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Sample records for manually validated human

  1. Demonstration and Validation Assets: User Manual Development

    SciTech Connect

    2008-06-30

    This report documents the development of a database-supported user manual for DEMVAL assets in the NSTI area of operations and focuses on providing comprehensive user information on DEMVAL assets serving businesses with national security technology applications in southern New Mexico. The DEMVAL asset program is being developed as part of the NSPP, funded by both Department of Energy (DOE) and NNSA. This report describes the development of a comprehensive user manual system for delivering indexed DEMVAL asset information to be used in marketing and visibility materials and to NSTI clients, prospective clients, stakeholders, and any person or organization seeking it. The data about area DEMVAL asset providers are organized in an SQL database with updateable application structure that optimizes ease of access and customizes search ability for the user.

  2. Human Rights: Respecting Our Differences, Teachers' Manual [And] Human Rights: Respecting Our Differences, Students' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCardle, Elizabeth, Ed.

    This unit on human rights designed for secondary students in Alberta, Canada includes both student and teacher manuals. Eleven chapters in the student manual examine what human rights are, the causes and effects of prejudice and discrimination, relevant laws, and social action. Each chapter includes readings followed by discussion questions and…

  3. Criterion validity of manual assessment of spinal stiffness.

    PubMed

    Koppenhaver, Shane L; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Kawchuk, Greg N; Childs, John D; Teyhen, Deydre S; Croy, Theodore; Fritz, Julie M

    2014-12-01

    Assessment of spinal stiffness is widely used by manual therapy practitioners as a part of clinical diagnosis and treatment selection. Although studies have commonly found poor reliability of such procedures, conflicting evidence suggests that assessment of spinal stiffness may help predict response to specific treatments. The current study evaluated the criterion validity of manual assessments of spinal stiffness by comparing them to indentation measurements in patients with low back pain (LBP). As part of a standard examination, an experienced clinician assessed passive accessory spinal stiffness of the L3 vertebrae using posterior to anterior (PA) force on the spinous process of L3 in 50 subjects (54% female, mean (SD) age = 33.0 (12.8) years, BMI = 27.0 (6.0) kg/m(2)) with LBP. A criterion measure of spinal stiffness was performed using mechanized indentation by a blinded second examiner. Results indicated that manual assessments were uncorrelated to criterion measures of stiffness (spearman rho = 0.06, p = 0.67). Similarly, sensitivity and specificity estimates of judgments of hypomobility were low (0.20-0.45) and likelihood ratios were generally not statistically significant. Sensitivity and specificity of judgments of hypermobility were not calculated due to limited prevalence. Additional analysis found that BMI explained 32% of the variance in the criterion measure of stiffness, yet failed to improve the relationship between assessments. Additional studies should investigate whether manual assessment of stiffness relates to other clinical and biomechanical constructs, such as symptom reproduction, angular rotation, quality of motion, or end feel. PMID:24965495

  4. Where is the human waist? Definitions, manual compared toscanner measurements.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Daisy

    2012-01-01

    Where exactly is the human waist? How do definitions work for women who deviate from the conventional body shape? Does the measuring instrument matter? Waist is conventionally understood to be a measurable zone within the abdominal region of the torso, a zone of considerable importance. There needs to be a good consistent waist definition, one accurate and valid for everyone. Incorrect definition and measurement will result in technical errors, commercial wastage and customer dissatisfaction. This paper investigates the waist's location and size from the point of view of garment construction for 90 adult women scanned and manually measured in a breast reduction study at Flinders Medical Center, South Australia. There are differing definitions of the location of the human waist as well as different measuring instruments. This study compares:• Two definitions:• ISO 8559, 2.1.11 and • CAESAR, Waist Circumference Preferred.• Two different instruments:• the traditional tape measure, and • software-extracted computer-aided anthropometry (CAA). Substantial discrepancies between the results from these two locations-definitions were found. The choice of instrument used seriously affects the measurement obtained. This study demonstrates three things:• waist is not horizontal for a significant sub group of the population,• CAA extracted waist measurements are not accurate (same as real values) or valid (measures the characteristic) for a sub group, and • manually measured CAESAR Preferred Waist accurately and validly measured all individuals studied. There is a clear need to modify ISO waist definition for garment construction to include the full range of anatomical variation encountered amongst women. PMID:22317337

  5. The origins of non-human primates' manual gestures

    PubMed Central

    Liebal, Katja; Call, Josep

    2012-01-01

    The increasing body of research into human and non-human primates' gestural communication reflects the interest in a comparative approach to human communication, particularly possible scenarios of language evolution. One of the central challenges of this field of research is to identify appropriate criteria to differentiate a gesture from other non-communicative actions. After an introduction to the criteria currently used to define non-human primates' gestures and an overview of ongoing research, we discuss different pathways of how manual actions are transformed into manual gestures in both phylogeny and ontogeny. Currently, the relationship between actions and gestures is not only investigated on a behavioural, but also on a neural level. Here, we focus on recent evidence concerning the differential laterality of manual actions and gestures in apes in the framework of a functional asymmetry of the brain for both hand use and language. PMID:22106431

  6. Training Manual for Human Service Risk Managers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Frank W.; And Others

    This manual is designed to educate human service agency management personnel involved in transportation about basic risk management principles and insurance issues. Chapter I illustrates the liability factors that create the insurance and risk management needs. Both legal and humanitarian obligations of human service agencies involved in…

  7. Computer Aided Manual Validation of Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Timothy G.; Bryson, Bryan D.; Reigelhaupt, Michael; Johnson, Hannah; White, Forest M.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies have increased the speed of analysis and the depth provided by a single analysis. Computational tools to evaluate the accuracy of peptide identifications from these high-throughput analyses have not kept pace with technological advances; currently the most common quality evaluation methods are based on statistical analysis of the likelihood of false positive identifications in large-scale data sets. While helpful, these calculations do not consider the accuracy of each identification, thus creating a precarious situation for biologists relying on the data to inform experimental design. Manual validation is the gold standard approach to confirm accuracy of database identifications, but is extremely time-intensive. To palliate the increasing time required to manually validate large proteomic datasets, we provide computer aided manual validation software (CAMV) to expedite the process. Relevant spectra are collected, catalogued, and pre-labeled, allowing users to efficiently judge the quality of each identification and summarize applicable quantitative information. CAMV significantly reduces the burden associated with manual validation and will hopefully encourage broader adoption of manual validation in mass spectrometry-based proteomics. PMID:23500044

  8. Development and Validation of the Personality Assessment Questionnaire: Test Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohner, Ronald P.; And Others

    Data are presented evaluating the validity and reliability of the Personality Assessment Questionnaire (PAQ), a self-report questionnaire designed to elicit respondents' perceptions of themselves with respect to seven personality and behavioral dispositions: hostility and aggression, dependence, self-esteem, self-adequacy, emotional…

  9. You and Me and Human Sexuality. Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Emily Morrill

    This teacher's manual is designed for teaching deaf adolescents about human sexuality. Each chapter is organized into topic objectives, large group content presentation strategies, small group activities, materials, and resources. Topics include: (1) relationships; (2) adolescent growth and development; (3) female and male anatomy; (4) conception,…

  10. Validity of a Manual Soft Tissue Profile Prediction Method Following Mandibular Setback Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kolokitha, Olga-Elpis

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the validity of a manual cephalometric method used for predicting the post-operative soft tissue profiles of patients who underwent mandibular setback surgery and compare it to a computerized cephalometric prediction method (Dentofacial Planner). Lateral cephalograms of 18 adults with mandibular prognathism taken at the end of pre-surgical orthodontics and approximately one year after surgery were used. Methods To test the validity of the manual method the prediction tracings were compared to the actual post-operative tracings. The Dentofacial Planner software was used to develop the computerized post-surgical prediction tracings. Both manual and computerized prediction printouts were analyzed by using the cephalometric system PORDIOS. Statistical analysis was performed by means of t-test. Results Comparison between manual prediction tracings and the actual post-operative profile showed that the manual method results in more convex soft tissue profiles; the upper lip was found in a more prominent position, upper lip thickness was increased and, the mandible and lower lip were found in a less posterior position than that of the actual profiles. Comparison between computerized and manual prediction methods showed that in the manual method upper lip thickness was increased, the upper lip was found in a more anterior position and the lower anterior facial height was increased as compared to the computerized prediction method. Conclusions Cephalometric simulation of post-operative soft tissue profile following orthodontic-surgical management of mandibular prognathism imposes certain limitations related to the methods implied. However, both manual and computerized prediction methods remain a useful tool for patient communication. PMID:19212468

  11. User's manual for the Human Exposure Model (HEM). Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    This document describes the Human Exposure Model, furnishes contact personnel to establish access to the UNIVAC System, and provides step-by-step instructions for operating both the SHED and SHEAR portions of the model. The manual also lists caveats that should be considered when using the HEM and criteria to distinguish situations that are appropriately modeled by each portion of HEM. The intended audience ranges from someone with limited knowledge of modeling to someone well acquainted with the UNIVAC.

  12. The EADC-ADNI Harmonized Protocol for manual hippocampal segmentation on magnetic resonance: Evidence of validity

    PubMed Central

    Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Jack, Clifford R.; Bocchetta, Martina; Bauer, Corinna; Frederiksen, Kristian S.; Liu, Yawu; Preboske, Gregory; Swihart, Tim; Blair, Melanie; Cavedo, Enrica; Grothe, Michel J.; Lanfredi, Mariangela; Martinez, Oliver; Nishikawa, Masami; Portegies, Marileen; Stoub, Travis; Ward, Chadwich; Apostolova, Liana G.; Ganzola, Rossana; Wolf, Dominik; Barkhof, Frederik; Bartzokis, George; DeCarli, Charles; Csernansky, John G.; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Killiany, Ronald J.; Lehéricy, Stephane; Matsuda, Hiroshi; O'Brien, John; Silbert, Lisa C.; Scheltens, Philip; Soininen, Hilkka; Teipel, Stefan; Waldemar, Gunhild; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Barnes, Josephine; Firbank, Michael; Gerritsen, Lotte; Henneman, Wouter; Malykhin, Nikolai; Pruessner, Jens C.; Wang, Lei; Watson, Craig; Wolf, Henrike; deLeon, Mony; Pantel, Johannes; Ferrari, Clarissa; Bosco, Paolo; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Duchesne, Simon; Duvernoy, Henri; Boccardi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background An international Delphi panel has defined a harmonized protocol (HarP) for the manual segmentation of the hippocampus on MR. The aim of this study is to study the concurrent validity of the HarP toward local protocols, and its major sources of variance. Methods Fourteen tracers segmented 10 Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cases scanned at 1.5 T and 3T following local protocols, qualified for segmentation based on the HarP through a standard web-platform and resegmented following the HarP. The five most accurate tracers followed the HarP to segment 15 ADNI cases acquired at three time points on both 1.5 T and 3T. Results The agreement among tracers was relatively low with the local protocols (absolute left/right ICC 0.44/0.43) and much higher with the HarP (absolute left/right ICC 0.88/0.89). On the larger set of 15 cases, the HarP agreement within (left/right ICC range: 0.94/0.95 to 0.99/0.99) and among tracers (left/right ICC range: 0.89/0.90) was very high. The volume variance due to different tracers was 0.9% of the total, comparing favorably to variance due to scanner manufacturer (1.2), atrophy rates (3.5), hemispheric asymmetry (3.7), field strength (4.4), and significantly smaller than the variance due to atrophy (33.5%, P < .001), and physiological variability (49.2%, P < .001). Conclusions The HarP has high measurement stability compared with local segmentation protocols, and good reproducibility within and among human tracers. Hippocampi segmented with the HarP can be used as a reference for the qualification of human tracers and automated segmentation algorithms. PMID:25267715

  13. Manual control. [of high order systems by human operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Man's nonlinear characteristics and his use of control with compatible and incompatible multiple inputs, both visual and vestibular were studied. Experiments were also made with pulse and bang-bang controllers and the effects of sudden changes in control stick mechanical impedance. Closing the loop through the dynamics of the controlled vehicle allowed experiments on the limits of control of unstable vehicles with and without motion cues. The inverted pendulum controlled element, programmed as a self pacing element, was used extensively as a scalar performance index. In addition, the motorbike equations of motion were studied with regard to required human equalization. Abstracts are included for a series of published data on manual control.

  14. Time Series Modeling of Human Operator Dynamics in Manual Control Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biezad, D. J.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    A time-series technique is presented for identifying the dynamic characteristics of the human operator in manual control tasks from relatively short records of experimental data. Control of system excitation signals used in the identification is not required. The approach is a multi-channel identification technique for modeling multi-input/multi-output situations. The method presented includes statistical tests for validity, is designed for digital computation, and yields estimates for the frequency response of the human operator. A comprehensive relative power analysis may also be performed for validated models. This method is applied to several sets of experimental data; the results are discussed and shown to compare favorably with previous research findings. New results are also presented for a multi-input task that was previously modeled to demonstrate the strengths of the method.

  15. Lumbar segmental instability: a criterion-related validity study of manual therapy assessment

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, J Haxby; McCane, Brendan; Herbison, Peter; Moginie, Graeme; Chapple, Cathy; Hogarty, Tracy

    2005-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal physiotherapists routinely assess lumbar segmental motion during the clinical examination of a patient with low back pain. The validity of manual assessment of segmental motion has not, however, been adequately investigated. Methods In this prospective, multi-centre, pragmatic, diagnostic validity study, 138 consecutive patients with recurrent or chronic low back pain (R/CLBP) were recruited. Physiotherapists with post-graduate training in manual therapy performed passive accessory intervertebral motion tests (PAIVMs) and passive physiological intervertebral motion tests (PPIVMs). Consenting patients were referred for flexion-extension radiographs. Sagittal angular rotation and sagittal translation of each lumbar spinal motion segment was measured from these radiographs, and compared to a reference range derived from a study of 30 asymptomatic volunteers. Motion beyond two standard deviations from the reference mean was considered diagnostic of rotational lumbar segmental instability (LSI) and translational LSI. Accuracy and validity of the clinical assessments were expressed using sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio statistics with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Only translation LSI was found to be significantly associated with R/CLBP (p < 0.05). PAIVMs were specific for the diagnosis of translation LSI (specificity 89%, CI 83–93%), but showed poor sensitivity (29%, CI 14–50%). A positive test results in a likelihood ratio (LR+) of 2.52 (95% CI 1.15–5.53). Flexion PPIVMs were highly specific for the diagnosis of translation LSI (specificity 99.5%; CI 97–100%), but showed very poor sensitivity (5%; CI 1–22%). Likelihood ratio statistics for flexion PPIVMs were not statistically significant. Extension PPIVMs performed better than flexion PPIVMs, with slightly higher sensitivity (16%; CI 6–38%) resulting in a likelihood ratio for a positive test of 7.1 (95% CI 1.7 to 29.2) for translation LSI. Conclusion This

  16. User's Manual for Data for Validating Models for PV Module Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, W.; Anderberg, A.; Deline, C.; Glick, S.; Muller, M.; Perrin, G.; Rodriguez, J.; Rummel, S.; Terwilliger, K.; Silverman, T. J.

    2014-04-01

    This user's manual describes performance data measured for flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) modules installed in Cocoa, Florida, Eugene, Oregon, and Golden, Colorado. The data include PV module current-voltage curves and associated meteorological data for approximately one-year periods. These publicly available data are intended to facilitate the validation of existing models for predicting the performance of PV modules, and for the development of new and improved models. For comparing different modeling approaches, using these public data will provide transparency and more meaningful comparisons of the relative benefits.

  17. Manually Interpreted Land-Use Change for Validation and Regional Assessments - 2001 TO 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulard, C. E.; Acevedo, W.; Sayler, K. L.; Taylor, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Land-use/land-cover (LULC) change information for the entire conterminous United States is becoming more common, yet existing national-scale LULC datasets may provide an incomplete story of change or may contain questionable land change statistics. In order to evaluate these datasets appropriately, the overall quality, accuracy, or precision of LULC products needs be determined independently. To this end, the USGS Land Change Research Project manually collected LULC change for 676 sample blocks for the 2001-2006 and 2006-2011 time periods. The team identified 29 of 84 Level III EPA Ecoregions that underwent specific types and amounts of land change between 1973 and 2000, and updated LULC change information to 2011 in these regions using the same sample block classification procedure as the USGS Land Cover Trends project. Ecoregion specific alterations in the sampling density were made to expedite the completion of manual block interpretations. Results from this study include ecoregion-based statistical estimates of the amount of LULC change per time period, the most common types of conversions, rates of change, and percent composition. Overall estimated amount of change per ecoregion from 2001 to 2011 ranged from a low of 370 km2 in the Northern Basin and Range Ecoregion to a high of 78,782 km2 in the Southeastern Plains Ecoregion. The Southeastern Plains Ecoregion continues to undergo one of the most intense forest harvesting and regrowth cycles in the country, with 16.6% of the ecoregion changing between 2001 and 2011. These manually collected LULC change statistics provide a new, valuable resource that may be used along with other ground truth data and field verified LULC data to independently validate other land change products or used alone to conduct regional land change assessments.

  18. Affective Education: A Teacher's Manual to Promote Student Self-Actualization and Human Relations Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Thomas R.

    This teacher's manual presents affective education as a program to promote student self-actualization and human relations skills. Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and Erik Erikson's life stages of psychosocial development form the conceptual base for this program. The goals and objectives of this manual are concerned with problem-solving…

  19. Validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy 1

    PubMed Central

    da Cruz, Flávia Oliveira de Almeida Marques; Ferreira, Elaine Barros; Vasques, Christiane Inocêncio; da Mata, Luciana Regina Ferreira; dos Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: develop the content and face validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy. Method: descriptive methodological research. The Theory of Psychometrics was used for the validation process, developed by 15 experts in the theme area of the educative manual and by two language and publicity professionals. A minimum agreement level of 80% was considered to guarantee the validity of the material. Results: the items addressed in the assessment tool of the educative manual were divided in three blocks: objectives, structure and format, and relevance. Only one item, related to the sociocultural level of the target public, obtained an agreement rate <80%, and was reformulated based on the participants' suggestions. All other items were considered appropriate and/or complete appropriate in the three blocks proposed: objectives - 92.38%, structure and form - 89.74%, and relevance - 94.44%. Conclusion: the face and content validation of the educative manual proposed were attended to. This can contribute to the understanding of the therapeutic process the head and neck cancer patient is submitted to during the radiation therapy, besides supporting clinical practice through the nursing consultation. PMID:27305178

  20. Test re-test reliability and construct validity of the star-track test of manual dexterity

    PubMed Central

    Amirian, Ilda; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We wished to determine test re-test reliability and construct validity of the star-track test of manual dexterity. Design. Test re-test reliability was examined in a controlled study. Construct validity was tested in a blinded randomized crossover study. Setting. The study was performed at a university hospital in Denmark. Participants. A total of 11 subjects for test re-test and 20 subjects for the construct validity study were included. All subjects were healthy volunteers. Intervention. The test re-test trial had two measurements with 2 days pause in between. The interventions in the construct validity study included baseline measurement, intervention 1: fatigue, intervention 2: stress, and intervention 3: fatigue and stress. There was a 2 day pause between each intervention. Main outcome measure. An integrated measure of completion time and number of errors was used. Results. All participants completed the study (test re-test n = 11; construct validity n = 20). The test re-testshowed a strong Pearson product-moment correlation (r = 0.90, n = 11, P < 0.01) with no sign of learning effect. The 20 subjects in the construct validity trial were randomized to the order of the four interventions, so that all subjects completed each intervention once. A repeated measures ANOVA determined that mean integrated measure differed between interventions (p = 0.002). Post hoc tests using Bonferroni correction revealed that compared with baseline all interventions had significantly higher integrated scores ranging from 47–59% difference in mean. Conclusion. The star track test of manual dexterity had a strong test re-test reliability, and was able to discriminate between a subject’s normal manual dexterity and dexterity after exposure to fatigue and/or stress. PMID:25922800

  1. Human Growth: Guide to a Healthier You. A Middle School Science Curriculum. Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huba, Jeanne C.; Crow, Tracy L.

    This instructor's manual contains information and activities related to human growth processes. The curriculum focuses on choices students can make for a healthy lifestyle and is based on the most up-to-date research about human growth and development. Students generate and test their hypotheses throughout each of five modules which include…

  2. Human manual control performance in hyper-gravity.

    PubMed

    Clark, Torin K; Newman, Michael C; Merfeld, Daniel M; Oman, Charles M; Young, Laurence R

    2015-05-01

    Hyper-gravity provides a unique environment to study how misperceptions impact control of orientation relative to gravity. Previous studies have found that static and dynamic roll tilts are perceptually overestimated in hyper-gravity. The current investigation quantifies how this influences control of orientation. We utilized a long-radius centrifuge to study manual control performance in hyper-gravity. In the dark, subjects were tasked with nulling out a pseudo-random roll disturbance on the cab of the centrifuge using a rotational hand controller to command their roll rate in order to remain perceptually upright. The task was performed in 1, 1.5, and 2 G's of net gravito-inertial acceleration. Initial performance, in terms of root-mean-square deviation from upright, degraded in hyper-gravity relative to 1 G performance levels. In 1.5 G, initial performance degraded by 26 % and in 2 G, by 45 %. With practice, however, performance in hyper-gravity improved to near the 1 G performance level over several minutes. Finally, pre-exposure to one hyper-gravity level reduced initial performance decrements in a different, novel, hyper-gravity level. Perceptual overestimation of roll tilts in hyper-gravity leads to manual control performance errors, which are reduced both with practice and with pre-exposure to alternate hyper-gravity stimuli. PMID:25651980

  3. Lnc2Cancer: a manually curated database of experimentally supported lncRNAs associated with various human cancers.

    PubMed

    Ning, Shangwei; Zhang, Jizhou; Wang, Peng; Zhi, Hui; Wang, Jianjian; Liu, Yue; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Yue, Ming; Wang, Lihua; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Lnc2Cancer (http://www.bio-bigdata.net/lnc2cancer) is a manually curated database of cancer-associated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) with experimental support that aims to provide a high-quality and integrated resource for exploring lncRNA deregulation in various human cancers. LncRNAs represent a large category of functional RNA molecules that play a significant role in human cancers. A curated collection and summary of deregulated lncRNAs in cancer is essential to thoroughly understand the mechanisms and functions of lncRNAs. Here, we developed the Lnc2Cancer database, which contains 1057 manually curated associations between 531 lncRNAs and 86 human cancers. Each association includes lncRNA and cancer name, the lncRNA expression pattern, experimental techniques, a brief functional description, the original reference and additional annotation information. Lnc2Cancer provides a user-friendly interface to conveniently browse, retrieve and download data. Lnc2Cancer also offers a submission page for researchers to submit newly validated lncRNA-cancer associations. With the rapidly increasing interest in lncRNAs, Lnc2Cancer will significantly improve our understanding of lncRNA deregulation in cancer and has the potential to be a timely and valuable resource. PMID:26481356

  4. Lnc2Cancer: a manually curated database of experimentally supported lncRNAs associated with various human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Shangwei; Zhang, Jizhou; Wang, Peng; Zhi, Hui; Wang, Jianjian; Liu, Yue; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Yue, Ming; Wang, Lihua; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Lnc2Cancer (http://www.bio-bigdata.net/lnc2cancer) is a manually curated database of cancer-associated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) with experimental support that aims to provide a high-quality and integrated resource for exploring lncRNA deregulation in various human cancers. LncRNAs represent a large category of functional RNA molecules that play a significant role in human cancers. A curated collection and summary of deregulated lncRNAs in cancer is essential to thoroughly understand the mechanisms and functions of lncRNAs. Here, we developed the Lnc2Cancer database, which contains 1057 manually curated associations between 531 lncRNAs and 86 human cancers. Each association includes lncRNA and cancer name, the lncRNA expression pattern, experimental techniques, a brief functional description, the original reference and additional annotation information. Lnc2Cancer provides a user-friendly interface to conveniently browse, retrieve and download data. Lnc2Cancer also offers a submission page for researchers to submit newly validated lncRNA-cancer associations. With the rapidly increasing interest in lncRNAs, Lnc2Cancer will significantly improve our understanding of lncRNA deregulation in cancer and has the potential to be a timely and valuable resource. PMID:26481356

  5. Validation of a Manual Protocol for BRAF V600E Mutation-specific Immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Dinges, Hanns C; Capper, David; Ritz, Olga; Brüderlein, Silke; Marienfeld, Ralf; von Deimling, Andreas; Möller, Peter; Lennerz, Jochen K

    2015-01-01

    Detection of BRAF V600E has diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic relevance. The recently developed BRAF V600E mutation-specific antibody has evolved into a feasible alternative to DNA analysis. The plethora of immunohistochemical protocols makes implementation tedious and, here we tested a set of manual and automated protocols and compared test performance with sequencing results. For assays, we employed formalin-fixed, in part decalcified, and paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Empiric testing of manual protocols included 10 variables in 17 protocols. Automated immunohistochemical staining and BRAF pyrosequencing served as independent test methods. Test performance measures were compared without considering 1 method as a standard. Four well-fixed samples (2WT/2Mut) were used for testing of all protocols and indicated 2 correctly classifying procedures. Practical performance assessment employed 33 independent tissue samples, composed of 27 leukemias (by pyrosequencing: 8 wild-type; 18 mutated; 1 noninformative) and 6 melanomas (V600E; V600K; wild-type, 2 each). Manual V600E staining was positive in 20 cases (19 of 20 V600E-containing samples plus the 1 sample that was noninformative), whereas all wild-type and V600K cases were immunonegative. Manual or automated staining as well as pyrosequencing would have missed an equal number of V600E-mutated cases and the correlation coefficient for these methods was 0.75 to 0.93 (substantial to almost perfect); the Youden index was 0.95. Detection of V600E-mutated BRAF at the protein level in routine and decalcified tissue samples is possible, and the presented manual protocols should expedite implementation in routine diagnostic practice. Our results indicate that both molecular techniques should be considered complementary. PMID:25611237

  6. Interactive production planning and ergonomic assessment with Digital Human Models--introducing the Editor for Manual Work Activities (ema).

    PubMed

    Fritzsche, Lars; Leidholdt, Wolfgang; Bauer, Sebastian; Jäckel, Thomas; Moreno, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The aging workforce is a risk factor for manufacturing industries that contain many jobs with high physical workloads. Thus, ergonomic risk factors have to be avoided in early phases of production planning. This paper introduces a new tool for simulating manual work activities with 3D human models, the so-called emaΦ. For the most part, the emaΦ software is based on a unique modular approach including a number of complex operations that were theoretically developed and empirically validated by means of motion capturing technologies. Using these modules for defining the digital work process enables the production planner to compile human simulations more accurately and much quicker compared to any of the existing modeling tools. Features of the emaΦ software implementation, such as ergonomic evaluation and MTM-time analyses, and the workflow for practical application are presented. PMID:22317401

  7. MANUAL OF ANALYTICAL QUALITY CONTROL FOR PESTICIDES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual provides the pesticide chemist with a systematic protocol for the quality control of analytical procedures and the problems that arise in the analysis of human or environmental media. It also serves as a guide to the latest and most reliable methodology available for ...

  8. Training Manual for Mental Health and Human Service Workers in Major Disasters. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWolfe, Deborah J.

    One of the changes experienced during the past decade has been the occurrence of human-caused disasters. With the rise in the number of such complex events, the Center for Mental Health Services has updated this training manual to assist mental health administrators and workers in developing the training components of crisis counseling. This…

  9. Introduction to Therapeutic and Counseling Principles: A Manual for Human Service Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Health and Social Services, Juneau. Div. of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities.

    This manual introduces some of the essential principles of counseling. It is geared toward the training and education of those who have not had significant prior counseling experiences and is not comprehensive. These topics are discussed, focusing on basic, introductory material: (1) general principles of human behavior and motivation including…

  10. Rational Manual and Automated Scoring Thresholds for the Immunohistochemical Detection of TP53 Missense Mutations in Human Breast Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicholas J; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Midkiff, Bentley R; Conway, Kathleen; Millikan, Robert C; Geradts, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Missense mutations in TP53 are common in human breast cancer, have been associated with worse prognosis, and may predict therapy effect. TP53 missense mutations are associated with aberrant accumulation of p53 protein in tumor cell nuclei. Previous studies have used relatively arbitrary cutoffs to characterize breast tumors as positive for p53 staining by immunohistochemical assays. This study aimed to objectively determine optimal thresholds for p53 positivity by manual and automated scoring methods using whole tissue sections from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. p53-immunostained slides were available for 564 breast tumors previously assayed for TP53 mutations. Average nuclear p53 staining intensity was manually scored as negative, borderline, weak, moderate, or strong and percentage of positive tumor cells was estimated. Automated p53 signal intensity was measured using the Aperio nuclear v9 algorithm combined with the Genie histology pattern recognition tool and tuned to achieve optimal nuclear segmentation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine optimal cutoffs for average staining intensity and percent cells positive to distinguish between tumors with and without a missense mutation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated a threshold of moderate average nuclear staining intensity as a good surrogate for TP53 missense mutations in both manual (area under the curve=0.87) and automated (area under the curve=0.84) scoring systems. Both manual and automated immunohistochemical scoring methods predicted missense mutations in breast carcinomas with high accuracy. Validation of the automated intensity scoring threshold suggests a role for such algorithms in detecting TP53 missense mutations in high throughput studies. PMID:26200835

  11. Motion cue effects on human pilot dynamics in manual control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washizu, K.; Tanaka, K.; Endo, S.; Itoko, T.

    1977-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the motion cue effects on human pilots during tracking tasks. The moving-base simulator of National Aerospace Laboratory was employed as the motion cue device, and the attitude director indicator or the projected visual field was employed as the visual cue device. The chosen controlled elements were second-order unstable systems. It was confirmed that with the aid of motion cues the pilot workload was lessened and consequently the human controllability limits were enlarged. In order to clarify the mechanism of these effects, the describing functions of the human pilots were identified by making use of the spectral and the time domain analyses. The results of these analyses suggest that the sensory system of the motion cues can yield the differential informations of the signal effectively, which coincides with the existing knowledges in the physiological area.

  12. Prediction of Outcome in Women With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Who Receive Manual Physical Therapy Interventions: A Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Palacios-Ceña, María; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Pareja, Juan A; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis of a randomized trial. Background A clinical prediction rule to identify patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) most likely to respond to manual physical therapy has been published but requires further testing to determine its validity. Objective To assess the validity of a clinical prediction rule proposed for the management of patients with CTS in a different group of patients with a variety of treating clinicians. Methods A preplanned secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial investigating the efficacy of manual physical therapies, including desensitization maneuvers of the central nervous system, in 120 women suffering from CTS was performed. Patients were randomized to receive 3 sessions of manual physical therapy (n = 60) or surgical release/decompression of the carpal tunnel (n = 60). Self-perceived improvement with a global rating of change was recorded at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Pain intensity (mean pain and worst pain on a 0-to-10 numeric pain-rating scale) and scores on the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (functional status and symptom severity subscales) were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. A baseline assessment of status on the clinical prediction rule was performed (positive status on the clinical prediction rule was defined as meeting at least 2 of the following criteria: pressure pain threshold of less than 137 kPa over the affected C5-6 joint; heat pain threshold of less than 39.6°C over the affected carpal tunnel; and general health score [Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey] of greater than 66 points). Linear mixed models with repeated measures were used to examine the validity of the rule. Results Participants with a positive status on the rule who received manual physical therapy did not experience greater improvements compared to those with a negative status on the rule for mean pain (P = .65), worst pain (P = .86), function (P = .99), or symptom

  13. New techniques for the analysis of manual control systems. [mathematical models of human operator behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Studies are summarized on the application of advanced analytical and computational methods to the development of mathematical models of human controllers in multiaxis manual control systems. Specific accomplishments include the following: (1) The development of analytical and computer methods for the measurement of random parameters in linear models of human operators. (2) Discrete models of human operator behavior in a multiple display situation were developed. (3) Sensitivity techniques were developed which make possible the identification of unknown sampling intervals in linear systems. (4) The adaptive behavior of human operators following particular classes of vehicle failures was studied and a model structure proposed.

  14. Different binarization processes validated against manual counts of fluorescent bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Tamminga, Gerrit G; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H; Jansen, Gijsbert J; Euverink, Gert-Jan W

    2016-09-01

    State of the art software methods (such as fixed value approaches or statistical approaches) to create a binary image of fluorescent bacterial cells are not as accurate and precise as they should be for counting bacteria and measuring their area. To overcome these bottlenecks, we introduce biological significance to obtain a binary image from a greyscale microscopic image. Using our biological significance approach we are able to automatically count about the same number of cells as an individual researcher would do by manual/visual counting. Using the fixed value or statistical approach to obtain a binary image leads to about 20% less cells in automatic counting. In our procedure we included the area measurements of the bacterial cells to determine the right parameters for background subtraction and threshold values. In an iterative process the threshold and background subtraction values were incremented until the number of particles smaller than a typical bacterial cell is less than the number of bacterial cells with a certain area. This research also shows that every image has a specific threshold with respect to the optical system, magnification and staining procedure as well as the exposure time. The biological significance approach shows that automatic counting can be performed with the same accuracy, precision and reproducibility as manual counting. The same approach can be used to count bacterial cells using different optical systems (Leica, Olympus and Navitar), magnification factors (200× and 400×), staining procedures (DNA (Propidium Iodide) and RNA (FISH)) and substrates (polycarbonate filter or glass). PMID:27380963

  15. The 14th Annual Conference on Manual Control. [digital simulation of human operator dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Human operator dynamics during actual manual control or while monitoring the automatic control systems involved in air-to-air tracking, automobile driving, the operator of undersea vehicles, and remote handling are examined. Optimal control models and the use of mathematical theory in representing man behavior in complex man machine system tasks are discussed with emphasis on eye/head tracking and scanning; perception and attention allocation; decision making; and motion simulation and effects.

  16. Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: User`s manual. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsky, S.M.; Hayes, J.E.; Miller, L.A.

    1995-03-01

    This report provides a step-by-step guide, or user manual, for personnel responsible for the planning and execution of the verification and validation (V&V), and developmental testing, of expert systems, conventional software systems, and various other types of artificial intelligence systems. While the guide was developed primarily for applications in the utility industry, it applies well to all industries. The user manual has three sections. In Section 1 the user assesses the stringency of V&V needed for the system under consideration, identifies the development stage the system is in, and identifies the component(s) of the system to be tested next. These three pieces of information determine which Guideline Package of V&V methods is most appropriate for those conditions. The V&V Guideline Packages are provided in Section 2. Each package consists of an ordered set of V&V techniques to be applied to the system, guides on choosing the review/evaluation team, measurement criteria, and references to a book or report which describes the application of the method. Section 3 presents details of 11 of the most important (or least well-explained in the literature) methods to assist the user in applying these techniques accurately.

  17. Validation of the Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Variability: Can Manual Segmentations Be Trusted as Ground Truth?

    PubMed

    Meiburger, Kristen M; Molinari, Filippo; Wong, Justin; Aguilar, Luis; Gallo, Diego; Steinman, David A; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-07-01

    The common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) is widely accepted and used as an indicator of atherosclerosis. Recent studies, however, have found that the irregularity of the IMT along the carotid artery wall has a stronger correlation with atherosclerosis than the IMT itself. We set out to validate IMT variability (IMTV), a parameter defined to assess IMT irregularities along the wall. In particular, we analyzed whether or not manual segmentations of the lumen-intima and media-adventitia can be considered reliable in calculation of the IMTV parameter. To do this, we used a total of 60 simulated ultrasound images with a priori IMT and IMTV values. The images, simulated using the Fast And Mechanistic Ultrasound Simulation software, presented five different morphologies, four nominal IMT values and three different levels of variability along the carotid artery wall (no variability, small variability and large variability). Three experts traced the lumen-intima (LI) and media-adventitia (MA) profiles, and two automated algorithms were employed to obtain the LI and MA profiles. One expert also re-traced the LI and MA profiles to test intra-reader variability. The average IMTV measurements of the profiles used to simulate the longitudinal B-mode images were 0.002 ± 0.002, 0.149 ± 0.035 and 0.286 ± 0.068 mm for the cases of no variability, small variability and large variability, respectively. The IMTV measurements of one of the automated algorithms were statistically similar (p > 0.05, Wilcoxon signed rank) when considering small and large variability, but non-significant when considering no variability (p < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed rank). The second automated algorithm resulted in statistically similar values in the small variability case. Two readers' manual tracings, however, produced IMTV measurements with a statistically significant difference considering all three variability levels, whereas the third reader found a statistically significant

  18. THE VALIDITY OF HUMAN AND COMPUTERIZED WRITING ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring

    2005-09-01

    This paper summarizes an experiment designed to assess the validity of essay grading between holistic and analytic human graders and a computerized grader based on latent semantic analysis. The validity of the grade was gauged by the extent to which the student’s knowledge of the topic correlated with the grader’s expert knowledge. To assess knowledge, Pathfinder networks were generated by the student essay writers, the holistic and analytic graders, and the computerized grader. It was found that the computer generated grades more closely matched the definition of valid grading than did human generated grades.

  19. Development and validation of a computer crash simulation model of an occupied adult manual wheelchair subjected to a frontal impact.

    PubMed

    Dsouza, R; Bertocci, G

    2010-04-01

    Wheelchairs are primarily designed for mobility and are not necessarily intended for use as motor vehicle seats. However, many wheelchairs serve as vehicle seats for individuals unable to transfer to a vehicle seat. Subjecting wheelchairs to sled testing, in part establishes the crashworthiness of wheelchairs used as motor vehicle seats. Computer simulations provide a supplemental approach for sled testing, to assess wheelchair response and loading under crash conditions. In this study a nonlinear, dynamic, computer model was developed and validated to simulate a wheelchair and occupant subjected to a frontal impact test (ANSI/RESNA WC19). This simulation model was developed utilizing data from two frontal impact 20 g/48 km/h sled tests, which consisted of identical, adult manual wheelchairs secured with 4-point tiedowns, occupied with a 50th percentile adult male anthropomorphic test device (ATD), restrained with a 3-point occupant restraint system. Additionally, the model was validated against sled data using visual comparisons of wheelchair and occupant kinematics, along with statistical assessments of outcome measures. All statistical evaluations were found to be within the acceptance criteria, indicating the model's high predictability of the sled tests. This model provides a useful tool for the development of crashworthy wheelchair design guidelines, as well as the development of transit-safe wheelchair technologies. PMID:19251461

  20. Flight Simulator and Training Human Factors Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, Scott T.; Leland, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Loss of control has been identified as the leading cause of aircraft accidents in recent years. Efforts have been made to better equip pilots to deal with these types of events, commonly referred to as upsets. A major challenge in these endeavors has been recreating the motion environments found in flight as the majority of upsets take place well beyond the normal operating envelope of large aircraft. The Environmental Tectonics Corporation has developed a simulator motion base, called GYROLAB, that is capable of recreating the sustained accelerations, or G-forces, and motions of flight. A two part research study was accomplished that coupled NASA's Generic Transport Model with a GYROLAB device. The goal of the study was to characterize physiological effects of the upset environment and to demonstrate that a sustained motion based simulator can be an effective means for upset recovery training. Two groups of 25 Air Transport Pilots participated in the study. The results showed reliable signs of pilot arousal at specific stages of similar upsets. Further validation also demonstrated that sustained motion technology was successful in improving pilot performance during recovery following an extensive training program using GYROLAB technology.

  1. Human and chicken TLR pathways: manual curation and computer-based orthology analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Marc; Shamovsky, Veronica; D’Eustachio, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The innate immune responses mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLR) provide an evolutionarily well-conserved first line of defense against microbial pathogens. In the Reactome Knowledgebase we previously integrated annotations of human TLR molecular functions with those of over 4000 other human proteins involved in processes such as adaptive immunity, DNA replication, signaling, and intermediary metabolism, and have linked these annotations to external resources, including PubMed, UniProt, EntrezGene, Ensembl, and the Gene Ontology to generate a resource suitable for data mining, pathway analysis, and other systems biology approaches. We have now used a combination of manual expert curation and computer-based orthology analysis to generate a set of annotations for TLR molecular function in the chicken (Gallus gallus). Mammalian and avian lineages diverged approximately 300 million years ago, and the avian TLR repertoire consists of both orthologs and distinct new genes. The work described here centers on the molecular biology of TLR3, the host receptor that mediates responses to viral and other doubled-stranded polynucleotides, as a paradigm for our approach to integrated manual and computationally based annotation and data analysis. It tests the quality of computationally generated annotations projected from human onto other species and supports a systems biology approach to analysis of virus-activated signaling pathways and identification of clinically useful antiviral measures. PMID:21052677

  2. A study of the effect of forcing function characteristics on human operator dynamics in manual control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washizu, K.; Tanaka, K.; Osawa, T.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the spectrum of the forcing function on the human pilot dynamics in manual control was investigated. A simple compensatory tracking experiment was conducted, where the controlled element was of a second-order dynamics and the forcing function was a random noise having a dominant frequency. The dominant frequency and the power of the forcing function were two variable parameters during the experiment. The results show that the human pilot describing functions are dependent not only on the dynamics of the controlled element, but also on the characteristics of the forcing function. This suggests that the human pilot behavior should be expressed by the transfer function taking into consideration his ability to sense and predict the forcing function.

  3. A Tool for Biomarker Discovery in the Urinary Proteome: A Manually Curated Human and Animal Urine Protein Biomarker Database*

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chen; Li, Menglin; Li, Xundou; Wei, Lilong; Zhu, Lisi; Yang, Fan; Jia, Lulu; Mu, Yi; Wang, Jiangning; Guo, Zhengguang; Zhang, Dan; Yin, Jianrui; Wang, Zhigang; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Zhengguo; Gao, Youhe

    2011-01-01

    Urine is an important source of biomarkers. A single proteomics assay can identify hundreds of differentially expressed proteins between disease and control samples; however, the ability to select biomarker candidates with the most promise for further validation study remains difficult. A bioinformatics tool that allows accurate and convenient comparison of all of the existing related studies can markedly aid the development of this area. In this study, we constructed the Urinary Protein Biomarker (UPB) database to collect existing studies of urinary protein biomarkers from published literature. To ensure the quality of data collection, all literature was manually curated. The website (http://122.70.220.102/biomarker) allows users to browse the database by disease categories and search by protein IDs in bulk. Researchers can easily determine whether a biomarker candidate has already been identified by another group for the same disease or for other diseases, which allows for the confidence and disease specificity of their biomarker candidate to be evaluated. Additionally, the pathophysiological processes of the diseases can be studied using our database with the hypothesis that diseases that share biomarkers may have the same pathophysiological processes. Because of the natural relationship between urinary proteins and the urinary system, this database may be especially suitable for studying the pathogenesis of urological diseases. Currently, the database contains 553 and 275 records compiled from 174 and 31 publications of human and animal studies, respectively. We found that biomarkers identified by different proteomic methods had a poor overlap with each other. The differences between sample preparation and separation methods, mass spectrometers, and data analysis algorithms may be influencing factors. Biomarkers identified from animal models also overlapped poorly with those from human samples, but the overlap rate was not lower than that of human proteomics

  4. Human Rights Attitude Scale: A Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercan, Recep; Yaman, Tugba; Demir, Selcuk Besir

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a valid and reliable attitude scale having quality psychometric features that can measure secondary school students' attitudes towards human rights. The study group of the research is comprised by 710 6th, 7th and 8th grade students who study at 4 secondary schools in the centre of Sivas. The study group…

  5. Analysis of operational comfort in manual tasks using human force manipulability measure.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Nishikawa, Kazuo; Yamada, Naoki; Tsuji, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme for human force manipulability (HFM) based on the use of isometric joint torque properties to simulate the spatial characteristics of human operation forces at an end-point of a limb with feasible magnitudes for a specified limb posture. This is also applied to the evaluation/prediction of operational comfort (OC) when manually operating a human-machine interface. The effectiveness of HFM is investigated through two experiments and computer simulations of humans generating forces by using their upper extremities. Operation force generation with maximum isometric effort can be roughly estimated with an HFM measure computed from information on the arm posture during a maintained posture. The layout of a human-machine interface is then discussed based on the results of operational experiments using an electric gear-shifting system originally developed for robotic devices. The results indicate a strong relationship between the spatial characteristics of the HFM and OC levels when shifting, and the OC is predicted by using a multiple regression model with HFM measures. PMID:25415990

  6. Development and validation of a food photography manual, as a tool for estimation of food portion size in epidemiological dietary surveys in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Bouchoucha, Mongia; Akrout, Mouna; Bellali, Hédia; Bouchoucha, Rim; Tarhouni, Fadwa; Mansour, Abderraouf Ben; Zouari, Béchir

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimation of food portion sizes has always been a challenge in dietary studies on free-living individuals. The aim of this work was to develop and validate a food photography manual to improve the accuracy of the estimated size of consumed food portions. Methods A manual was compiled from digital photos of foods commonly consumed by the Tunisian population. The food was cooked and weighed before taking digital photographs of three portion sizes. The manual was validated by comparing the method of 24-hour recall (using photos) to the reference method [food weighing (FW)]. In both the methods, the comparison focused on food intake amounts as well as nutritional issues. Validity was assessed by Bland–Altman limits of agreement. In total, 31 male and female volunteers aged 9–89 participated in the study. Results We focused on eight food categories and compared their estimated amounts (using the 24-hour recall method) to those actually consumed (using FW). Animal products and sweets were underestimated, whereas pasta, bread, vegetables, fruits, and dairy products were overestimated. However, the difference between the two methods is not statistically significant except for pasta (p<0.05) and dairy products (p<0.05). The coefficient of correlation between the two methods is highly significant, ranging from 0.876 for pasta to 0.989 for dairy products. Nutrient intake calculated for both methods showed insignificant differences except for fat (p<0.001) and dietary fiber (p<0.05). A highly significant correlation was observed between the two methods for all micronutrients. The test agreement highlights the lack of difference between the two methods. Conclusion The difference between the 24-hour recall method using digital photos and the weighing method is acceptable. Our findings indicate that the food photography manual can be a useful tool for quantifying food portion sizes in epidemiological dietary surveys. PMID:27585631

  7. Physiological responses and manual performance in humans following repeated exposure to severe cold at night.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, H; Nagai, Y; Tochihara, Y

    2001-04-01

    We evaluated human physiological responses and the performance of manual tasks during exposure to severe cold (-25 degrees C) at night (0300-0500 hours) and in the afternoon (1500-1700 hours). Thirteen male students wearing standard cold protective clothing occupied a severely cold room (-25 degrees C) for 20 min, and were then transferred to a cool room (10 degrees C) for 20 min. This pattern of exposure was repeated three times, for a total time of exposure to extreme cold of 60 min. The experiments were started either at 1500 hours or 0300 hours and measurements of rectal temperature, skin temperature, blood pressure, performance in a counting task, hand tremor, and subjective responses were made in each condition. At the end of the experiment at night the mean decrease in rectal temperature [0.68 (SEM 0.04) degree C] was significantly greater than that at the end of the experiment in the afternoon [0.55 (SEM 0.08) degree C, P < 0.01]. After the second cold exposure at night the mean increase in diastolic blood pressure [90 (SEM 2.0) mmHg] was significantly greater than that at the end of the second cold exposure in the afternoon [82 (SEM 2.8) mmHg, P < 0.01]. At the end of the second cold exposure at night, mean finger skin temperature [11.8 (SEM 0.8) degrees C] was significantly higher than that at the comparable time in the afternoon [9.0 (SEM 0.7) degrees C, P < 0.01]. Similarly for the toe, mean skin temperature at the start of the second cold exposure at night [25.6 (SEM 1.5) degrees C] was significantly higher than in the afternoon [20.1 (SEM 0.8) degrees C, P < 0.01]. The increased skin temperatures in the periphery resulted in increased heat loss. Since peripheral skin temperatures were highest at night, the subjects noted diminished sensations of thermal cold and pain at that time. Manual dexterity at the end of the first cold exposure at night [mean 83.7 (SEM 3.6) times.min-1] had decreased significantly more than at the end of the first cold exposure

  8. Validity of home blood pressure measurements manually registered by patients after an educational session provided by community pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Sendra-Lillo, José; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; García-Corpas, José Pedro; Marín Rivas, Fátima; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    When home blood pressure (HBP) measurements are taken, the readings can be registered manually by the patient and/or stored in the device's memory. The instructions provided by healthcare professionals would be particularly relevant to guarantee the reliability of manual blood pressure (BP) figures and enhance clinical decision making. The aim of this study is assess the agreement between HBP measurements manually registered by patients and those stored in the device's memory after an educational session provided by community pharmacists. Secondary data of the MEPAFAR and the Palmera studies have been used in this analysis. All the (treated hypertensive) patients attended an individual educational session in which they were instructed on how to use the measurement device and properly measure and manually register HBP. The same device and HBP monitoring protocol were used in both studies: 4 consecutive days (three morning measurements and three in the evening). HBP measurements were both manually registered by patients and stored in the device's memory. To evaluate the agreement between BP figures, Lin's correlation-concordance coefficient and κ coefficient were used for quantitative and qualitative agreement, respectively. One hundred and sixty-sixty patients were included in this analysis. The agreement between the average manual and the stored HBP was very good [systolic=0.99, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99-0.99; diastolic=0.99, 95% CI: 0.99-1.00]. 99.4% of patients were classified in the same category by both alternatives [κ index=0.99 (95% CI: 0.98-1.00)]. In this sample of treated hypertensive patients, the agreement between manually registered and stored BP figures was very good. This high concordance may be explained by the pharmacist's intervention. PMID:25856419

  9. The human operator in manual preview tracking /an experiment and its modeling via optimal control/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomizuka, M.; Whitney, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    A manual preview tracking experiment and its results are presented. The preview drastically improves the tracking performance compared to zero-preview tracking. Optimal discrete finite preview control is applied to determine the structure of a mathematical model of the manual preview tracking experiment. Variable parameters in the model are adjusted to values which are consistent to the published data in manual control. The model with the adjusted parameters is found to be well correlated to the experimental results.

  10. Validation of a finite element model of the human metacarpal.

    PubMed

    Barker, D S; Netherway, D J; Krishnan, J; Hearn, T C

    2005-03-01

    Implant loosening and mechanical failure of components are frequently reported following metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint replacement. Studies of the mechanical environment of the MCP implant-bone construct are rare. The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive ability of a finite element model of the intact second human metacarpal to provide a validated baseline for further mechanical studies. A right index human metacarpal was subjected to torsion and combined axial/bending loading using strain gauge (SG) and 3D finite element (FE) analysis. Four different representations of bone material properties were considered. Regression analyses were performed comparing maximum and minimum principal surface strains taken from the SG and FE models. Regression slopes close to unity and high correlation coefficients were found when the diaphyseal cortical shell was modelled as anisotropic and cancellous bone properties were derived from quantitative computed tomography. The inclusion of anisotropy for cortical bone was strongly influential in producing high model validity whereas variation in methods of assigning stiffness to cancellous bone had only a minor influence. The validated FE model provides a tool for future investigations of current and novel MCP joint prostheses. PMID:15642506

  11. Validation of Student and Parent Reported Data on the Basic Grant Application Form, 1978-79 Comprehensive Validation Guide. Procedural Manual for: Validation of Cases Referred by Institutions; Validation of Cases Referred by the Office of Education; Recovery of Overpayments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karen; And Others

    Procedures for validating data reported by students and parents on an application for Basic Educational Opportunity Grants were developed in 1978 for the U.S. Office of Education (OE). Validation activities include: validation of flagged Student Eligibility Reports (SERs) for students whose schools are part of the Alternate Disbursement System;…

  12. Biosafety Manual

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce W.

    2010-05-18

    Work with or potential exposure to biological materials in the course of performing research or other work activities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) must be conducted in a safe, ethical, environmentally sound, and compliant manner. Work must be conducted in accordance with established biosafety standards, the principles and functions of Integrated Safety Management (ISM), this Biosafety Manual, Chapter 26 (Biosafety) of the Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000), and applicable standards and LBNL policies. The purpose of the Biosafety Program is to protect workers, the public, agriculture, and the environment from exposure to biological agents or materials that may cause disease or other detrimental effects in humans, animals, or plants. This manual provides workers; line management; Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S) Division staff; Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) members; and others with a comprehensive overview of biosafety principles, requirements from biosafety standards, and measures needed to control biological risks in work activities and facilities at LBNL.

