of adult female rats. The sequence of events was analyzed by scoring a series of morphological changes in one of the white matter structures that appears to represent a sensitive location, that is the fimbria hippocampi. The previously defined Tissue Injury Unit, characterized by a dilation of the blood vessel lumen, a thickening of the blood vessel wall, an enlargement of endothelial cell nuclei, and a hypertrophy of the adjacent astrocytes which represents a combined score of four different, but related histological changes, proved to be slightly more sensitive and responsive than the earliest recognizable changes in the neurological structures, that is demyelination. In addition, the incidence of demyelination could be expressed as a function of the intensity of the Tissue Injury Unit. These findings can be interpreted as an additional indication that blood vessel changes and the hypertrophy of the perivascular astrocytes precede degenerative changes in the white matter of the CNS after moderate doses of X rays.

  3. The Role of Thin Aggregative Fimbriae on Pathogenic Bacterial Transport Through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, A. E.; Fuka, D. R.; Marjerison, R. D.; Hay, A. G.; Zhang, W.; Caballero, L. A.; Zevi, Y.; Richards, B. K.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-05-01

    Pathogenic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp., are responsible for many deaths worldwide every year. Their survival in the natural environment is enhanced by the production of biofilms, which provide a resistance to environmental stresses. However, it remains unclear how these biofilms affect the bacterias' ability to move through the soil matrix and potentially contaminate groundwater or water from drainage systems. In this presentation, we discuss the role of thin aggregative fimbriae (curli), a key biofilm component, on transport through porous media. An experiment was performed consisting of 96 sand columns created using a deep-well microtiter plate. We used well-characterized strains of E. coli, one with the ability to form curli and one without. Pulsing the E. coli strains through the sand column, mimicking natural leaching processes, showed less transport, by greater retention, in the strains that produce curli versus those strains that do not. In addition, when cultured in conditions unfavorable to curli production, transport between strains did not differ significantly. These preliminary results indicate that curli, and to a larger extent biofilms, could be an important component influencing the transport of bacterial strains through the soil matrix. This determination of pathogens' ability to move through the environment, as related to how well they form biofilms, will facilitate a better understanding of the fate of pathogenic bacteria in the environment.

  4. Promoting crystallisation of the Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae 14 pilin SefD using deuterium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bing; Garnett, James A.; Lee, Wei-chao; Lin, Jing; Salgado, Paula; Taylor, Jonathan; Xu, Yingqi; Lambert, Sebastian; Cota, Ernesto; Matthews, Steve

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The benefits of D{sub 2}O in screening for crystallisation was explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structures of the SefD pilin in both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O reveal differences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallisation improvements are explained by altered interactions in D{sub 2}O crystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D{sub 2}O is useful additive in sparse-matrix screening for crystallisation. -- Abstract: The use of heavy water (D{sub 2}O) as a solvent is commonplace in many spectroscopic techniques for the study of biological macromolecules. A significant deuterium isotope effect exists where hydrogen-bonding is important, such as in protein stability, dynamics and assembly. Here we illustrate the use of D{sub 2}O in additive screening for the production of reproducible diffraction-quality crystals for the Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae 14 (SEF14) putative tip adhesin, SefD.

  5. Escherichia coli K1 RS218 Interacts with Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells via Type 1 Fimbria Bacteria in the Fimbriated State

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Ching-Hao; Cai, Mian; Shin, Sooan; Xie, Yi; Kim, Kee-Jun; Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Di Cello, Francescopaolo; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1 is a major gram-negative organism causing neonatal meningitis. E. coli K1 binding to and invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) are a prerequisite for E. coli penetration into the central nervous system in vivo. In the present study, we showed using DNA microarray analysis that E. coli K1 associated with HBMEC expressed significantly higher levels of the fim genes compared to nonassociated bacteria. We also showed that E. coli K1 binding to and invasion of HBMEC were significantly decreased with its fimH deletion mutant and type 1 fimbria locked-off mutant, while they were significantly increased with its type 1 fimbria locked-on mutant. E. coli K1 strains associated with HBMEC were predominantly type 1 fimbria phase-on (i.e., fimbriated) bacteria. Taken together, we showed for the first time that type 1 fimbriae play an important role in E. coli K1 binding to and invasion of HBMEC and that type 1 fimbria phase-on E. coli is the major population interacting with HBMEC. PMID:15845498

  6. Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Attila; Xu, Yunfeng; Bauchan, Gary R; Shelton, Daniel R; Nou, Xiangwu

    2016-07-16

    The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolated during the 2011 European outbreak expresses Shiga toxin 2a and possess virulence genes associated with the enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) pathotype. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga-toxin adsorption, but it is not clear whether the AAF/I fimbriae are involved in the colonization and biofilm formation on food and environmental matrices such as the surface of fresh produce. We deleted the gene encoding for the AAF/I fimbriae main subunit (AggA) from an outbreak associated E. coli O104:H4 strain, and evaluated the role of AAF/I fimbriae in the adherence and colonization of E. coli O104:H4 to spinach and abiotic surfaces. The deletion of aggA did not affect the adherence of E. coli O104:H4 to these surfaces. However, it severely diminished the colonization and biofilm formation of E. coli O104:H4 on these surfaces. Strong aggregation and biofilm formation on spinach and abiotic surfaces were observed with the wild type strain but not the isogenic aggA deletion mutant, suggesting that AAF/I fimbriae play a crucial role in persistence of O104:H4 cells outside of the intestines of host species, such as on the surface of fresh produce. PMID:27099984

  7. Comprehensive analysis of type 1 fimbriae regulation in fimB-null strains from the multidrug resistant Escherichia coli ST131 clone.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sohinee; Roberts, Leah W; Phan, Minh-Duy; Tan, Lendl; Lo, Alvin W; Peters, Kate M; Paterson, David L; Upton, Mathew; Ulett, Glen C; Beatson, Scott A; Totsika, Makrina; Schembri, Mark A

    2016-09-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) of sequence type 131 (ST131) are a pandemic multidrug resistant clone associated with urinary tract and bloodstream infections. Type 1 fimbriae, a major UPEC virulence factor, are essential for ST131 bladder colonization. The globally dominant sub-lineage of ST131 strains, clade C/H30-R, possess an ISEc55 insertion in the fimB gene that controls phase-variable type 1 fimbriae expression via the invertible fimS promoter. We report that inactivation of fimB in these strains causes altered regulation of type 1 fimbriae expression. Using a novel read-mapping approach based on Illumina sequencing, we demonstrate that 'off' to 'on' fimS inversion is reduced in these strains and controlled by recombinases encoded by the fimE and fimX genes. Unlike typical UPEC strains, the nucleoid-associated H-NS protein does not strongly repress fimE transcription in clade C ST131 strains. Using a genetic screen to identify novel regulators of fimE and fimX in the clade C ST131 strain EC958, we defined a new role for the guaB gene in the regulation of type 1 fimbriae and in colonisation of the mouse bladder. Our results provide a comprehensive analysis of type 1 fimbriae regulation in ST131, and highlight important differences in its control compared to non-ST131 UPEC. PMID:27309594

  8. Mfa4, an Accessory Protein of Mfa1 Fimbriae, Modulates Fimbrial Biogenesis, Cell Auto-Aggregation, and Biofilm Formation in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Izumigawa, Masashi; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshida, Yasuo; Kitai, Noriyuki; Lamont, Richard J.; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Murakami, Yukitaka

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a gram-negative obligate anaerobic bacterium, is considered to be a key pathogen in periodontal disease. The bacterium expresses Mfa1 fimbriae, which are composed of polymers of Mfa1. The minor accessory components Mfa3, Mfa4, and Mfa5 are incorporated into these fimbriae. In this study, we characterized Mfa4 using genetically modified strains. Deficiency in the mfa4 gene decreased, but did not eliminate, expression of Mfa1 fimbriae. However, Mfa3 and Mfa5 were not incorporated because of defects in posttranslational processing and leakage into the culture supernatant, respectively. Furthermore, the mfa4-deficient mutant had an increased tendency to auto-aggregate and form biofilms, reminiscent of a mutant completely lacking Mfa1. Notably, complementation of mfa4 restored expression of structurally intact and functional Mfa1 fimbriae. Taken together, these results indicate that the accessory proteins Mfa3, Mfa4, and Mfa5 are necessary for assembly of Mfa1 fimbriae and regulation of auto-aggregation and biofilm formation of P. gingivalis. In addition, we found that Mfa3 and Mfa4 are processed to maturity by the same RgpA/B protease that processes Mfa1 subunits prior to polymerization. PMID:26437277

  9. Structural insight in the inhibition of adherence of F4 fimbriae producing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli by llama single domain antibodies.

    PubMed

    Moonens, Kristof; Van den Broeck, Imke; Okello, Emmanuel; Pardon, Els; De Kerpel, Maia; Remaut, Han; De Greve, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that cause neonatal and post-weaning diarrhea in piglets express F4 fimbriae to mediate attachment towards host receptors. Recently we described how llama single domain antibodies (VHHs) fused to IgA, produced in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and fed to piglets resulted in a progressive decline in shedding of F4 positive ETEC bacteria. Here we present the structures of these inhibiting VHHs in complex with the major adhesive subunit FaeG. A conserved surface, distant from the lactose binding pocket, is targeted by these VHHs, highlighting the possibility of targeting epitopes on single-domain adhesins that are non-involved in receptor binding. PMID:25828907

  10. Diversification of the Salmonella Fimbriae: A Model of Macro- and Microevolution

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Rankin, Shelley C.; Blanchet, Ryan T.; Nulton, James D.; Edwards, Robert A.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Salmonella comprise a large and evolutionary related population of zoonotic pathogens that can infect mammals, including humans and domestic animals, birds, reptiles and amphibians. Salmonella carries a plethora of virulence genes, including fimbrial adhesins, some of them known to participate in mammalian or avian host colonization. Each type of fimbria has its structural subunit and biogenesis genes encoded by one fimbrial gene cluster (FGC). The accumulation of new genomic information offered a timely opportunity to better evaluate the number and types of FGCs in the Salmonella pangenome, to test the use of current classifications based on phylogeny, and to infer potential correlations between FGC evolution in various Salmonella serovars and host niches. This study focused on the FGCs of the currently deciphered 90 genomes and 60 plasmids of Salmonella. The analysis highlighted a fimbriome consisting of 35 different FGCs, of which 16 were new, each strain carrying between 5 and 14 FGCs. The Salmonella fimbriome was extremely diverse with FGC representatives in 8 out of 9 previously categorized fimbrial clades and subclades. Phylogenetic analysis of Salmonella suggested macroevolutionary shifts detectable by extensive FGC deletion and acquisition. In addition, microevolutionary drifts were best depicted by the high level of allelic variation in predicted or known adhesins, such as the type 1 fimbrial adhesin FimH for which 67 different natural alleles were identified in S. enterica subsp. I. Together with strain-specific collections of FGCs, allelic variation among adhesins attested to the pathoadaptive evolution of Salmonella towards specific hosts and tissues, potentially modulating host range, strain virulence, disease progression, and transmission efficiency. Further understanding of how each Salmonella strain utilizes its panel of FGCs and specific adhesin alleles for survival and infection will support the development of new approaches

  11. Gonadal sex differentiation and effects of dietary methyltestosterone treatment in sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria).

    PubMed

    Luckenbach, J Adam; Fairgrieve, William T

    2016-02-01

    Methods for sex control are needed to establish monosex aquaculture of sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria). Here we conducted the first characterization of sex differentiation by histology and hormonal sex reversal experiment in sablefish. Ovarian differentiation was first discernible at ~80 mm fork length (FL) and characterized by development of lamellar structures and onset of meiosis. Testes exhibited a dual-lobe appearance over much of their length and remained non-meiotic until males were ≥520 mm FL (2 years post-fertilization). Juveniles with undifferentiated gonads were provided diets containing 0 (control), 5 or 50 mg 17α-methyltestosterone (MT)/kg for 2 months. Following treatment, controls possessed either ovaries or non-meiotic testes, whereas MT-treated fish exhibited meiotic testes (60% of the fish), intersex gonads (~30%), or gonads that appeared sterile (~10%). A genetic sex marker revealed that all intersex fish were genetic females, although other females appeared to be completely sex reversed (i.e., neomales). One year after treatment, MT-treated fish possessed non-meiotic testes similar to control males or intersex gonads with reduced ovarian features, presumably due to atresia following MT withdrawal. Milt collected from neomales and genetic males 3 years post-treatment permitted sperm motility analyses; however, neomale sperm were virtually immotile. These results demonstrated that sablefish are differentiated gonochorists and that MT treatment from 76 to 196 mm FL induced permanent masculinization of a portion of the genetic females, but acquisition of sperm motility was impaired. Earlier administration of MT may be necessary to sex reverse a higher proportion of genetic females and reduce negative effects on fertility. PMID:26400269

  12. Sialic acid and N-acetylglucosamine Regulate type 1 Fimbriae Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Blomfield, Ian C

    2015-06-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of E. coli, a chaperon-usher bacterial adhesin, are synthesized by the majority of strains of the bacterium. Although frequently produced by commensal strains, the adhesin is nevertheless a virulence factor in Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). The role of the adhesin in pathogenesis is best understood in Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). Host attachment and invasion by type 1 fimbriate bacteria activates inflammatory pathways, with TLR4 signaling playing a predominant role. In a mouse model of cystitis, type 1 fimbriation not only enhances UPEC adherence to the surface of superficial umbrella cells of the bladder urothelium, but is both necessary and sufficient for their invasion. Moreover the adhesin plays a role in the formation of transient intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) within the cytoplasm of urothelial cells as part of UPEC cycles of invasion. The expression of type 1 fimbriation is controlled by phase variation at the transcriptional level, a mode of gene regulation in which bacteria switch reversibly between fimbriate and afimbriate phases. Phase variation has been widely considered to be a mechanism enabling immune evasion. Notwithstanding the apparently random nature of phase variation, switching of type 1 fimbrial expression is nevertheless controlled by a range of environmental signals that include the amino sugars sialic acid and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). Sialic acid plays a pivotal role in innate immunity, including signaling by the toll-like receptors. Here how sialic acid and GlcNAc control type 1 fimbriation is described and the potential significance of this regulatory response is discussed. PMID:26185091

  13. Reduction of enterotoxin induced fluid accumulation in ileal loops of neonatal calves with anti-F5 fimbriae recombinant antibody.

    PubMed

    Sahagun-Ruiz, Alfredo; Velazquez, Leticia V; Bhaskaran, Shoba; Jay, Chris M; Morales-Salinas, E; Rathore, Keerti; Wagner, Gale G; Waghela, Suryakant D

    2015-12-01

    Neonatal calf colibacillosis caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an economically significant problem in most parts of the world. The most common ETEC found in calves express the F5 (K99) fimbriae, which are necessary for the attachment of the bacteria to the ganglioside receptors on enterocytes. It is known that prevention of ETEC F5(+) adhesion to its ganglioside receptors with specific antibodies protects calves from colibacillosis. Previously we have described the development and characterization of a mouse recombinant antibody fragment (moRAb) that prevents F5 fimbrial protein induced agglutination of horse red blood cells (HRBC), which exhibit the same gangloside receptor for F5 fimbriae. Here we demonstrate that this recombinant antibody fragment inhibits in vitro the attachment of ETEC F5(+) bacteria to HRBC as well as isolated calf enterocytes, and in vivo it decreases fluid accumulation in intestinal loops of calves. Thus, correct oral administration of this anti-F5 moRAb may serve as an immunoprophylactic for cost effective control of colibacillosis in calves. PMID:26521056

  14. Acetyl-L-carnitine restores choline acetyltransferase activity in the hippocampus of rats with partial unilateral fimbria-fornix transection.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, P; Quatrini, G; Pacifici, L; Taglialatela, G; Angelucci, L

    1995-02-01

    Transection of the fimbria-fornix bundle in adult rats results in degeneration of the septohippocampal cholinergic pathway, reminiscent of that occurring in aging as well as Alzheimer disease. We report here a study of the effect of a treatment with acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) in three-month-old Fischer 344 rats bearing a partial unilateral fimbria-fornix transection. ALCAR is known to ameliorate some morphological and functional disturbances in the aged central nervous system (CNS). We used choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) as markers of central cholinergic function, and nerve growth factor (NGF) levels as indicative of the trophic regulation of the medio-septal cholinergic system. ChAT and AChE activities were significantly reduced in the hippocampus (HIPP) ipsilateral to the lesion as compared to the contralateral one, while no changes were observed in the septum (SPT), nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) or frontal cortex (FCX). ALCAR treatment restored ChAT activity in the ipsilateral HIPP, while AChE levels were not different from those of untreated animals, and did not affect NGF content in either SPT or HIPP. PMID:7793306

  15. Biofilm formation by multidrug resistant Escherichia coli ST131 is dependent on type 1 fimbriae and assay conditions.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sohinee; Vagenas, Dimitrios; Schembri, Mark A; Totsika, Makrina

    2016-04-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) has emerged as a pandemic lineage of important multidrug resistant pathogens worldwide. Despite many studies examining the epidemiology of ST131, only a few studies to date have investigated the capacity of ST131 strains to form biofilms. Some of these studies have reported contrasting findings, with no specific ST131 biofilm-promoting factors identified. Here, we examined a diverse collection of ST131 isolates for in vitro biofilm formation in different media and assay conditions, including urine from healthy adult women. We found significant differences among strains and assay conditions, which offers an explanation for the contrasting findings reported by previous studies using a single condition. Importantly, we showed that expression of type 1 fimbriae is a critical determinant for biofilm formation by ST131 strains and that inhibition of the FimH adhesin significantly reduces biofilm formation. We also offer direct genetic evidence for the contribution of type 1 fimbriae in biofilm formation by the reference ST131 strain EC958, a representative of the clinically dominant H30-Rx ST131 subgroup. This is the first study of ST131 biofilm formation in biologically relevant conditions and paves the way for the application of FimH inhibitors in treating drug resistant ST131 biofilm infections. PMID:26940589

  16. Development and Efficacy Assessment of an Enteric Coated Porous Tablet Loaded With F4 Fimbriae for Oral Vaccination of Piglets against F4+ Escherichia coli Infections.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Atul; Gowda, D V; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Siddaramaiah

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is one of the major causes contributing to the development of diarrhoea and mortality in new born, suckling and newly weaned piglets. To date, no preventive/treatment strategy showed promising results, which could be due to the lack of potent vaccines, and/or due to the development of resistance of ETEC to antibiotics. Therefore, in the present investigation, a novel porous sodium alginate (SA) tablet formulation loaded with F4 fimbriae antigen was developed and tested for efficacy against ETEC infections in piglet models. Precompression parameters of the powder mixes and post compression parameters of tablets have been evaluated and results were found to be satisfactory. Loading of F4 fimbrial antigens into the tablets was achieved by inducing pores in the tablets via the sublimation of camphor followed by incubation with purified F4 fimbriae. The loaded tablets have been coated with Eudragit L100 to protect the F4 fimbriae from (a) highly acidic gastric environment; (b) proteolytic cleavage by pepsin; and (c) to promote subsequent release in the intestine. Evaluation of developed F4 fimbrial tablets in a Pig model demonstrated induction of mucosal immunity, and a significant reduction of F4+ E. coli in faeces. Therefore, F4 fimbriae loaded porous tablets could be a novel oral vaccination candidate to induce mucosal and systemic immunity against ETEC infections. PMID:26212139

  17. Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 bares the characteristics of both enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) and enteroaggregative (EAEC) E. coli. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga...

  18. Both flagella and F4 fimbriae from F4ac+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli contribute to attachment to IPEC-J2 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingxu; Duan, Qiangde; Zhu, Xiaofang; Guo, Zhiyan; Li, Yinchau; Hardwidge, Philip R; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    The role of flagella in the pathogenesis of F4ac+ Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) mediated neonatal and post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) is not currently understood. We targeted the reference C83902 ETEC strain (O8:H19:F4ac+ LT+ STa+ STb+), to construct isogenic mutants in the fliC (encoding the major flagellin protein), motA (encoding the flagella motor), and faeG (encoding the major subunit of F4 fimbriae) genes. Both the ΔfliC and ΔfaeG mutants had a reduced ability to adhere to porcine intestinal epithelial IPEC-J2 cells. F4 fimbriae expression was significantly down-regulated after deleting fliC, which revealed that co-regulation exists between flagella and F4 fimbriae. However, there was no difference in adhesion between the ΔmotA mutant and its parent strain. These data demonstrate that both flagella and F4 fimbriae are required for efficient F4ac+ ETEC adhesion in vitro. PMID:23668601

  19. Conservation of fimbriae and the hemagglutinating adhesin HA-Ag2 among Porphyromonas gingivalis strains and other anaerobic bacteria studied by epitope mapping analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Du, L; Pellen-Mussi, P; Chandad, F; Mouton, C; Bonnaure-Mallet, M

    1997-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies characterized as antifimbria and anti-HA-Ag2 were used in immunoblotting to examine the antigenic distribution of fimbriae and HA-Ag2 among a collection of human and animal Porphyromonas strains and human Prevotella and Bacteroides strains. The results showed that fimbrial and HA-Ag2 antigenic structures are peculiar to the species Porphyromonas gingivalis. PMID:9384294

  20. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaA, a molecular chaperone essential for the assembly of CFA/I fimbriae of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Poole, Steven; McVeigh, Annette; Chen, Yu-xing; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2014-01-21

    The molecular chaperone CfaA plays a critical role in the bioassembly of the surface-adhesive CFA/I fimbriae of enterotoxigenic E. coli. Purified CfaA was crystallized and the phase solution was determined by the multiple isomorphous replacement coupled with anomalous scattering method.

  1. Transcriptional Analysis of the sfa Determinant Revealing Multiple mRNA Processing Events in the Biogenesis of S Fimbriae in Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Balsalobre, Carlos; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Jass, Jana; Hacker, Jörg; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2003-01-01

    Among the virulence factors present in pathogenic extraintestinal Escherichia coli strains, expression of fimbrial adhesins is necessary for attachment to the host tissues and subsequent colonization. Occurrence of the sfa determinant coding for the S fimbriae is widespread among the uropathogens and meningitis isolates. The sfa operon consists of nine genes. In the biogenesis of S fimbriae, the proteins encoded by the sfa genes are presumably required in a specific stoichiometry. In the present work we studied how differential expression of the sfa operon genes occurs. Our findings indicate that a number of endoribonucleolytic cleavages occur in the mRNA from the sfa operon, and we detected the presence of different distinct transcriptional products, including sfaBA, sfaA, sfaADE, and sfaGSH. The sfaGSH transcript represents the three distal genes of the sfa operon, which code for the minor subunits of the S fimbriae. Analysis of the proteins in S fimbriae suggested that expression of the sfaGSH transcript provides equimolar amounts of the minor subunits. Furthermore, we showed that in the generation of the major sfaA transcript, the processing included RNase E endoribonuceolytic cleavage of the precursor sfaBA transcript. We suggest that posttranscriptional mRNA processing events result in differential gene expression important to achieve the stoichiometry necessary for fimbrial adhesin biogenesis. PMID:12511509

  2. Live attenuated Salmonella displaying HIV-1 10E8 epitope on fimbriae: systemic and mucosal immune responses in BALB/c mice by mucosal administration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing-Hai; Jin, Gang; Wang, Jia-Ye; Li, Hai-Ning; Liu, Huidi; Chang, Xiao-Yun; Wang, Fu-Xiang; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 membrane proximal external region (MPER) that is targeted by several broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs) has been considered a potential immunogen for vaccine development. However, to date the immunogenicity of these BNAb epitopes has not been made sufficiently adequate. In the present work, we used live attenuated Salmonella as a platform to present the HIV-1 MPER 10E8 epitope in the fimbriae. The insertion of the 10E8 epitope into the fimbriae had no significant influence on the expression and the absorption capacity of bacterial fimbriae, nor on the virulence and invasiveness of the attenuated Salmonella. After oral administration of the vaccine construct to mice followed by 10E8 epitope peptide boost, specific antibody responses in serum and mucosa as well as memory lymphocytes in spleen and plasma cells in bone marrow were induced. We also found that the live attenuated Salmonella vector directed the immunity toward Th1 bias, induced Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses and stimulated significant B cell differentiation into GC B, memory B and plasma cells. Therefore, we propose that the live attenuated Salmonella constitutively expressing HIV-1 BNAb epitopes on the fimbriae will be an effective approach to improving immune microenvironment and enhancing the immunogenicity of HIV-1 epitope vaccines. PMID:27411313

  3. Permissive linker insertion sites in the outer membrane protein of 987P fimbriae of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Schifferli, D M; Alrutz, M A

    1994-01-01

    The FasD protein is essential for the biogenesis of 987P fimbriae of Escherichia coli. In this study, subcellular fractionation was used to demonstrate that FasD is an outer membrane protein. In addition, the accessibility of FasD to proteases established the presence of surface-exposed FasD domains on both sides of the outer membrane. The fasD gene was sequenced, and the deduced amino acid sequence was shown to share homologous domains with a family of outer membrane proteins from various fimbrial systems. Similar to porins, fimbrial outer membrane proteins are relatively polar, lack typical hydrophobic membrane-spanning domains, and posses secondary structures predicted to be rich in turns and amphipathic beta-sheets. On the basis of the experimental data and structural predictions, FasD is postulated to consist essentially of surface-exposed turns and loops and membrane-spanning interacting amphipathic beta-strands. In an attempt to test this prediction, the fasD gene was submitted to random in-frame linker insertion mutagenesis. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that it was possible to produce fasD mutants, whose products remain functional for fimbrial export and assembly. Subsequently, 11 fasD alleles, containing linker inserts encoding beta-turn-inducing residues, were shown to express functional proteins. The insertion sites were designated permissive sites. The inserts used are expected to be least detrimental to the function of FasD when they are inserted into surface-exposed domains not directly involved in fimbrial export. In contrast, FasD is not expected to accommodate such residues in its amphipathic beta-strands without being destabilized in the membrane and losing function. All permissive sites were sequenced and shown to be located in or one residue away from predicted turns. In contrast, 5 of 10 sequenced nonpermissive sites were mapped to predicted amphipathic beta-strands. These results are consistent with the structural predictions for Fas

  4. The Role of Long Polar Fimbriae in Escherichia coli O104:H4 Adhesion and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Brittany N.; Rojas-Lopez, Maricarmen; Cieza, Roberto J.; McWilliams, Brian D.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2015-01-01

    A renewed interest in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains was sparked due to the appearance of an outbreak in 2011, causing 3,816 diarrheal cases and some deaths in Europe. The causative strain was classified as enteroaggregative E. coli of serotype O104:H4 that had acquired Shiga toxin genes. The ability of STEC O104:H4 to cause disease relies greatly on the bacteria’s capacity to colonize, persist, and produce Shiga toxin. However, not much is known about the colonization factors of this strain. Because long polar fimbriae (lpf) lpf1 and lpf2 operons encode important colonization factors in other STEC isolates and E. coli O104:H4 possesses both loci, we hypothesized that Lpf is required for adhesion and colonization. In this study, isogenic lpfA1 and lpfA2 major fimbrial subunit mutants were constructed. To determine their role in O104:H4’s virulence, we assessed their ability to adhere to non-polarized and polarized intestinal epithelial cells. The ΔlpfA1 showed decreased adherence in both cell systems, while the ΔlpfA2 only showed a decrease in adherence to polarized Caco-2 cells. We also tested the O104:H4 mutants’ ability to form biofilm and found that the ΔlpfA1 was unable to form a stable biofilm. In an in vivo murine model of intestinal colonization, the ΔlpfA1 had a reduced ability to colonize the cecum and large intestine, consistent with the in vitro data. Further, we tested the lpfA1 mutants’ ability to compete against the wild type. We found that in the in vitro and in vivo models, the presence of the wild type O104:H4 facilitates increased adherence of the ΔlpfA1 to levels exceeding that of the wild type. Overall, our data demonstrated that Lpf1 is one of the factors responsible for O104:H4 intestinal adhesion and colonization. PMID:26517878

  5. Environmental regulation of the long polar fimbriae 2 of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M.P.; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Medrano-López, Abraham; Nuñez-Reza, Karen J.; Puente, José Luis; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling expression of the Long Polar Fimbriae 2 (Lpf2) of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7 were evaluated. Primer extension was used to locate the lpfA2 transcriptional start site in EHEC strain EDL933 at 171 bp upstream of the lpfA2 start codon. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that the highest lpfA2 expression occurs between an OD600 of 1.0 and 1.2 in DMEM at pH 6.5 and 37°C. The level of lpfA2 transcription at OD600 1.2 and pH 6.5 was 4-times greater than that at pH 7.2. Although lpfA2 expression was decreased under iron-depleted conditions, its expression was increased in a Ferric-uptake-regulator (Fur) mutant strain. The lpfA2 transcript was 0.7 and 2-times more abundant in wt EHEC grown in DMEM pH 6.5 plus iron and MacConkey broth at 25°C, respectively, than in DMEM at pH 6.5. The lpf2 expression in DMEM pH 6.5 plus iron and bile salts was 2.7-times more abundant and similar to MacConkey. Further, transcription in the EDL933Δfur was 0.6 and 0.8-times higher as compared to the wt strain grown in DMEM pH 6.5 plus iron and MacConkey broth, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) showed that purified Fur interacts with the lpf2 regulatory region, indicating that Fur-repression is exerted by direct binding to the promoter region. In summary, we demonstrated that the EHEC lpf2 operon is regulated in response to temperature, pH, bile salts and iron, during exponential phase of growth, and controlled by Fur. PMID:24966050

  6. Oral Immunization with a Salmonella typhimurium Vaccine Vector Expressing Recombinant Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K99 Fimbriae Elicits Elevated Antibody Titers for Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ascón, Miguel A.; Hone, David M.; Walters, Nancy; Pascual, David W.

    1998-01-01

    Bovine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) continues to cause mortality in piglets and newborn calves. In an effort to develop a safe and effective vaccine for the prevention of F5+ ETEC infections, a balanced lethal asd+ plasmid carrying the complete K99 operon was constructed and designated pMAK99-asd+. Introduction of this plasmid into an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Δaro Δasd strain, H683, resulted in strain AP112, which stably expresses E. coli K99 fimbriae. A single oral immunization of BALB/c and CD-1 mice with strain AP112 elicited significant mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) titers that remained elevated for >11 weeks. IgA and IgG responses in serum specific for K99 fimbriae were also induced, with a prominent IgG1, as well as IgG2a and IgG2b, titer. To assess the derivation of these antibodies, a K99 isotype-specific B-cell ELISPOT analysis was conducted by using mononuclear cells from the lamina propria of the small intestines (LP), Peyer’s patches (PP), and spleens of vaccinated and control BALB/c mice. This analysis revealed elevated numbers of K99 fimbria-specific IgA-producing cells in the LP, PP, and spleen, whereas elevated K99 fimbria-specific IgG-producing cells were detected only in the PP and spleen. These antibodies were important for protective immunity. One-day-old neonates from dams orally immunized with AP112 were provided passive protection against oral challenge with wild-type ETEC, in contrast to challenged neonates from unvaccinated dams or from dams vaccinated with a control Salmonella vector. These results confirm that oral Salmonella vaccine vectors effectively deliver K99 fimbriae to mucosal inductive sites for sustained elevation of IgA and IgG antibodies and for eliciting protective immunity. PMID:9784559

  7. Micro-evolutionary processes in sablefish Anoplopoma fimbria, based on polymorphism of the two sites of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Orlova, S Y; Orlov, A M; Volkov, A A; Novikov, R N

    2014-01-01

    Sablefish Anoplopoma fimbria is a deep-sea fish, endemic to the North Pacific Ocean, with continuous range from southern California to the central part of Honshu Island, including the Bering and Okhotsk Seas. It is an important commercial species and a promising object for aquaculture. Compared to the eastern part of the range the population structure of sablefish in Asian waters is poorly studied. It is believed that sablefish goes to the Bering Sea and Pacific waters of Kamchatka and the Kuril Islands from the northeastern Pacific, and Asian waters are its eviction zone. Other authors suggest that replenishment of sablefish off the eastern Kamchatka and the Kuril Islands is not only due to migration of the adult fish from the Bering Sea along the continental slope, but also due to the drift of yearlings by Aleutian current over the American coast. PMID:25366282

  8. Phylogenetic group-associated differences in regulation of the common colonization factor Mat fimbria in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lehti, Timo A; Bauchart, Philippe; Kukkonen, Maini; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Korhonen, Timo K; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita

    2013-03-01

    Heterogeneity of cell population is a key component behind the evolutionary success of Escherichia coli. The heterogeneity supports species adaptation and mainly results from lateral gene transfer. Adaptation may also involve genomic alterations that affect regulation of conserved genes. Here we analysed regulation of the mat (or ecp) genes that encode a conserved fimbrial adhesin of E. coli. We found that the differential and temperature-sensitive expression control of the mat operon is dependent on mat promoter polymorphism and closely linked to phylogenetic grouping of E. coli. In the mat promoter lineage favouring fimbriae expression, the mat operon-encoded regulator MatA forms a positive feedback loop that overcomes the repression by H-NS and stabilizes the fimbrillin mRNA under low growth temperature, acidic pH or elevated levels of acetate. The study exemplifies phylogenetic group-associated expression of a highly common surface organelle in E. coli. PMID:23347101

  9. Intestinal receptors for adhesive fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 in swine--a review.

    PubMed

    Jin, L Z; Zhao, X

    2000-09-01

    Determining the structure of the intestinal receptor for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 fimbriae will make it possible to develop new strategies to prevent K88+ ETEC-induced disease in pigs. Putative K88 adhesin receptors have been identified in both intestinal brush border and mucus preparations as either glycoproteins or glycolipids. Proteins with sizes of 25, 35, 40-42, 60, and 80 kDa in the intestinal mucus and 16, 23, 35, 40-70, 74, 210, and 240 kDa in brush border membranes were reported to bind specifically to K88ab and K88ac fimbriae. The factors accounting for these variable results may include the variants of K88, ages, breeds, and phenotypes of pigs, and even the sampling sites in the small intestine. Of the reported K88 receptors, only three brush border receptors, i.e., a pair of mucin-type sialoglycoproteins (210 kDa or 240 kDa), an intestinal neutral glycosphingolipid (IGLad), and a 74-kDa transferrin glycoprotein (GP74), have fulfilled the criteria as phenotype-specific K88 fimbrial receptors. Inhibiting the attachment of ETEC to intestine by modifying the receptor attachment sites has been the key for developing novel approaches to preventing ETEC-induced diarrhea in pigs. These include: (1) receptor analogs from a variety of biological sources, (2) an enteric protected protease, (3) chicken egg-yolk containing anti-K88 fimbrial antibodies, and (4) some Lactobacillus isolates producing proteinaceous components or carbohydrates interacting with mucus components. Future studies should be directed to further characterize the carbohydrate and protein moieties of receptors recognized by the K88 adhesin variants and to identify the genes responsible for susceptibility to K88+ infections. PMID:11030565

  10. Flagellin and F4 fimbriae have opposite effects on biofilm formation and quorum sensing in F4ac+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingxu; Guo, Zhiyan; Yang, Yang; Duan, Qiangde; Zhang, Qi; Yao, Fenghua; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Xinjun; Hardwidge, Philip R; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2014-01-10

    Bacteria that form biofilms are often highly resistant to antibiotics and are capable of evading the host immune system. To evaluate the role of flagellin and F4 fimbriae on biofilm formation by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), we deleted the fliC (encoding the major flagellin protein) and/or the faeG (encoding the major subunit of F4 fimbriae) genes from ETEC C83902. Biofilm formation was reduced in the fliC mutant but increased in the faeG mutant, as compared with the wild-type strain. The expression of AI-2 quorum sensing associated genes was regulated in the fliC and faeG mutants, consistent with the biofilm formation of these strains. But, deleting fliC and/or faeG also inhibited AI-2 quorum sensing activity. PMID:24238669

  11. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Requires the Lpf, Pef, and Tafi Fimbriae for Biofilm Formation on HEp-2 Tissue Culture Cells and Chicken Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.; Frye, Jonathan G.; McClelland, Michael; Jones, Bradley D.

    2006-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium forms biofilms on HEp-2 tissue culture cells in a type 1 fimbria-dependent manner. To investigate how biofilm growth of HEp-2 tissue culture cells affects gene expression in Salmonella, we compared global gene expression during planktonic growth and biofilm growth. Microarray results indicated that the transcription of ∼100 genes was substantially altered by growth in a biofilm. These genes encode proteins with a wide range of functions, including antibiotic resistance, central metabolism, conjugation, intracellular survival, membrane transport, regulation, and fimbrial biosynthesis. The identification of five fimbrial gene clusters was of particular interest, as we have demonstrated that type 1 fimbriae are required for biofilm formation on HEp-2 cells and murine intestinal epithelium. Mutations in each of these fimbriae were constructed in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain BJ2710, and the mutants were found to have various biofilm phenotypes on plastic, HEp-2 cells, and chicken intestinal tissue. The pef and csg mutants were defective for biofilm formation on each of the three surfaces tested, while the lpf mutant exhibited a complete loss of the ability to form a biofilm on chicken intestinal tissue but only an intermediate loss of the ability to form a biofilm on tissue culture cells and plastic surfaces. The bcf mutant displayed increased biofilm formation on both HEp-2 cells and chicken intestinal epithelium, while the sth mutant had no detectable biofilm defects. In all instances, the mutants could be restored to a wild-type phenotype by a plasmid carrying the functional genes. This is the first work to identify the genomic responses of Salmonella to biofilm formation on host cells, and this work highlights the importance of fimbriae in adhering to and adapting to a eukaryotic cell surface. An understanding of these interactions is likely to provide new insights for intervention

  12. Chloroplasts assemble the major subunit FaeG of Escherichia coli F4 (K88) fimbriae to strand-swapped dimers.

    PubMed

    Van Molle, Inge; Joensuu, Jussi J; Buts, Lieven; Panjikar, Santosh; Kotiaho, Mirkka; Bouckaert, Julie; Wyns, Lode; Niklander-Teeri, Viola; De Greve, Henri

    2007-05-01

    F4 fimbriae encoded by the fae operon are the major colonization factors associated with porcine neonatal and postweaning diarrhoea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). Via the chaperone/usher pathway, the F4 fimbriae are assembled as long polymers of the major subunit FaeG, which also possesses the adhesive properties of the fimbriae. Intrinsically, the incomplete fold of fimbrial subunits renders them unstable and susceptible to aggregation and/or proteolytic degradation in the absence of a specific periplasmic chaperone. In order to test the possibility of producing FaeG in plants, FaeG expression was studied in transgenic tobacco plants. FaeG was directed to different subcellular compartments by specific targeting signals. Targeting of FaeG to the chloroplast results in much higher yields than FaeG targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum or the apoplast. Two chloroplast-targeted FaeG variants were purified from tobacco plants and crystallized. The crystal structures show that chloroplasts circumvent the absence of the fimbrial assembly machinery by assembling FaeG into strand-swapped dimers. Furthermore, the structures reveal how FaeG combines the structural requirements of a major fimbrial subunit with its adhesive role by grafting an additional domain on its Ig-like core. PMID:17368480

  13. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for the detection of F5 fimbriae gene in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kuiyu; Zhu, Ying; Liu, Wenxin; Feng, Yufei; He, Lili; Guan, Weikun; Hu, Wenxia; Shi, Dongfang

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the detection of F5 fimbriae gene in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. A set of four primers were designed based on the conservative sequence of coding F5 fimbriae. Temperature and time condition, specificity test, and sensitivity test were performed with the DNA of Escherichia coli (F5+). The results showed that the optimal reaction condition for LAMP was achieved at 61 °C for 45 min in a water bath. Ladder-like products were produced with those F5-positive samples by LAMP, while no product was generated with other negative samples. The assay of LAMP had a detection limit equivalent to 72 cfu/tube, which was more sensitive than PCR (7.2 × 10(2) cfu/tube). The agreement rate between LAMP and PCR was 100 % in detecting simulation samples. Thus, the LAMP assay may be a new method for rapid detection of F5 fimbriae gene of ETEC. PMID:22890294

  14. IscR Regulates Synthesis of Colonization Factor Antigen I Fimbriae in Response to Iron Starvation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Sara; Arnaud-Barbe, Nadège; Poncet, David; Reverchon, Sylvie; Wawrzyniak, Julien; Nasser, William

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron availability functions as an environmental cue for enteropathogenic bacteria, signaling arrival within the human host. As enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of human diarrhea, the effect of iron on ETEC virulence factors was evaluated here. ETEC pathogenicity is directly linked to production of fimbrial colonization factors and secretion of heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and/or heat-stable enterotoxin (ST). Efficient colonization of the small intestine further requires at least the flagellin binding adhesin EtpA. Under iron starvation, production of the CFA/I fimbriae was increased in the ETEC H10407 prototype strain. In contrast, LT secretion was inhibited. Furthermore, under iron starvation, gene expression of the cfa (CFA/I) and etp (EtpBAC) operons was induced, whereas transcription of toxin genes was either unchanged or repressed. Transcriptional reporter fusion experiments focusing on the cfa operon further showed that iron starvation stimulated cfaA promoter activity in ETEC, indicating that the impact of iron on CFA/I production was mediated by transcriptional regulation. Evaluation of cfaA promoter activity in heterologous E. coli single mutant knockout strains identified IscR as the regulator responsible for inducing cfa fimbrial gene expression in response to iron starvation, and this was confirmed in an ETEC ΔiscR strain. The global iron response regulator, Fur, was not implicated. IscR binding sites were identified in silico within the cfaA promoter and fixation confirmed by DNase I footprinting, indicating that IscR directly binds the promoter region to induce CFA/I. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic enterobacteria modulate expression of virulence genes in response to iron availability. Although the Fur transcription factor represents the global regulator of iron homeostasis in Escherichia coli, we show that several ETEC virulence factors are modulated by iron, with expression of the major fimbriae under the control of the iron

  15. Curli fimbriae are conditionally required in Escherichia coli O157:H7 for initial attachment and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Carter, Michelle Qiu; Louie, Jacqueline W; Feng, Doris; Zhong, Wayne; Brandl, Maria T

    2016-08-01

    Several species of enteric pathogens produce curli fimbriae, which may affect their interaction with surfaces and other microbes in nonhost environments. Here we used two Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreak strains with distinct genotypes to understand the role of curli in surface attachment and biofilm formation in several systems relevant to fresh produce production and processing. Curli significantly enhanced the initial attachment of E. coli O157:H7 to spinach leaves and stainless steel surfaces by 5-fold. Curli was also required for E. coli O157:H7 biofilm formation on stainless steel and enhanced biofilm production on glass by 19-27 fold in LB no-salt broth. However, this contribution was not observed when cells were grown in sterile spinach lysates. Furthermore, both strains of E. coli O157:H7 produced minimal biofilms on polypropylene in LB no-salt broth but considerable amounts in spinach lysates. Under the latter conditions, curli appeared to slightly increase biofilm production. Importantly, curli played an essential role in the formation of mixed biofilm by E. coli O157:H7 and plant-associated microorganisms in spinach leaf washes, as revealed by confocal microscopy. Little or no E. coli O157:H7 biofilms were detected at 4 °C, supporting the importance of temperature control in postharvest and produce processing environments. PMID:27052705

  16. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Modulates Immune Responses and Its Curli Fimbriae Interact with the Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    PubMed Central

    Kai-Larsen, Ylva; Lüthje, Petra; Chromek, Milan; Peters, Verena; Wang, Xiaoda; Holm, Åsa; Kádas, Lavinia; Hedlund, Kjell-Olof; Johansson, Jan; Chapman, Matthew R.; Jacobson, Stefan H.; Römling, Ute; Agerberth, Birgitta; Brauner, Annelie

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial growth in multicellular communities, or biofilms, offers many potential advantages over single-cell growth, including resistance to antimicrobial factors. Here we describe the interaction between the biofilm-promoting components curli fimbriae and cellulose of uropathogenic E. coli and the endogenous antimicrobial defense in the urinary tract. We also demonstrate the impact of this interplay on the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. Our results suggest that curli and cellulose exhibit differential and complementary functions. Both of these biofilm components were expressed by a high proportion of clinical E. coli isolates. Curli promoted adherence to epithelial cells and resistance against the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37, but also increased the induction of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8. Cellulose production, on the other hand, reduced immune induction and hence delayed bacterial elimination from the kidneys. Interestingly, LL-37 inhibited curli formation by preventing the polymerization of the major curli subunit, CsgA. Thus, even relatively low concentrations of LL-37 inhibited curli-mediated biofilm formation in vitro. Taken together, our data demonstrate that biofilm components are involved in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections by E. coli and can be a target of local immune defense mechanisms. PMID:20661475

  17. Identification of novel sRNAs involved in biofilm formation, motility, and fimbriae formation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bak, Geunu; Lee, Jungmin; Suk, Shinae; Kim, Daun; Young Lee, Ji; Kim, Kwang-Sun; Choi, Byong-Seok; Lee, Younghoon

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) are known regulators in many physiological processes. In Escherichia coli, a large number of sRNAs have been predicted, among which only about a hundred are experimentally validated. Despite considerable research, the majority of their functions remain uncovered. Therefore, collective analysis of the roles of sRNAs in specific cellular processes may provide an effective approach to identify their functions. Here, we constructed a collection of plasmids overexpressing 99 individual sRNAs, and analyzed their effects on biofilm formation and related phenotypes. Thirty-three sRNAs significantly affecting these cellular processes were identified. No consistent correlations were observed, except that all five sRNAs suppressing type I fimbriae inhibited biofilm formation. Interestingly, IS118, yet to be characterized, suppressed all the processes. Our data not only reveal potentially critical functions of individual sRNAs in biofilm formation and other phenotypes but also highlight the unexpected complexity of sRNA-mediated metabolic pathways leading to these processes. PMID:26469694

  18. Genes Related to Long Polar Fimbriae of Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains as Reliable Markers To Identify Virulent Isolates▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Alfredo G.; Blanco, Miguel; Valenzuela, Patricio; Slater, Terry M.; Patel, Shilpa D.; Dahbi, Ghizlane; López, Cecilia; Barriga, Ximena Fernández; Blanco, Jesús E.; Gomes, Tânia A. T.; Vidal, Roberto; Blanco, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Lpf (stands for long polar fimbriae) is one of the few adhesive factors of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 associated with colonization of the intestine. E. coli O157:H7 strains possess two lpf loci encoding highly regulated fimbrial structures. Database analysis of the genes encoding the major fimbrial subunits demonstrated that they are present in commensal as well as pathogenic (both intestinal and extraintestinal) E. coli strains and in Salmonella strains and that the lpfA1 and lpfA2 genes are highly prevalent among LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement)-positive E. coli strains associated with severe and/or epidemic disease. Further DNA sequence analysis of the lpfA1 and lpfA2 genes from different attaching-and-effacing E. coli strains has led us to the identification of several polymorphisms and the classification of the major fimbrial subunits into distinct variants. Using collections of pathogenic E. coli isolates from Europe and Latin America, we demonstrated that the different lpfA types are associated with the presence of specific intimin (eae) adhesin variants and, most importantly, that they are found in specific E. coli pathotypes. Our results showed that the use of these fimbrial genes as markers, in combination with the different intimin types, resulted in a specific test for the identification of E. coli O157:H7, distinguishing it from other pathogenic E. coli strains. PMID:19494071

  19. Identification of novel sRNAs involved in biofilm formation, motility, and fimbriae formation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Geunu; Lee, Jungmin; Suk, Shinae; Kim, Daun; Young Lee, Ji; Kim, Kwang-sun; Choi, Byong-Seok; Lee, Younghoon

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) are known regulators in many physiological processes. In Escherichia coli, a large number of sRNAs have been predicted, among which only about a hundred are experimentally validated. Despite considerable research, the majority of their functions remain uncovered. Therefore, collective analysis of the roles of sRNAs in specific cellular processes may provide an effective approach to identify their functions. Here, we constructed a collection of plasmids overexpressing 99 individual sRNAs, and analyzed their effects on biofilm formation and related phenotypes. Thirty-three sRNAs significantly affecting these cellular processes were identified. No consistent correlations were observed, except that all five sRNAs suppressing type I fimbriae inhibited biofilm formation. Interestingly, IS118, yet to be characterized, suppressed all the processes. Our data not only reveal potentially critical functions of individual sRNAs in biofilm formation and other phenotypes but also highlight the unexpected complexity of sRNA-mediated metabolic pathways leading to these processes. PMID:26469694

  20. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaA, a molecular chaperone essential for the assembly of CFA/I fimbriae of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Poole, Steven; McVeigh, Annette; Chen, Yu-xing; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of pilus bioassembly in Gram-negative bacteria stems mainly from studies of P pili and type 1 fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which are mediated by the classic chaperone–usher pathway (CUP). However, CFA/I fimbriae, a class 5 fimbria and intestinal colonization factor for enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), are proposed to assemble via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP). Both CUP and ACP fimbrial bioassembly pathways require the function of a periplasmic chaperone, but their corresponding proteins share very low similarity in primary sequence. Here, the crystallization of the CFA/I periplasmic chaperone CfaA by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method is reported. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected from a native CfaA crystal to 2 Å resolution and to 1.8 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively, from a lead and a platinum derivative. These crystals displayed the symmetry of space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.6, b = 28.68, c = 90.60 Å, β = 119.7°. Initial phases were derived from multiple isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering experiments using the data from the platinum and lead derivatives. This resulted in an interpretable electron-density map showing one CfaA molecule in an asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the heavy-atom derivatives. Refinement of the atomic model of CfaA is ongoing, which is expected to further understanding of the essential aspects and allowable variations in tertiary structure of the greater family of chaperones involved in chaperone–usher mediated bioassembly. PMID:24637755

  1. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaA, a molecular chaperone essential for the assembly of CFA/I fimbriae of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Poole, Steven; McVeigh, Annette; Chen, Yu Xing; Savarino, Stephen J; Xia, Di

    2014-02-01

    Understanding of pilus bioassembly in Gram-negative bacteria stems mainly from studies of P pili and type 1 fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which are mediated by the classic chaperone-usher pathway (CUP). However, CFA/I fimbriae, a class 5 fimbria and intestinal colonization factor for enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), are proposed to assemble via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP). Both CUP and ACP fimbrial bioassembly pathways require the function of a periplasmic chaperone, but their corresponding proteins share very low similarity in primary sequence. Here, the crystallization of the CFA/I periplasmic chaperone CfaA by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method is reported. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected from a native CfaA crystal to 2 Å resolution and to 1.8 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively, from a lead and a platinum derivative. These crystals displayed the symmetry of space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.6, b = 28.68, c = 90.60 Å, β = 119.7°. Initial phases were derived from multiple isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering experiments using the data from the platinum and lead derivatives. This resulted in an interpretable electron-density map showing one CfaA molecule in an asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the heavy-atom derivatives. Refinement of the atomic model of CfaA is ongoing, which is expected to further understanding of the essential aspects and allowable variations in tertiary structure of the greater family of chaperones involved in chaperone-usher mediated bioassembly. PMID:24637755

  2. Immunohistochemical analysis of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxicity on the developmental dentate gyrus and hippocampal fimbria in fetal mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Tetsushi; Omotehara, Takuya; Hashimoto, Rie; Umemura, Yuria; Yuasa, Hideto; Masuda, Natsumi; Kubota, Naoto; Minami, Kiichi; Yanai, Shogo; Ishihara-Sugano, Mitsuko; Mantani, Youhei; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Hoshi, Nobuhiko

    2015-11-01

    Dioxins are widespread persistent environmental contaminants with adverse impacts on humans and experimental animals. Behavioral and cognitive functions are impaired by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure. TCDD exerts its toxicity via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. The hippocampus, which plays important roles in episodic memory and spatial function, is considered vulnerable to TCDD-induced neurotoxicity, because it contains the AhR. We herein investigated the effects of TCDD toxicity on hippocampal development in embryonic mice. TCDD was administered to dams at 8.5 days postcoitum with a single dose of 20, 200, 2,000 and 5,000 ng/kg body weight (groups T20, T200, T2000 and T5000, respectively), and the brains were dissected from their pups at embryonic day 18.5. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) immunoreactivities in the dentate gyrus (DG) were reduced in the T5000 group. Granular GFAP immunoreactivity was observed in the hippocampal fimbria, and the number of immunoreactive fimbria was significantly decreased in the T5000 group. The number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA)-positive cells was decreased in all TCDD-exposed groups and significantly reduced in the T20, T200 and T5000 groups. Together, these results demonstrate that maternal TCDD exposure has adverse impacts on neural stem cells (NSCs), neural precursor cells (NPCs) and granular cells in the DG and disrupts the NSC maintenance and timing of differentiation in the hippocampal fimbria, which in turn interrupt neuronal development in future generations of mice. PMID:26096965

  3. Immunohistochemical analysis of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxicity on the developmental dentate gyrus and hippocampal fimbria in fetal mice

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, Yoshihiro; HIRANO, Tetsushi; OMOTEHARA, Takuya; HASHIMOTO, Rie; UMEMURA, Yuria; YUASA, Hideto; MASUDA, Natsumi; KUBOTA, Naoto; MINAMI, Kiichi; YANAI, Shogo; ISHIHARA-SUGANO, Mitsuko; MANTANI, Youhei; YOKOYAMA, Toshifumi; KITAGAWA, Hiroshi; HOSHI, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Dioxins are widespread persistent environmental contaminants with adverse impacts on humans and experimental animals. Behavioral and cognitive functions are impaired by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure. TCDD exerts its toxicity via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. The hippocampus, which plays important roles in episodic memory and spatial function, is considered vulnerable to TCDD-induced neurotoxicity, because it contains the AhR. We herein investigated the effects of TCDD toxicity on hippocampal development in embryonic mice. TCDD was administered to dams at 8.5 days postcoitum with a single dose of 20, 200, 2,000 and 5,000 ng/kg body weight (groups T20, T200, T2000 and T5000, respectively), and the brains were dissected from their pups at embryonic day 18.5. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) immunoreactivities in the dentate gyrus (DG) were reduced in the T5000 group. Granular GFAP immunoreactivity was observed in the hippocampal fimbria, and the number of immunoreactive fimbria was significantly decreased in the T5000 group. The number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA)-positive cells was decreased in all TCDD-exposed groups and significantly reduced in the T20, T200 and T5000 groups. Together, these results demonstrate that maternal TCDD exposure has adverse impacts on neural stem cells (NSCs), neural precursor cells (NPCs) and granular cells in the DG and disrupts the NSC maintenance and timing of differentiation in the hippocampal fimbria, which in turn interrupt neuronal development in future generations of mice. PMID:26096965

  4. Delayed intensive acquisition training alleviates the lesion-induced place learning deficits after fimbria-fornix transection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Malá, Hana; Rodríguez Castro, María; Pearce, Hadley; Kingod, Siff Camilla; Nedergaard, Signe Kjær; Scharff, Zakaryiah; Zandersen, Maja; Mogensen, Jesper

    2012-03-22

    This study evaluates the effects of two learning paradigms, intensive vs. baseline, on the posttraumatic acquisition of a water maze based place learning task. Rats were subjected either to a control operation (Sham) or to a fimbria-fornix (FF) transection, which renders the hippocampus dysfunctional and disrupts the acquisition of allocentric place learning. All animals were administered 30 post-lesion acquisition sessions, which spanned either 10 or 30days. The acquisition period was followed by a 7day pause after which a retention probe was administered. The lesioned animals were divided into 3 groups: i) Baseline Acquisition Paradigm (BAP) once daily for 30days starting 1week post-surgery; ii) Early Intensive Acquisition Paradigm (EIAP) 3 times daily for 10days starting 1week post-surgery; and iii) Late Intensive Acquisition Paradigm (LIAP) 3 times daily for 10days starting 3weeks post-surgery. Within the control animals, one group followed the schedule of BAP, and one group followed the schedule of Intensive Acquisition Paradigm (IAP). All lesioned animals showed an impaired task acquisition. LIAP was beneficial in FF animals, in that it led to a better acquisition of the place learning task than the two other acquisition paradigms. The FF/EIAP group did not show improved acquisition compared to the FF/BAP group. The control animals were not differentially affected by the two learning schedules. The findings have implications for cognitive rehabilitation after brain injury and support the assumption that intensive treatment can lead to an improved learning, even when the neural structures underlying such a process are compromised. However, the timing of intensive treatment needs to be considered further. PMID:22322151

  5. Immunization with the Recombinant Cholera Toxin B Fused to Fimbria 2 Protein Protects against Bordetella pertussis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castuma, Celina E.; Hozbor, Daniela; Gaillard, María E.; Rumbo, Martín; Gómez, Ricardo M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the immunogenic properties of the fusion protein fimbria 2 of Bordetella pertussis (Fim2)—cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) in the intranasal murine model of infection. To this end B. pertussis Fim2 coding sequence was cloned downstream of the cholera toxin B subunit coding sequence. The expression and assembly of the fusion protein into pentameric structures (CTB-Fim2) were evaluated by SDS-PAGE and monosialotetrahexosylgaglioside (GM1-ganglioside) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To evaluate the protective capacity of CTB-Fim2, an intraperitoneal or intranasal mouse immunization schedule was performed with 50 μg of CTB-Fim2. Recombinant (rFim2) or purified (BpFim2) Fim2, CTB, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were used as controls. The results showed that mice immunized with BpFim2 or CTB-Fim2 intraperitoneally or intranasally presented a significant reduction in bacterial lung counts compared to control groups (P < 0.01 or P < 0.001 , resp.). Moreover, intranasal immunization with CTB-Fim2 induced significant levels of Fim2-specific IgG in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and Fim2-specific IgA in BAL. Analysis of IgG isotypes and cytokines mRNA levels showed that CTB-Fim2 results in a mixed Th1/Th2 (T-helper) response. The data presented here provide support for CTB-Fim2 as a promising recombinant antigen against Bordetella pertussis infection. PMID:24982881

  6. Equal effects of typical environmental and specific social enrichment on posttraumatic cognitive functioning after fimbria-fornix transection in rats.

    PubMed

    Gajhede Gram, Marie; Gade, Louise; Wogensen, Elise; Mogensen, Jesper; Malá, Hana

    2015-12-10

    Enriched environment (EE) has been shown to have beneficial effects on cognitive recovery after brain injury. Typical EE comprises three components: (i) enlarged living area providing physical activation, (ii) sensory stimulation, and (iii) social stimulation. The present study assessed the specific contribution of the social stimulation. Animals were randomly divided into groups of (1) a typical EE, (2) pure social enrichment (SE), or (3) standard housing (SH) and subjected to either a sham operation or transection of the fimbria-fornix (FF). The effect of these conditions on acquisition of a delayed alternation task in a T-maze was assessed. The sham control groups were not affected by housing conditions. In the lesioned groups, both typical EE and SE improved the task acquisition, compared to SH. A baseline one-hour activity measurement confirmed an equal level of physical activity in the EE and SE groups. After delayed alternation testing, pharmacological challenges (muscarinergic antagonist scopolamine and dopaminergic antagonist SKF-83566) were used to assess cholinergic and dopaminergic contributions to task solution. Scopolamine led to a marked impairment in all groups. SKF-83566 significantly enhanced the performance of the lesioned group subjected to SE. The results demonstrate that housing in a typical as well as atypical EE can enhance cognitive recovery after mechanical injury to the hippocampus. The scopolamine challenge revealed a cholinergic dependency during task performance in all groups, regardless of lesion and housing conditions. The dopaminergic challenge revealed a difference in the neural substrates mediating recovery in the lesioned groups exposed to different types of housing. PMID:26499260

  7. Molecular characterization of the gonadal kisspeptin system: Cloning, tissue distribution, gene expression analysis and localization in sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria).