  13. Career Education. Human Ecology/Home Economics Objectives, Grades 6-12. DS Manual 2850.1 [and] Approved List of Essential Textbooks/Instructional Materials for Human Ecology/Home Economics, Grades 6-12. DS Manual 2850.2; Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This manual provides program and instructional objectives as guidelines for a human ecology/home economics program in Department of Defense Dependents Schools (DoDDS). Four sections are inlcuded in the manual: (1) Human Ecology/Home Economics Program Objectives; (2) Human Ecology/Home Economics, Grades 6-8, Exploratory; (3) Fundamentals Level…

  14. A validation study of a stochastic model of human interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchfield, Mitchel Talmadge

    The purpose of this dissertation is to validate a stochastic model of human interactions which is part of a developmentalism paradigm. Incorporating elements of ancient and contemporary philosophy and science, developmentalism defines human development as a progression of increasing competence and utilizes compatible theories of developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, educational psychology, social psychology, curriculum development, neurology, psychophysics, and physics. To validate a stochastic model of human interactions, the study addressed four research questions: (a) Does attitude vary over time? (b) What are the distributional assumptions underlying attitudes? (c) Does the stochastic model, {-}N{intlimitssbsp{-infty}{infty}}varphi(chi,tau)\\ Psi(tau)dtau, have utility for the study of attitudinal distributions and dynamics? (d) Are the Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein theories applicable to human groups? Approximately 25,000 attitude observations were made using the Semantic Differential Scale. Positions of individuals varied over time and the logistic model predicted observed distributions with correlations between 0.98 and 1.0, with estimated standard errors significantly less than the magnitudes of the parameters. The results bring into question the applicability of Fisherian research designs (Fisher, 1922, 1928, 1938) for behavioral research based on the apparent failure of two fundamental assumptions-the noninteractive nature of the objects being studied and normal distribution of attributes. The findings indicate that individual belief structures are representable in terms of a psychological space which has the same or similar properties as physical space. The psychological space not only has dimension, but individuals interact by force equations similar to those described in theoretical physics models. Nonlinear regression techniques were used to estimate Fermi-Dirac parameters from the data. The model explained a high degree

  15. Improving human capabilities for combined manual handling tasks through a short and intensive physical training program.

    PubMed

    Genaidy, A M; Gupta, T; Alshedi, A

    1990-11-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to test whether the muscular endurance, muscular strength, cardiovascular endurance, and workload perception of individuals engaged in combined manual handling tasks could be improved through a short and intensive physical training program. Three groups were formed to achieve the objectives of this study, and five subjects participated in each group. Two groups were trained using the concept of progressive resistance exercise; one group used the concept of six-repetition maximum (6 RM) while the other group followed the ten-repetition maximum (10 RM) protocol. The third group was used as a control group to monitor the effectiveness of the training groups. The training groups required subjects' attendance at 16 sessions for a period of 6 weeks. The control group performed the same tests given to the training group twice, separated by a period of 6 weeks. Endurance time, heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion, and static and dynamic strength were the response variables. Based on the results of this study, the following conclusions could be made: (1) it is possible to significantly improve muscular endurance, muscular strength, and cardiovascular endurance through the short and intensive training protocols examined in this investigation (the 10 RM training protocol, however, yielded better improvement in human physical capability than the 6 RM training protocol); and (2) for a fixed work load, endurance time can increase without changing job demand perception. PMID:2085166

  16. Resource Manual for Handling Body Fluids in the School Setting To Prevent the Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    Guidelines to prevent the transmission of blood-borne diseases, especially those caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), in the school setting are provided in this resource manual for school staff. Sections include information on the reasons for the development of this manual; a summary of the means of HIV…

  17. Resource Manual for Handling Body Fluids in the School Setting To Prevent Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    This Maryland resource manual provides local education agencies with guidelines on how to handle body fluids to prevent the transmission of diseases, especially Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), in the school setting. The first section summarizes the reasons for development of the manual. The second section summarizes…

  18. A self-instructional manual for installing low-cost/no-cost weatherization materials: Experimental validation with scouts

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovich, Mark; Greene, Brandon F.

    1984-01-01

    In this study, we describe the development and evaluation of a self-instructional program for installing 10 low-cost/no-cost weatherization materials (e.g., weatherstripping, caulking). This program was a weatherization and retrofit manual (WARM) providing step-by-step instructions and illustrations. Boy and Girl Scouts participated and used either the WARM or existing product instructions (EPI) to apply the materials. Scouts installed the materials properly only when they used the WARM. PMID:16795671

  19. Development of the NRC`s Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP). Volume 2, Investigators`s Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L.; Haas, P.; Terranova, M.

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause event at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume II, is a field manual for use by investigators when performing event investigations. Volume II includes the HPIP Procedure, the HPIP Modules, and Appendices that provide extensive documentation of each investigation technique.

  20. The frequency of human, manual adjustments in balancing an inverted pendulum is constrained by intrinsic physiological factors.

    PubMed

    Loram, Ian D; Gawthrop, Peter J; Lakie, Martin

    2006-11-15

    While standing naturally and when manually or pedally balancing an equivalent inverted pendulum, the load sways slowly (characteristic unidirectional duration approximately 1 s) and the controller, calf muscles or hand, makes more frequent adjustments (characteristic unidirectional duration 400 ms). Here we test the hypothesis that these durations reflect load properties rather than some intrinsic property of the human neuromuscular system. Using a specialized set-up mechanically analogous to real standing, subjects manually balanced inverted pendulums with different moments of inertia through a compliant spring representing the Achilles tendon. The spring bias was controlled by a sensitive joystick via a servo motor and accurate visual feedback was provided on an oscilloscope. As moment of inertia decreased, inverted pendulum sway size increased and it became difficult to sustain successful balance. The mean duration of unidirectional balance adjustments did not change. Moreover, the mean duration of unidirectional inverted pendulum sway reduced only slightly, remaining around 1 s. The simplest explanation is that balance was maintained by a process of manual adjustments intrinsically limited to a mean frequency of two to three unidirectional adjustments per second corresponding to intermittent control observed in manual tracking experiments. Consequently the inverted pendulum sway duration, mechanically related to the bias duration, reflects an intrinsic constraint of the neuromuscular control system. Given the similar durations of sway and muscle adjustments observed in real standing, we postulate that the characteristic duration of unidirectional standing sway reflects intrinsic intermittent control rather than the inertial properties of the body. PMID:16973712

  1. The frequency of human, manual adjustments in balancing an inverted pendulum is constrained by intrinsic physiological factors

    PubMed Central

    Loram, Ian D; Gawthrop, Peter J; Lakie, Martin

    2006-01-01

    While standing naturally and when manually or pedally balancing an equivalent inverted pendulum, the load sways slowly (characteristic unidirectional duration ∼1 s) and the controller, calf muscles or hand, makes more frequent adjustments (characteristic unidirectional duration 400 ms). Here we test the hypothesis that these durations reflect load properties rather than some intrinsic property of the human neuromuscular system. Using a specialized set-up mechanically analogous to real standing, subjects manually balanced inverted pendulums with different moments of inertia through a compliant spring representing the Achilles tendon. The spring bias was controlled by a sensitive joystick via a servo motor and accurate visual feedback was provided on an oscilloscope. As moment of inertia decreased, inverted pendulum sway size increased and it became difficult to sustain successful balance. The mean duration of unidirectional balance adjustments did not change. Moreover, the mean duration of unidirectional inverted pendulum sway reduced only slightly, remaining around 1 s. The simplest explanation is that balance was maintained by a process of manual adjustments intrinsically limited to a mean frequency of two to three unidirectional adjustments per second corresponding to intermittent control observed in manual tracking experiments. Consequently the inverted pendulum sway duration, mechanically related to the bias duration, reflects an intrinsic constraint of the neuromuscular control system. Given the similar durations of sway and muscle adjustments observed in real standing, we postulate that the characteristic duration of unidirectional standing sway reflects intrinsic intermittent control rather than the inertial properties of the body. PMID:16973712

  2. A thermal manikin with human thermoregulatory control: Implementation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foda, Ehab; Sirén, Kai

    2012-09-01

    Tens of different sorts of thermal manikins are employed worldwide, mainly in the evaluation of clothing thermal insulation and thermal environments. They are regulated thermally using simplified control modes. This paper reports on the implementation and validation of a new thermoregulatory control mode for thermal manikins. The new control mode is based on a multi-segmental Pierce (MSP) model. In this study, the MSP control mode was implemented, using the LabVIEW platform, onto the control system of the thermal manikin `Therminator'. The MSP mode was then used to estimate the segmental equivalent temperature ( t eq) along with constant surface temperature (CST) mode under two asymmetric thermal conditions. Furthermore, subjective tests under the same two conditions were carried out using 17 human subjects. The estimated segmental t eq from the experiments with the two modes and from the subjective assessment were compared in order to validate the use of the MSP mode for the estimation of t eq. The results showed that the t eq values estimated by the MSP mode were closer to the subjective mean votes under the two test conditions for most body segments and compared favourably with values estimated by the CST mode.

  3. A thermal manikin with human thermoregulatory control: implementation and validation.

    PubMed

    Foda, Ehab; Sirén, Kai

    2012-09-01

    Tens of different sorts of thermal manikins are employed worldwide, mainly in the evaluation of clothing thermal insulation and thermal environments. They are regulated thermally using simplified control modes. This paper reports on the implementation and validation of a new thermoregulatory control mode for thermal manikins. The new control mode is based on a multi-segmental Pierce (MSP) model. In this study, the MSP control mode was implemented, using the LabVIEW platform, onto the control system of the thermal manikin 'Therminator'. The MSP mode was then used to estimate the segmental equivalent temperature (t(eq)) along with constant surface temperature (CST) mode under two asymmetric thermal conditions. Furthermore, subjective tests under the same two conditions were carried out using 17 human subjects. The estimated segmental t(eq) from the experiments with the two modes and from the subjective assessment were compared in order to validate the use of the MSP mode for the estimation of t(eq). The results showed that the t(eq) values estimated by the MSP mode were closer to the subjective mean votes under the two test conditions for most body segments and compared favourably with values estimated by the CST mode. PMID:22083406

  4. Evola: Ortholog database of all human genes in H-InvDB with manual curation of phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Matsuya, Akihiro; Sakate, Ryuichi; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Koyanagi, Kanako O; Sato, Yoshiharu; Fujii, Yasuyuki; Yamasaki, Chisato; Habara, Takuya; Nakaoka, Hajime; Todokoro, Fusano; Yamaguchi, Kaori; Endo, Toshinori; Oota, Satoshi; Makalowski, Wojciech; Ikeo, Kazuho; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Hanada, Kousuke; Hashimoto, Katsuyuki; Hirai, Momoki; Iwama, Hisakazu; Saitou, Naruya; Hiraki, Aiko T; Jin, Lihua; Kaneko, Yayoi; Kanno, Masako; Murakami, Katsuhiko; Noda, Akiko Ogura; Saichi, Naomi; Sanbonmatsu, Ryoko; Suzuki, Mami; Takeda, Jun-ichi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Gojobori, Takashi; Imanishi, Tadashi; Itoh, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    Orthologs are genes in different species that evolved from a common ancestral gene by speciation. Currently, with the rapid growth of transcriptome data of various species, more reliable orthology information is prerequisite for further studies. However, detection of orthologs could be erroneous if pairwise distance-based methods, such as reciprocal BLAST searches, are utilized. Thus, as a sub-database of H-InvDB, an integrated database of annotated human genes (http://h-invitational.jp/), we constructed a fully curated database of evolutionary features of human genes, called 'Evola'. In the process of the ortholog detection, computational analysis based on conserved genome synteny and transcript sequence similarity was followed by manual curation by researchers examining phylogenetic trees. In total, 18 968 human genes have orthologs among 11 vertebrates (chimpanzee, mouse, cow, chicken, zebrafish, etc.), either computationally detected or manually curated orthologs. Evola provides amino acid sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees of orthologs and homologs. In 'd(N)/d(S) view', natural selection on genes can be analyzed between human and other species. In 'Locus maps', all transcript variants and their exon/intron structures can be compared among orthologous gene loci. We expect the Evola to serve as a comprehensive and reliable database to be utilized in comparative analyses for obtaining new knowledge about human genes. Evola is available at http://www.h-invitational.jp/evola/. PMID:17982176

  5. Human Awareness Program: A Sex Manual for Use in Juvenile Court Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Barbara

    The booklet provides information and materials for setting up and implementing a 10-day sex education course for delinquent or sexually active adolescents. The course objectives are stated as imparting factual information in the areas of anatomy, venereal disease, birth control, and pregnancy. The manual provides information on staff…

  6. Multivariable manual control with simultaneous visual and auditory presentation of information. [for improved compensatory tracking performance of human operator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhlemann, H.; Geiser, G.

    1975-01-01

    Multivariable manual compensatory tracking experiments were carried out in order to determine typical strategies of the human operator and conditions for improvement of his performance if one of the visual displays of the tracking errors is supplemented by an auditory feedback. Because the tracking error of the system which is only visually displayed is found to decrease, but not in general that of the auditorally supported system, it was concluded that the auditory feedback unloads the visual system of the operator who can then concentrate on the remaining exclusively visual displays.

  7. ONRLDB—manually curated database of experimentally validated ligands for orphan nuclear receptors: insights into new drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Nanduri, Ravikanth; Bhutani, Isha; Somavarapu, Arun Kumar; Mahajan, Sahil; Parkesh, Raman; Gupta, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    Orphan nuclear receptors are potential therapeutic targets. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor Ligand Binding Database (ONRLDB) is an interactive, comprehensive and manually curated database of small molecule ligands targeting orphan nuclear receptors. Currently, ONRLDB consists of ∼11 000 ligands, of which ∼6500 are unique. All entries include information for the ligand, such as EC50 and IC50, number of aromatic rings and rotatable bonds, XlogP, hydrogen donor and acceptor count, molecular weight (MW) and structure. ONRLDB is a cross-platform database, where either the cognate small molecule modulators of a receptor or the cognate receptors to a ligand can be searched. The database can be searched using three methods: text search, advanced search or similarity search. Substructure search, cataloguing tools, and clustering tools can be used to perform advanced analysis of the ligand based on chemical similarity fingerprints, hierarchical clustering, binning partition and multidimensional scaling. These tools, together with the Tree function provided, deliver an interactive platform and a comprehensive resource for identification of common and unique scaffolds. As demonstrated, ONRLDB is designed to allow selection of ligands based on various properties and for designing novel ligands or to improve the existing ones. Database URL: http://www.onrldb.org/ PMID:26637529

  8. Intermittent appearances of saddle-type hyperbolic dynamics during human stick balancing on a manually controlled cart.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Ken; Nomura, Taishin

    2015-08-01

    Stabilization of an inverted pendulum on a manually controlled cart (cart-inverted pendulum; CIP), analogous to human fingertip stick balancing, is considered to get insights of how the human central nervous system stabilizes unstable dynamics. We explore a possibility that a type of intermittent control strategy proposed for human postural control might also be applicable to the CIP task, i.e., whether a transient contracting dynamics along a stable manifold of a saddle-type equilibrium of the non-controlled inverted pendulum is exploited intermittently. To this end, we measured task performances during CIP balancing from several experimental subjects. Intermittent appearances of hyperbolicity as typical characteristics reflecting the intermittent control strategy were examined in the recorded motion data using phase space analysis and wavelet analysis. We show that skilled subjects tend to exhibit those characteristics, suggesting that they stabilize upright posture of the stick by utilizing the intermittent control strategy. PMID:26737047

  9. Validation of Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Vinyl Acetate Against Human Nasal Dosimetry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hinderliter, Paul M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Corley, Rick A.; Bloemen, Louis J.; Bogdanffy, M S.

    2005-05-01

    Vinyl acetate has been shown to induce nasal lesions in rodents in inhalation bioassays. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for vinyl acetate has been used in human risk assessment, but previous in vivo validation was conducted only in rats. Controlled human exposures to vinyl acetate were conducted to provide validation data for the application of the model in humans. Five volunteers were exposed to 1, 5, and 10 ppm 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate via inhalation. A probe inserted into thenasopharyngeal region sampled both 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate and the major metabolite 13 C1 , 13 C2 acetaldehyde during rest and light exercise. Nasopharyngeal air concentrations were analyzed in real time by ion trap mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Experimental concentrations of both vinyl acetate and acetaldehyde were then compared to predicted concentrations calculated from the previously published human model. Model predictions of vinyl acetate nasal extraction compared favorably with measured values of vinyl acetate, as did predictions of nasopharyngeal acetaldehyde when compared to measured acetaldehyde. The results showed that the current PBPK model structure and parameterization are appropriate for vinyl acetate. These analyses were conducted from 1 to 10 ppm vinyl acetate, a range relevant to workplace exposure standards but which would not be expected to saturate vinyl acetate metabolism. Risk assessment based on this model further concluded that 24 h per day exposures up to 1 ppm do not present concern regarding cancer or non-cancer toxicity. Validation of the vinyl acetate human PBPK model provides support for these conclusions.

  10. Development and Initial Validation of an Instrument for Human Capital Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zula, Kenneth J.; Chermack, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on development and validation of an instrument for use in human capital approaches for organizational planning. The article describes use of a team of subject matter experts in developing a measure of human capital planning, and use of exploratory factor analysis techniques to validate the resulting instrument. These data were…

  11. Evaluating the iterative development of VR/AR human factors tools for manual work.

    PubMed

    Liston, Paul M; Kay, Alison; Cromie, Sam; Leva, Chiara; D'Cruz, Mirabelle; Patel, Harshada; Langley, Alyson; Sharples, Sarah; Aromaa, Susanna

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the approach taken to iteratively evaluate a set of VR/AR (virtual reality / augmented reality) applications for five different manual-work applications - terrestrial spacecraft assembly, assembly-line design, remote maintenance of trains, maintenance of nuclear reactors, and large-machine assembly process design - and examines the evaluation data for evidence of the effectiveness of the evaluation framework as well as the benefits to the development process of feedback from iterative evaluation. ManuVAR is an EU-funded research project that is working to develop an innovative technology platform and a framework to support high-value, high-knowledge manual work throughout the product lifecycle. The results of this study demonstrate the iterative improvements reached throughout the design cycles, observable through the trending of the quantitative results from three successive trials of the applications and the investigation of the qualitative interview findings. The paper discusses the limitations of evaluation in complex, multi-disciplinary development projects and finds evidence of the effectiveness of the use of the particular set of complementary evaluation methods incorporating a common inquiry structure used for the evaluation - particularly in facilitating triangulation of the data. PMID:22317043

  12. Cognitive Psychology: A Computer-Oriented Laboratory Manual. Student Manual and Instructor Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bewley, William L.

    The six experiments presented in these two manuals were designed for use in any introductory or advanced undergraduate psychology course either partially or totally concerned with human cognition. One manual serves as the teacher's accompaniment to the actual experiments detailed in the student's manual. A list of textbooks which might be…

  13. Visualization and Rule Validation in Human-Behavior Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moya, Lisa Jean; McKenzie, Frederic D.; Nguyen, Quynh-Anh H.

    2008-01-01

    Human behavior representation (HBR) models simulate human behaviors and responses. The Joint Crowd Federate [TM] cognitive model developed by the Virginia Modeling, Analysis, and Simulation Center (VMASC) and licensed by WernerAnderson, Inc., models the cognitive behavior of crowds to provide credible crowd behavior in support of military…

  14. The human touch: skin temperature during the rubber hand illusion in manual and automated stroking procedures.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Marieke; Wold, Andrew; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Ernst, Marc O

    2013-01-01

    A difference in skin temperature between the hands has been identified as a physiological correlate of the rubber hand illusion (RHI). The RHI is an illusion of body ownership, where participants perceive body ownership over a rubber hand if they see it being stroked in synchrony with their own occluded hand. The current study set out to replicate this result, i.e., psychologically induced cooling of the stimulated hand using an automated stroking paradigm, where stimulation was delivered by a robot arm (PHANToM(TM) force-feedback device). After we found no evidence for hand cooling in two experiments using this automated procedure, we reverted to a manual stroking paradigm, which is closer to the one employed in the study that first produced this effect. With this procedure, we observed a relative cooling of the stimulated hand in both the experimental and the control condition. The subjective experience of ownership, as rated by the participants, by contrast, was strictly linked to synchronous stroking in all three experiments. This implies that hand-cooling is not a strict correlate of the subjective feeling of hand ownership in the RHI. Factors associated with the differences between the two designs (differences in pressure of tactile stimulation, presence of another person) that were thus far considered irrelevant to the RHI appear to play a role in bringing about this temperature effect. PMID:24260454

  15. Human Events Reference for ATHEANA (HERA) Database Description and Preliminary User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Auflick, J.L.

    1999-08-12

    The Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA) is a newly developed human reliability analysis (HRA) methodology that aims to facilitate better representation and integration of human performance into probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) modeling and quantification by analyzing risk-significant operating experience in the context of existing behavioral science models. The fundamental premise of ATHEANA is that error forcing contexts (EFCs), which refer to combinations of equipment/material conditions and performance shaping factors (PSFs), set up or create the conditions under which unsafe actions (UAs) can occur. Because ATHEANA relies heavily on the analysis of operational events that have already occurred as a mechanism for generating creative thinking about possible EFCs, a database (db) of analytical operational events, called the Human Events Reference for ATHEANA (HERA), has been developed to support the methodology. This report documents the initial development efforts for HERA.

  16. Human events reference for ATHEANA (HERA) database description and preliminary user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Auflick, J.L.; Hahn, H.A.; Pond, D.J.

    1998-05-27

    The Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA) is a newly developed human reliability analysis (HRA) methodology that aims to facilitate better representation and integration of human performance into probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) modeling and quantification by analyzing risk-significant operating experience in the context of existing behavioral science models. The fundamental premise of ATHEANA is that error-forcing contexts (EFCs), which refer to combinations of equipment/material conditions and performance shaping factors (PSFs), set up or create the conditions under which unsafe actions (UAs) can occur. Because ATHEANA relies heavily on the analysis of operational events that have already occurred as a mechanism for generating creative thinking about possible EFCs, a database, called the Human Events Reference for ATHEANA (HERA), has been developed to support the methodology. This report documents the initial development efforts for HERA.

  17. Modeling of human operator dynamics in simple manual control utilizing time series analysis. [tracking (position)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, G. C.; Osafo-Charles, F.; Oneill, W. D.; Gottlieb, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    Time series analysis is applied to model human operator dynamics in pursuit and compensatory tracking modes. The normalized residual criterion is used as a one-step analytical tool to encompass the processes of identification, estimation, and diagnostic checking. A parameter constraining technique is introduced to develop more reliable models of human operator dynamics. The human operator is adequately modeled by a second order dynamic system both in pursuit and compensatory tracking modes. In comparing the data sampling rates, 100 msec between samples is adequate and is shown to provide better results than 200 msec sampling. The residual power spectrum and eigenvalue analysis show that the human operator is not a generator of periodic characteristics.

  18. Crazy like a fox. Validity and ethics of animal models of human psychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Rollin, Michael D H; Rollin, Bernard E

    2014-04-01

    Animal models of human disease play a central role in modern biomedical science. Developing animal models for human mental illness presents unique practical and philosophical challenges. In this article we argue that (1) existing animal models of psychiatric disease are not valid, (2) attempts to model syndromes are undermined by current nosology, (3) models of symptoms are rife with circular logic and anthropomorphism, (4) any model must make unjustified assumptions about subjective experience, and (5) any model deemed valid would be inherently unethical, for if an animal adequately models human subjective experience, then there is no morally relevant difference between that animal and a human. PMID:24534739

  19. Human Identification via Lateral Patella Radiographs: A Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Niespodziewanski, Emily; Stephan, Carl N; Guyomarc'h, Pierre; Fenton, Todd W

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the utility of patella outline shape for matching 3D scans of patellae to knee radiographs using elliptical Fourier analysis and subjective methods of human visual comparison of patellae across radiographs for identification purposes. Repeat radiographs were captured of cadaver's knees for visual comparison before patellae were extracted and skeletonized for quantitative comparisons. Quantitative methods provided significant narrowing down of the candidate pool to just a few potential matches (<5% of original sample), while the human analysts showed high capacity for correctly matching radiographs, irrespective of educational level (positive predictive value = 99.8%). The successful computerized matching based on a single quantified patella trait (outline shape) helps explain the potency achieved by subjective visual examination. This work adds to a growing body of studies demonstrating the value of single isolated infracranial bones for human identification via radiographic comparison. PMID:26234529

  20. 21 CFR 882.4840 - Manual rongeur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual rongeur. 882.4840 Section 882.4840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4840 Manual rongeur. (a) Identification. A manual rongeur is a manually...

  1. Intermittent Feedback-Control Strategy for Stabilizing Inverted Pendulum on Manually Controlled Cart as Analogy to Human Stick Balancing.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Ken; Nomura, Taishin

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of an inverted pendulum on a manually controlled cart (cart-inverted-pendulum; CIP) in an upright position, which is analogous to balancing a stick on a fingertip, is considered in order to investigate how the human central nervous system (CNS) stabilizes unstable dynamics due to mechanical instability and time delays in neural feedback control. We explore the possibility that a type of intermittent time-delayed feedback control, which has been proposed for human postural control during quiet standing, is also a promising strategy for the CIP task and stick balancing on a fingertip. Such a strategy hypothesizes that the CNS exploits transient contracting dynamics along a stable manifold of a saddle-type unstable upright equilibrium of the inverted pendulum in the absence of control by inactivating neural feedback control intermittently for compensating delay-induced instability. To this end, the motions of a CIP stabilized by human subjects were experimentally acquired, and computational models of the system were employed to characterize the experimental behaviors. We first confirmed fat-tailed non-Gaussian temporal fluctuation in the acceleration distribution of the pendulum, as well as the power-law distributions of corrective cart movements for skilled subjects, which was previously reported for stick balancing. We then showed that the experimental behaviors could be better described by the models with an intermittent delayed feedback controller than by those with the conventional continuous delayed feedback controller, suggesting that the human CNS stabilizes the upright posture of the pendulum by utilizing the intermittent delayed feedback-control strategy. PMID:27148031

  2. Intermittent Feedback-Control Strategy for Stabilizing Inverted Pendulum on Manually Controlled Cart as Analogy to Human Stick Balancing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Ken; Nomura, Taishin

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of an inverted pendulum on a manually controlled cart (cart-inverted-pendulum; CIP) in an upright position, which is analogous to balancing a stick on a fingertip, is considered in order to investigate how the human central nervous system (CNS) stabilizes unstable dynamics due to mechanical instability and time delays in neural feedback control. We explore the possibility that a type of intermittent time-delayed feedback control, which has been proposed for human postural control during quiet standing, is also a promising strategy for the CIP task and stick balancing on a fingertip. Such a strategy hypothesizes that the CNS exploits transient contracting dynamics along a stable manifold of a saddle-type unstable upright equilibrium of the inverted pendulum in the absence of control by inactivating neural feedback control intermittently for compensating delay-induced instability. To this end, the motions of a CIP stabilized by human subjects were experimentally acquired, and computational models of the system were employed to characterize the experimental behaviors. We first confirmed fat-tailed non-Gaussian temporal fluctuation in the acceleration distribution of the pendulum, as well as the power-law distributions of corrective cart movements for skilled subjects, which was previously reported for stick balancing. We then showed that the experimental behaviors could be better described by the models with an intermittent delayed feedback controller than by those with the conventional continuous delayed feedback controller, suggesting that the human CNS stabilizes the upright posture of the pendulum by utilizing the intermittent delayed feedback-control strategy. PMID:27148031

  3. Bigfoot Field Manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.; Burrows, S.; Gower, S. T.; Cohen, W. B.

    1999-09-01

    The BigFoot Project is funded by the Earth Science Enterprise to collect and organize data to be used in the EOS Validation Program. The data collected by the BigFoot Project are unique in being ground-based observations coincident with satellite overpasses. In addition to collecting data, the BigFoot project will develop and test new algorithms for scaling point measurements to the same spatial scales as the EOS satellite products. This BigFoot Field Manual Mill be used to achieve completeness and consistency of data collected at four initial BigFoot sites and at future sites that may collect similar validation data. Therefore, validation datasets submitted to the ORNL DAAC that have been compiled in a manner consistent with the field manual will be especially valuable in the validation program.

  4. Junior Science and Humanities Symposium, January 1994-July 1995. Pacific Region Program Operations Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This informational packet contains the materials necessary to administer the annual Department of Defense Dependent Schools Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (JSHS) at the high school and middle school levels. The symposium program is a calendar year research program which includes one week symposium of students (grade 8-12)…

  5. Class Manual for Information Resources in the Humanities (LIS 382L.2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene

    Basic course information and worksheets are presented in this textbook/workbook for "Information Resources in the Humanities," a course offered by the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Texas at Austin. The guide is divided into eight sections. The first presents the syllabus, lists assignments (e.g., online…

  6. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual. Part 2: Human error probability (HEP) data; Volume 5, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, W.J.; Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    This data manual contains a hard copy of the information in the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) Version 3.5 database, which is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUCLARR was designed as a tool for risk analysis. Many of the nuclear reactors in the US and several outside the US are represented in the NUCLARR database. NUCLARR includes both human error probability estimates for workers at the plants and hardware failure data for nuclear reactor equipment. Aggregations of these data yield valuable reliability estimates for probabilistic risk assessments and human reliability analyses. The data manual is organized to permit manual searches of the information if the computerized version is not available. Originally, the manual was published in three parts. In this revision the introductory material located in the original Part 1 has been incorporated into the text of Parts 2 and 3. The user can now find introductory material either in the original Part 1, or in Parts 2 and 3 as revised. Part 2 contains the human error probability data, and Part 3, the hardware component reliability data.

  7. Development and validation of human psoriatic skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Tjabringa, Geuranne; Bergers, Mieke; van Rens, Desiree; de Boer, Roelie; Lamme, Evert; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2008-09-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disease driven by aberrant interactions between the epithelium and the immune system. Anti-psoriatic drugs can therefore target either the keratinocytes or the immunocytes. Here we sought to develop an in vitro reconstructed skin model that would display the molecular characteristics of psoriatic epidermis in a controlled manner, allowing the screening of anti-psoriatic drugs and providing a model in which to study the biology of this disease. Human skin equivalents generated from normal human adult keratinocytes after air exposure and stimulation by keratinocyte growth factor and epidermal growth factor displayed the correct morphological and molecular characteristics of normal human epidermis whereas the psoriasis-associated proteins, hBD-2, SKALP/elafin, and CK16, were absent. Skin equivalents generated from foreskin keratinocytes were clearly abnormal both morphologically and with respect to gene expression. When normal skin equivalents derived from adult keratinocytes were stimulated with psoriasis-associated cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-6, and IL-22] or combinations thereof, strong expression of hBD-2, SKALP/elafin, CK16, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was induced as shown by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Retinoic acid but not cyclosporin A was found to inhibit cytokine-induced gene expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. These results illustrate the potential of this disease model to study the molecular pathology and pharmacological intervention in vitro. PMID:18669614

  8. International Validation of Two Human Recombinant Estrogen Receptor (ERa) Binding Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    An international validation study has been successfully completed for 2 competitive binding assays using human recombinant ERa. Assays evaluated included the Freyberger-Wilson (FW) assay using a full length human ER, and the Chemical Evaluation and Research Institute (CERI) assay...

  9. Validating an artificial intelligence human proximity operations system with test cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Justin; Straub, Jeremy

    2013-05-01

    An artificial intelligence-controlled robot (AICR) operating in close proximity to humans poses risk to these humans. Validating the performance of an AICR is an ill posed problem, due to the complexity introduced by the erratic (noncomputer) actors. In order to prove the AICR's usefulness, test cases must be generated to simulate the actions of these actors. This paper discusses AICR's performance validation in the context of a common human activity, moving through a crowded corridor, using test cases created by an AI use case producer. This test is a two-dimensional simplification relevant to autonomous UAV navigation in the national airspace.

  10. Detection algorithm for the validation of human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Eltonsy, Névine; Gabisi, Vivian; Li, Xuesong; Russe, K Blair; Mills, Gordon B; Stemke-Hale, Katherine

    2012-09-15

    Cell lines are an important tool in understanding all aspects of cancer growth, development, metastasis and tumor cell death. There has been a dramatic increase in the number of cell lines and diversity of the cancers they represent; however, misidentification and cross-contamination of cell lines can lead to erroneous conclusions. One method that has gained favor for authenticating cell lines is the use of short tandem repeats (STR) to generate a unique DNA profile. The challenge in validating cell lines is the requirement to compare the large number of existing STR profiles against cell lines of interest, particularly when considering that the profiles of many cell lines have drifted over time and original samples are not available. We report here methods that analyze the variations and the proportional changes extracted from tetra-nucleotide repeat regions in the STR analysis. This technique allows a paired match between a target cell line and a reference database of cell lines to find cell lines that match within a user designated percentage cut-off quality matrix. Our method accounts for DNA instability and can suggest whether the target cell lines are misidentified or unstable. PMID:22419365

  11. Validating and Verifying Biomathematical Models of Human Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Siera Brooke; Quintero, Luis Ortiz; Flynn-Evans, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Airline pilots experience acute and chronic sleep deprivation, sleep inertia, and circadian desynchrony due to the need to schedule flight operations around the clock. This sleep loss and circadian desynchrony gives rise to cognitive impairments, reduced vigilance and inconsistent performance. Several biomathematical models, based principally on patterns observed in circadian rhythms and homeostatic drive, have been developed to predict a pilots levels of fatigue or alertness. These models allow for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and commercial airlines to make decisions about pilot capabilities and flight schedules. Although these models have been validated in a laboratory setting, they have not been thoroughly tested in operational environments where uncontrolled factors, such as environmental sleep disrupters, caffeine use and napping, may impact actual pilot alertness and performance. We will compare the predictions of three prominent biomathematical fatigue models (McCauley Model, Harvard Model, and the privately-sold SAFTE-FAST Model) to actual measures of alertness and performance. We collected sleep logs, movement and light recordings, psychomotor vigilance task (PVT), and urinary melatonin (a marker of circadian phase) from 44 pilots in a short-haul commercial airline over one month. We will statistically compare with the model predictions to lapses on the PVT and circadian phase. We will calculate the sensitivity and specificity of each model prediction under different scheduling conditions. Our findings will aid operational decision-makers in determining the reliability of each model under real-world scheduling situations.

  12. Crosscultural Communication: The Hispanic Community of Connecticut. A Human Services Staff Development Training Manual. A TITLE XX Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klitz, Sally Innis

    This manual was designed for use by Title XX field training personnel involved in providing services for Puerto Ricans in Connecticut. The manual is intended to develop cross cultural awareness by introducing the reader to the cultural orientations, social systems, and values of Puerto Ricans and other Hispanics. Included are background…

  13. Management Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Joaquin Delta Community Coll. District, CA.

    This manual articulates the rights, responsibilities, entitlements, and conditions of employment of management personnel at San Joaquin Delta College (SJDC). The manual first presents SJDC's mission statement and then discusses the college's management goals and priorities. An examination of SJDC's administrative organization and a list of…

  14. Resource Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Development Institute, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This manual was designed primarily for use by individuals with developmental disabilities and related conditions. The main focus of this manual is to provide easy-to-read information concerning available resources, and to provide immediate contact information for the purpose of applying for resources and/or locating additional information. The…

  15. Terminology Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felber, Helmut

    A product of the International Information Center for Terminology (Infoterm), this manual is designed to serve as a reference tool for practitioners active in terminology work and documentation. The manual explores the basic ideas of the Vienna School of Terminology and explains developments in the area of applied computer aided terminography…

  16. The effects of acceleration stress on human workload and manual control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, R. T.; Albery, W. B.; Ward, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of +Gz stress on operator task performance and workload were assessed. Subjects were presented a two dimensional maze and were required to solve it as rapidly as possible (by moving a light dot through it via a trim switch on a control stick) while under G-stress at levels from +1 Gz to +6 Gz. The G-stress was provided by a human centrifuge. The effects of this stress were assessed by two techniques; (1) objective performance measures on the primary maze-solving task, and (2) subjective workload measures obtained using the subjective workload assessment technique (SWAT). It was found that while neither moderate (+3 Gz) nor high (+5 Gz and +6 Gz) levels of G-stress affected maze solving performance, the high G levels did increase significantly the subjective workload of the maze task.

  17. Technical Manual: 2002 Series GED Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezzelle, Carol; Setzer, J. Carl

    2009-01-01

    This manual was written to provide technical information regarding the 2002 Series GED (General Educational Development) Tests. Throughout this manual, documentation is provided regarding the development of the GED Tests, data collection activities, as well as reliability and validity evidence. The purpose of this manual is to provide evidence…

  18. Cloud cover retrieved from skyviewer: A validation with human observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bu-Yo; Jee, Joon-Bum; Zo, Il-Sung; Lee, Kyu-Tae

    2016-02-01

    Cloud cover information is used alongside weather forecasts in various fields of research; however, ground observation of cloud cover is conducted by human observers, a method that is subjective and has low temporal and spatial resolutions. To address these problems, we have developed an improved algorithm to calculate cloud cover using sky image data obtained with Skyviewer equipment. The algorithm uses a variable threshold for the Red Blue Ratio (RBR), determined from the frequency distribution of the Green Blue Ratio (GBR), to calculate cloud cover more accurately than existing algorithms. To verify the accuracy of the algorithm, we conducted daily, monthly, seasonal, and yearly statistical analyses of human observations of cloud cover, obtained every hour from 0800 to 1700 Local Standard Time (LST) for the entirety of 2012 at the Gangwon Regional Meteorological Administration (GRMA), Korea. A case study compared daily images taken at 1200 LST in each season with pixel images of cloud cover calculated by our improved algorithm. The selected cases yielded a high correlation coefficient of 0.93 with the GRMA data. A monthly case study showed low root mean square errors (RMSEs) and high correlation coefficients (Rs) for December (RMSE = 1.64 tenths and R = 0.92) and August (RMSE = 1.43 tenths and R = 0.91). In addition, seasonal cases yielded a high correlation of 0.9 and 87% consistency within ± 2 tenths for winter and a correlation of 0.83 and 82% consistency for summer, when cases of cloud-free or overcast conditions are frequent. Annual analyses showed that the bias of GRMA and Skyviewer cloud cover data for 2012 was -0.36 tenth, and the RMSE was 2.12 tenths, with the GRMA data showing more cloud cover. Considering that the GRMA and Skyviewer data were gathered at different spatial locations, GRMA and Skyviewer data were well correlated (R = 0.87) and showed a consistency of 80% in their cloud cover data (consistent within ± 2 tenths).

  19. Manual de Carpinteria (Carpentry Manual).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TomSing, Luisa B.

    This manual is part of a Mexican series of instructional materials designed for Spanish speaking adults who are in the process of becoming literate or have recently become literate in their native language. The manual describes a carpentry course that is structured to appeal to the student as a self-directing adult. The following units are…

  20. Salinas : theory manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy Francis; Reese, Garth M.; Bhardwaj, Manoj Kumar

    2011-11-01

    Salinas provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of structural systems. This manual describes the theory behind many of the constructs in Salinas. For a more detailed description of how to use Salinas, we refer the reader to Salinas, User's Notes. Many of the constructs in Salinas are pulled directly from published material. Where possible, these materials are referenced herein. However, certain functions in Salinas are specific to our implementation. We try to be far more complete in those areas. The theory manual was developed from several sources including general notes, a programmer notes manual, the user's notes and of course the material in the open literature.

  1. Human DNA quantification and sample quality assessment: Developmental validation of the PowerQuant(®) system.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Margaret M; Thompson, Jonelle M; McLaren, Robert S; Purpero, Vincent M; Thomas, Kelli J; Dobrowski, Patricia A; DeGroot, Gretchen A; Romsos, Erica L; Storts, Douglas R

    2016-07-01

    Quantification of the total amount of human DNA isolated from a forensic evidence item is crucial for DNA normalization prior to short tandem repeat (STR) DNA analysis and a federal quality assurance standard requirement. Previous commercial quantification methods determine the total human DNA and total human male DNA concentrations, but provide limited information about the condition of the DNA sample. The PowerQuant(®) System includes targets for quantification of total human and total human male DNA as well as targets for evaluating whether the human DNA is degraded and/or PCR inhibitors are present in the sample. A developmental validation of the PowerQuant(®) System was completed, following SWGDAM Validation Guidelines, to evaluate the assay's specificity, sensitivity, precision and accuracy, as well as the ability to detect degraded DNA or PCR inhibitors. In addition to the total human DNA and total human male DNA concentrations in a sample, data from the degradation target and internal PCR control (IPC) provide a forensic DNA analyst meaningful information about the quality of the isolated human DNA and the presence of PCR inhibitors in the sample that can be used to determine the most effective workflow and assist downstream interpretation. PMID:27206225

  2. Ciencias 2. Manual do Professor (Science Teacher's Manual).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raposo, Lucilia

    This is the teacher's manual for Ciencias 2, the second in a series of elementary science textbooks for Portuguese-speaking students. The student textbook contains 10 chapters and 57 activities. The teacher's manual presents an explanation of the educational goals and the organization of the content, Topics included are environment, the human,…

  3. Influence of Bristle Stiffness of Manual Toothbrushes on Eroded and Sound Human Dentin – An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Wolfgang H.; Domin, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to determine the influence of manual toothbrushes with different bristle stiffness on the abrasivity on eroded and sound human dentin. Materials and Methods Dentin specimens were made from impacted third molars and attributed to three groups: erosion-abrasion (EA), abrasion (A) and erosion (E). The specimens from EA and E were treated with 1% citric acid (pH 2.3) for 1 min rinsed, and neutralized with artificial saliva for 15 min. This cycle was repeated five times. Thereafter, specimens from EA and A were treated with three toothbrushes types with different bristle stiffness (soft, medium, and hard) in a custom-made toothbrushing machine. The brushing was performed at a load of 3 N with a toothpaste slurry for 630 s. This procedure was repeated five times, in group EA after each erosion cycle. EA and A groups passed through five cycles with a total of 6300 strokes. The abrasivity was analyzed by contact-free profilometry. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were performed for statistical analysis. Results With respect to bristle stiffness there was no statistically significant difference in dentin loss within the EA group. In group A, a statistically significantly higher dentin loss was found for the soft in comparison to the hard bristles. No statistically significant differences were measured between soft/medium and medium/hard toothbrushes. The amount of dentin loss from specimens in the EA group was significantly higher than in the A group. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, the dentin loss in the Abrasion group was higher with soft bristles than with hard ones. This result might have an influence on the toothbrush recommendations for patients with non-carious cervical lesions. PMID:27070901

  4. Validation of Human Body Model VIRTHUMAN and its Implementation in Crash Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroslav Maňas, Ing.; Luděk Kovář, Ing.; Jan Petřík, Ing.; Hana Čechová, Ing.; Stanislav Špirk, Ing.

    Standard virtual prototyping approach of passive safety field is based on virtual models of dummies, but human body models become to be more and more important for specific crash scenarios. VIRTHUMAN is human body model based on MBS (Multi-Body Structure) approach. The model consists of movable rigid segments, which represent proper mass of each human part and enables to evaluate injury criteria describing safety risks during crash scenarios. There is evident advantage of the MBS approach in simple preparation of crash configuration—human body positioning, reasonable calculation times and mainly its applicability for robust designs development respecting variety of human population. The project VIRTHUMAN is directed on development of scaling technique enabling to generate human model based on the standard anthropometric inputs. The contribution describes status of the VIRTHUMAN model, procedures of its validation and results in standard crash scenarios.

  5. Discretionary Grants Administration Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Human Development Services (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This manual sets forth applicable administrative policies and procedures to recipients of discretionary project grants or cooperative agreements awarded by program offices in the Office of Human Development Services (HDS). It is intended to serve as a basic reference for project directors and business officers of recipient organizations who are…

  6. Human error model adaptation and validation for Savannah River Site nonreactor facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Eide, S.A.; Benhardt, H.C.; Held, J.E.; Olsen, L.M.; Vail, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    As part of an overall effort to improve safety analysis methods for the Savannah River Site (SRS) nonreactor nuclear facilities, a comprehensive human reliability analysis (HRA) methodology has been developed and selectively validated. The HRA methodology covers a wide variety of human errors that may exist in risk analyses of the nonreactor nuclear facilities. Such risk analyses are an integral part of safety analysis reports (SARS) at the SRS, forming the basis for severe accident analysis and assisting in the identification of safety classes for equipment. Nonreactor nuclear facilities at the SRS include nuclear fuel fabrication and reprocessing, nuclear waste processing, and nuclear waste storage and disposal. The SRS HRA methodology improvement included both adaptation of existing human error models and validation of selected model results with SRS-specific data on actual human errors. The data were obtained from three existing SRS data bases: (1) Fuel Processing, (2) Fuel Fabrication, and (3) Waste Management. These three are part of the Risk Analysis Methodology (RAM) Fault Tree data banks. Events in these data banks are obtained from a wide variety of sources, including operator log books, occurrence reports, safety newsletters, and others. Validation of the human error models involved comparison with SRS-specific data and calibration of model results where appropriate.

  7. Human performance measurement: Validation procedures applicable to advanced manned telescience systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    As telescience systems become more and more complex, autonomous, and opaque to their operators it becomes increasingly difficult to determine whether the total system is performing as it should. Some of the complex and interrelated human performance measurement issues are addressed as they relate to total system validation. The assumption is made that human interaction with the automated system will be required well into the Space Station Freedom era. Candidate human performance measurement-validation techniques are discussed for selected ground-to-space-to-ground and space-to-space situations. Most of these measures may be used in conjunction with an information throughput model presented elsewhere (Haines, 1990). Teleoperations, teleanalysis, teleplanning, teledesign, and teledocumentation are considered, as are selected illustrative examples of space related telescience activities.

  8. Methodological issues in the validation of complex human-machine systems

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.; Stubler, W.; Wachtel, J.

    1995-05-01

    Integrated system validation is one aspect of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s design review process for human-system interfaces. This paper will consider three methodological issues that must be addressed in validation and their implications for drawing conclusions about the acceptability of the integrated system. They are: representing the integrated system, representing the operational events it must handle, and representing system performance. A logical basis for generalizability from validation tests to predicted performance of the integrated system emerges from the comparability of the psychological and physical processes of the test and actual situations. Generalizability of results is supported when the integrated system, operating conditions and performance are representative of their real-world counterparts. The methodological considerations for establishing representativeness are discussed.

  9. Coaches' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Secondary School Athletic Directors, Washington, DC.

    This manual focuses on the coach's relationships and interactions with students, school personnel, civic groups, and community agencies. The first chapter examines how athletics, as an integral part of education, can make a significant contribution (a) to the development of the individual, (b) in meeting society's needs, and (c) in transmitting…

  10. Computer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    This manual designed to provide the teacher with methods of understanding the computer and its potential in the classroom includes four units with exercises and an answer sheet. Unit 1 covers computer fundamentals, the mini computer, programming languages, an introduction to BASIC, and control instructions. Variable names and constants described…

  11. Boilermaking Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    This manual is intended (1) to provide an information resource to supplement the formal training program for boilermaker apprentices; (2) to assist the journeyworker to build on present knowledge to increase expertise and qualify for formal accreditation in the boilermaking trade; and (3) to serve as an on-the-job reference with sound, up-to-date…

  12. Student Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapleton, Diana L., Comp.

    This manual for student assistants employed in the government document section of the Eastern Kentucky University Library covers policy and procedures and use of the major reference tools in this area. General policies and procedures relating to working hours and conditions, and general responsibilities are discussed, as well as shelving rules and…

  13. Using the mouse to model human disease: increasing validity and reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Justice, Monica J.; Dhillon, Paraminder

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Experiments that use the mouse as a model for disease have recently come under scrutiny because of the repeated failure of data, particularly derived from preclinical studies, to be replicated or translated to humans. The usefulness of mouse models has been questioned because of irreproducibility and poor recapitulation of human conditions. Newer studies, however, point to bias in reporting results and improper data analysis as key factors that limit reproducibility and validity of preclinical mouse research. Inaccurate and incomplete descriptions of experimental conditions also contribute. Here, we provide guidance on best practice in mouse experimentation, focusing on appropriate selection and validation of the model, sources of variation and their influence on phenotypic outcomes, minimum requirements for control sets, and the importance of rigorous statistics. Our goal is to raise the standards in mouse disease modeling to enhance reproducibility, reliability and clinical translation of findings. PMID:26839397

  14. Information flow between interacting human brains: Identification, validation, and relationship to social expertise.

    PubMed

    Bilek, Edda; Ruf, Matthias; Schäfer, Axel; Akdeniz, Ceren; Calhoun, Vince D; Schmahl, Christian; Demanuele, Charmaine; Tost, Heike; Kirsch, Peter; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2015-04-21

    Social interactions are fundamental for human behavior, but the quantification of their neural underpinnings remains challenging. Here, we used hyperscanning functional MRI (fMRI) to study information flow between brains of human dyads during real-time social interaction in a joint attention paradigm. In a hardware setup enabling immersive audiovisual interaction of subjects in linked fMRI scanners, we characterize cross-brain connectivity components that are unique to interacting individuals, identifying information flow between the sender's and receiver's temporoparietal junction. We replicate these findings in an independent sample and validate our methods by demonstrating that cross-brain connectivity relates to a key real-world measure of social behavior. Together, our findings support a central role of human-specific cortical areas in the brain dynamics of dyadic interactions and provide an approach for the noninvasive examination of the neural basis of healthy and disturbed human social behavior with minimal a priori assumptions. PMID:25848050

  15. Real time contact-free and non-invasive tracking of the human skull: first light and initial validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Floris; Bruder, Ralf; Wissel, Tobias; Stüber, Patrick; Wagner, Benjamin; Schweikard, Achim

    2013-09-01

    In an increasing number of fields in medicine, precise and fast localisation of bony targets inside the body is essential. Up to now, exact localisation in the operation room can either be done with invasive methods like X-ray imaging and electromagnetic tracking systems, with volumetric ultrasound or by fixing the target in place. In this work, we present a new technology to directly track the position of the human skull through tissue in real time using infrared lasers. To achieve this, an experimental setup has been developed to precisely target a position on a subject's skin with an 850nm laser. The primary reflection on the skin is triangulated using a high-speed camera. Additionally, the reflections as well as in-tissue scattering are recorded with an in-beam setup of a NIR sensitive high-speed and high-resolution camera. Consequently, it is possible to record the scattering patterns specific to the composition of the tissue at the target. We have recorded MRI data of two test subjects (voxel size 0.15 x 0.15 x 1mm3) and extracted the soft tissue thickness with a semi-automatic segmentation approach. The MRI data was validated using force-controlled 2D ultrasound (tracked by an optical tracking system), from which soft tissue thickness was segmented manually. Optical measurements and MRI data were registered to determine soft tissue thickness for each measured laser target and finally used to train a support vector regression machine. Using the optical setup, we succeeded in computing the soft tissue thickness on the subjects' foreheads with sub-millimetre accuracy.