    PubMed

    Fairgrieve, Marian R; Shibata, Yasushi; Smith, Elizabeth K; Hayman, Edward S; Luckenbach, J Adam

    2016-01-01

    The kisspeptin system plays pivotal roles in the regulation of vertebrate reproduction. Classically, kisspeptin produced in the brain stimulates brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone signaling, which in turn activates the pituitary-gonad axis. Expression of the kisspeptin system has also been documented in peripheral tissues, including gonads of mammals and fishes. However, the fish gonadal kisspeptin system remained uncharacterized. Herein we report identification and characterization of four kisspeptin system mRNAs (kisspeptin 1 (kiss1), kiss2, and G protein-coupled receptor 54-1 (gpr54-1) and gpr54-2) in sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria. Sablefish predicted protein sequences were highly similar to those of other marine teleosts, but less so to freshwater teleosts. Tissue distribution analyses revealed that all four kisspeptin-system transcripts were expressed in both brain and gonad. However, kiss2 was the predominant transcript in the gonads and the only transcript detected in ovulated eggs. Ontogenetic analysis of kiss2 expression in juvenile sablefish gonads demonstrated that levels were low during sex differentiation but increased with fish size and gonadal development. Dramatic increases in kiss2 mRNA occurred during primary oocyte growth, while levels remained relatively low in testes. In situ hybridization revealed that kiss2 mRNA was localized to cytoplasm of perinucleolus stage oocytes, suggesting it could play a local role in oogenesis or could be synthesized and stored within oocytes as maternal mRNA. This represents the first study to focus on the gonadal kisspeptin system in fishes and provides important tools for further investigation of both the gonadal and brain kisspeptin systems in sablefish. PMID:26386183

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses of several forms of the CfaB major subunit of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Fu; Poole, Steven; Rasulova, Fatima; McVeigh, Annette L.; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2009-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a major global cause of diarrhea, initiates the pathogenic process via fimbriae-mediated attachment to the small intestinal epithelium. A common prototypic ETEC fimbria, colo­nization factor antigen I (CFA/I), consists of a tip-localized minor adhesive subunit CfaE and the stalk-forming major subunit CfaB, both of which are necessary for fimbrial assembly. To elucidate the structure of CFA/I at atomic resolution, three recombinant proteins were generated consisting of fusions of the minor and major subunits (CfaEB) and of two (CfaBB) and three (CfaBBB) repeats of the major subunit. Crystals of CfaEB diffracted X-rays to 2.1 Å resolution and displayed the symmetry of space group P21. CfaBB exhibited a crystal diffraction limit of 2.3 Å resolution and had the symmetry of space group P21212. CfaBBB crystallized in the monoclinic space group C2 and diffracted X-­rays to 2.3 Å resolution. These structures were determined using the molecular-replacement method. PMID:19255474

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaE, the adhesive subunit of the CFA/I fimbriae from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong-Fu; Poole, Steven; Rasulova, Fatima; Esser, Lothar; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2006-02-01

    The adhesin CfaE of the CFA/I fimbriae from human enterotoxigenic E. coli has been crystallized. CfaE crystals diffracted X-rays to better than 2.4 Å and phasing was solved by the SIRAS method. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) represents a formidable food and waterborne diarrheal disease threat of global importance. The first step in ETEC pathogenesis is bacterial attachment to small-intestine epithelial cells via adhesive fimbriae, many of which are genetically related to the prototype colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I). The minor fimbrial subunit CfaE is required for initiation of CFA/I fimbrial assembly and mediates bacterial attachment to host cell-surface receptors. A donor-strand complemented variant of CfaE (dscCfaE) was expressed with a hexahistidine tag, purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected to 2.4 Å resolution for both native and derivatized crystals and showed the symmetry of space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 142.9, c = 231.9 Å. Initial phases were derived from the SIRAS approach and electron density showed two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the selenium of an SeMet-derivatized crystal and from S atoms of a native crystal.

  10. Role of Proteus mirabilis MR/P fimbriae and flagella in adhesion, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induction in T24 and Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Scavone, Paola; Villar, Silvia; Umpiérrez, Ana; Zunino, Pablo

    2015-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is frequently associated with complicated urinary tract infections (UTI). It is proposed that several virulence factors are associated with P. mirabilis uropathogenicity. The aim of this work was to elucidate genotoxic and cytotoxic effects mediated by MR/P fimbriae and flagella in eukaryotic cells in vitro. Two cell lines (kidney- and bladder-derived) were infected with a clinical wild-type P. mirabilis strain and an MR/P and a flagellar mutant. We evaluated adhesion, genotoxicity and cytotoxicity by microscopy, comet assay and triple staining technique, respectively. Mutant strains displayed lower adhesion rates than the P. mirabilis wild-type strain and were significantly less effective to induce genotoxic and cytotoxic effects compared to the wild type. We report for the first time that P. mirabilis MR/P fimbriae and flagella mediate genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells, at least in in vitro conditions. These results could contribute to design new strategies for the control of UTI. PMID:25724892

  11. Escherichia coli K88ac Fimbriae Expressing Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable (STa) Toxin Epitopes Elicit Antibodies That Neutralize Cholera Toxin and STa Toxin and Inhibit Adherence of K88ac Fimbrial E. coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengxian; Zhang, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Bacterial adhesins and heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins are the virulence determinants in ETEC diarrhea. It is believed that vaccines inducing anti-adhesin immunity to inhibit bacterial adherence and anti-toxin immunity to eliminate toxin activity would provide broad-spectrum protection against ETEC. In this study, an ETEC fimbrial adhesin was used as a platform to express LT and STa for adhesin-toxin fusion antigens to induce anti-toxin and anti-adhesin immunity. An epitope from the B subunit of LT toxin (LTP1, 8LCSEYRNTQIYTIN21) and an STa toxoid epitope (5CCELCCNPQCAGCY18) were embedded in the FaeG major subunit of E. coli K88ac fimbriae. Constructed K88ac-toxin chimeric fimbriae were harvested and used for rabbit immunization. Immunized rabbits developed anti-K88ac, anti-LT, and anti-STa antibodies. Moreover, induced antibodies not only inhibited adherence of K88ac fimbrial E. coli to porcine small intestinal enterocytes but also neutralized cholera toxin and STa toxin. Data from this study demonstrated that K88ac fimbriae expressing LT and STa epitope antigens elicited neutralizing anti-toxin antibodies and anti-adhesin antibodies and suggested that E. coli fimbriae could serve as a platform for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines against ETEC. PMID:20980482

  12. Escherichia coli K88ac fimbriae expressing heat-labile and heat-stable (STa) toxin epitopes elicit antibodies that neutralize cholera toxin and STa toxin and inhibit adherence of K88ac fimbrial E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengxian; Zhang, Weiping

    2010-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Bacterial adhesins and heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins are the virulence determinants in ETEC diarrhea. It is believed that vaccines inducing anti-adhesin immunity to inhibit bacterial adherence and anti-toxin immunity to eliminate toxin activity would provide broad-spectrum protection against ETEC. In this study, an ETEC fimbrial adhesin was used as a platform to express LT and STa for adhesin-toxin fusion antigens to induce anti-toxin and anti-adhesin immunity. An epitope from the B subunit of LT toxin (LTP1, (8)LCSEYRNTQIYTIN(21)) and an STa toxoid epitope ((5)CCELCCNPQCAGCY(18)) were embedded in the FaeG major subunit of E. coli K88ac fimbriae. Constructed K88ac-toxin chimeric fimbriae were harvested and used for rabbit immunization. Immunized rabbits developed anti-K88ac, anti-LT, and anti-STa antibodies. Moreover, induced antibodies not only inhibited adherence of K88ac fimbrial E. coli to porcine small intestinal enterocytes but also neutralized cholera toxin and STa toxin. Data from this study demonstrated that K88ac fimbriae expressing LT and STa epitope antigens elicited neutralizing anti-toxin antibodies and anti-adhesin antibodies and suggested that E. coli fimbriae could serve as a platform for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines against ETEC. PMID:20980482

  13. F1C Fimbriae Play an Important Role in Biofilm Formation and Intestinal Colonization by the Escherichia coli Commensal Strain Nissle 1917▿

    PubMed Central

    Lasaro, Melissa A.; Salinger, Nina; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yantao; Zhong, Zhengtao; Goulian, Mark; Zhu, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation is thought to enhance survival in natural environments and during interaction with hosts. A robust colonizer of the human gastrointestinal tract, Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, is widely employed in probiotic therapy. In this study, we performed a genetic screen to identify genes that are involved in Nissle biofilm formation. We found that F1C fimbriae are required for biofilm formation on an inert surface. In addition, these structures are also important for adherence to epithelial cells and persistence in infant mouse colonization. The data suggest a possible connection between Nissle biofilm formation and the survival of this commensal within the host. Further study of the requirements for robust biofilm formation may improve the therapeutic efficacy of Nissle 1917. PMID:18997018

  14. Development and application of pathovar-specific monoclonal antibodies that recognize the lipopolysaccharide O antigen and the type IV fimbriae of Xanthomonas hyacinthi

    SciTech Connect

    Doorn, J. van; Ojanen-Reuhs, T.; Hollinger, T.C.; Reuhs, B.L.; Schots, A.; Boonekamp, P.M.; Oudega, B.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a specific immunological diagnostic assay for yellow disease in hyacinths, using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Mice were immunized with a crude cell wall preparation (shear fraction) from Xanthomonas hyacinthi and with purified type IV fimbriae. Hybridomas were screened for a positive reaction with X. hyacinthi cells or fimbriae and for a negative reaction with X. translucens pv. graminis or Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. Nine MAbs recognized fimbrial epitopes, as shown by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and immunoelectron microscopy; however, three of these MAbs had weak cross-reactions with two X. translucens pathovars in immunoblotting experiments. Seven MAbs reacted with lipopolysaccharides and yielded a low-mobility ladder pattern on immunoblots. Subsequent analysis of MAb 2E5 showed that it specifically recognized an epitope on the O antigen, which was found to consist of rhamnose and fucose in a 2:1 molar ratio. The cross-reaction of MAb 2E5 with all X. hyacinthi strains tested showed that this O antigen is highly conserved within this species. MAb 1B10 also reacted with lipopolysaccharides. MAbs 2E5 and 1B10 were further tested in ELISA and immunoblotting experiments with cells and extracts from other pathogens. No cross-reaction was found with 27 other Xanthomonas pathovars tested or with 14 other bacterial species from other genera, such as Erwinia and Pseudomonas, indicating the high specificity of these antibodies. MAbs 2E5 and 1B10 were shown to be useful in ELISA for the detection of X. hyacinthi in infected hyacinths.

  15. Development and Application of Pathovar-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies That Recognize the Lipopolysaccharide O Antigen and the Type IV Fimbriae of Xanthomonas hyacinthi

    PubMed Central

    van Doorn, J.; Ojanen-Reuhs, T.; Hollinger, T. C.; Reuhs, B. L.; Schots, A.; Boonekamp, P. M.; Oudega, B.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a specific immunological diagnostic assay for yellow disease in hyacinths, using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Mice were immunized with a crude cell wall preparation (shear fraction) from Xanthomonas hyacinthi and with purified type IV fimbriae. Hybridomas were screened for a positive reaction with X. hyacinthi cells or fimbriae and for a negative reaction with X. translucens pv. graminis or Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. Nine MAbs recognized fimbrial epitopes, as shown by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and immunoelectron microscopy; however, three of these MAbs had weak cross-reactions with two X. translucens pathovars in immunoblotting experiments. Seven MAbs reacted with lipopolysaccharides and yielded a low-mobility ladder pattern on immunoblots. Subsequent analysis of MAb 2E5 showed that it specifically recognized an epitope on the O antigen, which was found to consist of rhamnose and fucose in a 2:1 molar ratio. The cross-reaction of MAb 2E5 with all X. hyacinthi strains tested showed that this O antigen is highly conserved within this species. MAb 1B10 also reacted with lipopolysaccharides. MAbs 2E5 and 1B10 were further tested in ELISA and immunoblotting experiments with cells and extracts from other pathogens. No cross-reaction was found with 27 other Xanthomonas pathovars tested or with 14 other bacterial species from other genera, such as Erwinia and Pseudomonas, indicating the high specificity of these antibodies. MAbs 2E5 and 1B10 were shown to be useful in ELISA for the detection of X. hyacinthi in infected hyacinths. PMID:10473431

  16. Implementation of a Functional Observation Battery for the Assessment of Postoperative Well-being in Rats Subjected to Fimbria-Fornix Transection.

    PubMed

    Marschner, Linda; Wogensen, Elise; Mogensen, Jesper; Abelson, Klas

    2016-01-01

    The postoperative well-being of Wistar rats subjected to fimbria-fornix transections was assessed using a functional observational battery (FOB), including observations of relative body weight change, general condition, fur quality, body posture and movement, appetite, and pica behavior. Fimbria-fornix transected animals (FF), sham-operated animals (Sham), and two non-operated control groups with and without administration of buprenorphine (+BUP and -BUP, respectively) were observed twice daily for seven days after surgery. Buprenorphine (0.4 mg/kg) mixed in a nut paste for voluntary ingestion was supplied twice daily for 84 h to all groups except the -BUP control group starting on the day of surgery. Body weight was slightly decreased postoperatively in both surgical groups (FF and Sham) compared to control groups. The +BUP control group lost weight starting at day four after discontinuation of buprenorphine. Furthermore, the FF group exhibited significantly reduced general condition one day after surgery, with significantly affected body posture and movement for two days after surgery. In addition, mild pica behavior was observed in the FF group during the first postsurgical day. In conclusion, the FOB implemented in the present study appears to be a sensitive and accurate protocol for assessing animal well-being in the experimental setup applied. It is apparent that the FF transection is an invasive procedure that causes mildly adverse postoperative effects on the rats' well-being. We therefore recommend that this FOB is applied as a routine welfare monitoring protocol in experiments using mechanical central nervous system injury models, such as FF transection. PMID:26912816

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaE, the adhesive subunit of the CFA/I fimbriae from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Fu; Poole, Steven; Rasulova, Fatima; Esser, Lothar; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2006-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) represents a formidable food and waterborne diarrheal disease threat of global importance. The first step in ETEC pathogenesis is bacterial attachment to small-intestine epithelial cells via adhesive fimbriae, many of which are genetically related to the prototype colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I). The minor fimbrial subunit CfaE is required for initiation of CFA/I fimbrial assembly and mediates bacterial attachment to host cell-surface receptors. A donor-strand complemented variant of CfaE (dscCfaE) was expressed with a hexahistidine tag, purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected to 2.4 Å resolution for both native and derivatized crystals and showed the symmetry of space group P6222, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 142.9, c = 231.9 Å. Initial phases were derived from the SIRAS approach and electron density showed two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the selenium of an SeMet-derivatized crystal and from S atoms of a native crystal. PMID:16511280

  18. Crohn disease–associated adherent-invasive E. coli bacteria target mouse and human Peyer’s patches via long polar fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Chassaing, Benoit; Rolhion, Nathalie; de Vallée, Amélie; Salim, Sa’ad Y.; Prorok-Hamon, Maelle; Neut, Christel; Campbell, Barry J.; Söderholm, Johan D.; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a multifactorial disease in which an abnormal immune response in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract leads to chronic inflammation. The small intestine, particularly the ileum, of patients with CD is colonized by adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC) — a pathogenic group of E. coli able to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells. As the earliest inflammatory lesions are microscopic erosions of the epithelium lining the Peyer’s patches (PPs), we investigated the ability of AIEC bacteria to interact with PPs and the virulence factors involved. We found that AIEC bacteria could interact with mouse and human PPs via long polar fimbriae (LPF). An LPF-negative AIEC mutant was highly impaired in its ability to interact with mouse and human PPs and to translocate across monolayers of M cells, specialized epithelial cells at the surface of PPs. The prevalence of AIEC strains harboring the lpf operon was markedly higher in CD patients compared with controls. In addition, increased numbers of AIEC, but not LPF-deficient AIEC, bacteria were found interacting with PPs from Nod2–/– mice compared with WT mice. In conclusion, we have identified LPF as a key factor for AIEC to target PPs. This could be the missing link between AIEC colonization and the presence of early lesions in the PPs of CD patients. PMID:21339647

  19. The Klebsiella pneumoniae YfgL (BamB) lipoprotein contributes to outer membrane protein biogenesis, type-1 fimbriae expression, anti-phagocytosis, and in vivo virulence.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Ru; Chen, Chun-Tang; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Wang, Jin-Town

    2016-07-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen that causes several kinds of infections, including pneumonia, bacteremia, urinary tract infection and community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). Adhesion is the critical first step in the infection process. Our previous work demonstrated that the transcellular translocation is exploited by K. pneumoniae strains to migrate from the gut flora into other tissues, resulting in systemic infections. However, the initial stages of K. pneumoniae infection remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that a K. pneumoniae strain deleted for yfgL (bamB) exhibited reduced adherence to and invasion of host cells; changed biogenesis of major β-barrel outer membrane proteins; decreased transcriptional expression of type-1 fimbriae; and increased susceptibility to vancomycin and erythromycin. The yfgL deletion mutant also had reduced ability to against neutrophil phagocytosis; exhibited decreased induction of host IL-6 production; and was profoundly attenuated for virulence in a K. pneumoniae model of bacteremia. Thus, the K. pneumoniae YfgL lipoprotein mediates in outer membrane proteins biogenesis and is crucial for anti-phagocytosis and survival in vivo. These data provide a new insight for K. pneumoniae attachment and such knowledge could facilitate preventive therapies or alternative therapies against K. pneumoniae. PMID:27029012

  20. Role of type 1 and S fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli O18:K1 bacteremia and meningitis in the infant rat.

    PubMed Central

    Saukkonen, K M; Nowicki, B; Leinonen, M

    1988-01-01

    The role of fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli infection was studied in the infant rat model. Rat pups were challenged intraperitoneally at the age of 5 days with E. coli K1 (strain IH3080, O18:K1:H7) and three different subpopulations (type 1, type S, or nonfimbriated) of it. All bacterial subpopulations were able to produce peritonitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. However, the type 1 fraction was the least virulent and the type S fraction was the most virulent, as judged by the bacterial counts in body fluids and by the mortality rates of the pups. Fimbrial phase variation to mainly the type-S-fimbriated forms was observed in all body fluids. An initially type-S-fimbriated inoculum remained predominantly type S fimbriated in the peritoneal fluid and blood. In the cerebrospinal fluid, however, about 50% of the bacteria were type S fimbriated and 50% were nonfimbriated 1 h after challenge with the type-S-fimbriated subpopulation; at later times the share of type-S-fimbriated bacteria also increased in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:2894363

  1. Characterization of F107 fimbriae of Escherichia coli 107/86, which causes edema disease in pigs, and nucleotide sequence of the F107 major fimbrial subunit gene, fedA.

    PubMed Central

    Imberechts, H; De Greve, H; Schlicker, C; Bouchet, H; Pohl, P; Charlier, G; Bertschinger, H; Wild, P; Vandekerckhove, J; Van Damme, J

    1992-01-01

    F107 fimbriae were isolated and purified from edema disease strain 107/86 of Escherichia coli. Plasmid pIH120 was constructed, which contains the gene cluster that codes for adhesive F107 fimbriae. The major fimbrial subunit gene, fedA, was sequenced. An open reading frame that codes for a protein with 170 amino acids, including a 21-amino-acid signal peptide, was found. The protein without the signal sequence has a calculated molecular mass of 15,099 Da. Construction of a nonsense mutation in the open reading frame of fedA abolished both fimbrial expression and the capacity to adhere to isolated porcine intestinal villi. In a screening of 28 reference edema disease strains and isolates from clinically ill piglets, fedA was detected in 24 cases (85.7%). In 20 (83.3%) of these 24 strains, fedA was found in association with Shiga-like toxin II variant genes, coding for the toxin that is characteristic for edema disease strains of E. coli. The fimbrial subunit gene was not detected in enterotoxigenic E. coli strains. Because of the capacity of E. coli HB101(pIH120) transformants to adhere to isolated porcine intestinal villi, the high prevalence of fedA in edema disease strains, and the high correlation with the Shiga-like toxin II variant toxin-encoding genes, we suggest that F107 fimbriae are an important virulence factor in edema disease strains of E. coli. Images PMID:1348723

  2. The study of adhesive forces between the type-3 fimbriae of Klebsiella pneumoniae and collagen-coated surfaces by using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chiahan; Fan, Chia-chieh; Huang, Ying-Jung; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Long, Hsu

    2004-10-01

    Adherence to host cells by a bacterial pathogen is a critical step for establishment of infection. It will contribute greatly to the understanding of bacterial pathogenesis by studying the biological force between a single pair of pathogen and host cell. In our experiment, we use a calibrated optical tweezers system to detach a single Klebsiella pneumoniae, the pathogen, from collagen, the host. By gradually increasing the laser power of the optical tweezers until the Klebsiella pneumoniae is detached from the collagen, we obtain the magnitude of the adhesive force between them. This happens when the adhesive force is barely equal to the trapping force provided by the optical tweezers at that specific laser power. This study is important because Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen which causes suppurative lesions, urinary and respiratory tract infections. It has been proved that type 3 fimbrial adhesin (mrkD) is strongly associated with the adherence of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Besides, four polymorphic mrkD alleles: namely, mrkDv1, v2, v3, and v4, are typed by using RFLP. In order to investigate the relationship between the structure and the function for each of these variants, DNA fragments encoding the major fimbrial proteins mrkA, mrkB, mrkC are expressed together with any of the four mrkD adhesins in E. coli JM109. Our study shows that the E. coli strain carrying the mrkDv3 fimbriae has the strongest binding activity. This suggests that mrkDv3 is a key factor that enhances the adherence of Klebsiella Pneumoniae to human body.

  3. Contributions of EspA Filaments and Curli Fimbriae in Cellular Adherence and Biofilm Formation of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay K; Kudva, Indira T; Bearson, Bradley L; Stasko, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), the filamentous structure of the type III secretion system is produced from the polymerization of the EspA protein. EspA filaments are essential for O157 adherence to epithelial cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that O157 hha deletion mutants showed increased adherence to HEp-2 cells and produced abundant biofilms. Transcriptional analysis revealed increased expression of espA as well as the csgA gene, which encodes curli fimbriae that are essential for biofilm formation. In the present study, we constructed hha espA, hha csgA, and hha csgA espA deletion mutants to determine the relative importance of EspA and CsgA in O157 adherence to HEp-2 cells and biofilm formation. In vitro adherence assays, conducted at 37°C in a tissue culture medium containing 0.1% glucose, showed that HEp-2 cell adherence required EspA because hha espA and hha csgA espA mutants adhered to HEp-2 cells at higher levels only when complemented with an espA-expressing plasmid. Biofilm assays performed at 28°C in a medium lacking glucose showed dependency of biofilm formation on CsgA; however EspA was not produced under these conditions. Despite production of detectable levels of EspA at 37°C in media supplemented with 0.1% glucose, the biofilm formation occurred independent of EspA. These results indicate dependency of O157 adherence to epithelial cells on EspA filaments, while CsgA promoted biofilm formation under conditions mimicking those found in the environment (low temperature with nutrient limitations) and in the digestive tract of an host animal (higher temperature and low levels of glucose). PMID:26900701

  4. Contributions of EspA Filaments and Curli Fimbriae in Cellular Adherence and Biofilm Formation of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Kudva, Indira T.; Bearson, Bradley L.; Stasko, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), the filamentous structure of the type III secretion system is produced from the polymerization of the EspA protein. EspA filaments are essential for O157 adherence to epithelial cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that O157 hha deletion mutants showed increased adherence to HEp-2 cells and produced abundant biofilms. Transcriptional analysis revealed increased expression of espA as well as the csgA gene, which encodes curli fimbriae that are essential for biofilm formation. In the present study, we constructed hha espA, hha csgA, and hha csgA espA deletion mutants to determine the relative importance of EspA and CsgA in O157 adherence to HEp-2 cells and biofilm formation. In vitro adherence assays, conducted at 37°C in a tissue culture medium containing 0.1% glucose, showed that HEp-2 cell adherence required EspA because hha espA and hha csgA espA mutants adhered to HEp-2 cells at higher levels only when complemented with an espA-expressing plasmid. Biofilm assays performed at 28°C in a medium lacking glucose showed dependency of biofilm formation on CsgA; however EspA was not produced under these conditions. Despite production of detectable levels of EspA at 37°C in media supplemented with 0.1% glucose, the biofilm formation occurred independent of EspA. These results indicate dependency of O157 adherence to epithelial cells on EspA filaments, while CsgA promoted biofilm formation under conditions mimicking those found in the environment (low temperature with nutrient limitations) and in the digestive tract of an host animal (higher temperature and low levels of glucose). PMID:26900701

  5. Role of F1C fimbriae, flagella, and secreted bacterial components in the inhibitory effect of probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on atypical enteropathogenic E. coli infection.

    PubMed

    Kleta, Sylvia; Nordhoff, Marcel; Tedin, Karsten; Wieler, Lothar H; Kolenda, Rafal; Oswald, Sibylle; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A; Bleiss, Wilfried; Schierack, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is recognized as an important intestinal pathogen that frequently causes acute and persistent diarrhea in humans and animals. The use of probiotic bacteria to prevent diarrhea is gaining increasing interest. The probiotic E. coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) is known to be effective in the treatment of several gastrointestinal disorders. While both in vitro and in vivo studies have described strong inhibitory effects of EcN on enteropathogenic bacteria, including pathogenic E. coli, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the inhibitory effect of EcN on infections of porcine intestinal epithelial cells with atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC) with respect to single infection steps, including adhesion, microcolony formation, and the attaching and effacing phenotype. We show that EcN drastically reduced the infection efficiencies of aEPEC by inhibiting bacterial adhesion and growth of microcolonies, but not the attaching and effacing of adherent bacteria. The inhibitory effect correlated with EcN adhesion capacities and was predominantly mediated by F1C fimbriae, but also by H1 flagella, which served as bridges between EcN cells. Furthermore, EcN seemed to interfere with the initial adhesion of aEPEC to host cells by secretion of inhibitory components. These components do not appear to be specific to EcN, but we propose that the strong adhesion capacities enable EcN to secrete sufficient local concentrations of the inhibitory factors. The results of this study are consistent with a mode of action whereby EcN inhibits secretion of virulence-associated proteins of EPEC, but not their expression. PMID:24549324

  6. Role of F1C Fimbriae, Flagella, and Secreted Bacterial Components in the Inhibitory Effect of Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on Atypical Enteropathogenic E. coli Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kleta, Sylvia; Nordhoff, Marcel; Tedin, Karsten; Wieler, Lothar H.; Kolenda, Rafal; Oswald, Sibylle; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A.; Bleiß, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is recognized as an important intestinal pathogen that frequently causes acute and persistent diarrhea in humans and animals. The use of probiotic bacteria to prevent diarrhea is gaining increasing interest. The probiotic E. coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) is known to be effective in the treatment of several gastrointestinal disorders. While both in vitro and in vivo studies have described strong inhibitory effects of EcN on enteropathogenic bacteria, including pathogenic E. coli, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the inhibitory effect of EcN on infections of porcine intestinal epithelial cells with atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC) with respect to single infection steps, including adhesion, microcolony formation, and the attaching and effacing phenotype. We show that EcN drastically reduced the infection efficiencies of aEPEC by inhibiting bacterial adhesion and growth of microcolonies, but not the attaching and effacing of adherent bacteria. The inhibitory effect correlated with EcN adhesion capacities and was predominantly mediated by F1C fimbriae, but also by H1 flagella, which served as bridges between EcN cells. Furthermore, EcN seemed to interfere with the initial adhesion of aEPEC to host cells by secretion of inhibitory components. These components do not appear to be specific to EcN, but we propose that the strong adhesion capacities enable EcN to secrete sufficient local concentrations of the inhibitory factors. The results of this study are consistent with a mode of action whereby EcN inhibits secretion of virulence-associated proteins of EPEC, but not their expression. PMID:24549324

  7. Protection of piglets against enteric colibacillosis by intranasal immunization with K88ac (F4ac) fimbriae and heat labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun; Mateo, Kristina S; Zhao, Mojun; Erickson, Alan K; Garcia, Nuria; He, Dong; Moxley, Rodney A; Francis, David H

    2013-03-23

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important diarrheal agent of young domestic animals. Currently, there are no commercially available non-living vaccines to protect weaned pigs from the disease and no major veterinary biologics company markets a postweaning ETEC vaccine of any kind. While efforts have been made to develop a non-living postweaning ETEC vaccine for pigs, studies have been limited to the assessment of immune responses to experimental immunogens. In the present study, we describe a reproducible gnotobiotic piglet model of post-weaning ETEC diarrhea and efficacy tests in that model of subunit vaccines consisting of K88 (F4) fimbriae and/or heat labile enterotoxin (LT) delivered by the intranasal route. We also report antibody responses to the vaccine antigens. Piglets vaccinated with both antigens mounted a substantial immune response with serum and cecal antibody titers to K88 antigen significantly greater than those of controls. Serum anti-LT antibody titers were also significantly greater than those of controls. Piglets vaccinated with both antigens remained healthy following challenge with ETEC. At least some pigs vaccinated with either antigen alone, and most of the control piglets developed dehydrating diarrhea and suffered significant weight loss. The results of this study suggest that an intranasal vaccine consisting of both antigens is highly protective against a vigorous experimental challenge of pigs with K88+ ETEC, while that against either antigen alone is not. The current study provides a system whereby various ETEC antigens and/or combinations of antigens can be tested in exploring strategies for the development of vaccines for ETEC. PMID:23089483

  8. Fimbria-Encoding Gene yadC Has a Pleiotropic Effect on Several Biological Characteristics and Plays a Role in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Leite, Janaína Luisa; da Silva, Livia Pilatti Mendes; Nakazato, Gerson

    2015-01-01

    The extraintestinal pathogen termed avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is known to cause colibacillosis in chickens. The molecular basis of APEC pathogenesis is not fully elucidated yet. In this work, we deleted a component of the Yad gene cluster (yadC) in order to understand the role of Yad in the pathogenicity of the APEC strain SCI-07. In vitro, the transcription level of yadC was upregulated at 41°C and downregulated at 22°C. The yadC expression in vivo was more pronounced in lungs than in spleen, suggesting a role in the early steps of the infection. Chicks infected with the wild-type and mutant strains presented, respectively, 80% and 50% mortality rates. The ΔyadC strain presented a slightly decreased ability to adhere to HeLa cells with or without the d-mannose analog compared with the wild type. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assays showed that fimH was downregulated (P < 0.05) and csgA and ecpA were slightly upregulated in the mutant strain, showing that yadC modulates expression of other fimbriae. Bacterial internalization studies showed that the ΔyadC strain had a lower number of intracellular bacteria recovered from Hep-2 cells and HD11 cells than the wild-type strain (P < 0.05). Motility assays in soft agar demonstrated that the ΔyadC strain was less motile than the wild type (P < 0.01). Curiously, flagellum-associated genes were not dramatically downregulated in the ΔyadC strain. Taken together, the results show that the fimbrial adhesin Yad contributes to the pathogenicity and modulates different biological characteristics of the APEC strain SCI-07. PMID:26502907

  9. Fimbria-Encoding Gene yadC Has a Pleiotropic Effect on Several Biological Characteristics and Plays a Role in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Verma, Renu; Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Leite, Janaína Luisa; da Silva, Livia Pilatti Mendes; Nakazato, Gerson; Dias da Silveira, Wanderley

    2016-01-01

    The extraintestinal pathogen termed avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is known to cause colibacillosis in chickens. The molecular basis of APEC pathogenesis is not fully elucidated yet. In this work, we deleted a component of the Yad gene cluster (yadC) in order to understand the role of Yad in the pathogenicity of the APEC strain SCI-07. In vitro, the transcription level of yadC was upregulated at 41°C and downregulated at 22°C. The yadC expression in vivo was more pronounced in lungs than in spleen, suggesting a role in the early steps of the infection. Chicks infected with the wild-type and mutant strains presented, respectively, 80% and 50% mortality rates. The ΔyadC strain presented a slightly decreased ability to adhere to HeLa cells with or without the d-mannose analog compared with the wild type. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assays showed that fimH was downregulated (P < 0.05) and csgA and ecpA were slightly upregulated in the mutant strain, showing that yadC modulates expression of other fimbriae. Bacterial internalization studies showed that the ΔyadC strain had a lower number of intracellular bacteria recovered from Hep-2 cells and HD11 cells than the wild-type strain (P < 0.05). Motility assays in soft agar demonstrated that the ΔyadC strain was less motile than the wild type (P < 0.01). Curiously, flagellum-associated genes were not dramatically downregulated in the ΔyadC strain. Taken together, the results show that the fimbrial adhesin Yad contributes to the pathogenicity and modulates different biological characteristics of the APEC strain SCI-07. PMID:26502907

  10. Altered neuronal responses and regulation of neurotrophic proteins in the medial septum following fimbria-fornix transection in CNTF- and leukaemia inhibitory factor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Thomas; Steup, Andreas; Schnell, Oliver; Schubert, Klaus Oliver; Zhi, Qixia; Guijarro, Christian; Kirsch, Matthias; Hofmann, Hans-Dieter

    2006-10-01

    Degeneration of axotomized GABAergic septohippocampal neurones has been shown to be enhanced in ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)-deficient mice following fimbria-fornix transection (FFT), indicating a neuroprotective function of endogenous CNTF. Paradoxically, however, the cholinergic population of septohippocampal neurones was more resistant to axotomy in these mutants. As leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) has been identified as a potential neuroprotective factor for the cholinergic medial septum (MS) neurones, FFT-induced responses were compared in CNTF(-/-), LIF(-/-) and CNTF/LIF double knockout mice. In CNTF(-/-) mice, FFT-induced cholinergic degeneration was confirmed to be attenuated as compared with wildtype mice. The expression of both LIF and LIF receptor beta was increased in the MS providing a possible explanation for the enhanced neuronal resistance to FFT in these animals. However, ablation of the LIF gene also produced paradoxical effects; following FFT in LIF(-/-) mice no loss of GABAergic or cholinergic MS neurones was detectable during the first postlesional week, suggesting that other efficient neuroprotective mechanisms are activated in these animals. In fact, enhanced activation of astrocytes, a source of neurotrophic proteins, was indicated by increased up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin expression. In addition, mRNA levels for neurotrophin signalling components (e.g. nerve growth factor, p75(NTR)) were differentially regulated. The positive effect on axotomized cholinergic neurones seen in CNTF(-/-) and LIF(-/-) mice as well as the increased up-regulation of astrogliose markers was abolished in CNTF/LIF double knockout animals. Our results indicate that endogenous CNTF and LIF are involved in the regulation of neuronal survival following central nervous system lesion and are integrated into a network of neurotrophic signals that mutually influence their expression and function. PMID:17074046

  11. The secondary Müllerian system, field effect, BRCA, and tubal fimbria: our evolving understanding of the origin of tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma and why assignment of primary site matters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Naveena; Gilks, C Blake; Wilkinson, Nafisa; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2015-08-01

    It has long been held that most epithelial ovarian carcinomas arise from the ovarian surface epithelium. Theories on origin were based on the assumption that there was a common cell of origin for all ovarian carcinoma histotypes, and that these histotypes were closely related and frequently admixed. It is now recognised that the histotypes are distinct diseases. Recent studies on early, organ-confined, non-uterine high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) have led to a change in our understanding of their anatomical site of origin. These studies were initially on patients at high risk of developing HGSC but more recently have been extended to cases without family history or genetic markers of increased risk. These have shown that incidental HGSC, when detected before dissemination, is most commonly identified in the tubal fimbria. As a result, we have had to revisit theories on the cell and site of origin of HGSC. This progress in our understanding has necessitated a change in how we handle cases in clinical practice, as it impacts on primary site assignment, which in turn has implications for staging. In this review we will discuss the evolution of our understanding of the cell of origin of HGSC, the evidence for the tubal fimbria as the anatomical site of origin of most non-uterine HGSC, and the clinical implications of these recent developments. PMID:26126051

  12. Inheritance of porcine receptors for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with fimbriae F4ad and their relation to other F4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Rampoldi, A; Bertschinger, H U; Bürgi, E; Dolf, G; Sidler, X; Bratus, A; Vögeli, P; Neuenschwander, S

    2014-06-01

    Enteric Escherichia coli infections are a highly relevant cause of disease and death in young pigs. Breeding genetically resistant pigs is an economical and sustainable method of prevention. Resistant pigs are protected against colonization of the intestine through the absence of receptors for the bacterial fimbriae, which mediate adhesion to the intestinal surface. The present work aimed at elucidation of the mode of inheritance of the F4ad receptor which according to former investigations appeared quite confusing. Intestines of 489 pigs of an experimental herd were examined by a microscopic adhesion test modified in such a manner that four small intestinal sites instead of one were tested for adhesion of the fimbrial variant F4ad. Segregation analysis revealed that the mixed inheritance model explained our data best. The heritability of the F4ad phenotype was estimated to be 0.7±0.1. There are no relations to the strong receptors for variants F4ab and F4ac. Targeted matings allowed the discrimination between two F4ad receptors, that is, a fully adhesive receptor (F4adRFA) expressed on all enterocytes and at all small intestinal sites, and a partially adhesive receptor (F4adRPA) variably expressed at different sites and often leading to partial bacterial adhesion. In pigs with both F4ad receptors, the F4adRPA receptor is masked by the F4adRFA. The hypothesis that F4adRFA must be encoded by at least two complementary or epistatic dominant genes is supported by the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium statistics. The F4adRPA receptor is inherited as a monogenetic dominant trait. A comparable partially adhesive receptor for variant F4ab (F4abRPA) was also observed but the limited data did not allow a prediction of the mode of inheritance. Pigs were therefore classified into one of eight receptor phenotypes: A1 (F4abRFA/F4acR+/F4adRFA); A2 (F4abRFA/F4acR+/F4adRPA); B (F4abRFA/F4acR+/F4adR-); C1 (F4abRPA/F4acR-/F4adRFA); C2 (F4abRPA/F4acR-/F4adRPA); D1 (F4abR-/F4acR-/F4ad

  13. Proteins with molecular masses of 50 and 80 kilodaltons encoded by genes downstream from the fimbrilin gene (fimA) are components associated with fimbriae in the oral anaerobe Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, F; Takahashi, Y; Hibi, E; Takasawa, T; Kato, H; Dickinson, D P

    1993-01-01

    Flanking DNA regions of the fimbrilin gene (designated fimA), which encodes the major subunit protein of Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis fimbriae, were cloned in several manners from the P. gingivalis chromosome into Escherichia coli by screening with probes derived from a 2.5-kb SacI DNA fragment previously cloned. A total of 10.4 kb of DNA fragments from the P. gingivalis genome was cloned in the pUC plasmid. Expression of the fimA gene and possible flanking genes in the fragments cloned was examined in a pUC plasmid vector system and in a bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase-promoter expression vector system. The results show that in the pUC plasmid system, a 45-kDa protein, a product of fimA, was only poorly expressed as a precursor of the fimbrilin protein (FimA) and could be detected from cell extracts in Western blotting (immunoblotting) analysis as a sharp band but not in colony immunoblotting analysis. On the other hand, in the T7 RNA polymerase-promoter system, the product of fimA and products of the possible flanking genes responsible for fimbriation were overproduced as thick bands of the 45-kDa protein and as 63-, 50-, and 80-kDa proteins, respectively, in stained electrophoresis gels. All of the recombinant proteins were insoluble and seemed to be expressed as precursors with leader peptides. The 63-kDa, 45-k*Da (a truncated protein of the 50-kDa protein), and 80-kDa proteins were purified after solubilization with sodium dodecyl sulfate. N-terminal amino acid sequences of the 45-k*Da and 80-kDa proteins were analyzed up to the first 35 residues with a gas-phase sequencer. Monospecific antibodies directed to the recombinant proteins, i.e., the 63-kDa, 45-k*Da, and 80-kDa proteins, were raised in rabbits. By using the antibodies, localization of their matured proteins in P. gingivalis was investigated by Western blotting analysis. Immunoblotting analysis suggests that at least the 50- and 80-kDa proteins, encoded by genes downstream from the fim

  14. Hemagglutinin, urease, and hemolysin production by Proteus mirabilis from clinical sources.

    PubMed

    Mobley, H L; Chippendale, G R

    1990-03-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of urinary tract infection, can lead to serious complications including pyelonephritis. Adherence factors, urease, and hemolysin may be virulence determinants. These factors were compared for bacteria cultured from 16 patients with acute pyelonephritis and 35 with catheter-associated bacteriuria and for 20 fecal isolates. Pyelonephritis isolates were more likely (P less than .05) to express the mannose-resistant/Proteus-like (MR/P) hemagglutinin in the absence of mannose-resistant/Klebsiella-like (MR/K) hemagglutinin than were catheter-associated or fecal isolates. Pyelonephritis isolates produced urease activity of 63 +/- 27 (mean +/- SD) mumol of NH3/min/mg of protein, not significantly different from catheter-associated or fecal isolates. Hybridization of Southern blots of P. mirabilis chromosomal DNA with two urease gene probes demonstrated that urease gene sequences were conserved in all isolates. Geometric mean of reciprocal hemolytic titers for pyelonephritis isolates was 27.9; for urinary catheter isolates, 18.0; and for fecal isolates, 55.7 (not significantly different, P greater than .1). Although in vivo expression of urease and hemolysin may not be reliable indexes of virulence, MR/P hemagglutination in the absence of MR/K hemagglutination may be necessary for development of pyelonephritis. PMID:2179424

  15. “Kinin danger signals proteolytically released by gingipain induce fimbriae-specific IFN-γ and IL-17-producing T cells in mice infected intramucosally with Porphyromonas gingivalis”

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Scovino, Aline; Raposo, Susane; Gaze, Vinicius Mussa; Cruz, Catia; Svensjö, Erik; Narciso, Marcelo Sampaio; Colombo, Ana Paula; Pesquero, João B.; Feres-Filho, Eduardo; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Sroka, Aneta; Potempa, Jan; Scharfstein, Julio

    2009-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a gram-negative bacterium that causes periodontitis, activates the kinin system via the cysteine protease R-gingipain. Using a model of buccal infection based on P. gingivalis inoculation in the anterior mandibular vestibule, here we studied whether kinins released by gingipain may link mucosal inflammation to T cell-dependent immunity through the activation of bradykinin B2 receptors (B2R). Our data show that P. gingivalis W83 (WT), but not gingipain deficient mutant or WT bacteria pretreated with gingipain inhibitors, elicited buccal edema and gingivitis in Balb/C or C57BL/6 mice. Studies in TLR2−/−, B2R−/− and neutrophil-depleted C57Bl/6 mice revealed that P. gingivalis induced edema through the sequential activation of TLR2/neutrophils, with the initial plasma leakage being amplified by gingipain-dependent release of vasoactive kinins from plasma-borne kininogens. We then used fimbriae (Fim) Ag as a read-out to verify if activation of the TLR2>PMN>B2R axis at early-stages of mucosal infection had impact on adaptive immunity. Analyzes of T cell recall responses indicated that gingipain drives B2R-dependent generation of IFN-γ-producing Fim T cells in submandibular draining LNs of Balb/C and C57BL/6 mice while IL-17-producing Fim T cells were generated only in Balb/C mice. In summary, our studies suggest that two virulence factors, LPS (an atypical TLR2 ligand) and gingipain, forges a trans-cellular cross-talk between TLR2/B2R, thus forming an innate axis that guides the development of Fim-specific T cells in mice challenged intrabuccally by P. gingivalis. Ongoing research may clarify if kinin-driven modulation of T cell responses may also influence the severity of chronic periodontitis. PMID:19687097

  16. A tripartite fusion, FaeG-FedF-LT(192)A2:B, of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) elicits antibodies that neutralize cholera toxin, inhibit adherence of K88 (F4) and F18 fimbriae, and protect pigs against K88ac/heat-labile toxin infection.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Liu, Mei; Casey, Thomas A; Zhang, Weiping

    2011-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains expressing K88 (F4) or F18 fimbriae and heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) toxins are the major cause of diarrhea in young pigs. Effective vaccines inducing antiadhesin (anti-K88 and anti-F18) and antitoxin (anti-LT and anti-ST) immunity would provide broad protection to young pigs against ETEC. In this study, we genetically fused nucleotides coding for peptides from K88ac major subunit FaeG, F18 minor subunit FedF, and LT toxoid (LT(192)) A2 and B subunits for a tripartite adhesin-adhesin-toxoid fusion (FaeG-FedF-LT(192)A2:B). This fusion was used for immunizations in mice and pigs to assess the induction of antiadhesin and antitoxin antibodies. In addition, protection by the elicited antiadhesin and antitoxin antibodies against a porcine ETEC strain was evaluated in a gnotobiotic piglet challenge model. The data showed that this FaeG-FedF-LT(192)A2:B fusion elicited anti-K88, anti-F18, and anti-LT antibodies in immunized mice and pigs. In addition, the anti-porcine antibodies elicited neutralized cholera toxin and inhibited adherence against both K88 and F18 fimbriae. Moreover, immunized piglets were protected when challenged with ETEC strain 30302 (K88ac/LT/STb) and did not develop clinical disease. In contrast, all control nonvaccinated piglets developed severe diarrhea and dehydration after being challenged with the same ETEC strain. This study clearly demonstrated that this FaeG-FedF-LT(192)A2:B fusion antigen elicited antibodies that neutralized LT toxin and inhibited the adherence of K88 and F18 fimbrial E. coli strains and that this fusion could serve as an antigen for vaccines against porcine ETEC diarrhea. In addition, the adhesin-toxoid fusion approach used in this study may provide important information for developing effective vaccines against human ETEC diarrhea. PMID:21813665

  17. Production of Neisseria gonorrhoeae pili (fimbriae) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyne, P A; Haas, R; Meyer, T F; Davies, J K; Elleman, T C

    1992-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa K/2PfS, when transformed with an expression plasmid harboring the pilin gene (pilE1) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11, was able to express and assemble gonococcal pilin monomers into surface-associated pili, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and immunoelectron microscopy. Concomitant with the expression of gonococcal pili in P. aeruginosa was the virtual loss of production of P. aeruginosa K/2PfS pili normally associated with the host cell. Images PMID:1358873

  18. Correlation between virulence factors and in vitro biofilm formation by Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Naves, Plínio; del Prado, Gema; Huelves, Lorena; Gracia, Matilde; Ruiz, Vicente; Blanco, Jorge; Dahbi, Ghizlane; Blanco, Miguel; Ponte, María del Carmen; Soriano, Francisco

    2008-08-01

    The ability of 15 Escherichia coli strains to form biofilms on polystirene plates was studied. The strains were serotyped, and their phenotypic expression of surface virulence factors (VFs), and antibiotic susceptibility was also determined. Moreover, 30 VFs-associated genes were analysed, including 15 adhesins (papC, papG and its three alleles, sfa/focDE, sfaS, focG, afa/draBC, iha, bmaE, gafD, nfaE, fimH, fimAvMT78, agn43, F9 fimbriae and type 3 fimbriae-encoding gene clusters), four toxins (hlyA, cnf1, sat and tsh), four siderophore (iron, fyuA, iutA and iucD), five proctetins/invasion-encoding genes (kpsM II, kpsMT III, K1 kps variant- neuC, traT and ibeA), and the pathogenicity island malX and cvaC. Morphological appearance and thickness of biofilms of two strong and three weak biofilm producers were also studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Seven strains were classified as strong biofilm producers and the remaining eight strains were regarded as weak biofilm producers. Mannose-resistant haemagglutination was the only phenotypically expressed surface virulence factor more frequently found in the strong biofilm group. Five virulence-associated genes were more common (p<0.05) in strong biofilm producers: papC and papG alleles, sfa/focDE, focG, hlyA and cnf1. CLSM images showed irregular biofilms with projections at the top mainly in strong biofilm. PMID:18486439

  19. Virulence factors in Escherichia coli urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J R

    1991-01-01

    Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli are characterized by the expression of distinctive bacterial properties, products, or structures referred to as virulence factors because they help the organism overcome host defenses and colonize or invade the urinary tract. Virulence factors of recognized importance in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) include adhesins (P fimbriae, certain other mannose-resistant adhesins, and type 1 fimbriae), the aerobactin system, hemolysin, K capsule, and resistance to serum killing. This review summarizes the virtual explosion of information regarding the epidemiology, biochemistry, mechanisms of action, and genetic basis of these urovirulence factors that has occurred in the past decade and identifies areas in need of further study. Virulence factor expression is more common among certain genetically related groups of E. coli which constitute virulent clones within the larger E. coli population. In general, the more virulence factors a strain expresses, the more severe an infection it is able to cause. Certain virulence factors specifically favor the development of pyelonephritis, others favor cystitis, and others favor asymptomatic bacteriuria. The currently defined virulence factors clearly contribute to the virulence of wild-type strains but are usually insufficient in themselves to transform an avirulent organism into a pathogen, demonstrating that other as-yet-undefined virulence properties await discovery. Virulence factor testing is a useful epidemiological and research tool but as yet has no defined clinical role. Immunological and biochemical anti-virulence factor interventions are effective in animal models of UTI and hold promise for the prevention of UTI in humans. Images PMID:1672263

  20. Phenotypic Assays to Determine Virulence Factors of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) Isolates and their Correlation with Antibiotic Resistance Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Tabasi, Mohsen; Asadi Karam, Mohammad Reza; Habibi, Mehri; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Bouzari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Urinary tract infection caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains is one of the most important infections in the world. UPEC encode widespread virulence factors closely related with pathogenesis of the bacteria. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of different phenotypic virulence markers in UPEC isolates and determine their correlation with antibiotic resistance pattern. Methods UPEC isolates from patients with different clinical symptoms of UTI were collected and screened for biofilm and hemolysin production, mannose resistant, and mannose sensitive hemagglutination (MRHA and MSHA, respectively). In addition, antimicrobial resistance pattern and ESBL-producing isolates were recorded. Results Of the 156 UPEC isolates, biofilm and hemolysin formation was seen in 133 (85.3%) and 53 (34%) isolates, respectively. Moreover, 98 (62.8%) and 58 (37.2%) isolates showed the presence of Types 1 fimbriae (MSHA) and P fimbriae (MRHA), respectively. Our results also showed a relationship between biofilm formation in UPEC isolated from acute cystitis patients and recurrent UTI cases. Occurrence of UTI was dramatically correlated with the patients' profiles. We observed that the difference in antimicrobial susceptibilities of the biofilm and nonbiofilm former isolates was statistically significant. The UPEC isolates showed the highest resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, amoxicillin, and cotrimoxazole. Moreover, 26.9% of isolates were ESBL producers. Conclusion This study indicated that there is a relationship between the phenotypic virulence traits of the UPEC isolates, patients' profiles, and antibiotic resistance. Detection of the phenotypic virulence factors could help to improve understanding of pathogenesis of UPEC isolates and better medical intervention. PMID:26473094

  1. Tubal Ligation Induces Quiescence in the Epithelia of the Fallopian Tube Fimbria.

    PubMed

    Tiourin, Ekaterina; Velasco, Victor S; Rosales, Miguel A; Sullivan, Peggy S; Janzen, Deanna M; Memarzadeh, Sanaz

    2015-10-01

    Tubal ligation keeps the fimbriated end of the fallopian tube intact while interrupting the conduit for sperm and egg between the uterus and ovary. Tubal ligation is associated with an approximately 20% decreased risk of high-grade serous ovarian cancers, which mounting evidence suggests arise from the distal fallopian tube epithelium. We postulated that biological changes at the epithelial cellular level of the distal fallopian tube may account for the surgical procedure's observed risk reduction. We compared the histology, presence of epithelial progenitors (basally located CD44-positive cells), and degree of epithelial proliferation (Ki67-positive cells) of distal fallopian tube from 10 patients with previous tubal ligation and 10 age-matched patients with uncut fallopian tubes. A significantly reduced population of proliferating epithelial progenitors (basally located CD44/Ki67 dual-positive cells) was detected in the tubal ligated specimens (P = .0002). To functionally assess the effect of tubal ligation, a murine model was utilized to compare the growth capacity of distal fallopian tube epithelial cells isolated from either ligated or sham-operated tubal epithelia. Murine fallopian tube epithelial cells isolated after tubal ligation showed a significantly reduced capacity to grow organoids in culture compared to sham-operated controls (P = .002). The findings of this study show that tubal ligation is associated with a reduced presence and decreased proliferation of progenitor cells in the distal fallopian tube epithelium. These compositional and functional changes suggest that tubal ligation induces quiescence of distal fallopian tube epithelial cells. PMID:25736327

  2. Production and regulation of functional amyloid curli fimbriae by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional amyloid, in the form of adhesive fimbrial proteins termed curli, was first described in Salmonella and Escherichia coli. Curli fibers adhere to various host cells and structural proteins, interact with components of the host immune system, and participate in biofilm formation. Shiga toxin...

  3. Epigenetic reprogramming of fallopian tube fimbriae in BRCA mutation carriers defines early ovarian cancer evolution.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Thomas E; Chindera, Kantaraja; McDermott, Jacqueline; Breeze, Charles E; Cooke, William R; Jones, Allison; Reisel, Daniel; Karegodar, Smita T; Arora, Rupali; Beck, Stephan; Menon, Usha; Dubeau, Louis; Widschwendter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The exact timing and contribution of epigenetic reprogramming to carcinogenesis are unclear. Women harbouring BRCA1/2 mutations demonstrate a 30-40-fold increased risk of high-grade serous extra-uterine Müllerian cancers (HGSEMC), otherwise referred to as 'ovarian carcinomas', which frequently develop from fimbrial cells but not from the proximal portion of the fallopian tube. Here we compare the DNA methylome of the fimbrial and proximal ends of the fallopian tube in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and non-carriers. We show that the number of CpGs displaying significant differences in methylation levels between fimbrial and proximal fallopian tube segments are threefold higher in BRCA mutation carriers than in controls, correlating with overexpression of activation-induced deaminase in their fimbrial epithelium. The differentially methylated CpGs accurately discriminate HGSEMCs from non-serous subtypes. Epigenetic reprogramming is an early pre-malignant event integral to BRCA1/2 mutation-driven carcinogenesis. Our findings may provide a basis for cancer-preventative strategies. PMID:27216078

  4. Epigenetic reprogramming of fallopian tube fimbriae in BRCA mutation carriers defines early ovarian cancer evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Thomas E.; Chindera, Kantaraja; McDermott, Jacqueline; Breeze, Charles E.; Cooke, William R.; Jones, Allison; Reisel, Daniel; Karegodar, Smita T.; Arora, Rupali; Beck, Stephan; Menon, Usha; Dubeau, Louis; Widschwendter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The exact timing and contribution of epigenetic reprogramming to carcinogenesis are unclear. Women harbouring BRCA1/2 mutations demonstrate a 30–40-fold increased risk of high-grade serous extra-uterine Müllerian cancers (HGSEMC), otherwise referred to as ‘ovarian carcinomas', which frequently develop from fimbrial cells but not from the proximal portion of the fallopian tube. Here we compare the DNA methylome of the fimbrial and proximal ends of the fallopian tube in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and non-carriers. We show that the number of CpGs displaying significant differences in methylation levels between fimbrial and proximal fallopian tube segments are threefold higher in BRCA mutation carriers than in controls, correlating with overexpression of activation-induced deaminase in their fimbrial epithelium. The differentially methylated CpGs accurately discriminate HGSEMCs from non-serous subtypes. Epigenetic reprogramming is an early pre-malignant event integral to BRCA1/2 mutation-driven carcinogenesis. Our findings may provide a basis for cancer-preventative strategies. PMID:27216078

  5. Nanobody Mediated Inhibition of Attachment of F18 Fimbriae Expressing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Moonens, Kristof; De Kerpel, Maia; Coddens, Annelies; Cox, Eric; Pardon, Els; Remaut, Han; De Greve, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Post-weaning diarrhea and edema disease caused by F18 fimbriated E. coli are important diseases in newly weaned piglets and lead to severe production losses in farming industry. Protective treatments against these infections have thus far limited efficacy. In this study we generated nanobodies directed against the lectin domain of the F18 fimbrial adhesin FedF and showed in an in vitro adherence assay that four unique nanobodies inhibit the attachment of F18 fimbriated E. coli bacteria to piglet enterocytes. Crystallization of the FedF lectin domain with the most potent inhibitory nanobodies revealed their mechanism of action. These either competed with the binding of the blood group antigen receptor on the FedF surface or induced a conformational change in which the CDR3 region of the nanobody displaces the D″-E loop adjacent to the binding site. This D″-E loop was previously shown to be required for the interaction between F18 fimbriated bacteria and blood group antigen receptors in a membrane context. This work demonstrates the feasibility of inhibiting the attachment of fimbriated pathogens by employing nanobodies directed against the adhesin domain. PMID:25502211

  6. Discovery and phylogenetic analysis of novel members of class b enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli adhesive fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Nada, Rania A; Shaheen, Hind I; Khalil, Sami B; Mansour, Adel; El-Sayed, Nasr; Touni, Iman; Weiner, Matthew; Armstrong, Adam W; Klena, John D

    2011-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is recognized to be a common cause of acute watery diarrhea in children from developing countries. Colonization factors (CFAs) have been identified predominantly in ETEC isolates secreting heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) or cosecreting ST with a heat-labile toxin (LT). We hypothesized that LT-only-secreting ETEC produces unique colonization factors not previously described in ST and LTST-secreting ETEC. A set of degenerate primers based on nucleotide sequence similarities between the major structural genes of CS20 (csnA), CS18 (fotA), CS12 (cswA), and porcine antigen 987 (fasA) was developed and used to screen a collection of 266 LT-secreting ETEC isolates in which no known CFA was detected. PCR-amplified products of different molecular masses were obtained from 49 (18.4%) isolates. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the PCR amplicons followed by GenBank nucleotide BLASTn analysis revealed five novel DNA sequences; translated amino acid BLASTx analysis confirmed sequence similarity to class 1b major structural proteins encoded by csnA, fotA, and fasA. Strains expressing the novel CFAs were phylotyped and analyzed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST; Achtman scheme), and the types detected were compared to those of a collection of archived global E. coli strains. In conclusion, application of the degenerate primer sets to ETEC isolates from surveillance studies increased the total number of ETEC isolates with detectable CFAs by almost 20%. Additionally, MLST analysis suggests that for many CFAs, there may be a requirement for certain genetic backgrounds to acquire and maintain plasmids carrying genes encoding CFAs. PMID:21289147

  7. Genomic Subtractive Hybridization and Selective Capture of Transcribed Sequences Identify a Novel Salmonella typhimurium Fimbrial Operon and Putative Transcriptional Regulator That Are Absent from the Salmonella typhi Genome

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Brian J.; Graham, James E.; Curtiss, Roy

    1999-01-01

    Salmonella typhi, the etiologic agent of typhoid fever, is adapted to the human host and unable to infect nonprimate species. The genetic basis for host specificity in S. typhi is unknown. The avirulence of S. typhi in animal hosts may result from a lack of genes present in the broad-host-range pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Genomic subtractive hybridization was successfully employed to isolate S. typhimurium genomic sequences which are absent from the S. typhi genome. These genomic subtracted sequences mapped to 17 regions distributed throughout the S. typhimurium chromosome. A positive cDNA selection method was then used to identify subtracted sequences which were transcribed by S. typhimurium following macrophage phagocytosis. A novel putative transcriptional regulator of the LysR family was identified as transcribed by intramacrophage S. typhimurium. This putative transcriptional regulator was absent from the genomes of the human-adapted serovars S. typhi and Salmonella paratyphi A. Mutations within this gene did not alter the level of S. typhimurium survival within macrophages or virulence within mice. A subtracted genomic fragment derived from the ferrichrome operon also hybridized to the intramacrophage cDNA. Nucleotide sequence analysis of S. typhimurium and S. typhi chromosomal sequences flanking the ferrichrome operon identified a novel S. typhimurium fimbrial operon with a high level of similarity to sequences encoding Proteus mirabilis mannose-resistant fimbriae. The novel fimbrial operon was absent from the S. typhi genome. The absence of specific genes may have allowed S. typhi to evolve as a highly invasive, systemic human pathogen. PMID:10496884

  8. Effect of dietary taurine supplementation on growth, feed efficiency, and nutrient composition of juvenile sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Juvenile sablefish were fed a low taurine, basal feed with seven graded levels of supplemental taurine to determine taurine requirements for growth and feed efficiency. The basal feed was plant based, formulated primarily with soy and corn proteins with a minimal (9%) amount of fishmeal. The unsuppl...

  9. Structure of CfaA Suggests a New Family of Chaperones Essential for Assembly of Class 5 Fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rui; Fordyce, April; Chen, Yu-Xing; McVeigh, Annette; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive pili on the surface of pathogenic bacteria comprise polymerized pilin subunits and are essential for initiation of infections. Pili assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway (CUP) require periplasmic chaperones that assist subunit folding, maintain their stability, and escort them to the site of bioassembly. Until now, CUP chaperones have been classified into two families, FGS and FGL, based on the short and long length of the subunit-interacting loops between its F1 and G1 β-strands, respectively. CfaA is the chaperone for assembly of colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) pili of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), a cause of diarrhea in travelers and young children. Here, the crystal structure of CfaA along with sequence analyses reveals some unique structural and functional features, leading us to propose a separate family for CfaA and closely related chaperones. Phenotypic changes resulting from mutations in regions unique to this chaperone family provide insight into their function, consistent with involvement of these regions in interactions with cognate subunits and usher proteins during pilus assembly. PMID:25122114

  10. Structure of CfaA suggests a new family of chaperones essential for assembly of class 5 fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rui; Fordyce, April; Chen, Yu-Xing; McVeigh, Annette; Savarino, Stephen J; Xia, Di

    2014-08-01

    Adhesive pili on the surface of pathogenic bacteria comprise polymerized pilin subunits and are essential for initiation of infections. Pili assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway (CUP) require periplasmic chaperones that assist subunit folding, maintain their stability, and escort them to the site of bioassembly. Until now, CUP chaperones have been classified into two families, FGS and FGL, based on the short and long length of the subunit-interacting loops between its F1 and G1 β-strands, respectively. CfaA is the chaperone for assembly of colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) pili of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), a cause of diarrhea in travelers and young children. Here, the crystal structure of CfaA along with sequence analyses reveals some unique structural and functional features, leading us to propose a separate family for CfaA and closely related chaperones. Phenotypic changes resulting from mutations in regions unique to this chaperone family provide insight into their function, consistent with involvement of these regions in interactions with cognate subunits and usher proteins during pilus assembly. PMID:25122114

  11. The role of Type 1, P and S fimbriae in binding of Escherichia coli to the canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Krekeler, N; Marenda, M S; Browning, G F; Holden, K M; Charles, J A; Wright, P J

    2013-06-28

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most commonly isolated infectious agent causing pyometra in bitches. Many E. coli strains isolated from the uteri of infected dogs carry several adhesin genes (fimH, papGIII and sfa). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of each adhesin gene product, acting alone or expressed in combination, in the bacterial binding to canine endometrium. E. coli strain P3, which was isolated from a uterus of a bitch naturally affected with pyometra, was shown by PCR to carry all three known fimbrial adhesin genes fimH, papGIII and sfa. Knockout (KO) mutants of this wildtype (P3-wt) strain were generated using insertional inactivation. Adhesion assays on anoestrous uteri of three post-pubertal bitches were undertaken. Overall, the number of bacteria adhering to canine endometrial biopsies was comparable between strains and no significant difference in the number of bound bacteria was found between the P3-wt strain and the single or double KO-strains. However, the triple knockout strain displayed less binding to the canine endometrium compared with the P3-wt strain. This study shows that a pathogenic E. coli strain (P3) isolated from the uterus of a bitch with pyometra was able to fully compensate for the loss of two of its three known adhesin genes. It was necessary to inactivate all three known adhesin genes in order to see a significant decrease in binding to canine endometrium. PMID:23523172

  12. Leucine-responsive regulatory protein Lrp and PapI homologues influence phase variation of CS31A fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Graveline, Richard; Garneau, Philippe; Martin, Christine; Mourez, Michaël; Hancock, Mark A; Lavoie, Rémi; Harel, Josée

    2014-08-15

    CS31A, a K88-related surface antigen specified by the clp operon, is a member of the type P family of adhesive factors and plays a key role in the establishment of disease caused by septicemic and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains. Its expression is under the control of methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation, for which the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is essential. CS31A is preferentially in the OFF state and exhibits distinct regulatory features compared to the regulation of other P family members. In the present study, surface plasmon resonance and DNase I protection assays showed that Lrp binds to the distal moiety of the clp regulatory region with low micromolar affinity compared to its binding to the proximal moiety, which exhibits stronger, nanomolar affinity. The complex formation was also influenced by the addition of PapI or FooI, which increased the affinity of Lrp for the clp distal and proximal regions and was required to induce phase variation. The influence of PapI or FooI, however, was predominantly associated with a more complete shutdown of clp expression, in contrast to what has previously been observed with AfaF (a PapI ortholog). Taken together, these results suggest that the preferential OFF state observed in CS31A cells is mainly due to the weak interaction of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein with the clp distal region and that the PapI homolog favors the OFF phase. Within the large repertoire of fimbrial variants in the P family, our study illustrates that having a fimbrial operon that lacks its own PapI ortholog allows it to be more flexibly regulated by other orthologs in the cell. PMID:24914179

  13. Effects of erythropoietin on posttraumatic place learning in fimbria-fornix transected rats after a 30-day postoperative pause.

    PubMed

    Malá, Hana; Rodriguez Castro, Maria; Dall Jørgensen, Katrine; Mogensen, Jesper

    2007-10-01

    Human recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects following both vascular and mechanical brain injury. Previously, we showed that behavioral symptoms associated with mechanical lesions of the hippocampus are nearly abolished due to EPO treatment. In these studies, the EPO administration took place simultaneously with the infliction of brain injury and the rehabilitation training started 6-7 days postoperatively. In the present study, we tested whether the therapeutic effect of EPO on the acquisition of an allocentric eight-arm radial maze spatial task also manifests itself if the rehabilitative training is postponed. Postoperatively, the animals were left without any specific stimulation for 30 days. The current results show an improved behavioral performance of the EPO-treated lesioned group relative to the saline-treated lesioned group, and confirm EPO's therapeutic effect even in case of postponed rehabilitation. However, compared to the control group, the EPO-treated lesioned group demonstrated an impaired task acquisition. All subjects eventually recovered functionally. Subsequently, the animals were given behavioral challenges during which the cue constellation in the room was changed. The challenges revealed that, although the EPO-treated lesion group had achieved the same level of task proficiency as the control group, the cognitive mechanisms mediating the task performance in the EPO-treated lesion group (as well as in the saline-treated lesion group) were dissimilar from those mediating the task in the control group. Both the EPO-treated and the saline-treated lesion group demonstrated an increased dependency on the original cue configuration. PMID:17970627

  14. Monitoring F1651 P-Like Fimbria Expression at the Single-Cell Level Reveals a Highly Heterogeneous Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Graveline, Richard; Lavoie, Rémi; Garneau, Philippe; Daigle, France; Sénéchal, Serge; Martin, Christine

    2015-01-01

    F1651 and the pyelonephritis-associated pili (Pap) are two members of the type P family of adhesive factors. They play a key role in establishing disease caused by extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains in animals and humans. Both F1651 and Pap are under the control of an epigenetic and reversible switch that defines the number of fimbriated (ON) and afimbriated (OFF) cells within a clonal population. Using the Gfp reporter system, we monitored in vitro the level of fluorescence intensity corresponding to the F1651 and Pap fimbrial synthesis. Monitoring individual Escherichia coli cells by flow cytometry and by real-time fluorescence microscopy, we identified cells associated with a low or high level of fluorescence intensity and a large amount of cells with partial levels of fluorescence, mostly present in the F1651 system. This mixed population identified through fluorescence intensity could be attributed to the high switching rate previously observed in F1651-positive bacteria. The fimbrial heterogeneous phenotype for these ExPEC could represent increased fitness in unpredictable environments. Our study illustrates that within the large repertoire of fimbrial variants such as the well-characterized Pap, F1651 is an exquisite example of regulatory expression that arms the bacterium with strategies for surviving in more than one particular environment. PMID:25712930

  15. Hha Represses Biofilm Formation in Escherichia coli O157:H7 by Affecting the Expression of Flagella and Curli Fimbriae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a zoonotic pathogen that produces a broad-spectrum of diarrheal illnesses in infected humans. Although the genetic and molecular mechanisms enabling EHEC O157:H7 to produce characteristic adherence on epithelial cells are well characterized, the g...

  16. Nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the major subunit of CS3 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, M; Smyth, C J; Scott, J R

    1988-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a 612-base-pair DNA fragment containing the gene for the major fimbrial subunit of CS3 of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is presented. A possible promoter region, a ribosome-binding site, and two potential signal peptidase cleavage sites are indicated. Unlike the best-studied fimbrial proteins, the predicted CS3 sequence has no Cys residues. PMID:2903130

  17. Transcriptional analysis and regulation of the sfa determinant coding for S fimbriae of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Morschhäuser, J; Uhlin, B E; Hacker, J

    1993-04-01

    The sfa determinant codes for S fimbrial adhesins which constitute adherence factors of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. We have recently shown that the sfa determinant is transcribed from three promoters, pA, pB, and pC. In comparison with the promoters pB and pC, promoter pA, which is located in front of the structural gene sfaA, showed very weak activity. Here we have determined the exact positions of the mRNA start points by primer extension studies. We have also shown that mRNAs of 500, 700 and 1400 bases can be detected using oligonucleotide probes specific for the genes sfaB, sfaC and sfaA. SfaB and SfaC are positive regulators influencing fimbriation and the production of the S-specific adhesin which is encoded by the gene sfaS located in the distal half of the determinant. In addition, it is demonstrated that SfaB and SfaC interfere with the regulatory effect of the histone-like protein H-NS, encoded by a locus termed drdX or osmZ. In a drdX+ strain the regulators are necessary for transcription of the sfa determinant. In contrast, sfa expression is activator-independent in a drdX- strain. In this latter genetic background, a substantial fraction of the sfa transcripts is initiated from promoter pA. On the basis of these data we discuss a model for the regulation of this adhesin-specific determinant. PMID:8097559

  18. Untangling a Repetitive Amyloid Sequence: Correlating Biofilm-Derived and Segmentally Labeled Curli Fimbriae by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schubeis, Tobias; Yuan, Puwei; Ahmed, Mumdooh; Nagaraj, Madhu; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Ritter, Christiane

    2015-12-01

    Curli are functional bacterial amyloids produced by an intricate biogenesis machinery. Insights into their folding and regulation can advance our understanding of amyloidogenesis. However, gaining detailed structural information of amyloids, and their tendency for structural polymorphisms, remains challenging. Herein we compare high-quality solid-state NMR spectra from biofilm-derived and recombinantly produced curli and provide evidence that they adopt a similar, well-defined β-solenoid arrangement. Curli subunits consist of five sequence repeats, resulting in severe spectral overlap. Using segmental isotope labeling, we obtained the unambiguous sequence-specific resonance assignments and secondary structure of one repeat, and demonstrate that all repeats are most likely structurally equivalent. PMID:26474178

  19. Inhibition of EGFR pathway signaling and the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells by PA-MSHA mediated by type 1 fimbriae via a mannose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z-B; Hou, Y-F; Zhu, J; Hu, D-L; Jin, W; Ou, Z-L; Di, G-H; Wu, J; Shen, Z-Z; Shao, Z-M

    2010-05-20

    To identify more therapeutic targets and clarify the detailed mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (PA-MSHA) on breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. PA-MSHA was administered to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231HM and MDA-MB-468 in vitro and to mice bearing tumor xenografts. The mannose cocultured test was used to detect the effect of mannose on PA-MSHA-induced cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and EGFR pathway signaling. We found that cells stimulated with PA-MSHA exhibited a downregulation of EGFR signaling. The addition of mannose partially inhibited the PA-MSHA-stimulated cell anti-proliferative effect, cell apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, activation of apoptosis-associated caspases, and even downregulation of the EGFR signaling pathway. In vivo, PA-MSHA treatment significantly suppressed mammary tumorigenesis in xenografts in mice and decreased lung metastasis in MDA-MB-231HM cell-transplanted mice. Tumor sample analyses confirmed inhibition of the EGFR pathway in the PA-MSHA-treated mice. In conclusion, this study showed that the involvement of the mannose-mediated EGFR pathway has a critical function in the preclinical rationale for the development of PA-MSHA for the treatment of human breast cancer. It also suggests the potentially beneficial use of PA-MSHA in adjuvant therapy for breast tumors with EGFR overexpression. PMID:20228837

  20. Contributions of EspA filaments and curli fimbriae in cellular adherence and biofilm formation of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), the filamentous structure of the type III secretion system is produced from the polymerization of the EspA protein. EspA filaments are essential for O157 adherence to epithelial cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that O157 hha deletion mutants showed incr...

  1. Pathogenicity of an Escherichia coli O115:K"V165" mutant negative for F165(1) fimbriae in septicemia of gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Ngeleka, M; Jacques, M; Martineau-Doizé, B; Daigle, F; Harel, J; Fairbrother, J M

    1993-03-01

    To evaluate the role of the F165(1) fimbrial system in the pathogenesis of septicemia, 2-day-old germfree pigs were inoculated intragastrically with Escherichia coli O115:K"V165":F165 wild-type strain 5131, its F165(1)-negative TnphoA mutant M48, or E. coli O115:K(-):F165(-) wild-type strain 862B. Pigs were sacrificed at different times (3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 96 h) postinfection (p.i.). Pigs inoculated with strain 5131 developed clinical signs (anorexia, lameness, reluctance to move, or lack of motor coordination) and were moribund within 48 h p.i., and, at necropsy, infecting bacteria were isolated in various extraintestinal organs. Strain 5131 was isolated as early as 6 h p.i. from the blood of inoculated pigs. Pigs inoculated with mutant M48 developed only mild clinical signs at 96 h p.i. Mutant M48 colonized extraintestinal organs of pigs but to a lesser extent than the parent strain did. In contrast to the parent strain, this mutant was not isolated in the blood of inoculated pigs. Pigs inoculated with strain 862B remained normal during the experiment. All of the strains colonized the mucus layer of the intestine, but no histological changes of intestinal mucosa were observed by either light or electron microscopy. The parent strain, but not the mutant M48, expressed F165(1) in vivo. In a competitive study in which the parent strain and its afimbrial mutant were inoculated simultaneously, clinical signs of septicemia developed 24 h after inoculation, and only the parent strain 5131 was isolated from the blood of inoculated pigs. Our results suggest that the F165(1) fimbrial system of E. coli O115:K"V165" strains may play an important role in the ability of the bacteria to survive in the blood and spread systemically through the porcine host. PMID:8094383

  2. A cryptic fimbrial gene in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed Central

    Moriya, T; Kawabata, S; Mizunoe, Y; Amako, K

    1989-01-01

    The gene coding for the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinating fimbriae in Serratia marcescens US5 was cloned into Escherichia coli K4 with a cosmid vector system. One of the transformants, US5-1, expressed two morphologically distinct fimbriae, one that was 5-nm wide and one that was 3-nm wide. The latter fimbria was morphologically and serologically indistinguishable from that of strain US5. Genetic analysis of transformant US5-1 showed that the gene responsible for the 5-nm-wide fimbriae was located more than 10 kilobases away from the gene responsible for the 3-nm-wide fimbriae. The molecular sizes of the subunits of these two fimbriae, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were 19 kilodaltons for the 3-nm-wide fimbriae and 20 kilodaltons for the 5-nm-wide fimbriae. Serologically, the 5-nm-wide fimbriae did not cross-react with monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies raised against the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinating fimbriae of strain US5. Strain EL101, which expressed only the 5-nm-wide fimbriae, did not agglutinate chicken or human erythrocytes. These experimental results suggest that the gene for the 5-nm-wide fimbriae is cryptic in strain US5 and is expressed in E. coli K4 only after it is moved by transformation. Images PMID:2574174

  3. Inverse relationship between heat stable enterotoxin-b induced fluid accumulation and adherence of F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in ligated jejunal loops of F4ab/ac fimbria receptor-positive swine.

    PubMed

    Erume, Joseph; Wijemanne, Prageeth; Berberov, Emil M; Kachman, Stephen D; Oestmann, Daniel J; Francis, David H; Moxley, Rodney A

    2013-01-25

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) increases bacterial adherence to porcine enterocytes in vitro and enhances small intestinal colonization in swine. Heat-stable enterotoxin-b (STb) is not known to affect colonization; however, through an induction of net fluid accumulation it might reduce bacterial adherence. The relationship between fluid accumulation and bacterial adherence in jejunal loops inoculated with ETEC strains that produce LT, STb, both, or neither toxin was studied. Ligated jejunal loops were constructed in weaned Yorkshire pigs in two independent experiments (Exp. 1, n=5, 8-week-old; Exp. 2, n=6, 6-8-week-old). Each pig was inoculated with six F4ac(+)E. coli strains: (1) LT(+), STb(+) parent (WAM2317); (2) STb(-) (ΔestB) mutant (MUN297); (3) MUN297 complemented with STb (MUN298); (4) LT(-) STb(-) (ΔeltAB ΔestB) mutant (MUN300); (5) MUN300 complemented with LT (MUN301); and (6) 1836-2 (non-enterotoxigenic, wild-type). Pigs were confirmed to be K88 (F4)ab/ac receptor-positive in Exp. 2 by testing for intestinal mucin-type glycoproteins and inferred to be receptor-positive in both Exp. 1 and 2 based on histopathologic evidence of bacterial adherence. Strains that produced STb induced marked fluid accumulation with the response (ml/cm) to WAM2317 and MUN298 significantly greater than that to the other strains (P<0.0001). Conversely, bacterial adherence scores based on immunohistochemistry and CFU/g of washed mucosa were both lowest in the strains that expressed STb and highest in those that did not. For the two experiments combined, the Pearson correlation coefficient (R) between fluid volume (ml/cm) and log CFU per gram was -0.57021 (P<0.0001); R(2)=0.3521 (n=197). These results support the hypothesis that enterotoxin-induced fluid accumulation flushes progeny organisms into the lumen of the bowel, thereby increasing the likelihood of fecal shedding and transmission of the pathogen to new hosts. PMID:22901529

  4. Purification, morphology, and genetics of a new fimbrial putative colonization factor of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O159:H4.

    PubMed Central

    Tacket, C O; Maneval, D R; Levine, M M

    1987-01-01

    The ability to colonize the small intestine is essential for the pathogenesis of diarrhea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). Colonization is mediated by fimbriae (pili), of which there are several antigenically distinct types, including colonization factor antigen I, colonization factor antigen II (CS1, CS2, and CS3), and PCF8775 (CS4, CS5, and CS6). These fimbriae are associated with certain ETEC O serogroups. Serogroup O159 has had no known colonization factor. We found a distinct plasmid-encoded fimbria composed of 19-kilodalton protein subunits associated with ETEC serotype O159:H4. Rabbit antibody against this purified fimbria reacted with a single 19-kilodalton protein band as seen by Western immunoblot of sheared-cell preparations. The rabbit antibody, treated with colloidal-gold-labeled goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulin G, bound specifically to fimbriae when cells were examined with an electron microscope. Of 10 available ETEC O159:H4 strains from Europe, Bangladesh, and Kenya, 6 expressed this type of fimbria; its true prevalence among ETEC strains is unknown. This putative colonization factor of O159:H4 joins other ETEC fimbriae as potentially useful immunogens against human diarrhea. Images PMID:2883122

  5. The major fimbrial subunit of Bordetella pertussis binds to sulfated sugars.

    PubMed Central

    Geuijen, C A; Willems, R J; Mooi, F R

    1996-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis fimbriae are composed of major and minor subunits, and recently it was shown that the minor fimbrial subunit binds to Vla-5, a receptor located on monocytes (W. Hazenbos, C. Geuijen, B. van den Berg, F. Mooi, and R. van Furth, J. Infect. Dis. 171:924-929, 1995). Here we present evidence that the major subunits bind to sulfated sugars, which are ubiquitous in the respiratory tract. Binding was observed to chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate, and dextran sulfate but not to dextran. Removal of the minor subunit from fimbriae did not significantly affect binding to sulfated sugars, indicating that the major subunit alone is sufficient for this binding. Fimbriae were also able to bind HEp-2 cells, which are known to display glycoconjugates on their surface. This binding was not dependent on the presence of the minor subunit. However, binding was dependent on the sulfation state of the glycoconjugates, since inhibition of the sulfation resulted in a significant reduction of fimbria binding. The specificity of fimbria binding was further characterized by using heparan sulfate-derived disaccharides in inhibition assays. Two disaccharides were highly effective inhibitors, and it was observed that both the degree of sulfation and the arrangement of the sulfate groups on the disaccharides were important for binding to fimbriae. B. pertussis bacteria also bound to sulfated sugars and HEp-2 cells, and analysis of B. pertussis mutants indicated that both filamentous hemagglutinin and fimbriae were required for this binding. A host protein present in the extracellular matrix, fibronectin, has binding activities similar to those of B. pertussis fimbriae, binding to both Vla-5 and sulfated sugars. Two regions in the major fimbrial subunit were identified which showed similarity with fibronectin peptides which bind to sulfated sugars. Thus, B. pertussis fimbriae exemplify molecular mimicry and may co-opt host processes by mimicking natural ligand

  6. The Non-Fimbriate Phenotype Is Predominant among Salmonella enterica Serovar Choleraesuis from Swine and Those Non-Fimbriate Strains Possess Distinct Amino Acid Variations in FimH

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-An; Yeh, Kuang-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Although most Salmonella serovars are able to infect a range of animal hosts, some have acquired the ability to cause systemic infections of specific hosts. For example, Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis is primarily associated with systemic infection in swine. Adherence to host epithelial cells is considered a prerequisite for initial infection, and fimbrial appendages on the outer membrane of the bacteria are implicated in this process. Although type 1 fimbriae encoded by the fim gene cluster are commonly found in Salmonella serovars, it is not known whether S. Choleraesuis produces this fimbrial type and if and how fimbriae are involved in pathogenesis. In the present study, we demonstrated that only four out of 120 S. Choleraesuis isolates from pigs with salmonellosis produced type 1 fimbriae as assayed by the yeast agglutination test and electron microscopy. One of the 116 non-type 1 fimbria-producing isolates was transformed with plasmids carrying different fim genes from S. Typhimurium LB5010, a type 1 fimbria-producing strain. Our results indicate that non-type 1 fimbria-producing S. Choleraesuis required only an intact fimH to regain the ability to produce fimbrial appendages. Sequence comparison revealed six amino acid variations between the FimH of the non-type 1 fimbria-producing S. Choleraesuis isolates and those of the type 1 fimbria-producing S. Choleraesuis isolates. S. Choleraesuis that produced type 1 fimbriae contained FimH with an amino acid sequence identical to that of S. Typhimurium LB5010. Site-directed mutagenesis leading to the replacement of the non-conserved residues revealed that a change from glycine to valine at position of 63 (G63V) resulted in a non-type 1 fimbria-producing S. Choleraesuis being able to express type 1 fimbriae on its outer membrane. It is possible that this particular amino acid change prevents this polypeptide from proper interaction with other Fim subunits required for assembly of an intact type 1 fimbrial

  7. New Surface-Associated Heat-Labile Colonization Factor Antigen (CFA/II) Produced by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli of Serogroups O6 and O8

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Dolores G.; Evans, Doyle J.

    1978-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) belonging to serogroups O6 and O8 do not possess the H-10407-type colonization factor antigen (CFA/I). However, these frequently isolated ETEC were found to possess a second and distinct heat-labile surface-associated colonization factor antigen, termed CFA/II. Whereas CFA/I mediates mannose-resistant hemagglutination of human group A erythrocytes, CFA/II does not. CFA/II mediates mannose-resistant hemagglutination of bovine erythrocytes, and mannose-resistant hemagglutination is rapid only at reduced temperature (4°C). Because CFA/II, like CFA/I, is spontaneously lost by many ETEC isolates in the laboratory, it was possible to produce specific anti-CFA/II serum by preparing antiserum against living cells of a prototype strain (PB-176) and adsorbing this serum with living and heat-treated cells of its CFA/II-negative derivative strain PB-176-P. This serum, which neutralized the colonization factor activity of CFA/II-positive strains in infant rabbits, was employed to confirm the presence of CFA/II on ETEC which exhibited mannose-resistant hemagglutination of bovine but not human erythrocytes. CFA/II, like CFA/I, mediates adherence of the bacteria to the mucosal surface of the small intestine, as demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence. CFA/II appears to be an important virulence factor for humans since CFA/II-positive ETEC are frequently isolated from diarrhea cases, particularly travelers' diarrhea, in Mexico; these ETEC were not uncommon in a collection of isolates from Bangladesh. The O6:H16 strain of ETEC responsible for an outbreak of diarrhea in the United States was also shown to be CFA/II positive. CFA/I and CFA/II were never found on the same serotypes of ETEC, but 98% of the heat-stable and heat-labile enterotoxin-producing ETEC belonging to the frequently isolated serogroups O6, O8, O15, O25, O63, and O78 were positive for either CFA/I or CFA/II. Images PMID:80383

  8. The role of cellulose and O-antigen capsule in the colonization of plants by Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous salmonellosis outbreaks have been associated with vegetables, in particular sprouted seeds. Thin aggregative fimbriae (Tafi), a component of the extracellular matrix responsible for multicellular behavior, are important for Salmonella enterica attachment and colonization of plants. Here we ...

  9. 77 FR 52333 - International Workshop on Alternatives to the Murine Histamine Sensitization Test (HIST) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a highly contagious disease caused by the bacterium Bordetella.... pertussis bacteria (e.g., inactivated pertussis toxin , pertactin, and fimbriae) and are less...

  10. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of fused B-subunit of heat labile toxin of Escherichia coli and colonization factor antigen I polyepitopes.

    PubMed

    Savar, Nastaran Sadat; Dashti, Amir; Darzi Eslam, Elham; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali; Jafari, Anis

    2014-11-01

    Linear B-cell epitopes ((93)AKEFEAAAL(101) and (66)PQLTDVLN(73)) of CfaB were genetically fused to ltb-(gly)5-cfaB(1-25). Sera of rabbits immunized with fusion proteins reacted strongly with solid-phase bound ETEC bacteria bearing CFA/I fimbriae. Sera failed to agglutinate or inhibit hemagglutination promoted by CFA/I-positive strain which may be due to solvent inaccessibility of epitope residues on intact fimbriae. PMID:25108290

  11. Pathogenic properties of Edwardsiella species.

    PubMed Central

    Janda, J M; Abbott, S L; Kroske-Bystrom, S; Cheung, W K; Powers, C; Kokka, R P; Tamura, K

    1991-01-01

    The pathogenic characteristics of 35 Edwardsiella strains from clinical and environmental sources were investigated. Overall, most Edwardsiella tarda strains were invasive in HEp-2 cell monolayers, produced a cell-associated hemolysin and siderophores, and bound Congo red; many strains also expressed mannose-resistant hemagglutination against guinea pig erythrocytes. Edwardsiella hoshinae strains bound Congo red and were variable in their invasive and hemolytic capabilities while Edwardsiella ictaluri strains did not produce either factor; neither E. hoshinae nor E. ictaluri expressed mannose-resistant hemagglutination nor elaborated siderophores under the tested conditions. Selected strains of each species tested for mouse lethality indicated strain variability in pathogenic potential, with E. tarda strains being the most virulent; 50% lethal doses in individual strains did not correlate with plasmid content, chemotactic motility, serum resistance, or expression of selected enzyme activities. The results suggest some potential important differences in pathogenic properties that may help explain their environmental distribution and ability to cause disease in humans. Images PMID:1774326

  12. Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis fimbrillin: size, amino-terminal sequence, and antigenic heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J Y; Sojar, H T; Bedi, G S; Genco, R J

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial fimbriae mediate cell adhesion and are important in colonization. Fimbrial proteins from strains of Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis isolated from different individuals were compared for their size, amino-terminal sequence, and antigenic diversity. Two major protein components of the crude fimbrial preparations differed in apparent molecular mass, ranging from 41 to 49 kDa for the fimbrillin monomer and from 61 to 78 kDa for the other major protein. The amino-terminal sequence of the antigenically related group of proteins of the fimbrillin monomer in the 41- to 49-kDa range showed significant homology; however, minor sequence heterogeneity was observed, mainly in residues 4 to 6. One of the observed amino-terminal sequences, AFGVGDDESKVAKLTVMVYNG, resembled the deduced sequence of P. gingivalis 381 (D.P. Dickinson, M. K. Kubiniec, F. Yoshimura, and R.J. Genco, J. Bacteriol. 170:1658-1665, 1988). Fimbriae from all the strains of P. gingivalis showing this sequence contained a fimbrillin monomer of 43 kDa and showed a strong reaction with both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies directed to the fimbriae from P. gingivalis 2561 (381). Fimbriae from strains showing amino-terminal sequence variations in residues 4 to 6 (i.e., substitution of VGD with either E or NAG) were more diverse in their molecular sizes. Most of these variant fimbriae showed weak reactions with the polyclonal antibodies and no reaction with the monoclonal antibodies induced to the fimbriae of strain 2561. No correlation could be established between the molecular size and immunological reactivity of the fimbrillin monomer of P. gingivalis strains. Strains 9-14K-1 and HG 564 not only showed markedly different sequences from the other three amino-terminal sequences but also did not react with either polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies to the fimbriae of strain 2561. Strains W50, W83, and AJW 5 failed to show any immunological reactivity with the antibodies to fimbrillin or fimbriae

  13. Molecular analysis of type 3 fimbrial genes from Escherichia coli, Klebsiella and Citrobacter species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the most common nosocomial infection in the United States and is caused by a range of uropathogens. Biofilm formation by uropathogens that cause CAUTI is often mediated by cell surface structures such as fimbriae. In this study, we characterised the genes encoding type 3 fimbriae from CAUTI strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Citrobacter koseri and Citrobacter freundii. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the type 3 fimbrial genes (mrkABCD) from 39 strains revealed they clustered into five distinct clades (A-E) ranging from one to twenty-three members. The majority of sequences grouped in clade A, which was represented by the mrk gene cluster from the genome sequenced K. pneumoniae MGH78578. The E. coli and K. pneumoniae mrkABCD gene sequences clustered together in two distinct clades, supporting previous evidence for the occurrence of inter-genera lateral gene transfer. All of the strains examined caused type 3 fimbriae mediated agglutination of tannic acid treated human erythrocytes despite sequence variation in the mrkD-encoding adhesin gene. Type 3 fimbriae deletion mutants were constructed in 13 representative strains and were used to demonstrate a direct role for type 3 fimbriae in biofilm formation. Conclusions The expression of functional type 3 fimbriae is common to many Gram-negative pathogens that cause CAUTI and is strongly associated with biofilm growth. Our data provides additional evidence for the spread of type 3 fimbrial genes by lateral gene transfer. Further work is now required to substantiate the clade structure reported here by examining more strains as well as other bacterial genera that make type 3 fimbriae and cause CAUTI. PMID:20576143

  14. The location of surface antigens of Bordetella pertussis by immuno-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, L A; Dowsett, A B; Irons, L I; Robinson, A

    1985-01-01

    Immuno-electron microscopy using colloidal gold-tagged monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) has been used to detect antigens on the surface of Bordetella pertussis cells. McAbs to serotype-specific agglutinogens 2 and 3 labelled fimbriae in a serotype-specific manner. An attempt was made to determine whether individual fimbriae of serotype 1.2.3 cells bear both antigens 2 and 3. In double labelling experiments, individual cells were found to label with McAbs to antigen 2 (3 nm gold) and to antigen 3 (15 nm gold). Many fimbriae labelled with only one of these reagents, but there were instances where both labels could have been attached to the same fimbria. No fimbrial labelling was obtained with McAb to agglutinogen 1. Gold-tagged McAbs to filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA) labelled neither the fimbriae nor the surface of B. pertussis cells. Unfixed cells on electron microscope grids appeared to shed FHA readily. After fixation, a small proportion of cells bore aggregates of FHA which labelled specifically with anti-FHA McAb-gold. Results with one McAb to lymphocytosis promoting factor indicated that this antigen may be more intimately associated with the surface of B. pertussis than is FHA. PMID:2872100

  15. Structure of the fimbrial protein Mfa4 from Porphyromonas gingivalis in its precursor form: implications for a donor-strand complementation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kloppsteck, Patrik; Hall, Michael; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Persson, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are chronic inflammatory diseases that can lead to tooth loss. One of the causes of these diseases is the Gram-negative Porphyromonas gingivalis. This periodontal pathogen is dependent on two fimbriae, FimA and Mfa1, for binding to dental biofilm, salivary proteins, and host cells. These fimbriae are composed of five proteins each, but the fimbriae assembly mechanism and ligands are unknown. Here we reveal the crystal structure of the precursor form of Mfa4, one of the accessory proteins of the Mfa1 fimbria. Mfa4 consists of two β-sandwich domains and the first part of the structure forms two well-defined β-strands that run over both domains. This N-terminal region is cleaved by gingipains, a family of proteolytic enzymes that encompass arginine- and lysine-specific proteases. Cleavage of the N-terminal region generates the mature form of the protein. Our structural data allow us to propose that the new N-terminus of the mature protein may function as a donor strand in the polymerization of P. gingivalis fimbriae. PMID:26972441

  16. Structure of the fimbrial protein Mfa4 from Porphyromonas gingivalis in its precursor form: implications for a donor-strand complementation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kloppsteck, Patrik; Hall, Michael; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Persson, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are chronic inflammatory diseases that can lead to tooth loss. One of the causes of these diseases is the Gram-negative Porphyromonas gingivalis. This periodontal pathogen is dependent on two fimbriae, FimA and Mfa1, for binding to dental biofilm, salivary proteins, and host cells. These fimbriae are composed of five proteins each, but the fimbriae assembly mechanism and ligands are unknown. Here we reveal the crystal structure of the precursor form of Mfa4, one of the accessory proteins of the Mfa1 fimbria. Mfa4 consists of two β-sandwich domains and the first part of the structure forms two well-defined β-strands that run over both domains. This N-terminal region is cleaved by gingipains, a family of proteolytic enzymes that encompass arginine- and lysine-specific proteases. Cleavage of the N-terminal region generates the mature form of the protein. Our structural data allow us to propose that the new N-terminus of the mature protein may function as a donor strand in the polymerization of P. gingivalis fimbriae. PMID:26972441

  17. Mannanoligosaccharide agglutination by Salmonella enterica strains isolated from carrier pigs

    PubMed Central

    Borowsky, Luciane; Corção, Gertrudes; Cardoso, Marisa

    2009-01-01

    Type-1 fimbriae are associated with most Salmonella enterica serovars and are an essential factor for host colonization. Mannanoligosaccharides (MOS), a prebiotic that is agglutinated by type-1 fimbriae, are proposed for the control of enterobacteria colonization and may be an alternative to Salmonella control in pigs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of porcine Salmonella strains to adhere to MOS in vitro. A total of 108 strains of Salmonella sp. isolated from carrier pigs were evaluated for the amplification of fimA and fimH genes, agglutination of MOS and hemagglutination. In all tested strains, amplicons of expected size were detected for both fimA and fimH gene. In the hemagglutination assays, 31 (28.7%) strains presented mannose–sensitive agglutination of erythrocytes, indicating that the strains were expressing type-1 fimbriae. Considering only strains expressing the type-1 fimbriae, 23 (74.2%) presented a strong agglutination of MOS, 3 (9.6%) a weak reaction and 5 (16.2%) none. The results indicate that Salmonella enterica strains expressing type-1 fimbriae can agglutinate effectively in vitro to MOS. PMID:24031388

  18. Purification, and biochemical and structural characterization of a fimbrial haemagglutinin of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, J D; Jacques, M; Graham, L; Lallier, R

    1990-12-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum was shown to possess peritrichous fimbriae. Electron microscopy of strains FMV 84-01 and ATCC 33209T revealed short, flexible fimbriae less than 2 nm in diameter. These surface appendages were isolated from the bacteria by a procedure involving water extraction and urea solubilization. The fimbrin was purified to homogeneity by Fast Pressure Liquid Chromatography, and shown by SDS-PAGE to be a protein of 57 kDa. Isoelectric focusing under non-denaturing conditions indicated a pI of 4.8. The protein had an amino acid composition rich in glycine, Asx (aspartic acid and asparagine), valine and alanine; methionine was absent. Approximately 33% of the amino acid residues were hydrophobic. Immunoblotting using a polyclonal antiserum raised against whole cells showed that the 57 kDa protein was the immunodominant antigen on the cell surface. Immunogold labelling using polyclonal antibodies raised against the fimbrin revealed an alignment of gold particles along the fimbriae. Purified fimbriae caused agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes and antifimbrial serum inhibited this haemagglutination. Altogether the results indicate that the fimbriae on the surface of R. salmoninarum are responsible for the haemagglutinating activity. PMID:1981894

  19. Identification and sequence analysis of lpfABCDE, a putative fimbrial operon of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Bäumler, A J; Heffron, F

    1995-01-01

    A chromosomal region present in Salmonella typhimurium but absent from related species was identified by hybridization. A DNA probe originating from 78 min on the S. typhimurium chromosome hybridized with DNA from Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella heidelberg, and Salmonella dublin but not with DNA from Salmonella typhi, Salmonella arizonae, Escherichia coli, and Shigella serotypes. Cloning and sequence analysis revealed that the corresponding region of the S. typhimurium chromosome encodes a fimbrial operon. Long fimbriae inserted at the poles of the bacterium were observed by electron microscopy when this fimbrial operon was introduced into a nonpiliated E. coli strain. The genes encoding these fimbriae were therefore termed lpfABCDE, for long polar fimbriae. Genetically, the lpf operon was found to be most closely related to the fim operon of S. typhimurium, both in gene order and in conservation of the deduced amino acid sequences. PMID:7721701

  20. Bordetella pertussis infection: pathogenesis, diagnosis, management, and the role of protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Kerr, J R; Matthews, R C

    2000-02-01

    Whooping cough is presently one of the ten most common causes of death from infectious disease worldwide. Despite a high vaccine uptake, resurgences of this disease have been observed in several countries. Virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis include agglutinogens, fimbriae, P.69/pertactin, pertussis toxin, filamentous haemagglutinin, adenylate cyclase, tracheal cytotoxin, dermonecrotic toxin, lipopolysaccharide, tracheal colonisation factor, serum resistance factor, and type III secretion. Virulence factor expression is regulated by the bvgAS locus, a two-component signal transduction system. The pathophysiologic sequence consists of attachment (fimbriae, P.69/pertactin, tracheal colonisation factor, pertussis toxin, filamentous haemagglutinin), evasion of host defence (adenylate cyclase, pertussis toxin, serum resistance factor), local effects (tracheal cytotoxin), and systemic effects (pertussis toxin). Bordetella pertussis is transmitted by respiratory droplets and causes disease only in humans. Various diagnostic methods are available, including culture, serological methods, and the polymerase chain reaction. Serotyping of isolates to detect agglutinogens 2 and 3 is useful because serotype 1,2 may be associated with higher mortality, and antibodies to these antigens (agglutinins) may be protective in both animals and humans. Immunisation using whole-cell vaccine is effective but is reactogenic. Acellular vaccines containing one to five components are being used increasingly in various countries. Protective immunity to pertussis correlates with high levels of antibody to each of pertactin, fimbriae, and pertussis toxin; however, doubt remains as to the relationship between agglutinogen 3 and fimbria 3, making results of trials investigating these virulence factors difficult to interpret. PMID:10746492

  1. Stx1 prophage excision in Escherichia coli strain PA20 confers strong curli and biofilm formation by restoring native mlrA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prophage insertions in Escherichia coli O157:H7 mlrA contribute to the low expression of curli fimbriae and biofilm observed in many clinical isolates. Varying levels of CsgD-dependent curli/biofilm expression are restored to strains bearing prophage insertions in mlrA by mutation of regulatory gene...

  2. ESCHERICHIA COLI O147: AN EMERGING SEROGROUP OF EDEMA DISEASE OUTBREAKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edema disease is a systemic disease of weanling pigs caused by E. coli strains that produce a variant of Shiga toxin, Stx2e. These strains usually produce F18ab fimbriae and heat stable enterotoxin b (STb). Historically, edema disease strains from U.S. outbreaks have not produced heat stable enter...

  3. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the spleens of hens by bacterins that vary in fimbrial protein SefD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene sefD is part of operon sefABCD, and it is required for production of the SEF14 fimbria by Salmonella Enteritidis. We compared strains that varied in SefD content for their ability to reduce recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from the spleens of hens infected by parenteral challenge. The two bac...

  4. RcsB contributes to the distinct stress fitness between Escherichia coli O157:H7 curli variants of 1993 hamburger-associated outbreak strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curli are adhesive fimbriae of Enterobactericaeae and are involved in surface attachment, cell aggregation and biofilm formation. We previously reported that natural curli variants of E. coli O157:H7 (EcO157) displayed distinct acid resistance; however, this difference was not linked to the curli fi...

  5. Draft Genome Sequence and Gene Annotation of the Uropathogenic Bacterium Proteus mirabilis Pr2921

    PubMed Central

    Giorello, F. M.; Romero, V.; Farias, J.; Scavone, P.; Umpiérrez, A.; Zunino, P.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence of Proteus mirabilis Pr2921, a uropathogenic bacterium that can cause severe complicated urinary tract infections. After gene annotation, we identified two additional copies of ucaA, one of the most studied fimbrial protein genes, and other fimbriae related-proteins that are not present in P. mirabilis HI4320. PMID:27340058

  6. Virulence and metabolic characteristics of Salmonella Enteritidis sefD variants in hens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of a few pathogenic Salmonella enterica serotypes that have SEF14 fimbriae encoded by the sef operon, which consists of 4 co-transcribed genes sefABCD that are regulated by sefR. To explore the function of sefD within the infection pathway resulting in egg contamination...

  7. How methylglyoxal kills bacteria: An ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Erika; Serem, June Cheptoo; Oberholzer, Hester Magdalena; Gaspar, Anabella Regina Marques; Bester, Megan Jean

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of honey is due to the presence of methylglyoxal (MGO), H2O2, bee defensin as well as polyphenols. High MGO levels in manuka honey are the main source of antibacterial activity. Manuka honey has been reported to reduce the swarming and swimming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to de-flagellation. Due to the complexity of honey it is unknown if this effect is directly due to MGO. In this ultrastructural investigation the effects of MGO on the morphology of bacteria and specifically the structure of fimbriae and flagella were investigated. MGO effectively inhibited Gram positive (Bacillus subtilis; MIC 0.8 mM and Staphylococcus aureus; MIC 1.2 mM) and Gram negative (P. aeruginosa; MIC 1.0 mM and Escherichia coli; MIC 1.2 mM) bacteria growth. The ultrastructural effects of 0.5, 1.0 and 2 mM MGO on B. substilis and E. coli morphology was then evaluated. At 0.5 mM MGO, bacteria structure was unaltered. For both bacteria at 1 mM MGO fewer fimbriae were present and the flagella were less or absent. Identified structures appeared stunted and fragile. At 2 mM MGO fimbriae and flagella were absent while the bacteria were rounded with shrinkage and loss of membrane integrity. Antibacterial MGO causes alterations in the structure of bacterial fimbriae and flagella which would limit bacteria adherence and motility. PMID:26986806

  8. Natural rpoS mutations contribute to the phenotypic heterogeneity of clonal populations in Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported the distinct acid resistance between the curli-producing (C+) and curli-deficient (C-) variants of E. coli O157:H7, although the curli fimbriae were not associated with this intra-strain phenotypic divergence. Here we investigated the underlying molecular mechanism by examinin...

  9. A conserved fold for fimbrial components revealed by the crystal structure of a putative fimbrial assembly protein (BT1062) from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron at 2.2 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Cai, Xiaohui; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Yeh, Andrew; Zhou, Jiadong; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    BT1062 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is a homolog of Mfa2 (PGN0288 or PG0179), which is a component of the minor fimbriae in Porphyromonas gingivalis. The crystal structure of BT1062 revealed a conserved fold that is widely adopted by fimbrial components. PMID:20944223

  10. Swarming and pathogenicity of Proteus mirabilis in the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Mobley, H L; Belas, R

    1995-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis is best known for its pattern of swarming differentiation on agar plates, as well as for its association with the development of renal stones in patients with urinary tract infection. Urease and flagella appear to contribute most significantly to virulence, with fimbriae playing a more subtle role, whereas hemolysin does not appear to contribute significantly to pathogenesis. PMID:7551643

  11. Virulence determinants of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Mobley, H L; Island, M D; Massad, G

    1994-11-01

    The urinary tract is among the most common sites of bacterial infection and E. coli is by far the most common infecting agent. In patients with urinary catheters in place or structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, Proteus mirabilis is also a frequent isolate. To study virulence of these bacterial species, we have isolated the genes that encode putative virulence factors, constructed specific mutations within these genes, introduced the mutation back into the wild type strain by allelic exchange, and analyzed these mutants for virulence in appropriate in vitro and in vivo models. Specific virulence markers have been identified for strains that cause urinary tract infection. For E. coli, these include P fimbriae, S fimbriae, hemolysin, aerobactin, serum resistance, and a small group of O-serotypes. Redundant virulence factors must be present in these organisms as mutation of the most clearly identified epidemiological marker, P fimbriae, does not result in attenuation of a virulent strain. For P. mirabilis, urease appears to contribute most significantly to virulence. Fimbriae play a significant but more subtle role in colonization. Hemolysin, although potently cytotoxic to renal cells in vitro, does not appear to contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of ascending urinary tract infection. We can conclude that the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection and acute pyelonephritis caused by uropathogenic E. coli and P. mirabilis are multifactorial, as mutation of single genes rarely causes significant attenuation of virulence. PMID:7869662

  12. Growth media and temperature effects on biofilm formation by serotype O157:H7 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilm formation in most Escherichia coli strains is dependent on curli fimbriae and cellulose, and the expression of both varies widely among pathogenic strains. Curli and cellulose expression are often identified by their affinity for Congo red dye (CR). However, media composition and incubation ...

  13. Phenotypic Divergence in Curli Variants of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curli are adhesive fimbriae of many Enterobactericeae and are involved in surface attachment, cell aggregation, and biofilm formation. They also mediate host cell invasion and are potent inducers of the host inflammatory response. Variations in curli expression were reported in enterohemorrhagic E. ...

  14. Interactions of Neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 (RS218) and Its Derivatives Lacking Genomic Islands with Phagocytic Acanthamoeba castellanii and Nonphagocytic Brain Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Farzana Abubakar; Yousuf, Zuhair; Iqbal, Junaid; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Hafsa; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Here we determined the role of various genomic islands in E. coli K1 interactions with phagocytic A. castellanii and nonphagocytic brain microvascular endothelial cells. The findings revealed that the genomic islands deletion mutants of RS218 related to toxins (peptide toxin, α-hemolysin), adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin), protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin), invasins (IbeA, CNF1), metabolism (D-serine catabolism, dihydroxyacetone, glycerol, and glyoxylate metabolism) showed reduced interactions with both A. castellanii and brain microvascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, the deletion of RS218-derived genomic island 21 containing adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin), protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin), invasins (CNF1), metabolism (D-serine catabolism) abolished E. coli K1-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity in a CNF1-independent manner. Therefore, the characterization of these genomic islands should reveal mechanisms of evolutionary gain for E. coli K1 pathogenicity. PMID:24818136

  15. Media composition and incubation temperature affect Congo red dye affinity of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Escherichia coli biofilm formation is dependent on curli fimbriae and cellulose, and the expression of both varies among Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Curli and cellulose expression are often identified by their affinity for Congo red dye (CR) but media composition and incubation...

  16. EVALUATING THE ROLE OF SDIA AND HHA IN ENHANCED ADHERENCE OF A SDIA HHA DOUBLE MUTANT OF ENTEROHEMORRHAGIC ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adherence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 to biotic (epithelial cells) and abiotic surfaces (biofilm formation) proceeds from an initial reversible adherence to an irreversible stage of intimate adherence. While flagella and fimbriae facilitate initial stage of adherence in both...

  17. Conjugative Plasmid Transfer and Adhesion Dynamics in an Escherichia coli Biofilm▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y.; Beatson, Scott A.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    A conjugative plasmid from the catheter-associated urinary tract infection strain Escherichia coli MS2027 was sequenced and annotated. This 42,644-bp plasmid, designated pMAS2027, contains 58 putative genes and is most closely related to plasmids belonging to incompatibility group X (IncX1). Plasmid pMAS2027 encodes two important virulence factors: type 3 fimbriae and a type IV secretion (T4S) system. Type 3 fimbriae, recently found to be functionally expressed in E. coli, played an important role in biofilm formation. Biofilm formation by E. coli MS2027 was specifically due to expression of type 3 fimbriae and not the T4S system. The T4S system, however, accounted for the conjugative ability of pMAS2027 and enabled a non-biofilm-forming strain to grow as part of a mixed biofilm following acquisition of this plasmid. Thus, the importance of conjugation as a mechanism to spread biofilm determinants was demonstrated. Conjugation may represent an important mechanism by which type 3 fimbria genes are transferred among the Enterobacteriaceae that cause device-related infections in nosocomial settings. PMID:19717626

  18. Characterization of an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain from Africa Expressing a Putative Colonization Factor

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Sami B.; Cassels, Frederick J.; Shaheen, Hind I.; Pannell, Lewis K.; El-Ghorab, Nemat; Kamal, Karim; Mansour, Moustafa; Savarino, Stephen J.; Peruski, Leonard F.

    1999-01-01

    An enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain of serotype O114:H− that expressed both heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins and tested negative for colonization factors (CF) was isolated from a child with diarrhea in Egypt. This strain, WS0115A, induced hemagglutination of bovine erythrocytes and adhered to the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2, suggesting that it may elaborate novel fimbriae. Surface-expressed antigen purified by differential ammonium sulfate precipitation and column chromatography yielded a single protein band with Mr 14,800 when resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (16% polyacrylamide). A monoclonal antibody against this putative fimbrial antigen was generated and reacted with strain WS0115A and also with CS1-, CS17-, and CS19-positive strains in a dot blot assay. Reactivity was temperature dependent, with cells displaying reactivity when grown at 37°C but not when grown at 22°C. Immunoblot analysis of a fimbrial preparation from strain WS0115A showed that the monoclonal antibody reacted with a single protein band. Electron microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy revealed fimbria-like structures on the surface of strain WS0115A. These structures were rigid and measured 6.8 to 7.4 nm in diameter. Electrospray mass-spectrometric analysis showed that the mass of the purified fimbria was 14,965 Da. The N-terminal sequence of the fimbria established that it was a member of the CFA/I family, with sequence identity to the amino terminus of CS19, a new CF recently identified in India. Cumulatively, our results suggest that this fimbria is CS19. Screening of a collection of ETEC strains isolated from children with diarrhea in Egypt found that 4.2% of strains originally reported as CF negative were positive for this CF, suggesting that it is biologically relevant in the pathogenesis of ETEC. PMID:10417169

  19. P-fimbriated clones among uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed Central

    Väisänen-Rhen, V; Elo, J; Väisänen, E; Siitonen, A; Orskov, I; Orskov, F; Svenson, S B; Mäkelä, P H; Korhonen, T K

    1984-01-01

    A total of 237 Escherichia coli strains isolated from the urine of patients with various forms of urinary tract infection or from feces of healthy children were analyzed for O group, possession of K1 capsule, type 1 fimbriae, P fimbriae, X adhesin, and production of hemolysin. Some of the strains were also analyzed for K and H antigens, outer membrane protein pattern, and plasmid content. P fimbriation, hemolysin production, and certain O groups were found to be significantly correlated with pyelonephritogenicity. Possession of type 1 fimbriae or of K1 capsule or plasmid content did not significantly correlate with virulence. Outer membrane protein patterns in 139 strains of the more common O groups were analyzed. Only one to three patterns, which varied between serotypes, were usually found within any one O group. Distinctive groups (clones) were found when the strains were grouped according to complete serotype, fimbriation, hemolysin production, and outer membrane protein pattern; also, the mean number of plasmids was typical of the strains in a given clone. Seven clones associated with pyelonephritis were found; together they accounted for 57% of the O serotypable strains from the pyelonephritis patients. The seven clones were P fimbriated but differed in their serotypes as follows: O1:K1:H7, O4:K12:H1, O4:K12:H5, O6:K2:H1, O16:K1:H6, or O18ac:K5:H7. All O1:K1:H7 strains observed fell into two clones according to the presence or absence of type 1 fimbriae and hemolysin production. One clone associated with cystitis was also found; this consisted of O6:K13:H1 strains lacking P fimbriae. Not a single representative of these eight clones was found among the fecal strains from the healthy children. They are proposed to represent virulent clones with special ability to cause human urinary tract infection. Images PMID:6140222

  20. A novel multifunctional metabolic pathway in a marine mollusc leads to unprecedented prostaglandin derivatives (prostaglandin 1,15-lactones).

    PubMed Central

    Di Marzo, V; Cimino, G; Crispino, A; Minardi, C; Sodano, G; Spinella, A

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of high levels of prostaglandin (PG) 1,15-lactones of both the E and F series and their co-existence with PGs has been recently described in the opisthobranch mollusc Tethys fimbria. The present study was undertaken in order to investigate the biosynthesis of these novel natural PG derivatives in vivo using radiolabelled precursors, and to gain a preliminary understanding of their biological role. PGE2 1,15-lactone was shown to be produced from both PGE2 and PGF2 alpha in the mollusc mantle and appeared to be quickly transferred to the mollusc dorsal appendices (cerata). The detachment of the latter during the typical defence behaviour of T. fimbria was accompanied by the conversion of PGE2 and PGE3 1,15-lactones back to the corresponding PGs. Both PGE2 and PGE2 1,15-lactone were also shown to be biosynthesized from arachidonic acid. Lactones of the F series were present as 11-acetyl derivatives in T. fimbria mantle and as 9- and 11-fatty acyl esters in the mollusc egg-mass and reproductive gland, and their biosynthesis from PGF2 alpha was demonstrated in all of these tissues. A multiple biological role of PG 1,15-lactones in T. fimbria defensive behaviour, smooth muscle contraction and egg production/fertilization control is hypothesized. The high amounts of PG derivatives found in T. fimbria and the biosynthetic studies described herein indicate that this marine mollusc may be a useful model for future studies on PG biosynthesis. PMID:1899996

  1. Investigation of engineered bacterial adhesins for opportunity to interface cells with abiotic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Jessica L.; Dong, Hong; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Small, Meagan C.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    The convenience of cellular genetic engineering has afforded the power to build `smart' synthetic biological tools with novel applications. Here, we have explored opportunities to hybridize engineered cells with inorganic materials toward the development of 'living' device-compatible systems. Cellular structural biology is engineerable based on the ability to rewrite genetic code to generate recombinant, foreign, or even unnatural proteins. With this capability on the biological end, it should be possible to achieve superior abio-compatibility with the inorganic materials that compose current microfabricated technology. This work investigated the hair-like appendages of Escherichia coli known as Type 1 fimbriae that enable natural adhesion to glycosylated substrates. Sequence alterations within the fimbrial gene cluster were found to be well-tolerated, evidenced by tagging the fimbriae with peptide-based probes. As a further development, fimbriae tips could be reconfigured to, in turn, alter cell binding. In particular, the fimbriae were fused with a genetically optimized peptide-for-inorganics to enable metal binding. This work established methodologies to systematically survey cell adhesion properties across a suite of fimbriae-modified cell types as well as to direct patterned cell adhesion. Cell types were further customized for added complexity including turning on secondary gene expression and binding to gold surfaces. The former demonstrates potential for programmable gene switches and the latter for interfacing biology with inorganic materials. In general, the incorporation of 'programmed' cells into devices can be used to provide the feature of dynamic and automated cell response. The outcomes of this study are foundational toward the critical feature of deliberate positioning of cells as configurable biocomponentry. Overall, cellular integration into bioMEMs will yield advanced sensing and actuation.