  16. Competing endogenous RNA networks in human cancer: hypothesis, validation, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yinji; Wang, Dong; Wang, Tianzhen; Li, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs represent a majority of the human transcriptome. However, less is known about the functions and regulatory mechanisms of most non-coding species. Moreover, little is known about the potential non-coding functions of coding RNAs. The competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) hypothesis is proposed recently. This hypothesis describes potential communication networks among all transcript RNA species mediated by miRNAs and miRNA-recognizing elements (MREs) within RNA transcripts. Here we review the evolution of the ceRNA hypothesis, summarize the validation experiments and discusses the significance and perspectives of this hypothesis in human cancer. PMID:26872371

  17. Obtaining Human Ischemic Stroke Gene Expression Biomarkers from Animal Models: A Cross-species Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Cai, Yunpeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the systematic altering of gene expression in human peripheral blood during the early stages of ischemic stroke, which suggests a new potential approach for the rapid diagnosis or prediction of stroke onset. Nevertheless, due to the difficulties of collecting human samples during proper disease stages, related studies are rather restricted. Many studies have instead been performed on manipulated animal models for investigating the regulation patterns of biomarkers during different stroke stages. An important inquiry is how well the findings of animal models can be replicated in human cases. Here, a method is proposed based on PageRank scores of miRNA-mRNA interaction network to select ischemic stroke biomarkers derived from rat brain samples, and biomarkers are validated with two human peripheral blood gene expression datasets. Hierarchical clustering results revealed that the achieved biomarkers clearly separate the blood gene expression of stroke patients and healthy people. Literature searches and functional analyses further validated the biological significance of these biomarkers. Compared to the traditional methods, such as differential expression, the proposed approach is more stable and accurate in detecting cross-species biomarkers with biological relevance, thereby suggesting an efficient approach of re-using gene biomarkers obtained from animal-model studies for human diseases. PMID:27407070

  18. Obtaining Human Ischemic Stroke Gene Expression Biomarkers from Animal Models: A Cross-species Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingying; Cai, Yunpeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the systematic altering of gene expression in human peripheral blood during the early stages of ischemic stroke, which suggests a new potential approach for the rapid diagnosis or prediction of stroke onset. Nevertheless, due to the difficulties of collecting human samples during proper disease stages, related studies are rather restricted. Many studies have instead been performed on manipulated animal models for investigating the regulation patterns of biomarkers during different stroke stages. An important inquiry is how well the findings of animal models can be replicated in human cases. Here, a method is proposed based on PageRank scores of miRNA-mRNA interaction network to select ischemic stroke biomarkers derived from rat brain samples, and biomarkers are validated with two human peripheral blood gene expression datasets. Hierarchical clustering results revealed that the achieved biomarkers clearly separate the blood gene expression of stroke patients and healthy people. Literature searches and functional analyses further validated the biological significance of these biomarkers. Compared to the traditional methods, such as differential expression, the proposed approach is more stable and accurate in detecting cross-species biomarkers with biological relevance, thereby suggesting an efficient approach of re-using gene biomarkers obtained from animal-model studies for human diseases. PMID:27407070

  19. Face, content, and construct validity of human placenta as a haptic training tool in neurointerventional surgery.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro de Oliveira, Marcelo Magaldi; Nicolato, Arthur; Santos, Marcilea; Godinho, Joao Victor; Brito, Rafael; Alvarenga, Alexandre; Martins, Ana Luiza Valle; Prosdocimi, André; Trivelato, Felipe Padovani; Sabbagh, Abdulrahman J; Reis, Augusto Barbosa; Maestro, Rolando Del

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The development of neurointerventional treatments of central nervous system disorders has resulted in the need for adequate training environments for novice interventionalists. Virtual simulators offer anatomical definition but lack adequate tactile feedback. Animal models, which provide more lifelike training, require an appropriate infrastructure base. The authors describe a training model for neurointerventional procedures using the human placenta (HP), which affords haptic training with significantly fewer resource requirements, and discuss its validation. METHODS Twelve HPs were prepared for simulated endovascular procedures. Training exercises performed by interventional neuroradiologists and novice fellows were placental angiography, stent placement, aneurysm coiling, and intravascular liquid embolic agent injection. RESULTS The endovascular training exercises proposed can be easily reproduced in the HP. Face, content, and construct validity were assessed by 6 neurointerventional radiologists and 6 novice fellows in interventional radiology. CONCLUSIONS The use of HP provides an inexpensive training model for the training of neurointerventionalists. Preliminary validation results show that this simulation model has face and content validity and has demonstrated construct validity for the interventions assessed in this study. PMID:26452122

  20. Independent Verification and Validation of Complex User Interfaces: A Human Factors Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Berman, Andrea; Chmielewski, Cynthia

    1996-01-01

    The Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF) at the NASA Johnson Space Center has identified and evaluated a potential automated software interface inspection tool capable of assessing the degree to which space-related critical and high-risk software system user interfaces meet objective human factors standards across each NASA program and project. Testing consisted of two distinct phases. Phase 1 compared analysis times and similarity of results for the automated tool and for human-computer interface (HCI) experts. In Phase 2, HCI experts critiqued the prototype tool's user interface. Based on this evaluation, it appears that a more fully developed version of the tool will be a promising complement to a human factors-oriented independent verification and validation (IV&V) process.

  1. Human factors engineering and design validation for the redesigned follitropin alfa pen injection device

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Mary C; Patterson, Patricia; Hayward, Brooke; North, Robert; Green, Dawne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To demonstrate, using human factors engineering (HFE), that a redesigned, pre-filled, ready-to-use, pre-asembled follitropin alfa pen can be used to administer prescribed follitropin alfa doses safely and accurately. Methods: A failure modes and effects analysis identified hazards and harms potentially caused by use errors; risk-control measures were implemented to ensure acceptable device use risk management. Participants were women with infertility, their significant others, and fertility nurse (FN) professionals. Preliminary testing included ‘Instructions for Use’ (IFU) and pre-validation studies. Validation studies used simulated injections in a representative use environment; participants received prior training on pen use. Results: User performance in preliminary testing led to IFU revisions and a change to outer needle cap design to mitigate needle stick potential. In the first validation study (49 users, 343 simulated injections), in the FN group, one observed critical use error resulted in a device design modification and another in an IFU change. A second validation study tested the mitigation strategies; previously reported use errors were not repeated. Conclusions: Through an iterative process involving a series of studies, modifications were made to the pen design and IFU. Simulated-use testing demonstrated that the redesigned pen can be used to administer follitropin alfa effectively and safely. PMID:25895897

  2. Challenges in validating the sterilisation dose for processed human amniotic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Norimah; Hassan, Asnah; Firdaus Abd Rahman, M. N.; Hamid, Suzina A.

    2007-11-01

    Most of the tissue banks in the Asia Pacific region have been using ionising radiation at 25 kGy to sterilise human tissues for save clinical usage. Under tissue banking quality system, any dose employed for sterilisation has to be validated and the validation exercise has to be a part of quality document. Tissue grafts, unlike medical items, are not produced in large number per each processing batch and tissues relatively have a different microbial population. A Code of Practice established by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 2004 offers several validation methods using smaller number of samples compared to ISO 11137 (1995), which is meant for medical products. The methods emphasise on bioburden determination, followed by sterility test on samples after they were exposed to verification dose for attaining of sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -1. This paper describes our experience in using the IAEA Code of Practice in conducting the validation exercise for substantiating 25 kGy as sterilisation dose for both air-dried amnion and those preserved in 99% glycerol.

  3. Inference of human affective states from psychophysiological measurements extracted under ecologically valid conditions

    PubMed Central

    Betella, Alberto; Zucca, Riccardo; Cetnarski, Ryszard; Greco, Alberto; Lanatà, Antonio; Mazzei, Daniele; Tognetti, Alessandro; Arsiwalla, Xerxes D.; Omedas, Pedro; De Rossi, Danilo; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to standard laboratory protocols, the measurement of psychophysiological signals in real world experiments poses technical and methodological challenges due to external factors that cannot be directly controlled. To address this problem, we propose a hybrid approach based on an immersive and human accessible space called the eXperience Induction Machine (XIM), that incorporates the advantages of a laboratory within a life-like setting. The XIM integrates unobtrusive wearable sensors for the acquisition of psychophysiological signals suitable for ambulatory emotion research. In this paper, we present results from two different studies conducted to validate the XIM as a general-purpose sensing infrastructure for the study of human affective states under ecologically valid conditions. In the first investigation, we recorded and classified signals from subjects exposed to pictorial stimuli corresponding to a range of arousal levels, while they were free to walk and gesticulate. In the second study, we designed an experiment that follows the classical conditioning paradigm, a well-known procedure in the behavioral sciences, with the additional feature that participants were free to move in the physical space, as opposed to similar studies measuring physiological signals in constrained laboratory settings. Our results indicate that, by using our sensing infrastructure, it is indeed possible to infer human event-elicited affective states through measurements of psychophysiological signals under ecological conditions. PMID:25309310

  4. Evaluating Nextgen Closely Spaced Parallel Operations Concepts with Validated Human Performance Models: Flight Deck Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooey, Becky Lee; Gore, Brian Francis; Mahlstedt, Eric; Foyle, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the current research were to develop valid human performance models (HPMs) of approach and land operations; use these models to evaluate the impact of NextGen Closely Spaced Parallel Operations (CSPO) on pilot performance; and draw conclusions regarding flight deck display design and pilot-ATC roles and responsibilities for NextGen CSPO concepts. This document presents guidelines and implications for flight deck display designs and candidate roles and responsibilities. A companion document (Gore, Hooey, Mahlstedt, & Foyle, 2013) provides complete scenario descriptions and results including predictions of pilot workload, visual attention and time to detect off-nominal events.

  5. Astronaut training manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, E. A.

    1980-01-01

    Scientific information from previous space flights, space medicine, exercise physiology, and sports medicine was used to prepare a physical fitness manual suitable for use by members of the NASA astronaut population. A variety of scientifically valid exercise programs and activities suitable for the development of physical fitness are provided. Programs, activities, and supportive scientific data are presented in a concise, easy to read format so as to permit the user to select his or her mode of training with confidence and devote time previously spent experimenting with training routines to preparation for space flight. The programs and activities included were tested and shown to be effective and enjoyable.

  6. Carcinogen biomonitoring in human exposures and laboratory research: validation and application to human occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Talaska, Glenn; Maier, Andrew; Henn, Scott; Booth-Jones, Angela; Tsuneoka, Yutaka; Vermeulen, Roel; Schumann, Brenda L

    2002-08-01

    A multiple biomarker approach is required to integrate for metabolism, temporal response and exposure-response kinetics, biological relevance, and positive predictive value. Carcinogen DNA adduct analysis can be used in animal and in vitro studies to detect absorption permutations caused by mixture interactions, and to control metabolic variation when specific CYP450 genes (1A1 or 1A2) are knocked out. These enzymes are not critical to the metabolic activation of model Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (PAC) and aromatic amines, respectively, as suggested by in vitro analysis. Several human studies have been carried out where multiple biomarkers have been measured. In a study of benzidine workers, the similarities in elimination kinetics between urinary metabolites and mutagenicity is likely responsible for a better correlation between these markers than to BZ-DNA adducts in exfoliated cells. In a study of rubber workers, the relationship between specific departments, urinary 1 HP and DNA adducts in exfoliated cells coincided with the historical urinary bladder cancer risk in these departments; the same relationship did not hold for urinary mutagenicity. In a study of automotive mechanics, biomarkers were used to monitor the effectiveness of exposure interventions. These data reinforce the notion that carcinogen biomarkers are useful to monitor exposure, but that a complementary approaches involving effect and perhaps susceptibility biomarkers is necessary to obtain the necessary information. PMID:12191859

  7. Enhanced Oceanic Operations Human-In-The-Loop In-Trail Procedure Validation Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Bussink, Frank J. L.; Chamberlain, James P.; Chartrand, Ryan C.; Palmer, Michael T.; Palmer, Susan O.

    2008-01-01

    The Enhanced Oceanic Operations Human-In-The-Loop In-Trail Procedure (ITP) Validation Simulation Study investigated the viability of an ITP designed to enable oceanic flight level changes that would not otherwise be possible. Twelve commercial airline pilots with current oceanic experience flew a series of simulated scenarios involving either standard or ITP flight level change maneuvers and provided subjective workload ratings, assessments of ITP validity and acceptability, and objective performance measures associated with the appropriate selection, request, and execution of ITP flight level change maneuvers. In the majority of scenarios, subject pilots correctly assessed the traffic situation, selected an appropriate response (i.e., either a standard flight level change request, an ITP request, or no request), and executed their selected flight level change procedure, if any, without error. Workload ratings for ITP maneuvers were acceptable and not substantially higher than for standard flight level change maneuvers, and, for the majority of scenarios and subject pilots, subjective acceptability ratings and comments for ITP were generally high and positive. Qualitatively, the ITP was found to be valid and acceptable. However, the error rates for ITP maneuvers were higher than for standard flight level changes, and these errors may have design implications for both the ITP and the study's prototype traffic display. These errors and their implications are discussed.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of a validated subject-specific finite element model of the human craniofacial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Szwedowski, T D; Fialkov, J; Whyne, C M

    2011-01-01

    Developing a more complete understanding of the mechanical response of the craniofacial skeleton (CFS) to physiological loads is fundamental to improving treatment for traumatic injuries, reconstruction due to neoplasia, and deformities. Characterization of the biomechanics of the CFS is challenging due to its highly complex structure and heterogeneity, motivating the utilization of experimentally validated computational models. As such, the objective of this study was to develop, experimentally validate, and parametrically analyse a patient-specific finite element (FE) model of the CFS to elucidate a better understanding of the factors that are of intrinsic importance to the skeletal structural behaviour of the human CFS. An FE model of a cadaveric craniofacial skeleton was created from subject-specific computed tomography data. The model was validated based on bone strain measurements taken under simulated physiological-like loading through the masseter and temporalis muscles (which are responsible for the majority of craniofacial physiologic loading due to mastication). The baseline subject-specific model using locally defined cortical bone thicknesses produced the strongest correlation to the experimental data (r2 = 0.73). Large effects on strain patterns arising from small parametric changes in cortical thickness suggest that the very thin bony structures present in the CFS are crucial to characterizing the local load distribution in the CFS accurately. PMID:21381488

  9. Quantitative Validation of a Human Body Finite Element Model Using Rigid Body Impacts.

    PubMed

    Vavalle, Nicholas A; Davis, Matthew L; Stitzel, Joel D; Gayzik, F Scott

    2015-09-01

    Validation is a critical step in finite element model (FEM) development. This study focuses on the validation of the Global Human Body Models Consortium full body average male occupant FEM in five localized loading regimes-a chest impact, a shoulder impact, a thoracoabdominal impact, an abdominal impact, and a pelvic impact. Force and deflection outputs from the model were compared to experimental traces and corridors scaled to the 50th percentile male. Predicted fractures and injury severity measures were compared to evaluate the model's injury prediction capabilities. The methods of ISO/TS 18571 were used to quantitatively assess the fit of model outputs to experimental force and deflection traces. The model produced peak chest, shoulder, thoracoabdominal, abdominal, and pelvis forces of 4.8, 3.3, 4.5, 5.1, and 13.0 kN compared to 4.3, 3.2, 4.0, 4.0, and 10.3 kN in the experiments, respectively. The model predicted rib and pelvic fractures related to Abbreviated Injury Scale scores within the ranges found experimentally all cases except the abdominal impact. ISO/TS 18571 scores for the impacts studied had a mean score of 0.73 with a range of 0.57-0.83. Well-validated FEMs are important tools used by engineers in advancing occupant safety. PMID:25739950

  10. Validating Human Performance Models of the Future Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Douglas T.; Walters, Brett; Fairey, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) will provide transportation for crew and cargo to and from destinations in support of the Constellation Architecture Design Reference Missions. Discrete Event Simulation (DES) is one of the design methods NASA employs for crew performance of the CEV. During the early development of the CEV, NASA and its prime Orion contractor Lockheed Martin (LM) strived to seek an effective low-cost method for developing and validating human performance DES models. This paper focuses on the method developed while creating a DES model for the CEV Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, and Docking (RPOD) task to the International Space Station. Our approach to validation was to attack the problem from several fronts. First, we began the development of the model early in the CEV design stage. Second, we adhered strictly to M&S development standards. Third, we involved the stakeholders, NASA astronauts, subject matter experts, and NASA's modeling and simulation development community throughout. Fourth, we applied standard and easy-to-conduct methods to ensure the model's accuracy. Lastly, we reviewed the data from an earlier human-in-the-loop RPOD simulation that had different objectives, which provided us an additional means to estimate the model's confidence level. The results revealed that a majority of the DES model was a reasonable representation of the current CEV design.

  11. Validation study of human figure drawing test in a Colombian school children population.

    PubMed

    Vélez van Meerbeke, Alberto; Sandoval-Garcia, Carolina; Ibáñez, Milciades; Talero-Gutiérrez, Claudia; Fiallo, Dolly; Halliday, Karen

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this article was to assess the validity of the emotional and developmental components of the Koppitz human figure drawing test. 2420 children's drawings available in a database resulting from a previous cross sectional study designed to determine the prevalence of neurological diseases in children between 0 and 12 years old in Bogota schools were evaluated. They were scored using the criteria proposed by Koppitz, and classified into 16 groups according to age, gender, and presence/absence of learning or attention problems. The overall results were then compared with the normative study to assess whether descriptive parameters of the two populations were significantly different. There were no significant differences associated with presence/absence of learning and attention disorders or school attended within the overall sample. An Interrater reliability test has been made to assure the homogeneity of scoring by the evaluator team. There were significant differences between this population and that of the original study. New scoring tables contextualized for our population based on the frequency of appearance in this sample are presented. We can conclude that various ethnic, social, and cultural factors can influence the way children draw the human figure. It is thus important to establish local reference values to adequately distinguish between normality and abnormality. The new scoring tables proposed here should be followed up with a clinical study to corroborate their validity. PMID:21568202

  12. Method Development and Validation for UHPLC-MS-MS Determination of Hop Prenylflavonoids in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yang; Qiu, Xi; Nikolic, Dejan; Dahl, Jeffrey H.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are used in the brewing of beer, and hop extracts containing prenylated compounds such as xanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin are under investigation as dietary supplements for cancer chemoprevention and for the management of hot flashes in menopausal women. To facilitate clinical studies of hop safety and efficacy, a selective, sensitive, and fast ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS-MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of the hop prenylflavonoids xanthohumol, isoxanthohumol, 6-prenylnaringenin, and 8-prenylnaringenin in human serum. The analytical method requires 300 μL of human serum which is processed using liquid-liquid extraction. UHPLC separation was carried out in 2.5 min with gradient elution using a reversed phase column containing 1.6 μm packing material. Prenylflavonoids were measured using negative ion electrospray mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation and selected reaction monitoring. The method was validated and showed good accuracy and precision with a lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) of 0.50 ng/mL for XN (1.4 nM) and 1.0 ng/mL for 6-PN (2.8 nM), XN and IX (2.9 nM) in serum for each analyte. PMID:23451393

  13. Uptake of dietary milk miRNAs by adult humans: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Amanda; Vyas, Gopi; Li, Anne; Halushka, Marc; Witwer, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Breast milk is replete with nutritional content as well as nucleic acids including microRNAs (miRNAs). In a recent report, adult humans who drank bovine milk appeared to have increased circulating levels of miRNAs miR-29b-3p and miR-200c-3p. Since these miRNAs are homologous between human and cow, these results could be explained by xeno-miRNA influx, endogenous miRNA regulation, or both. More data were needed to validate the results and explore for additional milk-related alterations in circulating miRNAs. Samples from the published study were obtained, and 223 small RNA features were profiled with a custom OpenArray, followed by individual quantitative PCR assays for selected miRNAs. Additionally, small RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data obtained from plasma samples of the same project were analyzed to find human and uniquely bovine miRNAs. OpenArray revealed no significantly altered miRNA signals after milk ingestion, and this was confirmed by qPCR. Plasma sequencing data contained no miR-29b or miR-200c reads and no intake-consistent mapping of uniquely bovine miRNAs. In conclusion, the results do not support transfer of dietary xenomiRs into the circulation of adult humans. PMID:27158459

  14. Information flow between interacting human brains: Identification, validation, and relationship to social expertise

    PubMed Central

    Bilek, Edda; Ruf, Matthias; Schäfer, Axel; Akdeniz, Ceren; Calhoun, Vince D.; Schmahl, Christian; Demanuele, Charmaine; Tost, Heike; Kirsch, Peter; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Social interactions are fundamental for human behavior, but the quantification of their neural underpinnings remains challenging. Here, we used hyperscanning functional MRI (fMRI) to study information flow between brains of human dyads during real-time social interaction in a joint attention paradigm. In a hardware setup enabling immersive audiovisual interaction of subjects in linked fMRI scanners, we characterize cross-brain connectivity components that are unique to interacting individuals, identifying information flow between the sender’s and receiver’s temporoparietal junction. We replicate these findings in an independent sample and validate our methods by demonstrating that cross-brain connectivity relates to a key real-world measure of social behavior. Together, our findings support a central role of human-specific cortical areas in the brain dynamics of dyadic interactions and provide an approach for the noninvasive examination of the neural basis of healthy and disturbed human social behavior with minimal a priori assumptions. PMID:25848050

  15. The development, assessment and validation of virtual reality for human anatomy instruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Karen Benn

    1996-01-01

    This research project seeks to meet the objective of science training by developing, assessing, validating and utilizing VR as a human anatomy training medium. Current anatomy instruction is primarily in the form of lectures and usage of textbooks. In ideal situations, anatomic models, computer-based instruction, and cadaver dissection are utilized to augment traditional methods of instruction. At many institutions, lack of financial resources limits anatomy instruction to textbooks and lectures. However, human anatomy is three-dimensional, unlike the one-dimensional depiction found in textbooks and the two-dimensional depiction found on the computer. Virtual reality allows one to step through the computer screen into a 3-D artificial world. The primary objective of this project is to produce a virtual reality application of the abdominopelvic region of a human cadaver that can be taken back to the classroom. The hypothesis is that an immersive learning environment affords quicker anatomic recognition and orientation and a greater level of retention in human anatomy instruction. The goal is to augment not replace traditional modes of instruction.

  16. Manual compactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Grant E. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A manual compactor having two handles each pivoted at one end for movement through adjacent arcs toward and away from each other, such reciprocating activation motion being translated into rotary motion in a single direction by means of ratchet and pawl arrangements about the pivot shaft of each handle, and thenceforth to rotary motion of opposing screws one each of which is driven by each handle, which in turn act through ball nut structures to forcibly draw together plates with force sufficient for compacting, the handles also having provisions for actuating push rod within the handles for the purpose of disengaging the pawls from the ratchets thereby allowing retraction through spring loading of the plates and repositioning of the apparatus for subsequent compacting.

  17. Development of a finite element human head model partially validated with thirty five experimental cases.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haojie; Zhang, Liying; Jiang, Binhui; Genthikatti, Vinay V; Jin, Xin; Zhu, Feng; Makwana, Rahul; Gill, Amandeep; Jandir, Gurdeep; Singh, Amrinder; Yang, King H

    2013-11-01

    This study is aimed to develop a high quality, extensively validated finite element (FE) human head model for enhanced head injury prediction and prevention. The geometry of the model was based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging scans of an adult male who has the average height and weight of an American. A feature-based multiblock technique was adopted to develop hexahedral brain meshes including the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, corpus callosum, ventricles, and thalamus. Conventional meshing methods were used to create the bridging veins, cerebrospinal fluid, skull, facial bones, flesh, skin, and membranes-including falx, tentorium, pia, arachnoid, and dura. The head model has 270,552 elements in total. Thirty five loading cases were selected from a range of experimental head impacts to check the robustness of the model predictions based on responses including the brain pressure, relative skull-brain motion, skull response, and facial response. The brain pressure was validated against intracranial pressure data reported by Nahum et al. (1977, "Intracranial Pressure Dynamics During Head Impact," Proc. 21st Stapp Car Crash Conference, SAE Technical Paper No. 770922) and Trosseille et al. (1992, "Development of a F.E.M. of the Human Head According to a Specific Test Protocol," Proc. 36th Stapp Car Crash Conference, SAE Technical Paper No. 922527). The brain motion was validated against brain displacements under sagittal, coronal, and horizontal blunt impacts performed by Hardy et al. (2001, "Investigation of Head Injury Mechanisms Using Neutral Density Technology and High-Speed Biplanar X-Ray," Stapp Car Crash Journal, 45, pp. 337-368; and 2007, "A Study of the Response of the Human Cadaver Head to Impact," Stapp Car Crash Journal, 51, pp. 17-80). The facial bone responses were validated under nasal impact (Nyquist et al. 1986, "Facial Impact Tolerance and Response," Proc. 30th Stapp Car Crash Conference, SAE Technical Paper No. 861896

  18. The use of reconstructed human epidermis for skin absorption testing: Results of the validation study.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Bock, Udo; Diembeck, Walter; Düsing, Hans-Jürgen; Gamer, Armin; Haltner-Ukomadu, Eleonore; Hoffmann, Christine; Kaca, Monika; Kamp, Hennicke; Kersen, Silke; Kietzmann, Manfred; Korting, Hans Christian; Krächter, Hans-Udo; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Liebsch, Manfred; Mehling, Annette; Müller-Goymann, Christel; Netzlaff, Frank; Niedorf, Frank; Rübbelke, Maria K; Schäfer, Ulrich; Schmidt, Elisabeth; Schreiber, Sylvia; Spielmann, Horst; Vuia, Alexander; Weimer, Michaela

    2008-05-01

    A formal validation study was performed, in order to investigate whether the commercially-available reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) models, EPISKIN, EpiDerm and SkinEthic, are suitable for in vitro skin absorption testing. The skin types currently recommended in the OECD Test Guideline 428, namely, ex vivo human epidermis and pig skin, were used as references. Based on the promising outcome of the prevalidation study, the panel of test substances was enlarged to nine substances, covering a wider spectrum of physicochemical properties. The substances were tested under both infinite-dose and finite-dose conditions, in ten laboratories, under strictly controlled conditions. The data were subjected to independent statistical analyses. Intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory variability contributed almost equally to the total variability, which was in the same range as that in preceding studies. In general, permeation of the RHE models exceeded that of human epidermis and pig skin (the SkinEthic RHE was found to be the most permeable), yet the ranking of substance permeation through the three tested RHE models and the pig skin reflected the permeation through human epidermis. In addition, both infinite-dose and finite-dose experiments are feasible with RHE models. The RHE models did not show the expected significantly better reproducibility, as compared to excised skin, despite a tendency toward lower variability of the data. Importantly, however, the permeation data showed a sufficient correlation between all the preparations examined. Thus, the RHE models, EPISKIN, EpiDerm and SkinEthic, are appropriate alternatives to human and pig skin, for the in vitro assessment of the permeation and penetration of substances when applied as aqueous solutions. PMID:18522484

  19. Validation of a mouse xenograft model system for gene expression analysis of human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pre-clinical models that effectively recapitulate human disease are critical for expanding our knowledge of cancer biology and drug resistance mechanisms. For haematological malignancies, the non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mouse is one of the most successful models to study paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, for this model to be effective for studying engraftment and therapy responses at the whole genome level, careful molecular characterisation is essential. Results Here, we sought to validate species-specific gene expression profiling in the high engraftment continuous ALL NOD/SCID xenograft. Using the human Affymetrix whole transcript platform we analysed transcriptional profiles from engrafted tissues without prior cell separation of mouse cells and found it to return highly reproducible profiles in xenografts from individual mice. The model was further tested with experimental mixtures of human and mouse cells, demonstrating that the presence of mouse cells does not significantly skew expression profiles when xenografts contain 90% or more human cells. In addition, we present a novel in silico and experimental masking approach to identify probes and transcript clusters susceptible to cross-species hybridisation. Conclusions We demonstrate species-specific transcriptional profiles can be obtained from xenografts when high levels of engraftment are achieved or with the application of transcript cluster masks. Importantly, this masking approach can be applied and adapted to other xenograft models where human tissue infiltration is lower. This model provides a powerful platform for identifying genes and pathways associated with ALL disease progression and response to therapy in vivo. PMID:20406497

  20. Identification and Validation of Novel Contraction-Regulated Myokines Released from Primary Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, Silja; Eckardt, Kristin; Bjørklund Holven, Kirsten; Jensen, Jørgen; Eckel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Proteins secreted by skeletal muscle, so called myokines, have been shown to affect muscle physiology and additionally exert systemic effects on other tissues and organs. Although recent profiling studies have identified numerous myokines, the amount of overlap from these studies indicates that the secretome of skeletal muscle is still incompletely characterized. One limitation of the models used is the lack of contraction, a central characteristic of muscle cells. Here we aimed to characterize the secretome of primary human myotubes by cytokine antibody arrays and to identify myokines regulated by contraction, which was induced by electrical pulse stimulation (EPS). In this study, we validated the regulation and release of two selected myokines, namely pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), which were recently described as adipokines. This study reveals that both factors, DPP4 and PEDF, are secreted by primary human myotubes. PEDF is a contraction-regulated myokine, although PEDF serum levels from healthy young men decrease after 60 min cycling at VO2max of 70%. Most interestingly, we identified 52 novel myokines which have not been described before to be secreted by skeletal muscle cells. For 48 myokines we show that their release is regulated by contractile activity. This profiling study of the human skeletal muscle secretome expands the number of myokines, identifies novel contraction-regulated myokines and underlines the overlap between proteins which are adipokines as well as myokines. PMID:23637948

  1. Manually controlled human balancing using visual, vestibular and proprioceptive senses involves a common, low frequency neural process

    PubMed Central

    Lakie, Martin; Loram, Ian D

    2006-01-01

    Ten subjects balanced their own body or a mechanically equivalent unstable inverted pendulum by hand, through a compliant spring linkage. Their balancing process was always characterized by repeated small reciprocating hand movements. These bias adjustments were an observable sign of intermittent alterations in neural output. On average, the adjustments occurred at intervals of ∼400 ms. To generate appropriate stabilizing bias adjustments, sensory information about body or load movement is needed. Subjects used visual, vestibular or proprioceptive sensation alone and in combination to perform the tasks. We first ask, is the time between adjustments (bias duration) sensory specific? Vision is associated with slow responses. Other senses involved with balance are known to be faster. Our second question is; does bias duration depend on sensory abundance? An appropriate bias adjustment cannot occur until unplanned motion is unambiguously perceived (a sensory threshold). The addition of more sensory data should therefore expedite action, decreasing the mean bias adjustment duration. Statistical analysis showed that (1) the mean bias adjustment duration was remarkably independent of the sensory modality and (2) the addition of one or two sensory modalities made a small, but significant, decrease in the mean bias adjustment duration. Thus, a threshold effect can alter only a very minor part of the bias duration. The bias adjustment duration in manual balancing must reflect something more than visual sensation and perceptual thresholds; our suggestion is that it is a common central motor planning process. We predict that similar processes may be identified in the control of standing. PMID:16959857

  2. Asphalt Raking. Instructor Manual. Trainee Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laborers-AGC Education and Training Fund, Pomfret Center, CT.

    This packet consists of the instructor and trainee manuals for an asphalt raking course. The instructor manual contains a course schedule for 4 days of instruction, content outline, and instructor outline. The trainee manual is divided into five sections: safety, asphalt basics, placing methods, repair and patching, and clean-up and maintenance.…

  3. The Human Glioblastoma Cell Culture Resource: Validated Cell Models Representing All Molecular Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; Bergström, Tobias; Jiang, Yiwen; Johansson, Patrik; Marinescu, Voichita Dana; Lindberg, Nanna; Segerman, Anna; Wicher, Grzegorz; Niklasson, Mia; Baskaran, Sathishkumar; Sreedharan, Smitha; Everlien, Isabelle; Kastemar, Marianne; Hermansson, Annika; Elfineh, Lioudmila; Libard, Sylwia; Holland, Eric Charles; Hesselager, Göran; Alafuzoff, Irina; Westermark, Bengt; Nelander, Sven; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Uhrbom, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and malignant form of primary brain tumor. GBM is essentially incurable and its resistance to therapy is attributed to a subpopulation of cells called glioma stem cells (GSCs). To meet the present shortage of relevant GBM cell (GC) lines we developed a library of annotated and validated cell lines derived from surgical samples of GBM patients, maintained under conditions to preserve GSC characteristics. This collection, which we call the Human Glioblastoma Cell Culture (HGCC) resource, consists of a biobank of 48 GC lines and an associated database containing high-resolution molecular data. We demonstrate that the HGCC lines are tumorigenic, harbor genomic lesions characteristic of GBMs, and represent all four transcriptional subtypes. The HGCC panel provides an open resource for in vitro and in vivo modeling of a large part of GBM diversity useful to both basic and translational GBM research. PMID:26629530

  4. A comprehensive assessment of human strivings: test-retest reliability and validity of the Reiss Profile.

    PubMed

    Havercamp, Susan M; Reiss, Steven

    2003-10-01

    Sensitivity theory provides an analysis of personality based on what people say motivates their behavior. After Reiss and Havercamp (1998) confirmed a 15-factor solution to self-reported human strivings, the Reiss Profile of Fundamental Goals and Motivation Sensitivities (Reiss & Havercamp, 1998) psychometric instrument was standardized. In 3 studies, the Reiss Profile was shown to possess good test-retest and internal reliability and concurrent and criterion validity. Ten independent samples of adults (n = 764) and a comparison group (n = 737) participated in these studies. Pearson product-moment correlations between the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (Crowne & Marlowe, 1960) and the Reiss Profile ranged in absolute value from .01 to.39 (M =.16). How people self-reported their trait motives correlated with how they behaved in the "real world." The Reiss Profile can be used to study motivational traits. PMID:12946919

  5. Identification of Stably Expressed lncRNAs as Valid Endogenous Controls for Profiling of Human Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Theo F. J.; Greiner, Andrea; Guibourt, Virginie; Lisec, Kristina; Kretzschmar, Hans A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent research indicates that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) represent a new family of RNAs that is of fundamental importance for controlling transcription and translation. Thereby, there is increasing evidence that lncRNAs are also important in tumourigenesis. Thereby valid expression profiling using quantitative PCR requires suitable, stably expressed normalisers to achieve reliable and reproducible data. However, no systematic analysis of suitable references in lncRNA studies in human glioma has been performed yet. Methods: In this study, we investigated 90 lncRNAs in 30 tissue specimen for the expression stability in human diffuse astrocytoma (WHO-Grade II), anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO-Grade III) and glioblastoma (WHO-Grade IV) both alone as well as in comparison with normal white matter. Our identification procedure included a rigorous bioinformatical selection process that resulted in the inclusion of only highly abundant, equally expressed lncRNAs for further analysis. Additionally, lncRNAs were classified according to their stability value using the NormFinder algorithm. Results: We identified 24 appropriate normalisers suitable for studies in diffuse astrocytoma, 22 for studies in anaplastic astrocytoma and 12 for studies in glioblastoma. Comparing all three glioma entities 7 lncRNAs showed stable expression levels. Addition of normal brain tissue resulted in only 4 suitable lncRNAs. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that 4 lncRNAs (HOXA6as, H19 upstream conserved 1 and 2, Zfhx2as and BC200) are suitable as normalisers in glioma and normal brain. These lncRNAs may thus be regarded as universal references being applicable for the accurate normalisation of lncRNA expression profiling in various glioma (WHO-Grades II-IV) alone and in combination with brain tissue. This enables to perform valid longitudinal studies, e.g. of glioma before and after malignisation to identify changes of lncRNA expressions probably driving malignant transformation

  6. Systems analysis programs for Hands-on integrated reliability evaluations (SAPHIRE) Version 5.0: Verification and validation (V&V) manual. Volume 9

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.L.; Calley, M.B.; Capps, E.L.; Zeigler, S.L.; Galyean, W.J.; Novack, S.D.; Smith, C.L.; Wolfram, L.M.

    1995-03-01

    A verification and validation (V&V) process has been performed for the System Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluation (SAPHIRE) Version 5.0. SAPHIRE is a set of four computer programs that NRC developed for performing probabilistic risk assessments. They allow an analyst to perform many of the functions necessary to create, quantify, and evaluate the risk associated with a facility or process being analyzed. The programs are Integrated Reliability and Risk Analysis System (IRRAS) System Analysis and Risk Assessment (SARA), Models And Results Database (MAR-D), and Fault tree, Event tree, and Piping and instrumentation diagram (FEP) graphical editor. Intent of this program is to perform a V&V of successive versions of SAPHIRE. Previous efforts have been the V&V of SAPHIRE Version 4.0. The SAPHIRE 5.0 V&V plan is based on the SAPHIRE 4.0 V&V plan with revisions to incorporate lessons learned from the previous effort. Also, the SAPHIRE 5.0 vital and nonvital test procedures are based on the test procedures from SAPHIRE 4.0 with revisions to include the new SAPHIRE 5.0 features as well as to incorporate lessons learned from the previous effort. Most results from the testing were acceptable; however, some discrepancies between expected code operation and actual code operation were identified. Modifications made to SAPHIRE are identified.

  7. MANUAL OF ANALYTICAL QUALITY CONTROL FOR PESTICIDES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS, IN HUMAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES. A COMPENDIUM OF SYSTEMATIC PROCEDURES DESIGNED TO ASSIST IN THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF ANALYTICAL PROBLEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual primarily provides the pesticide chemist with a systematic protocol for the prevention and control of analytical procedures which arise in the analysis of human or environmental media. The sections dealing with inter- and intra-laboratory quality control, the evaluati...

  8. MANUAL OF ANALYTICAL QUALITY CONTROL FOR PESTICIDES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES. A COMPENDIUM OF SYSTEMATIC PROCEDURES DESIGNED TO ASSIST IN THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF ANALYTICAL PROBLEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual provides the pesticide chemist with a systematic protocol for the quality control of analytical procedures and the problems that arise in the analysis of human or environmental media. It also serves as a guide to the latest and most reliable methodology available for ...

  9. The reference human nuclear mitochondrial sequences compilation validated and implemented on the UCSC genome browser

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic nuclear genomes contain fragments of mitochondrial DNA called NumtS (Nuclear mitochondrial Sequences), whose mode and time of insertion, as well as their functional/structural role within the genome are debated issues. Insertion sites match with chromosomal breaks, revealing that micro-deletions usually occurring at non-homologous end joining loci become reduced in presence of NumtS. Some NumtS are involved in recombination events leading to fragment duplication. Moreover, NumtS are polymorphic, a feature that renders them candidates as population markers. Finally, they are a cause of contamination during human mtDNA sequencing, leading to the generation of false heteroplasmies. Results Here we present RHNumtS.2, the most exhaustive human NumtSome catalogue annotating 585 NumtS, 97% of which were here validated in a European individual and in HapMap samples. The NumtS complete dataset and related features have been made available at the UCSC Genome Browser. The produced sequences have been submitted to INSDC databases. The implementation of the RHNumtS.2 tracks within the UCSC Genome Browser has been carried out with the aim to facilitate browsing of the NumtS tracks to be exploited in a wide range of research applications. Conclusions We aimed at providing the scientific community with the most exhaustive overview on the human NumtSome, a resource whose aim is to support several research applications, such as studies concerning human structural variation, diversity, and disease, as well as the detection of false heteroplasmic mtDNA variants. Upon implementation of the NumtS tracks, the application of the BLAT program on the UCSC Genome Browser has now become an additional tool to check for heteroplasmic artefacts, supported by data available through the NumtS tracks. PMID:22013967

  10. Sierra Structural Dynamics Theory Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Garth M.

    2015-10-19

    Sierra/SD provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of structural systems. This manual describes the theory behind many of the constructs in Sierra/SD. For a more detailed description of how to use Sierra/SD , we refer the reader to Sierra/SD, User's Notes . Many of the constructs in Sierra/SD are pulled directly from published material. Where possible, these materials are referenced herein. However, certain functions in Sierra/SD are specific to our implementation. We try to be far more complete in those areas. The theory manual was developed from several sources including general notes, a programmer notes manual, the user's notes and of course the material in the open literature. This page intentionally left blank.

  11. Human vision noise model validation for the U.S. Army sensor performance metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Bradley L.; Olson, Jeffrey T.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Fanning, Jonathan D.; Haefner, David P.

    2014-06-01

    Image noise originating from a sensor system is often the limiting factor in target acquisition performance, especially when limited by atmospheric transmission or low-light conditions. To accurately predict target acquisition range performance for a wide variety of imaging systems, image degradation introduced by the sensor must be properly combined with the limitations of the human visual system (HVS). This crucial step of incorporating the HVS has been improved and updated within NVESD's latest imaging system performance model. The new noise model discussed here shows how an imaging system's noise and blur are combined with the contrast threshold function (CTF) to form the system CTF. Model calibration constants were found by presenting low-contrast sine gratings with additive noise in a two alternative forced choice experiment. One of the principal improvements comes from adding an eye photon noise term allowing the noise CTF to be accurate over a wide range of luminance. The latest HVS noise model is then applied to the targeting task performance metric responsible for predicting system performance from the system CTF. To validate this model, human target acquisition performance was measured from a series of infrared and visible-band noise-limited imaging systems.

  12. Validation of a robotic balance system for investigations in the control of human standing balance.

    PubMed

    Luu, Billy L; Huryn, Thomas P; Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Croft, Elizabeth A; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that human body sway during standing approximates the mechanics of an inverted pendulum pivoted at the ankle joints. In this study, a robotic balance system incorporating a Stewart platform base was developed to provide a new technique to investigate the neural mechanisms involved in standing balance. The robotic system, programmed with the mechanics of an inverted pendulum, controlled the motion of the body in response to a change in applied ankle torque. The ability of the robotic system to replicate the load properties of standing was validated by comparing the load stiffness generated when subjects balanced their own body to the robot's mechanical load programmed with a low (concentrated-mass model) or high (distributed-mass model) inertia. The results show that static load stiffness was not significantly (p > 0.05) different for standing and the robotic system. Dynamic load stiffness for the robotic system increased with the frequency of sway, as predicted by the mechanics of an inverted pendulum, with the higher inertia being accurately matched to the load properties of the human body. This robotic balance system accurately replicated the physical model of standing and represents a useful tool to simulate the dynamics of a standing person. PMID:21511567

  13. Implementation and validation of thoracic side impact injury prediction metrics in a human body model.

    PubMed

    Golman, Adam J; Danelson, Kerry A; Gaewsky, James P; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-08-01

    This study's purpose was to implement injury metrics into the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) mirroring the spinal accelerometers, rib accelerometers and chest band instrumentation from two lateral post-mortem human subject sled test configurations. In both sled configurations, THUMS contacted a flat rigid surface (either a wall or beam) at 6.7 m/s. Sled A maximum simulated wall forces for the thorax, abdomen and pelvis were 7.1, 5.0 and 10.0 kN versus 5.7 ± 0.8, 3.4 ± 1.2 and 6.2 ± 2.7 kN experimentally. Sled B maximum simulated beam forces for the torso and pelvis were 8.0 and 7.6 kN versus 8.5 ± 0.2 and 7.9 ± 2.5 kN experimentally. Quantitatively, force magnitude contributed more to variation between simulated and experimental forces than phase shift. Acceleration-based injury metrics were within one standard deviation of experimental means except for the lower spine in the rigid wall sled test. These validated metrics will be useful for quantifying occupant loading conditions and calculating injury risks in various loading configurations. PMID:24520849

  14. Validation of the auditory hazard assessment algorithm for the human with impulse noise data.

    PubMed

    Price, G Richard

    2007-11-01

    Predicting auditory hazard from intense acoustic impulses, such as weapons fire or airbags, has been an intractable problem. The U.S. Army developed a theoretically based mathematical model of the ear designed to predict such hazards [the Auditory Hazard Assessment Algorithm for the Human (AHAAH)]. To validate it as a predictor of hazard, data from the literature (wave forms and changes in hearing sensitivity) were processed with the model in order to predict the onset of unacceptable threshold shift (25 dB or more) in the 95th percentile human ear. For comparison, alternate standards MIL-STD-1747D and A-weighted energy were also used to compute hazards for the same data. The primary dataset was that of the US Army's "Albuquerque studies" (53 different cases) and other impulses from the literature (19 additional predictions). The AHAAH model predicted correctly in over 95% of the cases, the MIL-STD-1474D was correct in 42% of the cases, and A-weighted energy was correct in 25% of the cases. Errors for all methods tended to be in the direction of overprediction of hazard. In addition to greatly increased accuracy, the AHAAH model also has the advantage of being theoretically based and including novel diagnostic features. PMID:18189569

  15. Manual evaluation of tissue microarrays in a high-throughput research project: The contribution of Indian surgical pathology to the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) project.

    PubMed

    Navani, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    The Human Protein Atlas (HPA) program (www.proteinatlas.org) is an international program that has been set up to allow for a systematic exploration of the human proteome using antibody-based proteomics. This is accomplished by combining high-throughput generation of affinity-purified (mono-specific) antibodies with protein profiling in a multitude of tissues/cell types assembled in tissue microarrays. Twenty-six surgical pathologists over a seven-and-half year period have annotated and curated approximately sixteen million tissue images derived from immunostaining of normal and cancer tissues by approximately 23 000 antibodies. Web-based annotation software that allows for a basic and rapid evaluation of immunoreactivity in tissues has been utilized. Intensity, fraction of immunoreactive cells and subcellular localization were recorded for each given cell population. A text comment summarizing the characteristics for each antibody was added. The methods used and the challenges encountered for this exercise, the largest effort ever by a single group of surgical pathologists, are discussed. Manual annotation of digital images is an important tool that may be successfully utilized in high-throughput research projects. This is the first time an Indian private pathology laboratory has been associated with cutting-edge research internationally providing a classic example of developed and emerging nation collaboration. PMID:26748468

  16. Development and validation of a sensitive assay for the quantification of imatinib using LC/LC-MS/MS in human whole blood and cell culture.

    PubMed

    Klawitter, Jelena; Zhang, Yan Ling; Klawitter, Jost; Anderson, Nora; Serkova, Natalie J; Christians, Uwe

    2009-12-01

    We developed and validated a semi-automated LC/LC-MS/MS assay for the quantification of imatinib in human whole blood and leukemia cells. After protein precipitation, samples were injected into the HPLC system and trapped onto the enrichment column (flow 5 mL/min); extracts were back-flushed onto the analytical column. Ion transitions [M + H](+) of imatinib (m/z = 494.3 --> 394.3) and its internal standard trazodone (372.5 --> 176.3) were monitored. The range of reliable response was 0.03-75 ng/mL. The inter-day precisions were: 8.4% (0.03 ng/mL), 7.2% (0.1 ng/mL), 6.5% (1 ng/mL), 8.2% (10 ng/mL) and 4.3% (75 ng/mL) with no interference from ion suppression. Autosampler stability was 24 hs and samples were stable over three freeze-thaw cycles. This semi-automated method is simple with only one manual step, uses a commercially available internal standard, and has proven to be robust in larger studies. PMID:19517424

  17. Successful validation of genomic biomarkers for human immunotoxicity in Jurkat T cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schmeits, Peter C J; Shao, Jia; van der Krieken, Danique A; Volger, Oscar L; van Loveren, Henk; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Hendriksen, Peter J M

    2015-07-01

    Previously, we identified 25 classifier genes that were able to assess immunotoxicity using human Jurkat T cells. The present study aimed to validate these classifiers. For that purpose, Jurkat cells were exposed for 6 h to subcytotoxic doses of nine immunotoxicants, five non-immunotoxicants and four compounds for which human immunotoxicity has not yet been fully established. RNA was isolated and subjected to Fluidigm quantitative real time (qRT)-PCR analysis. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the screening assay as based on the nine immunotoxicants and five non-immunotoxicants used in this study were 100%, 80% and 93%, respectively, which is better than the performance in our previous study. Only one compound was classified as false positive (benzo-e-pyrene). Of the four potential (non-)immunotoxicants, chlorantraniliprole and Hidrasec were classified immunotoxic and Sunset yellow and imidacloprid as non-immunotoxic. ToxPi analysis of the PCR data provided insight in the molecular pathways that were affected by the compounds. The immunotoxicants 2,3-dichloro-propanol and cypermethrin, although structurally different, affected protein metabolism and cholesterol biosynthesis and transport. In addition, four compounds, i.e. chlorpyrifos, aldicarb, benzo-e-pyrene and anti-CD3, affected genes in cholesterol metabolism and transport, protein metabolism and transcription regulation. qRT-PCR on eight additional genes coding for similar processes as defined in ToxPi analyzes, supported these results. In conclusion, the 25 immunotoxic classifiers performed very well in a screening with new non-immunotoxic and immunotoxic compounds. Therefore, the Jurkat screening assay has great promise to be applied within a tiered approach for animal free testing of human immunotoxicity. PMID:25424538

  18. Development and validation of SPMMTE HPLC method for analysis of profens from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Afzal; Al-Ajmi, Mohamed F; Amir, Samira; Ali, Imran

    2016-08-01

    A fast, selective and reproducible solid-phase membrane microtip extraction (SPMMTE) HPLC method has been developed and validated for the analyses of ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and flurbiprofen from human plasma. The analysis was carried out on a C18 (150 × 4.6 mm; 5 μm) column. The mobile phase used was water-acetonitrile (55:45, v/v) adjusted to pH 3.0 using trifluoroacetic acid, at a flow rate 0.5 mL/min with a detection wavelength of 225 nm. The values for the capacity factors for the profen samples ranged from 0.47 to 1.50. The values for the selectivity factor (α) for ketoprofen-flurbiprofen, flurbiprofen-ibuprofen and ibuprofen-ketoprofen combinations from human plasma samples were 1.99, 1.00 and 2.10, respectively. The resolution factors (Rs) for ketoprofen-flurbiprofen, flurbiprofen-ibuprofen and ibuprofen-ketoprofen from plasma samples were 3.00, 1.50 and 4.10, respectively. The percentage recoveries of ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and flurbiprofen from human plasma were 75-85%. All of the profens were separated within 7.0 min, indicating a relatively fast method. During the development of the SPMMTE procedure the parameters of pH, contact time, desorption and types of solvents were optimized. The final method was also found to be efficient, effective and inexpensive. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26686197

  19. Development and validation of a nonisotopic immunoassay for the detection of LSD in human urine.

    PubMed

    Cassells, N P; Craston, D H; Hand, C W; Baldwin, D

    1996-10-01

    A microplate enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the detection of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in human urine was developed. The assay kit is designed around an LSD derivative coated on the wall of microplate wells with preservatives and stabilizers. Sample and rabbit anti-LSD are added to the microplate well. The immobilized LSD and LSD present in specimens compete for the opportunity to bind to the anti-LSD antibodies. An anti-rabbit antibody labeled with horseradish peroxidase is used to provide the assay signal, which is inversely proportional to the concentration of LSD in the sample. The assay requires a 25-microL urine sample and three consecutive incubation periods of 60, 30, and 30 min at room temperature. The assay was tested with a variety of drugs, including ergot alkaloids spiked into drug-free urine at up to 100,000 ng/mL without cross-reaction. Nor-LSD was shown to cross-react between 16% and 28%, depending on its concentration. Of the other compounds tested, only ergonovine demonstrated slight cross-reactivity at approximately 0.0008%. The assay is designed to be used with a qualitative cutoff of 0.5 ng/mL. Precision testing at 0.5 ng/mL gave a coefficient of variation (CV) of 6% based on 20 replicates. The CV at 0.375 ng/mL (cutoff, -25%) was 5.2% and at 0.625 ng/mL was 6.6%. Precision at other concentrations within the range of the calibration curve gave similar results both intra- and interassay. Clinical performance of the assay was compared with that of a commercial radioimmunoassay (RIA). Comparable performance was observed with both methods, each screening a total of 458 samples as negative and 17 samples as positive relative to a 0.5 ng/mL cutoff. The EIA found an additional three positive samples that were negative by RIA. The EIA is suitable for the screening of urine samples for the presence of LSD. Preliminary indications are that the assay is also suitable for use with whole blood specimens. The assay can be performed manually or be fully

  20. The nondecussating pathway of the dentatorubrothalamic tract in humans: human connectome-based tractographic study and microdissection validation.

    PubMed

    Meola, Antonio; Comert, Ayhan; Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Sivakanthan, Sananthan; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The dentatorubrothalamic tract (DRTT) is the major efferent cerebellar pathway arising from the dentate nucleus (DN) and decussating to the contralateral red nucleus (RN) and thalamus. Surprisingly, hemispheric cerebellar output influences bilateral limb movements. In animals, uncrossed projections from the DN to the ipsilateral RN and thalamus may explain this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to clarify the anatomy of the dentatorubrothalamic connections in humans. METHODS The authors applied advanced deterministic fiber tractography to a template of 488 subjects from the Human Connectome Project (Q1-Q3 release, WU-Minn HCP consortium) and validated the results with microsurgical dissection of cadaveric brains prepared according to Klingler's method. RESULTS The authors identified the "classic" decussating DRTT and a corresponding nondecussating path (the nondecussating DRTT, nd-DRTT). Within each of these 2 tracts some fibers stop at the level of the RN, forming the dentatorubro tract and the nondecussating dentatorubro tract. The left nd-DRTT encompasses 21.7% of the tracts and 24.9% of the volume of the left superior cerebellar peduncle, and the right nd-DRTT encompasses 20.2% of the tracts and 28.4% of the volume of the right superior cerebellar peduncle. CONCLUSIONS The connections of the DN with the RN and thalamus are bilateral, not ipsilateral only. This affords a potential anatomical substrate for bilateral limb motor effects originating in a single cerebellar hemisphere under physiological conditions, and for bilateral limb motor impairment in hemispheric cerebellar lesions such as ischemic stroke and hemorrhage, and after resection of hemispheric tumors and arteriovenous malformations. Furthermore, when a lesion is located on the course of the dentatorubrothalamic system, a careful preoperative tractographic analysis of the relationship of the DRTT, nd-DRTT, and the lesion should be performed in order to tailor the surgical approach properly

  1. 21 CFR 868.1030 - Manual algesimeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual algesimeter. 868.1030 Section 868.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1030 Manual algesimeter. (a) Identification....