  2. Location of the three major agglutinogens of Bordetella pertussis by immuno-electronmicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Preston, N W; Zorgani, A A; Carter, E J

    1990-05-01

    When the three serotypes of Bordetella pertussis (types 1,2,3; 1,2 and 1,3) were labelled with agglutinins and protein-A gold, agglutinogen 1 was found on fimbriae and on the cell surface of types 1,2,3 and 1,2 but on the cell surface only of non-fimbriate type 1,3 organisms. In contrast, agglutinogen 2 was located on fimbriae only. Agglutinogen 3 was not labelled. When protein-A gold was replaced by immunoglobulin-G gold, agglutinogen 3 was found on the cell surface only, even of fimbriate bacteria of type 1,2,3. The implications of these findings for acellular vaccines are discussed. PMID:1971311

  3. Purification and characterisation of a fimbrial haemagglutinin from Bordetella pertussis for use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Askelöf, P; Granström, M; Gillenius, P; Lindberg, A A

    1982-02-01

    The fimbrial haemagglutinin (F-HA) of Bordetella pertussis grown on solid medium was extracted with 1M sodium acetate for 72 h at 20 degree C, and partially purified by Sephacryl S-300 gel chromatography. A pooled fraction with fimbrial haemmagglutinating activity was shown to contain fimbriae haemagglutinating activity was shown to contain fimbriae of the expected morphology by electron microscopy. Chemical and biological assays showed that the F-HA fraction contained some heat-labile agglutinogen and lipopolysaccharide but no measureable lymphocytosis-promoting factor or heat-labile toxin. The F-HA fraction used as antigen in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) permitted the detection of antibodies in convalescent serum from a patient with whooping cough. The impurities, heat-labile agglutinogens and lipopolysaccharide, did not contribute to the ELISA activity. The method for preparation of the F-HA antigen is simple, reproducible and gives a high yield. PMID:6292428

  4. The Fimbrial Protein is a Virulence Factor and Potential Vaccine Antigen of Avibacterium paragallinarum.

    PubMed

    Liu, C-C; Ou, S-C; Tan, D-H; Hsieh, M-K; Shien, J-H; Chang, P-C

    2016-09-01

    Fimbriae are recognized as virulence factors and potential vaccine antigens of several pathogenic bacteria, but the function of the fimbriae from Avibacterium paragallinarum is not well known. In this study, a gene encoding the fimbrial protein FlfA was identified in A. paragallinarum . Sequencing analysis of the putative promoter region of flfA suggests that flfA expression in A. paragallinarum might be controlled by phase variation. The flfA gene from A. paragallinarum was expressed as a recombinant protein (r-FlfA) in Escherichia coli . Immunization with r-FlfA conferred chickens protection against challenge infection with A. paragallinarum . Virulence assays showed that the flfA-deficient mutants of A. paragallinarum were less virulent than their parental wild-type strains. These results indicated that the fimbrial protein FlfA is a virulence factor and potential vaccine antigen from A. paragallinarum . PMID:27610725

  5. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of pre- and postpolymerization states in the F4 fimbrial subunit FaeG.

    PubMed

    Van Molle, Inge; Moonens, Kristof; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Buts, Lieven; De Kerpel, Maia; Wyns, Lode; Bouckaert, Julie; De Greve, Henri

    2009-12-18

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli expressing F4 fimbriae are the major cause of porcine colibacillosis and are responsible for significant death and morbidity in neonatal and postweaned piglets. Via the chaperone-usher pathway, F4 fimbriae are assembled into thin, flexible polymers mainly composed of the single-domain adhesin FaeG. The F4 fimbrial system has been labeled eccentric because the F4 pilins show some features distinct from the features of pilins of other chaperone-usher-assembled structures. In particular, FaeG is much larger than other pilins (27 versus approximately 17 kDa), grafting an additional carbohydrate binding domain on the common immunoglobulin-like core. Structural data of FaeG during different stages of the F4 fimbrial biogenesis process, combined with differential scanning calorimetry measurements, confirm the general principles of the donor strand complementation/exchange mechanisms taking place during pilus biogenesis via the chaperone-usher pathway. PMID:19799915

  6. [Study on virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and phylogenetic groupings in Escherichia coli strains isolated from patients with cystitis].

    PubMed

    Tiba, Monique Ribeiro; Nogueira, Gustavo Prado; Leite, Domingos da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli samples isolated from female patients with cystitis were characterized with regard to the presence of virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and phylogenetic groupings. Polymerase chain reaction results demonstrated that all the samples were positive for the gene fimH (type 1 fimbriae), 91 for fliC (flagellins), 50 for papC (P fimbriae), 44 for kpsMTII (capsules) and 36 for flu (antigen 43). The results from assays to quantify the biofilm formation demonstrated that 44 samples produced biofilm on polystyrene microplates and 56 samples produced weak or no biofilm. We also confirmed that Escherichia coli samples were present in phylogenetic groups B2 and D. PMID:19287937

  7. Characterization of FimH adhesins expressed by Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum biovars Gallinarum and Pullorum: reconstitution of mannose-binding properties by single amino acid substitution.

    PubMed

    Kisiela, Dagmara; Sapeta, Anna; Kuczkowski, Maciej; Stefaniak, Tadeusz; Wieliczko, Alina; Ugorski, Maciej

    2005-09-01

    Recombinant FimH adhesins of type 1 fimbriae from Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum biovars Gallinarum and Pullorum, in contrast to those of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, did not bind to high-mannose oligosaccharides or to human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells. However, mutated FimH proteins from biovar Gallinarum and biovar Pullorum, in which the isoleucine at position 78 was replaced by the threonine found in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, bound well to glycoproteins carrying high-mannose oligosaccharides and colon carcinoma cells. The loss of sugar-binding properties by biovar Gallinarum and biovar Pullorum FimH adhesins, which are a part of the type 1 fimbriae, is most probably the result of a single T78I mutation, as was proven by site-directed mutagenesis of FimH proteins. PMID:16113346

  8. Extended virulence genotypes and phylogenetic background of Escherichia coli isolates from patients with cystitis, pyelonephritis, or prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James R; Kuskowski, Michael A; Gajewski, Abby; Soto, Sara; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Jimenez de Anta, M Teresa; Vila, Jordi

    2005-01-01

    Molecular analysis of 63 Escherichia coli urine isolates showed that pyelonephritis (n=23) and prostatitis (n=17) isolates exhibited more virulence factors (VFs) among the 35 sought than did cystitis isolates (n=23). Several nontraditional VFs--including bmaE (M fimbriae), gafD (G fimbriae), fyuA (yersiniabactin receptor), ireA and iroN (novel siderophore receptors), cvaC (colicin [microcin] V), traT (serum-resistance associated), ibeA (invasion of brain endothelium), ompT (outer membrane protease T), and malX (pathogenicity island marker)--either differentiated significantly between syndromes (despite small numbers of isolates and possible multiple-comparison artifacts) or were broadly prevalent. Thus, interventions that target conserved uro-VFs may be possible, despite the likely existence of syndrome-specific pathogenetic mechanisms and/or host defense systems. PMID:15593002

  9. The GafD protein of the G (F17) fimbrial complex confers adhesiveness of Escherichia coli to laminin.

    PubMed Central

    Saarela, S; Westerlund-Wikström, B; Rhen, M; Korhonen, T K

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli IHE11088(pRR-5) expressing the G (F17) fimbria adhered to immobilized laminin as well as to reconstituted basement membranes. No adhesion was seen with the plasmidless strain IHE11088 or with the deletion derivative IHE11088(pHUB110), which expresses the G-fimbrial filament with a defective GafD lectin and lacks N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific binding. Adhesion of IHE11088(pRR-5) to laminin and to reconstituted basement membranes was specifically inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and adhesion was abolished after N-glycosidase F treatment of laminin. The results show that the GafD lectin binds to laminin carbohydrate and suggest a novel function for the F17 fimbria in binding to mammalian basement membranes. PMID:8698525

  10. Enhanced phagocytosis of group A streptococci M type 6 by oleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Speert, D.P.; Quie, P.G.; Wannamaker, L.W.

    1981-04-01

    M protein, located on the surface fimbriae of group A streptococci, is antiphagocytic by unknown means. It is known that oleic acid kills group A streptococci and distorts the fimbriae. The effect of oleic acid on phagocytosis of group A streptococci was examined. Phagocytosis of a strain possessing M protein (M+) and its M- variant was assessed by uptake of radiolabeled bacteria and by chemiluminescence. The M- but not the M+ streptococci were well phagocytized and induced chemiluminescence. Oleic acid-killed and heat-killed streptococci (both M+ and M-) were readily phagocytized and induced sustained chemiluminescence. M+ streptococci killed by ultraviolet irradiation were inefficiently phagocytized and did not induce chemiluminescence. Oleic acid-killed M+ streptococci absorbed type-specific antibody. An extract of M protein reduced the bactericidal capacity of oleic acid. It is proposed that oleic acid may bind to and alter the M protein of group A streptococci and thereby enhance phagocytosis.

  11. Generation of Salmonella ghost cells expressing fimbrial antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and evaluation of their antigenicity in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan Song; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium ghost cells expressing K88ab, K88ac, K99, and FasA fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in their envelopes were constructed. The genes encoding the fimbriae were individually cloned into an expression plasmid, pMMP81, carrying the asd gene, which was subsequently electroporated into the Δasd S. Typhimurium mutant. Plasmid pJHLP99, carrying the phiX174 lysis gene E, was also subsequently electroporated into the Salmonella mutant. The presence of the individual fimbriae on the ghost cells was examined by Western blot analysis. Forty BALB/c mice were equally divided into 2 groups of 20 mice each. Group A mice were intramuscularly vaccinated with a mixture of the 4 ghost cells expressing the individual fimbriae. The group B mice were inoculated with sterile phosphate-buffered saline as a control. The antigen-specific serum IgG concentrations were significantly higher in group A than in group B from week 2 until week 6 after inoculation. In addition, the antigen-specific IgA concentrations in fecal samples were significantly higher in group A than in group B at week 2 after inoculation. A large difference between the groups in the number of antigen-specific IgA-secreting cells in the small intestine was observed by immunohistochemical study. Also, the splenic lymphocyte proliferative responses were significantly greater in group A than in the control mice. These results suggest that vaccination with our Salmonella ghost cells can induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and that the increased number of antigen-specific IgA-secreting cells in the small intestine may be correlated with the elevated fecal IgA immune response. PMID:26733731

  12. Quantitative differences in adhesiveness of type 1 fimbriated Escherichia coli due to structural differences in fimH genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sokurenko, E V; Courtney, H S; Maslow, J; Siitonen, A; Hasty, D L

    1995-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae are heteropolymeric surface organelles responsible for the D-mannose-sensitive (MS) adhesion of Escherichia coli. We recently reported that variation of receptor specificity of type 1 fimbriae can result solely from minor alterations in the structure of the gene for the FimH adhesin subunit. To further study the relationship between allelic variation of the fimH gene and adhesive properties of type 1 fimbriae, the fimH genes from five additional strains were cloned and used to complement the FimH deletion in E. coli KB18. When the parental and recombinant strains were tested for adhesion to immobilized mannan, a wide quantitative range in the ability of bacteria to adhere was noted. The differences in adhesion do not appear to be due to differences in the levels of fimbriation or relative levels of incorporation of FimH, because these parameters were similar in low-adhesion and high-adhesion strains. The nucleotide sequence for each of the fimH genes was determined. Analysis of deduced FimH sequences allowed identification of two sequence homology groups, based on the presence of Asn-70 and Ser-78 or Ser-70 and Asn-78 residues. The consensus sequences for each group conferred very low adhesion activity, and this low-adhesion phenotype predominated among a group of 43 fecal isolates. Strains isolated from a different host niche, the urinary tract, expressed type 1 fimbriae that conferred an increased level of adhesion. The results presented here strongly suggest that the quantitative variations in MS adhesion are due primarily to structural differences in the FimH adhesin. The observed differences in MS adhesion among populations of E. coli isolated from different host niches call attention to the possibility that phenotypic variants of FimH may play a functional role in populations dynamics. PMID:7601831

  13. Escherichia coli K5 capsule expression enhances colonization of the large intestine in the gnotobiotic rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hérias, M V; Midtvedt, T; Hanson, L A; Wold, A E

    1997-01-01

    The role of capsule expression in the capacity of Escherichia coli to colonize in the large intestinal environment was studied in a gnotobiotic rat model. The rats were given perorally a mixture of two mutant strains differing in K5 expression. After 2 weeks, the rats were sacrificed, and subsequently intestinal contents, intestinal mucosae, and mesenteric lymph nodes were homogenized and bacterial numbers were quantified. Two E. coli mutant pairs were used, the first pair (972-998) lacking the O-specific side chain and the second pair (973-997) carrying the O75 lipopolysaccharide. The K5+ mutants established themselves at a higher level than the K5- mutants (10(9) versus 10(6) CFU/g [P < 0.001] for the first pair and 10(9) versus 10(8) CFU/g [P < 0.01] for the second pair, respectively). The results were confirmed by serology showing a K5+ phenotype for practically all isolates. The bacterial population associated with the mucosa was similar to that in the luminal contents with respect to the proportions of the respective mutants, and translocation occurred in numbers proportional to the intestinal population densities of the respective mutants. All mutants were able to express type 1 as well as P fimbriae. After colonization, the expression of P fimbriae remained high whereas only a minority of the isolates expressed type 1 fimbriae. The results suggest that capsule expression and P fimbriae enhance intestinal colonization by E. coli and that these virulence factors, by increasing bacterial densities in the intestine, secondarily increase translocation. PMID:9009309

  14. In Vivo Consumption of Cranberry Exerts ex Vivo Antiadhesive Activity against FimH-Dominated Uropathogenic Escherichia coli: A Combined in Vivo, ex Vivo, and in Vitro Study of an Extract from Vaccinium macrocarpon.

    PubMed

    Rafsanjany, Nasli; Senker, Jandirk; Brandt, Simone; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hensel, Andreas

    2015-10-14

    For investigation of the molecular interaction of cranberry extract with adhesins of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), urine from four volunteers consuming standardized cranberry extract (proanthocyanidin content = 1.24%) was analyzed within ex vivo experiments, indicating time-dependent significant inhibition of 40-50% of bacterial adhesion of UPEC strain NU14 to human T24 bladder cells. Under in vitro conditions a dose-dependent increase in bacterial adhesion was observed with proanthocyanidin-enriched cranberry Vaccinium macrocarpon extract (proanthocyanidin content = 21%). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy proved that V.m. extract led to the formation of bacterial clusters on the outer plasma membrane of the host cells without subsequent internalization. This agglomerating activity was not observed when a PAC-depleted extract (V.m. extract(≠PAC)) was used, which showed significant inhibition of bacterial adhesion in cases where type 1 fimbriae dominated and mannose-sensitive UPEC strain NU14 was used. V.m. extract(≠PAC) had no inhibitory activity against P- and F1C-fimbriae dominated strain 2980. Quantitative gene expression analysis indicated that PAC-containing as well as PAC-depleted cranberry extracts increased the fimH expression in NU14 as part of a feedback mechanism after blocking FimH. For strain 2980 the PAC-containing extract led to up-regulation of P- and F1C-fimbriae, whereas the PAC-depleted extract had no influence on gene expression. V.m. and V.m. extract(≠PAC) did not influence biofilm and curli formation in UPEC strains NU14 and 2980. These data lead to the conclusion that also proanthocyanidin-free cranberry extracts exert antiadhesive activity by interaction with mannose-sensitive type 1 fimbriae of UPEC. PMID:26330108

  15. Lectin-dependent attachment of Actinomyces naeslundii to receptors on epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, M J; Cisar, J O; Vatter, A E; Sandberg, A L

    1984-01-01

    The adherence of Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 to monolayer cultures of human epithelial cell lines was mediated by the lactose-sensitive fimbriae (type 2) of strain WVU45. The attachment of Actinomyces viscosus T14V, which has both types 1 and 2 fimbriae, was approximately half that of A. naeslundii, and only minimal attachment of A. naeslundii and A. viscosus mutants lacking type 2 fimbriae was detected. The adherence of strain WVU45 was enhanced two- to threefold by neuraminidase treatment of the epithelial cells. The Fab fragments of antibodies which recognize the type 2 fimbriae inhibited the adherence of A. naeslundii WVU45 to the epithelial cells. The bacterial interaction with epithelial cells was inhibited by lactose, methyl-beta-D-galactoside, and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, but not by methyl-alpha-D-galactoside, cellobiose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, L-fucose, or D-mannose. To further characterize the epithelial cell receptors for the bacterial lectin, we utilized several plant and invertebrate lectins as potential inhibitors of bacterial adherence. Lectins from Bauhinia purpurea and Arachis hypogaea which recognize N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, D-galactose, and D-galactose-beta-(1----3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine inhibited bacterial attachment, and binding of these lectins to epithelial cells was enhanced by the addition of neuraminidase. Lectins reacting with alpha-linked D-galactose, alpha-linked N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, D-mannose, or sialic acid were not inhibitory. Under similar assay conditions, adherence of a mannose-sensitive strain of Escherichia coli was inhibited by concanavalin A but not by the lectin from Bauhinia purpurea. These results indicate that certain plant lectins have specificities similar to that of the actinomyces fimbrial lectin and are, therefore, useful probes for identifying receptors on epithelial cells for certain bacteria. Images PMID:6150008

  16. Identification of a cross-reactive continuous B-cell epitope in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I.

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, A; Svennerholm, A M

    1996-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) colonizes the intestine by means of several antigenically distinct colonization factors (CFs). Several of these CFs have very significant amino acid sequence similarity or identity, particularly in the N-terminal end. We have previously shown that a monoclonal antibody (MAb) raised against the subunits of colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae, which reacts with a peptide corresponding to the 25 N-terminal amino acids of such subunits, can inhibit attachment to intestinal cells of ETEC expressing heterologous as well as homologous CFs, with related amino acid sequences. In this study we have, by means of Pepscan analysis, determined the sequence of the MAb-specific linear epitope to be 15IDLLQ19. Parenteral immunization of rabbits with an N-terminal 25-mer synthetic peptide of CFA/I fimbrial subunit, either covalently coupled to bovine serum albumin or uncoupled, induced high titers of specific antibodies against this peptide as well as against CFA/I fimbriae. Increased titers against several heterologous CF fimbriae with a related N-terminal sequence were also induced, whereas no increase was seen against fimbriae with an unrelated sequence. Neither antisera against the coupled peptide nor antisera against the uncoupled peptide inhibited binding of CF-expressing bacteria to the human intestinal cell line Caco-2 in spite of high titers. The difference in the inhibitory capabilities of the antipeptide sera and the MAb might be due to slightly different epitope specificities. Thus, whereas the antipeptide sera bound to several continuous epitopes in the N-terminal end, none of them reacted specifically with the epitope 15IDLLQ19. PMID:8890199

  17. Selection and phenotypic characterization of nonhemagglutinating mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Chandad, F; Mayrand, D; Grenier, D; Hinode, D; Mouton, C

    1996-01-01

    To further investigate the relationship between fimbriae and the hemagglutinating adhesin HA-Ag2 of Porphyromonas gingivalis, three spontaneous mutants of the type strain ATCC 33277 were selected by a hemadsorption procedure. They were characterized for hemagglutination, trypsin-like and lectin-binding activities, and hydrophobicity and for the presence of fimbriae. The presence of the 42-kDa (the fimbrilin subunit) and the 43- and 49-kDa (the HA-Ag2 components) polypeptides was investigated by immunoblotting using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies directed to fimbriae and to the hemagglutinating adhesin HA-Ag2. Cells from two of the three mutants (M1 and M2) exhibited no or little hemagglutination activity and very low trypsin-like activity and did not show the 43- and 49-kDa polypeptides. Abnormal fimbriation in M1 was deduced from the following observations of cells grown for 18 h: absence of the 42-kDa polypeptide and of a 14-kDa polypeptide and no fimbriae visible on electron micrographs. While the cells of mutant M2, irrespective of the age of the culture, were found to lack the 43- and 49-kDa polypeptides and hemagglutination activity, the supernatants of cultures grown for 72 h had high hemagglutination and trypsin-like activities and revealed the presence of the 42-, 43-, and 49-kDa polypeptides. This suggests that M2 may be missing some molecules which anchor the components to the cell surface. Mutant M3 showed levels of activities similar to those of the parental strain but lacked the 43-kDa polypeptide. Other pleiotropic effects observed for the mutants included loss of dark pigmentation and lower hydrophobicity. The data from this study fuel an emerging consensus whereby fimbriation, hemagglutination, and proteolytic activities, as well as other functions in P. gingivalis, are intricate. PMID:8641806

  18. Filamentous hemagglutinin has a major role in mediating adherence of Bordetella pertussis to human WiDr cells.

    PubMed Central

    Urisu, A; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1986-01-01

    [35S]methionine-labeled Bordetella pertussis adhered to monolayers of WiDr cells, an epitheliumlike cell line from a human intestinal carcinoma. Adherence was proportional to the density of the WiDr cells and to the concentration of B. pertussis in the assay. Adherence of virulent phase I strains Tohama phase I, 114, and BP338 was much greater than adherence of avirulent strains Tohama phase III and 423 phase IV. Mutants deficient in the production of the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) were hemagglutination negative and adhered to WiDr cells much less efficiently than the parent strains. Preincubation of B. pertussis cells with FHA increased their hemagglutination activity and adherence to WiDr cells. Goat antibody to FHA inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the adherence of strain Tohama I but not the adherence of FHA-deficient mutant Tohama 325. At similar protein concentrations, normal goat antibody, goat antibody to pertussis toxin, or the Fab fragments of goat antibody to serotype 2 fimbriae had no effect on adherence. Also, an FHA-positive strain without fimbriae showed high adherence, while a fimbriated FHA-deficient mutant adhered poorly. Our data indicate that FHA plays a major role in adherence of B. pertussis to human WiDr cells. Fimbriae do not appear to mediate attachment of B. pertussis to WiDr cells. PMID:2872165

  19. A High-resolution Typing Assay for Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Based on Fimbrial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yi; Palusiak, Agata; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiao; Wei, Huiting; Kong, Qingke; Rozalski, Antoni; Yao, Zhi; Wang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections in humans, causing cystitis, pyelonephritis, and renal failure. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the leading cause of UTIs. Accurate and rapid discrimination of UPEC lineages is useful for epidemiological surveillance. Fimbriae are necessary for the adherence of UPEC strains to host uroepithelia, and seem to be abundant and diverse in UPEC strains. By analyzing all the possible fimbrial operons in UPEC strains, we found that closely related strains had similar types of chaperone-usher fimbriae, and the diversity of fimbrial genes was higher than that of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) genes. A typing assay based on the polymorphism of four gene sequences (three fimbrial genes and one housekeeping gene) and the diversity of fimbriae present was developed. By comparison with the MLST, whole-genome sequence (WGS) and fumC/fimH typing methods, this was shown to be accurate and have high resolution, and it was also relatively inexpensive and easy to perform. The assay can supply more discriminatory information for UPEC lineages, and have the potential to be applied in epidemiological surveillance of UPEC isolates. PMID:27199951

  20. N. elongata produces type IV pili that mediate interspecies gene transfer with N. gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Dustin L; Biais, Nicolas; Weyand, Nathan J; Agellon, Al; Sisko, Jennifer L; Brown, Lewis M; So, Magdalene

    2011-01-01

    The genus Neisseria contains at least eight commensal and two pathogenic species. According to the Neisseria phylogenetic tree, commensals are basal to the pathogens. N. elongata, which is at the opposite end of the tree from N. gonorrhoeae, has been observed to be fimbriated, and these fimbriae are correlated with genetic competence in this organism. We tested the hypothesis that the fimbriae of N. elongata are Type IV pili (Tfp), and that Tfp functions in genetic competence. We provide evidence that the N. elongata fimbriae are indeed Tfp. Tfp, as well as the DNA Uptake Sequence (DUS), greatly enhance N. elongata DNA transformation. Tfp allows N. elongata to make intimate contact with N. gonorrhoeae and to mediate the transfer of antibiotic resistance markers between these two species. We conclude that Tfp functional for genetic competence is a trait of a commensal member of the Neisseria genus. Our findings provide a mechanism for the horizontal gene transfer that has been observed among Neisseria species. PMID:21731720

  1. Determination of adhesin gene sequences in, and biofilm formation by, O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from different sources.

    PubMed

    Biscola, Franciele Tafarello; Abe, Cecilia Mari; Guth, Beatriz Ernestina Cabilio

    2011-04-01

    Biofilm formation by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) has been associated with the expression of different adhesins (type 1 fimbria, curli, Ag43, Cah, and EhaA). In this study, biofilm formation and the presence of adhesin-related gene sequences were determined by PCR in 18 O157 strains and 33 non-O157 strains isolated from different sources (human, animal, food, and water). The expression of different adhesins was also assessed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), Congo red agar plates, and mannose-sensitive hemagglutination (MSHA) assay. Biofilm formation occurred in 5/18 (28%) O157 STEC strains and 17/33 (51%) non-O157 STEC strains from different serotypes and sources, when the assays were performed at 28°C for 48 h. Among the non-O157 biofilm-producing isolates, 12/17 (71%) expressed type 1 fimbriae and 11/17 (65%) expressed curli and produced cellulose, while 8/17 (47%) were considered to be Ag43(+) by RT-PCR. Among O157 strains, a close correlation was observed between biofilm formation and expression of curli and cellulose. In non-O157 strains, it seems that, in addition to the presence of curli, the ability to form biofilm is associated with the presence of other factors such as type 1 fimbriae and autotransporter proteins, which may contribute to the persistence of these organisms in the environment. PMID:21317257

  2. A High-resolution Typing Assay for Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Based on Fimbrial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yi; Palusiak, Agata; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiao; Wei, Huiting; Kong, Qingke; Rozalski, Antoni; Yao, Zhi; Wang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections in humans, causing cystitis, pyelonephritis, and renal failure. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the leading cause of UTIs. Accurate and rapid discrimination of UPEC lineages is useful for epidemiological surveillance. Fimbriae are necessary for the adherence of UPEC strains to host uroepithelia, and seem to be abundant and diverse in UPEC strains. By analyzing all the possible fimbrial operons in UPEC strains, we found that closely related strains had similar types of chaperone-usher fimbriae, and the diversity of fimbrial genes was higher than that of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) genes. A typing assay based on the polymorphism of four gene sequences (three fimbrial genes and one housekeeping gene) and the diversity of fimbriae present was developed. By comparison with the MLST, whole-genome sequence (WGS) and fumC/fimH typing methods, this was shown to be accurate and have high resolution, and it was also relatively inexpensive and easy to perform. The assay can supply more discriminatory information for UPEC lineages, and have the potential to be applied in epidemiological surveillance of UPEC isolates. PMID:27199951

  3. Genotypic characterization of virulence factors in Escherichia coli strains from patients with cystitis.

    PubMed

    Tiba, Monique Ribeiro; Yano, Tomomasa; Leite, Domingos da Silva

    2008-01-01

    Adhesins (P-fimbriae, S-fimbriae, type 1 fimbriae and afimbrial adhesin), toxins (alpha-hemolysin and cytotoxic necrotizing factor type 1), iron acquisition systems (aerobactin) and host defense avoidance mechanisms (capsule or lipopolysaccharide) have been shown to be prevalent in Escherichia coli strains associated with urinary tract infections. In this work, 162 Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains from patients with cystitis were genotypically characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. We developed three multiplex PCR assays for virulence-related genes papC, papE/F, papG alleles, fimH, sfa/foc, afaE, hly, cnf-1, usp, cdtB, iucD, and kpsMTII, all of them previously identified in UPEC strains. The PCR assay results identified 158 fimH (97.5%), 86 kpsMTII (53.1%), 53 papC/papEF/papG (32.7%), 45 sfa (27.8%), 42 iucD (25.9%), 41 hly (25.3%), 36 usp (22.2%), 30 cnf-1(18.5%) and 10 afa (6.2%) strains. No strain was positive for cdtB. In this work, we also demonstrated that adhesins may be multiple within a single strain and that several virulence genes can occur combined in association. PMID:18949339

  4. Porcine intestinal glycosphingolipids recognized by F6-fimbriated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Madar Johansson, Miralda; Coddens, Annelies; Benktander, John; Cox, Eric; Teneberg, Susann

    2014-11-01

    One important virulence factor of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is their ability to adhere via fimbrial adhesins to specific receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. Here, the potential glycosphingolipid receptors of enterotoxigenic F6-fimbriated E. coli were examined by binding of purified F6 fimbriae, and F6-expressing bacteria, to glycosphingolipids on thin-layer chromatograms. When intestinal mucosal non-acid glycosphingolipids from single pigs were assayed for F6 binding capacity, a selective interaction with two glycosphingolipids was observed. The binding-active glycosphingolipids were isolated and characterized as lactotriaosylceramide (GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer) and lactotetraosylceramide (Galβ3GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer). Further binding assays using a panel of reference glycosphingolipids showed a specific interaction between the F6 fimbriae and a number of neolacto core chain (Galβ4GlcNAc) glycosphingolipids. In addition, an occasional binding of the F6 fimbriae to sulfatide, galactosylceramide, lactosylceramide with phytosphingosine and/or hydroxy fatty acids, isoglobotriaosylceramide, gangliotriaosylceramide, and gangliotetraosylceramide was obtained. From the results we conclude that lactotriaosylceramide and lactotetraosylceramide are major porcine intestinal receptors for F6-fimbriated E. coli. PMID:25241919

  5. Cytochemical Differences in Bacterial Glycocalyx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautgartner, Wolf Dietrich; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Hannig, Matthias; Pelz, Klaus; Stoiber, Walter

    2005-02-01

    To examine new cytochemical aspects of the bacterial adhesion, a strain 41452/01 of the oral commensal Streptococcus sanguis and a wild strain of Staphylococcus aureus were grown with and without sucrose supplementation for 6 days. Osmiumtetraoxyde (OsO4), uranyl acetate (UA), ruthenium red (RR), cupromeronic blue (CB) staining with critical electrolytic concentrations (CECs), and the tannic acid-metal salt technique (TAMST) were applied for electron microscopy. Cytochemically, only RR-positive fimbriae in S. sanguis were visualized. By contrast, some types of fimbriae staining were observed in S. aureus glycocalyx: RR-positive, OsO4-positive, tannophilic and CB-positive with ceasing point at 0.3 M MgCl2. The CB staining with CEC, used for the first time for visualization of glycoproteins of bacterial glycocalyx, also reveals intacellular CB-positive substances-probably the monomeric molecules, that is, subunits forming the fimbriae via extracellular assembly. Thus, glycosylated components of the biofilm matrix can be reliably related to single cells. The visualization of intracellular components by CB with CEC enables clear distinction between S. aureus and other bacteria, which do not produce CB-positive substances. The small quantities of tannophilic substances found in S. aureus makes the use of TAMST for the same purpose difficult. The present work protocol enables, for the first time, a partial cytochemical differentiation of the bacterial glycocalyx.

  6. Construction and Characterization of Mutations within the Klebsiella mrkD1P Gene That Affect Binding to Collagen Type V

    PubMed Central

    Sebghati, Tricia A.; Clegg, Steven

    1999-01-01

    The fimbria-associated MrkD1P protein mediates adherence of type 3 fimbriate strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae to collagen type V. Currently, three different MrkD adhesins have been described in Klebsiella species, and each possesses a distinctive binding pattern. Therefore, the binding abilities of mutants possessing defined mutations within the mrkD1P gene were examined in order to determine whether specific regions of the adhesin molecule were responsible for collagen binding. Both site-directed and chemically induced mutations were constructed within mrkD1P, and the ability of the gene products to be incorporated into fimbrial appendages or bind to collagen was determined. Binding to type V collagen was not associated solely with one particular region of the MrkD1P protein, and two classes of nonadhesive mutants were isolated. In one class of mutants, the MrkD adhesin was not assembled into the fimbrial shaft, whereas in the second class of mutants, the adhesin was associated with fimbriae but did not bind to collagen. Both hemagglutinating and collagen-binding activities were associated with the MrkD1P molecule, since P pili and type 3 fimbriae carrying adhesive MrkD proteins exhibited identical binding properties. PMID:10085002

  7. Extended virulence genotypes of Escherichia coli strains from patients with urosepsis in relation to phylogeny and host compromise.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J R; Stell, A L

    2000-01-01

    Among 75 urosepsis isolates of Escherichia coli, 29 virulence factor (VF) genes were detected by use of a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Compared with probe hybridization, the PCR assay's specificity was 100% and sensitivity 97.1%. fyuA (yersiniabactin: overall prevalence, 93%), traT (serum resistance, 68%), and a pathogenicity-associated island marker (71%) occurred in most strains from both compromised and noncompromised hosts. Present in <20% of strains each were sfaS, focG (F1C fimbriae), afa/dra, bmaE (M fimbriae), gafD (G fimbriae), cnf1, cdtB (cytolethal distending toxin), cvaC (colicin V), and ibeA (invasion of brain endothelium). Different VFs were variously confined to virulence-associated phylogenetic group B2 (as defined by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis); concentrated in group B2, but with spread beyond; or concentrated outside of group B2. These findings provide novel insights into the VFs of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and demonstrate the new PCR assay's utility for molecular epidemiological studies. PMID:10608775

  8. F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adhesion mediated by the major fimbrial subunit FaeG.

    PubMed

    Xia, Pengpeng; Song, Yujie; Zou, Yajie; Yang, Ying; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2015-09-01

    The FaeG subunit is the major constituent of F4(+) fimbriae, associated with glycoprotein and/or glycolipid receptor recognition and majorly contributes to the pathogen attachment to the host cells. To investigate the key factor involved in the fimbrial binding of F4(+) Escherichia coli, both the recombinant E. coli SE5000 strains carrying the fae operon gene clusters that express the different types of fimbriae in vitro, named as rF4ab, rF4ac, and rF4ad, respectively, corresponding to the fimbrial types F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad, and the three isogenic in-frame faeG gene deletion mutants were constructed. The adhesion assays and adhesion inhibition assays showed that ΔfaeG mutants had a significant reduction in the binding to porcine brush border as well as the intestinal epithelial cell lines, while the complemented strain ΔfaeG/pfaeG restored the adhesion function. The recombinant bacterial strains rF4ab, rF4ac, and rF4ad have the same binding property as wild-type F4(+) E. coli strains do and improvement in terms of binding to porcine brush border and the intestinal epithelial cells, and the adherence was blocked by the monoclonal antibody anti-F4 fimbriae. These data demonstrate that the fimbrial binding of F4(+) E. coli is directly mediated by the major FaeG subunit. PMID:25847483

  9. Molecular cloning, expression, and sequence of the pilin gene from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae M37.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, T; Grass, S; Munson, R

    1991-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae M37 adheres to human buccal epithelial cells and exhibits mannose-resistant hemagglutination of human erythrocytes. An isogenic variant of this strain which was deficient in hemagglutination was isolated. A protein with an apparent molecular weight of 22,000 was present in the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel profile of sarcosyl-insoluble proteins from the hemagglutination-proficient strain but was absent from the profile of the isogenic hemagglutination-deficient variant. A monoclonal antibody which reacts with the hemagglutination-proficient isolate but not with the hemagglutination-deficient isolate has been characterized. This monoclonal antibody was employed in an affinity column for purification of the protein as well as to screen a genomic library for recombinant clones expressing the gene. Several clones which contained overlapping genomic fragments were identified by reaction with the monoclonal antibody. The gene for the 22-kDa protein was subcloned and sequenced. The gene for the type b pilin from H. influenzae type b strain MinnA was also cloned and sequenced. The DNA sequence of the strain MinnA gene was identical to that reported previously for two other type b strains. The DNA sequence of the strain M37 gene is 77% identical to that of the type b pilin gene, and the derived amino acid sequence is 68% identical to that of the type b pilin. Images PMID:1673447

  10. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess the bacterial anti-adhesion effects of cranberry extract beverages.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Kerrie L; Howell, Amy B; Khoo, Christina

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we examined the ex vivo urinary anti-adhesion activity of low-calorie cranberry extract beverages in both a pilot study (n = 10) and a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial (n = 59). In the pilot study, subjects consumed a cranberry extract beverage (CEB) or a cranberry extract and juice beverage (CEJB), compared to placebo. Both cranberry beverages utilized a standardized cranberry extract powder at a level equivalent to low-calorie cranberry juice cocktail (LCJC) on a PAC content basis. Clean-catch urine samples collected at baseline and post intervention were tested for anti-adhesion activity utilizing a mannose-resistant human red blood cell hemagglutination assay specific for P-fimbriated E. coli. Results from the pilot study indicated that ex vivo anti-adhesion activity for both cranberry treatments were higher (p < 0.05) than placebo. In the clinical trial, we compared CEJB to LCJC and a placebo beverage. Post-consumption urine from both cranberry treatment groups showed significantly higher (p < 0.05) anti-adhesion activity compared to placebo. There were no differences observed in anti-adhesion activity between CJEB and LCJC, indicating similar bioactivity. Therefore, acute beverage consumption of cranberry extract and/or juice provides ex vivo anti-adhesion activity, which may help to improve urinary tract health. PMID:25723356

  11. Bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity properties in the mediation of in vitro adhesion by the rabbit enteric pathogen Escherichia coli strain RDEC-1.

    PubMed Central

    Drumm, B; Neumann, A W; Policova, Z; Sherman, P M

    1989-01-01

    The role of hydrophobicity in the attachment of enteropathogens to gastrointestinal mucosa is controversial. In vitro binding of Escherichia coli RDEC-1 to rabbit intestine is dependent on the expression of pili. We examined in vitro adherence of piliated RDEC-1 after altering either the hydrophobicity of the organisms, the hydrophobicity of the substrate for attachment, or the surface tension of the suspending liquid. Hydrophobicity of RDEC-1 was determined using four complementary methods. In each assay piliated RDEC-1 demonstrated relatively more hydrophobic properties compared with both organisms grown to suppress pilus expression and a mutant that cannot express mannose-resistant pili. When piliated RDEC-1 were pretreated with tetramethyl urea to disrupt hydrophobic bonds surface hydrophobicity decreased. Concurrently, bacterial adherence to rabbit ileal microvillus membranes, mucus and mucin was reduced. Binding of piliated organisms to hydrophobic surfaces was significantly higher compared to both nonpiliated bacteria and the adherence of piliated RDEC-1 to relatively hydrophilic surfaces. Addition of propanol reduced the surface tension of the suspending liquid, and decreased adhesion of piliated RDEC-1 to polystyrene by 80%. Conversely, adherence of piliated organisms to a hydrophilic surface increased 12-fold after lowering the surface tension of the suspending liquid. We conclude that hydrophobic properties have a role in mediating in vitro adherence of this E. coli enteric pathogen. Images PMID:2572606

  12. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and other gram-negative bacteria of infantile diarrhea: surface antigens, hemagglutinins, colonization factor antigen, and loss of enterotoxigenicity.

    PubMed

    Bäck, E; Möllby, R; Kaijser, B; Stintzing, G; Wadström, T; Habte, D

    1980-09-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT)-producing Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria isolated from diarrheal Ethiopian children were studied for O and K antigen, production of heat-stable enterotoxin (ST), stability of LT production, properties of mannose-resistant hemagglutination (MRHA) (indicative of adhesive properties), and colonization factor antigen (CFA). Of the E. coli strains, 33% possessed O6, O8, or O78; 93% of these were stable producers of LT, and 86% produced both Lt and ST. O78 strains possessed CFA/I, whereas O6 and O8 strains possessed CFA/II. The E. coli with O antigens other than O6, O8, or O78, as well as the non-E. coli bacteria tended to lose their ability to produce LT; only 16% produced ST, and they only occasionally showed MRHA properties. The former group of E. coli strains might be considered as true enteropathogenic bacteria (enterovirulent E. coli), which may be identified serologically, while the pathogenic significance of the diversified latter group remains less certain. PMID:7003030

  13. Phosphomannose isomerase gene for selection in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) transformation.

    PubMed

    Bríza, Jindrich; Růzicková, Nina; Niedermeierová, Hana; Dusbábková, Jana; Vlasák, Josef

    2010-01-01

    A positive selection system using phosphomannose isomerase was employed for Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. 'Achát'). It was shown that the mannose-based selection system works very well with the lettuce genotype used, reaching up to 25% transformation efficiency on the medium with 20 g/L mannose and 20 g/L sucrose. The best transformation efficacy with the commonly-used kanamycin at 100 mg/L as a selection agent was 21%. Southern blot analyses of thirteen chosen mannose-resistant regenerants revealed that some of them have clonal origin, about one-half harbour a single T-DNA copy and one plant contains an incomplete T-DNA segment with only the left part of T-DNA with the pmi gene present in the genomic DNA. The following Northern analysis showed transcriptional activity of the introduced pmi gene in all plants analysed with very high differences in the level of pmi specific mRNA. The results demonstrate that both mannose and kanamycin provide comparable transformation efficiencies in our lettuce genotype. An alternative selection method with mannose as a selection agent is now available for lettuce transgenosis. PMID:20234883

  14. Escherichia coli Isolates Causing Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Catheterized and Noncatheterized Individuals Possess Similar Virulence Properties ▿

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Rebecca E.; Hancock, Viktoria; Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y.; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Mabbett, Amanda N.; Totsika, Makrina; Looke, David F.; Nimmo, Graeme R.; Klemm, Per; Schembri, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infectious diseases of humans, with Escherichia coli being responsible for >80% of all cases. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) occurs when bacteria colonize the urinary tract without causing clinical symptoms and can affect both catheterized patients (catheter-associated ABU [CA-ABU]) and noncatheterized patients. Here, we compared the virulence properties of a collection of ABU and CA-ABU nosocomial E. coli isolates in terms of antibiotic resistance, phylogenetic grouping, specific UTI-associated virulence genes, hemagglutination characteristics, and biofilm formation. CA-ABU isolates were similar to ABU isolates with regard to the majority of these characteristics; exceptions were that CA-ABU isolates had a higher prevalence of the polysaccharide capsule marker genes kpsMT II and kpsMT K1, while more ABU strains were capable of mannose-resistant hemagglutination. To examine biofilm growth in detail, we performed a global gene expression analysis with two CA-ABU strains that formed a strong biofilm and that possessed a limited adhesin repertoire. The gene expression profile of the CA-ABU strains during biofilm growth showed considerable overlap with that previously described for the prototype ABU E. coli strain, 83972. This is the first global gene expression analysis of E. coli CA-ABU strains. Overall, our data suggest that nosocomial ABU and CA-ABU E. coli isolates possess similar virulence profiles. PMID:20444967

  15. Early detection of high-grade tubal serous carcinoma in women at low risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome by systematic examination of fallopian tubes incidentally removed during benign surgery.

    PubMed

    Rabban, Joseph T; Garg, Karuna; Crawford, Beth; Chen, Lee-may; Zaloudek, Charles J

    2014-06-01

    Early detection of sporadic pelvic serous carcinoma remains an elusive goal. In women at high risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome who undergo prophylactic salpingectomy, systematic pathologic examination of the fallopian tubes will detect occult tubal cancer, mostly in the fimbriae, of a minority of women. Such tubal cancers are the putative precursor to advanced-stage pelvic cancer. We hypothesized that early tubal cancer detection can also be accomplished in women at low risk using a similar approach. In this study, we performed complete and systematic examination of the fallopian tubes removed during surgery performed for benign indications. Among 522 women, 4 cases of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) were identified. Three of these cases would have gone undetected using the current standard of care of sampling only a single random section of the tube. The fourth case was accompanied by occult ovarian carcinoma. The fimbriae contained STIC in 3 of the 4 cases and atypical mucosa in 1 case in which the STIC was in the nonfimbriated portion of the tube. The morphologic and immunohistochemical features (aberrant p53 and MIB-1) of these STICs were similar to those expected in high-risk women. All 4 patients with STIC underwent BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing; no germline mutations were identified in any patient. An additional 11 specimens contained atypical mucosal proliferations that fell short of morphologic and immunohistochemical criteria for STIC. Two of these 11 fulfilled criteria for a serous tubal intraepithelial lesion, and the remaining atypical proliferations exhibited normal p53 and MIB-1. For most specimens, the fimbriae could be completely submitted in 1 or 2 cassettes per tube. These results demonstrate that systematic examination of the tubal fimbriae can serve as a form of early detection of sporadic tubal cancer without incurring significant labor or cost. We propose that the tubal fimbriae should be completely examined

  16. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Ladurner, Angela; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij, Sandra; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Schuerer, Nadine; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Leisch, Nikolaus; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs) as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN), whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results are an important step in constructing a delivery system based on a nonliving probiotic that is suitable for use in ocular surface diseases pairing immunomodulation and targeted delivery. PMID:26229437

  17. Fimbrial Profiles Predict Virulence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains: Contribution of Ygi and Yad Fimbriae▿

    PubMed Central

    Spurbeck, Rachel R.; Stapleton, Ann E.; Johnson, James R.; Walk, Seth T.; Hooton, Thomas M.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli, a cause of ∼90% of urinary tract infections (UTI), utilizes fimbrial adhesins to colonize the uroepithelium. Pyelonephritis isolate E. coli CFT073 carries 12 fimbrial operons, 5 of which have never been studied. Using multiplex PCR, the prevalence of these 12 and 3 additional fimbrial types was determined for a collection of 303 E. coli isolates (57 human commensal, 32 animal commensal, 54 asymptomatic bacteriuria, 45 complicated UTI, 38 uncomplicated cystitis, and 77 pyelonephritis). The number of fimbrial types per E. coli isolate was distributed bimodally: those with low (3.2 ± 1.1) and those with high (8.3 ± 1.3) numbers of fimbrial types (means ± standard errors of the means). The fimbrial genes ygiL, yadN, yfcV, and c2395 were significantly more prevalent among urine isolates than human commensal isolates. The effect of deletion of Ygi and Yad fimbrial operons on growth, motility, biofilm formation, adherence to immortalized human epithelial cells, and pathogenesis in the mouse model of UTI was examined. Yad fimbriae were necessary for wild-type levels of adherence to a bladder epithelial cell line and for biofilm formation. Deletion of these fimbrial genes increased motility. Ygi fimbriae were necessary for wild-type levels of adherence to a human embryonic kidney cell line, biofilm formation, and in vivo fitness in the urine and kidneys. Complementation of each fimbrial mutant restored wild-type levels of motility, biofilm formation, adherence and, for ygi, in vivo fitness. A double deletion strain, Δygi Δyad, was attenuated in the urine, bladder, and kidneys in the mouse model, demonstrating that these fimbriae contribute to uropathogenesis. PMID:21911462

  18. Insights into a Multidrug Resistant Escherichia coli Pathogen of the Globally Disseminated ST131 Lineage: Genome Analysis and Virulence Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sohinee; Phan, Minh-Duy; Petty, Nicola K.; Bachmann, Nathan; Szubert, Marek; Sidjabat, Hanna E.; Paterson, David L.; Upton, Mathew; Schembri, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains causing urinary tract infection (UTI) are increasingly recognized as belonging to specific clones. E. coli clone O25b:H4-ST131 has recently emerged globally as a leading multi-drug resistant pathogen causing urinary tract and bloodstream infections in hospitals and the community. While most molecular studies to date examine the mechanisms conferring multi-drug resistance in E. coli ST131, relatively little is known about their virulence potential. Here we examined E. coli ST131 clinical isolates from two geographically diverse collections, one representing the major pathogenic lineages causing UTI across the United Kingdom and a second representing UTI isolates from patients presenting at two large hospitals in Australia. We determined a draft genome sequence for one representative isolate, E. coli EC958, which produced CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamase, CMY-23 type AmpC cephalosporinase and was resistant to ciprofloxacin. Comparative genome analysis indicated that EC958 encodes virulence genes commonly associated with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). The genome sequence of EC958 revealed a transposon insertion in the fimB gene encoding the activator of type 1 fimbriae, an important UPEC bladder colonization factor. We identified the same fimB transposon insertion in 59% of the ST131 UK isolates, as well as 71% of ST131 isolates from Australia, suggesting this mutation is common among E. coli ST131 strains. Insertional inactivation of fimB resulted in a phenotype resembling a slower off-to-on switching for type 1 fimbriae. Type 1 fimbriae expression could still be induced in fimB-null isolates; this correlated strongly with adherence to and invasion of human bladder cells and bladder colonisation in a mouse UTI model. We conclude that E. coli ST131 is a geographically widespread, antibiotic resistant clone that has the capacity to produce numerous virulence factors associated with UTI. PMID:22053197

  19. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Ladurner, Angela; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij, Sandra; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Schuerer, Nadine; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Leisch, Nikolaus; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs) as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN), whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results are an important step in constructing a delivery system based on a nonliving probiotic that is suitable for use in ocular surface diseases pairing immunomodulation and targeted delivery. PMID:26229437

  20. Porphyromonas gingivalis Evasion of Autophagy and Intracellular Killing by Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Involves DC-SIGN-TLR2 Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    El-Awady, Ahmed R.; Miles, Brodie; Scisci, Elizabeth; Kurago, Zoya B.; Palani, Chithra D.; Arce, Roger M.; Waller, Jennifer L.; Genco, Caroline A.; Slocum, Connie; Manning, Matthew; Schoenlein, Patricia V.; Cutler, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed on professional antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), is crucial to the fate of engulfed microbes. Among the many PRRs expressed by DCs are Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectins such as DC-SIGN. DC-SIGN is targeted by several major human pathogens for immune-evasion, although its role in intracellular routing of pathogens to autophagosomes is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of DC-SIGN and TLRs in evasion of autophagy and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). We employed a panel of P. gingivalis isogenic fimbriae deficient strains with defined defects in Mfa-1 fimbriae, a DC-SIGN ligand, and FimA fimbriae, a TLR2 agonist. Our results show that DC-SIGN dependent uptake of Mfa1+P. gingivalis strains by MoDCs resulted in lower intracellular killing and higher intracellular content of P. gingivalis. Moreover, Mfa1+P. gingivalis was mostly contained within single membrane vesicles, where it survived intracellularly. Survival was decreased by activation of TLR2 and/or autophagy. Mfa1+P. gingivalis strain did not induce significant levels of Rab5, LC3-II, and LAMP1. In contrast, P. gingivalis uptake through a DC-SIGN independent manner was associated with early endosomal routing through Rab5, increased LC3-II and LAMP-1, as well as the formation of double membrane intracellular phagophores, a characteristic feature of autophagy. These results suggest that selective engagement of DC-SIGN by Mfa-1+P. gingivalis promotes evasion of antibacterial autophagy and lysosome fusion, resulting in intracellular persistence in myeloid DCs; however TLR2 activation can overcome autophagy evasion and pathogen persistence in DCs. PMID:25679217

  1. Influence of the hippocampus on amino acid utilizing and cholinergic neurons within the nucleus accumbens is promoted by histamine via H1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, M M; Prast, H; Philippu, A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The influence of the neurotransmitter histamine on spontaneous and stimulation-evoked release of glutamate, aspartate, GABA and ACh in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was investigated in vivo. Experimental Approach Using the push–pull superfusion technique, histaminergic compounds were applied to the NAc and neurotransmitter release was assessed. In some experiments, the fornix/fimbria of the hippocampus was electrically stimulated by a microelectrode and evoked potentials were monitored in the NAc. Key Results Superfusion of the NAc with the H1 receptor antagonist triprolidine (50 μM) decreased spontaneous outflow of glutamate, aspartate and ACh, while release of GABA remained unaffected. Superfusion with histamine elevated release of ACh, without influencing that of the amino acids. Electrical stimulation of the fornix/fimbria enhanced the output of amino acids and ACh within the NAc. The evoked outflow of glutamate and ACh was diminished on superfusion with triprolidine, while release of aspartate and GABA was not affected. Superfusion of the NAc with histamine intensified the stimulation-evoked release of glutamate and Ach. Histamine also elevated the stimulation-induced release of aspartate, without influencing that of GABA. Presuperfusion with triprolidine abolished the reinforced effect of histamine on stimulation-evoked transmitter release within the NAc. Conclusion and Implications Neuronal histamine activates H1 receptors and increases spontaneous release of glutamate, aspartate and ACh within the NAc. Stimulation of the hippocampal fornix/fimbria tract also enhances release of glutamate and ACh within the NAc and this effect is intensified by H1 receptor stimulation within the NAc. The latter effects, which are mediated by hippocampal afferences, might play an important role in mnemonic performance and in emotional processes such as anxiety and stress disorders. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine

  2. Identification of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Genes Regulated during Biofilm Formation on Cholesterol Gallstone Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella spp. are able to form biofilms on abiotic and biotic surfaces. In vivo studies in our laboratory have shown that Salmonella can form biofilms on the surfaces of cholesterol gallstones in the gallbladders of mice and human carriers. Biofilm formation on gallstones has been demonstrated to be a mechanism of persistence. The purpose of this work was to identify and evaluate Salmonella sp. cholesterol-dependent biofilm factors. Differential gene expression analysis between biofilms on glass or cholesterol-coated surfaces and subsequent quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that type 1 fimbria structural genes and a gene encoding a putative outer membrane protein (ycfR) were specifically upregulated in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilms grown on cholesterol-coated surfaces. Spatiotemporal expression of ycfR and FimA verified their regulation during biofilm development on cholesterol-coated surfaces. Surprisingly, confocal and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that a mutant of type 1 fimbria structural genes (ΔfimAICDHF) and a ycfR mutant showed increased biofilm formation on cholesterol-coated surfaces. In vivo experiments using Nramp1+/+ mice harboring gallstones showed that only the ΔycfR mutant formed extensive biofilms on mouse gallstones at 7 and 21 days postinfection; ΔfimAICDHF was not observed on gallstone surfaces after the 7-day-postinfection time point. These data suggest that in Salmonella spp., wild-type type 1 fimbriae are important for attachment to and/or persistence on gallstones at later points of chronic infection, whereas YcfR may represent a specific potential natural inhibitor of initial biofilm formation on gallstones. PMID:23897604

  3. New Aspects of RpoE in Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Che; Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Tsai, Yi-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common human pathogen causing recurrent or persistent urinary tract infections (UTIs). The underlying mechanisms for P. mirabilis to establish UTIs are not fully elucidated. In this study, we showed that loss of the sigma factor E (RpoE), mediating extracytoplasmic stress responses, decreased fimbria expression, survival in macrophages, cell invasion, and colonization in mice but increased the interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression of urothelial cells and swarming motility. This is the first study to demonstrate that RpoE modulated expression of MR/P fimbriae by regulating mrpI, a gene encoding a recombinase controlling the orientation of MR/P fimbria promoter. By real-time reverse transcription-PCR, we found that the IL-8 mRNA amount of urothelial cells was induced significantly by lipopolysaccharides extracted from rpoE mutant but not from the wild type. These RpoE-associated virulence factors should be coordinately expressed to enhance the fitness of P. mirabilis in the host, including the avoidance of immune attacks. Accordingly, rpoE mutant-infected mice displayed more immune cell infiltration in bladders and kidneys during early stages of infection, and the rpoE mutant had a dramatically impaired ability of colonization. Moreover, it is noteworthy that urea (the major component in urine) and polymyxin B (a cationic antimicrobial peptide) can induce expression of rpoE by the reporter assay, suggesting that RpoE might be activated in the urinary tract. Altogether, our results indicate that RpoE is important in sensing environmental cues of the urinary tract and subsequently triggering the expression of virulence factors, which are associated with the fitness of P. mirabilis, to build up a UTI. PMID:25547796

  4. Exopolysaccharides Synthesized by Lactobacillus reuteri Protect against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao Yan; Woodward, Adrienne; Zijlstra, Ruurd T.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrhea in piglets; ETEC cells colonize the intestinal mucosa with adhesins and deliver toxins that cause fluid loss. This study determined the antiadhesive properties of bacterial exopolysaccharides (reuteran and levan) and related glycans (dextran and inulin) in a small intestinal segment perfusion (SISP) model. The SISP model used 10 jejunal segments from 5-week-old piglets. Five segments were infected with ETEC expressing K88 fimbriae (ETEC K88), while five segments were treated with saline. Every two segments (ETEC and non-ETEC infected) were infused with 65 ml of 10 g liter−1 of glycans or saline (control) for 8 h. High-resolution melting-curve (HRM) quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that E. coli is the dominant bacterium in infected segments, while other bacteria were predominant in noninfected segments. Infection by ETEC K88 was also verified by qPCR; gene copy numbers of K88 fimbriae and the heat-labile toxin (LT) in mucosal scrapings and outflow fluid of infected segments were significantly higher than those in noninfected segments. Genes coding for K88 fimbriae and LT were also detected in noninfected segments. LT amplicons from infected and noninfected segments were 99% identical over 481 bp, demonstrating the presence of autochthonous ETEC K88. All glycans reduced fluid loss caused by ETEC K88 infection. Reuteran tended (P = 0.06) to decrease ETEC K88 levels in mucosal scraping sample, as judged by qPCR. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that reuteran significantly (P = 0.012) decreased levels of adherent ETEC K88. Overall, reuteran may prevent piglet diarrhea by reducing adhesion of ETEC K88. PMID:25015886

  5. Serogroups and virulence genotypes of Escherichia coli isolated from patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ananias, M; Yano, T

    2008-10-01

    Sixty strains of Escherichia coli, isolated by hemoculture, from septicemic Brazilian patients were evaluated to determine their serogroup and invasivity to Vero cells. All 60 patients died within 2 days of hospitalization. Furthermore, the molecular study of the following extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli-associated virulence factor (VF) genes was performed by PCR: i) adhesins: type 1 fimbria (fimH), S fimbria (sfaD/E), P fimbria (papC and papG alleles) and afimbrial adhesin (afaB/C); ii) capsule K1/K5 (kpsMTII); iii) siderophores: aerobactin (iucD), yersiniabactin (fyuA) and salmochelin (iroN); iv) toxins hemolysin (hlyA), necrotizing cytotoxic factor type 1 (cnf1) and secreted autotransporter toxin (sat); v) miscellaneous: brain microvascular endothelial cells invasion (ibeA), serum resistance (traT), colicin V (cvaC) and specific uropathogenic protein (usp). Our results showed that isolates are able to invade Vero cells (96.6%), differing from previous research on uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). The O serogroups associated with UPEC were prevalent in 60% of strains vs 11.7% of other serogroups. The PCR results showed a conserved virulence subgroup profile and a prevalence above 75% for fimH, fyuA, kpsMTII and iucD, and between 35-65% for papC, papG, sat, iroN, usp and traT. The evasion from the immunological system of the host and also iron uptake are essential for the survival of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains. Interestingly, among our isolates, a low prevalence of VF genes appeared. Therefore, the present study contributes to the identification of a bacterial profile for sepsis-associated E. coli. PMID:19030710

  6. Characterisation of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) associated with colisepticaemia compared to faecal isolates from healthy birds.