  2. 21 CFR 868.1030 - Manual algesimeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual algesimeter. 868.1030 Section 868.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1030 Manual algesimeter. (a) Identification....

  3. 21 CFR 868.1030 - Manual algesimeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manual algesimeter. 868.1030 Section 868.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1030 Manual algesimeter. (a) Identification....

  4. 21 CFR 868.1030 - Manual algesimeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual algesimeter. 868.1030 Section 868.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1030 Manual algesimeter. (a) Identification....

  5. 21 CFR 872.6855 - Manual toothbrush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual toothbrush. 872.6855 Section 872.6855 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6855 Manual toothbrush. (a) Identification. A...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4840 - Manual rongeur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual rongeur. 882.4840 Section 882.4840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4840 Manual rongeur. (a) Identification. A...

  7. 21 CFR 886.1770 - Manual refractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual refractor. 886.1770 Section 886.1770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1770 Manual refractor. (a) Identification. A...

  8. Comparison of automated and manual segmentation of hippocampus MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, John W.; Christensen, Gary E.; Miller, Michael I.; Joshi, Sarang C.; Gado, Mokhtar; Csernansky, John G.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1995-05-01

    The precision and accuracy of area estimates from magnetic resonance (MR) brain images and using manual and automated segmentation methods are determined. Areas of the human hippocampus were measured to compare a new automatic method of segmentation with regions of interest drawn by an expert. MR images of nine normal subjects and nine schizophrenic patients were acquired with a 1.5-T unit (Siemens Medical Systems, Inc., Iselin, New Jersey). From each individual MPRAGE 3D volume image a single comparable 2-D slice (matrix equals 256 X 256) was chosen which corresponds to the same coronal slice of the hippocampus. The hippocampus was first manually segmented, then segmented using high dimensional transformations of a digital brain atlas to individual brain MR images. The repeatability of a trained rater was assessed by comparing two measurements from each individual subject. Variability was also compared within and between subject groups of schizophrenics and normal subjects. Finally, the precision and accuracy of automated segmentation of hippocampal areas were determined by comparing automated measurements to manual segmentation measurements made by the trained rater on MR and brain slice images. The results demonstrate the high repeatability of area measurement from MR images of the human hippocampus. Automated segmentation using high dimensional transformations from a digital brain atlas provides repeatability superior to that of manual segmentation. Furthermore, the validity of automated measurements was demonstrated by a high correlation with manual segmentation measurements made by a trained rater. Quantitative morphometry of brain substructures (e.g. hippocampus) is feasible by use of a high dimensional transformation of a digital brain atlas to an individual MR image. This method automates the search for neuromorphological correlates of schizophrenia by a new mathematically robust method with unprecedented sensitivity to small local and regional differences.

  9. Bridging the gap between computation and clinical biology: validation of cable theory in humans

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Malcolm C.; Xu, Lei; Taggart, Peter; Hanson, Ben; Lambiase, Pier D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Computerized simulations of cardiac activity have significantly contributed to our understanding of cardiac electrophysiology, but techniques of simulations based on patient-acquired data remain in their infancy. We sought to integrate data acquired from human electrophysiological studies into patient-specific models, and validated this approach by testing whether electrophysiological responses to sequential premature stimuli could be predicted in a quantitatively accurate manner. Methods: Eleven patients with structurally normal hearts underwent electrophysiological studies. Semi-automated analysis was used to reconstruct activation and repolarization dynamics for each electrode. This S2 extrastimuli data was used to inform individualized models of cardiac conduction, including a novel derivation of conduction velocity restitution. Activation dynamics of multiple premature extrastimuli were then predicted from this model and compared against measured patient data as well as data derived from the ten-Tusscher cell-ionic model. Results: Activation dynamics following a premature S3 were significantly different from those after an S2. Patient specific models demonstrated accurate prediction of the S3 activation wave, (Pearson's R2 = 0.90, median error 4%). Examination of the modeled conduction dynamics allowed inferences into the spatial dispersion of activation delay. Further validation was performed against data from the ten-Tusscher cell-ionic model, with our model accurately recapitulating predictions of repolarization times (R2 = 0.99). Conclusions: Simulations based on clinically acquired data can be used to successfully predict complex activation patterns following sequential extrastimuli. Such modeling techniques may be useful as a method of incorporation of clinical data into predictive models. PMID:24027527

  10. Type-Specific Human Papillomavirus Biological Features: Validated Model-Based Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Baussano, Iacopo; Elfström, K. Miriam; Lazzarato, Fulvio; Gillio-Tos, Anna; De Marco, Laura; Carozzi, Francesca; Del Mistro, Annarosa; Dillner, Joakim; Franceschi, Silvia; Ronco, Guglielmo

    2013-01-01

    Infection with high-risk (hr) human papillomavirus (HPV) is considered the necessary cause of cervical cancer. Vaccination against HPV16 and 18 types, which are responsible of about 75% of cervical cancer worldwide, is expected to have a major global impact on cervical cancer occurrence. Valid estimates of the parameters that regulate the natural history of hrHPV infections are crucial to draw reliable projections of the impact of vaccination. We devised a mathematical model to estimate the probability of infection transmission, the rate of clearance, and the patterns of immune response following the clearance of infection of 13 hrHPV types. To test the validity of our estimates, we fitted the same transmission model to two large independent datasets from Italy and Sweden and assessed finding consistency. The two populations, both unvaccinated, differed substantially by sexual behaviour, age distribution, and study setting (screening for cervical cancer or Chlamydia trachomatis infection). Estimated transmission probability of hrHPV types (80% for HPV16, 73%-82% for HPV18, and above 50% for most other types); clearance rates decreasing as a function of time since infection; and partial protection against re-infection with the same hrHPV type (approximately 20% for HPV16 and 50% for the other types) were similar in the two countries. The model could accurately predict the HPV16 prevalence observed in Italy among women who were not infected three years before. In conclusion, our models inform on biological parameters that cannot at the moment be measured directly from any empirical data but are essential to forecast the impact of HPV vaccination programmes. PMID:24400036

  11. Histological validation of high-resolution DTI in human post mortem tissue

    PubMed Central

    Seehaus, Arne; Roebroeck, Alard; Bastiani, Matteo; Fonseca, Lúcia; Bratzke, Hansjürgen; Lori, Nicolás; Vilanova, Anna; Goebel, Rainer; Galuske, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is amongst the simplest mathematical models available for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, yet still by far the most used one. Despite the success of DTI as an imaging tool for white matter fibers, its anatomical underpinnings on a microstructural basis remain unclear. In this study, we used 65 myelin-stained sections of human premotor cortex to validate modeled fiber orientations and oft used microstructure-sensitive scalar measures of DTI on the level of individual voxels. We performed this validation on high spatial resolution diffusion MRI acquisitions investigating both white and gray matter. We found a very good agreement between DTI and myelin orientations with the majority of voxels showing angular differences less than 10°. The agreement was strongest in white matter, particularly in unidirectional fiber pathways. In gray matter, the agreement was good in the deeper layers highlighting radial fiber directions even at lower fractional anisotropy (FA) compared to white matter. This result has potentially important implications for tractography algorithms applied to high resolution diffusion MRI data if the aim is to move across the gray/white matter boundary. We found strong relationships between myelin microstructure and DTI-based microstructure-sensitive measures. High FA values were linked to high myelin density and a sharply tuned histological orientation profile. Conversely, high values of mean diffusivity (MD) were linked to bimodal or diffuse orientation distributions and low myelin density. At high spatial resolution, DTI-based measures can be highly sensitive to white and gray matter microstructure despite being relatively unspecific to concrete microarchitectural aspects. PMID:26257612

  12. Human factors validation study of 3 mg sumatriptan autoinjector, for migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Brand-Schieber, Elimor; Munjal, Sagar; Kumar, Rajesh; Andre, Anthony D; Valladao, Will; Ramirez, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Background Migraine pain relief is reported by more than 50% of patients who receive low dose (3 mg) of sumatriptan. Currently, there is no two-step autoinjector of low-dose sumatriptan available on the market for acute migraine treatment. To fulfill this need, a fully assembled, single-dose, subcutaneous autoinjector (sumatriptan 3 mg; product-code DFN-11) was developed. The device allows for injection with a simple two-step, push-to-inject process and provides feedback of the injection activation, progress, and completion. Objective To determine if DFN-11 autoinjector can be used correctly and safely by migraine patients. Methods and participants A human factors validation study was conducted with 45 migraine patients (30 oral-only medications users; 15 injectable sumatriptan users) who performed one unaided simulated injection. Two days prior, half the oral participants were briefly trained. All others were only given the device to inspect and written instructions to review. No injections were performed during the initial session. All participants received written instructions at the injection session. Results All participants (45/45; 100%) performed the injection without any errors. Objective measures included device removal from packaging, cap removal, expiration date check, inspection of fluid in window, identification of allowable injection site, proper device positioning, dose confirmation, and device disposal. All participants (45/45; 100%) reported no difficulty administering the injection and no concerns about using the autoinjector during a severe migraine onset. Conclusion The results showed that the DFN-11 autoinjector can be used with safe handling without patterns of confusion, failures, high-risk errors, wet injections, or patient safety risks. The DFN-11 autoinjector was validated to be used correctly and safely by migraine patients, whether they were injection experienced, unexperienced, trained, or self-trained. PMID:27313479

  13. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Part 2, Human Error Probability (HEP) estimates: Data manual

    SciTech Connect

    Gertman, D.I.; Gilbert, B.G.; Gilmore, W.E.; Galyean, W.J.

    1988-06-01

    This volume of a five-volume series summarizes those data currently resident in the first releases of the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) data base. The raw human error probability (HEP) contained herein is accompanied by a glossary of terms and the HEP and hardware taxonomies used to structure the data. Instructions are presented on how the user may navigate through the NUCLARR data management system to find anchor values to assist in solving risk-related problems.

  14. VaDE: a manually curated database of reproducible associations between various traits and human genomic polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoko; Takahashi, Yasuko; Imanishi, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the development of common diseases. However, it is clear that genetic risk factors of common diseases are heterogeneous among human populations. Therefore, we developed a database of genomic polymorphisms that are reproducibly associated with disease susceptibilities, drug responses and other traits for each human population: 'VarySysDB Disease Edition' (VaDE; http://bmi-tokai.jp/VaDE/). SNP-trait association data were obtained from the National Human Genome Research Institute GWAS (NHGRI GWAS) catalog and RAvariome, and we added detailed information of sample populations by curating original papers. In addition, we collected and curated original papers, and registered the detailed information of SNP-trait associations in VaDE. Then, we evaluated reproducibility of associations in each population by counting the number of significantly associated studies. VaDE provides literature-based SNP-trait association data and functional genomic region annotation for SNP functional research. SNP functional annotation data included experimental data of the ENCODE project, H-InvDB transcripts and the 1000 Genome Project. A user-friendly web interface was developed to assist quick search, easy download and fast swapping among viewers. We believe that our database will contribute to the future establishment of personalized medicine and increase our understanding of genetic factors underlying diseases. PMID:25361969

  15. GRSAC Users Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, S.J.; Nypaver, D.J.

    1999-02-01

    An interactive workstation-based simulation code (GRSAC) for studying postulated severe accidents in gas-cooled reactors has been developed to accommodate user-generated input with ''smart front-end'' checking. Code features includes on- and off-line plotting, on-line help and documentation, and an automated sensitivity study option. The code and its predecessors have been validated using comparisons with a variety of experimental data and similar codes. GRSAC model features include a three-dimensional representation of the core thermal hydraulics, and optional ATWS (anticipated transients without scram) capabilities. The user manual includes a detailed description of the code features, and includes four case studies which guide the user through four different examples of the major uses of GRSAC: an accident case; an initial conditions setup and run; a sensitivity study; and the setup of a new reactor model.

  16. A validated SPME-GC-MS method for simultaneous quantification of club drugs in human urine.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stacy D; Rhodes, Daniel J; Pritchard, Boyd J

    2007-09-13

    A solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (SPME-GC-MS) method has been developed and validated for measuring four club drugs in human urine. These drugs include gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), ketamine (KET), methamphetamine (MAMP), and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). These drugs are referred to as 'club drugs' because of their prevalence at parties and raves. Deuterium labeled internal standards for each of the four drugs was included in the assay to aid in quantitation. The drugs were spiked into human urine and derivatized using pyridine and hexylchloroformate to make them suitable for GC-MS analysis. The SPME conditions of extraction time/temperature and desorption time/temperature were optimized to yield the highest peak area for each of the four drugs. The final SPME parameters included a 90 degrees C extraction for 20min with a 1min desorption in the GC injector at 225 degrees C using a splitless injection. All SPME work was done using a 100microm PDMS fiber by Supelco. The ratio of pyridine to hexylchloroformate for derivatization was also optimized. The GC separation was carried out on a VF-5ht column by Varian (30m, 0.25mm i.d., 0.10microm film thickness) using a temperature program of 150-270 degrees C at 10 degrees C/min. The instrument used was a ThermoFinnigan Trace GC-Polaris Q interfaced with a LEAP CombiPal autosampler. The data was collected by using extracted ion chromatograms of marker m/z values for each drug from the total ion chromatograms (TIC) (full scan mode). Calibration curves with R(2)>0.99 were generated each day using the peak area ratios (peak area drug/peak area internal standard) versus concentration. The validated method resulted in intra-day and inter-day precision (% R.S.D.) of less than 15% and a % error of less than 15% for four concentrations in the range of 0.05-20microg/mL (MAMP) and 0.10-20microg/mL (GHB, KET, and MDMA). This method has the advantage of an easy sample preparation with

  17. Rivet user manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Andy; Butterworth, Jonathan; Grellscheid, David; Hoeth, Hendrik; Lönnblad, Leif; Monk, James; Schulz, Holger; Siegert, Frank

    2013-12-01

    This is the manual and user guide for the Rivet system for the validation and tuning of Monte Carlo event generators. As well as the core Rivet library, this manual describes the usage of the rivet program and the AGILe generator interface library. The depth and level of description is chosen for users of the system, starting with the basics of using validation code written by others, and then covering sufficient details to write new Rivet analyses and calculational components. Catalogue identifier: AEPS_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPS_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 571126 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4717522 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, Python. Computer: PC running Linux, Mac. Operating system: Linux, Mac OS. RAM: 20 MB Classification: 11.9, 11.2. External routines: HepMC (https://savannah.cern.ch/projects/hepmc/), GSL (http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/manual/gsl-ref.html), FastJet (http://fastjet.fr/), Python (http://www.python.org/), Swig (http://www.swig.org/), Boost (http://www.boostsoftware.com/), YAML (http://www.yaml.org/spec/1.2/spec.html) Nature of problem: Experimental measurements from high-energy particle colliders should be defined and stored in a general framework such that it is simple to compare theory predictions to them. Rivet is such a framework, and contains at the same time a large collection of existing measurements. Solution method: Rivet is based on HepMC events, a standardised output format provided by many theory simulation tools. Events are processed by Rivet to generate histograms for the requested list of analyses, incorporating all experimental phase space cuts and histogram definitions. Restrictions: Cannot calculate

  18. The Model Human Processor and the Older Adult: Parameter Estimation and Validation within a Mobile Phone Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jastrzembski, Tiffany S.; Charness, Neil

    2007-01-01

    The authors estimate weighted mean values for nine information processing parameters for older adults using the Card, Moran, and Newell (1983) Model Human Processor model. The authors validate a subset of these parameters by modeling two mobile phone tasks using two different phones and comparing model predictions to a sample of younger (N = 20;…

  19. Integrated Summary Report: Validation of Two Binding Assays Using Human Recombinant Estrogen Receptor Alpha (hrERa)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Integrated Summary Report (ISR) summarizes, in a single document, the results from an international multi-laboratory validation study conducted for two in vitro estrogen receptor (ER) binding assays. These assays both use human recombinant estrogen receptor, alpha subtype (h...

  20. Iodonium Ylide Mediated Radiofluorination of 18F-FPEB and Validation for Human Use

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Nickeisha A.; Holland, Jason P.; Kassenbrock, Alina; Yokell, Daniel L.; Livni, Eli; Liang, Steven H.; Vasdev, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Translation of new methodologies for labeling non-activated aromatic molecules with fluorine-18 remains a challenge. Here, we report a one-step, regioselective, metal-free 18F-labeling method that employs a hypervalent iodonium(III) ylide precursor, to prepare the radiopharmaceutical 18F-FPEB. Methods Automated radiosynthesis of 18F-FPEB was achieved by reaction of the ylide precursor (4 mg) with 18F-NEt4F in DMF at 80 °C for 5 minutes, and formulated for injection within 1 hour. Results 18F-FPEB was synthesized in 15 – 25% (n = 3) uncorrected radiochemical yields relative to 18F-fluoride, with specific activities of 666 ± 51.8 GBq/μmol (18 ± 1.4 Ci/μmol) at the end-of-synthesis (EOS). The radiopharmaceutical was validated for human use. Conclusions Radiofluorination of iodonium (III) ylides proved to be an efficient radiosynthetic strategy for synthesis of 18F-labeled radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:25655630

  1. Building a human kinase gene repository: Bioinformatics, molecular cloning, and functional validation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaehong; Hu, Yanhui; Murthy, T. V. S.; Vannberg, Fredrik; Shen, Binghua; Rolfs, Andreas; Hutti, Jessica E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; LaBaer, Joshua; Harlow, Ed; Brizuela, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    Kinases catalyze the phosphorylation of proteins, lipids, sugars, nucleosides, and other important cellular metabolites and play key regulatory roles in all aspects of eukaryotic cell physiology. Here, we describe the mining of public databases to collect the sequence information of all identified human kinase genes and the cloning of the corresponding ORFs. We identified 663 genes, 511 encoding protein kinases, and 152 encoding nonprotein kinases. We describe the successful cloning and sequence verification of 270 of these genes. Subcloning of this gene set in mammalian expression vectors and their use in high-throughput cell-based screens allowed the validation of the clones at the level of expression and the identification of previously uncharacterized modulators of the survivin promoter. Moreover, expressions of the kinase genes in bacteria, followed by autophosphorylation assays, identified 21 protein kinases that showed autocatalytic activity. The work described here will facilitate the functional assaying of this important gene family in phenotypic screens and their use in biochemical and structural studies. PMID:15928075

  2. Intrasurgical Human Retinal Imaging With Manual Instrument Tracking Using a Microscope-Integrated Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Device

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Paul; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Cunefare, David; Migacz, Justin; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the first in-human intraoperative imaging using a custom prototype spectral-domain microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (MIOCT) device during vitreoretinal surgery with instruments in the eye. Methods: Under institutional review board approval for a prospective intraoperative study, MIOCT images were obtained at surgical pauses with instruments held static in the vitreous cavity and then concurrently with surgical maneuvers. Postoperatively, MIOCT images obtained at surgical pauses were compared with images obtained with a high-resolution handheld spectral-domain OCT (HHOCT) system with objective endpoints, including acquisition of images acceptable for analysis and identification of predefined macular morphologic or pathologic features. Results: Human MIOCT images were successfully obtained before incision and during pauses in surgical maneuvers. MIOCT imaging confirmed preoperative diagnoses, such as epiretinal membrane, full-thickness macular hole, and vitreomacular traction and demonstrated successful achievement of surgical goals. MIOCT and HHOCT images obtained at surgical pauses in two cohorts of five patients were comparable with greater than or equal to 80% correlation in 80% of patients. Real-time video-imaging concurrent with surgical manipulations enabled, for the first time using this device, visualization of dynamic instrument-retina interaction with targeted OCT tracking. Conclusion: MIOCT is successful for imaging at surgical pauses and for real-time image guidance with implementation of targeted OCT tracking. Even faster acquisition speeds are currently being developed with incorporation of a swept-source MIOCT engine. Further refinements and investigations will be directed toward continued integration for real-time volumetric imaging of surgical maneuvers. Translational Relevance: Ongoing development of seamless MIOCT systems will likely transform surgical visualization, approaches, and decision-making. PMID

  3. Treatment manuals: use in the treatment of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Laurel M; von Ranson, Kristin M

    2011-11-01

    As psychology has moved toward emphasizing evidence-based practice, use of treatment manuals has extended from research trials into clinical practice. Minimal research has directly evaluated use of manuals in clinical practice. This survey of international eating disorder professionals examined use of manuals with 259 clinicians' most recent client with bulimia nervosa. Although evidence-based manuals for bulimia nervosa exist, only 35.9% of clinicians reported using a manual. Clinicians were more likely to use a manual if they were younger; were treating an adult client; were clinical psychologists; were involved in research related to eating disorders; and endorsed a cognitive-behavioral orientation. Clinicians were less likely to use a manual if they provided eclectic psychotherapy that incorporated multiple psychotherapeutic approaches. We conclude that psychotherapy provided in clinical practice often does not align with the specific form validated in research trials, and "eclecticism" is at odds with efforts to disseminate manuals into clinical practice. PMID:21939960

  4. Sixteenth Annual Conference on Manual Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Manual control is discussed in terms of operator modeling, measurement of human response, mental workload, pilot/operator opinion, effects of motion, aircraft displays, supervisory control, automobile driving, and remote manipulation.

  5. 21 CFR 880.6785 - Manual patient transfer device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual patient transfer device. 880.6785 Section 880.6785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6785 Manual patient transfer device. (a) Identification. A manual patient...

  6. 76 FR 37118 - Manual Materials Handling (MMH) Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Manual Materials Handling (MMH) Workshop... Health, will be holding a two-day Manual Materials Handling (MMH) Workshop. The Workshop is a National... engineering solutions for manual materials handling jobs in Retail, Wholesale and Warehouse industries....

  7. Validation of Health Services Careers Curriculum Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Sheila D.

    This report is the result of a field test of "Health Service Careers" curriculum materials developed and published by the Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center, Oklahoma State Department of Vocational Technical Education. The results and conclusions reported in the study relate to student achievement and teacher evaluations and comments.…

  8. Validation of Finite Element Predictions of Cartilage Contact Pressure in the Human Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Andrew E.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Maas, Steve A.; Peters, Christopher L.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Methods to predict contact stresses in the hip can provide an improved understanding of load distribution in the normal and pathologic joint. The objectives of this study were to develop and validate a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for predicting cartilage contact stresses in the human hip using subject-specific geometry from computed tomography image data, and to assess the sensitivity of model predictions to boundary conditions, cartilage geometry, and cartilage material properties. Loads based on in vivo data were applied to a cadaveric hip joint to simulate walking, descending stairs and stair-climbing. Contact pressures and areas were measured using pressure sensitive film. CT image data were segmented and discretized into FE meshes of bone and cartilage. FE boundary and loading conditions mimicked the experimental testing. Fair to good qualitative correspondence was obtained between FE predictions and experimental measurements for simulated walking and descending stairs, while excellent agreement was obtained for stair-climbing. Experimental peak pressures, average pressures, and contact areas were 10.0 MPa (limit of film detection), 4.4-5.0 MPa and 321.9-425.1 mm2, respectively, while FE predicted peak pressures, average pressures and contact areas were 10.8-12.7 MPa, 5.1-6.2 MPa and 304.2-366.1 mm2, respectively. Misalignment errors, determined as the difference in root mean squared error before and after alignment of FE results, were less than 10%. Magnitude errors, determined as the residual error following alignment, were approximately 30% but decreased to 10-15% when the regions of highest pressure were compared. Alterations to the cartilage shear modulus, bulk modulus, or thickness resulted in ±25% change in peak pressures, while changes in average pressures and contact areas were minor (±10%). When the pelvis and proximal femur were represented as rigid, there were large changes, but the effect depended on the particular loading

  9. Concrete Practices & Procedures. Instructor Manual. Trainee Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laborers-AGC Education and Training Fund, Pomfret Center, CT.

    This packet consists of the instructor and trainee manuals for a concrete practices and procedures course. The instructor manual contains a schedule for an 80-hour, 10-day course and instructor outline. The outline provides a step-by-step description of the instructor's activities and includes answer sheets to accompany questions on information…

  10. Recognition of Manual Actions Using Vector Quantization and Dynamic Time Warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Marcel; Maycock, Jonathan; Schmidt, Florian Paul; Kramer, Oliver

    The recognition of manual actions, i.e., hand movements, hand postures and gestures, plays an important role in human-computer interaction, while belonging to a category of particularly difficult tasks. Using a Vicon system to capture 3D spatial data, we investigate the recognition of manual actions in tasks such as pouring a cup of milk and writing into a book. We propose recognizing sequences in multidimensional time-series by first learning a smooth quantization of the data, and then using a variant of dynamic time warping to recognize short sequences of prototypical motions in a long unknown sequence. An experimental analysis validates our approach. Short manual actions are successfully recognized and the approach is shown to be spatially invariant. We also show that the approach speeds up processing while not decreasing recognition performance.

  11. High-resolution In Vivo Manual Segmentation Protocol for Human Hippocampal Subfields Using 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Julie; Pruessner, Jens C; Sofia, Chavez; Schira, Mark M; Lobaugh, Nancy J; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Chakravarty, M Mallar

    2015-01-01

    The human hippocampus has been broadly studied in the context of memory and normal brain function and its role in different neuropsychiatric disorders has been heavily studied. While many imaging studies treat the hippocampus as a single unitary neuroanatomical structure, it is, in fact, composed of several subfields that have a complex three-dimensional geometry. As such, it is known that these subfields perform specialized functions and are differentially affected through the course of different disease states. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used as a powerful tool to interrogate the morphology of the hippocampus and its subfields. Many groups use advanced imaging software and hardware (>3T) to image the subfields; however this type of technology may not be readily available in most research and clinical imaging centers. To address this need, this manuscript provides a detailed step-by-step protocol for segmenting the full anterior-posterior length of the hippocampus and its subfields: cornu ammonis (CA) 1, CA2/CA3, CA4/dentate gyrus (DG), strata radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare (SR/SL/SM), and subiculum. This protocol has been applied to five subjects (3F, 2M; age 29-57, avg. 37). Protocol reliability is assessed by resegmenting either the right or left hippocampus of each subject and computing the overlap using the Dice's kappa metric. Mean Dice's kappa (range) across the five subjects are: whole hippocampus, 0.91 (0.90-0.92); CA1, 0.78 (0.77-0.79); CA2/CA3, 0.64 (0.56-0.73); CA4/dentate gyrus, 0.83 (0.81-0.85); strata radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare, 0.71 (0.68-0.73); and subiculum 0.75 (0.72-0.78). The segmentation protocol presented here provides other laboratories with a reliable method to study the hippocampus and hippocampal subfields in vivo using commonly available MR tools. PMID:26575133

  12. Nutrient Control Design Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nutrient Control Design Manual will present an extensive state-of-the-technology review of the engineering design and operation of nitrogen and phosphorous control technologies and techniques applied at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This manual will present ...

  13. DESIGN MANUAL: PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual summarizes process design information for the best developed methods for removing phosphorus from wastewater. his manual discusses several proven phosphorus removal methods, including phosphorus removal obtainable through biological activity as well as chemical precip...

  14. Validating the distribution of specific ventilation in healthy humans measured using proton MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Amran K.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Hopkins, Susan R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Darquenne, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Specific ventilation imaging (SVI) uses proton MRI to quantitatively map the distribution of specific ventilation (SV) in the human lung, using inhaled oxygen as a contrast agent. To validate this recent technique, we compared the quantitative measures of heterogeneity of the SV distribution in a 15-mm sagittal slice of lung obtained in 10 healthy supine subjects, (age 37 ± 10 yr, forced expiratory volume in 1 s 97 ± 7% predicted) using SVI to those obtained in the whole lung from multiple-breath nitrogen washout (MBW). Using the analysis of Lewis et al. (Lewis SM, Evans JW, Jalowayski AA. J App Physiol 44: 416–423, 1978), the most likely distribution of SV from the MBW data was computed and compared with the distribution of SV obtained from SVI, after normalizing for the difference in tidal volume. The average SV was 0.30 ± 0.10 MBW, compared with 0.36 ± 0.10 SVI (P = 0.01). The width of the distribution, a measure of the heterogeneity, obtained using both methods was comparable: 0.51 ± 0.06 and 0.47 ± 0.08 in MBW and SVI, respectively (P = 0.15). The MBW estimated width of the SV distribution was 0.05 (10.7%) higher than that estimated using SVI, and smaller than the intertest variability of the MBW estimation [inter-MBW (SD) for the width of the SV distribution was 0.08 (15.8)%]. To assess reliability, SVI was performed twice on 13 subjects showing small differences between measurements of SV heterogeneity (typical error 0.05, 12%). In conclusion, quantitative estimations of SV heterogeneity from SVI are reliable and similar to those obtained using MBW, with SVI providing spatial information that is absent in MBW. PMID:24505099

  15. Energy expenditure by doubly labeled water: validation in humans and proposed calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeller, D.A.; Ravussin, E.; Schutz, Y.; Acheson, K.J.; Baertschi, P.; Jequier, E.

    1986-05-01

    To further validate the doubly labeled water method for measurement of CO/sub 2/ production and energy expenditure in humans, we compared it with near-continuous respiratory gas exchange in nine healthy young adult males. Subjects were housed in a respiratory chamber for 4 days. Each received /sup 2/H/sub 2/(18)O at either a low (n = 6) or a moderate (n = 3) isotope dose. Low and moderate doses produced initial /sup 2/H enrichments of 5 and 10 X 10(-3) atom percent excess, respectively, and initial 18O enrichments of 2 and 2.5 X 10(-2) atom percent excess, respectively. Total body water was calculated from isotope dilution in saliva collected at 4 and 5 h after the dose. CO/sub 2/ production was calculated by the two-point method using the isotopic enrichments of urines collected just before each subject entered and left the chamber. Isotope enrichments relative to predose samples were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. At low isotope dose, doubly labeled water overestimated average daily energy expenditure by 8 +/- 9% (SD) (range -7 to 22%). At moderate dose the difference was reduced to +4 +/- 5% (range 0-9%). The isotope elimination curves for /sup 2/H and 18O from serial urines collected from one of the subjects showed expected diurnal variations but were otherwise quite smooth. The overestimate may be due to approximations in the corrections for isotope fractionation and isotope dilution. An alternative approach to the corrections is presented that reduces the overestimate to 1%.

  16. KDYNA user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Levatin, J.A.L.; Attia, A.V.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1990-09-28

    This report is a complete user's manual for KDYNA, the Earth Sciences version of DYNA2D. Because most features of DYNA2D have been retained in KDYNA much of this manual is identical to the DYNA2D user's manual.

  17. Nutrient Control Design Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this EPA design manual is to provide updated, state‐of‐the‐technology design guidance on nitrogen and phosphorus control at municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs). Similar to previous EPA manuals, this manual contains extensive information on the principles ...

  18. Quantitative detection of caffeine in human skin by confocal Raman spectroscopy--A systematic in vitro validation study.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Lutz; Anderski, Juliane; Windbergs, Maike

    2015-09-01

    For rational development and evaluation of dermal drug delivery, the knowledge of rate and extent of substance penetration into the human skin is essential. However, current analytical procedures are destructive, labor intense and lack a defined spatial resolution. In this context, confocal Raman microscopy bares the potential to overcome current limitations in drug depth profiling. Confocal Raman microscopy already proved its suitability for the acquisition of qualitative penetration profiles, but a comprehensive investigation regarding its suitability for quantitative measurements inside the human skin is still missing. In this work, we present a systematic validation study to deploy confocal Raman microscopy for quantitative drug depth profiling in human skin. After we validated our Raman microscopic setup, we successfully established an experimental procedure that allows correlating the Raman signal of a model drug with its controlled concentration in human skin. To overcome current drawbacks in drug depth profiling, we evaluated different modes of peak correlation for quantitative Raman measurements and offer a suitable operating procedure for quantitative drug depth profiling in human skin. In conclusion, we successfully demonstrate the potential of confocal Raman microscopy for quantitative drug depth profiling in human skin as valuable alternative to destructive state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:25828208

  19. FRMAC Assessment Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, H.

    1999-12-01

    The ingestion pathway assessment procedures cited in the current version of the ``RMAC Assessment Manual'', DOE/NV/11718-061 (September 1996) have been superseded by new US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance. This addendum replaces the obsolete procedures with a revised set based on the new guidance released by the FDA in August 1998. This addendum provides an overview of the new guidance, revised assessment methods, and assessment aids. It does not provide a general method of ingestion pathway analysis. The scope is limited to that covered by the new guidance titled, ``Accidental Radioactive Contamination of Human Food and Animal Feeds: Recommendations for State and Local Agencies,'' issued by the FDA in August 1998.

  20. 21 CFR 878.4950 - Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories. 878.4950 Section 878.4950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY...

  1. 21 CFR 878.4950 - Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories. 878.4950 Section 878.4950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY...

  2. 21 CFR 878.4950 - Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories. 878.4950 Section 878.4950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY...

  3. 21 CFR 878.4950 - Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories. 878.4950 Section 878.4950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY...

  4. The Model Human Processor and the Older Adult: Parameter Estimation and Validation Within a Mobile Phone Task

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzembski, Tiffany S.; Charness, Neil

    2009-01-01

    The authors estimate weighted mean values for nine information processing parameters for older adults using the Card, Moran, and Newell (1983) Model Human Processor model. The authors validate a subset of these parameters by modeling two mobile phone tasks using two different phones and comparing model predictions to a sample of younger (N = 20; Mage = 20) and older (N = 20; Mage = 69) adults. Older adult models fit keystroke-level performance at the aggregate grain of analysis extremely well (R = 0.99) and produced equivalent fits to previously validated younger adult models. Critical path analyses highlighted points of poor design as a function of cognitive workload, hardware/software design, and user characteristics. The findings demonstrate that estimated older adult information processing parameters are valid for modeling purposes, can help designers understand age-related performance using existing interfaces, and may support the development of age-sensitive technologies. PMID:18194048

  5. Why test animals to treat humans? On the validity of animal models.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Cameron

    2010-09-01

    Critics of animal modeling have advanced a variety of arguments against the validity of the practice. The point of one such form of argument is to establish that animal modeling is pointless and therefore immoral. In this article, critical arguments of this form are divided into three types, the pseudoscience argument, the disanalogy argument, and the predictive validity argument. I contend that none of these criticisms currently succeed, nor are they likely to. However, the connection between validity and morality is important, suggesting that critical efforts would be instructive if they addressed it in a more nuanced way. PMID:20934650

  6. The canine model of human cognitive aging and dementia: pharmacological validity of the model for assessment of human cognitive-enhancing drugs.

    PubMed

    Studzinski, Christa M; Araujo, Joseph A; Milgram, Norton W

    2005-03-01

    For the past 15 years we have investigated the aged beagle dog as a model for human aging and dementia. We have shown that dogs develop cognitive deficits and neuropathology seen in human aging and dementia. These similarities increase the likelihood that the model will be able to accurately predict the efficacy of Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatments as well as detect therapeutics with limited or no efficacy. Better predictive validity of cognitive-enhancing therapeutics (CETs) could lead to enormous cost savings by reducing the number of failed human clinical trials and also may reduce the likelihood of negative outcomes such as those recently observed in the AN-1792 clinical trials. The current review assesses the pharmacological validity of the canine model of human aging and dementia. We tested the efficacy of (1) CP-118,954 and phenserine, two acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, (2) an ampakine, (3) selegiline hydrochloride, two drugs that have failed human AD trials, and (4) adrafinil, a putative CET. Our research demonstrates that dogs not only develop isomorphic changes in human cognition and brain pathology, but also accurately predict the efficacy of known AD treatments and the absence or limited efficacy of treatments that failed clinical trials. These findings collectively support the utilization of the dog model as a preclinical screen for identifying novel CETs for both age-associated memory disorder and dementia. PMID:15795058

  7. Human factors design, verification, and validation for two types of control room upgrades at a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, Laurids Ronald

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the NUREG-0711 based human factors engineering (HFE) phases and associated elements required to support design, verification and validation (V&V), and implementation of a new plant process computer (PPC) and turbine control system (TCS) at a representative nuclear power plant. This paper reviews ways to take a human-system interface (HSI) specification and use it when migrating legacy PPC displays or designing displays with new functionality. These displays undergo iterative usability testing during the design phase and then undergo an integrated system validation (ISV) in a full scope control room training simulator. Following the successful demonstration of operator performance with the systems during the ISV, the new system is implemented at the plant, first in the training simulator and then in the main control room.

  8. Development and validation of a method for the detection and confirmation of biomarkers of exposure in human urine by means of restricted access material-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gonzalo, E; García-Gómez, D; Carabias-Martínez, R

    2010-01-01

    The present article describes the development and validation of a LC-MS/MS method for the determination and confirmation of biomarkers of exposure to different types of xenobiotics in human urine. The method combines the use of a restricted access material (RAM) coupled on-line to a LC-IT-MS system; in this way, a rapid and efficient matrix cleanup was achieved, reducing manual sample preparation to freezing and sample filtration. The ion trap (IT) mass spectrometry detector provided the selectivity, sensitivity and ruggedness needed for confirmatory purposes. The on-line RAM-LC-MS/MS method developed here has been validated as a quantitative confirmatory method according to the European Union (EU) Decision 2002/657/EC. The validation steps included the verification of linearity, repeatability, specificity, trueness/recovery, reproducibility, stability and ruggedness in fortified urine samples. Repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility, measured as intraday and interday precisions, were evaluated at two concentration levels, being 12.7% or below at the concentration corresponding to the quantification limits. Matrix effects and non-targeted qualitative analyses were also evaluated in fortified urine samples. Decision limits (CC(alpha)) and detection capabilities (CC(beta)) were in the range of 3.6-16.5 and 6.0-28.1ngmL(-1) respectively. The results of the validation process revealed that the proposed method is suitable for reliable quantification and confirmation of biomarkers of exposure to xenobiotics in human urine at low ngmL(-1) levels. In addition, working in Data-Dependent Scan mode the proposed method can be used for the screening of these compounds in urine samples. PMID:19931866

  9. Parametric Comparisons of Intracranial Mechanical Responses from Three Validated Finite Element Models of the Human Head

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Songbai; Ghadyani, Hamidreza; Bolander, Richard P.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Ford, James C.; Mcallister, Thomas W.; Flashman, Laura A.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Ernstrom, Karin; Jain, Sonia; Raman, Rema; Zhang, Liying; Greenwald, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of human head finite element (FE) models have been developed from different research groups over the years to study the mechanisms of traumatic brain injury. These models can vary substantially in model features and parameters, making it important to evaluate whether simulation results from one model are readily comparable with another, and whether response-based injury thresholds established from a specific model can be generalized when a different model is employed. The purpose of this study is to parametrically compare regional brain mechanical responses from three validated head FE models to test the hypothesis that regional brain responses are dependent on the specific head model employed as well as the region of interest (ROI). The Dartmouth Scaled and Normalized Model (DSNM), the Simulated Injury Monitor (SIMon), and the Wayne State University Head Injury Model (WSUHIM) were selected for comparisons. For model input, 144 unique kinematic conditions were created to represent the range of head impacts sustained by male collegiate hockey players during play. These impacts encompass the 50th, 95th, and 99th percentile peak linear and rotational accelerations at 16 impact locations around the head. Five mechanical variables (strain, strain rate, strain × strain rate, stress, and pressure) in seven ROIs reported from the FE models were compared using Generalized Estimating Equation statistical models. Highly significant differences existed among FE models for nearly all output variables and ROIs. The WSUHIM produced substantially higher peak values for almost all output variables regardless of the ROI compared to the DSNM and SIMon models (p < 0.05). DSNM also produced significantly different stress and pressure compared with SIMon for all ROIs (p < 0.05), but such differences were not consistent across ROIs for other variables. Regardless of FE model, most output variables were highly correlated with linear and rotational peak accelerations. The

  10. Impact of Serum and Plasma Matrices on the Titration of Human Inflammatory Biomarkers Using Analytically Validated SRM Assays.

    PubMed

    Dupin, Marilyne; Fortin, Tanguy; Larue-Triolet, Audrey; Surault, Isabelle; Beaulieu, Corinne; Gouel-Chéron, Aurélie; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Asehnoune, Karim; Roquilly, Antoine; Venet, Fabienne; Monneret, Guillaume; Lacoux, Xavier; Roitsch, Carolyn A; Pachot, Alexandre; Charrier, Jean-Philippe; Pons, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Protein biomarker discovery has inherent challenges linked to the validation of the analytical method used or to the impact of biological matrices. Matrix influences must be mastered to guarantee the reliability of the identified biomarkers to monitor human diseases. In this study, multiplexed mass spectrometry assays in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode have been developed to measure 107 inflammatory putative proteins in matched serum and plasma from 36 ICU trauma patients. The assays' validation directly in clinical samples was shown to be valuable to manage intersample variability. Using the validation process developed here, assays were validated for 58 biomarkers in serum, 57 in plasma, and 55 in both matrices. Correlation analyses demonstrated that the quantitation using SRM of most of the validated biomarkers (45/55) was impacted by the biological matrix and that the matrix impact was biomarker-dependent. Among the 45 impacted biomarkers, 23 were nevertheless correlated between serum and plasma, whereas the quantitation was shown to be equivalent in both for the 10 last proteins. Matrix selection using SRM is therefore suggested to be suitable prior to clinical evaluation of biomarkers in a large cohort of patients. PMID:27322794

  11. Intra-Laboratory Pre-Validation of a Human Cell Based in vitro Angiogenesis Assay for Testing Angiogenesis Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Sarkanen, Jertta-Riina; Mannerström, Marika; Vuorenpää, Hanna; Uotila, Jukka; Ylikomi, Timo; Heinonen, Tuula

    2010-01-01

    The developed standardized human cell based in vitro angiogenesis assay was intra-laboratory pre-validated to verify that the method is reliable and relevant for routine testing of modulators of angiogenesis, e.g., pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals. This assay is based on the earlier published method but it was improved and shown to be more sensitive and rapid than the previous assay. The performance of the assay was assessed by using six reference chemicals, which are widely used pharmaceuticals that inhibit angiogenesis: acetyl salicylic acid, erlotinib, 2-methoxyestradiol, levamisole, thalidomide, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. In the intra-laboratory pre-validation, the sensitivity of the assay (upper and lower limits of detection and linearity of response in tubule formation), batch to batch variation in tubule formation between different Master cell bank batches, and precision as well as the reliability of the assay (reproducibility and repeatability) were tested. The pre-set acceptance criteria for the intra-laboratory pre-validation study were met. The relevance of the assay in man was investigated by comparing the effects of reference chemicals and their concentrations to the published human data. The comparison showed a good concordance, which indicates that this human cell based angiogenesis model predicts well the effects in man and has the potential to be used to supplement and/or replace of animal tests. PMID:21779245

  12. Generation and validation of PAX7 reporter lines from human iPS cells using CRISPR/Cas9 technology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianbo; Hunt, Samuel D; Xue, Haipeng; Liu, Ying; Darabi, Radbod

    2016-03-01

    Directed differentiation of iPS cells toward various tissue progenitors has been the focus of recent research. Therefore, generation of tissue-specific reporter iPS cell lines provides better understanding of developmental stages in iPS cells. This technical report describes an efficient strategy for generation and validation of knock-in reporter lines in human iPS cells using the Cas9-nickase system. Here, we have generated a knock-in human iPS cell line for the early myogenic lineage specification gene of PAX7. By introduction of site-specific double-stranded breaks (DSB) in the genomic locus of PAX7 using CRISPR/Cas9 nickase pairs, a 2A-GFP reporter with selection markers has been incorporated before the stop codon of the PAX7 gene at the last exon. After positive and negative selection, single cell-derived human iPS clones have been isolated and sequenced for in-frame positioning of the reporter construct. Finally, by using a nuclease-dead Cas9 activator (dCas9-VP160) system, the promoter region of PAX7 has been targeted for transient gene induction to validate the GFP reporter activity. This was confirmed by flow cytometry analysis and immunostaining for PAX7 and GFP. This technical report provides a practical guideline for generation and validation of knock-in reporters using CRISPR/Cas9 system. PMID:26826926

  13. Microbial ecology laboratory procedures manual NASA/MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    1990-01-01

    An essential part of the efficient operation of any microbiology laboratory involved in sample analysis is a standard procedures manual. The purpose of this manual is to provide concise and well defined instructions on routine technical procedures involving sample analysis and methods for monitoring and maintaining quality control within the laboratory. Of equal importance is the safe operation of the laboratory. This manual outlines detailed procedures to be followed in the microbial ecology laboratory to assure safety, analytical control, and validity of results.

  14. Surface Environmental Surveillance Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect

    RW Hanf; TM Poston

    2000-09-20

    Environmental surveillance data are used in assessing the impact of current and past site operations on human health and the environment, demonstrating compliance with applicable local, state, and federal environmental regulations, and verifying the adequacy of containment and effluent controls. SESP sampling schedules are reviewed, revised, and published each calendar year in the Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule. Environmental samples are collected by SESP staff in accordance with the approved sample collection procedures documented in this manual.

  15. Validating a human biotelemetry system for use in captive blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus).

    PubMed

    Laubscher, Liesel L; Hoffman, Louwrens C; Pitts, Neville I; Raath, Jacobus P

    2015-01-01

    We fitted two blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) with modified versions of the Equivital™ EQ02 wireless monitoring system to evaluate if the device could accurately measure heart rate and respiration rate in this species whilst anaesthetized as well as whilst fully conscious in captivity. Whilst under anaesthesia, we monitored each animal's heart rate and respiration rate using the Equivital™ biotelemetry belt, a Cardell(®) veterinary monitor and manual measurements. The animals were also administered doxapram hydrochloride (Dopram(®) ) and adrenaline intravenously at different times to stimulate changes in respiration and heart rate, respectively. Once 30 minutes of monitoring was completed, we reversed the anaesthetic and left the animals in captivity for 24 hours whilst wearing the Equivital™ belts. After 24 hr, we repeated the anaesthesia and monitoring as well as the administration of the doxapram hydrochloride and adrenaline. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) calculated between all three monitoring methods showed moderate to excellent agreements for heart rate on both days (ICC: 0.73-0.98). ICCs calculated between the three methods for respiration rate showed good to excellent agreement between the Equivital belt and the other two methods (0.82-0.92) with the exception of occasions when only poor to fair agreements were found between the Cardell(®) measurements and manual measurements. Heart rate and respiration rate were also found to increase with motion while animals were in captivity. The results indicate that a modified version of the Equivital™ EQ02 system can be used as a potential biotelemetry device for measuring heart and respiration rate in captive blue wildebeest. PMID:25982471

  16. Analysis of Human Innate Immune Responses to PRINT Fabricated Nanoparticles with Cross Validation Using a Humanized Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, GR; Roberts, RA; Guo, H; Reuter, K; Shen, T; Sempowski, GD; McKinnon, Karen P.; Su, L; DeSimone, JM; Ting, JP

    2015-01-01

    Ideal nanoparticle (NP)-based drug and vaccine delivery vectors should be free of inherent cytotoxic or immunostimulatory properties. Therefore, determining baseline immune responses to nanomaterials is of utmost importance when designing human therapeutics. We characterized the response of human immune cells to hydrogel NPs fabricated using Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINT) technology. We found preferential NP uptake by primary CD14+ monocytes, which was significantly reduced upon PEGylation of the NP surface. Multiplex cytokine analysis of NP treated primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hu-PBMC) suggests that PRINT based hydrogel NPs do not evoke significant inflammatory responses nor do they induce cytotoxicity or complement activation. We furthered these studies using an in vivo humanized mouse model and similarly found preferential NP uptake by human CD14+ monocytes without systemic inflammatory cytokine responses. These studies suggest that PRINT hydrogel particles form a desirable platform for vaccine and drug delivery as they neither induce inflammation nor toxicity. PMID:25596079

  17. Bigfoot Field Manual, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.L.; Burrows, S.; Gower, S.T.; Cohen, W.B.

    1999-09-01

    The BigFoot Project is funded by the Earth Science Enterprise to collect and organize data to be used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Observing System (EOS) Validation Program. The data collected by the BigFoot Project are unique in being ground-based observations coincident with satellite overpasses. In addition to collecting data, the BigFoot project will develop and test new algorithms for scaling point measurements to the same spatial scales as the EOS satellite products. This BigFoot Field Manual will be used to achieve completeness and consistency of data collected at four initial BigFoot sites and at future sites that may collect similar validation data. Therefore, validation datasets submitted to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center that have been compiled in a manner consistent with the field manual will be especially valuable in the validation program.

  18. Development and validation of a new dynamic computer-controlled model of the human stomach and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Aurélie; Denis, Sylvain; le Goff, Olivier; Sicardi, Vincent; François, Olivier; Yao, Anne-Françoise; Garrait, Ghislain; Manzi, Aimé Pacifique; Beyssac, Eric; Alric, Monique; Blanquet-Diot, Stéphanie

    2016-06-01

    For ethical, regulatory, and economic reasons, in vitro human digestion models are increasingly used as an alternative to in vivo assays. This study aims to present the new Engineered Stomach and small INtestine (ESIN) model and its validation for pharmaceutical applications. This dynamic computer-controlled system reproduces, according to in vivo data, the complex physiology of the human stomach and small intestine, including pH, transit times, chyme mixing, digestive secretions, and passive absorption of digestion products. Its innovative design allows a progressive meal intake and the differential gastric emptying of solids and liquids. The pharmaceutical behavior of two model drugs (paracetamol immediate release form and theophylline sustained release tablet) was studied in ESIN during liquid digestion. The results were compared to those found with a classical compendial method (paddle apparatus) and in human volunteers. Paracetamol and theophylline tablets showed similar absorption profiles in ESIN and in healthy subjects. For theophylline, a level A in vitro-in vivo correlation could be established between the results obtained in ESIN and in humans. Interestingly, using a pharmaceutical basket, the swelling and erosion of the theophylline sustained release form was followed during transit throughout ESIN. ESIN emerges as a relevant tool for pharmaceutical studies but once further validated may find many other applications in nutritional, toxicological, and microbiological fields. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1325-1335. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26616643

  19. CSTEM User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, M.; McKnight, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    This manual is a combination of a user manual, theory manual, and programmer manual. The reader is assumed to have some previous exposure to the finite element method. This manual is written with the idea that the CSTEM (Coupled Structural Thermal Electromagnetic-Computer Code) user needs to have a basic understanding of what the code is actually doing in order to properly use the code. For that reason, the underlying theory and methods used in the code are described to a basic level of detail. The manual gives an overview of the CSTEM code: how the code came into existence, a basic description of what the code does, and the order in which it happens (a flowchart). Appendices provide a listing and very brief description of every file used by the CSTEM code, including the type of file it is, what routine regularly accesses the file, and what routine opens the file, as well as special features included in CSTEM.