    PubMed

    McPeake, S J W; Smyth, J A; Ball, H J

    2005-10-31

    A total of 114 avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) isolates were collected from cases of colisepticaemia occurring in broilers (77) and layers (37) within Ireland. In addition 45 strains isolated from faeces of healthy birds were included for comparison. All isolates were serogrouped, and examined for known virulence factors, mostly by PCR. The O78 serogroup represented 55 and 27% of broiler and layer colisepticaemic isolates respectively. All isolates were positive for curli fimbriae (crl, csg) and negative for afimbrial adhesin (afa). S-fimbrial (sfa) sequences were present in 8.8% of septicaemic isolates and 8.9% of healthy bird isolates. The majority of E. coli from cases of colisepticaemia (97.4%) and healthy bird (95.6%) isolates were positive for aerobactin (aer), and temperature sensitive haemagglutinin (tsh) was similarly detected in high numbers in 93.9 and 93.3%, respectively. In comparison to E. coli isolates from the faeces of healthy birds, a significantly higher percentage of isolates from septicaemic cases possessed Type 1 fimbriae (fimC) and increased serum survival (iss) gene sequences. Forty-seven (41.2%) isolates from septicaemic birds possessed P-fimbriae (pap) gene sequences, compared with only 15.6% from E. coli isolated from healthy birds. Haemolysin (hlyE) sequences were detected in 46.7% of isolates from healthy birds in comparison with 6.1% of septicaemic isolates. Sequences encoding colicin V (cvaC) were detected in 99.1% of septicaemic isolates and 82.2% of isolates from healthy birds. The K1 capsule was only present in two septicaemic isolates, both taken from layers. Motility was detected in 36.8% of E. coli isolated from cases of septicaemia, compared with 93.3% of isolates from healthy birds. These results demonstrate the presence of 11 virulence genes in E. coli isolated from cases of colisepticaemia within Ireland, and indicate the prevalence of iss and fimC. PMID:16150559

  7. Microstructural effects of a neuro-modulating drug evaluated by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Egger, K; Janz, P; Döbrössy, M D; Bienert, T; Reisert, M; Obmann, M; Glauche, V; Haas, C; Harsan, L A; Urbach, H; von Elverfeldt, D

    2016-02-15

    In a longitudinal mouse study we evaluated whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can monitor microstructural changes after administration of the neuromodulating drug EPO and whether erythropoietin (EPO) has an effect on cognitive performance. Twelve mice (2 groups with 6 mice each) were scanned in a 7T Bruker Biospin animal scanner with a highly resolved DTI sequence before and 16 days after intraperitoneal injections of EPO or saline. All mice underwent behavioral testing (Morris water maze) and histologic evaluation of hippocampal and corpus callosum cell proliferation and oligodendrogenesis. Whole brain DTI analysis showed significant Trace, RD and AD decrease within the dentate gyrus, subiculum, primary motor, somatosensory, and supplementary somatosensory areas and FA increase in the hippocampus, corpus callosum, and fimbria fornix in EPO treated mice only. ROI-based DTI analysis showed significant Trace and RD decrease and FA increase only in the corpus callosum of EPO treated mice, whereas in the dentate gyrus significant Trace, RD, and AD decrease occurred in both, EPO- and control-group. Behavioral tests showed that EPO treated mice performed better and learned faster than controls. Histologically, the number of BrdU-positive nuclei and optical density of DCX-labeled juvenile neurons significantly increased within the dentate gyrus, corpus callosum and fimbria fornix and the number of NG2-positive oligodendrocyte progenitors in corpus callosum and fimbria fornix, respectively. In conclusion we were able to monitor microstructural changes with DTI and showed EPO treatment-related alterations correlating with enhanced dentate gyrus and corpus callosum cell proliferation and better learning capabilities. PMID:26654787

  8. Exopolysaccharides synthesized by Lactobacillus reuteri protect against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in piglets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao Yan; Woodward, Adrienne; Zijlstra, Ruurd T; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrhea in piglets; ETEC cells colonize the intestinal mucosa with adhesins and deliver toxins that cause fluid loss. This study determined the antiadhesive properties of bacterial exopolysaccharides (reuteran and levan) and related glycans (dextran and inulin) in a small intestinal segment perfusion (SISP) model. The SISP model used 10 jejunal segments from 5-week-old piglets. Five segments were infected with ETEC expressing K88 fimbriae (ETEC K88), while five segments were treated with saline. Every two segments (ETEC and non-ETEC infected) were infused with 65 ml of 10 g liter(-1) of glycans or saline (control) for 8 h. High-resolution melting-curve (HRM) quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that E. coli is the dominant bacterium in infected segments, while other bacteria were predominant in noninfected segments. Infection by ETEC K88 was also verified by qPCR; gene copy numbers of K88 fimbriae and the heat-labile toxin (LT) in mucosal scrapings and outflow fluid of infected segments were significantly higher than those in noninfected segments. Genes coding for K88 fimbriae and LT were also detected in noninfected segments. LT amplicons from infected and noninfected segments were 99% identical over 481 bp, demonstrating the presence of autochthonous ETEC K88. All glycans reduced fluid loss caused by ETEC K88 infection. Reuteran tended (P = 0.06) to decrease ETEC K88 levels in mucosal scraping sample, as judged by qPCR. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that reuteran significantly (P = 0.012) decreased levels of adherent ETEC K88. Overall, reuteran may prevent piglet diarrhea by reducing adhesion of ETEC K88. PMID:25015886

  9. An unwritten anatomy lesson: The influence of Roman clothing on neuroanatomical terminology: In memoriam Albert L. Rhoton, Jr. (1932-2016).

    PubMed

    Turliuc, Dana Mihaela; Turliuc, Serban; Cucu, Andrei Ionut; Sava, Anca; Dumitrescu, Gabriela Florenta; Cărăuleanu, Alexandru; Buzdugă, Cătălin; Trandafir, Daniela; Costea, Claudia Florida

    2016-09-01

    Throughout the centuries, anatomists attempting to denominate the new structures they discovered have found inspiration in the civilization of ancient Rome and the clothing worn by its citizens. This aricle presents the origins of seven neuroanatomical terms, fimbria, velum, funiculus, lemniscus, corona, splenium, and cingulum, inspired by the clothing and jewellery of Roman women and the military attire of Roman soldiers. Thus, through their apparel, the Romans influenced the Terminologia Anatomica and "clothed" the structures of the brain and spinal cord, making them immortal. Clin. Anat. 29:685-690, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27062436

  10. Reduced diversity and increased virulence-gene carriage in intestinal enterobacteria of coeliac children

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Ester; Nadal, Inmaculada; Donat, Ester; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Calabuig, Miguel; Sanz, Yolanda

    2008-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathology triggered by the ingestion of cereal gluten proteins. This disorder is associated with imbalances in the composition of the gut microbiota that could be involved in its pathogenesis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether intestinal Enterobacteriaceae populations of active and non-active coeliac patients and healthy children differ in diversity and virulence-gene carriage, so as to establish a possible link between the pathogenic potential of enterobacteria and the disease. Methods Enterobacteriaceae clones were isolated on VRBD agar from faecal samples of 31 subjects (10 active coeliac patients, 10 symptom-free coeliac patients and 11 healthy controls) and identified at species level by the API 20E system. Escherichia coli clones were classified into four phylogenetic groups A, B1, B2 and D and the prevalence of eight virulence-associated genes (type-1 fimbriae [fimA], P fimbriae [papC], S fimbriae [sfaD/E], Dr haemagglutinin [draA], haemolysin [hlyA], capsule K1 [neuB], capsule K5 [KfiC] and aerobactin [iutA]) was determined by multiplex PCR. Results A total of 155 Enterobacteriaceae clones were isolated. Non-E. coli clones were more commonly isolated in healthy children than in coeliac patients. The four phylogenetic E. coli groups were equally distributed in healthy children, while in both coeliac patients most commensal isolates belonged to group A. Within the virulent groups, B2 was the most prevalent in active coeliac disease children, while D was the most prevalent in non-active coeliac patients. E coli clones of the virulent phylogenetic groups (B2+D) from active and non-active coeliac patients carried a higher number of virulence genes than those from healthy individuals. Prevalence of P fimbriae (papC), capsule K5 (sfaD/E) and haemolysin (hlyA) genes was higher in E. coli isolated from active and non-active coeliac children than in those from control subjects. Conclusion This

  11. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. PMID:26187892

  12. Glycan-functionalized diamond nanoparticles as potent E. coli anti-adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barras, Alexandre; Martin, Fernando Ariel; Bande, Omprakash; Baumann, Jean-Sébastien; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Boukherroub, Rabah; Beloin, Christophe; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation on biotic surfaces or medical devices is an increasing source of infections in clinical settings. A large proportion of these biofilm-related infections are caused by Escherichia coli, a major nosocomial pathogen, in which the major adhesion factor is the FimH adhesin located at the tip of type 1 fimbriae. Inhibition of FimH-mediated adhesion has been identified as an efficient antibiotic-alternative strategy to potentially reduce E. coli-related infections. In this article we demonstrate that nanodiamond particles, covently modified with mannose moieties by a ``click'' chemistry approach, are able to efficiently inhibit E. coli type 1 fimbriae-mediated adhesion to eukaryotic cells with relative inhibitory potency (RIP) of as high as 9259 (bladder cell adhesion assay), which is unprecedented when compared with RIP values previously reported for alternate multivalent mannose-functionalized nanostructures designed to inhibit E. coli adhesion. Also remarkable is that these novel mannose-modified NDs reduce E. coli biofilm formation, a property previously not observed for multivalent glyco-nanoparticles and rarely demonstrated for other multivalent or monovalent mannose glycans. This work sets the stage for the further evaluation of these novel NDs as an anti-adhesive therapeutic strategy against E. coli-derived infections.Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation on biotic surfaces or medical devices is an increasing source of infections in clinical settings. A large proportion of these biofilm-related infections are caused by Escherichia coli, a major nosocomial pathogen, in which the major adhesion factor is the FimH adhesin located at the tip of type 1 fimbriae. Inhibition of FimH-mediated adhesion has been identified as an efficient antibiotic-alternative strategy to potentially reduce E. coli-related infections. In this article we demonstrate that nanodiamond particles, covently modified with

  13. Grafting Genetically Modified Cells to the Damaged Brain: Restorative Effects of NGF Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Michael B.; Friedmann, Theodore; Robertson, Robin C.; Tuszynski, Mark; Wolff, Jon A.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Gage, Fred H.

    1988-12-01

    Fibroblasts were genetically modified to secrete nerve growth factor (NGF) by infection with a retroviral vector and then implanted into the brains of rats that had surgical lesions of the fimbria-fornix. The grafted cells survived and produced sufficient NGF to prevent the degeneration of cholinergic neurons that would die without treatment. In addition, the protected cholinergic cells sprouted axons that projected in the direction of the cellular source of NGF. These results indicate that a combination of gene transfer and intracerebral grafting may provide an effective treatment for some disorders of the central nervous system.

  14. Pathogenic microbes and community service through manipulation of innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Krauss, Jennifer L.; Liang, Shuang; McIntosh, Megan L.; Lambris, John D.

    2011-01-01

    The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis undermines major components of innate immunity, such as complement, Toll-like receptors (TLR), and their crosstalk pathways. At least in principle, these subversive activities could promote the adaptive fitness of the entire periodontal biofilm community. In this regard, the virulence factors responsible for complement and TLR exploitation (gingipain enzymes, atypical lipopolysaccharide molecules, and fimbriae) are released as components of readily diffusible membrane vesicles, which can thus become available to other biofilm organisms. This review summarizes important immune subversive tactics of P. gingivalis which might enable it to exert a supportive impact on the oral microbial community. PMID:21948363

  15. Differentiation of F4 receptor profiles in pigs based on their mucin 4 polymorphism, responsiveness to oral F4 immunization and in vitro binding of F4 to villi.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V U; Goetstouwers, T; Coddens, A; Van Poucke, M; Peelman, L; Deforce, D; Melkebeek, V; Cox, E

    2013-03-15

    F4(+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (F4(+) ETEC) are an important cause of diarrhoea and mortality in piglets. F4(+) ETEC use their F4 fimbriae to adhere to specific receptors (F4Rs) on small intestinal brush borders, resulting in colonization of the small intestine. To prevent pigs from post-weaning diarrhoea, pigs should be vaccinated during the suckling period. Previously, we demonstrated that F4acR(+), but not F4acR(-) piglets could be orally immunized with purified F4 fimbriae resulting in a protective immunity against F4(+) ETEC infections, indicating that this immune response was F4R dependent. Recently, aminopeptidase N has been identified as a glycoprotein receptor important for this oral immune response. However, in some oral immunization experiments, a few F4acR(+) piglets did not show an antibody response upon oral immunization, suggesting additional receptors. Therefore, the binding profile of F4 to brush border membrane (glyco)proteins was determined for pigs differing in F4-specific antibody response upon oral immunization, in in vitro adhesion of F4(+)E. coli to small intestinal villi, and in Muc4 genotype. Six groups of pigs could be identified. Only two groups positive in all three assays showed two high molecular weight (MW) glycoprotein bands (>250kDa) suggesting that these high MW bands are linked to the MUC4 susceptible genotype. The fact that these bands were absent in the MUC4 resistant group which showed a positive immune response against F4 and was positive in the adhesion test confirm that at least one or perhaps more other F4Rs exist. Interestingly, two pigs that were positive in the villous adhesion assay did not show an immune response against F4 fimbriae. This suggests that a third receptor category might exist which allows the bacteria to adhere but does not allow effective immunization with soluble F4 fimbriae. Future research will be necessary to confirm or reveal the identity of these receptors. PMID:23084626

  16. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, Samuel M.; Boinett, Christine J.; Madé, Laure F.; Ouko, Tom T.; Fèvre, Eric M.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. PMID:26187892

  17. Hemagglutinin of unusual specificity from Helcococcus kunzii.

    PubMed

    Stavri, Henriette; Beveridge, Terry J; Moyles, Dianne; Athamna, Abed; Doyle, Ronald J

    2002-02-01

    Helcococcus kunzii is a gram-positive, catalase-negative opportunist. The organism has been isolated from the lower extremities and breast masses of several patients. A clinical isolate of Helcococcus kunzii was shown to possess a hemagglutinin-lectin with a specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and lactose, two structurally unrelated carbohydrates. The lectin is sensitive to protease, heat and mutanolysin. Electron microscopy failed to reveal fimbriae or fibrillae, suggesting that the lectin is associated with peptidoglycan or the cytoplasmic membrane. It is likely that the lectin is involved in adhesion and colonization of H. kunzii. PMID:11807570

  18. Permanent genetic resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 August 2010-30 September 2010.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ramesh K; Allainguillaume, Joel; Bajay, M M; Barthwal, Santan; Bertolino, P; Chauhan, Priti; Consuegra, Sofia; Croxford, Adam; Dalton, Desiré L; den Belder, E; Díaz-Ferguson, E; Douglas, M R; Drees, Michael; Elderson, J; Esselink, G D; Fernández-Manjarrés, J F; Frascaria-Lacoste, N; Gäbler-Schwarz, Steffi; Garcia de Leaniz, Carlos; Ginwal, H S; Goodisman, Michael A D; Guo, Baoling; Hamilton, M B; Hayes, Paul K; Hong, Yan; Kajita, Tadashi; Kalinowski, Steven T; Keller, Laurent; Koop, Ben F; Kotzé, Antoinette; Lalremruata, Albert; Leese, Florian; Li, Chunhong; Liew, W Y; Martinelli, S; Matthews, Emily A; Medlin, Linda K; Messmer, Amber M; Meyer, Elisabeth I; Monteiro, M; Moyer, G R; Nelson, R John; Nguyen, Thuy T T; Omoto, C; Ono, Junya; Pavinato, V A C; Pearcy, Morgan; Pinheiro, J B; Power, L D; Rawat, Anita; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Sanderson, Dan; Sannier, J; Sathe, Santosh; Sheridan, C K; Smulders, M J M; Sukganah, A; Takayama, Koji; Tamura, Mariko; Tateishi, Yoichi; Vanhaecke, Delphine; Vu, Ninh V; Wickneswari, R; Williams, A S; Wimp, G M; Witte, Volker; Zucchi, M I

    2011-01-01

    This article documents the addition of 229 microsatellite marker loci to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Acacia auriculiformis × Acacia mangium hybrid, Alabama argillacea, Anoplopoma fimbria, Aplochiton zebra, Brevicoryne brassicae, Bruguiera gymnorhiza, Bucorvus leadbeateri, Delphacodes detecta, Tumidagena minuta, Dictyostelium giganteum, Echinogammarus berilloni, Epimedium sagittatum, Fraxinus excelsior, Labeo chrysophekadion, Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi, Paratrechina longicornis, Phaeocystis antarctica, Pinus roxburghii and Potamilus capax. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Acacia peregrinalis, Acacia crassicarpa, Bruguiera cylindrica, Delphacodes detecta, Tumidagena minuta, Dictyostelium macrocephalum, Dictyostelium discoideum, Dictyostelium purpureum, Dictyostelium mucoroides, Dictyostelium rosarium, Polysphondylium pallidum, Epimedium brevicornum, Epimedium koreanum, Epimedium pubescens, Epimedium wushanese and Fraxinus angustifolia. PMID:21429127

  19. Bilateral Ovarian Teratoma: One Parasitic Twisted In-situ and Another Parasitic at the Hepato Renal Space.

    PubMed

    Chitrakar, N S; Suwal, S; Neupane, S

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic ovarian dermoid cysts are very rare. We report a rare case of bilateral ovarian dermoid cysts with parasitic teratoma at the hepato renal space measuring 11x11x6 cm while the other was twisted measuring 10x6x5 cm.Right ovary and tube were absent. The mass found at the hepato renal space was surrounded by and adherent to the omentum with viable tubal fimbria like structure at upper surface. Histopathologically both masses were confirmed as mature ovarian teratoma. The etiology of parasitic teratoma would be due to torsion followed by autoamputation and reimplantation of the right ovarian dermoid cyst. PMID:26744205

  20. The gaf Fimbrial Gene Cluster of Escherichia coli Expresses a Full-Size and a Truncated Soluble Adhesin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tanskanen, Jarna; Saarela, Sirkku; Tankka, Sanna; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Rhen, Mikael; Korhonen, Timo K.; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita

    2001-01-01

    The GafD lectin of the G (F17) fimbriae of diarrhea-associated Escherichia coli was overexpressed and purified from the periplasm of E. coli by affinity chromatography on GlcNAc-agarose. The predicted mature GafD peptide comprises 321 amino acids, but the predominant form of GafD recovered from the periplasm was 19,092 Da in size and corresponded to the 178 N-terminal amino acid residues, as judged by mass spectrometry and amino acid sequencing, and was named ΔGafD. Expression of gafD from the cloned gaf gene cluster in DegP-, Lon-, and OmpT-deficient recombinant strains did not significantly decrease the formation of ΔGafD. The peptide was also detected in the periplasm of the wild-type E. coli strain from which the gaf gene cluster originally was cloned. We expressed gafD fragments encoding C-terminally truncated peptides. Peptides GafD1-252, GafD1-224, GafD1-189, and the GafD1-178, isolated from the periplasm by affinity chromatography, had apparent sizes closely similar to that of ΔGafD. Only trace amounts of truncated forms with expected molecular sizes were detected in spheroplasts. In contrast, the shorter GafD1-157 peptide was detected in spheroplasts but not in the periplasm, indicating that it was poorly translocated or was degraded by periplasmic proteases. Pulse-chase assays using gafD indicated that ΔGafD was processed from GafD and is not a primary translation product. The ΔGafD peptide was soluble by biochemical criteria and exhibited specific binding to GlcNAc-agarose. Inhibition assays with mono- and oligosaccharides gave a similar inhibition pattern in the hemagglutination by the G-fimbria-expressing recombinant E. coli strain and in the binding of [14C]ΔGafD to GlcNAc-agarose. ΔGafD bound specifically to laminin, a previously described tissue target for the G fimbria. Our results show that a soluble, protease-resistant subdomain of GafD exhibits receptor-binding specificity similar to that for intact G fimbriae and that it is formed when

  1. Monoclonal antibodies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) that cross-react immunologically with heterologous CFAs.

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, A; McConnell, M M; Svennerholm, A M

    1994-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli binds to enterocytes in the small intestine by means of antigenically distinct colonization factors (CFs), usually termed colonization factor antigens (CFAs), coli surface antigens (CS), or putative colonization factor antigens (PCFs). To explore the immunological relationship between different CFs, we dissociated CFA/I fimbriae into subunits and produced monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against these subunits. We selected three MAbs that cross-reacted immunologically with a number of different, whole purified CFs in a dot blot test and with the corresponding subunits in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. One of the MAbs, i.e., subunit CFA/I 17:8 (S-CFA/I 17:8), reacted more strongly with subunits of CFA/I than with whole purified fimbriae. This MAb cross-reacted with whole purified fimbriae and subunits of CS4, PCFO166, CS1, and CS2. Moreover, it bound strongly to a peptide of 25 amino acids corresponding to the N-terminal end of CFA/I. The other two MAbs, i.e., S-CFA/I 5:6 and S-CFA/I 8:11, cross-reacted with CS1, CS2, CS4, PCFO166, and CS17 fimbriae but reacted only slightly or not at all with the CFA/I peptide. MAbs S-CFA/I 17:8 and S-CFA/I 5:6 were shown to inhibit hemagglutination by bacterial strains that express either CFA/I, CS1, or CS4. In addition, the binding of enterotoxigenic E. coli strains expressing CFA/I, CS2, CS4, and PCFO166 to enterocyte-like cell-line Caco-2 was inhibited by both MAbs. These results show that several antigenically different CFs have common epitopes and that among these at least one is located in the N-terminal end of the subunit protein. Moreover, antibodies against the common epitopes seem to block binding of the bacterial strains that express different CFs to both erythrocytes and Caco-2 cells. Images PMID:7927693

  2. Virulence factors of lactose-negative Escherichia coli strains isolated from children with diarrhea in Somalia.

    PubMed Central

    Nicoletti, M; Superti, F; Conti, C; Calconi, A; Zagaglia, C

    1988-01-01

    Lactose-negative Escherichia coli strains were isolated at high frequency from children with diarrhea in Somalia during a 2-year study on diarrheal diseases. Sixty-four of these strains, considered to be a representative sample, were characterized for virulence factors, plasmid profiles, and antibiotic resistance. Of these strains, 5 were recognized as enteroinvasive E. coli (they were serotyped as O135:K-:H-), 6 belonged to classical enteropathogenic E. coli serotypes, 9 were able to adhere to tissue culture cells (of these, 4 showed a pattern of localized adherence and 1 was an enteropathogenic strain), 18 were both adherent and hemolytic, and 8 were simply hemolytic. None hybridized with 32P-labeled heat-labile or heat-stable (a and b) enterotoxin gene probes or produced moderate or high-level cytotoxic effects on HeLa cells. Of the 64 strains examined, 24 produced mannose-resistant hemagglutination with human, chicken, and monkey erythrocytes. One of these was serotyped as O4:K-:H8, and a rabbit O antiserum raised against this strain allowed us to establish that 23 strains had the same O antigen. The 23 O4 strains were hemolytic and were not enterotoxic for rabbit ileal loops, and intact bacteria were able to destroy tissue culture cell monolayers very rapidly. The uniformity of the antibiotic resistance pattern and of the plasmid DNA content, together with the fact that they were isolated in different years and in different children, suggests that the O4 strains must be epidemiologically relevant in Somalia. A possible diarrheagenic role for the adherent-hemolytic E. coli strains is also discussed. Images PMID:3281977

  3. Identification of Novel Components Influencing Colonization Factor Antigen I Expression in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Haines, Sara; Gautheron, Sylviane; Nasser, William; Renauld-Mongénie, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Colonization factors (CFs) mediate early adhesion of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in the small intestine. Environmental signals including bile, glucose, and contact with epithelial cells have previously been shown to modulate CF expression in a strain dependent manner. To identify novel components modulating CF surface expression, 20 components relevant to the intestinal environment were selected for evaluation. These included mucin, bicarbonate, norepinephrine, lincomycin, carbon sources, and cations. Effects of individual components on surface expression of the archetype CF, CFA/I, were screened using a fractional factorial Hadamard matrix incorporating 24 growth conditions. As most CFs agglutinate erythrocytes, surface expression was evaluated by mannose resistant hemagglutination. Seven components, including porcine gastric mucin, lincomycin, glutamine, and glucose were found to induce CFA/I surface expression in vitro in a minimal media while five others were inhibitory, including leucine and 1,10-phenanthroline. To further explore the effect of components positively influencing CFA/I surface expression, a response surface methodology (RSM) was designed incorporating 36 growth conditions. The optimum concentration for each component was identified, thereby generating a novel culture media, SP1, for CFA/I expression. CFs closely related to CFA/I, including CS4 and CS14 were similarly induced in SP1 media. Other epidemiologically relevant CFs were also induced when compared to the level obtained in minimal media. These results indicate that although CF surface expression is complex and highly variable among strains, the CF response can be predicted for closely related strains. A novel culture media inducing CFs in the CF5a group was successfully identified. In addition, mucin was found to positively influence CF expression in strains expressing either CFA/I or CS1 and CS3, and may function as a common environmental cue. PMID:26517723

  4. Identification of Novel Components Influencing Colonization Factor Antigen I Expression in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Sara; Gautheron, Sylviane; Nasser, William; Renauld-Mongénie, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Colonization factors (CFs) mediate early adhesion of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in the small intestine. Environmental signals including bile, glucose, and contact with epithelial cells have previously been shown to modulate CF expression in a strain dependent manner. To identify novel components modulating CF surface expression, 20 components relevant to the intestinal environment were selected for evaluation. These included mucin, bicarbonate, norepinephrine, lincomycin, carbon sources, and cations. Effects of individual components on surface expression of the archetype CF, CFA/I, were screened using a fractional factorial Hadamard matrix incorporating 24 growth conditions. As most CFs agglutinate erythrocytes, surface expression was evaluated by mannose resistant hemagglutination. Seven components, including porcine gastric mucin, lincomycin, glutamine, and glucose were found to induce CFA/I surface expression in vitro in a minimal media while five others were inhibitory, including leucine and 1,10-phenanthroline. To further explore the effect of components positively influencing CFA/I surface expression, a response surface methodology (RSM) was designed incorporating 36 growth conditions. The optimum concentration for each component was identified, thereby generating a novel culture media, SP1, for CFA/I expression. CFs closely related to CFA/I, including CS4 and CS14 were similarly induced in SP1 media. Other epidemiologically relevant CFs were also induced when compared to the level obtained in minimal media. These results indicate that although CF surface expression is complex and highly variable among strains, the CF response can be predicted for closely related strains. A novel culture media inducing CFs in the CF5a group was successfully identified. In addition, mucin was found to positively influence CF expression in strains expressing either CFA/I or CS1 and CS3, and may function as a common environmental cue. PMID:26517723

  5. How to make sense of pertussis immunogenicity data.

    PubMed

    Olin, P; Hallander, H O; Gustafsson, L; Reizenstein, E; Storsaeter, J

    2001-12-15

    Studies on serologic correlates to protection in pertussis were reviewed. Trials in the 1950s showed that agglutinogen titers correlated to protection of whole-cell vaccines, but postvaccination antibodies against pertussis toxin (PT) and against filamentous hemagglutinin did not in a later trial of acellular vaccines. However, in household studies nested in 2 recent trials, preexposure antibody levels against pertactin and against fimbriae correlated with protection against typical and mild pertussis, and anti-PT correlated only with protection against typical pertussis. These findings could be used by regulatory agencies to license pertussis vaccines. A reference laboratory for pertussis should distribute panels to control interlaboratory variation in recommended assays, and a minimal response should be set for each pertussis antigen. We conclude that 2 studies have shown correlates between measurable anti-pertactin, anti-fimbriae, and anti-PT antibody levels at exposure and individual protection against pertussis. We suggest that postvaccination response rates may be used as surrogate markers of protection. PMID:11709761

  6. Two autonomous structural modules in the fimbrial shaft adhesin FimA mediate Actinomyces interactions with streptococci and host cells during oral biofilm development

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Arunima; Devarajan, Bharanidharan; Reardon, Melissa E.; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Krishnan, Vengadesan; Cisar, John O.; Das, Asis; Narayana, Sthanam V.L.; Ton-That, Hung

    2011-09-06

    By combining X-ray crystallography and modelling, we describe here the atomic structure of distinct adhesive moieties of FimA, the shaft fimbrillin of Actinomyces type 2 fimbriae, which uniquely mediates the receptor-dependent intercellular interactions between Actinomyces and oral streptococci as well as host cells during the development of oral biofilms. The FimA adhesin is built with three IgG-like domains, each of which harbours an intramolecular isopeptide bond, previously described in several Gram-positive pilins. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that although these isopeptide bonds are dispensable for fimbrial assembly, cell-cell interactions and biofilm formation, they contribute significantly to the proteolytic stability of FimA. Remarkably, FimA harbours two autonomous adhesive modules, which structurally resemble the Staphylococcus aureus Cna B domain. Each isolated module can bind the plasma glycoprotein asialofetuin as well as the polysaccharide receptors present on the surface of oral streptococci and epithelial cells. Thus, FimA should serve as an excellent paradigm for the development of therapeutic strategies and elucidating the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between cellular receptors and Gram-positive fimbriae.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of goat oviductal epithelial cells at the follicular and luteal phases of the oestrus cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, H; Onodera, M; Sugawara, S

    1993-01-01

    The luminal surfaces of epithelial cells in various regions of the oviducts of the goats at the follicular and luteal phases of the oestrous cycle were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Marked cyclic changes were observed on the surface of the epithelium in the fimbriae, ampulla and ampullar-isthmic junction, but few changes were found in the isthmus or uterotubal junction. The epithelium of the fimbriae, ampulla, and ampullar-isthmic junction of oviducts in the follicular phase was extensively ciliated and most of the cilia extended above the apical processes of the nonciliated cells. In the luteal phase, many ciliated cells were hidden by the bulbous processes of the nonciliated cells. In the isthmus and at the uterotubal junction, the apical surfaces of the nonciliated cells were flat or gently rounded at both phases of the oestrous cycle. The results demonstrate that regional variations are associated with the cyclic changes in the epithelial cells of the goat oviduct. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:8300425

  8. Detection of pap, sfa, afa, foc, and fim Adhesin-Encoding Operons in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolates Collected From Patients With Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rahdar, Masoud; Rashki, Ahmad; Miri, Hamid Reza; Rashki Ghalehnoo, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) with its virulence factors is the most prevalent cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). Objectives; This study aimed to determine the occurrence of fim, pap, sfa, and afa genes among 100 UPEC isolates collected from patients diagnosed with UTI. Materials and Methods A total of 100 UPEC isolates were obtained from urine samples of patients with UTI. The prevalence of 5 virulence genes encoding type 1 fimbriae (fimH), pili associated with pyelonephritis (pap), S and F1C fimbriae (sfa and foc) and afimbrial adhesins (afa) were determined through PCR method. We also investigated the phylogenetic background of all isolates. In addition, the distribution of adhesin-encoding operons between the phylogroups was assessed. Results: The prevalence of genes encoding for fimbrial adhesive systems was 95% for fim, 57% for pap, 16% for foc, and 81% for sfa. The operons encoding for afa afimbrial adhesins were identified in 12% of isolates. The various combinations of detected genes were designated as virulence patterns. The fim gene, which occurred in strains from all phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D) was evaluated and no significant differences were found among these groups. Conversely, significant differences were observed in relation to pap, afa, foc, and sfa operons. Conclusions: These results indicate that the PCR method is a powerful genotypic assay for the detection of adhesin-encoding operons. Thus, this assay can be recommended for clinical use to detect virulent urinary E. coli strains, as well as epidemiological studies. PMID:26464770

  9. Occurrence and regulation of the multicellular morphotype in Salmonella serovars important in human disease.

    PubMed

    Römling, Ute; Bokranz, Werner; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Zogaj, Xhavit; Nimtz, Manfred; Tschäpe, Helmut

    2003-08-01

    Multicellular behavior in Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC14028 called the rdar morphotype is characterized by the expression of the extracellular matrix components cellulose and curli fimbriae. Over 90% of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis strains from human disease, food and animals expressed the rdar morphotype at 28 degrees C. Regulation of the rdar morphotype occurred via the response regulator ompR, which activated transcription of csgD required for production of cellulose and curli fimbriae. Serovar-specific regulation of csgD required rpoS in S. Typhimurium, but was partially independent of rpoS in S. Enteritidis. Rarely, strain-specific temperature-deregulated expression of the rdar morphotype was observed. The host-restricted serovars S. Typhimurium var. Copenhagen phage type DT2 and DT99, Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Choleraesuis did not express the rdar morphotype, while in Salmonella Gallinarum cellulose expression at 37 degrees C was seen in some strains. Therefore, the expression pattern of the rdar morphotype is serovar specific and correlates with a disease phenotype breaching the intestinal epithelial cell lining. PMID:14503792

  10. Denervated hippocampus provides a favorable microenvironment for neuronal differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Han, Xiao; Cheng, Xiang; Tan, Xue-Feng; Zhao, He-Yan; Zhang, Xin-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Fimbria-fornix transection induces both exogenous and endogenous neural stem cells to differentiate into neurons in the hippocampus. This indicates that the denervated hippocampus provides an environment for neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells. However, the pathways and mechanisms in this process are still unclear. Seven days after fimbria fornix transection, our reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blot assay, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay results show a significant increase in ciliary neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein expression in the denervated hippocampus. Moreover, neural stem cells derived from hippocampi of fetal (embryonic day 17) Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with ciliary neurotrophic factor for 7 days, with an increased number of microtubule associated protein-2-positive cells and decreased number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells detected. Our results show that ciliary neurotrophic factor expression is up-regulated in the denervated hippocampus, which may promote neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells in the denervated hippocampus. PMID:27212920

  11. Characterization of cellulose production in Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and its biological consequences.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Cláudia; Saxena, Inder; Wang, Xiaoda; Kader, Abdul; Bokranz, Werner; Simm, Roger; Nobles, David; Chromek, Milan; Brauner, Annelie; Brown, R Malcolm; Römling, Ute

    2009-05-01

    Bacterial species of the Enterobacteriaceae family produce cellulose and curli fimbriae as extracellular matrix components, and their synthesis is positively regulated by the transcriptional activator CsgD. In this group of bacteria, cellulose biosynthesis is commonly regulated by CsgD via the GGDEF domain protein AdrA, a diguanylate cyclase that produces cyclic-diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP), an allosteric activator of cellulose synthase. In the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 and its recent clonal isolates, CsgD activates the production of curli fimbriae at 28 degrees C, but neither CsgD nor AdrA is required for the c-di-GMP-dependent biosynthesis of cellulose at 28 degrees C and 37 degrees C. In these strains, the GGDEF domain protein YedQ, a diguanylate cyclase that activates cellulose biosynthesis in certain E. coli strains, is not required for cellulose biosynthesis and it has in fact evolved into a novel protein. Cellulose production in Nissle 1917 is required for adhesion of bacteria to the gastrointestinal epithelial cell line HT-29, to the mouse epithelium in vivo, and for enhanced cytokine production. The role of cellulose in this strain is in contrast to the role of cellulose in the commensal strain E. coli TOB1. Consequently, the role of cellulose in bacterial-host interaction is dependent on the E. coli strain background. PMID:19175667

  12. Shear-enhanced binding of intestinal colonization factor antigen I of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; McVeigh, Annette L.; Kidd, Brian; Yakovenko, Olga; Thomas, Wendy E.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In the intestine, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli works against peristaltic forces, adhering to the epithelium via the CFA/I fimbrial adhesin CfaE. The CfaE adhesin is similar in localization and tertiary (but not primary) structure to FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which shows shear-dependent binding to epithelial receptors by an allosteric catch-bond mechanism. Thus, we speculated that CfaE is also capable of shear-enhanced binding. Indeed, bovine erythrocytes coursing over immobilized CFA/I fimbriae in flow-chambers exhibited low accumulation levels and fast rolling at low shear, but an 80-fold increase in accumulation and 3-fold decrease in rolling velocity at elevated shear. This effect was reversible and abolished by pre-incubation of fimbriae with anti-CfaE antibody. Erythrocytes bound to whole CfaE in the same shear-enhanced manner, but to CfaE adhesin domain in a shear-inhibitable fashion. Residue replacements designed to disrupt CfaE interdomain interaction decreased the shear-dependency of adhesion and increased binding under static conditions to human intestinal epithelial cells. These findings indicate that close interaction between adhesive and anchoring pilin domains of CfaE keeps the former in a low-affinity state that toggles into a high-affinity state upon separation of two domains, all consistent with an allosteric catch-bond mechanism of CfaE binding. PMID:20345656

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Csu pili CsuC-CsuA/B chaperone-major subunit pre-assembly complex from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Pakharukova, Natalia; Tuittila, Minna; Paavilainen, Sari; Zavialov, Anton

    2015-06-01

    The attachment of many Gram-negative pathogens to biotic and abiotic surfaces is mediated by fimbrial adhesins, which are assembled via the classical, alternative and archaic chaperone-usher (CU) pathways. The archaic CU fimbrial adhesins have the widest phylogenetic distribution, yet very little is known about their structure and mechanism of assembly. To elucidate the biogenesis of archaic CU systems, structural analysis of the Csu fimbriae, which are used by Acinetobacter baumannii to form stable biofilms and cause nosocomial infection, was focused on. The major fimbriae subunit CsuA/B complexed with the CsuC chaperone was purified from the periplasm of Escherichia coli cells co-expressing CsuA/B and CsuC, and the complex was crystallized in PEG 3350 solution using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Selenomethionine-labelled CsuC-CsuA/B complex was purified and crystallized under the same conditions. The crystals diffracted to 2.40 Å resolution and belonged to the hexagonal space group P6(4)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 94.71, c = 187.05 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Initial phases were derived from a single anomalous diffraction (SAD) experiment using the selenomethionine derivative. PMID:26057810

  14. The multicellular morphotypes of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli produce cellulose as the second component of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Zogaj, X; Nimtz, M; Rohde, M; Bokranz, W; Römling, U

    2001-03-01

    Production of cellulose has been thought to be restricted to a few bacterial species such as the model organism Acetobacter xylinus. We show by enzymatic analysis and mass spectrometry that, besides thin aggregative fimbriae, the second component of the extracellular matrix of the multicellular morphotype (rdar) of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli is cellulose. The bcsA, bcsB, bcsZ and bcsC genes responsible for cellulose biosynthesis are not regulated by AgfD, the positive transcriptional regulator of the rdar morphotype. Transcription of the bcs genes was not co-expressed with the rdar morphotype under any of the environmental conditions examined. However, cellulose biosynthesis was turned on by the sole expression of adrA, a gene encoding a putative transmembrane protein regulated by agfD, indicating a novel pathway for the activation of cellulose synthesis. The co-expression of cellulose and thin aggregative fimbriae leads to the formation of a highly hydrophobic network with tightly packed cells aligned in parallel in a rigid matrix. As the production of cellulose would now appear to be a property widely distributed among bacteria, the function of the cellulose polymer in bacteria will have to be considered in a new light. PMID:11260463

  15. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of Escherichia coli PapD-like protein (EcpD).

    PubMed

    Pandey, Nishant Kumar; Pal, Ravi Kant; Kashyap, Maruthi; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2012-08-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria are characterized by hair-like proteinaceous appendages on their surface known as fimbriae. In uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, fimbriae mediate attachment by binding to receptors on the host cell, often contributing to virulence and disease. E. coli PapD-like protein (EcpD) is a periplasmic chaperone that plays an important role in the proper folding and guiding of Yad fimbrial proteins to the outer membrane usher protein in a process known as pilus biogenesis. EcpD is essential for pilus biogenesis in uropathogenic E. coli and plays an important role in virulence. In the present study, EcpD was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 1.67 Å resolution and belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 100.3, b = 127.6, c = 45.9 Å. There was a single molecule in the asymmetric unit and the corresponding Matthews coefficient was calculated to be 3.02 Å(3) Da(-1), with 59% solvent content. Initial phases were determined by molecular replacement. PMID:22869131

  16. The F4 fimbrial chaperone FaeE is stable as a monomer that does not require self-capping of its pilin-interactive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Van Molle, Inge; Moonens, Kristof; Buts, Lieven; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Panjikar, Santosh; Wyns, Lode; De Greve, Henri; Bouckaert, Julie

    2009-05-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use the chaperone-usher pathway to express adhesive surface structures, such as fimbriae, in order to mediate attachment to host cells. Periplasmic chaperones are required to shuttle fimbrial subunits or pilins through the periplasmic space in an assembly-competent form. The chaperones cap the hydrophobic surface of the pilins through a donor-strand complementation mechanism. FaeE is the periplasmic chaperone required for the assembly of the F4 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The FaeE crystal structure shows a dimer formed by interaction between the pilin-binding interfaces of the two monomers. Dimerization and tetramerization have been observed previously in crystal structures of fimbrial chaperones and have been suggested to serve as a self-capping mechanism that protects the pilin-interactive surfaces in solution in the absence of the pilins. However, thermodynamic and biochemical data show that FaeE occurs as a stable monomer in solution. Other lines of evidence indicate that self-capping of the pilin-interactive interfaces is not a mechanism that is conservedly applied by all periplasmic chaperones, but is rather a case-specific solution to cap aggregation-prone surfaces. PMID:19390146

  17. The fimbrial adhesin F17-G of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli has an immunoglobulin-like lectin domain that binds N-acetylglucosamine.

    PubMed

    Buts, Lieven; Bouckaert, Julie; De Genst, Erwin; Loris, Remy; Oscarson, Stefan; Lahmann, Martina; Messens, Joris; Brosens, Elke; Wyns, Lode; De Greve, Henri

    2003-08-01

    The F17-G adhesin at the tip of flexible F17 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli mediates binding to N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine-presenting receptors on the microvilli of the intestinal epithelium of ruminants. We report the 1.7 A resolution crystal structure of the lectin domain of F17-G, both free and in complex with N-acetylglucosamine. The monosaccharide is bound on the side of the ellipsoid-shaped protein in a conserved site around which all natural variations of F17-G are clustered. A model is proposed for the interaction between F17-fimbriated E. coli and microvilli with enhanced affinity compared with the binding constant we determined for F17-G binding to N-acetylglucosamine (0.85 mM-1). Unexpectedly, the F17-G structure reveals that the lectin domains of the F17-G, PapGII and FimH fimbrial adhesins all share the immunoglobulin-like fold of the structural components (pilins) of their fimbriae, despite lack of any sequence identity. Fold comparisons with pilin and chaperone structures of the chaperone/usher pathway highlight the central role of the C-terminal beta-strand G of the immunoglobulin-like fold and provides new insights into pilus assembly, function and adhesion. PMID:12864853

  18. E. coli Nissle 1917 Affects Salmonella Adhesion to Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schierack, Peter; Kleta, Sylvia; Tedin, Karsten; Babila, Julius Tachu; Oswald, Sibylle; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A.; Hiemann, Rico; Paetzold, Susanne; Wieler, Lothar H.

    2011-01-01

    Background The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) has been shown to interfere in a human in vitro model with the invasion of several bacterial pathogens into epithelial cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EcN on Salmonella Typhimurium invasion of porcine intestinal epithelial cells, focusing on EcN effects on the various stages of Salmonella infection including intracellular and extracellular Salmonella growth rates, virulence gene regulation, and adhesion. We show that EcN affects the initial Salmonella invasion steps by modulating Salmonella virulence gene regulation and Salmonella SiiE-mediated adhesion, but not extra- and intracellular Salmonella growth. However, the inhibitory activity of EcN against Salmonella invasion always correlated with EcN adhesion capacities. EcN mutants defective in the expression of F1C fimbriae and flagellae were less adherent and less inhibitory toward Salmonella invasion. Another E. coli strain expressing F1C fimbriae was also adherent to IPEC-J2 cells, and was similarly inhibitory against Salmonella invasion like EcN. Conclusions We propose that EcN affects Salmonella adhesion through secretory components. This mechanism appears to be common to many E. coli strains, with strong adherence being a prerequisite for an effective reduction of SiiE-mediated Salmonella adhesion. PMID:21379575

  19. Coli surface antigens 1 and 3 of colonization factor antigen II-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: morphology, purification, and immune responses in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, M M; Ristaino, P; Marley, G; Smyth, C; Knutton, S; Boedeker, E; Black, R; Young, C; Clements, M L; Cheney, C

    1984-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) of serotype O6:H16, biotype A, bearing colonization factor antigen II (CFA/II) possesses two distinct coli surface antigens, CS1 and CS3, whereas CFA/II-positive ETEC of serotype O8:H9 manifests only CS3. CS1 has been shown to be fimbrial in nature, but heretofore the morphology of CS3 has not been described. Accordingly, by immune electron microscopy we investigated the morphological characteristics of CS3 on bacterial cells and after purification. CS3 was found to consist of thin (2-nm), flexible, wiry, "fibrillar" fimbriae, visible both on bacteria (O6:H16, biotype A, and O8:H9 strains) and in the pure state. In contrast, CS1 exists as wider (6-nm), rigid fimbriae on the surface of O6:H16, biotype A, strains. By the use of antisera to CS1 and CS3 in immune electron microscopy, immunodiffusion in gel, and immunoblotting techniques, CS1 and CS3 were found to be immunologically as well as morphologically distinct. Six of nine volunteers who developed diarrhea after challenge with an O139:H28 ETEC strain bearing CS1 and CS3 had significant serological rises to purified CS1 and CS3 antigens, suggesting that both antigens are elaborated in vivo, play a role in pathogenesis, and stimulate an immune response. Images PMID:6370866

  20. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Streptococcus gordonii Expressing Porphyromonas gingivalis FimA Domains

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashu; Honma, Kiyonobu; Evans, Richard T.; Hruby, Dennis E.; Genco, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a gram-negative anaerobe, is implicated in the etiology of adult periodontitis. P. gingivalis fimbriae are one of several critical surface virulence factors involved in both bacterial adherence and inflammation. P. gingivalis fimbrillin (FimA), the major subunit protein of fimbriae, is considered an important antigen for vaccine development against P. gingivalis-associated periodontitis. We have previously shown that biologically active domains of P. gingivalis fimbrillin can be expressed on the surface of the human commensal bacterium Streptococcus gordonii. In this study, we examined the effects of oral coimmunization of germfree rats with two S. gordonii recombinants expressing N (residues 55 to 145)- and C (residues 226 to 337)-terminal epitopes of P. gingivalis FimA to elicit FimA-specific immune responses. The effectiveness of immunization in protecting against alveolar bone loss following P. gingivalis infection was also evaluated. The results of this study show that the oral delivery of P. gingivalis FimA epitopes via S. gordonii vectors resulted in the induction of FimA-specific serum (immunoglobulin G [IgG] and IgA) and salivary (IgA) antibody responses and that the immune responses were protective against subsequent P. gingivalis-induced alveolar bone loss. These results support the potential usefulness of the S. gordonii vectors expressing P. gingivalis fimbrillin as a mucosal vaccine against adult periodontitis. PMID:11292708

  1. Mucosal immune responses following oral immunisation of pigs with fimbrial antigens of enterotoxigenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Cox, Eric; Snoeck, Veerle; Verdonck, Frank; Goddeeris, Bruno

    2003-01-01

    The intestinal mucosal immune system can discriminate actively between harmful pathogens and harmless food antigens resulting in different immune responses namely IgA production and oral tolerance, respectively. Whereas particulate antigen (microorganisms) can induce an IgA response, soluble antigen often leads to tolerance. Recently, it has been demonstrated that F4 fimbrial antigens of enterotoxigenic E. coli (F4 ETEC) can be used to immunise piglets. Oral administration of soluble F4 to F4R+ piglets (pigs with a receptor for these fimbriae (F4R+) on their small intestinal villous enterocytes) results in an intestinal mucosal immune response that completely protects the piglets against a challenge infection. In F4R- pigs, such an intestinal mucosal immune response does not occur. However, a priming of the systemic immune system can be seen similar to the priming in pigs fed with the same dose of a food antigen, suggesting that F4 in F4R- pigs behaves as a food antigen. These results indicate that a receptor-mediated mechanism is involved in the induction of a protective intestinal mucosal immune response using soluble antigen. However, oral administration of soluble F18 fimbriae of verotoxigenic E. coli to F18R+ piglets could not induce a similar protective immune response. So the type of the receptor and/or the nature of the antigen seem to be important to obtain an intestinal IgA response. PMID:24757806

  2. BolA Is a Transcriptional Switch That Turns Off Motility and Turns On Biofilm Development

    PubMed Central

    Dressaire, Clémentine; Moreira, Ricardo Neves; Barahona, Susana; Alves de Matos, António Pedro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria are extremely versatile organisms that rapidly adapt to changing environments. When bacterial cells switch from planktonic growth to biofilm, flagellum formation is turned off and the production of fimbriae and extracellular polysaccharides is switched on. BolA is present in most Gram-negative bacteria, and homologues can be found from proteobacteria to eukaryotes. Here, we show that BolA is a new bacterial transcription factor that modulates the switch from a planktonic to a sessile lifestyle. It negatively modulates flagellar biosynthesis and swimming capacity in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, BolA overexpression favors biofilm formation, involving the production of fimbria-like adhesins and curli. Our results also demonstrate that BolA is a protein with high affinity to DNA and is able to regulate many genes on a genome-wide scale. Moreover, we show that the most significant targets of this protein involve a complex network of genes encoding proteins related to biofilm development. Herein, we propose that BolA is a motile/adhesive transcriptional switch, specifically involved in the transition between the planktonic and the attachment stage of biofilm formation. PMID:25691594

  3. One-step spray-dried polyelectrolyte microparticles enhance the antigen cross-presentation capacity of porcine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Devriendt, Bert; Baert, Kim; Dierendonck, Marijke; Favoreel, Herman; De Koker, Stefaan; Remon, Jean Paul; De Geest, Bruno G; Cox, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Vaccination is regarded as the most efficient and cost-effective way to prevent infectious diseases. Vaccine design nowadays focuses on the implementation of safer recombinant subunit vaccines. However, these recombinant subunit antigens are often poor immunogens and several strategies are currently under investigation to enhance their immunogenicity. The encapsulation of antigens in biodegradable microparticulate delivery systems seems a promising strategy to boost their immunogenicity. Here, we evaluate the capacity of polyelectrolyte complex microparticles (PECMs), fabricated by single step spray-drying, to deliver antigens to porcine dendritic cells and how these particles affect the functional maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). As clinically relevant model antigen F4 fimbriae, a bacterial adhesin purified from a porcine-specific enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain was chosen. The resulting antigen-loaded PECMs are efficiently internalised by porcine monocyte-derived DCs. F4 fimbriae-loaded PECMs (F4-PECMs) enhanced CD40 and CD25 surface expression by DCs and this phenotypical maturation correlated with an increased secretion of IL-6 and IL-1β. More importantly, F4-PECMs enhance both the T cell stimulatory and antigen presentation capacity of DCs. Moreover, PECMs efficiently promoted the CD8(+) T cell stimulatory capacity of dendritic cells, indicating an enhanced ability to cross-present the encapsulated antigens. These results could accelerate the development of veterinary and human subunit vaccines based on polyelectrolyte complex microparticles to induce protective immunity against a variety of extra- and intracellular pathogens. PMID:23207327

  4. Macrophages lift off surface-bound bacteria using a filopodium-lamellipodium hook-and-shovel mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Jens; Lühmann, Tessa; Chabria, Mamta; Hall, Heike; Vogel, Viola

    2013-01-01

    To clear pathogens from host tissues or biomaterial surfaces, phagocytes have to break the adhesive bacteria-substrate interactions. Here we analysed the mechanobiological process that enables macrophages to lift-off and phagocytose surface-bound Escherichia coli (E. coli). In this opsonin-independent process, macrophage filopodia hold on to the E. coli fimbriae long enough to induce a local protrusion of a lamellipodium. Specific contacts between the macrophage and E. coli are formed via the glycoprotein CD48 on filopodia and the adhesin FimH on type 1 fimbriae (hook). We show that bacterial detachment from surfaces occurrs after a lamellipodium has protruded underneath the bacterium (shovel), thereby breaking the multiple bacterium-surface interactions. After lift-off, the bacterium is engulfed by a phagocytic cup. Force activated catch bonds enable the long-term survival of the filopodium-fimbrium interactions while soluble mannose inhibitors and CD48 antibodies suppress the contact formation and thereby inhibit subsequent E. coli phagocytosis. PMID:24097079

  5. H-NS controls pap and daa fimbrial transcription in Escherichia coli in response to multiple environmental cues.

    PubMed

    White-Ziegler, C A; Villapakkam, A; Ronaszeki, K; Young, S

    2000-11-01

    A comparative study was completed to determine the influence of various environmental stimuli on the transcription of three different fimbrial operons in Escherichia coli and to determine the role of the histone-like protein H-NS in this environmental regulation. The fimbrial operons studied included the pap operon, which encodes pyelonephritis-associated pili (P pili), the daa operon, which encodes F1845 fimbriae, and the fan operon, which encodes K99 fimbriae. Using lacZYA transcriptional fusions within each of the fimbrial operons, we tested temperature, osmolarity, carbon source, rich medium, oxygen levels, pH, amino acids, solid medium, and iron concentration for their effects on fimbrial gene expression. Low temperature, high osmolarity, glucose as a carbon source, and rich medium repressed transcription of all three operons. High iron did not alter transcription of any of the operons tested, whereas the remaining stimuli had effects on individual operons. For the pap and daa operons, introduction of the hns651 mutation relieved the repression, either fully or partially, due to low temperature, glucose as a carbon source, rich medium, and high osmolarity. Taken together, these data indicate that there are common environmental cues that regulate fimbrial transcription in E. coli and that H-NS is an important environmental regulator for fimbrial transcription in response to several stimuli. PMID:11053383

  6. Cloning and expression of a Salmonella enteritidis fimbrin gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Feutrier, J; Kay, W W; Trust, T J

    1988-01-01

    A gene bank of DNA from a human isolate of Salmonella enteritidis was constructed in the cosmid pHC79 in Escherichia coli HB101. Five clones containing 35- to 45-kilobase inserts of S. enteritidis DNA reacted in colony immunoblot assays with a polyclonal antiserum prepared against purified S. enteritidis fimbriae. Electron microscopy showed that none of the five fimbrin-producing clones produced fimbriae, yet radioimmunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis located the 14,400-molecular-weight S. enteritidis in the outer membrane fraction of three of the clones and in the periplasmic fraction of all five clones. By using an oligonucleotide probe homologous to the 5' region of the fimbrin structural gene, the fimbrin gene was located on a 5.3-kilobase HindIII fragment. In vitro transcription-translation analysis verified that this HindIII fragment subcloned into plasmid pTZ18R produced unprocessed S. enteritidis fimbrin of molecular weight 16,400. Dot blot hybridization against a selection of strains of the family Enterobacteriaceae indicated a limited distribution of the S. enteritidis fimbrin gene. Images PMID:2900832

  7. Adhesion of type A Pasteurella mulocida to rabbit pharyngeal cells and its possible role in rabbit respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed Central

    Glorioso, J C; Jones, G W; Rush, H G; Pentler, L J; Darif, C A; Coward, J E

    1982-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida serotype A was found in association with the mucosal epithelium of the nasopharynges of rabbits with respiratory tract infections. The bacteria specifically attached to squamous epithelial cells of the pharyngeal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro and to some tissue culture cell lines such as HeLa. All strains with serotype A capsules were adhesive. With the exception of one serotype D strain, strains with capsular serotypes B, D, and E were at least 10-fold less adhesive. Bacterial adhesiveness was much reduced after pronase digestion, heat treatment, and homogenization, but removal of the hyaluronic acid capsule increased adhesion. Electron microscopy revealed that fimbriae were produced by an adhesive pasteurella strain, but not by two nonadherent strains. The attachment of the former strain to pharyngeal and HeLa cells was inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Together, these findings suggest that this amino sugar may be a component of the receptor on both animal cell surfaces and that the fimbriae may be the adhesions. It is proposed that bacterial attachment has a role in colonization and infection of rabbit upper respiratory mucosae. Images PMID:7068213

  8. Dynamic Responses of Selective Brain White Matter Fiber Tracts to Binge Alcohol and Recovery in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Zahr, Natalie M.; Mayer, Dirk; Rohlfing, Torsten; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the dynamics of white matter vulnerability to excessive alcohol consumption, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used in an animal model of alcohol exposure. Quantitative, in vivo fiber tracking results are presented from rats with DTI conducted at 3 time points: baseline; after 4 days of intragastric alcohol to blood alcohol levels of ~250mg/dL; and after one week of recovery. Binge alcohol followed by a week of sobriety resulted in rapidly reversible decreases in fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure of the coherence of fiber tracts, in callosal genu and fimbria-fornix but not splenium; and increases in mean diffusivity (MD), an index of freely diffusing water in tissue, selective to the fimbria-fornix. These effects were confirmed with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). The directionality of changes in DTI metrics reproduce those observed in human alcoholism. That a single exposure to binge alcohol can cause substantial transient changes detectable in DTI metrics demonstrates the potential for rapid neuroplasticity. PMID:25894968

  9. Analysis of Bordetella pertussis clinical isolates circulating in European countries during the period 1998-2012.

    PubMed

    van Gent, M; Heuvelman, C J; van der Heide, H G; Hallander, H O; Advani, A; Guiso, N; Wirsing von Kőnig, C H; Vestrheim, D F; Dalby, T; Fry, N K; Pierard, D; Detemmerman, L; Zavadilova, J; Fabianova, K; Logan, C; Habington, A; Byrne, M; Lutyńska, A; Mosiej, E; Pelaz, C; Gröndahl-Yli-Hannuksela, K; Barkoff, A M; Mertsola, J; Economopoulou, A; He, Q; Mooi, F R

    2015-04-01

    Despite more than 50 years of vaccination, pertussis is still an endemic disease, with regular epidemic outbreaks. With the exception of Poland, European countries have replaced whole-cell vaccines (WCVs) by acellular vaccines (ACVs) in the 1990s. Worldwide, antigenic divergence in vaccine antigens has been found between vaccine strains and circulating strains. In this work, 466 Bordetella pertussis isolates collected in the period 1998-2012 from 13 European countries were characterised by multi-locus antigen sequence typing (MAST) of the pertussis toxin promoter (ptxP) and of the genes coding for proteins used in the ACVs: pertussis toxin (Ptx), pertactin (Prn), type 2 fimbriae (Fim2) and type 3 fimbriae (Fim3). Isolates were further characterised by fimbrial serotyping, multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The results showed a very similar B. pertussis population for 12 countries using ACVs, while Poland, which uses a WCV, was quite distinct, suggesting that ACVs and WCVs select for different B. pertussis populations. This study forms a baseline for future studies on the effect of vaccination programmes on B. pertussis populations. PMID:25527446

  10. Ongoing Horizontal and Vertical Transmission of Virulence Genes and papA Alleles among Escherichia coli Blood Isolates from Patients with Diverse-Source Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; O'Bryan, Timothy T.; Kuskowski, Michael; Maslow, Joel N.

    2001-01-01

    The phylogenetic distributions of multiple putative virulence factors (VFs) and papA (P fimbrial structural subunit) alleles among 182 Escherichia coli blood isolates from patients with diverse-source bacteremia were defined. Phylogenetic correspondence among these strains, the E. coli Reference (ECOR) collection, and other collections of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) was assessed. Although among the 182 bacteremia isolates phylogenetic group B2 predominated, exhibited the greatest concentration of individual VFs, and contained the largest number of familiar virulent clones, other phylogenetic groups exhibited greater concentrations of certain VFs than did group B2 and included several additional virulent clones. Certain of the newly detected VF genes, e.g., fyuA (yersiniabactin; 76%) and focG (F1C fimbriae; 25%), were as prevalent or more prevalent than their more familiar traditional counterparts, e.g., iut (aerobactin; 57%) and sfaS (S fimbriae; 14%), thus possibly offering additional useful targets for preventive interventions. Considerable diversity of VF profiles was observed at every level within the phylogenetic tree, including even within individual lineages. This suggested that many different pathways can lead to extraintestinal virulence in E. coli and that the evolution of ExPEC, which involves extensive horizontal transmission of VFs and continuous remodeling of pathogenicity-associated islands, is a highly active, ongoing process. PMID:11500406

  11. The Escherichia coli G-fimbrial lectin protein participates both in fimbrial biogenesis and in recognition of the receptor N-acetyl-D-glucosamine.

    PubMed Central

    Saarela, S; Taira, S; Nurmiaho-Lassila, E L; Makkonen, A; Rhen, M

    1995-01-01

    The gafD gene encoding the N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific fimbrial lectin (adhesin) protein GafD of uropathogenic Escherichia coli was cloned and subjected to genetic analysis. The corresponding gene product was isolated as a MalE fusion protein. The lectin gene was identified with the aid of deletion mutagenesis; mutations in gafD impaired either receptor binding or both receptor binding and fimbria production, depending on the mutation created. All mutants converted to wild-type expressors when complemented in trans with the cloned intact gafD gene. The predicted 354-amino-acid sequence of GafD, deduced from the nucleotide sequence, is closely related to those of the fimbria-associated F17-G and F17b-G proteins coded for by enterotoxigenic and invasive E. coli strains. Isolated GafD was shown to recognize N-acetyl-D-glucosamine by virtue of specific binding to an immobilized receptor, thus proving directly that GafD is a sugar-binding protein. Our results indicate that GafD as such is sufficient for receptor recognition and that the protein also participates in fimbrial biogenesis. PMID:7883703

  12. Denervated hippocampus provides a favorable microenvironment for neuronal differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Han, Xiao; Cheng, Xiang; Tan, Xue-feng; Zhao, He-yan; Zhang, Xin-hua

    2016-01-01

    Fimbria-fornix transection induces both exogenous and endogenous neural stem cells to differentiate into neurons in the hippocampus. This indicates that the denervated hippocampus provides an environment for neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells. However, the pathways and mechanisms in this process are still unclear. Seven days after fimbria fornix transection, our reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blot assay, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay results show a significant increase in ciliary neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein expression in the denervated hippocampus. Moreover, neural stem cells derived from hippocampi of fetal (embryonic day 17) Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with ciliary neurotrophic factor for 7 days, with an increased number of microtubule associated protein-2-positive cells and decreased number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells detected. Our results show that ciliary neurotrophic factor expression is up-regulated in the denervated hippocampus, which may promote neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells in the denervated hippocampus. PMID:27212920

  13. High-affinity choline uptake and acetylcholine-metabolizing enzymes in CNS white matter. A quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Solyga, Volker; Lossius, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The presence of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors suggests the occurrence of cholinergic neurotransmission in white matter; however no quantitative information exists on acetylcholine formation and breakdown in white matter. We compared white structures of pig brain (fimbria, corpus callosum, pyramidal tracts, and occipital white matter) to gray structures (temporal, parietal and cerebellar cortices, hippocampus, and caudate) and found that sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline uptake in white structures was 25-31% of that in hippocampus. White matter choline acetyltransferase activity was 10-50% of the hippocampal value; the highest activity was found in fimbria. Acetylcholine esterase activity in white structures was 20-25% of that in hippocampus. The caudate, which is rich in cholinergic interneurons, gave values for all three parameters that were 2.8-4 times higher than in hippocampus. The results suggest a certain capacity for cholinergic neurotransmission in central nervous white matter. The white matter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which provides acetyl-CoA for acetylcholine synthesis, ranged between 33 and 50% of the hippocampal activity; the activity in the caudate was similar to that in hippocampus and the other gray structures, which was true also for other enzymes of glucose metabolism: hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Acetylcholine esterase activity in white matter was inhibited by the nerve agent soman, which may help explain the reported deleterious effect of soman on white matter. Further, this finding suggests that acetylcholine esterase inhibitors used in Alzheimer's disease may have an effect in white matter. PMID:18674580

  14. Differentiation of Crohn’s Disease-Associated Isolates from Other Pathogenic Escherichia coli by Fimbrial Adhesion under Shear Force

    PubMed Central

    Szunerits, Sabine; Zagorodko, Oleksandr; Cogez, Virginie; Dumych, Tetiana; Chalopin, Thibaut; Alvarez Dorta, Dimitri; Sivignon, Adeline; Barnich, Nicolas; Harduin-Lepers, Anne; Larroulet, Iban; Yanguas Serrano, Aritz; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Gouin, Sébastien G.; Boukherroub, Rabah; Bouckaert, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Shear force exerted on uropathogenic Escherichia coli adhering to surfaces makes type-1 fimbriae stretch out like springs to catch on to mannosidic receptors. This mechanism is initiated by a disruption of the quaternary interactions between the lectin and the pilin of the two-domain FimH adhesin and transduces allosterically to the mannose-binding pocket of FimH to increase its affinity. Mannose-specific adhesion of 14 E. coli pathovars was measured under flow, using surface plasmon resonance detection on functionalized graphene-coated gold interfaces. Increasing the shear had important differential consequences on bacterial adhesion. Adherent-invasive E. coli, isolated from the feces and biopsies of Crohn’s disease patients, consistently changed their adhesion behavior less under shear and displayed lower SPR signals, compared to E. coli opportunistically infecting the urinary tract, intestines or loci of knee and hip prostheses. We exemplified this further with the extreme behaviors of the reference strains UTI89 and LF82. Whereas their FimA major pilins have identical sequences, FimH of LF82 E. coli is marked by the Thr158Pro mutation. Positioned in the inter-domain region known to carry hot spots of mutations in E. coli pathotypes, residue 158 is indicated to play a structural role in the allosteric regulation of type-1 fimbriae-mediated bacterial adhesion. PMID:27043645

  15. Proteus cibarius sp. nov., a swarming bacterium from Jeotgal, a traditional Korean fermented seafood, and emended description of the genus Proteus.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Dong-Wook; Jung, Mi-Ja; Kim, Min-Soo; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Pil Soo; Whon, Tae Woong; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-06-01

    A novel Proteus-like, Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain JS9T, was isolated from Korean fermented seafood, Jeotgal. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain JS9T belonged to the genus Proteus in the family Enterobacteriaceae. The highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of strain JS9T was to Proteus vulgaris KCTC 2579T (98.98 %) and the genomic DNA G+C content is 39.0 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization values were measured and strain JS9T showed <20.8 % genomic relatedness with closely-related members of the genus Proteus. The isolate showed bacterial motility and swarming activity similar to those of pathogenic Proteus mirabilis but distinct from those of other species of the genus Proteus. The isolate grows optimally at 30 °C, at pH 7, and in the presence of 2 % (w/v) NaCl. The main respiratory quinones are ubiquinone Q-8 and Q-10, and the major cellular fatty acids are C16 : 0, summed feature 3 and summed feature 8. The polar lipids comprise phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unidentified amino lipid, two unidentified amino-phospholipids, and three unidentified lipids. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic analyses, strain JS9T represents a novel species of the genus Proteus, for which the name Proteus cibarius sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JS9T (=KACC 18404T=JCM 30699T). An emended description of the genus Proteus is also provided. PMID:26944634

  16. Salivary receptors for recombinant fimbrillin of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Amano, A; Sojar, H T; Lee, J Y; Sharma, A; Levine, M J; Genco, R J

    1994-01-01

    Fimbriae are considered important in the adherence and colonization of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the oral cavity. It has been demonstrated that purified fimbriae bind to whole human saliva adsorbed to hydroxyapatite (HAP) beads, and the binding appears to be mediated by specific protein-protein interactions. Recently, we expressed the recombinant fimbrillin protein (r-Fim) of P. gingivalis corresponding to amino acid residues 10 to 337 of the native fimbrillin (A. Sharma, H.T. Sojar, J.-Y. Lee, and R.J. Genco, Infect. Immun. 61:3570-3573, 1993). We examined the ability of individual salivary components to promote the direct attachment of r-Fim to HAP beads. Purified r-Fim was radiolabeled with 125I and incubated with HAP beads which were coated with saliva or purified individual salivary components. Whole, parotid, and submandibular-sublingual salivas increased the binding of 125I-r-Fim to HAP beads. Submandibular-sublingual saliva was most effective in increasing the binding of 125I-r-Fim to HAP beads (1.8 times greater than that to uncoated HAP beads). The binding of 125I-r-Fim to HAP beads coated with acidic proline-rich protein 1 (PRP1) or statherin was four and two times greater, respectively, than that to uncoated HAP beads. PRP1 and statherin molecules were also found to bind 125I-r-Fim in an overlay assay. The binding of intact P. gingivalis cells to HAP beads coated with PRP1 or statherin was also enhanced, by 5.4 and 4.3 times, respectively, over that to uncoated HAP beads. The interactions of PRP1 and statherin with 125I-r-Fim were not inhibited by the addition of carbohydrates or amino acids. PRP1 and statherin in solution did not show inhibitory activity on 125I-r-Fim binding to HAP beads coated with PRP1 or statherin. These results suggest that P. gingivalis fimbriae bind strongly through protein-protein interactions to acidic proline-rich protein and statherin molecules which coat surfaces. Images PMID:8039907

  17. Dependence of Bacterial Protein Adhesins on Toll-Like Receptors for Proinflammatory Cytokine Induction

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Martin, Michael; Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Sharma, Ashu; Schifferle, Robert E.; DeNardin, Ernesto; Russell, Michael W.; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signal transducers that mediate inflammatory reactions induced by microbes through pattern recognition of virulence molecules such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoproteins. We investigated whether proinflammatory cytokine responses induced by certain bacterial protein adhesins may also depend on TLRs. In differentiated THP-1 mononuclear cells stimulated by LPS-free recombinant fimbrillin (rFimA) from Porphyromonas gingivalis, cytokine release was abrogated by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to CD14 and TLR4 but not to TLR2. Similar experiments using anti-β2 integrin MAbs suggested that β2 integrins (CD11/CD18) also play a role in cytokine induction by rFimA or native fimbriae. Minor fimbriae (distinct from the fimA-encoded major fimbriae) of P. gingivalis induced proinflammatory cytokine release in a CD14- and TLR2-dependent mode. Cytokine induction by BspA, a leucine-rich repeat protein from Bacteroides forsythus, depended heavily on CD14 and TLR2. We also found that the ability of the streptococcal protein AgI/II to stimulate cytokine release depended partially on CD14 and TLR4, and the AgI/II segment that possibly interacts with these receptors was identified as its N-terminal saliva-binding region. When THP-1 cells were exposed to rFimA for 24 h, surface expression of CD14 and CD18 was decreased and the cells became hyporesponsive to cytokine induction by a second challenge with rFimA. However, tolerance induction was abolished when the THP-1 cells were pretreated with rFimA in the presence of either anti-CD14 MAb or anti-TLR4 MAb. Induction of cross-tolerance between rFimA and LPS correlated with downregulation of the pattern recognition receptors involved. Our data suggest that the CD14-TLR2/4 system is involved in cytokine production and tolerance induction upon interaction with certain proinflammatory bacterial protein adhesins. PMID:11874886

  18. Survival potential of wild type cellulose deficient Salmonella from the feed industry

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Biofilm has been shown to be one way for Salmonella to persist in the feed factory environment. Matrix components, such as fimbriae and cellulose, have been suggested to play an important role in the survival of Salmonella in the environment. Multicellular behaviour by Salmonella is often categorized according to colony morphology into rdar (red, dry and rough) expressing curli fimbriae and cellulose, bdar (brown, dry and rough) expressing curli fimbriae and pdar (pink, dry and rough) expressing cellulose. The aim of the study was to look into the distribution of morphotypes among feed and fish meal factory strains of Salmonella, with emphasis on potential differences between morphotypes with regards to survival in the feed factory environment. Results When screening a total of 148 Salmonella ser. Agona, Salmonella ser. Montevideo, Salmonella ser. Senftenberg and Salmonella ser. Typhimurium strains of feed factory, human clinical and reference collection origin, as many as 99% were able to express rough morphology (rdar or bdar). The dominant morphotype was rdar (74%), however as many as 55% of Salmonella ser. Agona and 19% of Salmonella ser. Senftenberg displayed the bdar morphology. Inconsistency in Calcofluor binding, indicating expression of cellulose, was found among 25% of all the strains tested, however Salmonella ser. Agona showed to be highly consistent in Calcofluor binding (98%). In biofilm, Salmonella ser. Agona strains with bdar mophology was found to be equally tolerant to disinfection treatment as strains with rdar morphotype. However, rdar morphology appeared to be favourable in long term survival in biofilm in a very dry environment. Chemical analysis showed no major differences in polysaccharide content between bdar and rdar strains. Our results indicate that cellulose is not a major component of the Salmonella biofilm matrix. Conclusion The bdar morphotype is common among Salmonella ser. Agona strains isolated from the factory

  19. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics associated with biofilm formation in clinical isolates of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) have been recently described in the prototype typical EPEC E2348/69 strain and in an atypical EPEC O55:H7 strain. In this study, we sought to evaluate biofilm formation in a collection of 126 atypical EPEC strains isolated from 92 diarrheic and 34 nondiarrheic children, belonging to different serotypes. The association of biofilm formation and adhesin-related genes were also investigated. Results Biofilm formation occurred in 37 (29%) strains of different serotypes, when the assays were performed at 26°C and 37°C for 24 h. Among these, four strains (A79, A87, A88, and A111) formed a stronger biofilm than did the others. The frequency of biofilm producers was higher among isolates from patients compared with isolates from controls (34.8% vs 14.7%; P = 0.029). An association was found between biofilm formation and expression of type 1 fimbriae and curli (P < 0.05). Unlike the previously described aEPEC O55:H7, one aEPEC O119:HND strain (A111) formed a strong biofilm and pellicle at the air-liquid interface, but did not express curli. Transposon mutagenesis was used to identify biofilm-deficient mutants. Transposon insertion sequences of six mutants revealed similarity with type 1 fimbriae (fimC, fimD, and fimH), diguanylate cyclase, ATP synthase F1, beta subunit (atpD), and the uncharacterized YjiC protein. All these mutants were deficient in biofilm formation ability. Conclusion This study showed that the ability to adhere to abiotic surfaces and form biofilm is present in an array of aEPEC strains. Moreover, it seems that the ability to form biofilms is associated with the presence of type 1 fimbriae and diguanylate cyclase. Characterization of additional biofilm formation mutants may reveal other mechanisms involved in biofilm formation and bring new insights into aEPEC adhesion and pathogenesis. PMID:25012525

  20. Stimulation of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte oxidative metabolism by type 1 pili from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, M B; Silverblatt, F J

    1987-01-01

    We compared the degree to which Escherichia coli phase variants which do (T1P+ E. coli) or do not (T1P- E. coli) express type 1 pili (T1P) stimulate human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) oxidative activity. Unopsonized T1P+ E. coli stimulated the release of 0.20 to 0.24 nmol of H2O2 per 10(6) PMN per min and the consumption of 1.4 to 4.0 nmol of O2 per 10(6) PMN per min; no measurable PMN oxidative activity was stimulated by unopsonized T1P- E. coli. In the presence of serum opsonins, T1P+ E. coli stimulated the release of 1.12 to 1.16 nmol of H2O2 per 10(6) PMN per min and the consumption of 5.0 to 6.0 nmol of O2 per 10(6) PMN per min, whereas T1P- E. coli stimulated the release of 0.42 to 0.43 nmol of H2O2 per 10(6) PMN per min and the consumption of 0.6 to 2.0 nmol of O2 per 10(6) PMN per min. Although unaggregated T1P did not stimulate PMN, latex beads coated with T1P (T1P-latex) stimulated alpha-methylmannoside-inhibitable, opsonin-independent PMN oxidative activity. The activity stimulated by either T1P+ E. coli or T1P-latex was susceptible to inhibition by cytochalasin B. Latex particles coated with bovine serum albumin or mannose-resistant pili did not stimulate PMN. These data indicate that T1P+ E. coli stimulate PMN oxidative metabolism more effectively than do T1P- E. coli and that a similar PMN oxidative response follows cellular stimulation by either unopsonized T1P+ or opsonized T1P- E. coli. Furthermore, T1P-latex faithfully mimics the ability of T1P+ E. coli to stimulate PMN oxidative metabolism. Such particles may be useful in further analyses of cellular responses to T1P+ E. coli. Images PMID:2880806

  1. Serotype variation in Bordetella pertussis is governed by cis-acting elements.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, D; Coote, J G; Duggleby, C J; Parton, R

    1991-03-01

    Bordetella pertussis contains two genes encoding the serospecific fimbrial subunit proteins 2 and 3 which are assembled into completed fimbriae, which elicit the formation of agglutinating antibodies. Expression of these agglutinogens can vary independently of each other. A gene library from a B. pertussis strain (fimbrial serotype 0.3) was probed with an oligonucleotide probe specific for fimbrial subunit genes. Three homologous genetic loci were identified; an active fim 3 gene, an inactive fim 2 gene and an unknown fim-homologous region. The fim 3 gene carried on a cosmid produced agglutinating fimbrial structures in B. parapertussis and in variants of B. pertussis which had lost the capacity to produce the agglutinogen. This indicated that cis-acting factors are associated with serotype variation in B. pertussis rather than the production of trans-acting repressor molecules. PMID:2040439

  2. Nonimmunoglobulin fraction of human milk inhibits bacterial adhesion (hemagglutination) and enterotoxin binding of Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A M; Ahrén, C

    1981-01-01

    Human milk and colostrum samples were divided into an immunoglobulin and a nonimmunoglobulin fraction by immunosorbent chromatography. The ability of these fractions to inhibit bacterial cell adhesion and enterotoxin receptor binding of Vibrio cholerae and various Escherichia coli isolates was then tested by in vitro assays. The strongest effect was generally seen with the nonimmunoglobulin fractions, which were shown to significantly inhibit E. coli cell adhesion (hemagglutination) mediated by CFA/I, CFA/II, or K88 fimbriae (but not type 1 pili) and V. cholerae hemagglutination, as well as the binding of cholera toxin and E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin to GM1 ganglioside. Also, the immunoglobulin fractions had significant inhibitory activity in some of these systems. The results are interpreted to suggest that human milk and colostrum may contain secreted structure analogs of the cell receptors for some bacterial adhesions and enterotoxins; this might contribute to the protective effect of milk against enteric infections. PMID:7021421

  3. Molecular Characterization of the Multidrug Resistant Escherichia coli ST131 Clone

    PubMed Central

    Schembri, Mark A.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Forde, Brian M.; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Beatson, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli ST131 is a recently emerged and globally disseminated multidrug resistant clone associated with urinary tract and bloodstream infections in both community and clinical settings. The most common group of ST131 strains are defined by resistance to fluoroquinolones and possession of the type 1 fimbriae fimH30 allele. Here we provide an update on our recent work describing the globally epidemiology of ST131. We review the phylogeny of ST131 based on whole genome sequence data and highlight the important role of recombination in the evolution of this clonal lineage. We also summarize our findings on the virulence of the ST131 reference strain EC958, and highlight the use of transposon directed insertion-site sequencing to define genes associated with serum resistance and essential features of its large antibiotic resistance plasmid pEC958. PMID:26131613

  4. Folding of the C-terminal bacterial binding domain in statherin upon adsorption onto hydroxyapatite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Goobes, Gil; Goobes, Rivka; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Baker, David; Stayton, Patrick S.; Drobny, Gary P.

    2006-01-01

    Statherin is an enamel pellicle protein that inhibits hydroxyapatite (HAP) nucleation and growth, lubricates the enamel surface, and is recognized by oral bacteria in periodontal diseases. We report here from solid-state NMR measurements that the protein's C-terminal region folds into an α-helix upon adsorption to HAP crystals. This region contains the binding sites for bacterial fimbriae that mediate bacterial cell adhesion to the surface of the tooth. The helical segment is shown through long-range distance measurements to fold back onto the intermediate region (residues Y16–P28) defining the global fold of the protein. Statherin, previously shown to be unstructured in solution, undergoes conformation selection on its substrate mineral surface. This surface-induced folding of statherin can be related to its functionality in inhibiting HAP crystal growth and can explain how oral pathogens selectively recognize HAP-bound statherin. PMID:17060618

  5. Potential virulence factors of Proteus bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Rózalski, A; Sidorczyk, Z; Kotełko, K

    1997-01-01

    The object of this review is the genus Proteus, which contains bacteria considered now to belong to the opportunistic pathogens. Widely distributed in nature (in soil, water, and sewage), Proteus species play a significant ecological role. When present in the niches of higher macroorganisms, these species are able to evoke pathological events in different regions of the human body. The invaders (Proteus mirabilis, P. vulgaris, and P. penneri) have numerous factors including fimbriae, flagella, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharide, capsule antigen, urease, immunoglobulin A proteases, hemolysins, amino acid deaminases, and, finally, the most characteristic attribute of Proteus, swarming growth, enabling them to colonize and survive in higher organisms. All these features and factors are described and commented on in detail. The questions important for future investigation of these facultatively pathogenic microorganisms are also discussed. PMID:9106365

  6. [Electron microscopic representation of the pili structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Müller, G; Klug, H

    1979-01-01

    The technique of negative staining and ultra-thin section has been used for investigations of 30 Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains in order to represent the structure of pili (fimbriae) electron microscopically. The staining of the gonococci was effected by phosphotungstic acid (0,5%). The pili ascertained were 30 to 60 A thick. In course of in vitro passages up to 10. subculture morphological changes of the pili have been observed. The application of trisbuffer or solution of Hylase (hyaluronidase) showed not any improved results in comparison with buffered NaCl-solution as suspension medium. The investigation of ultra-thin sections showed that the structure of the pili could be exhibited not clearly. Therefore, these technique seems to be not suitable for qualitative representative of the pili. PMID:86464

  7. The Pilus Usher Controls Protein Interactions via Domain Masking and is Functional as an Oligomer

    PubMed Central

    Werneburg, Glenn T.; Henderson, Nadine S.; Portnoy, Erica B.; Sarowar, Samema; Hultgren, Scott J.; Li, Huilin; Thanassi, David G.

    2015-01-01

    The chaperone-usher (CU) pathway assembles organelles termed pili or fimbriae in Gram-negative bacteria. Type 1 pili expressed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli are prototypical structures assembled by the CU pathway. Biogenesis of pili by the CU pathway requires a periplasmic chaperone and an outer membrane protein termed the usher (FimD). We show that the FimD C-terminal domains provide the high-affinity substrate binding site, but that these domains are masked in the resting usher. Domain masking requires the FimD plug domain, which serves as a switch controlling usher activation. We demonstrate that usher molecules can act in trans for pilus biogenesis, providing conclusive evidence for a functional usher oligomer. These results reveal mechanisms by which molecular machines such as the usher regulate and harness protein-protein interactions, and suggest that ushers may interact in a cooperative manner during pilus assembly in bacteria. PMID:26052892

  8. High molecular weight bioemulsifiers, main properties and potential environmental and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Inès; Ghribi, Dhouha

    2015-05-01

    High molecular weight bioemulsifiers are amphipathic polysaccharides, proteins, lipopolysaccharides, lipoproteins, or complex mixtures of these biopolymers, produced by a wide variety of microorganisms. They are characterized by highly structural diversity and have the ability to decrease the surface and interfacial tension at the surface and interface respectively and/or emulsify hydrophobic compounds. Emulsan, fatty acids, phospholipids, neutral lipids, exopolysaccharides, vesicles and fimbriae are among the most popular high molecular weight bioemulsifiers. They have great physic-chemical properties like tolerance to extreme conditions of pH, temperature and salinity, low toxicity and biodegradability. Owing their emulsion forming and breaking capacities, solubilization, mobilization and dispersion activities and their viscosity reduction activity; they possess great environmental application as enhancer of hydrocarbon biodegradation and for microbial enhanced oil recovery. Besides, they are applied in biomedical fields for their antimicrobial and anti-adhesive activities and involvement in immune responses. PMID:25739564

  9. Evolution of the Chaperone/Usher Assembly Pathway: Fimbrial Classification Goes Greek†

    PubMed Central

    Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Many Proteobacteria use the chaperone/usher pathway to assemble proteinaceous filaments on the bacterial surface. These filaments can curl into fimbrial or nonfimbrial surface structures (e.g., a capsule or spore coat). This article reviews the phylogeny of operons belonging to the chaperone/usher assembly class to explore the utility of establishing a scheme for subdividing them into clades of phylogenetically related gene clusters. Based on usher amino acid sequence comparisons, our analysis shows that the chaperone/usher assembly class is subdivided into six major phylogenetic clades, which we have termed α-, β-, γ-, κ-, π-, and σ-fimbriae. Members of each clade share related operon structures and encode fimbrial subunits with similar protein domains. The proposed classification system offers a simple and convenient method for assigning newly discovered chaperone/usher systems to one of the six major phylogenetic groups. PMID:18063717

  10. Bidirectional changes to hippocampal theta–gamma comodulation predict memory for recent spatial episodes

    PubMed Central

    Shirvalkar, Prasad R.; Rapp, Peter R.; Shapiro, Matthew L.

    2010-01-01

    Episodic memory requires the hippocampus, which is thought to bind cortical inputs into conjunctive codes. Local field potentials (LFPs) reflect dendritic and synaptic oscillations whose temporal structure may coordinate cellular mechanisms of plasticity and memory. We now report that single-trial spatial memory performance in rats was predicted by the power comodulation of theta (4–10 Hz) and low gamma (30–50 Hz) rhythms in the hippocampus. Theta–gamma comodulation (TGC) was prominent during successful memory retrieval but was weak when memory failed or was unavailable during spatial exploration in sample trials. Muscimol infusion into medial septum reduced the probability of TGC and successful memory retrieval. In contrast, patterned electrical stimulation of the fimbria-fornix increased TGC in amnestic animals and partially rescued memory performance in the water maze. The results suggest that TGC accompanies memory retrieval in the hippocampus and that patterned brain stimulation may inform therapeutic strategies for cognitive disorders. PMID:20351262

  11. [Oral ciprofloxacin therapy in salpingitis].

    PubMed

    De Wilde, R

    1988-01-01

    Thirty patients with clinical pelvic inflammatory disease were studied. Diagnosis was confirmed by laparoscopy. To determine the microbiological etiology, swab specimen for detection of aerobic, anaerobic and chlamydial infections were obtained from the endocervix, fimbriae and cul-de-sac. In 22 of 30 patients, microorganisms were detected. The patients received ciprofloxacin 2 X 750 mg p.o. daily at 12 hours interval for 10 days. During and after therapy, bacteriological examinations of the endocervix were performed. Based on the microbiological evaluation and clinical aspects, the bacteriological response and clinical efficacy were 86%. Laboratory analysis showed no alterations of blood values. As side effects we noticed gastrointestinal complaints (6/30), candidiasis vulvovaginalis (6/30), allergic exanthema (5/30) and non-bacterial cystitis (2/30). Oral ciprofloxacin-monotherapy proved to be safe and effective in pelvic inflammatory disease. PMID:3227738

  12. The main Aeromonas pathogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Tomás, J M

    2012-01-01

    The members of the Aeromonas genus are ubiquitous, water-borne bacteria. They have been isolated from marine waters, rivers, lakes, swamps, sediments, chlorine water, water distribution systems, drinking water and residual waters; different types of food, such as meat, fish, seafood, vegetables, and processed foods. Aeromonas strains are predominantly pathogenic to poikilothermic animals, and the mesophilic strains are emerging as important pathogens in humans, causing a variety of extraintestinal and systemic infections as well as gastrointestinal infections. The most commonly described disease caused by Aeromonas is the gastroenteritis; however, no adequate animal model is available to reproduce this illness caused by Aeromonas. The main pathogenic factors associated with Aeromonas are: surface polysaccharides (capsule, lipopolysaccharide, and glucan), S-layers, iron-binding systems, exotoxins and extracellular enzymes, secretion systems, fimbriae and other nonfilamentous adhesins, motility and flagella. PMID:23724321

  13. Molecular mechanism of bacterial type 1 and P pili assembly.

    PubMed

    Busch, Andreas; Phan, Gilles; Waksman, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    The formation of adhesive surface structures called pili or fimbriae ('bacterial hair') is an important contributor towards bacterial pathogenicity and persistence. To fight often chronic or recurrent bacterial infections such as urinary tract infections, it is necessary to understand the molecular mechanism of the nanomachines assembling such pili. Here, we focus on the so far best-known pilus assembly machinery: the chaperone-usher pathway producing the type 1 and P pili, and highlight the most recently acquired structural knowledge. First, we describe the subunits' structure and the molecular role of the periplasmic chaperone. Second, we focus on the outer-membrane usher structure and the catalytic mechanism of usher-mediated pilus biogenesis. Finally, we describe how the detailed understanding of the chaperone-usher pathway at a molecular level has paved the way for the design of a new generation of bacterial inhibitors called 'pilicides'. PMID:25624519

  14. The role of quorum sensing in Escherichia coli (ETEC) virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Sturbelle, Régis Tuchtenhagen; de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; Roos, Talita Bandeira; Borchardt, Jéssica Lopes; da Conceição, Rita de Cássia dos Santos; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio; Leite, Fábio Pereira Leivas

    2015-11-18

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a signaling system among bacteria mediated by auto-inducer substances (AI). Whenever the concentration of these molecules reaches a threshold corresponding to a high cell density or quorum, the whole population starts a coordinated expression of specific genes. Studies have shown that epinephrine is also responsible for activating specific bacterial genes. This work aimed to investigate the role of conditioned medium (containing AI), epinephrine and their association on growth, motility, F4 fimbriae and heat-labile toxin (LT) expression on enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC, E68). A significant increase in motility, F4 and LT expression, was observed in the ETEC culture supplemented with conditioned medium and epinephrine. These findings suggest that ETEC uses some components of conditioned medium (e.g., AI molecules), host molecules (epinephrine), and their association to modulate the expression of important virulence genes. PMID:26386492

  15. Shiga toxin 2a and Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli – a deadly combination

    PubMed Central

    Boisen, Nadia; Melton-Celsa, Angela R; Scheutz, Flemming; O'Brien, Alison D; Nataro, James P

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, a Shiga toxin (Stx) type 2a-producing enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) strain of serotype O104:H4 caused a large lethal outbreak in Northern Europe. Until recently, the pathogenic mechanisms explaining the high virulence of the strain have remained unclear. Our laboratories have shown that EAEC genes encoded on the pAA virulence plasmid, particularly the AggR-regulated AAF/I fimbriae, enhance inflammation and enable the outbreak strain to both adhere to epithelial cells and translocate Stx2a across the intestinal epithelium, possibly explaining the high incidence of the life threatening post-diarrheal sequelae of hemolytic uremic syndrome. Epidemiologic evidence supports a model of EAEC pathogenesis comprising the concerted action of multiple virulence factors along with induction of inflammation. Here, we suggest a model for the pathogenesis of the O104:H4 outbreak strain that includes contributions from EAEC alone, but incorporating additional injury induced by Stx2a. PMID:26039753

  16. Efficient Immobilization and Patterning of Live Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suo, Zhiyong; Avci, Recep; Yang, Xinghong; Pascual, David W.

    2008-01-01

    A monolayer of live bacterial cells has been patterned onto substrates through the interaction between CFA/I fimbriae and the corresponding antibody. Patterns of live bacteria have been prepared with cellular resolution on silicon and gold substrates for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model with high specificity and efficiency. The immobilized cells are capable of dividing in growth medium to form a self-sustaining bacterial monolayer on the patterned areas. Interestingly, the immobilized cells can alter their orientation on the substrate, from lying-down to standing-up, as a response to the cell density increase during incubation. This method was successfully used to sort a targeted bacterial species from a mixed culture within 2 h. PMID:18321142

  17. Fermentation and dry fractionation increase bioactivity of cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus).

    PubMed

    Puupponen-Pimiä, Riitta; Nohynek, Liisa; Juvonen, Riikka; Kössö, Tuija; Truchado, Pilar; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita; Leppänen, Tiina; Moilanen, Eeva; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2016-04-15

    Phenolic composition and bioactivity of cloudberry was modified by bioprocessing, and highly bioactive fractions were produced by dry fractionation of the press cake. During fermentation polymeric ellagitannins were partly degraded into ellagic acid derivatives. Phenolic compounds were differentially distributed in seed coarse and fine fractions after dry fractionation process. Tannins concentrated in fine fraction, and flavonol derivatives were mainly found in coarse fraction. Ellagic acid derivatives were equally distributed between the dry fractions. Fermentation and dry fractionation increased statistically significantly anti-adhesion and anti-inflammatory activity of cloudberry. The seed fine fraction showed significant inhibition of P fimbria-mediated haemagglutination assay of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. The seed coarse fraction significantly reduced NO and IL-6 production and iNOS expression in activated macrophages. Fermentation did not affect antimicrobial activity, but slight increase in activity was detected in dry fractions. The results indicate the potential of cloudberry in pharma or health food applications. PMID:26617039

  18. Astrocytic role in synapse formation after injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Li, Daqing; Raisman, Geoffrey

    2016-08-15

    In 1969 a paper entitled Neuronal plasticity in the septal nuclei of the adult rat proposed that new synapses are formed in the adult brain after injury (Raisman, 1969). The quantitative electron microscopic study of the timed responses to selective partial denervation of the neuropil of the adult rat septal nuclei after distant transection of the hippocampal efferent axons in the fimbria showed that the new synapses arise by sprouting of surviving adjacent synapses which selectively take over the previously denervated sites and thus restore the number of synapses to normal. This article presents the evidence for the role of perisynaptic astrocytic processes in the removal and formation of synapses and considers its significance as one of the three major divisions of the astrocytic surface in terms of the axonal responses to injury and regeneration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. PMID:26746338

  19. Vaccines for Proteus mirabilis in urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a documented cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) in the complicated urinary tract. Urease-mediated urea hydrolysis is responsible for both virulence of the organism and the ability to cause urolithiasis. A urease-negative mutant of P. mirabilis is unable to initiate stone formation and colonizes the kidney at a significantly lower rate. The considerable pathology caused by P. mirabilis warrants the development of a vaccine. We have initiated the advancement of vaccine studies and have determined that the MR/P fimbria, a surface adhesin of P. mirabilis, is a promising vaccine candidate. Successful vaccination would be expected both to prevent colonization by P. mirabilis and urolithiasis. PMID:12135833

  20. Potential virulence factors of Proteus bacilli.

    PubMed

    Rózalski, A; Sidorczyk, Z; Kotełko, K

    1997-03-01

    The object of this review is the genus Proteus, which contains bacteria considered now to belong to the opportunistic pathogens. Widely distributed in nature (in soil, water, and sewage), Proteus species play a significant ecological role. When present in the niches of higher macroorganisms, these species are able to evoke pathological events in different regions of the human body. The invaders (Proteus mirabilis, P. vulgaris, and P. penneri) have numerous factors including fimbriae, flagella, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharide, capsule antigen, urease, immunoglobulin A proteases, hemolysins, amino acid deaminases, and, finally, the most characteristic attribute of Proteus, swarming growth, enabling them to colonize and survive in higher organisms. All these features and factors are described and commented on in detail. The questions important for future investigation of these facultatively pathogenic microorganisms are also discussed. PMID:9106365

  1. Use of a combined cryo-EM and X-ray crystallography approach to reveal molecular details of bacterial pilus assembly by the chaperone/usher pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Thanassi, D. G.

    2009-06-01

    Many bacteria assemble hair-like fibers termed pili or fimbriae on their cell surface. These fibers mediate adhesion to various surfaces, including host cells, and play crucial roles in pathogenesis. Pili are polymers composed of thousands of individual subunit proteins. Understanding how these subunit proteins cross the bacterial envelope and correctly assemble at the cell surface is important not only for basic biology but also for the development of novel antimicrobial agents. The chaperone/usher pilus biogenesis pathway is one of the best-understood protein secretion systems, thanks largely to innovative efforts in biophysical techniques such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Such a combined approach holds promise for further elucidating remaining questions regarding the multi-step and highly dynamic pilus assembly process, as well as for studying other protein secretion and organelle biogenesis systems.

  2. Stx1 prophage excision in Escherichia coli strain PA20 confers strong curli and biofilm formation by restoring native mlrA.

    PubMed

    Uhlich, Gaylen A; Chen, Chin-Yi; Cottrell, Bryan J; Hofmann, Christopher S; Yan, Xianghe; Nguyen, Ly

    2016-07-01

    Prophage insertions in Escherichia coli O157:H7 mlrA contribute to the low expression of curli fimbriae and biofilm observed in many clinical isolates. Varying levels of CsgD-dependent curli/biofilm expression are restored to strains bearing prophage insertions in mlrA by mutation of regulatory genes affecting csgD Our previous study identified strong biofilm- and curli-producing variants in O157:H7 cultures that had lost the mlrA-imbedded prophage characteristic of the parent population, suggesting prophage excision as a mechanism for restoring biofilm properties. In this study, we compared genomic, transcriptomic and phenotypic properties of parent strain PA20 (stx1, stx2) and its prophage-cured variant, 20R2R (stx2), and confirmed the mechanism underlying the differences in biofilm formation. PMID:27190164

  3. Selection of indigenous lactic acid bacteria to reinforce the intestinal microbiota of newly hatched chicken: relevance of in vitro and ex vivo methods for strains characterization.

    PubMed

    Babot, Jaime D; Argañaraz-Martínez, Eloy; Saavedra, Lucila; Apella, María C; Perez Chaia, Adriana

    2014-08-01

    Based on the natural benefits of the indigenous microbiota, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from poultry origin were isolated from hens and broilers intestine, and their probiotic potential was further studied. The tolerance to digestion, adhesion, capture of a mannose-binding lectin, absence of virulent factors and antibiotic resistances were studied. Different in vitro and ex vivo assays were performed to select tolerant and adherent strains because standardized protocols have not been defined. Fourteen strains highly tolerant to gastrointestinal digestion were genetically identified. Hydrophobic surfaces were not required for the bacterial adhesion and only nine strains adhered ex vivo to the intestinal mucosa. Three strains captured a lectin of the same specificity of Type-1 fimbriae. Virulence factors were absent but some strains evidenced multiple antibiotic resistances. These results provide bases for a future standardization of methods for the selection of probiotic strains intended to reinforce the microbiota of newly hatched chickens. PMID:24975325

  4. Role of Capsular Polysaccharides in Biofilm Formation: An AFM Nanomechanics Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabin; Wilksch, Jonathan J; Strugnell, Richard A; Gee, Michelle L

    2015-06-17

    Bacteria form biofilms to facilitate colonization of biotic and abiotic surfaces, and biofilm formation on indwelling medical devices is a common cause of hospital-acquired infection. Although it is well-recognized that the exopolysaccharide capsule is one of the key bacterial components for biofilm formation, the underlying biophysical mechanism is poorly understood. In the present study, nanomechanical measurements of wild type and specific mutants of the pathogen, Klebsiella pneumoniae, were performed in situ using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Theoretical modeling of the mechanical data and static microtiter plate biofilm assays show that the organization of the capsule can influence bacterial adhesion, and thereby biofilm formation. The capsular organization is affected by the presence of type 3 fimbriae. Understanding the biophysical mechanisms for the impact of the structural organization of the bacterial polysaccharide capsule on biofilm formation will aid the development of strategies to prevent biofilm formation. PMID:26034816

  5. The Mode of Cell Wall Growth in Selected Archaea Is Similar to the General Mode of Cell Wall Growth in Bacteria as Revealed by Fluorescent Dye Analysis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Reinhard; Bellack, Annett; Bertl, Markus; Bilek, Yvonne; Heimerl, Thomas; Herzog, Bastian; Leisner, Madeleine; Probst, Alexander; Rachel, Reinhard; Sarbu, Christina; Schopf, Simone; Wanner, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    The surfaces of 8 bacterial and 23 archaeal species, including many hyperthermophilic Archaea, could be stained using succinimidyl esters of fluorescent dyes. This allowed us for the first time to analyze the mode of cell wall growth in Archaea by subculturing stained cells. The data obtained show that incorporation of new cell wall material in Archaea follows the pattern observed for Bacteria: in the coccoid species Pyrococcus furiosus incorporation was in the region of septum formation while for the rod-shaped species Methanopyrus kandleri and Methanothermus sociabilis, a diffuse incorporation of cell wall material over the cell length was observed. Cell surface appendages like fimbriae/pili, fibers, or flagella were detectable by fluorescence staining only in a very few cases although their presence was proven by electron microscopy. Our data in addition prove that Alexa Fluor dyes can be used for in situ analyses at temperatures up to 100°C. PMID:21169435

  6. Human enteric pathogens in produce: un-answered ecological questions with direct implications for food safety.

    PubMed

    Teplitski, Max; Barak, Jeri D; Schneider, Keith R

    2009-04-01

    Recent outbreaks of gastroenteritis linked to the consumption of fresh produce raise questions about the mechanisms by which human pathogens colonize plants and persist within marketable produce. Neither Salmonella nor Escherichia coli appear to produce enzymes that degrade plant cell walls, therefore it is not yet certain how these bacteria enter plant tissues and spread within them. Similar to plant-associated bacteria, enterics use cellulose and aggregative fimbriae for their attachment to plant surfaces. Salmonella can be an effective plant endophyte, even though it is capable of triggering plant defenses. Plant-associated microbiota contributes to the fitness and translocation of these human pathogens within plant hosts, although interactions and mechanisms of communication between plant-associated microbiota and enteric pathogens are not yet characterized. PMID:19349159

  7. Associative Nitrogen Fixation by Klebsiella spp.: Adhesion Sites and Inoculation Effects on Grass Roots

    PubMed Central

    Haahtela, Kielo; Laakso, Tuula; Korhonen, Timo K.

    1986-01-01

    Adhesion sites on grass roots for Klebsiella strains carrying type 3 or type 1 fimbriae or both were determined. Adhesion of the strains to the roots of Poa pratensis and Festuca rubra was highly localized; the bacteria adhered strongly to root hairs and with a markedly lower efficiency to the surface of the zone of elongation and to the root cap mucilage. No adhesion to the epidermal cells between root hairs was observed. The adhesion sites were identical for the type 3- and 1-fimbriated bacteria and for P. pratensis, F. rubra, and Trifolium pratense. Inoculation of P. pratensis seedlings with Klebsiella pneumoniae strain As resulted in morphological changes in plant roots. The roots of infected plants were heavily covered with root hairs, which often were deformed and branched. Images PMID:16347205

  8. Development of an IgY-based rocket-immunoelectrophoresis for identity monitoring of Pertussis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Matheis, Walter; Schade, Rüdiger

    2011-06-30

    An important step in vaccine production and quality control is the analysis of identity of different lots. For that purpose chicken was immunized with acellular Pertussis components (Pertussis toxoid, Filamenteous haemagglutinin, Pertactin, Fimbriae 2/3 antigen). The resulting antibodies (IgY) were non-invasive extracted from egg yolk and used for rocket immunoelectrophoresis (RIE). We demonstrated that the Ab reacted with characteristic peaks ("rockets") with the corresponding antigen. The shape of the peaks varied depending on the manufacturer and the nature of antigen (adsorbed or non-adsorbed). The coefficients of variation was about 20% during a year period. In summary, our data illustrate that an IgY-based RIE is not only a cost-effective method but also proficient for monitoring Pertussis vaccines. PMID:21586289

  9. Effect of nutrient limitation on biofilm formation and phosphatase activity of a Citrobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Allan, Victoria J M; Callow, Maureen E; Macaskie, Lynne E; Paterson-Beedle, Marion

    2002-01-01

    A phosphatase-overproducing Citrobacter sp. (NCIMB 40259) was grown in an air-lift reactor in steady-state continuous culture under limitation of carbon, phosphorus or nitrogen. Substantial biofilm formation, and the highest phosphatase activity, were observed under lactose limitation. However, the total amount of biofilm wet biomass and the phosphatase specific activity were reduced in phosphorus- or nitrogen-limited cultures or when glucose was substituted for lactose as the limiting carbon source. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed differences in cell and biofilm morphology in relation to medium composition. Electron microscopy suggested that the differences in biofilm formation may relate to differential expression of fimbriae on the cell surface. PMID:11782520

  10. Evaluation of components of X-ray irradiated 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and pneumococcal vaccine polyvalent and X-ray and gamma-ray irradiated acellular pertussis component of DTaP vaccine products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J. C.; Rey, L.; Lee, Chi-Jen; Arciniega, Juan

    2004-09-01

    Samples of pneumococcal vaccine polyvalent, 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, and two different diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccines adsorbed were irradiated with X-rays and/or gamma-rays (Co-60). Mouse IgG and IgM antibody responses (ELISA) for types 9V, 14, 18C, and 19F pneumococcal polysaccharides and conjugates indicated that the polysaccharides were more tolerant of the radiation than the conjugates. The mouse antibody response for the detoxified pertussis toxin (PT) antigen, filamentous hemagglutinin antigen (FHA), pertactin (PRN), and fimbriae types 2 and 3 (FIM) antigens for the appropriate vaccine type indicated that the antibody response was not significantly changed in the 25 kGy X-ray irradiated vaccines frozen in liquid nitrogen compared to the control vaccine.

  11. Identification of a 69-kilodalton nonfimbrial protein as an agglutinogen of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Brennan, M J; Li, Z M; Cowell, J L; Bisher, M E; Steven, A C; Novotny, P; Manclark, C R

    1988-12-01

    Cells of Bordetella pertussis BP353, a nonfimbriated Eldering serotype 1.3 strain, were used as an immunogen to produce three monoclonal antibodies, BPE3, BPD8, and BPE8, that agglutinated the immunizing cells, as well as certain other nonfimbriated and fimbriated serotype 3-containing B. pertussis strains. The antibodies did not agglutinate serotype 1 or nontypable B. pertussis cells. These monoclonal antibodies specifically detected a 69-kilodalton (kDa) band on Western blots (immunoblots) containing whole B. pertussis cell lysates of Eldering agglutinogen serotypes 1.3, 1.3.6, 1.2.3.4, and 1.2.3.4.6. This 69-kDa antigen was released from the bacteria by cell incubation for 60 min at 60 degrees C, and it was purified by affinity chromatography with a BPE3-agarose affinity matrix. Purified material was used to produce a polyclonal antiserum that agglutinated all nonfimbriated and fimbriated B. pertussis cells containing serotype 3 agglutinogen. Immunogold electron microscopy and indirect immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that it is an outer membrane constituent but nonfimbrial in appearance. BPE3 did not detect purified fimbriae on Western blots, and antibodies to these fimbriae did not bind to the 69-kDa component. Although B. bronchiseptica and B. parapertussis cells were not agglutinated by the monoclonal antibodies, antigenically similar proteins were detected in extracts of the bacteria. These results identify the 69-kDa protein as a nonfimbrial agglutinogen present on all virulent strains of B. pertussis. The monoclonal antibodies described here should be useful for further studies on the structure and function of this protein. PMID:2903126

  12. Identification of a 69-kilodalton nonfimbrial protein as an agglutinogen of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, M J; Li, Z M; Cowell, J L; Bisher, M E; Steven, A C; Novotny, P; Manclark, C R

    1988-01-01

    Cells of Bordetella pertussis BP353, a nonfimbriated Eldering serotype 1.3 strain, were used as an immunogen to produce three monoclonal antibodies, BPE3, BPD8, and BPE8, that agglutinated the immunizing cells, as well as certain other nonfimbriated and fimbriated serotype 3-containing B. pertussis strains. The antibodies did not agglutinate serotype 1 or nontypable B. pertussis cells. These monoclonal antibodies specifically detected a 69-kilodalton (kDa) band on Western blots (immunoblots) containing whole B. pertussis cell lysates of Eldering agglutinogen serotypes 1.3, 1.3.6, 1.2.3.4, and 1.2.3.4.6. This 69-kDa antigen was released from the bacteria by cell incubation for 60 min at 60 degrees C, and it was purified by affinity chromatography with a BPE3-agarose affinity matrix. Purified material was used to produce a polyclonal antiserum that agglutinated all nonfimbriated and fimbriated B. pertussis cells containing serotype 3 agglutinogen. Immunogold electron microscopy and indirect immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that it is an outer membrane constituent but nonfimbrial in appearance. BPE3 did not detect purified fimbriae on Western blots, and antibodies to these fimbriae did not bind to the 69-kDa component. Although B. bronchiseptica and B. parapertussis cells were not agglutinated by the monoclonal antibodies, antigenically similar proteins were detected in extracts of the bacteria. These results identify the 69-kDa protein as a nonfimbrial agglutinogen present on all virulent strains of B. pertussis. The monoclonal antibodies described here should be useful for further studies on the structure and function of this protein. Images PMID:2903126

  13. YjcC, a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase protein, regulates the oxidative stress response and virulence of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Jou; Wang, Zhe-Chong; Huang, Hsi-Yuan; Huang, Hsien-Da; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2013-01-01

    This study shows that the expression of yjcC, an in vivo expression (IVE) gene, and the stress response regulatory genes soxR, soxS, and rpoS are paraquat inducible in Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43. The deletion of rpoS or soxRS decreased yjcC expression, implying an RpoS- or SoxRS-dependent control. After paraquat or H2O2 treatment, the deletion of yjcC reduced bacterial survival. These effects could be complemented by introducing the ΔyjcC mutant with the YjcC-expression plasmid pJR1. The recombinant protein containing only the YjcC-EAL domain exhibited phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity; overexpression of yjcC has lower levels of cyclic di-GMP. The yjcC deletion mutant also exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, oxidation damage, and oxidative stress scavenging activity. In addition, the yjcC deletion reduced capsular polysaccharide production in the bacteria, but increased the LD50 in mice, biofilm formation, and type 3 fimbriae major pilin MrkA production. Finally, a comparative transcriptome analysis showed 34 upregulated and 29 downregulated genes with the increased production of YjcC. The activated gene products include glutaredoxin I, thioredoxin, heat shock proteins, chaperone, and MrkHI, and proteins for energy metabolism (transporters, cell surface structure, and transcriptional regulation). In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that YjcC positively regulates the oxidative stress response and mouse virulence but negatively affects the biofilm formation and type 3 fimbriae expression by altering the c-di-GMP levels after receiving oxidative stress signaling inputs. PMID:23935824

  14. Metagenomic Analysis Revealed Methylamine and Ureide Utilization of Soybean-Associated Methylobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Tomoyuki; Anda, Misue; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Sugawara, Masayuki; Kaneko, Takakazu; Sato, Shusei; Ikeda, Seishi; Okubo, Takashi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2016-01-01

    Methylobacterium inhabits the phyllosphere of a large number of plants. We herein report the results of comparative metagenome analyses on methylobacterial communities of soybean plants grown in an experimental field in Tohoku University (Kashimadai, Miyagi, Japan). Methylobacterium was identified as the most dominant genus (33%) among bacteria inhabiting soybean stems. We classified plant-derived Methylobacterium species into Groups I, II, and III based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, and found that Group I members (phylogenetically close to M. extorquens) were dominant in soybean-associated Methylobacterium. By comparing 29 genomes, we found that all Group I members possessed a complete set of genes for the N-methylglutamate pathway for methylamine utilization, and genes for urea degradation (urea carboxylase, urea amidolyase, and conventional urease). Only Group I members and soybean methylobacterial isolates grew in a culture supplemented with methylamine as the sole carbon source. They utilized urea or allantoin (a urea-related compound in legumes) as the sole nitrogen source; however, group III also utilized these compounds. The utilization of allantoin may be crucial in soybean-bacterial interactions because allantoin is a transported form of fixed nitrogen in legume plants. Soybean-derived Group I strain AMS5 colonized the model legume Lotus japonicus well. A comparison among the 29 genomes of plant-derived and other strains suggested that several candidate genes are involved in plant colonization such as csgG (curli fimbriae). Genes for the N-methylglutamate pathway and curli fimbriae were more abundant in soybean microbiomes than in rice microbiomes in the field. Based on these results, we discuss the lifestyle of Methylobacterium in the legume phyllosphere. PMID:27431374

  15. RcsB Contributes to the Distinct Stress Fitness among Escherichia coli O157:H7 Curli Variants of the 1993 Hamburger-Associated Outbreak Strains

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Craig T.; Louie, Jacqueline W.; Huynh, Steven; Fagerquist, Clifton K.; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Curli are adhesive fimbriae of Enterobactericaeae and are involved in surface attachment, cell aggregation, and biofilm formation. We reported previously that curli-producing (C+) variants of E. coli O157:H7 (EcO157) were much more acid sensitive than their corresponding curli-deficient (C−) variants; however, this difference was not linked to the curli fimbriae per se. Here, we investigated the underlying molecular basis of this phenotypic divergence. We identified large deletions in the rcsB gene of C+ variants isolated from the 1993 U.S. hamburger-associated outbreak strains. rcsB encodes the response regulator of the RcsCDB two-component signal transduction system, which regulates curli biogenesis negatively but acid resistance positively. Further comparison of stress fitness revealed that C+ variants were also significantly more sensitive to heat shock but were resistant to osmotic stress and oxidative damage, similar to C− variants. Transcriptomics analysis uncovered a large number of differentially expressed genes between the curli variants, characterized by enhanced expression in C+ variants of genes related to biofilm formation, virulence, catabolic activity, and nutrient uptake but marked decreases in transcription of genes related to various types of stress resistance. Supplying C+ variants with a functional rcsB restored resistance to heat shock and acid challenge in cells but blocked curli production, confirming that inactivation of RcsB in C+ variants was the basis of fitness segregation within the EcO157 population. This study provides an example of how genome instability of EcO157 promotes intrapopulation diversification, generating subpopulations carrying an array of distinct phenotypes that may confer the pathogen with survival advantages in diverse environments. PMID:22923406

  16. Distinct Acid Resistance and Survival Fitness Displayed by Curli Variants of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7▿†

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Michelle Q.; Brandl, Maria T.; Louie, Jacqueline W.; Kyle, Jennifer L.; Carychao, Diana K.; Cooley, Michael B.; Parker, Craig T.; Bates, Anne H.; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Curli are adhesive fimbriae of Enterobacteriaceae and are involved in surface attachment, cell aggregation, and biofilm formation. Here, we report that both inter- and intrastrain variations in curli production are widespread in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7. The relative proportions of curli-producing variants (C+) and curli-deficient variants (C−) in an E. coli O157:H7 cell population varied depending on the growth conditions. In variants derived from the 2006 U.S. spinach outbreak strains, the shift between the C+ and C− subpopulations occurred mostly in response to starvation and was unidirectional from C− to C+; in variants derived from the 1993 hamburger outbreak strains, the shift occurred primarily in response to oxygen depletion and was bidirectional. Furthermore, curli variants derived from the same strain displayed marked differences in survival fitness: C+ variants grew to higher concentrations in nutrient-limited conditions than C− variants, whereas C− variants were significantly more acid resistant than C+ variants. This difference in acid resistance does not appear to be linked to the curli fimbriae per se, since a csgA deletion mutant in either a C+ or a C− variant exhibited an acid resistance similar to that of its parental strain. Our data suggest that natural curli variants of E. coli O157:H7 carry several distinct physiological properties that are important for their environmental survival. Maintenance of curli variants in an E. coli O157:H7 population may provide a survival strategy in which C+ variants are selected in a nutrient-limited environment, whereas C− variants are selected in an acidic environment, such as the stomach of an animal host, including that of a human. PMID:21478320

  17. The exopolysaccharide gene cluster Bcam1330–Bcam1341 is involved in Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilm formation, and its expression is regulated by c-di-GMP and Bcam1349

    PubMed Central

    Fazli, Mustafa; McCarthy, Yvonne; Givskov, Michael; Ryan, Robert P; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2013-01-01

    In Burkholderia cenocepacia, the second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) has previously been shown to positively regulate biofilm formation and the expression of cellulose and type-I fimbriae genes through binding to the transcriptional regulator Bcam1349. Here, we provide evidence that cellulose and type-I fimbriae are not involved in B. cenocepacia biofilm formation in flow chambers, and we identify a novel Bcam1349/c-di-GMP-regulated exopolysaccharide gene cluster which is essential for B. cenocepacia biofilm formation. Overproduction of Bcam1349 in trans promotes wrinkly colony morphology, pellicle, and biofilm formation in B. cenocepacia. A screen for transposon mutants unable to respond to the overproduction of Bcam1349 led to the identification of a 12-gene cluster, Bcam1330–Bcam1341, the products of which appear to be involved in the production of a putative biofilm matrix exopolysaccharide and to be essential for flow-chamber biofilm formation. We demonstrate that Bcam1349 binds to the promoter region of genes in the Bcam1330–Bcam1341 cluster and that this binding is enhanced by the presence of c-di-GMP. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overproduction of both c-di-GMP and Bcam1349 leads to increased transcription of these genes, indicating that c-di-GMP and Bcam1349 functions together in regulating exopolysaccharide production from the Bcam1330–Bcam1341 gene cluster. Our results suggest that the product encoded by the Bcam1330–Bcam1341 gene cluster is a major exopolysaccharide that provides structural stability to the biofilms formed by B. cenocepacia, and that its production is regulated by c-di-GMP through binding to and promotion of the activity of the transcriptional regulator Bcam1349. PMID:23281338

  18. Genotype Cluster Analysis in Pathogenic Escherichia coli Isolates Producing Different CDT Types

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Maryam; Oloomi, Mana; Bouzari, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Diarrheagenic and uropathogenic E. coli types are mainly characterized by the expression of distinctive bacterial virulent factors. stx1, stx2 (Shiga toxins), and cdt (cytolethal distending toxin) genes have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Some virulent genes such as espP (serine protease), etpD (part of secretion pathway), and katP (catalase-peroxidase), or sfpA gene (Sfp fimbriae), are on plasmids and the others like fliC (flagellin) and the fimH gene (fimbriae type-I) are located on chromosome. Genomic pathogenicity islands (PAIs) carry some virulent genes such as hly gene. To determine the existence of virulence genes in cdt clinical isolates, genes including stx1, stx2, cdt, hly, espP, katP, sfpA, etpD, fliC, and fimH were assessed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The most prevalent isolates for etpD and katP genes were 85.7% in cdtII. katP gene was also observed 83.3% in cdtI. However, in 42.85% of cdtIII isolates, espP gene was the most detected. Moreover, hly gene was also the most prominent gene in cdtIII (71.42%). sfpA gene was observed in 66.6% of cdtV. stx1 gene was detected in 100% of cdtII, cdtIV, and cdtV types. Presence and pattern of virulence genes were considered among cdt positive isotypes and used for their clustering and profiling. PMID:27042356

  19. Immunogenicity of a prototype enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli adhesin vaccine in mice and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Sincock, Stephanie A; Hall, Eric R; Woods, Colleen M; O'Dowd, Aisling; Poole, Steven T; McVeigh, Annette L; Nunez, Gladys; Espinoza, Nereyda; Miller, Milagros; Savarino, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers. Efforts to develop an ETEC vaccine have intensified in the past decade, and intestinal colonization factors (CFs) are somatic components of most investigational vaccines. CFA/I and related Class 5 fimbrial CFs feature a major stalk-forming subunit and a minor, antigenically conserved tip adhesin. We hypothesized that the tip adhesin is critical for stimulating antibodies that specifically inhibit ETEC attachment to the small intestine. To address this, we compared the capacity of donor strand complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, and CFA/I fimbriae to elicit anti-adhesive antibodies in mice, using hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) as proxy for neutralization of intestinal adhesion. When given with genetically attenuated heat-labile enterotoxin LTR192G as adjuvant by intranasal (IN) or orogastric (OG) vaccination, dscCfaE exceeded CFA/I fimbriae in eliciting serum HAI titers and anti-CfaE antibody titers. Based on these findings, we vaccinated Aotus nancymaae nonhuman primates (NHP) with dscCfaE alone or admixed with one of two adjuvants, LTR192G and cholera toxin B-subunit, by IN and OG administration. Only IN vaccination with dscCfaE with either adjuvant elicited substantial serum HAI titers and IgA and IgG anti-adhesin responses, with the latter detectable a year after vaccination. In conclusion, we have shown that dscCfaE elicits robust HAI and anti-adhesin antibody responses in both mice and NHPs when given with adjuvant by IN vaccination, encouraging further evaluation of an ETEC adhesin-based vaccine approach. PMID:26597148

  20. Maternal vaccination with a fimbrial tip adhesin and passive protection of neonatal mice against lethal human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli challenge.