  20. Do animal models provide a valid analogue for human drug lapse and relapse? Comment on Leri and Stewart (2002).

    PubMed

    Marlatt, G Alan

    2002-11-01

    Prior research on animal models of drug relapse has demonstrated that passive exposure to an addictive substance following acquisition and extinction of drug self-administration has a "priming effect" on subsequent drug use. The validity of this animal analogue of human relapse can be criticized, however, because most human drug relapses are precipitated by the user's voluntary self-administration of a substance. The results of the present study by F. Leri and J. Stewart (2002) clearly show that if the initial heroin lapse is self-administered by rats, subsequent heroin seeking during the relapse test is significantly greater than if the heroin is externally administered. These results help bridge the gap between animal and human models of drug use and highlight the significance of both behavioral and environmental determinants of relapse. PMID:12498331

  1. Validation of In utero Tractography of Human Fetal Commissural and Internal Capsule Fibers with Histological Structure Tensor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mitter, Christian; Jakab, András; Brugger, Peter C.; Ricken, Gerda; Gruber, Gerlinde M.; Bettelheim, Dieter; Scharrer, Anke; Langs, Georg; Hainfellner, Johannes A.; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography offer the unique possibility to visualize the developing white matter macroanatomy of the human fetal brain in vivo and in utero and are currently under investigation for their potential use in the diagnosis of developmental pathologies of the human central nervous system. However, in order to establish in utero DTI as a clinical imaging tool, an independent comparison between macroscopic imaging and microscopic histology data in the same subject is needed. The present study aimed to cross-validate normal as well as abnormal in utero tractography results of commissural and internal capsule fibers in human fetal brains using postmortem histological structure tensor (ST) analysis. In utero tractography findings from two structurally unremarkable and five abnormal fetal brains were compared to the results of postmortem ST analysis applied to digitalized whole hemisphere sections of the same subjects. An approach to perform ST-based deterministic tractography in histological sections was implemented to overcome limitations in correlating in utero tractography to postmortem histology data. ST analysis and histology-based tractography of fetal brain sections enabled the direct assessment of the anisotropic organization and main fiber orientation of fetal telencephalic layers on a micro- and macroscopic scale, and validated in utero tractography results of corpus callosum and internal capsule fiber tracts. Cross-validation of abnormal in utero tractography results could be achieved in four subjects with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) and in two cases with malformations of internal capsule fibers. In addition, potential limitations of current DTI-based in utero tractography could be demonstrated in several brain regions. Combining the three-dimensional nature of DTI-based in utero tractography with the microscopic resolution provided by histological ST analysis may ultimately facilitate a more complete morphologic

  2. Validation of In utero Tractography of Human Fetal Commissural and Internal Capsule Fibers with Histological Structure Tensor Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mitter, Christian; Jakab, András; Brugger, Peter C; Ricken, Gerda; Gruber, Gerlinde M; Bettelheim, Dieter; Scharrer, Anke; Langs, Georg; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography offer the unique possibility to visualize the developing white matter macroanatomy of the human fetal brain in vivo and in utero and are currently under investigation for their potential use in the diagnosis of developmental pathologies of the human central nervous system. However, in order to establish in utero DTI as a clinical imaging tool, an independent comparison between macroscopic imaging and microscopic histology data in the same subject is needed. The present study aimed to cross-validate normal as well as abnormal in utero tractography results of commissural and internal capsule fibers in human fetal brains using postmortem histological structure tensor (ST) analysis. In utero tractography findings from two structurally unremarkable and five abnormal fetal brains were compared to the results of postmortem ST analysis applied to digitalized whole hemisphere sections of the same subjects. An approach to perform ST-based deterministic tractography in histological sections was implemented to overcome limitations in correlating in utero tractography to postmortem histology data. ST analysis and histology-based tractography of fetal brain sections enabled the direct assessment of the anisotropic organization and main fiber orientation of fetal telencephalic layers on a micro- and macroscopic scale, and validated in utero tractography results of corpus callosum and internal capsule fiber tracts. Cross-validation of abnormal in utero tractography results could be achieved in four subjects with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) and in two cases with malformations of internal capsule fibers. In addition, potential limitations of current DTI-based in utero tractography could be demonstrated in several brain regions. Combining the three-dimensional nature of DTI-based in utero tractography with the microscopic resolution provided by histological ST analysis may ultimately facilitate a more complete morphologic

  3. Industrial labor relations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Industrial Labor Relations Manual provides internal guidelines and procedures to assist NASA Field Installations in dealing with contractor labor management disputes, Service Contract Act variance hearings, and to provide access of Labor Union Representatives to NASA for the purpose of maintaining schedules and goals in connection with vital NASA programs. This manual will be revised by page changes as revisions become necessary. Initial distribution of this manual has been made to NASA Headquarters and Field Installations.

  4. Validated spectrofluorimetric method for determination of two phosphodiesterase inhibitors tadalafil and vardenafil in pharmaceutical preparations and spiked human plasma.

    PubMed

    Abu El-Enin, Mohammed Abu Bakr; Al-Ghaffar Hammouda, Mohammed El-Sayed Abd; El-Sherbiny, Dina Tawfik; El-Wasseef, Dalia Rashad; El-Ashry, Saadia Mahmoud

    2016-02-01

    A valid, sensitive and rapid spectrofluorimetric method has been developed and validated for determination of both tadalafil (TAD) and vardenafil (VAR) either in their pure form, in their tablet dosage forms or spiked in human plasma. This method is based on measurement of the native fluorescence of both drugs in acetonitrile at λem 330 and 470 nm after excitation at 280 and 275 nm for tadalafil and vardenafil, respectively. Linear relationships were obtained over the concentration range 4-40 and 10-250 ng/mL with a minimum detection of 1 and 3 ng/mL for tadalafil and vardenafil, respectively. Various experimental parameters affecting the fluorescence intensity were carefully studied and optimized. The developed method was applied successfully for the determination of tadalafil and vardenafil in bulk drugs and tablet dosage forms. Moreover, the high sensitivity of the proposed method permitted their determination in spiked human plasma. The developed method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity, lower limit of quantification (LOQ), lower limit of detection (LOD), precision and accuracy. The mean recoveries of the analytes in pharmaceutical preparations were in agreement with those obtained from the comparison methods, as revealed by statistical analysis of the obtained results using Student's t-test and the variance ratio F-test. PMID:26019060

  5. Educational Services for Schoolage Parents. Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Office of Program Development.

    This resource manual contains the goals, evaluation design, evaluation results, and complete description of a program developed for schoolage parents in the New Brunswick, New Jersey public schools. The project was validated in 1973 by the standards and guidelines of the U.S. Office of Education and found to be successful, innovative,…

  6. Involvement of the left insula in the ecological validity of the human voice

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Yuri; Kuriki, Shinji; Nakano, Tamami

    2015-01-01

    A subtle difference between a real human and an artificial object that resembles a human evokes an impression of a large qualitative difference between them. This suggests the existence of a neural mechanism that processes the sense of humanness. To examine the presence of such a mechanism, we compared the behavioral and brain responses of participants who listened to human and artificial singing voices created from vocal fragments of a real human voice. The behavioral experiment showed that the song sung by human voices more often elicited positive feelings and feelings of humanness than the same song sung by artificial voices, although the lyrics, melody, and rhythm were identical. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed significantly higher activation in the left posterior insula in response to human voices than in response to artificial voices. Insular activation was not merely evoked by differences in acoustic features between the voices. Therefore, these results suggest that the left insula participates in the neural processing of the ecological quality of the human voice. PMID:25739519

  7. Involvement of the left insula in the ecological validity of the human voice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yuri; Kuriki, Shinji; Nakano, Tamami

    2015-01-01

    A subtle difference between a real human and an artificial object that resembles a human evokes an impression of a large qualitative difference between them. This suggests the existence of a neural mechanism that processes the sense of humanness. To examine the presence of such a mechanism, we compared the behavioral and brain responses of participants who listened to human and artificial singing voices created from vocal fragments of a real human voice. The behavioral experiment showed that the song sung by human voices more often elicited positive feelings and feelings of humanness than the same song sung by artificial voices, although the lyrics, melody, and rhythm were identical. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed significantly higher activation in the left posterior insula in response to human voices than in response to artificial voices. Insular activation was not merely evoked by differences in acoustic features between the voices. Therefore, these results suggest that the left insula participates in the neural processing of the ecological quality of the human voice. PMID:25739519

  8. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  9. Instruct coders' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, J.

    1971-01-01

    A manual designed both as an instructional manual for beginning coders and as a reference manual for the coding language INSTRUCT, is presented. The manual includes the major programs necessary to implement the teaching system and lists the limitation of current implementation. A detailed description is given of how to code a lesson, what buttons to push, and what utility programs to use. Suggestions for debugging coded lessons and the error messages that may be received during assembly or while running the lesson are given.

  10. EMSL Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Nancy S.

    2009-03-25

    This manual is a general resource tool to assist EMSL users and Laboratory staff within EMSL locate official policy, practice and subject matter experts. It is not intended to replace or amend any formal Battelle policy or practice. Users of this manual should rely only on Battelle’s Standard Based Management System (SBMS) for official policy. No contractual commitment or right of any kind is created by this manual. Battelle management reserves the right to alter, change, or delete any information contained within this manual without prior notice.

  11. EMSL Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Nancy S.

    2009-06-18

    This manual is a general resource tool to assist EMSL users and Laboratory staff within EMSL locate official policy, practice and subject matter experts. It is not intended to replace or amend any formal Battelle policy or practice. Users of this manual should rely only on Battelle’s Standard Based Management System (SBMS) for official policy. No contractual commitment or right of any kind is created by this manual. Battelle management reserves the right to alter, change, or delete any information contained within this manual without prior notice.

  12. Design and Validation of a Morphing Myoelectric Hand Posture Controller Based on Principal Component Analysis of Human Grasping

    PubMed Central

    Segil, Jacob L.; Weir, Richard F. ff.

    2015-01-01

    An ideal myoelectric prosthetic hand should have the ability to continuously morph between any posture like an anatomical hand. This paper describes the design and validation of a morphing myoelectric hand controller based on principal component analysis of human grasping. The controller commands continuously morphing hand postures including functional grasps using between two and four surface electromyography (EMG) electrodes pairs. Four unique maps were developed to transform the EMG control signals in the principal component domain. A preliminary validation experiment was performed by 10 nonamputee subjects to determine the map with highest performance. The subjects used the myoelectric controller to morph a virtual hand between functional grasps in a series of randomized trials. The number of joints controlled accurately was evaluated to characterize the performance of each map. Additional metrics were studied including completion rate, time to completion, and path efficiency. The highest performing map controlled over 13 out of 15 joints accurately. PMID:23649286

  13. Automation and validation of micronucleus detection in the 3D EpiDerm™ human reconstructed skin assay and correlation with 2D dose responses.

    PubMed

    Chapman, K E; Thomas, A D; Wills, J W; Pfuhler, S; Doak, S H; Jenkins, G J S

    2014-05-01

    Recent restrictions on the testing of cosmetic ingredients in animals have resulted in the need to test the genotoxic potential of chemicals exclusively in vitro prior to licensing. However, as current in vitro tests produce some misleading positive results, sole reliance on such tests could prevent some chemicals with safe or beneficial exposure levels from being marketed. The 3D human reconstructed skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay is a promising new in vitro approach designed to assess genotoxicity of dermally applied compounds. The assay utilises a highly differentiated in vitro model of the human epidermis. For the first time, we have applied automated micronucleus detection to this assay using MetaSystems Metafer Slide Scanning Platform (Metafer), demonstrating concordance with manual scoring. The RSMN assay's fixation protocol was found to be compatible with the Metafer, providing a considerably shorter alternative to the recommended Metafer protocol. Lowest observed genotoxic effect levels (LOGELs) were observed for mitomycin-C at 4.8 µg/ml and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) at 1750 µg/ml when applied topically to the skin surface. In-medium dosing with MMS produced a LOGEL of 20 µg/ml, which was very similar to the topical LOGEL when considering the total mass of MMS added. Comparisons between 3D medium and 2D LOGELs resulted in a 7-fold difference in total mass of MMS applied to each system, suggesting a protective function of the 3D microarchitecture. Interestingly, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a positive clastogen in 2D systems, tested negative in this assay. A non-genotoxic carcinogen, methyl carbamate, produced negative results, as expected. We also demonstrated expression of the DNA repair protein N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase in EpiDerm™. Our preliminary validation here demonstrates that the RSMN assay may be a valuable follow-up to the current in vitro test battery, and together with its automation, could contribute to minimising unnecessary in vivo

  14. Automation and validation of micronucleus detection in the 3D EpiDerm™ human reconstructed skin assay and correlation with 2D dose responses

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, K. E.; Thomas, A. D.; Jenkins, G. J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent restrictions on the testing of cosmetic ingredients in animals have resulted in the need to test the genotoxic potential of chemicals exclusively in vitro prior to licensing. However, as current in vitro tests produce some misleading positive results, sole reliance on such tests could prevent some chemicals with safe or beneficial exposure levels from being marketed. The 3D human reconstructed skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay is a promising new in vitro approach designed to assess genotoxicity of dermally applied compounds. The assay utilises a highly differentiated in vitro model of the human epidermis. For the first time, we have applied automated micronucleus detection to this assay using MetaSystems Metafer Slide Scanning Platform (Metafer), demonstrating concordance with manual scoring. The RSMN assay’s fixation protocol was found to be compatible with the Metafer, providing a considerably shorter alternative to the recommended Metafer protocol. Lowest observed genotoxic effect levels (LOGELs) were observed for mitomycin-C at 4.8 µg/ml and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) at 1750 µg/ml when applied topically to the skin surface. In-medium dosing with MMS produced a LOGEL of 20 µg/ml, which was very similar to the topical LOGEL when considering the total mass of MMS added. Comparisons between 3D medium and 2D LOGELs resulted in a 7-fold difference in total mass of MMS applied to each system, suggesting a protective function of the 3D microarchitecture. Interestingly, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a positive clastogen in 2D systems, tested negative in this assay. A non-genotoxic carcinogen, methyl carbamate, produced negative results, as expected. We also demonstrated expression of the DNA repair protein N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase in EpiDerm™. Our preliminary validation here demonstrates that the RSMN assay may be a valuable follow-up to the current in vitro test battery, and together with its automation, could contribute to minimising unnecessary in

  15. Evaluation of validity and reliability of a methodology for measuring human postural attitude and its relation to temporomandibular joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Ramón Fuentes; Carter, Pablo; Muñoz, Sergio; Silva, Héctor; Venegas, Gonzalo Hernán Oporto; Cantin, Mario; Ottone, Nicolás Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs) are caused by several factors such as anatomical, neuromuscular and psychological alterations. A relationship has been established between TMJDs and postural alterations, a type of anatomical alteration. An anterior position of the head requires hyperactivity of the posterior neck region and shoulder muscles to prevent the head from falling forward. This compensatory muscular function may cause fatigue, discomfort and trigger point activation. To our knowledge, a method for assessing human postural attitude in more than one plane has not been reported. Thus, the aim of this study was to design a methodology to measure the external human postural attitude in frontal and sagittal planes, with proper validity and reliability analyses. METHODS The variable postures of 78 subjects (36 men, 42 women; age 18–24 years) were evaluated. The postural attitudes of the subjects were measured in the frontal and sagittal planes, using an acromiopelvimeter, grid panel and Fox plane. RESULTS The method we designed for measuring postural attitudes had adequate reliability and validity, both qualitatively and quantitatively, based on Cohen’s Kappa coefficient (> 0.87) and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r = 0.824, > 80%). CONCLUSION This method exhibits adequate metrical properties and can therefore be used in further research on the association of human body posture with skeletal types and TMJDs. PMID:26768173

  16. Boating Safety Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coast Guard, Washington, DC.

    The training manual serves as the text for the Coast Guard's boating safety 32-hour course and for the D-8 Qualification Code Recertification Course. The manual is designed for self-study or for use with an instructor-led course. Each chapter concludes with a quiz to be used as a review of chaper content. Opening chapters review the use of the…

  17. Home Maintenance Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Jim; And Others

    This manual, written especially for the Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission, is a simply worded, step-by-step guide to home maintenance for new homeowners. It can be used for self-study or it can serve as instructional material for a training class on home ownership. The manual is organized in nine sections that cover the following…

  18. Manual for Refugee Sponsorship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Kathleen; Taran, Patrick A.

    This manual provides guidelines for religious congregations interested in setting up programs to sponsor refugees. The manual describes the psychological implications of the refugee experience and discusses initial steps in organizing for sponsorship. Detailed information is provided for sponsors regarding: finances and mobilization of resources;…

  19. School Fire Safety Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. General Education Div.

    This manual provides the background information necessary for the planning of school fire safety programs by local school officials, particularly in Arkansas. The manual first discusses the need for such programs and cites the Arkansas state law regarding them. Policies established by the Arkansas State Board of Education to implement the legal…

  20. School District Energy Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials International, Reston, VA.

    This manual serves as an energy conservation reference and management guide for school districts. The School District Energy Program (SDEP) is designed to provide information and/or assistance to school administrators planning to implement a comprehensive energy management program. The manual consists of 15 parts. Part 1 describes the SDEP; Parts…

  1. Functional Handwriting Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Louise; Lehotsky, Rutheda R.

    An inservice project to review the functional handwriting being taught in the Williamsport, Pennsylvania, school district produced a handwriting manual that provides teachers and students with models of letter forms and instructional exercises leading to the development of an individualized style of handwriting. The manual describes student…

  2. NYS Foster Parent Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This manual was developed for use in foster parents' day-to-day life with the children in their care. It gives them practical information on topics like medical care, payments, and the role of the court, and also provides guidance on areas like welcoming a child, discipline, and parent visits. The manual emphasizes the role of foster parents in…

  3. Indoor Air Quality Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin Union Free School District, NY.

    This manual identifies ways to improve a school's indoor air quality (IAQ) and discusses practical actions that can be carried out by school staff in managing air quality. The manual includes discussions of the many sources contributing to school indoor air pollution and the preventive planning for each including renovation and repair work,…

  4. Learning Resources Evaluations Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunes, Evelyn H., Ed.

    This manual contains evaluations of 196 instructional products listed in Virginia's Adult Basic Education Curricula Resource Catalog. It is intended as a convenient reference manual for making informed decisions concerning materials for adult learners in adult basic education, English-as-a-Second-Language instruction, and general educational…

  5. Materials inventory management manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This NASA Materials Inventory Management Manual (NHB 4100.1) is issued pursuant to Section 203(c)(1) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (42 USC 2473). It sets forth policy, performance standards, and procedures governing the acquisition, management and use of materials. This Manual is effective upon receipt.

  6. Circulation Aide Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeson, Alan O.

    This training manual provides instruction on shelving and other duties for student assistants in the learning resources center at the College of Dupage, located in Illinois. It is noted that prospective student circulation aides are required to read the manual and pass a written test on policies and procedures before they are allowed to shelve…

  7. EPA VAN OPERATIONAL MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual generally describes the EPA Van, and discusses both its energy control system and Van operation. The manual includes instructions for the Van's transportation, setup, safety, troubleshooting, and maintenance. The Van is a mobile research unit, designed for testing in v...

  8. Biology Laboratory Safety Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that schools prepare or adapt a biosafety manual, and that instructors develop a list of safety procedures applicable to their own lab and distribute it to each student. In this way, safety issues will be brought to each student's attention. This document is an example of such a manual. It contains…

  9. Technical Manual. The ACT®

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2014

    2014-01-01

    This manual contains technical information about the ACT® college readiness assessment. The principal purpose of this manual is to document the technical characteristics of the ACT in light of its intended purposes. ACT regularly conducts research as part of the ongoing formative evaluation of its programs. The research is intended to ensure that…

  10. Miami University Information Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami Univ., Oxford, OH.

    The 1975 information manual is designed to provide current data on policies, procedures, services, facilities, organization and governance of Miami University and, through the extensive index, quick access to this information. The manual is complementary to the university catalog and directory. Information relating to students is in the Student…

  11. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  12. Validation of murine and human placental explant cultures for use in sex steroid and phase II conjugation toxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Sato, Brittany L; Ward, Monika A; Astern, Joshua M; Kendal-Wright, Claire E; Collier, Abby C

    2015-02-01

    Human primary placental explant culture is well established for cytokine signaling and toxicity, but has not been validated for steroidogenic or metabolic toxicology. The technique has never been investigated in the mouse. We characterized human and mouse placental explants for up to 96 h in culture. Explant viability (Lactate dehydrogenase) and sex steroid levels were measured in media using spectrophotometry and ELISA, respectively. Expression and activities of the steroidogenic (3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, Cytochrome P45017A1, Cytochrome P45019), conjugation (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, sulfotransferase (SULT)), and regeneration (β-glucuronidase, arylsulfatase C (ASC)) enzymes were determined biochemically in tissues with fluorimetric and spectrophotometric assays, and western blot. Explants were viable up to 96 h, but progesterone, estrone, and 17β-estradiol secretion decreased. Steroidogenic enzyme expression and activities were stable in mouse explants and similar to levels in freshly isolated tissues, but were lower in human explants than in fresh tissue (P<0.01). Human and mouse explants exhibited significantly less conjugation after 96 h, SULT was not detected in the mouse, and neither explants had active ASC, although proteins were expressed. Mouse explants may be useful for steroid biochemistry and endocrine disruption studies, but not metabolic conjugation. In contrast, human explants may be useful for studying conjugation for <48 h, but not for steroid/endocrine studies. PMID:25283089

  13. Validation of murine and human placental explant cultures for use in sex steroid and phase II conjugation toxicology studies

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Brittany L.; Ward, Monika A.; Astern, Joshua M.; Kendal-Wright, Claire E.; Collier, Abby C.

    2014-01-01

    Human primary placental explant culture is well established for cytokine signaling and toxicity, but has not been validated for steroidogenic or metabolic toxicology. The technique has never been investigated in the mouse. We characterized human and mouse placental explants for up to 96hr in culture. Explant viability (Lactate dehydrogenase) and sex steroid levels were measured in media using spectrophotometry and ELISA, respectively. Expression and activities of the steroidogenic (3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, Cytochrome P45017A1, Cytochrome P45019), conjugation (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, sulfotransferase (SULT)), and regeneration (β-glucuronidase, arylsulfatase C (ASC)) enzymes were determined biochemically in tissues with fluorimetric and spectrophotometric assays, and western blot. Explants were viable up to 96hr, but progesterone, estrone, and 17β-estradiol secretion decreased. Steroidogenic enzyme expression and activities were stable in mouse explants and similar to levels in freshly isolated tissues, but were lower in human explants than in fresh tissue (P<0.01). Human and mouse explants exhibited significantly less conjugation after 96hr, SULT was not detected in the mouse, and neither explants had active ASC, although proteins were expressed. Mouse explants may be useful for steroid biochemistry and endocrine disruption studies, but not metabolic conjugation. In contrast, human explants may be useful for studying conjugation for <48hr, but not for steroid/endocrine studies. PMID:25283089

  14. Validation of Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells as a Model for Influenza A Infections in Human Distal Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A. Sally; Chertow, Daniel S.; Moyer, Jenna E.; Suzich, Jon; Sandouk, Aline; Dorward, David W.; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Primary normal human bronchial/tracheal epithelial (NHBE) cells, derived from the distal-most aspect of the trachea at the bifurcation, have been used for a number of studies in respiratory disease research. Differences between the source tissue and the differentiated primary cells may impact infection studies based on this model. Therefore, we examined how well-differentiated NHBE cells compared with their source tissue, the human distal trachea, as well as the ramifications of these differences on influenza A viral pathogenesis research using this model. We employed a histological analysis including morphological measurements, electron microscopy, multi-label immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, lectin histochemistry, and microarray expression analysis to compare differentiated NHBEs to human distal tracheal epithelium. Pseudostratified epithelial height, cell type variety and distribution varied significantly. Electron microscopy confirmed differences in cellular attachment and paracellular junctions. Influenza receptor lectin histochemistry revealed that α2,3 sialic acids were rarely present on the apical aspect of the differentiated NHBE cells, but were present in low numbers in the distal trachea. We bound fluorochrome bioconjugated virus to respiratory tissue and NHBE cells and infected NHBE cells with human influenza A viruses. Both indicated that the pattern of infection progression in these cells correlated with autopsy studies of fatal cases from the 2009 pandemic. PMID:25604814

  15. Supervision: Trainer's Manual and Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliasoph, Beverly; And Others

    This manual is designed to train those helping professionals who carry supervisory responsibility for the work of counselors in drug or other substance abuse programs. The purpose of this training course include identification and desceiption of supervision forms, processes and skills, and development of supervisory competencies useful in the work…

  16. Petty Cash. Student's Manual and Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElveen, Peggy C.

    Both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on maintaining a petty cash fund are included in this packet, which is one of a series. The student materials include a pretest, five learning activities which contain the information and forms needed to complete the activities, a student self-check, with each activity, and a posttest. The…

  17. Taking Inventory. Student's Manual and Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamer, Jean

    Supporting performance objective 56 of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Secretarial Catalog, both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on taking inventory are included in this packet. (The packet is the first in a set of nine on performing computational clerical activities--CE 016 951-959.) The…

  18. Writing Checks. Student's Manual and Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamer, Jean

    Supporting performance objective 54 of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Secretarial Catalog, both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on writing checks are included in this packet. (The packet is the sixth in a set of nine on performing computational clerical activities--CE 016 951-959.) The…

  19. Filing Geographically. Student's Manual and Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Sadie

    Supporting performance objective 23 of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Secretarial Catalog, both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on filing materials geographically are included in this packet. (The packet is the fifth in a set of nine on maintaining files and a library--CE 016 939-947.) The…

  20. Filing Numerically. Student's Manual and Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Sadie

    Supporting performance objective 22 of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Secretarial Catalog, both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on filing materials numerically are included in this packet. (The packet is the fourth in a set of nine on maintaining files and a library--CE 016 939-947.) The…

  1. Chain Feeding. Student's Manual and Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snapp, Jane

    Supporting performance objectives 82, 76, and 85 of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Secretarial Catalog, both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on chain feeding techniques and correction methods are included in this packet. (The packet is the sixth in a set of fifteen on typewriting--CE 016…

  2. Completing Invoices. Student's Manual and Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamer, Jean

    Supporting performance objective 46 of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Secretarial Catalog, both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on completing invoices are included in this packet. (The packet is the fifth in a set of nine on performing computational clerical activities--CE 016 951-959.) The…

  3. DESIGN MANUAL: MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual provides a comprehensive source of information to be used in the design of disinfection facilities for municipal wastewater treatment plants. he manual includes design information on halogenation/dehalogenation, ozonation, and ultraviolet radiation. he manual presents...

  4. Attempts to validate a possible predictive animal model for human erythrocyte G-6-PD deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, H.M.; Calabrese, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The use of Dorset sheep erythrocytes as a model for human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes was investigated. Seven pharmaceuticals were examined for oxidant stressor effects using a liver microsomal enzyme system to generate metabolites of the drugs. The pharmaceuticals examined were salicyclic acid, dapsone, naphthalene, B-naphtol, p-aminobenzoic acid, sulfanilamide and sulfapyridine. The test compounds were incubated with Dorset sheep erythrocytes and oxidant stressor effects were measured through reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and methemaglobin formation. The response of the Dorset sheep erythrocytes to the seven agents was compared to previous studies revealing the response of human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes to these agents. The results indicated that metabolites of the pharmaceuticals, B-naphthol, dapsone, and sulfanilamide, are oxidant stressor agents towards sheep G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes. These results agreed with studies on the response of human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes. The metabolized naphthalene and sulfapyridine did not cause oxidant stress in the sheep erythrocytes, despite the fact that these two agents caused oxidizing effects in human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes in previous studies. None of the non-metabolized parent compounds caused oxidant stress in the sheep erythrocytes, which agreed with the responses of human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes.

  5. Validation and Application of an LC-MS-MS Method for the Determination of Ceftizoxime in Human Serum and Urine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zheng, Xin; Zhong, Wen; Chen, Jia; Jiang, Ji; Hu, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Ceftizoxime sodium is a third-generation cephalosporin available for parenteral administration, which is mainly excreted through urine. A rapid and sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of ceftizoxime in human serum and urine. The samples were purified by protein precipitation and separated on an XTerra Phenyl column (4.6 × 50 mm, 5 µm). Electrospray ionization in the positive ion mode and multiple reaction monitoring were used to monitor the ion transitions at m/z 383.9/227.0. The results revealed that the method had excellent selectivity. The linear range covered from 2.50 to 10,000 ng/mL in serum and from 0.500 to 50.0 µg/mL in urine, respectively. Intra-batch and inter-batch precisions (in terms of relative standard deviation) were all <15% and the accuracies (in terms of relative error) were within the range of ± 15%. The lower limit of quantification, stability and extraction recovery were also validated and satisfied the criteria of validation. Finally, the method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of Chinese elderly healthy subjects after intravenous administration. The Cmax values in serum were 34,721.3 ± 5,697.3 ng/mL. Serum concentrations declined with t1/2 of 2.57 ± 0.22 h. PMID:26896348

  6. In-Depth Characterization and Validation of Human Urine Metabolomes Reveal Novel Metabolic Signatures of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ling; Greer, Tyler; Page, David; Shi, Yatao; Vezina, Chad M.; Macoska, Jill A.; Marker, Paul C.; Bjorling, Dale E.; Bushman, Wade; Ricke, William A.; Li, Lingjun

    2016-08-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are a range of irritative or obstructive symptoms that commonly afflict aging population. The diagnosis is mostly based on patient-reported symptoms, and current medication often fails to completely eliminate these symptoms. There is a pressing need for objective non-invasive approaches to measure symptoms and understand disease mechanisms. We developed an in-depth workflow combining urine metabolomics analysis and machine learning bioinformatics to characterize metabolic alterations and support objective diagnosis of LUTS. Machine learning feature selection and statistical tests were combined to identify candidate biomarkers, which were statistically validated with leave-one-patient-out cross-validation and absolutely quantified by selected reaction monitoring assay. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed highly-accurate prediction power of candidate biomarkers to stratify patients into disease or non-diseased categories. The key metabolites and pathways may be possibly correlated with smooth muscle tone changes, increased collagen content, and inflammation, which have been identified as potential contributors to urinary dysfunction in humans and rodents. Periurethral tissue staining revealed a significant increase in collagen content and tissue stiffness in men with LUTS. Together, our study provides the first characterization and validation of LUTS urinary metabolites and pathways to support the future development of a urine-based diagnostic test for LUTS.

  7. In-Depth Characterization and Validation of Human Urine Metabolomes Reveal Novel Metabolic Signatures of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ling; Greer, Tyler; Page, David; Shi, Yatao; Vezina, Chad M.; Macoska, Jill A.; Marker, Paul C.; Bjorling, Dale E.; Bushman, Wade; Ricke, William A.; Li, Lingjun

    2016-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are a range of irritative or obstructive symptoms that commonly afflict aging population. The diagnosis is mostly based on patient-reported symptoms, and current medication often fails to completely eliminate these symptoms. There is a pressing need for objective non-invasive approaches to measure symptoms and understand disease mechanisms. We developed an in-depth workflow combining urine metabolomics analysis and machine learning bioinformatics to characterize metabolic alterations and support objective diagnosis of LUTS. Machine learning feature selection and statistical tests were combined to identify candidate biomarkers, which were statistically validated with leave-one-patient-out cross-validation and absolutely quantified by selected reaction monitoring assay. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed highly-accurate prediction power of candidate biomarkers to stratify patients into disease or non-diseased categories. The key metabolites and pathways may be possibly correlated with smooth muscle tone changes, increased collagen content, and inflammation, which have been identified as potential contributors to urinary dysfunction in humans and rodents. Periurethral tissue staining revealed a significant increase in collagen content and tissue stiffness in men with LUTS. Together, our study provides the first characterization and validation of LUTS urinary metabolites and pathways to support the future development of a urine-based diagnostic test for LUTS. PMID:27502322

  8. Validation of an immunodiagnostic assay for detection of 13 Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype-specific polysaccharides in human urine.

    PubMed

    Pride, Michael W; Huijts, Susanne M; Wu, Kangjian; Souza, Victor; Passador, Sherry; Tinder, Chunyan; Song, Esther; Elfassy, Arik; McNeil, Lisa; Menton, Ronald; French, Roger; Callahan, Janice; Webber, Chris; Gruber, William C; Bonten, Marc J M; Jansen, Kathrin U

    2012-08-01

    To improve the clinical diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in bacteremic and nonbacteremic community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), a Luminex technology-based multiplex urinary antigen detection (UAD) diagnostic assay was developed and validated. The UAD assay can simultaneously detect 13 different serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae by capturing serotype-specific S. pneumoniae polysaccharides (PnPSs) secreted in human urine. Assay specificity is achieved by capturing the polysaccharides with serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) on spectrally unique microspheres. Positivity for each serotype was based on positivity cutoff values calculated from a standard curve run on each assay plate together with positive- and negative-control urine samples. The assay is highly specific, since significant signals are detected only when each PnPS was paired with its homologous MAb-coated microspheres. Validation experiments demonstrated excellent accuracy and precision. The UAD assay and corresponding positivity cutoff values were clinically validated by assessing 776 urine specimens obtained from patients with X-ray-confirmed CAP. The UAD assay demonstrated 97% sensitivity and 100% specificity using samples obtained from patients with bacteremic, blood culture-positive CAP. Importantly, the UAD assay identified Streptococcus pneumoniae (13 serotypes) in a proportion of individuals with nonbacteremic CAP, a patient population for which the pneumococcal etiology of CAP was previously difficult to assess. Therefore, the UAD assay provides a specific, noninvasive, sensitive, and reproducible tool to support vaccine efficacy as well as epidemiological evaluation of pneumococcal disease, including CAP, in adults. PMID:22675155

  9. Validation of an Immunodiagnostic Assay for Detection of 13 Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype-Specific Polysaccharides in Human Urine

    PubMed Central

    Huijts, Susanne M.; Wu, Kangjian; Souza, Victor; Passador, Sherry; Tinder, Chunyan; Song, Esther; Elfassy, Arik; McNeil, Lisa; Menton, Ronald; French, Roger; Callahan, Janice; Webber, Chris; Gruber, William C.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Jansen, Kathrin U.

    2012-01-01

    To improve the clinical diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in bacteremic and nonbacteremic community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), a Luminex technology-based multiplex urinary antigen detection (UAD) diagnostic assay was developed and validated. The UAD assay can simultaneously detect 13 different serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae by capturing serotype-specific S. pneumoniae polysaccharides (PnPSs) secreted in human urine. Assay specificity is achieved by capturing the polysaccharides with serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) on spectrally unique microspheres. Positivity for each serotype was based on positivity cutoff values calculated from a standard curve run on each assay plate together with positive- and negative-control urine samples. The assay is highly specific, since significant signals are detected only when each PnPS was paired with its homologous MAb-coated microspheres. Validation experiments demonstrated excellent accuracy and precision. The UAD assay and corresponding positivity cutoff values were clinically validated by assessing 776 urine specimens obtained from patients with X-ray-confirmed CAP. The UAD assay demonstrated 97% sensitivity and 100% specificity using samples obtained from patients with bacteremic, blood culture-positive CAP. Importantly, the UAD assay identified Streptococcus pneumoniae (13 serotypes) in a proportion of individuals with nonbacteremic CAP, a patient population for which the pneumococcal etiology of CAP was previously difficult to assess. Therefore, the UAD assay provides a specific, noninvasive, sensitive, and reproducible tool to support vaccine efficacy as well as epidemiological evaluation of pneumococcal disease, including CAP, in adults. PMID:22675155

  10. An experimental approach to validating a theory of human error in complex systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, N. M.; Rouse, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of 'human error' is pervasive in engineering systems in which the human is involved. In contrast to the common engineering approach of dealing with error probabilistically, the present research seeks to alleviate problems associated with error by gaining a greater understanding of causes and contributing factors from a human information processing perspective. The general approach involves identifying conditions which are hypothesized to contribute to errors, and experimentally creating the conditions in order to verify the hypotheses. The conceptual framework which serves as the basis for this research is discussed briefly, followed by a description of upcoming research. Finally, the potential relevance of this research to design, training, and aiding issues is discussed.

  11. Validation of a HPLC/FLD Method for Quantification of Tocotrienols in Human Plasma.

    PubMed

    Che, Hui-Ling; Tan, Doryn Meam-Yee; Meganathan, Puvaneswari; Gan, Yee-Lin; Abdul Razak, Ghazali; Fu, Ju-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of tocotrienols in human plasma is critical when the attention towards tocotrienols on its distinctive properties is arising. We aim to develop a simple and practical normal-phase high performance liquid chromatography method to quantify the amount of four tocotrienol homologues in human plasma. Using both the external and internal standards, tocotrienol homologues were quantified via a normal-phase high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector maintained at the excitation wavelength of 295 nm and the emission wavelength of 325 nm. The four tocotrienol homologues were well separated within 30 minutes. A large interindividual variation between subjects was observed as the absorption of tocotrienols is dependent on food matrix and gut lipolysis. The accuracies of lower and upper limit of quantification ranged between 92% and 109% for intraday assays and 90% and 112% for interday assays. This method was successfully applied to quantify the total amount of four tocotrienol homologues in human plasma. PMID:26604927

  12. Validation of a HPLC/FLD Method for Quantification of Tocotrienols in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Che, Hui-Ling; Tan, Doryn Meam-Yee; Meganathan, Puvaneswari; Gan, Yee-Lin; Abdul Razak, Ghazali; Fu, Ju-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of tocotrienols in human plasma is critical when the attention towards tocotrienols on its distinctive properties is arising. We aim to develop a simple and practical normal-phase high performance liquid chromatography method to quantify the amount of four tocotrienol homologues in human plasma. Using both the external and internal standards, tocotrienol homologues were quantified via a normal-phase high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector maintained at the excitation wavelength of 295 nm and the emission wavelength of 325 nm. The four tocotrienol homologues were well separated within 30 minutes. A large interindividual variation between subjects was observed as the absorption of tocotrienols is dependent on food matrix and gut lipolysis. The accuracies of lower and upper limit of quantification ranged between 92% and 109% for intraday assays and 90% and 112% for interday assays. This method was successfully applied to quantify the total amount of four tocotrienol homologues in human plasma. PMID:26604927

  13. Validation of copy number variation sequencing for detecting chromosome imbalances in human preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cram, David S; Shen, Jiandong; Wang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jianguang; Song, Zhuo; Xu, Genming; Li, Na; Fan, Junmei; Wang, Shufang; Luo, Yaning; Wang, Jun; Yu, Li; Liu, Jiayin; Yao, Yuanqing

    2014-08-01

    Chromosome aneuploidies commonly arise in embryos produced by assisted reproductive technologies and represent a major cause of implantation failure and miscarriage. Currently, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is performed by array-based methods to identify euploid embryos for transfer to the patient. We speculated that a combination of next-generation sequencing technologies and sophisticated bioinformatics would deliver a more comprehensive and accurate methodology to improve the overall efficacy of embryo testing. To meet this challenge, we developed a high-resolution copy number variation (CNV) sequencing pipeline suitable for single-cell analysis. In validation studies, we showed that CNV-Seq was highly sensitive and specific for detection of euploidy, aneuploidy, and segmental imbalances in 24 whole genome amplification samples from PGD embryos that were originally diagnosed by gold standard array comparative genomic hybridization. In addition, CNV-Seq was capable of detecting, mapping, and accurately quantifying terminal chromosome imbalances down to 1 Mb in size originating from abnormal segregation of translocation chromosomes. These validation studies indicate that CNV-Seq displays the hallmarks of an accurate and reliable embryo test with the potential to further improve the overall efficacy of PGD. PMID:24966395

  14. A validated new method for nevirapine quantitation in human plasma via high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, Courtney F; Parsons, Teresa L

    2006-01-01

    A fully validated and clinically relevant assay was developed for the assessment of nevirapine concentrations in neonate blood plasma samples. Solid-phase extraction with an acid-base wash series was used to prepare subject samples for analysis. Samples were separated by high performance liquid chromatography and detected at 280 nm on a C8 reverse-phase column in an isocratic mobile phase. The retention times of nevirapine and its internal standard were 5.0 and 6.9 min, respectively. The method was validated by assessment of accuracy and precision (statistical values <15%), specificity, and stability. The assay was linear in the range 25-10,000 ng/mL (r2 > 0.996) and the average recovery was 93% (n = 18). The lower limit of quantification (relative standard deviation <20%) was determined to be 25 ng/mL for 50 microL of plasma, allowing detection of as little as 1.25 ng of nevirapine in a sample. This value represents an increase in sensitivity of up to 30-fold over previously published methods. PMID:15920701

  15. A Validated Normative Model for Human Uterine Volume from Birth to Age 40 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ginbey, Eleanor; Chowdhury, Moti M.; Bath, Louise E.; Anderson, Richard A.; Wallace, W. Hamish B.

    2016-01-01

    Transabdominal pelvic ultrasound and/or pelvic Magnetic Resonance Imaging are safe, accurate and non-invasive means of determining the size and configuration of the internal female genitalia. The assessment of uterine size and volume is helpful in the assessment of many conditions including disorders of sex development, precocious or delayed puberty, infertility and menstrual disorders. Using our own data from the assessment of MRI scans in healthy young females and data extracted from four studies that assessed uterine volume using transabdominal ultrasound in healthy females we have derived and validated a normative model of uterine volume from birth to age 40 years. This shows that uterine volume increases across childhood, with a faster increase in adolescence reflecting the influence of puberty, followed by a slow but progressive rise during adult life. The model suggests that around 84% of the variation in uterine volumes in the healthy population up to age 40 is due to age alone. The derivation of a validated normative model for uterine volume from birth to age 40 years has important clinical applications by providing age-related reference values for uterine volume. PMID:27295032

  16. Development and validation of an HPLC-MS/MS method to determine clopidogrel in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangyi; Dong, Chunxia; Shen, Weiwei; Lu, Xiaopei; Zhang, Mengqi; Gui, Yuzhou; Zhou, Qinyi; Yu, Chen

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative method for clopidogrel using online-SPE tandem LC-MS/MS was developed and fully validated according to the well-established FDA guidelines. The method achieves adequate sensitivity for pharmacokinetic studies, with lower limit of quantifications (LLOQs) as low as 10 pg/mL. Chromatographic separations were performed on reversed phase columns Kromasil Eternity-2.5-C18-UHPLC for both methods. Positive electrospray ionization in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was employed for signal detection and a deuterated analogue (clopidogrel-d 4) was used as internal standard (IS). Adjustments in sample preparation, including introduction of an online-SPE system proved to be the most effective method to solve the analyte back-conversion in clinical samples. Pooled clinical samples (two levels) were prepared and successfully used as real-sample quality control (QC) in the validation of back-conversion testing under different conditions. The result showed that the real samples were stable in room temperature for 24 h. Linearity, precision, extraction recovery, matrix effect on spiked QC samples and stability tests on both spiked QCs and real sample QCs stored in different conditions met the acceptance criteria. This online-SPE method was successfully applied to a bioequivalence study of 75 mg single dose clopidogrel tablets in 48 healthy male subjects. PMID:26904399

  17. Comparing predictive validity of four ballistic swing phase models of human walking.

    PubMed

    Selles, R W; Bussmann, J B; Wagenaar, R C; Stam, H J

    2001-09-01

    It is unclear to what extent ballistic walking models can be used to qualitatively predict the swing phase at comfortable walking speed. Different study findings regarding the accuracy of the predictions of the swing phase kinematics may have been caused by differences in (1) kinematic input, (2) model characteristics (e.g. the number of segments), and (3) evaluation criteria. In the present study, the predictive validity of four ballistic swing phase models was evaluated and compared, that is, (1) the ballistic walking model as originally introduced by Mochon and McMahon, (2) an extended version of this model in which heel-off of the stance leg is added, (3) a double pendulum model, consisting of a two-segment swing leg with a prescribed hip trajectory, and (4) a shank pendulum model consisting of a shank and rigidly attached foot with a prescribed knee trajectory. The predictive validity was evaluated by comparing the outcome of the model simulations with experimentally derived swing phase kinematics of six healthy subjects. In all models, statistically significant differences were found between model output and experimental data. All models underestimated swing time and step length. In addition, statistically significant differences were found between the output of the different models. The present study shows that although qualitative similarities exist between the ballistic models and normal gait at comfortable walking speed, these models cannot adequately predict swing phase kinematics. PMID:11506787

  18. Validated HPLC-UV method for determination of naproxen in human plasma with proven selectivity against ibuprofen and paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Filist, Monika; Szlaska, Iwona; Kaza, Michał; Pawiński, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Estimating the influence of interfering compounds present in the biological matrix on the determination of an analyte is one of the most important tasks during bioanalytical method development and validation. Interferences from endogenous components and, if necessary, from major metabolites as well as possible co-administered medications should be evaluated during a selectivity test. This paper describes a simple, rapid and cost-effective HPLC-UV method for the determination of naproxen in human plasma in the presence of two other analgesics, ibuprofen and paracetamol. Sample preparation is based on a simple liquid-liquid extraction procedure with a short, 5 s mixing time. Fenoprofen, which is characterized by a similar structure and properties to naproxen, was first used as the internal standard. The calibration curve is linear in the concentration range of 0.5-80.0 µg/mL, which is suitable for pharmacokinetic studies following a single 220 mg oral dose of naproxen sodium. The method was fully validated according to international guidelines and was successfully applied in a bioequivalence study in humans. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26458096

  19. Method development and validation for ultra-high-pressure LC/MS/MS determination of hop prenylflavonoids in human serum.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yang; Qiu, Xi; Nikolic, Dejan; Dahl, Jeffrey H; van Breemen, Richard B

    2012-01-01

    Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are used in the brewing of beer, and hop extracts containing prenylated compounds, such as xanthohumol (XN) and 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), are under investigation as dietary supplements for cancer chemoprevention and the management of hot flashes in menopausal women. To facilitate clinical studies of hop safety and efficacy, a selective, sensitive, and fast ultra-high-pressure LC (UHPLC) tandem MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of the hop prenylflavonoids XN, isoxanthohumol (IX), 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN), and 8-PN in human serum. The analytical method requires 300 microL of human serum, which is processed using liquid-liquid extraction. UHPLC separation was carried out in 2.5 min with gradient elution using an RP C18 column containing 1.6 pm particle size packing material. Prenylflavonoids were measured using negative ion electrospray MS with collision-induced dissociation and selected reaction monitoring. The method was validated and showed good accuracy and precision with an LOQ of 0.50 ng/mL for XN (1.4 nM) and 1.0 ng/mL for 6-PN, 8-PN (2.94 nM), and IX (2.82 nM) in serum. PMID:23451393

  20. [Development of a Crisis Management Manual for Occupational Health Experts].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Juri; Tateishi, Seiichiro; Igarashi, Yu; Ide, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Hara, Tatsuhiko; Kobashi, Masaki; Inoue, Megumi; Kawashima, Megumi; Okada, Takeo; Mori, Koji

    2015-12-01

    When crises such as natural disasters or industrial accidents occur in workplaces, not only the workers who are injured, but also those who engage in emergency or recovery work may be exposed to various health hazards. We developed a manual to enable occupational health (OH) experts to prevent health hazards. The manual includes detailed explanations of the characteristics and necessary actions for each need in the list of "OH Needs During Crisis Management" developed after an analysis of eight cases in our previous research. We changed the endings of explanatory sentences so that users could learn how often each need occurred in these eight cases. We evaluated the validity of the manual using two processes: 1) Providing the manual to OH physicians during an industrial accident; 2) Asking crisis management experts to review the manual. We made improvements based on their feedback and completed the manual. The manual includes explanations about 99 OH needs, and users can learn how and what to do for each need during various crisis cases. Because additional OH needs may occur in other crises, it is necessary to collect information about new cases and to improve the comprehensiveness of the manual continuously. It is critical that this crisis management manual be available when a crisis occurs. We need to inform potential users of the manual through various media, as well as by posting it on our website. PMID:26667194

  1. Development and validation of a human biomechanical model for rib fracture and thorax injuries in blunt impact.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhihua; Lan, Fengchong; Chen, Jiqing

    2015-07-01

    From 1990 to approximately 50,000-120,000 people die annually of road traffic accidents in China. Traffic accidents are the main cause of death of Chinese adults aged 15-45 years. This study aimed to determine the biomechanical response and injury tolerance of the human body in traffic accidents. The subject was a 35-year-old male with a height of 170 cm, weight of 70 kg and Chinese characteristics at the 50th percentile. Geometry was generated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. A human-body biomechanical model was then developed. The model featured in great detail the main anatomical characteristics of skeletal tissues, soft tissues and internal organs, including the head, neck, shoulder, thoracic cage, abdomen, spine, pelvis, pleurae and lungs, heart, aorta, arms, legs, and other muscle tissues and skeletons. The material properties of all tissues in the human body model were obtained from the literature. Material properties were developed in the LS-DYNA code to simulate the mechanical behaviour of the biological tissues in the human body. The model was validated against cadaver responses to frontal and side impact. The predicted model response reasonably agreed with the experimental data, and the model can further be used to evaluate thoracic injury in real-world crashes. We believe that the transportation industry can use numerical models in the future to simultaneously reduce physical testing and improve automotive safety. PMID:24460401

  2. Integrative Annotation of 21,037 Human Genes Validated by Full-Length cDNA Clones

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Tadashi; Itoh, Takeshi; Suzuki, Yutaka; O'Donovan, Claire; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Koyanagi, Kanako O.; Barrero, Roberto A.; Tamura, Takuro; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Tanino, Motohiko; Yura, Kei; Miyazaki, Satoru; Ikeo, Kazuho; Homma, Keiichi; Kasprzyk, Arek; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Hirakawa, Mika; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Ashurst, Jennifer; Jia, Libin; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Thomas, Michael A.; Mulder, Nicola; Karavidopoulou, Youla; Jin, Lihua; Kim, Sangsoo; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Lenhard, Boris; Eveno, Eric; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Yamasaki, Chisato; Takeda, Jun-ichi; Gough, Craig; Hilton, Phillip; Fujii, Yasuyuki; Sakai, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Susumu; Amid, Clara; Bellgard, Matthew; de Fatima Bonaldo, Maria; Bono Hidemasa; Bromberg, Susan K.; Brookes, Anthony J.; Bruford, Elspeth; Carninci Piero; Chelala, Claude; Couillault, Christine; de Souza, Sandro J.; Debily, Marie-Anne; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Dubchak, Inna; Endo, Toshinori; Estreicher, Anne; Eyras, Eduardo; Fukami-Kobayashi, Kaoru; Gopinath, Gopal R.; Graudens, Esther; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Han, Michael; Han, Ze-Guang; Hanada, Kousuke; Hanaoka, Hideki; Harada, Erimi; Hashimoto, Katsuyuki; Hinz, Ursula; Hirai, Momoki; Hishiki, Teruyoshi; Hopkinson, Ian; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Kanapin, Alexander; Kaneko, Yayoi; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kelso, Janet; Kersey, Paul; Kikuno Reiko; Kimura, Kouichi; Korn, Bernhard; Kuryshev, Vladimir; Makalowska, Izabela; Makino Takashi; Mano, Shuhei; Mariage-Samson, Regine; Mashima, Jun; Matsuda, Hideo; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Minoshima, Shinsei; Nagai, Keiichi; Nagasaki, Hideki; Nagata, Naoki; Nigam, Rajni; Ogasawara, Osamu; Ohara, Osamu; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Okada, Norihiro; Okido, Toshihisa; Oota, Satoshi; Ota, Motonori; Ota, Toshio; Otsuki, Tetsuji; Piatier-Tonneau, Dominique; Poustka, Annemarie; Ren, Shuang-Xi; Saitou, Naruya; Sakai, Katsunaga; Sakamoto, Shigetaka; Sakate, Ryuichi; Schupp, Ingo; Servant, Florence; Sherry, Stephen; Shiba Rie; et al.

    2004-01-15

    The human genome sequence defines our inherent biological potential; the realization of the biology encoded therein requires knowledge of the function of each gene. Currently, our knowledge in this area is still limited. Several lines of investigation have been used to elucidate the structure and function of the genes in the human genome. Even so, gene prediction remains a difficult task, as the varieties of transcripts of a gene may vary to a great extent. We thus performed an exhaustive integrative characterization of 41,118 full-length cDNAs that capture the gene transcripts as complete functional cassettes, providing an unequivocal report of structural and functional diversity at the gene level. Our international collaboration has validated 21,037 human gene candidates by analysis of high-quality full-length cDNA clones through curation using unified criteria. This led to the identification of 5,155 new gene candidates. It also manifested the most reliable way to control the quality of the cDNA clones. We have developed a human gene database, called the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/). It provides the following: integrative annotation of human genes, description of gene structures, details of novel alternative splicing isoforms, non-protein-coding RNAs, functional domains, subcellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein three-dimensional structure, mapping of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identification of polymorphic microsatellite repeats within human genes, and comparative results with mouse full-length cDNAs. The H-InvDB analysis has shown that up to 4 percent of the human genome sequence (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 34 assembly) may contain misassembled or missing regions. We found that 6.5 percent of the human gene candidates (1,377 loci) did not have a good protein-coding open reading frame, of which 296 loci are strong candidates for nonprotein-coding RNA

  3. Hippocampal unified multi-atlas network (HUMAN): protocol and scale validation of a novel segmentation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, N.; Errico, R.; Bruno, S.; Chincarini, A.; Garuccio, E.; Sensi, F.; Tangaro, S.; Tateo, A.; Bellotti, R.; Alzheimers Disease Neuroimaging Initiative,the

    2015-11-01

    In this study we present a novel fully automated Hippocampal Unified Multi-Atlas-Networks (HUMAN) algorithm for the segmentation of the hippocampus in structural magnetic resonance imaging. In multi-atlas approaches atlas selection is of crucial importance for the accuracy of the segmentation. Here we present an optimized method based on the definition of a small peri-hippocampal region to target the atlas learning with linear and non-linear embedded manifolds. All atlases were co-registered to a data driven template resulting in a computationally efficient method that requires only one test registration. The optimal atlases identified were used to train dedicated artificial neural networks whose labels were then propagated and fused to obtain the final segmentation. To quantify data heterogeneity and protocol inherent effects, HUMAN was tested on two independent data sets provided by the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and the Open Access Series of Imaging Studies. HUMAN is accurate and achieves state-of-the-art performance (Dice{{}\\text{ADNI}} =0.929+/- 0.003 and Dice{{}\\text{OASIS}} =0.869+/- 0.002 ). It is also a robust method that remains stable when applied to the whole hippocampus or to sub-regions (patches). HUMAN also compares favorably with a basic multi-atlas approach and a benchmark segmentation tool such as FreeSurfer.