    PubMed

    Luiz, Wilson B; Rodrigues, Juliana F; Crabb, Joseph H; Savarino, Stephen J; Ferreira, Luis C S

    2015-12-01

    Globally, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading cause of childhood and travelers' diarrhea, for which an effective vaccine is needed. Prevalent intestinal colonization factors (CFs) such as CFA/I fimbriae and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) are important virulence factors and protective antigens. We tested the hypothesis that donor strand-complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, is a protective antigen, using a lethal neonatal mouse ETEC challenge model and passive dam vaccination. For CFA/I-ETEC strain H10407, which has been extensively studied in volunteers, an inoculum of 2 × 10(7) bacteria resulted in 50% lethal doses (LD50) in neonatal DBA/2 mice. Vaccination of female DBA/2 mice with CFA/I fimbriae or dscCfaE, each given with a genetically attenuated LT adjuvant (LTK63) by intranasal or orogastric delivery, induced high antigen-specific serum IgG and fecal IgA titers and detectable milk IgA responses. Neonates born to and suckled by dams antenatally vaccinated with each of these four regimens showed 78 to 93% survival after a 20× LD50 challenge with H10407, compared to 100% mortality in pups from dams vaccinated with sham vaccine or LTK63 only. Crossover experiments showed that high pup survival rates after ETEC challenge were associated with suckling but not birthing from vaccinated dams, suggesting that vaccine-specific milk antibodies are protective. In corroboration, preincubation of the ETEC inoculum with antiadhesin and antifimbrial bovine colostral antibodies conferred a dose-dependent increase in pup survival after challenge. These findings indicate that the dscCfaE fimbrial tip adhesin serves as a protective passive vaccine antigen in this small animal model and merits further evaluation. PMID:26371126

  1. Fallopian tube secretory cell expansion: a sensitive biomarker for ovarian serous carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiying; Li, Li; Wang, Yue; Tang, Sarah Ngocvi; Zheng, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances suggest that precancerous lesions of pelvic serous carcinoma originate from tubal secretory cells. The purpose of our study was to determine if an increased number of secretory cells vary with age or location in the fallopian tube and to examine its association with serous neoplasia. Three groups (benign control, high-risk, and pelvic serous carcinoma) of age-matched patients were studied. The age data were stratified into 10-year intervals ranging from 20-29 to older than 80. The number of secretory and ciliated cells from both tubal fimbria and ampulla segments was counted by microscopy and immunohistochemical staining methods. The data were analyzed by standard contingency table and Poisson distribution methods after age justification. We found that the absolute number of tubal secretory cells increased significantly with age in all three groups. But a more dramatic increase of secretory cells was observed in high-risk and pelvic serous carcinoma patients. Secretory cell expansion is more prevalent than secretory cell outgrowth in both fimbria and ampulla tubal segments and is significantly associated with serous neoplasia (p < 0.001). Furthermore, age remained a significant risk factor for serous neoplasia after age adjustment. These findings suggest that secretory cell expansion could serve as a potential sensitive biomarker for early serous carcinogenesis within the fallopian tube. The study also supports a relationship between serous neoplasia and increased secretory to ciliated cell ratios, and the relationship between frequency of secretory cell expansion within the fallopian tube and increasing age and-more significantly-presence of high-risk factors or co-existing serous cancers. PMID:27069556

  2. Fallopian tube secretory cell expansion: a sensitive biomarker for ovarian serous carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiying; Li, Li; Wang, Yue; Tang, Sarah Ngocvi; Zheng, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances suggest that precancerous lesions of pelvic serous carcinoma originate from tubal secretory cells. The purpose of our study was to determine if an increased number of secretory cells varies with age or location in the fallopian tube and to examine its association with serous neoplasia. Three groups (benign control, high-risk, and pelvic serous carcinoma) of age-matched patients were studied. The age data were stratified into 10-year intervals ranging from 20-29 to older than 80. The number of secretory and ciliated cells from both tubal fimbria and ampulla segments was counted by microscopy and immunohistochemical staining methods. The data were analyzed by standard contingency table and Poisson distribution methods after age justification. We found that the absolute number of tubal secretory cells increased significantly with age in all three groups. But a more dramatic increase of secretory cells was observed in high-risk and pelvic serous carcinoma patients. Secretory cell expansion is more prevalent than secretory cell outgrowth in both fimbria and ampulla tubal segments and is significantly associated with serous neoplasia (P < 0.001). Furthermore, age remained a significant risk factor for serous neoplasia after age adjustment. These findings suggest that secretory cell expansion could serve as a potential sensitive biomarker for early serous carcinogenesis within the fallopian tube. The study also supports a relationship between serous neoplasia and increased secretory to ciliated cell ratios, and the relationship between frequency of secretory cell expansion within the fallopian tube and increasing age and-more significantly-presence of high-risk factors or co-existing serous cancers. PMID:26692952

  3. Changes in the oviducal epithelium during the estrous cycle in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Annetrudi; Morson, Gianni

    2007-01-01

    The Monodelphis oviduct can be divided into four anatomical segments: preampulla (comprising fimbriae and infundibulum), ampulla, isthmus with crypts and uterotubal junction. Ovaries are enclosed in a periovarial sac, the bursa, and in some specimens tubules of an epoophoron could be identified. In both structures non-ciliated cells develop small translucent vesicles, which accumulate in the cell apices and presumably produce fluid as often seen in the bursa and in the tubules of the epooophoron. These vesicles do not stain with Alcian blue or PAS. The same applies also to the non-ciliated cells of the fimbriae. The oviducal epithelium of ampulla and the surface epithelium of the isthmus consisting of ciliated and non-ciliated, secretory cells undergo considerable changes during the estrous cycle. Proestrus shows low numbers of ciliated cells, some are in the process of neo-ciliogenesis, non-ciliated cells carry solitary cilia and few remnant secretory granules from the previous cycle may be found. At estrus the amount of ciliated cells in ampulla and isthmus has increased, most non-cililated cells lost the solitary cilia, developed longer microvilli and formed numerous secretory granules in their cell apices. At postestrus secretory products, often surrounded by membranes, are extruded into the oviducal lumen and contribute towards egg coat formation. First signs of deciliation processes are apparent. Solitary cilia reappear. At metestrus only few secretory cells are left with some secretory material. The lumen is often filled with shed cilia and cell apices. Proliferation of basal bodies within non-secretory cells indicate the formation of new ciliated cells. The non-ciliated epithelial cells of the isthmic crypts form no secretory granules but accumulate a great number of translucent vesicles, which in contrast to the secretory granules do not stain with Alcian blue or PAS. PMID:17883438

  4. Nitazoxanide Inhibits Pilus Biogenesis by Interfering with Folding of the Usher Protein in the Outer Membrane.

    PubMed

    Chahales, Peter; Hoffman, Paul S; Thanassi, David G

    2016-04-01

    Many bacterial pathogens assemble surface fibers termed pili or fimbriae that facilitate attachment to host cells and colonization of host tissues. The chaperone/usher (CU) pathway is a conserved secretion system that is responsible for the assembly of virulence-associated pili by many different Gram-negative bacteria. Pilus biogenesis by the CU pathway requires a dedicated periplasmic chaperone and an integral outer membrane (OM) assembly and secretion platform termed the usher. Nitazoxanide (NTZ), an antiparasitic drug, was previously shown to inhibit the function of aggregative adherence fimbriae and type 1 pili assembled by the CU pathway in enteroaggregativeEscherichia coli, an important causative agent of diarrhea. We show here that NTZ also inhibits the function of type 1 and P pili from uropathogenicE. coli(UPEC). UPEC is the primary causative agent of urinary tract infections, and type 1 and P pili mediate colonization of the bladder and kidneys, respectively. By analysis of the different stages of the CU pilus biogenesis pathway, we show that treatment of bacteria with NTZ causes a reduction in the number of usher molecules in the OM, resulting in a loss of pilus assembly on the bacterial surface. In addition, we determine that NTZ specifically prevents proper folding of the usher β-barrel domain in the OM. Our findings demonstrate that NTZ is a pilicide with a novel mechanism of action and activity against diverse CU pathways. This suggests that further development of the NTZ scaffold may lead to new antivirulence agents that target the usher to prevent pilus assembly. PMID:26824945

  5. Comparative anti-inflammatory activities of curcumin and tetrahydrocurcumin based on the phenolic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy, ionization potential and quantum chemical descriptor.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yukio; Ishii, Hiroaki; Takada, Naoki; Tanaka, Shoji; Machino, Mamoru; Ito, Shigeru; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2008-01-01

    Curcumin and its reduced derivative tetrahydrocurcumin have been shown to exhibit chemopreventive activity. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbria-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells was investigated using Northern blot analysis. The fimbria-stimulated expression of the COX-2 gene was inhibited by curcumin but not by tetrahydrocurcumin. LPS-stimulated COX-2 gene expression was completely inhibited by curcumin, but an increase in the concentration of tetrahydrocurcumin did not cause complete inhibition of COX-2 expression. The inhibitory effect of curcumin on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation in the cells was clearly observed, but that of tetrahydrocurcumin was incomplete even at a concentration of 20 microM. To explain the difference in effect between the two compounds, analysis of the frontier orbital was performed using ab initio 6-31G* wave function. The calculated chemical hardness (eta) for curcumin was clearly smaller, whereas its electronegativity (chi) and electrophilicity (omega) were clearly greater than the corresponding values for the curcumin-related compounds tetrahydrocurcumin, isoeugenol and eugenol. This suggested that the anti-inflammatory activities of curcumin may be related to eta-, chi- and/or omega-controlled enzymes. In addition, the bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) of the phenolic OH was calculated using the density function theory (DFT)/B3LY. The total BDE values of curcumin and tetrahydrocurcumin were almost identical, but the BDE of one-electron oxidation and ionization potential (IP) for curcumin were lower than those for tetrahydrocurcumin, suggesting the highly pro-oxidative activity of curcumin. Curcumin has both oxidant and antioxidant properties. A causal link between the anti-inflammatory activities and molecular properties of phenolic antioxidants is suggested. PMID:18507010

  6. Detection and characterization of colonization factor of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from adults with diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D G; Evans, D J; Tjoa, W S; DuPont, H L

    1978-01-01

    The fimbriate colonization factor antigen (CEA) of Escherichia coli strain H-1047 was isolated and used to prepare anti-CFA antiserum. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) isolated from 29 adults with diarrhea acquired in Mexico were examined for CFA by using this serum. Retrospectively, it was found that ETEC possessing the H-10407-type CFA were isolated from 25 (86%) of these diarrhea cases as compared with 2 of 11 (18%) from asymptomatic controls from whom ETEC had been isolated. CFA was found onE. coli of various serotypes, as demonstrated by bacterial agglutination by the anti-CFA serum. Heat treating the cells at 65 degress C for 1 h prevented the agglutination. CFA-positive strains did not react with anti-CFA serum when the cultures were grown at a low incubation temperature (18 degrees C). E. coli isolates identified serologically as CFA positive were shown to adhere to the intestinal villous surfaces of infant rabbits. By the indirect immunofluorescence technique, it was found that adhesion occurred preferentially in the upper 20 cm of the small intestine. Also, the ability or inability of various isolates to adhere to intestinal mucosa in vivo correlated with the presence or absence of fimbriae on the cells when grown in vitro. Agglutinability with anti-CFA serum, fimbriae, and adhesiveness were spontaneously lost by many isolates after laboratory passage in a manner previously described with E. coli H-10407. These observations suggest that the H-10407-type CFA plays a role in the virulence of ETEC possessing this antigen. Images PMID:344221

  7. Susceptibility of piglets to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is not related to the expression of MUC13 and MUC20.

    PubMed

    Schroyen, M; Stinckens, A; Verhelst, R; Geens, M; Cox, E; Niewold, T; Buys, N

    2012-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most frequently isolated enteropathogens in production animals, especially pigs and calves. Economically, the swine industry is by far the most affected by infections with ETEC because of mortality, morbidity and decreased growth rate of newborn and early-weaned piglets. After ingestion by the animal, these bacteria attach themselves to specific receptors on the small intestinal epithelium by means of proteinaceous surface appendages, the fimbriae. The F4 fimbriae, which attach to the F4 receptor, are the most studied. The aim of our study was to investigate gene expression in the small intestine of piglets of MUC13 and MUC20 in relation to animals with a different treatment towards or a different reaction on ETEC-F4ac by means of quantitative reverse transcription chain reaction (qRT/PCR). MUC13 and MUC20 are positional candidate genes for this F4ac receptor and are located in the region on SSC13q41 that segregates with the susceptibility to ETEC-F4ac. The condition of the small intestine is crucial when examining expression differences between different samples. Therefore, the expression of two genes, fatty-acid binding protein 2, intestinal (FABP2) and pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP), now known as regenerating islet-derived 3 alpha (REG3A) in the small intestine was simultaneously checked. FABP2, a standard for epithelial content, reflects the state of damage, whereas REG3A is a measure for inflammation in the small intestine. The four different substudies presented here suggest that expression of MUC13 and MUC20 is not related to the susceptibility of piglets to ETEC-F4ac. PMID:22486505

  8. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the epidemiology of pathogenic Escherichia coli of calves and the role of calves as reservoirs for human pathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kolenda, Rafał; Burdukiewicz, Michał; Schierack, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli bacteria are the most common causes of diarrhea and septicemia in calves. Moreover, calves form a major reservoir for transmission of pathogenic E. coli to humans. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of publications on E. coli as calf pathogens and the role of calves as reservoir have not been done so far. We reviewed studies between 1951 and 2013 reporting the presence of virulence associated factors (VAFs) in calf E. coli and extracted the following information: year(s) and country of sampling, animal number, health status, isolate number, VAF prevalence, serotypes, diagnostic methods, and biological assays. The prevalence of VAFs or E. coli pathotypes was compared between healthy and diarrheic animals and was analyzed for time courses. Together, 106 papers with 25,982 E. coli isolates from 27 countries tested for VAFs were included. F5, F17, and F41 fimbriae and heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) - VAFs of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) were significantly associated with calf diarrhea. On the contrary, ETEC VAF F4 fimbriae and heat-labile enterotoxin as well as enteropathogenic (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing (STEC), and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) were not associated with diarrhea. The prevalence increased overtime for ST-positive isolates, but decreased for F5- and STEC-positive isolates. Our study provides useful information about the history of scientific investigations performed in this domain so far, and helps to define etiological agents of calf disease, and to evaluate calves as reservoir hosts for human pathogenic E. coli. PMID:25815276

  9. Virulence profiles of enterotoxigenic, shiga toxin and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in South African pigs.

    PubMed

    Mohlatlole, Ramadimetja Prescilla; Madoroba, Evelyn; Muchadeyi, Farai Catherine; Chimonyo, Michael; Kanengoni, Arnold Tapera; Dzomba, Edgar Farai

    2013-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and shiga toxin E. coli (STEC) are important causes of colibacillosis in piglets. Recently, enteroaggregative E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST-1) has been implicated in pig diarrhoea. This study investigated the prevalence of enterotoxin [heat-labile toxins (LT), heat-stable toxin a (STa), heat-stable toxin b (STb)], shiga toxins (Stx1, Stx2, Stx2e), enteroaggregative heat-stable E. coli (EAST-1), associated fimbriae (F4, F5, F6, F41, F18ab, F18ac) and non-fimbrial adhesins [adhesin involved in diffuse adherence 1 (AIDA-1), attaching and effacing factor, porcine attaching- and effacing-associated factor] in South African pigs. A total of 263 E. coli strains were isolated from Landrace (n = 24), Large White (n = 126), Duroc (n = 28) and indigenous (n = 85) breeds of piglets aged between 9 and 136 days. PCR was used in the analysis. Virulent genes were detected in 40.3% of the isolates, of which 18.6, 0.4 and 17.5% were classified as ETEC, STEC and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), respectively. Individual genes were found in the following proportions: STb (19.01%), LT (0.4%), STa (3.4%), St2xe (1.1%) and EAST-1 (20.2%) toxins. None of the tested fimbriae were detected in ETEC and STEC isolates. About one third of the ETEC and STEC isolates was tested negative for both fimbrial and non-fimbrial adhesins. Twenty-five pathotypes from ETEC-, EAEC- and STEC-positive strains were identified. Pathotypes EAST-1 (30.2%), STb (13.2%) and STb/AIDA-1 (10.4%) were most prevalent. The study provided insight on possible causes of colibacillosis in South African pigs. PMID:23417826

  10. Maternal Vaccination with a Fimbrial Tip Adhesin and Passive Protection of Neonatal Mice against Lethal Human Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Luiz, Wilson B.; Rodrigues, Juliana F.; Crabb, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading cause of childhood and travelers' diarrhea, for which an effective vaccine is needed. Prevalent intestinal colonization factors (CFs) such as CFA/I fimbriae and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) are important virulence factors and protective antigens. We tested the hypothesis that donor strand-complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, is a protective antigen, using a lethal neonatal mouse ETEC challenge model and passive dam vaccination. For CFA/I-ETEC strain H10407, which has been extensively studied in volunteers, an inoculum of 2 × 107 bacteria resulted in 50% lethal doses (LD50) in neonatal DBA/2 mice. Vaccination of female DBA/2 mice with CFA/I fimbriae or dscCfaE, each given with a genetically attenuated LT adjuvant (LTK63) by intranasal or orogastric delivery, induced high antigen-specific serum IgG and fecal IgA titers and detectable milk IgA responses. Neonates born to and suckled by dams antenatally vaccinated with each of these four regimens showed 78 to 93% survival after a 20× LD50 challenge with H10407, compared to 100% mortality in pups from dams vaccinated with sham vaccine or LTK63 only. Crossover experiments showed that high pup survival rates after ETEC challenge were associated with suckling but not birthing from vaccinated dams, suggesting that vaccine-specific milk antibodies are protective. In corroboration, preincubation of the ETEC inoculum with antiadhesin and antifimbrial bovine colostral antibodies conferred a dose-dependent increase in pup survival after challenge. These findings indicate that the dscCfaE fimbrial tip adhesin serves as a protective passive vaccine antigen in this small animal model and merits further evaluation. PMID:26371126

  11. Avirulent K88 (F4)+ Escherichia coli strains constructed to express modified enterotoxins protect young piglets from challenge with a virulent enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain that expresses the same adhesion and enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Mateo, Kristina; Zhao, Mojun; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Weiping; Francis, David H

    2012-10-12

    Virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is associated with fimbrial adhesins and enterotoxins such as heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Previous studies using a cell culture model suggest that exclusion of ETEC from attachment to epithelial cells requires expression of both an adhesin such as K88 (F4) fimbriae, and LT. To test the ability of non-pathogenic E. coli constructs to exclude virulent ETEC sufficiently to prevent clinical disease, we utilized a piglet ETEC challenge model. Thirty-nine 5-day-old piglets were inoculated with a placebo (control), or with either of the three K88(+)E. coli strains isogenic with regard to modified LT expression: 8017 (pBR322 plasmid vector control), non-toxigenic mutant 8221 (LT(R192G)) in pBR322, or 8488, with the LT gene fused to the STb gene in pBR322 (LT(R192G)-STb). Piglets were challenged with virulent ETEC Strain 3030-2 (K88(+)/LT/STb) 24h post-inoculation. K88ac receptor-positive piglets in the control group developed diarrhea and became dehydrated 12-24h post-challenge. Piglets inoculated with 8221 or 8488 did not exhibit clinical signs of ETEC disease; most piglets inoculated with 8017 showed diarrhea. Control pigs exhibited significant weight loss, increased blood total protein, and higher numbers of colony-forming units of 3030-2 E. coli in washed ileum and jejunum than treated pigs. This study shows for the first time that pre-inoculation with an avirulent strain expressing adhesive fimbriae and a non-toxic form of LT provides significant short term protection from challenge with a virulent ETEC strain that expresses the same fimbrial adhesion and enterotoxin. PMID:22541162

  12. Temperature Control of Fimbriation Circuit Switch in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Quantitative Analysis via Automated Model Abstraction

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Myers, Chris J.; Samoilov, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) represent the predominant cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs). A key UPEC molecular virulence mechanism is type 1 fimbriae, whose expression is controlled by the orientation of an invertible chromosomal DNA element—the fim switch. Temperature has been shown to act as a major regulator of fim switching behavior and is overall an important indicator as well as functional feature of many urologic diseases, including UPEC host-pathogen interaction dynamics. Given this panoptic physiological role of temperature during UTI progression and notable empirical challenges to its direct in vivo studies, in silico modeling of corresponding biochemical and biophysical mechanisms essential to UPEC pathogenicity may significantly aid our understanding of the underlying disease processes. However, rigorous computational analysis of biological systems, such as fim switch temperature control circuit, has hereto presented a notoriously demanding problem due to both the substantial complexity of the gene regulatory networks involved as well as their often characteristically discrete and stochastic dynamics. To address these issues, we have developed an approach that enables automated multiscale abstraction of biological system descriptions based on reaction kinetics. Implemented as a computational tool, this method has allowed us to efficiently analyze the modular organization and behavior of the E. coli fimbriation switch circuit at different temperature settings, thus facilitating new insights into this mode of UPEC molecular virulence regulation. In particular, our results suggest that, with respect to its role in shutting down fimbriae expression, the primary function of FimB recombinase may be to effect a controlled down-regulation (rather than increase) of the ON-to-OFF fim switching rate via temperature-dependent suppression of competing dynamics mediated by recombinase FimE. Our computational analysis further implies that this down

  13. Role of the Bordetella pertussis minor fimbrial subunit, FimD, in colonization of the mouse respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Geuijen, C A; Willems, R J; Bongaerts, M; Top, J; Gielen, H; Mooi, F R

    1997-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis fimbriae are composed of a major subunit, Fim2 or Fim3, and the minor subunit FimD. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we provide evidence that FimD is located at the fimbrial tip. The role of FimD in colonization of the mouse respiratory tract was studied by using two fimbrial mutants: a mutant completely devoid of fimbriae (designated FimD-) and a mutant devoid of the major fimbrial subunits but still producing the minor subunit (designated FimD+). The ability of the two fimbrial mutants to colonize the nasopharynx, trachea, and lungs was compared with those of the wild type parental strain and a filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) mutant. Of the three mutants studied, the FimD- mutant showed the greatest defect, colonizing less well in the nasopharynx, trachea, and lungs. The most pronounced defect in colonizing ability of the three mutants was observed in the trachea. However, the colonizing defect of the FHA and FimD+ mutants in the trachea was observed only during the first 3 days of infection. After 10 days, the colonization level was nearly restored to wild-type levels. The FHA and FimD+ mutants showed a slight colonization defect in the nasopharynx but no defect in the lungs. A maltose binding protein-FimD fusion protein and a peptide derived from FimD were able to bind to heparin, a member of a class of sulfated sugars which are ubiquitous in the respiratory tract. Recently it was shown (W. L. W. Hazenbos, C. A. W. Geuijen, B. M. van den Berg, F. R. Mooi, and R. van Furth, J. Infect. Dis. 171:924-929, 1995) that FimD also binds to the integrin VLA-5, and our results suggest that the binding of B. pertussis to these two molecules plays an important role in colonization of the respiratory tract of the mouse. PMID:9317030

  14. FimY of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium functions as a DNA-binding protein and binds the fimZ promoter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Chuan; Hsu, Yuan-Hsun; Huang, Yi-Ning; Lin, Jiunn-Horng; Yeh, Kuang-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium produces type 1 fimbriae with binding specificity to mannose residues. Elements involved in fimbrial structural biosynthesis, transport, and regulation are encoded by the fim gene cluster. FimZ, FimY, FimW, STM0551, and an arginine transfer RNA (fimU) were previously demonstrated to regulate fimbrial expression. The amino acid sequences of the C-terminal portion of FimY revealed similarity with those of LuxR-like proteins. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that FimY possessed DNA-binding capacity and bound a 605-bp DNA fragment spanning the intergenic region between fimY and fimZ, while a FimY protein harboring a double mutation in the C-terminal helix-turn-helix region containing a glycine (G) to aspartate (D) substitution at residue 189 and isoleucine (I) to lysine (K) substitution at residue 195 lost its ability to bind this DNA fragment. A lux box sequence (5'-TCTGTTATTACATAACAAATACT-3') within the fimZ promoter was required for binding. None of the DNA fragments derived from the promoters for fimA, fimY, or fimW was shifted by FimY. Pull-down assays showed that there were physical protein/protein interactions between FimY and FimZ. We propose that in the regulatory circuit of type 1 fimbriae, FimY functions as a DNA-binding protein to activate fimZ, and a FimY-FimZ protein complex may form to regulate other fim genes. Confirming these proposals requires further study. PMID:24462182

  15. Screening of extracts from natural feed ingredients for their ability to reduce enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 adhesion to porcine intestinal epithelial cell-line IPEC-J2.

    PubMed

    González-Ortiz, G; Hermes, R G; Jiménez-Díaz, R; Pérez, J F; Martín-Orúe, S M

    2013-12-27

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 is the most prevalent enteropathogen in weaned piglets, with the ability to express fimbria F4 and specifically attach to intestinal receptors in the young piglet. The prevention of ETEC K88 adhesion to the epithelium by interfering in this fimbria-receptor recognition provides an alternative approach to prevent the initial stage of disease. The aim of this study is to screen, among different feed ingredients (FI), their ability to reduce ETEC K88 attachment to the porcine intestinal epithelial cell-line (IPEC-J2). The selected FI consisted of products of a vegetable or dairy origin, and microbial by-products, which could be suitable to be included in piglet's diet. Incubation of a mixture of each FI extract with the bacteria on IPEC-J2 monolayer was allowed. After washing with PBS to remove the non-adhered bacteria, the culture medium was added to grow the adhered bacteria and, simultaneously, to keep the cells alive. Then, the bacterial growth was monitored in a spectrophotometer reader for 12h. Casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP), locust bean (LB), exopolysaccharide (EPS) and wheat bran (WB) reduced the number of attached ETEC K88 to IPEC-J2, but no anti-adhesive effect was found for soybean hulls, sugar-beet pulp, locust gum, fructooligosaccharides, inulin, mushroom, mannanoligosaccharides or the fermented product from Aspergillus oryzae. The lineal analysis of dose responses demonstrated lineal activity (P<0.0001) for CGMP, LB, EPS and WB. These in vitro results suggest CGMP, LB, EPS and WB as good candidates to be included in piglet's diet with supported functional activity against colibacillosis. PMID:23992796

  16. Fetal hypothalamic transplants into brain irradiated rats: Graft morphometry and host behavioral responses

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, S.H.; Rubin, P.; White, H.C.; Wiegand, S.J.; Gash, D.M. )

    1990-08-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that neural implants can ameliorate or prevent some of the long-term changes associated with CNS irradiation. Using a rat model, the initial study focused on establishing motor, regulatory, and morphological changes associated with brain radiation treatments. Secondly, fetal hypothalamic tissue grafts were placed into the third ventricle of rats which had been previously irradiated. Adult male Long Evans rats received one of three radiation doses (15, 22.5, 30 Gy) or no radiation. Three days after irradiation, 7 animals in each dose group received an embryonic day 17 hypothalamic graft into the third ventricle while the remaining 8-9 animals in each group received injections of vehicle solution (sham). Few changes were observed in the 15 and 22.5 Gy animals, however rats in the 30 Gy treatment group showed stereotypic and ambulatory behavioral hyperactivity 32 weeks after irradiation. Regulatory changes in the high dose group included decreased growth rate and decreased urine osmolalities, but these measures were extremely variable among animals. Morphological results demonstrated that 30 Gy irradiated animals showed extensive necrosis primarily in the fimbria, which extended into the internal capsule, optic nerve, hippocampus, and thalamus. Hemorrhages were found in the hippocampus, thalamus, and fimbria. Defects in the blood-brain barrier also were evident by entry of intravascularly injected horseradish peroxidase into the parenchyma of the brain. Animals in the 30 Gy grafted group showed fewer behavioral changes and less brain damage than their sham grafted counterparts. Specifically, activity measures were comparable to normal levels, and a dilute urine was not found in the 30 Gy implanted rats. Morphological changes support these behavioral results since only two 30 Gy implanted rats showed necrosis.

  17. Genome-wide transcriptional response of an avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) pst mutant

    PubMed Central

    Crépin, Sébastien; Lamarche, Martin G; Garneau, Philippe; Séguin, Julie; Proulx, Julie; Dozois, Charles M; Harel, Josée

    2008-01-01

    Background Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) are associated with extraintestinal diseases in poultry. The pstSCAB-phoU operon belongs to the Pho regulon and encodes the phosphate specific transport (Pst) system. A functional Pst system is required for full virulence in APEC and other bacteria and contributes to resistance of APEC to serum, to cationic antimicrobial peptides and acid shock. The global mechanisms contributing to the attenuation and decreased resistance of the APEC pst mutant to environmental stresses have not been investigated at the transcriptional level. To determine the global effect of a pst mutation on gene expression, we compared the transcriptomes of APEC strain χ7122 and its isogenic pst mutant (K3) grown in phosphate-rich medium. Results Overall, 470 genes were differentially expressed by at least 1.5-fold. Interestingly, the pst mutant not only induced systems involved in phosphate acquisition and metabolism, despite phosphate availability, but also modulated stress response mechanisms. Indeed, transcriptional changes in genes associated with the general stress responses, including the oxidative stress response were among the major differences observed. Accordingly, the K3 strain was less resistant to reactive oxygen species (ROS) than the wild-type strain. In addition, the pst mutant demonstrated reduced expression of genes involved in lipopolysaccharide modifications and coding for cell surface components such as type 1 and F9 fimbriae. Phenotypic tests also established that the pst mutant was impaired in its capacity to produce type 1 fimbriae, as demonstrated by western blotting and agglutination of yeast cells, when compared to wild-type APEC strain χ7122. Conclusion Overall, our data elucidated the effects of a pst mutation on the transcriptional response, and further support the role of the Pho regulon as part of a complex network contributing to phosphate homeostasis, adaptive stress responses, and E. coli virulence. PMID:19038054

  18. Putative glycoprotein and glycolipid polymorphonuclear leukocyte receptors for the Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 fimbrial lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, A L; Ruhl, S; Joralmon, R A; Brennan, M J; Sutphin, M J; Cisar, J O

    1995-01-01

    Recognition of receptors on sialidase-treated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) by the Gal/GalNAc lectin associated with the type 2 fimbriae of certain strains of actinomyces results in activation of the PMNs, phagocytosis, and destruction of the bacteria. In the present study, plant lectins were utilized as probes to identify putative PMN receptors for the actinomyces lectin. The Gal-reactive lectin from Ricinus communis (RCAI), the Gal/GalNAc-reactive lectins from R. communis (RCAII) and Bauhinia purpurea (BPA), as well as the Gal beta 1-3GalNAc-specific lectins from Arachis hypogaea (PNA) and Agaricus bisporus (ABA) inhibited killing of Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 by sialidase-treated PMNs. These five lectins detected a 130-kDa surface-labeled glycoprotein on nitrocellulose transfers of PMN extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This glycoprotein was revealed only after treatment of the transfers with sialidase, a condition analogous to the sialidase dependence of the lectin-mediated biological responses of the PMNs to the actinomyces. The mannose-reactive lectin concanavalin A did not inhibit killing of the actinomyces and failed to detect the 130-kDa glycoprotein but did block PMN-dependent killing of Escherichia coli B, a bacterium that possesses mannose-sensitive fimbriae. Therefore, the PMN glycoprotein receptor for A. naeslundii is clearly distinct from those recognized by E. coli. Two major putative glycolipid receptors were also identified by actinomyces and RCAI overlays on sialidase-treated thin-layer chromatograms of PMN gangliosides. Thus, both a 130-kDa glycoprotein and certain gangliosides are implicated in the attachment of the actinomyces to PMNs. PMID:7790078

  19. A Comparison of Diets Supplemented with a Feed Additive Containing Organic Acids, Cinnamaldehyde and a Permeabilizing Complex, or Zinc Oxide, on Post-Weaning Diarrhoea, Selected Bacterial Populations, Blood Measures and Performance in Weaned Pigs Experimentally Infected with Enterotoxigenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Stensland, Ingunn; Kim, Jae Cheol; Bowring, Bethany; Collins, Alison M; Mansfield, Josephine P; Pluske, John R

    2015-01-01

    The effects of feeding a diet supplemented with zinc oxide (ZnO) or a blend of organic acids, cinnamaldehyde and a permeabilizing complex (OACP) on post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD) and performance in pigs infected with enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) were examined. Additionally, changes in selected bacterial populations and blood measures were assessed. A total of 72 pigs weaned at 22 d of age and weighing 7.2 ± 1.02 kg (mean ± SEM) was used. Treatments were: base diet (no antimicrobial compounds); base diet + 3 g ZnO/kg; base diet + 1.5 g OACP/kg. Dietary treatments started on the day of weaning and were fed ad libitum for 3 weeks. All pigs were infected with an F4 ETEC on d 4, 5 and 6 after weaning. The incidence of PWD was lower in pigs fed ZnO ( p = 0.026). Overall, pigs fed ZnO grew faster ( p = 0.013) and ate more ( p = 0.004) than the base diet-fed pigs, with OACP-fed pigs performing the same ( p > 0.05) as both the ZnO- and base diet-fed pigs. Feed conversion ratio was similar for all diets ( p > 0.05). The percentage of E. coli with F4 fimbriae was affected a day by treatment interaction ( p = 0.037), with more E. coli with F4 fimbriae found in pigs fed ZnO on d 11 ( p = 0.011) compared to base diet-fed pigs. Only significant time effects ( p < 0.05) occurred for blood measures. Under the conditions of this study, inclusion of OACP gave statistically similar production responses to pigs fed ZnO, however pigs fed ZnO had less PWD compared to OACP- and the base diet-fed pigs. PMID:26610577

  20. YjcC, a c-di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Protein, Regulates the Oxidative Stress Response and Virulence of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Jou; Wang, Zhe-Chong; Huang, Hsi-Yuan; Huang, Hsien-Da; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2013-01-01

    This study shows that the expression of yjcC, an in vivo expression (IVE) gene, and the stress response regulatory genes soxR, soxS, and rpoS are paraquat inducible in Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43. The deletion of rpoS or soxRS decreased yjcC expression, implying an RpoS- or SoxRS-dependent control. After paraquat or H2O2 treatment, the deletion of yjcC reduced bacterial survival. These effects could be complemented by introducing the ΔyjcC mutant with the YjcC-expression plasmid pJR1. The recombinant protein containing only the YjcC-EAL domain exhibited phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity; overexpression of yjcC has lower levels of cyclic di-GMP. The yjcC deletion mutant also exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, oxidation damage, and oxidative stress scavenging activity. In addition, the yjcC deletion reduced capsular polysaccharide production in the bacteria, but increased the LD50 in mice, biofilm formation, and type 3 fimbriae major pilin MrkA production. Finally, a comparative transcriptome analysis showed 34 upregulated and 29 downregulated genes with the increased production of YjcC. The activated gene products include glutaredoxin I, thioredoxin, heat shock proteins, chaperone, and MrkHI, and proteins for energy metabolism (transporters, cell surface structure, and transcriptional regulation). In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that YjcC positively regulates the oxidative stress response and mouse virulence but negatively affects the biofilm formation and type 3 fimbriae expression by altering the c-di-GMP levels after receiving oxidative stress signaling inputs. PMID:23935824

  1. Oral immunization of a live attenuated Escherichia coli strain expressing a holotoxin-structured adhesin-toxoid fusion (1FaeG-FedF-LTA₂:5LTB) protected young pigs against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) infection.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-03-01

    ETEC strains expressing K88 (F4) or F18 fimbriae and enterotoxins are the predominant cause of porcine post-weaning diarrhea (PWD). PWD continues causing significant economic losses to swine producers worldwide. Vaccines effectively protecting against PWD are needed. Our recent study revealed that a tripartite adhesin-toxin monomer (FaeG-FedF-LT(A2-B)) elicited protective antibodies. In this study, we constructed a new adhesin-toxoid fusion, expressed it as a 1A:5B holotoxin-structured antigen (1FaeG-FedF-LT(192A2):5LT(B)) in an avirulent Escherichia coli strain, and evaluated its vaccine potential in pig challenge studies. Piglets orally inoculated with this live strain showed no adverse effects but developed systemic and mucosal antibodies that neutralized cholera toxin and inhibited adherence of K88 and F18 fimbriae in vitro. Moreover, the immunized piglets, when were challenged with ETEC strain 3030-2 (K88ac/LT/STb), had significant fewer bacteria colonized at small intestines and did not develop diarrhea; whereas the control piglets developed severe diarrhea and died. These results indicated the 1FaeG-FedF-LT(192A2):5LT(B) fusion antigen induced protective antiadhesin and antitoxin immunity in pigs, and suggested a live attenuated vaccine can be potentially developed against porcine ETEC diarrhea. Additionally, presenting antigens in a holotoxin structure to target host local mucosal immunity can be used in vaccine development against other enteric diseases. PMID:23375979

  2. Candidate vaccine antigens and genes in Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Adler, B; Bulach, D; Chung, J; Doughty, S; Hunt, M; Rajakumar, K; Serrano, M; van Zanden, A; Zhang, Y; Ruffolo, C

    1999-08-20

    Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of fowl cholera and other diseases of production animals. Isolates are classified into five groups based on capsular antigens and into 16 serotypes based on LPS antigens. Strains causing fowl cholera are most frequently designated A:1, A:3 or A:4. Whole cell bacterins can provide some degree of protection, but only against the homologous LPS serotype. There is good evidence that cross-protective antigens are expressed only under in vivo conditions. Empirically derived, live, attenuated vaccines can protect against heterologous serotypes, but because the basis for attenuation is undefined, reversion to virulence is not uncommon. Work in our laboratory is aimed at using a variety of approaches to identify potential protective antigens or virulence genes to be used as candidates for attenuating mutations or as the basis for vaccine antigen delivery systems. The gene encoding an outer membrane protein, Oma87, which is a homologue of the D15 protective antigen of Haemophilus influenzae, was cloned and sequenced. Rabbit antiserum prepared against recombinant Oma87 could passively protect mice against infection. Type 4 fimbriae form the basis of vaccines against ovine footrot and bovine keratoconjunctivitis. We have identified type 4 fimbriae on the surface of P. multocida, purified the fimbrial subunit protein, PtfA, and determined its N-terminal amino acid sequence. Subsequent cloning of the ptfA gene and its inactivation will now be used to assess the importance of type 4 fimbriae in virulence. There has long been anecdotal evidence for the importance of capsule in virulence, but unequivocal genetic evidence for such a role is lacking. We have cloned and characterised the capsule biosynthetic locus in P. multocida A:1 and identified four bex genes involved in capsule transport and genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and transfer of the N-acetyl glucosamine and glucuronic acid components of the capsule. It has

  3. Bordetella pertussis isolates in Finland: Serotype and fimbrial expression

    PubMed Central

    Heikkinen, Eriikka; Xing, Dorothy K; Ölander, Rose-Marie; Hytönen, Jukka; Viljanen, Matti K; Mertsola, Jussi; He, Qiushui

    2008-01-01

    Background Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough or pertussis in humans. It produces several virulence factors, of which the fimbriae are considered adhesins and elicit immune responses in the host. B. pertussis has three distinct serotypes Fim2, Fim3 or Fim2,3. Generally, B. pertussis Fim2 strains predominate in unvaccinated populations, whereas Fim3 strains are often isolated in vaccinated populations. In Finland, pertussis vaccination was introduced in 1952. The whole-cell vaccine contained two strains, 18530 (Fim3) since 1962 and strain 1772 (Fim2,3) added in 1976. After that the vaccine has remained the same until 2005 when the whole-cell vaccine was replaced by the acellular vaccine containing pertussis toxin and filamentous hemagglutinin. Our aims were to study serotypes of Finnish B. pertussis isolates from 1974 to 2006 in a population with > 90% vaccination coverage and fimbrial expression of the isolates during infection. Serotyping was done by agglutination and serotype-specific antibody responses were determined by blocking ELISA. Results Altogether, 1,109 isolates were serotyped. Before 1976, serotype distributions of Fim2, Fim3 and Fim2,3 were 67%, 19% and 10%, respectively. From 1976 to 1998, 94% of the isolates were Fim2 serotype. Since 1999, the frequency of Fim3 strains started to increase and reached 83% during a nationwide epidemic in 2003. A significant increase in level of serum IgG antibodies against purified fimbriae was observed between paired sera of 37 patients. The patients infected by Fim3 strains had antibodies which blocked the binding of monoclonal antibodies to Fim3 but not to Fim2. Moreover, about one third of the Fim2 strain infected patients developed antibodies capable of blocking of binding of both anti-Fim2 and Fim3 monoclonal antibodies. Conclusion Despite extensive vaccinations in Finland, B. pertussis Fim2 strains were the most common serotype. Emergence of Fim3 strains started in 1999 and coincided with nationwide

  4. Prevalence and Characteristics of the Epidemic Multiresistant Escherichia coli ST131 Clonal Group among Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing E. coli Isolates in Copenhagen, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Dennis S.; Nilsson, Frida; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Leihof, Rikke Fleron; Struve, Carsten; Scheutz, Flemming; Johnston, Brian; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Johnson, James R.

    2013-01-01

    We report the characteristics of 115 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli clinical isolates, from 115 unique Danish patients, over a 1-year study interval (1 October 2008 to 30 September 2009). Forty-four (38%) of the ESBL isolates represented sequence type 131 (ST13)1, from phylogenetic group B2. The remaining 71 isolates were from phylogenetic groups D (27%), A (22%), B1 (10%), and B2 (3%). Serogroup O25 ST131 isolates (n = 42; 95% of ST131) comprised 7 different K antigens, whereas two ST131 isolates were O16:K100:H5. Compared to non-ST131 isolates, ST131 isolates were associated positively with CTX-M-15 and negatively with CTX-M-1 and CTX-M-14. They also were associated positively with 11 virulence genes, including afa and dra (Dr family adhesins), the F10 papA allele (P fimbria variant), fimH (type 1 fimbriae), fyuA (yersiniabactin receptor), iha (adhesin siderophore), iutA (aerobactin receptor), kpsM II (group 2 capsules), malX (pathogenicity island marker), ompT (outer membrane protease), sat (secreted autotransporter toxin), and usp (uropathogenicity-specific protein) and negatively with hra (heat-resistant agglutinin) and iroN (salmochelin receptor). The consensus virulence gene profile (>90% prevalence) of the ST131 isolates included fimH, fyuA, malX, and usp (100% each), ompT and the F10 papA allele (95% each), and kpsM II and iutA (93% each). ST131 isolates were also positively associated with community acquisition, extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) status, and the O25, K100, and H4 antigens. Thus, among ESBL E. coli isolates in Copenhagen, ST131 was the most prevalent clonal group, was community associated, and exhibited distinctive and comparatively extensive virulence profiles, plus a greater variety of capsular antigens than reported previously. PMID:23554186

  5. FimH adhesin from host unrestricted Salmonella Enteritidis binds to different glycoprotein ligands expressed by enterocytes from sheep, pig and cattle than FimH adhesins from host restricted Salmonella Abortus-ovis, Salmonella Choleraesuis and Salmonella Dublin.

    PubMed

    Grzymajło, Krzysztof; Ugorski, Maciej; Kolenda, Rafał; Kędzierska, Anna; Kuźmińska-Bajor, Marta; Wieliczko, Alina

    2013-10-25

    Adhesion to gut tissues and colonization of the alimentary tract, two important stages in the pathogenesis of Salmonella, are mediated by FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae. It was suggested that minor differences in the structure of FimH are most likely associated with differences in adhesion specificities, and may determine the tropism of various Salmonella serovars to different species and tissues. We investigated this hypothesis by comparing the binding properties of FimH proteins from three Salmonella enterica serovars with limited (Choleraesuis, Dublin) or restricted (Abortusovis) host ranges to FimH from broad host range S. Enteritidis and mannose inactive FimH from S. Gallinarum. Although all active variants of FimH protein were able to bind mannose-rich glycoproteins (RNase B, HRP and Man-BSA) with comparable affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance, there were significant differences in the binding profiles of the FimH proteins from host restricted serovars and host unrestricted serovar Enteritidis, to glycoproteins from enterocyte cell lines established in vitro and derived from sheep, pig and cattle. When low-binding FimH adhesin from S. Enteritidis was subjected to Western blot analysis, it bound to surface membrane protein of about 130 kDa, and high-binding FimH adhesins from S. Abortusovis, S. Choleraesuis and S. Dublin bound to surface membrane protein of about 55 kDa present in each cell line. Differential binding of FimH proteins from host-restricted and broad-host-range Salmonella to intestinal receptors was confirmed using mutant FimH adhesins obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the low-binding variant of FimH from S. Choleraesuis with mutation Leu57Pro lost the ability to bind protein band of 55 kDa, but instead interacted with glycoprotein of about 130 kDa. On the other hand, the high-binding variant of FimH adhesin from S. Enteritids with mutation Asn101Ser did not bind to its receptor of 130 kDa, but instead it

  6. Environmentally Endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains with Mutations in lasR Are Associated with Increased Disease Severity in Corneal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, John H.; Hebert, Wesley P.; Naimie, Amanda; Ray, Kathryn; Van Gelder, Rachel D.; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Lalitha, Prajna; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT) was a multicenter, international study of bacterial keratitis in which 101 Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections were treated. Twenty-two of 101 P. aeruginosa isolates collected had a colony morphology characteristic of a loss-of-function mutation in lasR, the gene encoding a quorum-sensing master regulator. Ulcers caused by these 22 strains were associated with larger areas of corneal opacification, worse vision, and a lower rate of vision recovery in response to treatment than ulcers caused by the other isolates. The lasR sequences from these isolates each contained one of three nonsynonymous substitutions, and these strains were deficient in production of LasR-regulated protease and rhamnolipids. Replacement of lasR with either of the two most common lasR alleles from the SCUT isolates was sufficient to decrease protease and rhamnolipid production in PA14. Loss of LasR function is associated with increased production of CupA fimbriae, and the LasR-defective isolates exhibited higher production of CupA fimbriae than LasR-intact isolates. Strains with the same lasR mutation were of the same multilocus sequence type, suggesting that LasR-deficient, environmental P. aeruginosa strains were endemic to the area, and infections caused by these strains were associated with worse patient outcomes in the SCUT study. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00324168.) IMPORTANCE The LasR transcription factor is an important regulator of quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa and positively controls multiple virulence-associated pathways. The emergence of strains with lasR loss-of-function alleles in chronic disease is well described and is thought to represent a specific adaptation to the host environment. However, the prevalence and virulence of these strains in acute infections remain unclear. This report describes observations revealing that lasR mutants were common among isolates from

  7. Identification of fimbrial subunits in the genome of Trueperella pyogenes and association between serum antibodies against fimbrial proteins and uterine conditions in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bisinotto, R S; Filho, J C Oliveira; Narbus, C; Machado, V S; Murray, E; Bicalho, R C

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the role of fimbrial subunits during bacterial adherence and the host's immunological response against anchorage proteins is critical for the development of strategies to prevent pathogens from thriving. The objectives of the present study were to locate fimbria-related proteins in the genome of Trueperella pyogenes (CP007519), define their importance for bacterial adherence, and evaluate the association between serum antibodies against fimbrial subunits and uterine health in dairy cows. Using a BLASTp search through the GenBank database, 4 putative clusters for fimbrial assembly were identified in the genome of T. pyogenes, namely FimA, FimC, FimE, and the novel major fimbriae FimJ. The fimbrial proteins FimA, FimC, FimE, and surface-anchored protein (SAP) were cloned into the pET 26b (+) vector, expressed in Escherichia coli BL21, and purified using affinity chromatography. Serum antibodies against FimA, FimC, FimE, and SAP were determined by ELISA on d 260±3 of gestation and at 2±1 and 35±3 d in milk (DIM) to assess the relationship between antigenicity against fimbrial proteins and parameters of uterine health. Antibodies against FimC and FimE were greater both pre- and postpartum in cows from which T. pyogenes was recovered by uterine flushing at 35±3 DIM, whereas T. pyogenes infection was not associated with differences in serum concentrations of FimA and SAP antibodies. Likewise, concentrations of FimC antibodies were consistently greater in cows diagnosed with clinical endometritis at 35±3 DIM compared with healthy counterparts. These results suggest that fimbrial proteins evaluated in the present study, particularly FimC and FimE, are important for maintenance of T. pyogenes in the uterus postpartum and development of uterine diseases in dairy cattle. Additional research is warranted to elucidate the mechanisms by which each fimbrial subunit contributes to the establishment of uterine diseases, evaluate its effect on fertility responses

  8. A Dual Role for P2X7 Receptor during Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Junior, E S; Morandini, A C; Almeida-da-Silva, C L C; Franco, E J; Potempa, J; Nguyen, K A; Oliveira, A C; Zamboni, D S; Ojcius, D M; Scharfstein, J; Coutinho-Silva, R

    2015-09-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a role for purinergic signaling in the activation of multiprotein intracellular complexes called inflammasomes, which control the release of potent inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL) -1β and -18. Porphyromonas gingivalis is intimately associated with periodontitis and is currently considered one of the pathogens that can subvert the immune system by limiting the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. We recently showed that P. gingivalis can dampen eATP-induced IL-1β secretion by means of its fimbriae in a purinergic P2X7 receptor-dependent manner. Here, we further explore the role of this purinergic receptor during eATP-induced IL-1β processing and secretion by P. gingivalis-infected macrophages. We found that NLRP3 was necessary for eATP-induced IL-1β secretion as well as for caspase 1 activation irrespective of P. gingivalis fimbriae. Additionally, although the secretion of IL-1β from P. gingivalis-infected macrophages was dependent on NLRP3, its adaptor protein ASC, or caspase 1, the cleavage of intracellular pro-IL-1β to the mature form was found to occur independently of NLRP3, its adaptor protein ASC, or caspase 1. Our in vitro findings revealed that P2X7 receptor has a dual role, being critical not only for eATP-induced IL-1β secretion but also for intracellular pro-IL-1β processing. These results were relevant in vivo since P2X7 receptor expression was upregulated in a P. gingivalis oral infection model, and reduced IFN-γ and IL-17 were detected in draining lymph node cells from P2rx7(-/-) mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that P2X7 receptor and NLRP3 transcription were modulated in human chronic periodontitis. Overall, we conclude that the P2X7 receptor has a role in periodontal immunopathogenesis and suggest that targeting of the P2X7/NLRP3 pathway should be considered in future therapeutic interventions in periodontitis. PMID:26152185

  9. FimH family of type 1 fimbrial adhesins: functional heterogeneity due to minor sequence variations among fimH genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sokurenko, E V; Courtney, H S; Ohman, D E; Klemm, P; Hasty, D L

    1994-01-01

    We recently reported that the type 1-fimbriated Escherichia coli strains CSH-50 and HB101(pPKL4), both K-12 derivatives, have different patterns of adhesion to yeast mannan, human plasma fibronectin, and fibronectin derivatives, suggesting functional heterogeneity of type 1 fimbriae. In this report, we provide evidence that this functional heterogeneity is due to variations in the fimH genes. We also investigated functional heterogeneity among clinical isolates and whether variation in fimH genes accounts for differences in receptor specificity. Twelve isolates obtained from human urine were tested for their ability to adhere to mannan, fibronectin, periodate-treated fibronectin, and a synthetic peptide copying the 30 amino-terminal residues of fibronectin. CSH-50 and HB101(pPKL4) were tested for comparison. Selected isolates were also tested for adhesion to purified fragments spanning the entire fibronectin molecule. Three distinct functional classes, designated M, MF, and MFP, were observed. The fimH genes were amplified by PCR from chromosomal DNA obtained from representative strains and expressed in a delta fim strain (AAEC191A) transformed with a recombinant plasmid containing the entire fim gene cluster but with a translational stop-linker inserted into the fimH gene (pPKL114). Cloned fimH genes conferred on AAEC191A(pPKL114) receptor specificities mimicking those of the parent strains from which the fimH genes were obtained, demonstrating that the FimH subunits are responsible for the functional heterogeneity. Representative fimH genes were sequenced, and the deduced amino acid sequences were compared with the previously published FimH sequence. Allelic variants exhibiting >98% homology and encoding proteins differing by as little as a single amino acid substitution confer distinct adhesive phenotypes. This unexpected adhesive diversity within the FimH family broadens the scope of potential receptors for enterobacterial adhesion and may lead to a fundamental

  10. Invasion of Aortic and Heart Endothelial Cells by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rajashri G.; Khan, Mahfuz B.; Attardo Genco, Caroline

    1998-01-01

    lacks the major fimbriae, was not detected. These results indicate that P. gingivalis can actively invade endothelial cells and that fimbriae are required for this process. P. gingivalis invasion of endothelial cells may represent another strategy utilized by this pathogen to thwart the host immune response. PMID:9784541

  11. The effect of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4ab,ac on early-weaned piglets: a gene expression study.

    PubMed

    Schroyen, M; Goddeeris, B M; Stinckens, A; Verhelst, R; Janssens, S; Cox, E; Georges, M; Niewold, T; Buys, N

    2013-03-15

    Diarrhoea in neonatal and early-weaned piglets due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-F4 (ETEC-F4) is an important problem in the pig farming industry. There is substantial evidence for a genetic basis for susceptibility to ETEC-F4 since not all pigs suffer from diarrhoea after an ETEC-F4 infection. A region on SSC13 has been found to be in close linkage to the susceptibility of piglets for ETEC-F4ab,ac. Potential candidate genes on SSC13 have been examined and although some polymorphisms were found to be in linkage disequilibrium with the phenotype, the causative mutation has not yet been found. In this study we are looking at the expression of porcine genes in relation to ETEC-F4ab,ac. With the aid of the Affymetrix GeneChip Porcine Genome Array we were able to find differentially expressed genes between ETEC-F4ab,ac receptor positive (Fab,acR(+)) piglets without diarrhoea and F4ab,acR(+) piglets with diarrhoea or F4ab,acR(-) animals. Since the susceptibility to ETEC-F4ab,ac was described as a Mendelian trait, it is not so surprisingly that only two differentially expressed genes, transferrin receptor (TFRC) and trefoil factor 1 (TFF1), came out of the analysis. Although both genes could pass for functional candidate genes only TFRC also mapped to the region on SSC13 associated with susceptibility for ETEC-F4, which makes TFRC a positional functional candidate gene. Validation by qRT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of TFRC and TFF1. In piglets without diarrhoea, the expression of both genes was higher in F4ab,acR(+) than in F4ab,acR(-) piglets. Similarly, TFRC and TFF1 expression in F4ab,acR(+) piglets without diarrhoea was also higher than in F4ab,acR(+) piglets with diarrhoea. Consequently, although both genes might not play a role as receptor for F4 fimbriae, they could be of great importance during an ETEC-F4 outbreak. An upregulation of TFRC can be a consequence of the piglets ability to raise an effective immune response. An elevation of TFF1, a

  12. Genetic Fusions of Heat-Labile (LT) and Heat-Stable (ST) Toxoids of Porcine Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Elicit Neutralizing Anti-LT and Anti-STa antibodies ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiping; Zhang, Chengxian; Francis, David H.; Fang, Ying; Knudsen, David; Nataro, James P.; Robertson, Donald C.

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and farm animals. E. coli fimbriae, or colonization factor antigens (CFAs), and enterotoxins, including heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) and heat-stable enterotoxins (ST), are the key virulence factors in ETEC diarrhea. Unlike fimbriae or LT, STa has not often been included as an antigen in development of vaccines against ETEC diarrhea because of its poor immunogenicity. STa becomes immunogenic only after being coupled with a strongly immunogenic carrier protein. However, native or shorter STa antigens either had to retain toxic activity in order to become antigenic or elicited anti-STa antibodies that were not sufficiently protective. In this study, we genetically mutated the porcine LT (pLT) gene for a pLT192(R→G) toxoid and the porcine STa (pSTa) gene for three full-length pSTa toxoids [STa11(N→K), STa12(P→F), and STa13(A→Q)] and used the full-length pLT192 as an adjuvant to carry the pSTa toxoid for pLT192:pSTa-toxoid fusion antigens. Rabbits immunized with pLT192:pSTa12 or pLT192:pSTa13 fusion protein developed high titers of anti-LT and anti-STa antibodies. Furthermore, rabbit antiserum and antifecal antibodies were able to neutralize purified cholera toxin (CT) and STa toxin. In addition, preliminary data suggested that suckling piglets born by a sow immunized with the pLT192:pSTa13 fusion antigen were protected when challenged with an STa-positive ETEC strain. This study demonstrated that pSTa toxoids are antigenic when fused with a pLT toxoid and that the elicited anti-LT and anti-STa antibodies were protective. This fusion strategy could provide instructive information to develop effective toxoid vaccines against ETEC-associated diarrhea in animals and humans. PMID:19858307

  13. A Comparison of Diets Supplemented with a Feed Additive Containing Organic Acids, Cinnamaldehyde and a Permeabilizing Complex, or Zinc Oxide, on Post-Weaning Diarrhoea, Selected Bacterial Populations, Blood Measures and Performance in Weaned Pigs Experimentally Infected with Enterotoxigenic E. coli †

    PubMed Central

    Stensland, Ingunn; Kim, Jae Cheol; Bowring, Bethany; Collins, Alison M.; Mansfield, Josephine P.; Pluske, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary This experiment was conducted to assess the effects of three diets on diarrhoea, performance (weight change, feed intake and feed conversion ratio), selected bacterial populations and blood measures of weaner pigs infected with enterotoxigenic E. coli. The three diets were: base diet (no antimicrobial compounds), base diet containing zinc oxide, and base diet containing a feed additive (blend of organic acids, cinnamaldehyde and permeabilizing complex). Only feeding zinc oxide decreased diarrhoea, with zinc oxide-fed pigs performing better than base diet-fed pigs. Zinc oxide-fed pigs performed similarly to pigs fed the organic acids, cinnamaldehyde and permeabilizing complex. Significant interactions between treatment and day after weaning were found for some bacterial populations, although the implications of such findings require further examination. Abstract The effects of feeding a diet supplemented with zinc oxide (ZnO) or a blend of organic acids, cinnamaldehyde and a permeabilizing complex (OACP) on post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD) and performance in pigs infected with enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) were examined. Additionally, changes in selected bacterial populations and blood measures were assessed. A total of 72 pigs weaned at 22 d of age and weighing 7.2 ± 1.02 kg (mean ± SEM) was used. Treatments were: base diet (no antimicrobial compounds); base diet + 3 g ZnO/kg; base diet + 1.5 g OACP/kg. Dietary treatments started on the day of weaning and were fed ad libitum for 3 weeks. All pigs were infected with an F4 ETEC on d 4, 5 and 6 after weaning. The incidence of PWD was lower in pigs fed ZnO (p = 0.026). Overall, pigs fed ZnO grew faster (p = 0.013) and ate more (p = 0.004) than the base diet-fed pigs, with OACP-fed pigs performing the same (p > 0.05) as both the ZnO- and base diet-fed pigs. Feed conversion ratio was similar for all diets (p > 0.05). The percentage of E. coli with F4 fimbriae was affected a day by treatment interaction (p

  14. Histomorphometric evaluation of intestinal cellular immune responses in pigs immunized with live oral F4ac+ non-enterotoxigenic E. coli vaccine against postweaning colibacillosis

    PubMed Central

    Kovšca Janjatović, A.; Lacković, G.; Božić, F.; Kezić, D.; Popović, M.; Valpotić, H.; Harapin, I.; Pavižić, Ž.; Njari, B.; Valpotić, I.