  4. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Increases High-Risk Sexual Behaviors: A Myth or Valid Concern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Nop T.

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the first human pappilomavirus (HPV) vaccine was approved for females aged 9 to 26. However, the national HPV vaccination rate among young women has been low. Public concerns were raised in regard to the fact that HPV vaccination might encourage unsafe sex. This cross-sectional study examined the differences in sexual practices between…

  5. Development and validation of a semi-automated assay for the highly sensitive quantification of Biolimus A9 in human whole blood using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Clavijo, Claudia; Strom, Tobin; Moll, Vanessa; Betts, Ronald; Zhang, Yan Ling; Christians, Uwe; Bendrick-Peart, Jamie

    2009-11-01

    Drug-eluting stents are sustained-release intra-coronary devices that are usually coated with a few hundred micrograms of drug. Measuring the drugs that are released over weeks in order to assess human pharmacokinetics is a challenge that requires assays with high sensitivity. We developed and validated a semi-automated LC-MS/MS assay for the quantification of Biolimus A9, a proliferation signal inhibitor that was specifically developed for coating on drug-eluting stents in human EDTA blood. The only manual step was the addition of a zinc sulfate/methanol protein precipitation solution which included the internal standard. Samples were injected into the HPLC and extracted online. The assay had the following performance characteristics: range of reliable response 0.01-100 ng/mL (r(2)>0.99), inter-day accuracy (0.033 ng/mL): 111.7%, and inter-day precision: 8.6%. There was no ion suppression, matrix interferences or carry-over. Extracted samples were stable in the autosampler at +4 degrees C for at least 24 h and could undergo three freeze-thaw cycles. The assay, with a lower limit of detection of 333 fg/mL and a lower limit of quantitation of 10 pg/mL, was sufficiently sensitive and robust for quantifying Biolimus A9 in clinical trials after i.v. injection and after stent implantation. PMID:19762292

  6. Simulation of the undiseased human cardiac ventricular action potential: model formulation and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Thomas; Virág, László; Varró, András; Rudy, Yoram

    2011-05-01

    Cellular electrophysiology experiments, important for understanding cardiac arrhythmia mechanisms, are usually performed with channels expressed in non myocytes, or with non-human myocytes. Differences between cell types and species affect results. Thus, an accurate model for the undiseased human ventricular action potential (AP) which reproduces a broad range of physiological behaviors is needed. Such a model requires extensive experimental data, but essential elements have been unavailable. Here, we develop a human ventricular AP model using new undiseased human ventricular data: Ca(2+) versus voltage dependent inactivation of L-type Ca(2+) current (I(CaL)); kinetics for the transient outward, rapid delayed rectifier (I(Kr)), Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange (I(NaCa)), and inward rectifier currents; AP recordings at all physiological cycle lengths; and rate dependence and restitution of AP duration (APD) with and without a variety of specific channel blockers. Simulated APs reproduced the experimental AP morphology, APD rate dependence, and restitution. Using undiseased human mRNA and protein data, models for different transmural cell types were developed. Experiments for rate dependence of Ca(2+) (including peak and decay) and intracellular sodium ([Na(+)](i)) in undiseased human myocytes were quantitatively reproduced by the model. Early afterdepolarizations were induced by I(Kr) block during slow pacing, and AP and Ca(2+) alternans appeared at rates >200 bpm, as observed in the nonfailing human ventricle. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK) modulated rate dependence of Ca(2+) cycling. I(NaCa) linked Ca(2+) alternation to AP alternans. CaMK suppression or SERCA upregulation eliminated alternans. Steady state APD rate dependence was caused primarily by changes in [Na(+)](i), via its modulation of the electrogenic Na(+)/K(+) ATPase current. At fast pacing rates, late Na(+) current and I(CaL) were also contributors. APD shortening during restitution was

  7. Development and validation of an LC-MS/MS method for determination of phencyclidine in human serum and its application to human drug abuse cases

    PubMed Central

    Chimalakonda, Krishna C.; Hailey, Chris; Black, Ryan; Beekman, Allison; Carlisle, Rebecca; Lowman-Smith, Elizabeth; Singletary, Heathe; Owens, S. Michael; Hendrickson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    A new analytical method was developed and validated for the rapid determination of phencyclidine (PCP) in human blood and serum. Rapid chromatographic separation decreased the analysis time relative to standard gas chromatography (GC)-based methodologies. The method involved the use of solid-phase extraction for sample preparation and cleanup followed by liquid chromatography tandem spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis and an electrospray-ionization (ESI) interface. PCP was quantified using multiple-reaction-monitoring with deuterium labeled PCP (PCP-d5) as an internal standard. The method was validated for accuracy, precision, linearity, and recovery. The method was accurate with error <14% and precision with coefficient of variation (CV) <5.0%. The assay was linear over the entire range of calibration standards (r2 > 0.997). The recovery of PCP after solid-phase extraction was greater than 90% with the lower limit of detection (LLOD) for PCP in 500 µl of human serum after solid-phase extraction at 0.06 ng ml−1. This method was used to determine the levels of PCP in postmortem human blood samples. The LLOD in blood was 1 ng ml−1. Blood PCP concentrations were also determined separately using GC and flame ionization detection (FID). Blood calibration standards and serum calibration standards yielded similar concentrations when used to quantitate authentic human blood samples that tested positive for PCP under the GC-FID method. Extraction of PCP from serum required fewer steps and therefore could be used as a calibration matrix in place of blood. The LC-MS/MS methodology shown here was higher throughput compared with GC-based methods because of very short chromatographic run times. This was accomplished without sacrificing analytical sensitivity. PMID:20959870

  8. Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

  9. Salinas : theory manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy Francis; Reese, Garth M.; Bhardwaj, Manoj Kumar

    2004-08-01

    This manual describes the theory behind many of the constructs in Salinas. For a more detailed description of how to use Salinas , we refer the reader to Salinas, User's Notes. Many of the constructs in Salinas are pulled directly from published material. Where possible, these materials are referenced herein. However, certain functions in Salinas are specific to our implementation. We try to be far more complete in those areas. The theory manual was developed from several sources including general notes, a programer-notes manual, the user's notes and of course the material in the open literature.

  10. Fire Protection Program Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, J A

    2012-05-18

    This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

  11. My child is God's gift to humanity: development and validation of the Parental Overvaluation Scale (POS).

    PubMed

    Brummelman, Eddie; Thomaes, Sander; Nelemans, Stefanie A; Orobio de Castro, Bram; Bushman, Brad J

    2015-04-01

    Although it is natural for parents to value their children, some parents "overvalue" them, believing that their own children are more special and more entitled than other children are. This research introduces this concept of parental overvaluation. We developed a concise self-report scale to measure individual differences in parental overvaluation, the Parental Overvaluation Scale (POS; Study 1). The POS has high test-retest stability over 6, 12, and 18 months (Study 2). As demonstrated in a representative sample of Dutch parents (Study 3) and a diverse sample of American parents (Study 4), the POS has an internally consistent single-factor structure; strong measurement invariance across sexes; as well as good convergent, discriminant, and criterion validity. Overvaluation is especially high in narcissistic parents (Studies 3, 4, 6). When parents overvalue their child, they overclaim their child's knowledge (Study 4), perceive their child as more gifted than actual IQ scores justify (Study 5), want their child to stand out from others, and frequently praise their child in real-life settings (Study 6). By contrast, overvaluation is not consistently related to parents' basic parenting dimensions (i.e., warmth and control) or Big Five personality traits (Studies 3, 4, 6). Importantly, overvalued children are not more intelligent or better performing than other children (Studies 5-6). These findings support the validity of the POS and show that parental overvaluation has important and unique implications for parents' beliefs and practices. Research on overvaluation might shed light on the determinants of parenting practices and the socialization of children's self-views, including narcissism. PMID:25365035

  12. Development and validation of the Human Activity Profile into Chinese language: lessons in determining equivalence.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Ann; Wellard, Sally; Kenrick, Marita

    2006-03-01

    The Human Activity Profile (HAP), and associated Dyspnea Scale, is a self-report instrument for assessing levels of human activity. Although it has been used in studies examining the levels of activity in people, it is limited to people who are only able to understand English. However, many countries are multicultural with significant numbers of people whose native language is not English. This study sought to demonstrate the equivalence between the Chinese and English versions of the HAP and Dyspnea scales. Thirty-five bilingual university students completed both the Chinese and English versions of each questionnaire. There was 89% and 85% agreement between items across the HAP and Dyspnea Scale questionnaires, respectively. Although the psychometric evaluations suggested there was equivalence between the Chinese and English versions of both the HAP and Dyspnea Scale, lessons have been learnt regarding the different written forms of Chinese. PMID:16451427

  13. Cholangiocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells for disease modeling and drug validation.

    PubMed

    Sampaziotis, Fotios; Cardoso de Brito, Miguel; Madrigal, Pedro; Bertero, Alessandro; Saeb-Parsy, Kourosh; Soares, Filipa A C; Schrumpf, Elisabeth; Melum, Espen; Karlsen, Tom H; Bradley, J Andrew; Gelson, William T H; Davies, Susan; Baker, Alastair; Kaser, Arthur; Alexander, Graeme J; Hannan, Nicholas R F; Vallier, Ludovic

    2015-08-01

    The study of biliary disease has been constrained by a lack of primary human cholangiocytes. Here we present an efficient, serum-free protocol for directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into cholangiocyte-like cells (CLCs). CLCs show functional characteristics of cholangiocytes, including bile acids transfer, alkaline phosphatase activity, γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase activity and physiological responses to secretin, somatostatin and vascular endothelial growth factor. We use CLCs to model in vitro key features of Alagille syndrome, polycystic liver disease and cystic fibrosis (CF)-associated cholangiopathy. Furthermore, we use CLCs generated from healthy individuals and patients with polycystic liver disease to reproduce the effects of the drugs verapamil and octreotide, and we show that the experimental CF drug VX809 rescues the disease phenotype of CF cholangiopathy in vitro. Our differentiation protocol will facilitate the study of biological mechanisms controlling biliary development, as well as disease modeling and drug screening. PMID:26167629

  14. Cholangiocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells for disease modeling and drug validation

    PubMed Central

    Sampaziotis, Fotios; Bertero, Alessandro; Saeb-Parsy, Kourosh; Soares, Filipa A. C.; Schrumpf, Elisabeth; Melum, Espen; Karlsen, Tom H.; Bradley, J. Andrew; Gelson, William TH; Davies, Susan; Baker, Alastair; Kaser, Arthur; Alexander, Graeme J.

    2016-01-01

    The study of biliary disease has been constrained by a lack of primary human cholangiocytes. Here we present an efficient, serum-free protocol for directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into cholangiocyte-like cells (CLCs). CLCs show functional characteristics of cholangiocytes, including bile acids transfer, alkaline phosphatase activity, gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase activity and physiological responses to secretin, somatostatin and VEGF. We use CLCs to model in vitro key features of Alagille syndrome, polycystic liver disease and cystic fibrosis (CF)-associated cholangiopathy. Furthermore, we use CLCs generated from healthy individuals and patients with polycystic liver disease to reproduce the effects of the drugs verapamil and octreotide, and we show that the experimental CF drug VX809 rescues the disease phenotype of CF cholangiopathy in vitro. Our differentiation protocol will facilitate the study of biological mechanisms controlling biliary development as well as disease modeling and drug screening. PMID:26167629

  15. Measurement and validation of GHz-band whole-body average SAR in a human volunteer using reverberation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianqing; Suzuki, Tokio; Fujiwara, Osamu; Harima, Katsushige

    2012-12-01

    The World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommendation on the need for further research for radio-frequency dosimetry has promoted studies on the whole-body average-specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) in various kinds of anatomical-based numerical models. For experimental validation of GHz-band WBA-SARs in a real human, however, there have not so far been any published papers, despite the fact that, in 1982, Hill measured WBA-SARs at frequencies less than 40 MHz in human volunteers using a TEM-cell exposure system. In this study, we provide a measurement technique with a reverberation chamber for validating numerical dosimetry results on GHz-band WBA-SARs in living humans. We measured WBA-SARs at 1, 1.5 and 2 GHz for a 22 year old male volunteer, with a height of 173 cm and a weight of 73 kg, in the reverberation chamber, and compared the results with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. The reverberation chamber was excited by using a signal generator through an amplifier with an output power of 30-40 mW, which produced inside the chamber with the volunteer an average electric field strength of 5 V m-1 equivalent to an average power spectral density of 6.6 μW cm-2. The WBA-SARs were obtained from the measured S11 and S21 together with the power density. On the other hand, the WBA-SARs have been calculated using the FDTD method for an adult male model with almost the same physique as that of the volunteer exposed to the electromagnetic field in the reverberation chamber. From the comparison between the measured and the calculated WBA-SARs, we could confirm that the measured GHz-band WBA-SARs approximately agree with the FDTD calculated results.

  16. Functional validation of a human CAPN5 exome variant by lentiviral transduction into mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Wert, Katherine J; Skeie, Jessica M; Bassuk, Alexander G; Olivier, Alicia K; Tsang, Stephen H; Mahajan, Vinit B

    2014-05-15

    Exome sequencing indicated that the gene encoding the calpain-5 protease, CAPN5, is the likely cause of retinal degeneration and autoimmune uveitis in human patients with autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV, OMIM #193235). To explore the mechanism of ADNIV, a human CAPN5 disease allele was expressed in mouse retinas with a lentiviral vector created to express either the wild-type human (h) CAPN5 or the ADNIV mutant hCAPN5-R243L allele under a rhodopsin promoter with tandem green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. Vectors were injected into the subretinal space of perinatal mice. Mouse phenotypes were analyzed using electroretinography, histology and inflammatory gene expression profiling. Mouse calpain-5 showed high homology to its human ortholog with >98% sequence identity that includes the ADNIV mutant residue. Calpain-5 protein was expressed in the inner and outer segments of the photoreceptors and in the outer plexiform layer. Expression of the hCAPN5-R243L allele caused loss of the electroretinogram b-wave, photoreceptor degeneration and induction of immune cell infiltration and inflammatory genes in the retina, recapitulating major features of the ADNIV phenotype. Intraocular neovascularization and fibrosis were not observed during the study period. Our study shows that expression of the hCAPN5-R243L disease allele elicits an ADNIV-like disease in mice. It further suggests that ADNIV is due to CAPN5 gain-of-function rather than haploinsufficiency, and retinal expression may be sufficient to generate an autoimmune response. Genetic models of ADNIV in the mouse can be used to explore protease mechanisms in retinal degeneration and inflammation as well as preclinical therapeutic testing. PMID:24381307

  17. Functional validation of a human CAPN5 exome variant by lentiviral transduction into mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Skeie, Jessica M.; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Olivier, Alicia K.; Tsang, Stephen H.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing indicated that the gene encoding the calpain-5 protease, CAPN5, is the likely cause of retinal degeneration and autoimmune uveitis in human patients with autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV, OMIM #193235). To explore the mechanism of ADNIV, a human CAPN5 disease allele was expressed in mouse retinas with a lentiviral vector created to express either the wild-type human (h) CAPN5 or the ADNIV mutant hCAPN5-R243L allele under a rhodopsin promoter with tandem green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. Vectors were injected into the subretinal space of perinatal mice. Mouse phenotypes were analyzed using electroretinography, histology and inflammatory gene expression profiling. Mouse calpain-5 showed high homology to its human ortholog with >98% sequence identity that includes the ADNIV mutant residue. Calpain-5 protein was expressed in the inner and outer segments of the photoreceptors and in the outer plexiform layer. Expression of the hCAPN5-R243L allele caused loss of the electroretinogram b-wave, photoreceptor degeneration and induction of immune cell infiltration and inflammatory genes in the retina, recapitulating major features of the ADNIV phenotype. Intraocular neovascularization and fibrosis were not observed during the study period. Our study shows that expression of the hCAPN5-R243L disease allele elicits an ADNIV-like disease in mice. It further suggests that ADNIV is due to CAPN5 gain-of-function rather than haploinsufficiency, and retinal expression may be sufficient to generate an autoimmune response. Genetic models of ADNIV in the mouse can be used to explore protease mechanisms in retinal degeneration and inflammation as well as preclinical therapeutic testing. PMID:24381307

  18. Peace Corps Aquaculture Training Manual. Training Manual T0057.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This Peace Corps training manual was developed from two existing manuals to provide a comprehensive training program in fish production for Peace Corps volunteers. The manual encompasses the essential elements of the University of Oklahoma program that has been training volunteers in aquaculture for 25 years. The 22 chapters of the manual are…

  19. Bioanalytical method development and validation for the determination of glycine in human cerebrospinal fluid by ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; James, Christopher A; Wong, Philip

    2016-09-01

    A LC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated for the determination of glycine in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The validated method used artificial cerebrospinal fluid as a surrogate matrix for calibration standards. The calibration curve range for the assay was 100-10,000ng/mL and (13)C2, (15)N-glycine was used as an internal standard (IS). Pre-validation experiments were performed to demonstrate parallelism with surrogate matrix and standard addition methods. The mean endogenous glycine concentration in a pooled human CSF determined on three days by using artificial CSF as a surrogate matrix and the method of standard addition was found to be 748±30.6 and 768±18.1ng/mL, respectively. A percentage difference of -2.6% indicated that artificial CSF could be used as a surrogate calibration matrix for the determination of glycine in human CSF. Quality control (QC) samples, except the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) QC and low QC samples, were prepared by spiking glycine into aliquots of pooled human CSF sample. The low QC sample was prepared from a separate pooled human CSF sample containing low endogenous glycine concentrations, while the LLOQ QC sample was prepared in artificial CSF. Standard addition was used extensively to evaluate matrix effects during validation. The validated method was used to determine the endogenous glycine concentrations in human CSF samples. Incurred sample reanalysis demonstrated reproducibility of the method. PMID:27262106

  20. Manual control of unstable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. W.; Hogue, J. R.; Parseghian, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Under certain operational regimes and failure modes, air and ground vehicles can present the human operator with a dynamically unstable or divergent control task. Research conducted over the last two decades has explored the ability of the human operator to control unstable systems under a variety of circumstances. Past research is reviewed and human operator control capabilities are summarized. A current example of automobile directional control under rear brake lockup conditions is also reviewed. A control system model analysis of the driver's steering control task is summarized, based on a generic driver/vehicle model presented at last year's Annual Manual. Results from closed course braking tests are presented that confirm the difficulty the average driver has in controlling the unstable directional dynamics arising from rear wheel lockup.

  1. Interactive Office user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E.; Lowers, Benjamin; Nabors, Terri L.

    1990-01-01

    Given here is a user's manual for Interactive Office (IO), an executive office tool for organization and planning, written specifically for Macintosh. IO is a paperless management tool to automate a related group of individuals into one productive system.

  2. Geochemical engineering reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, L.B.; Michels, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The following topics are included in this manual: physical and chemical properties of geothermal brine and steam, scale and solids control, processing spent brine for reinjection, control of noncondensable gas emissions, and goethermal mineral recovery. (MHR)

  3. Specimen-specific predictions of contact stress under physiological loading in the human hip: validation and sensitivity studies

    PubMed Central

    Henak, Corinne R.; Kapron, Ashley L.; Anderson, Andrew E.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Maas, Steve A.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Hip osteoarthritis may be initiated and advanced by abnormal cartilage contact mechanics, and finite element (FE) modeling provides an approach with the potential to allow the study of this process. Previous FE models of the human hip have been limited by single specimen validation and the use of quasi-linear or linear elastic constitutive models of articular cartilage. The effects of the latter assumptions on model predictions are unknown, partially because data for the instantaneous behavior of healthy human hip cartilage are unavailable. The aims of this study were to develop and validate a series of specimen-specific FE models, to characterize the regional instantaneous response of healthy human hip cartilage in compression, and to assess the effects of material nonlinearity, inhomogeneity and specimen-specific material coefficients on FE predictions of cartilage contact stress and contact area. Five cadaveric specimens underwent experimental loading, cartilage material characterization and specimen-specific FE modeling. Cartilage in the FE models was represented by average neo-Hookean, average Veronda Westmann and specimen- and region-specific Veronda Westmann hyperelastic constitutive models. Experimental measurements and FE predictions compared well for all three cartilage representations, which was reflected in average RMS errors in contact stress of less than 25%. The instantaneous material behavior of healthy human hip cartilage varied spatially, with stiffer acetabular cartilage than femoral cartilage and stiffer cartilage in lateral regions than in medial regions. The Veronda Westmann constitutive model with average material coefficients accurately predicted peak contact stress, average contact stress, contact area and contact patterns. The use of subject- and region-specific material coefficients did not increase the accuracy of FE model predictions. The neo-Hookean constitutive model underpredicted peak contact stress in areas of high stress. The

  4. Bayesian model selection validates a biokinetic model for zirconium processing in humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In radiation protection, biokinetic models for zirconium processing are of crucial importance in dose estimation and further risk analysis for humans exposed to this radioactive substance. They provide limiting values of detrimental effects and build the basis for applications in internal dosimetry, the prediction for radioactive zirconium retention in various organs as well as retrospective dosimetry. Multi-compartmental models are the tool of choice for simulating the processing of zirconium. Although easily interpretable, determining the exact compartment structure and interaction mechanisms is generally daunting. In the context of observing the dynamics of multiple compartments, Bayesian methods provide efficient tools for model inference and selection. Results We are the first to apply a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach to compute Bayes factors for the evaluation of two competing models for zirconium processing in the human body after ingestion. Based on in vivo measurements of human plasma and urine levels we were able to show that a recently published model is superior to the standard model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The Bayes factors were estimated by means of the numerically stable thermodynamic integration in combination with a recently developed copula-based Metropolis-Hastings sampler. Conclusions In contrast to the standard model the novel model predicts lower accretion of zirconium in bones. This results in lower levels of noxious doses for exposed individuals. Moreover, the Bayesian approach allows for retrospective dose assessment, including credible intervals for the initially ingested zirconium, in a significantly more reliable fashion than previously possible. All methods presented here are readily applicable to many modeling tasks in systems biology. PMID:22863152

  5. Severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and human psoriatic skin chimeras. Validation of a new animal model.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, B. J.; Kunkel, S. L.; Burdick, M.; Strieter, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    Research into the cause and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying expression of psoriatric skin lesions has been hampered by lack of an appropriate animal model for this common and enigmatic cutaneous disease. These studies characterize normal skin, pre-psoriatic skin, and psoriatic plaque skin samples transplanted onto severe combined immunodeficiency mice. In this report we document that 1), normal, prepsoriatic, and psoriatic plaque keratome skin samples can be transplanted onto severe combined immunodeficiency mice reliably with high rates of graft survival (> 85%) and with reproducible changes consistently observed over prolonged periods of engraftment; 2), after transplantation, by clinical assessment and routine light microscopy, normal skin remained essentially normal whereas pre-psoriatic skin became thicker, and psoriatic plaque skin retained its characteristic plaque-type elevation and scale; 3), by using a panel of antibodies and immunohistochemical analysis, the overall phenotype of human cell types (including immunocytes) that persisted in the transplanted skin was remarkably similar to the immunophenotype of pretransplanted skin samples; 4), clearly recognized interface zones between human and murine skin within the epidermal and dermal compartments could be identified by routine microscopy and immunostaining, with focal areas of chimerism; and 5), elevated interleukin 8 cytokine levels were present in transplanted pre-psoriatic and psoriatic plaque skin samples. We conclude that there are many similarities between pre- and post-transplanted human samples of normal and psoriatic skin that are grafted onto severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Thus, we propose that this new animal model is appropriate for additional mechanistic-type studies designed to reveal the underlying genetic/etiological abnormality, as well as better illuminate the pathophysiological basis, for this important skin disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7887440

  6. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  7. Bioinformatic prediction and in vivo validation of residue-residue interactions in human proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Daniel; Davis, Erica; Katsanis, Nicholas; Sunyaev, Shamil

    2014-03-01

    Identifying residue-residue interactions in protein molecules is important for understanding both protein structure and function in the context of evolutionary dynamics and medical genetics. Such interactions can be difficult to predict using existing empirical or physical potentials, especially when residues are far from each other in sequence space. Using a multiple sequence alignment of 46 diverse vertebrate species we explore the space of allowed sequences for orthologous protein families. Amino acid changes that are known to damage protein function allow us to identify specific changes that are likely to have interacting partners. We fit the parameters of the continuous-time Markov process used in the alignment to conclude that these interactions are primarily pairwise, rather than higher order. Candidates for sites under pairwise epistasis are predicted, which can then be tested by experiment. We report the results of an initial round of in vivo experiments in a zebrafish model that verify the presence of multiple pairwise interactions predicted by our model. These experimentally validated interactions are novel, distant in sequence, and are not readily explained by known biochemical or biophysical features.

  8. Candidate microRNA Biomarkers in Human Gastric Cancer: A Systematic Review and Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xuan; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Chen, Hao-Yan; Xu, Jie; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and there is therefore a clear need to search for more sensitive early diagnostic biomarkers. We performed a systematic review of eight published miRNA profiling studies that compared GC tissues with adjacent noncancerous tissues. A miRNA ranking system was used that took the frequency of comparisons, direction of differential expression and total sample size into consideration. We identified five miRNAs that were most consistently reported to be upregulated (miR-21, miR-106b, miR-17, miR-18a and miR-20a) and two miRNAs that were downregulated (miR-378 and miR-638). Six of these were further validated in 32 paired sets of GC and adjacent noncancerous tissue samples using real-time PCR. MiR-21, miR-106b, miR-17, miR-18a and miR-20a were confirmed to be upregulatedin GC tissues, while the expression of miR-378 was decreased. Moreover, we found a significant association between expression levels of miR-21, miR-106b, miR-17, miR-18a and miR-20a and clinicopathological features of GC. These miRNAs may be used for diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers for GC and therefore warrant further investigation. PMID:24040025

  9. Presentation and validation of "The Learning Game," a tool to study associative learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Nelson, James Byron; Navarro, Anton; Sanjuan, Maria del Carmen

    2014-12-01

    This article presents a 3-D science-fiction-based videogame method to study learning, and two experiments that we used to validate it. In this method, participants are first trained to respond to enemy spaceships (Stimulus 2, or S2) with particular keypresses, followed by transport to a new context (galaxy), where other manipulations can occur. During conditioning, colored flashing lights (Stimulus 1, or S1) can predict S2, and the response attached to S2 from the prior phase comes to be evoked by S1. In Experiment 1 we demonstrated that, in accord with previous findings from animals, conditioning in this procedure was positively related to the ratio of the time between trials to the time within a trial. Experiment 2 demonstrated the phenomena of extinction, timing, and renewal. Responding to S1 was slightly lost with a context change, and diminished over trials in the absence of S2. On early extinction trials, responding during S1 declined after the time that S2 normally occurred. Extinguished responding to S1 recovered robustly with a context change. PMID:24570334

  10. Validation and Verification of Chandra Data: Combining Pipelines a Graphical Application and the Human Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deponte Evans, J.; Calderwood, T. J.; Evans, I. N.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Hall, D. M.; Miller, J. B.; Plummer, D. A.

    2006-07-01

    Validation and Verification (V&V) data products are created on a per-Observation basis by a V&V pipeline. The pipeline is initiated by Automated Processing after completion of Level 2 processing for the observation. A V&V Manager/GUI receives notification when the V&V data products for an observation are available, and performs the management and display tasks needed to make the products available for review by the V&V scientist, notify relevant parties, and assign a disposition to the observation data. In this paper we review the automated preparation of V&V data in pipeline processing, the visual aids offered in the graphical display to identify data violations, identify pipeline warnings or errors, and recommend dispositions and courses of actions for many commonly anticipated predefined conditions. The disposition and triggers to distribute data to the user based on successful completion of V&V are highlighted. The system simplifies and speeds the review process, ensures that quality data reaches the observer and archive, and raises project awareness of issues with the data or processing software.

  11. Extending Validated Human Performance Models to Explore NextGen Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Brian Francis; Hooey, Becky Lee; Mahlstedt, Eric; Foyle, David C.

    2012-01-01

    To meet the expected increases in air traffic demands, NASA and FAA are researching and developing Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concepts. NextGen will require substantial increases in the data available to pilots on the flight deck (e.g., weather,wake, traffic trajectory predictions, etc.) to support more precise and closely coordinated operations (e.g., self-separation, RNAV/RNP, and closely spaced parallel operations, CSPOs). These NextGen procedures and operations, along with the pilot's roles and responsibilities, must be designed with consideration of the pilot's capabilities and limitations. Failure to do so will leave the pilots, and thus the entire aviation system, vulnerable to error. A validated Man-machine Integration and design Analysis System (MIDAS) v5 model was extended to evaluate anticipated changes to flight deck and controller roles and responsibilities in NextGen approach and Land operations. Compared to conditions when the controllers are responsible for separation on decent to land phase of flight, the output from these model predictions suggest that the flight deck response time to detect the lead aircraft blunder will decrease, pilot scans to the navigation display will increase, and workload will increase.

  12. Bioanalytical method development and validation for simultaneous estimation of cefixime and dicloxacillin by RP-HPLC in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Bhinge, Somnath D; Malipatil, Sharangouda M; Sonawane, Lalit V

    2014-01-01

    An accurate, rapid and simple reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) bioanalytical method was developed and validated for simultaneous estimation of cefixime, dicloxacillin in human plasma using ezetimibe as an internal standard. The cefixime, dicloxacillin and internal standard were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction technique. Chromatographic separation is accomplished using CAPCELL PAK C18 (4.6 mm × 250 mm, 5 m) analytical column. The mobile phase consisted of phosphate buffer, acetonitrile and methanol in 42:55:03 proportions. Detection and quantification were performed by UV/Vis detection at 225 nm. The lower limit of quantification was 0.5 µg mL(-1) for both cefixime and dicloxacillin in human plasma. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration range 0.5 to 40 µg mL(-1) for both drugs in human plasma. The method was quantitatively evaluated in terms of linearity, precision, accuracy, recovery, selectivity, and stability. The method was found to be simple, convenient and suitable for the analysis of cefixime and dicloxacillin from biological fluids. PMID:25286213

  13. Human Joint Angle Estimation with Inertial Sensors and Validation with A Robot Arm.

    PubMed

    El-Gohary, Mahmoud; McNames, James

    2015-07-01

    Traditionally, human movement has been captured primarily by motion capture systems. These systems are costly, require fixed cameras in a controlled environment, and suffer from occlusion. Recently, the availability of low-cost wearable inertial sensors containing accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers have provided an alternative means to overcome the limitations of motion capture systems. Wearable inertial sensors can be used anywhere, cannot be occluded, and are low cost. Several groups have described algorithms for tracking human joint angles. We previously described a novel approach based on a kinematic arm model and the Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF). Our proposed method used a minimal sensor configuration with one sensor on each segment. This paper reports significant improvements in both the algorithm and the assessment. The new model incorporates gyroscope and accelerometer random drift models, imposes physical constraints on the range of motion for each joint, and uses zero-velocity updates to mitigate the effect of sensor drift. A high-precision industrial robot arm precisely quantifies the performance of the tracker during slow, normal, and fast movements over continuous 15-min recording durations. The agreement between the estimated angles from our algorithm and the high-precision robot arm reference was excellent. On average, the tracker attained an RMS angle error of about 3(°) for all six angles. The UKF performed slightly better than the more common Extended Kalman Filter. PMID:25700438

  14. An automated instrument for human STR identification: design, characterization, and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Hurth, Cedric; Smith, Stanley D; Nordquist, Alan R; Lenigk, Ralf; Duane, Brett; Nguyen, David; Surve, Amol; Hopwood, Andrew J; Estes, Matthew D; Yang, Jianing; Cai, Zhi; Chen, Xiaojia; Lee-Edghill, John G; Moran, Nina; Elliott, Keith; Tully, Gillian; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2010-10-01

    The microfluidic integration of an entire DNA analysis workflow on a fully integrated miniaturized instrument is reported using lab-on-a-chip automation to perform DNA fingerprinting compatible with CODIS standard relevant to the forensic community. The instrument aims to improve the cost, duration, and ease of use to perform a "sample-to-profile" analysis with no need for human intervention. The present publication describes the operation of the three major components of the system: the electronic control components, the microfluidic cartridge and CE microchip, and the optical excitation/detection module. Experimental details are given to characterize the level of performance, stability, reliability, accuracy, and sensitivity of the prototype system. A typical temperature profile from a PCR amplification process and an electropherogram of a commercial size standard (GeneScan 500™, Applied Biosystems) separation are shown to assess the relevance of the instrument to forensic applications. Finally, we present a profile from an automated integrated run where lysed cells from a buccal swab were introduced in the system and no further human intervention was required to complete the analysis. PMID:20931618

  15. Functional Validation of Rare Human Genetic Variants Involved in Homologous Recombination Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Mi; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Park, Geun-Hee; Kwack, KyuBum; Kim, Keun P.

    2015-01-01

    Systems for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are necessary to maintain genome integrity and normal functionality of cells in all organisms. Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in repairing accidental and programmed DSBs in mitotic and meiotic cells, respectively. Failure to repair these DSBs causes genome instability and can induce tumorigenesis. Rad51 and Rad52 are two key proteins in homologous pairing and strand exchange during DSB-induced HR; both are highly conserved in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed pathogenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human RAD51 and RAD52 using the Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) algorithms and observed the effect of mutations in highly conserved domains of RAD51 and RAD52 on DNA damage repair in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system. We identified a number of rad51 and rad52 alleles that exhibited severe DNA repair defects. The functionally inactive SNPs were located near ATPase active site of Rad51 and the DNA binding domain of Rad52. The rad51-F317I, rad52-R52W, and rad52-G107C mutations conferred hypersensitivity to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage and were defective in HR-mediated DSB repair. Our study provides a new approach for detecting functional and loss-of-function genetic polymorphisms and for identifying causal variants in human DNA repair genes that contribute to the initiation or progression of cancer. PMID:25938495

  16. Analytical Validation of AmpliChip p53 Research Test for Archival Human Ovarian FFPE Sections.

    PubMed

    Marton, Matthew J; McNamara, Andrew R; Nikoloff, D Michele; Nakao, Aki; Cheng, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene (TP53) is reported to be mutated in nearly half of all tumors and plays a central role in genome integrity. Detection of mutations in p53 can be accomplished by many assays, including the AmpliChip p53 Research Test. The AmpliChip p53 Research Test has been successfully used to determine p53 status in hematologic malignancies and fresh frozen solid tissues but there are few reports of using the assay with formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The objective of this study was to describe analytical performance characterization of the AmpliChip p53 Research Test to detect p53 mutations in genomic DNA isolated from archival FFPE human ovarian tumor tissues. Method correlation with sequencing showed 96% mutation-wise agreement and 99% chip-wise agreement. We furthermore observed 100% agreement (113/113) of the most prevalent TP53 mutations. Workflow reproducibility was 96.8% across 8 samples, with 2 operators, 2 reagent lots and 2 instruments. Section-to-section reproducibility was 100% for each sample across a 60 μm region of the FFPE block from ovarian tumors. These data indicate that the AmpliChip p53 Research Test is an accurate and reproducible method for detecting mutations in TP53 from archival FFPE human ovarian specimens. PMID:26125596

  17. A theory of human error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcruer, D. T.; Clement, W. F.; Allen, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Human error, a significant contributing factor in a very high proportion of civil transport, general aviation, and rotorcraft accidents is investigated. Correction of the sources of human error requires that one attempt to reconstruct underlying and contributing causes of error from the circumstantial causes cited in official investigative reports. A validated analytical theory of the input-output behavior of human operators involving manual control, communication, supervisory, and monitoring tasks which are relevant to aviation operations is presented. This theory of behavior, both appropriate and inappropriate, provides an insightful basis for investigating, classifying, and quantifying the needed cause-effect relationships governing propagation of human error.

  18. Content and Face Validation of a Curriculum for Ultrasonic Propulsion of Calculi in a Human Renal Model

    PubMed Central

    Dunmire, Barbrina; Cunitz, Bryan W.; He, Xuemei; Sorensen, Mathew D.; Harper, Jonathan D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Lendvay, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Ultrasonic propulsion to reposition urinary tract calculi requires knowledge about ultrasound image capture, device manipulation, and interpretation. The purpose of this study was to validate a cognitive and technical skills curriculum to teach urologists ultrasonic propulsion to reposition kidney stones in tissue phantoms. Materials and Methods: Ten board-certified urologists recruited from a single institution underwent a didactic session on renal ultrasound imaging. Subjects completed technical skills modules in tissue phantoms, including kidney imaging, pushing a stone through a translucent maze, and repositioning a lower pole calyceal stone. Objective cognitive and technical performance metrics were recorded. Subjects completed a questionnaire to ascertain face and content validity on a five-point Likert scale. Results: Eight urologists (80%) had never attended a previous ultrasound course, and nine (90%) performed renal ultrasounds less frequently than every 6 months. Mean cognitive skills scores improved from 55% to 91% (p<0.0001) on pre- and post-didactic tests. In the kidney phantom, 10 subjects (100%) repositioned the lower pole calyceal stone to at least the lower pole infundibulum, while 9 (90%) successfully repositioned the stone to the renal pelvis. A mean±SD (15.7±13.3) pushes were required to complete the task over an average of 4.6±2.2 minutes. Urologists rated the curriculum's effectiveness and realism as a training tool at a mean score of 4.6/5.0 and 4.1/5.0, respectively. Conclusions: The curriculum for ultrasonic propulsion is effective and useful for training urologists with limited ultrasound proficiency in stone repositioning technique. Further studies in animate and human models will be required to assess predictive validity. PMID:24228719

  19. Development and Validation of a Novel Platform-Independent Metastasis Signature in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Speers, Corey; Liu, Meilan; Wilder-Romans, Kari; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Pierce, Lori J.; Feng, Felix Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The molecular drivers of metastasis in breast cancer are not well understood. Therefore, we sought to identify the biological processes underlying distant progression and define a prognostic signature for metastatic potential in breast cancer. Experimental design In vivo screening for metastases was performed using Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane assays in 21 preclinical breast cancer models. Expressed genes associated with metastatic potential were identified using high-throughput analysis. Correlations with biological function were determined using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Results We identified a broad range of metastatic potential that was independent of intrinsic breast cancer subtypes. 146 genes were significantly associated with metastasis progression and were linked to cancer-related biological functions, including cell migration/adhesion, Jak-STAT, TGF-beta, and Wnt signaling. These genes were used to develop a platform-independent gene expression signature (M-Sig), which was trained and subsequently validated on 5 independent cohorts totaling nearly 1800 breast cancer patients with all p-values < 0.005 and hazard ratios ranging from approximately 2.5 to 3. On multivariate analysis accounting for standard clinicopathologic prognostic variables, M-Sig remained the strongest prognostic factor for metastatic progression, with p-values < 0.001 and hazard ratios > 2 in three different cohorts. Conclusion M-Sig is strongly prognostic for metastatic progression, and may provide clinical utility in combination with treatment prediction tools to better guide patient care. In addition, the platform-independent nature of the signature makes it an excellent research tool as it can be directly applied onto existing, and future, datasets. PMID:25974184

  20. Development and validation of a bioanalytical method for five antidepressants in human milk by LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Fernanda Rodrigues; D'Avila, Felipe Bianchini; de Oliveira, Marcella Herbstrith; Ferreira, Pamela Lukasewicz; Bergold, Ana Maria

    2016-09-10

    The use of medications during lactation is a common practice; however, pharmacological treatments impose serious doubts to both professionals and nursing mothers regarding the safety of drugs used during this period. Most of drugs are excreted in breast milk and there is great variability in the amount of analytes that can be received by the infant. Dilemmas about breastfeeding arise most commonly in relation to postpartum depression. Depression is a major clinical problem during the postpartum period and the vulnerability to onset or recurrence of depressive symptoms increases the possibility of psychotropic drug use during lactation. Selective inhibitors of serotonin reuptake are commonly prescribed for the treatment of depressive disorders, including fluoxetine, sertraline, citalopram, and paroxetine. A validated bioanalytical method using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was developed and validated for determination of antidepressants in human milk following protein precipation. The bioanalytical method was successfully applied to assess milk samples from nursing mothers. From found concentrations, infant absolute (4.36-12.26μg/kg/day) and relative dose (0.60-2.90%,) were estimated and low values were obtained indicating safe use during laction. However, other factors such as complemantary feeding and hepatic or renal disorders in the infant should be considered. PMID:27497651

  1. Validation of a Microsphere Immunoassay for Serological Leptospirosis Diagnosis in Human Serum by Comparison to the Current Gold Standard

    PubMed Central

    Wynwood, Sarah J.; Burns, Mary-Anne A.; Graham, Glenn C.; Weier, Steven L.; McKay, David B.; Craig, Scott B.

    2015-01-01

    A microsphere immunoassay (MIA) utilising Luminex xMap technology that is capable of determining leptospirosis IgG and IgM independently was developed. The MIA was validated using 200 human samples submitted for routine leptospirosis serology testing. The traditional microscopic agglutination (MAT) method (now 100 years old) suffers from a significant range of technical problems including a dependence on antisera which is difficult to source and produce, false positive reactions due to auto-agglutination and an inability to differentiate between IgG and IgM antibodies. A comparative validation method of the MIA against the MAT was performed and used to determine the ability of the MIA to detect leptospiral antibodies when compared with the MAT. The assay was able to determine samples in the reactive, equivocal and non-reactive ranges when compared to the MAT and was able to differentiate leptospiral IgG antibodies from leptospiral IgM antibodies. The MIA is more sensitive than the MAT and in true infections was able to detect low levels of antibody in the later stages of the acute phase as well as detect higher levels of IgM antibody earlier in the immune phase of the infection. The relatively low cost, high throughput platform and significantly reduced dependency on large volumes of rabbit antisera make this assay worthy of consideration for any microbiological assay that currently uses agglutination assays. PMID:25807009

  2. Validating cognitive support for operators of complex human-machine systems

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.; Wachtel, J.

    1995-10-01

    Modem nuclear power plants (NPPs) are complex systems whose performance is the result of an intricate interaction of human and system control. A complex system may be defined as one which supports a dynamic process involving a large number of elements that interact in many different ways. Safety is addressed through defense-in-depth design and preplanning; i.e., designers consider the types of failures that are most likely to occur and those of high consequence, and design their solutions in advance. However, complex interactions and their failure modes cannot always be anticipated by the designer and may be unfamiliar to plant personnel. These situations may pose cognitive demands on plant personnel, both individually and as a crew. Other factors may contribute to the cognitive challenges of NPP operation as well, including hierarchal processes, dynamic pace, system redundancy and reliability, and conflicting objectives. These factors are discussed in this paper.

  3. Rational Engineering of a Human Anti-Dengue Antibody through Experimentally Validated Computational Docking

    PubMed Central

    Beltramello, Martina; Livoti, Elsa; Calzolai, Luigi; Sallusto, Federica; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Varani, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies play an increasing pivotal role in both basic research and the biopharmaceutical sector, therefore technology for characterizing and improving their properties through rational engineering is desirable. This is a difficult task thought to require high-resolution x-ray structures, which are not always available. We, instead, use a combination of solution NMR epitope mapping and computational docking to investigate the structure of a human antibody in complex with the four Dengue virus serotypes. Analysis of the resulting models allows us to design several antibody mutants altering its properties in a predictable manner, changing its binding selectivity and ultimately improving its ability to neutralize the virus by up to 40 fold. The successful rational design of antibody mutants is a testament to the accuracy achievable by combining experimental NMR epitope mapping with computational docking and to the possibility of applying it to study antibody/pathogen interactions. PMID:23405171

  4. Human figure drawings: validity in assessing intellectual level and academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Aikman, K G; Belter, R W; Finch, A J

    1992-01-01

    In a sample of 216 child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients, significant but low correlations were found between Goodenough-Harris (GH) drawing scores and both Full Scale IQs and academic achievement. The percentage of subjects correctly classified in appropriate IQ categories ranged from 35 to 44%; the percentage of misclassified subjects ranged from 56 to 65%. Consideration of visual-motor integration, using the Bender-Gestalt, did not improve the accuracy of G-H scores in predicting IQ scores in this sample. These results indicate that human figure drawings should not be substituted for other well-established intelligence and achievement tests nor used as an additional measure of these constructs when one is evaluating psychiatric patients. PMID:1556206

  5. 21 CFR 890.5180 - Manual patient rotation bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual patient rotation bed. 890.5180 Section 890.5180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5180 Manual...

  6. 21 CFR 890.5180 - Manual patient rotation bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual patient rotation bed. 890.5180 Section 890.5180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5180 Manual...

  7. 21 CFR 890.5180 - Manual patient rotation bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual patient rotation bed. 890.5180 Section 890.5180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5180 Manual...

  8. 21 CFR 890.5180 - Manual patient rotation bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manual patient rotation bed. 890.5180 Section 890.5180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5180 Manual...

  9. 21 CFR 880.5120 - Manual adjustable hospital bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual adjustable hospital bed. 880.5120 Section 880.5120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... hospital bed is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of a bed with a manual...

  10. 42 CFR 431.18 - Availability of agency program manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Availability of agency program manuals. 431.18 Section 431.18 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Agency § 431.18 Availability of agency program manuals. (a) Basis and purpose. This section, based...

  11. 21 CFR 866.2180 - Manual colony counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual colony counter. 866.2180 Section 866.2180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2180 Manual colony...

  12. 21 CFR 866.2180 - Manual colony counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual colony counter. 866.2180 Section 866.2180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2180 Manual colony...

  13. 21 CFR 866.2180 - Manual colony counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manual colony counter. 866.2180 Section 866.2180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2180 Manual colony...

  14. 21 CFR 866.2180 - Manual colony counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual colony counter. 866.2180 Section 866.2180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2180 Manual colony...

  15. 21 CFR 866.2180 - Manual colony counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual colony counter. 866.2180 Section 866.2180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2180 Manual colony...

  16. Cloud cover retrieved from ground-base observation using Skyviewer : A validation with human observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bu-Yo; Jee, Joon-Bum; Zo, Il-Sung; Lee, Kyu-Tae

    2016-04-01

    Cloud cover is used in various fields of research in addition to weather forecasts; however, the ground observation of cloud cover is conducted by human observers, a method with low objectivity, temporal and spatial resolutions. Therefore, to address these problems, we have developed an improved algorithm to calculate cloud cover using sky image data obtained with Skyviewer equipment. The algorithm uses a variable threshold of the Red Blue Ratio (RBR) determined from the frequency distributions of the Green Blue Ratio (GBR) to calculate cloud cover more accurately than existing algorithms. To verify the accuracy of the algorithm, we conducted daily, monthly, seasonal and yearly statistical analysis on human observations of cloud cover obtained every hour from 0800 to 1700 LST for the entire year of 2012 at Gangwon Regional Meteorological Administration (GRMA), Korea. A daily case study compared the images of 1200 LST cases by season and pixel images of cloud cover calculated by the algorithm. The selected weekly cases yielded a high correlation of 0.93 with GRMA data. A monthly case study showed low RMSEs and high correlations for December (RMSE=1.64 tenths and r=0.92) and August (RMSE=1.43 tenths and r=0.91). In addition, seasonal cases yielded a high correlation of 0.9 and 87% consistency within ±2 tenths for winter and a correlation of 0.83 and 82% consistency for summer, when cases of cloud-free or overcast conditions are frequent. Annual analysis showed that the bias of GRMA and Skyviewer for the year of 2012 was -0.36 tenth, with cloud cover of the GRMA data being greater, whilst RMSE was 2.12 tenths. Considering the spatial inconsistency of the data used in the analysis, GRMA and Skyviewer showed a high correlation (0.87) and 80% consistency for cases with a difference in cloud cover of within ±2 tenths.

  17. Measurement of human growth hormone in urine: development and validation of a sensitive and specific assay.

    PubMed

    Hourd, P; Edwards, R

    1989-04-01

    A specific solid-phase immunoradiometric assay (IRMA), optimized for maximum sensitivity, has been developed for measurement of human GH (hGH) in urine. The sensitivity varied with sample size, giving a range of 0.001 to 0.003 mU/l for a sample volume of 2 ml. Recovery and dilution experiments, together with chromatography of urine samples, indicate that the method is specific for hGH. Added exogenous hGH was measured with a mean recovery of 101 +/- 10% (S.D.) for 1 ml samples and 87 +/- 8% for 2 ml samples. Measurements of samples diluted at 1:2 and 1:4 gave values of 97.4 and 96.6% respectively of those expected. Cross-reactions of human placental lactogen and prolactin were less than 0.008 and 0.04% respectively on a mol/mol basis. The assay was insensitive to the presence of NaCl (50-500 mmol/l), urea (50-1000 mmol/l), creatinine (1-20 mmol/l), Ca2+ ions (1-20 mmol/l), SO4(2-) ions (1-1000 mmol/l), Mg2+ ions (0.05-50 mmol/l), 0.5-5% (w/v) glucose and a pH range of 6-9. Chromatography of unextracted samples showed that the immunoreactive material in urine eluted in a single homogenous peak with a similar position to monomeric pituitary hGH (22 kDa). Administered hGH (0.002%) was recovered in urine collected over a 2-h period following an intravenous injection. The urine output of hGH showed a good correlation with serum hGH in 18 patients following routine insulin tolerance tests and in 25 patients following an oral glucose tolerance test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2715756

  18. Genome-Wide Prediction and Validation of Peptides That Bind Human Prosurvival Bcl-2 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    DeBartolo, Joe; Taipale, Mikko; Keating, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death is regulated by interactions between pro-apoptotic and prosurvival members of the Bcl-2 family. Pro-apoptotic family members contain a weakly conserved BH3 motif that can adopt an alpha-helical structure and bind to a groove on prosurvival partners Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bfl-1. Peptides corresponding to roughly 13 reported BH3 motifs have been verified to bind in this manner. Due to their short lengths and low sequence conservation, BH3 motifs are not detected using standard sequence-based bioinformatics approaches. Thus, it is possible that many additional proteins harbor BH3-like sequences that can mediate interactions with the Bcl-2 family. In this work, we used structure-based and data-based Bcl-2 interaction models to find new BH3-like peptides in the human proteome. We used peptide SPOT arrays to test candidate peptides for interaction with one or more of the prosurvival proteins Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bfl-1. For the 36 most promising array candidates, we quantified binding to all five human receptors using direct and competition binding assays in solution. All 36 peptides showed evidence of interaction with at least one prosurvival protein, and 22 peptides bound at least one prosurvival protein with a dissociation constant between 1 and 500 nM; many peptides had specificity profiles not previously observed. We also screened the full-length parent proteins of a subset of array-tested peptides for binding to Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Finally, we used the peptide binding data, in conjunction with previously reported interactions, to assess the affinity and specificity prediction performance of different models. PMID:24967846

  19. Determination of levocetirizine in human plasma by LC-MS-MS: validation and application in a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wichitnithad, Wisut; Jithavech, Ponsiree; Sanphanya, Kingkan; Vicheantawatchai, Petploy; Rojsitthisak, Pornchai

    2015-01-01

    A fast and simple sample cleanup approach for levocetirizine in human was developed using protein precipitation coupled with LC-MS-MS. Samples were treated with 6% trichloroacetic acid in water prior to LC-MS-MS analysis. Chromatographic separation was performed on a reverse phase column with an isocratic mobile phase of acetonitrile and 10 mM ammonium formate pH 3.5 (80:20, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The run time was 3.5 min. Mass parameters were optimized to monitor transitions at m/z [M+H](+) 389.0→201.0 for levocetirizine and m/z [M+H](+) 375.3→201.0 for hydroxyzine as internal standard. The lower limit of quantification and the dynamic range were 1.00 and 1.00-500 ng/mL, respectively. Linearity was good for intraday and interday validations (r(2) ≥ 0.995). The mean recoveries were 59 and 69% for levocetirizine and hydroxyzine, respectively. Matrix effect was acceptable with %CV < 15. Hemolytic effect was negligible. Levocetirizine was stable in human plasma for 27 h at room temperature (25°C), for 16 weeks frozen at -70°C, 4 weeks frozen at -20°C, for 24 h in an autosampler at 15°C and for three freeze/thaw cycles. The validated method was applied in a pharmacokinetic study to determine the concentration of levocetirizine in plasma samples. The study provides a fast and simple bioanalytical method for routine analysis and may be particularly useful for bioequivalence studies. PMID:26084706

  20. Validation and genotyping of multiple human polymorphic inversions mediated by inverted repeats reveals a high degree of recurrence.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Cristina; Gayà-Vidal, Magdalena; Villatoro, Sergi; Oliva, Meritxell; Izquierdo, David; Giner-Delgado, Carla; Montalvo, Víctor; García-González, Judit; Martínez-Fundichely, Alexander; Capilla, Laia; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Estivill, Xavier; Puig, Marta; Cáceres, Mario

    2014-03-01

    In recent years different types of structural variants (SVs) have been discovered in the human genome and their functional impact has become increasingly clear. Inversions, however, are poorly characterized and more difficult to study, especially those mediated by inverted repeats or segmental duplications. Here, we describe the results of a simple and fast inverse PCR (iPCR) protocol for high-throughput genotyping of a wide variety of inversions using a small amount of DNA. In particular, we analyzed 22 inversions predicted in humans ranging from 5.1 kb to 226 kb and mediated by inverted repeat sequences of 1.6-24 kb. First, we validated 17 of the 22 inversions in a panel of nine HapMap individuals from different populations, and we genotyped them in 68 additional individuals of European origin, with correct genetic transmission in ∼ 12 mother-father-child trios. Global inversion minor allele frequency varied between 1% and 49% and inversion genotypes were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. By analyzing the nucleotide variation and the haplotypes in these regions, we found that only four inversions have linked tag-SNPs and that in many cases there are multiple shared SNPs between standard and inverted chromosomes, suggesting an unexpected high degree of inversion recurrence during human evolution. iPCR was also used to check 16 of these inversions in four chimpanzees and two gorillas, and 10 showed both orientations either within or between species, providing additional support for their multiple origin. Finally, we have identified several inversions that include genes in the inverted or breakpoint regions, and at least one disrupts a potential coding gene. Thus, these results represent a significant advance in our understanding of inversion polymorphism in human populations and challenge the common view of a single origin of inversions, with important implications for inversion analysis in SNP-based studies. PMID:24651690

  1. Biochemical validation of a rat model for polycystic kidney disease: comparison of guanidino compound profile with the human condition.

    PubMed

    Torremans, A; Marescau, B; Kränzlin, B; Gretz, N; Billiouw, J-M; Vanholder, R; De Smet, R; Bouwman, K; Brouns, R; De Deyn, P P

    2006-06-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) accounts for 7-10% of all dialyzed renal insufficient patients. Accumulation of specific guanidino compounds (GCs) has been related to neurological, cardiovascular, hematological, and immunological complications of renal failure. In this study, we investigate whether the PKD/Mhm rat model can be used as a biochemical model for human PKD. For the validation of the rat model, we performed the first detailed evaluation of the concentrations of GCs in serum and urine of patients with PKD in addition to the GC patterns in the plasma, urine, and tissues of the PKD/Mhm rat model. The GCs were determined after separation on a cation exchange resin and fluorescence detection. The GC levels and changes observed in blood and urine of patients with PKD are comparable with those found in patients with renal insufficiency due to different etiologies. The PKD/Mhm rat model can be used as a biochemical model for human PKD as the obvious increases of urea, guanidinosuccinic acid, creatinine, guanidine, methylguanidine, and N(G)N(G)-dimethylarginine (symmetrical dimethylarginine) seen in blood of oldest heterozygous and younger homozygous PKD rats were largely within the same range as those found in the studied human PKD population, especially in patients with a glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2). The decreased levels of plasma guanidinoacetic acid seen at end-stage renal disease in homozygous and oldest heterozygous rats were also observed in serum of patients with a glomerular filtration rate below 20 ml/min/1.73 m(2). The PKD/Mhm rat model has, besides similar disease characteristics with human PKD, comparable GC alterations. PMID:16641922

  2. Validation and Genotyping of Multiple Human Polymorphic Inversions Mediated by Inverted Repeats Reveals a High Degree of Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Cristina; Gayà-Vidal, Magdalena; Villatoro, Sergi; Oliva, Meritxell; Izquierdo, David; Giner-Delgado, Carla; Montalvo, Víctor; García-González, Judit; Martínez-Fundichely, Alexander; Capilla, Laia; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Estivill, Xavier; Puig, Marta; Cáceres, Mario

    2014-01-01

    In recent years different types of structural variants (SVs) have been discovered in the human genome and their functional impact has become increasingly clear. Inversions, however, are poorly characterized and more difficult to study, especially those mediated by inverted repeats or segmental duplications. Here, we describe the results of a simple and fast inverse PCR (iPCR) protocol for high-throughput genotyping of a wide variety of inversions using a small amount of DNA. In particular, we analyzed 22 inversions predicted in humans ranging from 5.1 kb to 226 kb and mediated by inverted repeat sequences of 1.6–24 kb. First, we validated 17 of the 22 inversions in a panel of nine HapMap individuals from different populations, and we genotyped them in 68 additional individuals of European origin, with correct genetic transmission in ∼12 mother-father-child trios. Global inversion minor allele frequency varied between 1% and 49% and inversion genotypes were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. By analyzing the nucleotide variation and the haplotypes in these regions, we found that only four inversions have linked tag-SNPs and that in many cases there are multiple shared SNPs between standard and inverted chromosomes, suggesting an unexpected high degree of inversion recurrence during human evolution. iPCR was also used to check 16 of these inversions in four chimpanzees and two gorillas, and 10 showed both orientations either within or between species, providing additional support for their multiple origin. Finally, we have identified several inversions that include genes in the inverted or breakpoint regions, and at least one disrupts a potential coding gene. Thus, these results represent a significant advance in our understanding of inversion polymorphism in human populations and challenge the common view of a single origin of inversions, with important implications for inversion analysis in SNP-based studies. PMID:24651690

  3. The Intergenerational Caregiving Program: A Replication Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Marlene Cresci; And Others

    The Intergenerational Caregiving Program (ICP), a year long educational experience in human development and child care for older adults, is described in this replication manual. In its first year of operation, the ICP recruited older, usually retired adults from agencies and organizations in San Francisco that serve older people. The 22 older…

  4. 21 CFR 872.6855 - Manual toothbrush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual toothbrush. 872.6855 Section 872.6855 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... toothbrush is a device composed of a shaft with either natural or synthetic bristles at one end intended...

  5. Identification and Validation of a Putative Polycomb Responsive Element in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Bengani, Hemant; Mendiratta, Shweta; Maini, Jayant; Vasanthi, Dasari; Sultana, Hina; Ghasemi, Mohsen; Ramachandran, Sowmya; Mishra, Rakesh K.; Brahmachari, Vani

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic cellular memory mechanisms that involve polycomb and trithorax group of proteins are well conserved across metazoans. The cis-acting elements interacting with these proteins, however, are poorly understood in mammals. In a directed search we identified a potential polycomb responsive element with 25 repeats of YY1 binding motifthatwe designate PRE-PIK3C2B as it occurs in the first intron of human PIK3C2B gene. It down regulates reporter gene expression in HEK cells and the repression is dependent on polycomb group of proteins (PcG). We demonstrate that PRE-PIK3C2B interacts directly with YY1 in vitro and recruits PRC2 complex in vivo. The localization of PcG proteins including YY1 to PRE-PIK3C2B in HEK cells is decreased on knock-down of either YY1 or SUZ12. Endogenous PRE-PIK3C2B shows bivalent marking having H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 for repressed and active state respectively. In transgenic Drosophila, PRE-PIK3C2B down regulates mini-white expression, exhibits variegation and pairing sensitive silencing (PSS), which has not been previously demonstrated for mammalian PRE. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that PRE-PIK3C2B functions as a site of interaction for polycomb proteins. PMID:23805300

  6. Two Validated Spectrofluorometric Methods for Determination of Gemifloxacin Mesylate in Tablets and Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Atia, Noha N.; Mahmoud, Ashraf M.; El-Shabouri, Salwa R.; El-Koussi, Wesam M.

    2013-01-01

    Two new, sensitive, and selective spectrofluorometric methods were developed for the determination of gemifloxacin mesylate (GFX) in tablets and spiked human plasma. Method A was based on measurement of the enhanced fluorescence spectral behaviour of GFX in a sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micellar system. In aqueous solution of acetate buffer pH 5.5, the fluorescence intensity of GFX was greatly enhanced about tenfold in the presence of SDS. The fluorescence intensity was measured at 402 nm after excitation at 274 nm. Method B was based on Hantzsch condensation reaction between the primary amino group of GFX with acetylacetone and formaldehyde in acetate buffer of pH 3.5 yielding a highly yellow fluorescent derivative. The reaction of GFX with acetylacetone-formaldehyde system solution resulted in bathochromic shift of both emission (476 nm) and excitation (420 nm) wavelengths. The fluorescence intensity was directly proportional to the concentration over the range 10–1000 ng/ml and 100–2000 ng/ml for method A and B, respectively. The proposed methods were applied successfully for determination of GFX in its tablets and spiked plasma. Therefore, these methods can be considered of real interest for reliable and practical quality control analysis of GFX. PMID:23762060

  7. Performance Characteristics and Validation of Next-Generation Sequencing for Human Leucocyte Antigen Typing.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Eric T; Montgomery, Maureen; Petraroia, Rosanne; Crawford, John; Schmitz, John L

    2016-09-01

    High-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching reduces graft-versus-host disease and improves overall patient survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Sanger sequencing has been the gold standard for HLA typing since 1996. However, given the increasing number of new HLA alleles identified and the complexity of the HLA genes, clinical HLA typing by Sanger sequencing requires several rounds of additional testing to provide allele-level resolution. Although next-generation sequencing (NGS) is routinely used in molecular genetics, few clinical HLA laboratories use the technology. The performance characteristics of NGS HLA typing using TruSight HLA were determined using Sanger sequencing as the reference method. In total, 211 samples were analyzed with an overall accuracy of 99.8% (2954/2961) and 46 samples were analyzed for precision with 100% (368/368) reproducibility. Most discordant alleles were because of technical error rather than assay performance. More important, the ambiguity rate was 3.5% (103/2961). Seventy-four percentage of the ambiguities were within the DRB1 and DRB4 loci. HLA typing by NGS saves approximately $6000 per run when compared to Sanger sequencing. Thus, TruSight HLA assay enables high-throughput HLA typing with an accuracy, precision, ambiguity rate, and cost savings that should facilitate adoption of NGS technology in clinical HLA laboratories. PMID:27376474

  8. RP-HPLC analysis of flucloxacillin in human plasma: validation and application to a bioequivalence study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Q; Ruan, Z; Yuan, H; Jiang, B; Xu, D

    2007-02-01

    A RP-HPLC method with rapid sample processing was developed for quantitation of flucloxacillin in human plasma using dicloxacillin as the internal standard. The plasma sample (100 microL) was acidified with glacial acetic acid, and deproteinized by precipitation with acetonitrile. The supernatant was directly injected into the HPLC system. Separation was achieved on an Alltima C18 column (250 mmx4.6 mm I.D., 5 microm), with a mixture of 10 mmol x L(-1) KH2PO4-acetonitrile (64.5:35.5, v/v) as mobile phase. The assay was successfully applied to a randomized, two-period cross-over bioequivalence study in 20 healthy Chinese volunteers following a single oral dose of 250 mg flucloxacillin capsules. A non-compartmental method was used for pharmacokinetic analysis. Compared with data in the literature, flucloxacillin was eliminated more slowly in Chinese than in Caucasians. Cmax, AUC(0-t) and AUC(0-infinity) were tested for bioequivalence after log-transformation of data. No significant difference was found. Tmax was analyzed by Wilcoxon's test and no significant difference was obtained (P > 0.05). Based on these statistical inferences, the two formulations were judged to be bioequivalent and, thus, can be prescribed interchangeably. PMID:17341027

  9. Modeling of Depth Cue Integration in Manual Control Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, Barbara T.; Kaiser, Mary K.; Davis, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    Psychophysical research has demonstrated that human observers utilize a variety of visual cues to form a perception of three-dimensional depth. However, most of these studies have utilized a passive judgement paradigm, and failed to consider depth-cue integration as a dynamic and task-specific process. In the current study, we developed and experimentally validated a model of manual control of depth that examines how two potential cues (stereo disparity and relative size) are utilized in both first- and second-order active depth control tasks. We found that stereo disparity plays the dominate role for determining depth position, while relative size dominates perception of depth velocity. Stereo disparity also plays a reduced role when made less salient (i.e., when viewing distance is increased). Manual control models predict that position information is sufficient for first-order control tasks, while velocity information is required to perform a second-order control task. Thus, the rules for depth-cue integration in active control tasks are dependent on both task demands and cue quality.

  10. Validation of marrow fat assessment using noninvasive imaging with histologic examination of human bone samples

    PubMed Central

    Arentsen, Luke; Yagi, Masashi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Bolan, Patrick J.; White, Melissa; Yee, Douglas; Hui, Susanta

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The marrow composition throughout the body is heterogeneous and changes with age. Due to the heterogeneity, invasive biopsies of the iliac crest do not truly represent the complete physiological status, impeding the clinical effectiveness of this method. Therefore, we aim to provide verification for an in vivo imaging technique using co-registered histologic examinations for assessment of marrow adiposity. Methods Five recently expired (i.e. < 24 hours) human cadavers were scanned with a dual source CT (DECT) scanner in order to measure marrow fat in the lumbar vertebrae. These donors were also imaged using water-fat MRI (wfMRI) which was used to estimate the fraction of yellow marrow. After imaging, lumbar columns were excised and the superior and inferior aspects of 21 vertebrae were removed. The remaining center section was processed for histological examination to find the ratio of adipocyte volume per tissue volume (AV/TV). Results Results of DECT and wfMRI had a high correlation (r = 0.88). AV/TV ranged from 0.18 to 0.75 with a mean (SD) of 0.36 (0.18). Inter-evaluator reliability for AV/TV was r > 0.984. There were similar correlations between AV/TV and the imaging modalities, DECT-derived MF and wfMRI (r = 0.802 and 0.772, respectively). Conclusions A high MF variation was seen among the 25 vertebrae imaged. Both DECT and wfMRI have a good correlation with the histologic adipocyte proportion and can be used to measure MF. This makes longitudinal studies possible without painful, less-effective, invasive biopsies PMID:25460181

  11. Validation of computational fluid dynamics methodology used for human upper airway flow simulations.

    PubMed

    Mylavarapu, Goutham; Murugappan, Shanmugam; Mihaescu, Mihai; Kalra, Maninder; Khosla, Sid; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2009-07-22

    An anatomically accurate human upper airway model was constructed from multiple magnetic resonance imaging axial scans. This model was used to conduct detailed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations during expiration, to investigate the fluid flow in the airway regions where obstruction could occur. An identical physical model of the same airway was built using stereo lithography. Pressure and velocity measurements were conducted in the physical model. Both simulations and experiments were performed at a peak expiratory flow rate of 200 L/min. Several different numerical approaches within the FLUENT commercial software framework were used in the simulations; unsteady Large Eddy Simulation (LES), steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) with two-equation turbulence models (i.e. k-epsilon, standard k-omega, and k-omega Shear Stress Transport (SST)) and with one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model. The CFD predictions of the average wall static pressures at different locations along the airway wall were favorably compared with the experimental data. Among all the approaches, standard k-omega turbulence model resulted in the best agreement with the static pressure measurements, with an average error of approximately 20% over all ports. The highest positive pressures were observed in the retroglossal regions below the epiglottis, while the lowest negative pressures were recorded in the retropalatal region. The latter is a result of the airflow acceleration in the narrow retropalatal region. The largest pressure drop was observed at the tip of the soft palate. This location has the smallest cross section of the airway. The good agreement between the computations and the experimental results suggest that CFD simulations can be used to accurately compute aerodynamic flow characteristics of the upper airway. PMID:19501360

  12. Validation of an individualised model of human thermoregulation for predicting responses to cold air.

    PubMed

    van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D; Frijns, Arjan J H; van Ooijen, Marieke J; Fiala, Dusan; Kester, Arnold M; van Steenhoven, Anton A

    2007-01-01

    Most computer models of human thermoregulation are population based. Here, we individualised the Fiala model [Fiala et al. (2001) Int J Biometeorol 45:143-159] with respect to anthropometrics, body fat, and metabolic rate. The predictions of the adapted multisegmental thermoregulatory model were compared with measured skin temperatures of individuals. Data from two experiments, in which reclining subjects were suddenly exposed to mild to moderate cold environmental conditions, were used to study the effect on dynamic skin temperature responses. Body fat was measured by the three-compartment method combining underwater weighing and deuterium dilution. Metabolic rate was determined by indirect calorimetry. In experiment 1, the bias (mean difference) between predicted and measured mean skin temperature decreased from 1.8 degrees C to -0.15 degrees C during cold exposure. The standard deviation of the mean difference remained of the same magnitude (from 0.7 degrees C to 0.9 degrees C). In experiment 2 the bias of the skin temperature changed from 2.0+/-1.09 degrees C using the standard model to 1.3+/-0.93 degrees C using individual characteristics in the model. The inclusion of individual characteristics thus improved the predictions for an individual and led to a significantly smaller systematic error. However, a large part of the discrepancies in individual response to cold remained unexplained. Possible further improvements to the model accomplished by inclusion of more subject characteristics (i.e. body fat distribution, body shape) and model refinements on the level of (skin) blood perfusion, and control functions, are discussed. PMID:17096080

  13. Reassessing manual proportions in Australopithecus afarensis.

    PubMed

    Rolian, Campbell; Gordon, Adam D

    2013-11-01

    Previous analyses of hand morphology in Australopithecus afarensis have concluded that this taxon had modern human-like manual proportions, with relatively long thumbs and short fingers. These conclusions are based on the A.L.333 composite fossil assemblage from Hadar, Ethiopia, and are premised on the ability to assign phalanges to a single individual, and to the correct side and digit. Neither assignment is secure, however, given the taphonomy and sample composition at A.L.333. We use a resampling approach that includes the entire assemblage of complete hand elements at Hadar, and takes into account uncertainties in identifying phalanges by individual, side and digit number. This approach provides the most conservative estimates of manual proportions in Au. afarensis. We resampled hand long bone lengths in Au. afarensis and extant hominoids, and obtained confidence limits for distributions of manual proportions in the latter. Results confirm that intrinsic manual proportions in Au. afarensis are dissimilar to Pan and Pongo. However, manual proportions in Au. afarensis often fall at the upper end of the distribution in Gorilla, and very lower end in Homo, corresponding to disproportionately short thumbs and long medial digits in Homo. This suggests that manual proportions in Au. afarensis, particularly metacarpal proportions, were not as derived towards Homo as previously described, but rather are intermediate between gorillas and humans. Functionally, these results suggest Au. afarensis could not produce precision grips with the same efficiency as modern humans, which may in part account for the absence of lithic technology in this fossil taxon. PMID:24104947

  14. Total esterase activity in human saliva: Validation of an automated assay, characterization and behaviour after physical stress.

    PubMed

    Tecles, Fernando; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; De Torre, Carlos; Carrillo, José M; Rubio, Mónica; García, Montserrat; Cugat, Ramón; Cerón, José J

    2016-07-01

    Although saliva has esterase activity, this activity has not been characterized or studied in individuals subjected to physical stress. The aim of this report was to develop and validate an automated spectrophotometric assay for total esterase activity measurement in human saliva, as well as to study the contribution of different enzymes on this activity and its behaviour under physical stress in healthy subjects. The assay used 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate and was precise, accurate and provided low limits of detection and quantification. Inhibition with diisopropylfluorophosphate showed that cholinesterase, carboxylesterase and cholesterol esterase contributions not represented more than 20% of total esterase. Addition of standards of lipase and albumin to saliva samples showed that both proteins significantly contributed to esterase activity only when equal or higher than 11.6 IU/L and 250 μg/mL, respectively. Western blot analyses showed absence of paraoxonase-1 and high amount of carbonic anhydrase-VI. The high affinity of purified carbonic anhydrase-VI for the substrate supported a major contribution of this enzyme. Total esterase activity and alpha-amylase was measured in saliva samples from 12 healthy male students before and after participation in an indoor football match. The activity significantly increased after match and positively correlated with salivary alpha-amylase. This method could be used as a biomarker of physical stress in humans, with carbonic anhydrase-VI being the esterase that contributed more to the activity of the assay. PMID:27045801

  15. Identification of tumor-associated cassette exons in human cancer through EST-based computational prediction and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many evidences report that alternative splicing, the mechanism which produces mRNAs and proteins with different structures and functions from the same gene, is altered in cancer cells. Thus, the identification and characterization of cancer-specific splice variants may give large impulse to the discovery of novel diagnostic and prognostic tumour biomarkers, as well as of new targets for more selective and effective therapies. Results We present here a genome-wide analysis of the alternative splicing pattern of human genes through a computational analysis of normal and cancer-specific ESTs from seventeen anatomical groups, using data available in AspicDB, a database resource for the analysis of alternative splicing in human. By using a statistical methodology, normal and cancer-specific genes, splice sites and cassette exons were predicted in silico. The condition association of some of the novel normal/tumoral cassette exons was experimentally verified by RT-qPCR assays in the same anatomical system where they were predicted. Remarkably, the presence in vivo of the predicted alternative transcripts, specific for the nervous system, was confirmed in patients affected by glioblastoma. Conclusion This study presents a novel computational methodology for the identification of tumor-associated transcript variants to be used as cancer molecular biomarkers, provides its experimental validation, and reports specific biomarkers for glioblastoma. PMID:20813049

  16. Development and validation of a novel, simple, and accurate spectrophotometric method for the determination of lead in human serum.

    PubMed

    Shayesteh, Tavakol Heidari; Khajavi, Farzad; Khosroshahi, Abolfazl Ghafuri; Mahjub, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The determination of blood lead levels is the most useful indicator of the determination of the amount of lead that is absorbed by the human body. Various methods, like atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), have already been used for the detection of lead in biological fluid, but most of these methods are based on complicated, expensive, and highly instructed instruments. In this study, a simple and accurate spectroscopic method for the determination of lead has been developed and applied for the investigation of lead concentration in biological samples. In this study, a silica gel column was used to extract lead and eliminate interfering agents in human serum samples. The column was washed with deionized water. The pH was adjusted to the value of 8.2 using phosphate buffer, and then tartrate and cyanide solutions were added as masking agents. The lead content was extracted into the organic phase containing dithizone as a complexion reagent and the dithizone-Pb(II) complex was formed and approved by visible spectrophotometry at 538 nm. The recovery was found to be 84.6 %. In order to validate the method, a calibration curve involving the use of various concentration levels was calculated and proven to be linear in the range of 0.01-1.5 μg/ml, with an R (2) regression coefficient of 0.9968 by statistical analysis of linear model validation. The largest error % values were found to be -5.80 and +11.6 % for intra-day and inter-day measurements, respectively. The largest RSD % values were calculated to be 6.54 and 12.32 % for intra-day and inter-day measurements, respectively. Further, the limit of detection (LOD) was calculated to be 0.002 μg/ml. The developed method was applied to determine the lead content in the human serum of voluntary miners, and it has been proven that there is no statistically significant difference between the data provided from this novel method and the data obtained from previously studied AAS. PMID:26631397

  17. Development and Validation of a Biomarker for Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Mark; Morales, Walter; Rezaie, Ali; Marsh, Emily; Lembo, Anthony; Mirocha, James; Leffler, Daniel A.; Marsh, Zachary; Weitsman, Stacy; Chua, Kathleen S.; Barlow, Gillian M.; Bortey, Enoch; Forbes, William; Yu, Allen; Chang, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is diagnosed through clinical criteria after excluding “organic” conditions, and can be precipitated by acute gastroenteritis. Cytolethal distending toxin B (CdtB) is produced by bacteria that cause acute gastroenteritis, and a post-infectious animal model demonstrates that host antibodies to CdtB cross-react with vinculin in the host gut, producing an IBS-like phenotype. Therefore, we assessed circulating anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin antibodies as biomarkers for D-IBS in human subjects. Subjects with D-IBS based on Rome criteria (n=2375) were recruited from a large-scale multicenter clinical trial for D-IBS (TARGET 3). Subjects with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (n=142), subjects with celiac disease (n=121), and healthy controls (n=43) were obtained for comparison. Subjects with IBD and celiac disease were recruited based on the presence of intestinal complaints and histologic confirmation of chronic inflammatory changes in the colon or small intestine. Subjects with celiac disease were also required to have an elevated tTG and biopsy. All subjects were aged between 18 and 65 years. Plasma levels of anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin antibodies were determined by ELISA, and compared between groups. Anti-CdtB titers were significantly higher in D-IBS subjects compared to IBD, healthy controls and celiac disease (P<0.001). Anti-vinculin titers were also significantly higher in IBS (P<0.001) compared to the other groups. The area-under-the-receiver operating curves (AUCs) were 0.81 and 0.62 for diagnosis of D-IBS against IBD for anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin, respectively. Both tests were less specific in differentiating IBS from celiac disease. Optimization demonstrated that for anti-CdtB (optical density≥2.80) the specificity, sensitivity and likelihood ratio were 91.6%, 43.7 and 5.2, respectively, and for anti-vinculin (OD≥1.68) were 83.8%, 32.6 and 2.0, respectively. These results confirm that anti-CdtB and

  18. Validation and Comparison of Two Methods to Assess Human Energy Expenditure during Free-Living Activities

    PubMed Central

    Anastasopoulou, Panagiota; Tubic, Mirnes; Schmidt, Steffen; Neumann, Rainer; Woll, Alexander; Härtel, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    Background The measurement of activity energy expenditure (AEE) via accelerometry is the most commonly used objective method for assessing human daily physical activity and has gained increasing importance in the medical, sports and psychological science research in recent years. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine which of the following procedures is more accurate to determine the energy cost during the most common everyday life activities; a single regression or an activity based approach. For this we used a device that utilizes single regression models (GT3X, ActiGraph Manufacturing Technology Inc., FL., USA) and a device using activity-dependent calculation models (move II, movisens GmbH, Karlsruhe, Germany). Material and Methods Nineteen adults (11 male, 8 female; 30.4±9.0 years) wore the activity monitors attached to the waist and a portable indirect calorimeter (IC) as reference measure for AEE while performing several typical daily activities. The accuracy of the two devices for estimating AEE was assessed as the mean differences between their output and the reference and evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis. Results The GT3X overestimated the AEE of walking (GT3X minus reference, 1.26 kcal/min), walking fast (1.72 kcal/min), walking up−/downhill (1.45 kcal/min) and walking upstairs (1.92 kcal/min) and underestimated the AEE of jogging (−1.30 kcal/min) and walking upstairs (−2.46 kcal/min). The errors for move II were smaller than those for GT3X for all activities. The move II overestimated AEE of walking (move II minus reference, 0.21 kcal/min), walking up−/downhill (0.06 kcal/min) and stair walking (upstairs: 0.13 kcal/min; downstairs: 0.29 kcal/min) and underestimated AEE of walking fast (−0.11 kcal/min) and jogging (−0.93 kcal/min). Conclusions Our data suggest that the activity monitor using activity-dependent calculation models is more appropriate for predicting AEE in daily life than the activity monitor using a single

  19. Manual Control Aspects of Orbital Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brody, Adam R. (Editor); Ellis, Stephen R. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    A brief description of several laboratories' current research in the general area of manual control of orbital flight is presented. With an operational-space-station era (and its increased traffic levels) approaching, now is an opportune time to investigate issues such as docking and rendezvous profiles and course-planning aids. The tremendous increase in the capabilities of computers and computer graphics has made extensive study possible and economical. It is time to study these areas, from a human factors and manual control perspective in order to preclude the occurrence of problems analogous to those that occurred in the airline and other related industries.

  20. Aircraft operations management manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA aircraft operations program is a multifaceted, highly diverse entity that directly supports the agency mission in aeronautical research and development, space science and applications, space flight, astronaut readiness training, and related activities through research and development, program support, and mission management aircraft operations flights. Users of the program are interagency, inter-government, international, and the business community. This manual provides guidelines to establish policy for the management of NASA aircraft resources, aircraft operations, and related matters. This policy is an integral part of and must be followed when establishing field installation policy and procedures covering the management of NASA aircraft operations. Each operating location will develop appropriate local procedures that conform with the requirements of this handbook. This manual should be used in conjunction with other governing instructions, handbooks, and manuals.

  1. Nuclear material operations manual

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, R.P.

    1981-02-01

    This manual provides a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia National Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations-management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of playscripts in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion.

  2. Ethics manual: fifth edition.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Lois; Leffler, Cathy

    2005-04-01

    Medicine, law, and social values are not static. Reexamining the ethical tenets of medical practice and their application in new circumstances is a necessary exercise. The fifth edition of the College's Ethics Manual covers emerging issues in medical ethics and revisits old ones. It reflects on many of the ethical tensions faced by internists and their patients and attempts to shed light on how existing principles extend to emerging concerns. In addition, by reiterating ethical principles that have provided guidance in resolving past ethical problems, the Manual may help physicians avert future problems. The Manual is not a substitute for the experience and integrity of individual physicians, but it may serve as a reminder of the shared obligations and duties of the medical profession. PMID:15809467

  3. Developing a policy manual.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Tracey A

    2013-01-01

    Do you really need to have a policy and procedure in the office? Frequently they are seen sitting on the shelf, collecting dust. The answer is yes for a number of very important reasons. A policy and procedure manual is a tool to set guidelines and expectations on the basis of the mission and vision of the office. A well-written manual is a powerful training tool for new staff so they can get a feel for the office culture. Furthermore, it is a provincial or state legislative requirement that can reduce management's concern about potential legal issues or problems. If an office does not have a manual to set guidelines, the employees may be forced to make their own decisions to solve problems, which can often result in confusion, inconsistencies, and mistakes. PMID:23446507

  4. Towards the Development of an Effective Working Alliance: The Application of DBT Validation and Stylistic Strategies in the Adaptation of a Manualized Complex Trauma Group Treatment Program for Adolescents in Long-Term Detention.

    PubMed

    Fasulo, Samuel J; Ball, Joanna M; Jurkovic, Gregory J; Miller, Alec L

    2015-01-01

    The current paper details a case of adapting a manualized group therapy treatment for youths experiencing chronic stress. It was used for use with a highly traumatized and behaviorally disordered group of adolescents (ages 14 to 17 years) in long-term juvenile detention. The authors argue for a phasic approach to treatment for this population, with the goal of the essential, initial phase being the development of an authentic therapeutic alliance before other treatment goals are pursued. The authors provide clinical examples of liberally and patiently utilizing dialectical behavior therapy-framed acceptance-based strategies to achieve this therapeutic alliance, and only then naturally weaving in more traditional cognitive behavioral, change-oriented psychoeducational approaches successfully. Clinical and research implications for effective treatment of traumatized, detained youths are also discussed. PMID:26160624

  5. Quality Assurance Manual

    SciTech Connect

    McGarrah, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    In order to provide clients with quality products and services, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has established and implemented a formal quality assurance program. These management controls are documented in this manual (PNL-MA-70) and its accompanying standards and procedures. The QA Program meets the basic requirements and supplements of ANSI/ASME NQA-1, Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities, as interpreted for PNL activities. Additional, the quality requirements are augmented to include the Total Quality approach defined in the Department of Energy Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance. This manual provides requirements and an overview of the administrative procedures that apply to projects and activities.

  6. Fastener Design Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Richard T.

    1990-01-01

    This manual was written for design engineers to enable them to choose appropriate fasteners for their designs. Subject matter includes fastener material selection, platings, lubricants, corrosion, locking methods, washers, inserts, thread types and classes, fatigue loading, and fastener torque. A section on design criteria covers the derivation of torque formulas, loads on a fastener group, combining simultaneous shear and tension loads, pullout load for tapped holes, grip length, head styles, and fastener strengths. The second half of this manual presents general guidelines and selection criteria for rivets and lockbolts.

  7. Manuals of Cultural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballonoff, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Ethnography often studies social networks including empirical descriptions of marriages and families. We initially concentrate on a special subset of networks which we call configurations. We show that descriptions of the possible outcomes of viable histories form a manual, and an orthoalgebra. We then study cases where family sizes vary, and show that this also forms a manual. In fact, it demonstrates adiabatic invariance, a property often associated with physical system conservation laws, and which here expresses conservation of the viability of a cultural system.

  8. Equipment Management Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Equipment Management Manual (NHB 4200.1) is issued pursuant to Section 203(c)(1) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, as amended (42 USC 2473), and sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for the acquisition, management, and use of NASA-owned equipment. This revision is effective upon receipt. This is a controlled manual, issued in loose-leaf form, and revised through page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution.

  9. Validation of cold chain shipping environment for transport of allografts as part of a human tissue bank returns policy.

    PubMed

    Rooney, P; Eagle, M J; Kearney, J N

    2015-12-01

    Human tissue is shipped to surgeons in the UK in either a freeze-dried or frozen state. To ensure quality and safety of the tissue, frozen tissue must be shipped in insulated containers such that tissue is maintained at an appropriate temperature. UK Blood Transfusion Service regulations state "Transportation systems must be validated to show maintenance of the required storage temperature" and also state that frozen, non-cryopreserved tissue "must be transported… at -20 °C or lower" (Guidelines for the Blood Transfusion Services in the United Kingdom, 8th Edn. 2013). To maintain an expiry date for frozen tissue longer than 6 months, the tissue must be maintained at a temperature of -40 °C or below. The objective of this study was to evaluate and validate the capability of a commercially available insulated polystyrene carton (XPL10), packed with dry ice, to maintain tissue temperature below -40 °C. Tissue temperature of a single frozen femoral head or a single frozen Achilles tendon, was recorded over a 4-day period at 37 °C, inside a XPL10 carton with dry ice as refrigerant. The data demonstrate that at 37 °C, the XPL10 carton with 9.5 kg of dry ice maintained femoral head and tendon tissue temperature below -55 °C for at least 48 h; tissue temperature did not rise above -40 °C until at least 70 h. Data also indicated that at a storage temperature lower than 37 °C, tissue temperature was maintained for longer periods. PMID:25700692

  10. Extensive validation of the global water resources model PCR-GLOBWB 2.0: the added value of human impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peßenteiner, Stefanie; Van Beek, Rens; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; Bierkens, Marc

    2015-04-01

    With growing populations, economic expansion, and rising standards of living the demand for water is increasing across the globe. Demographic developments and a changing climate will further aggravate the pressure on global water resources. In the EU FP7 project EartH2Observe in-situ data, earth observations, and models will be assimilated to provide a comprehensive reanalysis of the global water resources system, accounting for all components of the global water cycle including information on the impacts of human activities, e.g., through water consumption and man-made reservoirs. Synthesizing as many sources of information as possible bears great potential to improve global water balance estimates and to consequently allow for consistent and informed decisions in water management. One of the modelling suites participating in EartH2Observe is the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (Van Beek et al., 2011) which already accounts for anthropogenic perturbations in the water cycle. Here we present an extensive validation of the latest model version PCR-GLOBWB 2.0 (Sutanudjaja et al., 2014) which comprises dynamic withdrawal, allocation and consumptive use of ground- and surface water resources, irrigation, return flows of unconsumed water to surface water and groundwater resources, and more than 6000 reservoirs of the GRanD database. This study presents the first step towards a full reanalysis merging earth observations, in-situ data and models. We focus on human activities altering the hydrologic cycle over the past 30 years by evaluating PCR-GLOBWB 'natural' and 'humanly-modified' simulations in 0.5°× 0.5° spatial and daily temporal resolution. To this end our model is forced with the newly available WFDEI (WATCH Forcing Data methodology applied to ERA-Interim data) data set. PCR-GLOBWB 2.0 simulations of river discharge, water abstraction and water use are validated against observations from the Global Runoff Data Centre as well as available national and

  11. Twenty-First Annual Conference on Manual Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A. (Compiler); Jagacinski, R. J. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings of the entitled conference are presented. Twenty-nine manuscripts and eight abstracts pertaining to workload, attention and errors, controller evaluation, movement skills, coordination and decision making, display evaluation and human operator modeling and manual control.

  12. Noninvasive device readouts validated by immunohistochemical analysis enable objective quantitative assessment of acute wound healing in human skin.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Sara; Greaves, Nicholas S; Sebastian, Anil; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Objective evaluation of cutaneous wounds through use of noninvasive devices has important implications for diagnosis, monitoring treatment efficacy, progression and may lead to development of improved theranostic treatment strategies. However, there is a lack of validation in the use of certain devices in wound repair, where objective measurements taken by noninvasive devices have been corroborated by immunohistochemical analysis. Thus, data from three acute wound-healing studies in healthy volunteers using three noninvasive objective devices were further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. One hundred ten participants had 5-mm diameter skin biopsies to their arms. Spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis (SIAscopy), full-field laser perfusion imaging, and three-dimensional imaging provided quantitative measurements of melanin, hemoglobin, collagen, blood flow, and wound size; all of which were validated by immunohistochemistry. Full-field laser perfusion imaging showed blood flow increased to D7 and decreased by 40% to D14. SIAscopy showed that hemoglobin increased to D7 and reduced to D14. CD31 analysis corroborated this by showing a 76% increase in blood vessel density to D7 and a reduction by 14% to D14. Three-dimensional imaging showed that wound surface area reduced by 50% from day 7 to day 14. Alpha-smooth muscle Actin (Alpha-SMA) staining supported these trends by showing increased levels by 72% from D0 to D14 (corresponding to wound contraction). Collagen, measured by SIAscopy, decreased to D7 and increased to D14, which was validated by collagen III analysis. Additionally, collagen I increased by 14% from D0 to D14. SIAscopy measurements for melanin showed an increase at D7 and a slight reduction to D14, while melanogenesis increased by 46.7% from D0 to D14. These findings show the utility of noninvasive objective devices in the quantitative evaluation of wound-healing parameters in human skin as corroborated by immunohistochemistry. This may contribute

  13. Books and Pets: Our Friends for Life! Arizona Reading Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This reading program manual delineates the "Books and Pets" program, a project of Arizona Reads, which is a collaboration between the Arizona Humanities Council and the Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records. A CD-ROM version of the program accompanies the manual. The manual is divided into the following parts: Introduction; Getting…

  14. 21 CFR 874.4420 - Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat manual surgical instrument. 874.4420 Section 874.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., and throat manual surgical instrument. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat manual...

  15. Multiloop Manual Control of Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.; Mcnally, B. D.

    1984-01-01

    Human interaction with a simple, multiloop dynamic system in which the human's activity was systematically varied by changing the levels of automation was studied. The control loop structure resulting from the task definition parallels that for any multiloop manual control system, is considered a sterotype. Simple models of the human in the task, and upon extending a technique for describing the manner in which the human subjectively quantifies his opinion of task difficulty were developed. A man in the loop simulation which provides data to support and direct the analytical effort is presented.

  16. Brain Response to Primary Blast Wave Using Validated Finite Element Models of Human Head and Advanced Combat Helmet

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liying; Makwana, Rahul; Sharma, Sumit

    2013-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has emerged as a “signature injury” in combat casualty care. Present combat helmets are designed primarily to protect against ballistic and blunt impacts, but the current issue with helmets is protection concerning blasts. In order to delineate the blast wave attenuating capability of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH), a finite element (FE) study was undertaken to evaluate the head response against blast loadings with and without helmet using a partially validated FE model of the human head and ACH. Four levels of overpressures (0.27–0.66 MPa) from the Bowen’s lung iso-damage threshold curves were used to simulate blast insults. Effectiveness of the helmet with respect to head orientation was also investigated. The resulting biomechanical responses of the brain to blast threats were compared for human head with and without the helmet. For all Bowen’s cases, the peak intracranial pressures (ICP) in the head ranged from 0.68 to 1.8 MPa in the coup cortical region. ACH was found to mitigate ICP in the head by 10–35%. Helmeted head resulted in 30% lower average peak brain strains and product of strain and strain rate. Among three blast loading directions with ACH, highest reduction in peak ICP (44%) was due to backward blasts whereas the lowest reduction in peak ICP and brain strains was due to forward blast (27%). The biomechanical responses of a human head to primary blast insult exhibited directional sensitivity owing to the different geometry contours and coverage of the helmet construction and asymmetric anatomy of the head. Thus, direction-specific tolerances are needed in helmet design in order to offer omni-directional protection for the human head. The blasts of varying peak overpressures and durations that are believed to produce the same level of lung injury produce different levels of mechanical responses in the brain, and hence “iso-damage” curves for brain injury are likely different than the Bowen

  17. Brain response to primary blast wave using validated finite element models of human head and advanced combat helmet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Makwana, Rahul; Sharma, Sumit

    2013-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has emerged as a "signature injury" in combat casualty care. Present combat helmets are designed primarily to protect against ballistic and blunt impacts, but the current issue with helmets is protection concerning blasts. In order to delineate the blast wave attenuating capability of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH), a finite element (FE) study was undertaken to evaluate the head response against blast loadings with and without helmet using a partially validated FE model of the human head and ACH. Four levels of overpressures (0.27-0.66 MPa) from the Bowen's lung iso-damage threshold curves were used to simulate blast insults. Effectiveness of the helmet with respect to head orientation was also investigated. The resulting biomechanical responses of the brain to blast threats were compared for human head with and without the helmet. For all Bowen's cases, the peak intracranial pressures (ICP) in the head ranged from 0.68 to 1.8 MPa in the coup cortical region. ACH was found to mitigate ICP in the head by 10-35%. Helmeted head resulted in 30% lower average peak brain strains and product of strain and strain rate. Among three blast loading directions with ACH, highest reduction in peak ICP (44%) was due to backward blasts whereas the lowest reduction in peak ICP and brain strains was due to forward blast (27%). The biomechanical responses of a human head to primary blast insult exhibited directional sensitivity owing to the different geometry contours and coverage of the helmet construction and asymmetric anatomy of the head. Thus, direction-specific tolerances are needed in helmet design in order to offer omni-directional protection for the human head. The blasts of varying peak overpressures and durations that are believed to produce the same level of lung injury produce different levels of mechanical responses in the brain, and hence "iso-damage" curves for brain injury are likely different than the Bowen curves for lung

  18. Classroom Processes Observer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Laurie; Fennema, Elizabeth

    This manual describes procedures for collecting data about two classroom elements: (1) teacher-student interactions; and (2) amount and type of student engagement in academic work. Although the system was originally developed from a study of influences on sex-related differences in mathematics, it is designed to be adapted as needed for…

  19. Manual for physical fitness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    Training manual used for preflight conditioning of NASA astronauts is written for audience with diverse backgrounds and interests. It suggests programs for various levels of fitness, including sample starter programs, safe progression schedules, and stretching exercises. Related information on equipment needs, environmental coonsiderations, and precautions can help readers design safe and effective running programs.

  20. Occupational Health Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Medical Training Inst., Bethesda, MD.

    This manual is designed to be used for "Administrative Aspects of Occupational Medicine," one of two officer correspondence courses offered by the Naval Medical Training Institute. Part one comprises guidelines for setting up occupational health clinics, covering the areas of staffing, layout, equipment, other services, and records maintenance.…

  1. Nursing Applicant Interview Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Suzanne

    This manual is a tool for use in an interview for nursing student selection that will assist in sizing up the fitness or suitability of the candidate for nursing. It also includes tools and methods that could be used in the initial interview to assess what factors will predict those students most likely to stay in an Associate Degree nursing…

  2. Aquatic Microbiology Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Robert C.; And Others

    This laboratory manual presents information and techniques dealing with aquatic microbiology as it relates to environmental health science, sanitary engineering, and environmental microbiology. The contents are divided into three categories: (1) ecological and physiological considerations; (2) public health aspects; and (3)microbiology of water…

  3. Audiology Services Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaudet Coll., Washington, DC. Pre-College Programs.

    The manual describes audiology services offered at the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (MSSD). Components are listed for diagnostic services, instructional services, program development, training, and publications. Testing and reporting procedures for MSSD students are outlined. Testing includes pure-tone air conduction testing, tympanometry,…

  4. NASCAP user's manual, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, J. J., III

    1978-01-01

    NASCAP simulates the charging process for a complex object in either tenuous plasma (geosynchronous orbit) or ground test (electron gun source) environment. Program control words, the structure of user input files, and various user options available are described in this computer programmer's user manual.

  5. Ohio School Design Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio School Facilities Commission, Columbus.

    This manual presents guidance to facility designers, school administrators, staff, and students for the development of school facilities being constructed under Ohio's Classroom Facilities Assistance Program. It provides critical analysis of individual spaces and material/system components necessary for the construction of elementary and secondary…

  6. Graphics mini manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Nancy L.; Randall, Donald P.; Bowen, John T.; Johnson, Mary M.; Roland, Vincent R.; Matthews, Christine G.; Gates, Raymond L.; Skeens, Kristi M.; Nolf, Scott R.; Hammond, Dana P.

    1990-01-01

    The computer graphics capabilities available at the Center are introduced and their use is explained. More specifically, the manual identifies and describes the various graphics software and hardware components, details the interfaces between these components, and provides information concerning the use of these components at LaRC.

  7. Records Retention Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Michael L.

    This manual is a compilation of information from the Government Code, the Education Code, and the Administrative Code, Title 5, of the State of California. It is designed as a reliable source of information to enable the Long Beach Community College District to develop an effective system of forms control and limit the number of documents…

  8. Idaho Safety Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This manual is intended to help teachers, administrators, and local school boards develop and institute effective safety education as a part of all vocational instruction in the public schools of Idaho. This guide is organized in 13 sections that cover the following topics: introduction to safety education, legislation, levels of responsibility,…

  9. LOGSIM programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. L.; Taylor, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    A programmer's manual is reported for a Logic Simulator (LOGSIM) computer program that is a large capacity event simulator with the capability to accurately simulate the effects of certain unknown states, rise and fall times, and floating nodes in large scale metal oxide semiconductor logic circuits. A detailed description of the software with flow charts is included within the report.

  10. Turkmen Language Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, David; Clark, Larry

    The manual of standard Turkmen language is designed to teach basic language skills that Peace Corps volunteers need during a tour in Turkmenistan. An introductory section gives information about the Turkmen language, including a brief history, notes on the alphabet, vowel and consonant sounds, rules of vowel harmony, and specific grammatical forms…

  11. Head Start Facilities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Assessment Management, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    A quality Head Start facility should provide a physical environment responsive both to the needs of the children and families served and to the needs of staff, volunteers, and community agencies that share space with Head Start. This manual is a tool for Head Start grantees and delegate agencies for assessing existing facilities, making…

  12. Outdoor Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooyers, Cobina; And Others

    Designed for teachers to provide students with an awareness of the world of nature which surrounds them, the manual presents the philosophy of outdoor education, goals and objectives of the school program, planning for outdoor education, the Wildwood Programs, sequential program planning for students, program booking and resource list. Content…

  13. Water Chemistry Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, David; And Others

    This manual of laboratory experiments in water chemistry serves a dual function of illustrating fundamental chemical principles of dilute aqueous systems and of providing the student with some familiarity with the chemical measurements commonly used in water and wastewater analysis. Experiments are grouped in categories on the basis of similar…

  14. Radiological Defense Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Originally prepared for use as a student textbook in Radiological Defense (RADEF) courses, this manual provides the basic technical information necessary for an understanding of RADEF. It also briefly discusses the need for RADEF planning and expected postattack emergency operations. There are 14 chapters covering these major topics: introduction…

  15. Typing Manuscripts. General Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snapp, Jane

    Supporting performance objective 83 of the V-TECS (Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States) Secretarial Catalog, both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on typing manuscripts are included in this packet. (The packet is the tenth in a set of fifteen on typewriting--CE 016 920-934.) The packet includes four learning…

  16. Rescue Manual. Module 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The fourth of 10 modules contains 8 chapters: (1) construction and characteristics of rescue rope; (2) knots, bends, and hitches; (3) critical angles; (4) raising systems; (5) rigging; (6) using the brake-bar rack for rope rescue; (7) rope…

  17. Bridge Inspector's Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Bureau of Public Roads.

    A guide for the instruction of bridge inspectors is provided in this manual as well as instructions for conducting and reporting on a bridge inspection. The chapters outline the qualifications necessary to become a bridge inspector. The subject areas covered are: The Bridge Inspector, Bridge Structures, Bridge Inspection Reporting System,…

  18. Radiological Control Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noblin, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Objectives of the manual are to (1) ensure compliance with requirements of AEC and governmental health agencies, (2) ensure against excessive and unnecessary exposure of personnel to harmful radiation, and (3) prevent contamination of equipment, materials, and environment with radioactive materials.

  19. Therapeutic Recreation Practicum Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneegas, Kay

    This manual provides information on the practicum program offered by Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) for students in its therapeutic recreation program. Sections I and II outline the rationale and goals for providing practical, on-the-job work experiences for therapeutic recreation students. Section III specifies MVCC's responsibilities…

  20. Christmas Tree Category Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, James S.; Turmel, Jon P.

    This manual provides information needed to meet the standards for pesticide applicator certification. Pests and diseases of christmas tree plantations are identified and discussed. Section one deals with weeds and woody plants and the application, formulation and effects of herbicides in controlling them. Section two discusses specific diseases…

  1. Operations Policy Manual, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teacher Education Accreditation Council, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) "Operations Policy Manual" outlines all of TEAC's current policies and procedures related to TEAC members, TEAC administration, and the public, and includes the Bylaws of the Teacher Education Accreditation Council, Inc. An index is also included.

  2. Water Quality Monitoring Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Fred J.; Houdart, Joseph F.

    This manual is designed for students involved in environmental education programs dealing with water pollution problems. By establishing a network of Environmental Monitoring Stations within the educational system, four steps toward the prevention, control, and abatement of water pollution are proposed. (1) Train students to recognize, monitor,…

  3. Cooperative Office Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This manual, intended for inexperienced and experienced coordinators, school administrators, and guidance personnel, is designed to provide practical suggestions for initiating, developing, operating, coordinating, improving, and evaluating cooperative office education programs. Major content is presented primarily in outline form under the…

  4. The Tree Worker's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithyman, S. J.

    This manual is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions as tree care professionals. Addressed in the individual chapters of the guide are the following topics: the tree service industry; clothing, eqiupment, and tools; tree workers; basic tree anatomy; techniques of pruning; procedures for climbing and working in the tree; aerial…

  5. Florida Language Profile Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolking, William D.; And Others

    Described in the manual is the Florida Language Profile (funded through Title VI), a flexible set of performance sampling procedures for measuring language cognitive skills of children in kindergarten and grade 1 and remediating diagnosed disabilities. It is said that the Profile may be administered by the trained examiner or classroom teacher on…

  6. Child Study Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polk County Public Schools, Bartow, FL.

    This manual from the Polk County Public Schools in Bartow, Florida, was developed for school personnel and parents to aid in their efforts to develop successful behavioral and academic interventions to enhance the educational outcomes for students. Section 1 describes the child study team which is comprised of an administrator, guidance counselor,…

  7. Student Employment Manuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Thyra K.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the information on academic library practices provided in student employment manuals. Highlights include the mission statement, expectations of employment, enrollment and eligibility requirements, employment eligibility verification, application form, the hiring process, program policies, release of employment verification information;…

  8. Political Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    League of United Latin American Citizens, Washington, DC.