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is the most common type of porcine postweaning colibacillosis (PWC). Among fimbriae of porcine ETEC strains the best studied family of fimbriae are the members of F4 adhesins, existing in at least three variants: ab, ac, ad. Active immunization against porcine PWC is difficult due to: i) ETEC strains are only one of the essential predisposing factors, ii) the success of vaccinal antigen uptake depends on the presence of enterocyte receptors for F4 adhesins, iii) the intestinal immune system may react with tolerance or hypersensitivity to the same antigens depending on the dose and form of the vaccinal immunogen, and iv) kinetics of the specific immune responses may be different in the case of F4 (earlier) and the other ETEC adhesins, particularly F18 (later). The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a live attenuated F4ac+ non-ETEC vaccine against porcine PWC by analyzing quantitative differences in the small intestinal lymphoid and myeloid cell subsets of immunized (with or without levamisole given as an adjuvant) vs control non-immunized pigs. Four week-old pigs were intragastrically immunized with a vaccine candidate F4ac + non-ETEC strain 2407 at day 0, challenged 7 days later with a virulent F4ac+ strain ETEC 11-800/1/94, euthanatized at day 13 and sampled for immunohistology. Non-immunized pigs received saline at day 0 and were processed as the principals. Immunophenotypes of lymphoid and myeloid cell subsets were demonstrated within jejunal and ileal mucosa by immunohistochemical avidinbiotin complex method and corresponding morphometric data were analyzed using software program Lucia G for digital image analyses. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with surface molecules on porcine immune cells such as CD3, CD45RA, CD45RC, CD21 and SWC3 enabled clear insight into distribution patterns and amount of these cells within the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) examined. The numbers of jejunal and

  15. Comparative biological activities of acellular pertussis vaccines produced by Kitasato.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Izumiya, K; Sato, T; Yoshino, K; Nakagawa, N; Ohoishi, M; Hoshino, M

    1991-04-01

    The quality of 14 lots of acellular pertussis-diphtheria-tetanus (AC-PDT) vaccines manufactured by the Kitasato Institute during the period 1987-1990 were investigated. The geometric means of HSU, LPU, and BWDU were 0.078, 0.257, and 7.33 per ml respectively. The potency was higher than 14 IU per ml. These results indicated the consistency of the Kitasato AC-PDT vaccines. The antibody response to the AC-PDT vaccines was measured in primary and secondary vaccinated mice by ELISA. IgG antibody response to FHA and PT was obtained in all immunized mice (P less than 0.001) after the primary injection. In contrast, IgG antibody response to fimbriae 2 showed a significant titer rise (P less than 0.001) after the booster injection. The results indicated that the Kitasato AC-P vaccines consisted of protein, PT and FHA as the major antigens, and a little agglutinogen as the minor antigen. PMID:1798236

  16. Immunogenicity and safety of a monovalent, multicomponent acellular pertussis vaccine in 15 month-6-year-old German children. Monovalent Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Study Group.

    PubMed

    Stehr, K; Heininger, U; Uhlenbusch, R; Angersbach, P; Hackell, J; Eckhardt, T

    1995-03-01

    Immunization against pertussis has been re-recommended for healthy children in Germany in 1991. In addition the former restriction of immunizing only in the first 2 years of life was abolished. In children born before 1991 immunization rates against pertussis were 15% or less. With the new recommendations physicians are now faced with an increasing demand of parents for catch-up vaccinations in these children. Since they were immunized against diphtheria and tetanus previously monovalent pertussis vaccines are needed for this indication. Therefore a monovalent, multicomponent acellular pertussis vaccine was studied in 249 German children 15 months to 6 years of age. Three doses were administered at 6-10 week intervals. Reactogenicity and antibody responses against the vaccine antigens pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), 69-kd antigen (pertactin) and fimbriae-2 (agglutinogen) were investigated. Local and systemic reactions were minimal in frequency and severity. Antibody responses against all vaccine antigens were pronounced with 93%-100% of vaccinees demonstrating at least four fold titre rises above pre-immunization after the third dose. These findings indicate that this monovalent, multicomponent acellular pertussis vaccine with excellent immunogenicity and low reactogenicity is an appropriate candidate for closing immunization gaps in older children in countries with previously low vaccination rates against pertussis. Based on the results of this study the monovalent acellular pertussis vaccine was licensed in Germany in January 1994. PMID:7758519

  17. Evaluation of progestogens for postoperative adhesion prevention.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, P J; Quigley, M M; Held, B

    1984-10-01

    Progesterone (P) has been shown to have potent antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. Previous reports have suggested that the use of P decreases postoperative adhesion formation. To further evaluate the role of pharmacologic doses of progestogens in adhesion prevention, 42 mature New Zealand White rabbits underwent standardized injuries to the uterine horns, fimbriae, and pelvic peritoneum and received one of six treatments. Group S had intraperitoneal placement of normal saline (0.9%); group H received intraperitoneal placement of 32% dextran 70; group IM-P received intramuscular P-in-oil 10 days before and after laparotomy in addition to intraperitoneal saline; group IP-P had intraperitoneal placement of an aqueous P suspension; group DP received medroxyprogesterone acetate intraperitoneally; and group C received no intramuscular or intraperitoneal adhesion-prevention agents. The animals were sacrificed 6 weeks after laparotomy, and the adhesions were scored. Intraperitoneal saline (group S) significantly reduced the amount of adhesions when compared with the control group (C) (P less than 0.05). No significant difference was observed when group S was compared with group H. Intramuscular P added to saline (group IM-P) did not cause further reduction in adhesions when compared with group S. Both group IP-P and group DP had more adhesions than did group S (P less than 0.01). These data fail to support previous claims regarding adhesion prevention by the use of locally or parenterally administered progestogens. PMID:6237937

  18. Advanced glycation end products facilitate bacterial adherence in urinary tract infection in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Ahmet; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Izgi, Kenan; Bicer, Fuat; Hultgren, Scott J.; Liu, Guiming; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic individuals have increased susceptibility to urinary tract infection (UTI), a common, painful condition. During diabetes mellitus, non-enzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and protein amine groups result in excessive production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that accumulate in tissues. Since bacteria adhere to cell surfaces by binding to carbohydrates, we hypothesized that adherence of bacteria to the bladder in diabetics may be enhanced by accumulation of AGEs on urothelial surface proteins. Using a murine model of UTI, we observed increased adherence of type 1 fimbriated uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to the bladder in streptozotocin-induced diabetic female mice compared with age-matched controls, along with increased concentrations of two common AGEs in superficial urothelial cells from diabetic bladders. Several lectins with different specificities exhibited increased binding to urothelial homogenates from diabetic mice compared with controls, and two of those lectins also bound to AGEs. Furthermore, mannose-binding type 1 fimbriae isolated from UPEC bound to different AGEs, and UPEC adherence to the bladder in diabetic mice, were inhibited by pretreatment of mice with the AGE inhibitor pyridoxamine. These results strongly suggest a role for urothelial AGE accumulation in increased bacterial adherence during UTI in diabetes. PMID:25986378

  19. FNR Regulates Expression of Important Virulence Factors Contributing to Pathogenicity of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Nicolle L.; Nicholson, Bryon; Hussein, Ashraf; Cai, Wentong; Wannemuehler, Yvonne M.; Dell'Anna, Giuseppe; Logue, Catherine M.; Horn, Fabiana; Nolan, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is responsible for the majority of urinary tract infections (UTIs), which are some of the world's most common bacterial infections of humans. Here, we examined the role of FNR (fumarate and nitrate reduction), a well-known global regulator, in the pathogenesis of UPEC infections. We constructed an fnr deletion mutant of UPEC CFT073 and compared it to the wild type for changes in virulence, adherence, invasion, and expression of key virulence factors. Compared to the wild type, the fnr mutant was highly attenuated in the mouse model of human UTI and showed severe defects in adherence to and invasion of bladder and kidney epithelial cells. Our results showed that FNR regulates motility and multiple virulence factors, including expression of type I and P fimbriae, modulation of hemolysin expression, and expression of a novel pathogenicity island involved in α-ketoglutarate metabolism under anaerobic conditions. Our results demonstrate that FNR is a key global regulator of UPEC virulence and controls expression of important virulence factors that contribute to UPEC pathogenicity. PMID:25245807

  20. Therapeutic potential of CERE-110 (AAV2-NGF): Targeted, stable, and sustained NGF delivery and trophic activity on rodent basal forebrain cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Kathie M.; Hofer, Eva K.; Mehta, Arpesh; Ramirez, Anthony; Sun, Liangwu; Tuszynski, Mark; Bartus, Raymond T.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of degenerating basal forebrain cholinergic neurons with nerve growth factor (NGF) in Alzheimer’s disease has long been contemplated, but an effective and safe delivery method has been lacking. Towards achieving this goal, we are currently developing CERE-110, an adeno-associated virus-based gene delivery vector that encodes for human NGF, for stereotactic surgical delivery to the human nucleus basalis of Meynert. Results indicate that NGF transgene delivery to the targeted brain region via CERE-110 is reliable and accurate, that NGF transgene distribution can be controlled by altering CERE-110 dose, and that it is possible to achieve restricted NGF expression limited to but covering the target brain region. Results from animals examined at longer time periods of 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after CERE-110 delivery indicate that NGF transgene expression is stable and sustained at all time points, with no loss or build-up of protein over the long-term. In addition, results from a series of experiments indicate that CERE-110 is neuroprotective and neurorestorative to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in the rat fimbria-fornix lesion and aged rat models, and has bioactive effects on young rat basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. These findings, as well as those from several additional non-clinical experiments conducted in both rats and monkeys, led to the initiation of a Phase I clinical study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CERE-110 in Alzheimer’s disease subjects, which is currently ongoing. PMID:18439998

  1. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Adhesins.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Brian D; Torres, Alfredo G

    2014-06-01

    Adhesins are a group of proteins in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) that are involved in the attachment or colonization of this pathogen to abiotic (plastic or steel) and biological surfaces, such as those found in bovine and human intestines. This review provides the most up-to-date information on these essential adhesion factors, summarizing important historical discoveries and analyzing the current and future state of this research. In doing so, the proteins intimin and Tir are discussed in depth, especially regarding their role in the development of attaching and effacing lesions and in EHEC virulence. Further, a series of fimbrial proteins (Lpf1, Lpf2, curli, ECP, F9, ELF, Sfp, HCP, and type 1 fimbria) are also described, emphasizing their various contributions to adherence and colonization of different surfaces and their potential use as genetic markers in detection and classification of different EHEC serotypes. This review also discusses the role of several autotransporter proteins (EhaA-D, EspP, Saa and Sab, and Cah), as well as other proteins associated with adherence, such as flagella, EibG, Iha, and OmpA. While these proteins have all been studied to varying degrees, all of the adhesins summarized in this article have been linked to different stages of the EHEC life cycle, making them good targets for the development of more effective diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:26103974

  2. Ultrastructure of Thiothrix spp. and “Type 021N” Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Terry M.; Unz, Richard F.; Doman, J. Thomas

    1987-01-01

    The ultrastructural features of two groups of filamentous sulfur bacteria, Thiothrix spp. and an unnamed organism designated “type 021N,” were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Negative staining of whole cells and filaments with uranyl acetate revealed the presence of tufts of fimbriae located at the ends of individual gonidia of Thiothrix sp. strain A1 and “type 021N” strain N7. Holdfast material present at the center of mature rosettes was observed in thin sections stained with ruthenium red. A clearly defined sheath enveloped the trichomes of two of three Thiothrix strains but was absent from “type 021N” filaments. The outer cell wall appeared more complex in “type 021N” strains than in Thiothrix isolates. Bulbs or clusters of irregularly shaped cells, often present in filaments of “type 021N” bacteria, appeared to result from crosswalls which formed at angles oblique to the filament axis. The multicellular nature of these sulfur bacteria was apparent in that only the cytoplasmic membrane and peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall were involved in the septation process. Sulfur inclusions which developed in the presence of sodium thiosulfate were enclosed by a single-layered envelope and located within invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane. Images PMID:16347385

  3. Ultrastructural features of goat oviductal secretory cells at follicular and luteal phases of the oestrous cycle

    PubMed Central

    ABE, HIROYUKI; ONODERA, MASAKAZU; SUGAWARA, SHICHIRO; SATOH, TAKESHI; HOSHI, HIROYOSHI

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the ultrastructure of secretory cells in the various regions of the goat oviduct during the follicular and luteal phases of the oestrous cycle. During the follicular phase in the fimbriae, the secretory cells contained small secretory granules with electron-dense matrices. In the luteal phase, the secretory granules disappeared and cytoplasmic protrusions, extending beyond the luminal border of the ciliated cells and often containing the nucleus, were predominant. During the follicular phase in ampullary secretory cells, numerous secretory granules with moderately electron-dense matrices were present in the supranuclear cytoplasm and exocytosis of secretory granules was observed. The number of secretory granules was dramatically reduced in the ampullary secretory cells at the luteal phase. Conspicuous cytoplasmic protrusions of secretory cells were observed similar to those of the fimbrial epithelium. Isthmic cells were almost free of secretory granules and lysosome-like bodies were found both at the follicular and luteal phases. In conclusion, our ultrastructural observations of goat oviduct revealed marked cyclic changes in the ultrastructural features of secretory cells and the ultrastructural features and the numbers of secretory granules were distinctive for each particular segment. PMID:10634690

  4. Heterogeneous patterns of oligodendroglial differentiation in the forebrain of the opossum Didelphis marsupialis.

    PubMed

    Barradas, P C; Gomes, S S; Cavalcante, L A

    1998-01-01

    The differentiation of oligodendrocytes in the forebrain of the opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) has been studied by the immunohistochemical identification of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) and by the autoradiographic detection of the uptake of 3H-thymidine. CNPase is expressed early in oligodendroglia somata and fibre sheaths (myelin) in the forebrain and its persistence in the cell bodies is regionally heterogeneous, being ephemeral in cells within the optic pathway, supraoptic decussation, and posterior commissure, of intermediate duration in the mamillo-thalamic fascicle, and stria medullaris, and long-lasting in other diencephalic and in telencephalic tracts. In the cerebral cortex, most CNPase+ cells have small somata and multiple processes (types I and II). CNPase-expressing oligodendrocytes are also regionally heterogeneous in terms of proliferative capability, which could not be detected in forebrain tracts or diencephalon, but has appeared in a small proportion of cells in the neocortical white matter and in the fimbria. Our findings provide additional evidence in favour of the heterogeneity of oligodendrocytes. PMID:9530996

  5. Virulence determinants in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli from North India and their interaction in in vitro organ culture system.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepika; Sharma, Monica; Sarkar, Subendu; Thapa, B R; Chakraborti, Anuradha

    2016-09-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an important diarrhoeal pathogen causing diseases in multiple epidemiological and clinical settings. In developing countries like India, diarrhoeal diseases are one of the major killers among paediatric population and oddly, few studies are available from Indian paediatric population on the variability of EAEC virulence genes. In this study, we examined the distribution of plasmid and chromosomal-encoded virulence determinants in EAEC isolates, and analysed cytokines response generated against EAEC with specific aggregative adherence fimbriae (AAF) type in duodenal biopsies using in vitro organ culture (IVOC) mimicking in vivo conditions. Different virulence marker combinations among strains were reflected as a function of specific adhesins signifying EAEC heterogeneity. fis gene emerged as an important genetic marker apart from aggA and aap Further, EAEC infection in IVOC showed upregulation of IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and TLR-5 expression. EAEC with AAFII induced significant TLR-5 and IL-8 response, conceivably owing to more pathogenicity markers. This study sheds light on the pattern of EAEC pathotypes prevalent in North Indian paediatric population and highlights the presence of unique virulence combinations in pathogenic strains. Thus, evident diversity in EAEC virulence and multifaceted bacteria-host crosstalk can provide useful insights for the strategic management of diarrhoeal diseases in India, where diarrhoeal outbreaks are more frequent. PMID:27493010

  6. Genetic relationships among pathogenic Escherichia coli of serogroup O157.

    PubMed Central

    Whittam, T S; Wilson, R A

    1988-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains of serotype O157:H7 are a newly described clonal pathogenic form associated with recent outbreaks of hemorrhagic colitis in humans. Although O157 strains of various H types have long been recognized as enterotoxigenic in animals, little is known about how these pathogenic animal strains are related to those of serotype O157:H7. To determine the genetic relatedness of O157:H7 isolates to animal O157 strains, we examined 194 O157 isolates, representing 12 distinct flagellar antigens (H serotypes), obtained from a variety of animal and human infections. To characterize isolates, we assayed allelic variation at 19 enzyme loci by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Genotypic comparisons of isolates revealed extensive variation among 33 distinct clonal genotypes that differed, on average, at 44% of the enzyme loci. K88 fimbriae were expressed in 72% of the isolates and occurred in a diversity of chromosomal genotypic backgrounds. Five major clonal groups were recognized; one group was clearly associated with porcine colibacillosis, and another was associated with human urinary tract infections. The O157:H7 genotype was not closely allied with any of the major groups of clones. The results indicate that O157 E. coli are genetically diverse and strongly suggest that the O157:H7 lineage was not recently derived from other pathogenic strains of the O157 serogroup. PMID:2457555

  7. Enzyme replacement improves ataxic gait and central nervous system histopathology in a mouse model of metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Ulrich; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Stroobants, Stijn; Andersson, Claes; Weigelt, Cecilia; Eistrup, Carl; Fogh, Jens; D'Hooge, Rudi; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2009-04-01

    Inherited deficiencies of lysosomal hydrolases cause lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) that are characterized by a progressive multisystemic pathology and premature death. Repeated intravenous injection of the active counterpart of the deficient enzyme, a treatment strategy called enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), evolved as a clinical option for several LSDs without central nervous system (CNS) involvement. To assess the efficacy of long-term ERT in metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), an LSD with prevailing nervous system disease, we treated immunotolerant arylsulfatase A (ASA) knockout mice with 52 doses of either 4 or 50 mg/kg recombinant human ASA (rhASA). ERT was tolerated without side effects and improved disease manifestations in a dose-dependent manner. Dosing of 4 mg/kg diminished sulfatide storage in kidney and peripheral nervous system (PNS) but not the CNS, whereas treatment with 50 mg/kg was also effective in the CNS in reducing storage in brain and spinal cord by 34 and 45%, respectively. Histological analyses revealed regional differences in sulfatide clearance. While 70% less storage profiles were detectable, for example, in the hippocampal fimbria, the histopathology of the brain stem was unchanged. Both enzyme doses normalized the ataxic gait of ASA knockout mice, demonstrating prevention of nervous system dysfunctions that dominate early stages of MLD. PMID:19174759

  8. Enzyme Replacement Improves Ataxic Gait and Central Nervous System Histopathology in a Mouse Model of Metachromatic Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Matzner, Ulrich; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Stroobants, Stijn; Andersson, Claes; Weigelt, Cecilia; Eistrup, Carl; Fogh, Jens; D'Hooge, Rudi; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2009-01-01

    Inherited deficiencies of lysosomal hydrolases cause lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) that are characterized by a progressive multisystemic pathology and premature death. Repeated intravenous injection of the active counterpart of the deficient enzyme, a treatment strategy called enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), evolved as a clinical option for several LSDs without central nervous system (CNS) involvement. To assess the efficacy of long-term ERT in metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), an LSD with prevailing nervous system disease, we treated immunotolerant arylsulfatase A (ASA) knockout mice with 52 doses of either 4 or 50 mg/kg recombinant human ASA (rhASA). ERT was tolerated without side effects and improved disease manifestations in a dose-dependent manner. Dosing of 4 mg/kg diminished sulfatide storage in kidney and peripheral nervous system (PNS) but not the CNS, whereas treatment with 50 mg/kg was also effective in the CNS in reducing storage in brain and spinal cord by 34 and 45%, respectively. Histological analyses revealed regional differences in sulfatide clearance. While 70% less storage profiles were detectable, for example, in the hippocampal fimbria, the histopathology of the brain stem was unchanged. Both enzyme doses normalized the ataxic gait of ASA knockout mice, demonstrating prevention of nervous system dysfunctions that dominate early stages of MLD. PMID:19174759

  9. Temperature control of molecular circuit switch responsible for virulent phenotype expression in uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilov, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The behavior and fate of biological organisms are to a large extent dictated by their environment, which can be often viewed as a collection of features and constraints governed by physics laws. Since biological systems comprise networks of molecular interactions, one such key physical property is temperature, whose variations directly affect the rates of biochemical reactions involved. For instance, temperature is known to control many gene regulatory circuits responsible for pathogenicity in bacteria. One such example is type 1 fimbriae (T1F) -- the foremost virulence factor in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which accounts for 80-90% of all community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). The expression of T1F is randomly `phase variable', i.e. individual cells switch between virulent/fimbriate and avirulent/afimbriate phenotypes, with rates regulated by temperature. Our computational investigation of this process, which is based on FimB/FimE recombinase-mediated inversion of fimS DNA element, offers new insights into its discrete-stochastic kinetics. In particular, it elucidates the logic of T1F control optimization to the host temperature and contributes further understanding toward the development of novel therapeutic approaches to UPEC-caused UTIs.

  10. Homologues of insecticidal toxin complex genes within a genomic island in the marine bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kathy F J; Lightner, Donald V

    2014-10-01

    Three insecticidal toxin complex (tc)-like genes were identified in Vibrio parahaemolyticus 13-028/A3, which can cause acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease in penaeid shrimp. The three genes are a tcdA-like gene (7710 bp), predicted to code for a 284-kDa protein; a tcdB-like gene (4272 bp), predicted to code for a 158-kDa protein; and a tccC3-like gene (2916 bp), predicted to encode a 107-kDa protein. All three predicted proteins contain conserved domains that are characteristic of their respective Tc proteins. By RT-PCR, all three tc-like genes were found to be expressed in this bacterium. Through genome walking and the use of PCR to join contigs surrounding these three genes, a genomic island (87 712 bp, named tc-GIvp) was found on chromosome II localized next to the tRNA Gly. The GC content of this island, which is not found in other Vibrio species, is 40%. The tc-GIvp is characterized to have 60 ORFs encoding regulatory or virulence factors. These include a type 6 secretion protein VgrG, EAL domain-containing proteins, fimbriae subunits and assembly proteins, invasin-like proteins, peptidoglycan-binding proteins, and Tc proteins. The tc-GIvp also contains 21 transposase genes, suggesting that it was acquired through horizontal transfer from other organisms. PMID:25272969

  11. The Three-Dimensional Structure of CFA/I Adhesion Pili

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiang-Qi; Savarino, Stephen J.; Bullitt, Esther

    2008-01-01

    Summary To survive the harsh environment of a churning intestinal tract, bacteria attach to the host epithelium via thin fibers called pili (or fimbriae). Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli expressing CFA/I pili and related pili are the most common known bacterial cause of diarrheal disease, including traveler’s diarrhea. CFA/I pili, assembled via the alternate chaperone pathway, are essential for binding and colonization of the small bowel by these pathogenic bacteria. We elucidate unique structural features of CFA/I pili that appear to optimize their function as bacterial tethers in the intestinal tract. Using transmission electron microscopy of negatively stained sample in combination with iterative three-dimensional helical reconstruction methods for image processing, we have determined the structure of the CFA/I pilus filament. Our results indicate that strong end-to-end protein interactions and weak interactions between the coils of a sturdy spring-like helix provide the combination of strength, stability, and flexibility required to sustain bacterial adhesion and incite intestinal disease. We propose that CFA/I pili behave like a spring to survive the harsh environment of a churning intestinal tract, thereby persisting long enough for these bacteria to colonize the host epithelium and cause enteric disease. PMID:18166195

  12. Cell Adhesion Modification of Streptococcus viridians in the Presence of Xylitol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmacher, Jason; Vidakovich, Blair; Giangrande, Michael; Hoffmann, Peter

    2012-10-01

    There is scientific documentation that those who chew gum sweetened by the sugar alcohol xylitol report a dramatically lower incident of both dental caries and otitis media compared to those who chew conventional gum sweetened by sucrose. An explanation contends that xylitol interferes with the ability of Streptococcus viridian (SV) to form biofilms which is a necessary precursor to the bacteria's ability to damage human tissues. We have used atomic force microscopy to study the cell wall/fimbria properties at the nanonewton level in both the presence and absence of xylitol. The first set of measurements used varying concentrations of xylitol incorporated within the incubation medium. The second used non-xylitol grown bacteria, the xylitol was added externally at various concentrations. Our study suggests that growing SV with xylitol reduces their ability to adhere together. Additionally, externally added xylitol showed grouping of cell adhesion to a relatively narrow nanonewton spread that is concentration dependent. Measurement of the adhesion properties of the bacterial cell wall have found that there is a dramatic increase in the cell wall's firmness which simultaneously accompanied a decrease in its ability to support adhesion, even at very low concentrations of xylitol.

  13. Myofibroblasts in the mucosal layer of the uterine tube.

    PubMed

    Walter, I

    1998-01-01

    Uterine tubes from cow, sheep, horse, pig, dog, cat, rabbit, and guinea pig were examined immunohistochemically for presence and distribution of contractile cells in the mucosal lamina propria. We tested for the presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin, tropomyosin, desmin, smooth muscle myosin (heavy chain) and cytoskeletal proteins vimentin and cytokeratin. Immunostaining for alpha-smooth muscle actin showed two distribution patterns: either positive cells were freely dispersed in the mucosal lamina propria or a distinct subepithelial layer of positive cells was seen. The first distribution pattern was found in the isthmic uterine tube segments of all animals examined. Alpha-smooth muscle actin was colocalized with tropomyosin (all species), desmin (horse, sheep), and smooth muscle myosin (sheep, cow). All these cells were found reactive with anti-vimentin but not with anticytokeratin and therefore were classified as myofibroblasts. A distinct subepithelial layer of alpha-actin and tropomyosin positive cells was seen in horse fimbriae. In other examined species alpha-smooth muscle actin immunoreactivity in the subepithelial region was very weak. Contractile cells in the uterine tube mucosa were supposed to influence mucosal condition and motility, and therefore to play a role in gamete transport. PMID:11315956

  14. Fiber optic laser light scattering measurement of ciliary function of the fallopian tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbert, Sheridan A.; Lim, Kap; Lee, Wylie I.

    1990-07-01

    A fiber-optic laser light-scattering system (FLS) for measuring ciliary function was evaluated by means of three sets of in vitro experiments. First, FLS performance was compared to that of a previously proven benchtop laser system (BLS). Using tissue excised from rabbit fallopian tubes, ciliary beat frequency (CBF) of each sample was measured with FLS and BLS. Paired CBF measurements showed excellent correlation between the two systems (r =0.93). Second, the FLS was used to evaluate the dependency of CBF on temperature (T) by using tissue sampies of rabbit oviductal fimbna. Regression analysis of CBF vs T showed a linear relationship over the range of 18-37°C for both individual samples (r =0.98) and pooled data from all experiments (r = 0.84). Fmally, the relalionship between CBF and ciliary ovum transport rate (TR) was tested by using T to modulate CBF of rabbit fimbria, in vitro. The relationship was linear over the range of CBF from 10 to 30 Hz (r2 = 0.83). At 37°C, CBF = 31+/-1 Hz, and TR = O.12+/-.02 mm/sec. equal to ovum transport rate in situ. The FLS is a valuable tool for characterizing ciliary activity and thus ovum transport function. Owing to the fact that ciliary dyskinesia resulting from disease of the fallopian tube is associated with infeitility, the FLS may be useful to acquire data important to the clinical evaluation of fallopian tube function and female infertility.

  15. Phenotypic characterization of Salmonella isolated from food production environments associated with low-water activity foods.

    PubMed

    Finn, Sarah; Hinton, Jay C D; McClure, Peter; Amézquita, Aléjandro; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus

    2013-09-01

    Salmonella can survive for extended periods of time in low-moisture environments posing a challenge for modern food production. This dangerous pathogen must be controlled throughout the production chain with a minimal risk of dissemination. Limited information is currently available describing the behavior and characteristics of this important zoonotic foodborne bacterium in low-moisture food production environments and in food. In our study, the phenotypes related to low-moisture survival of 46 Salmonella isolates were examined. Most of the isolates in the collection could form biofilms under defined laboratory conditions, with 57% being positive for curli fimbriae production and 75% of the collection positive for cellulose production, which are both linked with stronger biofilm formation. Biocides in the factory environment to manage hygiene were found to be most effective against planktonic cells but less so when the same bacteria were surface dried or present as a biofilm. Cellulose-producing isolates were better survivors when exposed to a biocide compared with cellulose-negative isolates. Examination of Salmonella growth of these 18 serotypes in NaCl, KCl, and glycerol found that glycerol was the least inhibitory of these three humectants. We identified a significant correlation between the ability to survive in glycerol and the ability to survive in KCl and biofilm formation, which may be important for food safety and the protection of public health. PMID:23992493

  16. Label-free identification of the hippocampus and surrounding structures by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu; Jiang, Liwei; Du, Huiping; Wang, Xingfu; Zheng, Liqin; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    The hippocampus is one of the essential neuroanatomical substrates and plays an important role in different neurological illnesses. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on intrinsic nonlinear optical processes two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), was applied to label-freely detect the entire hippocampus and surrounding structures in high-magnification imaging, as well as acquire large-scale MPM images at subcellular resolution. It was found that MPM has the capability to identify cornu ammonis, dentate gyrus (DG), alveus, and fimbria of the entire hippocampus, choroid plexus in lateral ventricles, and white matter tracts. MPM also can be used to quantitatively describe the differences of the cellular nucleus in the cornu ammonis and the DG, further identify the morphological features of hippocampal subfields. In addition, the surrounding structures of the hippocampus including the lateral ventricles and white matter serve as useful information to determine the position of the hippocampus. Our results suggest that with the development of the clinical feasibility of two-photon fiberscopes and microendoscope probes, MPM has the potential for in vivo intraoperative identification and monitoring of hippocampus-related lesions without the need for tissue labelling or fluorescent markers.

  17. Transcriptional Analysis of the MrpJ Network: Modulation of Diverse Virulence-Associated Genes and Direct Regulation of mrp Fimbrial and flhDC Flagellar Operons in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Nadine J.; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence. PMID:25847961

  18. Biofilm formation by enteric pathogens and its role in plant colonization and persistence

    PubMed Central

    Yaron, Sima; Römling, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The significant increase in foodborne outbreaks caused by contaminated fresh produce, such as alfalfa sprouts, lettuce, melons, tomatoes and spinach, during the last 30 years stimulated investigation of the mechanisms of persistence of human pathogens on plants. Emerging evidence suggests that Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli, which cause the vast majority of fresh produce outbreaks, are able to adhere to and to form biofilms on plants leading to persistence and resistance to disinfection treatments, which subsequently can cause human infections and major outbreaks. In this review, we present the current knowledge about host, bacterial and environmental factors that affect the attachment to plant tissue and the process of biofilm formation by S. enterica and E. coli, and discuss how biofilm formation assists in persistence of pathogens on the plants. Mechanisms used by S. enterica and E. coli to adhere and persist on abiotic surfaces and mammalian cells are partially similar and also used by plant pathogens and symbionts. For example, amyloid curli fimbriae, part of the extracellular matrix of biofilms, frequently contribute to adherence and are upregulated upon adherence and colonization of plant material. Also the major exopolysaccharide of the biofilm matrix, cellulose, is an adherence factor not only of S. enterica and E. coli, but also of plant symbionts and pathogens. Plants, on the other hand, respond to colonization by enteric pathogens with a variety of defence mechanisms, some of which can effectively inhibit biofilm formation. Consequently, plant compounds might be investigated for promising novel antibiofilm strategies. PMID:25351039

  19. Oxygen-Free Condition Inhibited Biofilm Formation in Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strain PPECC42 Through Preventing Curli Production.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianrong; Zhang, Liyuan; Hou, Bo; Liu, Xueling; Li, Shaowen

    2016-08-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is an important zoonotic and foodborne pathogen. Biofilms are specially structured communities for bacteria to survive in different hostile environments and can protect the bacteria from eradication by the host and external factors. In this study, we found that oxygen is definitely required for biofilm formation in ExPEC strain PPECC42. Aerobically growing ExPEC showed a bdar (brown, dry, and rough) morphotype, whereas anaerobically growing ExPEC showed a saw (smooth and white) morphotype. Under anaerobic condition, curli fimbriae did not accumulate and the expression levels of curli biosynthesis-related genes including csgB, csgD, and rpoS decreased significantly; in contrast, the expression level of h-ns, of which the encoding protein is a repressor for csgD transcription, increased significantly. Taken together, the results suggested that oxygen-free condition limited ExPEC strain PPECC42 biofilm formation mainly through preventing curli accumulation by affecting the transcriptional levels of curli biosynthesis-related genes. PMID:27094999

  20. Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System 2 ATPase EivC Is Involved in the Motility and Virulence of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xuan; Yang, Denghui; Wang, Dong; Han, Xiangan; Shi, Yonghong; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are crucial for bacterial infections because they deliver effector proteins into host cells. The Escherichia coli type III secretion system 2 (ETT2) is present in the majority of E. coli strains, and although it is degenerate, ETT2 regulates bacterial virulence. An ATPase is essential for T3SS secretion, but the function of the ETT2 ATPase has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that EivC is homologous to the β subunit of F0F1 ATPases and it possesses ATPase activity. To investigate the effects of ETT2 ATPase EivC on the phenotype and virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), eivC mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of eivC led to impaired flagella production and augmented fimbriae on the bacterial surface, and, consequently, reduced bacterial motility. In addition, the eivC mutant strain exhibited attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished serum resistance, reduced survival in macrophage cells and in ducks, upregulated fimbrial gene expression, and downregulated flagellar and virulence gene expression. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 were increased in HD-11 macrophages infected with the eivC mutant strain, compared with the wild-type strain. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. These findings demonstrate that ETT2 ATPase EivC is involved in the motility and pathogenicity of APEC.

  1. Luteolin decreases the attachment, invasion and cytotoxicity of UPEC in bladder epithelial cells and inhibits UPEC biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-fei; Ren, Lai-bin; Teng, Yan; Zheng, Shuang; Yang, Xiao-long; Guo, Xiao-juan; Wang, Xin-yuan; Sha, Kai-hui; Li, Na; Xu, Guang-ya; Tian, Han-wen; Wang, Xiao-ying; Liu, Xiao-kang; Li, Jingyu; Huang, Ning

    2014-10-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI), primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), is one of the most common infectious diseases worldwide. Emerging antibiotic resistance requires novel treatment strategies. Luteolin, a dietary polyphenolic flavonoid, has been confirmed as a potential antimicrobial agent. Here, we evaluated the sub-MICs of luteolin for potential properties to modulate the UPEC infection. We found that luteolin significantly decreased the attachment and invasion of UPEC J96 or CFT073 in human bladder epithelial cell lines T24. Meanwhile, obvious decreased expression of type 1 fimbriae adhesin fimH gene, lower bacterial surface hydrophobicity and swimming motility, were observed in luteolin-pretreated UPEC. Furthermore, luteolin could attenuate UPEC-induced cytotoxicity in T24 cells, which manifested as decreased activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Simultaneously, the inhibition of luteolin on UPEC-induced cytotoxicity was confirmed by ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining. Finally, the luteolin-pretreated UPEC showed a lower ability of biofilm formation. Collectively, these results indicated that luteolin decreased the attachment and invasion of UPEC in bladder epithelial cells, attenuated UPEC-induced cytotoxicity and biofilm formation via down-regulating the expression of adhesin fimH gene, reducing the bacterial surface hydrophobicity and motility. PMID:25051393

  2. Salmonella Biofilm Formation on Aspergillus niger Involves Cellulose – Chitin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Maria T.; Carter, Michelle Q.; Parker, Craig T.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Huynh, Steven; Zhou, Yaguang

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella cycles between host and nonhost environments, where it can become an active member of complex microbial communities. The role of fungi in the environmental adaptation of enteric pathogens remains relatively unexplored. We have discovered that S. enterica Typhimurium rapidly attaches to and forms biofilms on the hyphae of the common fungus, Aspergillus niger. Several Salmonella enterica serovars displayed a similar interaction, whereas other bacterial species were unable to bind to the fungus. Bacterial attachment to chitin, a major constituent of fungal cell walls, mirrored this specificity. Pre-incubation of S. Typhimurium with N-acetylglucosamine, the monomeric component of chitin, reduced binding to chitin beads by as much as 727-fold and inhibited attachment to A. niger hyphae considerably. A cellulose-deficient mutant of S. Typhimurium failed to attach to chitin beads and to the fungus. Complementation of this mutant with the cellulose operon restored binding to chitin beads to 79% of that of the parental strain and allowed for attachment and biofilm formation on A. niger, indicating that cellulose is involved in bacterial attachment to the fungus via the chitin component of its cell wall. In contrast to cellulose, S. Typhimurium curli fimbriae were not required for attachment and biofilm development on the hyphae but were critical for its stability. Our results suggest that cellulose–chitin interactions are required for the production of mixed Salmonella-A. niger biofilms, and support the hypothesis that encounters with chitinaceous alternate hosts may contribute to the ecological success of human pathogens. PMID:22003399

  3. Crl Activates Transcription Initiation of RpoS-Regulated Genes Involved in the Multicellular Behavior of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Robbe-Saule, Véronique; Jaumouillé, Valentin; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Guadagnini, Stéphanie; Talhouarne, Christelle; Mathout, Hayette; Kolb, Annie; Norel, Françoise

    2006-01-01

    In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the stationary-phase sigma factor σS (RpoS) is required for virulence, stress resistance, biofilm formation, and development of the rdar morphotype. This morphotype is a multicellular behavior characterized by expression of the adhesive extracellular matrix components cellulose and curli fimbriae. The Crl protein of Escherichia coli interacts with σS and activates expression of σS-regulated genes, such as the csgBAC operon encoding the subunit of the curli proteins, by an unknown mechanism. Here, we showed using in vivo and in vitro experiments that the Crl protein of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium is required for development of a typical rdar morphotype and for maximal expression of the csgD, csgB, adrA, and bcsA genes, which are involved in curli and cellulose biosynthesis. In vitro transcription assays and potassium permanganate reactivity experiments with purified His6-Crl showed that Crl directly activated σS-dependent transcription initiation at the csgD and adrA promoters. We observed no effect of Crl on σ70-dependent transcription. Crl protein levels increased during the late exponential and stationary growth phases in Luria-Beratani medium without NaCl at 28°C. We obtained complementation of the crl mutation by increasing σS levels. This suggests that Crl has a major physiological impact at low concentrations of σS. PMID:16707690

  4. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains are highly prevalent in Ugandan piggeries but disease outbreaks are masked by antibiotic prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Okello, Emmanuel; Moonens, Kristof; Erume, Joseph; De Greve, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important disease of newly weaned piglets. ETEC strains commonly express F4 and/or F18 fimbriae that attach to carbohydrate receptors present on the intestinal epithelium during colonization. The disease status in the Ugandan piggeries had previously not been studied. In this cross-sectional sero-survey and clinical outbreak monitoring, we found very high sero-prevalence levels of both anti-F4 (70.5%) and anti-F18 (73.7%) antibodies, despite limited cases of clinical outbreaks. Strains isolated from these cases were typically F18(+) ETEC. High antibiotic resistance and multi-drug resistance were characteristics of the isolates, with highest resistance level of over 95% to commonly used antibiotics such as penicillin and tetracycline. We conclude that ETEC infections are widely spread on farms in Central Uganda but clinical disease outbreaks were masked by the management practices on these farms, like the use of extensive antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:25311441

  5. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R; Middleton, Dorothy M; Loewen, Matthew E; Kidney, Beverly A; Simko, Elemir

    2015-04-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization. PMID:25852227

  6. Colonization factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, T P Vipin; Sakellaris, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of life-threatening diarrheal disease around the world. The major aspects of ETEC virulence are colonization of the small intestine and the secretion of enterotoxins which elicit diarrhea. Intestinal colonization is mediated, in part, by adhesins displayed on the bacterial cell surface. As colonization of the intestine is the critical first step in the establishment of an infection, it represents a potential point of intervention for the prevention of infections. Therefore, colonization factors (CFs) have been important subjects of research in the field of ETEC virulence. Research in this field has revealed that ETEC possesses a large array of serologically distinct CFs that differ in composition, structure, and function. Most ETEC CFs are pili (fimbriae) or related fibrous structures, while other adhesins are simple outer membrane proteins lacking any macromolecular structure. This chapter reviews the genetics, structure, function, and regulation of ETEC CFs and how such studies have contributed to our understanding of ETEC virulence and opened up potential opportunities for the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. PMID:25596032

  7. Structure and secretion of CofJ, a putative colonization factor of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Alex S W; Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Ng, Dixon; Craig, Lisa

    2013-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) colonize the human gut, causing severe cholera-like diarrhoea. ETEC utilize a diverse array of pili and fimbriae for host colonization, including the Type IVb pilus CFA/III. The CFA/III pilus machinery is encoded on the cof operon, which is similar in gene sequence and synteny to the tcp operon that encodes another Type IVb pilus, the Vibrio cholerae toxin co-regulated pilus (TCP). Both pilus operons possess a syntenic gene encoding a protein of unknown function. In V. cholerae, this protein, TcpF, is a critical colonization factor secreted by the TCP apparatus. Here we show that the corresponding ETEC protein, CofJ, is a soluble protein secreted via the CFA/III apparatus. We present a 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of CofJ, revealing a large β-sandwich protein that bears no sequence or structural homology to TcpF. CofJ has a cluster of exposed hydrophobic side-chains at one end and structural homology to the pore-forming proteins perfringolysin O and α-haemolysin. CofJ binds to lipid vesicles and epithelial cells, suggesting a role in membrane attachment during ETEC colonization. PMID:24106767

  8. Stress induced by hooking, net towing, elevated sea water temperature and air in sablefish: Lack of concordance between mortality and physiological measures of stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, M.W.; Olla, B.L.; Schreck, C.B.

    2001-01-01

    In a series of laboratory studies designed to simulate bycatch processes, sablefish Anoplopoma fimbria were either hooked for up to 24 h or towed in a net for 4 h and then subjected to an abrupt transfer to elevated sea water temperature and air. Mortality did not result from hooking or net towing followed by exposure to air, but increased for both capture methods as fish were exposed to elevated temperatures, reflecting the magnifying effect of elevated temperature on mortality. Hooking and exposure to air resulted in increased plasma cortisol and lactate concentrations, while the combination of hooking and exposure to elevated temperature and air resulted in increased lactate and potassium concentrations. In fish that were towed in a net and exposed to air, cortisol, lactate, potassium and sodium concentrations increased, but when subjected to elevated temperature and air, no further increases occurred above the concentrations induced by net towing and air, suggesting a possible maximum of the physiological stress response. The results suggest that caution should be exercised when using physiological measures to quantify stress induced by capture and exposure to elevated temperature and air, that ultimately result in mortality, since the connections between physiological stress and mortality in bycatch processes remain to be fully understood.

  9. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  10. A vaccine candidate for post-weaning diarrhea in swine constructed with a live attenuated Salmonella delivering Escherichia coli K88ab, K88ac, FedA, and FedF fimbrial antigens and its immune responses in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jin; Stein, Barry D.; Lee, John Hwa

    2012-01-01

    In order to construct a novel vaccine candidate for preventing post-weaning diarrhea in swine, the individual genes for Escherichia coli K88ab, K88ac, FedA, and FedF fimbriae were inserted into a secretion plasmid pBP244 containing asd, lepB, secA, and secB. These were transformed into Salmonella Typhimurium Δlon ΔcpxR Δasd. Secretion of the individual recombinant fimbrial antigens was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. Groups 1 and 2 mice received a single oral dose of the vaccine mixture and S. Typhimurium carrying pBP244 only as a control, respectively. In groups 3 and 4, mice were primed and boosted with the vaccine mixture and S. Typhimurium carrying pBP244 only as a control, respectively. In general, all immunized mice had significantly increased serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G (P < 0.05) and intestinal secretory IgA against the individual fimbrial antigens compared with those mice in the control group. In the IgG2a and IgG1 titer assay, only IgG2a titer was increased in group 1, while both IgG2a and IgG1 titers were increased in group 3. Furthermore, the vaccine strains were not detected in the excreted feces of any immunized mice. Thus, the vaccine candidate can be highly immunogenic and be safe to the environment. PMID:23277697

  11. Bilateral Symmetrical Idiopathic Necrotizing Encephalopathy: A New Syndrome in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    De Jonghe, Sandra; Abbott, David; Vinken, Petra; Moesen, Esther; Feyen, Bianca; Lammens, Lieve; Vynckier, An; De Lahunta, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    This article describes the occurrence of a bilaterally symmetrical encephalopathy in Sprague-Dawley rats, which occurred over the period 2005 to 2012 in our laboratory in both untreated control rats and rats treated with different pharmacologically active compounds. The acute brain lesions consisted of degeneration/necrosis in the ventral areas of the brain mostly with little inflammatory response; in the more rare chronic cases there were numerous lipid-laden macrophages. The areas most consistently affected were the crus cerebri, the ventral midbrain, the pyramids, and the internal capsule. Other areas less frequently affected were the mammillary bodies, the fimbria, the olfactory tubercles, the optic tracts, and the ventral hippocampus. All available data, including clinical signs, gross pathology, clinical pathology, diet, breeding, and housing were collected and are presented. Our investigations did not elucidate the pathogenesis of the lesions, although the infarction-type changes are suggestive of a vascular etiology. To our knowledge, this particular lesion with its consistent distribution pattern has not been reported in the rat literature and its publication is therefore important to the toxicological pathology community, because an unbalanced group distribution in a toxicology study could potentially confound the safety assessment of a compound. PMID:26511844

  12. Subnanometric Roughness Affects the Deposition and Mobile Adhesion of Escherichia coli on Silanized Glass Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sumedha; Jaimes-Lizcano, Yuly Andrea; McLay, Ryan B; Cirino, Patrick C; Conrad, Jacinta C

    2016-05-31

    We investigate the deposition and transient adhesion of Escherichia coli on alkyl and fluoroalkyl silanized glass surfaces of different carbon chain lengths. The rate at which bacteria deposit onto these surfaces decreases as the shear stress is increased from 3 to 67 mPa, but trends in the deposition rate across all surfaces cannot be predicted from extended DLVO calculations of the interaction potential. As the surface root-mean-square (rms) roughness increases, the deposition rate increases and the percentage of motile tethered cells decreases. Furthermore, on surfaces of root-mean-square roughness of less than 0.2 nm, bacteria exhibit mobile adhesion, for which surface-associated cells linearly translate distances greater than approximately 1.5 times their average body length along the flow direction. E. coli bacteria with and without flagella exhibit mobile adhesion, indicating that this behavior is not driven by these appendages. Cells that express fimbriae do not exhibit mobile adhesion. These results suggest that even subnanoscale roughness can influence the deposition and transient adhesion of bacteria and imply that strategies to reduce frictional interactions by making cells or surfaces smoother may help to control the initial fouling of surfaces by E. coli bacteria. PMID:27158837

  13. Epidemiology and Clinical Manifestations of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hebbelstrup Jensen, Betina; Olsen, Katharina E. P.; Struve, Carsten; Petersen, Andreas Munk

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) represents a heterogeneous group of E. coli strains. The pathogenicity and clinical relevance of these bacteria are still controversial. In this review, we describe the clinical significance of EAEC regarding patterns of infection in humans, transmission, reservoirs, and symptoms. Manifestations associated with EAEC infection include watery diarrhea, mucoid diarrhea, low-grade fever, nausea, tenesmus, and borborygmi. In early studies, EAEC was considered to be an opportunistic pathogen associated with diarrhea in HIV patients and in malnourished children in developing countries. In recent studies, associations with traveler's diarrhea, the occurrence of diarrhea cases in industrialized countries, and outbreaks of diarrhea in Europe and Asia have been reported. In the spring of 2011, a large outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) and hemorrhagic colitis occurred in Germany due to an EAEC O104:H4 strain, causing 54 deaths and 855 cases of HUS. This strain produces the potent Shiga toxin along with the aggregative fimbriae. An outbreak of urinary tract infection associated with EAEC in Copenhagen, Denmark, occurred in 1991; this involved extensive production of biofilm, an important characteristic of the pathogenicity of EAEC. However, the heterogeneity of EAEC continues to complicate diagnostics and also our understanding of pathogenicity. PMID:24982324

  14. Defining the human hippocampus in cerebral magnetic resonance images—An overview of current segmentation protocols

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, C.; Ukas, T.; Nebel, C.; Arolt, V.; Toga, A.W.; Narr, K.L.

    2011-01-01

    Due to its crucial role for memory processes and its relevance in neurological and psychiatric disorders, the hippocampus has been the focus of neuroimaging research for several decades. In vivo measurement of human hippocampal volume and shape with magnetic resonance imaging has become an important element of neuroimaging research. Nevertheless, volumetric findings are still inconsistent and controversial for many psychiatric conditions including affective disorders. Here we review the wealth of anatomical protocols for the delineation of the hippocampus in MR images, taking into consideration 71 different published protocols from the neuroimaging literature, with an emphasis on studies of affective disorders. We identified large variations between protocols in five major areas. 1) The inclusion/exclusion of hippocampal white matter (alveus and fimbria), 2) the definition of the anterior hippocampal–amygdala border, 3) the definition of the posterior border and the extent to which the hippocampal tail is included, 4) the definition of the inferior medial border of the hippocampus, and 5) the use of varying arbitrary lines. These are major sources of variance between different protocols. In contrast, the definitions of the lateral, superior, and inferior borders are less disputed. Directing resources to replication studies that incorporate characteristics of the segmentation protocols presented herein may help resolve seemingly contradictory volumetric results between prior neuroimaging studies and facilitate the appropriate selection of protocols for manual or automated delineation of the hippocampus for future research purposes. PMID:19447182

  15. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane

    PubMed Central

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y.; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R.; Middleton, Dorothy M.; Loewen, Matthew E.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization. PMID:25852227

  16. The pilus usher controls protein interactions via domain masking and is functional as an oligomer

    SciTech Connect

    Werneburg, Glenn T.; Li, Huilin; Henderson, Nadine S.; Portnoy, Erica B.; Sarowar, Samema; Hultgren, Scott J.; Thanassi, David G.

    2015-06-08

    The chaperone/usher (CU) pathway is responsible for biogenesis of organelles termed pili or fimbriae in Gram-negative bacteria. Type 1 pili expressed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli are prototypical structures assembled by the CU pathway. Assembly and secretion of pili by the CU pathway requires a dedicated periplasmic chaperone and a multidomain outer membrane protein termed the usher (FimD). We show that the FimD C-terminal domains provide the high-affinity substrate binding site, but that these domains are masked in the resting usher. Domain masking requires the FimD plug domain, which served as a central switch controlling usher activation. In addition, we demonstrate that usher molecules can act in trans for pilus biogenesis, providing conclusive evidence for a functional usher oligomer. These results reveal mechanisms by which molecular machines such as the usher regulate and harness protein-protein interactions, and suggest that ushers may interact in a cooperative manner during pilus assembly in bacteria.

  17. The pilus usher controls protein interactions via domain masking and is functional as an oligomer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Werneburg, Glenn T.; Li, Huilin; Henderson, Nadine S.; Portnoy, Erica B.; Sarowar, Samema; Hultgren, Scott J.; Thanassi, David G.

    2015-06-08

    The chaperone/usher (CU) pathway is responsible for biogenesis of organelles termed pili or fimbriae in Gram-negative bacteria. Type 1 pili expressed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli are prototypical structures assembled by the CU pathway. Assembly and secretion of pili by the CU pathway requires a dedicated periplasmic chaperone and a multidomain outer membrane protein termed the usher (FimD). We show that the FimD C-terminal domains provide the high-affinity substrate binding site, but that these domains are masked in the resting usher. Domain masking requires the FimD plug domain, which served as a central switch controlling usher activation. In addition, we demonstratemore » that usher molecules can act in trans for pilus biogenesis, providing conclusive evidence for a functional usher oligomer. These results reveal mechanisms by which molecular machines such as the usher regulate and harness protein-protein interactions, and suggest that ushers may interact in a cooperative manner during pilus assembly in bacteria.« less

  18. Milk-Based Nutraceutical for Treating Autoimmune Arthritis via the Stimulation of IL-10- and TGF-β-producing CD39+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maddaloni, Massimo; Kochetkova, Irina; Jun, SangMu; Callis, Gayle; Thornburg, Theresa; Pascual, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases arise from the loss of tolerance to self, and because the etiologies of such diseases are largely unknown, symptomatic treatments rely on anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents. Tolerogenic treatments that can reverse disease are preferred, but again, often thwarted by not knowing the responsible auto-antigens (auto-Ags). Hence, a viable alternative to stimulating regulatory T cells (Tregs) is to induce bystander tolerance. Colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) has been shown to evoke bystander immunity and to hasten Ag-specific Treg development independent of auto-Ag. To translate in treating human autoimmune diseases, the food-based Lactococcus was engineered to express CFA/I fimbriae, and Lactococcus-CFA/I fermented milk fed to arthritic mice proved highly efficacious. Protection occurred via CD39+ Tregs producing TGF-β and IL-10 to potently suppress TNF-α production and neutrophil influx into the joints. Thus, these data demonstrate the feasibility of oral nutraceuticals for treating arthritis, and potency of protection against arthritis was improved relative to that obtained with Salmonella-CFA/I. PMID:25629976

  19. Resource subsidies from multi-trophic aquaculture affect isotopic niche width in wild blue mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldrick, C. K.; Jelinski, D. E.

    2016-05-01

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) are boreo-temperate, filter-feeding bivalves common to intertidal areas. As filter-feeders they have been employed in open-water, multi-tropic aquaculture systems to reduce organic benthic loading though the exploitation of suspended particulate organic materials. We compared δ13C and δ15N signatures and the isotopic niches of mussels growing in, and adjacent to, an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) farm in British Columbia, Canada, and using this information evaluated the contribution of aquaculture-derived effluent to their diet. Farm-sampled mussels had the least intraspecific isotopic variation compared to mussels sampled at the reference site. The interaction between time (i.e. sampling dates) and site did not significantly affect the isotopic composition of mussels; however significant variation was detected in δ15N values as a function of sampling date and particulate organic matter. A two-source isotopic mixing model indicated that marine particulate organic matter and IMTA farm effluent were approximately equal in importance (~ 46 % and ~ 54 %, respectively) to the diet of IMTA-retrieved mussels. Uptake of IMTA farm waste by M. edulis supports their use as economic extractives while also mitigating farmed sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) nutrient loading to the aquatic environment.

  20. Impact of nanomaterials on in vitro and in vivo systems: role of nanoscale features in nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzello, Loris; Vecchio, Giuseppe; Brunetti, Virgilio; Maiorano, Gabriele; Malvindi, Maria A.; Galeone, Antonio; Sabella, Stefania; Pompa, Pier P.

    2012-03-01

    The interactions between biological systems and nanostructured materials are attracting great interest, due to the possibility to open up novel concepts for the design of smart nano-biomaterials that actively play a functional biological role. On the other hand, the assessment of the potential toxic effects arising from such interactions is gaining increasing attention, and a new field known as nanotoxicology is strongly emerging. In this frame, we investigated the response of human neurons to gold surfaces with different levels of nanoroughness, finding out that neurons are capable to sense and actively respond to these nanotopography features. These nanostructured substrates were also investigated to explore the impact of nanotopography on morphology and genomics of adherent bacteria. A multidisciplinary approach was exploited to characterize bacteria-nanostructured surface interactions, observing that type-1 fimbriae disappear in bacteria grown onto nanorough substrates. We also show how nanoparticles interact with biomolecules in culture media and in vitro and in vivo biological systems, by investigating the toxic effects of a wide range of nanomaterials (AuNPs, QDs, SiO2 NPs), demonstrating the key role of size, shape, and surface coating.

  1. Adhesion and its role in the virulence of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Law, D

    1994-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) organisms are an important cause of diarrheal disease in young children. The virulence of EPEC is a multifactorial process and involves a number of distinct stages. Initial adherence to intestinal mucosa is mediated by fimbriae which bring about a distinct form of adhesion, localized adhesion. Intimate adhesion of the bacterium to the eukaryotic membrane occurs, resulting in the activation of signal transduction pathways. Microvilli are disrupted and effaced from the apical membrane which then cups around the organism to form pedestal structures, the attaching and effacing lesion. Diarrhea may be produced by alteration of the permeability of the apical membrane and also through a malabsorption mechanism. The pathways involved in the production of the attaching and effacing lesion are described. EPEC organisms were originally thought to belong to a number of distinct serogroups; it is now apparent that many isolates belonging to these serogroups are not pathogenic or belong to other pathogenic groups of E. coli. In addition, isolates falling outside of these serogroups are considered to be true EPEC. The definition of EPEC based on serotyping is inaccurate and should be replaced by methods that specifically detect the virulence properties of EPEC. Images PMID:8055465

  2. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mannose Sensitive Hamemagglutination Strain (PA-MSHA) Induces a Th1-Polarizing Phenotype by Promoting Human Dendritic Cells Maturation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunyan; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Youqiang; Chen, Ke; Ye, Jinmei; Liao, Xin; Chen, Yiyang; Ran, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa mannose sensitive hamemagglutination strain (PA-MSHA) is a kind of peritrichous P. aeruginosa strain with MSHA fimbriae and has been shown to activate kinds of immunocytes. Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells required for the stimulating and priming CD4(+) T cells toward the T helper cell type 1 (Th1), Th2 and other different phenotypes. PA-MSHA effecting on Th1 remains an important missing link. Here we demonstrated that PA-MSHA augmented monocytes derived-dendritic cells (Mo-DCs) expression of HLA-DR, co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules, and induced Th1-promoting interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor α secretion, in addition, PA-MSHA treated Mo-DCs displayed lesser endocytic capacity. Furthermore, in mixed lymphocyte reactions, allostimulatory capacity of Mo-DCs was enhanced by PA-MSHA, CD4(+) T cells stimulated by PA-MSHA -activated Mo-DCs showed a Th1-polarized cytokine production, increasing secretion of IFN-γ and decreasing secretion of IL-10 and IL-4. Our findings identified PA-MSHA as an important exogenous factor that induced DCs maturation toward a Th1-promoting phenotype. PMID:25320417