    Written to help Hispanics understand the electoral process more thoroughly and to encourage them to participate more actively in the political arena, this manual begins by describing the present status of the Hispanic electorate and then explains how laws are made, how Hispanics can influence legislation, and how to organize a voter registration…

  9. Respite Care. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukenbill, Ron; And Others

    The manual is intended for use in training institutes for persons providing respite care for families of children with developmental disabilities in Montana. Expectations for participants and objectives for training are outlined in preliminary sections. Each chapter contains a brief statement of the chapter's main point or points, a selected…

  10. Keypunching Manual. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldsen, Carl F.; Spagnuolo, Lenore

    Presented in the manual are keypunching procedures with associated representative forms and keypunching cards for bibliographies and five basic types of abstracts which are used with the Control Data 3600 computer by the Michigan State University Materials Center for Handicapped Children and Youth (IMC HCY). Emphasis is given to keypunching all…

  11. Reference Service Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielke, John; Young, William

    This manual is primarily designed as an orientation program for librarians new to the Reference Services Division at the State University of New York at Albany University Libraries. It contains practical information and some of the procedures necessary for providing service at the reference desk in these libraries. The appendices provide samples…

  12. System Documentation Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmel, Melvyn I.; Olson, Jerry

    The document is a system documentation manual of the Computer-Assisted Teacher Training System (CATTS) developed by the Center for Innovation in Teaching the Handicapped (Indiana University). CATTS is characterized as a system capable of providing continuous, instantaneous, and/or delayed feedback of relevant teacher-student interaction data to a…

  13. Student Attendance Accounting Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitas, Joseph M.

    In response to state legislation authorizing procedures for changes in academic calendars and measurement of student workload in California community colleges, this manual from the Chancellor's Office provides guidelines for student attendance accounting. Chapter 1 explains general items such as the academic calendar, admissions policies, student…

  14. Peer Leadership Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovell, Nikki; Hachmeister, Paula

    This is a manual for peer counselors and parents in an alcohol and drug abuse prevention program for teenagers. The document opens with the training objectives for the peer helpers: to know yourself, to be a resource, and to promote and establish a drug-free peer group and drug-free activities in school. Discussion on these topics is provided: (1)…

  15. Public Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Human Resources, Baltimore.

    Noting that every community is faced with providing high quality, affordable, and accessible child care, and that child care resource centers (CCRCs) are among the best tools for helping communities meet child care needs with the combined resources of the community, this manual is designed to help CCRCs design a public education program to meet…

  16. Rescue Manual. Module 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The sixth of 10 modules contains 4 chapters: (1) industrial rescue; (2) rescue from a confined space; (3) extrication from heavy equipment; and (4) rescue operations involving elevators. Key points, an introduction, and conclusion accompany…

  17. Educational Services Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    The Educational Services Program of the Navy provides an opportunity for enlisted personnel to earn a high school diploma, for career personnel to pursue an advanced educational program, and for officers to work on baccalaureate or advanced degrees. This is a manual of information about the G.I. Bill, available counseling, tuition aid, program…

  18. Manual for CLE Lecturers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shellaberger, Donna J.

    This manual is designed to help lawyers develop the skills needed to present effective, stimulating continuing legal education (CLE) lectures. It focuses on the particular purpose and nature of CLE lecturing, relationships and interplay of personalities in CLE, commitments and constraints which lecturers should observe, program structure and…

  19. Marketing Manual: Workplace Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanshawe Coll., Strathroy (Ontario).

    This manual applies marketing concepts and methods, selling techniques and principles to the workplace literacy program for the purpose of assisting individuals involved in promoting and selling these programs. Part I provides a rationale for marketing and discusses the following: the role of the sponsor in marketing, market versus marketing,…

  20. Records Management Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. State Archives and Records Management.

    This manual, prepared primarily for state government agencies, describes the organization and management of Alaska government records. Information is presented in nine topic areas: (1) Alaska's Archives and Records Management Program, which describes the program, its mission, services available, and employee responsibilities; (2) Records in…

  1. Elementary School Finance Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Catholic Educational Association, Washington, DC.

    Developed to assist those responsible for financial matters in Catholic elementary schools, this manual presents each topic briefly and simply, taking into account administrators' minimal formal financial training. It is divided into six sections. Chapter 1, "Daily Financial Operations," describes the specifics of handling receipts, billings, and…

  2. Rescue Manual. Module 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The eighth of 10 modules contains 6 chapters: (1) trench rescue; (2) shoring and tunneling techniques; (3) farm accident rescue; (4) wilderness search and rescue; (5) aircraft rescue; and (6) helicopter information. Key points, an…

  3. Rescue Manual. Module 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The second of 10 modules contains 5 chapters: (1) patient care and handling techniques; (2) rescue carries and drags; (3) emergency vehicle operations; (4) self-contained breathing apparatus; and (5) protective clothing. Key points, an…

  4. DFLOW USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    DFLOW is a computer program for estimating design stream flows for use in water quality studies. The manual describes the use of the program on both the EPA's IBM mainframe system and on a personal computer (PC). The mainframe version of DFLOW can extract a river's daily flow rec...

  5. Manually operated coded switch

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Jon H.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a manually operated recodable coded switch in which a code may be inserted, tried and used to actuate a lever controlling an external device. After attempting a code, the switch's code wheels must be returned to their zero positions before another try is made.

  6. Shelter Care Operations Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    This manual provides guidelines for the planning and development of shelter care projects as alternatives for juveniles facing pretrial detention, and suggestions for improving the quality of services in existing shelters. A six-phase planning process for establishing a shelter care service is outlined, with planning activities and narrative…

  7. Kyrgyz Language Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abylkasymova, Mairam, Comp.; Jumabaeva, Gulaim, Comp.

    The language manual for Kyrgyz was designed for the specific language instruction needs of Peace Corps personnel in Kyrgyzstan. It begins with a brief introduction to the Kyrgyz language, stressing the points at which the Kyrgyz system differs from English, and outlining the Kyrgyz sound system. It then presents 15 topical lessons, each containing…

  8. System Orientation Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheppke, Jim, Ed.

    Intended as an orientation guide, this manual presents information on library network operations for use by staff and advisory council members of the Texas Library System. The first chapter describes the role of systems in public library development in Texas, with a delineation of the history of Texas library systems, a chronology of related…

  9. Conference Planning Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Library Association, Burlington.

    Intended as a useful aid for organizing its annual spring meeting, this general conference planning manual developed by the Vermont Library Association provides a blueprint for planners on the responsibilities of the planning committee, the conference chair, and others; site selection and local arrangements; program and sessions planning;…

  10. Operations Policy Manual, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teacher Education Accreditation Council, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Teacher Education Accreditation Council's (TEAC's) "Operations Policy Manual" outlines all of TEAC's current policies and procedures related to TEAC members, TEAC administration, and the public, and includes the Bylaws of the Teacher Education Accreditation Council. Contents include: (1) Policies Related to TEAC Members; (2) Policies Related…

  11. Manual on Bibliographic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This manual outlines objectives, functions, and methods for establishing national bibliographic control as part of the development of a worldwide system for the control and exchange of bibliographic information. Chapters cover: (1) definitions of bibliographic control and related concepts including Universal Bibliographic Control (UBC) and…

  12. Children's Collective Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrough, Jackie; And Others

    This children's collective manual describes a training program for parents and teachers of preschool children which is designed to encourage cooperative, community-oriented styles of group interaction in black preschool children. Developed by the Children's Collective of the Coordinated Child Care Council of South Los Angeles, the program is based…

  13. Child Welfare Policy Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children & Families, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This document conveys mandatory policies that have their basis in Federal Law and/or program regulations. It also provides interpretations of Federal Statutes and program regulations initiated by inquiries from State Child Welfare agencies or Administration for Children and Families (ACF) Regional Offices. The manual replaces the Children's…

  14. Medical Veteran Utilization Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan (Robert R.) Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This manual is intended to encourage policy makers, administrators, and personnel officers in hospitals and other health facilities to recruit and hire the thousands of well-trained, experienced men and women who leave the military medical services each year. The document lists the advantages to the medical institution when employing medically…

  15. Small Town Renewal Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Peter

    Over the last 2 decades, the loss of population and businesses in many small, inland, and remote Australian rural communities has intensified, largely because of the stress and uncertainty of volatile world commodity markets. This manual presents a range of survival and revival strategies that some communities have used to build resilient…

  16. Enucleation Procedure Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kevin; Poston, George

    This manual provides information on the enucleation procedure (removal of the eyes for organ banks). An introductory section focuses on the anatomy of the eye and defines each of the parts. Diagrams of the eye are provided. A list of enucleation materials follows. Other sections present outlines of (1) a sterile procedure; (2) preparation for eye…

  17. ESL Classroom Observation Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terdal, Marjorie S.; Douglas, Prudence

    This observation manual is meant to be used by English as a second language teacher-trainees observing classroom teachers at a college or university and by the teachers being observed. In the introductory material some of the literature on teaching effectiveness and coding procedures is discussed. It is noted that most educators who have been…

  18. Drywall Finishing Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lengert, Gerald

    This manual, a self-study guide for apprentices in the drywall finishing trade in British Columbia, attempts to establish standards for the trade. It tells how to produce a properly taped and filled drywall surface and describes what that surface should look like. The standards emphasize quality work that can be realistically achieved on the job.…

  19. Fiscal Accounting Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Housing and Community Development, Sacramento. Indian Assistance Program.

    Written in simple, easy to understand form, the manual provides a vehicle for the untrained person in bookkeeping to control funds received from grants for Indian Tribal Councils and Indian organizations. The method used to control grants (federal, state, or private) is fund accounting, designed to organize rendering services on a non-profit…

  20. Manual for Youth Coordinators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Council on Youth Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    This manual was designed primarily for use by coordinators responsible for developing comprehensive community youth opportunity programs of employment, education, and recreation, but the material may also be of assistance to community and business leaders, educators, and others involved in expanding local opportunities for young people. Contents…

  1. Rescue Manual. Module 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The ninth of 10 modules contains 7 chapters: (1) ice characteristics; (2) river characteristics and tactics for rescue; (3) water rescue techniques; (4) water rescue/recovery operations; (5) dive operations; (6) water rescue equipment; and…

  2. Educator Effectiveness Administrative Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this manual is to provide guidance in the evaluation of educators, highlight critical components of effectiveness training, and offer opportunities for professional growth. The term "educator" includes teachers, all professional and temporary professional employees, education specialists, and school administrators/principals.…

  3. Book Repair Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milevski, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    This book repair manual developed for the Illinois Cooperative Conservation Program includes book structure and book problems, book repair procedures for 4 specific problems, a description of adhesive bindings, a glossary, an annotated list of 11 additional readings, book repair supplies and suppliers, and specifications for book repair kits. (LRW)

  4. Consumer Education Reference Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Univ., Knoxville. State Agency for Title I.

    This manual contains information for consumer education, which is defined as the process of imparting to an individual the skills, concepts, knowledges, and insights required to help each person evolve his or her own values, evaluate alternative choices in the marketplace, manage personal resources effectively, and obtain the best buys for his or…

  5. CAM Coordinator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodel, Lee J.

    The technical implementation and operation of the Comprehensive Achievement Monitoring (CAM) system are discussed in this manual. It is written as a guide for those responsible for implementing CAM and for processing CAM-related work requests. Subjects covered include: CAM system operation summary: objectives and test items; conferencing with the…

  6. Environmental Science Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strobbe, Maurice A.

    The objective of this manual is to provide a set of basic analytical procedures commonly used to determine environmental quality. Procedures are designed to be used in an introductory course in environmental science and are explicit enough to allow them to be performed by both the non-science or beginning science student. Stressing ecology and…

  7. DFLOW USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    DFLOW is a computer program for estimating design stream flows for use in water quality studies. his manual describes the use of the program on both the EPA's IBM mainframe system and on a personal computer (PC). he mainframe version of DFLOW can extract a river's daily flow reco...

  8. BETA GAUGE OPERATION MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual provides description and operating instructions for a redesigned Beta Gauge for measuring particles from vehicle exhaust. The improvements and a new control system including a control unit which is radically different from the prior unit, are described. Complete Beta ...

  9. Abstractors Manual. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldsen, Carl F.

    Instructions for preparation of abstracts associated with processing information for the retrieval system of the Michigan State University Regional Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped Children and Youth are given in the manual. An abstract is described as a summary of a written work's content which must provide information that both…

  10. Southern Ductile Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This instructor's manual contains the materials required to conduct the competency-based workplace literacy program that was developed to help employees at a foundry that has evolved from a small, family-owned business into a major foundry group with several automated production systems. The workplace literacy program consists of 24 lessons in…

  11. Sewer Maintenance Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    Outlined are practices and procedures that should be followed in order to protect and fully realize the benefits of sewer systems and also to maximize service and minimize inconveniences to the public. Written in practical terms, the manual is designed to be of immediate use to municipal employees and others involved in sewer maintenance…

  12. Matematica 3. Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Alu, Maria Jose Miranda de Sousa

    This teachers manual accompanies a mathematics textbook, written in Portuguese, for third graders. It closely follows the objectives and methodology of the major curricula used throughout the schools in the United States. The 11 chapters deal with: numeration (0-999,999); addition with and without regrouping; subtraction with and without…

  13. Collection Assessment Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Blaine H.

    This manual is designed to help bibliographers, librarians, and other materials selectors plan and conduct systematic collection evaluations using both collection centered and client centered techniques. Topics covered in five chapters are: (1) planning the assessment; (2) collection-centered techniques, comprising the compilation of statistics,…

  14. Rescue Manual. Module 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The fifth of 10 modules contains information on hazardous materials. Key points, an introduction, and conclusion accompany substantive material in this module. In addition, the module contains a Department of Transportation guide chart on…

  15. Hunter Education Instructors Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jack E.

    The instructors manual for teaching ethics, conservation, and safe hunting to Alaskans provides a uniform course in hunter education for both young people and adults, regardless of previous hunting experience. Developed as part of a training program in hunter ethics and safe handling of hunting equipment, the hunter education course is designed to…

  16. Implementing GNVQs. A Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This manual provides a comprehensive guide to college activities associated with the implementation of General National Vocational Qualifications (GNVQs) in Britain. Part A addresses GNVQ curriculum planning and management at the college level. This part includes the following sections: description of the context; questions that need to be…

  17. High-resolution molecular validation of self-renewal and spontaneous differentiation in adipose-tissue derived human mesenchymal stem cells cultured in human platelet lysate

    PubMed Central

    Dudakovic, Amel Dudakovic; Camilleri, Emily; Riester, Scott M.; Lewallen, Eric A.; Kvasha, Sergiy; Chen, Xiaoyue; Radel, Darcie J.; Anderson, Jarett M.; Nair, Asha A.; Evans, Jared M.; Krych, Aaron J.; Smith, Jay; Deyle, David R.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Im, Hee-Jeong; Cool, Simon M.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Kakar, Sanjeev; Dietz, Allan B.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2014-01-01

    Improving the effectiveness of adipose-tissue derived human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (AMSCs) for skeletal therapies requires a detailed characterization of mechanisms supporting cell proliferation and multi-potency. We investigated the molecular phenotype of AMSCs that were either actively proliferating in platelet lysate or in a basal non-proliferative state. Flow cytometry combined with high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNASeq) and RT-qPCR analyses validate that AMSCs express classic mesenchymal cell surface markers (e.g., CD44, CD73/NT5E, CD90/THY1 and CD105/ENG). Expression of CD90 is selectively elevated at confluence. Self-renewing AMSCs express a standard cell cycle program that successively mediates DNA replication, chromatin packaging, cyto-architectural enlargement and mitotic division. Confluent AMSCs preferentially express genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and cellular communication. For example, cell cycle-related biomarkers (e.g., cyclins E2 and B2, transcription factor E2F1) and histone-related genes (e.g., H4, HINFP, NPAT) are elevated in proliferating AMSCs, while ECM genes are strongly upregulated (>10 fold) in quiescent AMSCs. AMSCs also express pluripotency genes (e.g., POU5F1, NANOG, KLF4) and early mesenchymal markers (e.g., NES, ACTA2) consistent with their multipotent phenotype. Strikingly, AMSCs modulate expression of WNT signaling components and switch production of WNT ligands (from WNT5A/WNT5B/WNT7B to WNT2/WNT2B), while up-regulating WNT-related genes (WISP2, SFRP2 and SFRP4). Furthermore, post-proliferative AMSCs spontaneously express fibroblastic, osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic biomarkers when maintained in confluent cultures. Our findings validate the biological properties of self-renewing and multi-potent AMSCs by providing high-resolution quality control data that support their clinical versatility. PMID:24905804

  18. Validation of an optimized method for the determination of iodine in human breast milk by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) after tetramethylammonium hydroxide extraction.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Dao; Zhou, Shao Jia; Gibson, Robert; Palmer, Lyndon; Muhlhausler, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    In this study a novel method to determine iodine concentrations in human breast milk was developed and validated. The iodine was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) following tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) extraction at 90°C in disposable polypropylene tubes. While similar approaches have been used previously, this method adopted a shorter extraction time (1h vs. 3h) and used antimony (Sb) as the internal standard, which exhibited greater stability in breast milk and milk powder matrices compared to tellurium (Te). Method validation included: defining iodine linearity up to 200μgL(-1); confirming recovery of iodine from NIST 1549 milk powder. A recovery of 94-98% was also achieved for the NIST 1549 milk powder and human breast milk samples spiked with sodium iodide and thyroxine (T4) solutions. The method quantitation limit (MQL) for human breast milk was 1.6μgL(-1). The intra-assay and inter-assay coefficient of variation for the breast milk samples and NIST powder were <1% and <3.5%, respectively. NIST 1549 milk powder, human breast milk samples and calibration standards spiked with the internal standard were all stable for at least 2.5 months after extraction. The results of the validation process confirmed that this newly developed method provides greater accuracy and precision in the assessment of iodine concentrations in human breast milk than previous methods and therefore offers a more reliable approach for assessing iodine concentrations in human breast milk. PMID:25153367

  19. Development and validation of HPLC method for the determination of alpha-tocopherol in human erythrocytes for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Solichová, Dagmar; Korecká, Lucie; Svobodová, Iveta; Musil, Frantisek; Bláha, Vladimír; Zdánský, Petr; Zadák, Zdenek

    2003-06-01

    In this work, a simple isocratic reversed-phase HPLC method for determination of alpha-tocopherol in human erythrocytes has been developed and validated. After separation of plasma the erythrocytes were washed three times with 0.9% sodium chloride containing 0.01% butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as antioxidant and then were diluted 1:1 (v/v) with the same solution. In the liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) procedure, 2500 microL of n-hexane was added to 500 microL of erythrocytes. After 2 min this mixture was deproteinized by addition of cool ethanol (500 microL, 5 min) denatured with 5% methanol containing alpha-tocopherol acetate (20 micromol L(-1)), as internal standard, and then extracted for 5 min by vortex mixing. After centrifugation (10 min, 1600xg) an aliquot (2000 microL) of the clean extract was separated and evaporated under nitrogen. The residue was dissolved in 400 microL methanol and analysed by reversed-phase HPLC on a 4.6 mmx150 mm, 5 microm Pecosphere C18 column; the mobile phase was 100% methanol, flow rate 1.2 mL min(-1). The volume injected was 100 microL and detection was by diode-array detector at a wavelength of 295 nm. The extraction recovery of alpha-tocopherol from human erythrocytes was 100.0+/-2.0%. The detection limit was 0.1 micromol L(-1) and a linear calibration plot was obtained in the concentration range 0.5-20.0 micromol L(-1). Within determination precision was 5.2% RSD (n=10), between determination precision was 6.1% RSD (n=10). The method was applied successfully in a clinical study of patients with acute pancreatitis and for determination of the reference values in the healthy Czech population. PMID:12719955

  20. Mapping the distribution of serotonin transporter in the human brainstem with high-resolution PET: Validation using postmortem autoradiography data.

    PubMed

    Fazio, P; Schain, M; Varnäs, K; Halldin, C; Farde, L; Varrone, A

    2016-06-01

    The human brainstem is a complex structure with several small nuclei and neural pathways of interest in the pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In common with other monoaminergic systems, serotoninergic neurons originate from a group of nuclei located in the brainstem. The present study was designed to validate a user-independent approach for a detailed in vivo quantification of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) availability in the human brainstem using a template-based approach that consisted of three steps. First, 3T-MR images and parametric binding potential (BPND) [(11)C]MADAM images of ten healthy subjects were used to generate a PET template of 5-HTT availability. In the second step, volumes of interest (VOIs) for different brainstem nuclei were obtained using a method in which VOIs are initially delineated on MRI images using anatomical landmarks and then are finally tailored on the distribution of 5-HTT binding using a thresholding approach applied to the 5-HTT template. In the final step, the VOIs were transformed and applied individually to BPND images of 16 healthy subjects (14M/2F, 20-64years). The in vivo distribution of BPND values obtained with the template-based method were in good agreement with an individual-based approach taken as gold standard. Results were also in agreement with 5-HTT quantification using in vitro binding data obtained with autoradiography (ARG) studies using [(3)H]MADAM. The proposed template-based method can be applied to PET data acquired in several CNS disorders in which serotonin neurons in the brainstem might be affected. PMID:26994829

  1. [Manual therapy in general practice].

    PubMed

    Березуцкий, Владимир И

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to manual therapy practice for diagnostics and treatment of vertebrogenic pain syndrome in general practice. Analytical roundup of sources proves medical advantage of implementation of manual therapy basic methods by general practice specialists. PMID:27487550

  2. Validated LC-MS/MS Assay for the Quantitative Determination of Fimasartan in Human Plasma: Application to Pharmacokinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seo Hyun; Oh, Seul; Kim, Hwa Suk; Yi, SoJeong; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Jang, In-Jin; Cho, Joo-Youn

    2015-09-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of a newly developed antihypertensive agent fimasartan (BR-A657, Kanarb(®)) in human plasma was developed and validated. Fimasartan and internal standard (IS, BR-A563) were extracted by simple protein precipitation using acetonitrile and separated on a Phenyl-Hexyl column (Luna(®), 5 µm, 50 mm × 2.0 mm, Phenomenex) under the gradient conditions of mobile phase A (distilled water with 0.1% formic acid) and mobile phase B (100% acetonitrile with 0.1% formic acid) at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min. Detection and quantification were performed by the mass spectrometer using multiple reaction monitoring mode at m/z 500.2 → 221.2 for fimasartan and m/z 524.3 → 204.9 for the IS. The assay was linear over a calibration range of 0.5-500 ng/mL with a lower limit of quantification of 0.5 ng/mL. The coefficient of variation of this assay precision was <14.9% and the accuracy exceeded 91.9%. This method provided the necessary sensitivity, linearity, precision, accuracy and specificity to allow the determination of fimasartan after oral administration to healthy Korean male volunteers in several drug-drug interaction studies conducted at the Clinical Trials Center of Seoul National University Hospital. PMID:25616988

  3. Validation and Application of a Simple UHPLC-MS-MS Method for the Enantiospecific Determination of Warfarin in Human Urine.

    PubMed

    Alshogran, Osama Y; Ocque, Andrew J; Leblond, François A; Pichette, Vincent; Nolin, Thomas D

    2016-04-01

    A simple and rapid liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method has been developed and validated for the enantiospecific determination of R- and S-warfarin in human urine. Warfarin enantiomers were extracted from urine using methyl tert-butyl ether. Chromatographic separation of warfarin enantiomers and the internal standard d5-warfarin was achieved using a Astec Chirobiotic V column with gradient mobile phase at a flow rate of 400 µL/min over 10 min. Detection was performed on a TSQ Quantum Ultra triple quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with a heated electrospray ionization source. Analytes were detected in negative ionization mode using selected reaction monitoring. Calibration curves were linear with a correlation coefficient of ≥0.996 for both enantiomers over a concentration range of 5-500 ng/mL. The intra- and interday accuracy and precision for both analytes were within ±9.0%. Excellent extraction efficiency and negligible matrix effects were observed. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by successful measurement of warfarin enantiomers in urine of patients with kidney disease. The method is simple, accurate and reproducible and is currently being used to support warfarin pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:26657732

  4. Simultaneous determination of amoxicillin and ambroxol in human plasma by LC-MS/MS: validation and application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wen, Aidong; Hang, Taijun; Chen, Suning; Wang, Zhirui; Ding, Likun; Tian, Yun; Zhang, Meng; Xu, Xinxin

    2008-11-01

    A rapid, simple and sensitive LC-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous determination of amoxicillin and ambroxol in human plasma using clenbuterol as internal standard (IS). The plasma samples were subjected to a simple protein precipitation with methanol. Separation was achieved on a Lichrospher C(18) column (150 mm x 4.6mm ID, dp 5 microm) using methanol (containing 0.2% of formic acid) and water (containing 0.2% of formic acid) as a mobile phase by gradient elution at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Detection was performed using electrospray ionization in positive ion multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode by monitoring the ion transitions from m/z 365.9-->348.9 (amoxicillin), m/z 378.9-->263.6 (ambroxol) and m/z 277.0-->203.0 (IS). Calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 5-20,000 ng/mL for amoxicillin, and 1-200 ng/mL for ambroxol, with the intra- and inter-run precisions of <9% and the accuracies of 100+/-7%. The method has been validated and applied to pharmacokinetic studies of compound amoxicillin and ambroxol hydrochloride tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers. PMID:18603398

  5. Validation of Shoulder Response of Human Body Finite-Element Model (GHBMC) Under Whole Body Lateral Impact Condition.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwansik; Kim, Taewung; Panzer, Matthew B; Crandall, Jeff R

    2016-08-01

    In previous shoulder impact studies, the 50th-percentile male GHBMC human body finite-element model was shown to have good biofidelity regarding impact force, but under-predicted shoulder deflection by 80% compared to those observed in the experiment. The goal of this study was to validate the response of the GHBMC M50 model by focusing on three-dimensional shoulder kinematics under a whole-body lateral impact condition. Five modifications, focused on material properties and modeling techniques, were introduced into the model and a supplementary sensitivity analysis was done to determine the influence of each modification to the biomechanical response of the body. The modified model predicted substantially improved shoulder response and peak shoulder deflection within 10% of the observed experimental data, and showed good correlation in the scapula kinematics on sagittal and transverse planes. The improvement in the biofidelity of the shoulder region was mainly due to the modifications of material properties of muscle, the acromioclavicular joint, and the attachment region between the pectoralis major and ribs. Predictions of rib fracture and chest deflection were also improved because of these modifications. PMID:26753830

  6. Development and Validation of a Microarray for the Investigation of the CAZymes Encoded by the Human Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Quentin; Vialettes, Bernard; Million, Matthieu; Raoult, Didier; Henrissat, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Distal gut bacteria play a pivotal role in the digestion of dietary polysaccharides by producing a large number of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) that the host otherwise does not produce. We report here the design of a custom microarray that we used to spot non-redundant DNA probes for more than 6,500 genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lyases selected from 174 reference genomes from distal gut bacteria. The custom microarray was tested and validated by the hybridization of bacterial DNA extracted from the stool samples of lean, obese and anorexic individuals. Our results suggest that a microarray-based study can detect genes from low-abundance bacteria better than metagenomic-based studies. A striking example was the finding that a gene encoding a GH6-family cellulase was present in all subjects examined, whereas metagenomic studies have consistently failed to detect this gene in both human and animal gut microbiomes. In addition, an examination of eight stool samples allowed the identification of a corresponding CAZome core containing 46 families of glycoside hydrolases and polysaccharide lyases, which suggests the functional stability of the gut microbiota despite large taxonomical variations between individuals. PMID:24391873

  7. Affective components of the human-animal relationship in animal husbandry: development and validation of a questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Porcher, Jocelyne; Cousson-Gélie, Florence; Dantzer, Robert

    2004-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the main dimensions of the human-animal relationship in animal husbandry and to test the hypothesis of a coherent system linking attitudes and feelings. A second objective was to assess interindividual differences which could be linked to socioenvironmental or personal factors. The 26-item questionnaire was administered to 197 animal farmers (143 men, 54 women, 3.8% under 25 years old, 45.2% under 40 years, 44.2% under 60 years and 7.1% over 60 years). To include even farmers not in the official agricultural registries, we used a random selection procedure. A principal component analysis of responses followed by varimax rotation yielded two factors accounting for 30.7% of the total variance, a Friendship factor and a Power relationship factor. Significant differences on the Friendship factor were observed between groups by sex of farmers, education, size of the production system, and region of production. There were also differences on the Power relationship factor between groups by age and education. These results validate a questionnaire with 21 items, allowing measurement of positive and negative affects of farmers towards their animals. PMID:15460383

  8. Ensemble-Based Virtual Screening and Experimental Validation of Inhibitors Targeting a Novel Site of Human DNMT1.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Manali; Rajpathak, Shriram N; Narwade, Santosh C; Deobagkar, Deepti

    2016-07-01

    Human DNA methyltransferase1 (hDNMT1) is responsible for preserving DNA methylation patterns that play important regulatory roles in differentiation and development. Misregulation of DNA methylation has thus been linked to many syndromes, life style diseases, and cancers. Developing specific inhibitors of hDNMT1 is an important challenge in the area since the currently targeted cofactor and substrate binding site share structural features with various proteins. In this work, we generated a structural model of the active form of hDNMT1 and identified that the 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) binding site of the hDNMT1 is structurally unique to the protein. This site has been previously demonstrated to be critical for methylation activity. We further performed multiple nanosecond time scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the structural model followed by virtual screening of the Asinex database to identify inhibitors targeting the 5-mC site. Two compounds were discovered that inhibited hDNMT1 in vitro, one of which also showed inhibition in vivo corroborating the screening procedure. This study thus identifies and attempts to validate for the first time a unique site of hDNMT1 that could be harnessed for rationally designing highly selective and potent hypomethylating agents. PMID:26850820

  9. The validation of a human force model to predict dynamic forces resulting from multi-joint motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Abhilash K.; Maida, James C.; Aldridge, Ann M.; Hasson, Scott M.; Woolford, Barbara J.

    1992-01-01

    The development and validation is examined of a dynamic strength model for humans. This model is based on empirical data. The shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints were characterized in terms of maximum isolated torque, or position and velocity, in all rotational planes. This data was reduced by a least squares regression technique into a table of single variable second degree polynomial equations determining torque as a function of position and velocity. The isolated joint torque equations were then used to compute forces resulting from a composite motion, in this case, a ratchet wrench push and pull operation. A comparison of the predicted results of the model with the actual measured values for the composite motion indicates that forces derived from a composite motion of joints (ratcheting) can be predicted from isolated joint measures. Calculated T values comparing model versus measured values for 14 subjects were well within the statistically acceptable limits and regression analysis revealed coefficient of variation between actual and measured to be within 0.72 and 0.80.

  10. Introduction to Hydraulics. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Extension Instruction and Materials Center.

    This manual on hydraulics is one of a series of individualized instructional materials for students. The manual is self-paced, but is designed to be used under the supervision of an instructor. The manual contains 10 assignments, each with all the information needed, a list of objectives that should be met, and exercise questions that can help in…

  11. Bioculture System Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Kevin Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Bioculture System first flight will be to validate the performance of the hardware and its automated and manual operational capabilities in the space flight environment of the International Space Station. Biology, Engineering, and Operations tests will be conducted in the Bioculture System fully characterize its automated and manual functions to support cell culturing for short and long durations. No hypothesis-driven research will be conducted with biological sample, and the science leads have all provided their concurrence that none of the data they collect will be considered as proprietary and can be free distributed to the science community. The outcome of the validation flight will be to commission the hardware for use by the science community. This presentation will provide non-proprietary details about the Bioculture System and information about the activities for the first flight.

  12. ALS Project Management Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Krupnick, Jim; Harkins, Joe

    2000-05-01

    This manual has been prepared to help establish a consistent baseline of management practices across all ALS projects. It describes the initial process of planning a project, with a specific focus on the production of a formal project plan. We feel that the primary weakness in ALS project management efforts to date stems from a failure to appreciate the importance of ''up-front'' project planning. In this document, we present a guide (with examples) to preparing the documents necessary to properly plan, monitor, and control a project's activities. While following the manual will certainly not guarantee good project management, failure to address the issues we raise will dramatically reduce the chance of success. Here we define success as meeting the technical goals on schedule and within the prescribed budget.

  13. IMAT graphics manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.; Cooper, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    The Integrated Multidisciplinary Analysis Tool (IMAT) consists of a menu driven executive system coupled with a relational database which links commercial structures, structural dynamics and control codes. The IMAT graphics system, a key element of the software, provides a common interface for storing, retrieving, and displaying graphical information. The IMAT Graphics Manual shows users of commercial analysis codes (MATRIXx, MSC/NASTRAN and I-DEAS) how to use the IMAT graphics system to obtain high quality graphical output using familiar plotting procedures. The manual explains the key features of the IMAT graphics system, illustrates their use with simple step-by-step examples, and provides a reference for users who wish to take advantage of the flexibility of the software to customize their own applications.

  14. IAC user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Beste, D. L.; Gregg, J.

    1984-01-01

    The User Manual for the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) Level 1 system is presented. The IAC system currently supports the thermal, structures, controls and system dynamics technologies, and its development is influenced by the requirements for design/analysis of large space systems. The system has many features which make it applicable to general problems in engineering, and to management of data and software. Information includes basic IAC operation, executive commands, modules, solution paths, data organization and storage, IAC utilities, and module implementation.

  15. RRFC hardware operation manual

    SciTech Connect

    Abhold, M.E.; Hsue, S.T.; Menlove, H.O.; Walton, G.

    1996-05-01

    The Research Reactor Fuel Counter (RRFC) system was developed to assay the {sup 235}U content in spent Material Test Reactor (MTR) type fuel elements underwater in a spent fuel pool. RRFC assays the {sup 235}U content using active neutron coincidence counting and also incorporates an ion chamber for gross gamma-ray measurements. This manual describes RRFC hardware, including detectors, electronics, and performance characteristics.

  16. ASSIST internals reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sally C.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1994-01-01

    The Abstract Semi-Markov Specification Interface to the SURE Tool (ASSIST) program was developed at NASA LaRC in order to analyze the reliability of virtually any fault-tolerant system. A user manual was developed to detail its use. Certain technical specifics are of no concern to the end user, yet are of importance to those who must maintain and/or verify the correctness of the tool. This document takes a detailed look into these technical issues.

  17. Polymer concrete patching manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, J. J.; Bartholomew, J.

    1982-06-01

    The practicality of using polymer concrete to repair deteriorated portland cement concrete bridge decks and pavements was demonstrated. This manual outlines the procedures for using polymer concrete as a rapid patching material to repair deteriorated concrete. The process technology, materials, equipment, and safety provisions used in manufacturing and placing polymer concrete are discussed. Potential users are informed of the various steps necessary to insure successful field applications of the material.

  18. ACARA user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalnaker, Dale K.

    1993-01-01

    ACARA (Availability, Cost, and Resource Allocation) is a computer program which analyzes system availability, lifecycle cost (LCC), and resupply scheduling using Monte Carlo analysis to simulate component failure and replacement. This manual was written to: (1) explain how to prepare and enter input data for use in ACARA; (2) explain the user interface, menus, input screens, and input tables; (3) explain the algorithms used in the program; and (4) explain each table and chart in the output.

  19. PISCES 2 users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Terrence W.

    1987-01-01

    PISCES 2 is a programming environment and set of extensions to Fortran 77 for parallel programming. It is intended to provide a basis for writing programs for scientific and engineering applications on parallel computers in a way that is relatively independent of the particular details of the underlying computer architecture. This user's manual provides a complete description of the PISCES 2 system as it is currently implemented on the 20 processor Flexible FLEX/32 at NASA Langley Research Center.

  20. Force user's manual, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.; Benten, Muhammad S.; Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Ramanan, Aruna V.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology for writing parallel programs for shared memory multiprocessors has been formalized as an extension to the Fortran language and implemented as a macro preprocessor. The extended language is known as the Force, and this manual describes how to write Force programs and execute them on the Flexible Computer Corporation Flex/32, the Encore Multimax and the Sequent Balance computers. The parallel extension macros are described in detail, but knowledge of Fortran is assumed.

  1. Manual of carbonate sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Reijers, T.J.; Hsu, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    This manual, organised along encycolopaedic/lexicographic lines, summarizes information on the properties and characteristics of carbonates and their environments. Part 1 deals with the elements of carbonates; Part 2 with environments, settings, and carbonate bodies; Part 3 with carbonate diagenesis, and Part 4 with carbonate reservoirs. Contents include: Elements of carbonates; Carbonate Environments, Settings and Bodies; Carbonate diagenesis; Carbonate reservoirs; Alphabetical Indices; English, Dutch, German, Spanish, French Computer Compatible Codes; Commonly Used (Informal) abbreviations.

  2. Validation of density-elasticity relationships for finite element modeling of human pelvic bone by modal analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Roger; Hoffmann, Falk; von Sachsen, Sandra; Drossel, Welf-Guntram; Klöhn, Carsten; Voigt, Christian

    2013-10-18

    In total hip arthroplasty and particularly in revision surgery, computer assisted pre-operative prediction of the best possible anchorage strategy for implant fixation would be a great help to the surgeon. Computer simulation relies on validated numerical models. In the current study, three density-elasticity relationships (No. 1-3) from the literature for inhomogeneous material parameter assignment from CT data in automated finite element (FE) modeling of long bones were evaluated for their suitability for FE modeling of human pelvic bone. Numerical modal analysis was conducted on 10 FE models of hemipelvic bone specimens and compared to the gold standard provided by experimental modal analysis results from a previous in-vitro study on the same specimens. Overall, calculated resonance frequencies came out lower than measured values. Magnitude of mean relative deviation of numerical resonance frequencies with regard to measured values is lowest for the density-elasticity relationship No. 3 (-15.9%) and considerably higher for both density-elasticity relationships No. 1 (-41.1%) and No. 2 (-45.0%). Mean MAC values over all specimens amount to 77.8% (No. 1), 78.5% (No. 2), and 83.0% (No. 3). MAC results show, that mode shapes are only slightly influenced by material distribution. Calculated resonance frequencies are generally lower than measured values, which indicates, that numerical models lack stiffness. Even when using the best suited (No. 3) out of three investigated density-elasticity relationships, in FE modeling of pelvic bone a considerable underestimation of model stiffness has to be taken into account. PMID:24001928

  3. Small RNA and RNA-IP Sequencing Identifies and Validates Novel MicroRNAs in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chin-Han; Liao, Ko-Hsun; Shih, Chuan-Chi; Chan, Chia-Hao; Hsieh, Jui-Yu; Tsai, Cheng-Fong; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Chang, Shing-Jyh

    2016-03-01

    Organ regeneration therapies using multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently being investigated for a variety of common complex diseases. Understanding the molecular regulation of MSC biology will benefit regenerative medicine. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as regulators in MSC stemness. There are approximately 2500 currently known human miRNAs that have been recorded in the miRBase v21 database. In the present study, we identified novel microRNAs involved in MSC stemness and differentiation by obtaining the global microRNA expression profiles (miRNomes) of MSCs from two anatomical locations bone marrow (BM-MSCs) and umbilical cord Wharton's jelly (WJ-MSCs) and from osteogenically and adipogenically differentiated progenies of BM-MSCs. Small RNA sequencing (smRNA-seq) and bioinformatics analyses predicted that 49 uncharacterized miRNA candidates had high cellular expression values in MSCs. Another independent batch of Ago1/2-based RNA immunoprecipitation (RNA-IP) sequencing datasets validated the existence of 40 unreported miRNAs in cells and their associations with the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Nine of these 40 new miRNAs were universally overexpressed in both MSC types; nine others were overexpressed in differentiated cells. A novel miRNA (UNI-118-3p) was specifically expressed in BM-MSCs, as verified using RT-qPCR. Taken together, this report offers comprehensive miRNome profiles for two MSC types, as well as cells differentiated from BM-MSCs. MSC transplantation has the potential to ameliorate degenerative disorders and repair damaged tissues. Interventions involving the above 40 new microRNA members in transplanted MSCs may potentially guide future clinical applications. PMID:26910904

  4. The development and validation of a LIPUS system with preliminary observations of ultrasonic effects on human adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Marvel, Skylar; Okrasinski, Stan; Bernacki, Susan H; Loboa, Elizabeth; Dayton, Paul A

    2010-09-01

    To study the potential effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on cell response in vitro, the ability to alter LIPUS parameters is required. However, commercial LIPUS systems have very little control over parameter selection. In this study, a custom LIPUS system was designed and validated by exploring the effects of using different pulse repetition frequency (PRF) parameters on human adipose derived adult stem cells (hASCs) and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), two common stem cell sources for creating bone constructs in vitro. Changing the PRF was found to affect cellular response to LIPUS stimulation for both cell types. Proliferation of LIPUS-stimulated cells was found to decrease for hASCs by d 7 for all three groups compared with unstimulated control cells (P = 0.008, 0.011, 0.014 for 1 Hz, 100 Hz and 1 kHz PRF, respectively) and for hMSCs by d 14 (donor 1: P = 0.0005, 0.0002, 0.0003; donor 2: P = 0.0003, 0.0002, 0.0001; for PRFs of 1 Hz, 100 Hz, and 1 kHz, respectively). Additionally, LIPUS was shown to strongly accelerate osteogenic differentiation of hASCs based on amount of calcium accretion normalized by total DNA (P = 0.003, 0.001, 0.003, and 0.032 between control/100 Hz, control/1 kHz, 1 Hz/1 kHz, and 100 Hz/1 kHz pulse repetition frequencies, respectively). These findings promote the study of using LIPUS to induce osteogenic differentiation and further encourage the exploration of LIPUS parameter optimization. The custom LIPUS system was successfully designed to allow extreme parameter variation, specifically PRF, and encourages further studies. PMID:20875987

  5. SEM and microCT validation for en face OCT imagistic evaluation of endodontically treated human teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Nica, Luminita; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin; Ionita, Ciprian; Bradu, Adrian; Petrescu, Emanuela L.; Pop, Daniela M.; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2011-03-01

    Successful root canal treatment is based on diagnosis, treatment planning, knowledge of tooth anatomy, endodontic access cavity design, controlling the infection by thorough cleaning and shaping, methods and materials used in root canal obturation. An endodontic obturation must be a complete, three-dimensional filling of the root canal system, as close as possible to cemento-dentinal junction, without massive overfilling or underfilling. There are several known methods which are used to assess the quality of the endodontic sealing, but most are invasive. These lead to the destruction of the samples and often no conclusion could be drawn in respect to the existence of any microleakage in the investigated areas of interest. Using an time domain en-face OCT system, we have recently demonstrated real time thorough evaluation of quality of root canal fillings. The purpose of this in vitro study was to validate the en face OCT imagistic evaluation of endodontically treated human teeth by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microcomputer tomography (μCT). SEM investigations evidenced the nonlinear aspect of the interface between the endodontic filling material and the root canal walls and materials defects in some samples. The results obtained by μCT revealed also some defects inside the root-canal filling and at the interfaces between the material and the root canal walls. The advantages of the OCT method consist in non-invasiveness and high resolution. In addition, en face OCT investigations permit visualization of the more complex stratified structure at the interface between the filling material and the dental hard tissue.

  6. Aerocapture, Entry, Descent and Landing (AEDL) Human Planetary Landing Systems. Section 10: AEDL Analysis, Test and Validation Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J.; Cheatwood, N.; Powell, D.; Wolf, A.; Guensey, C.; Rivellini, T.; Venkatapathy, E.; Beard, T.; Beutter, B.; Laub, B.

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: 3 Listing of critical capabilities (knowledge, procedures, training, facilities) and metrics for validating that they are mission ready. Examples of critical capabilities and validation metrics: ground test and simulations. Flight testing to prove capabilities are mission ready. Issues and recommendations.

  7. Quantifying Variability of Manual Annotation in Cryo-Electron Tomograms.

    PubMed

    Hecksel, Corey W; Darrow, Michele C; Dai, Wei; Galaz-Montoya, Jesús G; Chin, Jessica A; Mitchell, Patrick G; Chen, Shurui; Jakana, Jemba; Schmid, Michael F; Chiu, Wah

    2016-06-01

    Although acknowledged to be variable and subjective, manual annotation of cryo-electron tomography data is commonly used to answer structural questions and to create a "ground truth" for evaluation of automated segmentation algorithms. Validation of such annotation is lacking, but is critical for understanding the reproducibility of manual annotations. Here, we used voxel-based similarity scores for a variety of specimens, ranging in complexity and segmented by several annotators, to quantify the variation among their annotations. In addition, we have identified procedures for merging annotations to reduce variability, thereby increasing the reliability of manual annotation. Based on our analyses, we find that it is necessary to combine multiple manual annotations to increase the confidence level for answering structural questions. We also make recommendations to guide algorithm development for automated annotation of features of interest. PMID:27225525

  8. Walking biped humanoids that perform manual labour.

    PubMed

    Hirukawa, Hirohisa

    2007-01-15

    The Humanoid Robotics Project of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan realized that biped humanoid robots can perform manual labour. The project developed humanoid robot platforms, consisting of humanoid robot hardware and a package of fundamental software, and explored applications of humanoid robots on them. The applications include maintenance tasks of industrial plants, teleoperation of industrial vehicles, cooperative tasks with a human, guarding the home and office and the care of patients in beds. PMID:17148050

  9. CHRPR Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Windsor, Bradford T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.; Myjak, Mitchell J.

    2012-08-21

    proportional to the amplitude, via voltage to pulse width converters (VPW). These time widths are then digitized by a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and transmitted over Ethernet to a data acquisition computer. The CHRPR records the magnitude of each pulse to a continuous event mode file on or each detector and occupancy sensor This manual begins with CHRPR installation instructions, then a section on CHRPR software. Afterward is a brief overview of how the TSA system works, then an explanation of the CHRPR. This manual is meant as a supplement to the TSA VM-250AGN manual, which can be found at http://tsasystems.com/library/manuals/pm700agn-vm250agn_manual.pdf . That manual is the manufacturer’s guide for the installation, programming, and maintenance of the portal system.

  10. Emergency Response Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Traci M.

    2004-01-01

    Safety and security is very important at NASA. The Security Management and Safeguards Office goal is ensure safety and security for all NASA Lewis and Plum Brook Station visitors and workers. The office protects against theft, sabotage, malicious damage, espionage, and other threats or acts of violence. There are three types of security at NASA: physical, IT, and personnel. IT is concerned with sensitive and classified information and computers. Physical security includes the officers who check visitors and workers in and patrol the facility. Personnel security is concerned with background checks during hiring. During my internship, I met people from and gained knowledge about all three types of security. I primarily worked with Dr. Richard Soppet in physical security. During my experience with physical security, I observed and worked with many aspects of it. I attended various security meetings at both NASA Lewis and Plum Brook. The meetings were about homeland security and other improvements that will be made to both facilities. I also spent time with a locksmith. The locksmith makes copies of keys and unlocks doors for people who need them. I rode around in a security vehicle with an officer as he patrolled. I also observed the officer make a search of a visitor s vehicle. All visitors vehicles are searched upon entering NASA. I spent time and observed in the dispatch office. The officer answers calls and sends out officers when needed. The officer also monitors the security cameras. My primary task was completing an emergency response manual. This manual would assist local law enforcement and fire agencies in case of an emergency. The manual has pictures and descriptions of the buildings. It also contains the information about hazards inside of the buildings. This information will be very helpul to law enforcement so that when called upon during an emergency, they will not create an even bigger problem with collateral damage.

  11. Nuclear structure references coding manual

    SciTech Connect

    Ramavataram, S.; Dunford, C.L.

    1984-02-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to Nuclear Structure References (NSR) compilers. The basic conventions followed at the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), which are compatible with the maintenance and updating of and retrieval from the Nuclear Structure References (NSR) file, are outlined. The structure of the NSR file such as the valid record identifiers, record contents, text fields as well as the major topics for which (KEYWORDS) are prepared are ennumerated. Relevant comments regarding a new entry into the NSR file, assignment of (KEYNO ), generation of (SELECTRS) and linkage characteristics are also given. A brief definition of the Keyword abstract is given followed by specific examples; for each TOPIC, the criteria for inclusion of an article as an entry into the NSR file as well as coding procedures are described. Authors submitting articles to Journals which require Keyword abstracts should follow the illustrations. The scope of the literature covered at NNDC, the categorization into Primary and Secondary sources, etc. is discussed. Useful information regarding permitted character sets, recommended abbreviations, etc. is given.

  12. TALENT user's manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Bion John

    2012-01-01

    The Ground-Based Monitoring R and E Component Evaluation project performs testing on the hardware components that make up Seismic and Infrasound monitoring systems. The majority of the testing is focused on the Digital Waveform Recorder (DWR), Seismic Sensor, and Infrasound Sensor. The software tool used to capture and analyze the data collected from testing is called TALENT: Test and Analysis Evaluation Tool. This document is the manual for using TALENT. Other reports document the testing procedures that are in place (Kromer, 2007) and the algorithms employed in the test analysis (Merchant, 2011).

  13. NASCAP programmer's reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, M. J.; Stannard, P. R.; Katz, I.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) is a computer program designed to model the electrostatic charging of complicated three-dimensional objects, both in a test tank and at geosynchronous altitudes. This document is a programmer's reference manual and user's guide. It is designed as a reference to experienced users of the code, as well as an introduction to its use for beginners. All of the many capabilities of NASCAP are covered in detail, together with examples of their use. These include the definition of objects, plasma environments, potential calculations, particle emission and detection simulations, and charging analysis.

  14. SHAFT79 user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Schroeder, R.C.

    1980-03-01

    SHAFT79 (Simultaneous Heat And Fluid Transport) is an integrated finite difference program for computing two-phase non-isothermal flow in porous media. The principal application for which SHAFT79 is designed is in geothermal reservoir simulation. SHAFT79 solves the same equations as an earlier version, called SHAFT78, but uses much more efficient mathematical and numerical methods. The present SHAFT79 user's manual gives a brief account of equations and numerical methods and then describes in detail how to set up input decks for running the program. The application of SHAFT79 is illustrated by means of a few sample problems. (MHR)

  15. RADTRAN 6 technical manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Neuhauser, Karen Sieglinde; Heames, Terence John; O'Donnell, Brandon M.; Dennis, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    This Technical Manual contains descriptions of the calculation models and mathematical and numerical methods used in the RADTRAN 6 computer code for transportation risk and consequence assessment. The RADTRAN 6 code combines user-supplied input data with values from an internal library of physical and radiological data to calculate the expected radiological consequences and risks associated with the transportation of radioactive material. Radiological consequences and risks are estimated with numerical models of exposure pathways, receptor populations, package behavior in accidents, and accident severity and probability.

  16. RADTRAN 6 Technical Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Neuhauser, Karen Sieglinde; Heames, Terence John; O'Donnell, Brandon M.; Dennis, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    This Technical Manual contains descriptions of the calculation models and mathematical and numerical methods used in the RADTRAN 6 computer code for transportation risk and consequence assessment. The RADTRAN 6 code combines user-supplied input data with values from an internal library of physical and radiological data to calculate the expected radiological consequences and risks associated with the transportation of radioactive material. Radiological consequences and risks are estimated with numerical models of exposure pathways, receptor populations, package behavior in accidents, and accident severity and probability.

  17. TIA Software User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Syed, Hazari I.

    1995-01-01

    This user's manual describes the installation and operation of TIA, the Thermal-Imaging acquisition and processing Application, developed by the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. TIA is a user friendly graphical interface application for the Macintosh 2 and higher series computers. The software has been developed to interface with the Perceptics/Westinghouse Pixelpipe(TM) and PixelStore(TM) NuBus cards and the GW Instruments MacADIOS(TM) input-output (I/O) card for the Macintosh for imaging thermal data. The software is also capable of performing generic image-processing functions.

  18. Chemical Processing Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyerle, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical processes presented in this document include cleaning, pickling, surface finishes, chemical milling, plating, dry film lubricants, and polishing. All types of chemical processes applicable to aluminum, for example, are to be found in the aluminum alloy section. There is a separate section for each category of metallic alloy plus a section for non-metals, such as plastics. The refractories, super-alloys and titanium, are prime candidates for the space shuttle, therefore, the chemical processes applicable to these alloys are contained in individual sections of this manual.

  19. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  20. Development and Validation of the Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS) Version 5 Containing Multiple 1D Muscles for Estimating Occupant Motions with Muscle Activation During Side Impacts.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masami; Nakahira, Yuko

    2015-11-01

    Accurate prediction of occupant head kinematics is critical for better understanding of head/face injury mechanisms in side impacts, especially far-side occupants. In light of the fact that researchers have demonstrated that muscle activations, especially in neck muscles, can affect occupant head kinematics, a human body finite element (FE) model that considers muscle activation is useful for predicting occupant head kinematics in real-world automotive accidents. In this study, we developed a human body FE model called the THUMS (Total HUman Model for Safety) Version 5 that contains 262 one-dimensional (1D) Hill-type muscle models over the entire body. The THUMS was validated against 36 series of PMHS (Post Mortem Human Surrogate) and volunteer test data in this study, and 16 series of PMHS and volunteer test data on side impacts are presented. Validation results with force-time curves were also evaluated quantitatively using the CORA (CORrelation and Analysis) method. The validation results suggest that the THUMS has good biofidelity in the responses of the regional or full body for side impacts, but relatively poor biofidelity in its local level of responses such as brain displacements. Occupant kinematics predicted by the THUMS with a muscle controller using 22 PID (Proportional-Integral- Derivative) controllers were compared with those of volunteer test data on low-speed lateral impacts. The THUMS with muscle controller reproduced the head kinematics of the volunteer data more accurately than that without muscle activation, although further studies on validation of torso kinematics are needed for more accurate predictions of occupant head kinematics. PMID:26660740